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1

Soil Carbon Sequestration and Land-Use Change: Processes and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sequestration and Land-Use Change Soil Carbon Sequestration and Land-Use Change: Processes and Potential PDF file Full text Global Change Biology 6:317-327 (2000) Wilfred M. Post...

2

Biofuels and indirect land use change  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biofuels and indirect land use change The case for mitigation October 2011 #12;About this study), Malaysian Palm Oil Board, National Farmers Union, Novozymes, Northeast Biofuels Collaborative, Patagonia Bio contributed views on a confidential basis. #12;1Biofuels and indirect land use change The case for mitigation

3

The land use climate change energy nexus  

SciTech Connect

Landscape ecology focuses on the spatial patterns and processes of ecological and human interactions. These patterns and processes are being altered both by changing human resource-management practices and changing climate conditions associated, in part, with increases in atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases. Dominant resource extraction and land management activities involve energy, and the use of fossil energy is one of the key drivers behind increasing greenhouse gas emissions as well as land-use changes. Alternative energy sources (such as wind, solar, nuclear, and bioenergy) are being explored to reduce greenhouse gas emission rates. Yet, energy production, including alternative-energy options, can have a wide range of effects on land productivity, surface cover, albedo, and other factors that affect carbon, water and energy fluxes and, in turn, climate. Meanwhile, climate influences the potential output, relative efficiencies and sustainability of alternative energy sources. Thus climate change, energy choices, and land-use change are linked, and any analysis in landscape ecology that considers one of these factors should consider them all. This analysis explores the implications of those linkages and points out ecological patterns and processes that may be affected by these interactions.

Dale, Virginia H [ORNL; Efroymson, Rebecca Ann [ORNL; Kline, Keith L [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Greenhouse Gas Policy Development in the Land Use, Land-Use Change...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Policy Development in the Land Use, Land-Use Change and Forestry (LULUCF) Sector J. Kinsman (jkinsman@eei.org; 202-508-5711) Edison Electric Institute 701 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W....

5

Impacts of Land-use Changes on Biofuels ORNL History of Exploring Changes in Land Use in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Impacts of Land-use Changes on Biofuels ORNL History of Exploring Changes in Land Use in the United. Building from their work on environmental costs and benefits associated with biofuel production, ORNL positively impact the sustainability of the biofuels industry. Building understanding of land-use change from

6

Land use and climate change in Miami-Dade County  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Miami-Dade County, Florida, was one of the earliest jurisdictions to adopt a climate change plan in 1993. Land use features prominently in this plan as a means to reduce greenhouse gases through development patterns that ...

Peckett, Haley Rose

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Memorandum on Land Use Change and the Global Food System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The LUC (Land Use Change) term in an LCA assessment of a biofuel’s global warming effect (GW), while superposable for small excursions, is not independent of other events in the global food system. In particular, the GW effect of biofuel use resulting from remote land use change mediated by global grain markets is probably larger to the extent that food supplies are under pressure from whatever other causes. Fuel use of any inputs to food production, especially land, unambiguously causes an increase in food prices relative to what they would otherwise be as long as the demand curve for food slopes upward to the left. Limited opportunities do exist for what are termed ‘pro-poor ’ land use strategies; namely positve, synergestic, interactions of biofuel production and food availability. An example from Africa is included in this memo. Past experience with the ‘Green Revolution ’ of agricultural intensification suggests, however, that the chance to improve the sitation of the global poor can be exceedingly difficult to implement. Discussion Current analysis of the global warming (GW) effect resulting from the substitution of biofuels for petroleum recognizes that land use change (LUC) remote in space (and possibly time) induced by competition with food consumption for biofeedstocks may be large, and that the carbon releases from these changes may not only reduce the GW advantage of [some] biofuels over petroleum but actually reverse it. The discussion has been especially influenced by two recent journal articles (Fargione, Hill, Tilman, Polasky, & Hawthorne, 2008; Searchinger et al., 2007). Because LUC is ‘caused ’ directly by price changes for food crops, discussion of policy implications, including especially discussion in the popular press (for example, (Garber, 2008)), has noted the rapid worldwide increase in food prices, especially grains, over the past two or three years. A good part of that discussion comprises contradictory assertions about whether the increase in US corn ethanol production is responsible for the increases, part of them, or very little. Other

Richard Rhoda; Daniel Kammen

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Attributing land-use change carbon emissions to exported biomass  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, a simple, transparent and robust method is developed in which land-use change (LUC) emissions are retrospectively attributed to exported biomass products based on the agricultural area occupied for the production. LUC emissions account for approximately one-fifth of current greenhouse gas emissions. Increasing agricultural exports are becoming an important driver of deforestation. Brazil and Indonesia are used as case studies due to their significant deforestation in recent years. According to our study, in 2007, approximately 32% and 15% of the total agricultural land harvested and LUC emissions in Brazil and Indonesia respectively were due to exports. The most important exported single items with regard to deforestation were palm oil for Indonesia and bovine meat for Brazil. To reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions effectively worldwide, leakage of emissions should be avoided. This can be done, for example, by attributing embodied LUC emissions to exported biomass products. With the approach developed in this study, controversial attribution between direct and indirect LUC and amortization of emissions over the product life cycle can be overcome, as the method operates on an average basis and annual level. The approach could be considered in the context of the UNFCCC climate policy instead of, or alongside with, other instruments aimed at reducing deforestation. However, the quality of the data should be improved and some methodological issues, such as the allocation procedure in multiproduct systems and the possible dilution effect through third parties not committed to emission reduction targets, should be considered. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CO{sub 2} emissions from land use changes are highly important. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Attribution of land use changes for products is difficult. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Simple and robust method is developed to attribute land use change emissions.

Saikku, Laura, E-mail: laura.saikku@helsinki.fi [University of Helsinki, P.O Box 65, 00014 University of Helsinki (Finland); Soimakallio, Sampo, E-mail: sampo.soimakallio@vtt.fi [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, P.O. Box 1000, 02044 VTT (Finland); Pingoud, Kim, E-mail: kim.pingoud@vtt.fi [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, P.O. Box 1000, 02044 VTT (Finland)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

9

An integrated approach to modelling land-use change on continental and global scales  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Land-use and land-cover change are important drivers of global environmental change, affecting the state of biodiversity, the global carbon cycle, and other aspects of the earth system. In this article we describe the development of the land-use model ... Keywords: Continental and global scale land-use change modelling, Human-environment interaction, Land-use systems, Model framework

Rüdiger Schaldach; Joseph Alcamo; Jennifer Koch; Christina Kölking; David M. Lapola; Jan Schüngel; Jörg A. Priess

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Data Sets Released from Two LBA Land Use-Land Change Teams  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Two land Use-Land Change Teams The ORNL DAAC and the LBA DIS announce the release of two data sets from the Land Use-Land Change teams, a component of the LBA-ECO Large Scale...

11

GRR/Section 1a - Land Use Planning Process | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

1a - Land Use Planning Process < GRR Jump to: navigation, search Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleGRRSection1a-LandUsePlanningProcess&oldid448257"...

12

Climate Change Mitigation Through Land-Use Measures in the Agriculture...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Climate Change Mitigation Through Land-Use Measures in the Agriculture and Forestry Sectors Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Climate Change Mitigation Through...

13

EA-1936: Proposed Changes to Parcel ED-1 Land Uses, Utility Infrastruc...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6: Proposed Changes to Parcel ED-1 Land Uses, Utility Infrastructure, and Natural Area Management Responsibility, Oak Ridge, Tennessee EA-1936: Proposed Changes to Parcel ED-1 Land...

14

Integrated assessment and the relation between land-use change and climate change  

SciTech Connect

Integrated assessment is an approach that is useful in evaluating the consequences of global climate change. Understanding the consequences requires knowledge of the relationship between land-use change and climate change. Methodologies for assessing the contribution of land-use change to atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations are considered with reference to a particular case study area: south and southeast Asia. The use of models to evaluate the consequences of climate change on forests must also consider an assessment approach. Each of these points is discussed in the following four sections.

Dale, V.H.

1994-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

15

Climate Change Mitigation Through Land-Use Measures in the Agriculture and  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Climate Change Mitigation Through Land-Use Measures in the Agriculture and Climate Change Mitigation Through Land-Use Measures in the Agriculture and Forestry Sectors Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Climate Change Mitigation Through Land-Use Measures in the Agriculture and Forestry Sectors Agency/Company /Organization: International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD) Sector: Energy, Land, Climate Focus Area: Forestry, Agriculture Topics: Policies/deployment programs Resource Type: Publications Website: www.iisd.org/pdf/2009/climate_change_mitigation_land_use.pdf References: Climate Change Mitigation Through Land-Use Measures in the Agriculture and Forestry Sectors[1] Overview "This paper reviews the status of the post-2012 negotiations on climate change mitigation through land-use measures in the agriculture and forestry

16

Expanding the Role of "Land Use, Land Use Change and Forestry" Projects and the Carbon Market in Addressing Global Climate Change  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

While the Land Use, Land Use Change and Forestry (LULUCF) sector is highly significant in any consideration of global climate change, the fact remains that the scale of LULUCF market activity currently is very small, particularly compared with its overall potential for carbon sequestration and importance as both a source and sink of carbon emissions. The underlying problem seems to be finding a workable policy framework. A flexible market-based policy at both international and domestic levels will score ...

2005-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

17

THE EFFECTS OF CLIMATE CHANGE AND BIOFUEL PRODUCTION ON AGRICULTURAL LAND USE AND BIOMASS PRODUCTION.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This project examines the influence that climate change and biofuel production could have on agricultural land use decisions in Pennsylvania. The first chapter develops a… (more)

Yenerall, Jacqueline

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

The Relationship between Land Use and Temperature Change in Dallas County, Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study examines the relationship between land use and temperature change in Dallas County, TX. The purpose of this research is to analyze the relationship between temperature and land use and to identify the primary factors contributing to the formation of urban heat islands based on different categories of land use. Specifically, this research analyzes the elements that contribute to the urban heat island effect in Dallas County using temperature data provided by remote sensing imagery and parcel-based land use data using Geographic Information System (GIS) technique and a correlation analysis method, which was employed to analyze the relationship between temperature and land use. The results of this study showed that every land use category has different temperature averages and those patterns were observed similarly in both 2000 and 2005. Parking, airport, commercial, industrial, and residential areas have relatively high temperatures. In contrast, water, undeveloped area and parks showed relatively low temperatures. Another major finding was ratio of land use composition affected the temperature of census tracts. Correlation analyses of land use and temperature in 2000 and 2005 indicate that various types of land use categories have significant relationships with temperature. Among them commercial, industrial, residential, parking, and infrastructure, are positively associated with temperature, while undeveloped, parks, water, and dedicated areas are negatively associated with temperature. Areas with a high ratio of commercial use showed the highest and undeveloped areas showed the lowest relationship. Furthermore, through the analysis of the relationship between land use and temperature change for five years (2000-2005), this study finds that temperature change depends on the ratio of each land use category change. The results of this study can help local planning and policy decisions which are related to urban land use planning concerning temperature change such as zoning, environmental regulations and open space preservation.

Kim, Hee Ju

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Biofuel Policy & Indirect Land Use Change (ILUC) Dr. Julie Witcover, Dr. Sonia Yeh  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biofuel Policy & Indirect Land Use Change (ILUC) Dr. Julie Witcover, Dr. Sonia Yeh Institute(jwitcover@ucdavis.edu), Sonia Yeh(slyeh@ucdavis.edu) Project Description Indirect land use change (ILUC) occurs when biofuel with a risk of substantial GHG emissions. Controversy over ILUCs inclusion in biofuel policies is due

California at Davis, University of

20

GRR/Section 13 - Land Use Assessment Process | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

- Land Use Assessment Process - Land Use Assessment Process < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 13 - Land Use Assessment Process 13 - LandUseAssessmentProcess.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 13 - LandUseAssessmentProcess.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative Preexisting land uses at and surrounding the site are critical considerations in the early planning stages of the project. Federal and state law may prohibit interference with certain preexisting uses. For instance, developers should consider impact on farmland, livestock, nearby

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land-use change processes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Land Use Change in Central Florida and Sensitivity Analysis Based on Agriculture to Urban Extreme Conversion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper explored recent land use and land cover change in western central Florida, examining both socioeconomic and biophysical influences on land transformation and the impacts of that change. Between 1995 and 2006, a growth in population ...

José L. Hernández; Syewoon Hwang; Francisco Escobedo; April H. Davis; James W. Jones

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Wheat Yield Functions for Analysis of Land-Use Change in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CERES-Wheat, a dynamic process crop growth model is specified and validated for eight sites in the major wheat-growing regions of China. Crop model results are then used to test functional forms for yield response to nitrogen fertilizer, irrigation water, temperature, and precipitation. The resulting functions are designed to be used in a linked biophysical-economic model of land-use and land-cover change. Variables explaining a significant proportion of simulated yield variance are nitrogen, irrigation water, and precipitation; temperature was not a sig...

Chynthia Rosenzweig; Ana Iglesias; Yanhua Liu; Walter Baethgen (baethgen+aea-undp. Org. Uy; James W. Jones; Gordon J. Macdonald

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

TRENDS Online - Carbon Flux to the Atmosphere from Land-Use Change  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Trends graphic Carbon Flux to the Atmosphere from Land-Use Changes 1850-2005 Richard A. Houghton The Woods Hole Research Center, 149 Woods Hole Road, Falmouth, Massachusetts 02540,...

24

Greenhouse Gas Policy Influences Climate via Direct Effects of Land-Use Change  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Proposed climate mitigation measures do not account for direct biophysical climate impacts of land-use change (LUC), nor do the stabilization targets modeled for phase 5 of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5) representative ...

Andrew D. Jones; William D. Collins; James Edmonds; Margaret S. Torn; Anthony Janetos; Katherine V. Calvin; Allison Thomson; Louise P. Chini; Jiafu Mao; Xiaoying Shi; Peter Thornton; George C. Hurtt; Marshall Wise

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

EA-1936: Proposed Changes to Parcel ED-1 Land Uses, Utility Infrastructure,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6: Proposed Changes to Parcel ED-1 Land Uses, Utility 6: Proposed Changes to Parcel ED-1 Land Uses, Utility Infrastructure, and Natural Area Management Responsibility, Oak Ridge, Tennessee EA-1936: Proposed Changes to Parcel ED-1 Land Uses, Utility Infrastructure, and Natural Area Management Responsibility, Oak Ridge, Tennessee SUMMARY NOTE: This EA has been cancelled. This EA will evaluate the environmental impacts of DOE's proposed modifications to the allowable land uses, utility infrastructure, and Natural Area management responsibility for Parcel ED-1. The purpose of the modifications is to enhance the development potential of the Horizon Center business/industrial park, while ensuring protection of the adjacent Natural Area. The area addressed by the proposed action was evaluated for various industrial/business uses in the

26

GRR/Section 3-MT-d - Land Use License Process | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

d - Land Use License Process d - Land Use License Process < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 3-MT-d - Land Use License Process 03MTDLandUseLicenseProcess (1).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Montana Department of Natural Resources & Conservation Regulations & Policies Surface Management Rule 36.25.103 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 03MTDLandUseLicenseProcess (1).pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative The land use license is intended to be used for short-term use of state-owned lands. This license may be used for casual use of the lands

27

GRR/Section 1-FD-a - Land Use Planning Process | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

-FD-a - Land Use Planning Process -FD-a - Land Use Planning Process < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 1-FD-a - Land Use Planning Process 01-FD-a - LandUsePlanning.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Bureau of Land Management United States Department of Energy Bureau of Indian Affairs United States Forest Service Regulations & Policies National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Federal Land Policy and Management Act of 1976(FLPMA) CEQ CRF Regulations 40 C.F.R. 1501.7 Scoping 40 C.F.R. 1502.9 Draft, Final, and Supplemental Statements 40 C.F.R. 1502.14 Alternatives Including the Proposed Action 40 C.F.R. 1503.4 Response to Comments 40 C.F.R. 1506.1 Limitations on Actions During the NEPA Process

28

Relating United States Crop Land Use to Natural Resources and Climate Change  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Crop production depends not only on the yield but also on the area harvested. The yield response to climate change has been widely examined, but the sensitivity of crop land use to hypothetical climate change has not been examined directly. Crop ...

K. G. Hubbard; F. J. Flores-mendoza

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Land-use change and greenhouse gas emissions from corn and cellulosic  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Science Science Computing, Environment & Life Sciences Energy Engineering & Systems Analysis Photon Sciences Physical Sciences & Engineering Energy Frontier Research Centers Science Highlights Postdoctoral Researchers Land-use change and greenhouse gas emissions from corn and cellulosic ethanol July 16, 2013 Tweet EmailPrint The greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions that may accompany land-use change (LUC) from increased biofuel feedstock production are a source of debate in the discussion of drawbacks and advantages of biofuels. Estimates of LUC GHG emissions focus mainly on corn ethanol and vary widely. Increasing the understanding of LUC GHG impacts associated with both corn and cellulosic ethanol will inform the on-going debate concerning their magnitudes and

30

GRR/Section 1-FD-b - Land Use Plan Amendment Process | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

-FD-b - Land Use Plan Amendment Process -FD-b - Land Use Plan Amendment Process < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 1-FD-b - Land Use Plan Amendment Process 01-FD-b - LandUsePlanAmendmentProcess.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Bureau of Land Management United States Forest Service Regulations & Policies National Environmental Policy Act 40 CFR 1506.1 Limitations on Actions During NEPA Process 40 CFR 1501.4(e)(2) "No Significant Impact" 40 CFR 1501.7 Scoping 43 CFR 1610.3-1(d) Developing Guidance to Field Manager 43 CFR 1610.3-2(e) To the Governor 43 CFR 1610.7-2(b) Public Notice Triggers None specified A Plan amendment is a modification of one or more parts (e.g., decisions about geothermal leasing) of an existing Land Use Plan (LUP). A LUP can be

31

Climate Impacts of Land-Cover and Land-Use Changes in Tropical Islands under Conditions of Global Climate Change  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Land-cover and land-use (LCLU) changes have significant climate impacts in tropical coastal regions with the added complexity of occurring within the context of a warming climate. The individual and combined effects of these two factors in ...

Daniel E. Comarazamy; Jorge E. González; Jeffrey C. Luvall; Douglas L. Rickman; Robert D. Bornstein

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Resource Assessment and Land Use Change Light Duty Vehicles/Fuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to farmgate or forest roadside (not transportation or conversion) · Exogenous targets for biofuel production emissions related to biofuels ­ Emissions can be reduced by including a broad set of incentives targeting · Resource assessment and indirect land use change 2 #12;Increasing Feedstock Production for Biofuels

33

The Land-use Change Effect of Ethanol Plants in Iowa: 1997-2009  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this article we test the local land-use change effects of ethanol plants in Iowa using county-level panel data between 1997 and 2009. Results show that the establishment of ethanol plants has a significant effect on land-use change in counties where the plants are located. Moreover, locally owned ethanol plants have slightly higher effects than non-locally owned ethanol plants have. Specifically, ceteris paribus, the average effect of a locally (or non-locally) owned 100-million gallon ethanol plant is to increase the corn acreage share by 5.9 (or 5.7) percentage points in its host-county if the plant’s corn supply area (defined as a round area center at the plant) is completely in the county. The land-use change effect is greater in counties with medium corn share than in counties with either low or high corn shares. Once rotation effects are controlled, the average prices in April for December corn future contracts no longer significantly affect corn acreage share. Key words: land-use change, ethanol plants, Iowa, Arellano-Bond difference GMM estimator.

Ruiqing Miao

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

A hybrid analytical-heuristic method for calibrating land-use change models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Spatially explicit land-use models simulate the patterns of change on the landscape in response to coupled human-ecological dynamics. As these models become more complex involving larger than ever data sets, the need to improve calibration techniques ... Keywords: Amazon deforestation, Dinamica EGO, Genetic algorithm, Map comparison method, Spatial transition probability

Britaldo Soares-Filho; Hermann Rodrigues; Marco Follador

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

CARBON FLUX TO THE ATMOSPHERE FROM LAND-USE CHANGES: 1850 TO 1990 (APPENDIX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

B: REGIONAL LAND-USE CHANGE AND WOOD HARVEST DATA B: REGIONAL LAND-USE CHANGE AND WOOD HARVEST DATA The following listing provides the regional details of fuelwood (nonindustrial logging) and timber (industrial logging) harvest by forest type, changes in area of pasture, forest plantation, afforestation, forest clearing for croplands, and lands in shifting cultivation. The values in this listing replace the values in the indicated ascii and binary spreadsheet files in Houghton and Hackler (1995), the previous version of this database. South and Southeast Asia The following values replace the data in files asia-rat.* in Houghton and Hackler (1995). South and Southeast Asia Fuelwood Harvest (10^6 Mg C per year): Tropical Tropical Tropical moist seasonal open Year forest forest forest 1751 8.58 10.50 4.50

36

Relating United States crop land use to natural resources and climate change  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Crop production depends not only on the yield but also on the area harvested. The yield response to climate change has been widely examined, but the sensitivity of crop land use to hypothetical climate change has not been examined directly. Crop land-use regression models for estimating crop area indices (CAIs)-the percent of land used for corn, soybean, wheat, and sorghum production-are presented. Inputs to the models include available water-holding capacity of the soil, percent of land available for rain-fed agricultural production, annual precipitation, and annual temperature. The total variance of CAI explained by the models ranged from 78% from wheat to 87% for sorghum, and the root-mean-square errors ranged from 1.74% for sorghum to 4.24% for corn. The introduction of additional climatic variables to the models did not significantly improve their performance. The crop land-use models were used to predict the CAI for every crop reporting district in the United States for the current climatic condition and for possible future climate change scenarios (various combinations of temperature and precipitation changes over a range of -3{degrees} to +6{degrees}C and -20% to +20% respectively). The magnitude of climatic warming suggested by GCMs (GISS and GFDL) is from 3.5{degrees} to 5.9{degrees}C for regions of the United States. For this magnitude of warming, the model suggests corn and soybean production areas may decline while wheat and sorghum production areas may expand. If the warming is accompanied by a decrease in annual precipitation from 1% to 10%, then the areas used for corn and soybean production could decrease by as much as 20% and 40%, respectively. The area for sorghum and wheat under these conditions would increase by as much as 80% and 70%, respectively; the exact amount depending strongly on the change in precipitation. 15 refs., 6 figs.

Flores-Mendoza, F.J.; Hubbard, K.G. [Univ. of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE (United States)

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Carbon Flux to the Atmosphere From Land-use Changes: 1850 to 1990  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Flux to the Atmosphere From Land-use Changes: 1850 to 1990 Carbon Flux to the Atmosphere From Land-use Changes: 1850 to 1990 (NDP-050/R1) DOI: 10.3334/CDIAC/lue.ndp050 data Data PDF PDF The PDF of NDP-050/R1 (body of report, plus appendices A through E) and tellus51b.pdf (Appendix F, reprint of Houghton paper in Tellus, Vol. 51B; copyright 1999 Blackwell Publishing Ltd and reprinted with kind permission from the publisher) Contributors Richard A. Houghton Joseph L. Hackler The Woods Hole Research Center Woods Hole, Massachusetts Please Note: Revised data through the year 2000 are available in CDIAC's Trends Online. Prepared by Robert M. Cushman Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center Environmental Sciences Division Publication No. 5054 Date Published: February 2001 Prepared for the Environmental Sciences Division Office of Biological and Environmental Research

38

Biofuels, causes of land-use change, and the role of fire in greenhouse gas emissions  

SciTech Connect

IN THEIR REPORTS IN THE 29 FEBRUARY ISSUE ('LAND CLEARING AND THE BIOFUEL CARBON debt,' J. Fargione et al., p. 1235, and 'Use of U.S. croplands for biofuels increases greenhouse gases through emissions from land-use change,' T. Searchinger et al., p. 1238), the authors do not provide adequate support for their claim that biofuels cause high emissions due to land-use change. The conclusions of both papers depend on the misleading premise that biofuel production causes forests and grasslands to be converted to agriculture. However, field research, including a meta-analysis of 152 case studies, consistently finds that land-use change and associated carbon emissions are driven by interactions among cultural, technological, biophysical, political, economic, and demographic forces within a spatial and temporal context rather than by a single crop market. Searchinger et al. assert that soybean prices accelerate clearing of rainforest based on a single citation for a study not designed to identify the causal factors of land clearing. The study analyzed satellite imagery from a single state in Brazil over a 4-year period and focused on land classification after deforestation. Satellite imagery can measure what changed but does little to tell us why. Similarly, Fargione et al. do not rely on primary empirical studies of causes of land-use change. Furthermore, neither fire nor soil carbon sequestration was properly considered in the Reports. Fire's escalating contribution to global climate change is largely a result of burning in tropical savannas and forests. Searchinger et al. postulate that 10.8 million hectares could be needed for future biofuel, a fraction of the 250 to 400 million hectares burned each year between 2000 and 2005. By offering enhanced employment and incomes, biofuels can help establish economic stability and thus reduce the recurring use of fire on previously cleared land as well as pressures to clear more land. Neither Searchinger et al. nor Fargione et al. consider fire as an ongoing land-management tool. In addition, deep-rooted perennial biofuel feedstocks in the tropics could enhance soil carbon storage by 0.5 to 1 metric ton per hectare per year. An improved understanding of the forces behind land-use change leads to more favorable conclusions regarding the potential for biofuels to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

Kline, Keith L [ORNL; Dale, Virginia H [ORNL

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Observational Evidence that agricultural Intensification and land use change may1 be reducing the Indian Summer Monsoon Rainfall2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Indian Summer Monsoon Rainfall2 Dev Niyogi1 , Chandra Kishtawal2 , Shivam Tripathi3 , Rao S. Govindaraju3 land use change and monsoonal rainfall climatology is10 analyzed. A combination of statistical analysis data over13 the Indian summer monsoon region, (ii) investigate the relation between land use change/14

Niyogi, Dev

40

File:01-FD-b - LandUsePlanAmendmentProcess.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land-use change processes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Future land use plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy`s (DOE) changing mission, coupled with the need to apply appropriate cleanup standards for current and future environmental restoration, prompted the need for a process to determine preferred Future Land Uses for DOE-owned sites. DOE began the ``Future Land Use`` initiative in 1994 to ensure that its cleanup efforts reflect the surrounding communities` interests in future land use. This plan presents the results of a study of stakeholder-preferred future land uses for the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), located in central Long Island, New York. The plan gives the Laboratory`s view of its future development over the next 20 years, as well as land uses preferred by the community were BNL ever to cease operations as a national laboratory (the post-BNL scenario). The plan provides an overview of the physical features of the site including its history, topography, geology/hydrogeology, biological inventory, floodplains, wetlands, climate, and atmosphere. Utility systems and current environmental operations are described including waste management, waste water treatment, hazardous waste management, refuse disposal and ground water management. To complement the physical descriptions of the site, demographics are discussed, including overviews of the surrounding areas, laboratory population, and economic and non-economic impacts.

NONE

1995-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

42

Increase in Near-Surface Atmospheric Moisture Content due to Land Use Changes: Evidence from the Observed Dewpoint Temperature Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Land use change can significantly affect root zone soil moisture, surface energy balance, and near-surface atmospheric temperature and moisture content. During the second half of the twentieth century, portions of the North American Great Plains ...

Rezaul Mahmood; Kenneth G. Hubbard; Ronnie D. Leeper; Stuart A. Foster

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Carbon Calculator for Land Use Change from Biofuels Production (CCLUB). Users' manual and technical documentation.  

SciTech Connect

The Carbon Calculator for Land Use Change from Biofuels Production (CCLUB) calculates carbon emissions from land use change (LUC) for four different ethanol production pathways including corn grain ethanol and cellulosic ethanol from corn stover, miscanthus, and switchgrass. This document discusses the version of CCLUB released May 31, 2012 which includes corn, as did the previous CCLUB version, and three cellulosic feedstocks: corn stover, miscanthus, and switchgrass. CCLUB calculations are based upon two data sets: land change areas and above- and below-ground carbon content. Table 1 identifies where these data are stored and used within the CCLUB model, which is built in MS Excel. Land change area data is from Purdue University's Global Trade Analysis Project (GTAP) model, a computable general equilibrium (CGE) economic model. Section 2 describes the GTAP data CCLUB uses and how these data were modified to reflect shrubland transitions. Feedstock- and spatially-explicit below-ground carbon content data for the United States were generated with a surrogate model for CENTURY's soil organic carbon sub-model (Kwon and Hudson 2010) as described in Section 3. CENTURY is a soil organic matter model developed by Parton et al. (1987). The previous CCLUB version used more coarse domestic carbon emission factors. Above-ground non-soil carbon content data for forest ecosystems was sourced from the USDA/NCIAS Carbon Online Estimator (COLE) as explained in Section 4. We discuss emission factors used for calculation of international greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in Section 5. Temporal issues associated with modeling LUC emissions are the topic of Section 6. Finally, in Section 7 we provide a step-by-step guide to using CCLUB and obtaining results.

Mueller, S; Dunn, JB; Wang, M (Energy Systems); (Univ. of Illinois at Chicago)

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

44

Land Use Changes and Consequent CO2 Emissions due to US Corn Ethanol Production: A Comprehensive Analysis* By  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are deeply indebted to Dr. Michael Wang for his many contributions to this research. Throughout the process, he has consistently posed excellent questions that have stimulated more thinking and modifications on our part. Also, for this final paper, he provided an excellent set of insightful suggestions and comments that have improved the paper significantly. Of course, the authors are solely responsible for the content of and any errors in the report. **The original April report was revised because in the review process errors were found in the magnitudes of the EU and Brazil ethanol shocks in moving from the 2001 data base to the updated 2006 data base. The impacts of the errors were small. However, we revised the report to reflect the corrected shocks. The model versions posted on the web include the corrected values and are consistent with this report. Executive Summary The basic objective of this research was to estimate land use changes associated with US corn ethanol production up to the 15 billion gallon Renewable Fuel Standard level implied by the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007. We also used the estimated land use changes to calculate Greenhouse Gas Emissions associated with the corn ethanol production. The main model that was used for the analysis is a special version of the Global Trade

Wallace E. Tyner; Farzad Taheripour; Qianlai Zhuang; Dileep Birur; Uris Baldos

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

CARBON FLUX TO THE ATMOSPHERE FROM LAND-USE CHANGES: 1850 TO 1990 (APPENDIX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

E: FULL LISTING OF COMPARE.DAT (FILE 4) E: FULL LISTING OF COMPARE.DAT (FILE 4) The following is a full listing of ascii file compare.dat (File 4), which is also provided, in binary spreadsheet format, as file compare.wk1 (File 5). This file compares the estimated global total net flux of carbon to the atmosphere from land-use change, from 1850 to 1990, by year, for this database (Houghton 1999) and three earlier publications (Houghton et al. 1983, Houghton and Skole 1990, and Houghton and Hackler 1995). Note that the data for the period 1850 through 1859 attributed below to Houghton et al. (1983) were not actually presented in that publication but are present in the data used in that publication. Units = Pg of carbon (1 petagram = 1015 grams); -9.999 denotes missing value Year Houghton Houghton Houghton Houghton

46

CARBON FLUX TO THE ATMOSPHERE FROM LAND-USE CHANGES: 1850 TO 1990 (APPENDIX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

D: FULL LISTING OF NDP050.DAT (FILE 2) D: FULL LISTING OF NDP050.DAT (FILE 2) The following is a full listing of ascii file ndp050.dat (File 2), which is also provided, in binary spreadsheet format, as file ndp050.wk1 (File 3). This file lists the estimated net flux of carbon, in units of 1000 Gg of carbon (1 gigagram = 109 g), to the atmosphere from land-use change, from 1850 through 1990, by year and by region, along with the global totals. The values in this listing replace the values in files netflux.* in Houghton and Hackler (1995), the previous version of this database. Year North South and Europe North Tropical Former China South and Pacific TOTAL America Central Africa and Africa Soviet Southeast Developed FLUX America Middle East Union Asia Region

47

Research priorities in land use and land-cover change for the Earth system and integrated assessment modelling  

SciTech Connect

This special issue has highlighted recent and innovative methods and results that integrate observations and AQ3 modelling analyses of regional to global aspect of biophysical and biogeochemical interactions of land-cover change with the climate system. Both the Earth System and the Integrated Assessment modeling communities recognize the importance of an accurate representation of land use and land-cover change to understand and quantify the interactions and feedbacks with the climate and socio-economic systems, respectively. To date, cooperation between these communities has been limited. Based on common interests, this work discusses research priorities in representing land use and land-cover change for improved collaboration across modelling, observing and measurement communities. Major research topics in land use and land-cover change are those that help us better understand (1) the interaction of land use and land cover with the climate system (e.g. carbon cycle feedbacks), (2) the provision of goods and ecosystem services by terrestrial (natural and anthropogenic) land-cover types (e.g. food production), (3) land use and management decisions and (4) opportunities and limitations for managing climate change (for both mitigation and adaptation strategies).

Hibbard, Kathleen A.; Janetos, Anthony C.; Van Vuuren, Detlef; Pongratz, Julia; Rose, Steven K.; Betts, Richard; Herold, Martin; Feddema, Johannes J.

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

48

Determining Robust Impacts of Land-Use-Induced Land Cover Changes on Surface Climate over North America and Eurasia: Results from the First Set of LUCID Experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The project Land-Use and Climate, Identification of Robust Impacts (LUCID) was conceived to address the robustness of biogeophysical impacts of historical land use–land cover change (LULCC). LUCID used seven atmosphere–land models with a common ...

Nathalie de Noblet-Ducoudré; Juan-Pablo Boisier; Andy Pitman; G. B. Bonan; V. Brovkin; Faye Cruz; C. Delire; V. Gayler; B. J. J. M. van den Hurk; P. J. Lawrence; M. K. van der Molen; C. Müller; C. H. Reick; B. J. Strengers; A. Voldoire

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Baselines For Land-Use Change In The Tropics: Application To Avoided Deforestation Projects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the area of the pilot carbon sequestration projects in theseLUCS = Land Use and Carbon Sequestration model, and GEOMOD =in Mexico: making carbon sequestration a by-product of

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Indirect Land Use Change: A second best solution to a first class problem  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and reflect the concern that biofuel production will lead tothe whole plant for biofuel production, not just parts ofbiofuel or expansion of biofuel production on land use is an

Zilberman, David D.; Hochman, Gal; Rajagopal, Deepak

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Land-Use Change and Carbon Sinks: Econometric Estimation of the Carbon Sequestration Supply Function  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Shuzhen Nong, and helpful comments on previous versions of the manuscript by Michael Roberts. The authors take responsibility for all remaining errors. The opinions expressed are the authors ’ only and do not necessarily When and if the United States chooses to implement a greenhouse gas reduction program, it will be necessary to decide whether carbon sequestration policies — such as those that promote forestation and discourage deforestation — should be part of the domestic portfolio of compliance activities. We investigate the cost of forest-based carbon sequestration. In contrast with previous approaches, we econometrically examine micro-data on revealed landowner preferences, modeling six major private land uses in a comprehensive analysis of the contiguous United States. The econometric estimates are used to simulate landowner responses to sequestration policies. Key commodity prices are treated as endogenous and a carbon sink model is used to predict changes in carbon storage. Our estimated marginal costs of carbon sequestration are greater than those from previous engineering cost analyses and sectoral optimization models. Our estimated sequestration supply function is similar to the carbon abatement supply function from energy-based analyses, suggesting that forest-based carbon

Ruben N. Lubowski; Andrew J. Plantinga; Robert N. Stavins

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Carbon Flux to the Atmosphere from Land-Use Changes: 1850 to 1990  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The database documented in this numeric data package, a revision to a database originally published by the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC) in 1995, consists of annual estimates, from 1850 through 1990, of the net flux of carbon between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere resulting from deliberate changes in land cover and land use, especially forest clearing for agriculture and the harvest of wood for wood products or energy. The data are provided on a year-by-year basis for nine regions (North America, South and Central America, Europe, North Africa and the Middle East, Tropical Africa, the Former Soviet Union, China, South and Southeast Asia, and the Pacific Developed Region) and the globe. Some data begin earlier than 1850 (e.g., for six regions, areas of different ecosystems are provided for the year 1700) or extend beyond 1990 (e.g., fuelwood harvest in South and Southeast Asia, by forest type, is provided through 1995). The global net flux during the period 1850 to 1990 was 124 Pg of carbon (1 petagram = 10{sup 15} grams). During this period, the greatest regional flux was from South and Southeast Asia (39 Pg of carbon), while the smallest regional flux was from North Africa and the Middle East (3 Pg of carbon). For the year 1990, the global total net flux was estimated to be 2.1 Pg of carbon.

Houghton, R.A.

2001-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

53

Regional Climate Change in Tropical and Northern Africa due to Greenhouse Forcing and Land Use Changes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Human activity is supposed to affect the earth’s climate mainly via two processes: the emission of greenhouse gases and aerosols and the alteration of land cover. While the former process is well established in state-of-the-art climate model ...

Heiko Paeth; Kai Born; Robin Girmes; Ralf Podzun; Daniela Jacob

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

The impact of climate, CO2, nitrogen deposition and land use change on simulated contemporary global river flow  

SciTech Connect

We investigated how climate, rising atmospheric CO2 concentration, increasing anthropogenic nitrogen deposition and land use change influenced continental river flow over the period 1948-2004 using the Community Land Model version 4 (CLM4) with coupled river transfer model (RTM), a global river routing scheme. The model results indicate that the global mean river flow shows significant decreasing trend and climate forcing likely functions as the dominant controller of the downward trend during the study period. Nitrogen deposition and land use change account for about 5% and 2.5% of the decrease in simulated global scale river flow, respectively, while atmospheric CO2 accounts for an upward trend. However, the relative role of each driving factor is heterogeneous across regions in our simulations. The trend in river flow for the Amazon River basin is primarily explained by CO2, while land use change accounts for 27.4% of the downward trend in river flow for the Yangtze rive basin. Our simulations suggest that to better understand the trends of river flow, it is not only necessary to take into account the climate, but also to consider atmospheric composition, carbon-nitrogen interaction and land use change, particularly for regional scales.

Shi, Xiaoying [ORNL; Mao, Jiafu [ORNL; Thornton, Peter E [ORNL; Hoffman, Forrest M [ORNL; Post, Wilfred M [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Understanding and Mapping Land-Use and Land-Cover Change along Bolivia's Corredor Bioceancio  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Corredor Bioceanico is a major transportation project connecting the agricultural heartlands of South America to the Atlantic and Pacific coasts. The final link is in southeastern Bolivia - an underdeveloped area that is home to two indigenous groups and globally-significant woodlands and wetlands. Infrastructure developments - comprising a major highway upgrade, revitalized railway services and increased flows along gas pipelines to Brazil - pose major threats to livelihoods and the region's ecological integrity. There are two broad objectives: (i) to map and quantify the spatial patterns of land change using a time-series of coarse and medium resolution satellite imagery; and (ii) to understand the socio-economic and political drivers of change by linking household surveys and interviews with farmers; environmental, climatic, and political data; and classified satellite imagery. Overall, large-scale deforestation has occurred along the Corredor Bioceanico for mechanized commercial production of oil-seed crops such as soybeans and sunflower. The significance of these findings is that agriculture-driven deforestation is pushing into sensitive areas threatening world-renowned ecosystems such as the Chaco, Chiquitano and Pantanal as well as noteworthy national parks. Though quantity remains relatively small compared to other parts of South America, rates of forest loss match or exceed those of more publicized regions such as Rondonia or Mato Grosso, Brazil. Moreover, rates of forest loss are accelerating linearly with time due to policies implemented by incumbent president Evo Morales. Results also show that in the first years of cultivation, pasture is the dominant land-use, but it quickly gives way to intensively cropped farmland. The main findings in terms of percentage area cleared according to forest type is that farmers appear to be favoring transitional forest types on deep and poorly drained soils of alluvial plains. Semi-structured interviews with farmers and representatives of key institutions illustrate that price determined by the global market is not proportionally the most dominant motive driving LULCC in the lowlands of Santa Cruz, Bolivia - an area seen as a quintessential neoliberal frontier.

Redo, Daniel J.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Land use and energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides estimates of the amount of land required by past and future energy development in the United States and examines major federal legislation that regulates the impact of energy facilities on land use. An example of one land use issue associated with energy development - the potential conflict between surface mining and agriculture - is illustrated by describing the actual and projected changes in land use caused by coal mining in western Indiana. Energy activities addressed in the report include extraction of coal, oil, natural gas, uranium, oil shale, and geothermal steam; uranium processing; preparation of synfuels from coal; oil refineries; fossil-fuel, nuclear, and hydro-electric power plants; biomass energy farms; and disposal of solid wastes generated during combustion of fossil fuels. Approximately 1.1 to 3.3 x 10/sup 6/ acres were devoted to these activities in the United States in 1975. As much as 1.8 to 2.0 x 10/sup 6/ additional acres could be required by 1990 for new, nonbiomass energy development. The production of grain for fuel ethanol could require an additional 16.9 to 55.7 x 10/sup 6/ acres by 1990. Federal laws that directly or indirectly regulate the land-use impacts of energy facilities include the National Environmental Protection Act, Clean Air Act, Federal Water Pollution Control Act, Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act, and Coastal Zone Management Act. The major provisions of these acts, other relevant federal regulations, and similar state and local regulatons are described in this report. Federal legislation relating to air quality, water quality, and the management of public lands has the greatest potential to influence the location and timing of future energy development in the United States.

Robeck, K.E.; Ballou, S.W.; South, D.W.; Davis, M.J.; Chiu, S.Y.; Baker, J.E.; Dauzvardis, P.A.; Garvey, D.B.; Torpy, M.F.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Governing Change: An Institutional Geography of Rural Land Use, Environmental Management, and Change in the North Coastal Basin of California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

timber producing land while sediment pollution is associatedin Rural Land Use, Nonpoint Source Pollution, and Evolvingto reduce sediment pollution from private lands within the

Short, Anne Garrity

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Mitigation Options in Forestry, Land-Use, Change and Biomass Burning in Africa  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Mitigation options to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and sequester carbon in land use sectors are describe in some detail. The paper highlights those options in the forestry sector, which are more relevant to different parts of Africa. It briefly outlines a bottom-up methodological framework for comprehensively assessing mitigation options in land use sectors. This method emphasizes the application of end-use demand projections to construct a baseline and mitigation scenarios and explicitly addresses the carbon storage potential on land and in wood products, as well as use of wood to substitute for fossil fuels. Cost-effectiveness indicators for ranking mitigation options are proposed, including those, which account for non-carbon monetary benefits such as those derived from forest products, as well as opportunity cost of pursuing specific mitigation option. The paper finally surveys the likely policies, barriers and incentives to implement such mitigation options in African countries .

Makundi, Willy R.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Identifying Stormwater Pollution Sources from Land Use Deconstruction Using Digital Image Processing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

digital images, GIS (Geographic Information systems) and RS (Remote Sensing) software were used. A maximum results by 6% on average. A Statistical analysis was conducted to find the relationships between land use References ·Stein, Eric D., Tiefenthaler, Liesl, Schiff, Kenneth C. Comparison of Sormwater Pollutant Loading

Mountziaris, T. J.

60

Energy and greenhouse gas emission effects of corn and cellulosic ethanol with technology improvements and land use changes.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Use of ethanol as a transportation fuel in the United States has grown from 76 dam{sup 3} in 1980 to over 40.1 hm{sup 3} in 2009 - and virtually all of it has been produced from corn. It has been debated whether using corn ethanol results in any energy and greenhouse gas benefits. This issue has been especially critical in the past several years, when indirect effects, such as indirect land use changes, associated with U.S. corn ethanol production are considered in evaluation. In the past three years, modeling of direct and indirect land use changes related to the production of corn ethanol has advanced significantly. Meanwhile, technology improvements in key stages of the ethanol life cycle (such as corn farming and ethanol production) have been made. With updated simulation results of direct and indirect land use changes and observed technology improvements in the past several years, we conducted a life-cycle analysis of ethanol and show that at present and in the near future, using corn ethanol reduces greenhouse gas emission by more than 20%, relative to those of petroleum gasoline. On the other hand, second-generation ethanol could achieve much higher reductions in greenhouse gas emissions. In a broader sense, sound evaluation of U.S. biofuel policies should account for both unanticipated consequences and technology potentials. We maintain that the usefulness of such evaluations is to provide insight into how to prevent unanticipated consequences and how to promote efficient technologies with policy intervention.

Wang, M.; Han, J.; Haq, Z; Tyner, .W.; Wu, M.; Elgowainy, A. (Energy Systems)

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land-use change processes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Governing Change: An Institutional Geography of Rural Land Use, Environmental Management, and Change in the North Coastal Basin of California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

land use, the prevention and control of nonpoint source pollution,prevention and control of nonpoint source (NPS) pollution from rural private landspollution prevention, the protection and restoration of salmonid habitat, and/or land

Short, Anne Garrity

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Savannah River Site Land Use Plan - May, 2013 i SRNS-RP-2013-00162  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Savannah River Site Land Use Plan - May, 2013 i Savannah River Site Land Use Plan - May, 2013 i SRNS-RP-2013-00162 Savannah River Site Land Use Plan - May, 2013 i Table of Contents 1.0 - Purpose p1 2.0 - Executive Summary p1 3.0 - SRS Land Use Overview p5 Assumptions Current Land Use Leases, Transfers and Other Land Use Actions Future Land Use Land Use Issues 4.0 - Land Use Planning and Control for Existing Missions p13 Cleanup, Production and Support Missions Natural and Cultural Resource Management 5.0 - Process for Future Land Use Changes p15 Introduction Process Overview Process Description 6.0 - Summary p19 7.0 - References p20 8.0 - Acronyms p21 Savannah River Site Land Use Plan - May, 2013 i

63

FINAL REPORT: An Integrated Inter-temporal Analysis of Land Use Change in Forestry and Agriculture: An Assessment of the Influence of Technological Change on Carbon Sequestration and Land Use.  

SciTech Connect

This project built a global land use model to examine the implications of land based carbon sequestration on land uses. The model also can be used to assess the costs of different land-based actions to reduce carbon emissions.

Brent Sohngen

2008-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

64

Summary of IALE Symposium on Bioenergy and Land-Use Change Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

into the global energy landscape is likely to drive changes in natural and agricultural landscapes. Changes are projected to change in response to economic and energy drivers. Estimating future changes requires knowledge Bay watershed. Donna Perla, US EPA, Office of Research and Development, Washington DC. [abstract only

65

Capturing the implications of land use change in Brazil through environmental assessment: Time for a strategic approach?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Brazil is experiencing a surge in planting of sugar cane crops driven by internal markets and external policy drivers for biofuels. The current expectation is for the expansion of these crops to continue. This creates concern over the extent to which the full implications of large scale land use change are currently being considered by decision-makers. Using the State of Sao Paulo as a case study (as it accounts for the majority of sugar cane grown in Brazil), a comparison was made of the impacts identified in Environmental Impact Statements (EISs) and Preliminary Environmental Reports (PERs), which have to be submitted for approval of most new sugar cane activities, with significant impacts known to be associated with sugar cane activities derived from literature review. The results from a review of 32 EISs and PERs (30% of the population) indicated that whilst some impacts were well covered by the sample (water and soil pollution, and air emissions) energy balance and Green House Gas emissions and food security had very limited consideration, and water resources, residues, labour conditions and social responsibility were only partially covered. Environmental Impact Assessment is constrained by its environmental advocacy role and its application to the project level only. This study highlights its limitations in the context of assessment of land use change which demands more strategic consideration.

Gallardo, Amarilis Lucia Casteli Figueiredo, E-mail: amacafi@ipt.b [Institute for Technological Research, Center of Environmental and Energetic Technologies, Cidade Universitaria, Sao Paulo - SP, CEP 05508-901 (Brazil); Bond, Alan, E-mail: alan.bond@uea.ac.u [InteREAM (Interdisciplinary Research in Environmental Assessment and Management), School of Environmental Sciences, University of East Anglia, Norwich, NR4 7TJ (United Kingdom)

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

66

CARBON FLUX TO THE ATMOSPHERE FROM LAND-USE CHANGES: 1850 TO...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

C: REGIONAL CARBON-CHANGE COEFFICIENTS The following listing provides the regional values and coefficients associated with oxidation and recovery of carbon in vegetation, soils,...

67

GoMRC Website ‘Meta-analysis Report: Land-use and submerged aquatic vegetation change in the Gulf of Mexico’  

SciTech Connect

Over the past century, health and spatial extent of seagrasses has decreased dramatically in the Gulf of Mexico. While some of the changes can be explained by direct impacts to the seagrass beds, we hypothesize that changes in the land use in the watersheds can also be correlated with the decline of seagrasses. Through this meta-analysis, we researched historical and compared trends in seagrass populations and land use in five bays and their watersheds within the Gulf of Mexico: Mobile Bay, Perdido Bay, Tampa Bay, Charlotte Harbor, and Galveston Bay. Using both historical records and spatial datasets, we examined land use and seagrass trends in these five areas.

Judd, Chaeli; Stefansson, Emily S.; Brushnahan, Heather

2007-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

68

The Influence of Land Use Change on Climate in the Sahel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A number of general circulation model (GCM) experiments have shown that changes in vegetation in the Sahel can cause substantial reductions in rainfall. In some studies, the climate sensitivity is large enough to trigger drought of the severity ...

Christopher M. Taylor; Eric F. Lambin; Nathalie Stephenne; Richard J. Harding; Richard L. H. Essery

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

The Amazon Frontier of Land-Use Change: Croplands and Consequences for Greenhouse Gas Emissions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Brazilian Amazon is one of the most rapidly developing agricultural frontiers in the world. The authors assess changes in cropland area and the intensification of cropping in the Brazilian agricultural frontier state of Mato Grosso using ...

Gillian L. Galford; Jerry Melillo; John F. Mustard; Carlos E. P. Cerri; Carlos C. Cerri

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

CARBON FLUX TO THE ATMOSPHERE FROM LAND-USE CHANGES: 1850 TO 1990 (APPENDIX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A: ECOSYSTEM AREA BY REGION A: ECOSYSTEM AREA BY REGION This listing indicates the area (in units of 106 hectare) in different ecosystems for the nine regions in this database, for the years 1700, 1850, and 1990, along with the percent change from 1850 to 1990. The values in this listing replace the values in files areas.* in Houghton and Hackler (1995), the previous version of this database. Missing values are denoted by -9999. % Change 1700 1850 1990 1850-1990 North America Temperate evergreen forest 236 222 215 -0.03 Temperate deciduous forest 157 125 118 -0.06 Boreal forest 325 325 322 -0.01 Temperate woodland/shrubland 302 302 292 -0.03 Temperate grassland 568 481 172 -0.64

71

Scientific analysis is essential to assess biofuel policy effects: in response to the paper by Kim and Dale on "Indirect land use change for biofuels: Testing predictions and improving analytical methodologies"  

SciTech Connect

Vigorous debate on the effects of biofuels derives largely from the changes in land use estimated using economic models designed mainly for the analysis of agricultural trade and markets. The models referenced for land-use change (LUC) analysis in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Final Rule on the Renewable Fuel Standard include GTAP, FAPRI-CARD, and FASOM. To address bioenergy impacts, these models were expanded and modified to facilitate simulations of hypothesized LUC. However, even when models use similar basic assumptions and data, the range of LUC results can vary by ten-fold or more. While the market dynamics simulated in these models include processes that are important in estimating effects of biofuel policies, the models have not been validated for estimating land-use changes and employ crucial assumptions and simplifications that contradict empirical evidence.

Kline, Keith L [ORNL; Oladosu, Gbadebo A [ORNL; Dale, Virginia H [ORNL; McBride, Allen [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Africa Land Use (1980)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Africa Land Use (1980) image Brown, S., and G. Gaston. 1996. Tropical Africa: Land Use, Biomass, and Carbon Estimates For 1980. ORNLCDIAC-92, NDP-055. Carbon Dioxide Information...

73

Center for BioEnergy Sustainability (CBES) http://www.ornl.gov/sci/besd/cbes/ Bioenergy Sustainability and Land-Use Change Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Center for BioEnergy Sustainability (CBES) http://www.ornl.gov/sci/besd/cbes/ 1 Bioenergy Sustainability and Land-Use Change Report Oak Ridge National Laboratory December 2010 Publication: Dale, VH, R and Environmental Change, pages 52-55, published by the Institute for a Secure and Sustainable Environment

74

Modeling urban growth and land use/land cover change in the Houston Metropolitan Area from 2002 - 2030  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Houston-Galveston-Brazoria Consolidated Metropolitan Statistical Area (Houston CMSA) has experienced rapid population growth during the past decades and is the only major US metropolitan area with no zoning regulations. We use SLEUTH, a spatially explicit cellular automata model, to simulate future (2002-2030) urban growth in the Houston metropolitan area, one of the fastest growing metropolises in the United States during the past decades. The model is calibrated with historical data for the period 1974-2002 that are extracted from a time series of satellite images. The dataset consists of four historical urban extents (1974, 1984, 1992, 2002), two land use layers (1992, 2002), five transportation layers (1974, 1984, 1990, 2002, 2025), slope layer, hillshade layer, and excluded layer. Future growth patterns are predicted based on growth coefficients derived during the calibration phase. After calibrating the model successfully, the spatial pattern of urban growth of the Houston CMSA for the period from 2002 to 2030 is predicted. Within SLEUTH, growth in the Houston CMSA is predominately "organic" with most growth occurring along the urban/rural fringe. Projected increases in urban area from 2002 to 2030 parallel projected increases in population growth within the Houston CMSA. We design three specific scenarios to simulate the spatial consequences of urban growth under different environmental conditions. The first scenario is to simulate the unmanaged growth with no restrictions. The second scenario is to project the moderate growth trend by taking into consideration environmental protection, specifically for agricultural areas, forests and wetlands. The last scenario is to simulate the managed growth with maximum environmental protection. Adjusting the level of protection for different land cover types was found to markedly affect the land use changes in the Houston CMSA. Without any protection on resource lands, Houston CMSA is estimated to lose 2,000 km2 of forest land by 2030, about 600 km2 of agricultural land, and approximately 400 km2 of wetland. Approximately half of all resource land could be saved by the third scenario, managed growth with maximum protection.

Oguz, Hakan

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Energy and land use  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report addresses the land use impacts of past and future energy development and summarizes the major federal and state legislation which influences the potential land use impacts of energy facilities and can thus influence the locations and timing of energy development. In addition, this report describes and presents the data which are used to measure, and in some cases, predict the potential conflicts between energy development and alternative uses of the nation's land resources. The topics section of this report is divided into three parts. The first part describes the myriad of federal, state and local legislation which have a direct or indirect impact upon the use of land for energy development. The second part addresses the potential land use impacts associated with the extraction, conversion and combustion of energy resources, as well as the disposal of wastes generated by these processes. The third part discusses the conflicts that might arise between agriculture and energy development as projected under a number of DOE mid-term (1990) energy supply and demand scenarios.

Not Available

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Effect of anthropogenic land-use and land cover changes on climate and land carbon storage in CMIP5 projections for the 21st century  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effects of land-use changes on climate are assessed using specified-concentration simulations complementary to the RCP2.6 and 8.5 scenarios performed for the fifth coupled model intercomparison project (CMIP5). This analysis focuses on ...

V. Brovkin; L. Boysen; V. K. Arora; J. P. Boisier; P. Cadule; L. Chini; M. Claussen; P. Friedlingstein; V. Gayler; B. J. J. M. van den Hurk; G. C. Hurtt; C. D. Jones; E. Kato; N. de Noblet-Ducoudré; F. Pacifico; J. Pongratz; M. Weiss

77

Contribution of Land Use Changes to Near-Surface Air Temperatures during Recent Summer Extreme Heat Events in the Phoenix Metropolitan Area  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The impact of 1973–2005 land use–land cover (LULC) changes on near-surface air temperatures during four recent summer extreme heat events (EHEs) are investigated for the arid Phoenix, Arizona, metropolitan area using the Weather Research and ...

Susanne Grossman-Clarke; Joseph A. Zehnder; Thomas Loridan; C. Sue B. Grimmond

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Center for BioEnergy Sustainability (CBES) http://www.ornl.gov/sci/besd/cbes/ Bioenergy Sustainability and Land-Use Change Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Center for BioEnergy Sustainability (CBES) http://www.ornl.gov/sci/besd/cbes/ 1 Bioenergy Sustainability and Land-Use Change Report Oak Ridge National Laboratory October 2010 Invited Talks and Presentations: October 17-20: Keith Kline gave a presentation on the Global Sustainable Bioenergy Project

79

Effect of Anthropogenic Land-Use and Land-Cover Changes on Climate and Land Carbon Storage in CMIP5 Projections for the Twenty-First Century  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effects of land-use changes on climate are assessed using specified-concentration simulations complementary to the representative concentration pathway 2.6 (RCP2.6) and RCP8.5 scenarios performed for phase 5 of the Coupled Model ...

V. Brovkin; L. Boysen; V. K. Arora; J. P. Boisier; P. Cadule; L. Chini; M. Claussen; P. Friedlingstein; V. Gayler; B. J. J. M. van den Hurk; G. C. Hurtt; C. D. Jones; E. Kato; N. de Noblet-Ducoudré; F. Pacifico; J. Pongratz; M. Weiss

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Geothermal/Land Use | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal/Land Use Geothermal/Land Use < Geothermal(Redirected from Land Use) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Land Use Leasing Exploration Well Field Power Plant Transmission Environment Water Use Print PDF Geothermal Land Use Planning General Regulatory Roadmap The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and the USDA Forest Service (FS) have prepared a joint Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) to analyze and expedite the leasing of BLM-and FS-administered lands with high potential for renewable geothermal resources in 11 Western states and Alaska. Geothermal Land Use Planning is ... Example Land Use Plans References Information for Publication Standards for EA/EIS/Planning Documents IM 2004-110.pdf Fluid Mineral Leasing and Related Planning and National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Processes April 11, 2004 and

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land-use change processes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Simulation of land use spatial pattern of towns and villages based on CA-Markov model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Firstly, this paper analyzes the basic principles and processes of the spatial pattern changes of land use in towns and villages, and the result shows that the land resource demands of urban development and population growth lead to the spatial pattern ... Keywords: Cellular automata, Fangshan district in Beijing, Land use change, Markov, Spatial pattern

Lingling Sang; Chao Zhang; Jianyu Yang; Dehai Zhu; Wenju Yun

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

A Conceptual Framework for Estimating Bioenerg-Related Land-Use Change and Its Impacts over Time  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

use change due to biofuel production; • current research onand carbon budgets of biofuel production systems, includinguse change due to biofuel production. As indicated in Table

Delucchi, Mark

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions - Land use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6. Land use 6. Land use 6.1. Total land use, land use change, and forests This chapter presents estimates of carbon sequestration (removal from the atmosphere) and emissions (release into the atmosphere) from forests, croplands, grasslands, and residential areas (urban trees, grass clippings, and food scraps) in the United States. In 2008, land use, land use change, and forests were responsible for estimated net carbon sequestration of 940 MMTCO2e (Table 31), representing 16 percent of total U.S. CO2 emissions. The largest sequestration category in 2008 was forest lands and harvested wood pools,49 with estimated sequestration increasing from 730 MMTCO2e in 1990 to 792 MMTCO2e in 2008. The second-largest carbon sequestration category was urban trees,50 responsible for 57 MMTCO2e in 1990 and 94

84

Scale-Dependent Relationships between Land-Use Change and Its Determinants in the Volta Basin of Ghana  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Relationships between cropland change and presumed determinants were analyzed at scales ranging from 30 to 5100 m using logistic regression. The plot of the odds ratio across the spatial scales indicated that both biophysical and social variables ...

Ademola K. Braimoh; Paul L. G. Vlek

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Impacts of Climate Change and the End of Deforestation on Land Use in the Brazilian Legal Amazon  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Climate change scenarios vary considerably over the Amazon region, with an extreme scenario projecting a dangerous (from the human perspective) increase of 3.8°C in temperature and 30% reduction in precipitation by 2050. The impacts of such ...

David Montenegro Lapola; Ruediger Schaldach; Joseph Alcamo; Alberte Bondeau; Siwa Msangi; Joerg A. Priess; Rafaella Silvestrini; Britaldo Silveira Soares-Filho

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

A land-use systems approach to represent land-use dynamics at continental and global scales  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Most of the current global land cover datasets and global scale land-use models use a classification of land cover based on the dominant land cover type within a distinct region or pixel. Such a classification disregards the diversity and intensity of ... Keywords: Global, IMAGE, Land-use change, Land-use intensification, Land-use systems

Aurélien Letourneau; Peter H. Verburg; Elke Stehfest

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Use of U.S. croplands for biofuels increases greenhouse gases through emissions from land-use change?, Science 319:1238–40  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Most prior studies have found that substituting biofuels for gasoline will reduce greenhouse gases because biofuels sequester carbon through the growth of the feedstock. These analyses have failed to count the carbon emissions that occur as farmers worldwide respond to higher prices and convert forest and grassland to new cropland to replace the grain (or cropland) diverted to biofuels. Using a worldwide agricultural model to estimate emissions from land use change, we found that corn-based ethanol, instead of producing a 20 % savings, nearly doubles greenhouse emissions over 30 years and increases greenhouse gases for 167 years. Biofuels from switchgrass, if grown on U.S. corn lands, increase emissions by 50%. This result raises concerns about large biofuel mandates and highlights the value of using waste products.

Timothy Searchinger; Ralph Heimlich; R. A. Houghton; Fengxia Dong; Amani Elobeid; Jacinto Fabiosa; Simla Tokgoz; Dermot Hayes; Tun-hsiang Yu

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Climatic impacts of land-use change due to crop yield increases and a universal carbon tax from a scenario model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Future land cover will have a significant impact on climate and is strongly influenced by the extent of agricultural land-use. Differing assumptions of crop yield increase and carbon pricing mitigation strategies affect projected expansion of ...

T. Davies-Barnard; P. J. Valdes; J. S. Singarayer; C. D. Jones

89

Agriculture, land use, and commercial biomass energy  

SciTech Connect

In this paper we have considered commercial biomass energy in the context of overall agriculture and land-use change. We have described a model of energy, agriculture, and land-use and employed that model to examine the implications of commercial biomass energy or both energy sector and land-use change carbon emissions. In general we find that the introduction of biomass energy has a negative effect on the extent of unmanaged ecosystems. Commercial biomass introduces a major new land use which raises land rental rates, and provides an incentive to bring more land into production, increasing the rate of incursion into unmanaged ecosystems. But while the emergence of a commercial biomass industry may increase land-use change emissions, the overall effect is strongly to reduce total anthropogenic carbon emissions. Further, the higher the rate of commercial biomass energy productivity, the lower net emissions. Higher commercial biomass energy productivity, while leading to higher land-use change emissions, has a far stronger effect on fossil fuel carbon emissions. Highly productive and inexpensive commercial biomass energy technologies appear to have a substantial depressing effect on total anthropogenic carbon emissions, though their introduction raises the rental rate on land, providing incentives for greater rates of deforestation than in the reference case.

Edmonds, J.A.; Wise, M.A.; Sands, R.D.; Brown, R.A.; Kheshgi, H.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Land-Use and Ecosystems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Land-Use and Ecosystems Terrestrial Carbon Management Data Sets and Analyses National Land Cover Data 1992 (2005), and 2001 (2008) Carbon Flux to the Atmosphere from Land-Use...

91

Land Use History  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study focuses on the cultural-historical environment of the 88,900-acre (35,560-ha) Valles Caldera National Preserve (VCNP) over the past four centuries of Spanish, Mexican, and U.S. governance. It includes a review and synthesis of available published and unpublished historical, ethnohistorical, and ethnographic literature about the human occupation of the area now contained within the VCNP. Documents include historical maps, texts, letters, diaries, business records, photographs, land and mineral patents, and court testimony. This study presents a cultural-historical framework of VCNP land use that will be useful to land managers and researchers in assessing the historical ecology of the property. It provides VCNP administrators and agents the cultural-historical background needed to develop management plans that acknowledge traditional associations with the Preserve, and offers managers additional background for structuring and acting on consultations with affiliated communities.

United States; Forest Service; Kurt F. Anschuetz

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Geothermal/Land Use | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Use Use < Geothermal Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Land Use Leasing Exploration Well Field Power Plant Transmission Environment Water Use Print PDF Geothermal Land Use Planning General Regulatory Roadmap The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and the USDA Forest Service (FS) have prepared a joint Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) to analyze and expedite the leasing of BLM-and FS-administered lands with high potential for renewable geothermal resources in 11 Western states and Alaska. Geothermal Land Use Planning is ... Example Land Use Plans References Information for Publication Standards for EA/EIS/Planning Documents IM 2004-110.pdf Fluid Mineral Leasing and Related Planning and National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Processes April 11, 2004 and

93

Impacts of Post-Dam Land-use/Land-Cover Changes on Modification of Extreme Precipitation in Contrasting Hydro-climate and Terrain Features  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Understanding the impact of post-dam climate feedbacks, due to land-use/land-cover (LULC)variability, on modification of extreme precipitation (EP) remains a challenge for a 21st century approach to dam design and operation. In this study, we used ...

Abel T. Woldemichael; Faisal Hossain; Roger Pielke Sr.

94

land use | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

use use Dataset Summary Description This dataset is part of a larger internal dataset at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) that explores various characteristics of large solar electric (both PV and CSP) facilities around the United States. This dataset focuses on the land use characteristics for solar facilities that are either under construction or currently in operation. Source Land-Use Requirements for Solar Power Plants in the United States Date Released June 25th, 2013 (5 months ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords acres area average concentrating solar power csp Density electric hectares km2 land land requirements land use land-use mean photovoltaic photovoltaics PV solar statistics Data application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.spreadsheetml.sheet icon Master Solar Land Use Spreadsheet (xlsx, 1.5 MiB)

95

OpenEI - land use  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

en.openei.orgdatasetstaxonomyterm4160 en Land use requirements for ground-mounted solar power facilities. http:en.openei.orgdatasetsnode454

This dataset is part of...

96

California Energy Commission California Leadership on Land Use  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

California Energy Commission California Leadership on Land Use and Climate Change California Leadership on Land Use and Climate Change Panama Bartholomy Advisor to the Chairman California Energy Commission New Partners for Smart GrowthNew Partners for Smart Growth Washington, DCWashington, DC February 8

97

csp land use | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

csp land use Home Sfomail's picture Submitted by Sfomail(48) Member 25 June, 2013 - 12:10 Solar Land Use Data on OpenEI acres csp land use how much land land requirements pv land...

98

Land Use Assessment Toolkit | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Land Use Assessment Toolkit Land Use Assessment Toolkit Jump to: navigation, search Stage 3 LEDS Home Introduction to Framework Assess current country plans, policies, practices, and capacities Develop_BAU Stage 4: Prioritizing and Planning for Actions Begin execution of implementation plans 1.0. Organizing the LEDS Process 1.1. Institutional Structure for LEDS 1.2. Workplan to Develop the LEDS 1.3. Roles and responsibilities to develop LEDS 2.1. Assess current country plans, policies, practices, and capacities 2.2. Compile lessons learned and good practices from ongoing and previous sustainable development efforts in the country 2.3. Assess public and private sector capacity to support initiatives 2.4. Assess and improve the national GHG inventory and other economic and resource data as needed for LEDS development

99

Integrated land use, transportation, and environmental simulation: UrbanSim project highlights  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The process of planning and constructing a new light rail system or freeway, setting an urban growth boundary, changing tax policy, or modifying zoning and land use plans is often politically charged. Our goal in the UrbanSim project is to provide tools ...

Alan Borning; Paul Waddell

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Mapping Land-Use Change and Monitoring the Impacts of Hardwood-to-Pine Conversion on the Southern Cumberland Plateau in Tennessee  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over the past two decades, forests in the southeastern United States have undergone dramatic changes as the result of urban sprawl and conversion to intensively managed pine plantations. The Cumberland Plateau, an important ecoregion in the ...

Deborah A. McGrath; Jonathan P. Evans; C. Ken Smith; David G. Haskell; Neil W. Pelkey; Robert R. Gottfried; Charles D. Brockett; Matthew D. Lane; E. Douglass Williams

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land-use change processes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

solar land use | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

solar land use solar land use Home Rosborne318's picture Submitted by Rosborne318(5) Member 2 December, 2013 - 11:06 Request for Information Renewable Energy Generation/Production Shreveport Airport Authority - Response Deadline 2 January 2014 pv land use Solar solar land use Solar Power The Shreveport Airport Authority intends to issue a Request for Proposal (RFP) at some future time for renewable energy generation opportunities on Shreveport Airport property. Files: application/pdf icon solar_rfi_complete.pdf Sfomail's picture Submitted by Sfomail(48) Member 25 June, 2013 - 12:10 Solar Land Use Data on OpenEI acres csp land use how much land land requirements pv land use solar land use square miles I'm happy to announce that a new report on Solar+Land+Use was just released by the National+Renewable+Energy+Laboratory. You can find a brief summary

102

pv land use | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

pv land use pv land use Home Rosborne318's picture Submitted by Rosborne318(5) Member 2 December, 2013 - 11:06 Request for Information Renewable Energy Generation/Production Shreveport Airport Authority - Response Deadline 2 January 2014 pv land use Solar solar land use Solar Power The Shreveport Airport Authority intends to issue a Request for Proposal (RFP) at some future time for renewable energy generation opportunities on Shreveport Airport property. Files: application/pdf icon solar_rfi_complete.pdf Sfomail's picture Submitted by Sfomail(48) Member 25 June, 2013 - 12:10 Solar Land Use Data on OpenEI acres csp land use how much land land requirements pv land use solar land use square miles I'm happy to announce that a new report on Solar+Land+Use was just released by the National+Renewable+Energy+Laboratory. You can find a brief summary

103

Using neural networks and cellular automata for modelling intra-urban land-use dynamics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Empirical models designed to simulate and predict urban land-use change in real situations are generally based on the utilization of statistical techniques to compute the land-use change probabilities. In contrast to these methods, artificial neural ... Keywords: Cellular automata, Fuzzy similarity measures, Land-use dynamics, Neural networks, Town planning, Urban modelling

C. M. Almeida; J. M. Gleriani; E. F. Castejon; B. S. Soares-Filho

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Land use and land cover change: the effects of woody plant encroachment and prescribed fire on biodiversity and ecosystem carbon dynamics in a southern great plains mixed grass savanna  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the southern Great Plains, the encroachment of grassland ecosystems by mesquite (Prosopis glandulosa), is widespread, and prescribed fire is commonly used in its control. Despite this, substantial quantitative information concerning their influences on the community composition, functional dynamics, and soil organic carbon (SOC) storage potential of grassland ecosystems is lacking. The objectives of this study were to: a) quantify the effects of seasonal prescribed fire treatments and mesquite encroachment on aboveground net primary productivity (ANPP) and herbaceous community composition; b) characterize SOC pool sizes, turnover, and storage potential relative to vegetation type and fire treatment; c) evaluate the structure and diversity of soil microbial communities relative to vegetation type; and d) characterize the functional diversity of these same microbes using the GeoChip functional gene microarray. Repeated winter and summer fires led to increased ANPP rates (average, 434 and 313 g m-2 y-1, respectively), relative to unburned controls (average, 238 g m-2 y-1), altered herbaceous community composition, and increased the storage of resistant forms of SOC, but did not affect overall SOC storage. Herbaceous ANPP rates did not differ significantly as a result of mesquite encroachment, but herbaceous community composition and SOC storage did. Mesquite soils contained significantly more total, slow-turnover, and resistant forms of SOC than those that occurred beneath C3 or C4 grasses. Similarity among the soil bacterial and fungal communities associated with the major vegetation types in this system was low to moderate. Significant differences were detected among soil fungi, with the mesquite-associated fungi harboring significant differences in community structure relative to the fungal communities associated with each of the other vegetation types examined. Despite this result, few significant differences were detected with respect to the functional diversity of these communities, suggesting either a high degree of functional redundancy, or that the functional differences harbored by these communities are beyond the scope of the GeoChip. The results of this study demonstrate that both fire and mesquite encroachment have the potential to alter ecosystem components and processes significantly, providing new insight regarding the effects of these widespread land use and land cover changes on ecosystem structure and function.

Hollister, Emily Brooke

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

OpenEI Community - solar land use  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

90 en Solar Land Use Data on OpenEI http:en.openei.orgcommunityblogsolar-land-use-data-openei

 

 

106

Agriculture, Forestry and Other Land Use Mitigation Project Database | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Agriculture, Forestry and Other Land Use Mitigation Project Database Agriculture, Forestry and Other Land Use Mitigation Project Database Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Agriculture, Forestry and Other Land Use Mitigation Project Database Agency/Company /Organization: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations Sector: Land Focus Area: Forestry, Agriculture Resource Type: Dataset Website: www.fao.org/climatechange/67148/en/ RelatedTo: Mitigation of Climate Change in Agriculture (MICCA) Project Agriculture, Forestry and Other Land Use Mitigation Project Database Screenshot References: AFOLU Mitigation Database[1] Global Survey of Agricultural Mitigation Projects Paper[2] "The AFOLU MP database endeavors to gather information on all mitigation activities currently ongoing within the agricultural and forestry sectors

107

land-use | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

land-use land-use Dataset Summary Description This dataset is part of a larger internal dataset at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) that explores various characteristics of large solar electric (both PV and CSP) facilities around the United States. This dataset focuses on the land use characteristics for solar facilities that are either under construction or currently in operation. Source Land-Use Requirements for Solar Power Plants in the United States Date Released June 25th, 2013 (5 months ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords acres area average concentrating solar power csp Density electric hectares km2 land land requirements land use land-use mean photovoltaic photovoltaics PV solar statistics Data application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.spreadsheetml.sheet icon Master Solar Land Use Spreadsheet (xlsx, 1.5 MiB)

108

Biofuel Policies and Indirect Land Use Change  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The European Union sees the expansion of biomass production for bioenergy as one of the components of its strategy to replace fossil energy sources by non-fossil renewable sources. However, the target of 10 % renewables in the transport sector by 2020 set in the Directive 2009/28/EC on the promotion of the use of energy from renewable sources (EU-RED) has been widely criticised. Due to an increase in biomass demand for feedstocks for biofuel production and a continuously high demand of the food and feed sector, the demand for land to be used for both food and production and bioenergy is expected to increase globally (see e.g. Hertl et al. 2008, Haberl et al. 2011). Considering that already today deforestation for agricultural expansion and for conversion into pasture, but also forest degradation, infrastructure development, destructive logging and fires cause nearly 20 % of global GHG emissions (UN-REDD 2009), the contribution of biofuels to climate mitigation is at least questionable. To ensure that biofuels contribute to GHG emission savings and that their overall sustainability is maintained, the EU-RED has put forward a sustainability regulation in

Ruth Delzeit; Mareike Lange

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Resource Assessment and Land Use Change  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

via pipeline compressed in CA 68.0 0 68.0 Liquefied natural gas Overseas sourced LNG delivered to Baja, regasified and reliquefied at 80% efficiency 93.37 0 93.37...

110

Solar Land Use | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Land Use Land Use Jump to: navigation, search (The following text is derived from a National Renewable Energy Laboratory report on solar land use in the United States.)[1] One concern regarding large-scale deployment of solar energy is its potentially significant land use. This article summarizes data and analysis of the land use associated with U.S. utility-scale ground-mounted photovoltaic (PV) and concentrating solar power (CSP) facilities. This article presents total and direct land-use results for various solar technologies and system configurations, on both a capacity and an electricity-generation basis. The total area corresponds to all land enclosed by the site boundary. The direct area comprises land directly occupied by solar arrays, access roads, substations, service buildings, and

111

EIS-0222: Hanford Comprehensive Land-Use Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

22: Hanford Comprehensive Land-Use Plan 22: Hanford Comprehensive Land-Use Plan EIS-0222: Hanford Comprehensive Land-Use Plan SUMMARY DOE has prepared the EIS to evaluate the potential environmental impacts associated with implementing a comprehensive land-use plan (CLUP) for the Hanford Site for at least the next 50 years. DOE is expected to use this land-use plan in its decision-making process to establish what is the "highest and best use" of the land (41 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] 101-47, "Federal Property Management Regulations"). The final selection of a land-use map, land-use policies, and implementing procedures would create the working CLUP when they are adopted through the ROD for the EIS. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD

112

Toward a Methodology to Investigate the Downstream Flood Hazards on the American River due to Changes in Probable Maximum Flood due to Effects of Artificial Reservoir Size and Land-Use/Land-Cover Patterns  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent research in mesoscale hydrology suggests that the size of the reservoirs and the land-use/land-cover (LULC) patterns near them impact the extreme weather [e.g., probable maximum flood (PMF)]. A key question was addressed by W. Yigzaw et al.:...

Alfred J. Kalyanapu; A. K. M. Azad Hossain; Jinwoo Kim; Wondmagegn Yigzaw; Faisal Hossain; C. K. Shum

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Towards methodology to investigate the downstream flood hazards on American River due to changes in Probable Maximum Flood due to effects of Artificial Reservoir Size and Land Use/Land Cover Patterns  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent research in mesoscale hydrology suggests that the size of the reservoirs and the land use/land cover (LULC) patterns near them impact the extreme weather (such as probable maximum flood or PMF). A key question was addressed by Yigzaw et al.,...

Alfred J. Kalyanapu; A. K. M. Azad Hossain; Jinwoo Kim; Wondmagegn Yigzaw; Faisal Hossain; C. K. Shum

114

POLLUTION AND LAND USE: OPTIMUM AND DECENTRALIZATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with land and labor inputs and pollution emissions as a by-isolating the role of land use in pollution control we: i)land and the composite good, and disutility from the pollution

Hochman, Oded; Rausser, Gordon C.; Arnott, Richard J

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

OpenEI - land-use  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

en.openei.orgdatasetstaxonomyterm4170 en Land use requirements for ground-mounted solar power facilities. http:en.openei.orgdatasetsnode454

This dataset is part of...

116

Idaho National Laboratory Comprehensive Land Use and Environmental Stewardship Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Land and facility use planning and decisions at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Site are guided by a comprehensive site planning process in accordance with Department of Energy Policy 430.1, 'Land and Facility Use Policy,' that integrates mission, economic, ecologic, social, and cultural factors. The INL Ten-Year Site Plan, prepared in accordance with Department of Energy Order 430.1B, 'Real Property Asset Management,' outlines the vision and strategy to transform INL to deliver world-leading capabilities that will enable the Department of Energy to accomplish its mission. Land use planning is the overarching function within real property asset management that integrates the other functions of acquisition, recapitalization, maintenance, disposition, real property utilization, and long-term stewardship into a coordinated effort to ensure current and future mission needs are met. All land and facility use projects planned at the INL Site are considered through a formal planning process that supports the Ten-Year Site Plan. This Comprehensive Land Use and Environmental Stewardship Report describes that process. The land use planning process identifies the current condition of existing land and facility assets and the scope of constraints across INL and in the surrounding region. Current land use conditions are included in the Comprehensive Land Use and Environmental Stewardship Report and facility assets and scope of constraints are discussed in the Ten-Year Site Plan. This report also presents the past, present, and future uses of land at the INL Site that are considered during the planning process, as well as outlining the future of the INL Site for the 10, 30, and 100-year timeframes.

No name listed on publication

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

IA-SDSS: A GIS-based land use decision support system with consideration of carbon sequestration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Land use, land use change and forestry (LULUCF) can play a positive role in mitigating global warming by sequestering carbon from the atmosphere into vegetation and soils. Local entities (e.g. local government, community, stockholders) have been making ... Keywords: Carbon models, Carbon sequestration, GIS, Integrated assessment, Land-use planning, RS, SDSS

Jun Wang; Jingming Chen; Weimin Ju; Manchun Li

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

An Act to Reform Land Use Planning in the Unorganized Territory (Maine) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

An Act to Reform Land Use Planning in the Unorganized Territory An Act to Reform Land Use Planning in the Unorganized Territory (Maine) An Act to Reform Land Use Planning in the Unorganized Territory (Maine) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Rural Electric Cooperative Schools Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Wind Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State Maine Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Conservation An Act to Reform Land Use Planning in the Unorganized Territory alters the makeup and responsibilities of Maine's Land Use Regulation Commission (LURC). It took effect on August 29, 2012 and changed the Commission's name to the Land Use Planning Commission. Under the Act, permitting review for significant projects, such as

119

INL Comprehensive Land Use and Environmental Stewardship Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

INL Comprehensive Land Use and Environmental Stewardship Report The Idaho National Laboratory announced recently that the Comprehensive Land Use and Environmental Stewardship...

120

Tropical Africa: Land Use, Biomass, and Carbon Estimates for...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tropical Africa: Land Use, Biomass, and Carbon Estimates for 1990 image Brown, S., and G. Gaston. 1996. Tropical Africa: Land Use, Biomass, and Carbon Estimates For 1980. ORNL...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land-use change processes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Application for State Land Use Lease: Surface Lease (SL) - Coastal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

for State Land Use Lease: Surface Lease (SL) - Coastal Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Reference Material: Application for State Land Use Lease:...

122

Town of Chapel Hill - Land-Use Management Ordinance | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Land-Use Management Ordinance Town of Chapel Hill - Land-Use Management Ordinance Eligibility Residential Savings For Solar Buying & Making Electricity Heating & Cooling Commercial...

123

Land Use Baseline Report Savannah River Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document is to serve as a resource for Savannah River Site managers, planners, and SRS stakeholders by providing a general description of the site and land-use factors important to future use decisions and plans. The intent of this document is to be comprehensive in its review of SRS and the surrounding area.

Noah, J.C.

1995-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

124

Multi-Criteria Spatial Decision Support System DECERNS: Application to Land Use Planning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Land-use planning and environmental management often requires an implementation of both geoyspatial information analysis and value-driven criteria within the decision-making process. DECERNS Decision Evaluation in Complex Risk Network Systems is a web-based ... Keywords: DECERNS, GIS, Housing Development, Land-Use Planning, MCDA, Multi-Criteria Decision Analysis, Spatial Decision Support System, WebSDSS

B. Yatsalo; V. Didenko; A. Tkachuk; G. Gritsyuk; O. Mirzeabasov; V. Slipenkaya; A. Babutski; I. Pichugina; T. Sullivan; I. Linkov

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Bioenergy and the importance of land use policy in a carbon-constrained world  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Policies aimed at limiting anthropogenic climate change would result in significant transformations of the energy and land-use systems. However, increasing the demand for bioenergy could have a tremendous impact on land use, and can result in land clearing and deforestation. Wise et al. (2009a,b) analyzed an idealized policy to limit the indirect land use change emissions from bioenergy. The policy, while effective, would be difficult, if not impossible, to implement in the real world. In this paper, we consider several different land use policies that deviate from this first-best, using the Joint Global Change Research Institute’s Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM). Specifically, these new frameworks are (1) a policy that focuses on just the above-ground or vegetative terrestrial carbon rather than the total carbon, (2) policies that focus exclusively on incentivizing and protecting forestland, and (3) policies that apply an economic penalty on the use of biomass as a proxy to limit indirect land use change emissions. For each policy, we examine its impact on land use, land-use change emissions, atmospheric CO2 concentrations, agricultural supply, and food prices.

Calvin, Katherine V.; Edmonds, James A.; Wise, Marshall A.

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Final Hanford Comprehensive Land-Use Plan Environmental Impact Statement, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington  

SciTech Connect

This Final ''Hanford Comprehensive Land-Use Plan Environmental Impact Statement'' (HCP EIS) is being used by the Department of Energy (DOE) and its nine cooperating and consulting agencies to develop a comprehensive land-use plan (CLUP) for the Hanford Site. The DOE will use the Final HCP EIS as a basis for a Record of Decision (ROD) on a CLUP for the Hanford Site. While development of the CLUP will be complete with release of the HCP EIS ROD, full implementation of the CLUP is expected to take at least 50 years. Implementation of the CLUP would begin a more detailed planning process for land-use and facility-use decisions at the Hanford Site. The DOE would use the CLUP to screen proposals. Eventually, management of Hanford Site areas would move toward the CLUP land-use goals. This CLUP process could take more than 50 years to fully achieve the land-use goals.

N /A

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Sustainable Land-use Impact Assessment Toolkit | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sustainable Land-use Impact Assessment Toolkit Sustainable Land-use Impact Assessment Toolkit Jump to: navigation, search Stage 3 LEDS Home Introduction to Framework Assess current country plans, policies, practices, and capacities Develop_BAU Stage 4: Prioritizing and Planning for Actions Begin execution of implementation plans 1.0. Organizing the LEDS Process 1.1. Institutional Structure for LEDS 1.2. Workplan to Develop the LEDS 1.3. Roles and responsibilities to develop LEDS 2.1. Assess current country plans, policies, practices, and capacities 2.2. Compile lessons learned and good practices from ongoing and previous sustainable development efforts in the country 2.3. Assess public and private sector capacity to support initiatives 2.4. Assess and improve the national GHG inventory and other economic and resource data as needed for LEDS development

128

Land-use Scenario Analysis Toolkit | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Land-use Scenario Analysis Toolkit Land-use Scenario Analysis Toolkit Jump to: navigation, search Stage 3 LEDS Home Introduction to Framework Assess current country plans, policies, practices, and capacities Develop_BAU Stage 4: Prioritizing and Planning for Actions Begin execution of implementation plans 1.0. Organizing the LEDS Process 1.1. Institutional Structure for LEDS 1.2. Workplan to Develop the LEDS 1.3. Roles and responsibilities to develop LEDS 2.1. Assess current country plans, policies, practices, and capacities 2.2. Compile lessons learned and good practices from ongoing and previous sustainable development efforts in the country 2.3. Assess public and private sector capacity to support initiatives 2.4. Assess and improve the national GHG inventory and other economic and resource data as needed for LEDS development

129

Land Use Affects on Modern Bankfull Hydraulic Geometry in Southwest Ohio and its Implications for Stream Restoration.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Channel morphology is affected by land use change nationwide. In Southwest Ohio, streams are influenced by agricultural and urban landscapes. The purpose of this study… (more)

Ellison, Elizabeth J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Interactions among bioenergy feedstock choices, landscape dynamics, and land use  

SciTech Connect

Landscape implications of bioenergy feedstock choices are significant and depend on land-use practices and their environmental impacts. Although land-use changes and carbon emissions associated with bioenergy feedstock production are dynamic and complicated, lignocellulosic feedstocks may offer opportunities that enhance sustainability when compared to other transportation fuel alternatives. For bioenergy sustainability, major drivers and concerns revolve around energy security, food production, land productivity, soil carbon and erosion, greenhouse gas emissions, biodiversity, air quality, and water quantity and quality. The many implications of bioenergy feedstock choices require several indicators at multiple scales to provide a more complete accounting of effects. Ultimately, the long-term sustainability of bioenergy feedstock resources (as well as food supplies) throughout the world depends on land-use practices and landscape dynamics. Land-management decisions often invoke trade-offs among potential environmental effects and social and economic factors as well as future opportunities for resource use. The hypothesis being addressed in this paper is that sustainability of bioenergy feedstock production can be achieved via appropriately designed crop residue and perennial lignocellulosic systems. We find that decision makers need scientific advancements and adequate data that both provide quantitative and qualitative measures of the effects of bioenergy feedstock choices at different spatial and temporal scales and allow fair comparisons among available options for renewable liquid fuels.

Dale, Virginia H [ORNL; Kline, Keith L [ORNL; Wright, Lynn L [ORNL; Perlack, Robert D [ORNL; Downing, Mark [ORNL; Graham, Robin Lambert [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Northern Hemisphere Biome-and Process-Specific Changes in Forest Area and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Northern Hemisphere Biome-and Process-Specific Changes in Forest Area and Northern Hemisphere Biome-and Process-Specific Changes in Forest Area and Gross Merchantable Volume: 1890-1990 (DB1017) data Data DOI: 10.3334/CDIAC/lue.db1017 Contributors A. N. D. Auclair, J. A. Bedford, and C. Revenga Description This database lists annual changes in areal extent (Ha) and gross merchantable wood volume (m3) produced by depletion and accrual processes in boreal and temperate forests in Alaska, Canada, Europe, Former Soviet Union, Non-Soviet temperate Asia, and the contiguous United States for the years 1890 through 1990. Forest depletions (source terms for atmospheric CO2) are identified as forest pests, forest dieback, forest fires, forest harvest, and land-use changes (predominantly the conversion of forest, temperate woodland, and shrubland to cropland). Forest accruals (sink terms

132

Global Vegetation and Land Use: New High-Resolution Data Bases for Climate Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Global vegetation and land-use data bases (1° latitude by 1° longitude resolution), designed for use in studies of climate and climate change, were compiled in digital form drawing upon approximately 100 published sources complemented by a large ...

Elaine Matthews

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Historic Land Use and Carbon Estimates for South and Southeast Asia:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Historic Land Use and Carbon Estimates for South and Southeast Asia: Historic Land Use and Carbon Estimates for South and Southeast Asia: 1880-1980 (1994) (NDP-046) DOI: 10.3334/CDIAC/lue.ndp046 data Data PDF PDF Contributors J. F. Richards and E. P. Flint Description This data base contains estimates of land use change and the carbon content of vegetation for South and Southeast Asia for the years 1880, 1920, 1950, 1970, and 1980. These data were originally collected for climate modelers so they could reduce the uncertainty associated with the magnitude and time course of historical land use change and of carbon release. For this data base, South and Southeast Asia is defined as encompassing nearly 8 × 106 km2 of the earth's land surface and includes the countries of India, Sri Lanka, Bangladesh, Myanmar (Burma), Thailand, Laos, Kampuchea (Cambodia),

134

LBA Land Use and Land Cover Data Set Released  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Land Use and Land Cover Data Set Released The ORNL DAAC announces the release of an image data set from the Land Use and Land Cover science theme, a component of the LBA-ECO Large...

135

Conditions and effectiveness of land use as a mobility tool  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation examines the potential of land use as a mobility tool to affect travel, a subject of long and ongoing policy debate. Land use strategies such as densification, mixed-use development, and non-driving-oriented ...

Zhang, Ming, 1963 Apr. 22-

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Harmonization of Land-Use Scenarios for the Period 1500-2100: 600 Years of Global Gridded Annual Land-Use Transitions, Wood Harvest, and Resulting Secondary Lands  

SciTech Connect

In preparation for the fifth Assessment Report (AR5) of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), the international community is developing new advanced Earth System Models (ESM) to assess the combined effects of human activities (e.g. land use and fossil fuel emissions) on the carbon-climate system. In addition, four Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) scenarios of the future (2005-2100) are being provided by four Integrated Assessment Model (IAM) teams to be used as input to the ESMs for future carbon-climate projections (Moss et al., 2010). The diversity of approaches and requirements among IAMs and ESMs for tracking land-use change, along with the dependence of model projections on land-use history, presents a challenge for effectively passing data between these communities and for smoothly transitioning from the historical estimates to future projections. Here, a harmonized set of land-use scenarios are presented that smoothly connects historical reconstructions of land use with future projections, in the format required by ESMs.

Hurtt, George; Chini, Louise Parsons; Frolking, Steve; Betts, Richard; Feddema, Johannes; Fischer, Gavin M.; Fisk, J.P.; Hibbard, Kathleen A.; Houghton, R. A.; Janetos, Anthony C.; Jones, C.; Kindermann, G.; Kinoshita, Tsuguki; Goldeweijk, Kees K.; Riahi, Keywan; Shevliakova, Elena; Smith, Steven J.; Stehfest, Eike; Thomson, Allison M.; Thornton, P.; Van Vuuren, Detlef; Wang, Y.

2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

137

Agriculture and Land Use National Greenhouse Gas Inventory Software | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Agriculture and Land Use National Greenhouse Gas Inventory Software Agriculture and Land Use National Greenhouse Gas Inventory Software Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Agriculture and Land Use National Greenhouse Gas Inventory Software Agency/Company /Organization: Colorado State University Partner: United States Agency for International Development, United States Forest Service, United States Environmental Protection Agency Sector: Land Focus Area: Forestry, Agriculture Topics: GHG inventory Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Desktop Application Website: www.nrel.colostate.edu/projects/ghgtool/index.php Cost: Free Agriculture and Land Use National Greenhouse Gas Inventory Software Screenshot References: Agriculture and Land Use National Greenhouse Gas Inventory Software[1]

138

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Production Land Use Allowance and  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Biofuels Production Biofuels Production Land Use Allowance and Exemption to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Production Land Use Allowance and Exemption on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Production Land Use Allowance and Exemption on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Production Land Use Allowance and Exemption on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Production Land Use Allowance and Exemption on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Production Land Use Allowance and Exemption on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Production Land Use Allowance and Exemption on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search

139

Integrated Dynamic Gloabal Modeling of Land Use, Energy and Economic Growth  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this collaborative project is to integrate an existing general equilibrium energy-economic growth model with a biogeochemical cycles and biophysical models in order to more fully explore the potential contribution of land use-related activities to future emissions scenarios. Land cover and land use change activities, including deforestation, afforestation, and agriculture management, are important source of not only CO2, but also non-CO2 GHGs. Therefore, contribution of land-use emissions to total emissions of GHGs is important, and consequently their future trends are relevant to the estimation of climate change and its mitigation. This final report covers the full project period of the award, beginning May 2006, which includes a sub-contract to Brown University later transferred to the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) when Co-PI Brian O'Neill changed institutional affiliations.

Atul Jain, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL Brian O'Neill, NCAR, Boulder, CO

2009-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

140

Land use analysis using GIS, radar and thematic mapper in Ethiopia: PhD showcase  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Land degradation, and poverty issues are very common in our world, especially in developing countries in Africa. There are fewer adaptation strategies for climate change in these countries. Ethiopia is a tropical country found in the horn of Africa. ... Keywords: GIS, classification algorithm, land use change, modeling, remote sensing

Haile K. Tadesse

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land-use change processes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Metropolitan Land Use Planning (Minnesota) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Land Use Planning (Minnesota) Land Use Planning (Minnesota) Metropolitan Land Use Planning (Minnesota) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Environmental Regulations This statute establishes the Metropolitan Land Use Advisory Committee within the Metropolitan Council to coordinate plans, programs, and controls

142

Resource Management Services: Land Use, Part 505: Coastal Erosion...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5: Coastal Erosion Management (New York) Resource Management Services: Land Use, Part 505: Coastal Erosion Management (New York) Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction...

143

Application for State Land Use Lease: Miscellaneous Easement...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Reference Material: Application for State Land Use Lease: Miscellaneous EasementROW Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions...

144

Application for State Land Use Lease: Commercial/Multi-Family...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Reference Material: Application for State Land Use Lease: CommercialMulti-Family Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0)...

145

Land use siting considerations for hydrothermal energy facilities  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydrothermal resources are described and discussion is focused on some of the land use and social considerations involved in siting hydrothermal power plants. (MHR)

Oakes, K.M.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Tropical Africa: Land Use, Biomass, and Carbon Estimates for...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

This Numeric Data Package Brown, S., and G. Gaston. 1996. Tropical Africa: Land Use, Biomass, and Carbon Estimates For 1980. ORNLCDIAC-92, NDP-055. Carbon Dioxide Information...

147

Assess technical and economic potential for land-use initiatives...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

for sector technologies Renewable Energy Technical Potential Toolkit Building Energy Assessment Toolkit Power System Screening and Design Toolkit Land Use Assessment...

148

Accessibility, land use and transport. Accessibitliy evaluation of land-use and transport developments and policy strategies.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??How can accessibility be defined? How useful are different accessibility approaches in evaluating land-use and transport policy strategies? How can the economic benefits associated with… (more)

Geurs, Karst Teunis

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Implications of Limiting CO2 Concentrations for Land Use and Energy  

SciTech Connect

This paper is the first to simultaneously examine the implications of extending the concept of placing a value on carbon beyond fossil fuel and industrial emissions to all sources, including those associated with land use and land use change. The paper reports a variety of results that have bearing on recent discussions in the literature regarding the role of bioenergy and the indirect emission of carbon through land-use change as well as the burgeoning literature on interactions between bioenergy and crop prices. This paper goes beyond results currently in the literature by using an integrated assessment model to assess energy use and supply, atmospheric composition, land use, and terrestrial carbon in the context of limiting the concentration of atmospheric CO2. We find that when the concept of valuing carbon emissions is extended to all carbon emissions, regardless of origin, that in contrast to a mitigation scenario where only fossil fuel and industrial carbon emissions are valued, deforestation is replaced by afforestation and expanded unmanaged ecosystems; the cost of limiting CO2 concentrations falls; crop prices rise; and human diets are transformed as people shift away from consumption of beef and other carbon-intensive protein sources. The increase in crop prices flows directly from the consideration of land-use change emissions in a comprehensive emissions mitigation program and occurs even in the absence of the use of purpose-grown bioenergy. Finally, we find that the assumed rate of improvement in food and fiber crop productivity (e.g. wheat, rice, corn) has a strong influence on land-use change emissions, making the technology for growing crops potentially as important for limiting atmospheric CO2 concentrations as energy technologies such as CO2 capture and storage.

Wise, Marshall A.; Calvin, Katherine V.; Thomson, Allison M.; Clarke, Leon E.; Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; Sands, Ronald D.; Smith, Steven J.; Janetos, Anthony C.; Edmonds, James A.

2009-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

150

Short communication: A generic framework for land-use modelling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we present the generic modelling system SITE (SImulation of Terrestrial Environments), a software package to develop and apply models simulating regional land-use dynamics. The modelling system includes (i) a framework managing the model ... Keywords: Cellular automata, Genetic algorithm, Integrated framework, Land-use model, Map comparison

Christian Schweitzer; Joerg A. Priess; Subhashree Das

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

DOE Announces Changes to the Energy Conservation Standards Process...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Announces Changes to the Energy Conservation Standards Process DOE Announces Changes to the Energy Conservation Standards Process November 16, 2010 - 7:18pm Addthis The Department...

152

LBA Land Use and Land Cover Change Data Sets Released  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

four data sets from the Carbon four data sets from the Carbon Dynamics and Nutrient Dynamics science themes, components of the LBA-ECO Large Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia (LBA). LBA-ECO CD-36 South American Land Data Assimilation System Atmospheric Forcing Data . Data set prepared by L.G.G. de Goncalves, W.J. Shuttleworth, D. Vila, E. Larroza, M.J. Bottino, D.L. Herdies, J.A. Aravequia, J.G. de Mattos, D.L. Toll, M. Rodell and P. Houser. This data set provides South American Land Data Assimilation System (SALDAS) atmospheric forcing data necessary for land surface modeling for South America. The data were derived by combining modeled and observation based sources.The forcing data cover the entire continent of South America at 0.125 degree resolution and are built around the model-calculated values of

153

CARBON SEQUESTRATION THROUGH CHANGES IN LAND USE IN OREGON  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

stream would have increased the overall thermal efficiency by another 10%. 3. U.S. EPA, eGrid 2007.gov/cleanenergy/energy-resources/ egrid/index.html. (Accessed February 13, 2009.) 4. Personal communication with Joseph Staniunas, UTC

154

LBA Land Use and Land Cover Change Data Sets Released  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Three Science Themes The ORNL DAAC announces the release of eight data sets from three science themes. These science research themes are components of the LBA-ECO Large Scale...

155

Land-use practices in Ouro Preto do Oeste, Rondonia, Brazil  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Road development and colonization projects have brought about wide-scale deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon. The state of Rondonia, located in the western Amazon Basin, best exemplifies the problems related to land-use changes because it has the highest rates of deforestation in the Amazon Basin. In order to identify the main land-use practices in Rondonia, interviews with local farmers were carried out in the central part of Rondonia, in the PIC (Integrated Colonization Project) Ouro Preto do Oeste. This is the oldest colonization project in the state. The governmental colonization programs attracted migrants to the area through the construction of roads and infrastructure necessary for the colonists to occupy the land for agricultural practices. The interviews were done on lots of the PIC Ouro Preto and in PAD Urupa to define the background of the colonists, their land-use practices, their economic situation, and their relationships with governmental institutions.

Pedlowski, M.A.; Dale, V.H.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Evolution trends of land use/land cover in a mediterranean forest landscape in Italy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To understand the evolution trends of landscape, in particular those linked to urban/rural relations, is crucial for a sustainable landscape planning. The main goal of this paper is to interpret the forest landscape dynamics occurred over the period ... Keywords: Calabria (Italy), GIS, Mediterranean forest landscape, aerial photographs, land use/land cover (LULC) changes, transition matrices

Salvatore Di Fazio; Giuseppe Modica; Paolo Zoccali

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Biofuels and land-use A simpler approach to the problem  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biofuels and land-use change A simpler approach to the problem John J. Sheehan Presented of increased biofuels demand "Consequential" Life Cycle Assessment is a new concept #12;Technical uncertainty ethano #12;Political and ethical dilemmas The ceteris paribus argument: Biofuels effects should

158

Dischargecalcium concentration relationships in streams of the Amazon and Cerrado of Brazil: soil or land use  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Discharge­calcium concentration relationships in streams of the Amazon and Cerrado of Brazil: soil ecosystem function. Throughout the Amazon and Cerrado regions of Brazil rapid changes in land use and land with data from 28 streams throughout Brazil. These streams come from three distinct regions and varied

159

Environmental Land Use Restriction (Connecticut) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Environmental Land Use Restriction (Connecticut) Environmental Land Use Restriction (Connecticut) Environmental Land Use Restriction (Connecticut) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Connecticut Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Energy and Environmental Protection

160

GCAM 3.0 Agriculture and Land Use: Data Sources and Methods  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the data processing methods used in the GCAM 3.0 agriculture and land use component, starting from all source data used, and detailing all calculations and assumptions made in generating the model inputs. The report starts with a brief introduction to modeling of agriculture and land use in GCAM 3.0, and then provides documentation of the data and methods used for generating the base-year dataset and future scenario parameters assumed in the model input files. Specifically, the report addresses primary commodity production, secondary (animal) commodity production, disposition of commodities, land allocation, land carbon contents, and land values.

Kyle, G. Page; Luckow, Patrick; Calvin, Katherine V.; Emanuel, William R.; Nathan, Mayda; Zhou, Yuyu

2011-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land-use change processes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Vermont Land Use and Development, Act 250 (Vermont) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Land Use and Development, Act 250 (Vermont) Land Use and Development, Act 250 (Vermont) Vermont Land Use and Development, Act 250 (Vermont) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Vermont Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Agency of Natural Resources The Act 250 program provides a public, quasi-judicial process for reviewing

162

Object-oriented change detection for the city of Harare, Zimbabwe  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Object building and the extraction of homogeneous landscape units on which spatial statistics can be applied is useful in assessing land use and land cover change. Object-oriented processing techniques are becoming more popular compared to traditional ... Keywords: Change detection, Classification, Land cover, Land use, Object-oriented, Remote sensing, Satellite, Sustainable development

Ruvimbo Gamanya; Philippe De Maeyer; Morgan De Dapper

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

GRR/Section 1 - Land Use Overview | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

1 - Land Use Overview 1 - Land Use Overview < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 1 - Land Use Overview 01LandUseOverview.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Bureau of Land Management U S Army Corps of Engineers United States Environmental Protection Agency Fish and Wildlife Service United States Department of Defense Regulations & Policies Federal Land Policy and Management Act of 1976 Endangered Species Act Clean Water Act Clean Air Act Farmland Protection Policy Act Sikes Act National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA) - specifically, Section 106 Native American Graves Protection Act Archaeological Resource Protection Act Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content

164

Tropical Africa: Land Use, Biomass, and Carbon Estimates for...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

80 image Brown, S., and G. Gaston. 1996. Tropical Africa: Land Use, Biomass, and Carbon Estimates For 1980. ORNLCDIAC-92, NDP-055. Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center, U.S....

165

Tropical Africa: Land Use, Biomass, and Carbon Estimates for...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

60 image Brown, S., and G. Gaston. 1996. Tropical Africa: Land Use, Biomass, and Carbon Estimates For 1980. ORNLCDIAC-92, NDP-055. Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center, U.S....

166

An interactive land use VRML application (ILUVA) with servlet assist  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We summarize progress achieved on an interactive land use VRML application (ILUVA) with servlet assist. The purpose of this application is to enable one to take a virtual land area and add buildings, roadways, landscaping and other features. The application ...

Lee A. Belfore, II; Suresh Chitithoti

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Tropical Africa: Land Use, Biomass, and Carbon Estimates for...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

70 image Brown, S., and G. Gaston. 1996. Tropical Africa: Land Use, Biomass, and Carbon Estimates For 1980. ORNLCDIAC-92, NDP-055. Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center, U.S....

168

Database Development of Land Use Characteristics along Major...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

with TIGER files so that land use data can be collected at a more detailed level. D. Aerial photos and satellite images: Digital aerial photos and satellite images, panchromatic...

169

An integrated multi-criteria scenario evaluation web tool for participatory land-use planning in urbanized areas: The Ecosystem Portfolio Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Land-use land-cover change is one of the most important and direct drivers of changes in ecosystem functions and services. Given the complexity of the decision-making, there is a need for Internet-based decision support systems with scenario evaluation ... Keywords: Decision support, Ecological value, Ecosystem restoration, Land-use planning, Quality of life, Sea level rise mitigation, Sustainability

W. B. Labiosa; W. M. Forney; A. -M. Esnard; D. Mitsova-Boneva; R. Bernknopf; P. Hearn; D. Hogan; L. Pearlstine; D. Strong; H. Gladwin; E. Swain

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Micro-level land use impacts of bioconversion  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The energy crisis has prompted research and development of renewable energy sources, among which are the bioconversion technologies. Crops, crop residues, manure and other organic wastes are potential sources of liquid, solid and gaseous fuels. These feedstocks originate on the farm or in the forest and therefore are land intensive. Implementation of the bioconversion technologies will involve actions which will impact existing land use patterns. Because of differences in crop type, yield per acre, existing land use conditions and agricultural practices, an aggregated national approach to the assessment of land use is not sufficient. If energy policy regarding bioconversion is to be successful, then it must be sensitive to micro-level information. This paper demonstrates the land use assessment work at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) in support of the Department of Energy's Technical Assessment of Solar Energy Program, (TASE). Local Biomass potential, existing and use and potential land use impacts from bio-energy implementation for three of the fifteen counties selected for the TASE study will be presented. The methodology creased for the evaluation is useful in determining the biomass potential for any community or county, and in identifying regional differences inherent in the trade-offs between existing land use and energy production.

Parsons, V.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Changes related to "BioProcess Algae" | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

page Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Changes related to "BioProcess Algae" BioProcess Algae Jump to: navigation, search This is a list of changes made...

172

Marine Habitats and Land Use (Virginia) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Marine Habitats and Land Use (Virginia) Marine Habitats and Land Use (Virginia) Marine Habitats and Land Use (Virginia) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Developer Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Systems Integrator Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Virginia Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Virginia Marine Resources Commission The Virginia Marine Resources Commission has jurisdiction over submerged lands off the state's coast and in inland rivers and streams, wetlands and tidal wetlands, coastal sand dunes and beaches, and other shores. A permit from the Commission is required to dredge, fill, or otherwise disturb these

173

Missouri River Preservation and Land Use Authority (Iowa) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

River Preservation and Land Use Authority (Iowa) River Preservation and Land Use Authority (Iowa) Missouri River Preservation and Land Use Authority (Iowa) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Iowa Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Iowa Department of Natural Resources The State Interagency Missouri River Authority engages in comprehensive

174

LBA Land Use and Land Cover Data Set Released  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LBA Land Use and Land Cover Data Sets Released LBA Land Use and Land Cover Data Sets Released The ORNL DAAC announces the release of two image data sets from the Land Use and Land Cover science theme (LC-15 team), a component of the LBA-ECO Large Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia (LBA). LBA-ECO LC-15 SRTM30 Digital Elevation Model Data, Amazon Basin: 2000 . Data set prepared by S. Saatchi. This data set provides a subset of the SRTM30 Digital Elevation Model (DEM) elevation and standard deviation data (STD of the data points used in the averaging) for the Amazon Basin. SRTM30 is a near-global digital elevation model (DEM) comprising a combination of data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), flown in February, 2000, and the earlier U.S. Geological Survey's GTOPO30 data set.

175

Implementation of state solar incentives: land-use planning to ensure solar access  

SciTech Connect

State incentives in land-use planning to ensure solar access are examined to determine issues in program design and implementation. Available incentives are reviewed to indicate their structure and purpose. These incentives include broad legislative grants of solar rights, application of nuisance law to solar-collector shading, removal of restrictive covenants or establishment of covenants to protect solar access, provision for privately-negotiated solar easements, and land-use planning and regulation to include passive solar design and provision for active solar collection in land-use development. State initiatives in the period 1973 to 1978 are cataloged. Case studies in four states (Oregon, California, New Mexico, and Minnesota) are reported. Oregon is currently engaged in a statewide, mandated local comprehensive planning process which includes consideration of energy conservation and renewable energy sources. California has recently adopted two solar access related bills which address private solar easements, subdivision design, restrictive covenants, and shading by vegetation. New Mexico has established a broad legislative grant of solar rights based on water rights law. And Minnesota has authorized the inclusion of solar energy as a factor in local land use planning and established a private easement procedure.

Pollock, P.

1979-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Land Use - Smart Planning (Iowa) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Use - Smart Planning (Iowa) Use - Smart Planning (Iowa) Land Use - Smart Planning (Iowa) < Back Eligibility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Tribal Government Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Iowa Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Iowa Department of Natural Resources State agencies, local governments, and other public entities engaging in land use planning shall work to promote clean and renewable energy use, increased energy efficiency, and sustainable design and construction standards, while emphasizing the protection, preservation, and restoration of natural resources, agricultural land, and cultural and historic

177

Overview of Strategies for Making Connections Between Transportation, Land Use and Air Quality  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Land Use Regulation : Designing Parking Policies to Reduce Automotive PollutionLand Use, Air Quality Connection deals with the mobile monitoring of pollutionLand Use, Air Quality Connection The Comprehensive Behavior Alternative approach views air pollution

Shirazi, Elham; Taylor, Brian

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Historic land use and carbon estimates for South and Southeast Asia: 1880--1980  

SciTech Connect

This document describes the contents of a digital data base containing estimates of land use change and the carbon content of vegetation for South and Southeast Asia for the years 1880, 1920, 1950, 1970, and 1980. These data were originally collected for climate modelers, so they could reduce the uncertainty associated with the magnitude and time course of historical land use change and of carbon release. For this data base, South and Southeast Asia is defined as the countries of India, Sri Lanka, Bangladesh, Myanmar (Burma), Thailand, Laos, Kampuchea (Cambodia), Vietnam, Malaysia, Brunei, Singapore, Indonesia, and the Philippines. The most important change in land use over the 100 year period was the conversion of 107 {times} 10{sup 6} ha of forest/woodland to categories with lower biomass. Land thus transformed accounted for 13.5% of the total area of the study region. The estimated total carbon content of live vegetation in South and Southeast Asia has dropped progressively, from 59 {times} 10{sup 9} Mg in 1880 to 27 {times} 10{sup 9} Mg in 1980. Throughout the study period the carbon stock in forests was greater than the carbon content in all other categories combined, although its share of the total declined progressively from 81% in 1880 to 73% in 1980. The data base itself was developed in Lotus 1-2-3{trademark} using a sequential bookkeeping model. The source data were obtained at the local and regional level for each country from official agricultural and economic statistics from historical geographic and demographic texts, reports, and articles; and from any other available source. Because of boundary changes through time and disparities between the validity, availability, and scale of the data for each country, the data were aggregated into 94 ecological zones. The resulting data base contains land use and carbon information for 94 ecological zones and national totals for 13 countries.

Daniels, R.C. [ed.] [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center]|[Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Energy, Environment and Resources Center; Richards, J.F.; Flint, E.P. [Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States). Dept. of History

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

A California Statewide Exploratory Analysis Correlating Land Use Density, Infrastructure Supply and Travel Behavior  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Land Use Density, Infrastructure Supply and Travel Behaviorof employment and infrastructure supply are used togetherCalifonia. Land use and infrastructure have a significant,

Yoon, Seo Youn; Golob, Thomas F.; Goulias, Konstadinos G.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Coupling GIS and LCA for biodiversity assessments of land use: Part 1: Inventory modeling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of land use Part 1: Inventory modeling Roland Geyer & Davidthe use of GIS-based inventory modeling to generatedemonstrated that GIS-based inventory modeling of land use

Geyer, Roland; Stoms, David M.; Lindner, Jan P.; Davis, Frank W.; Wittstock, Bastian

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land-use change processes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Hierarchical Marginal Land Assessment for Land Use Planning  

SciTech Connect

Marginal land provides an alternative potential for food and bioenergy production in the face of limited land resources; however, effective assessment of marginal lands is not well addressed. Concerns over environmental risks, ecosystem services and sustainability for marginal land have been widely raised. The objective of this study was to develop a hierarchical marginal land assessment framework for land use planning and management. We first identified major land functions linking production, environment, ecosystem services and economics, and then classified land resources into four categories of marginal land using suitability and limitations associated with major management goals, including physically marginal land, biologically marginal land, environmental-ecological marginal land, and economically marginal land. We tested this assessment framework in south-western Michigan, USA. Our results indicated that this marginal land assessment framework can be potentially feasible on land use planning for food and bioenergy production, and balancing multiple goals of land use management. We also compared our results with marginal land assessment from the Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) and land capability classes (LCC) that are used in the US. The hierarchical assessment framework has advantages of quantitatively reflecting land functions and multiple concerns. This provides a foundation upon which focused studies can be identified in order to improve the assessment framework by quantifying high-resolution land functions associated with environment and ecosystem services as well as their criteria are needed to improve the assessment framework.

Kang, Shujiang [ORNL; Post, Wilfred M [ORNL; Wang, Dali [ORNL; Nichols, Dr Jeff A [ORNL; Bandaru, Vara Prasad [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Linking Oil Prices, Gas Prices, Economy, Transport, and Land Use  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Linking Oil Prices, Gas Prices, Economy, Transport, and Land Use A Review of Empirical Findings Hongwei Dong, Ph.D. Candidate John D. Hunt, Professor John Gliebe, Assistant Professor #12;Framework Oil-run Short and Long-run #12;Topics covered by this presentation: Oil price and macro-economy Gas price

Bertini, Robert L.

183

Land Use and natUraL resoUrces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Land Use and natUraL resoUrces CONTINUING AND PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION SPRING 2013 Including.m. Sacramento: Sutter Square Galleria, 2901 K St. $575 ($625 if postmarked after 03/28/2013). Enroll in section and site designs, create and prepare site plans, and analyze and develop planning staff reports. Emphasis

California at Davis, University of

184

Asking the Right Questions About Transportation and Land Use  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

March 2007 CTS 07-03 Asking the Right Questions About Transportation and Land Use Access to Destinations Study Research Summary No. 1 Getting There: Access and the Future of the Twin Cities Region #12;Published by the Center for Transportation Studies University of Minnesota March 2007 This research summary

Minnesota, University of

185

Director's Protest Resolution Report Programmatic Land Use Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Director's Protest Resolution Report Programmatic Land Use Plan Amendments for Solar Energy......................................................................................... 68 #12;Reader How do The Dire excerpts Land Ma Report How do 1. F al 2. In n Issue T NEPA Issue N Organi Protest Issue E Rather renewab Summa There i Respon Specific decision 's Guide I read the R ector

Argonne National Laboratory

186

The Impact of Biofuel Mandates on Land Use Suhail Ahmad  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

short of the expected targets as laid forward by biofuel mandates. Cellulosic crops tend to be heavy of cellulosic biofuels yet exists. Such an ambitious target relies on the assumption from the DepartmentThe Impact of Biofuel Mandates on Land Use by Suhail Ahmad B.E., Avionics Engineering National

187

Bioenergy and land-use competition in Northeast Brazil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bioenergy and land-use competition in Northeast Brazil Christian Azar Department of Physical of Brazil on "good" versus "bad" lands is investigated. It is shown that the value of the higher yields) lands. The focus of the analysis is on the Northeast of Brazil (NE), where the prospects for dedicated

188

DOE Announces Changes to the Energy Conservation Standards Process |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Announces Changes to the Energy Conservation Standards Process DOE Announces Changes to the Energy Conservation Standards Process DOE Announces Changes to the Energy Conservation Standards Process November 16, 2010 - 7:18pm Addthis The Department of Energy today announced it is making changes to expedite its rulemaking process. Historically, the Department has had difficulty meeting deadlines imposed by Congress for adopting energy efficiency standards. The Department has already taken steps to improve its internal management of the rulemaking process, and is now making further changes designed to make the rulemaking process more efficient. Those changes are as follows: Notice of Proposed Rule The energy conservation standards rulemaking process typically began with a framework document, followed by a preliminary analysis. Only after these

189

Health Equity in a New Urbanist Environment: Land Use Planning and Community Capacity Building in Fresno, CA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on the links between land use, air pollution and health inlinks between land use and air pollution were simultaneouslyof land- use siting and cumulative air pollution impacts. ”

ZUK, MIRIAM ZOFITH

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

GRR/Section 1-OR-a - Land Use Considerations | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » GRR/Section 1-OR-a - Land Use Considerations < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 1-OR-a - Land Use Considerations 01ORALandUseConsiderations.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 01ORALandUseConsiderations.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative Add Text Print PDF

191

Implementing change in the facilities planning process  

SciTech Connect

In the post-Cold War climate of reduced budgets at the national laboratories, the Sites Planning Department at Sandia National Laboratories was faced with the problem of securing funding for capital construction projects in a very competitive environment. The Department of Energy (DOE), felt that requests for new facilities were not always well coordinated with its mission needs. The Sites Planning Department needed to revolutionize the way they were doing business. To be successful in obtaining approval and funding for future facilities, they recognized the need to concentrate their efforts on project proposals that tap strategic programs at DOE. The authors developed a series of new processes to identify, evaluate, prioritize, and develop line item project proposals to request approval and obtain funding. A matrixed group of sites and facilities directors was formed to establish criteria and make preliminary recommendations to upper management. Matrixed working groups were also established at the staff level to develop and prepare projects for the prioritization process. Ultimately, similar processes will be applied to all project types, and a prioritized plan generated for each. These plans will become the blueprint for an overarching strategic site plan. What started as a means of increasing success in obtaining approval and funding of capital projects has launched a whole new approach to project development that permits incorporation of facilities planning into overall corporate strategic planning.

Williams, J.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Sites Planning Dept.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Land-use Policy and Program Design Toolkit | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Land-use Policy and Program Design Toolkit Land-use Policy and Program Design Toolkit Jump to: navigation, search Stage 4 LEDS Home Introduction to Framework Assess current country plans, policies, practices, and capacities Develop_BAU Stage 4: Prioritizing and Planning for Actions Begin execution of implementation plans 1.0. Organizing the LEDS Process 1.1. Institutional Structure for LEDS 1.2. Workplan to Develop the LEDS 1.3. Roles and responsibilities to develop LEDS 2.1. Assess current country plans, policies, practices, and capacities 2.2. Compile lessons learned and good practices from ongoing and previous sustainable development efforts in the country 2.3. Assess public and private sector capacity to support initiatives 2.4. Assess and improve the national GHG inventory and other economic and resource data as needed for LEDS development

193

Assess institutional frameworks for LEDS for land-use sector | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Assess institutional frameworks for LEDS for land-use sector Assess institutional frameworks for LEDS for land-use sector Jump to: navigation, search Stage 3 LEDS Home Introduction to Framework Assess current country plans, policies, practices, and capacities Develop_BAU Stage 4: Prioritizing and Planning for Actions Begin execution of implementation plans 1.0. Organizing the LEDS Process 1.1. Institutional Structure for LEDS 1.2. Workplan to Develop the LEDS 1.3. Roles and responsibilities to develop LEDS 2.1. Assess current country plans, policies, practices, and capacities 2.2. Compile lessons learned and good practices from ongoing and previous sustainable development efforts in the country 2.3. Assess public and private sector capacity to support initiatives 2.4. Assess and improve the national GHG inventory and other

194

Tropical Africa: Land Use, Biomass, and Carbon Estimates for 1980  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tropical Africa: Land Use, Biomass, and Carbon Estimates for 1980 (NDP-055) Tropical Africa: Land Use, Biomass, and Carbon Estimates for 1980 (NDP-055) DOI: 10.3334/CDIAC/lue.ndp055 data Data PDF PDF graphics Graphics Please note: these data have been updated for the year 2000 Contributors Sandra Brown1 Greg Gaston2 Work on this project was initiated while at the Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Sciences University of Illinois Urbana, Illinois 61801, U.S.A. 1Present address: Winrock International, Arlington, Virgina. 2Present address: Department of Geosciences, Oregon State University. Prepared by T.W. Beaty, and L.M. Olsen. Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center Environmental Sciences Division OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6290 managed by UT-Battelle, LLC for the U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY

195

Environmental assessment of spatial plan policies through land use scenarios  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a method based on scenario analysis to compare the environmental effects of different spatial plan policies in a range of possible futures. The study aimed at contributing to overcome two limitations encountered in Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) for spatial planning: poor exploration of how the future might unfold, and poor consideration of alternative plan policies. Scenarios were developed through what-if functions and spatial modeling in a Geographical Information System (GIS), and consisted in maps that represent future land uses under different assumptions on key driving forces. The use of land use scenarios provided a representation of how the different policies will look like on the ground. This allowed gaining a better understanding of the policies' implications on the environment, which could be measured through a set of indicators. The research undertook a case-study approach by developing and assessing land use scenarios for the future growth of Caia, a strategically-located and fast-developing town in rural Mozambique. The effects of alternative spatial plan policies were assessed against a set of environmental performance indicators, including deforestation, loss of agricultural land, encroachment of flood-prone areas and wetlands and access to water sources. In this way, critical environmental effects related to the implementation of each policy were identified and discussed, suggesting possible strategies to address them. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Research Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The method contributes to two critical issues in SEA: exploration of the future and consideration of alternatives. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Future scenarios are used to test the environmental performance of different spatial plan policies in uncertainty conditions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Spatially-explicit land use scenarios provide a representation of how different policies will look like on the ground.

Geneletti, Davide, E-mail: davide.geneletti@ing.unitn.it

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

196

File:01LandUseOverview.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

LandUseOverview.pdf LandUseOverview.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Metadata File:01LandUseOverview.pdf Size of this preview: 463 × 599 pixels. Other resolution: 464 × 600 pixels. Full resolution ‎(1,275 × 1,650 pixels, file size: 42 KB, MIME type: application/pdf) File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 09:54, 28 March 2013 Thumbnail for version as of 09:54, 28 March 2013 1,275 × 1,650 (42 KB) Dfitzger (Talk | contribs) 14:23, 30 October 2012 Thumbnail for version as of 14:23, 30 October 2012 1,275 × 1,650 (41 KB) Dklein2012 (Talk | contribs) 15:55, 11 September 2012 Thumbnail for version as of 15:55, 11 September 2012 1,275 × 1,650 (34 KB) Djenne (Talk | contribs)

197

Employment and land-use impacts of resource program elements  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) evaluated several power resource alternatives under consideration by the Bonneville Power Administration in its Resource Program Environmental Impact Statement (RPEIS). The purpose of this evaluation was to determine the potential impacts of each alternative in terms of land use and employment. We reviewed the literature that describes land-use and employment impacts to derive estimates of each type of effect. These estimates were scaled to a per-megawatt basis for use as multipliers in the RPEIS analysis. Multipliers for employment were taken from the literature and developed from power plant capital cost estimates. Land-use multipliers were taken from the literature or estimated from existing plants. In this report we compared information sources and estimates to develop the most applicable multipliers. Employment levels required (in terms of employee years per MW of plant capacity) for the construction and operation phases of each energy-generating resource alternative analyzed are shown. The amounts of land required (in terms of acres per MW capacity) for the construction and operation phases of each energy-generating resource alternatives analyzed are also shown.

Shankle, S A; Baechler, M C; Blondin, D W; Grover, S E

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Tropical Africa: Land Use, Biomass, and Carbon Estimates for 1980 (NDP-055)  

SciTech Connect

This document describes the contents of a digital database containing maximum potential aboveground biomass, land use, and estimated biomass and carbon data for 1980. The biomass data and carbon estimates are associated with woody vegetation in Tropical Africa. These data were collected to reduce the uncertainty associated with estimating historical releases of carbon from land use change. Tropical Africa is defined here as encompassing 22.7 x 10{sup 6} km{sup 2} of the earth's land surface and is comprised of countries that are located in tropical Africa (Angola, Botswana, Burundi, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, Congo, Benin, Equatorial Guinea, Ethiopia, Djibouti, Gabon, Gambia, Ghana, Guinea, Ivory Coast, Kenya, Liberia, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Mozambique, Namibia, Niger, Nigeria, Guinea-Bissau, Zimbabwe (Rhodesia), Rwanda, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Somalia, Sudan, Tanzania, Togo, Uganda, Burkina Faso (Upper Volta), Zaire, and Zambia). The database was developed using the GRID module in the ARC/INFO{trademark} geographic information system. Source data were obtained from the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), the U.S. National Geophysical Data Center, and a limited number of biomass-carbon density case studies. These data were used to derive the maximum potential and actual (ca. 1980) aboveground biomass values at regional and country levels. The land-use data provided were derived from a vegetation map originally produced for the FAO by the International Institute of Vegetation Mapping, Toulouse, France.

Brown, S.

2002-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

199

Automated economic data processing in the changing business world  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An attempt is made for exploring some strands of the automated economic data processing in the changing business world. The new realities in business management and automated economic data processing are outlined. Some strands for intellectual support ... Keywords: E-business, M-business, business intelligence, data processing, information technology, knowledge management

Ljuben Kraev

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Solar Land Use Data on OpenEI | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Solar Land Use Data on OpenEI Solar Land Use Data on OpenEI Home > Groups > OpenEI Community Central Sfomail's picture Submitted by Sfomail(48) Member 25 June, 2013 - 12:10 acres csp land use how much land land requirements pv land use solar land use square miles I'm happy to announce that a new report on Solar+Land+Use was just released by the National+Renewable+Energy+Laboratory. You can find a brief summary of the results at the Solar+Land+Use page on OpenEI. As solar power becomes more popular, a big question that people have is "how much land does solar energy use?" This dataset and report provides answers to the solar land use question while also doing an in-depth analysis and evaluation of various factors related to solar land use. Both photovoltaic (PV) and concentrating solar power (CSP) facilities were

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land-use change processes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Resource Management Services: Land Use, Part 505: Coastal Erosion  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5: Coastal Erosion 5: Coastal Erosion Management (New York) Resource Management Services: Land Use, Part 505: Coastal Erosion Management (New York) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State New York Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider NY Department of Environmental Conservation

202

A Dynamic Simulation of the Indirect Land Use Implications of Recent Biofuel Production and Use in the United States.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The global indirect land use change (ILUC) implications of biofuel use in the United States of America (USA) from 2001 to 2010 are evaluated with a dynamic general equilibrium model. The effects of biofuels production on agricultural land area vary by year; from a net expansion of 0.17 ha per 1000 gallons produced (2002) to a net contraction of 0.13 ha per 1000 gallons (2018) in Case 1 of our simulation. In accordance with the general narrative about the implications of biofuel policy, agricultural land area increased in many regions of the world. However, oil-export dependent economies experienced agricultural land contraction because of reductions in their revenues. Reducing crude oil imports is a major goal of biofuel policy, but the land use change implications have received little attention in the literature. Simulations evaluating the effects of doubling supply elasticities for land and fossil resources show that these parameters can significantly influence the land use change estimates. Therefore, research that provides empirically-based and spatially-detailed agricultural land-supply curves and capability to project future fossil energy prices is critical for improving estimates of the effects of biofuel policy on land use.

Oladosu, Gbadebo A [ORNL] [ORNL; Kline, Keith L [ORNL] [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Land use and environmental impacts of decentralized solar energy use  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The physical, spatial and land-use impacts of decentralized solar technologies applied at the community level by the year 2000 are examined. The results of the study are intended to provide a basis for evaluating the way in which a shift toward reliance on decentralized energy technologies may eventually alter community form. Six land-use types representative of those found in most US cities are analyzed according to solar penetration levels identified in the maximum solar scenario for the year 2000. The scenario is translated into shares of end use demand in the residential, commercial and industrial sectors. These proportions become the scenario goals to be met by the use of decentralized solar energy systems. The percentage of total energy demand is assumed to be 36.5 percent, 18.8 percent and 22.6 percent in the residential, commercial and industrial sectors respectively. The community level scenario stipulated that a certain percentage of the total demand be met by on-site solar collection, i.e. photovoltaic and thermal collectors, and by passive design. This on-site solar goal is 31.9 percent (residential), 16.8 percent (commercial) and 13.1 percent (industrial).

Twiss, R.H.; Smith, P.L.; Gatzke, A.E.; McCreary, S.T.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Integrating the principles of strategic environmental assessment into local comprehensive land use plans in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The lack of early integration with the planning and decision-making process has been a major problem in environmental assessment. Traditional project-based environmental impact assessment has inadequate incentives and capacities to incorporate critical environmental impacts at a broader temporal or spatial scale. While many applications have been geared towards implementing project-level environmental assessments, comparatively little research has been done to determine how to incorporate strategically critical environmental impacts into local planning. Although the principles of strategic environmental assessment (SEA) are not yet required in local planning in the United States, these principles create a theoretical framework for local environmental assessment. The objective of this study is to examine the ability of local plans to integrate and implement the key SEA principles. This study focuses on increasing the understanding of how and where to integrate environmental impacts into the local planning and decision-making process by converting the principles of SEA into specific planning tools, policies, and implementation strategies. This study develops a protocol with 112 indicators to measure the strengths and weaknesses of integrating strategic environmental assessment into local comprehensive land use plans. A random sample of 40 California local comprehensive land use plans and associated planning processes is evaluated based on this plan quality evaluation protocol. Statistical analysis and multiple regression models identify the factors affecting the quality of plans with respect to their ability to assess environmental impacts. The results identify the relative strengths and weaknesses of the ability of local jurisdictions to integrate the SEA principles. The results show that many strategically important environmental issues and tools are rarely adopted by current local plans. The regression analysis results further identify the effects of planning capacity, environmental assessment capacity, public participation and contextual variables on environmental assessment plan quality. The findings extend established planning theory and practice by incorporating strategic environmental considerations into the existing framework of what constitutes a high quality local land use comprehensive plan and suggest ways to improve plan quality.

Tang, Zhenghong

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

A technical modeler's interface for urbansim, a system for integrated land use, transportation, and environmental modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Patterns of land use and available transportation systems play a critical role in determining the economic vitality, livability, and sustainability of urban areas. Transportation interacts strongly with land use. For example, automobile-oriented development ...

Alan Borning; Paul Waddell

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

GRR/Section 13-NV-a - Land Use Assessment | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NV-a - Land Use Assessment < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 13-NV-a - Land Use...

207

GRR/Section 13-MT-a - Land Use Assessment | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MT-a - Land Use Assessment < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 13-MT-a - Land Use...

208

GRR/Section 13-ID-a - Land Use Assessment | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ID-a - Land Use Assessment < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 13-ID-a - Land Use...

209

GRR/Section 13-OR-a - Land Use Assessment | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

3-OR-a - Land Use Assessment < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 13-OR-a - Land Use...

210

Coupling GIS and LCA for biodiversity assessments of land use: Part 1: Inventory modeling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

scenarios were developed with GIS modeling. Current land use0170-9 LAND USE IN LCA Coupling GIS and LCA for biodiversityGeographic information systems (GIS) are adept at modeling

Geyer, Roland; Stoms, David M.; Lindner, Jan P.; Davis, Frank W.; Wittstock, Bastian

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Land use suitability screening for power plant sites in Maryland  

SciTech Connect

Since 1974 Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been engaged in developing an automated procedure for land use suitability screening. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission has funded the project to aid in the selection of power plant sites in Maryland. Its purpose is to identify candidate areas from which specific candidate sites can be chosen for detailed analyses. The ORNL approach assures that certain key variables are examined empirically for every cell in the study region before candidate sites are selected. Each variable is assigned an importance weight and compatibility score based upon its effect on the economic, social, or ecologic costs associated with construction in a given cell. The weighted scores for each variable are aggregated and output as a suitability score for each cell. (auth)

Dobson, J.E.

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

A Study on the Bioenergy Crop Production Function of Land Use in China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Based on the analysis of the bioenergy crop production function of land use, combined with the current situation of Chinese land use, this paper analyzes and discusses the cultivation of energy plants and the bioenergy crop production function of land ... Keywords: Land use, Bioenergy crop production function, farmers income

Zhang Kun; Duan Jiannan; Yang Jun; Li Ping

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Optimizing Patterns of Land Use to Reduce Peak Runoff Flow and Nonpoint Source Pollution with an Integrated Hydrological and Land-Use Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of this study is to develop and apply a methodology for delineating optimal land-use patterns that minimize peak runoff flow at watershed outlets by coupling a hydrological model and a land-use model. Under the assumption supported in ...

In-Young Yeo; Steven I. Gordon; Jean-Michel Guldmann

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

GRR/Section 3-ID-d - Land Use Permit | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

d - Land Use Permit d - Land Use Permit < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 3-ID-d - Land Use Permit 03-ID-d - Land Use Permit.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Idaho Department of Lands Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 03-ID-d - Land Use Permit.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative The Idaho Department of Lands issues Land Use Permits for non-invasive exploration on a case by case basis. 3-ID-d.1 to 3-ID-d.2 - Will Non-Invasive Exploration Be Preformed on State Lands? A Land Use Permit is required to preform non-invasive exploration on state

215

GRR/Section 1-NV-a - State Land Use Planning | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

-NV-a - State Land Use Planning -NV-a - State Land Use Planning < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 1-NV-a - State Land Use Planning 01NVAStateLandUsePlanning (1).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Nevada Division of State Lands Regulations & Policies NRS 278: Planning and Zoning Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 01NVAStateLandUsePlanning (1).pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative _ 1-NV-a.1 - Inventory Population Data, Land Use Survey, Housing, and Economic Data According to the Planner's Guide, a land use plan ought to consider:

216

Land use requirements for ground-mounted solar power facilities. | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Land use requirements for ground-mounted solar power facilities. Land use requirements for ground-mounted solar power facilities. Dataset Summary Description This dataset is part of a larger internal dataset at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) that explores various characteristics of large solar electric (both PV and CSP) facilities around the United States. This dataset focuses on the land use characteristics for solar facilities that are either under construction or currently in operation. Source Land-Use Requirements for Solar Power Plants in the United States Date Released June 25th, 2013 (5 months ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords acres area average concentrating solar power csp Density electric hectares km2 land land requirements land use land-use mean photovoltaic photovoltaics PV solar statistics Data application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.spreadsheetml.sheet icon Master Solar Land Use Spreadsheet (xlsx, 1.5 MiB)

217

Risk Analysis for Water Resources Under Climate Change, Population Growth, and Land Use Change  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

10: WEAP implementation of FERC instream flow requirementsgreater of the Davis-Grunsky and FERC flows, plus the Cowellas 200 cfs. October FERC Flows are average values of the

Kiparsky, Michael

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Risk Analysis for Water Resources Under Climate Change, Population Growth, and Land Use Change  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water Supply Reliability. Sacramento, CA, California EnergyWater Resources. Sacramento, CA, California Department ofUse in California. Sacramento, CA, California Department of

Kiparsky, Michael

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Planning for a Sustainable Nexus of Urban Land Use, Transport and Energy.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Land use, transport, and energy systems create demands that are transferred to ecosystems. Urban sprawl is increasing, open space and farmland are disappearing and climate… (more)

Belaieff, Antoine; Moy, Gloria

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

GRR/Section 1-AK-a - Land Use Considerations | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon GRRSection 1-AK-a - Land Use Considerations < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land-use change processes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Coupling GIS and LCA for biodiversity assessments of land use: Part 2: Impact assessment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Evenness . Geographic information systems (GIS) .GIS-based inventory modeling . Habitats . Hemeroby . Land0199-9 LAND USE IN LCA Coupling GIS and LCA for biodiversity

Geyer, Roland; Lindner, Jan P.; Stoms, David M.; Davis, Frank W.; Wittstock, Bastian

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Coupling GIS and LCA for biodiversity assessments of land use: Part 1: Inventory modeling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MC (2007) California biofuel goals and production potential.Many LCA studies of biofuel production and use have appearedand downstream of biofuel crop production that have land use

Geyer, Roland; Stoms, David M.; Lindner, Jan P.; Davis, Frank W.; Wittstock, Bastian

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Land use and land cover, 1978 Hot Springs, South Dakota, Nebraska  

SciTech Connect

Land use and land cover of the area surrounding Hot Springs, South Dakota in 1978 is presented in map form. (ACR)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

An economic analysis of land use alternatives on CRP land trees after the CRP contracts expire in east Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Landowners who have planted trees on CRP land must decide whether to retain the trees or divert land to others uses after the contracts expire. An economic tool is developed to assist landowners in making the most profitable choice between retaining trees to produce sawlogs or pulpwood and reverting land to crops, corn, cotton, sorghum and wheat. A generic theoretical framework is formulated to compare various land use alternatives. Several scenarios are formulated to incorporate the changing patterns of variables and to examine the sensitivity of the outcome to these changes. The influence of implementing the conservation compliance plan (CCP) is also examined. The time frame of the analysis is determined by the financially optimal. single rotation length of the tree stand. The real discounted revenues of the land use alternatives, based in 1993, are compared on a per-acre basis. The results indicate that retaining trees on post-CRP land is a better option than reverting land to corn, cotton without a CCP, sorghum, or wheat under all scenarios. However, when compared with reverting land to cotton with a CCP, retaining trees does not seem to be a profitable land use alternative under several of the scenarios. Given that a large proportion of the land going into CRP in east Texas is wheat acres, it seems likely that majority of the CRP land in trees is going to be retained in trees upon expiration of contracts.

Arekere, Marigowda Dhananjaya

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

E:\Active Projects\Comprehensive Land Use Plan\fclup.prn.pdf  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FERMILAB FERMILAB COMPREHENSIVE LAND USE PLAN f FERMILAB TABLE OF CONTENTS Comprehensive Land Use Report Contents * PAGE i * Revision 0 * April 15, 1998 Contents f Table of Contents I. Regional Conditions............................................................................. .1 1. History ............................................................................................. 1 2. Regional Overview........................................................................ 7 3. Specific Local Conditions ........................................................... 10 4. Public Transportation.................................................................. 17 5. Geology/Seismic Risk/Topography/Hydrology ................. 25 6. Meteorology..................................................................................

226

Introducing a novel model of belief-desire-intention agent for urban land use planning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Land use planning is a potentially demanding search and optimization task that has been challenged by numerous researchers in the field of spatial planning. Agent and multi-agent systems are examples of the modern concepts, which have been gaining more ... Keywords: Agent, BDI architecture, Commitment, Geospatial Information System (GIS), Interaction, Urban land use planning

Saeed Behzadi, Ali A. Alesheikh

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

REMOTE SENSING TECHNIQUES FOR LAND USE CLASSIFICATION OF RIO JAUCA WATERSHED USING IKONOS IMAGES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

REMOTE SENSING TECHNIQUES FOR LAND USE CLASSIFICATION OF RIO JAUCA WATERSHED USING IKONOS IMAGES-Mayagüez E-mail: edwinmm80@yahoo.com Key words: GIS, remote sensing, land use, supervised classification resource and supplies water to the metropolitan area. Remote sensing techniques can be used to assess

Gilbes, Fernando

228

Impacts of Land-Use and Biofuels Policy on Climate: Temperature and Localized Impacts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Impacts of Land-Use and Biofuels Policy on Climate: Temperature and Localized Impacts Willow on recycled paper #12;1 Impacts of Land-Use and Biofuels Policy on Climate: Temperature and Localized Impacts to agricultural production, including growing biofuels, and (ii) Observed Land Supply Response (OLSR

229

KBSLUA: A knowledge-based system applied in river land use assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The assessment of river land use is an important, but complex and time-consuming task that has to deal with a huge amount of data, domain regulations, legal aspects, and expert knowledge in terms of environmental protection, ecology, and water resource ... Keywords: Geographic information system, Knowledge-based system, River land use

Tzai-Zang Lee; Chien-Hsing Wu; Hsien-Hui Wei

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

GRR/Section 13-TX-a - State Land Use Assessment | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 13-TX-a - State Land Use Assessment GRR/Section 13-TX-a - State Land Use Assessment < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 13-TX-a - State Land Use Assessment 13-TX-a - State Land Use Assessment.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Texas General Land Office Regulations & Policies Open Beaches Act Dune Protection Act Beach Dune Rules Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 13-TX-a - State Land Use Assessment.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative The Texas General Land Office (GLO) is in charge of making sure construction on the Texas coast that affects the beach and dunes is

231

NREL: News - NREL Report Firms Up Land-Use Requirements of Solar  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NREL Report Firms Up Land-Use Requirements of Solar NREL Report Firms Up Land-Use Requirements of Solar Study shows solar for 1,000 homes would require 32 acres July 30, 2013 The Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has published a report on the land use requirements of solar power plants based on actual land-use practices from existing solar facilities. "Having real data from a majority of the solar plants in the United States will help people make proper comparisons and informed decisions," lead author Sean Ong said. The report, "Land-use Requirements for Solar Power Plants in the United States," was written with NREL colleagues Clinton Campbell, Robert Margolis, Paul Denholm and Garvin Heath. Ong gathered data from 72% of the solar power plants installed or under

232

GIZ Sourcebook Module 2a: Land Use Planning and Urban Transport (Español)  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GIZ Sourcebook Module 2a: Land Use Planning and Urban Transport (Español) GIZ Sourcebook Module 2a: Land Use Planning and Urban Transport (Español) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: GIZ Sourcebook Module 2a: Land Use Planning and Urban Transport (Español) Agency/Company /Organization: GIZ Complexity/Ease of Use: Not Available Website: www.sutp.org/component/phocadownload/category/25-2a?download=33:2a-lup Related Tools Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center Demonstrating Electric Vehicles in Canada Electric Vehicle Charging Infrastructure Deployment Guidelines: British Columbia ... further results Find Another Tool FIND TRANSPORTATION TOOLS Which cities have succeeded in establishing land use patterns which support the more environmentally-friendly and efficient modes of transit, walking and cycling? What are the benefits of better land use planning for

233

GRR/Section 13-CA-a - Coastal Land Use Assessment | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 13-CA-a - Coastal Land Use Assessment GRR/Section 13-CA-a - Coastal Land Use Assessment < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 13-CA-a - Coastal Land Use Assessment 13-CA-a Coastal Land Use Assessment.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies California Coastal Commission California State Lands Commission Regulations & Policies California Coastal Act California PRC § 6826 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 13-CA-a Coastal Land Use Assessment.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative Under the California Coastal Act, projects in California Coastal Zones may

234

Estimating Carbon Supply Curves for Global Forests and Other Land Uses |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Estimating Carbon Supply Curves for Global Forests and Other Land Uses Estimating Carbon Supply Curves for Global Forests and Other Land Uses Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Estimating Carbon Supply Curves for Global Forests and Other Land Uses Agency/Company /Organization: Resources for the Future Sector: Land Focus Area: Forestry, Agriculture Topics: GHG inventory, Resource assessment Resource Type: Guide/manual Website: www.rff.org/documents/RFF-DP-01-19.pdf Estimating Carbon Supply Curves for Global Forests and Other Land Uses Screenshot References: Estimating Carbon Supply Curves for Global Forests and Other Land Uses[1] Abstract "This study develops cumulative carbon "supply curves" for global forests utilizing an dynamic timber supply model for sequestration of forest carbon. Because the period of concern is the next century, and

235

NGNP Process Heat Utilization: Liquid Metal Phase Change Heat Exchanger  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

One key long-standing issue that must be overcome to fully realize the successful growth of nuclear power is to determine other benefits of nuclear energy apart from meeting the electricity demands. The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) will most likely be producing electricity and heat for the production of hydrogen and/or oil retrieval from oil sands and oil shale to help in our national pursuit of energy independence. For nuclear process heat to be utilized, intermediate heat exchange is required to transfer heat from the NGNP to the hydrogen plant or oil recovery field in the most efficient way possible. Development of nuclear reactor - process heat technology has intensified the interest in liquid metals as heat transfer media because of their ideal transport properties. Liquid metal heat exchangers are not new in practical applications. An important rational for considering liquid metals is the potential convective heat transfer is among the highest known. Thus explains the interest in liquid metals as coolant for intermediate heat exchange from NGNP. For process heat it is desired that, intermediate heat exchangers (IHX) transfer heat from the NGNP in the most efficient way possible. The production of electric power at higher efficiency via the Brayton Cycle, and hydrogen production, requires both heat at higher temperatures and high effectiveness compact heat exchangers to transfer heat to either the power or process cycle. Compact heat exchangers maximize the heat transfer surface area per volume of heat exchanger; this has the benefit of reducing heat exchanger size and heat losses. High temperature IHX design requirements are governed in part by the allowable temperature drop between the outlet and inlet of the NGNP. In order to improve the characteristics of heat transfer, liquid metal phase change heat exchangers may be more effective and efficient. This paper explores the overall heat transfer characteristics and pressure drop of the phase change heat exchanger with Na as the heat exchanger coolant. In order to design a very efficient and effective heat exchanger one must optimize the design such that we have a high heat transfer and a lower pressure drop, but there is always a trade-off between them. Based on NGNP operational parameters, a heat exchanger analysis with the sodium phase change will be presented to show that the heat exchanger has the potential for highly effective heat transfer, within a small volume at reasonable cost.

Piyush Sabharwall; Mike Patterson; Vivek Utgikar; Fred Gunnerson

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

THE ROLE OF LAND USE IN ENVIRONMENTAL DECISION MAKING AT THREE DOE MEGA-CLEANUP SITES FERNALD & ROCKY FLATS & MOUND  

SciTech Connect

This paper explores the role that future land use decisions have played in the establishment of cost-effective cleanup objectives and the setting of environmental media cleanup levels for the three major U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites for which cleanup has now been successfully completed: the Rocky Flats, Mound, and Fernald Closure Sites. At each site, there are distinct consensus-building histories throughout the following four phases: (1) the facility shut-down and site investigation phase, which took place at the completion of their Cold War nuclear-material production missions; (2) the decision-making phase, whereby stakeholder and regulatory-agency consensus was achieved for the future land-use-based environmental decisions confronting the sites; (3) the remedy selection phase, whereby appropriate remedial actions were identified to achieve the future land-use-based decisions; and (4) the implementation phase, whereby the selected remedial actions for these high-profile sites were implemented and successfully closed out. At each of the three projects, there were strained relationships and distrust between the local community and the DOE as a result of site contamination and potential health effects to the workers and local residents. To engage citizens and interested stakeholder groups - particularly in the role of final land use in the decision-making process, the site management teams at each respective site developed new public-participation strategies to open stakeholder communication channels with site leadership, technical staff, and the regulatory agencies. This action proved invaluable to the success of the projects and reaching consensus on appropriate levels of cleanup. With the implementation of the cleanup remedies now complete, each of the three DOE sites have become models for future environmental-remediation projects and associated decision making.

JEWETT MA

2011-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

237

Surface mine pollution abatement and land use impact investigation. Volume III. Considerations of post mining land use, mine inventory and abatement plan for the quicksand watershed. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Volume III of the five volume series primarily presents three general topics. The first of these is a discussion of considerations relating to post-mining land use. Following this discussion, an evaluation of factors relating to more important environmental and land use impacts of the surface mining industry in Eastern Kentucky is presented. The last topic presents a mine inventory of the 33 surface mines located in the Quicksand Watershed in Breathitt County, Kentucky. Surface mines have several environmental and land use impacts. Those considered in the discussion which are of special importance to Eastern Kentucky are hydrologic influence, sedimentation, spoil bank stability, the impact on the public road system and mine access roads, and haul road abandonment. A number of major conclusions of general applicability are given along with some conclusions specifically related to the Quicksand Watershed.

1975-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

LBA Land Use and Land Cover Data Set Released  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Images Published The ORNL DAAC announces the release of two Landsat images of Manaus, Brazil, for October 14, 2004, and for July 29, 2005. The images were obtained and processed...

239

Land Use and Reactive Nitrogen Discharge: Effects of Dietary Choices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Modern agriculture alters natural biological and geophysical processes, with magnitudes proportional to its spatial extent. Cultivation is also the main cause of artificially enhanced reactive nitrogen (Nr) availability in natural ecosystems. ...

Gidon Eshel; Pamela A. Martin; Esther E. Bowen

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Land Use and natUraL resoUrces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

://www.lawlibrary.state.mt.us/ Montana State Legislative Site: http://leg.state.mt.us/css/default.asp Montana Code Annotated: http://data regularly change. Bring this schedule to each class session for regular updates and additional or subtracted (2006): 233-311. 4. Environmental Planning Bradley C. Karkkainen, "Toward a Smarter NEPA: Monitoring

California at Davis, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land-use change processes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Long-term land use future scenarios for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

In order to facilitate decision regarding environmental restoration activities at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), the United States Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID) conducted analyses to project reasonable future land use scenarios at the INEL for the next 100 years. The methodology for generating these scenarios included: review of existing DOE plans, policy statements, and mission statements pertaining to the INEL; review of surrounding land use characteristics and county developments policies; solicitation of input from local, county, state and federal planners, policy specialists, environmental professionals, and elected officials; and review of environmental and development constraints at the INEL site that could influence future land use.

NONE

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

GRR/Section 1-ID-a - Land Use Considerations | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 1-ID-a - Land Use Considerations GRR/Section 1-ID-a - Land Use Considerations < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 1-ID-a - Land Use Considerations 01IDALandUseConsiderations.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 01IDALandUseConsiderations.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative Add Text Print PDF Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=GRR/Section_1-ID-a_-_Land_Use_Considerations&oldid=685536" Categories: Regulatory Roadmap State Sections Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap Sections

243

Using NASA Remote Sensing Data to Reduce Uncertainty of Land-Use Transitions in  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NASA Remote Sensing Data to Reduce Uncertainty of Land-Use Transitions in NASA Remote Sensing Data to Reduce Uncertainty of Land-Use Transitions in Global Carbon-Climate Models: Data Management Plan L. Chini, G.C. Hurtt, M. Hansen, and P. Potapov Department of Geography University of Maryland The following Data Management Plan was part of the NASA ROSES 2012 Proposal Using NASA Remote Sensing Data to Reduce Uncertainty of Land-Use Transitions in Global Carbon- Climate Models (summary) submitted to the Terrestrial Ecology Program. It is presented as an example plan. Data Management Plan The proposed project will generate important new datasets of remote-sensing-based land-use transitions and their inherent uncertainty. Our plan for managing these datasets includes quality assessment, long-term archiving, and data sharing and dissemination (along with documentation

244

GRR/Section 1-HI-a - Land Use Considerations | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 1-HI-a - Land Use Considerations GRR/Section 1-HI-a - Land Use Considerations < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 1-HI-a - Land Use Considerations 01HIALandUseConsiderations.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 01HIALandUseConsiderations.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative Add Text Print PDF Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=GRR/Section_1-HI-a_-_Land_Use_Considerations&oldid=685535" Categories: Regulatory Roadmap State Sections Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap Sections

245

GRR/Section 3-AK-e - Land Use Permit | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

3-AK-e - Land Use Permit 3-AK-e - Land Use Permit < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 3-AK-e - Land Use Permit 03AKELandUsePermit.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Alaska Department of Natural Resources Alaska Division of Mining Land and Water Regulations & Policies Alaska Statutes Alaska Administrative Code Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 03AKELandUsePermit.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative A land use permit in Alaska covers a number of uses of state land that are less invasive and do not require a full property interest such as a lease

246

GRR/Section 1-MT-a - Land Use Considerations | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 1-MT-a - Land Use Considerations GRR/Section 1-MT-a - Land Use Considerations < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 1-MT-a - Land Use Considerations 01MTALandUseConsiderations.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 01MTALandUseConsiderations.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative Add Text Print PDF Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=GRR/Section_1-MT-a_-_Land_Use_Considerations&oldid=685537" Categories: Regulatory Roadmap State Sections Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap Sections

247

The Influence of Land Use/Land Cover on Climatological Values of the Diurnal Temperature Range  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The diurnal temperature range (DTR) at weather observation stations that make up the U.S. Historical Climatology Network was evaluated with respect to the predominant land use/land cover associated with the stations within three radii intervals (...

Kevin P. Gallo; David R. Easterling; Thomas C. Peterson

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Effects of planning and policy decisions on residential land use in Singapore  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A study of current land use in Singapore shows that through effective long-term space planning, the island city-state has maintained an adequate stock of developable residential land to meet its most ambitious maximum ...

Davis, Noel R

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Urban land use, air toxics and public health: Assessing hazardous exposures at the neighborhood scale  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Land use data are increasingly understood as important indicators of potential environmental health risk in urban areas where micro-scale or neighborhood level hazard exposure data are not routinely collected. This paper aims to offer a method for estimating the distribution of air toxics in urban neighborhoods using land use information because actual air monitoring data rarely exist at this scale. Using Geographic Information System spatial modeling tools, we estimate air toxics concentrations across neighborhoods in New York City and statistically compare our model with the US Environmental Protection Agency's National Air Toxic Assessment and air monitoring data across three NYC neighborhoods. We conclude that land use data can act as a good proxy for estimating neighborhood scale air toxics, particularly in the absence of monitoring data. In addition, the paper suggests that land use data can expand the reach of environmental impact assessments that routinely exclude analyses of potential exposures to urban air toxics at the neighborhood scale.

Corburn, Jason [Columbia University, Graduate School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation and School of International and Public Affairs, 400 Avery Hall, 1172 Amsterdam Ave. New York, NY 10027 (United States)]. E-mail: jtc2105@columbia.edu

2007-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

250

Land-use regulations to promote ridesharing: an evaluation of the Seattle approach  

SciTech Connect

The use of local land-use regulations to promote ridesharing in Seattle is described in detail. The approach is then critically evaluated, and recommendations are made to modify the approach and improve its effectiveness. 1 table.

McCutcheon, M.; Hamm, J.

1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

GRR/Section 13-AK-a - Land Use Assessment | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRRSection 13-AK-a - Land Use Assessment < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 13-AK-a -...

252

GRR/Section 1-CA-a - State Land Use Planning | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Section 1-CA-a - State Land Use Planning < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 1-CA-a -...

253

Global Population Distribution and Urban Land Use in Geophysical Parameter Space  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The spatial distribution of human population on the land surface is a fundamental determinant of land-use impacts on Earth's ecosystems. Census enumerations and satellite-detected night lights provide two complementary, but distinct, ...

Christopher Small

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Land-Use Requirements for Solar Power Plants in the United States  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Land-Use Requirements for Solar Power Plants in the United States Sean Ong, Clinton Campbell, Paul Denholm, Robert Margolis, and Garvin Heath Technical Report NRELTP-6A20-56290...

255

Impacts of Land Use and Biofuels Policy on Climate: Temperature and Localized Impacts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The impact on climate of future land use and energy policy scenarios is explored using two landuse frameworks: (i) Pure Cost Conversion Response (PCCR), or 'extensification', where the price of land is the only constraint ...

Hallgren, Willow

2012-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

256

Land use politics southern style : the case of cash proffers in Virginia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The linkage between the political dynamics at the state level and actual implementation of land use regulations at the local level is the focus of this dissertation. This focus is explored through the genesis and efficacy ...

McKay, Shannon Ashley

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Land Use for Wind, Solar, and Geothermal Electricity Generation Facilities in the United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides data and analysis of the land use associated with utility-scale wind, photovoltaic (PV), concentrating solar power (CSP), and geothermal projects. The analysts evaluated 458 existing or proposed projects, representing (as of 2012 third quarter) 51% of installed wind capacity, 80% of PV and CSP capacity, and all known geothermal power plants in the United States. The report identifies two major land use classes: 1) direct area (land permanently or temporarily disturbed due to ...

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

258

Land Use Requirements of Modern Wind Power Plants in the United States  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report provides data and analysis of the land use associated with modern, large wind power plants (defined as greater than 20 megawatts (MW) and constructed after 2000). The analysis discusses standard land-use metrics as established in the life-cycle assessment literature, and then discusses their applicability to wind power plants. The report identifies two major 'classes' of wind plant land use: 1) direct impact (i.e., disturbed land due to physical infrastructure development), and 2) total area (i.e., land associated with the complete wind plant project). The analysis also provides data for each of these classes, derived from project applications, environmental impact statements, and other sources. It attempts to identify relationships among land use, wind plant configuration, and geography. The analysts evaluated 172 existing or proposed projects, which represents more than 26 GW of capacity. In addition to providing land-use data and summary statistics, they identify several limitations to the existing wind project area data sets, and suggest additional analysis that could aid in evaluating actual land use and impacts associated with deployment of wind energy.

Denholm, P.; Hand, M.; Jackson, M.; Ong, S.

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

GIS-based land-use suitability analysis: a critical overview  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There are three main objectives of this monograph: (i) to provide an introduction to geographical information technology along with an historical perspective on the evolving role of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) in planning, (ii) to overview relevant methods and techniques for GISbased land-use suitability mapping and modeling, and (iii) to identify the trends, challenges and prospects of GIS-based land-use suitability analysis. The monograph focuses on two perspectives of GIS-based land-use suitability analysis: the techno-positivist perspective and the socio-political, public participation perspectives. It is organized into six chapters. After an introductory setting chapter, which defines the scope of land-use suitability analysis, an overview of relevant GIS technology is provided in Chapter 2. Chapter 3 offers an historical account of the development of GIS. It also discusses the development of GIS in the context of evolving perspectives of planning. Chapter 4 gives an overview of the methods for GIS-based land-use suitability modeling. The overview provides a background against which selected case studies are discussed in Chapter 5. The concluding chapter summarized the main points of the monographs and discusses problems and prospects for GIS-based land-use suitability analysis.

Jacek Malczewski

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

On the Use of GOES Thermal Data to Study Effects of Land Use on Diurnal Temperature Fluctuation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) infrared data were used to study the effect of land use on the diurnal surface temperature fluctuation. Five major land use types in southern Florida: the sandy soil agricultural area; the ...

S. F. Shih; E. Chen

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land-use change processes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Long-term Differences in Tillage and Land Use Affect Intra-aggregate Pore Heterogeneity  

SciTech Connect

Recent advances in computed tomography provide measurement tools to study internal structures of soil aggregates at micrometer resolutions and to improve our understanding of specific mechanisms of various soil processes. Fractal analysis is one of the data analysis tools that can be helpful in evaluating heterogeneity of the intra-aggregate internal structures. The goal of this study was to examine how long-term tillage and land use differences affect intra-aggregate pore heterogeneity. The specific objectives were: (i) to develop an approach to enhance utility of box-counting fractal dimension in characterizing intra-aggregate pore heterogeneity; (ii) to examine intra-aggregate pores in macro-aggregates (4-6 mm in size) using the computed tomography scanning and fractal analysis, and (iii) to compare heterogeneity of intra-aggregate pore space in aggregates from loamy Alfisol soil subjected to 20 yr of contrasting management practices, namely, conventional tillage (chisel plow) (CT), no-till (NT), and native succession vegetation (NS). Three-dimensional images of the intact aggregates were obtained with a resolution of 14.6 {micro}m at the Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL. Proposed box-counting fractal dimension normalization was successfully implemented to estimate heterogeneity of pore voxel distributions without bias associated with different porosities in soil aggregates. The aggregates from all three studied treatments had higher porosity associated with large (>100 {micro}m) pores present in their centers than in their exteriors. Pores 15 to 60 {micro}m were equally abundant throughout entire aggregates but their distributions were more heterogeneous in aggregate interiors. The CT aggregates had greater numbers of pores 15 to 60 {micro}m than NT and NS. Distribution of pore voxels belonging to large pores was most heterogeneous in the aggregates from NS, followed by NT and by CT. This result was consistent with presence of very large pores associated with former root channels in NT and NS aggregates. Our findings indicate that mechanisms of macro-aggregate formation might differ in their importance in different land use and management practices.

Kravchenko, A.N.; Wang, A.N.W.; Smucker, A.J.M.; Rivers, M.L. (MSU); (UC)

2012-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

262

CARBON FLUX TO THE ATMOSPHERE FROM LAND-USE CHANGES: 1850 TO 1990 (Table 4)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4. Contents and format of compare.dat (File 4) 4. Contents and format of compare.dat (File 4) Variable Variable Variable Starting Ending Units Spreadsheet Definition and type width column column column comments YEAR Integer 4 1 4 year A Year HETAL83 Real 6 13 18 1000 Mg C B Global total net flux, from Houghton et al. (1983) HS90 Real 6 31 36 1000 Mg C C Global total net flux, from Houghton and Skole (1990), as corrected HH95 Real 5 51 55 1000 Mg C D Global total net flux, from Houghton and Hackler (1995) H99 Real 5 63 67 1000 Mg C E Global total net flux, from

263

LIST OF PARTICIPANTS IPCC EXPERT MEETING ON LAND-USE CHANGE AND FORESTRY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Guinea 44.3 29 Serbia & Montenegro 69.4 84 Azerbaijan 59.1 139 Bangladesh 44.0 30 Ecuador 69.3 85 Viet Azerbaijan 59.1 155 Haiti 39.5 63 Poland 63.1 145 Bahrain 42.0 118 Honduras 49.9 19 Portugal 73.0 139

264

Chloride-mass-balance for predicting increased recharge after land-use change  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Key Words: precipitation, dry fallout, lysimeter, drainage,chloride input (from dry fallout and precipitation), andthan precipitation and fallout is likely the explanation for

Gee, G.W.; Zhang, Z.F.; Tyler, S.W.; Albright, W.H.; Singleton, M.J.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Indirect Land Use Change: A second best solution to a first class problem  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GHG emissions than corn ethanol. Sugarcane ethanol typicallybaseline gasoline while corn ethanol has 10% to 30% less (a fuel, such as corn into ethanol. Thus, more GHG emissions

Zilberman, David D.; Hochman, Gal; Rajagopal, Deepak

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Research papers Effects of land use change and sediment mobilization on coastal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

)a 1970 2 015 424 ­ Cemet factory expansion (1972­1973)d ; sugar cane mill (1974); PEMEX oil refinery (1978) 1980 2 369 076 Miguel de la Madrid (1988) PEMEX oil refinery expansion (1981, 1983)e ; PEMEX

Long, Bernard

267

Indirect Land Use Change: A second best solution to a first class problem  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the possible affects of biofuels on deforestation have ledto the production of various biofuels, including ethanol andpolicies that promoted biofuels had a fuel-security emphasis

Zilberman, David D.; Hochman, Gal; Rajagopal, Deepak

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Indirect Land Use Change: A second best solution to a first class problem  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

biofuels compared to gasoline vary by crop and their supply chains.biofuels are computed using lifecycle analysis (LCA) that takes into account the GHG emissions throughout the supply chain,

Zilberman, David D.; Hochman, Gal; Rajagopal, Deepak

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Indirect Land Use Change: A second best solution to a first class problem  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

have led to assigning biofuel producers with thetheir compliance with biofuel policies. We show that theother indirect effects of biofuel may need to be considered

Zilberman, David D.; Hochman, Gal; Rajagopal, Deepak

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

CARBON FLUX TO THE ATMOSPHERE FROM LAND-USE CHANGES: 1850 TO...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Afghanistan, Algeria, Bahrain, Cyprus, Democratic Yemen, Egypt, Iran, Iraq, Israel, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Libya, Morocco, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Syria, Tunisia, Turkey,...

271

CARBON FLUX TO THE ATMOSPHERE FROM LAND-USE CHANGES: 1850 TO 1990 (Table 3)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3. Contents and format of ndp050.dat (File 2) 3. Contents and format of ndp050.dat (File 2) Variable Variable Variable Starting Ending Units Spreadsheet Definition and type width column column column comments YEAR Integer 4 5 8 year A Year NAM Real 6 11 16 1000 Mg C B Net flux for North America SCAM Real 6 22 27 1000 Mg C C Net flux for South and Central America EUROPE Real 6 31 36 1000 Mg C D Net flux for Europe NAFRME Real 5 45 49 1000 Mg C E Net flux for North Africa and the Middle East TRAFR Real 6 54 59 1000 Mg C F Net flux for Tropical Africa

272

Two LBA-ECO Land Use and Land Cover Data Sets Released  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Land Use and Land Cover Data Sets Released Land Use and Land Cover Data Sets Released The ORNL DAAC and the LBA DIS announce the release of two data sets from the Land Use and Land Cover (LC-04) science teams associated with the ecology component of the Large Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia (LBA), LBA-ECO: LBA-ECO LC-04 THMB Model Simulations for the Amazon and Tocantins Basins: 1939-1998 . Data set prepared by M.T. Coe, M.H. Costa, A. Botta, and C. Birkett. The model output data provided were generated by the THMB 1.2 (Terrestrial Hydrology Model with Biogeochemistry) model which simulates the flow of water through groundwater systems, rivers, lakes and wetlands. The model operates at a 5-minute latitude-by-longitude grid with a 1-hour time step and requires as boundary conditions: topography,

273

Resource Management Services: Land Use, Part 501: Use of Flood Control  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Services: Land Use, Part 501: Use of Flood Services: Land Use, Part 501: Use of Flood Control Lands (New York) Resource Management Services: Land Use, Part 501: Use of Flood Control Lands (New York) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State New York Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider

274

An Integrated Computer Modeling Environment For Regional Land Use, Air Quality, And Transportation Planning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Land Use, Air Quality, and Transportation Integrated Modeling Environment (LATIME) represents an integrated approach to computer modeling and simulation of land use allocation, travel demand, and mobile source emissions for the Albuquerque, New Mexico, area. This environment provides predictive capability combined with a graphical and geographical interface. The graphical interface shows the causal relationships between data and policy scenarios and supports alternative model formulations. Scenarios are launched from within a Geographic Information System (GIS), and data produced by each model component at each time step within a simulation is stored in the GIS. A menudriven query system is utilized to review link-based results and regional and areawide results. These results can also be compared across time or between alternative land use scenarios. Using this environment, policies can be developed and implemented based on comparative analysis, rather than on single-step future pr...

Charles Hanley Renewable; Norman L. Marshall; Charles J. Hanley; Charles J. Hanley

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Land-Use Requirements for Solar Power Plants in the United States  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report provides data and analysis of the land use associated with utility-scale ground-mounted solar facilities, defined as installations greater than 1 MW. We begin by discussing standard land-use metrics as established in the life-cycle assessment literature and then discuss their applicability to solar power plants. We present total and direct land-use results for various solar technologies and system configurations, on both a capacity and an electricity-generation basis. The total area corresponds to all land enclosed by the site boundary. The direct area comprises land directly occupied by solar arrays, access roads, substations, service buildings, and other infrastructure. As of the third quarter of 2012, the solar projects we analyze represent 72% of installed and under-construction utility-scale PV and CSP capacity in the United States.

Ong, S.; Campbell, C.; Denholm, P.; Margolis, R.; Heath, G.

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Harold Cofer and the COLEX process, part 2 ? Ongoing changes...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Exchange) and COLEX (Column Exchange). Harold did not become involved with the OREX process as that was primarily being done at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. However, he...

277

Changes to Processes and Architectures; Suggested, Implemented and Analyzed  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that was actually being followed. The standard reference process model is the waterfall process (Royce 1970), where- sources, less dependence of interviewer Paper I, III, IV and V Standard- ized open- ended in- terview with help from checklists found in (Scriven 1991) and (Ares 2000). Architecture assessments were to some

278

Processes and continuous change in a SAT-based planner  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The TM-LPSAT planner can construct plans in domains containing atomic actions and durative actions; events and processes; discrete, real-valued, and interval-valued fluents; reusable resources, both numeric and interval-valued; and continuous linear ... Keywords: Continuous time, LPSAT, Metric quantities, Processes, SAT-based planning

Ji-Ae Shin; Ernest Davis

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Utility Scale Renewable Energy Development Near DOD Installations: Making the Case for Land Use Compatitbility  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mike Aimone, P.E. Mike Aimone, P.E. National Security Global Business Battelle Memorial Institute Utility Scale Renewable Energy Development near DOD Installations Making the Case for Land Use Compatibility Comments expressed are strictly those of the Briefer, and not necessarily the views or positions of the Battelle Memorial Institute or the Department of Defense 2 Sizing the Issue * Utility scale renewable energy development near DOD installations, ranges and Military Operational Areas/Special Use Airspace can affect mission operations and readiness * In the US, Land Use Planning is a "states-right" issue - tied to "Police Powers" - Goal: Acceptable zoning rules and consistent zoning

280

Land-use conflicts in The Geysers-Calistoga KGRA: a preliminary study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This preliminary study of potential land use conflicts of geothermal development in The Geysers region, one component of the LLL/LBL socioeconomic program, focuses on Lake County because it has most of the undeveloped resource and the least regulatory capability. The land resource is characterized in terms of its ecological, hydrological, agricultural, and recreational value; intrinsic natural hazards; and the adequacy of roads and utility systems and each factor is depicted on a map. Then those factors are analyzed for potential conflicts with both geothermal and urban development and the conflicts displayed on respective maps. A brief review of laws and methods germane to geothermal land-use regulation is included.

O'Banion, K.; Hall, C.; Haven, K.

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land-use change processes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Considering Climate Change in U.S. Air Quality Management  

SciTech Connect

Despite the challenges in linking global and regional processes, evidence from recent studies suggests that the effects of a changing climate should not be neglected when planning for the future attainment of regional-scale ozone standards such as the U.S. NAAQS. Research underway should provide insight regarding the impact of climate change on Ozone and PM2.5 and of the complex interaction of climate, land-use, and technology change.

Hogrefe, C.; Leung, Lai R.; Mickley, L. J.; Hunt, Sherri W.; Winner, D. A.

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Ecological perspectives of land use history: The Arid Lands Ecology (ALE) Reserve  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this study was to gather information on the land use history of the Arid Land Ecology (ALE) Reserve so that current ecological research could be placed within a historical perspective. The data were gathered in the early 1980s by interviewing former users of the land and from previously published research (where available). Interviews with former land users of the ALE Reserve in Benton County, Washington, revealed that major land uses from 1880 to 1940 were homesteading, grazing, oil/gas production, and road building. Land use practices associated with grazing and homesteading have left the greatest impact on the landscape. Disturbed sites where succession is characterized by non-native species, plots where sagebrush was railed away, and sheep trails are major indications today of past land uses. Recent estimates of annual bunchgrass production do ALE do not support the widespread belief that bunchgrass were more productive during the homesteading era, though the invasion of cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum), Jim Hill mustard (Sisymbrium altissium), and other European alien plant species has altered pre-settlement succession patterns. 15 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

Hinds, N R; Rogers, L E

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Land-use barriers and incentives to the use of solar energy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The impact of land-use issues on solar technologies is analyzed and attention is focused specifically on a discussion of on-site uses of active and passive solar heating and cooling. The first area discussed involves land-use regulations which prohibit the installation of solar collectors. Such regulations include both public regulations (zoning laws) and private regulations (restrictive convenants). The widely discussed issue of secure access to sunlight, also known as solar rights, comprises the bulk of the report. The many different proposed methods of ensuring solar access are compared to an ideal solar right. The solar access problem is divided into two parts: access in new developments and access in existing neighborhoods. Solar access in new developments can be provided fairly easily, if desired, by a combination of land-use tools which allow for the flexible siting of buildings and restrictive convenants to control vegetation. The problem of access in existing neighborhoods does not lend itself to easy solutions. No proposals approximate the ideal. The main solutions analyzed-privately negotiated easements, zoning laws, and allocated sun rights, have drawbacks. The final area addressed is the variety of ways in which land-use regulations can be structured to provide an incentive to install solar equipment.

Spivak, P.

1979-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory The Joint Global Change  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pacific Northwest Pacific Northwest National Laboratory The Joint Global Change The Joint Global Change Research Institute Research Institute Nuclear Power and Stabilizing CO 2 Concentrations Jae Edmonds and Sonny Kim Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Committee Meeting April 15 and 16, 2002 Alexandria, VA Pacific Northwest National Laboratory 2 The Joint Global Change The Joint Global Change Research Institute Research Institute CLIMATE CHANGE Pacific Northwest National Laboratory 3 The Joint Global Change The Joint Global Change Research Institute Research Institute CLIMATE CHANGE Multiple gases * CO 2 (fossil fuel, land-use) * CH 4 (rice paddies, ruminant livestock, landfills, coal mining, oil and gas production, incomplete combustion) * N 2 O (nitrogen fertilizers, industrial processes, other??)

285

Process for changing caking coals to noncaking coals  

SciTech Connect

Caking coals are treated in a slurry including alkaline earth metal hydroxides at moderate pressures and temperatures in air to form noncaking carbonaceous material. Hydroxides such as calcium hydroxide, magnesium hydroxide or barium hydroxide are contemplated for slurrying with the coal to interact with the agglomerating constituents. The slurry is subsequently dewatered and dried in air at atmospheric pressure to produce a nonagglomerating carbonaceous material that can be conveniently handled in various coal conversion and combustion processes.

Beeson, Justin L. (Woodridge, IL)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Linking Job/Housing Balance, Land Use Mix and Commute to Work  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With gas prices rising rapidly, many people have started to believe that it has become imperative to reduce their vehicle miles travelled. Land use patterns have been found culpable of contributing to the extra VMT driven by the average. As such, urban planners have employed many strategies to attempt to reduce this portion of VMT. For example, research shows that smart growth in the form of mixed-use compact development results in a better match of jobs and housing since it brings trip origins and destinations closer, thereby making work trips shorter. This research uses spatial modeling in GIS and Multiple Linear regression/ANOVA in SPSS to analyze the link between job-housing (J/H) mismatch, land use mix and worker commute flows. The study examines J/H imbalance within a travel catchment area using a 7-mile buffer from the centroid of each census tract in Dallas County, Texas. Moreover, it uses jobs, workers local economic and community data in the form of Local Employment Dynamics, Longitudinal Employer-Household Dynamics and Quarterly Workforce Indicators provided by the US Census Bureau to carry out area profile, area comparison, distance/direction, destination, inflow/outflow and paired area analysis for workers place of work and residential distributions in Dallas county. This analysis is linked in Geographical Information Systems to the land use map, which is classified as an entropy index. The GIS results present a spatial picture of labor- shed, commute-shed, job-housing balanced and imbalanced areas by relating the land use mix and commute flows of workers in Dallas County. Moreover, MLR regression model in SPSS shows that Land use mix, Job/housing balance and housing affordability are significant predictors of mean travel time to work. This strategic tool developed through Target Area Analysis and Hot Spot Analysis will act as a guideline for land use planners to understand the regional growth complexities related to work flows. The analytical model developed can also be deployed to direct land development patterns, which will ultimately improve the quality of life, halt urban sprawl, lower costs to businesses and commuters and produce related positive externalities.

Raja, Afia 1979-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Land-Use Requirements of Modern Wind Power Plants in the United States  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 4 August 2009 Land-Use Requirements of Modern Wind Power Plants in the United States Paul Denholm, Maureen Hand, Maddalena Jackson, and Sean Ong National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC Contract No. DE-AC36-08-GO28308 Technical Report NREL/TP-6A2-45834 August 2009 Land-Use Requirements of Modern Wind Power Plants in the United States Paul Denholm, Maureen Hand, Maddalena Jackson, and Sean Ong Prepared under Task No. WER9.3550 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government.

288

Meeting the Demand for Biofuels: Impact on Land Use and Carbon Mitigation  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this research was to develop an integrated, interdisciplinary framework to investigate the implications of large scale production of biofuels for land use, crop production, farm income and greenhouse gases. In particular, we examine the mix of feedstocks that would be viable for biofuel production and the spatial allocation of land required for producing these feedstocks at various gasoline and carbon emission prices as well as biofuel subsidy levels. The implication of interactions between energy policy that seeks energy independence from foreign oil and climate policy that seeks to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions for the optimal mix of biofuels and land use will also be investigated. This project contributes to the ELSI research goals of sustainable biofuel production while balancing competing demands for land and developing policy approaches needed to support biofuel production in a cost-effective and environmentally friendly manner.

Khanna, Madhu; Jain, Atul; Onal, Hayri; Scheffran, Jurgen; Chen, Xiaoguang; Erickson, Matt; Huang, Haixiao; Kang, Seungmo.

2011-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

289

The vital issues process: Strategic planning for a changing world  

SciTech Connect

The Vital Issues process (VIp) is a strategic planning tool initially developed by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) for the Office of Foreign Intelligence (OFI)* of the US Department of Energy (DOE). It was further developed and refined through its application to a variety of strategic purposes for a range of public and semipublic organizations. The VIp provides a structured mechanism for assisting organizations in accomplishing specified objectives by identifying and prioritizing a portfolio of strategic issues, programmatic areas, or responses to a specified problem. It employs day-long panel meetings in a specified format to elicit a broad range of perspectives on a particular issue in a nonconfrontational manner and to facilitate the interaction and synthesis of diverse viewpoints on a specific topic. The VIp is unique in its incorporation of two primary approaches in each panel session: a qualitative or transactional segment, which entails the synthesis of the alternatives through negotiations or discussion, and a quantitative or net benefit maximization segment, an analytical approach, which involves prioritization of the alternatives using pairwise comparisons. This combination of facilitated group discussion and quantitative ranking provides input to strategic management decisions in the form of stakeholder-defined and -prioritized items as well as information on potential barriers to the implementation of policies and programs. This is the final volume in the series Identifying Vital Issues: New Intelligence Strategies for a New World, a three-volume set that gives an accounting of the VIp as implemented for OFI. This volume provides an in-depth description of the methodology used in the VIp.

Engi, D.; Glicken, J.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

File:01-FD-a - LandUsePlanning.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

LandUsePlanning.pdf LandUsePlanning.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage File:01-FD-a - LandUsePlanning.pdf Size of this preview: 463 × 599 pixels. Other resolution: 464 × 600 pixels. Go to page 1 2 Go! next page → next page → Full resolution ‎(1,275 × 1,650 pixels, file size: 124 KB, MIME type: application/pdf, 2 pages) File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 17:06, 14 December 2012 Thumbnail for version as of 17:06, 14 December 2012 1,275 × 1,650, 2 pages (124 KB) Dfitzger (Talk | contribs) 14:52, 1 November 2012 Thumbnail for version as of 14:52, 1 November 2012 1,275 × 1,650, 2 pages (85 KB) Dklein2012 (Talk | contribs) 15:58, 11 September 2012 Thumbnail for version as of 15:58, 11 September 2012 1,275 × 1,650, 2 pages (85 KB) Djenne (Talk | contribs)

291

File:03-ID-d - Land Use Permit.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

d - Land Use Permit.pdf d - Land Use Permit.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Metadata File:03-ID-d - Land Use Permit.pdf Size of this preview: 463 × 599 pixels. Other resolution: 464 × 600 pixels. Full resolution ‎(1,275 × 1,650 pixels, file size: 28 KB, MIME type: application/pdf) File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 13:56, 22 August 2013 Thumbnail for version as of 13:56, 22 August 2013 1,275 × 1,650 (28 KB) Abergfel (Talk | contribs) 13:47, 22 August 2013 Thumbnail for version as of 13:47, 22 August 2013 1,275 × 1,650 (27 KB) Abergfel (Talk | contribs) You cannot overwrite this file. Edit this file using an external application (See the setup instructions for more information)

292

File:01NVAStateLandUsePlanning (1).pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NVAStateLandUsePlanning (1).pdf NVAStateLandUsePlanning (1).pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage File:01NVAStateLandUsePlanning (1).pdf Size of this preview: 463 × 599 pixels. Other resolution: 464 × 600 pixels. Full resolution ‎(1,275 × 1,650 pixels, file size: 75 KB, MIME type: application/pdf) File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 17:08, 15 October 2012 Thumbnail for version as of 17:08, 15 October 2012 1,275 × 1,650 (75 KB) Dklein2012 (Talk | contribs) 17:06, 15 October 2012 Thumbnail for version as of 17:06, 15 October 2012 1,275 × 1,650 (55 KB) Dklein2012 (Talk | contribs) You cannot overwrite this file. Edit this file using an external application (See the setup

293

Governing Change: An Institutional Geography of Rural Land Use, Environmental Management, and Change in the North Coastal Basin of California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

construction, maintenance, and management: 45.1 percent ofor road construction, maintenance and/or management from thedecisions about the management and maintenance of the road

Short, Anne Garrity

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Governing Change: An Institutional Geography of Rural Land Use, Environmental Management, and Change in the North Coastal Basin of California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for re-routing or decommissioning roads. These principlesre-construction or decommissioning activities in or near are- construction and decommissioning of existing roads

Short, Anne Garrity

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Governing Change: An Institutional Geography of Rural Land Use, Environmental Management, and Change in the North Coastal Basin of California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

technical assistance and funding ultimately led him to seekfunding to implement sediment control and road restoration projects Three citizen led

Short, Anne Garrity

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Impacts of Array Configuration on Land-Use Requirements for Large-Scale Photovoltaic Deployment in the United States: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

Land use is often cited as an important issue for renewable energy technologies. In this paper we examine the relationship between land-use requirements for large-scale photovoltaic (PV) deployment in the U.S. and PV-array configuration. We estimate the per capita land requirements for solar PV and find that array configuration is a stronger driver of energy density than regional variations in solar insolation. When deployed horizontally, the PV land area needed to meet 100% of an average U.S. citizen's electricity demand is about 100 m2. This requirement roughly doubles to about 200 m2 when using 1-axis tracking arrays. By comparing these total land-use requirements with other current per capita land uses, we find that land-use requirements of solar photovoltaics are modest, especially when considering the availability of zero impact 'land' on rooftops. Additional work is need to examine the tradeoffs between array spacing, self-shading losses, and land use, along with possible techniques to mitigate land-use impacts of large-scale PV deployment.

Denholm, P.; Margolis, R. M.

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Impacts of Array Configuration on Land-Use Requirements for Large-Scale Photovoltaic Deployment in the United States: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Land use is often cited as an important issue for renewable energy technologies. In this paper we examine the relationship between land-use requirements for large-scale photovoltaic (PV) deployment in the U.S. and PV-array configuration. We estimate the per capita land requirements for solar PV and find that array configuration is a stronger driver of energy density than regional variations in solar insolation. When deployed horizontally, the PV land area needed to meet 100% of an average U.S. citizen's electricity demand is about 100 m2. This requirement roughly doubles to about 200 m2 when using 1-axis tracking arrays. By comparing these total land-use requirements with other current per capita land uses, we find that land-use requirements of solar photovoltaics are modest, especially when considering the availability of zero impact 'land' on rooftops. Additional work is need to examine the tradeoffs between array spacing, self-shading losses, and land use, along with possible techniques to mitigate land-use impacts of large-scale PV deployment.

Denholm, P.; Margolis, R. M.

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Impacts of Array Configuration on Land Use Requirements for Large-Scale Photovoltaic Deployment in the United States  

SciTech Connect

Land use is often cited as an important issue for renewable energy technologies. In this paper we examine the relationship between land-use requirements for large-scale photovoltaic (PV) deployment in the U.S. and PV-array configuration. We estimate the per capita land requirements for solar PV and find that array configuration is a stronger driver of energy density than regional variations in solar insolation. When deployed horizontally, the PV land area needed to meet 100% of an average U.S. citizen's electricity demand is about 100 m{sup 2}. This requirement roughly doubles to about 200 m{sup 2} when using 1-axis tracking arrays. By comparing these total land-use requirements with other current per capita land uses, we find that land-use requirements of solar photovoltaics are modest, especially when considering the availability of zero impact 'land' on rooftops. Additional work is need to examine the tradeoffs between array spacing, self-shading losses, and land use, along with possible techniques to mitigate land-use impacts of large-scale PV deployment.

Denholm, P.; Margolis, R. M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

City form and changing process : the case of the North End, Boston, 1860-1930  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis originated from the assumption that the effects of time on city form involve complex processes and are closely related to different physical and social factors where human beings as changing agents play only a ...

Rashid, Mahbub

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Effects on Climate Records of Changes in National Weather Service Humidity Processing Procedures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. National Weather Service has recently corrected an error in radiosonde humidity data reduction algorithms, eliminated a sonde thats processing contained another error, and recently made a further change in the humidity data reduction ...

William P. Elliott; Rebecca J. Ross; Barry Schwartz

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land-use change processes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Some aspects of the computer simulation of conduction heat transfer and phase change processes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Various aspects of phase change processes in materials are discussd including computer modeling, validation of results and sensitivity. In addition, the possible incorporation of cognitive activities in computational heat transfer is examined.

Solomon, A. D.

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Institutional Bridging: How Conceptions of IT-Enabled Change Shape the Planning Process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Organizations are continually influenced by notions of management promoted through broadly held visions of managerial practice. These notions often incorporate models that generally prescribe information technologies as enabling agents for directed organizational ... Keywords: Business Process Reengineering Change Methodologies Interpretivist Field Study It-Enabled Organizational Changes It Planning Organizational Transformation

John Tillquist

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Land use in the late prehistoric Post Oak Savannah of Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to look at land use in the Late Prehistoric period in the Post Oak Savannah of Texas. The goal is to determine the geographic extent of agriculture and what inhibits the extent and degree. In order to accomplish this, data are compiled on the environment, the ethnohistoric record, and the archaeology of the Post Oak Savannah. It is expected that boundaries can be found between areas of hunter-gatherers and agriculturalists. In order to evaluate the role of the environment, the climate, vegetation, geology, soils, and fauna are examined. Data from the journals and diaries of early European explorers are compiled and analyzed to determine the extent of agriculture during the Historic period. The final source of information is the archaeological record. Ceramic assemblages are analyzed and the information used to determine a possible boundary. Information from these diverse data all point to the Brazos River basin as the boundary between agricultural and bunter-gatherer land use in the Post Oak Savannah.

Judjahn, Stephanie K.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

DOE/EIS-0222-SA-O1 Supplement Analysis Hanford Comprehensive Land-Use Plan Environmental Impact  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

22-SA-O1 22-SA-O1 Supplement Analysis Hanford Comprehensive Land-Use Plan Environmental Impact Statement U.S. Department of Energy Richland Operations Office Richland, Washington 99352 June 2008 DOE/EIS-0222-SA-0 1 SUMMARY In September 1999 the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) issued the Final Hanford Comprehensive Land-Use Plan (HCP) Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) (DOE/EIS-0222-F). The HCP EIS analyzed the impacts of alternatives for implementing a land-use plan for the DOE's Hanford Site for at least the next 50-year planning period and lasting for as long as DOE retains legal control of some portion of the real estate. In November 1999 DOE issued its Record of Decision (ROD), establishing the Comprehensive Land-Use Plan (CLUP), which consisted of four key elements:

305

Time Scales of Terrestrial Carbon Response Related to Land-Use Application: Implications for Initializing an Earth System Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The dynamic vegetation and carbon cycling component, LM3V, of the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL) prototype Earth system model (ESM2.1), has been designed to simulate the effects of land use on terrestrial carbon pools, including ...

Lori T. Sentman; Elena Shevliakova; Ronald J. Stouffer; Sergey Malyshev

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

GRR/Section 19-ID-b - Change Application Process | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » GRR/Section 19-ID-b - Change Application Process < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 19-ID-b - Change Application Process 19IDBChangeApplicationProcess (2).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Idaho Department of Water Resources Regulations & Policies Idaho Code 42-222 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 19IDBChangeApplicationProcess (2).pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative A water right transfer is a change to a water right's point of diversion,

307

Verifying the Accuracy of Land Use Models Used in Transportation and Air Quality: A Case Study in the Sacramento, California Region  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

simulations for a future transportation plan that uses fixedfuture regional land use projections and transportationFutures for Tansportation and Land Use–Integrated Models Contrasted with ‘Trend Delphi’ Methods: The Portland Metro Results,” Transportation

Rodier, Caroline J.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Final Hanford Comprehensive Land-Use Plan Environmental Impact Statement (9/22/1999)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cover Sheet Cover Sheet Final HCP EIS | Cover Sheet 1 2 3 Lead Federal Agency: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) 4 5 Cooperating Agencies: U.S. Department of the Interior (Bureau of Land Management, Bureau 6 of Reclamation, and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service); Benton, Franklin, and Grant counties; and 7 the City of Richland, Washington 8 | 9 Consulting Tribal Governments: Nez Perce Tribe Department of Environmental Restoration 10 and Waste Management and the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation 11 12 Title: Final Hanford Comprehensive Land-Use Plan Environmental Impact Statement 13 | (HCP EIS), Hanford Site, Richland, Washington 14 | 15 Contacts: For further information on this EIS call or contact: 16 17 Thomas W. Ferns, HCP EIS Document Manager 18 | U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office

309

US areal wind resource estimates considering environmental and land-use exclusions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In support of the US Department of Energy's National Energy Strategy initiative, estimates of the land area with various levels of wind energy resource have been developed for each state in the contiguous United States. The estimates are based on published wind resource data and account for the exclusion of some land owing to environmental of land-use considerations. These exclusions assume that 100% of the environmentally sensitive land and various percentages of land designated as urban, agricultural or range would be unavailable for wind energy development. Despite these exclusions, the amount of wind resource thus estimated is surprisingly large. For example, estimates of available wind resource and resultant wind electric potential from advanced turbine technology show that a group of 12 states in the midsection of the country could produce more than three times the nation's 1987 electric energy consumption. 1 ref., 7 figs., 1 tab.

Elliott, D.L.; Wendell, L.L.; Gower, G.L.

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

US areal wind resource estimates considering environmental and land-use exclusions  

SciTech Connect

In support of the US Department of Energy's National Energy Strategy initiative, estimates of the land area with various levels of wind energy resource have been developed for each state in the contiguous United States. The estimates are based on published wind resource data and account for the exclusion of some land owing to environmental of land-use considerations. These exclusions assume that 100% of the environmentally sensitive land and various percentages of land designated as urban, agricultural or range would be unavailable for wind energy development. Despite these exclusions, the amount of wind resource thus estimated is surprisingly large. For example, estimates of available wind resource and resultant wind electric potential from advanced turbine technology show that a group of 12 states in the midsection of the country could produce more than three times the nation's 1987 electric energy consumption. 1 ref., 7 figs., 1 tab.

Elliott, D.L.; Wendell, L.L.; Gower, G.L.

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Final Hanford Comprehensive Land-Use Plan Environmental Impact Statement (9/22/1999)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EIS EIS Summary Cover Sheet 1 2 3 Lead Federal Agency: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) 4 5 Cooperating Agencies: U.S. Department of the Interior (Bureau of Land Management, Bureau 6 of Reclamation, and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service); Benton, Franklin, and Grant counties; and 7 the City of Richland, Washington 8 | 9 Consulting Tribal Governments: Nez Perce Tribe Department of Environmental Restoration 10 and Waste Management and the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation 11 12 Title: Final Hanford Comprehensive Land-Use Plan Environmental Impact Statement 13 | (HCP EIS), Hanford Site, Richland, Washington 14 | 15 Contacts: For further information on this EIS call or contact: 16 17 Thomas W. Ferns, HCP EIS Document Manager 18 | U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office

312

Preliminary comparative assessment of land use for the satellite power system (SPS) and alternative electric energy technologies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A preliminary comparative assessment of land use for the satellite power system (SPS), other solar technologies, and alternative electric energy technologies has been conducted. The alternative technologies are coal-gasification/combined-cycle, coal fluidized-bed combustion (FBC), light water reactor (LWR), liquid metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR), terrestrial photovoltaics (TPV), solar thermal electric (STE), and ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC). Fusion was not included in this preliminary work but will be a part of the final evaluation based on available research, to identify a suitable assessment methodology, and to identify data deficiencies. The major issues of a land use assessment are the quantity, purpose, duration, location, and costs of the required land use. The phased methodology described treats the first four issues, but not the costs. Several past efforts at comparative or single-technology assessment are reviewed briefly. The current state of knowledge about land use is described for each technology. Conclusions are drawn regarding deficiencies in the data on comparative land use and needs for further research. (WHK)

Newsom, D.E.; Wolsko, T.D.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Heart Rate Regulation processed through wavelet analysis and change detection. Some case studies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Heart Rate Regulation processed through wavelet analysis and change detection. Some case studies-mail: veronique.billat@wanadoo.fr December 29, 2010 Abstract Heart rate variability (HRV) is an indicator of the regulation of the heart engine, Task Force (1996). This study compares the regulation of the heart in two

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

314

MEMORANDUM FOR DISTRIBUTION FROM: DEAN G. SUBJECT: Business Process Change for Inter-Entity Transactions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6, 2004 6, 2004 MEMORANDUM FOR DISTRIBUTION FROM: DEAN G. SUBJECT: Business Process Change for Inter-Entity Transactions The i~i~ple~iientation of Oracle Public Sector Financials software as the Department's new core fi~iaiicial systeni on October 1 , 2004, will require a business process change in the way the Department finances and accouiits for work performed by one DOE office or integrated contractor for another. The purpose of this memorandum is to notify you of thc changes required and to ask for your feedback on the proposed approach. Our currcnt policy on accounting for transfers is set forth in the DOE Accounting Handbook, Chapter 12, "Transfers." On the basis of input from the I-MANAGEISTARS Project Team, my office has revised Chapter 12 to describe how work performed by one

315

Estimating extinction risk under climate change: next-generation models simultaneously incorporate demography, dispersal, and biotic interactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

future? Global change projections of species distributions.2100, using ensemble projections based on seven differentuncertainties inherent in projections of land use change

Kissling, W. Daniel

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Investigation of the Effects of Different Land Use and Land Cover Patterns on Mesoscale Meteorological Simulations in the Taiwan Area  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) land use (LU) data employed in the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model classify most LU types in Taiwan as mixtures of irrigated cropland and forest, which is not an accurate representation of current ...

Fang-Yi Cheng; Yu-Ching Hsu; Pay-Liam Lin; Tang-Huang Lin

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Comparing the GLC2000 and GeoCover LC land cover datasets for use in economic modelling of land use  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper compares two recent near-global land cover (GLC) datasets, GLC 2000 and GeoCover LC, with differing resolutions (1km versus 30 m) for their potential usefulness in economic analyses of the determinants of land use. The comparisons are ...

G. C. Nelson; R. D. Robertson

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Comparative analysis of environmental impacts of maize-biogas and photovoltaics on a land use basis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study aims to stimulate the discussion on how to optimize a sustainable energy mix from an environmental perspective and how to apply existing renewable energy sources in the most efficient way. Ground-mounted photovoltaics (PV) and the maize-biogas-electricity route are compared with regard to their potential to mitigate environmental pressure, assuming that a given agricultural area is available for energy production. Existing life cycle assessment (LCA) studies are taken as a basis to analyse environmental impacts of those technologies in relation to conventional technology for power and heat generation. The life-cycle-wide mitigation potential per area used is calculated for the impact categories non-renewable energy input, green house gas (GHG) emissions, acidification and eutrophication. The environmental performance of each system depends on the scenario that is assumed for end energy use (electricity and heat supply have been contemplated). In all scenarios under consideration, PV turns out to be superior to biogas in almost all studied impact categories. Even when maize is used for electricity production in connection with very efficient heat usage, and reduced PV performance is assumed to account for intermittence, PV can still mitigate about four times the amount of green house gas emissions and non-renewable energy input compared to maize-biogas. Soil erosion, which can be entirely avoided with PV, exceeds soil renewal rates roughly 20-fold on maize fields. Regarding the overall Eco-indicator 99 (H) score under most favourable assumptions for the maize-biogas route, PV has still a more than 100% higher potential to mitigate environmental burden. At present, the key advantages of biogas are its price and its availability without intermittence. In the long run, and with respect to more efficient land use, biogas might preferably be produced from organic waste or manure, whereas PV should be integrated into buildings and infrastructures. (author)

Graebig, Markus; Fenner, Richard [Centre for Sustainable Development, Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge (United Kingdom); Bringezu, Stefan [Wuppertal Institute for Climate, Environment and Energy. P.B. 100480, 42004 Wuppertal (Germany)

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

319

A Conceptual Framework for Estimating Bioenerg-Related Land-Use Change and Its Impacts over Time  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dioxide,” Biomass and Bioenergy 13: 333-343 (1997). P.Biofuels,” Biomass and Bioenergy, in press, doi:10.1016/j.Greenhouse Gas Balnaces of Bioenergy Systems in Comparison

Delucchi, Mark

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Analyses of Nocturnal Temperature Cooling-Rate Response to Historical Local-Scale Urban Land-Use/Land Cover Change  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Urbanization affects near-surface climates by increasing city temperatures relative to rural temperatures [i.e., the urban heat island (UHI) effect]. This effect is usually measured as the relative temperature difference between urban areas and a ...

Winston T. L. Chow; Bohumil M. Svoma

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land-use change processes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Appendix E-2E-2.1 Transportation On The Potential Impacts of Land Use Change Policies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: Washington, DC, 2001 [available at http:// thomas.loc.gov/]. (5) United States Congress. Energy Policy Act of 2002, HR4; United States Congress: Washington, DC, 2001 [available at http:// thomas.loc.gov/]. (6, Appendix B; DOE/EIA-0573(00); U.S. Department of Energy, Energy Information Administration: Washington, DC

322

A Conceptual Framework for Estimating Bioenerg-Related Land-Use Change and Its Impacts over Time  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

P. Börjesson, “Good or Bad Bioethanol from a GreenhouseEfficiency in European Bioethanol Production for Automotive

Delucchi, Mark

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

The Roles of Precipitation Increases and Rural Land-Use Changes in Streamflow Trends in the Upper Mississippi River Basin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent trends in precipitation and streamflow in the United States have become a particular focus of hydroclimatic research. The U.S. Hydro-Climatic Data Network (HCDN) has proven to be especially useful for the analysis of long-term streamflow ...

J. P. Kochendorfer; J. A. Hubbart

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Changes in Prehistoric Land Use in the Alpine Sierra Nevada: A Regional Exploration Using Temperature-Adjusted Obsidian Hydration Rates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the Crane Valley Hydroelectric Project Area, Maderaand Balsam Meadow Hydroelectric Project. Report submitted toCalifornia—Bishop Creek Hydroelectric Project (FERC Project

Stevens, Nathan E.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

A Conceptual Framework for Estimating Bioenerg-Related Land-Use Change and Its Impacts over Time  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rubin, and H. Feng, “Is Corn Ethanol a Low-Carbon Fuel? ,”Can Be Better than Corn Ethanol,” Ecological Applicationsfrom the rest of the corn-ethanol fuelcycle; that clearing

Delucchi, Mark

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

A Conceptual Framework for Estimating Bioenerg-Related Land-Use Change and Its Impacts over Time  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gas emission Savings of Biofuels in Spain’s Transport Fuel.of the EU Policy on Biofuels,” Biomass and Bioenergy, inLaurance, “How Green Are Biofuels,” Science 319: 43-44 T. C.

Delucchi, Mark

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

A Conceptual Framework for Estimating Bioenerg-Related Land-Use Change and Its Impacts over Time  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2006). www.bio.org/ind/biofuel/SustainableBiomassReport.pdf.Land Clearing and the Biofuel Carbon Debt,” Science 319:Times for Crop-Based Biofuel Expansion in the Tropics: The

Delucchi, Mark

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Determinants of land-use change: A case study from the lower Mekong delta of southern Vietnam  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to vegetation mapping of Manitoba’s Hudson Bay Lowlands.and West St Paul, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. Journal of

Nguyen, Son T Mr.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

A multiapproach study of soil attributes under land use and cover change at the Cap de Creus Península, NE Spain.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The work presented in this Doctoral Thesis has studied the temporal and spatial patterns of the most relevant soil parameters with special attention posed to… (more)

Emran Khaled Abd El Aziz, Mohamed

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Rail Transit Investments, Real Estate Values, and Land Use Change: A Comparative Analysis of Five California Rail Transit Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Paswell, Robert E. 1983. "Rail Transit Investment and CBDCervero, Robert. 1993. "Rail Transit and Jsmt Development.Assessing the hpacts of Urban Rail Transit: on Local Real

Landis, John; Guhathakurta, Subhrajit; Huang, William; Zhang, Ming

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Rail Transit Investments, Real Estate Values, and Land Use Change: A Comparative Analysis of Five California Rail Transit Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cervero, Robert. 1993. "Rail Transit and Joint Development:the Vancouver Advanced Light Rail Transit System on Single-Strathman. 1993. Light Rail Transit Stations and Property

Landis, John; Guhathakurta, Subhrajit; Huang, William; Zhang, Ming; Fukuji, Bruce

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Rail Transit Investments, Real Estate Values, and Land Use Change: A Comparative Analysis of Five California Rail Transit Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

findings of this research: Proximity to rail mass transit isunderlying this research is whether urban rail transitunderlying this research is whether urban rail transit

Landis, John; Guhathakurta, Subhrajit; Huang, William; Zhang, Ming; Fukuji, Bruce

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Archaeology in the Kilauea East Rift Zone: Part 1, Land-use model and research design, Kapoho, Kamaili and Kilauea Geothermal Subzones, Puna District, Hawaii Island  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Puna Geothermal Resource Subzones (GRS) project area encompasses approximately 22,000 acres centered on the Kilauea East Rift Zone in Puna District, Hawaii Island. The area is divided into three subzones proposed for geothermal power development -- Kilauea Middle East Rift, Kamaili and Kapoho GRS. Throughout the time of human occupation, eruptive episodes along the rift have maintained a dynamic landscape. Periodic volcanic events, for example, have changed the coastline configuration, altered patterns of agriculturally suitable sediments, and created an assortment of periodically active, periodically quiescent, volcanic hazards. Because of the active character of the rift zone, then, the area`s occupants have always been obliged to organize their use of the landscape to accommodate a dynamic mosaic of lava flow types and ages. While the specific configuration of settlements and agricultural areas necessarily changed in response to volcanic events, it is possible to anticipate general patterns in the manner in which populations used the landscape through time. This research design offers a model that predicts the spatial results of long-term land-use patterns and relates them to the character of the archaeological record of that use. In essence, the environmental/land-use model developed here predicts that highest population levels, and hence the greatest abundance and complexity of identifiable prehistoric remains, tended to cluster near the coast at places that maximized access to productive fisheries and agricultural soils. With the possible exception of a few inland settlements, the density of archaeological remains expected to decrease with distance from the coastline. The pattern is generally supported in the regions existing ethnohistoric and archaeological record.

Burtchard, G.C.; Moblo, P. [International Archaeological Research Inst., Inc., Honolulu, HI (United States)

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Understanding impacts of climate change on our forests  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

use) · other changes: · aerosols & albedo (land use change) · uncertainties Not just carbon ! See IPCC evidence of changes in productivity, vegetation composition etc · Confounded by site differences, stand age

335

Problems in measuring effectiveness in software process improvement: A longitudinal study of organizational change at Danske Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Software process improvement (SPI) is a widely recognized approach that software companies implement to improve quality, productivity, and time-to-market. Assessing and analyzing performance improvements are important SPI activities. However, many SPI ... Keywords: Longitudinal process research, Organizational change, Software metrics, Software process improvement

Jakob Iversen; Ojelanki Ngwenyama

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Flaxseed in Human Nutrition, 2nd EditionChapter 21 Flaxseed Proteins: Potential Food Applications and Process-Induced Changes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flaxseed in Human Nutrition, 2nd Edition Chapter 21 Flaxseed Proteins: Potential Food Applications and Process-Induced Changes Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemi

337

Coupling GIS and LCA for biodiversity assessments of land use: Part 1: Inventory modeling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MC (2007) California biofuel goals and production potential.Fig. 1). Many LCA studies of biofuel production and use haveresults. The growing of biofuel crops is the only process in

Geyer, Roland; Stoms, David M.; Lindner, Jan P.; Davis, Frank W.; Wittstock, Bastian

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory The Joint Global Change  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CHANGE 2 * Pre-industrial concentration 280 ppmv * Current concentration 370 ppmv * Fossil fuels 6.9 PgCyear * Land-use change 1.6+ 1.3 PgCyear Pacific Northwest National...

339

Tenure-Track Position in Climate Change Science Terrestrial Biogeochemistry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

change. For example, a candidate may focus on connections between soil- and vegetation-related greenhouse gas emissions or carbon sequestration with changes in land use, cover and management. This "open

Angenent, Lars T.

340

The effects of agricultural land use patterns on pollutant runoff from watersheds: rangeland/pastureland and row cropping  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Much attention is being focused on water quality in rivers, lakes and streams. One of the contributors of pollution to rivers, lakes and streams is runoff from agriculture in the form of nutrients, pesticides and suspended solids. This study was designed to look at the amount of these substances produced in subwatersheds from corn, grain sorghum and cotton farming along the Colorado River in Travis and Bastrop counties. The study also looked at rangeland and row cropped familand to estimate which land use type produced more runoff and pollution to receiving streams. Best management practices were also looked at as a means of limiting the amount of runoff and pollution transport from row cropped areas. Three automated sampling sites were set up to collect water samples after rainfall events. Two of the sites were set up to sample from streams that drained subwatersheds of a tributary to the Colorado River. The land use at one subwatershed consisted primarily of rangeland and pastureland while the land use at the other site consisted mainly of row cropped farmland. The third site was set up to sample on a row cropped farm that employed certain best management practices. The accepted convention is that rangeland produces less runoff @ row cropped areas and therefore contributes less pollutants to receiving waters. The findings from this project generally support this. Additionally, it was found, through computer modeling, that best management practices in the form of terracing, contour plowing and filter strips significantly reduced the amount of runoff and pollutants that move off site from row cropped areas during rainfall events. The implications of these findings are that, where possible, efforts should be made to implement best management practices to reduce the amount of runoff and pollution to receiving waters. Producers also need to be educated as to how to implement and maintain best management practices to obtain optimal benefits.

Jayne, Andrew A.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land-use change processes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Plant Support Engineering: Guidelines for Optimizing the Engineering Change Process for Nuclear Power Plants, Revision 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report supersedes EPRI report TR-103586-R1 in its entirety. The objective of this report is to present decision criteria that licensees can apply to select the level of administrative and technical effort appropriate for any given engineering change8212whether it is a large, complex change with safety significance, a small insignificant change, or a documentation change with no impact on safety. The change must be categorized correctly, the regulatory requirements properly considered, and the approp...

2007-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

342

Effects of Land-Use Policy, Forest Fragmentation, and Residential Parcel Size on Land-Cover and Carbon Storage in Southeastern Michigan.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The overarching goal of this dissertation is to improve our understanding of the coupled natural-human land-use system in Southeastern Michigan. To accomplish this task Chapter… (more)

Robinson, Derek Thomas

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Landscape ecological planning: Integrating land use and wildlife conservation for biomass crops  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

What do a mussel shoat, a zoo, and a biomass plantation have in common? Each can benefit from ecology-based landscape planning. This paper provides examples of landscape ecological planning from some diverse projects the author has worked on, and discusses how processes employed and lessons learned from these projects are being used to help answer questions about the effects of biomass plantings (hardwood tree crops and native grasses) on wildlife habitat. Biomass environmental research is being designed to assess how plantings of different acreage, composition and landscape context affect wildlife habitat value, and is addressing the cumulative effect on wildlife habitat of establishing multiple biomass plantations across the landscape. Through landscape ecological planning, answers gleaned from research can also help guide biomass planting site selection and harvest strategies to improve habitat for native wildlife species within the context of economically viable plantation management - thereby integrating the needs of people with those of the environment.

Schiller, A.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

344

Satellite-Observed Surface Temperature Changes after the 2004 Taylor Complex Fire in Alaska  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Land-use and land-cover change has been recognized as a key component in global climate change. In the boreal forest ecosystem, fires often cause significant changes in vegetation structure and surface biophysical characteristics, which in turn ...

Jianjun Ge

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Neutron Capture Rates near A=130 which Effect a Global Change to the r-Process Abundance Distribution  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We investigate the impact of neutron capture rates near the A=130 peak on the r-process abundance pattern. We show that these capture rates can alter the abundances of individual nuclear species, not only in the region of A=130 peak but also throughout the abundance pattern. We discuss in general the nonequilibrium processes that produce these abundance changes and determine which capture rates have the most significant impact.

Surman, Rebecca [Union College; Beun, Joshua [North Carolina State University; Mclaughlin, Gail C [North Carolina State University; Hix, William Raphael [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Neutron Capture Rates near A=130 which Effect a Global Change to the r-Process Abundance Distribution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the impact of neutron capture rates near the A=130 peak on the $r$-process abundance pattern. We show that these capture rates can alter the abundances of individual nuclear species, not only in the region of A=130 peak, but also throughout the abundance pattern. We discuss the nonequilibrium processes that produce these abundance changes and determine which capture rates have the most significant impact.

R. Surman; J. Beun; G. C. McLaughlin; W. R. Hix

2008-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

347

DOE/EIS-0222 Revised Draft Hanford Remedial Action Environmental Impact Statement and Comprehensive Land-Use Plan, April 1999  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Draft Draft Executive Summary Cover Sheet 1 2 3 Lead Federal Agency: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) 4 5 Cooperating Agencies: U.S. Department of the Interior (Bureau of Land Management, 6 Bureau of Reclamation, and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service); Benton, Franklin, and Grant 7 counties; and the City of Richland 8 9 Consulting Tribal Governments: Nez Perce Tribe Department of Environmental Restoration 10 and Waste Management and the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation 11 12 Title: Revised Draft Hanford Remedial Action Environmental Impact Statement and 13 Comprehensive Land-Use Plan (HRA-EIS), Hanford Site, Richland, Washington 14 15 Contacts: For further information on this EIS call or contact: 16 17 Thomas W. Ferns, HRA-EIS Document Manager 18 U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office

348

How Well Do We Understand and Evaluate Climate Change Feedback Processes?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Processes in the climate system that can either amplify or dampen the climate response to an external perturbation are referred to as climate feedbacks. Climate sensitivity estimates depend critically on radiative feedbacks associated with water ...

Sandrine Bony; Robert Colman; Vladimir M. Kattsov; Richard P. Allan; Christopher S. Bretherton; Jean-Louis Dufresne; Alex Hall; Stephane Hallegatte; Marika M. Holland; William Ingram; David A. Randall; Brian J. Soden; George Tselioudis; Mark J. Webb

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Re-engineering the Engineering Change Management process for a drawing-less environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Currently, 3D models and 2D drawings are the main basic elements that together form and carry the product definition throughout the product lifecycle. With the advent of the Digital Product Definition trend, industries have been interested in adopting ... Keywords: Drawing-less, Engineering Change Management (ECM), Engineering drawing, Model-based Definition (MBD), Product lifecycle

Virgilio Quintana; Louis Rivest; Robert Pellerin; Fawzi Kheddouci

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

A Bayesian sensitivity analysis applied to an Agent-based model of bird population response to landscape change  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Agricultural land management has important impacts on land use and vegetation that can rapidly induce ecosystem change. Birds are often used as indicators of such impacts of landscape change on ecosystems. However, predicting the response of birds to ... Keywords: ALMaSS, Agent-based model, BACCO, Emulator, Land use policy, Meta-model, Sensitivity analysis, Set-aside removal, Skylarks, Uncertainty

Hazel R. Parry, Christopher J. Topping, Marc C. Kennedy, Nigel D. Boatman, Alistair W. A. Murray

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

The effect of processing and compositional changes on the tribology of PM212 in air  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effects of processing and compositional variations on the tribological performance of PM212 were investigated. PM212 is a self-lubricating powder metallurgy composite, comprised of a wear-resistant metal bonded chromium carbide matrix, containing the solid lubricants barium fluoride/calcium fluoride eutectic and silver. Several composites were formulated which had lubricant, matrix, and processing variations. Processing variations included sintering and hot isostatic pressing. Pins fabricated from the composites were slid against superalloy disks in a pinon-disk tribometer to study the tribological properties. Several composites exhibited low friction and wear in sliding against a nickel-based superalloy. The good tribological performance by several different composites showed that the composition of PM212 can be altered without dramatically affecting performance.

Bogdanski, M.S. [Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States); Sliney, H.E.; DellaCorte, C. [National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Cleveland, OH (United States). Lewis Research Center

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Applying geographic information systems to support strategic environmental assessment: Opportunities and limitations in the context of Irish land-use plans  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The strengthening of spatial database infrastructures, further promoted by the INSPIRE Directive adopted in 2007, has led to an increased use of spatial data in planning and decision-making. Given that land-use plans are intrinsically spatial, such evidence and approaches can significantly benefit plan-making. A spatial framework could especially support the specific Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) aspects of the plan-making process. Spatial tools such as Geographic Information Systems (GIS) are particularly well-placed to support the environmental integration sought in SEA by providing evidence through the spatial assessment of multiple environmental datasets. Moreover, GIS bring the opportunity to augment conventional assessment techniques (e.g. matrix-based assessments) by acting as visual mediators of spatial knowledge and by providing an effective tool for the spatial and temporal analysis of environmental impacts. This paper presents a GIS-based approach to SEA (GISEA), and analyses the above premise by evaluating the barriers, limitations, opportunities and benefits of its implementation. The GISEA approach has been applied to seven development plans of differing scales in the Republic of Ireland. The results of the case studies revealed that current issues in SEA (e.g. restricted time-frames and institutional arrangements) condition the implementation of a GIS-based approach. Moreover, GIS expertise, data accessibility and quality remain limiting factors to an effective GIS application in SEA. However, the results also confirmed that GIS have the potential to increase the objectivity and accuracy of the assessment, enhance both the understanding of environmental and planning considerations and the delivery of information, and, therefore, help to improve the effectiveness of SEA practice.

Gonzalez, Ainhoa, E-mail: ainhoag@yahoo.co [Department of Environment and Planning, Dublin Institute of Technology, Zhivago Building, Bolton Street, Dublin 1 (Ireland); Gilmer, Alan, E-mail: alan.gilmer@dit.i [Department of Environment and Planning, Dublin Institute of Technology, Zhivago Building, Bolton Street, Dublin 1 (Ireland); Foley, Ronan, E-mail: ronan.foley@nuim.i [National Centre for Geo-computation, National University of Ireland, Maynooth, Co. Kildare (Ireland); Sweeney, John, E-mail: john.sweeney@nuim.i [Department of Geography, National University of Ireland, Maynooth, Co. Kildare (Ireland); Fry, John, E-mail: john.fry@ucd.i [School of Biology and Environmental Science, UCD Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland)

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

353

Uncovering land-use dynamics driven by human decision-making - A combined model approach using cellular automata and system dynamics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper introduces an enhancement of a cellular automata (CA) model by integrating system dynamics (SD) to incorporate household dynamics and housing decisions as driving forces of residential development. CA macro-models used to simulate the quantitative ... Keywords: Berlin, Cellular automata, Residential choice, Shrinkage, System dynamics, Urban land use modeling

S. Lauf; D. Haase; P. Hostert; T. Lakes; B. Kleinschmit

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Assessment of a multi-objective decision support system generated land use plan on forest fodder dependency in a Himalayan watershed  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper analyzes the impact of integrated watershed land use plans generated through multi-objective optimization techniques in a Central Himalayan watershed on forest fodder dependency for meeting fodder requirements of livestock in the watershed. ... Keywords: Forest fodder dependency, Himalayas, Integrated watershed development, Multi-objective decision support system

A. Raizada; Pradeep Dogra; B. L. Dhyani

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Procession  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

UEE 2008 Ziermann, Martin 2004 Macht und Architektur: ZweiP ROCESSION Martin Stadler EDITORS W ILLEKE W ENDRICHFull Citation: Stadler, Martin, 2008, Procession. In Jacco

Stadler, Martin

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Processing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...are processed to complex final shapes by investment casting. Iron-nickel-base superalloys are not customarily investment cast. Investment casting permits intricate internal cooling

357

Influence of process changes on PCDD/Fs produced in an iron ore sintering plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study investigated the influence of different charge typologies and additives on the PCDD/Fs amount produced and on the congener profiles in an iron ore sintering plant. Many tests were carried out combining different typologies of charge (iron materials) and solid fuel ('coke breeze' or 'anthracite') with or without the use of urea. The PCDD/Fs produced ranged from 1.2 to 22.7 {mu} g I-TEQ/ton of agglomerate, whereas the PCDD/Fs released to the ambient air ranged from 0.10 to 1.92 ng I-TEQ/Nm{sup 3} because of cleaning in an electrostatic precipitator (ESP) and a Wetfine scrubber (WS). A more homogeneous charge with a higher amount of fine particles charge appeared to produce a lower PCDD/Fs concentration due to a better combustion but this hypothesis needs further investigations on charges having different dimension particles. Only a synergitic action of urea and anthracite was able to reduce the high PCDD/Fs content due to the bad combustion of the more inhomogeneous charge with a lower amount of fine particles. The congener profile was a typical combustion process fingerprint because the PCDFs predominated, the highly chlorinated congeners (HeptaCDD and OctaCDD) prevailed in PCDDs, whereas in PCDFs the profile was more varied; 1,2,3,4,6,7,8-HeptaCDF was the main contributor to the total concentration while 2,3,4,7,8-PentaCDF was the main contributor to the I-TEQ concentration. Whereas all the parameters under scrutiny influenced strongly the amount of PCDD/Fs produced, they affected only slightly the fingerprint of PCDD/Fs. In all cases studied, the reduction obtained using urea, anthracite, or the more homogeneous charge with a higher amount of fine particles was slightly greater on the higher chlorinated congeners in respect to the lower ones.

Guerriero, E.; Bianchini, M.; Gigliucci, P.F.; Guarnieri, A.; Mosca, S.; Rossetti, G.; Varde, M.; Rotatori, M. [CNR, Monterotondo (Italy)

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

358

CO2 Capture with Liquid-to-Solid Absorbents: CO2 Capture Process Using Phase-Changing Absorbents  

SciTech Connect

IMPACCT Project: GE and the University of Pittsburgh are developing a unique CO2 capture process in which a liquid absorbent, upon contact with CO2, changes into a solid phase. Once in solid form, the material can be separated and the CO2 can be released for storage by heating. Upon heating, the absorbent returns to its liquid form, where it can be reused to capture more CO2. The approach is more efficient than other solventbased processes because it avoids the heating of extraneous solvents such as water. This ultimately leads to a lower cost of CO2 capture and will lower the additional cost to produce electricity for coal-fired power plants that retrofit their facilities to include this technology.

None

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Land cover change and remote sensing: Examples of quantifying spatiotemporal dynamics in tropical forests  

SciTech Connect

Research on human impacts or natural processes that operate over broad geographic areas must explicitly address issues of scale and spatial heterogeneity. While the tropical forests of Southeast Asia and Mexico have been occupied and used to meet human needs for thousands of years, traditional forest management systems are currently being transformed by rapid and far-reaching demographic, political, economic, and environmental changes. The dynamics of population growth, migration into the remaining frontiers, and responses to national and international market forces result in a demand for land to produce food and fiber. These results illustrate some of the mechanisms that drive current land use changes, especially in the tropical forest frontiers. By linking the outcome of individual land use decisions and measures of landscape fragmentation and change, the aggregated results shows the hierarchy of temporal and spatial events that in summation result in global changes to the most complex and sensitive biome -- tropical forests. By quantifying the spatial and temporal patterns of tropical forest change, researchers can assist policy makers by showing how landscape systems in these tropical forests are controlled by physical, biological, social, and economic parameters.

Krummel, J.R.; Su, Haiping [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Fox, J. [East-West Center, Honolulu, HI (United States); Yarnasan, S.; Ekasingh, M. [Chiang Mai Univ. (Thailand)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Research Article Historical Pesticide Exposure in California Using Pesticide Use Reports and Land-Use Surveys: An Assessment of Misclassification Error and Bias  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We used California’s Pesticide Use Report (PUR) and land-use survey data to conduct a simulation study evaluating the potential consequences of misclassifying residential exposure from proximity to agricultural pesticide application in health effect studies. We developed a geographic model linking the PUR with crop location data from land-use surveys to assess the impact of exposure misclassification from simpler exposure models based solely on PUR or land-use data. We simulated the random selection of population controls recruited into a hypothetical case–control study within an agricultural region. Using residential parcel data, we derived annual exposure prevalences, sensitivity, and specificity for five pesticides and relied on the PUR plus land-use model as the “gold standard.” Based on these estimates, we calculated the attenuation of prespecified true odds ratios (ORs), assuming nondifferential exposure misclassification. True ORs were severely attenuated a) when residential exposure status was based on a larger geographic area yielding higher sensitivity but low specificity for exposure, in contrast to relying on a smaller area and increasing specificity; b) for less frequently applied pesticides; and c) with increasing mobility of residents among the study population. Considerable effect estimate attenuation also occurred when we used residential distance to crops as a proxy for pesticide exposure. Finally, exposure classifications based on annual instead of seasonal summaries of PUR resulted in highly attenuated ORs, especially during seasons when applications of specific pesticides were unlikely to occur. These results underscore the importance of increasing the spatiotemporal resolution of pesticide exposure models to minimize misclassification.

Rudolph P. Rull; Beate Ritz

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land-use change processes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

CHANGES IN LAND USE PATTERNS AND THEIR EFFECTS ON RIO GRANDE TURKEYS IN THE ROLLING PLAINS OF TEXAS (Annual Report-2001)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Savannah River DOE Site, Oak Ridge DOE Site, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, DOE Mound Site, UMTRA training of two populations of workers: Native American tribal members and employees, and public safety Diffusion Plant, KY; Portsmouth Site, OH; Oak Ridge Operations, TN; and the Savannah River Site, SC

362

Center for BioEnergy Sustainability (CBES) http://www.ornl.gov/cbes/ Bioenergy Sustainability and Land-Use Change Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Center for BioEnergy Sustainability (CBES) http://www.ornl.gov/cbes/ 1 Bioenergy Sustainability Dale and Gregg Marland (ORNL) contributed to Chapter 4 on Grand Challenges in Energy Sustainability Torre Ugarte, D., in review. "Collaborators welcome: Global Sustainable Bioenergy Project (GSB

363

Center for BioEnergy Sustainability (CBES) http://www.ornl.gov/cbes/ Bioenergy Sustainability and Land-Use Change Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Center for BioEnergy Sustainability (CBES) http://www.ornl.gov/cbes/ 1 Bioenergy Sustainability Storey. 2011. Indicators to support environmental sustainability of bioenergy systems. Ecological KL, et al. Global Agro-ecosystem Model System for Analysis of Sustainable Biofuel Production Under

364

Center for BioEnergy Sustainability (CBES) http://www.ornl.gov/cbes/ Bioenergy Sustainability and Land-Use Change Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Center for BioEnergy Sustainability (CBES) http://www.ornl.gov/cbes/ 1 Bioenergy Sustainability and Gregg Marland (ORNL) contributed to Chapter 4 on Grand Challenges in Energy Sustainability. Kline K, E Sustainable Bioenergy Project (GSB). GLP NEWS No. 7 (7-8). The article reviews recent collaborations among

366

national carbon accounting system Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Land Use Change in Australia: Results of the National Carbon Accounting System 1988-2001 Australian Greenhouse Office  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

• Supports Australia’s position in the international development of policy and guidelines on sinks activity and greenhouse gas emissions mitigation from land based systems. • Reduces the scientific uncertainties that surround estimates of land based greenhouse gas emissions and sequestration in the Australian context. • Provides monitoring capabilities for existing land based emissions and sinks, and scenario development and modelling capabilities that support greenhouse gas mitigation and the sinks development agenda through to 2012 and beyond. • Provides the scientific and technical basis for international negotiations and promotes Australia’s national interests in international fora.

unknown authors

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Precipitation Changes near Three Gorges Dam, China. Part I: A Spatiotemporal Validation Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In October 2010, the water level upstream of the Three Gorges Dam (TGD) reached the designated 175-m level. The associated inundation and land use–land cover changes have important implications for water resource management, agriculture, ...

Fang Zhao; Marshall Shepherd

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Implementing Scanned Medical Record Systems in Australia: A Structured Case Study on Envisioned Changes to Elective Admissions Process in a Victorian Hospital  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In recent years, influenced by the pervasive power of technology, standards and mandates, Australian hospitals have begun exploring digital forms of keeping this record. The main rationale is the ease of accessing different data sources at the same time ... Keywords: Australia, Change Management, Elective Admission Process, Electronic Health Records, Process Redesign, Scanned Medical Records, Victoria

Elise McAuley, Chandana Unnithan, Sofie Karamzalis

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Achieving California’s Land Use and Transportation Greenhouse Gas Emission Targets Under AB 32: An Exploration of Potential Policy Processes and Mechanisms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

vehicles banned, increases in bioethanol fuels in Brazil andU.S. : decreased tax on bioethanol fuel; E85 blends eligible

Shaheen, Susan A.; Bejamin-Chung, Jade; Allen, Denise; Howe-Steiger, Linda

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Achieving California’s Land Use and Transportation Greenhouse Gas Emission Targets Under AB 32: An Exploration of Potential Policy Processes and Mechanisms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

which target vehicle manufacturers and service providers;between individuals. Vehicle manufacturers could also beresponsibility between vehicle manufacturers and fuel

Shaheen, Susan A.; Bejamin-Chung, Jade; Allen, Denise; Howe-Steiger, Linda

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

A Simple, Minimal Parameter Model for Predicting the Influence of Changing Land Cover on the Land–Atmosphere System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The impacts of changing land cover on the soil–vegetation–atmosphere system are numerous. With the fraction of land used for farming and grazing expected to increase, extensive alterations to land cover such as replacing forests with cropland will ...

Justin E. Bagley; Ankur R. Desai; Paul C. West; Jonathan A. Foley

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Transportation Secure Data Center: Real-World Data for Transportation Planning and Land Use Analysis (Fact Sheet)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) have launched the free, web-based Transportation Secure Data Center (TSDC). The TSDC (www.nrel.gov/tsdc) preserves respondent anonymity while making vital transportation data available to a broad group of users through secure, online access. The TSDC database provides free-of-charge web-based access to valuable transportation data that can be used for: Transit planning, Travel demand modeling, Homeland Security evacuation planning, Alternative fuel station planning, and Validating transportation data from other sources. The TSDC's two levels of access make composite data available with simple online registration, and allow researchers to use detailed spatial data after completing a straight forward application process.

Not Available

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Climate change mitigation through forestry measures: potentials, options, practice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is the FC doing? ­ Woodland carbon code and assessment protocols (3 slides) · Conclusions (2 slides). #12 2010 Climate change mitigation and forestry measures Global carbon balance c. 2000 Burning fossil fuels 23.1 GtCO2 yr-1 Land-use change (including deforestation) 5.9 GtCO2 yr -1 Vegetation growth 11.0 Gt

374

STOCK AND DISTRIBUTION OF TOTAL AND CORN-DERIVED SOIL ORGANIC CARBON IN AGGREGATE AND PRIMARY PARTICLE FRACTIONS FOR DIFFERENT LAND USE AND SOIL MANAGEMENT PRACTICES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Land use, soil management, and cropping systems affect stock, distribution, and residence time of soil organic carbon (SOC). Therefore, SOC stock and its depth distribution and association with primary and secondary particles were assessed in long-term experiments at the North Appalachian Experimental Watersheds near Coshocton, Ohio, through *13C techniques. These measurements were made for five land use and soil management treatments: (1) secondary forest, (2) meadow converted from no-till (NT) corn since 1988, (3) continuous NT corn since 1970, (4) continuous NT corn-soybean in rotation with ryegrass since 1984, and (5) conventional plow till (PT) corn since 1984. Soil samples to 70-cm depth were obtained in 2002 in all treatments. Significant differences in soil properties were observed among land use treatments for 0 to 5-cm depth. The SOC concentration (g C kg*1 of soil) in the 0 to 5-cm layer was 44.0 in forest, 24.0 in meadow, 26.1 in NT corn, 19.5 in NT corn-soybean, and 11.1 i n PT corn. The fraction of total C in corn residue converted to SOC was 11.9% for NT corn, 10.6% for NT corn-soybean, and 8.3% for PT corn. The proportion of SOC derived from corn residue was 96% for NT corn in the 0 to 5-cm layer, and it decreased gradually with depth and was 50% in PT corn. The mean SOC sequestration rate on conversion from PT to NT was 280 kg C ha*1 y*1. The SOC concentration decreased with reduction in aggregate size, and macro-aggregates contained 15 to 35% more SOC concentration than microaggregates. In comparison with forest, the magnitude of SOC depletion in the 0 to 30-cm layer was 15.5 Mg C/ha (24.0%) in meadow, 12.7 Mg C/ha (19.8%) in NT corn, 17.3 Mg C/ha (26.8%) in NT corn-soybean, and 23.3 Mg C/ha (35.1%) in PT corn. The SOC had a long turnover time when located deeper in the subsoil.

Puget, P; Lal, Rattan; Izaurralde, R Cesar C.; Post, M; Owens, Lloyd

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

The effect of processing and compositional changes on the tribology of PM212 in air{copyright}  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effects of processing and compositional variations on the tribological performance of PM212 were investigated. PM212 is a self lubricating powder metallurgy composite, comprised of a wear-resistant, metal-bonded chromium carbide matrix, containing the solid lubricants barium fluoride/calcium fluoride eutectic and silver. Several composites were formulated which had lubricant, matrix, and processing variations. Processing variations included sintering and hot isostatic pressing (HIPing). Pins fabricated from the composites were slid against superalloy disks in a pin-on-disk tribometer to study the tribological properties. Several composites exhibited low friction and wear in sliding against a nickel-based superalloy. The results showed that, under these test conditions, the tribological properties of PM212 are not highly sensitive to compositional and processing variations within the matrix studied. 9 refs., 6 figs., 6 tabs.

Bogdanski, M.S. [Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States); Sliney, H.E.; Dellacorte, C. [NASA Lewis Research Center, Cleveland, OH (United States)

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Process / CI Process  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 Process/Continual Improvement Rev. 11_0406 Page 1 of 6 2 Process/Continual Improvement Rev. 11_0406 Page 1 of 6 EOTA - Business Process Document Title: Process/Continual Improvement Document Number: P-012 Rev 11_0406 Document Owner: Elizabeth Sousa Backup Owner: David Rocha Approver(s): Melissa Otero Parent Document: Q-001 Quality Manual Notify of Changes: EOTA Staff Referenced Document(s): F-016 Process/Continual Improvement Form, P-001 Document Control Process, P-008 Corrective Action and Preventive Action, P-004 Business System Management Review P-012 Process/Continual Improvement Rev. 11_0406 Page 2 of 6 Revision History:

377

Impact of Asymmetric Dynamical Processes on the Structure and Intensity Change of Two-Dimensional Hurricane-Like Annular Vortices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, a simple two-dimensional (2D) unforced barotropic model is used to study the asymmetric dynamics of the hurricane inner-core region and to assess their impact on the structure and intensity change. Two sets of experiments are ...

Konstantinos Menelaou; M. K. Yau; Yosvany Martinez

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Ice at the Interface: Atmosphere-Ice-Ocean Boundary Layer Processes and Their Role in Polar Change---Workshop Report  

SciTech Connect

The atmosphere-ocean boundary layer in which sea ice resides includes many complex processes that require a more realistic treatment in GCMs, particularly as models move toward full earth system descriptions. The primary purpose of the workshop was to define and discuss such coupled processes from observational and modeling points of view, including insight from both the Arctic and Antarctic systems. The workshop met each of its overarching goals, including fostering collaboration among experimentalists, theorists and modelers, proposing modeling strategies, and ascertaining data availability and needs. Several scientific themes emerged from the workshop, such as the importance of episodic or extreme events, precipitation, stratification above and below the ice, and the marginal ice zone, whose seasonal Arctic migrations now traverse more territory than in the past.

Hunke, Elizabeth C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

379

Radical External Beam Radiotherapy for Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer in Japan: Changing Trends in the Patterns of Care Process Survey  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To delineate changing trends in radical external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for prostate cancer in Japan. Methods and Materials: Data from 841 patients with clinically localized prostate cancer treated with EBRT in the Japanese Patterns of Care Study (PCS) from 1996 to 2005 were analyzed. Results: Significant increases in the proportions of patients with stage T1 to T2 disease and decrease in prostate-specific antigen values were observed. Also, there were significant increases in the percentages of patients treated with radiotherapy by their own choice. Median radiation doses were 65.0 Gy and 68.4 Gy from 1996 to 1998 and from 1999 to 2001, respectively, increasing to 70 Gy from 2003 to 2005. Moreover, conformal therapy was more frequently used from 2003 to 2005 (84.9%) than from 1996 to 1998 (49.1%) and from 1999 to 2001 (50.2%). On the other hand, the percentage of patients receiving hormone therapy from 2003 to 2005 (81.1%) was almost the same as that from 1996 to 1998 (86.3%) and from 1999 to 2001 (89.7%). Compared with the PCS in the United States, patient characteristics and patterns of treatments from 2003 to 2005 have become more similar to those in the United States than those from 1996 to 1998 and those from 1999 to 2001. Conclusions: This study indicates a trend toward increasing numbers of patients with early-stage disease and increasing proportions of patients treated with higher radiation doses with advanced equipment among Japanese prostate cancer patients treated with EBRT during 1996 to 2005 survey periods. Patterns of care for prostate cancer in Japan are becoming more similar to those in the United States.

Ogawa, Kazuhiko, E-mail: kogawa@med.u-ryukyu.ac.jp [Department of Radiology, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa (Japan); Nakamura, Katsumasa [Department of Clinical Radiology, Kyushu University Hospital at Beppu, Oita (Japan); Sasaki, Tomonari [Department of Radiation Oncology, National Kyushu Center, Fukuoka (Japan); Onishi, Hiroshi [Department of Radiology, Yamanashi University, Yamanashi (Japan); Koizumi, Masahiko [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka University, Osaka (Japan); Araya, Masayuki [Department of Radiology, Yamanashi University, Yamanashi (Japan); Mukumoto, Nobutaka; Teshima, Teruki [Department of Medical Physics and Engineering, Osaka University, Osaka (Japan); Mitsumori, Michihide [Department of Radiation Oncology and Image-Applied Therapy, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan)

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Additional Research Supporting Changes to the Branch Technical Position on Concentration Averaging and Waste Form: Summary of EPRI I nput to the Process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

U.S. disposal of low-level radioactive waste (LLWR) has changed significantly with the loss of Class B and C disposal access for ~85% of U.S. nuclear power plants. To promote increased disposal options, EPRI began to develop a technical basis for proposed modifications for the Branch Technical Position on Concentration Averaging and Encapsulation (BTP) for consideration by the U.S. NRC and other stakeholders during the revision process. This report summarizes a continuation of that BTP effort since the 2...

2012-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

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381

"The gate-keepers in a changing world: integrating microbial diversity and dynamics with global change biology."  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Microorganisms (Bacteria, Archaea and Fungi) are the gate-keepers of many ecosystem-scale biogeochemical cycles. Although there have been measurable changes in ecosystem function due to human activities such as greenhouse gas production, nutrient loading, land-use change, and water consumption, few studies have connected microbial community dynamics with these changes in ecosystem function. Specifically, very little is known about how global changes will induce important functional changes in microbial biodiversity. Even less is known about how microbial functional changes could alter rates of nutrient cycling or whether microbial communities have enough functional redundancy that changes will have little impact on overall process rates. The proposed symposium will provide an overview of this emerging research area, with emphasis on linking the microorganisms directly to important ecological functions under the influence of global change dynamics. The session will include both broad overviews as well as specific case-studies by researchers who examine microbial communities from a variety of taxonomic levels and from various environments. The session will begin broadly, with speakers discussing how microbial communities may inform ecosystem-scale global change studies, and help to make microbial ecological knowledge more tangible for a broad range of ecologists. The session will continue with case studies of microbial community information informing process in global change experiments. Finally, the session will close with speakers discussing how microbial community information might fit into global change models, and what types of information are useful for future studies. We have requested that speakers particularly incorporate their views on what types of microbial data is useful and informative in the context of larger ecosystem processes. We foresee that this session could serve as a focal point for global change microbial ecologists to meet and discuss their field at the ESA 2010 General Meeting. However, more importantly, the session will provide for a broad range of interests for ecosystem ecologists, theoretical ecologists, and global change biologists, and will foster communication between these groups to generate informative microbial community data in the future.

Jessica L.M. Gutknecht and Kathryn M. Docherty

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Process Deviation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0 Process Deviation 11_0304 Page 1 of 6 0 Process Deviation 11_0304 Page 1 of 6 EOTA - Business Process Document Title: Process Deviation Document Number: P-010 Rev 11-0304 Document Owner: Elizabeth Sousa Backup Owner: Melissa Otero Approver(s): Melissa Otero Parent Document: Q-001, Quality Manual Notify of Changes: EOTA Employees Referenced Document(s): F-013 Process Deviation Form, P-008 Corrective/Preventive Action, F-014 Process Deviation Log, ADMP-001 Procurement Process P-010 Process Deviation 11_0304 Page 2 of 6 Revision History: Rev. Description of Change A Initial Release 08_0822 Process assigned to new owner. Process and flowchart modified to require completion of all items on F-013. 09_0122 Process and flowchart modified to reflect process modifications.

383

Process / CI Process  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 Post Travel Summary 11_0221 Page 1 of 3 7 Post Travel Summary 11_0221 Page 1 of 3 EOTA - Business Process Document Title: Post Travel Summary Document Number: ADMF-017 Post Travel Summary 11_0221 Document Owner: Elizabeth Sousa Backup Owner: Melissa Otero Approver(s): Melissa Otero Parent Document: ADMP-004, Contractor Travel Process Notify of Changes: EOTA Staff Referenced Document(s): ADMF-007 EOTA Pre-Travel Authorization Form ADMF-017 Post Travel Summary 11_0221 Page 2 of 3 Revision History: Rev. Description of Change 11_0221 Initial Release ADMF-017 Post Travel Summary 11_0221 Page 3 of 3

384

Process Deviation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 Functional/Job/Task Analysis Process 11_0718 Page 1 of 8 5 Functional/Job/Task Analysis Process 11_0718 Page 1 of 8 EOTA - Business Process Document Title: Functional/Job/Task Analysis Process Document Number: ISDP-005 Rev 11_0718 Document Owner: Elizabeth Sousa Backup Owner: Melissa Otero Approver(s): Melissa Otero Parent Document: Q-001, Quality Manual Notify of Changes: PM2 Referenced Document(s): ISDF-XXX Vision User Guide (currently being developed ) ISDP-005 Functional/Job/Task Analysis Process 11_0718 Page 2 of 8 Revision History: Rev. Description of Change 08_0410 Initial Release 10_0630 Process modified to match steps within the TPP 11_0718 Minor editorial changes; changed step 8.0 from Task-to-Training Matrix to "Analysis"-to-Training Matrix.

385

Process Deviation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 Exercise Development Process 11_0414 Page 1 of 8 7 Exercise Development Process 11_0414 Page 1 of 8 EOTA - Business Process Document Title: Exercise Development Process Document Number: ISDP-017 Revision 11_0414 Document Owner: Elizabeth Sousa Backup Owner: Melissa Otero Approver(s): Melissa Otero Parent Document: ISDP-002, Training Product Process Notify of Changes: ISD, ITT, MGT Referenced Document(s): ISDF-001 Technical Direction, ISDF-004 Design Document, ISDF-006 WBT Script Template, ISDF-007 Lesson Plan Template, ITTP-016 WBT Programming ISDP-017 Exercise Development Process 11_0414 Page 2 of 8 Revision History: Rev. Description of Change 10_0630 Initial Release 11_0223 Made changes to accurately reflect TPP. 11_0414 Added Derivative Classifier to step 12.0 ISDP-017 Exercise Development Process 11_0414 Page 3 of 8

386

Effects of land markets and land management on ecosystem function: A framework for modelling exurban land-change  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents the conceptual design and application of a new land-change modelling framework that represents geographical, sociological, economic, and ecological aspects of a land system. The framework provides an overarching design that can be ... Keywords: Agent-based modelling, Carbon storage and flux, Exurban development, Land-use and land-cover change, Policy

Derek T. Robinson, Shipeng Sun, Meghan Hutchins, Rick L. Riolo, Daniel G. Brown, Dawn C. Parker, Tatiana Filatova, William S. Currie, Sarah Kiger

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

The terrestrial carbon inventory on the Savannah River Site: Assessing the change in Carbon pools 1951-2001.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Savannah River Site (SRS) has changed from an agricultural-woodland landscape in 1951 to a forested landscape during that latter half of the twentieth century. The corresponding change in carbon (C) pools associated land use on the SRS was estimated using comprehensive inventories from 1951 and 2001 in conjunction with operational forest management and monitoring data from the site.

Dai, Zhaohua; Trettin, Carl, C.; Parresol, Bernard, R.

2011-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

388

Radiative Forcing of Climate Change  

SciTech Connect

Chapter 6 of the IPCC Third Assessment Report Climate Change 2001: The Scientific Basis. Sections include: Executive Summary 6.1 Radiative Forcing 6.2 Forcing-Response Relationship 6.3 Well-Mixed Greenhouse Gases 6.4 Stratospheric Ozone 6.5 Radiative Forcing By Tropospheric Ozone 6.6 Indirect Forcings due to Chemistry 6.7 The Direct Radiative Forcing of Tropospheric Aerosols 6.8 The Indirect Radiative Forcing of Tropospheric Aerosols 6.9 Stratospheric Aerosols 6.10 Land-use Change (Surface Albedo Effect) 6.11 Solar Forcing of Climate 6.12 Global Warming Potentials hydrocarbons 6.13 Global Mean Radiative Forcings 6.14 The Geographical Distribution of the Radiative Forcings 6.15 Time Evolution of Radiative Forcings Appendix 6.1 Elements of Radiative Forcing Concept References.

Ramaswamy, V.; Boucher, Olivier; Haigh, J.; Hauglustaine, D.; Haywood, J.; Myhre, G.; Nakajima, Takahito; Shi, Guangyu; Solomon, S.; Betts, Robert E.; Charlson, R.; Chuang, C. C.; Daniel, J. S.; Del Genio, Anthony D.; Feichter, J.; Fuglestvedt, J.; Forster, P. M.; Ghan, Steven J.; Jones, A.; Kiehl, J. T.; Koch, D.; Land, C.; Lean, J.; Lohmann, Ulrike; Minschwaner, K.; Penner, Joyce E.; Roberts, D. L.; Rodhe, H.; Roelofs, G.-J.; Rotstayn, Leon D.; Schneider, T. L.; Schumann, U.; Schwartz, Stephen E.; Schwartzkopf, M. D.; Shine, K. P.; Smith, Steven J.; Stevenson, D. S.; Stordal, F.; Tegen, I.; van Dorland, R.; Zhang, Y.; Srinivasan, J.; Joos, Fortunat

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Investigation and modeling of processing-microstructure-property relations in ultra-fine grained hexagonal close packed materials under strain path changes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ultra-fine grained (UFG) materials have attracted considerable interest due to the possibility of achieving simultaneous increase in strength and ductility. Effective use of these materials in engineering applications requires investigating the processing-microstructure-property inter-relations leading to a comprehensive understanding of the material behavior. Research efforts on producing UFG hexagonal close packed (hcp) materials have been limited in spite of their envisaged utilization in various technologies. The present study explores multiple UFG hcp materials to identify the general trends in their deformation behaviors, microstructural features, crystallographic texture evolutions and mechanical responses under strain path changes. UFG hcp materials, including commercial purity Ti, Ti-6Al-4V alloy and high purity Zr, were fabricated using equal channel angular extrusion (ECAE) as a severe plastic deformation (SPD) technique following various processing schedules. Several characterization methods and a polycrystal plasticity model were utilized in synergy to impart the relationships between the UFG microstructure, the texture and the post-ECAE flow behavior. Pure UFG hcp materials exhibited enhanced strength properties, making them potential substitutes for coarse-grained high strength expensive alloys. Incorporation of post-ECAE thermo-mechanical treatments was effective in further improvement of the strength and ductility levels. Strong anisotropy of the post-ECAE flow response was evident in all the materials studied. The underlying mechanisms for anisotropy were identified as texture and processing-induced microstructure. Depending on the ECAE route, the applied strain level and the specific material, the relative importance of these two mechanisms on plastic flow anisotropy varied. A viscoplastic self-consistent approach is presented as a reliable model for predicting the texture evolutions and flow behaviors of UFG hcp materials in cases where texture governs the plastic anisotropy. Regardless of the material, the initial billet texture and the extrusion conditions, ECAE of all hcp materials revealed similar texture evolutions. Accurate texture and flow behavior predictions showed that basal slip is the responsible mechanism for such texture evolution in all hcp materials independent of their axial ratio. High strength of the UFG microstructure was presented as a triggering mechanism for the activation of unexpected deformation systems, such as high temperature deformation twinning in Ti-6Al-4V and room temperature basal slip in pure Zr.

Yapici, Guney Guven

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Process Deviation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

10 Course/Analysis Initiation Process 11_0512 Page 1 of 6 10 Course/Analysis Initiation Process 11_0512 Page 1 of 6 EOTA - Business Process Document Title: Course/Analysis Initiation Process Document Number: ISDP- 010 Rev 11_0512 Document Owner: Elizabeth Sousa Backup Owner: Vickie Pleau Approver(s): Melissa Otero Parent Document: ISDP-002, Training Production Process Notify of Changes: ISD, ITT, MGT Referenced Document(s): ISDF-001 Technical Direction, ISDF-035 Analysis Feasibility Assessment, ISDP-010, Course Analysis Initiation Process, ISDP-015, WBT/ILT/Ex Design Process ISDP-010 Course/Analysis Initiation Process 11_0512 Page 2 of 6 Revision History: Rev. Description of Change 10_0630 Initial Release 11_0512 Modified verbiage for clarification and updated referenced documents.

391

Process Deviation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 Course Evaluation and Close-out Process 10_0630 Page 1 of 5 4 Course Evaluation and Close-out Process 10_0630 Page 1 of 5 EOTA - Business Process Document Title: Course Evaluation and Close-out Process Document Number: ISDP-014 Rev. 10_0630 Document Owner: Vickie Pleau Backup Owner: Melissa Otero Approver(s): Melissa Otero Parent Document: ISDP-002, Training Production Process Notify of Changes: ISD, ITT, MGT Referenced Document(s): ISDF-011, ISD History File Acceptance, ISDF-012, ISD History File Checklist ISDP-014 Course Evaluation and Close-out Process 10_0630 Page 2 of 5 Revision History: Rev. Description of Change 10_0630 Initial Release ISDP-014 Course Evaluation and Close-out Process 10_0630 Page 3 of 5 I. Purpose To effectively plan and control the process for evaluating and finalizing EOTA ILT, EX and WBT training products, assuring

392

A decision-oriented model to evaluate the effect of land use and agricultural management on herbicide contamination in stream water  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Modelling stream water pollution by herbicides in agricultural areas is a critical issue since numerous and incompletely known processes are involved. A decision-oriented model, SACADEAU-Transf, which represents water and pesticide transfer in medium-sized ... Keywords: Agriculture, Catchment, Decision oriented, Herbicide, Modelling, Pesticide, Stream water quality, Subsurface flow, Surface flow

Chantal Gascuel-Odoux; Pierre Aurousseau; Marie-Odile Cordier; Patrick Durand; Frederick Garcia; Véronique Masson; Jordy Salmon-Monviola; Florent Tortrat; Ronan Trepos

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Process Deviation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 WBT/ILT/EX Course Design Process 10_0630 Page 1 of 6 5 WBT/ILT/EX Course Design Process 10_0630 Page 1 of 6 EOTA - Business Process Document Title: WBT/ILT/EX Course Design Process Document Number: ISDP-015 Rev. 10_0630 Document Owner: Elizabeth Sousa Backup Owner: Melissa Otero Approver(s): Melissa Otero Parent Document: ISDP-002, Training Production Process Notify of Changes: ISD, ITT, MGT Referenced Document(s): ISDF-046 Training Design/Development Summary, ISDF-004 Design Document, ISDF-006A WBT Script Template, ISDF- 007 Lesson Plan Template, ISDF-012, ISD History File Checklist ISDP-015 WBT/ILT/EX Course Design Process 10_0630 Page 2 of 6 Revision History: Rev. Description of Change 10_0630 Initial Release ISDP-015 WBT/ILT/EX Course Design Process 10_0630 Page 3 of 6

394

Process Deviation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 Website Development-Maintenance Process 11_0419Page 1 of 6 5 Website Development-Maintenance Process 11_0419Page 1 of 6 EOTA - Business Process Document Title: Website Development-Maintenance Process Document Number: ITTP-015 Rev. 11_0419 Document Owner: Benjamin Aragon Backup Owner: Melissa Otero Approver(s): Melissa Otero Parent Document: Q-001, Quality Manual Notify of Changes: ITT Referenced Document(s): ITTF-016 Website Development/Maintenance Log, ISDP-002 Training Production Process ITTP-015 Website Development-Maintenance Process 11_0419Page 2 of 6 Revision History: Rev. Description of Change A Initial Release 11_0419 Deleted decision point 2.1 and 2.2, incorporated Notifying Requester into step 2.0, modified verbiage for clarification. ITTP-015 Website Development-Maintenance Process 11_0419Page 3 of 6

395

Assessing the impacts of climate change on natural resource systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This volume is a collection of papers addressing the theme of potential impacts of climatic change. Papers are entitled Integrated Assessments of the Impacts of Climatic Change on Natural Resources: An Introductory Editorial; Framework for Integrated Assessments of Global Warming Impacts; Modeling Land Use and Cover as Part of Global Environmental Change; Assessing Impacts of Climatic Change on Forests: The State of Biological Modeling; Integrating Climatic Change and Forests: Economic and Ecological Assessments; Environmental Change in Grasslands: Assessment using Models; Assessing the Socio-economic Impacts of Climatic Change on Grazinglands; Modeling the Effects of Climatic Change on Water Resources- A Review; Assessing the Socioeconomic Consequences of Climate Change on Water Resources; and Conclusions, Remaining Issues, and Next Steps.

Frederick, K.D.; Rosenberg, N.J. [eds.

1994-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

396

FEDERAL DIRECT STUDENT LOANS FAU is participating in the Federal Direct Stafford Loan Program. With this change, all Stafford loans will be processed through the U.S. Department of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FEDERAL DIRECT STUDENT LOANS ­ FAU is participating in the Federal Direct Stafford Loan Program. With this change, all Stafford loans will be processed through the U.S. Department of Education. For more information, visit http://www.fau.edu/finaid/stafford/index.php. FINANCIAL AID NOTIFICATION POLICY

Fernandez, Eduardo

397

Final Technical Report: Effects of Changing Water and Nitrogen Inputs on a Mojave Desert Ecosystem  

SciTech Connect

In order to anticipate the effects of global change on ecosystem function, it is essential that predictive relationships be established linking ecosystem function to global change scenarios. The Mojave Desert is of considerable interest with respect to global change. It contains the driest habitats in North America, and thus most closely approximates the world’s great arid deserts. In order to examine the effects of climate and land use changes, in 2001 we established a long-term manipulative global change experiment, called the Mojave Global Change Facility. Manipulations in this study include the potential effects of (1) increased summer rainfall (75 mm over three discrete 25 mm events), (2) increased nitrogen deposition (10 and 40 kg ha-1), and (3) the disturbance of biological N-fixing crusts . Questions addressed under this grant shared the common hypothesis that plant and ecosystem performance will positively respond to the augmentation of the most limiting resources to plant growth in the Mojave Desert, e.g., water and nitrogen. Specific hypotheses include (1) increased summer rainfall will significantly increase plant production through an alleviation of moisture stress in the dry summer months, (2) N-deposition will increase plant production in this N-limited system, particularly in wet years or in concert with added summer rain, and (3) biological crust disturbance will gradually decrease bio-available N, with concomitant long-term reductions in photosynthesis and ANPP. Individual plant and ecosystem responses to global change may be regulated by biogeochemical processes and natural weather variability, and changes in plant and ecosystem processes may occur rapidly, may occur only after a time lag, or may not occur at all. During the first PER grant period, we observed changes in plant and ecosystem processes that would fall under each of these time-response intervals: plant and ecosystem processes responded rapidly to added summer rain, whereas most processes responded slowly or in a lag fashion to N-deposition and with no significant response to crust disturbance. Therefore, the primary objectives of this renewal grant were to: (1) continue ongoing measurements of soil and plant parameters that assess primary treatment responses; (2) address the potential heterogeneity of soil properties and (3) initiate a new suite of measurements that will provide data necessary for scaling/modeling of whole-plot to ecosystem-level responses. Our experimental approach included soil plant-water interactions using TDR, neutron probe, and miniaturized soil matric potential and moisture sensors, plant ecophysiological and productivity responses to water and nitrogen treatments and remote sensing methodologies deployed on a radio control platform. We report here the most significant findings of our study.

Smith, Stanley, D.; Nowak, Robert S.; Fenstermaker, Lynn, F.; Young, Michael,H.

2007-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

398

Intensification of hydrologic regimes due to climate change will have important impacts on biogeochemical processes and ecosystem services, but quantifying these impacts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Arsenic, and Iron Biogeochemistry at Abandoned Mining Sites Abandoned Uranium Mine Tailings in Harding Roosendaal Impact of Climate Change on Iron and Organic Carbon Chemistry: Molecular to Field Scale Uranium and surface waters. Background The site of interest, at which uraniferous lignite mining occurred

Borch, Thomas

399

Climate change mitigation and adaptation in strategic environmental assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Countries are implementing CO{sub 2} emission reduction targets in order to meet a globally agreed global warming limit of +2 Degree-Sign C. However, it was hypothesised that these national reduction targets are not translated to regional or state level planning, and are not considered through Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) in order to meet emission reduction obligations falling on the transport, energy, housing, agriculture, and forestry sectors. SEAs of land use plans in the German state of Saxony, and the English region of the East of England were examined for their consideration of climate change impacts based on a set of criteria drawn from the literature. It was found that SEAs in both cases failed to consider climate change impacts at scales larger than the boundary of the spatial plan, and that CO{sub 2} reduction targets were not considered. This suggests a need for more clarity in the legal obligations for climate change consideration within the text of the SEA Directive, a requirement for monitoring of carbon emissions, a need for methodological guidance to devolve global climate change targets down to regional and local levels, and a need for guidance on properly implementing climate change protection in SEA. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Strategic Environmental Assessments (SEA) of 12 land use plans from Germany and England have been examined. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SEA failed to consider climate change impacts at scales larger than the boundary of the land use plans. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SEA should be an important instrument for climate protection. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Concrete steps for climate protection mainstreaming into SEA at the European Union and national levels have been suggested.

Wende, Wolfgang, E-mail: W.Wende@ioer.de [Head of Research Area on Landscape Change and Management, Leibniz Institute of Ecological and Regional Development, Weberplatz 1, D-01217 Dresden (Germany); Bond, Alan, E-mail: alan.bond@uea.ac.uk [InteREAM, School of Environmental Sciences, University of East Anglia, Norwich, NR4 7TJ (United Kingdom); Bobylev, Nikolai, E-mail: nikolaibobylev@gmail.com [School of Innovation Science, Saint Petersburg State Polytechnical University, 195251, Politechnicheskaya, 29, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); St. Petersburg Research Centre for Ecological Safety of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 197110, Korpusnaya, 18, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Stratmann, Lars, E-mail: l.stratmann@ioer.de [Leibniz Institute of Ecological and Regional Development, Weberplatz 1, D-01217 Dresden (Germany)

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

400

IISD Climate Change and Agriculture Research | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

IISD Climate Change and Agriculture Research IISD Climate Change and Agriculture Research Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: IISD Climate Change and Agriculture Research Agency/Company /Organization: International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD) Sector: Land Focus Area: Forestry, Agriculture Topics: Policies/deployment programs Resource Type: Publications References: IISD Climate Change and Agriculture Research[1] "IISD's work related to climate change and agriculture has been supported by Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada." It include the two following publications: Expanding Agriculture's Role in a Post-2012 Regime (PDF - 712 kb) and Climate Change Mitigation through Land-Use Measures in the Agriculture and Forestry Sectors References ↑ "IISD Climate Change and Agriculture Research"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land-use change processes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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401

Estimating The Effect of Biofuel on Land Cover Change Using Multi-Year Modis Land Cover Data  

SciTech Connect

There has been a growing debate on the effects of the increase in demands of biofuels on land use land cover (LULC) change with apprehension in some quarters that the growing demand for bioenergy as a clean fuel will result in widespread direct and indirect LULC change. However estimating both direct and indirect LULC change is challenging and will require development of accurate high frequency, high resolution (temporal and spatial) land use land cover data as well as new LULC models which can be used to locate, quantify and predict these changes. To assess whether the demand for biofuel has caused significant LULC we used MODIS land cover data (MCD12Q1) from 2001 to 2008 along with cropland data layer (CDL) to estimate cropland and grassland changes in United States for the years 2002-2008 as well as its correlation with biofuel growth.

Singh, Nagendra [ORNL; Bhaduri, Budhendra L [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Image Change Detection via Ensemble Learning  

SciTech Connect

The concept of geographic change detection is relevant in many areas. Changes in geography can reveal much information about a particular location. For example, analysis of changes in geography can identify regions of population growth, change in land use, and potential environmental disturbance. A common way to perform change detection is to use a simple method such as differencing to detect regions of change. Though these techniques are simple, often the application of these techniques is very limited. Recently, use of machine learning methods such as neural networks for change detection has been explored with great success. In this work, we explore the use of ensemble learning methodologies for detecting changes in bitemporal synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images. Ensemble learning uses a collection of weak machine learning classifiers to create a stronger classifier which has higher accuracy than the individual classifiers in the ensemble. The strength of the ensemble lies in the fact that the individual classifiers in the ensemble create a mixture of experts in which the final classification made by the ensemble classifier is calculated from the outputs of the individual classifiers. Our methodology leverages this aspect of ensemble learning by training collections of weak decision tree based classifiers to identify regions of change in SAR images collected of a region in the Staten Island, New York area during Hurricane Sandy. Preliminary studies show that the ensemble method has approximately 11.5% higher change detection accuracy than an individual classifier.

Martin, Benjamin W [ORNL; Vatsavai, Raju [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Land Use Regulation with Durable Capital  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

prices, land rents, capital intensity of housing and housingrents and capital intensities. A richer formulation, inof development and the capital intensity of development. His

Quigley, John M.; Swoboda, Aaron

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Purdue Land Use Update March 1, 2010  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and research (DEAD) · HB 1265 - Oil, gas, and coal bed methane property. (ALIVE) · SB 177 - Indiana Historic for a lifetime (DEAD) #12;Jamie Palmer, AICP IU Public Policy Institute APA Indiana jlpalmer@iupui.edu 317

405

LAND USE, COVER AND FORMS CLASSIFICATION SYSTEM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

upon request other state agencies in their mapping activities. Although our primary responsibility. 1 #12;2 A committee representing eight state agencies was formed in 1973 to improve land resources data coordination within the various state agencies by reducing duplication of effort and increasing

Binford, Michael W.

406

EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions - Land use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

53 Wood products originating from forests outside the United States are not included in the U.S. greenhouse gas inventory. 54 Source: U.S. Energy Information ...

407

Aquifer Protection Area Land Use Regulations (Connecticut)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These regulations describe allowable activities within aquifer protection areas, the procedure by which such areas are delineated, and relevant permit requirements. The regulations also describe...

408

Process Deviation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 WBT Course Implementation 11_0512 Page 1 of 7 3 WBT Course Implementation 11_0512 Page 1 of 7 EOTA - Business Process Document Title: WBT Course Implementation Document Number: ISDP-013 Rev. 11_0512 Document Owner: Elizabeth Sousa Backup Owner: Vickie Pleau Approver(s): Melissa Otero Parent Document: ISDP-002, Training Product Process Notify of Changes: ISD, ITT, MGT Referenced Document(s): ISDF-014, Course Announcement Template, ITTF-014, Publication Review and Approval, ISDF-010 After Action Report, ISDF-042 Validation & Acceptance, ISDF-048, After Action Report Calculation Template, ITTP-015, Website Development Maintenance ISDP-013 WBT Course Implementation 11_0512 Page 2 of 7 Revision History: Rev. Description of Change 10_0630 Initial Release 11_0405 Added ISDF-048, After Action Report Calculation Template to process.

409

Optimization and AMS Modeling for Design of an Electrostatic Vibration Energy Harvester's Conditioning Circuit with an Auto-Adaptive Process to the External Vibration Changes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electrostatic transducers for vibration energy scavenging have been an object to numerous studies, but are still facing major issues relating to their conditioning circuit. One of the most popular ones uses a charge pump and a flyback circuit based on a Buck DC-DC converter (Fig. 1). A commutation between the energy accumulation in the charge pump and the recharge of the buffer capacitor Cres is assured by a switch which is the major bottleneck in the energy harvester circuit. The commutation timing of the switch determines the efficiency of the energy harvesting. In previous papers [1] the switch commutates periodically with some fixed duty ratio. However, this solution is not appropriate when the environment parameters, e.g. the vibration frequency, change. We found that the switching should be ordered by the internal state of the circuit, an not by some fixed timing scenario. We presents how to find the optimal operation mode of the harvester. To validate the study, the system was modeled using a mixed VHD...

Galayko, Dimitri; Paracha, Ayyaz Mahmood

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Process Deviation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 ILT Course Implementation 11_0512 Page 1 of 8 2 ILT Course Implementation 11_0512 Page 1 of 8 EOTA - Business Process Document Title: ILT Course Implementation Document Number: ISDP-012 Rev. 11_0512 Document Owner: Elizabeth Sousa Backup Owner: Melissa Otero Approver(s): Melissa Otero Parent Document: ISDP-002, Training Production Process Notify of Changes: ISD, ITT, MGT Referenced Document(s): ISDF-007 Lesson Plan Template, ISDF-014 Course Announcement, ISDF-010, After Action Report, ISDF-008 ILT Student Feedback Survey, ISDF-009, Design/Development Review Checklist, ITTF-014 Publication Review and Approval, ISDF-048, After Action Report Calculation Template, ISDP-011, Exercise Course Implementation Process, ITTP-015 Website Development/Maintenance Process, ISDF-015, ILT/EX Course Support Checklist

411

Patterns of Radiotherapy Practice for Patients With Cervical Cancer in Japan, 2003-2005: Changing Trends in the Pattern of Care Process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: The patterns of care study (PCS) of radiotherapy for cervical cancer in Japan over the last 10 years was reviewed. Methods and Materials: The Japanese PCS working group analyzed data from 1,200 patients (1995-1997, 591 patients; 1999-2001, 324 patients; 2003-2005, 285 patients) with cervical cancer treated with definitive radiotherapy in Japan. Results: Patients in the 2001-2003 survey were significantly younger than those in the 1999-2001 study (p < 0.0001). Histology, performance status, and International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage were not significantly different among the three survey periods. Use of combinations of chemotherapy has increased significantly during those periods (1995-1997, 24%; 1999-2001, 33%; 2003-2005, 54%; p < 0.0001). The ratio of patients receiving concurrent chemotherapy has also dramatically increased (1995-1997, 20%; 1999-2001, 54%; 2003-2005, 83%; p < 0.0001). As for external beam radiotherapy (EBRT), the application rate of four-field portals has greatly increased over the three survey periods (1995-1997, 2%; 1999-2001, 7%; 2003-2005, 21%; p < 0.0001). In addition, the use of an appropriate beam energy for EBRT has shown an increase (1995-1997, 67%; 1999-2001, 74%; 2003-2005, 81%; p = 0.064). As for intracavitary brachytherapy (ICBT), an iridium source has become increasingly popular (1995-1997, 27%; 1999-2001, 42%; 2003-2005, 84%; p < 0.0001). Among the three surveys, the ratio of patients receiving ICBT (1995-1997, 77%; 1999-2001, 82%; 2003-2005, 78%) has not changed. Although follow-up was inadequate in each survey, no significant survival differences were observed (p = 0.36), and rates of late Grade 3 or higher toxicity were significantly different (p = 0.016). Conclusions: The Japanese PCS has monitored consistent improvements over the past 10 years in the application of chemotherapy, timing of chemotherapy, and EBRT methods. However, there is still room for improvement, especially in the clinical practice of ICBT.

Tomita, Natsuo, E-mail: ntomita@aichi-cc.jp [Department of Radiation Oncology, Aichi Cancer Center Hospital, Nagoya (Japan)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Aichi Cancer Center Hospital, Nagoya (Japan); Toita, Takafumi [Department of Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Science, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa (Japan)] [Department of Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Science, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa (Japan); Kodaira, Takeshi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Aichi Cancer Center Hospital, Nagoya (Japan)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Aichi Cancer Center Hospital, Nagoya (Japan); Shinoda, Atsunori [Department of Radiology, Shinshu University School of Medicine, Matsumoto (Japan)] [Department of Radiology, Shinshu University School of Medicine, Matsumoto (Japan); Uno, Takashi [Department of Radiology, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, Chiba (Japan)] [Department of Radiology, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, Chiba (Japan); Numasaki, Hodaka; Teshima, Teruki [Department of Medical Physics and Engineering, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, Suita (Japan)] [Department of Medical Physics and Engineering, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, Suita (Japan); Mitsumori, Michihide [Department of Radiation Oncology and Image-applied Therapy, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan)] [Department of Radiation Oncology and Image-applied Therapy, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan)

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Process Deviation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 Exercise Course Implementation 10_0630 Page 1 of 8 1 Exercise Course Implementation 10_0630 Page 1 of 8 EOTA - Business Process Document Title: Exercise Course Implementation Document Number: ISDP-011 Rev. 10_0630 Document Owner: Elizabeth Sousa Backup Owner: Melissa Otero Approver(s): Melissa Otero Parent Document: ISDP-002, Training Production Process Notify of Changes: ISD, ITT, MGT Referenced Document(s): ISDF-004 Design Document, ISDF-006 WBT Script Template, ISDF-007 Lesson Plan Template, ISDP-012, ILT Course Implementation, ISDF-008 ILT Student Feedback Survey, ISDF-010 After Action Report ISDP-011 Exercise Course Implementation 10_0630 Page 2 of 8 Revision History: Rev. Description of Change 10_0630 Initial Release ISDP-011 Exercise Course Implementation 10_0630 Page 3 of 8

413

Business Process Improvement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Changes in energy markets are bringing with them increased levels of accountability ... comÕ s pay- ment processes and their favorite hotel chainÕ ...

2012-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

414

DECOVALEX-THMC Task D: Long-Term Permeability/Porosity Changes inthe EDZ and Near Field due to THM and THC Processes in Volcanic andCrystaline-Bentonite Systems, Status Report October 2005  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The DECOVALEX project is an international cooperativeproject initiated by SKI, the Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate, withparticipation of about 10 international organizations. The name DECOVALEXstands for DEvelopment of COupled models and their VALidation againstExperiments. The general goal of this project is to encouragemultidisciplinary interactive and cooperative research on modelingcoupled processes in geologic formations in support of the performanceassessment for underground storage of radioactive waste. Three multi-yearproject stages of DECOVALEX have been completed in the past decade,mainly focusing on coupled thermal-hydrological-mechanicalprocesses.Currently, a fourth three-year project stage of DECOVALEX isunder way, referred to as DECOVALEX-THMC. THMC stands for Thermal,Hydrological, Mechanical, and Chemical processes. The new project stageaims at expanding the traditional geomechanical scope of the previousDECOVALEX project stages by incorporating geochemical processes importantfor repository performance. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) leadsTask D of the new DECOVALEX phase, entitled "Long-termPermeability/Porosity Changes in the EDZ and Near Field due to THC andTHM Processes for Volcanic and Crystalline-Bentonite Systems." In itsleadership role for Task D, DOE coordinates and sets the direction forthe cooperative research activities of the international research teamsengaged in Task D.

Birkholzer, J.; Rutqvist, J.; Sonnenthal, E.; Barr, D.

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Estimating frequency of change  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many online data sources are updated autonomously and independently. In this article, we make the case for estimating the change frequency of data to improve Web crawlers, Web caches and to help data mining. We first identify various scenarios, where ... Keywords: Change frequency estimation, Poisson process

Junghoo Cho; Hector Garcia-Molina

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

EC/UNDP Climate Change Capacity Building Program | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

EC/UNDP Climate Change Capacity Building Program EC/UNDP Climate Change Capacity Building Program Jump to: navigation, search Name UNDP/EC Climate Change Capacity Building Program Agency/Company /Organization The European Union (EU), United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) Partner Multiple Ministries Sector Climate Focus Area Renewable Energy, Agriculture, Biomass, Buildings, Energy Efficiency, Forestry, Geothermal, Greenhouse Gas, Industry, Land Use, Offsets and Certificates, People and Policy, Solar, Transportation, Water Power, Wind Topics Background analysis, Baseline projection, Co-benefits assessment, - Energy Access, - Environmental and Biodiversity, GHG inventory, Implementation, -Roadmap, -TNA, Policies/deployment programs, Resource assessment Website http://www.lowemissiondevelopm

417

Costa Rica-EU-UNDP Climate Change Capacity Building Program | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Costa Rica-EU-UNDP Climate Change Capacity Building Program Costa Rica-EU-UNDP Climate Change Capacity Building Program Jump to: navigation, search Name Costa Rica-EU-UNDP Climate Change Capacity Building Program Agency/Company /Organization The European Union (EU), United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) Partner Multiple Ministries Sector Climate, Energy Focus Area Renewable Energy, Agriculture, Biomass, Buildings, Energy Efficiency, Forestry, Geothermal, Greenhouse Gas, Industry, Land Use, Offsets and Certificates, People and Policy, Solar, Transportation, Water Power, Wind Topics Background analysis, Baseline projection, Co-benefits assessment, - Energy Access, - Environmental and Biodiversity, GHG inventory, Implementation, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, -NAMA, -Roadmap, -TNA, Policies/deployment programs, Resource assessment

418

Ecosystem processes, biodiversity and climate change  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Nature) · Gas regulation · Climate regulation · Disturbance regulation · Water regulation · Water supply) · Gas regulation · Climate regulation · Disturbance regulation · Water regulation · Water supplyEvolution of fully modern humans in Africa Beginning of agriculture Sources: Petit et al. (1999) Nature 399, 429

419

ARM - Baseline Change Request Guidelines  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DocumentsBaseline Change Request Guidelines DocumentsBaseline Change Request Guidelines Page Contents Introduction Submit a BCR BCR Process Flowchart Baseline Change Request Guidelines Introduction Baseline Change Requests (BCR) are used by the ARM Infrastructure as a process to provide configuration control and for formally requesting and documenting changes within the ARM Infrastructure. Configuration Control: BCRs are required for changes to instruments, data systems, data processes, datastreams, measurement methods, and facilities. They help ensure that all aspects of the ARM Infrastructure are consulted prior to implementing changes. Seemingly minor changes can have significant repercussions throughout the Facility and therefore, NO change to an operational instrument, computer, facility, or other system can or will be

420

Continuous Change Institutional Change Principle | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Continuous Change Institutional Change Principle Continuous Change Institutional Change Principle Continuous Change Institutional Change Principle October 8, 2013 - 11:13am Addthis Because it takes time to establish institutional change, Federal agencies need multiyear plans that continuously work to achieve, reinforce, and improve significant and persistent sustainability goals. Sustainability efforts ultimately may fail unless organizational change becomes "the way we do business." This principle is in line with organization research showing that institutional change is a multiyear process. Methods Institutional change is a long process that requires patience and persistence. For instance, the trial period for a new behavior must be long enough to allow people to form new habits. The key is to think long-term

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land-use change processes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Vegetation Change Analysis User's Manual  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Approximately 70 percent of all U.S. military training lands are located in arid and semi-arid areas. Training activities in such areas frequently adversely affect vegetation, damaging plants and reducing the resilience of vegetation to recover once disturbed. Fugitive dust resulting from a loss of vegetation creates additional problems for human health, increasing accidents due to decreased visibility, and increasing maintenance costs for roads, vehicles, and equipment. Diagnostic techniques are needed to identify thresholds of sustainable military use. A cooperative effort among U.S. Department of Energy, U.S. Department of Defense, and selected university scientists was undertaken to focus on developing new techniques for monitoring and mitigating military impacts in arid lands. This manual focuses on the development of new monitoring techniques that have been implemented at Fort Irwin, California. New mitigation techniques are described in a separate companion manual. This User's Manual is designed to address diagnostic capabilities needed to distinguish between various degrees of sustainable and nonsustainable impacts due to military training and testing and habitat-disturbing activities in desert ecosystems. Techniques described here focus on the use of high-resolution imagery and the application of image-processing techniques developed primarily for medical research. A discussion is provided about the measurement of plant biomass and shrub canopy cover in arid. lands using conventional methods. Both semiquantitative methods and quantitative methods are discussed and reference to current literature is provided. A background about the use of digital imagery to measure vegetation is presented.

D. J. Hansen; W. K. Ostler

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Investigating impacts of natural and human-induced environmental changes on hydrological processes and flood hazards using a GIS-based hydrological/hydraulic model and remote sensing data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Natural and human-induced environmental changes have been altering the earth's surface and hydrological processes, and thus directly contribute to the severity of flood hazards. To understand these changes and their impacts, this research developed a GISbased hydrological and hydraulic modeling system, which incorporates state-of-the-art remote sensing data to simulate flood under various scenarios. The conceptual framework and technical issues of incorporating multi-scale remote sensing data have been addressed. This research develops an object-oriented hydrological modeling framework. Compared with traditional lumped or cell-based distributed hydrological modeling frameworks, the object-oriented framework allows basic spatial hydrologic units to have various size and irregular shape. This framework is capable of assimilating various GIS and remotely-sensed data with different spatial resolutions. It ensures the computational efficiency, while preserving sufficient spatial details of input data and model outputs. Sensitivity analysis and comparison of high resolution LIDAR DEM with traditional USGS 30m resolution DEM suggests that the use of LIDAR DEMs can greatly reduce uncertainty in calibration of flow parameters in the hydrologic model and hence increase the reliability of modeling results. In addition, subtle topographic features and hydrologic objects like surface depressions and detention basins can be extracted from the high resolution LiDAR DEMs. An innovative algorithm has been developed to efficiently delineate surface depressions and detention basins from LiDAR DEMs. Using a time series of Landsat images, a retrospective analysis of surface imperviousness has been conducted to assess the hydrologic impact of urbanization. The analysis reveals that with rapid urbanization the impervious surface has been increased from 10.1% to 38.4% for the case study area during 1974 - 2002. As a result, the peak flow for a 100-year flood event has increased by 20% and the floodplain extent has expanded by about 21.6%. The quantitative analysis suggests that the large regional detentions basins have effectively offset the adverse effect of increased impervious surface during the urbanization process. Based on the simulation and scenario analyses of land subsidence and potential climate changes, some planning measures and policy implications have been derived for guiding smart urban growth and sustainable resource development and management to minimize flood hazards.

Wang, Lei

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

DECOVALEX-THMC Task D: Long-Term Permeability/Porosity Changes in the EDZ and Near Field due to THM and THC Processes in Volcanic and Crystaline-Bentonite Systems, Status Report October 2005  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Although convective heat transfer processes are importantmain processes considered in Task D are heat transfer, fluidmain processes considered in Task D are heat transfer, fluid

Birkholzer, J.; Rutqvist, J.; Sonnenthal, E.; Barr, D.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Change Log  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Change Log Change Log Change Log NERSC-8 / Trinity Benchmarks Change Log 09/03/2013 Correction applied to MiniDFT web-page (to remove inconsistency with MiniDFT README). Capability Improvement measurements do not require 10,000 MPI ranks per k-point. 08/06/2013 Various pages have changed to remove "draft" status 08/02/2013 Correction added to FLOP Counts for "Small" Single-Node Miniapplication Tests page 07/12/2013 README files updated for IOR benchmark to correct an error in wording (no code changes); README file updated for osu-micro-benchmarks (OMB) changing the tests required and conditions including reinserting some tests that had been deleted earlier 07/05/2013 README updated for mpimemu benchmark; Revised version of benchmark results spreadsheet (linked on SSP web page);

425

Forest Conservation and Restoration as a Response to Climate Change  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Conservation and Conservation and Restoration as a Response to Climate change National Energy Technology Laboratory May 14, 2001 Forest Conservation and Restoration as a Response to Climate change National Energy Technology Laboratory May 14, 2001 Today's presentation * Nature Conservancy background * Land Use and Climate Change * Project Experience * Key Issues and Research Needs The mission of The Nature Conservancy is to preserve plants, animals and natural communities that represent the diversity of life on Earth by protecting the lands and waters they need to survive. Conservancy Background * Largest private conservation organization * Founded in 1951 * Conserved more than 12 million acres in U.S., and millions more in Latin America, the Caribbean, and Asia/Pacific * 1.2 million members

426

Skill Set Training Process  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MGTP-002 Skill Set/Training Process 11_0502 Page 1 of 7 MGTP-002 Skill Set/Training Process 11_0502 Page 1 of 7 EOTA - Business Process Document Title: Skill Set/Training Process Document Number: MGTP-002 Rev. 11_0502 Document Owner: Elizabeth Sousa Backup Owner: Melissa Otero Approver(s): Melissa Otero Parent Document: Q-001, Quality Manual Notify of Changes: EOTA Employees Referenced Documents: MGTF-002 Skill Set Model, MGTF-003 Training Review/Record, MGTF-004 New Employee Checklist, MGTF-005 Departing Employee Checklist, MGTF-006 Position Descriptions MGTP-002 Skill Set/Training Process 11_0502 Page 2 of 7 Revision History: Rev. Description of Change A Initial revision B Made minor, non-content editorial changes based on internal audit results 08_0805 Minor, non-content editorial changes based on internal audit results

427

Barriers to use of geospatial data for adaptation to climate change and variability: case studies in public health  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. This paper presents two case studies of the barriers to the use of geospatial data in the context of public health adaptation to climate change and variability. The first case study is on the hazards of coastal zone development in the United States with the main emphasis on Hurricane Katrina. An important barrier to the use of geospatial data is that the legal system does not support restrictions on land use intended to protect the coastal zone. Economic interests to develop New Orleans and the Mississippi River, both over the long term and the short term, had the effect of increasing the impact of the hurricane. The second case study is epidemics of climate-sensitive diseases with the main emphasis on malaria in Africa. Limits to model accuracy may present a problem in using climate data for an early warning system, and some geographic locations are likely to be more suitable than others. Costs of the system, including the costs of errors, may also inhibit implementation. Deriving societal benefits from geospatial data requires an understanding of the particular decision contexts and organizational processes in which knowledge is developed and used. The data by themselves will not usually generate a societal response. Scientists working in applications should develop partnerships to address the use of geospatial data for societal benefit.

Joan L. Aron

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Process Deviation Log  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Process Deviation Log 09_0730 Process Deviation Log 09_0730 EOTA - Business Form Document Title: P-010, Process Deviation Process Document Number: Process Deviation Log EOTA Employees Melissa Otero N/A Referenced Documents: Parent Document: F-014 Rev. 11_0316 Approvers: Melissa Otero Document Owner: Elizabeth Sousa Backup Owner: Notify of Changes: A 09_0730 11_0316 Revision History: Rev. Description of Change Intitial Release. Revised log to reflect date/date range that PD is in effect. Removed drop-down menu items. Added ECD, Extension Date and Closed Column. F-014 Process Deviation Log 09_0730 Process Deviation # Date Requestor Departme nt Process # Has PD Occurred ? (Y/N) CAR/PAR # Distributio n Date Estimated Closure Date Extension Date Closed Date Comment PD-001 PD-002 PD-003 PD-004 PD-005 PD-006 PD-007 PD-008 PD-009

429

Nonconforming Material Process  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

11 Nonconforming Material / Product Process 11_0304 Page 1 of 6 11 Nonconforming Material / Product Process 11_0304 Page 1 of 6 EOTA - Business Process Document Title: Nonconforming Material / Product Process Document Number: P-011 Rev. 11_0304 Document Owner: Elizabeth Sousa Backup Owner: Melissa Otero Approver(s): Melissa Otero Parent Document: Q-001, Quality Manual Notify of Changes: EOTA Employees Referenced Document(s): F-015 Nonconformance Report, REG-003 Record Register, ISDP-002 Training Production Process P-011 Nonconforming Material / Product Process 11_0304 Page 2 of 6 Revision History: Rev. Description of Change A Initial Release 08_0416 Added verbiage CAR/PAR/IO to Step 2 P-011 Nonconforming Material / Product Process 11_0304 Page 3 of 6 I. Purpose To establish the process for nonconforming material to be identified, segregated and dispositioned to prevent its unintended

430

Coordination studies with PNNL's global change assessment model: integrated science modeling and applications to the human dimensions. Final technical report for period October 1996 - March 2000  

SciTech Connect

This report outlines the progress on the development and application of Integrated Science Assessment Model (ISAM) supported by the DOE Program on Health and Environmental Research: Environmental Sciences Program under Grant No. DOE DFGO2-96ER62284. As part of this research proposal, we designed the model that better represent spatial variations and treat the process relevant towards evaluating the biogeochemical cycles important to determining atmospheric composition and resulting climatic effects at the regional scale. The process level understanding of regional impacts into the Integrated Assessment (IA) model will help to improve the understanding of climate change impacts and extend the range of issues, which can be addressed in an IA framework. On the application front, the newly developed model has been applied to a selected set of studies to address policy related questions on climate change, in particular, the role of forestry, and land-use for historical greenhouse gas emissions; projections of future methane emissions; a research study related to energy implications of future stabilization of atmospheric CO{sub 2} content; and radiative forcing and estimation of a number of important greenhouse gases. In the following, the significant findings from the DOE supported study are outlined.

Wuebbles, Donald J.; Jain Atul

2000-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

431

Solar access protection, energy policy and the zoning process  

SciTech Connect

It is suggested that existing zoning structures can be easily adapted to the role of solar access protection. The modification of conventional zoning, accomplished with newer land-use concepts, such as transferable development rights, will help to overcome its inherent weaknesses of lack of flexibility and potential inequity. When state and federal energy policies are considered in their proper perspective by zoning agencies, existing zoning structures can be implemented in a way that avoids any barriers to solar collector installations. In this way, the zoning process will be an extremely valuable aid to the encouragement, promotion, and protection of solar power installations, contributing directly toward the conservation of energy resources

Hirsen, J.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Lei Chang  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ph.D. in Theoretical Physics, Peking University, Beijing, China. Selected Recent Articles Phase diagram and critical endpoint for strongly-interacting quarks Si-xue Qin, Lei Chang,...

433

2013Chang  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE March 12, 2013 AOCS Announces 2013 Stephen S. Change Award Recipient AOCS is proud to announce that Alejandro G. Marangoni, Professor and Tier I Canada Research Chair Food, Health and Agin

434

Document Control Process  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 Document Control Process 11_0304 Page 1 of 7 1 Document Control Process 11_0304 Page 1 of 7 EOTA - Business Process Document Title: Document Control Process Document Number: P-001 Rev 11_0304 Document Owner: Elizabeth Sousa Backup Owner: Melissa Otero Approver(s): Melissa Otero Parent Document: Q-001, Quality Manual Notify of Changes: EOTA Employees Referenced Document(s): F-001 Document Control Template - Process, F-002 Document Control Template - Instruction, F-003 Document Control Template - Screenshot, F-004 Document Control Template - Form, F-005 Document Control Template - Form - Excel, MGTP-002 Skill Set Model, Q-003 EOTA Processes: Sequence and Interaction, P-003, Control of Records P-001 Document Control Process 11_0304 Page 2 of 7 Revision History: Rev. Description of Change

435

Supplier Selection Management Process  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ADMP-002 Vendor Selection and Management Process 11_0203 1 of 9 ADMP-002 Vendor Selection and Management Process 11_0203 1 of 9 EOTA - Business Process Document Title: Vendor Selection and Management Process Document Number: ADMP-002 Rev. 11_0203 Document Owner: Elizabeth Sousa Backup Owner: Melissa Otero Approver(s): Melissa Otero Parent Document: Q-001, Quality Manual Notify of Changes: EOTA Employees Referenced Document(s): ADMF-009 Vendor Audit Plan, ADMF-010 Vendor Audit Checklist, ADMF-011 Vendor Audit Report, ADMF-015 Vendor Evaluation Record, ADMP-001 Procurement Process, ADMF-016 EOTA Vendor List, REG-003 Record Register ADMP-002 Vendor Selection and Management Process 11_0203 2 of 9 Revision History: Rev. Description of Change A Initial Release 08_1110 Added verbiage and reference for ADMF-016, EOTA Vendor List to process.

436

Assessing Impacts of Climate Change on Forests: The State of Biological Modeling  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

Models that address the impacts to forests of climate change are reviewed by four levels of biological organization: global, regional or landscape, community, and tree. The models are compared as to their ability to assess changes in greenhouse gas flux, land use, maps of forest type or species composition, forest resource productivity, forest health, biodiversity, and wildlife habitat. No one model can address all of these impacts, but landscape transition models and regional vegetation and land-use models consider the largest number of impacts. Developing landscape vegetation dynamics models of functional groups is suggested as a means to integrate the theory of both landscape ecology and individual tree responses to climate change. Risk assessment methodologies can be adapted to deal with the impacts of climate change at various spatial and temporal scales. Four areas of research development are identified: (1) linking socioeconomic and ecologic models, (2) interfacing forest models at different scales, (3) obtaining data on susceptibility of trees and forest to changes in climate and disturbance regimes, and (4) relating information from different scales.

Dale, V. H.; Rauscher, H. M.

1993-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

437

Assessing impacts of climate change on forests: The state of biological modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Models that address the impacts to forests of climate change are reviewed by four levels of biological organization: global, regional or landscape, community, and tree. The models are compared as to their ability to assess changes in greenhouse gas flux, land use, maps of forest type or species composition, forest resource productivity, forest health, biodiversity, and wildlife habitat. No one model can address all of these impacts, but landscape transition models and regional vegetation and land-use models consider the largest number of impacts. Developing landscape vegetation dynamics models of functional groups is suggested as a means to integrate the theory of both landscape ecology and individual tree responses to climate change. Risk assessment methodologies can be adapted to deal with the impacts of climate change at various spatial and temporal scales. Four areas of research development are identified: (1) linking socioeconomic and ecologic models, (2) interfacing forest models at different scales, (3) obtaining data on susceptibility of trees and forest to changes in climate and disturbance regimes, and (4) relating information from different scales.

Dale, V.H. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Rauscher, H.M. [Forest Service, Grand Rapids, MI (United States). North Central Forest Experiment Station

1993-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

438

Process Deviation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8 WBT Course Development Process 110512 Page 1 of 7 EOTA - Business Process Document Title: WBT Course Development Process Document Number: ISDP- 018 Rev. 110512 Document Owner:...

439

Process Deviation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 WBT Programming Process 110426 Page 1 of 5 EOTA - Business Process Document Title: WBT Programming Process Document Number: ITTP-016 Rev. 110426 Document Owner: Doug Bond...

440

Process Deviation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 ILT Course Development Process 110512 Page 1 of 7 EOTA - Business Process Document Title: ILT Course Development Process Document Number: ISDP-016 Rev. 110512 Document Owner:...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land-use change processes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Process Deviation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 NetworkTechnical Support Process 110406 Page 1 of 5 EOTA - Business Process Document Title: NetworkTechnical Support Process Document Number: ITTP-014 Rev. 110406 Document...

442

Process Deviation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 Training Production Process Overview 110620 1 of 6 EOTA - Business Process Document Title: Training Production Process Document Number: ISDP-002 Rev. 110620 Document Owner:...

443

Role of Biochar in Mitigation of Climate Change  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

By virtue of the large fraction of the terrestrial carbon (C) cycle controlled by human activities, agroecosystems are both sources and sinks for greenhouse gases. Their potential role in mitigation of climate change thus depends on a dual strategy of decreasing greenhouse gas emissions while increasing sinks so that the net impact on climate warming is less than at present. Emissions of carbon dioxide, methane and nitrous oxide arise from various agricultural activities, ranging from land clearing to ploughing, fertilization, and animal husbandry. Reductions in these emissions can be achieved by decreasing the heterotrophic conversion of organic C to carbon dioxide, and by better management of agricultural waste streams to minimize release of methane and nitrous oxide. Current sinks include C stored in standing biomass and soil organic matter, and the oxidation of atmospheric methane by soil bacteria. These sinks can be enhanced by increasing net primary productivity, thereby actively withdrawing more carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, and by promoting more oxidation of methane by soils. Judicious biochar management may contribute to both strategies, reductions of emissions by agriculture and active withdrawal of atmospheric carbon dioxide, as part of a comprehensive scheme in agricultural and forestry watersheds. Biochar is a carbon-rich organic material generated by heating biomass in the absence, or under a limited supply, of oxygen. This so-called charring or pyrolysis process has been used to produce charcoal as a source of fuel for millennia. Recently, interest has grown in understanding the potential of this process to improve soil health by adding biochar as an amendment to soil, to manage agricultural and forestry wastes, to generate energy, to decrease net emissions of nitrous oxide and methane, and to store carbon (C). The main incentive of biochar systems for mitigation of climate change is to increase the stability of organic matter or biomass. This stability is achieved by the conversion of fresh organic materials, which mineralize comparatively quickly, into biochar, which mineralizes much more slowly. The difference between the mineralization of uncharred and charred material results in a greater amount of carbon storage in soils and a lower amount of carbon dioxide, the major greenhouse gas, in the atmosphere. The principle of creating and managing biochar systems may address multiple environmental constraints. Biochar may help not only in mitigating climate change, but also fulfill a role in management of agricultural and forestry wastes, enhancement of soil sustainability, and generation of energy. Pyrolysis is a comparatively low-technology intervention. Deployment on a global scale, however, must be done carefully if the full mitigation potential is to be reached. Critical aspects of a successful implementation are that: 1) the biochar is sufficiently stable to reduce greenhouse gases in the atmosphere for an appropriate length of time. 2) the storage of carbon as biochar in soil is not offset by greenhouse gas emissions along the value chain of the system, such as mineralization of soil carbon or emissions of other greenhouse gases (e.g., methane and nitrous oxide). 3) net emission reductions are achieved for the entire life cycle of the system including indirect land use. 4) the biochar product does not cause unwanted side effects in soil. 5) the handling and production of biochar are in compliance with health and safety standards and do not pose hurdles to implementation. and 6) the biochar system is financially viable. This chapter discusses these issues in separate sections, identifies knowledge gaps, and proposes a road map to fully evaluate an environmentally and socially safe exploration of the biochar potential to mitigate climate change if adopted widely around the world.

Lehmann, Johannes C.; Amonette, James E.; Roberts, Kelli G.

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

444

Process / CI Form  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 Process / Continual Improvement Form 11_0119 Page 1 of 3 6 Process / Continual Improvement Form 11_0119 Page 1 of 3 EOTA - Business Form Document Title: Process / Continual Improvement Form Document Number: F-016 Rev 11_0119 Document Owner: Elizabeth Sousa Backup Owner: David Rocha Approver(s): Melissa Otero Parent Document: P-012, Process / Continual Improvement Notify of Changes: EOTA Employees Referenced Document(s): N/A F-016 Process / Continual Improvement Form 11_0119 Page 2 of 3 Revision History: Rev. Description of Change A Initial Release 08_0425 Corrected minor problems and updated revision number. 11_0119 Merged F-019 Improvement Opportunity Planning Worksheet into this document F-016 Process / Continual Improvement Form 11_0119 Page 3 of 3

445

EU-UNDP Climate Change Capacity Building Program | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Building Program Building Program Jump to: navigation, search Name UNDP/EC Climate Change Capacity Building Program Agency/Company /Organization The European Union (EU), United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) Partner Multiple Ministries Sector Climate, Energy Focus Area Renewable Energy, Agriculture, Biomass, Buildings, Energy Efficiency, Forestry, Geothermal, Greenhouse Gas, Industry, Land Use, Offsets and Certificates, People and Policy, Solar, Transportation, Water Power, Wind Topics Background analysis, Baseline projection, Co-benefits assessment, - Energy Access, - Environmental and Biodiversity, GHG inventory, Implementation, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, -NAMA, -Roadmap, -TNA, Policies/deployment programs, Resource assessment Website http://www.lowemissiondevelopm

446

Proposal Process  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Proposal Process R&D Overview 100G Testbed Testbed Description Testbed Results Current Testbed Research Proposal Process Terms and Conditions Virtual Circuits (OSCARS) Performance...

447

Processing Division  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advances the processing knowledge and managerial skills by providing a forum of technical information and networking opportunities. Processing Division Divisions achievement agricultural analytical application award awards biotechnology detergents

448

EIS Process  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Process The EIS Process The two Conversion Facility EISs have been prepared pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969, Council on Environmental Quality NEPA...

449

LIFE CYCLE ASSET MANAGEMENT Good Practice Guide GPG-FM-024 Site-Selection Process  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

LIFE LIFE CYCLE ASSET MANAGEMENT Good Practice Guide GPG-FM-024 Site-Selection Process March 1996 Department of Energy Office of Field Management Office of Project and Fixed Asset Management This page intentionally left blank. Contents GPG-FM-024 March 1996 iii 1. INTRODUCTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 1.1 Purpose . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 1.2 Site Selection, NEPA, and Comprehensive Land-Use Planning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 2. PRINCIPLES AND PROCESSES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 2.1 Formal (Program Directed or Competed) Site Selection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 2.1.1 The Site-Selection Official . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 2.1.2 Site-Selection Team . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 2.1.3 Determining Task Scope

450

Programmatic environmental assessment of the DOE Solar Agricultural and Industrial Process Heat Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The program's potential environmental impacts are evaluated to ensure that environmental issues are considered at the earliest meaningful point in the decision-making process. The existing environment is studied for the following: grain drying; crop drying; livestock shelter heating; food processing; textile products; lumber and wood products; paper products; chemicals; petroleum refining; stone, clay, and glass products; and primary metals industries. Environmental impacts of the proposed action on the following are studied: air quality, water quality, ecosystems, health and safety, land use, esthetics, and social and institutional impacts. (MHR)

Not Available

1979-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Climatic Change  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration has been proposed as a key component in technological portfolios for managing anthropogenic climate change, since it may provide a faster and cheaper route to significant reductions in atmospheric CO2 concentrations than abating CO2 production. However, CO2 sequestration is not a perfect substitute for CO2 abatement because CO2 may leak back into the atmosphere (thus imposing future climate change impacts) and because CO2 sequestration requires energy (thus producing more CO2 and depleting fossil fuel resources earlier). Here we use analytical and numerical models to assess the economic efficiency of CO2 sequestration and analyze the optimal timing and extent of CO2 sequestration. The economic efficiency factor of CO2 sequestration can be expressed as the ratio of the marginal net benefits of sequestering CO2 and avoiding CO2 emissions. We derive an analytical solution for this efficiency factor for a simplified case in which we account for CO2 leakage, discounting, the additional fossil fuel requirement of CO2 sequestration, and the growth rate of carbon taxes. In this analytical model, the economic efficiency of CO2 sequestration decreases as the CO2 tax growth rate, leakage rates and energy requirements for CO2 sequestration increase.

Klaus Keller; David Mcinerney; David F. Bradford

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Peru-Planning for Climate Change (PlanCC) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Peru-Planning for Climate Change (PlanCC) Peru-Planning for Climate Change (PlanCC) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Planning for Climate Change (PlanCC) Peru Name Planning for Climate Change (PlanCC) Peru Agency/Company /Organization HELVETAS Swiss Intercooperation, Libélula Consulting Company of Peru Partner Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN), The Children's Investment Fund Foundation (CIFF), Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation (SDC), Ministry of Planning, Ministry of Finance, Ministry of Environment Sector Climate, Energy, Land, Water Focus Area Renewable Energy, Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Economic Development, Forestry, Greenhouse Gas, Industry, Land Use, People and Policy, Transportation, Water Conservation, Water Power Topics Adaptation, Background analysis, Baseline projection, Co-benefits assessment, - Energy Access, - Environmental and Biodiversity, - Macroeconomic, GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, Pathways analysis, Policies/deployment programs

453

Planning for Climate Change (PlanCC) Peru | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Change (PlanCC) Peru Change (PlanCC) Peru Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Planning for Climate Change (PlanCC) Peru Name Planning for Climate Change (PlanCC) Peru Agency/Company /Organization HELVETAS Swiss Intercooperation, Libélula Consulting Company of Peru Partner Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN), The Children's Investment Fund Foundation (CIFF), Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation (SDC), Ministry of Planning, Ministry of Finance, Ministry of Environment Sector Climate, Energy, Land, Water Focus Area Renewable Energy, Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Economic Development, Forestry, Greenhouse Gas, Industry, Land Use, People and Policy, Transportation, Water Conservation, Water Power Topics Adaptation, Background analysis, Baseline projection, Co-benefits assessment, - Energy Access, - Environmental and Biodiversity, - Macroeconomic, GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, Pathways analysis, Policies/deployment programs

454

An approach for managing web services changes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The dynamic environment where organisations and providers live imposes a gradually evolving of their services to meet new needs, technological changes and requirements of these users. Therefore, the evolution of web services becomes necessary because ... Keywords: adaptation rules, behaviour evolution, change management, change operators, change process, web services

Maamar Khater; Mimoun Malki

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

PROCESS AGENDA:  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Global Change, University of Maryland. He was technical director of the Geothermal Heat Pump Consortium. He is active in ...

2012-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

456

Change-Point Detection in Meteorological Measurement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Statistical methods of change-point detection can be useful for discovering inhomogeneities in precipitation, air pressure, or temperature time series caused by a change in the measurement process such as a relocation of a gauge. The method is ...

Daniela Jarušková

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Changing climate  

SciTech Connect

This article reviews a book written by a committee of the National Research Council. The book discussed the Greenhouse Effect which is a warming of the earth's atmosphere caused by the doubling of the atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration. The excess carbon dioxide is pollution derived from the burning of fossil fuels. The report suggested that the warming of the atmosphere would cause thawing of the polar regions which in turn would cause a rise in sea levels and flooding of the coastal lowlands. In addition to the flooding, the report predicted climate changes that would effect the productivity of croplands in the west. The authors of the report stressed that there was no way to avoid this warming of the earth. They suggested that people should start preparing for the inevitable.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Change: Connections to Adult Learning and Education  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Phrases such as “change is inevitable, ” “change is constant, ” and “the only thing certain is change itself ” are commonly heard when commiserating about the pace of modern life. As described in the fable Who Moved My Cheese? (Johnson 1998), humans have varying reactions to change: some welcome it, others tolerate it, but many dread it. The main idea underlying Johnson’s book—that change is inevitable so we must learn to accept it—delivers a naive and simplistic message about a complex process. Many perspectives exist about change, but a common theme throughout the literature is that it is a process that involves learning (Macduff 1993). The question of how adult learning and education can cultivate change with individuals and groups is explored in this Digest. Following a discussion of the change process, it examines the connection between change and adult education and adult learning, and it concludes with some suggestions for adult educators involved in the

Susan Imel; Eric D Igest

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Hydrocarbon Processing`s refining processes `96  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper compiles information on the following refining processes: alkylation, benzene reduction, benzene saturation, catalytic cracking, catalytic reforming, coking, crude distillation, deasphalting, deep catalytic cracking, electrical desalting, ethers, fluid catalytic cracking, hydrocracking, hydrogenation, hydrotreating, isomerization, resid catalytic cracking, treating, and visbreaking. The application, products, a description of the process, yield, economics, installation, and licensor are given for each entry.

NONE

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Climate Change Simulations with CCSM and CESM Project at NERSC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Climate Change Simulations with CCSM & CESM Climate Change Simulations with CCSM & CESM Key Challenges: Perform fundamental research on the processes that influence the natural...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land-use change processes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Democratic Republic of Congo-EU-UNDP Climate Change Capacity Building  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Democratic Republic of Congo-EU-UNDP Climate Change Capacity Building Democratic Republic of Congo-EU-UNDP Climate Change Capacity Building Program Jump to: navigation, search Name Democratic Republic of Congo-EU-UNDP Climate Change Capacity Building Program Agency/Company /Organization The European Union (EU), United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) Partner Multiple Ministries Sector Climate, Energy Focus Area Renewable Energy, Agriculture, Biomass, Buildings, Energy Efficiency, Forestry, Geothermal, Greenhouse Gas, Industry, Land Use, Offsets and Certificates, People and Policy, Solar, Transportation, Water Power, Wind Topics Background analysis, Baseline projection, Co-benefits assessment, - Energy Access, - Environmental and Biodiversity, GHG inventory, Implementation, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, -NAMA, -Roadmap, -TNA, Policies/deployment programs, Resource assessment

462

Chang-F-L  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Effect of Droplet Size Distribution on the Effect of Droplet Size Distribution on the Determination of Cloud Droplet Effective Radius F.-L. Chang and Z. Li ESSIC/Department of Meteorology University of Maryland College Park, Maryland F.-L. Chang Canada Centre for Remote Sensing Ottawa, Ontario, Canada Introduction Cloud microphysical processes can provide links between cloud radiative effect and hydrological cycle and create several feedback mechanisms linking clouds and climate. For instance, the aerosols can affect the climate through their indirect effect on clouds, which modifies cloud microphysical properties and hence cloud radiative properties, proving an increase in cloud albedo and a net radiative cooling (Twomey et al. 1984; Charlson et al. 1992). The key microphysical parameters affecting both radiation

463

Document Control Template-Process  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1_ADocument Control Template - Process.doc Page 1 of 7 1_ADocument Control Template - Process.doc Page 1 of 7 EOTA - Business Process Document Title: Document Control Template - Process Document Number: F-001 Rev. A Document Owner: Elizabeth Sousa Backup Owner: Melissa Otero Approver(s): Melissa Otero Parent Document: P-001, Document Control Process Notify of Changes: EOTA Employees Referenced Document(s): N/A F-001_ADocument Control Template - Process.doc Page 2 of 7 Revision History: Rev. Description of Change A Initial Release B C D E F-001_ADocument Control Template - Process.doc Page 3 of 7 EOTA - Business Process Document Title: DocTitle Document Number: P-DocID# Rev Document Owner: Elizabeth Sousa Backup Owner: David McKay Approver(s): Dennis Murphy Parent Document:

464

Research and development of methods and tools for achieving and maintaining consensus processes in the face of change within and among government oversight agencies. Progress report, October 1, 1992--March 31, 1994, Volume I  

SciTech Connect

This progress report summarizes our research activities under our consensus grant. In year five, we devoted much of our activities to completing fundamental research projects delayed because of the considerably stepped-up effort in consensus processes efforts during development of DOE`s Five Year Waste Plan (FYWP). Following our work on various procedures for bringing together groups such as the State and Tribal Government Working Group and the Stakeholders` Forum (both of which provide input to the Five Year Waste Plan), we compiled a literature overview of small-group consensus gaining and a handbook for consensus decision making. We also tested the effectiveness Of group decision support software, and designed a structured observation process and its related hard- and software. We completed studies on experts and the role of personality characteristics in consensus group influence. Results of these studies are included in this final report. In consensus processes research, we were unable to continue studying consensus groups in action. However, we did study ways to improve ways to improve DOE`s technological information exchange effectiveness. We also studied how a new administration identifies what its strategic mission is and how it gets support from existing EM managers. We identified selection criteria for locating the EM exhibit, and tested our audience selection model. We also further calibrated our consensus measure. Additional conference papers and papers for journal submission were completed during year five.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

aluminum processing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Refining of Potroom Metal Using the Hydro Ram Crucible Fluxing Process [pp. .... Approachgeneration of Aluminum Wrought Alloy Scrap of Old Cars [pp.

466

materials processing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of the Stainless Steel Elaborated by the Duplex Procedure (Electric Furnace- VOD Installation) [pp. ... Materials Processing on a Solar Furnace Satellite [pp.

467

LBA Land Use and Land Cover Data Set Released  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LBA Model Intercomparison Project Meteorological Forcing Data Published LBA Model Intercomparison Project Meteorological Forcing Data Published The ORNL DAAC announces the release of LBA Model Intercomparison Project (LBA-MIP) meteorological forcing data from nine Brazilian flux towers for periods between 1999 and 2006. LBA-ECO CD-32 LBA Model Intercomparison Project (LBA-MIP) Meteorological Forcing Data. Data set prepared by L.G.G. de Goncalves, N. Restrepo-Coupe, H.R. da Rocha, S.R. Saleska, and R. Stockli. This data set provides gap-filled meteorological observations from nine Brazilian flux towers for periods between 1999 and 2006. The measurements include: air temperature, specific humidity, module of wind speed, downward long wave and shortwave radiation at the surface, surface pressure, precipitation, and carbon dioxide (CO2). These atmospheric data are provided at 1-hour time-steps,

468

LBA Land Use and Land Cover Data Set Released  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Upgrade and Outage A planned 5-minute outage for systems upgrades turned into a 1 hour outage of the DAAC web site on Thursday morning 822 at 8:30am. Some driver software for the...

469

LBA Land Use and Land Cover Data Set Released  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Simple Tropical Ecosystem Model Published The ORNL DAAC announces the release of the data set LBA-ECO LC-31 Simple Tropical Ecosystem Model. LBA-ECO LC-31 Simple Tropical...

470

extension.ucdavis.edu/landuse Land Use and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

New Online! Solar Photovoltaic (PV) Energy Systems: Overview n Updated! GIS for Watershed Analysis n.............................................................................................14 New Online! Solar Photovoltaic (PV) Energy Systems: Overview....................................15NE Enroll by June 22 and complete by July 6 Solar Photovoltaic (PV) Energy Systems: Overview Enroll by July

Thomases, Becca

471

Nonlinear Influence of Mesoscale Land Use on Weather and Climate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper demonstrates that the influence of mesoscale landscape spatial variability on the atmosphere must be parameterized (or explicitly modeled) in larger-scale atmospheric model simulations including general circulation models. The ...

R. A. Pielke; G. A. Dalu; J. S. Snook; T. J. Lee; T. G. F. Kittel

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

LAND USE SUITABILITY INDEX FOR USE IN HARDEE COUNTY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the International Symposium on Phosphogypsum. The staff of the Soil Research Laboratory has been involved

Demers, Nora Egan