National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for land-use change processes

  1. Global Change Biology (2000) 6, 317328 Soil Carbon Sequestration and Land-Use Change: Processes and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2000-01-01

    Global Change Biology (2000) 6, 317­328 Soil Carbon Sequestration and Land-Use Change: Processes in enhanced soil carbon sequestration with changes in land-use and soil management. We review literature, and indicates the relative importance of some factors that influence the rates of organic carbon sequestration

  2. Soil carbon sequestration and land-use change: processes and potential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soil carbon sequestration and land-use change: processes and potential W . M . P O S T * and K . C to perennial vegetation, soil organic carbon can accumulate. This accumulation process essentially reverses some of the effects respon- sible for soil organic carbon losses from when the land was converted from

  3. Land Use and Land Cover Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Daniel; Polsky, Colin; Bolstad, Paul V.; Brody, Samuel D.; Hulse, David; Kroh, Roger; Loveland, Thomas; Thomson, Allison M.

    2014-05-01

    A contribution to the 3rd National Climate Assessment report, discussing the following key messages: 1. Choices about land-use and land-cover patterns have affected and will continue to affect how vulnerable or resilient human communities and ecosystems are to the effects of climate change. 2. Land-use and land-cover changes affect local, regional, and global climate processes. 3. Individuals, organizations, and governments have the capacity to make land-use decisions to adapt to the effects of climate change. 4. Choices about land use and land management provide a means of reducing atmospheric greenhouse gas levels.

  4. Land-Use Change and Bioenergy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2011-07-01

    This publication describes the Biomass Program’s efforts to examine the intersection of land-use change and bioenergy production. It describes legislation requiring land-use change assessments, key data and modeling challenges, and the research needs to better assess and understand the impact of bioenergy policy on land-use decisions.

  5. Impacts of Land-use Changes on Biofuels ORNL History of Exploring Changes in Land Use in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Impacts of Land-use Changes on Biofuels ORNL History of Exploring Changes in Land Use in the United. Building from their work on environmental costs and benefits associated with biofuel production, ORNL positively impact the sustainability of the biofuels industry. Building understanding of land-use change from

  6. Carbon Density and Anthropogenic Land Use Influences on Net Land-Use Change Emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Steven J.; Rothwell, Andrew J.

    2013-10-08

    We examine historical and future land-use emissions using a simple mechanistic carbon-cycle model with regional and ecosystem specific parameterizations. Our central estimate of net terrestrial land-use change emissions, exclusive of climate feedbacks, is 250 GtC over the last three hundred years. This estimate is most sensitive to assumptions for preindustrial forest and soil carbon densities. We also find that estimates are sensitive to the treatment of crop and pasture lands. These sensitivities also translate into differences in future terrestrial uptake in the RCP4.5 land-use scenario. This estimate of future uptake is lower than the native values from the GCAM integrated assessment model result due to lower net reforestation in the RCP4.5 gridded land-use data product

  7. Climate change and land use in Florida: Interdependencies and opportunities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    Climate change and land use in Florida: Interdependencies and opportunities Stephen Mulkey, Ph June 2007 Revised 30 September 2007 #12;Climate change and land use ­ Report to the Century Commission - S. Mulkey, June 2007 2 Executive summary Over this century anthropogenic climate change will present

  8. Land-Use Change Data Analysis

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    change, global bioenergy crop models and indicators of sustainability. Brazilian Bioethanol Science and Technology Laboratory, Campinas, Brazil, Oct 2012. 20 Presentation name...

  9. Bioenergy to Biodiversity: Downscaling scenarios of land use change 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacKenzie, Ian

    2009-11-26

    Bioenergy crops are a key component of Scotland’s strategy to meet 2050 carbon emissions targets. The introduction of these crops could have large scale impacts on the biodiversity of lowland farmland. These impacts depend on the change in land use...

  10. Attributing land-use change carbon emissions to exported biomass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saikku, Laura, E-mail: laura.saikku@helsinki.fi [University of Helsinki, P.O Box 65, 00014 University of Helsinki (Finland); Soimakallio, Sampo, E-mail: sampo.soimakallio@vtt.fi [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, P.O. Box 1000, 02044 VTT (Finland); Pingoud, Kim, E-mail: kim.pingoud@vtt.fi [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, P.O. Box 1000, 02044 VTT (Finland)

    2012-11-15

    In this study, a simple, transparent and robust method is developed in which land-use change (LUC) emissions are retrospectively attributed to exported biomass products based on the agricultural area occupied for the production. LUC emissions account for approximately one-fifth of current greenhouse gas emissions. Increasing agricultural exports are becoming an important driver of deforestation. Brazil and Indonesia are used as case studies due to their significant deforestation in recent years. According to our study, in 2007, approximately 32% and 15% of the total agricultural land harvested and LUC emissions in Brazil and Indonesia respectively were due to exports. The most important exported single items with regard to deforestation were palm oil for Indonesia and bovine meat for Brazil. To reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions effectively worldwide, leakage of emissions should be avoided. This can be done, for example, by attributing embodied LUC emissions to exported biomass products. With the approach developed in this study, controversial attribution between direct and indirect LUC and amortization of emissions over the product life cycle can be overcome, as the method operates on an average basis and annual level. The approach could be considered in the context of the UNFCCC climate policy instead of, or alongside with, other instruments aimed at reducing deforestation. However, the quality of the data should be improved and some methodological issues, such as the allocation procedure in multiproduct systems and the possible dilution effect through third parties not committed to emission reduction targets, should be considered. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CO{sub 2} emissions from land use changes are highly important. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Attribution of land use changes for products is difficult. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Simple and robust method is developed to attribute land use change emissions.

  11. Effects of climate change, land-use change, and invasive species on the ecology of the Cumberland forests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dale, Virginia H; Lannom, Karen O.; Hodges, Donald G.; Tharp, M Lynn; Fogel, Jonah

    2009-02-01

    Effects of climate change, land-use change, and invasive species on the ecology of the Cumberland forests

  12. Climate Change Mitigation Through Land-Use Measures in the Agriculture...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Climate Change Mitigation Through Land-Use Measures in the Agriculture and Forestry Sectors Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Climate Change Mitigation...

  13. Quantitative Analysis of Biofuel Sustainability, Including Land Use Change GHG Emissions

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Plenary V: Biofuels and Sustainability: Acknowledging Challenges and Confronting MisconceptionsQuantitative Analysis of Biofuel Sustainability, Including Land Use Change GHG EmissionsJennifer B....

  14. Global Soil Change: Land Use, Soil and Water SWS4231C, SWS5234

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    Global Soil Change: Land Use, Soil and Water SWS4231C, SWS5234 Course Syllabus: Fall 2014 that can be found at: https://catalog

  15. UW Madison PhD position: land use change and biodiversity protection in Position Description

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turner, Monica G.

    UW Madison PhD position: land use change and biodiversity protection in Russia Position Description change, and its effects on biodiversity in Russia. Russia has undergone dramatic changes in land use opportunities for biodiversity conservation. On the other hand, forest exports are rising, and harvesting rates

  16. Carbon Accounting and Economic Model Uncertainty of Emissions from Biofuels-Induced Land Use Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plevin, Richard J; Beckman, Jayson; Golub, Alla A; Witcover, Julie; O'??Hare, Michael

    2015-01-01

    the GTAP-BIO framework. Climate Change Economics 2012, 03, (in the GTAP-BIO framework. Climate Change Economics 03 (03),Land Use Data for Climate Change Analysis. Routledge Press.

  17. Governing Change: An Institutional Geography of Rural Land Use, Environmental Management, and Change in the North Coastal Basin of California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Short, Anne Garrity

    2010-01-01

    Rurality." Progress in Human Geography, 30, Hansen, A. J. ,Exurban' Sierra." cultural geographies, 10, 469-491. Waters,Change: An Institutional Geography of Rural Land Use,

  18. Simulating land use change in China from a global perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palmer, Paul

    drivers of population growth and socio-economic development to agricultural yield changes and alternative productivity and stable relationships with global food suppliers are important determinants of food security

  19. Interaction effects of climate and land use/land cover change on soil organic carbon sequestration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grunwald, Sabine

    Interaction effects of climate and land use/land cover change on soil organic carbon sequestration carbon sequestration Climate change Soil carbon change Historically, Florida soils stored the largest in Florida (FL) have acted as a sink for carbon (C) over the last 40 years. · Climate interacting with land

  20. Characterizing the Impact of Land Use and Land Cover Change on Freshwater Inflows 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferijal, Teuku

    2009-05-15

    . This study proposed to characterize the impact of land use/cover change in the Guadalupe River Watershed on freshwater inflows to the Guadalupe Estuary. Pre-whitening, Mann-Kendall and bootstrap techniques were used to test for significant trends...

  1. The impact of land use change on migrant birds in the Sahel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adams, William M.; Small, Robert D. S.; Vickery, Juliet A.

    2014-07-17

    and grazing reserves have been subject to more intensive use (both legal and illegal). The extent of Sahelian wetlands has been reduced by the construction of dams for hydro power and irrigation. The spatial patterns of land use change and the associated...

  2. Effects of land use changes on streamflow generation in the Rhine basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Troch, Peter

    , afforestation. In this study, we investigate the effect of projected land use change scenarios on river at various spatial scales. The variable infiltration capacity (VIC) (version 4.0.5) model is used, and infiltration capacity to decrease [Clark, 1987]. In addition, forests strongly affect snow accumulation

  3. Atmospheric aerosols in Amazonia and land use change: from natural biogenic to biomass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atmospheric aerosols in Amazonia and land use change: from natural biogenic to biomass burning in Central Amazonia (TT34 North of Manaus) and at a heavily biomass burning impacted site in south-refractory PM1 aerosol loading at TT34, while biomass burning aerosols at PVH shows a 93% content of organic

  4. Impacts of land use change due to biofuel crops on carbon balance, bioenergy production, and agricultural

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhuang, Qianlai

    Impacts of land use change due to biofuel crops on carbon balance, bioenergy production that biofuel crops have much higher net pri- mary production (NPP) than soybean and wheat crops. When food). Global biofuel production has increased dramatically in the last decade, especially in United States

  5. POPULATION, MULTI-SCALE PROCESSES, AND LAND USE TRANSITIONSIN WilliamKY Pan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lopez-Carr, David

    POPULATION, MULTI-SCALE PROCESSES, AND LAND USE TRANSITIONSIN THE AMAZON WilliamKY Pan DavidL. Carr focusedon anddebatedthe drivers of LUCC, such as the influence of population dynamics (Carr et al 2006; Allen andBarnes 1985; Barbieri andCarr 2005; Mather andNeedle 2000; Pan et al. 2007; Armenterasaet al

  6. Future land use plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-08-31

    The US Department of Energy`s (DOE) changing mission, coupled with the need to apply appropriate cleanup standards for current and future environmental restoration, prompted the need for a process to determine preferred Future Land Uses for DOE-owned sites. DOE began the ``Future Land Use`` initiative in 1994 to ensure that its cleanup efforts reflect the surrounding communities` interests in future land use. This plan presents the results of a study of stakeholder-preferred future land uses for the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), located in central Long Island, New York. The plan gives the Laboratory`s view of its future development over the next 20 years, as well as land uses preferred by the community were BNL ever to cease operations as a national laboratory (the post-BNL scenario). The plan provides an overview of the physical features of the site including its history, topography, geology/hydrogeology, biological inventory, floodplains, wetlands, climate, and atmosphere. Utility systems and current environmental operations are described including waste management, waste water treatment, hazardous waste management, refuse disposal and ground water management. To complement the physical descriptions of the site, demographics are discussed, including overviews of the surrounding areas, laboratory population, and economic and non-economic impacts.

  7. Impact of land use change on the local climate over the Tibetan Plateau

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jin, J.; Lu, S.; Li, S.; Miller, N.L.

    2010-04-01

    Observational data show that the remotely sensed leaf area index (LAI) has a significant downward trend over the east Tibetan Plateau (TP), while a warming trend is found in the same area. Further analysis indicates that this warming trend mainly results from the nighttime warming. The Single-Column Atmosphere Model (SCAM) version 3.1 developed by the National Center for Atmospheric Research is used to investigate the role of land use change in the TP local climate system and isolate the contribution of land use change to the warming. Two sets of SCAM simulations were performed at the Xinghai station that is located near the center of the TP Sanjiang (three rivers) Nature Reserve where the downward LAI trend is largest. These simulations were forced with the high and low LAIs. The modeling results indicate that, when the LAI changes from high to low, the daytime temperature has a slight decrease, while the nighttime temperature increases significantly, which is consistent with the observations. The modeling results further show that the lower surface roughness length plays a significant role in affecting the nighttime temperature increase.

  8. Carbon Accounting and Economic Model Uncertainty of Emissions from Biofuels-Induced Land Use Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plevin, Richard J; Beckman, Jayson; Golub, Alla A; Witcover, Julie; O'??Hare, Michael

    2015-01-01

    distributions for soybean biodiesel (food fixed) . . . . . .distributions for soybean biodiesel (food not fixed) . . .land use from expanded biodiesel production. Technical

  9. Greenhouse gas policy influences climate via direct effects of land-use change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, Andrew D.; Collins, William D.; Edmonds, James A.; Torn, Margaret S.; Janetos, Anthony C.; Calvin, Katherine V.; Thomson, Allison M.; Chini, Louise M.; Mao, Jiafu; Shi, Xiaoying; Thornton, Peter; Hurtt, George; Wise, Marshall A.

    2013-06-01

    Proposed climate mitigation measures do not account for direct biophysical climate impacts of land-use change (LUC), nor do the stabilization targets modeled for the 5th Climate Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5) Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs). To examine the significance of such effects on global and regional patterns of climate change, a baseline and alternative scenario of future anthropogenic activity are simulated within the Integrated Earth System Model, which couples the Global Change Assessment Model, Global Land-use Model, and Community Earth System Model. The alternative scenario has high biofuel utilization and approximately 50% less global forest cover compared to the baseline, standard RCP4.5 scenario. Both scenarios stabilize radiative forcing from atmospheric constituents at 4.5 W/m2 by 2100. Thus, differences between their climate predictions quantify the biophysical effects of LUC. Offline radiative transfer and land model simulations are also utilized to identify forcing and feedback mechanisms driving the coupled response. Boreal deforestation is found to strongly influence climate due to increased albedo coupled with a regional-scale water vapor feedback. Globally, the alternative scenario yields a 21st century warming trend that is 0.5 °C cooler than baseline, driven by a 1 W/m2 mean decrease in radiative forcing that is distributed unevenly around the globe. Some regions are cooler in the alternative scenario than in 2005. These results demonstrate that neither climate change nor actual radiative forcing are uniquely related to atmospheric forcing targets such as those found in the RCP’s, but rather depend on particulars of the socioeconomic pathways followed to meet each target.

  10. Risk Analysis for Water Resources Under Climate Change, Population Growth, and Land Use Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kiparsky, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Vulnerability from climate change acid population growth."2004). "Emissions pathways, climate change, and impacts onthe Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). J. J.

  11. Risk Analysis for Water Resources Under Climate Change, Population Growth, and Land Use Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kiparsky, Michael

    2010-01-01

    for California." Climatic Change 76(3-4): 361-387. Thompsonrisk assessments." Climatic Change 89(3): 371-394. Brekke,small forecast ensembles." Climatic Change 76(1-2): 149-168.

  12. Increased sediment loads over coral reefs in Saint Lucia in relation to land use change in contributing watersheds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lajeunesse, Marc J.

    Increased sediment loads over coral reefs in Saint Lucia in relation to land use change Article history: Available online a b s t r a c t Increased sedimentation is widely acknowledged records of changes in sediment accumu- lation rates over reefs as well as a quantitative link between land

  13. Assessing Effects of Changing Land Use Practices on Sediment Loads in Panther

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    coastal California. We compute land use statistics, analyze suspended sediment discharge rating curves operations are limited, and improved standards for newly constructed and upgraded roads. In July 2000 not require long-term road inspection and maintenance, the TMDL include

  14. Baselines For Land-Use Change In The Tropics: Application To Avoided Deforestation Projects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01

    in Mexico: making carbon sequestration a by-product ofthe area of the pilot carbon sequestration projects in theseLUCS = Land Use and Carbon Sequestration model, and GEOMOD =

  15. Indirect Land Use Change: A second best solution to a first class problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zilberman, David D.; Hochman, Gal; Rajagopal, Deepak

    2010-01-01

    and reflect the concern that biofuel production will lead tothe whole plant for biofuel production, not just parts ofbiofuel or expansion of biofuel production on land use is an

  16. Predicting Soil Erosion for Alternative Land Uses Erda Wang, Chang Xin,* Jimmy R. Williams, and Cheng Xu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Predicting Soil Erosion for Alternative Land Uses Erda Wang, Chang Xin,* Jimmy R. Williams States was calibrated for northwestern China's conditions. The model was then used to investigate soil include runoff, RUSLE (Revised Uni- versal Soil Loss Equation) slope length and steepness factor, channel

  17. Response of Free-Living Nitrogen-Fixing Microorganisms to Land Use Change in the Amazon Rainforest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bohannan, Brendan

    ) of this greenhouse gas annually (1, 2). To absorb this enormous amount of CO2, a sig- nificant input of nitrogen (NResponse of Free-Living Nitrogen-Fixing Microorganisms to Land Use Change in the Amazon Rainforest-living nitrogen-fixing microorganisms (di- azotrophs) respond to deforestation in the Amazon rainforest, using

  18. We have used land use change, driven by development of the University of Vermont campus and recent student

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nichols, Kyle K.

    ABSTRACT We have used land use change, driven by development of the University of Vermont campus and recent student occupancy of surrounding neighborhoods in Burlington, Vermont, as an opportunity feedback from the students, city officials, and community members. INTRODUCTION The University of Vermont

  19. U.S. Geological Survey Climate and Land Use Change Science Strategy--A Framework for Understanding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    U.S. Geological Survey Climate and Land Use Change Science Strategy--A Framework for Understanding. Clockwise left to right: Landsat 7 image of circular patterns in crop land near Garden City, Kansas, spring 2012. Photograph by Jerrod Wheeler, U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). Crop irrigation, South Dakota

  20. Isoprene emissions over Asia 1979-2012 : impact of climate and land use changes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stavrakou, T.; Muller, J. F.; Bauwens, M.; De Smedt, I.; Roozendael, Van M.; Guenther, Alex B.; Wild, M.; Xia, X.

    2014-05-12

    Due to the scarcity of observational constraints and the rapidly changing environment in East and Southeast Asia, isoprene emissions predicted by models are expected to bear substantial uncertainties. The aim of this study is to improve upon the existing bottom-up estimates, and investigate the temporal evolution of the fluxes in Asia over 1979-2012. To this purpose, we calculate the hourly emissions at 0.5% ×0.5% resolution using the MEGAN-MOHYCAN model driven by ECMWF ERA-Interim climatology. This study incorporates (i) changes in land use, including the rapid expansion of oil palms, (ii) meteorological variability according to ERA-Interim, (iii) long-term changes in solar radiation (dimming/brightening) constrained by surface network radiation measurements,and (iv) recent experimental evidence that South Asian tropical forests are much weaker isoprene emitters than previously assumed, and on the other hand, that oil palms hold a strong isoprene emission capacity. These effects lead to a significant lowering (factor of two) in the total isoprene fluxes over the studied domain, and to emission reductions reaching a factor of 3.5 in Southeast Asia. The bottom-up annual isoprene emissions for 2005 are estimated at 7.0, 4.8, 8.3, 2.9 Tg in China, India, Indonesia and Malaysia, respectively. Changes in temperature and solar radiation are the major drivers of the interannual variability and trend in the emissions. An annual positive flux trend of 0.2% and 0.52% is found in Asia and China, respectively, through the entire period, related to positive trend in temperature and solar radiation. The impact of oil palm expansion in Indonesia and Malaysia is to enhance the trends over that region, e.g. from 1.17% to 1.5% in 1979-2005 in Malaysia. A negative emission trend is derived in India (?0.4 %), owing to the negative trend in solar radiation data associated to the strong dimming effect likely due to increasing aerosol loadings. The bottom-up emissions are evaluated using top-down isoprene emission estimates derived from inverse modelling constrained by GOME-2/MetOp-A formaldehyde columns through 2007-2012. The satellite-based estimates appear to support our assumptions, and confirm the lower emission rate in tropical forests of Indonesia and Malaysia. Additional flux measurements are clearly needed to better characterize the spatial variability of emission factors. Finally, a decreasing trend in the top-down Chinese emissions inferred after 2007, is in line with the cooling episode recorded in China after that year, thus suggesting that the satellite HCHO columns are able to capture climate-induced changes in emissions.

  1. Mitigation Options in Forestry, Land-Use, Change and Biomass Burning in Africa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Makundi, Willy R.

    1998-06-01

    Mitigation options to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and sequester carbon in land use sectors are describe in some detail. The paper highlights those options in the forestry sector, which are more relevant to different parts of Africa. It briefly outlines a bottom-up methodological framework for comprehensively assessing mitigation options in land use sectors. This method emphasizes the application of end-use demand projections to construct a baseline and mitigation scenarios and explicitly addresses the carbon storage potential on land and in wood products, as well as use of wood to substitute for fossil fuels. Cost-effectiveness indicators for ranking mitigation options are proposed, including those, which account for non-carbon monetary benefits such as those derived from forest products, as well as opportunity cost of pursuing specific mitigation option. The paper finally surveys the likely policies, barriers and incentives to implement such mitigation options in African countries .

  2. Forecasting the response of Earth's surface to future climatic and land use changes: A review of methods and research needs

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Pelletier, Jon D.; Murray, A. Brad; Pierce, Jennifer L.; Bierman, Paul R.; Breshears, David D.; Crosby, Benjamin T.; Ellis, Michael; Foufoula-Georgiou, Efi; Heimsath, Arjun M.; Houser, Chris; et al

    2015-07-14

    In the future, Earth will be warmer, precipitation events will be more extreme, global mean sea level will rise, and many arid and semiarid regions will be drier. Human modifications of landscapes will also occur at an accelerated rate as developed areas increase in size and population density. We now have gridded global forecasts, being continually improved, of the climatic and land use changes (C&LUC) that are likely to occur in the coming decades. However, besides a few exceptions, consensus forecasts do not exist for how these C&LUC will likely impact Earth-surface processes and hazards. In some cases, we havemore »the tools to forecast the geomorphic responses to likely future C&LUC. Fully exploiting these models and utilizing these tools will require close collaboration among Earth-surface scientists and Earth-system modelers. This paper assesses the state-of-the-art tools and data that are being used or could be used to forecast changes in the state of Earth's surface as a result of likely future C&LUC. We also propose strategies for filling key knowledge gaps, emphasizing where additional basic research and/or collaboration across disciplines are necessary. The main body of the paper addresses cross-cutting issues, including the importance of nonlinear/threshold-dominated interactions among topography, vegetation, and sediment transport, as well as the importance of alternate stable states and extreme, rare events for understanding and forecasting Earth-surface response to C&LUC. Five supplements delve into different scales or process zones (global-scale assessments and fluvial, aeolian, glacial/periglacial, and coastal process zones) in detail.« less

  3. Energy and greenhouse gas emission effects of corn and cellulosic ethanol with technology improvements and land use changes.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, M.; Han, J.; Haq, Z; Tyner, .W.; Wu, M.; Elgowainy, A.

    2011-05-01

    Use of ethanol as a transportation fuel in the United States has grown from 76 dam{sup 3} in 1980 to over 40.1 hm{sup 3} in 2009 - and virtually all of it has been produced from corn. It has been debated whether using corn ethanol results in any energy and greenhouse gas benefits. This issue has been especially critical in the past several years, when indirect effects, such as indirect land use changes, associated with U.S. corn ethanol production are considered in evaluation. In the past three years, modeling of direct and indirect land use changes related to the production of corn ethanol has advanced significantly. Meanwhile, technology improvements in key stages of the ethanol life cycle (such as corn farming and ethanol production) have been made. With updated simulation results of direct and indirect land use changes and observed technology improvements in the past several years, we conducted a life-cycle analysis of ethanol and show that at present and in the near future, using corn ethanol reduces greenhouse gas emission by more than 20%, relative to those of petroleum gasoline. On the other hand, second-generation ethanol could achieve much higher reductions in greenhouse gas emissions. In a broader sense, sound evaluation of U.S. biofuel policies should account for both unanticipated consequences and technology potentials. We maintain that the usefulness of such evaluations is to provide insight into how to prevent unanticipated consequences and how to promote efficient technologies with policy intervention.

  4. Assessment of Uncertainties in the Response of the African Monsoon Precipitation to Land Use change simulated by a regional model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hagos, Samson M.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Xue, Yongkang; Boone, Aaron; de Sales, Fernando; Neupane, Naresh; Huang, Maoyi; Yoon, Jin-Ho

    2014-02-22

    Land use and land cover over Africa have changed substantially over the last sixty years and this change has been proposed to affect monsoon circulation and precipitation. This study examines the uncertainties on the effect of these changes on the African Monsoon system and Sahel precipitation using an ensemble of regional model simulations with different combinations of land surface and cumulus parameterization schemes. Although the magnitude of the response covers a broad range of values, most of the simulations show a decline in Sahel precipitation due to the expansion of pasture and croplands at the expense of trees and shrubs and an increase in surface air temperature.

  5. Land-use change and greenhouse gas emissions from corn and cellulosic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACTThousand CubicResourcelogo and mastheadLake CharlesLand-Use

  6. Changes in ecosystem services and runoff due to land use change in the watersheds of San Antonio, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris, Heather Grace

    2000-01-01

    service valuation model to each of the land use classes over the discreet time periods. Hydrologic peak flow models using the Soil Conservation Service Curve Number Method were developed and applied to each watershed for each discreet time period...

  7. A new GIS toolbox for integrating massive heterogeneous GIS data for land use change analysis A new GIS toolbox for integrating

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Köbben, Barend

    statistical analysis, we summarize impacts of increased biogas production on agricultural land use change highlighting the trend in biogas maize cultivation and the conversion of permanent grass- land to agricultural, environmental impacts, biogas maize, permanent grassland, Germany. 1. Introduction Agricultural land use

  8. GoMRC Website ‘Meta-analysis Report: Land-use and submerged aquatic vegetation change in the Gulf of Mexico’

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Judd, Chaeli; Stefansson, Emily S.; Brushnahan, Heather

    2007-12-06

    Over the past century, health and spatial extent of seagrasses has decreased dramatically in the Gulf of Mexico. While some of the changes can be explained by direct impacts to the seagrass beds, we hypothesize that changes in the land use in the watersheds can also be correlated with the decline of seagrasses. Through this meta-analysis, we researched historical and compared trends in seagrass populations and land use in five bays and their watersheds within the Gulf of Mexico: Mobile Bay, Perdido Bay, Tampa Bay, Charlotte Harbor, and Galveston Bay. Using both historical records and spatial datasets, we examined land use and seagrass trends in these five areas.

  9. Land-use change trajectories up to 2050: insights from a global agro-economic model comparison

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmitz, Christoph; van Meijl, Hans; Kyle, G. Page; Nelson, Gerald C.; Fujimori, Shinichiro; Gurgel, Angelo; Havlik, Petr; Heyhoe, Edwina; Mason d'Croz, Daniel; Popp, Alexander; Sands, Ronald; Tabeau, Andrzej; van der Mensbrugghe, Dominique; von Lampe, Martin; Wise, Marshall A.; Blanc, Elodie; Hasegawa, Tomoko; Kavallari, Aikaterini; Valin, Hugo

    2014-01-01

    Changes in agricultural land use have important implications for environmental services. Previous studies of agricultural land-use futures have been published indicating large uncertainty due to different model assumptions and methodologies. In this article we present a first comprehensive comparison of global agro-economic models that have harmonized drivers of population, GDP, and biophysical yields. The comparison allows us to ask two research questions: (1) How much cropland will be used under different socioeconomic and climate change scenarios? (2) How can differences in model results be explained? The comparison includes four partial and six general equilibrium models that differ in how they model land supply and amount of potentially available land. We analyze results of two different socioeconomic scenarios and three climate scenarios (one with constant climate). Most models (7 out of 10) project an increase of cropland of 10–25% by 2050 compared to 2005 (under constant climate), but one model projects a decrease. Pasture land expands in some models, which increase the treat on natural vegetation further. Across all models most of the cropland expansion takes place in South America and sub-Saharan Africa. In general, the strongest differences in model results are related to differences in the costs of land expansion, the endogenous productivity responses, and the assumptions about potential cropland.

  10. Greenhouse gas policy influences climate via direct effects of land-use change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, A.D.

    2014-01-01

    warming through the greenhouse effect.  Proceedings of the the radiative effect of greenhouse gases.   Philosophical Change for  Scenarios of Greenhouse Gas and Sulfur Dioxide 

  11. Greenhouse gas policy influences climate via direct effects of land-use change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, A.D.

    2014-01-01

    variations in energy and  carbon exchange over forest and energy flux changes associated with conversion from forestenergy budgets averaged over the boreal and tropical forest

  12. Carbon Accounting and Economic Model Uncertainty of Emissions from Biofuels-Induced Land Use Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plevin, Richard J; Beckman, Jayson; Golub, Alla A; Witcover, Julie; O'??Hare, Michael

    2015-01-01

    uncertainty of full carbon accounting of forest ecosystemsA. ; Hopson, E. , Proper accounting for time increases crop-use change modeling in GTEM: Accounting for forest sinks.

  13. Modeling the High Plains Aquifer's Response to Land Use and Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dermyer, Reuben

    2011-06-14

    -Monteith evapotranspiration model that changes depending on reference crop and time step. Cn – Constant in the Penman-Monteith evapotranspiration model that changes depending on reference crop and time step. ea – Actual vapor pressure. Units: kPa es – Saturation vapor... automated weather stations. The Saturation vapor pressure, es, was calculated based on daily minimum and maximum 26 temperatures. Actual vapor pressure, ea, for the Penman-Monteith method was calculated using the daily minimum and maximum relative...

  14. Predicted impacts of climate and land use change on surface ozone in the Houston, Texas, area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Zong-Liang

    sensitivity experiments show that the effect of future anthropogenic emissions change is on the same order detrimental effects on human health and plants. The conditions conducive to high O3 concentrations near the surface generally include warm weather, high solar radiation and high-pressure sys- tems. Future

  15. Cumulative Effects of Rapid Land-Cover and Land-Use Changes on the Yamal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhatt, Uma

    in the Bovanenkovo gas field, Yamal Peninsula, Russia. The presence of the gas field provides both economic, Russia Donald A. Walker, Bruce C. Forbes, Marina O. Leibman, Howard E. Epstein, Uma S. Bhatt, Josefino C to a combination of gas development, reindeer herding, and climate change. Unusual geological condi- tions

  16. A Spatial Modeling Framework to Evaluate Domestic Biofuel-Induced Potential Land Use Changes and Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : land availability, land suitability, LUC decision-making, and induced CO2 emissions. Using high obtain estimates for average total LUC emissions of 6.1, 2.2, 1.0, 2.2, and 2.4 gCO2e/MJ for Corn-15 fuels remain the major source of energy worldwide, raising concerns about both climate change due to CO2

  17. Understanding the drivers affecting land use change in Ecuador: an application of the Land Change Modeler software 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krishna Rajan, Dhruva

    2010-01-01

    deforestation and degradation) and related policy mechanisms has accelerated the need for modelling deforestation. This project looks at developing a methodology for modelling deforestation using the Land Change Modeler software. To generate the model of change...

  18. Wood density in forests of Brazil's `arc of deforestation': Implications for biomass and flux of carbon from land-use change in Amazonia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Camara, Gilberto

    Wood density in forests of Brazil's `arc of deforestation': Implications for biomass and flux form 25 April 2007; accepted 29 April 2007 Abstract Wood density is an important variable in estimates of forest biomass and greenhouse-gas emissions from land-use change. The mean wood density used in estimates

  19. How emissions, climate, and land use change will impact mid-century air quality over the United States: a focus on effects at national parks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Val Martin, M.

    We use a global coupled chemistry–climate–land model (CESM) to assess the integrated effect of climate, emissions and land use changes on annual surface O[subscript 3] and PM[subscript 2.5] in the United States with a focus ...

  20. Energy and land use

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-12-01

    This report addresses the land use impacts of past and future energy development and summarizes the major federal and state legislation which influences the potential land use impacts of energy facilities and can thus influence the locations and timing of energy development. In addition, this report describes and presents the data which are used to measure, and in some cases, predict the potential conflicts between energy development and alternative uses of the nation's land resources. The topics section of this report is divided into three parts. The first part describes the myriad of federal, state and local legislation which have a direct or indirect impact upon the use of land for energy development. The second part addresses the potential land use impacts associated with the extraction, conversion and combustion of energy resources, as well as the disposal of wastes generated by these processes. The third part discusses the conflicts that might arise between agriculture and energy development as projected under a number of DOE mid-term (1990) energy supply and demand scenarios.

  1. Predicted change in global secondary organic aerosol concentrations in response to future climate, emissions, and land use change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heald, C. L.; Henze, D. K.; Horowitz, L. W.; Feddema, Johannes J.; Lamarque, J. F.; Guenther, A.; Hess, P. G.; Vitt, F.; Seinfeld, J. H.; Goldstein, A. H.; Fung, I.

    2008-03-01

    The sensitivity of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) concentration to changes in climate and emissions is investigated using a coupled global atmosphere-land model driven by the year 2100 IPCC A1B scenario predictions. The Community Atmosphere Model...

  2. Forecasting the response of Earth's surface to future climatic and land use changes: A review of methods and research needs: FORECASTING EARTH'S SURFACE RESPONSE

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Pelletier, Jon D.; Brad Murray, A.; Pierce, Jennifer L.; Bierman, Paul R.; Breshears, David D.; Crosby, Benjamin T.; Ellis, Michael; Foufoula-Georgiou, Efi; Heimsath, Arjun M.; Houser, Chris; et al

    2015-07-14

    In the future, Earth will be warmer, precipitation events will be more extreme, global mean sea level will rise, and many arid and semiarid regions will be drier. Human modifications of landscapes will also occur at an accelerated rate as developed areas increase in size and population density. We now have gridded global forecasts, being continually improved, of the climatic and land use changes (C&LUC) that are likely to occur in the coming decades. However, besides a few exceptions, consensus forecasts do not exist for how these C&LUC will likely impact Earth-surface processes and hazards. In some cases, we havemore »the tools to forecast the geomorphic responses to likely future C&LUC. Fully exploiting these models and utilizing these tools will require close collaboration among Earth-surface scientists and Earth-system modelers. This paper assesses the state-of-the-art tools and data that are being used or could be used to forecast changes in the state of Earth's surface as a result of likely future C&LUC. We also propose strategies for filling key knowledge gaps, emphasizing where additional basic research and/or collaboration across disciplines are necessary. The main body of the paper addresses cross-cutting issues, including the importance of nonlinear/threshold-dominated interactions among topography, vegetation, and sediment transport, as well as the importance of alternate stable states and extreme, rare events for understanding and forecasting Earth-surface response to C&LUC. Five supplements delve into different scales or process zones (global-scale assessments and fluvial, aeolian, glacial/periglacial, and coastal process zones) in detail.« less

  3. EA-1936: Proposed Changes to Parcel ED-1 Land Uses, Utility Infrastructure, and Natural Area Management Responsibility, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    NOTE: This EA has been cancelled. This EA will evaluate the environmental impacts of DOE’s proposed modifications to the allowable land uses, utility infrastructure, and Natural Area management responsibility for Parcel ED-1. The purpose of the modifications is to enhance the development potential of the Horizon Center business/industrial park, while ensuring protection of the adjacent Natural Area. The area addressed by the proposed action was evaluated for various industrial/business uses in the Environmental Assessment Addendum for the Proposed Title Transfer of Parcel ED-1, DOE/EA-1113-A.

  4. A Conceptual Framework for Estimating Bioenerg-Related Land-Use Change and Its Impacts over Time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delucchi, Mark

    2009-01-01

    use change due to biofuel production; • current research onand carbon budgets of biofuel production systems, includinguse change due to biofuel production. As indicated in Table

  5. Land-use Leakage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Calvin, Katherine V.; Edmonds, James A.; Clarke, Leon E.; Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; Kim, Son H.; Wise, Marshall A.; Thomson, Allison M.; Kyle, G. Page

    2009-12-01

    Leakage occurs whenever actions to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions in one part of the world unleash countervailing forces elsewhere in the world so that reductions in global emissions are less than emissions mitigation in the mitigating region. While many researchers have examined the concept of industrial leakage, land-use policies can also result in leakage. We show that land-use leakage is potentially as large as or larger than industrial leakage. We identify two potential land-use leakage drivers, land-use policies and bioenergy. We distinguish between these two pathways and run numerical experiments for each. We also show that the land-use policy environment exerts a powerful influence on leakage and that under some policy designs leakage can be negative. International “offsets” are a potential mechanism to communicate emissions mitigation beyond the borders of emissions mitigating regions, but in a stabilization regime designed to limit radiative forcing to 3.7 2/m2, this also implies greater emissions mitigation commitments on the part of mitigating regions.

  6. A quantitative analysis of the impact of land use changes on floods in the Manafwa River Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bingwa, Fidele

    2013-01-01

    Flood events in the Manafwa watershed, located in eastern Uganda, have increased in frequency in recent years. The risk of flooding is increasing globally due partly to climate change which enhances the number of weather ...

  7. Research priorities in land use and land-cover change for the Earth system and integrated assessment modelling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hibbard, Kathy; Janetos, Anthony; van Vuuren, Detlef P.; Pongtatz, Julia; Rose, Steven K.; Betts, Richard; Herold, Martin; Feddema, Johannes J.

    2010-01-01

    for integration into ESMs and IAMs. A key application will be for the detection and attribution of historical climate change; previous detection and attribution studies have been unable to include land-cover change credibly in their range of potential drivers... Index time series, fire observations, night-time lights, hot-spot detection, etc.), a new level of data products and information on land dynamics will soon become available for different time periods since about 1990 (Herold et al., 2008b). 4. Moving...

  8. From land use to land cover: Restoring the afforestation signal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    integrated assessment - earth system model and the implications for CMIP5 RCP simulations Climate projections depend on scenarios of fossil fuel emissions and land use change, and...

  9. Land Use and Wildfire: A Review of Local Interactions and Teleconnections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelly, Maggi

    2015-01-01

    to coordinate land change and fire management across largeof land use change and fire management—Such as land useland use change through fire management. Often, increased

  10. Land Use and Wildfire: A Review of Local Interactions and Teleconnections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelly, Maggi

    2015-01-01

    R.A. , Sr. Land use and climate change. Science 2005, 310,change contributes to climate change, which in turns impacts

  11. Siting Renewable Energy: Land Use and Regulatory Context

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Outka, Uma

    2010-01-01

    This article takes up the increasingly important land use question of siting for renewable energy. As concern over climate change grows, new policies are being crafted at all levels of government to support renewable energy as a way of reducing...

  12. Modeling Impacts of Land-Use/Land-Cover Change and Variable Precipitation on Hydrology and Water Quality of a Coastal Watershed in Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Castillo, Cesar Ricardo

    2013-05-31

    for the M-A region was conducted by classifying two Landsat images for the years 1990 and 2010. A large degree of LULC change occurred within the M-A region during this time; with 27.1% of the land area experiencing LULC change. Furthermore, developed land...

  13. Quantifying the effect of land use and land cover changes on green water and blue water in northern part of China 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, X.; Ren, L.; Yuan, F.; Singh, V. P.; Fang, X.; Yu, Z.; Zhang, W.

    2009-06-12

    ) and runoff. The LULC data showed that from 1980 to 1996 grass land and water body had decreased and forest land and crop land had increased. This change caused the evaporation from vegetation interception and vegetation transpiration to increase, whereas...

  14. Integrating the principles of strategic environmental assessment into local comprehensive land use plans in California 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tang, Zhenghong

    2009-05-15

    of integrating strategic environmental assessment into local comprehensive land use plans. A random sample of 40 California local comprehensive land use plans and associated planning processes is evaluated based on this plan quality evaluation protocol...

  15. Coupling GIS and LCA for biodiversity assessments of land use: Part 2: Impact assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geyer, Roland; Lindner, Jan P.; Stoms, David M.; Davis, Frank W.; Wittstock, Bastian

    2010-01-01

    in life cycle assessment (LCA). Some production processes,support impacts of land use in LCA. J Clean Prod 8(4):313–010-0199-9 LAND USE IN LCA Coupling GIS and LCA for

  16. Biofuels and indirect land use change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the Renewable Energy Directive. An alternative approach is developed that would encourage producers and growers. With liquid fuels likely to remain the primary energy source for road transport for at least the next few emissions from transport fuels. Research

  17. Institutional Change Process for Sustainability | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Process for Sustainability Institutional Change Process for Sustainability For establishing institutional change in a federal agency to achieve sustainability or other energy...

  18. Modeling Engineering Change Management Process in Virtual

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akgunduz, Ali

    Modeling Engineering Change Management Process in Virtual Collaborative Design Environments Change Management - surveys and reviews - industrial case studies - tools & solutions (scarce) - change

  19. LAND USE AND WATER QUALITY MANAGEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;LAND USE AND WATER QUALITY MANAGEMENT IN THE BRIDGE CREEK BASIN Prepared for: Water Quality Branch Environmental Protection Dept. BC Environment Victoria, B.C. and Fraser Pollution Abatement Office ..................................................... WATER QUALITY OF UNDISTURBED AREAS ....................... LAND USE EFFECTS ON WATER QUALITY

  20. Idaho National Laboratory Comprehensive Land Use and Environmental Stewardship Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    No name listed on publication

    2011-08-01

    Land and facility use planning and decisions at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Site are guided by a comprehensive site planning process in accordance with Department of Energy Policy 430.1, 'Land and Facility Use Policy,' that integrates mission, economic, ecologic, social, and cultural factors. The INL Ten-Year Site Plan, prepared in accordance with Department of Energy Order 430.1B, 'Real Property Asset Management,' outlines the vision and strategy to transform INL to deliver world-leading capabilities that will enable the Department of Energy to accomplish its mission. Land use planning is the overarching function within real property asset management that integrates the other functions of acquisition, recapitalization, maintenance, disposition, real property utilization, and long-term stewardship into a coordinated effort to ensure current and future mission needs are met. All land and facility use projects planned at the INL Site are considered through a formal planning process that supports the Ten-Year Site Plan. This Comprehensive Land Use and Environmental Stewardship Report describes that process. The land use planning process identifies the current condition of existing land and facility assets and the scope of constraints across INL and in the surrounding region. Current land use conditions are included in the Comprehensive Land Use and Environmental Stewardship Report and facility assets and scope of constraints are discussed in the Ten-Year Site Plan. This report also presents the past, present, and future uses of land at the INL Site that are considered during the planning process, as well as outlining the future of the INL Site for the 10, 30, and 100-year timeframes.

  1. Agricultural land use dynamics in the Brazilian Amazon based on remote sensing and census data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Camara, Gilberto

    that carbon dioxide (CO2) from land use change contributed to 12% (in terms of CO2 equivalents) of the totalAgricultural land use dynamics in the Brazilian Amazon based on remote sensing and census data of biodiversity, erosion, floods, lowered water tables, as well as increased release of carbon into the atmosphere

  2. 3) What makes a species invasive? i) Disturbance and land use hypothesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nowak, Robert S.

    changes in the extent and frequency of disturbance to an ecosystem #12;3) What makes a species invasive? i3) What makes a species invasive? i) Disturbance and land use hypothesis Basic concepts: · Many;3) What makes a species invasive? i) Disturbance and land use hypothesis Basic concepts: · Invasive

  3. CHANGE PROCESS MODELLING USING THE EKD-CHANGE MANAGEMENT METHOD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    CHANGE PROCESS MODELLING USING THE EKD-CHANGE MANAGEMENT METHOD S. Nurcan* , J. Barrios*1 , G The Enterprise Knowledge Development - Change Management Method (EKD-CMM) provides a systematic way to organise and to guide the organisational change management. The EKD-CMM road map, implemented in the electronic guide

  4. Bioenergy and the importance of land use policy in a carbon-constrained world

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Calvin, Katherine V.; Edmonds, James A.; Wise, Marshall A.

    2010-06-01

    Policies aimed at limiting anthropogenic climate change would result in significant transformations of the energy and land-use systems. However, increasing the demand for bioenergy could have a tremendous impact on land use, and can result in land clearing and deforestation. Wise et al. (2009a,b) analyzed an idealized policy to limit the indirect land use change emissions from bioenergy. The policy, while effective, would be difficult, if not impossible, to implement in the real world. In this paper, we consider several different land use policies that deviate from this first-best, using the Joint Global Change Research Institute’s Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM). Specifically, these new frameworks are (1) a policy that focuses on just the above-ground or vegetative terrestrial carbon rather than the total carbon, (2) policies that focus exclusively on incentivizing and protecting forestland, and (3) policies that apply an economic penalty on the use of biomass as a proxy to limit indirect land use change emissions. For each policy, we examine its impact on land use, land-use change emissions, atmospheric CO2 concentrations, agricultural supply, and food prices.

  5. Final Hanford Comprehensive Land-Use Plan Environmental Impact Statement, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    1999-10-01

    This Final ''Hanford Comprehensive Land-Use Plan Environmental Impact Statement'' (HCP EIS) is being used by the Department of Energy (DOE) and its nine cooperating and consulting agencies to develop a comprehensive land-use plan (CLUP) for the Hanford Site. The DOE will use the Final HCP EIS as a basis for a Record of Decision (ROD) on a CLUP for the Hanford Site. While development of the CLUP will be complete with release of the HCP EIS ROD, full implementation of the CLUP is expected to take at least 50 years. Implementation of the CLUP would begin a more detailed planning process for land-use and facility-use decisions at the Hanford Site. The DOE would use the CLUP to screen proposals. Eventually, management of Hanford Site areas would move toward the CLUP land-use goals. This CLUP process could take more than 50 years to fully achieve the land-use goals.

  6. On linking an Earth system model to the equilibrium carbon representation of an economically optimizing land use model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; Calvin, Katherine V.; Jones, Andrew D.; Mao, Jiafu; Patel, Pralit L.; Shi, Xiaoying; Thomson, Allison M.; Thornton, Peter E.; Zhou, Yuyu

    2014-01-01

    Human activities are significantly altering biogeochemical cycles at the global scale, posing a significant problem for earth system models (ESMs), which may incorporate static land-use change inputs but do not actively simulate policy or economic forces. One option to address this problem is a to couple an ESM with an economically oriented integrated assessment model. Here we have implemented and tested a coupling mechanism between the carbon cycles of an ESM (CLM) and an integrated assessment (GCAM) model, examining the best proxy variables to share between the models, and quantifying our ability to distinguish climate- and land-use-driven flux changes. CLM’s net primary production and heterotrophic respiration outputs were found to be the most robust proxy variables by which to manipulate GCAM’s assumptions of long-term ecosystem steady state carbon, with short-term forest production strongly correlated with long-term biomass changes in climate-change model runs. By leveraging the fact that carbon-cycle effects of anthropogenic land-use change are short-term and spatially limited relative to widely distributed climate effects, we were able to distinguish these effects successfully in the model coupling, passing only the latter to GCAM. By allowing climate effects from a full earth system model to dynamically modulate the economic and policy decisions of an integrated assessment model, this work provides a foundation for linking these models in a robust and flexible framework capable of examining two-way interactions between human and earth system processes.

  7. Land Use Planning (3cr.) Spring 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Gregory G.

    , as well as the use of geographic information systems. The environmental approach to land use planning, ENV 2011. Students should also have taken ENV 2010, Geographic Information Systems, or alternatively information system · The ability to do a land suitability analysis Class expectations: This class is designed

  8. Land Use Baseline Report Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noah, J.C.

    1995-06-29

    This document is to serve as a resource for Savannah River Site managers, planners, and SRS stakeholders by providing a general description of the site and land-use factors important to future use decisions and plans. The intent of this document is to be comprehensive in its review of SRS and the surrounding area.

  9. The potential to influence runoff processes by changes in land M. Weiler, S. Scherrer, C. Thoma, P. Fackel and F. Naef

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weiler, Markus

    infiltration rates and storage capacities or percolation into the bedrock contribute little to storm runoff and infiltration exper- iments combined with tracer techniques, areas in catchments were identified where different runoff processes in the catchment were set-up. In order to study effects of land use changes on storm

  10. Interactions among bioenergy feedstock choices, landscape dynamics, and land use

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dale, Virginia H [ORNL; Kline, Keith L [ORNL; Wright, Lynn L [ORNL; Perlack, Robert D [ORNL; Downing, Mark [ORNL; Graham, Robin Lambert [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    Landscape implications of bioenergy feedstock choices are significant and depend on land-use practices and their environmental impacts. Although land-use changes and carbon emissions associated with bioenergy feedstock production are dynamic and complicated, lignocellulosic feedstocks may offer opportunities that enhance sustainability when compared to other transportation fuel alternatives. For bioenergy sustainability, major drivers and concerns revolve around energy security, food production, land productivity, soil carbon and erosion, greenhouse gas emissions, biodiversity, air quality, and water quantity and quality. The many implications of bioenergy feedstock choices require several indicators at multiple scales to provide a more complete accounting of effects. Ultimately, the long-term sustainability of bioenergy feedstock resources (as well as food supplies) throughout the world depends on land-use practices and landscape dynamics. Land-management decisions often invoke trade-offs among potential environmental effects and social and economic factors as well as future opportunities for resource use. The hypothesis being addressed in this paper is that sustainability of bioenergy feedstock production can be achieved via appropriately designed crop residue and perennial lignocellulosic systems. We find that decision makers need scientific advancements and adequate data that both provide quantitative and qualitative measures of the effects of bioenergy feedstock choices at different spatial and temporal scales and allow fair comparisons among available options for renewable liquid fuels.

  11. solar land use | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowa (UtilityMichigan)data bookresult formats Home Jweers'ssmartsolar land use

  12. Oak Ridge reservation land-use plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bibb, W. R.; Hardin, T. H.; Hawkins, C. C.; Johnson, W. A.; Peitzsch, F. C.; Scott, T. H.; Theisen, M. R.; Tuck, S. C.

    1980-03-01

    This study establishes a basis for long-range land-use planning to accommodate both present and projected DOE program requirements in Oak Ridge. In addition to technological requirements, this land-use plan incorporates in-depth ecological concepts that recognize multiple uses of land as a viable option. Neither environmental research nor technological operations need to be mutually exclusive in all instances. Unique biological areas, as well as rare and endangered species, need to be protected, and human and environmental health and safety must be maintained. The plan is based on the concept that the primary use of DOE land resources must be to implement the overall DOE mission in Oak Ridge. This document, along with the base map and overlay maps, provides a reasonably detailed description of the DOE Oak Ridge land resources and of the current and potential uses of the land. A description of the land characteristics, including geomorphology, agricultural productivity and soils, water courses, vegetation, and terrestrial and aquatic animal habitats, is presented to serve as a resource document. Essentially all DOE land in the Oak Ridge area is being fully used for ongoing DOE programs or has been set aside as protected areas.

  13. Symposium Essay: The Energy-Land Use Nexus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Outka, Uma

    2012-01-01

    This Symposium Essay explores the contours of the 'energy-land use nexus' – the rich set of interrelationships between land use and energy production and consumption. This underexplored nexus encapsulates barriers and opportunities as the trajectory...

  14. Conditions and effectiveness of land use as a mobility tool

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Ming, 1963 Apr. 22-

    2002-01-01

    This dissertation examines the potential of land use as a mobility tool to affect travel, a subject of long and ongoing policy debate. Land use strategies such as densification, mixed-use development, and non-driving-oriented ...

  15. Harmonization of Land-Use Scenarios for the Period 1500-2100: 600 Years of Global Gridded Annual Land-Use Transitions, Wood Harvest, and Resulting Secondary Lands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hurtt, George; Chini, Louise Parsons; Frolking, Steve; Betts, Richard; Feddema, Johannes; Fischer, Gavin M.; Fisk, J.P.; Hibbard, Kathleen A.; Houghton, R. A.; Janetos, Anthony C.; Jones, C.; Kindermann, G.; Kinoshita, Tsuguki; Goldeweijk, Kees K.; Riahi, Keywan; Shevliakova, Elena; Smith, Steven J.; Stehfest, Eike; Thomson, Allison M.; Thornton, P.; Van Vuuren, Detlef; Wang, Y.

    2011-08-08

    In preparation for the fifth Assessment Report (AR5) of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), the international community is developing new advanced Earth System Models (ESM) to assess the combined effects of human activities (e.g. land use and fossil fuel emissions) on the carbon-climate system. In addition, four Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) scenarios of the future (2005-2100) are being provided by four Integrated Assessment Model (IAM) teams to be used as input to the ESMs for future carbon-climate projections (Moss et al., 2010). The diversity of approaches and requirements among IAMs and ESMs for tracking land-use change, along with the dependence of model projections on land-use history, presents a challenge for effectively passing data between these communities and for smoothly transitioning from the historical estimates to future projections. Here, a harmonized set of land-use scenarios are presented that smoothly connects historical reconstructions of land use with future projections, in the format required by ESMs.

  16. Tropical Africa: Land use, biomass, and carbon estimates for 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, S.; Gaston, G.; Daniels, R.C.

    1996-06-01

    This document describes the contents of a digital database containing maximum potential aboveground biomass, land use, and estimated biomass and carbon data for 1980 and describes a methodology that may be used to extend this data set to 1990 and beyond based on population and land cover data. The biomass data and carbon estimates are for woody vegetation in Tropical Africa. These data were collected to reduce the uncertainty associated with the possible magnitude of historical releases of carbon from land use change. Tropical Africa is defined here as encompassing 22.7 x 10{sup 6} km{sup 2} of the earth`s land surface and includes those countries that for the most part are located in Tropical Africa. Countries bordering the Mediterranean Sea and in southern Africa (i.e., Egypt, Libya, Tunisia, Algeria, Morocco, South Africa, Lesotho, Swaziland, and Western Sahara) have maximum potential biomass and land cover information but do not have biomass or carbon estimate. The database was developed using the GRID module in the ARC/INFO{sup TM} geographic information system. Source data were obtained from the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), the U.S. National Geophysical Data Center, and a limited number of biomass-carbon density case studies. These data were used to derive the maximum potential and actual (ca. 1980) aboveground biomass-carbon values at regional and country levels. The land-use data provided were derived from a vegetation map originally produced for the FAO by the International Institute of Vegetation Mapping, Toulouse, France.

  17. Integrated Dynamic Gloabal Modeling of Land Use, Energy and Economic Growth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atul Jain, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL Brian O'Neill, NCAR, Boulder, CO

    2009-10-14

    The overall objective of this collaborative project is to integrate an existing general equilibrium energy-economic growth model with a biogeochemical cycles and biophysical models in order to more fully explore the potential contribution of land use-related activities to future emissions scenarios. Land cover and land use change activities, including deforestation, afforestation, and agriculture management, are important source of not only CO2, but also non-CO2 GHGs. Therefore, contribution of land-use emissions to total emissions of GHGs is important, and consequently their future trends are relevant to the estimation of climate change and its mitigation. This final report covers the full project period of the award, beginning May 2006, which includes a sub-contract to Brown University later transferred to the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) when Co-PI Brian O'Neill changed institutional affiliations.

  18. Land use regulation and intraregional population-employment interaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, JH; Hewings, GJD

    2013-01-01

    Levine J (2006) Zoned out: Regulation, markets, and choicesprices, externalities, and regulation in U.S. metropolitanCT (2000) Land use regulation and new construction. Regional

  19. Geothermal Direct-Use — Minimizing Land Use and Impact

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    With geothermal direct-use applications, land use issues usually only arise during exploration and development when geothermal reservoirs are located in or near urbanized areas, critical habitat...

  20. Wind Power Siting: Public Acceptance and Land Use

    Wind Powering America (EERE)

    by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. Wind Power Siting: Public Acceptance and Land Use Suzanne Tegen WINDExchange Webinar June 17, 2015 2 Overview * Current NREL Research *...

  1. An historical analysis of landscape structure change at Birch Creek State Park, Lake Somerville, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garcia, Leigh Ann

    1998-01-01

    Changes in land-use subsequently affect the landscape's spatial patterning and ecological processes. This thesis applies concepts of landscape ecology in order to assess the degree of landscape structural change which has taken place due...

  2. The Impact of Biofuel Mandates on Land Use Suhail Ahmad

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Impact of Biofuel Mandates on Land Use by Suhail Ahmad B.E., Avionics Engineering National, Technology and Policy Program #12;#12;3 The Impact of Biofuel Mandates on Land Use by Suhail Ahmad Submitted of Master of Science in Technology and Policy ABSTRACT The use of biofuels in domestic transportation sector

  3. Urban Land Use and Transportation Center University of California, Davis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    Urban Land Use and Transportation Center University of California, Davis The Urban Land Use and Transportation Center (ULTRANS) at the UC Davis Institute of Transportation Studies (ITS-Davis) is tackling-Davis researchers have provided strong input to the design and analysis of the entire array of California's proposed

  4. Short term effects of moderate carbon prices on land use in the New Zealand emissions trading

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silver, Whendee

    Short term effects of moderate carbon prices on land use in the New Zealand emissions trading Zealand Emissions Trading Scheme (NZ ETS) was introduced through the Climate Change Response Act............................................................................ 14 #12;1 1 Introduction The New Zealand Emissions Trading Scheme (NZ ETS) was legislated through

  5. Effects of land use history on hurricane damage and recovery in a neotropical forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flecker, Alex

    with high pre-hurricane basal area lost many large trees, whereas the basal area hardly changed in systemsEffects of land use history on hurricane damage and recovery in a neotropical forest M. Uriarte1M@ecostudies.org) Received 22 October 2001; accepted in revised form 27 July 2003 Key words: Hurricane effect, Human

  6. Elsevier Editorial System(tm) for Land Use Policy Manuscript Draft

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elsevier Editorial System(tm) for Land Use Policy Manuscript Draft Manuscript Number: Title the Corredor Bioceánico of southeastern Bolivia to determine if rates of agriculturally- driven forest) such research is accelerating. The determinants of land change are diverse, and no other facet has received more

  7. Dischargecalcium concentration relationships in streams of the Amazon and Cerrado of Brazil: soil or land use

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Discharge­calcium concentration relationships in streams of the Amazon and Cerrado of Brazil: soil ecosystem function. Throughout the Amazon and Cerrado regions of Brazil rapid changes in land use and land with data from 28 streams throughout Brazil. These streams come from three distinct regions and varied

  8. A DECISION MATRIX APPROACH TO EVALUATING THE IMPACTS OF LAND-USE ACTIVITIES UNDERTAKEN TO MITIGATE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kueppers, Lara M.

    CLIMATE CHANGE An Editorial Essay LARA M. KUEPPERS1, PAUL BAER2, JOHN HARTE1, 2, BARBARA HAYA2, LAURA E and Marrakech agreements on implementation of the Kyoto Protocol. However some still fear that land-use projects under the Kyoto Protocol, decisions at the last several meetings of the Confer- ence of the Parties (COP

  9. Land Use and Wildfire: A Review of Local Interactions and Teleconnections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelly, Maggi

    2015-01-01

    fuel loads, and once again management. The overall impact ofmanagement. Land use changes also influence fire ignition frequency and fuel loads andloads and ignition are often good indicators of fire risk, this relationship can also be complicated through fire suppression, fuels management

  10. Inter-regional comparison of land-use effects on stream metabolism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bernot, Melody [Ball State University; Sobota, Daniel [Oregon State University; Hall, Robert [University of Wyoming, Laramie; Mulholland, Patrick J [ORNL; Dodds, Walter [Kansas State University; Webster, Jackson [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech); Tank, Jennifer [University of Notre Dame, IN; Ashkenas, Linda [Oregon State University, Corvallis; Cooper, Lee W [ORNL; Dahm, Cliff [University of New Mexico, Albuquerque; Gregory, Stanley [Oregon State University, Corvallis; Grimm, Nancy [Arizona State University; Hamilton, Stephen [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Johnson, Sherri [Oregon State University; McDowell, William [University of Hew Hampshire; Meyer, Judy [University of Georgia, Athens, GA; Peterson, Bruce [Marine Biological Laboratory; Poole, Geoffrey C. [Montana State University; Valett, H. Maurice [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech); Arango, Clay [University of Notre Dame, IN; Beaulieu, Jake [University of Notre Dame, IN; Burgin, Amy [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Crenshaw, Chelsea [University of New Mexico, Albuquerque; Helton, Ashley [University of Georgia, Athens, GA; Johnson, Laura [University of Notre Dame, IN; Merriam, Jeffrey [University of New Hampshire; Niederlehner, Bobbie [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech); O'Brien, Jon [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Potter, Jody [University of New Hampshire; Sheibley, Rich [Arizona State University; Thomas, Suzanne [Marine Biological Laboratory; Wilson, Kym [Kansas State University

    2010-01-01

    Rates of whole-system metabolism (production and respiration) are fundamental indicators of ecosystem structure and function. Although first-order, proximal controls are well understood, assessments of the interactions between proximal controls and distal controls, such as land use and geographic region, are lacking. Thus, the influence of land use on stream metabolism across geographic regions is unknown. Further, there is limited understanding of how land use may alter variability in ecosystem metabolism across regions. 2. Stream metabolism was measured in nine streams in each of eight regions (n = 72) across the United States and Puerto Rico. In each region, three streams were selected from a range of three land uses: agriculturally influenced, urban-influenced, and reference streams. Stream metabolism was estimated from diel changes in dissolved oxygen concentrations in each stream reach with correction for reaeration and groundwater input. 3. Gross primary production (GPP) was highest in regions with little riparian vegetation (sagebrush steppe in Wyoming, desert shrub in Arizona/New Mexico) and lowest in forested regions (North Carolina, Oregon). In contrast, ecosystem respiration (ER) varied both within and among regions. Reference streams had significantly lower rates of GPP than urban or agriculturally influenced streams. 4. GPP was positively correlated with photosynthetically active radiation and autotrophic biomass. Multiple regression models compared using Akaike's information criterion (AIC) indicated GPP increased with water column ammonium and the fraction of the catchment in urban and reference land-use categories. Multiple regression models also identified velocity, temperature, nitrate, ammonium, dissolved organic carbon, GPP, coarse benthic organic matter, fine benthic organic matter and the fraction of all land-use categories in the catchment as regulators of ER. 5. Structural equation modelling indicated significant distal as well as proximal control pathways including a direct effect of land-use on GPP as well as SRP, DIN, and PAR effects on GPP; GPP effects on autotrophic biomass, organic matter, and ER; and organic matter effects on ER. 6. Overall, consideration of the data separated by land-use categories showed reduced inter-regional variability in rates of metabolism, indicating that the influence of agricultural and urban land use can obscure regional differences in stream metabolism.

  11. GCAM Bioenergy and Land Use Modeling

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Leon Clarke. 2013. "Can radiative forcing be limited to 2.6 Wm-2 without negative emissions from bioenergy and CO2 capture and storage?" Climatic Change. Special Issue on...

  12. Bishop's University Environment and Land Use Committee

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of recording that "plans to purchase the boiler will be implemented" it was decided that it should read "plans to purchase the boiler will be studied further." Finally, Mr. McLaughlin's last change was to amend the name

  13. LAND USE CHANGE IN BRAZIL: INTEGRATING ECOLOGY, ECONOMICS AND POLICY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for development; In order to integrate the region to the rest of the country, a series of highways were and landless workers; The landless workers are the agents with less opportunity cost; The loggers need.g. Hydropower) Transport (e.g. roads) Agricultural Expansion Cultivation (e.g Smallholders) Cattle Ranching

  14. LAND USE CHANGE IN BRAZIL: INTEGRATING ECOLOGY, ECONOMICS AND POLICY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    attempts for development; In order to integrate the region to the rest of the country, a series of highways and landless workers; The landless workers are the agents with less opportunity cost; The loggers need.g. Hydropower) Transport (e.g. roads) Agricultural Expansion Cultivation (e.g Smallholders) Cattle Ranching

  15. CARBON SEQUESTRATION THROUGH CHANGES IN LAND USE IN OREGON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Nick Martin, Jonathan Winsten, and John Kadyszewski Winrock International Ecosystem Services Unit 1621 or implied, and assume no legal liability for the information in this report; nor does any party represent that the uses of this information will not infringe upon privately owned rights. This report has not been

  16. Altered Belowground Carbon Cycling Following Land-Use Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeLucia, Evan H.

    Pesquisas Espaciais, Cachoeira Paulista, SP, Brazil ABSTRACT Belowground carbon (C) dynamics of terrestrial to be thoroughly quantified through field measurements. Here, we show that belowground C cycling pathways grasses; establishment phase. INTRODUCTION Terrestrial ecosystems have a pervasive influence on the global

  17. The Amazon Frontier of Land-Use Change: Croplands and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vermont, University of

    ~o Paulo, Piracicaba, Brazil Carlos C. Cerri Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura, Universidade de Sa

  18. Resource Assessment and Land Use Change | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURINGEnergy BillsNo. 195 - Oct.7,Breakout Sessions Notes and Reports |ResolvingResource

  19. Soil carbon sequestration and land use change associated with biofuel

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effect Photovoltaics -7541 *ImpactScience of SignaturesSoft CostsSoil

  20. GCAM 3.0 Agriculture and Land Use: Data Sources and Methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kyle, G. Page; Luckow, Patrick; Calvin, Katherine V.; Emanuel, William R.; Nathan, Mayda; Zhou, Yuyu

    2011-12-12

    This report presents the data processing methods used in the GCAM 3.0 agriculture and land use component, starting from all source data used, and detailing all calculations and assumptions made in generating the model inputs. The report starts with a brief introduction to modeling of agriculture and land use in GCAM 3.0, and then provides documentation of the data and methods used for generating the base-year dataset and future scenario parameters assumed in the model input files. Specifically, the report addresses primary commodity production, secondary (animal) commodity production, disposition of commodities, land allocation, land carbon contents, and land values.

  1. Climate Change as Recorded in Earth Surface Processes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Climate Change as Recorded in Earth Surface Processes Not surprisingly significant changes in climate leave their imprint on the landscape. During the last glacial maximum, 20,000...

  2. Town of Chapel Hill- Land-Use Management Ordinance

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In 2003, the Town of Chapel Hill adopted a land-use management ordinance that includes prohibitions against neighborhood or homeowners association covenants or other conditions of sale that...

  3. Geothermal/Land Use | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource History View New Pages Recent ChangesInformationGeothermal/Grid

  4. Institutional Change Process for Sustainability | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Background Material Underlying Guidance for Federal Agencies in Implementing Strategic Sustainability Performance FEMP Awards Program: Fostering Institutional Change and Energy...

  5. Image Processing Techniques for the Quanti cation of Atherosclerotic Changes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Bob

    Image Processing Techniques for the Quanti cation of Atherosclerotic Changes K.V. Chandrinos 1 , M processing of fundus images. This method would help in evaluating the e cacy of various treatments changes, focal narrowing and occlusion of retinal vessels. Automatic quanti cation of these changes would

  6. Redefining the typology of land use in the age of big data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Liqun, M.C.P. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2014-01-01

    Land use classification is important as a standard for land use description and management. However, current land use classification systems are problematic. Labels such as "residential use" and "commercial use" do not ...

  7. Environment and Land Use Committee Minutes of Meeting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sustainable Development Action Plan #12;2 There was discussion about the need to move forward with Sustainable Committee" to the "Sustainable Development and Land Use Committee" which is in keeping with today for Sustainable Development: Michel Caron read from the Sustainable Development Action Plan prepared by Benoit

  8. Predicting Ground Water Nitrate Concentration from Land Use

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vogel, Richard M.

    to assess the effects of land use on ground water quality. Exploratory data analysis was applied to historic-foot radius of a well are reliable predictors of nitrate concentration in ground water. Similarly with highly permeable materials to evaluate potential effects of development on ground water quality

  9. Bishop's University Minutes Sustainable Development & Land Use Committee Meeting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bishop's University Minutes Sustainable Development & Land Use Committee Meeting Meeting held called: Sustainable development residence challenge to compete to reduce the Residence's ecological foot the momentum gained by the committee up to now. The SD&LU is a student driven committee and sustainability

  10. Sustainable Development and Land Use Committee Minutes of Meeting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Sustainable Development and Land Use Committee Minutes of Meeting 10 March 2008 7:00 p.m. - 9 will coordinate with a student the Sustainable Development Audit before Dr. Bardati leaves Bishop's University. Motion: Proceed with the Sustainable Development Audit in accordance with the CREPUQ guidelines. Proposed

  11. Land Use Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Conventional Oil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turetsky, Merritt

    Land Use Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Conventional Oil Production and Oil Sands S O N I A Y E H received September 12, 2010. Accepted September 14, 2010. Debates surrounding the greenhouse gas (GHG emissions of California crude and in situ oil sands production (

  12. REVIEW PAPER Watershed land use as a determinant of metal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mazumder, Asit

    REVIEW PAPER Watershed land use as a determinant of metal concentrations in freshwater systems- lating concentrations and behavior of metals in freshwater systems. Results from the review suggest metal­DOM­pH interactions) affect the metal concentrations in freshwater systems. Among the watershed

  13. Linking Oil Prices, Gas Prices, Economy, Transport, and Land Use

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertini, Robert L.

    Linking Oil Prices, Gas Prices, Economy, Transport, and Land Use A Review of Empirical Findings/Fuel Price Travel Cost Macro-Economy Passenger: VMT or VKT Freight: Ton-Mile or Ton-KM Passenger Mode-run Short and Long-run #12;Topics covered by this presentation: Oil price and macro-economy Gas price

  14. Land Use Policy 22 (2005) 103114 Policy impact on desertification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oñate, Juan J.

    2005-01-01

    Land Use Policy 22 (2005) 103­114 Policy impact on desertification: stakeholders' perceptions) as one of the most severe cases of desertification in Europe: (1) expansion of highly productive the issue of desertification. Given this experience, it is estimated that only strict environmental policy

  15. Bioenergy and land-use competition in Northeast Brazil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bioenergy and land-use competition in Northeast Brazil Christian Azar Department of Physical of Brazil on "good" versus "bad" lands is investigated. It is shown that the value of the higher yields) lands. The focus of the analysis is on the Northeast of Brazil (NE), where the prospects for dedicated

  16. Scenarios of Future Socio-Economics, Energy, Land Use, and Radiative Forcing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eom, Jiyong; Moss, Richard H.; Edmonds, James A.; Calvin, Katherine V.; Clarke, Leon E.; Dooley, James J.; Kim, Son H.; Kopp, Roberrt; Kyle, G. Page; Luckow, Patrick W.; Patel, Pralit L.; Thomson, Allison M.; Wise, Marshall A.; Zhou, Yuyu

    2013-04-13

    This chapter explores uncertainty in future scenarios of energy, land use, emissions and radiative forcing that span the range in the literature for radiative forcing, but also consider uncertainty in two other dimensions, challenges to mitigation and challenges to adaptation. We develop a set of six scenarios that we explore in detail including the underlying the context in which they are set, assumptions that drive the scenarios, the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM), used to produce quantified implications for those assumptions, and results for the global energy and land-use systems as well as emissions, concentrations and radiative forcing. We also describe the history of scenario development and the present state of development of this branch of climate change research. We discuss the implications of alternative social, economic, demographic, and technology development possibilities, as well as potential stabilization regimes for the supply of and demand for energy, the choice of energy technologies, and prices of energy and agricultural commodities. Land use and land cover will also be discussed with the emphasis on the interaction between the demand for bioenergy and crops, crop yields, crop prices, and policy settings to limit greenhouse gas emissions.

  17. Processes change the look of wood fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zerbe, J.I.

    1980-06-01

    The various forms of wood-derived fuels are reviewed, these include briquetted and pelleted wood products. Charcoal, obtained by pyrolysis has a heating value one and a half times the equivalent weight of the dry wood from which it was made. By process modifications, more oil and gas may be produced instead of charcoal. At Albany, Oregon two barrels of oil are produced daily by hydrogenation of one ton of dry wood chips. It is stated that methanol can be synthesized from solid wood - by wood gasification - with a 38% energy efficiency while ethanol can also be made from wood. The use of wood fuels for electric power generation and cogeneration are also mentioned.

  18. Processes change the look of wood fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zerbe, J.I.

    1980-06-01

    The various forms of wood-derived fuels are reviewed; these include briquetted and pelleted wood products. Charcoal, obtained by pyrolysis has a heating value one and a half times the equivalent weight of the dry wood from which it was made. By process modifications, more oil and gas may be produced instead of charcoal. At Albany, Oregon two barrels of oil are produced daily by hydrogenation of one ton of dry wood chips. It is stated that methanol can be synthesized from solid wood - by wood gasification - with a 38% energy efficiency while ethanol can also be made from wood. The use of wood fuels for electric power generation and cogeneration are also mentioned.

  19. Tropical Africa: Land Use, Biomass, and Carbon Estimates for 1980 (NDP-055)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, S.

    2002-04-16

    This document describes the contents of a digital database containing maximum potential aboveground biomass, land use, and estimated biomass and carbon data for 1980. The biomass data and carbon estimates are associated with woody vegetation in Tropical Africa. These data were collected to reduce the uncertainty associated with estimating historical releases of carbon from land use change. Tropical Africa is defined here as encompassing 22.7 x 10{sup 6} km{sup 2} of the earth's land surface and is comprised of countries that are located in tropical Africa (Angola, Botswana, Burundi, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, Congo, Benin, Equatorial Guinea, Ethiopia, Djibouti, Gabon, Gambia, Ghana, Guinea, Ivory Coast, Kenya, Liberia, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Mozambique, Namibia, Niger, Nigeria, Guinea-Bissau, Zimbabwe (Rhodesia), Rwanda, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Somalia, Sudan, Tanzania, Togo, Uganda, Burkina Faso (Upper Volta), Zaire, and Zambia). The database was developed using the GRID module in the ARC/INFO{trademark} geographic information system. Source data were obtained from the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), the U.S. National Geophysical Data Center, and a limited number of biomass-carbon density case studies. These data were used to derive the maximum potential and actual (ca. 1980) aboveground biomass values at regional and country levels. The land-use data provided were derived from a vegetation map originally produced for the FAO by the International Institute of Vegetation Mapping, Toulouse, France.

  20. A multilevel analysis of effects of land use policy on land-cover change and local land use decisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Jianguo "Jingle"

    2014 Available online Keywords: Desertification Household Multi-scale drivers Multilevel statistical (Reynolds et al., 2007). Land degradation, which is often referred to as desertification in drylands (Dregne

  1. RAPID/Geothermal/Land Use/Federal | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onRAPID/Geothermal/Exploration/Colorado < RAPID‎RAPID/Geothermal/Land Use/Federal < RAPID‎ | Geothermal‎ |

  2. Employment and land-use impacts of resource program elements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shankle, S A; Baechler, M C; Blondin, D W; Grover, S E

    1992-03-01

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) evaluated several power resource alternatives under consideration by the Bonneville Power Administration in its Resource Program Environmental Impact Statement (RPEIS). The purpose of this evaluation was to determine the potential impacts of each alternative in terms of land use and employment. We reviewed the literature that describes land-use and employment impacts to derive estimates of each type of effect. These estimates were scaled to a per-megawatt basis for use as multipliers in the RPEIS analysis. Multipliers for employment were taken from the literature and developed from power plant capital cost estimates. Land-use multipliers were taken from the literature or estimated from existing plants. In this report we compared information sources and estimates to develop the most applicable multipliers. Employment levels required (in terms of employee years per MW of plant capacity) for the construction and operation phases of each energy-generating resource alternative analyzed are shown. The amounts of land required (in terms of acres per MW capacity) for the construction and operation phases of each energy-generating resource alternatives analyzed are also shown.

  3. From land use to land cover: Restoring the afforestation signal in a coupled integrated assessment - earth system model and the implications for CMIP5 RCP simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Di Vittorio, Alan; Chini, Louise M.; Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; Mao, Jiafu; Shi, Xiaoying; Truesdale, John E.; Craig, Anthony P.; Calvin, Katherine V.; Jones, Andrew D.; Collins, William D.; Edmonds, James A.; Hurtt, George; Thornton, Peter E.; Thomson, Allison M.

    2014-11-27

    Climate projections depend on scenarios of fossil fuel emissions and land use change, and the IPCC AR5 parallel process assumes consistent climate scenarios across Integrated Assessment and Earth System Models (IAMs and ESMs). To facilitate consistency, CMIP5 used a novel land use harmonization to provide ESMs with seamless, 1500-2100 land use trajectories generated by historical data and four IAMs. However, we have identified and partially addressed a major gap in the CMIP5 land coupling design. The CMIP5 Community ESM (CESM) global afforestation is only 22% of RCP4.5 afforestation from 2005 to 2100. Likewise, only 17% of the Global Change Assessment Model’s (GCAM’s) 2040 RCP4.5 afforestation signal, and none of the pasture loss, were transmitted to CESM within a newly integrated model. This is a critical problem because afforestation is necessary for achieving the RCP4.5 climate stabilization. We attempted to rectify this problem by modifying only the ESM component of the integrated model, enabling CESM to simulate 66% of GCAM’s afforestation in 2040, and 94% of GCAM’s pasture loss as grassland and shrubland losses. This additional afforestation increases vegetation carbon gain by 19 PgC and decreases atmospheric CO2 gain by 8 ppmv from 2005 to 2040, implying different climate scenarios between CMIP5 GCAM and CESM. Similar inconsistencies likely exist in other CMIP5 model results, primarily because land cover information is not shared between models, with possible contributions from afforestation exceeding model-specific, potentially viable forest area. Further work to harmonize land cover among models will be required to adequately rectify this problem.

  4. A Dynamic Simulation of the Indirect Land Use Implications of Recent Biofuel Production and Use in the United States.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oladosu, Gbadebo A; Kline, Keith L

    2013-01-01

    The global indirect land use change (ILUC) implications of biofuel use in the United States of America (USA) from 2001 to 2010 are evaluated with a dynamic general equilibrium model. The effects of biofuels production on agricultural land area vary by year; from a net expansion of 0.17 ha per 1000 gallons produced (2002) to a net contraction of 0.13 ha per 1000 gallons (2018) in Case 1 of our simulation. In accordance with the general narrative about the implications of biofuel policy, agricultural land area increased in many regions of the world. However, oil-export dependent economies experienced agricultural land contraction because of reductions in their revenues. Reducing crude oil imports is a major goal of biofuel policy, but the land use change implications have received little attention in the literature. Simulations evaluating the effects of doubling supply elasticities for land and fossil resources show that these parameters can significantly influence the land use change estimates. Therefore, research that provides empirically-based and spatially-detailed agricultural land-supply curves and capability to project future fossil energy prices is critical for improving estimates of the effects of biofuel policy on land use.

  5. Agriculture, Land Use, Energy and Carbon Emission Impacts of Global Biofuel Mandates to Mid-Century

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wise, Marshall A.; Dooley, James J.; Luckow, Patrick; Calvin, Katherine V.; Kyle, G. Page

    2014-02-01

    Three potential future scenarios of expanded global biofuel production are presented here utilizing the GCAM integrated assessment model. These scenarios span a range that encompasses on the low end a continuation of existing biofuel production policies to two scenarios that would require an expansion of current targets as well as an extension of biofuels targets to other regions of the world. Conventional oil use is reduced by 4-8% in the expanded biofuel scenarios, which results in a decrease of in CO2 emissions on the order of 1-2 GtCO2/year by mid-century from the global transportation sector. The regional distribution of crop production is relatively unaffected, but the biofuels targets do result in a marked increase in the production of conventional crops used for energy. Producer prices of sugar and corn reach levels about 12% and 7% above year 2005 levels, while the increased competition for land causes the price of food crops such as wheat, although not used for bioenergy in this study, to increase by 1 to 2%. The amount of land devoted to growing all food crops and dedicated bioenergy crops is increased by about 10% by 2050 in the High biofuel case, with concurrent decreases in other uses of land such as forest and pasture. In both of the expanded biofuels cases studied, there is an increase in net cumulative carbon emissions for the first couple of decades due to these induced land use changes. However, the difference in net cumulative emissions from the biofuels expansion decline by about 2035 as the reductions in energy system emissions exceed further increases in emissions from land use change. Even in the absence of a policy that would limit emissions from land use change, the differences in net cumulative emissions from the biofuels scenarios reach zero by 2050, and are decreasing further over time in both cases.

  6. Web-GIS Based System for the Management of Objections to a Comprehensive Municipal Land Use Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Touriño, Juan

    Web-GIS Based System for the Management of Objections to a Comprehensive Municipal Land Use Plan the land planning process. Geographic information Systems (GIS) have traditionally been used in daily municipalities in which the lack of resources or expert staff who can use this technology makes GIS

  7. Land Use and Ecosystems Data from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    CDIAC products are indexed and searchable through a customized interface powered by ORNL's Mercury search engine. Products include numeric data packages, publications, trend data, atlases, models, etc. and can be searched for by subject area, keywords, authors, product numbers, time periods, collection sites, spatial references, etc. Some of the collections may also be included in the CDIAC publication titled Trends Online: A Compendium of Global Change Data. Most data sets, many with numerous data files, are free to download from CDIAC's ftp area. Land Use and Ecosystems information includes Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration Data Sets, data sets from Africa and Asia, the Worldwide Organic Soil Carbon and Nitrogen Dataset, and much more.

  8. Geothermal/Land Use Planning | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar2-0057-EA Jump to:ofEniaElectric Jump to: navigation,DefinitionLand Use

  9. Sustainable Land-use Impact Assessment Toolkit | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop Inc JumpHeter BatterySolarfinMarketMember CorpSunviePty Ltd Jump to:Land-use

  10. Guidelines for Low Emission Land use Planning | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource History View NewGuam: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation,Low Emission Land use

  11. Integrated Assessment Modeling of Carbon Sequestration and Land Use Emissions Using Detailed Model Results and Observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Atul Jain

    2005-04-17

    This report outlines the progress on the development and application of Integrated Assessment Modeling of Carbon Sequestrations and Land Use Emissions supported by the DOE Office of Biological and Environmental Research (OBER), U.S. Department of Energy, Grant No. DOE-DE-FG02-01ER63069. The overall objective of this collaborative project between the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was to unite the latest advances in carbon cycle research with scientifically based models and policy-related integrated assessment tools that incorporate computationally efficient representations of the latest knowledge concerning science and emission trajectories, and their policy implications. As part of this research we accomplished the following tasks that we originally proposed: (1) In coordination with LLNL and ORNL, we enhanced the Integrated Science Assessment Model's (ISAM) parametric representation of the ocean and terrestrial carbon cycles that better represent spatial and seasonal variations, which are important to study the mechanisms that influence carbon sequestration in the ocean and terrestrial ecosystems; (2) Using the MiniCAM modeling capability, we revised the SRES (IPCC Special Report on Emission Scenarios; IPCC, 2000) land use emission scenarios; and (3) On the application front, the enhanced version of ISAM modeling capability is applied to understand how short- and long-term natural carbon fluxes, carbon sequestration, and human emissions contribute to the net global emissions (concentrations) trajectories required to reach various concentration (emission) targets. Under this grant, 21 research publications were produced. In addition, this grant supported a number of graduate and undergraduate students whose fundamental research was to learn a disciplinary field in climate change (e.g., ecological dynamics and ocean circulations) and then complete research on how this field could be linked to the other factors we need to consider in its dynamics (e.g., land use, ocean and terrestrial carbon sequestration and climate change).

  12. GIZ Sourcebook Module 2a: Land Use Planning and Urban Transport...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    GIZ Sourcebook Module 2a: Land Use Planning and Urban Transport (Espaol) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: GIZ Sourcebook Module 2a: Land Use Planning...

  13. Coupling GIS and LCA for biodiversity assessments of land use: Part 1: Inventory modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geyer, Roland; Stoms, David M.; Lindner, Jan P.; Davis, Frank W.; Wittstock, Bastian

    2010-01-01

    scenarios were developed with GIS modeling. Current land use0170-9 LAND USE IN LCA Coupling GIS and LCA for biodiversityGeographic information systems (GIS) are adept at modeling

  14. Surface Water Chemistry in White Oak Creek, North-East Texas: Effect of Land Use 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Eliza

    2012-02-14

    Over the last few decades increasing attention has been paid to the effects of land use activities and land management on stream water quality. Recent research has largely focused on dominant land uses such as urban development and agricultural...

  15. Coupling GIS and LCA for biodiversity assessments of land use: Part 1: Inventory modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geyer, Roland; Stoms, David M.; Lindner, Jan P.; Davis, Frank W.; Wittstock, Bastian

    2010-01-01

    467 DOI 10.1007/s11367-010-0170-9 LAND USE IN LCA CouplingGIS and LCA for biodiversity assessments of land use Part 1:while life cycle assessment (LCA) does not conventionally

  16. Page 1 of 10 SWS 5234: ENVIRONMENTAL SOIL, WATER, AND LAND USE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    Page 1 of 10 SWS 5234: ENVIRONMENTAL SOIL, WATER, AND LAND USE: SYLLABUS AND SCHEDULE 2012 Table of Contents SWS 5234: Environmental Soil, Water, and Land Use: Syllabus and Schedule 2012 ........... 1: .................................................................................................................... 3 DISTANCE EDUCATION PARTICIPATION

  17. Hydro-Ecologic Responses to Land Use in Small Urbanizing Watersheds Within the Chesapeake Bay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gruner, Daniel S.

    Hydro-Ecologic Responses to Land Use in Small Urbanizing Watersheds Within the Chesapeake Bay. The consequences for both the hydrology and 41 #12;42 HYDRO-ECOLOGIC RESPONSES TO LAND USE IN SMALL URBANIZING

  18. Greenhouse gas emissions from forest, land use and biomass burning in Tanzania

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matitu, M.R.

    1994-12-31

    Carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and methane (CH{sub 4}) gases are the main contributors to the greenhouse effect that consequently results in global warming. This paper examines the sources and sinks of these gases from/to forest, land use and biomass burning and their likely contribution to climate change using IPCC/OECD methodology. Emissions have been calculated in mass units of carbon and nitrogen Emissions and uptake have been summed for each gas and the emissions converted to full molecular weights. Mismanagement of forests and land misuse have contributed much to greenhouse gas emissions in Tanzania. For example, cultivation methods, forest clearing, burning of savannah grass and indiscriminate logging (non-sustainable logging) have contributed significantly to greenhouse gas emissions. These categories contribute more than 90% of total CO{sub 2} emissions. However, the study shows that shifting cultivation, savannah burning and forest clearing for conversion to permanent crop land and pasture are the main contributors.

  19. Risk Analysis for Water Resources Under Climate Change, Population Growth, and Land Use Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kiparsky, Michael

    2010-01-01

    to use forecasts." Risk Analysis 25(5): 1265- Oreskes, N. (P. C. (1977). "Mean-Risk Analysis with Risk Associated withChavas, J. -P. (2004). Risk Analysis in Theory and Practice.

  20. Risk Analysis for Water Resources Under Climate Change, Population Growth, and Land Use Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kiparsky, Michael

    2010-01-01

    scale. Thus, analysis of flood risk, sub-monthly instream-on water supply risk, and does not address flood risk.water resources modeling, flood risk and water supply risk

  1. Risk Analysis for Water Resources Under Climate Change, Population Growth, and Land Use Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kiparsky, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Potential Evapotranspiration .. 39 2.9.2 Applied water demands 39 2.10 Urban demands and supplies.. 40 2.11 In-stream flows and hydropower .

  2. Risk Analysis for Water Resources Under Climate Change, Population Growth, and Land Use Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kiparsky, Michael

    2010-01-01

    R. B. Lammers (2000). "Global water resources: Vulnerabilityin two small watersheds." Water Resources Research 18(3).of a warming climate on water availability in snow-dominated

  3. Risk Analysis for Water Resources Under Climate Change, Population Growth, and Land Use Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kiparsky, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Monthly required flows (cfs) based on 1922-1992 averageminimum fishery flow schedules (cfs). Note that in practiceminimum flows in WEAP (cfs). After Table 6-8 in (USBR

  4. Risk Analysis for Water Resources Under Climate Change, Population Growth, and Land Use Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kiparsky, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Lach, D. , H. Ingram and S. Rayner (2005). "Maintaining thePielke, R. , G. Prins, S. Rayner and D. Sarewitz (2007). "Nature 445(7128): 597-598. Rayner, S. , D. Lach and H.

  5. Coupling GIS and LCA for biodiversity assessments of land use: Part 2: Impact assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geyer, Roland; Lindner, Jan P.; Stoms, David M.; Davis, Frank W.; Wittstock, Bastian

    2010-01-01

    Evenness . Geographic information systems (GIS) .GIS-based inventory modeling . Habitats . Hemeroby . Land0199-9 LAND USE IN LCA Coupling GIS and LCA for biodiversity

  6. Fire-related carbon emissions from land use transitions in southern Amazonia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01

    2008 Fire-related carbon emissions from land use transitionsto atmospheric carbon emissions, including forest conversionthe major sources of emissions from fires in this region.

  7. Land-Use Requirements of Modern Wind Power Plants in the United...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4 August 2009 Land-Use Requirements of Modern Wind Power Plants in the United States Paul Denholm, Maureen Hand, Maddalena Jackson, and Sean Ong National Renewable Energy...

  8. Land-Use Analysis of Croplands for Sustainable Food and Energy Production in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zumkehr, Andrew Lee

    2013-01-01

    R. ; Balachandra, P. Biofuel Production and Implications forAvailability for Biofuel Production. Environmental Science &Carbon Sequestration or Biofuel Production: New Land-Use

  9. NGNP Process Heat Utilization: Liquid Metal Phase Change Heat Exchanger

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piyush Sabharwall; Mike Patterson; Vivek Utgikar; Fred Gunnerson

    2008-09-01

    One key long-standing issue that must be overcome to fully realize the successful growth of nuclear power is to determine other benefits of nuclear energy apart from meeting the electricity demands. The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) will most likely be producing electricity and heat for the production of hydrogen and/or oil retrieval from oil sands and oil shale to help in our national pursuit of energy independence. For nuclear process heat to be utilized, intermediate heat exchange is required to transfer heat from the NGNP to the hydrogen plant or oil recovery field in the most efficient way possible. Development of nuclear reactor - process heat technology has intensified the interest in liquid metals as heat transfer media because of their ideal transport properties. Liquid metal heat exchangers are not new in practical applications. An important rational for considering liquid metals is the potential convective heat transfer is among the highest known. Thus explains the interest in liquid metals as coolant for intermediate heat exchange from NGNP. For process heat it is desired that, intermediate heat exchangers (IHX) transfer heat from the NGNP in the most efficient way possible. The production of electric power at higher efficiency via the Brayton Cycle, and hydrogen production, requires both heat at higher temperatures and high effectiveness compact heat exchangers to transfer heat to either the power or process cycle. Compact heat exchangers maximize the heat transfer surface area per volume of heat exchanger; this has the benefit of reducing heat exchanger size and heat losses. High temperature IHX design requirements are governed in part by the allowable temperature drop between the outlet and inlet of the NGNP. In order to improve the characteristics of heat transfer, liquid metal phase change heat exchangers may be more effective and efficient. This paper explores the overall heat transfer characteristics and pressure drop of the phase change heat exchanger with Na as the heat exchanger coolant. In order to design a very efficient and effective heat exchanger one must optimize the design such that we have a high heat transfer and a lower pressure drop, but there is always a trade-off between them. Based on NGNP operational parameters, a heat exchanger analysis with the sodium phase change will be presented to show that the heat exchanger has the potential for highly effective heat transfer, within a small volume at reasonable cost.

  10. Impacts of Land-Use and Biofuels Policy on Climate: Temperature and Localized Impacts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Impacts of Land-Use and Biofuels Policy on Climate: Temperature and Localized Impacts Willow on recycled paper #12;1 Impacts of Land-Use and Biofuels Policy on Climate: Temperature and Localized Impacts to agricultural production, including growing biofuels, and (ii) Observed Land Supply Response (OLSR

  11. REMOTE SENSING TECHNIQUES FOR LAND USE CLASSIFICATION OF RIO JAUCA WATERSHED USING IKONOS IMAGES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbes, Fernando

    REMOTE SENSING TECHNIQUES FOR LAND USE CLASSIFICATION OF RIO JAUCA WATERSHED USING IKONOS IMAGES-Mayagüez E-mail: edwinmm80@yahoo.com Key words: GIS, remote sensing, land use, supervised classification resource and supplies water to the metropolitan area. Remote sensing techniques can be used to assess

  12. Tele-connecting local consumption to global land use

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zeng, Ning

    ;Ecoinvent LCA database · 4000 products x 4000 processes · More than 100 environmental indicators (e.g. water

  13. THE ROLE OF LAND USE IN ENVIRONMENTAL DECISION MAKING AT THREE DOE MEGA-CLEANUP SITES FERNALD & ROCKY FLATS & MOUND

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JEWETT MA

    2011-01-14

    This paper explores the role that future land use decisions have played in the establishment of cost-effective cleanup objectives and the setting of environmental media cleanup levels for the three major U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites for which cleanup has now been successfully completed: the Rocky Flats, Mound, and Fernald Closure Sites. At each site, there are distinct consensus-building histories throughout the following four phases: (1) the facility shut-down and site investigation phase, which took place at the completion of their Cold War nuclear-material production missions; (2) the decision-making phase, whereby stakeholder and regulatory-agency consensus was achieved for the future land-use-based environmental decisions confronting the sites; (3) the remedy selection phase, whereby appropriate remedial actions were identified to achieve the future land-use-based decisions; and (4) the implementation phase, whereby the selected remedial actions for these high-profile sites were implemented and successfully closed out. At each of the three projects, there were strained relationships and distrust between the local community and the DOE as a result of site contamination and potential health effects to the workers and local residents. To engage citizens and interested stakeholder groups - particularly in the role of final land use in the decision-making process, the site management teams at each respective site developed new public-participation strategies to open stakeholder communication channels with site leadership, technical staff, and the regulatory agencies. This action proved invaluable to the success of the projects and reaching consensus on appropriate levels of cleanup. With the implementation of the cleanup remedies now complete, each of the three DOE sites have become models for future environmental-remediation projects and associated decision making.

  14. BRITISH COLUMBIA LAND USE PLANNING: BACKCOUNTRY TOURISM PERSPECTIVES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    processes. Literature suggests that these sectors have subsequently been unable to secure their interests in BC's natural resources. In response to frequent stakeholder conflicts concerning inequities existing survey databases. The first database provided the survey responses of tourism participants

  15. Enhancing Requirements and Change Management through Process Modelling and Measurement1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valetto, Giuseppe "Peppo"

    Enhancing Requirements and Change Management through Process Modelling and Measurement1 Luigi of requirements and change management. Keywords: requirements management, change management, traceability Lavazza and Giuseppe Valetto CEFRIEL and Politecnico di Milano2 Abstract Effective management

  16. ORNL/TM-2000/160 Database Development of Land Use Characteristics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ORNL/TM-2000/160 Database Development of Land Use Characteristics along Major U.S. Highways Demin Xiong Center for Transportation Analysis Energy Division June 2000 Prepared for Bureau of Transportation

  17. Attoyac Bayou GIS Inventory, Source Survey and Land Use Cover Report 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boitnott, N.; Castilaw, A.; Gregory, L.; Wagner, K.

    2014-01-01

    will be developed and will integrate numerous existing information resources into a single location. Generally, the GIS will illustrate waterbodies, roadways, permitted point-source dischargers, and other points of concern. Additionally, current land use/land cover...

  18. RCW - 43.21B - Environmental and Land Use Hearings Office - Pollution...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    RCW - 43.21B - Environmental and Land Use Hearings Office - Pollution Control Hearings Board Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document-...

  19. Impacts of Land Use and Biofuels Policy on Climate: Temperature and Localized Impacts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hallgren, Willow

    2012-08-06

    The impact on climate of future land use and energy policy scenarios is explored using two landuse frameworks: (i) Pure Cost Conversion Response (PCCR), or 'extensification', where the price of land is the only constraint ...

  20. Land use politics southern style : the case of cash proffers in Virginia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKay, Shannon Ashley

    2012-01-01

    The linkage between the political dynamics at the state level and actual implementation of land use regulations at the local level is the focus of this dissertation. This focus is explored through the genesis and efficacy ...

  1. Energy balance and partition in Inner Mongolia steppe ecosystems with different land use types

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Jiquan

    Energy balance and partition in Inner Mongolia steppe ecosystems with different land use types surface, including radiation balance, energy partitioning, aerodynamic characteristics, leaf area index records of the surface energy balance are currently available for grassland ecosystems, especially

  2. Jackfruit (Artocarpus heterophyllus Lam.) Diversity in Bangladesh: Land Use and Artificial Selection1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wagenius, Stuart

    Jackfruit (Artocarpus heterophyllus Lam.) Diversity in Bangladesh: Land Use and Artificial, University of Rajshahi, Rajshahi, Bangladesh 3 Chicago Botanic Garden, Glencoe, IL, USA 4 Northwestern University, Plant Biology and Conservation, Evanston, IL, USA 5 Gono University, Savar, Dhaka, Bangladesh

  3. Shrink-Swell Dynamics of Vertisol Catenae under Different Land Uses 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dinka, Takele Mitiku

    2012-02-14

    of the shrinkage of a Vertisol under different land uses; and 3) determine the relationship between specific volume and water content of soils, particularly between saturation and field capacity. The research was conducted in Vertisol catenae of the Houston Black...

  4. The Evaluation of Transportation and Land Use Plans Using Linked Economic and GIS Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnston, Robert A.

    1995-01-01

    urban economyand and economic evaluations. for devlsing andAttempts to base the economic evaluation travel no state isEvaluation of Transportation and Land Use Plans Using Linked Economic

  5. Los Alamos National Laboratory Investigates Fenton Hill to Support Future Land Use

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    LOS ALAMOS, N.M. – Supporting future land use for the U.S. Forest Service, Los Alamos National Laboratory’s Corrective Actions Program (CAP) completed sampling soil at Fenton Hill in the Jemez Mountains this month.

  6. Connecting Land Use and Transportation Toward Sustainable Development: A Case Study of Houston-Galveston Metropolitan Area 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Jae Su

    2011-02-22

    How do land use characteristics affect individual and household travel behavior in a regional context? Can the investigation justify the land use policies to reduce automobile dependence and achieve the goals of sustainable ...

  7. A Characterization of the Spatial Poisson Process and Changing Time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Merzbach, Ely; Nualart, David

    1986-02-06

    Watanabe proved that if Xt is a point process such that Xt?t is a martingale, then Xt is a Poisson process and this result was generalized by Bremaud for doubly stochastic Poisson processes. Here we define two-parameter point processes and extend...

  8. Land Use Requirements of Modern Wind Power Plants in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denholm, P.; Hand, M.; Jackson, M.; Ong, S.

    2009-08-01

    This report provides data and analysis of the land use associated with modern, large wind power plants (defined as greater than 20 megawatts (MW) and constructed after 2000). The analysis discusses standard land-use metrics as established in the life-cycle assessment literature, and then discusses their applicability to wind power plants. The report identifies two major 'classes' of wind plant land use: 1) direct impact (i.e., disturbed land due to physical infrastructure development), and 2) total area (i.e., land associated with the complete wind plant project). The analysis also provides data for each of these classes, derived from project applications, environmental impact statements, and other sources. It attempts to identify relationships among land use, wind plant configuration, and geography. The analysts evaluated 172 existing or proposed projects, which represents more than 26 GW of capacity. In addition to providing land-use data and summary statistics, they identify several limitations to the existing wind project area data sets, and suggest additional analysis that could aid in evaluating actual land use and impacts associated with deployment of wind energy.

  9. Assessing the health equity impacts of regional land-use plan making: An equity focussed health impact assessment of alternative patterns of development of the Whitsunday Hinterland and Mackay Regional Plan, Australia (Short report)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gunning, Colleen; Harris, Patrick; Mallett, John

    2011-07-15

    Health service and partners completed an equity focussed health impact assessment to influence the consideration of health and equity within regional land-use planning in Queensland, Australia. This project demonstrated how an equity oriented assessment matrix can assist in testing regional planning scenarios. It is hoped that this HIA will contribute to the emerging interest in ensuring that potential differential health impacts continue to be considered as part of land-use planning processes.

  10. Legacy sediment: Definitions and processes of episodically produced anthropogenic sediment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James, L. Allan

    Legacy sediment: Definitions and processes of episodically produced anthropogenic sediment L. Allan. Introduction Anthropogenic sediment is an extremely important element of change during the Anthropocene of sediment and the character of land use before and after contact. Rivers are often dominated by cultural

  11. Building Tomorrow's Leaders Today 1 | P a g e Managing Strategic Process Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Emmons, Scott

    Building Tomorrow's Leaders Today 1 | P a g e Managing Strategic Process Change Registration: The Managing Strategic Process Change (MSPC) program is a great developmental opportunity designed to deliver the critical tools, knowledge, skills and confidence that change leaders need to pro-actively manage the people

  12. Farming: A Climate Change Culprit

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Farming: A Climate Change Culprit Farming: A Climate Change Culprit Simulations run at NERSC show impact of land-use change on African monsoon precipitation June 7, 2014 | Tags:...

  13. Effect of Urbanization and Climate Change on Hydrological Processes over the San Antonio River Basin, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Gang

    2014-11-18

    flood peaks. Meanwhile, climate change has led to more frequent extreme events. Therefore, a thorough understanding of the hydrological processes under urbanization and climate change is indispensable for sustainable water management...

  14. Land-Use Requirements for Solar Power Plants in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ong, S.; Campbell, C.; Denholm, P.; Margolis, R.; Heath, G.

    2013-06-01

    This report provides data and analysis of the land use associated with utility-scale ground-mounted solar facilities, defined as installations greater than 1 MW. We begin by discussing standard land-use metrics as established in the life-cycle assessment literature and then discuss their applicability to solar power plants. We present total and direct land-use results for various solar technologies and system configurations, on both a capacity and an electricity-generation basis. The total area corresponds to all land enclosed by the site boundary. The direct area comprises land directly occupied by solar arrays, access roads, substations, service buildings, and other infrastructure. As of the third quarter of 2012, the solar projects we analyze represent 72% of installed and under-construction utility-scale PV and CSP capacity in the United States.

  15. Observational estimates of radiative forcing due to land use change in southwest Australia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pielke, Roger A.

    this warming. Positive feedback effects, such as an increase in atmospheric water vapor, result in increased surface temper- atures, while negative feedback effects, such as increases in low-level cloudiness compared to native vegetation, especially during the time period between harvest and planting. Estimates

  16. Relationships among land ownership, land use, and landowner behavior changes in Gillespie and Washington Counties, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steinbach, Mark Shane

    2001-01-01

    kinds of fragmentation. This study focused on Gillespie and Washington Counties of Texas to attempt to discover landowner attitudes and behaviors related to parcelization and habitat fragmentation. A mail survey was used to assess landowner...

  17. Big Earth observation data analytics for land use and land cover change information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Camara, Gilberto

    .......................................................................................... 3 2.2 CONTRIBUTION TO COMPUTER SCIENCE: BIG DATA IN GEOINFORMATICS

  18. Subsurface thermal effects of land use changes Daniela Nitoiu and Hugo Beltrami

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beltrami, Hugo

    ] The International Heat Flow Commission global geothermal data set contains over 10,000 borehole temperature logs-order approach in terms of ground surface temperatures (GSTs) to attempt to correct borehole temperature data could allow many borehole data to be incorporated into the borehole climatology database and

  19. Comparison of land use change models with focus on spatial and temporal frameworks and data issues

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clarke, Keith

    Other Urban (Open space, Transportation) Cropland Agriculture Orchard Deciduous Forest Evergreen Non kinds of data with high thematic requirements 4. Focus of my research: Mapping of urban areas using services and office Light industry/warehousing Heavy industryIndustrial Industrial/Research park URBAN

  20. Short communication Land use change patterns in the Rio de la Plata grasslands: The influence of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nacional de San Luis, Universidad

    (Pielke and Avissar, 1990). Biodiversity is directly affected by LULCC, through the effect of agricultural practices on specific populations (Mattison and Norris, 2005) and habitat losses (Foley et al., 2008 with the introduction of domestic cattle brought by European conquerors and it was accelerated with century XIX farming

  1. Carbon Accounting and Economic Model Uncertainty of Emissions from Biofuels-Induced Land Use Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plevin, Richard J; Beckman, Jayson; Golub, Alla A; Witcover, Julie; O'??Hare, Michael

    2015-01-01

    of U.S. Croplands for Biofuels Increases Greenhouse GasesLife-Cycle Assessment of Biofuels. Environmental Science &cellulosic ethanol. Biotechnol Biofuels 6 (1), 51. Elliott,

  2. Research papers Effects of land use change and sediment mobilization on coastal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Centro de Investigaciones Energe´ticas y Medioambientales (CIEMAT), Avda. Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid

  3. The Relationship between Land Use and Temperature Change in Dallas County, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Hee Ju

    2010-10-12

    different temperature averages and those patterns were observed similarly in both 2000 and 2005. Parking, airport, commercial, industrial, and residential areas have relatively high temperatures. In contrast, water, undeveloped area and parks showed...

  4. Mitigation Options in Forestry, Land-Use, Change and Biomass Burning in Africa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Makundi, Willy R.

    1998-01-01

    reduces emissions. (iii) Bio-energy Initiatives These wouldThe mitigation options in the bio-energy field will mainlyof such programs in the bio-energy field. The experiences of

  5. Land use change in Maasailand drivers, dynamics and impacts on largeherbivores and agro-pastoralism 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Msoffe, Fortunata Urban

    2010-11-24

    The Maasailand of Kenya and Tanzania supports one of the richest wildlife populations remaining on Earth. However, over the last century, Maasailand has experienced land transformation notably through conversion of former ...

  6. Greenhouse gas policy influences climate via direct effects of land-use change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, A.D.

    2014-01-01

    in the Community Earth System Model (CESM1):  Seasonal within the Integrated Earth System Model, which couples theuse Model, and Community Earth System Model. The alternative

  7. Forecasting land use change and its environmental impact at a watershed scale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , but significantly increase losses of oil and grease and certain heavy metals in runoff. The spatial variation, heavy metals, sediment, oil and grease, pesticides, and fecal coliform bacteria. These pollutants

  8. Understanding and Mapping Land-Use and Land-Cover Change along Bolivia's Corredor Bioceancio 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Redo, Daniel J.

    2011-08-08

    by linking household surveys and interviews with farmers; environmental, climatic, and political data; and classified satellite imagery. Overall, large-scale deforestation has occurred along the Corredor Bioceanico for mechanized commercial production of oil...

  9. Some Historical Changes in the Patterns of Population and Land Use in the Hudson River

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Limburg, Karin E.

    and market forces. Finally, available records list nearly 800 dams, ranging from 0.6 m to 213 m (Ashokan of dams, largely since the time of European colonization. Population within the watershed has grown from by agriculture, forest use, and dam construction, leaving such topics as industrialization and urbaniza- tion

  10. Change in the Land Use System in Bhutan: Ecology, History, Culture, and Power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wangchuk, Tashi

    2000-01-01

    minority to the free peasants. Others were zasen or slaves as explained above. Ura distinguishes them from the drap: 'zab [zasen] were in a worse situation: they worked entirely for the master who gave them only food and clothes.' Thus, a mixture... , impinge, dominate, yield, and disappear in this kaleidoscope. The vast majority of the inhabitants we never see, because they are too small and obscure: creepy-crawlies, immense in diversity, from insects to fungi and bacteria. All together...

  11. Modeling the effect of land cover land use change on estuarine environmental flows 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sahoo, Debabrata

    2009-05-15

    Watershed. 1.2 Background The present study area, San Antonio River Basin, covers approximately 10, 826 km2. The river runs approximately 405 river km through four different counties. Major tributaries to this river are Leon Creek, Salado Creek..., agencies such as TWDB, and TPWD have used optimization techniques and hydrodynamic modeling to quantify coastal freshwater inflows requirement. Several agencies such as USGS, San Antonio Water Systems (SAWS), and San Antonio River Authority (SARA...

  12. Carbon Accounting and Economic Model Uncertainty of Emissions from Biofuels-Induced Land Use Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plevin, Richard J; Beckman, Jayson; Golub, Alla A; Witcover, Julie; O'??Hare, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Impacts of United States Biofuel Policies: The Importance ofcoproduct substitution in the biofuel era. Agribusiness 27 (CGE: assessing the EU biofuel mandates with the MIRAGE-BioF

  13. Carbon Accounting and Economic Model Uncertainty of Emissions from Biofuels-Induced Land Use Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plevin, Richard J; Beckman, Jayson; Golub, Alla A; Witcover, Julie; O'??Hare, Michael

    2015-01-01

    an increase in biofuel production. According to several;emissions from ILUC. Biofuel production also affects foodfrom increased biofuel production. AEZ- EF takes the GTAP

  14. Climate Change Mitigation Through Land-Use Measures in the Agriculture and

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (Utility Company) Jump to:NewMinnesota: EnergyVirginia:Forestry Sectors | Open

  15. INTERNATIONAL REGIONAL SCIENCE REVIEW (Vol. 25, No. 2, 2002)Walker et al. / LAND USE IN FOREST FRONTIERS LAND USE AND LAND COVER CHANGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Robert T.

    for inputs (including labor), outputs, and capital. The risk model is specified and estimated, using survey institutional environment of tropical frontiers. In particular, it poses a risk minimization model

  16. Institutional Change Process for Sustainability | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i nA Guide toIMPROVEMENT OFBarriersInstitutional change integrates

  17. Process for changing caking coals to noncaking coals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Beeson, Justin L. (Woodridge, IL)

    1980-01-01

    Caking coals are treated in a slurry including alkaline earth metal hydroxides at moderate pressures and temperatures in air to form noncaking carbonaceous material. Hydroxides such as calcium hydroxide, magnesium hydroxide or barium hydroxide are contemplated for slurrying with the coal to interact with the agglomerating constituents. The slurry is subsequently dewatered and dried in air at atmospheric pressure to produce a nonagglomerating carbonaceous material that can be conveniently handled in various coal conversion and combustion processes.

  18. PROCESS TO ADD NEW PROGRAMS AND PLANS IN ISIS For policy changes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Lowell, University of

    PROCESS TO ADD NEW PROGRAMS AND PLANS IN ISIS For policy changes 1. An academic Department changes in iSiS and in the appropriate academic catalogues with notification to all interested parties and the Department of Higher Education the registrar will make necessary changes in iSiS and in the appropriate

  19. Change Management in Enterprise IT Systems: Process Modeling and Capacity-optimal Scheduling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sarkar, Saswati

    Change Management in Enterprise IT Systems: Process Modeling and Capacity-optimal Scheduling of the optimal fluid scheduling policy, which is well suited for application to a real change management system management ­ or handling of problem diagnosis and root cause analysis, and (ii) Change management ­ or timely

  20. Title: York University building outlines with heights and clutter (land use) data Data Creator /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Title: York University building outlines with heights and clutter (land use) data Data Creator(s): April 2010 Updates: N/A Abstract: Data consists of: 3D Building Outlines in the York University Keele. Clutter data categories include: 1 Inland Water 2 Open 3 Low tree density 4 High Tree density 5 Buildings

  1. ANL/AA-19 Land Use and Energy K. E. Robeck, S. W. Ballou, D....

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Matheny. CONTENTS EXECUTIVE SUMMARY xi ABSTRACT 1 1 INTRODUCTION 1 2 EXTRACTION 9 2.1 Coal 9 2.1.1 Land Requirements 11 2.1.2 Past and Future Land Use 13 2.2 Oil and Oil Shale 16...

  2. Lessons Learned in Developing and Applying Land Use Model Systems: A Parcel-based Example

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kockelman, Kara M.

    pricing scenario (incorporating congestion tolls on freeways and carbon taxes on all roads of road pricing- and trend-scenario results for the Austin, Texas region highlight how policies may shape land and travel futures. While the road pricing policy did not alter land use intensity patterns

  3. City-wide relationships between green spaces, urban land use and topography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Queensland, University of

    City-wide relationships between green spaces, urban land use and topography Richard G. Davies in urban form and topography. The total area of buildings and length of the road network are equally strong-cover. Topography. Urban form Urban Ecosyst (2008) 11:269­287 DOI 10.1007/s11252-008-0062-y R. G. Davies :O. Barbosa

  4. Land use and habitat gradients determine bird community diversity and abundance in suburban, rural

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, David D.

    Land use and habitat gradients determine bird community diversity and abundance in suburban, rural, with reserves slightly below rural. Although reserves were like rural lands in diversity of bird communities bird communities, but differed in grassland and savanna bird communities. The extensive rural forests

  5. Reconciling Agency and Structure in Empirical Analysis: Smallholder Land Use in the Southern

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roy Chowdhury, Rinku

    , a development frontier and environmental conservation region. The land-use strategies of mixed sub- sistence-market and production sectors, and the po- tential explanatory power that may be gained from their union. This article to the behavior of land managers, who, after all, are the critical agents modifying or transforming the landscape

  6. MAE 124/ESYS 103 Discussion: Week 9 Buildings, Building Codes, Land Use

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gille, Sarah T.

    MAE 124/ESYS 103 Discussion: Week 9 Buildings, Building Codes, Land Use 0. Let's consider apartment complex under construction August 1, 2003 "If you build it we will burn it. The E.L.F.s are mad of life and the planet." Is ELF pursuing a sustainable "smart growth" strategy? 2. Is open space near

  7. Ecological perspectives of land use history: The Arid Lands Ecology (ALE) Reserve

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hinds, N R; Rogers, L E

    1991-07-01

    The objective of this study was to gather information on the land use history of the Arid Land Ecology (ALE) Reserve so that current ecological research could be placed within a historical perspective. The data were gathered in the early 1980s by interviewing former users of the land and from previously published research (where available). Interviews with former land users of the ALE Reserve in Benton County, Washington, revealed that major land uses from 1880 to 1940 were homesteading, grazing, oil/gas production, and road building. Land use practices associated with grazing and homesteading have left the greatest impact on the landscape. Disturbed sites where succession is characterized by non-native species, plots where sagebrush was railed away, and sheep trails are major indications today of past land uses. Recent estimates of annual bunchgrass production do ALE do not support the widespread belief that bunchgrass were more productive during the homesteading era, though the invasion of cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum), Jim Hill mustard (Sisymbrium altissium), and other European alien plant species has altered pre-settlement succession patterns. 15 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Economic and Physical Modeling of Land Use in GCAM 3.0 and an Application to Agricultural Productivity, Land, and Terrestrial Carbon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wise, Marshall A.; Calvin, Katherine V.; Kyle, G. Page; Luckow, Patrick; Edmonds, James A.

    2014-09-01

    We explore the impact of changes in agricultural productivity on global land use and terrestrial carbon using the new agriculture and land use modeling approach developed for Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM) version 3.0. This approach models economic land use decisions with regional, physical, and technological specificity while maintaining economic and physical integration with the rest of the GCAM model. Physical land characteristics and quantities are tracked explicitly, and crop production practices are modeled discretely to facilitate coupling with physical models. Economic land allocation is modeled with non-linear functions in a market equilibrium rather than through a constrained optimization. In this paper, we explore three scenarios of future agriculture productivity in all regions of the globe over this century, ranging from a high growth to a zero growth level. The higher productivity growth scenario leads to lower crop prices, increased production of crops in developing nations, preservation of global forested lands and lower terrestrial carbon emissions. The scenario with no productivity improvement results in higher crop prices, an expansion of crop production in the developed world, loss of forested lands globally, and higher terrestrial carbon emissions.

  9. Phase Change Heat Transfer Device for Process Heat Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piyush Sabharwall; Mike Patterson; Vivek Utgikar; Fred Gunnerson

    2010-10-01

    The next generation nuclear plant (NGNP) will most likely produce electricity and process heat, with both being considered for hydrogen production. To capture nuclear process heat, and transport it to a distant industrial facility requires a high temperature system of heat exchangers, pumps and/or compressors. The heat transfer system is particularly challenging not only due to the elevated temperatures (up to approx.1300 K) and industrial scale power transport (=50MW), but also due to a potentially large separation distance between the nuclear and industrial plants (100+m) dictated by safety and licensing mandates. The work reported here is the preliminary analysis of two-phase thermosyphon heat transfer performance with alkali metals. A thermosyphon is a thermal device for transporting heat from one point to another with quite extraordinary properties. In contrast to single-phased forced convective heat transfer via ‘pumping a fluid’, a thermosyphon (also called a wickless heat pipe) transfers heat through the vaporization/condensing process. The condensate is further returned to the hot source by gravity, i.e., without any requirement of pumps or compressors. With this mode of heat transfer, the thermosyphon has the capability to transport heat at high rates over appreciable distances, virtually isothermally and without any requirement for external pumping devices. Two-phase heat transfer by a thermosyphon has the advantage of high enthalpy transport that includes the sensible heat of the liquid, the latent heat of vaporization, and vapor superheat. In contrast, single-phase forced convection transports only the sensible heat of the fluid. Additionally, vapor-phase velocities within a thermosyphon are much greater than single-phase liquid velocities within a forced convective loop. Thermosyphon performance can be limited by the sonic limit (choking) of vapor flow and/or by condensate entrainment. Proper thermosyphon requires analysis of both.

  10. Modeling Long-Range Transportation and Land Use Scenarios for the Sacramento Region, Using Citizen-Generated Policies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnston, Robert A.; Gao, Shengyi; Clay, Michael J.

    2008-01-01

    Barra. Comparison from the Sacramento Model Testbed. Transp.Management Policies in the Sacramento Region: Year Two.Land Use Scenarios for the Sacramento Region, Using Citizen-

  11. File:01-FD-b - LandUsePlanAmendmentProcess.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, AlabamaETEC GmbHFarinello GeothermalFideris IncFile FTP DocumentFD-b -

  12. Bureau of Land Management - Table 1.4-1 - Land Use Planning Process Steps |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmentalBowerbank, Maine: EnergyEnergyOhio: EnergyNorth Dakota:HillE-FormsWebOpen Energy

  13. Biomedical Signal Processing Hsun-Hsien Chang and Jose M. F. Moura

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moura, José

    1 Biomedical Signal Processing Hsun-Hsien Chang and Jos´e M. F. Moura I. INTRODUCTION Biomedical, to neural and cardiac rhythms, to tissue and organ images. Biomedical signal processing aims at extracting significant information from biomedical signals. With the aid of biomedical signal processing, biologists can

  14. Application of satellite and GIS technologies for land-cover and land-use mapping at the rural-urban fringe - A case study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Treitz, P.M.; Howarth, P.J.; Gong, Peng )

    1992-04-01

    SPOT HRV multispectral and panchromatic data were recorded and coregistered for a portion of the rural-urban fringe of Toronto, Canada. A two-stage digital analysis algorithm incorporating a spectral-class frequency-based contextual classification of eight land-cover and land-use classes resulted in an overall Kappa coefficient of 82.2 percent for training-area data and a Kappa coefficient of 70.3 percent for test-area data. A matrix-overlay analysis was then performed within the geographic information system (GIS) to combine the land-cover and land-use classes generated from the SPOT digital classification with zoning information for the area. The map that was produced has an estimated interpretation accuracy of 78 percent. Global Positioning System (GPS) data provided a positional reference for new road networks. These networks, in addition to the new land-cover and land-use map derived from the SPOT HRV data, provide an up-to-date synthesis of change conditions in the area. 51 refs.

  15. Land Use Manager Application Ensures Protectiveness Following Remediation on the Oak Ridge Reservation - 13355

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garland, Sid; Brown, Sally; Sims, Lynn [Restoration Services, Inc., P.O. Box 4699, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States)] [Restoration Services, Inc., P.O. Box 4699, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Darby, Jason [U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Environmental Management, Oak Ridge Site (United States)] [U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Environmental Management, Oak Ridge Site (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Long-term stewardship is the set of activities necessary to return contaminated land to safe and beneficial use. The activities include physical and legal controls to prevent inappropriate exposure to contamination left in place at a site. It is the longest phase of the Department of Energy's Environmental Management Program and ensures the protection of human health and the environment for varied end uses. At the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge Reservation an automated program has been developed and implemented that tracks the multitude of long-term stewardship activities. The Oak Ridge Reservation is a large site that currently has over 50 actions requiring long-term stewardship activities. The Oak Ridge Reservation consists primarily of three plant sites, and long-term stewardship will enable these sites to be leased to private entities (East Tennessee Technology Park), modernized for an evolving national security mission (Y-12 National Security Complex), and revitalized to continue multi-disciplinary research (Oak Ridge National Laboratory). The varied site end uses of the individual plant sites coupled with the multitude of controls required by leaving waste in place presents challenges. A single remedial action may include surveillance and maintenance activities, media monitoring, property record notices as well as physical controls such as fences and signs. Thus, the array of long-term stewardship activities is complex and intermingled (over 200 inspections each year at various frequencies are required currently) and requires an effective tracking program, termed the Land Use Manager. The Land Use Manager is a web-based data management application for use by personnel responsible for implementing, maintaining, and verifying engineering and land use controls on the Oak Ridge Reservation. The program is a data entry and tracking tool, as well as a notification tool. The status and performance of engineering and land use controls are checked annually for evaluation in the required Remediation Effectiveness Report, and the automated Land Use Manager collects, maintains, tracks, notifies, monitors, and manages the information necessary to perform this evaluation. Land Use Manager tracks site information including type of contamination, regulatory requirements, locates land use controls; provides information on inspections, certification, and reporting; and provides reports. Most data access features, e.g., view, print, query, and download, are available to all users; however, data input, updating, and editing are restricted to the personnel directly responsible for monitoring and inspection. The Land Use Manager application was developed for the Department of Energy Oak Ridge Office by URS - CH2M Oak Ridge LLC, Restoration Services Incorporated, and MIJARA Corporation to meet the specific needs of long-term stewardship tracking on the Oak Ridge Reservation. The successful implementation of long-term stewardship enables the future government and private activities being planned on the Oak Ridge Reservation to proceed. (authors)

  16. Meeting the Demand for Biofuels: Impact on Land Use and Carbon Mitigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khanna, Madhu; Jain, Atul; Onal, Hayri; Scheffran, Jurgen; Chen, Xiaoguang; Erickson, Matt; Huang, Haixiao; Kang, Seungmo.

    2011-08-14

    The purpose of this research was to develop an integrated, interdisciplinary framework to investigate the implications of large scale production of biofuels for land use, crop production, farm income and greenhouse gases. In particular, we examine the mix of feedstocks that would be viable for biofuel production and the spatial allocation of land required for producing these feedstocks at various gasoline and carbon emission prices as well as biofuel subsidy levels. The implication of interactions between energy policy that seeks energy independence from foreign oil and climate policy that seeks to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions for the optimal mix of biofuels and land use will also be investigated. This project contributes to the ELSI research goals of sustainable biofuel production while balancing competing demands for land and developing policy approaches needed to support biofuel production in a cost-effective and environmentally friendly manner.

  17. 1 Forecasting Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Urban Regions: 2 Microsimulation of Land Use and Transport Patterns in Austin, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kockelman, Kara M.

    use electricity, natural gas and other energy sources regularly52 for space conditioning and powering1 Forecasting Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Urban Regions: 2 Microsimulation of Land Use 2030 household energy 26 demands and GHG emissions estimates are compared under five different land use

  18. The influence of land-use composition on fecal contamination of riverine source water in southern British Columbia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mazumder, Asit

    The influence of land-use composition on fecal contamination of riverine source water in southern to become contaminated with pathogens is related to the production and transport of fecal waste from within the local catchment area. Identifying specific relationships between land-use types and fecal contamination

  19. Using soft-systems methods to evaluate the outputs from multi-objective land use planning tools

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coello, Carlos A. Coello

    of soft-systems based analysis of land-use planning tool outputs is recommended, not only for evaluating? This paper reports on a soft-systems based evaluation of the multi-objective land-use planning tools within-off between objectives. The paper then details the soft- systems-based evaluation strategy. Land managers

  20. Bayesian wavelet approaches for parameter estimation and change point detection in long memory processes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ko, Kyungduk

    2005-11-01

    The main goal of this research is to estimate the model parameters and to detect multiple change points in the long memory parameter of Gaussian ARFIMA(p, d, q) processes. Our approach is Bayesian and inference is done on ...

  1. City form and changing process : the case of the North End, Boston, 1860-1930

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rashid, Mahbub

    1993-01-01

    This thesis originated from the assumption that the effects of time on city form involve complex processes and are closely related to different physical and social factors where human beings as changing agents play only a ...

  2. Climate Change Scenario Planning in Alaska's National Parks: Stakeholder Involvement in the Decision-Making Process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernst, Kathleen M; Van Riemsdijk, Dr. Micheline

    2013-01-01

    This article studies the participation of stakeholders in climate change decision-making in Alaska s National Parks. We place stakeholder participation within literatures on environmental and climate change decision-making. We conducted participant observation and interviews in two planning workshops to investigate the decision-making process, and our findings are three-fold. First, the inclusion of diverse stakeholders expanded climate change decision-making beyond National Park Service (NPS) institutional constraints. Second, workshops of the Climate Change Scenario Planning Project (CCSPP) enhanced institutional understandings of participants attitudes towards climate change and climate change decision-making. Third, the geographical context of climate change influences the decision-making process. As the first regional approach to climate change decision-making within the NPS, the CCSPP serves as a model for future climate change planning in public land agencies. This study shows how the participation of stakeholders can contribute to robust decisions, may move climate change decision-making beyond institutional barriers, and can provide information about attitudes towards climate change decision-making.

  3. Climate change scenario planning in Alaska's National Parks: Stakeholder involvement in the decision-making process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernst, Kathleen M; Van Riemsdijk, Dr. Micheline

    2013-01-01

    This article studies the participation of stakeholders in climate change decision-making in Alaska s National Parks. We place stakeholder participation within literatures on environmental and climate change decision-making. We conducted participant observation and interviews in two planning workshops to investigate the decision-making process, and our findings are three-fold. First, the inclusion of diverse stakeholders expanded climate change decision-making beyond National Park Service (NPS) institutional constraints. Second, workshops of the Climate Change Scenario Planning Project (CCSPP) enhanced institutional understandings of participants attitudes towards climate change and climate change decision-making. Third, the geographical context of climate change influences the decisionmaking process. As the first regional approach to climate change decision-making within the NPS, the CCSPP serves as a model for future climate change planning in public land agencies. This study shows how the participation of stakeholders can contribute to robust decisions, may move climate change decision-making beyond institutional barriers, and can provide information about attitudes towards climate change decision-making.

  4. Governing Change: An Institutional Geography of Rural Land Use, Environmental Management, and Change in the North Coastal Basin of California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Short, Anne Garrity

    2010-01-01

    activities. The NPS pollution management plan outlined inadopt particular pollution control management measures, aregovernance and management of sediment pollution associated

  5. Governing Change: An Institutional Geography of Rural Land Use, Environmental Management, and Change in the North Coastal Basin of California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Short, Anne Garrity

    2010-01-01

    for timber harvests and other water quality regulations. HeState Water Resources Control Board THP: Timber Harvest Planharvests), and alteration of the streambed and flow (e.g. , water

  6. Governing Change: An Institutional Geography of Rural Land Use, Environmental Management, and Change in the North Coastal Basin of California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Short, Anne Garrity

    2010-01-01

    Decentralization." In Environmental Policy, eds. N. J. Vig &Regulation." In Environmental Policy, eds. N. J. Vig & M. E.Review." In Environmental Policy, eds. N. J. Vig & M. E.

  7. Governing Change: An Institutional Geography of Rural Land Use, Environmental Management, and Change in the North Coastal Basin of California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Short, Anne Garrity

    2010-01-01

    effects of marijuana production illegible to natural resourceeffects of marijuana production and the governance response by natural resourceand effects of marijuana cultivation. The natural resource

  8. Governing Change: An Institutional Geography of Rural Land Use, Environmental Management, and Change in the North Coastal Basin of California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Short, Anne Garrity

    2010-01-01

    areas, • Deposit construction waste away from streams, •on their land: deposit construction waste away from streams,to stable areas Deposit construction waste away from streams

  9. A state-impact-state methodology for assessing environmental impact in land use planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Longgao; Yang, Xiaoyan; Chen, Longqian; Potter, Rebecca; Li, Yingkui

    2014-04-01

    The implementation of land use planning (LUP) has a large impact on environmental quality. There lacks a widely accepted and consolidated approach to assess the LUP environmental impact using Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA). In this paper, we developed a state-impact-state (SIS) model employed in the LUP environmental impact assessment (LUPEA). With the usage of Matter-element (ME) and Extenics method, the methodology based on the SIS model was established and applied in the LUPEA of Zoucheng County, China. The results show that: (1) this methodology provides an intuitive and easy understanding logical model for both the theoretical analysis and application of LUPEA; (2) the spatial multi-temporal assessment from base year, near-future year to planning target year suggests the positive impact on the environmental quality in the whole County despite certain environmental degradation in some towns; (3) besides the spatial assessment, other achievements including the environmental elements influenced by land use and their weights, the identification of key indicators in LUPEA, and the appropriate environmental mitigation measures were obtained; and (4) this methodology can be used to achieve multi-temporal assessment of LUP environmental impact of County or Town level in other areas. - Highlights: • A State-Impact-State model for Land Use Planning Environmental Assessment (LUPEA). • Matter-element (ME) and Extenics methods were embedded in the LUPEA. • The model was applied to the LUPEA of Zoucheng County. • The assessment shows improving environment quality since 2000 in Zoucheng County. • The method provides a useful tool for the LUPEA in the county level.

  10. GIS-Based Cellular Automaton Model to allocate Kansas High Plains Irrigated Agriculture Land Use

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chiu, Peiwen

    2014-04-08

    GIS-Based Cellular Automaton Model to Allocate Irrigated Agriculture Land Use Peiwen Chiu Kansas State University GIS Day 2013 November 20, 2013 University of Kansas High Plains/Ogallala Aquifer 8 States 186,000 mi2 480,000 km2 http...://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2013/05/16/us/an-underground-pool-drying-up.html?ref=us Aquifer Decline When amount of water diverted in the zone of influence is greater than recharge, this will result decline in the water level in the Aquifer. Most concentrated irrigated...

  11. Linking Job/Housing Balance, Land Use Mix and Commute to Work 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raja, Afia Zubair 1979-

    2012-12-11

    stream_source_info RAJA-DISSERTATION-2012.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 190530 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name RAJA-DISSERTATION-2012.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859...-1 LINKING JOB/HOUSING BALANCE, LAND USE MIX AND COMMUTE TO WORK A Dissertation by AFIA ZUBAIR RAJA Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR...

  12. Land-Use Requirements for Solar Power Plants in the United States

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACTThousand CubicResourcelogo and mastheadLake CharlesLand-Use Requirements

  13. Mechanical property changes in porous low-k dielectric thin films during processing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stan, G., E-mail: gheorghe.stan@nist.gov; Gates, R. S. [Material Measurement Laboratory, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States); Kavuri, P. [Physical Measurement Laboratory, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States); Torres, J.; Michalak, D.; Ege, C.; Bielefeld, J.; King, S. W. [Logic Technology Development, Intel Corporation, Hillsboro, Oregon 97124 (United States)

    2014-10-13

    The design of future generations of Cu-low-k dielectric interconnects with reduced electronic crosstalk often requires engineering materials with an optimal trade off between their dielectric constant and elastic modulus. This is because the benefits associated with the reduction of the dielectric constant by increasing the porosity of materials, for example, can adversely affect their mechanical integrity during processing. By using load-dependent contact-resonance atomic force microscopy, the changes in the elastic modulus of low-k dielectric materials due to processing were accurately measured. These changes were linked to alterations sustained by the structure of low-k dielectric films during processing. A two-phase model was used for quantitative assessments of the elastic modulus changes undergone by the organosilicate skeleton of the structure of porous and pore-filled dielectrics.

  14. Modeling the per capita ecological footprint for Dallas County, Texas: Examining demographic, environmental value, land-use, and spatial influences 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryu, Hyung Cheal

    2005-08-29

    This study addresses factors driving the variation in the per capita Ecological Footprint (EF) in Dallas County, Texas. A main hypothesis was that scientifically estimated demography, environmental values, spatial attributes, and land-use patterns...

  15. The correlational and causal investigation into the land use-transportation relationships: evidence from the Dallas-Fort Worth metropolitan area 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Sangkug

    2006-10-30

    The role of land-use and related policies in reducing automobile dependence has been the subject of heated policy debate for over two decades. Previous research has shed light on the correlations between land-use and travel. ...

  16. Thermal challenges in MEMS applications: phase change phenomena and thermal bonding processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Liwei

    Thermal challenges in MEMS applications: phase change phenomena and thermal bonding processes Liwei, MC 1740, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA Abstract Two thermal challenges for current and next generation generate single, spherical and controllable thermal bubbles with diameters between 2 and 500 mm. Both

  17. Continuous planning refers to the process of planning in a world under continual change. Traditionally, as

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Veloso, Manuela M.

    Abstract Continuous planning refers to the process of planning in a world under continual change of the plans that are under construction. The major thesis of this paper, however, is that often it is necessary to modify the goals of the planner in addition to the plans themselves. We introduce the concept

  18. A universal power law and proportionate change process characterize the evolution of metabolic networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jain, Sanjay

    in metabolic network evolution. II. METABOLIC NETWORKS We downloaded a database of metabolic networks of 107A universal power law and proportionate change process characterize the evolution of metabolic distant species, we present results on the evolution of these networks over short as well as long time

  19. Investigating the Impact of Changes in Iteration-likelihoods on Design Process Performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shapiro, Daniel; Hamraz, Bahram; Sommer, Anita F.; Clarkson, P. John

    2015-01-01

    1 Investigating the Impact of Changes in Iteration-likelihoods on Design Process Performance Authors: Daniel Shapiro(1) (corresponding author, ds678@cam.ac.uk, +447922058809), Bahram Hamraz(2) (bh351@cam.ac.uk), Anita F. Sommer(1) (afs35@cam...

  20. A top-down assessment of energy, water and land use in uranium mining, milling, and refining

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    E. Schneider; B. Carlsen; E. Tavrides; C. van der Hoeven; U. Phathanapirom

    2013-11-01

    Land, water and energy use are key measures of the sustainability of uranium production into the future. As the most attractive, accessible deposits are mined out, future discoveries may prove to be significantly, perhaps unsustainably, more intensive consumers of environmental resources. A number of previous attempts have been made to provide empirical relationships connecting these environmental impact metrics to process variables such as stripping ratio and ore grade. These earlier attempts were often constrained by a lack of real world data and perform poorly when compared against data from modern operations. This paper conditions new empirical models of energy, water and land use in uranium mining, milling, and refining on contemporary data reported by operating mines. It shows that, at present, direct energy use from uranium production represents less than 1% of the electrical energy produced by the once-through fuel cycle. Projections of future energy intensity from uranium production are also possible by coupling the empirical models with estimates of uranium crustal abundance, characteristics of new discoveries, and demand. The projections show that even for the most pessimistic of scenarios considered, by 2100, the direct energy use from uranium production represents less than 3% of the electrical energy produced by the contemporary once-through fuel cycle.

  1. Process for CO2 Capture Using Ionic Liquid That Exhibits Phase Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eisinger, RS; Keller, GE

    2014-11-01

    A novel process for capturing carbon dioxide from the flue gas of a coal-fired power plant has been shown to reduce parasitic power consumption substantially. The process employs an ionic liquid created at the University of Notre Dame that has a high capacity for absorbing CO2 by chemical reaction. A distinguishing property of this ionic liquid is that it changes phase from solid to liquid upon reaction with CO2. The process uses heat generated by this phase transition to lower parasitic power consumption. The driving force for CO2 separation is a combination of temperature and pressure differences; the process could even work without the addition of heat. A realistic process was created to capture CO2 efficiently. Computer simulation of the process enabled calculation of viable process conditions and power usage. The main concepts of the process were shown to work using a lab-scale apparatus. Parasitic power consumes 23% of net power generation, 55% lower than that of the monoethanolamine (MEA) process. However, capital cost is higher. The cost of electricity (COE) is 28% lower than that of the MEA process.

  2. Sedimentary processes of the Red River between Denison Dam, TX and Alexandria, LA 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weirich, Thomas Moody - Kenyon

    1990-01-01

    the processes that govern the suspended sediment concentration of the Red River; processes which may impact river navigation and the operation of lock and dams currently being constructed on the Red River between Alexandria, LA and Shreveport, LA. Knowledge.... 2. changes in land use which have promoted erosion of the lands along the reach of the Red River between Index, AR and Shreveport, LA. 3. easily erodible fine grained fractions that may be present in, or outcrop immediately adjacent to, the Red...

  3. Evolution of Arability and Land Use, Sacramento–San Joaquin Delta, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deverel, Steven J.; Lucero, Christina E.; Bachand, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    N, Flick R. 2009. Climate change scenarios and sea levelfor the California 2009 climate change scenarios assessment.unknown (CA)]: California Climate Change Center. Deverel SJ,

  4. Image analysis for facility siting: a comparison of low- and high-altitude image interpretability for land use/land cover mapping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borella, H.M.; Estes, J.E.; Ezra, C.E.; Scepan, J.; Tinney, L.R.

    1982-01-01

    For two test sites in Pennsylvania the interpretability of commercially acquired low-altitude and existing high-altitude aerial photography are documented in terms of time, costs, and accuracy for Anderson Level II land use/land cover mapping. Information extracted from the imagery is to be used in the evaluation process for siting energy facilities. Land use/land cover maps were drawn at 1:24,000 scale using commercially flown color infrared photography obtained from the United States Geological Surveys' EROS Data Center. Detailed accuracy assessment of the maps generated by manual image analysis was accomplished employing a stratified unaligned adequate class representation. Both are-weighted and by-class accuracies were documented and field-verified. A discrepancy map was also drawn to illustrate differences in classifications between the two map scales. Results show that the 1:24,000 scale map set was accurate (99% to 94% area-weighted) than the 1:62,500 scale set, especially when sampled by class (96% to 66%). The 1:24,000 scale maps were also more time-consuming and costly to produce, due mainly to higher image acquisition costs.

  5. Quantifying long term changes in streamflow characteristics in Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garg, Gaurav

    2005-02-17

    and management projects, water use, watershed land use changes, and climate changes. The main objective of this thesis is to assess the significance of the impacts of human activities such as construction of reservoirs, water supply diversions, increased water... of aquatic life and riparian habitat. Streamflow characteristics change over time as a result of water resources development and management projects, water use, watershed land use changes, and climate changes. The impacts of human activities on low flows...

  6. Methods for improved forewarning of condition changes in monitoring physical processes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hively, Lee M.

    2013-04-09

    This invention teaches further improvements in methods for forewarning of critical events via phase-space dissimilarity analysis of data from biomedical equipment, mechanical devices, and other physical processes. One improvement involves objective determination of a forewarning threshold (U.sub.FW), together with a failure-onset threshold (U.sub.FAIL) corresponding to a normalized value of a composite measure (C) of dissimilarity; and providing a visual or audible indication to a human observer of failure forewarning and/or failure onset. Another improvement relates to symbolization of the data according the binary numbers representing the slope between adjacent data points. Another improvement relates to adding measures of dissimilarity based on state-to-state dynamical changes of the system. And still another improvement relates to using a Shannon entropy as the measure of condition change in lieu of a connected or unconnected phase space.

  7. Land Use and Land Cover Analyses from the North Coast of Puerto Rico Using AVIRIS Images: from Arecibo to Quebradillas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbes, Fernando

    1 Land Use and Land Cover Analyses from the North Coast of Puerto Rico Using AVIRIS Images: from INTRODUCTION Image spectroscopy is the practice that collects images with a sensor that measures the energy and reflectance characteristics from the different materials. This new tool is used to map specific material

  8. The influence of geology and land use on arsenic in stream sediments and ground waters in New England, USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The influence of geology and land use on arsenic in stream sediments and ground waters in New England, USA Gilpin R. Robinson Jr. a,*, Joseph D. Ayotte b a US Geological Survey, 954 National Center, Reston, VA 20192, United States b US Geological Survey, 361 Commerce Way, Pembroke, NH 03275-3719, United

  9. Variation of surficial soil hydraulic properties across land uses in the southern Blue Ridge Mountains, North Carolina, USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Teskey, Robert O.

    distribution, in situ saturated hydraulic conductivity (measured using an Amoozemeter com- pact constant headVariation of surficial soil hydraulic properties across land uses in the southern Blue Ridge of Geography, 204 GG Building, The University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602-2502, United States b Ecosystems

  10. Linkages among land use, macronutrient levels, and soil erosion in northern Vietnam: A plot-scale study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacDonald, Lee

    Linkages among land use, macronutrient levels, and soil erosion in northern Vietnam: A plot, Japan e Forest Resources and Environmental Management Faculty, Vietnam Forestry University, Xuan Mai, Chuong My, Hanoi, Vietnam f Science Devision, Department of Science, IT, Innovation and the Arts, GPO Box

  11. Identifying Potential Land Use-derived Solute Sources to Stream Baseflow Using Ground Water Models and GIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to assess the impact of different baseflow solute contributions to surface water chemistry. Numerous field systems, locations of oil brine fields and high- density human populations) likely exist. Impacts of otherBoutt 1 Identifying Potential Land Use-derived Solute Sources to Stream Baseflow Using Ground Water

  12. Archaeology in the Kilauea East Rift Zone: Part 1, Land-use model and research design, Kapoho, Kamaili and Kilauea Geothermal Subzones, Puna District, Hawaii Island

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burtchard, G.C.; Moblo, P.

    1994-07-01

    The Puna Geothermal Resource Subzones (GRS) project area encompasses approximately 22,000 acres centered on the Kilauea East Rift Zone in Puna District, Hawaii Island. The area is divided into three subzones proposed for geothermal power development -- Kilauea Middle East Rift, Kamaili and Kapoho GRS. Throughout the time of human occupation, eruptive episodes along the rift have maintained a dynamic landscape. Periodic volcanic events, for example, have changed the coastline configuration, altered patterns of agriculturally suitable sediments, and created an assortment of periodically active, periodically quiescent, volcanic hazards. Because of the active character of the rift zone, then, the area`s occupants have always been obliged to organize their use of the landscape to accommodate a dynamic mosaic of lava flow types and ages. While the specific configuration of settlements and agricultural areas necessarily changed in response to volcanic events, it is possible to anticipate general patterns in the manner in which populations used the landscape through time. This research design offers a model that predicts the spatial results of long-term land-use patterns and relates them to the character of the archaeological record of that use. In essence, the environmental/land-use model developed here predicts that highest population levels, and hence the greatest abundance and complexity of identifiable prehistoric remains, tended to cluster near the coast at places that maximized access to productive fisheries and agricultural soils. With the possible exception of a few inland settlements, the density of archaeological remains expected to decrease with distance from the coastline. The pattern is generally supported in the regions existing ethnohistoric and archaeological record.

  13. Global environmental change: Its nature and impact

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hidore, J.J.

    1996-12-31

    This book is intended as an entry-level textbook on environmental science for nonscience majors. Twenty chapters address topics from historical geology and climatic change to population dynamics, land-use, water pollution, ozone depletion and biodiversity, global warming.

  14. Verifying the Accuracy of Land Use Models Used in Transportation and Air Quality: A Case Study in the Sacramento, California Region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodier, Caroline J.

    2005-01-01

    A Case Study in the Sacramento Region (Ph.D. Dissertation,Analysis using the Sacramento MEPLAN Land Use Transportationin the MEPLAN model of Sacramento. ” Transportation Research

  15. Modeling the impact of agricultural land use and management on US carbon budgets

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Drewniak, B. A.; Mishra, U.; Song, J.; Prell, J.; Kotamarthi, V. R.

    2014-09-22

    Cultivation of the terrestrial land surface can create either a source or sink of atmospheric CO2, depending on land management practices. The Community Land Model (CLM) provides a useful tool to explore how land use and management impact the soil carbon pool at regional to global scales. CLM was recently updated to include representation of managed lands growing maize, soybean, and spring wheat. In this study, CLM-Crop is used to investigate the impacts of various management practices, including fertilizer use and differential rates of crop residue removal, on the soil organic carbon (SOC) storage of croplands in the continental Unitedmore »States over approximately a 170 year period. Results indicate that total US SOC stocks have already lost over 8 Pg C (10%) due to land cultivation practices (e.g., fertilizer application, cultivar choice, and residue removal), compared to a land surface composed of native vegetation (i.e., grasslands). After long periods of cultivation, individual plots growing maize and soybean lost up to 65% of the carbon stored, compared to a grassland site. Crop residue management showed the greatest effect on soil carbon storage, with low and medium residue returns resulting in additional losses of 5% and 3.5%, respectively, in US carbon storage, while plots with high residue returns stored 2% more carbon. Nitrogenous fertilizer can alter the amount of soil carbon stocks significantly. Under current levels of crop residue return, not applying fertilizer resulted in a 5% loss of soil carbon. Our simulations indicate that disturbance through cultivation will always result in a loss of soil carbon, and management practices will have a large influence on the magnitude of SOC loss.« less

  16. Modeling the impact of agricultural land use and management on US carbon budgets

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Drewniak, B. A.; Mishra, U.; Song, J.; Prell, J.; Kotamarthi, V. R.

    2015-04-09

    Cultivation of the terrestrial land surface can create either a source or sink of atmospheric CO2, depending on land management practices. The Community Land Model (CLM) provides a useful tool for exploring how land use and management impact the soil carbon pool at regional to global scales. CLM was recently updated to include representation of managed lands growing maize, soybean, and spring wheat. In this study, CLM-Crop is used to investigate the impacts of various management practices, including fertilizer use and differential rates of crop residue removal, on the soil organic carbon (SOC) storage of croplands in the continental Unitedmore »States over approximately a 170-year period. Results indicate that total US SOC stocks have already lost over 8 Pg C (10%) due to land cultivation practices (e.g., fertilizer application, cultivar choice, and residue removal), compared to a land surface composed of native vegetation (i.e., grasslands). After long periods of cultivation, individual subgrids (the equivalent of a field plot) growing maize and soybean lost up to 65% of the carbon stored compared to a grassland site. Crop residue management showed the greatest effect on soil carbon storage, with low and medium residue returns resulting in additional losses of 5 and 3.5%, respectively, in US carbon storage, while plots with high residue returns stored 2% more carbon. Nitrogenous fertilizer can alter the amount of soil carbon stocks significantly. Under current levels of crop residue return, not applying fertilizer resulted in a 5% loss of soil carbon. Our simulations indicate that disturbance through cultivation will always result in a loss of soil carbon, and management practices will have a large influence on the magnitude of SOC loss.« less

  17. A new scenario framework for climate change research: background, process, and future directions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ebi, Kristie L.; Hallegatte, Stephane; Kram, Tom; Arnell, Nigel; Carter, Tim; Edmonds, James A.; Kriegler, Elmar; Mathur, Ritu; O'Neill, Brian; Riahi, Keywan; Winkler, Harald; Van Vuuren, Detlef; Zwickel, Timm

    2014-02-01

    The scientific community is developing new integrated global, regional, and sectoral scenarios to facilitate interdisciplinary research and assessment to explore the range of possible future climates and related physical changes could pose to human and natural systems; how these could interact with social, economic, and environmental development pathways; the degree to which mitigation and adaptation policies can avoid and reduce those risks; the costs and benefits of various policy mixes; residual impacts under alternative pathways; and the relationship with sustainable development. This paper provides the background to, and process of, developing the conceptual framework for these scenarios, described in three other papers in this Special Issue (van Vuuren et al.; O'Neill et al.; Kriegler et al.). The paper also discusses research needs to further develop and apply this framework. The goal is to encourage climate change researchers from a broad range of perspectives and disciplines to work together to develop policy-relevant scenarios and explore the implications of different possible futures for the challenges and opportunities human and natural systems could face with increasing climate change.

  18. Uniqueness of the Fock quantization of scalar fields and processes with signature change in cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laura Castelló Gomar; Guillermo A. Mena Marugán

    2014-03-27

    We study scalar fields subject to an equation of the Klein-Gordon type in nonstationary spacetimes, such as those found in cosmology, assuming that all the relevant spatial dependence is contained in the Laplacian. We show that the field description ---with a specific canonical pair--- and the Fock representation for the quantization of the field are fixed indeed in a unique way (except for unitary transformations that do not affect the physical predictions) if we adopt the combined criterion of (a) imposing the invariance of the vacuum under the group of spatial symmetries of the field equations and (b) requiring a unitary implementation of the dynamics in the quantum theory. Besides, we provide a spacetime interpretation of the field equations as those corresponding to a scalar field in a cosmological spacetime that is conformally ultrastatic. In addition, in the privileged Fock quantization, we investigate the generalization of the evolution of physical states from the hyperbolic dynamical regime to an elliptic regime. In order to do this, we contemplate the possibility of processes with signature change in the spacetime where the field propagates and discuss the behavior of the background geometry when the change happens, proving that the spacetime metric degenerates. Finally, we argue that this kind of signature change leads naturally to a phenomenon of particle creation, with exponential production.

  19. CONSEQUENCES OF CHANGING CLIMATE AND LAND USE TO 100-YEAR FLOODING LAMPREY RIVER WATERSHED OF NEW HAMPSHIRE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OF NEW HAMPSHIRE BY ANN M. SCHOLZ B.S. Applied Science and Technology, Charter Oak State College, 1998 THESIS Submitted to the University of New Hampshire in Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements deserve mention for their value in enabling me to pursue this research at the University of New Hampshire

  20. Irrigation cooling effect: Regional climate forcing by land-use change Lara M. Kueppers,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kueppers, Lara M.

    records has mostly focused on the influence of urban heat islands. Here we use a regional climate model to show that a regional irrigation cooling effect (ICE) exists, opposite in sign to urban heat island on the influence of urban heat islands [Kalnay and Cai, 2003; Parker, 2004; Trenberth, 2004]. However, irrigated

  1. A Conceptual Framework for Estimating Bioenerg-Related Land-Use Change and Its Impacts over Time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delucchi, Mark

    2009-01-01

    and so on. ) Surface coal mining, for example, destroysfossil-fuel production system, surface coal mining.I estimate that surface coal mining produces about 10,000

  2. A Conceptual Framework for Estimating Bioenerg-Related Land-Use Change and Its Impacts over Time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delucchi, Mark

    2009-01-01

    P. Börjesson, “Good or Bad Bioethanol from a GreenhouseEfficiency in European Bioethanol Production for Automotive

  3. Modeling urban growth and land use/land cover change in the Houston Metropolitan Area from 2002 - 2030 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oguz, Hakan

    2005-08-29

    for the period from 2002 to 2030 is predicted. Within SLEUTH, growth in the Houston CMSA is predominately "organic" with most growth occurring along the urban/rural fringe. Projected increases in urban area from 2002 to 2030 parallel projected increases...

  4. Center for BioEnergy Sustainability http://www.ornl.gov/cbes/ Bioenergy, Sustainability, and Land-Use Change Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    versus coal. March 23-27 ­ Several ORNL researchers participated in the Department of Energy's BioEnergy Technologies Office (BETO) 2015 Project Peer Review in Alexandria, Virginia. The following presentations were Durability Relationships for Improved Low-Cost Clean Cookstoves by Tim Theiss Increasing Biofuel Deployment

  5. Forecasting the effect of land-use change on native and non-native mammalian predator distributions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Merenlender, Adina

    2004; accepted in revised form 21 January 2005 Key words: Agriculture, Carnivore, Landscape, Logistic the maintenance of natural habitat corridors (Forman 1995; Bennett 1999; Perault and Lomolino 2000). Until

  6. A Conceptual Framework for Estimating Bioenerg-Related Land-Use Change and Its Impacts over Time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delucchi, Mark

    2009-01-01

    Turnbull, “Integrated Biomass Energy Systems and EmissionsSustainable Production of Biomass,” Energy Transition TaskDavis, and B. Saulsbury, Biomass Energy Data Book, ORNL/TM-

  7. A Conceptual Framework for Estimating Bioenerg-Related Land-Use Change and Its Impacts over Time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delucchi, Mark

    2009-01-01

    Turnbull, “Integrated Biomass Energy Systems and EmissionsDavis, and B. Saulsbury, Biomass Energy Data Book, ORNL/TM-cta.ornl.gov/bedb/pdf/Biomass_Energy_Data_Book.pdf. G. W.

  8. A Conceptual Framework for Estimating Bioenerg-Related Land-Use Change and Its Impacts over Time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delucchi, Mark

    2009-01-01

    expansion of demand for biomass feedstocks that marked theof demand for biomass feedstocks. Regardless of the specificexpansion of demand for biomass feedstocks, then the end of

  9. Determinants of land-use change: A case study from the lower Mekong delta of southern Vietnam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nguyen, Son T Mr.

    2008-01-01

    Xuyen City, An Giang, Vietnam. Electronic Green Journal,Cai Nuoc, Ca Mau Penisula, Vietnam. Environment, Developments scientific report, Vietnam. Lambin, E.F. , Turner, B.L. ,

  10. Can we reconcile differences in estimates of carbon fluxes from land-use change and forestry for the 1990s?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01

    Development and partially by Petrobras. We wish to thank M.Irvine, California, USA 4 Petrobras Research & Development

  11. Center for BioEnergy Sustainability http://www.ornl.gov/cbes/ Bioenergy, Sustainability, and Land-Use Change Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    designs. Renewable & Sustainable Energy Review. ORNL Presentations: February 2-4 ­ Esther Parish "Sustainability, Ecosystem Services, and Bioenergy Development across the Americas" Project. February 27 ­ UpdateCenter for BioEnergy Sustainability http://www.ornl.gov/cbes/ 1 Bioenergy, Sustainability, and Land

  12. Promoting lower-carbon lifestyles: the role of personal values, climate change communications and carbon allowances in processes of change 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howell, Rachel Angharad

    2013-07-01

    Climate change is a pressing problem and substantial reductions in the greenhouse gas emissions that cause it are necessary to avert the worst impacts predicted. The UK has targeted an 80% reduction from 1990 emissions ...

  13. Mass Spectral Evidence That Small Changes in Composition Caused by Oxidative Aging Processes Alter Aerosol CCN Properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mass Spectral Evidence That Small Changes in Composition Caused by Oxidative Aging Processes Alter that small changes in particle chemical composition caused by oxidation could increase the CCN activity increased cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activity compared to their hydro- phobic counterparts. At present

  14. Entropy Change in the Carnot Cycle: Entropy in the Adiabatic Process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kazumi Suematsu

    2012-06-24

    Entropy change in the Carnot cycle is discussed. In particular, the isentropic change in the adiabatic expansion (or compression) is reinvestigated.

  15. Entropy Change in the Carnot Cycle: Entropy in the Adiabatic Process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suematsu, Kazumi

    2012-01-01

    Entropy change in the Carnot cycle is discussed. In particular, the isentropic change in the adiabatic expansion (or compression) is reinvestigated.

  16. Sustainable Development & Land Use Committee Meeting Meeting 2009-2010 #5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to improve recycling and composting on campus. One of the things that they have asked to change is to remove the black garbage bags from the composting containers in The Grill as the composting containers look like

  17. Water Scarcity in the Andes: A Comparison of Local Perceptions and Observed Climate, Land Use

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lopez-Carr, David

    and Socioeconomic Changes Felipe Murtinho & Christina Tague & Bert de Bievre & Hallie Eakin & David Lopez-Carr, AZ, USA D. Lopez-Carr Geography Department, University California Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA

  18. Comparative analysis of hedonic rents and maximum bids in a land-use simulation context

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bierlaire, Michel

    of the population and the economy, or changes in the general market conditions (like the population's income of the locations, one of them being the price or rent, and choose the location that maximize their utility. In most

  19. Land use implications of future energy system trajectories - the case of the UK 2050 Carbon Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Konadu, D. Dennis; Mourão, Zenaida Sobral; Allwood, Julian M.; Richards, Keith S.; Kopec, Grant; McMahon, Richard; Fenner, Richard

    2015-07-25

    and Climate Change, with all pathways requiring increased us of bioenergy. A significant amount of this could be indigenously sourced from crops, but will increased domestic production of energy crops conflict with other agricultural priorities? To address...

  20. ANL/AA-19 Land Use and Energy K. E. Robeck, S. W. Ballou, D. W. South,

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield MunicipalTechnical Report:Speeding accessby a contractor ofvar generationAA-19 Land Use and Energy K.

  1. Deciphering the impact of land-uses on terrestrial organic matter and mercury inputs to large boreal lakes of central Qubec using lignin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , suc. Centre-Ville, Montréal, Québec H3C 3P8, Canada a r t i c l e i n f o Article history: Received 17.g. logging and/ or mining activities) were used to illustrate the influence of land-use on TOM and Hg cycling of anthropogenic land-uses from 1979 to 2010 (e.g. logging and mining activities) to TOM and THg contents measured

  2. Identification of the relationship between economic and land use characteristics and urban mobility at the macroscopic level in Texas urban areas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schrank, David Lynn

    2004-11-15

    finances ? Lack of land-use forecasting capabilities ? Inadequate GIS training ? Outdated or no origin-destination surveys for the area ? Improper or no mode choice information for the area ? No in-house modeling capabilities. Despite all... ? Lack of adequate finances ? Lack of land-use forecasting capabilities ? Inadequate GIS training ? Outdated or no origin-destination surveys for the area ? Improper or no mode choice information for the area ? No in-house modeling...

  3. Water Resources and Climate Change in Garden Park, Colorado

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baffa, Thomas W.

    2009-12-18

    This paper examines whether groundwater can provide adequate water supplies for land use change and future development in Garden Park, Colorado. A climatic water budget model was used to determine the amount and adequacy of the groundwater supply...

  4. Development of engineering geologic performance standards for land-use regulation in Sabine Pass, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vaught, Richmond Murphy

    1982-01-01

    on geologic features (such as chenier ridges), the effects of storm surge on chenier ridges, altered by borrow mining, was modeled physically (wave tank) and mathematically (computer model). Comparison of the physical and mathe- matical models shows... Pass, Texas, an area in the beginning stages of comprehensive urban planning. Sabine Pass is located along the chenier strandplain/coastal system at the Texas-Louisiana border. Processes affecting the chenier ridges and marsh at Sabine Pass...

  5. PHYSICAL CHANGES IN THE PORE STRUCTURE OF COAL WITH CHEMICAL PROCESSING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris Jr, E.C.

    2011-01-01

    WITH CHEMICAL PROCESSING Contents Abstract . . . . . . vChemical Engineering Department, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 Abstract

  6. Utilization of Science-Based Information on Climate Change in Decision Making and the Public Policy Process - Phase 1 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vedlitz, Arnold; Alston, Letitia T.; Wood, B. Dan; North, Gerald R.; Lindquist, Eric

    2008-01-01

    Utilization of Science-Based Information on Climate Change in Decision Making and the Public Policy Process - Phase I Institute for Science, Technology and Public Policy The Bush School of Government and Public Service Texas A&M University Institute... for Science, Technology and Public Policy ? The Bush School ? Texas A&M University 1 Acknowledgements Research Support...

  7. Non-equilbrium dynamics of ecosystem processes in a changing world

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, David D.

    , ushering in the Anthropocene. Meeting accelerating demands for food, energy, and goods and services has For the lovers ii #12;Abstract The relatively mild and stable climate of the last 10,000 years betrays a history of environmental variability and rapid changes. Humans have recently accelerated global environmental change

  8. Bench-Scale Process for Low-Cost Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Capture Using a Phase-Changing Absorbent

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Westendorf, Tiffany; Caraher, Joel; Chen, Wei; Farnum, Rachael; Perry, Robert; Spiry, Irina; Wilson, Paul; Wood, Benjamin

    2015-03-31

    The objective of this project is to design and build a bench-scale process for a novel phase-changing aminosilicone-based CO2-capture solvent. The project will establish scalability and technical and economic feasibility of using a phase-changing CO2-capture absorbent for post-combustion capture of CO2 from coal-fired power plants with 90% capture efficiency and 95% CO2 purity at a cost of $40/tonne of CO2 captured by 2025 and a cost of <$10/tonne of CO2 captured by 2035. In the first budget period of this project, the bench-scale phase-changing CO2 capture process was designed using data and operating experience generated under a previous project (ARPA-e project DE-AR0000084). Sizing and specification of all major unit operations was completed, including detailed process and instrumentation diagrams. The system was designed to operate over a wide range of operating conditions to allow for exploration of the effect of process variables on CO2 capture performance.

  9. SYNTHESIS Disturbance-driven changes in the variability of ecological patterns and processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraterrigo, Jennifer

    by considering disturbance extent, frequency and intensity, as well as ecosystem recovery, and thereby capturesREVIEW AND SYNTHESIS Disturbance-driven changes in the variability of ecological patterns Understanding how disturbance shapes the dynamics of ecological systems is of fundamental importance in ecology

  10. Land cover change and remote sensing: Examples of quantifying spatiotemporal dynamics in tropical forests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krummel, J.R.; Su, Haiping; Fox, J.; Yarnasan, S.; Ekasingh, M.

    1995-06-01

    Research on human impacts or natural processes that operate over broad geographic areas must explicitly address issues of scale and spatial heterogeneity. While the tropical forests of Southeast Asia and Mexico have been occupied and used to meet human needs for thousands of years, traditional forest management systems are currently being transformed by rapid and far-reaching demographic, political, economic, and environmental changes. The dynamics of population growth, migration into the remaining frontiers, and responses to national and international market forces result in a demand for land to produce food and fiber. These results illustrate some of the mechanisms that drive current land use changes, especially in the tropical forest frontiers. By linking the outcome of individual land use decisions and measures of landscape fragmentation and change, the aggregated results shows the hierarchy of temporal and spatial events that in summation result in global changes to the most complex and sensitive biome -- tropical forests. By quantifying the spatial and temporal patterns of tropical forest change, researchers can assist policy makers by showing how landscape systems in these tropical forests are controlled by physical, biological, social, and economic parameters.

  11. LandUse/Land Cover Map of the CF of ARM in the SGP Site Using DOE's Multispectral Thermal Imager (MTI) Satellite Images

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACTThousand CubicResourcelogo and mastheadLake CharlesLand-UseLand Use/Land

  12. The Homeowner Revolution: Democracy, Land Use and the Los Angeles Slow-Growth Movement, 1965-1992

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morrow, Gregory D.

    2013-01-01

    Cities: Responding to Peak Oil and Climate Change.consciousness. Reaching peak oil (crossing fuel cells and aCities: Responding to Peak Oil and Climate Change (

  13. Utilization of Science-Based Information on Climate Change in Decision Making and the Public Policy Process - Phase 2 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vedlitz, Arnold; Lindquist, Eric; Liu, Xinsheng; Zahran, Sammy; Wood, B. Dan; Alston, Letitia T.; North, Gerald

    2010-01-01

    -1 Utilization of Science-Based Information on Climate Change in Decision Making and the Public Policy Process - Phase 2 Institute for Science, Technology and Public Policy The Bush School of Government and Public Service Texas A&M University Dr. Arnold... Vedlitz, Director & Bob Bullock Chair in Government and Public Policy Institute for Science, Technology and Public Policy The Bush School of Government and Public Service Texas A&M University College Station, Texas 77843-4350 Phone 979.862.8855 avedlitz...

  14. CO2 Capture with Liquid-to-Solid Absorbents: CO2 Capture Process Using Phase-Changing Absorbents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-10-01

    IMPACCT Project: GE and the University of Pittsburgh are developing a unique CO2 capture process in which a liquid absorbent, upon contact with CO2, changes into a solid phase. Once in solid form, the material can be separated and the CO2 can be released for storage by heating. Upon heating, the absorbent returns to its liquid form, where it can be reused to capture more CO2. The approach is more efficient than other solventbased processes because it avoids the heating of extraneous solvents such as water. This ultimately leads to a lower cost of CO2 capture and will lower the additional cost to produce electricity for coal-fired power plants that retrofit their facilities to include this technology.

  15. Examining the Proximate and Underlying Causes of Tropical Deforestation: Migration and Land Use in the Sierra de Lacandn National Park, Guatemala1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lopez-Carr, David

    1 Examining the Proximate and Underlying Causes of Tropical Deforestation: Migration and Land Use-farm") resource use, while population scholars have largely ignored rural-to-rural migration. The way in which in another place has been inadequately explored. This paper investigates the primary proximate and underlying

  16. Using NASA Remote Sensing Data to Reduce Uncertainty of Land-Use Transitions in Global Carbon-Climate Models: Data Management Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Using NASA Remote Sensing Data to Reduce Uncertainty of Land-Use Transitions in Global Carbon University of Maryland The following Data Management Plan was part of the NASA ROSES 2012 Proposal Using NASA), as described below. We will follow all guidelines in the NASA Earth Science Data and Information Policy, along

  17. Government Regulations and Housing Markets: An Index to Characterize Local Land Use Regulatory Environments for Residential Markets in the Houston - Galveston Area 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Estevez Jimenez, Luis

    2012-07-16

    high housing prices and the lack of real income growth are cited as the main factors behind the housing affordability problem, it has been proven that land use regulations have some responsibility in this matter as well. Data from the JCHS suggests...

  18. Climate change and tropical biodiversity: a new focus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisenden, Brian D.

    Climate change and tropical biodiversity: a new focus Jedediah Brodie1 , Eric Post2 and William F, Australia Considerable efforts are focused on the consequences of climate change for tropical rainforests climatic changes and human land use) remain understudied. Key concerns are that aridification could

  19. Potential influence of climate-induced vegetation shifts on future land use and associated land carbon fluxes in Northern Eurasia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kicklighter, David

    Climate change will alter ecosystem metabolism and may lead to a redistribution of vegetation and changes in fire regimes in Northern Eurasia over the 21st century. Land management decisions will interact with these ...

  20. Information on Math Course Changes at Virginia Tech Virginia Tech is in the process of switching to math courses. In the past, students would take

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Battaglia, Francine

    Information on Math Course Changes at Virginia Tech Virginia Tech is in the process of switching to math courses. In the past, students would take: · MATH1205, Calculus (3 credits) · MATH1206, Calculus (3 credits) · MATH1224, Vector

  1. CLIMATIC CHANGE, GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS, FUTURE CLIMATE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bateman, Ian J.

    trends over India, greenhouse gas emissions due to energy consumption, forest and land-use changes the development of renewable, non- conventional energy sources. In all cases, serious institutional barriers an FOR INDIA by Pitta Govinda Rao, Mick Kelly, Mike Hulme and Govindarajan Srinivasan CSERGE Working Paper GEC

  2. Future land use and land cover influences on regional biogenic emissions and air quality in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01

    cover change in simulating future climates. Science 310 (Folberth, G.A. , 2005. Future tropospheric ozone simulatedconcentrations in response to future climate, emissions, and

  3. What is the importance of climate model bias when projecting the impacts of climate change on land surface processes?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, M. L.; Rajagopalan, K.; Chung, S. H.; Jiang, X.; Harrison, J. H.; Nergui, T.; Guenther, Alex B.; Miller, C.; Reyes, J.; Tague, C. L.; Choate, J. S.; Salathe, E.; Stockle, Claudio O.; Adam, J. C.

    2014-05-16

    Regional climate change impact (CCI) studies have widely involved downscaling and bias-correcting (BC) Global Climate Model (GCM)-projected climate for driving land surface models. However, BC may cause uncertainties in projecting hydrologic and biogeochemical responses to future climate due to the impaired spatiotemporal covariance of climate variables and a breakdown of physical conservation principles. Here we quantify the impact of BC on simulated climate-driven changes in water variables(evapotranspiration, ET; runoff; snow water equivalent, SWE; and water demand for irrigation), crop yield, biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC), nitric oxide (NO) emissions, and dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) export over the Pacific Northwest (PNW) Region. We also quantify the impacts on net primary production (NPP) over a small watershed in the region (HJ Andrews). Simulation results from the coupled ECHAM5/MPI-OM model with A1B emission scenario were firstly dynamically downscaled to 12 km resolutions with WRF model. Then a quantile mapping based statistical downscaling model was used to downscale them into 1/16th degree resolution daily climate data over historical and future periods. Two series climate data were generated according to the option of bias-correction (i.e. with bias-correction (BC) and without bias-correction, NBC). Impact models were then applied to estimate hydrologic and biogeochemical responses to both BC and NBC meteorological datasets. These im20 pact models include a macro-scale hydrologic model (VIC), a coupled cropping system model (VIC-CropSyst), an ecohydrologic model (RHESSys), a biogenic emissions model (MEGAN), and a nutrient export model (Global-NEWS). Results demonstrate that the BC and NBC climate data provide consistent estimates of the climate-driven changes in water fluxes (ET, runoff, and water demand), VOCs (isoprene and monoterpenes) and NO emissions, mean crop yield, and river DIN export over the PNW domain. However, significant differences rise from projected SWE, crop yield from dry lands, and HJ Andrews’s ET between BC and NBC data. Even though BC post-processing has no significant impacts on most of the studied variables when taking PNW as a whole, their effects have large spatial variations and some local areas are substantially influenced. In addition, there are months during which BC and NBC post-processing produces significant differences in projected changes, such as summer runoff. Factor-controlled simulations indicate that BC post-processing of precipitation and temperature both substantially contribute to these differences at region scales. We conclude that there are trade-offs between using BC climate data for offline CCI studies vs. direct modeled climate data. These trade-offs should be considered when designing integrated modeling frameworks for specific applications; e.g., BC may be more important when considering impacts on reservoir operations in mountainous watersheds than when investigating impacts on biogenic emissions and air quality (where VOCs are a primary indicator).

  4. 19th World Congress of Soil Science, Soil solutions for a changing world, Brisbane, Australia 1-6 August 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    ). The investigated ES were climate regulation through carbon sequestration in soil and biomass, soil conservation of these results are discussed. Key Words Land use change, socioeconomic drivers, carbon sequestration, soil

  5. An economic analysis of land use alternatives on CRP land trees after the CRP contracts expire in east Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arekere, Marigowda Dhananjaya

    1996-01-01

    patterns of variables and to examine the sensitivity of the outcome to these changes. The influence of implementing the conservation compliance plan (CCP) is also examined. The time frame of the analysis is determined by the financially optimal. single...

  6. Forest cover, carbon sequestration, and wildlife habitat: policy review and modeling of tradeoffs among land-use

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rissman, Adena

    Forest cover, carbon sequestration, and wildlife habitat: policy review and modeling of tradeoffs and services, including timber production, carbon sequestration and storage, scenic amenities, and wildlife habitat. International efforts to mitigate climate change through forest carbon sequestration

  7. Wilderness Conservation in Rural Europe - How do Discourses on Land-Use Change and the Neoliberalization of Nature affect Rural Communities? 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guhr, Sarah

    2014-11-27

    Conservation initiatives focusing on wilderness protection and rewilding claim that wilderness management can help to alleviate poverty and thus secure the livelihoods of rural communities. Nature-based tourism lies at the ...

  8. Physically-based dynamic modelling of the effect of land use changes on shallow landslide initiation in the Western Ghats of Kerala, India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jetten, Victor

    initiation in the Western Ghats of Kerala, India Sekhar Lukose Kuriakose #12;ITC dissertation number 178 ITC, Kerala, India Fysisch-dynamisch modeleren van de gevolgen van landgebruiksveranderingen op het veroorzaken van oppervlakkige aardverschuivingen in het West Ghats gebergte, Kerala, India (met een

  9. Land use/land cover change dynamics and drivers in a low-grade marginal coffee growing region of Veracruz, Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ellis, Edward A.; Baerenklau, Kenneth A.; Marcos-Martínez, Raymundo; Chávez, Edgar

    2010-01-01

    2010) Focos rojos para la conservacio n de la biodiversidad.In: La biodiversidad en Veracruz: Estudio de estado.

  10. New Mexico Water Resources Research Institute, New Mexico State University http://wrri.nmsu.edu Predicting Land Use Change and its Effect on Nonpoint

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Eric E.

    pollution, uniform tax, uniform standard Problem and research objectives Urban sprawl causes numerous pollution, and increased asthma incidence. Because many sources of urban pollutants are numerous and diffuse

  11. Land use/land cover change dynamics and drivers in a low-grade marginal coffee growing region of Veracruz, Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ellis, Edward A.; Baerenklau, Kenneth A.; Marcos-Martínez, Raymundo; Chávez, Edgar

    2010-01-01

    Mexico (2007) Indice Nacional de Precios al Con- sumidor Agropecuarios. http://www.banxico.gob.mx/Sie Internet/

  12. Land use/land cover change dynamics and drivers in a low-grade marginal coffee growing region of Veracruz, Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ellis, Edward A.; Baerenklau, Kenneth A.; Marcos-Martínez, Raymundo; Chávez, Edgar

    2010-01-01

    Sistema de Clasi?cacio n Clima tica de Koppen, 4th edn. Mestica, Geograf? a e Informa tica (INEGI) (2006) Conjunto destica, Geograf? a e Informa tica (INEGI) (2008) II Conteo de

  13. The contribution of future agricultural trends in the US Midwest to global climate change mitigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomson, Allison M.; Kyle, G. Page; Zhang, Xuesong; Bandaru, Varaprasad; West, Tristram O.; Wise, Marshall A.; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Calvin, Katherine V.

    2014-01-19

    Land use change is a complex response to changing environmental and socioeconomic systems. Historical drivers of land use change include changes in the natural resource availability of a region, changes in economic conditions for production of certain products and changing policies. Most recently, introduction of policy incentives for biofuel production have influenced land use change in the US Midwest, leading to concerns that bioenergy production systems may compete with food production and land conservation. Here we explore how land use may be impacted by future climate mitigation measures by nesting a high resolution agricultural model (EPIC – Environmental Policy Indicator Climate) for the US Midwest within a global integrated assessment model (GCAM – Global Change Assessment Model). This approach is designed to provide greater spatial resolution and detailed agricultural practice information by focusing on the climate mitigation potential of agriculture and land use in a specific region, while retaining the global economic context necessary to understand the far ranging effects of climate mitigation targets. We find that until the simulated carbon prices are very high, the US Midwest has a comparative advantage in producing traditional food and feed crops over bioenergy crops. Overall, the model responds to multiple pressures by adopting a mix of future responses. We also find that the GCAM model is capable of simulations at multiple spatial scales and agricultural technology resolution, which provides the capability to examine regional response to global policy and economic conditions in the context of climate mitigation.

  14. Implications of High Renewable Electricity Penetration in the U.S. for Water Use, Greenhouse Gas Emissions, Land-Use, and Materials Supply

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Recent work found that renewable energy could supply 80% of electricity demand in the contiguous United States in 2050 at the hourly level. This paper explores some of the implications of achieving such high levels of renewable electricity for supply chains and the environment in scenarios with renewable supply up to such levels. Transitioning to high renewable electricity supply would lead to significant reductions in greenhouse gas emissions and water use, with only modest land-use implications. While renewable energy expansion implies moderate growth of the renewable electricity supply chains, no insurmountable long-term constraints to renewable electricity technology manufacturing capacity or materials supply are identified.

  15. Achieving California’s Land Use and Transportation Greenhouse Gas Emission Targets Under AB 32: An Exploration of Potential Policy Processes and Mechanisms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaheen, Susan A.; Bejamin-Chung, Jade; Allen, Denise; Howe-Steiger, Linda

    2009-01-01

    want to reduce their ‘carbon footprint,’ not by law, but todecreases of its carbon footprint could reduce emissions byTo decrease the carbon footprint of transportation, the

  16. Achieving California’s Land Use and Transportation Greenhouse Gas Emission Targets Under AB 32: An Exploration of Potential Policy Processes and Mechanisms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaheen, Susan A.; Bejamin-Chung, Jade; Allen, Denise; Howe-Steiger, Linda

    2009-01-01

    vehicles banned, increases in bioethanol fuels in Brazil andU.S. : decreased tax on bioethanol fuel; E85 blends eligible

  17. Achieving California’s Land Use and Transportation Greenhouse Gas Emission Targets Under AB 32: An Exploration of Potential Policy Processes and Mechanisms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaheen, Susan A.; Bejamin-Chung, Jade; Allen, Denise; Howe-Steiger, Linda

    2009-01-01

    Schleich (2006). EU Emissions Trading: an Early Analysis of2002). Comparing Emission Trading with Absolute and Relativein the European Emissions Trading System: a Commentary.

  18. Achieving California’s Land Use and Transportation Greenhouse Gas Emission Targets Under AB 32: An Exploration of Potential Policy Processes and Mechanisms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaheen, Susan A.; Bejamin-Chung, Jade; Allen, Denise; Howe-Steiger, Linda

    2009-01-01

    1999?for fuel economy, CO2 emissions, car dealerships Tax onfor passenger cars and induce GHG emission reductions. Taxesregulates CO2 emissions from passenger cars; the policy

  19. Achieving California’s Land Use and Transportation Greenhouse Gas Emission Targets Under AB 32: An Exploration of Potential Policy Processes and Mechanisms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaheen, Susan A.; Bejamin-Chung, Jade; Allen, Denise; Howe-Steiger, Linda

    2009-01-01

    bioethanol fuels in Brazil and liquefied petroleum gas or LPG taxis in Tokyo Brazil ? Brazilian National Alcohol Programme: supports production

  20. Achieving California’s Land Use and Transportation Greenhouse Gas Emission Targets Under AB 32: An Exploration of Potential Policy Processes and Mechanisms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaheen, Susan A.; Bejamin-Chung, Jade; Allen, Denise; Howe-Steiger, Linda

    2009-01-01

    Department of Transportation, California Energy Commission,California Department of Transportation, the California EnergyCalifornia Department of Transportation (Caltrans), California Energy

  1. Supporting Context Changes for Plastic User Interfaces: a Process and a Mechanism, in Proc. HCI-IHM 2001, A. Blandford, J. Vanderdonckt, P. Gray Eds.,BCS conference series, Springer Publ., pp. 349-363.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nigay, Laurence

    Supporting Context Changes for Plastic User Interfaces: a Process and a Mechanism, in Proc. HCI-363. Supporting Context Changes for Plastic User Interfaces: a Process and a Mechanism G. Calvary, J. Coutaz, D. A user interface is plastic if it is able to adapt to context changes while preserving usability

  2. APBI 401 / SOIL 501: SOIL PROCESSES TERM 1 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    APBI 401 / SOIL 501: SOIL PROCESSES TERM 1 ­ 2014 Instructor Sandra Brown, MCML 156c Office hour: M Rationale: Soils are a fundamental component of agro-ecological, forest and other land use systems; reflecting natural processes and the influence of human activities. Soil properties and processes regulate

  3. Transportation Secure Data Center: Real-World Data for Transportation Planning and Land Use Analysis (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-01-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) have launched the free, web-based Transportation Secure Data Center (TSDC). The TSDC (www.nrel.gov/tsdc) preserves respondent anonymity while making vital transportation data available to a broad group of users through secure, online access. The TSDC database provides free-of-charge web-based access to valuable transportation data that can be used for: Transit planning, Travel demand modeling, Homeland Security evacuation planning, Alternative fuel station planning, and Validating transportation data from other sources. The TSDC's two levels of access make composite data available with simple online registration, and allow researchers to use detailed spatial data after completing a straight forward application process.

  4. Department of Bioengineering Assistantship Offer & Payroll Changes Form (All information MUST be provided for form to be processed)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Steven J.

    Department of Bioengineering Assistantship Offer & Payroll Changes Form (All information MUST For generation of offer letter, give completed form to Maria Torres Revised Jan.2015 Applicant Information: New Student--1st time hire by the PI Degree Program: M.S. Ph.D. Continuing Student Offer

  5. Climate Models from the Joint Global Change Research Institute

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Staff at the Joint Institute develop and use models to simulate the economic and physical impacts of global change policy options. The GCAM, for example, gives analysts insight into how regional and national economies might respond to climate change mitigation policies including carbon taxes, carbon trading, and accelerated deployment of energy technology. Three available models are Phoenix, GCAM, and EPIC. Phoenix is a global, dynamic recursive, computable general equilibrium model that is solved in five-year time steps from 2005 through 2100 and divides the world into twenty-four regions. Each region includes twenty-six industrial sectors. Particular attention is paid to energy production in Phoenix. There are nine electricity-generating technologies (coal, natural gas, oil, biomass, nuclear, hydro, wind, solar, and geothermal) and four additional energy commodities: crude oil, refined oil products, coal, and natural gas. Phoenix is designed to answer economic questions related to international climate and energy policy and international trade. Phoenix replaces the Second Generation Model (SGM) that was formerly used for general equilibrium analysis at JGCRI. GCAM is the Global Change Assessment Model, a partial equilibrium model of the world with 14 regions. GCAM operates in 5 year time steps from 1990 to 2095 and is designed to examine long-term changes in the coupled energy, agriculture/land-use, and climate system. GCAM includes a 151-region agriculture land-use module and a reduced form carbon cycle and climate module in addition to its incorporation of demographics, resources, energy production and consumption. The model has been used extensively in a number of assessment and modeling activities such as the Energy Modeling Forum (EMF), the U.S. Climate Change Technology Program, and the U.S. Climate Change Science Program and IPCC assessment reports. GCAM is now freely available as a community model. The Environmental Policy Integrated Climate (EPIC) Model is a process-based agricultural systems model composed of simulation components for weather, hydrology, nutrient cycling, pesticide fate, tillage, crop growth, soil erosion, crop and soil management and economics. Staff at PNNL have been involved in the development of this model by integrating new sub-models for soil carbon dynamics and nitrogen cycling.

  6. "The gate-keepers in a changing world: integrating microbial diversity and dynamics with global change biology."

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jessica L.M. Gutknecht and Kathryn M. Docherty

    2011-11-01

    Microorganisms (Bacteria, Archaea and Fungi) are the gate-keepers of many ecosystem-scale biogeochemical cycles. Although there have been measurable changes in ecosystem function due to human activities such as greenhouse gas production, nutrient loading, land-use change, and water consumption, few studies have connected microbial community dynamics with these changes in ecosystem function. Specifically, very little is known about how global changes will induce important functional changes in microbial biodiversity. Even less is known about how microbial functional changes could alter rates of nutrient cycling or whether microbial communities have enough functional redundancy that changes will have little impact on overall process rates. The proposed symposium will provide an overview of this emerging research area, with emphasis on linking the microorganisms directly to important ecological functions under the influence of global change dynamics. The session will include both broad overviews as well as specific case-studies by researchers who examine microbial communities from a variety of taxonomic levels and from various environments. The session will begin broadly, with speakers discussing how microbial communities may inform ecosystem-scale global change studies, and help to make microbial ecological knowledge more tangible for a broad range of ecologists. The session will continue with case studies of microbial community information informing process in global change experiments. Finally, the session will close with speakers discussing how microbial community information might fit into global change models, and what types of information are useful for future studies. We have requested that speakers particularly incorporate their views on what types of microbial data is useful and informative in the context of larger ecosystem processes. We foresee that this session could serve as a focal point for global change microbial ecologists to meet and discuss their field at the ESA 2010 General Meeting. However, more importantly, the session will provide for a broad range of interests for ecosystem ecologists, theoretical ecologists, and global change biologists, and will foster communication between these groups to generate informative microbial community data in the future.

  7. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON SEMICONDUCTOR MANUFACTURING, VOL. 13, NO. 2, MAY 2000 181 Evaluating the Impact of Process Changes on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubloff, Gary W.

    IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON SEMICONDUCTOR MANUFACTURING, VOL. 13, NO. 2, MAY 2000 181 Evaluating--Cluster tools are highly integrated machines that can perform a sequence of semiconductor manufacturing. In addition, we present an integrated simulation model that in- cludes a process model. For a given scheduling

  8. Automatic computations at next-to-leading order in QCD for top-quark flavor-changing neutral processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Celine Degrande; Fabio Maltoni; Jian Wang; Cen Zhang

    2015-03-02

    Computations at next-to-leading order in the Standard Model offer new technical challenges in presence of higher dimensional operators. We introduce a framework that, starting from the top-quark effective field theory at dimension six, allows to make predictions for cross sections as well as distributions in a fully automatic way. As an application, we present the first complete results at NLO in QCD for flavor changing neutral interactions including parton shower effects, for $tZ$, $th$, $t\\gamma$ associated production at the LHC.

  9. Ice at the Interface: Atmosphere-Ice-Ocean Boundary Layer Processes and Their Role in Polar Change---Workshop Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunke, Elizabeth C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-07-23

    The atmosphere-ocean boundary layer in which sea ice resides includes many complex processes that require a more realistic treatment in GCMs, particularly as models move toward full earth system descriptions. The primary purpose of the workshop was to define and discuss such coupled processes from observational and modeling points of view, including insight from both the Arctic and Antarctic systems. The workshop met each of its overarching goals, including fostering collaboration among experimentalists, theorists and modelers, proposing modeling strategies, and ascertaining data availability and needs. Several scientific themes emerged from the workshop, such as the importance of episodic or extreme events, precipitation, stratification above and below the ice, and the marginal ice zone, whose seasonal Arctic migrations now traverse more territory than in the past.

  10. Addressing trend-related changes within cumulative effects studies in water resources planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Canter, L.W., E-mail: envimptr@aol.com [University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma and President, Canter Associates, Inc., Horseshoe Bay, TX (United States); Chawla, M.K. [ERDC-CERL, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Champaign, IL (United States)] [ERDC-CERL, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Champaign, IL (United States); Swor, C.T. [Canter Associates, Inc., Frankewing, TN (United States)] [Canter Associates, Inc., Frankewing, TN (United States)

    2014-01-15

    Summarized herein are 28 case studies wherein trend-related causative physical, social, or institutional changes were connected to consequential changes in runoff, water quality, and riparian and aquatic ecological features. The reviewed cases were systematically evaluated relative to their identified environmental effects; usage of analytical frameworks, and appropriate models, methods, and technologies; and the attention given to mitigation and/or management of the resultant causative and consequential changes. These changes also represent important considerations in project design and operation, and in cumulative effects studies associated therewith. The cases were grouped into five categories: institutional changes associated with legislation and policies (seven cases); physical changes from land use changes in urbanizing watersheds (eight cases); physical changes from land use changes and development projects in watersheds (four cases); physical, institutional, and social changes from land use and related policy changes in river basins (three cases); and multiple changes within a comprehensive study of land use and policy changes in the Willamette River Basin in Oregon (six cases). A tabulation of 110 models, methods and technologies used in the studies is also presented. General observations from this review were that the features were unique for each case; the consequential changes were logically based on the causative changes; the analytical frameworks provided relevant structures for the studies, and the identified methods and technologies were pertinent for addressing both the causative and consequential changes. One key lesson was that the cases provide useful, “real-world” illustrations of the importance of addressing trend-related changes in cumulative effects studies within water resources planning. Accordingly, they could be used as an “initial tool kit” for addressing trend-related changes.

  11. Collaborative Research: Process-Resolving Decomposition of the Global Temperature Response to Modes of Low Frequency Variability in a Changing Climate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deng, Yi

    2014-11-24

    DOE-GTRC-05596 11/24/2104 Collaborative Research: Process-Resolving Decomposition of the Global Temperature Response to Modes of Low Frequency Variability in a Changing Climate PI: Dr. Yi Deng (PI) School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences Georgia Institute of Technology 404-385-1821, yi.deng@eas.gatech.edu El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and Annular Modes (AMs) represent respectively the most important modes of low frequency variability in the tropical and extratropical circulations. The projection of future changes in the ENSO and AM variability, however, remains highly uncertain with the state-of-the-science climate models. This project conducted a process-resolving, quantitative evaluations of the ENSO and AM variability in the modern reanalysis observations and in climate model simulations. The goal is to identify and understand the sources of uncertainty and biases in models’ representation of ENSO and AM variability. Using a feedback analysis method originally formulated by one of the collaborative PIs, we partitioned the 3D atmospheric temperature anomalies and surface temperature anomalies associated with ENSO and AM variability into components linked to 1) radiation-related thermodynamic processes such as cloud and water vapor feedbacks, 2) local dynamical processes including convection and turbulent/diffusive energy transfer and 3) non-local dynamical processes such as the horizontal energy transport in the oceans and atmosphere. In the past 4 years, the research conducted at Georgia Tech under the support of this project has led to 15 peer-reviewed publications and 9 conference/workshop presentations. Two graduate students and one postdoctoral fellow also received research training through participating the project activities. This final technical report summarizes key scientific discoveries we made and provides also a list of all publications and conference presentations resulted from research activities at Georgia Tech. The main findings include: 1) the distinctly different roles played by atmospheric dynamical processes in establishing surface temperature response to ENSO at tropics and extratropics (i.e., atmospheric dynamics disperses energy out of tropics during ENSO warm events and modulate surface temperature at mid-, high-latitudes through controlling downward longwave radiation); 2) the representations of ENSO-related temperature response in climate models fail to converge at the process-level particularly over extratropics (i.e., models produce the right temperature responses to ENSO but with wrong reasons); 3) water vapor feedback contributes substantially to the temperature anomalies found over U.S. during different phases of the Northern Annular Mode (NAM), which adds new insight to the traditional picture that cold/warm advective processes are the main drivers of local temperature responses to the NAM; 4) the overall land surface temperature biases in the latest NCAR model (CESM1) are caused by biases in surface albedo while the surface temperature biases over ocean are related to multiple factors including biases in model albedo, cloud and oceanic dynamics, and the temperature biases over different ocean basins are also induced by different process biases. These results provide a detailed guidance for process-level model turning and improvement, and thus contribute directly to the overall goal of reducing model uncertainty in projecting future changes in the Earth’s climate system, especially in the ENSO and AM variability.

  12. Radical External Beam Radiotherapy for Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer in Japan: Changing Trends in the Patterns of Care Process Survey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ogawa, Kazuhiko, E-mail: kogawa@med.u-ryukyu.ac.jp [Department of Radiology, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa (Japan); Nakamura, Katsumasa [Department of Clinical Radiology, Kyushu University Hospital at Beppu, Oita (Japan); Sasaki, Tomonari [Department of Radiation Oncology, National Kyushu Center, Fukuoka (Japan); Onishi, Hiroshi [Department of Radiology, Yamanashi University, Yamanashi (Japan); Koizumi, Masahiko [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka University, Osaka (Japan); Araya, Masayuki [Department of Radiology, Yamanashi University, Yamanashi (Japan); Mukumoto, Nobutaka; Teshima, Teruki [Department of Medical Physics and Engineering, Osaka University, Osaka (Japan); Mitsumori, Michihide [Department of Radiation Oncology and Image-Applied Therapy, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan)

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: To delineate changing trends in radical external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for prostate cancer in Japan. Methods and Materials: Data from 841 patients with clinically localized prostate cancer treated with EBRT in the Japanese Patterns of Care Study (PCS) from 1996 to 2005 were analyzed. Results: Significant increases in the proportions of patients with stage T1 to T2 disease and decrease in prostate-specific antigen values were observed. Also, there were significant increases in the percentages of patients treated with radiotherapy by their own choice. Median radiation doses were 65.0 Gy and 68.4 Gy from 1996 to 1998 and from 1999 to 2001, respectively, increasing to 70 Gy from 2003 to 2005. Moreover, conformal therapy was more frequently used from 2003 to 2005 (84.9%) than from 1996 to 1998 (49.1%) and from 1999 to 2001 (50.2%). On the other hand, the percentage of patients receiving hormone therapy from 2003 to 2005 (81.1%) was almost the same as that from 1996 to 1998 (86.3%) and from 1999 to 2001 (89.7%). Compared with the PCS in the United States, patient characteristics and patterns of treatments from 2003 to 2005 have become more similar to those in the United States than those from 1996 to 1998 and those from 1999 to 2001. Conclusions: This study indicates a trend toward increasing numbers of patients with early-stage disease and increasing proportions of patients treated with higher radiation doses with advanced equipment among Japanese prostate cancer patients treated with EBRT during 1996 to 2005 survey periods. Patterns of care for prostate cancer in Japan are becoming more similar to those in the United States.

  13. Bestelmeyer, BT, GS Okin, MC Duniway, SR Archer, NF Sayre, JC Williamson, JE Herrick. 2014. Desertification, land use and the transformation of global drylands. Frontiers in Ecology and the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Archer, Steven R.

    . Desertification, land use and the transformation of global drylands. Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment : In Press Desertification is an escalating concern in global drylands, yet assessments to guide are involved. In order to provide greater clarity, we propose that assessments of desertification and land

  14. Global Climate Change and Agriculture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Izaurralde, Roberto C.

    2009-01-01

    The Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change released in 2007 significantly increased our confidence about the role that humans play in forcing climate change. There is now a high degree of confidence that the (a) current atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) far exceed those of the pre-industrial era, (b) global increases in CO2 arise mainly from fossil fuel use and land use change while those of CH4 and N2O originate primarily from agricultural activities, and (c) the net effect of human activities since 1750 has led to a warming of the lower layers of the atmosphere, with an increased radiative forcing of 1.6 W m-2. Depending on the scenario of human population growth and global development, mean global temperatures could rise between 1.8 and 4.0 °C by the end of the 21st century.

  15. 150 G. Marland et al. / Climate Policy 3 (2003) 149157 Strategies to mitigate anthropogenic climate change recognize that carbon sequestration in the terrestrial biosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niyogi, Dev

    2003-01-01

    anthropogenic climate change recognize that carbon sequestration in the terrestrial biosphere can reduce to create a system of credits and debits wherein emission or sequestration of carbon in the biosphere; Carbon sequestration; Land use change; Land surface change; Surface energy balance 1. Introduction Human

  16. The terrestrial carbon inventory on the Savannah River Site: Assessing the change in Carbon pools 1951-2001.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dai, Zhaohua; Trettin, Carl, C.; Parresol, Bernard, R.

    2011-11-30

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) has changed from an agricultural-woodland landscape in 1951 to a forested landscape during that latter half of the twentieth century. The corresponding change in carbon (C) pools associated land use on the SRS was estimated using comprehensive inventories from 1951 and 2001 in conjunction with operational forest management and monitoring data from the site.

  17. Sensitivity of air quality to potential future climate change and emissions in the United1 States and major cities2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nenes, Athanasios

    1 Sensitivity of air quality to potential future climate change and emissions in the United1 States and future air quality is compared for the years 2006-2010 and17 2048-2052 over the contiguous United States affected by changes in climate, land use and pollutant38 emissions [Weaver et al., 2009]. Predictions

  18. Multilayer network modeling of change propagation for engineering change management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pasqual, Michael C

    2010-01-01

    Engineering change management is a critical and challenging process within product development. One pervasive source of difficulty for this process is the phenomenon of change propagation, by which a change to one part or ...

  19. Evaluating the ability of process based models to project sea-level change This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text article.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marzeion, Ben

    Evaluating the ability of process based models to project sea-level change This article has been) 014051 (8pp) doi:10.1088/1748-9326/8/1/014051 Evaluating the ability of process based models to project for publication 13 March 2013 Published 27 March 2013 Online at stacks.iop.org/ERL/8/014051 Abstract We evaluate

  20. Monitoring urban land cover change: An expert system approach to land cover classification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramsey, Michael

    such as land use data, spatial texture, and digital elevation models (DEMs) to obtain greater classificationMonitoring urban land cover change: An expert system approach to land cover classification with Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) data to derive a land cover classification for the semiarid Phoenix

  1. Modeling Field-level Irrigation Demands with Changing Weather and Crop Choices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MardanDoost, Babak

    2015-05-31

    . The presented water budget model is capable of estimate daily water demand over space and time under predicted climate and land-use change. The model-predicted irrigation demand was developed based on crop-specific evapotranspiration, weather data, and with 2007...

  2. Land system architecture: Using land systems to adapt and mitigate global environmental change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turner, B.L.; Janetos, Anthony C.; Verbug, Peter H.; Murray, Alan T.

    2013-04-01

    Land systems (mosaics of land use and cover) are human environment systems, the changes in which drive and respond to local to global environmental changes, climate to macro-economy (Foley et al., 2005). Changes in land systems have been the principal proximate cause in the loss of habitats and biota globally, long contributed to atmospheric greenhouse gases, and hypothesized to have triggered climate changes in the early Holocene (Ruddiman, 2003). Land use, foremost agriculture, is the largest source of biologically active nitrogen to the atmosphere, critical to sources and sinks of carbon, and a major component in the hydrologic cycle (e.g., Bouwman et al., 2011). Changes in land systems also affect regional climate (Feddema et al., 2005; Pielke, 2005), ecosystem functions, and the array of ecosystem services they provide. Land systems, therefore, are a central feature of how humankind manages its relationship with nature-intended or not, or whether this relationship proceeds sustainably or not.

  3. Assessing the impacts of climate change on natural resource systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frederick, K.D.; Rosenberg, N.J. [eds.

    1994-11-30

    This volume is a collection of papers addressing the theme of potential impacts of climatic change. Papers are entitled Integrated Assessments of the Impacts of Climatic Change on Natural Resources: An Introductory Editorial; Framework for Integrated Assessments of Global Warming Impacts; Modeling Land Use and Cover as Part of Global Environmental Change; Assessing Impacts of Climatic Change on Forests: The State of Biological Modeling; Integrating Climatic Change and Forests: Economic and Ecological Assessments; Environmental Change in Grasslands: Assessment using Models; Assessing the Socio-economic Impacts of Climatic Change on Grazinglands; Modeling the Effects of Climatic Change on Water Resources- A Review; Assessing the Socioeconomic Consequences of Climate Change on Water Resources; and Conclusions, Remaining Issues, and Next Steps.

  4. Final Technical Report: Effects of Changing Water and Nitrogen Inputs on a Mojave Desert Ecosystem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Stanley, D.; Nowak, Robert S.; Fenstermaker, Lynn, F.; Young, Michael,H.

    2007-11-30

    In order to anticipate the effects of global change on ecosystem function, it is essential that predictive relationships be established linking ecosystem function to global change scenarios. The Mojave Desert is of considerable interest with respect to global change. It contains the driest habitats in North America, and thus most closely approximates the world’s great arid deserts. In order to examine the effects of climate and land use changes, in 2001 we established a long-term manipulative global change experiment, called the Mojave Global Change Facility. Manipulations in this study include the potential effects of (1) increased summer rainfall (75 mm over three discrete 25 mm events), (2) increased nitrogen deposition (10 and 40 kg ha-1), and (3) the disturbance of biological N-fixing crusts . Questions addressed under this grant shared the common hypothesis that plant and ecosystem performance will positively respond to the augmentation of the most limiting resources to plant growth in the Mojave Desert, e.g., water and nitrogen. Specific hypotheses include (1) increased summer rainfall will significantly increase plant production through an alleviation of moisture stress in the dry summer months, (2) N-deposition will increase plant production in this N-limited system, particularly in wet years or in concert with added summer rain, and (3) biological crust disturbance will gradually decrease bio-available N, with concomitant long-term reductions in photosynthesis and ANPP. Individual plant and ecosystem responses to global change may be regulated by biogeochemical processes and natural weather variability, and changes in plant and ecosystem processes may occur rapidly, may occur only after a time lag, or may not occur at all. During the first PER grant period, we observed changes in plant and ecosystem processes that would fall under each of these time-response intervals: plant and ecosystem processes responded rapidly to added summer rain, whereas most processes responded slowly or in a lag fashion to N-deposition and with no significant response to crust disturbance. Therefore, the primary objectives of this renewal grant were to: (1) continue ongoing measurements of soil and plant parameters that assess primary treatment responses; (2) address the potential heterogeneity of soil properties and (3) initiate a new suite of measurements that will provide data necessary for scaling/modeling of whole-plot to ecosystem-level responses. Our experimental approach included soil plant-water interactions using TDR, neutron probe, and miniaturized soil matric potential and moisture sensors, plant ecophysiological and productivity responses to water and nitrogen treatments and remote sensing methodologies deployed on a radio control platform. We report here the most significant findings of our study.

  5. NASA is currently experiencing impacts from a changing climate... and is applying its risk management process to identify risks and possible

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waliser, Duane E.

    : Managing Climate Risks & Adapting to a Changing Climate I. Introduction II. Strategic Analysis III. Risks and vulnerabilities to manage the effects of climate change on the agency's operations and mission in both the shortNASA is currently experiencing impacts from a changing climate... and is applying its risk

  6. Direct and indirect effects of experimental warming on ecosystem carbon processes in a tallgrass prairie

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    concentration due to land-use change and fossil fuel combustion has resulted in a 0.6°C increase in the Earth [Price and Waser, 1998; Chmielewski and Ro¨tzer, 2001; Dunne et al., 2003; Fang et al., 2003; Norby et al

  7. Present and Future of Modeling Global Environmental Change: Toward Integrated Modeling, Eds., T. Matsuno and H. Kida, pp. 145172.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moorcroft, Paul R.

    145 Present and Future of Modeling Global Environmental Change: Toward Integrated Modeling, Eds., T, NH 03824, U.S.A. Abstract--Here we examine the cause, size and future of the U.S. carbon sink.4%, with the remainder due to land use. To forecast the future of the U.S. carbon sink, we used the Ecosystem Demography

  8. HYDROLOGICAL PROCESSES Hydrol. Process. (2011)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01

    HYDROLOGICAL PROCESSES Hydrol. Process. (2011) Published online in Wiley Online Library. Many recent studies quantify historical trends in streamflow and usually attribute these trends to structure studies of streamflow responses to climate change. A wide variety of trends in streamflow have

  9. Image Change Detection via Ensemble Learning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, Benjamin W [ORNL] [ORNL; Vatsavai, Raju [ORNL] [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    The concept of geographic change detection is relevant in many areas. Changes in geography can reveal much information about a particular location. For example, analysis of changes in geography can identify regions of population growth, change in land use, and potential environmental disturbance. A common way to perform change detection is to use a simple method such as differencing to detect regions of change. Though these techniques are simple, often the application of these techniques is very limited. Recently, use of machine learning methods such as neural networks for change detection has been explored with great success. In this work, we explore the use of ensemble learning methodologies for detecting changes in bitemporal synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images. Ensemble learning uses a collection of weak machine learning classifiers to create a stronger classifier which has higher accuracy than the individual classifiers in the ensemble. The strength of the ensemble lies in the fact that the individual classifiers in the ensemble create a mixture of experts in which the final classification made by the ensemble classifier is calculated from the outputs of the individual classifiers. Our methodology leverages this aspect of ensemble learning by training collections of weak decision tree based classifiers to identify regions of change in SAR images collected of a region in the Staten Island, New York area during Hurricane Sandy. Preliminary studies show that the ensemble method has approximately 11.5% higher change detection accuracy than an individual classifier.

  10. AN INTEGRATED VISION TO ASSIST THE EVOLUTION IN INDUSTRIAL RISK MANAGEMENT PROCESS IN FRANCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    AN INTEGRATED VISION TO ASSIST THE EVOLUTION IN INDUSTRIAL RISK MANAGEMENT PROCESS IN FRANCE Management in the field of environmental protection and risk prevention has evolved to the increasing with the complexity of risk management issues, in particular for those related to land-use planning. As technical

  11. Request a Permanent Change in Hours for an Existing Employee Use this job aid to request, post for and process a permanent change in hours for an existing MaPS or

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calgary, University of

    the Empl Class Quick Reference Sheet. · Enter the Length of Term which is a required field for all Limited Term positions, and must be between six months and two years. If known, enter the Expected Job End Date to the position attributes, so you will select Positioned Job ­ With Changes. Enter Position Information 3

  12. Land use and land cover change: the effects of woody plant encroachment and prescribed fire on biodiversity and ecosystem carbon dynamics in a southern great plains mixed grass savanna 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hollister, Emily Brooke

    2009-05-15

    treatments. Whole community estimates of herbaceous ANPP were obtained by summing individual functional group ANPP values. This approach was used to capture small, but important periods of productivity which might otherwise be masked by functional groups... stream_source_info HOLLISTER-DISSERTATION.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 280672 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name HOLLISTER-DISSERTATION.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 LAND...

  13. Linking tree biodiversity to belowground process in a young tropical plantation: Impacts on soil CO2 flux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Potvin, Catherine

    ,e a Department of Geography, McGill University, 805 Sherbrooke Street West, Montreal, Quebec, Canada H3A 2K6 b, Quebec, Canada Received 4 June 2007; received in revised form 2 January 2008; accepted 9 January 2008, 2000; Rayner et al., 2005). In particular, where there are high rates of land-use change, both

  14. 2014 Urban Forest Symposium: Climate Change and the Urban Forest Matt Kuharic, King County Department of Natural Resources and Parks (DNRP)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Sally

    Report · 2013: 660 new acres added to open space taxation programs (Public Benefit Rating System (PBRS Climate Action Plan Reducing Greenhouse Gas Emissions · Transportation and Land Use · Energy · Forests, promote public health, and are resilient to changing climate conditions. County Operations Goal: King

  15. On the connection between continental-scale land surface processes and the tropical climate in a coupled ocean-atmosphere-land system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma, Hsi-Yen; Mechoso, C. R.; Xue, Yongkang; Xiao, Heng; Neelin, David; Ji, Xuan

    2013-11-15

    The impact of global tropical climate to perturbations in land surface processes (LSP) are evaluated using perturbations given by different LSP representations of continental-scale in a global climate model that includes atmosphere-ocean interactions. One representation is a simple land scheme, which specifies climatological albedos and soil moisture availability. The other representation is the more comprehensive Simplified Simple Biosphere Model, which allows for interactive soil moisture and vegetation biophysical processes. The results demonstrate that LSP processes such as interactive soil moisture and vegetation biophysical processes have strong impacts on the seasonal mean states and seasonal cycles of global precipitation, clouds, and surface air temperature. The impact is especially significant over the tropical Pacific. To explore the mechanisms for such impact, different LSP representations are confined to selected continental-scale regions where strong interactions of climate-vegetation biophysical processes are present. We find that the largest impact is mainly from LSP perturbations over the tropical African continent. The impact is through anomalous convective heating in tropical Africa due to changes in the surface heat fluxes, which in turn affect basinwide teleconnections in the Pacific through equatorial wave dynamics. The modifications in the equatorial Pacific climate are further enhanced by strong air-sea coupling between surface wind stress and upwelling, as well as effect of ocean memory. Our results further suggest that correct representations of land surface processes, land use change and the associated changes in the deep convection over tropical Africa are crucial to reducing the uncertainty when performing future climate projections under different climate change scenarios.

  16. HYDROLOGICAL PROCESSES Hydrol. Process. (2011)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fountain, Andrew G.

    2011-01-01

    . Simultaneous time series for electrical conductivity, water temperature, and DO over the four-week study period. The main driver of the observed variations in DO is likely to be periodic melt-freeze cycles. We conclude perturbations have large impacts on hydrological and biological processes, via changes in rates of ice and snow

  17. Climate Change Adaptation Planning

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This course provides an introduction to planning for climate change impacts, with examples of tribes that have been going through the adaptation planning process. The course is intended for tribal...

  18. EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions - Land use

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    through decomposition, the continuing fall of trunks, branches, leaves, and other plant materials adds to the mass of litter and dead wood, leading to an overall increase in...

  19. Land Use Regulation with Durable Capital

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quigley, John M.; Swoboda, Aaron

    2009-01-01

    Manhattan so expensive? Regulation and the rise of housingmotive for restrictive regulation by local home owners.the impacts of these regulations vary across owner- occupied

  20. POLLUTION AND LAND USE: OPTIMUM AND DECENTRALIZATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hochman, Oded; Rausser, Gordon C.; Arnott, Richard J

    2008-01-01

    The case of internalizing pollution externalities, Journaltension between industrial pollution and households has beenas a means of controlling pollution. Separating polluter and

  1. POLLUTION AND LAND USE: OPTIMUM AND DECENTRALIZATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hochman, Oded; Rausser, Gordon C.; Arnott, Richard J

    2008-01-01

    the goal function, the initial allocation is not optimal; aoptimal allocation with convex production functions andoptimum allocation, both bid rents are functions of x and of

  2. Global Biofuels Modeling and Land Use

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    sectors of the economy Non-Agric Sectors Agric. Sectors Coal Coarse Grains Crude Oil Other Grains Natural Gas Other Agric. Other Manuf Oilseeds Oil Refining Sugarcane...

  3. Solar Land Use | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-Enhancing Capacity forSilicium deEnergy InformationDepotGreen Technology

  4. Land Use License | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas:Montezuma, Arizona: Energy Resources JumpColorado:New York: EnergyEnergy Jump

  5. Land Use Planning Handbook | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas:Montezuma, Arizona: Energy Resources JumpColorado:New York: EnergyEnergy JumpPlanning

  6. EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions - Land use

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969 1.979Coal4Cubic43,728 243,242ConsumersAnnual CoalOrigin65.6.

  7. Land Use Assessment Toolkit | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar2-0057-EAInvervar HydroElectricColorado: EnergyLamartine NavarroAssessment

  8. csp land use | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowa (UtilityMichigan) JumpZhuyuanWindeyZibobuildingcitiescommunitycontentcsp

  9. pv land use | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowa (UtilityMichigan)data book Homefuelleasingoutages Homeplanningpowerpv land

  10. OpenEI Community - csp land use

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceII JumpQuarterly Smart Grid Data available for download onst,/0 en BigArtby Example

  11. OpenEI Community - pv land use

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceII JumpQuarterly Smart Grid Data available for download

  12. OpenEI Community - solar land use

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceII JumpQuarterly Smart Grid Data available for downloadGRR 3rd Quarter -/0 en(DLA)

  13. Climate Change and Conceptual Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, David Joseph

    2013-01-01

    1.1.2 The Stark Reality of Climate Change . . . . . . . .1.2 Climate Change as a BehavioralEducation for Climate Change . . . . 1.4.1 The Numerically

  14. Patterns of Radiotherapy Practice for Patients With Cervical Cancer in Japan, 2003-2005: Changing Trends in the Pattern of Care Process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tomita, Natsuo, E-mail: ntomita@aichi-cc.jp [Department of Radiation Oncology, Aichi Cancer Center Hospital, Nagoya (Japan)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Aichi Cancer Center Hospital, Nagoya (Japan); Toita, Takafumi [Department of Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Science, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa (Japan)] [Department of Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Science, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa (Japan); Kodaira, Takeshi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Aichi Cancer Center Hospital, Nagoya (Japan)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Aichi Cancer Center Hospital, Nagoya (Japan); Shinoda, Atsunori [Department of Radiology, Shinshu University School of Medicine, Matsumoto (Japan)] [Department of Radiology, Shinshu University School of Medicine, Matsumoto (Japan); Uno, Takashi [Department of Radiology, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, Chiba (Japan)] [Department of Radiology, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, Chiba (Japan); Numasaki, Hodaka; Teshima, Teruki [Department of Medical Physics and Engineering, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, Suita (Japan)] [Department of Medical Physics and Engineering, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, Suita (Japan); Mitsumori, Michihide [Department of Radiation Oncology and Image-applied Therapy, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan)] [Department of Radiation Oncology and Image-applied Therapy, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan)

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: The patterns of care study (PCS) of radiotherapy for cervical cancer in Japan over the last 10 years was reviewed. Methods and Materials: The Japanese PCS working group analyzed data from 1,200 patients (1995-1997, 591 patients; 1999-2001, 324 patients; 2003-2005, 285 patients) with cervical cancer treated with definitive radiotherapy in Japan. Results: Patients in the 2001-2003 survey were significantly younger than those in the 1999-2001 study (p < 0.0001). Histology, performance status, and International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage were not significantly different among the three survey periods. Use of combinations of chemotherapy has increased significantly during those periods (1995-1997, 24%; 1999-2001, 33%; 2003-2005, 54%; p < 0.0001). The ratio of patients receiving concurrent chemotherapy has also dramatically increased (1995-1997, 20%; 1999-2001, 54%; 2003-2005, 83%; p < 0.0001). As for external beam radiotherapy (EBRT), the application rate of four-field portals has greatly increased over the three survey periods (1995-1997, 2%; 1999-2001, 7%; 2003-2005, 21%; p < 0.0001). In addition, the use of an appropriate beam energy for EBRT has shown an increase (1995-1997, 67%; 1999-2001, 74%; 2003-2005, 81%; p = 0.064). As for intracavitary brachytherapy (ICBT), an iridium source has become increasingly popular (1995-1997, 27%; 1999-2001, 42%; 2003-2005, 84%; p < 0.0001). Among the three surveys, the ratio of patients receiving ICBT (1995-1997, 77%; 1999-2001, 82%; 2003-2005, 78%) has not changed. Although follow-up was inadequate in each survey, no significant survival differences were observed (p = 0.36), and rates of late Grade 3 or higher toxicity were significantly different (p = 0.016). Conclusions: The Japanese PCS has monitored consistent improvements over the past 10 years in the application of chemotherapy, timing of chemotherapy, and EBRT methods. However, there is still room for improvement, especially in the clinical practice of ICBT.

  15. Vegetation Change Analysis User's Manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. J. Hansen; W. K. Ostler

    2002-10-01

    Approximately 70 percent of all U.S. military training lands are located in arid and semi-arid areas. Training activities in such areas frequently adversely affect vegetation, damaging plants and reducing the resilience of vegetation to recover once disturbed. Fugitive dust resulting from a loss of vegetation creates additional problems for human health, increasing accidents due to decreased visibility, and increasing maintenance costs for roads, vehicles, and equipment. Diagnostic techniques are needed to identify thresholds of sustainable military use. A cooperative effort among U.S. Department of Energy, U.S. Department of Defense, and selected university scientists was undertaken to focus on developing new techniques for monitoring and mitigating military impacts in arid lands. This manual focuses on the development of new monitoring techniques that have been implemented at Fort Irwin, California. New mitigation techniques are described in a separate companion manual. This User's Manual is designed to address diagnostic capabilities needed to distinguish between various degrees of sustainable and nonsustainable impacts due to military training and testing and habitat-disturbing activities in desert ecosystems. Techniques described here focus on the use of high-resolution imagery and the application of image-processing techniques developed primarily for medical research. A discussion is provided about the measurement of plant biomass and shrub canopy cover in arid. lands using conventional methods. Both semiquantitative methods and quantitative methods are discussed and reference to current literature is provided. A background about the use of digital imagery to measure vegetation is presented.

  16. Implementing change through a supplier evaluation process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wongthipkongka, Nitida

    2010-01-01

    With increased global competition, companies find that they must adjust and adapt to a supply chain model that incorporates more strategic suppliers. Pratt & Whitney, a division of United Technology Corporation, is no ...

  17. Change Log

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Log NERSC-8 Trinity Benchmarks Change Log 09032013 Correction applied to MiniDFT web-page (to remove inconsistency with MiniDFT README). Capability Improvement...

  18. Continuous Change Institutional Change Principle

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    ecause it takes time to establish institutional change, federal agencies need multiyear plans that continuously work to achieve, reinforce, and improve significant and persistent sustainability goals.

  19. Vermont Land Use: Essentials of Local Land Use Planning and Regulation |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEt Al.,Turin, NewArkansas: EnergyVentnorAct Rules Jump to:Form | Open

  20. Jonathan Chang, Jordan Boyd-Graber, Chong Wang, Sean Gerrish, and David M. Blei. Reading Tea Leaves: How Humans Interpret Topic Models. Neural Information Processing Systems, 2009, 9 pages.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyd-Graber, Jordan

    Jonathan Chang, Jordan Boyd-Graber, Chong Wang, Sean Gerrish, and David M. Blei. Reading Tea Leaves. @inproceedings{Chang:Boyd-Graber:Wang:Gerrish:Blei-2009, Title = {Reading Tea Leaves: How Humans Interpret Topic}, } 1 #12;Reading Tea Leaves: How Humans Interpret Topic Models Jonathan Chang Facebook 1601

  1. Change Log

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room News PublicationsAudits &BradburyMay 1,CenterJohnCeremony TheChallenges andChange LogChange

  2. EVOLUTIONARY CHANGE the evolution of change management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Emmerich, Michael

    page 1 EVOLUTIONARY CHANGE the evolution of change management by Jeroen van der Zon University, evolutionary change is studied by describing the evolution of Change Manage- ment (CM). CM is one . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 3 Modelling Change Management

  3. IMPROVING CHANGE MANAGEMENT: HOW COMMUNICATION NATURE INFLUENCES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    IMPROVING CHANGE MANAGEMENT: HOW COMMUNICATION NATURE INFLUENCES RESISTANCE TO CHANGE Paula Matos perform in time,practitioners may enhance guidelines to effective change communication management. It is requiring constant development of management science to deal with change processes. Impact and frequency

  4. Determine Institutional Change Sustainability Goals

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The first step in the institutional change process is defining your federal agency's sustainability goals. That is, decide what outcomes are desired (or required) over what period of time. Behavioral, organizational, and institutional changes typically are means to achieve desired energy, resource, or greenhouse gas emission outcomes. They are not ends in and of themselves.

  5. Climate Change Simulations with CCSM and CESM Project at NERSC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Climate Change Simulations with CCSM & CESM Climate Change Simulations with CCSM & CESM Key Challenges: Perform fundamental research on the processes that influence the natural...

  6. Climate Change 2007: Mitigation of Climate Change.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schiavon, Stefano; Zecchin, Roberto

    2007-01-01

    2007: Mitigation of Climate Change. Full report. WorkingIntergovernmental Panel on Climate Change www.webcda.it LaIntergovernmental Panel on Climate Change”. Il Rapporto

  7. This documentation will demonstrate the process of changing or resetting your password through the Siena College Password Reset Portal. Once a user has been registered at the Portal, a user will be able

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the Siena College Password Reset Portal. Once a user has been registered at the Portal, a user will be able to use the Password Reset Portal to (1) change their password when they already know their password MUST be registered for the Portal before you can change your password! Using the Password Reset Portal

  8. Change Number

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D BGene Network ShapingDate: M-16-04-04 Federal FacilityChange Number

  9. Change Number

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D BGene Network ShapingDate: M-16-04-04 Federal FacilityChange

  10. CS Chang

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room News PublicationsAudits &BradburyMay 1, 2013, 4:15pmEnergyNovemberCompute 1CS Chang CS

  11. Change Log

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room News PublicationsAudits &BradburyMay 1,CenterJohnCeremony TheChallenges andChange Log

  12. Global climate change crosses state boundaries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Changnon, S.A.

    1996-12-31

    The hot, dry summer of 1988 brought the specter of global warming a bit too close for comfort. {open_quotes}Scorching heat, not scientific models, attracted media attention,{close_quotes} says Stanley A. Changnon, senior scientist with the Illinois State Water Survey in Champaign, Illinois. Rising temperatures in the late 1980`s prompted individual states to begin to take action to curb greenhouse-gas emissions. A 1990 report by the National Governors Association identified two guiding principles for addressing climate change issues. {open_quotes}First, that energy policy must be at the center of any efforts to control greenhouse-gas emissions. Second, that state can...restrict emissions through state policies related to public utilities, land use, transportation, and even taxation,{close_quotes} Changnon says. Even if concerns for global warming prove to be overblown, states decided to act for broader economic and environmental reasons. Such initiatives not only save money, but they improve air quality and leave the nation more energy independent,{close_quotes} Changnon says.

  13. Towards Solid IT Change Management: Automated Detection of Conflicting IT Change Plans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kemper, Alfons

    Towards Solid IT Change Management: Automated Detection of Conflicting IT Change Plans Sebastian kemper@in.tum.de Abstract--Change Management, a core process of the Informa- tion Technology Infrastructure Library (ITIL), is concerned with the management of changes to networks and services to satisfy

  14. Commissioning Process

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The commissioning process for Federal facilities generally follows a four-step process. This process holds true across all forms of commissioning and for both new and existing buildings.

  15. Point processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frederic Schoenberg

    2011-01-01

    f(t) = 0 for t Renewal models embody the notion thatmodels are surveyed including Poisson processes, renewalrenewal process originating at the corresponding parent. Self-correcting models

  16. Management of change lessons learned

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jakubowski, J.A. [Upjohn Co., Kalamazoo, MI (United States)

    1996-08-01

    This paper will describe the development of a computer program that was written to assist production units meet the requirements of the management of chance (MOC) section under the OSHA Process Safety Management (PSM) Standard, 29 CFR 1910.119 (1). Areas that will be addressed include: the development of a MOC written policy, pilot testing of change control management procedures, training of operational and maintenance personnel to follow these procedures and final implementation of established chance control measures. Practical {open_quotes}lessons learned{close_quotes} will be reviewed and a description of the use of an Access{sup {trademark}}program that was written to enhance daily MOC equipment and process changes will be highlighted. This program was designed to expedite the required PSM review of changes and to simultaneously trigger an update of related change documentation such as piping and instrumentation diagrams, equipment files, regulatory permits, and unit operating procedures.

  17. NRE 501. 295 Managing Organizational Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoffman, Andrew J.

    NRE 501. 295 Managing Organizational Change WINTER B 2006 Syllabus Class Meets: Professor Andrew, while the necessity for change may seem obvious, methods for managing it are elusive. This course, implement and evaluate organizational change processes. One's effectiveness as a manager or team member

  18. Hydrocarbon Processing`s refining processes `96

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-11-01

    The paper compiles information on the following refining processes: alkylation, benzene reduction, benzene saturation, catalytic cracking, catalytic reforming, coking, crude distillation, deasphalting, deep catalytic cracking, electrical desalting, ethers, fluid catalytic cracking, hydrocracking, hydrogenation, hydrotreating, isomerization, resid catalytic cracking, treating, and visbreaking. The application, products, a description of the process, yield, economics, installation, and licensor are given for each entry.

  19. HYDROLOGICAL PROCESSES INVITED COMMENTARY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonnell, Jeffrey J.

    in the past 30 years, the basic concepts have changed only slightly. More detailed process representations after the last such USA-Japan hydrology seminar (see details in McDonnell et al., this issue is grounded in engineering and now motivated by explaining Copyright 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. 2053 #12;J

  20. Review: Global Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    introduction to global climate change, the greenhouseReview: Global Climate Change: A Primer By Orrin H PilkeyPilkey, Keith C. Global Climate Change: a primer. Durham,

  1. Apportioning Climate Change Costs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farber, Daniel A.

    2008-01-01

    Apportioning Climate Change Costs Daniel A. Farber* I. II.ON CLIMATE CHANGE FOUR QUESTIONS ABOUTof how to respond to climate change. Most public attention

  2. Forest Research Annual Report and Accounts 2003200498 Recent advances in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the interactions between the forestry land use component and the terrestrial water, carbon and nitrogen cycles environmental, ecological and land-use change. Therefore considerable understanding of the biological, biophysical and physical processes influencing the life cycle of trees and the forest ecosystem is required

  3. Climate Change and Extinctions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sinervo, Barry

    2013-01-01

    Lectures presents: Climate Change and Extinctions Happening2013. He will present a climate change extinction model that

  4. Climate Change Scoping Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Climate Change Scoping Plan a amework for change as approved Prepared by the California AirBackgroundBackgroundBackground ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 4444 1. Climate Change Policy in California1. Climate Change Policy in California1. Climate Change Policy in California1. Climate Change Policy in California

  5. Climate Change Scoping Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Climate Change Scoping Plan a amework for change Prepared by the California Air Resources BoardBackgroundBackgroundBackground ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 4444 1. Climate Change Policy in California1. Climate Change Policy in California1. Climate Change Policy in California1. Climate Change Policy in California

  6. Methods and Process Stewardship | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Plans (AOP). PMCO also manages the governance and Change Control Board processes, tools, support and our online resource center, PM Central. Goals and Priorities Enhance the...

  7. MGSC 485 Business Process Management Fall 2007 BUSINESS PROCESS MANAGEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Almor, Amit

    organizational change initiatives such as TQM, Business Process Reengineering, and Six-Sigma campaigns discussions. Students will learn and practice principles and techniques/tools of Lean and Six-Sigma Approach to business process improvements. This is in light of the pervasive implementations of six-sigma campaigns

  8. Employee Alignment: A Process for Understanding Individual Changeability 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thundiyil, Tomas

    2015-05-29

    Despite the fact that employee alignment with an initiative is often considered a critical process of organizational change, few studies have examined processes where organizations change the individual to bring about alignment. This research aims...

  9. Environmental Change Institute Environmental Change Institute

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oxford, University of

    Environmental Change Institute 2012/13 eci Environmental Change Institute #12;ii Environmental 06 Educating environmental leaders 08 Centre for interdisciplinary doctoral training 10 A thriving, Dumfriesshire (ECI) #12;1 The Environmental Change Institute has 21 years' experience in helping governments

  10. Climate change effects on agriculture: Economic responses to biophysical shocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, Gerald; Valin, Hugo; Sands, Ronald; Havlik, Petr; Ahammad, Helal; Deryng, Delphine; Elliott, Joshua; Fujimori, Shinichiro; Hasegawa, Tomoko; Heyhoe, Edwina; Kyle, G. Page; von Lampe, Martin; Lotze-Campen, Hermann; Mason d'Croz, Daniel; van Meijl, Hans; van der Mensbrugghe, Dominique; Mueller, C.; Popp, Alexander; Robertson, Richard; Robinson, Sherman; Schmid, E.; Schmitz, Christoph; Tabeau, Andrzej; Willenbockel, Dirk

    2013-12-16

    Agricultural production is sensitive to weather and will thus be directly affected by climate change. Plausible estimates of these climate change impacts require combined use of climate, crop, and economic models. Results from previous studies vary substantially due to differences in models, scenarios, and data. This paper is part of a collective effort to systematically integrate these three types of models. We focus on the economic component of the assessment, investigating how nine global economic models of agriculture represent endogenous responses to seven standardized climate change scenarios produced by two climate and five crop models. These responses include adjustments in yields, area, consumption, and international trade. We apply biophysical shocks derived from the IPCC’s Representative Concentration Pathway that result in end-of-century radiative forcing of 8.5 watts per square meter. The mean biophysical impact on crop yield with no incremental CO2 fertilization is a 17 percent reduction globally by 2050 relative to a scenario with unchanging climate. Endogenous economic responses reduce yield loss to 11 percent, increase area of major crops by 12 percent, and reduce consumption by 2 percent. Agricultural production, cropland area, trade, and prices show the greatest degree of variability in response to climate change, and consumption the lowest. The sources of these differences includes model structure and specification; in particular, model assumptions about ease of land use conversion, intensification, and trade. This study identifies where models disagree on the relative responses to climate shocks and highlights research activities needed to improve the representation of agricultural adaptation responses to climate change.

  11. Climate change action plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delivery Climate change action plan 2009-2011 #12;2 | Climate change action plan ©istockphoto.com #12;Climate Change Action Plan Climate change action plan | 3 Contents Overview 4 Preface and Introduction 5 Climate change predictions for Scotland 6 The role of forestry 7 Protecting and managing

  12. Title 36 CFR 251 Land Uses | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEt Al., 2013)Open EnergyTinox Jump to:,11InformationC.F.R. 29751 Land

  13. Title 50 CFR 29 Land Use Management | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEt Al., 2013)Open EnergyTinoxOpenStatutes Jump to: navigation,Habitat |Title9

  14. Land Use Regulations, Compliance and Land Markets in Argentina

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monkkonen, P; Ronconi, L

    2013-01-01

    upgrading programmes in Argentina: the cases of Promeba andand Bermu´dez, G. (2011) Argentina’s housing market in theREGULATION AND PRICE IN ARGENTINA Libertun de Duren, N. (

  15. DEVELOPING CALIFORNIA INTEGRATED LAND USE/TRANSPORTATION MODEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01

    1, allocates production and consumption  activities across implies the  production and consumption of commodities.  rates.  The production and consumption rates were derived 

  16. Land Use Influences on Trip Chaining in Portland, Oregon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenwald, Michael J.; McNally, Michael G.

    2008-01-01

    in feet) to the light rail stop nearest to the home X 25 =nearest to the home X 23 = Number of light rail stops within

  17. Landscape characteristics, land use, and coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) abundance,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montgomery, David R.

    . The proportion of total adult coho salmon abundance supported by a specific stream reach was consistent among these habitat variables explained al- most half of the variation in the annual distribution of adult coho salmon versant de la Snohomish. La proportion du nombre total de saumons adultes maintenue par chaque section de

  18. Aligning lAnd Use And TrAnsporTATion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    communities with enhanced mobility options by: · Developingandevaluatingeffective Global Warming Solutions Act of 2006 (AB 32), in 2008 California adopted the Sustainable Communities these initiatives, and partnering with government to help create more sustainable communities. ULTRANS is playing

  19. LAND USE AND ECOLOGICAL IMPACTS FROM SHALE DEVELOPMENT IN

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    in the Marcellus region. Some of those species, such as the green salamander and the snow trillium, have all or most of their populations in areas with a high probability of...

  20. Nexus of Energy, Water and Land Use: A Blueprint for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Das, Suman

    , etc. cycles. · Lets look at Carbon. #12;IEA BLUE MAP SCENARIO FOR 2050 #12;Key technologies to reduce Global CO2 emissions Source: Energy Technology Perspectives 2010, Key Graphs, IEA 2010 3.2 Gt C/yr 8 Gt C Technology Perspectives 2010, Key Graphs, IEA 2010 $12 T $1 T$7 T$28 T Transport is the most important

  1. Sustainable Development & Land Use Committee Meeting Meeting 2010-2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    project - there was a harvest party (corn boil) that was very well attended and enjoyed by all. Sports were: - the success of the bottle water free Orientation with each new student receiving a free water bottle. - there is no bottled water for sale anywhere campus - Katrina thanked Buildings & Grounds

  2. Potential Land Use Implications of a Global Biofuels Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gurgel, Angelo C.

    In this paper we investigate the potential production and implications of a global biofuels industry. We

  3. The impact of biofuel mandates on land use

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmad, Suhail, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2011-01-01

    The use of biofuels in domestic transportation sector in the United States and European Union is attributed mainly to the binding mandates, Renewable Fuel Standard in the US and European Directive on the Promotion of ...

  4. Synthesis and Summary: Land Use Decisions and Fire Risk1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    growth on fuel management and fire protection, concerns stated or implied in all presentations. Jim Davis of California, Davis. A preliminary analysis of the population, based on questionnaires, indicated that the aver was spent in fire suppres- sion. The bill for all costs and damages amounted to more than $1 billion. Given

  5. A National Survey of Local Land-Use

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neimark, Alexander V.

    of Design, Harvard University Cambridge, Massachusetts Associate Investigator Jerold S. Kayden HUD AGENCY OVERSIGHT: Regina C. Gray Edwin A. Stromberg HUD Originator Papers: Rolf Pendall, Cornell University Larry A without the strong commitment of the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD). Mr. Edwin A

  6. Regional patterns of agricultural land use and deforestation in Colombia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Queensland, University of

    Science, School of Geography, Planning and Architecture, University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD 4072 Asia (e.g. Indonesia), tropical Africa (e.g. Cameroon), Latin America (e.g. Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador (2006) 369­386 * Corresponding author at: School of Geography, Planning and Architecture, Chamberlain

  7. Geothermal Power Plants — Minimizing Land Use and Impact

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    For energy production and development, geothermal power plants don't use much land compared to coal and nuclear power plants. And the environmental impact upon the land they use is minimal.

  8. Towards a Real Estate Land Use Modeling Paradigm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dokko, Yoon; Edelstein, Robert H.

    1992-01-01

    for Nonresidential Real Estate: Inflation Expectations andand R. C. Zisler, “Real Estate: The Whole Story,” Journal ofTests for the Efficiency of Real Estate Investment Markets,”

  9. MSU at Work in Africa: Land Use, Strategic Growth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , construction, and finance of which are related to land tenure, use, and planning. Africans need rural economic areas of Africa, excessive extraction of resources, including oil, coal, and natural gas, has resulted

  10. Global Consequences of Land Use Jonathan A. Foley,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schweik, Charles M.

    , fiber, water, and shelter to more than six billion people. Global croplands, pastures, plantations in atmospheric composition to the extensive modification of Earth_s ecosystems (3­6). For example, land and ecosystem services, such as food, fiber, shelter, and fresh- water. On the other hand, some forms of land

  11. Sustainable Development & Land Use Committee Meeting Meeting 2010-2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    will be made available on the SD&LU web page. 5. SDAG Report - Katrina Kroeze The SDAG held their first meeting by the end of January 2011. - Keith Baxter mentioned that the Johnson basement was very dark with the dark

  12. Finding GIS data: Land cover and land use in Kansas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Houser, Rhonda

    2006-12-08

    classes with no key to indicate class descriptions. The student understands how human actions modify the physical environment. The student helps create both a hard copy and digital pie chart that shows relative land cover class areas. The student... helps create a digital pie chart that shows relative land cover class areas. The student helps create a pie chart by hand that shows relative land cover class areas. The student creates e a pie chart by hand that shows relative land cover class...

  13. Local Land-Use Controls and Aging-Friendliness

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosenthal, Larry A.

    2009-01-01

    A. 2001. “Aging and Smart Growth: Building Aging-Sensitivebuilding such product exclusively, or predominantly, because it creates homogenous-age zones, defeats smart-

  14. Bishop's University Sustainable Development & Land Use Committee Meeting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    September 22nd , 2011 from 4:00 to 5:30 p.m. in Hamilton #300 Present: Drew Leyburne (Chair), Michel Caron appreciation to Lynn Hyde's work as the recording secretary for the committee for the past years. He suggested 26th . At present, Ameresco is working on all the mechanical rooms on campus. The geothermal heating

  15. H.R.S. 205 - Land Use | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View New PagesSustainableGlynn County,SolarFERC

  16. Geothermal/Land Use Planning | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View New PagesSustainable UrbanKentucky:Bore TechnologiesAssessment InsettingGrid Connection

  17. File:01LandUseOverview.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, AlabamaETEC GmbHFarinello GeothermalFideris IncFile FTP DocumentFD-bFile EditFile

  18. Montana - Land Use License Application | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland: Energy ResourcesDec(Pritchett, 2004)Michigan: EnergyNew York:Lands | OpenLand

  19. RAPID/BulkTransmission/Land Use | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsourceBulkTransmission/Environment/Nevada < RAPID‎ |

  20. RAPID/Geothermal/Land Use | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onRAPID/Geothermal/Exploration/Colorado < RAPID‎

  1. ORS 197 - Comprehensive Land Use Planning | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPI VenturesNewSt. Louis, Minnesota:Nulato,Nyack, NewAgreement |AEnergyOPCORS197

  2. Oregon Land Use Compatibility Statement for Onsite Wastewater Treatment

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPIProtectio Program | Open Energy Information| OpenManagement Division

  3. Oregon Land Use Compatibility Statements Website | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPIProtectio Program | Open Energy Information| OpenManagement

  4. Land-use Scenario Analysis Toolkit | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar2-0057-EAInvervar HydroElectricColorado: EnergyLamartine

  5. Agriculture and Land Use National Greenhouse Gas Inventory Software | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EAand DaltonSolar EnergyAerodynall Countriescapital

  6. Alaska Department of Natural Resources Land Use Planning Webpage | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EAand DaltonSolarOpen5 - Applications JumpPermits | OpenEnergyEnergy

  7. Alaska Department of Natural Resources Land Use Plans | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EAand DaltonSolarOpen5 - Applications JumpPermits |

  8. California Land Use Planning Information Network | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmentalBowerbank, Maine:Kansas: EnergyCalendarCalhounWebpage |Open EnergyCalifornia Lake

  9. Bureau of Land Management - Land Use Planning | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmentalBowerbank, Maine: EnergyEnergyOhio: EnergyNorth Dakota:HillE-Forms JumpFONSIsPlanning

  10. Hawaii State Land Use Commission | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource History View NewGuam: Energy ResourcesHasselbachLight Company News

  11. Agriculture, Forestry and Other Land Use Mitigation Project Database | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowaWisconsin: Energy Resources JumpAdelan1986) |WaterAgni UK IncAgraliteEnergy

  12. Bureau of Land Management - Land Use Planning Handbook | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowaWisconsin:PontiacInformationAssessment

  13. INL Comprehensive Land Use and Environmental Stewardship Report

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (JournalvivoHighHussein KhalilResearch8 IEEE TRANSACTIONSIIILet'sINL

  14. How Europe is Changing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdolah, Kader

    2012-01-01

    20. Devil 21. Tirannie How Europe is Changing 22. Bin Ladencan swim in a pond," he How Europe is Changing I says. "Yourain falls on his hat. How Europe is Changing An Empty Grave

  15. Page 1 of 8 Information Technologies Change Management Standard

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Habib, Ayman

    Page 1 of 8 hi Information Technologies Change Management Standard Definitions 1 Change and supports change management processes by providing assistance in assessing and prioritizing change requests (CI): Any technical component (e.g. hardware, software) that needs to be managed in order to deliver

  16. Change Management James Tam, Saul Greenberg, and Frank Maurer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenberg, Saul

    Change Management James Tam, Saul Greenberg, and Frank Maurer Department of Computer Science change management as a process that helps one person recognize and track changes made by one or more others. Our particular interest is in how change management can be applied within a diagramming tool

  17. Phenotypic Plasticity, Ecophysiology, and Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saleska, Scott

    when the habitat changes? Habitat Tracking Ackerly 2003 #12;9/24/2010 3 Evolution Plasticity #12." Bradshaw 1965 #12;9/24/2010 5 From Sultan, 2007 Sun and Shade leaves Taiz and Zeiger. Plant Physiology responses to climate change relative to other processes (i.e. evolution, habitat tracking, etc)? · What

  18. Global change research: Science and policy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rayner, S.

    1993-05-01

    This report characterizes certain aspects of the Global Change Research Program of the US Government, and its relevance to the short and medium term needs of policy makers in the public and private sectors. It addresses some of the difficulties inherent in the science and policy interface on the issues of global change. Finally, this report offers some proposals for improving the science for policy process in the context of global environmental change.

  19. Climate change cripples forests

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Climate Change Cripples Forests Climate change cripples forests A team of scientists concluded that in the warmer and drier Southwest of the near future, widespread tree mortality...

  20. Climate change cripples forests

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Climate change cripples forests Climate change cripples forests A team of scientists concluded that in the warmer and drier Southwest of the near future, widespread tree mortality...

  1. A Framework for Modeling Uncertainty in Regional Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    climate models). The modeling framework revolves around the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MITA Framework for Modeling Uncertainty in Regional Climate Change Erwan Monier, Xiang Gao, Jeffery processes of policy development and implementation, climate change research needs to focus on improving

  2. Climate Extremes, Uncertainty and Impacts Climate Change Challenge: The Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Climate Extremes, Uncertainty and Impacts Climate Change Challenge: The Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC, AR4) has resulted in a wider acceptance of global climate change climate extremes and change impacts. Uncertainties in process studies, climate models, and associated

  3. Climatic Change An Interdisciplinary,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reale, Marco

    1 23 Climatic Change An Interdisciplinary, International Journal Devoted to the Description, Causes and Implications of Climatic Change ISSN 0165-0009 Volume 107 Combined 3-4 Climatic Change (2011) 107:247-265 DOI available until 12 months after publication. #12;Climatic Change (2011) 107:247­265 DOI 10.1007/s10584

  4. Climate Change and Transportation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    1 Climate Change and Transportation Addressing Climate Change in the Absence of Federal Guidelines;6 WSDOT Efforts · Climate Change Team · Project Level GHG Approach · Planning Level GHG Approach · Alternative Fuels Corridor · Recent legislation and research #12;7 WSDOT Efforts: Climate Change Team

  5. Global Climate Change,Global Climate Change, Land Cover Change, andLand Cover Change, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Global Climate Change,Global Climate Change, Land Cover Change, andLand Cover Change, and HydrologyHydrology Steven Fassnacht Watershed Science Colorado State University The Importance of Climate · Climate affects the environment and us ­ Ecology: vegetation and animals ­ Water Systems ­ People

  6. Characterizing Uncertainty for Regional Climate Change Mitigation and Adaptation Decisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unwin, Stephen D.; Moss, Richard H.; Rice, Jennie S.; Scott, Michael J.

    2011-09-30

    This white paper describes the results of new research to develop an uncertainty characterization process to help address the challenges of regional climate change mitigation and adaptation decisions.

  7. Occupancy change detection system and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bruemmer, David J. (Idaho Falls, ID) [Idaho Falls, ID; Few, Douglas A. (Idaho Falls, ID) [Idaho Falls, ID

    2009-09-01

    A robot platform includes perceptors, locomotors, and a system controller. The system controller executes instructions for producing an occupancy grid map of an environment around the robot, scanning the environment to generate a current obstacle map relative to a current robot position, and converting the current obstacle map to a current occupancy grid map. The instructions also include processing each grid cell in the occupancy grid map. Within the processing of each grid cell, the instructions include comparing each grid cell in the occupancy grid map to a corresponding grid cell in the current occupancy grid map. For grid cells with a difference, the instructions include defining a change vector for each changed grid cell, wherein the change vector includes a direction from the robot to the changed grid cell and a range from the robot to the changed grid cell.

  8. 116/02/2005 Assessing the changes in safety

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    be operated, and · The identification of vulnerable locations where modifications to a system may be required gathered in this area is essential for land use planning, the classification of hazardous areas

  9. Modeling landslide occurrence and impacts in a changing climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leidy, Erin, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2014-01-01

    In the coming years and decades, shifts in weather, population, land use, and other human factors are expected to have an impact on the occurrence and severity of landslides. A landslide inventory database from Switzerland ...

  10. Water Resources Challenges in the Next Decade and Beyond - Global Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerald Sehlke

    2008-05-01

    One of the most pressing issues facing water resources professionals in the next decade is “Global Change” and its impacts on humans and the environment. Global change research focuses on the anthropogenic aspects of climate change, land use change, water resources development and urbanization. Global change, at its root, is driven by two major factors; first, the overall size and growth of the human population, and second, by a combination of our life styles, our economies and technology development. Arguably, much of the success associated with human survival and prosperity has been related to our ability to control and utilize water resources to our benefit. However, while such development has helped extend human longevity, health and prosperity, our activities have greatly altered the earth’s climate and land and water resources. The hydrological and biological capacity of the earth must be shared by all living creatures. The challenges for water resources professionals in the next decade and beyond are to limit our population growth, to moderate our life styles and economies, and to develop technologies that will provide for our human needs, yet protect and maintain the earth’s environment for all current and future inhabitants.

  11. Climate Change, Adaptation, and Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cole, Daniel H.

    2008-01-01

    Climate Change, Adaptation, and Development Daniel H. Cole*THE COSTS OF CLIMATE CHANGE . ADAPTATIONCONVENTION ON CLIMATE CHANGE . IV. A.

  12. Hardware engineering change management : an enterprise analysis of factors contributing to technical change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knight, Matthew T. (Matthew Trevor)

    2013-01-01

    Engineering change management (ECM) is an essential but challenging cross-functional discipline within modern product development firms. ECM is best explained as a discipline because no single process can characterize the ...

  13. Hydrocracking process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baird, M.J.; Gutberlet, L.C.; Miller, J.T.

    1984-02-14

    A process for hydrocracking gas oil boiling range hydrocarbon feeds comprising contacting the feed with hydrogen under hydrocracking conditions in the presence of a catalyst comprising an active metallic component comprising at least one metal having hydrogenation activity and at least one oxygenated phosphorus component, and a support component comprising at least one non-zeolitic, porous refractory inorganic oxide matrix component and at least one crystalline molecular sieve zeolite component.

  14. Hydrocracking process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lamb, P.R.; Bakas, S.T.; Wood, B.M.

    1984-05-08

    A method is disclosed for hydrocracking a hydrocarbon feedstock having a propensity to form polynuclear aromatic compounds without excessively fouling the processing unit. The hydrocracking method includes contacting the hydrocarbon feedstock with a crystalline zeolite hydrocracking catalyst, contacting at least a portion of the resulting unconverted hydrocarbon oil containing polynuclear aromatic compounds with an adsorbent which selectively retains polynuclear aromatic compounds and recycling unconverted hydrocarbon oil having a reduced concentration of polynuclear aromatic compounds to the hydrocracking zone.

  15. Change in historic buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yin, Chien-Ni

    1992-01-01

    Change in historic buildings is inevitable. If these changes are not well-managed, the cityscape will be threatened because a city is composed of buildings. A good city should combine both growth and preservation. Controlling ...

  16. "Managing Department Climate Change"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    "Managing Department Climate Change" #12;Presenters · Ronda Callister Professor, Department Department Climate? · Assesment is essential for determining strategies for initiating change · In a research climate · Each panelist will describe an intervention designed to improve department climate ­ Ronda

  17. Hydropyrolysis process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ullman, Alan Z. (Northridge, CA); Silverman, Jacob (Woodland Hills, CA); Friedman, Joseph (Huntington Beach, CA)

    1986-01-01

    An improved process for producing a methane-enriched gas wherein a hydrogen-deficient carbonaceous material is treated with a hydrogen-containing pyrolysis gas at an elevated temperature and pressure to produce a product gas mixture including methane, carbon monoxide and hydrogen. The improvement comprises passing the product gas mixture sequentially through a water-gas shift reaction zone and a gas separation zone to provide separate gas streams of methane and of a recycle gas comprising hydrogen, carbon monoxide and methane for recycle to the process. A controlled amount of steam also is provided which when combined with the recycle gas provides a pyrolysis gas for treatment of additional hydrogen-deficient carbonaceous material. The amount of steam used and the conditions within the water-gas shift reaction zone and gas separation zone are controlled to obtain a steady-state composition of pyrolysis gas which will comprise hydrogen as the principal constituent and a minor amount of carbon monoxide, steam and methane so that no external source of hydrogen is needed to supply the hydrogen requirements of the process. In accordance with a particularly preferred embodiment, conditions are controlled such that there also is produced a significant quantity of benzene as a valuable coproduct.

  18. Infrastructure Institutional Change Principle

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Research shows that changes in infrastructure prompt changes in behavior (for better or worse). Federal agencies can modify their infrastructure to promote sustainability-oriented behavior change, ideally in ways that make new behaviors easier and more desirable to follow than existing patterns of behavior.

  19. CLIMATE CHANGE AND BIODIVERSITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CLIMATE CHANGE AND BIODIVERSITY THE CONTRIBUTION OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY #12;At, the origin of which is mainly related to human activities. For the first time climate change sends a strong of climate change and that will fully find material expression in the debates. What will the world we shape

  20. CLIMATE CHANGE & THE GREENHOUSE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tobar, Michael

    CLIMATE CHANGE & THE GREENHOUSE EFFECT #12;This development of these materials was supported under.nasa.gov/Features/BlueMarble/BlueMarble_history.php © 2014 University of Western Australia ISBN 978-0-646-93241-5 Title: Climate change and the greenhouse OF CONTENTS TABLE OF CONTENTS Introduction to climate change resources 5 Alternative conceptions 6 References