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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Risk Analysis for Water Resources Under Climate Change, Population Growth, and Land Use Change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2006). Climate Change Impacts on Water for Agriculture in2006). Climate Change Impacts on Water for Agriculture infuture climate change impacts on water for agriculture and

Kiparsky, Michael

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Risk Analysis for Water Resources Under Climate Change, Population Growth, and Land Use Change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

R. B. Lammers (2000). "Global water resources: Vulnerabilityin two small watersheds." Water Resources Research 18(3).of a warming climate on water availability in snow-dominated

Kiparsky, Michael

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Climate and Energy-Water-Land System Interactions Technical Report to the U.S. Department of Energy in Support of the National Climate Assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides a framework to characterize and understand the important elements of climate and energy-water-land (EWL) system interactions. It identifies many of the important issues, discusses our understanding of those issues, and presents a long-term research program research needs to address the priority scientific challenges and gaps in our understanding. Much of the discussion is organized around two discrete case studies with the broad themes of (1) extreme events and (2) regional intercomparisons. These case studies help demonstrate unique ways in which energy-water-land interactions can occur and be influenced by climate.

Skaggs, Richard; Hibbard, Kathleen A.; Frumhoff, Peter; Lowry, Thomas; Middleton, Richard; Pate, Ron; Tidwell, Vincent C.; Arnold, J. G.; Averyt, Kristen; Janetos, Anthony C.; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Rice, Jennie S.; Rose, Steven K.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Global Climate Change,Global Climate Change, Land Cover Change, andLand Cover Change, and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Global Climate Change,Global Climate Change, Land Cover Change, andLand Cover Change Changes · Due to ­ Climate Change ­ Land Cover / Land Use Change ­ Interaction of Climate and Land Cover Change · Resolution ­ Space ­ Time Hydro-Climatic Change · Variability vs. Change (Trends) · Point data

5

The land use climate change energy nexus  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Landscape ecology focuses on the spatial patterns and processes of ecological and human interactions. These patterns and processes are being altered both by changing human resource-management practices and changing climate conditions associated, in part, with increases in atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases. Dominant resource extraction and land management activities involve energy, and the use of fossil energy is one of the key drivers behind increasing greenhouse gas emissions as well as land-use changes. Alternative energy sources (such as wind, solar, nuclear, and bioenergy) are being explored to reduce greenhouse gas emission rates. Yet, energy production, including alternative-energy options, can have a wide range of effects on land productivity, surface cover, albedo, and other factors that affect carbon, water and energy fluxes and, in turn, climate. Meanwhile, climate influences the potential output, relative efficiencies and sustainability of alternative energy sources. Thus climate change, energy choices, and land-use change are linked, and any analysis in landscape ecology that considers one of these factors should consider them all. This analysis explores the implications of those linkages and points out ecological patterns and processes that may be affected by these interactions.

Dale, Virginia H [ORNL; Efroymson, Rebecca Ann [ORNL; Kline, Keith L [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Risk Analysis for Water Resources Under Climate Change, Population Growth, and Land Use Change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with Uncertainty in Quantitative Risk and Policy Analysis.of Uncertainty." Journal of Risk and Uncertainty 5(4): 297-Carbone (2005). "Feeling at risk matters: Water managers and

Kiparsky, Michael

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Please cite this article in press as: Otero, I., et al., Loss of water availability and stream biodiversity under land abandonment and climate change in a Mediterranean catchment (Olzinelles, NE Spain). Land Use Policy (2010), doi:10.1016/j.landusepol.201  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

biodiversity under land abandonment and climate change in a Mediterranean catchment (Olzinelles, NE Spain under land abandonment and climate change in a Mediterranean catchment (Olzinelles, NE Spain) Iago-cover change Warming Mediterranean catchment Water courses Aquatic fauna a b s t r a c t In the north rim

Gracia, Carlos

8

Investigating the Nexus of Climate, Energy, Water, and Land at Decision-Relevant Scales: The Platform for Regional Integrated Modeling and Analysis (PRIMA)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Platform for Regional Integrated Modeling and Analysis (PRIMA) is an innovative modeling system developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to simulate interactions among natural and human systems at scales relevant to regional decision making. PRIMA brings together state-of-the-art models of regional climate, hydrology, agriculture, socioeconomics, and energy systems using a flexible coupling approach. The platform can be customized to inform a variety of complex questions and decisions, such as the integrated evaluation of mitigation and adaptation options across a range of sectors. Research into stakeholder decision support needs underpins the platform's application to regional issues, including uncertainty characterization. Ongoing numerical experiments are yielding new insights into the interactions among human and natural systems on regional scales with an initial focus on the energy-land-water nexus in the upper U.S. Midwest. This paper focuses on PRIMAs functional capabilities and describes some lessons learned to date about integrated regional modeling.

Kraucunas, Ian P.; Clarke, Leon E.; Dirks, James A.; Hathaway, John E.; Hejazi, Mohamad I.; Hibbard, Kathleen A.; Huang, Maoyi; Jin, Chunlian; Kintner-Meyer, Michael CW; Kleese van Dam, Kerstin; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Li, Hongyi; Moss, Richard H.; Peterson, Marty J.; Rice, Jennie S.; Scott, Michael J.; Thomson, Allison M.; Voisin, Nathalie; West, Tristram O.

2014-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

9

The impacts of land use-induced land cover change on climate extremes.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Simulations from the CSIRO Mk3L climate model, coupled to the CABLE land surface model, indicate that climate extremes indices are significantly affected by land use-induced (more)

Avila, Francia Bismonte

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Sale of Water Resource Land (Maine)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This rule requires an eight month advance notice period whenever a consumer-owned water utility intends to transfer water resource land, defined as any land or real property owned by a water...

11

Interaction effects of climate and land use/land cover change on soil organic carbon sequestration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Interaction effects of climate and land use/land cover change on soil organic carbon sequestration carbon sequestration Climate change Soil carbon change Historically, Florida soils stored the largest in Florida (FL) have acted as a sink for carbon (C) over the last 40 years. · Climate interacting with land

Grunwald, Sabine

12

Climate Effects of Global Land Cover Change  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There are two competing effects of global land cover change on climate: an albedo effect which leads to heating when changing from grass/croplands to forest, and an evapotranspiration effect which tends to produce cooling. It is not clear which effect would dominate in a global land cover change scenario. We have performed coupled land/ocean/atmosphere simulations of global land cover change using the NCAR CAM3 atmospheric general circulation model. We find that replacement of current vegetation by trees on a global basis would lead to a global annual mean warming of 1.6 C, nearly 75% of the warming produced under a doubled CO{sub 2} concentration, while global replacement by grasslands would result in a cooling of 0.4 C. These results suggest that more research is necessary before forest carbon storage should be deployed as a mitigation strategy for global warming. In particular, high latitude forests probably have a net warming effect on the Earth's climate.

Gibbard, S G; Caldeira, K; Bala, G; Phillips, T; Wickett, M

2005-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

13

Climate change and land use in Florida: Interdependencies and opportunities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Climate change and land use in Florida: Interdependencies and opportunities Stephen Mulkey, Ph June 2007 Revised 30 September 2007 #12;Climate change and land use ­ Report to the Century Commission - S. Mulkey, June 2007 2 Executive summary Over this century anthropogenic climate change will present

Watson, Craig A.

14

Climate policy implications for agricultural water demand  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Energy, water and land are scarce resources, critical to humans. Developments in each affect the availability and cost of the others, and consequently human prosperity. Measures to limit greenhouse gas concentrations will inevitably exact dramatic changes on energy and land systems and in turn alter the character, magnitude and geographic distribution of human claims on water resources. We employ the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM), an integrated assessment model to explore the interactions of energy, land and water systems in the context of alternative policies to limit climate change to three alternative levels: 2.5 Wm-2 (445 ppm CO2-e), 3.5 Wm-2 (535 ppm CO2-e) and 4.5 Wm-2 (645 ppm CO2-e). We explore the effects of two alternative land-use emissions mitigation policy optionsone which taxes terrestrial carbon emissions equally with fossil fuel and industrial emissions, and an alternative which only taxes fossil fuel and industrial emissions but places no penalty on land-use change emissions. We find that increasing populations and economic growth could be anticipated to almost triple demand for water for agricultural systems across the century even in the absence of climate policy. In general policies to mitigate climate change increase agricultural demands for water still further, though the largest changes occur in the second half of the century, under both policy regimes. The two policies examined profoundly affected both the sources and magnitudes of the increase in irrigation water demands. The largest increases in agricultural irrigation water demand occurred in scenarios where only fossil fuel emissions were priced (but not land-use change emission) and were primarily driven by rapid expansion in bioenergy production. In these scenarios water demands were large relative to present-day total available water, calling into question whether it would be physically possible to produce the associated biomass energy. We explored the potential of improved water delivery and irrigation system efficiencies. These could potentially reduce demands substantially. However, overall demands remained high under our fossil-fuel-only tax policy. In contrast, when all carbon was priced, increases in agricultural water demands were smaller than under the fossil-fuel-only policy and were driven primarily by increased demands for water by non-biomass crops such as rice. Finally we estimate the geospatial pattern of water demands and find that regions such as China, India and other countries in south and east Asia might be expected to experience greatest increases in water demands.?

Chaturvedi, Vaibhav; Hejazi, Mohamad I.; Edmonds, James A.; Clarke, Leon E.; Kyle, G. Page; Davies, Evan; Wise, Marshall A.; Calvin, Katherine V.

2013-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

15

Global Ice and Land Climate Studies Using Scatterometer Image Data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Global Ice and Land Climate Studies Using Scatterometer Image Data David G. Long Brigham Young CA 91109 ben@pacific.jpl.nasa.gov Sasan.Saatchi@jpl.nasa.gov Cheryl Bertoia U. S. National Ice Center: Long, D. G., M. R. Drinkwater, B. Holt, S. Saatchi, and C. Bertoia, Global ice and land climate studies

Long, David G.

16

Land & Water Conservation Program Conservation Easements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Land & Water Conservation Program Conservation Easements: A Step by Step Guide PRELIMINARY STEPS: Step 1: Landowner expresses interest in land conservation. Step 2: Discuss the land with the landowner officially designated as prime. Source: municipal conservation commission or NH DES, Wetlands Bureau.* o Deer

New Hampshire, University of

17

Land use and climate change in Miami-Dade County  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Miami-Dade County, Florida, was one of the earliest jurisdictions to adopt a climate change plan in 1993. Land use features prominently in this plan as a means to reduce greenhouse gases through development patterns that ...

Peckett, Haley Rose

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

CLIMATE CHANGE AND WATER SUPPLY SECURITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CLIMATE CHANGE AND WATER SUPPLY SECURITY: Reconfiguring Groundwater Management to Reduce with climate change, present a significant planning challenge for California's water agencies. This research Drought Vulnerability A White Paper from the California Energy Commission's California Climate

19

Making Sustainable Energy Choices: Insights on the Energy/Water/Land Nexus  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This periodic publication summarizes insights from the body of NREL analysis work. In this issue of Analysis Insights, we examine the implications of our energy choices on water, land use, climate, developmental goals, and other factors. Collectively, NREL's work helps policymakers and investors understand and evaluate energy choices within the complex web of connections, or nexus, between energy, water, and land.

Not Available

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

WATER AND ENERGY SECTOR VULNERABILITY TO CLIMATE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WATER AND ENERGY SECTOR VULNERABILITY TO CLIMATE WARMING IN THE SIERRA NEVADA: Water Year explores the sensitivity of water indexing methods to climate change scenarios to better understand how water management decisions and allocations will be affected by climate change. Many water management

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land water climate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Climate Policy 3 (2003) 149157 The climatic impacts of land surface change and carbon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

recognize that carbon sequestration in the terrestrial biosphere can reduce the build-up of carbon dioxide of the surface energy budget can affect the local, regional, and global climate. Given the goal of mitigatingClimate Policy 3 (2003) 149­157 The climatic impacts of land surface change and carbon management

Pielke, Roger A.

22

Watershed response and land energy feedbacks under climate change depend upon groundwater.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Human induced climate change will have a significant impact on the hydrologic cycle, creating changes in fresh water resources, land cover, and feedbacks that are difficult to characterize, which makes it an issue of global importance. Previous studies have not included subsurface storage in climate change simulations and feedbacks. A variably-saturated groundwater flow model with integrated overland flow and land surface model processes is used to examine the interplay between coupled water and energy processes under climate change conditions. A case study from the Southern Great Plains (SGP) USA, an important agricultural region that is susceptible to drought, is used as the basis for three scenarios simulations using a modified atmospheric forcing dataset to reflect predicted effects due to human-induced climate change. These scenarios include an increase in the atmospheric temperature and variations in rainfall amount and are compared to the present-day climate case. Changes in shallow soil saturation and groundwater levels are quantified as well as the corresponding energy fluxes at the land surface. Here we show that groundwater and subsurface lateral flow processes are critical in understanding hydrologic response and energy feedbacks to climate change and that certain regions are more susceptible to changes in temperature, while others to changes in precipitation. This groundwater control is critical for understanding recharge and drought processes, possible under future climate conditions.

Maxwell, R M; Kollet, S J

2008-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

23

Climate Change: High Water Impacts and Adaptation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Climate Change: High Water Impacts and Adaptation David S. Liebl and Kenneth W. Potter Co of global climate change­ WICCI Stormwater Working Group #12;Projected Climate Change 200-2100 What Global

Sheridan, Jennifer

24

Impact of Agricultural Practice on Regional Climate in a CoupledLand Surface Mesoscale Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The land surface has been shown to form strong feedbacks with climate due to linkages between atmospheric conditions and terrestrial ecosystem exchanges of energy, momentum, water, and trace gases. Although often ignored in modeling studies, land management itself may form significant feedbacks. Because crops are harvested earlier under drier conditions, regional air temperature, precipitation, and soil moisture, for example, affect harvest timing, particularly of rain-fed crops. This removal of vegetation alters the land surface characteristics and may, in turn, affect regional climate. We applied a coupled climate(MM5) and land-surface (LSM1) model to examine the effects of early and late winter wheat harvest on regional climate in the Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility in the Southern Great Plains, where winter wheat accounts for 20 percent of the land area. Within the winter wheat region, simulated 2 m air temperature was 1.3 C warmer in the Early Harvest scenario at mid-day averaged over the two weeks following harvest. Soils in the harvested area were drier and warmer in the top 10 cm and wetter in the 10-20 cm layer. Midday soils were 2.5 C warmer in the harvested area at mid-day averaged over the two weeks following harvest. Harvest also dramatically altered latent and sensible heat fluxes. Although differences between scenarios diminished once both scenarios were harvested, the short-term impacts of land management on climate were comparable to those from land cover change demonstrated in other studies.

Cooley, H.S.; Riley, W.J.; Torn, M.S.; He, Y.

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Hydrology: The Influence of Climate Change and/or Land Cover/Use Change Steven R. Fassnacht, Colorado State University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydrology: The Influence of Climate Change and/or Land Cover/Use Change Steven R. Fassnacht. Precipitation and temperature are the main drivers of hydrological systems, which influence water availability in those temperatures has decreased. Hydrologic changes are occurring due to a changing climate. For snow

26

Land degradation and climate change: a sin of omission?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

not solely responsible for the lack of awareness of the impacts of poor management practices, but we do play temperatures and the consequent increase in evaporative demand. During large rainfall events, land degradation a contributing role. At best, our increasing focus on climate change has an opportunity cost: there is less time

27

Climate Change and Water Resources in the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Climate Change and Water Resources in the Tropical Andes Mathias Vuille Inter-American Development Bank Environmental Safeguards Unit TECHNICAL NOTE No. IDB-TN-515 March 2013 #12;Climate Change-American Development Bank Felipe Herrera Library Vuille, Mathias. Climate change and water resources in the tropical

Vuille, Mathias

28

Green Lands Blue Water 2014 Fall Conference | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Green Lands Blue Water 2014 Fall Conference Green Lands Blue Water 2014 Fall Conference November 18, 2014 10:00AM CST to November 20, 2014 4:00PM CST Richland Community College...

29

CLIMATE CHANGE ADAPTATIONS FOR LOCAL WATER MANAGEMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CLIMATE CHANGE ADAPTATIONS FOR LOCAL WATER MANAGEMENT IN THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY AREA A White Paper from the California Energy Commission's California Climate Change Center JULY 2012 CEC Climate change will affect both sea level and the temporal and spatial distribution of runoff

30

Greenhouse gas policy influences climate via direct effects of land-use change  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Proposed climate mitigation measures do not account for direct biophysical climate impacts of land-use change (LUC), nor do the stabilization targets modeled for the 5th Climate Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5) Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs). To examine the significance of such effects on global and regional patterns of climate change, a baseline and alternative scenario of future anthropogenic activity are simulated within the Integrated Earth System Model, which couples the Global Change Assessment Model, Global Land-use Model, and Community Earth System Model. The alternative scenario has high biofuel utilization and approximately 50% less global forest cover compared to the baseline, standard RCP4.5 scenario. Both scenarios stabilize radiative forcing from atmospheric constituents at 4.5 W/m2 by 2100. Thus, differences between their climate predictions quantify the biophysical effects of LUC. Offline radiative transfer and land model simulations are also utilized to identify forcing and feedback mechanisms driving the coupled response. Boreal deforestation is found to strongly influence climate due to increased albedo coupled with a regional-scale water vapor feedback. Globally, the alternative scenario yields a 21st century warming trend that is 0.5 C cooler than baseline, driven by a 1 W/m2 mean decrease in radiative forcing that is distributed unevenly around the globe. Some regions are cooler in the alternative scenario than in 2005. These results demonstrate that neither climate change nor actual radiative forcing are uniquely related to atmospheric forcing targets such as those found in the RCPs, but rather depend on particulars of the socioeconomic pathways followed to meet each target.

Jones, Andrew D.; Collins, William D.; Edmonds, James A.; Torn, Margaret S.; Janetos, Anthony C.; Calvin, Katherine V.; Thomson, Allison M.; Chini, Louise M.; Mao, Jiafu; Shi, Xiaoying; Thornton, Peter; Hurtt, George; Wise, Marshall A.

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

The Community Land Model and Its Climate Statistics as a Component of the Community Climate System Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to the Fourth Assessment Report (AR4) by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change [IPCC; i.e., the followThe Community Land Model and Its Climate Statistics as a Component of the Community Climate System carried out with the new version of the Community Climate System Model (CCSM). This paper reports

Hoffman, Forrest M.

32

Global Soil Change: Land Use, Soil and Water SWS4231C, SWS5234  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the soil system to withstand global-scale perturbations (e.g., climate or land use change, spread Properties 4. Land Use Change Impacts on Soils 5. Land Use and Agriculture (Irrigation and Fertilization In Soil) 6. Land Use and Soil Erosion 7. Climate Change Impacts on Soils 8. Land Use-Climate

Ma, Lena

33

Impacts of Land-Use and Biofuels Policy on Climate: Temperature and Localized Impacts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Impacts of Land-Use and Biofuels Policy on Climate: Temperature and Localized Impacts Willow on recycled paper #12;1 Impacts of Land-Use and Biofuels Policy on Climate: Temperature and Localized Impacts to agricultural production, including growing biofuels, and (ii) Observed Land Supply Response (OLSR

34

Pluralistic Modelling Approaches to Simulating Climate-Land Change Interactions in East Africa  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with atmospheric trends such as greenhouse gas concentrations, to loop back to regional and global climate change dynamics (Giorgi and Mearns 1999). Developing robust forecasts of land use change is essential in the proper simulation of land-climate interactions. Forecasts of land use at regional scales require several

35

Simulating Sustainability: Conjunctive Land and Water Management in the Upper  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Simulating Sustainability: Conjunctive Land and Water Management in the Upper Santa Cruz River Water Issue: Introduction and Context This research project addresses a chronic water management issue in Arizona: management and allocation of water supplies in areas undergoing rapid growth and land use changes

Fay, Noah

36

What is the importance of climate model bias when projecting the impacts of climate change on land surface processes?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Regional climate change impact (CCI) studies have widely involved downscaling and bias-correcting (BC) Global Climate Model (GCM)-projected climate for driving land surface models. However, BC may cause uncertainties in projecting hydrologic and biogeochemical responses to future climate due to the impaired spatiotemporal covariance of climate variables and a breakdown of physical conservation principles. Here we quantify the impact of BC on simulated climate-driven changes in water variables(evapotranspiration, ET; runoff; snow water equivalent, SWE; and water demand for irrigation), crop yield, biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC), nitric oxide (NO) emissions, and dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) export over the Pacific Northwest (PNW) Region. We also quantify the impacts on net primary production (NPP) over a small watershed in the region (HJ Andrews). Simulation results from the coupled ECHAM5/MPI-OM model with A1B emission scenario were firstly dynamically downscaled to 12 km resolutions with WRF model. Then a quantile mapping based statistical downscaling model was used to downscale them into 1/16th degree resolution daily climate data over historical and future periods. Two series climate data were generated according to the option of bias-correction (i.e. with bias-correction (BC) and without bias-correction, NBC). Impact models were then applied to estimate hydrologic and biogeochemical responses to both BC and NBC meteorological datasets. These im20 pact models include a macro-scale hydrologic model (VIC), a coupled cropping system model (VIC-CropSyst), an ecohydrologic model (RHESSys), a biogenic emissions model (MEGAN), and a nutrient export model (Global-NEWS). Results demonstrate that the BC and NBC climate data provide consistent estimates of the climate-driven changes in water fluxes (ET, runoff, and water demand), VOCs (isoprene and monoterpenes) and NO emissions, mean crop yield, and river DIN export over the PNW domain. However, significant differences rise from projected SWE, crop yield from dry lands, and HJ Andrewss ET between BC and NBC data. Even though BC post-processing has no significant impacts on most of the studied variables when taking PNW as a whole, their effects have large spatial variations and some local areas are substantially influenced. In addition, there are months during which BC and NBC post-processing produces significant differences in projected changes, such as summer runoff. Factor-controlled simulations indicate that BC post-processing of precipitation and temperature both substantially contribute to these differences at region scales. We conclude that there are trade-offs between using BC climate data for offline CCI studies vs. direct modeled climate data. These trade-offs should be considered when designing integrated modeling frameworks for specific applications; e.g., BC may be more important when considering impacts on reservoir operations in mountainous watersheds than when investigating impacts on biogenic emissions and air quality (where VOCs are a primary indicator).

Liu, M. L.; Rajagopalan, K.; Chung, S. H.; Jiang, X.; Harrison, J. H.; Nergui, T.; Guenther, Alex B.; Miller, C.; Reyes, J.; Tague, C. L.; Choate, J. S.; Salathe, E.; Stockle, Claudio O.; Adam, J. C.

2014-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

37

Climate Mitigation Policy Implications for Global Irrigation Water Demand  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Energy, water and land are scarce resources, critical to humans. Developments in each affect the availability and cost of the others, and consequently human prosperity. Measures to limit greenhouse gas concentrations will inevitably exact dramatic changes on energy and land systems and in turn alter the character, magnitude and geographic distribution of human claims on water resources. We employ the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM), an integrated assessment model to explore the interactions of energy, land and water systems in the context of alternative policies to limit climate change to three alternative levels: 2.5 Wm-2 (445 ppm CO2-e), 3.5 Wm-2 (535 ppm CO2-e) and 4.5 Wm-2 (645 ppm CO2-e). We explore the effects of alternative land-use emissions mitigation policy optionsone which values terrestrial carbon emissions equally with fossil fuel and industrial emissions, and an alternative which places no penalty on land-use change emissions. We find that increasing populations and economic growth could be anticipated to lead to increased demand for water for agricultural systems (+200%), even in the absence of climate change. In general policies to mitigate climate change will increase agricultural demands for water, regardless of whether or not terrestrial carbon is valued or not. Burgeoning demands for water are driven by the demand for bioenergy in response to emissions mitigation policies. We also find that the policy matters. Increases in the demand for water when terrestrial carbon emissions go un-prices are vastly larger than when terrestrial system carbon emissions are prices at the same rate as fossil fuel and industrial emissions. Our estimates for increased water demands when terrestrial carbon systems go un-priced are larger than earlier studies. We find that the deployment of improved irrigation delivery systems could mitigate some of the increase in water demands, but cannot reverse the increases in water demands when terrestrial carbon emissions go un-priced. Finally we estimates that the geospatial pattern of water demands could stress some parts of the world, e.g. China, India and other countries in south and east Asia, earlier and more intensely than in other parts of the world, e.g. North America.

Chaturvedi, Vaibhav; Hejazi, Mohamad I.; Edmonds, James A.; Clarke, Leon E.; Kyle, G. Page; Davies, Evan; Wise, Marshall A.

2013-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

38

Impacts of Land Use and Biofuels Policy on Climate: Temperature and Localized Impacts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The impact on climate of future land use and energy policy scenarios is explored using two landuse frameworks: (i) Pure Cost Conversion Response (PCCR), or 'extensification', where the price of land is the only constraint ...

Hallgren, Willow

2012-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

39

Bioenergy crop productivity and potential climate change mitigation from marginal lands in the United States: An  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bioenergy crop productivity and potential climate change mitigation from marginal lands bioenergy crops grown on marginal lands in the United States. Two broadly tested cellulosic crops June 2014 Introduction Bioenergy, an important renewable energy produced from biological materials

Zhuang, Qianlai

40

Climate Change Mitigation Through Land-Use Measures in the Agriculture...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and Forestry Sectors Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Climate Change Mitigation Through Land-Use Measures in the Agriculture and Forestry...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land water climate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Sensitivity of global tropical climate to land surface processes: Mean state and interannual variability  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study examines the sensitivity of global tropical climate to land surface processes (LSP) using an atmospheric general circulation model both uncoupled (with prescribed SSTs) and coupled to an oceanic general circulation model. The emphasis is on the interactive soil moisture and vegetation biophysical processes, which have first order influence on the surface energy and water budgets. The sensitivity to those processes is represented by the differences between model simulations, in which two land surface schemes are considered: 1) a simple land scheme that specifies surface albedo and soil moisture availability, and 2) the Simplified Simple Biosphere Model (SSiB), which allows for consideration of interactive soil moisture and vegetation biophysical process. Observational datasets are also employed to assess the reality of model-revealed sensitivity. The mean state sensitivity to different LSP is stronger in the coupled mode, especially in the tropical Pacific. Furthermore, seasonal cycle of SSTs in the equatorial Pacific, as well as ENSO frequency, amplitude, and locking to the seasonal cycle of SSTs are significantly modified and more realistic with SSiB. This outstanding sensitivity of the atmosphere-ocean system develops through changes in the intensity of equatorial Pacific trades modified by convection over land. Our results further demonstrate that the direct impact of land-atmosphere interactions on the tropical climate is modified by feedbacks associated with perturbed oceanic conditions ("indirect effect" of LSP). The magnitude of such indirect effect is strong enough to suggest that comprehensive studies on the importance of LSP on the global climate have to be made in a system that allows for atmosphere-ocean interactions.

Ma, Hsi-Yen; Xiao, Heng; Mechoso, C. R.; Xue, Yongkang

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Water Scarcity, Climate Change, and Water Quality: Three Economic Essays  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

percent being used for municipal purposes, 54 percent for irrigation, 10 percent for industry, and the rest for steam electric and livestock (see Figure 2-1). Ground water accounts for approximately 60 percent of water used, and 79 percent of ground............................................................................................. 125 3.3.4 Regression results ......................................................................... 125 3.3.5 Climate change impacts on water supply...................................... 129 3.4 Climate change impact on municipal water demand...

Cai, Yongxia

2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

43

Potential influence of climate-induced vegetation shifts on future land use and associated land carbon fluxes in Northern Eurasia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Climate change will alter ecosystem metabolism and may lead to a redistribution of vegetation and changes in fire regimes in Northern Eurasia over the 21st century. Land management decisions will interact with these ...

Kicklighter, D W

44

Modeling Water, Climate, Agriculture, and the Economy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Describes two models used in the integrated modeling framework designed to study water, climate, agriculture and the economy in Pakistan's Indus Basin: (1) the Indus Basin Model Revised (IBMR-1012), a hydro-economic ...

Yu, Winston

45

Adaptive Management of Water Resources in Light of Future Climate Uncertainty  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Water resources managers have always had to make operational decisions in spite of a relatively high degree of uncertainty caused by changing climate, hydrologic, population, land use, socioeconomic, and other conditions. However, based on current climate change predictions and observations of current impacts of climate change or natural variability, the degree of uncertainty appears to be increasing drastically. By better understanding these uncertainties and their policy implications and by managing those uncertainties adaptively, water resources managers and policy makers can reduce the risk of not meeting their management goals and reduce the potential physical, biological and socioeconomic impacts associated with climate change/variation.

Gerald Sehlke; Mark Colosimo

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Hawaii Bioenergy Master Plan Land and Water Resources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hawaii Bioenergy Master Plan Land and Water Resources Submitted to Hawaii Natural Energy Institute, SLH 2007, Part III, "The primary objective of the bioenergy master plan shall be to develop a Hawaii of any bioenergy crops in Hawaii is the availability of the land and water necessary to produce

47

Global climate change will affect air, water in California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Department of Land, Air and Water Resources, UC Davis. Hechange will affect air, water in California Bryan C. Wearelikely to include reduced water availability and quality,

Weare, Bryan C.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

The Potential Impact of Climate Change in the Norfolk Arable Land Management Initiative  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to assess the effects of climate change on agriculture, parts of the sector will be adversely affectedThe Potential Impact of Climate Change in the Norfolk Arable Land Management Initiative (NALMI-Mortlock, Queens University, Belfast * Contact: d.viner@uea.ac.uk C R U This poster presents climate change

Feigon, Brooke

49

RESEARCH ARTICLE Impacts of changing climate and land use on vegetation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RESEARCH ARTICLE Impacts of changing climate and land use on vegetation dynamics in a Mediterranean coast and in regions that are expected to experience a mediterranean-type climate in the future. Samartin Á O. Heiri Á W. Tinner Institute of Plant Sciences and Oeschger Centre for Climate Change Research

Bern, Universität

50

Water resources planning under climate change and variability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Scenario to Climatic Changes. Water Resources Management 19:2006) Quantifying the Urban Water Supply Impacts of Climateto the Shape of Supply? Water Demand Under Heterogeneous

O'Hara, Jeffrey Keith

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Framework to analyze Risk of Climate Change on Water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to translate the uncertainty of climate change predictions to long-term physical or regulatory water shortage climate- related physical or regulatory water shortage risks for power generation Technology development al. Western Energy-Water Forum, Santa Barbara, March 2007 Long-term Water shortage risk : Climate

Keller, Arturo A.

52

Decision Center for a Desert City Water/Climate Briefings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Water and its Role in Mitigation of Surface/Ground water depletion ­ Max Krzyzewski Climate Change EfDecision Center for a Desert City Water/Climate Briefings A place where multiple perspectives with the public policy community to investigate water, climate, decision-making and vulnerability

Zhang, Junshan

53

China's food production under water and land limitations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The future availability of the natural resources (water and land) needed for food production is highly uncertain. Evidence shows diminishing natural resources and growing food demand throughout many parts of the world. ...

Hoisungwan, Piyatida

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Biofuels, land and water : a systems approach to sustainability.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There is a strong societal need to evaluate and understand the sustainability of biofuels, especially because of the significant increases in production mandated by many countries, including the United States. Sustainability will be a strong factor in the regulatory environment and investments in biofuels. Biomass feedstock production is an important contributor to environmental, social, and economic impacts from biofuels. This study presents a systems approach where the agricultural, energy, and environmental sectors are considered as components of a single system, and environmental liabilities are used as recoverable resources for biomass feedstock production. We focus on efficient use of land and water resources. We conducted a spatial analysis evaluating marginal land and degraded water resources to improve feedstock productivity with concomitant environmental restoration for the state of Nebraska. Results indicate that utilizing marginal land resources such as riparian and roadway buffer strips, brownfield sites, and marginal agricultural land could produce enough feedstocks to meet a maximum of 22% of the energy requirements of the state compared to the current supply of 2%. Degraded water resources such as nitrate-contaminated groundwater and wastewater were evaluated as sources of nutrients and water to improve feedstock productivity. Spatial overlap between degraded water and marginal land resources was found to be as high as 96% and could maintain sustainable feedstock production on marginal lands. Other benefits of implementing this strategy include feedstock intensification to decrease biomass transportation costs, restoration of contaminated water resources, and mitigation of greenhouse gas emissions.

Gopalakrishnan, G.; Negri, M. C.; Wang, M.; Wu, M.; Snyder, S. W.; LaFreniere, L.

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Downscaled climate change impacts on agricultural water resources in Puerto Rico  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2006. Climate Change in the Caribbean: Water, Agriculture,role of agriculture in climate system and in climate change.

Harmsen, E.W.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Managing United States Public Lands in Response to Climate Change: A View From the Ground Up  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on public lands. Though climate change is now well recognized by federal agencies and their local land Federal agencies Á Forestry Á Fuels management Á Decision making Introduction Increases in the atmospheric ranging from renewable energy standards to emissions trading schemes, voluntary projects set up

Neff, Jason

57

Water Balance in Terrestrial PlantsWater Balance in Terrestrial Plants Water Regulation on LandWater Regulation on Land --PlantsPlants WWipip= W= Wrr + W+ Waa --WWtt --WWss  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Water Balance in Terrestrial PlantsWater Balance in Terrestrial Plants Water Regulation on LandWater waters internal water WWrr =Roots=Roots WWaa = Air= Air WWtt = Transpiration= Transpiration WWss = Secretions= Secretions Water Regulation on Land - Plants Water Balance in Terrestrial PlantsWater Balance

Cochran-Stafira, D. Liane

58

The impact of climate, CO2, nitrogen deposition and land use change on simulated contemporary global river flow  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The impact of climate, CO2, nitrogen deposition and land use change on simulated contemporary., 38, L08704, doi:10.1029/ 2011GL046773. 1. Introduction [2] Climate change and human activities and Fung [2008] found that climate and land use change play more important roles than the stomatal closure

Hoffman, Forrest M.

59

Land and Water Developments (Newfoundland and Labrador)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This policy applies to public water supply areas designated by the province of Newfoundland and Labrador. The policy limits development in public water supply areas unless they meet specific...

60

Trade-offs of different land and bioenergy policies on the path to achieving climate targets.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many papers have shown that bioenergy and land-use are potentially important elements in a strategy to limit anthropogenic climate change. But, significant expansion of bioenergy production can have a large terrestrial footprint. In this paper, we test the implications for land use, the global energy system, carbon cycle, and carbon prices of meeting a specific climate target, using a single fossil fuel and industrial sector policy instrumentthe carbon tax, but with five alternative bioenergy and land-use policy architectures. We find that the policies we examined have differing effects on the different segments of the economy. Comprehensive land policies can reduce land-use change emissions, increasing allowable emissions in the energy system, but have implications for the cost of food. Bioenergy taxes and constraints, on the other hand, have little effect on food prices, but can result in increased carbon and energy prices.

Calvin, Katherine V.; Wise, Marshall A.; Kyle, G. Page; Patel, Pralit L.; Clarke, Leon E.; Edmonds, James A.

2014-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land water climate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Tropospheric water vapor and climate sensitivity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Estimates are made of the effect of changes in tropospheric water vapor on the climate sensitivity to doubled carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) using a coarse resolution atmospheric general circulation model coupled to a slab mixed layer ocean. The sensitivity of the model to doubled CO{sub 2} is found as the difference between the equilibrium responses for control and doubled CO{sub 2} cases. Clouds are specified to isolate the water vapor feedback. Experiments in which the water vapor distribution is specified rather than internally calculated are used to find the contribution of water vapor in various layers and latitude belts to the sensitivity. The contribution of water vapor in layers of equal mass to the climate sensitivity varies by about a factor of 2 with height, with the largest contribution coming from layers between 450 and 750 mb, and the smallest from layers above 230 mb. The positive feedback on the global mean surface temperature response to doubled CO{sub 2} from water vapor above 750 mb is about 2.6 times as large as that from water vapor below 750 mb. The feedback on global mean surface temperature due to water vapor in the extratropical free troposphere is about 50% larger than the feedback due to the lower-latitude free troposphere water vapor. Several important sources of nonlinearity of the radiative heating rates were identified in the process of constructing the specified cloud and water vapor fields. These are (1) the interaction of clouds and solar radiation, which produces much more reflection of solar radiation for time mean clouds than for the instantaneous clouds; (2) the correlation of clouds and water vapor, which produces less downward longwave radiation at the ground for correlated clouds and water vapor than when these fields are independent; and (3) the interaction of water vapor with long wave radiation, which produces less downward longwave radiation at the ground of the average over instantaneous water vapor distributions than of the time mean water vapor distribution.

Schneider, E.K.; Kirtman, B.P.; Lindzen, R.S. [Center for Ocean-Land-Atmosphere Studies, Calverton, MD (United States)] [Center for Ocean-Land-Atmosphere Studies, Calverton, MD (United States)

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Land disposal of water treatment plant sludge -- A feasibility analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this study, the following alternative disposal methods for the Buffalo Pound Water Treatment Sludge were evaluated: landfilling, discharge into sanitary sewers, long-term lagooning, use in manufacturing, co-composting, alum recovery and land application. Land application was chosen at the best disposal alternative. Preliminary design resulted in a 1% dry alum sludge loading rate (25 tonnes/ha), requiring 35 ha over a nine-year period and a phosphorus fertilizer supplement of about 50kg/ha.

Viraraghavan, T.; Multon, L.M.; Wasylenchuk, E.J.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

How will changes in global climate influence California?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Department of Land, Air and Water Resources, UC Davis.climate change impacts on water for agriculture and otherincreased flooding and reduced water availability, higher

Weare, B C

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Stable water isotope simulation by current land-surface schemes:Results of IPILPS phase 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Phase 1 of isotopes in the Project for Intercomparison of Land-surface Parameterization Schemes (iPILPS) compares the simulation of two stable water isotopologues ({sup 1}H{sub 2} {sup 18}O and {sup 1}H{sup 2}H{sup 16}O) at the land-atmosphere interface. The simulations are off-line, with forcing from an isotopically enabled regional model for three locations selected to offer contrasting climates and ecotypes: an evergreen tropical forest, a sclerophyll eucalypt forest and a mixed deciduous wood. Here we report on the experimental framework, the quality control undertaken on the simulation results and the method of intercomparisons employed. The small number of available isotopically-enabled land-surface schemes (ILSSs) limits the drawing of strong conclusions but, despite this, there is shown to be benefit in undertaking this type of isotopic intercomparison. Although validation of isotopic simulations at the land surface must await more, and much more complete, observational campaigns, we find that the empirically-based Craig-Gordon parameterization (of isotopic fractionation during evaporation) gives adequately realistic isotopic simulations when incorporated in a wide range of land-surface codes. By introducing two new tools for understanding isotopic variability from the land surface, the Isotope Transfer Function and the iPILPS plot, we show that different hydrological parameterizations cause very different isotopic responses. We show that ILSS-simulated isotopic equilibrium is independent of the total water and energy budget (with respect to both equilibration time and state), but interestingly the partitioning of available energy and water is a function of the models' complexity.

Henderson-Sellers, A.; Fischer, M.; Aleinov, I.; McGuffie, K.; Riley, W.J.; Schmidt, G.A.; Sturm, K.; Yoshimura, K.; Irannejad, P.

2005-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

65

Connecting seas: western Palaearctic continental flyway for water birds in the perspective of changing land use  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of changing land use and climate M E N N O B A R T R . VA N E E R D E N *, R U D O L F H . D R E N T w, J U L I A S TA H L w and J A N P. B A K K E R z *Institute for Inland Water Management and Wastewater Treatment RIZA, PO Box 17, 8200 AA Lelystad, The Netherlands, wAnimal Ecology Group, Centre for Ecological

Kleyer, Michael

66

Coal conversion siting on coal mined lands: water quality issues  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The siting of new technology coal conversion facilities on land disturbed by coal mining results in both environmental benefits and unique water quality issues. Proximity to mining reduces transportation requirements and restores disrupted land to productive use. Uncertainties may exist, however, in both understanding the existing site environment and assessing the impact of the new technology. Oak Ridge National Laboratory is currently assessing the water-related impacts of proposed coal conversion facilities located in areas disturbed by surface and underground coal mining. Past mining practices, leaving highly permeable and unstable fill, may affect the design and quality of data from monitoring programs. Current mining and dewatering, or past underground mining may alter groundwater or surface water flow patterns or affect solid waste disposal stability. Potential acid-forming material influences the siting of waste disposal areas and the design of grading operations. These and other problems are considered in relation to the uncertainties and potentially unique problems inherent in developing new technologies.

Triegel, E.K.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Bright Water- hydrosols, water conservation and climate change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Since air-water and water-air interfaces are equally refractive, cloud droplets and microbubbles dispersed in bodies of water reflect sunlight in much the same way. The lifetime of sunlight-reflecting microbubbles, and hence the scale on which they may be applied, depends on Stokes Law and the influence of ambient or added surfactants. Small bubbles backscatter light more efficiently than large ones, opening the possibility of using highly dilute micron-radius hydrosols to substantially brighten surface waters. Such microbubbles can noticeably increase water surface reflectivity, even at volume fractions of parts per million and such loadings can be created at an energy cost as low as J m-2 to initiate and milliwatts m-2 to sustain. Increasing water albedo in this way can reduce solar energy absorption by as much as 100 W m-2, potentially reducing equilibrium temperatures of standing water bodies by several Kelvins. While aerosols injected into the stratosphere tend to alter climate globally, hydrosols can be...

Seitz, Russell

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Climate Change and Water Resources Management: Adaptations for Flood Control and Water Supply  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of climate warming can be very significant. Integrated water resources management is a promising wayClimate Change and Water Resources Management: Adaptations for Flood Control and Water Supply climate warming impacts on surface runoff, groundwater inflows and reservoir evaporation for distributed

Lund, Jay R.

69

Estimating future global per capita water availability based on changes in climate and population  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Human populations are profoundly affected by water stress, or the lack of sufficient per capita available freshwater. Water stress can result from overuse of available freshwater resources or from a reduction in the amount of available water due to decreases in rainfall and stored water supplies. Analyzing the interrelationship between human populations and water availability is complicated by the uncertainties associated with climate change projections and population projections. We present a simple methodology developed to integrate disparate climate and population data sources and develop first-order per capita water availability projections at the global scale. Simulations from the coupled land-ocean-atmosphere Community Climate System Model version 3 (CCSM3) forced with a range of hypothetical greenhouse gas emissions scenarios are used to project grid-based changes in precipitation minus evapotranspiration as proxies for changes in runoff, or fresh water supply. Population growth changes according to several Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) storylines are used as proxies for changes in fresh water demand by 2025, 2050 and 2100. These freshwater supply and demand projections are then combined to yield estimates of per capita water availability aggregated by watershed and political unit. Results suggest that important insights might be extracted from the use of the process developed here, notably including the identification of the globe s most vulnerable regions in need of more detailed analysis and the relative importance of population growth versus climate change in in altering future freshwater supplies. However, these are only exemplary insights and, as such, could be considered hypotheses that should be rigorously tested with multiple climate models, multiple observational climate datasets, and more comprehensive population change storylines.

Parish, Esther S [ORNL; Kodra, Evan [Northeastern University; Ganguly, Auroop R [Northeastern University; Steinhaeuser, Karsten [University of Minnesota

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Simulating the Biogeochemical and Biogeophysical Impacts of Transient Land Cover Change and Wood Harvest in the Community Climate System Model (CCSM4) from 1850 to 2100  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

To assess the climate impacts of historical and projected land cover change in the Community Climate System Model, version 4 (CCSM4), new time series of transient Community Land Model, version 4 (CLM4) plant functional ...

Lawrence, Peter J.; Feddema, Johannes J.; Bonan, Gordon B.; Meehl, Gerald A.; O’ Neill, Brian C.; Oleson, Keith W.; Levis, Samuel; Lawrence, David M.; Kluzek, Erik; Lindsay, Keith

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Modeling Water Resource Systems under Climate Change: IGSM-WRS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Through the integration of a Water Resource System (WRS) component, the MIT Integrated Global System Model (IGSM) framework has been enhanced to study the effects of climate change on managed water-resource systems. ...

Strzepek, K.

72

Analysis of U.S. Water Resources under Climate Change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The MIT Integrated Global System Model (IGSM) framework, extended to include a Water Resource System (WRS) component, is applied to an integrated assessment of effects of alternative climate policy scenarios on U.S. water ...

Blanc, E.

73

Economic impacts of climate change on water resources in the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a global response to climate change. To this end, the Program brings together an interdisciplinary group: Massachusetts Institute of Technology 77 Massachusetts Avenue, E19-411 Cambridge, MA 02139 (USA) Location associated with changes in water supply and demand as influenced by climate change. Water balances were

74

Influence of Dynamic Land Use and Land Cover Change on Simulated Global Terrestrial Carbon and Nitrogen Cycles, Climate-carbon Cycle Feedbacks, and Interactions with Rising CO2 and Anthropogenic Nitrogen Deposition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Previous work has demonstrated the sensitivity of terrestrial net carbon exchange to disturbance history and land use patterns at the scale of individual sites or regions. Here we show the influence of land use and land cover dynamics over the historical period 1850-present on global-scale carbon, nutrient, water, and energy fluxes. We also explore the spatial and temporal details of interactions among land use and disturbance history, rising atmospheric carbon dioxide consentation, and increasing anthropogenic nitrogen deposition. Our simulations show that these interactions are significant, and that their importance grows over time, expressed as a fraction of the independent forcing terms. We conclude with an analysis of the influence of these interactions on the sign and magnitude of global climate-carbon cycle feedbacks.

Thornton, Peter E [ORNL; Hoffman, Forrest M [ORNL; Hurtt, George C [University of Hew Hampshire

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Global climate change, land management, and biosolids application to semiarid grasslands  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Global climate change combined with improper land management, including over-grazing, can lead to a severe reduction in plant cover and soil productivity. This process is especially common in arid and semiarid regions with sparse vegetation cover. New and innovative methods of land management are needed to restore and maintain these ecosystems in a productive and sustainable state. Research conducted in New Mexico on the Rio Puerco Resource Area and the Sevilleta National Wildlife Refuge has shown that biosolids (municipal sewage sludge) application to semiarid grasslands can increase soil nutrient availability, increase plant cover and productivity, and decrease surface runoff and soil erosion without harming environmental quality.

Loftin, S.R. [Forest Service, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Rocky Mountain Forest and Range Experiment Station

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

76

Three Essays on the Impact of Climate Change and Weather Extremes on the United States' Agriculture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Changes on California Agriculture, California ClimateProductivity Growth in U.S. Agriculture, Economic BriefClimate, Water, and Agriculture, Land Economics, Vol.79(3),

Le, Phu Viet

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Effects of Climate Variability and Change on Mountain Water Resources in the Western U.S.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The western U.S. derives its water resources predominantly from cold season precipitation and storage in snowpack along the narrow Cascades and Sierra ranges, and the Rocky Mountains. Hydroclimate is modulated by the diverse orographic features across the region. Precipitation, runoff, and water demand generally peaks during winter, spring, and summer respectively. Such phase differences between water supply and demand create a necessity for water management, which is reflected by major development in irrigation, hydropower production, and flood control during the past 50 years. Because water resources have been essential to the economic development and environmental well being of the western states, it is worrisome that recent studies suggest that global warming may exert significant impacts on snowpack and streamflow, which may seriously affect water resources in the western U.S. in the 21st century (e.g., Leung and Wigmosta 1999; Leung and Ghan 1999; Mile et al. 2000; Leung et al. 2002a; Miller et al. 2002). To understand how climate change may affect mountain water resources, we have taken the approach of ?end-to-end? assessment where simulations of current and future climate produced by global climate models (GCMs) are downscaled using regional climate models (RCMs), which then provide atmospheric conditions for assessing water impacts using hydrologic models (e.g., Leung and Wigmosta 1999; Miller et al. 2000; Wood et al. 2002) and water management models (e.g., Hamlet and Lettenmaier 1999; Payne et al. 2002). This suite of models guides us through a comprehensive and global view of the effects of greenhouse warming on the atmosphere-ocean-land system to regional climate change, hydrologic response in river basins and watersheds, and reservoir management. The latter converts hydrologic response to impacts on water management objectives and enables the evaluation of adaptation strategies through modifications to existing reservoir operating rules.

Leung, Lai R.

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

The effects of climate change and extreme weather events on land use  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

scenario anticipates a diminished water supply in the future.Thus, to safeguard future income from events such as heavy rainfall, cold spells, and heat waves. Implementing sustainable land management (SLM was tested as a water conservation measure. Mulching reduces evaporation in the short term, providing

Richner, Heinz

79

Adapting to Climate ChangeAdapting to Climate Change ExtremeExtreme Water Levels, Invasive Species andWater Levels, Invasive Species and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Adapting to Climate ChangeAdapting to Climate Change ­­ ExtremeExtreme Water Levels, Invasive." IPCC Risk management is the framework to discuss adaptation to climate change impacts. Risk The Water Resources Working Group will assess and synthesize climate change impacts to Wisconsin's water

Sheridan, Jennifer

80

Predicted change in global secondary organic aerosol concentrations in response to future climate, emissions, and land use change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The sensitivity of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) concentration to changes in climate and emissions is investigated using a coupled global atmosphere-land model driven by the year 2100 IPCC A1B scenario predictions. The ...

Heald, C. L.; Henze, D. K.; Horowitz, L. W.; Feddema, Johannes J.; Lamarque, J. F.; Guenther, A.; Hess, P. G.; Vitt, F.; Seinfeld, J. H.; Goldstein, A. H.; Fung, I.

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land water climate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

OUR FUTURE WITH WEATHER, CLIMATE AND WATER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

country, territory, city or area or of its authorities, or concerning the delimitation of its frontiers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .....24 Energy and Climate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .....28 Sustainable Cities

Stoffelen, Ad

82

Alaska Division of Mining Land and Water | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectricEnergy InformationTuri BiomassWheelerLand and Water Jump to:

83

Developing a High-Resolution Texas Water and Climate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for hyperresolution: global food production; water resources sustainability; flood, drought, and climate change and vegetation; · landatmospheric interactions; soil moisture & evapotranspiration; · inclusion of water quality as part of the biogeochemical cycle; · representation of human impacts from water management; · utilizing

Yang, Zong-Liang

84

Irrigation cooling effect: Regional climate forcing by land-use change Lara M. Kueppers,1,2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of temperature. The potentially confounding impact of land-cover and land- use change on trends in temperature signal caused by greenhouse gas increases. Citation: Kueppers, L.M., M. A. Snyder, and L. C. Sloan (2007-use change are known to alter local, regional and global climate. For example, conversion of natural vegeta

Kueppers, Lara M.

85

DECEMBER 2008 WATER QUALITY AND LAND USE: IMPLICATIONS FOR REGULATION AND  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DECEMBER 2008 WATER QUALITY AND LAND USE: IMPLICATIONS FOR REGULATION AND URBAN PLANNING WRRI Technical Completion Report No. 346 Gwendolyn A. Aldrich Janie Chermak Jennifer A. Thacher NEW MEXICO WATER-0001 Telephone (505) 646-4337 FAX (505) 646-6418 email: nmwrri@wrri.nmsu.edu #12;WATER QUALITY AND LAND USE

Johnson, Eric E.

86

Water Consumption Footprint and Land Requirements of Large-Scale Alternative  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the lifecycle green and blue water consumption footprints of producing: MD from conventional crude oil; Fischer on crude oil and the greenhouse gas intensity of transportation. However, the water and land resourceWater Consumption Footprint and Land Requirements of Large-Scale Alternative Diesel and Jet Fuel

87

Sensitivity of Global Tropical Climate to Land Surface Processes: Mean State and Interannual Variability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to be made in a system that allows for atmosphere­ocean interactions. 1. Introduction Future projections influence on the surface energy and water budgets. The sensitivity to those processes is represented in the intensity of equatorial Pacific trades modified by convection over land. The results further demonstrate

Xue, Yongkang

88

Permits and Easements for Construction and Related Activities on Public Lands and Waters (Iowa)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

These rules establish procedures and regulate the evaluation and issuance of permits for construction or other related activities that alter the physical characteristics of public lands and waters...

89

Third Annual Report The Climate, Water, and Carbon Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

i Third Annual Report The Climate, Water, and Carbon Program A Targeted Investment in Excellence, Water, and Carbon Program (CWC) is pleased to provide this Third Annual Report for review by OAA and OR the CWC. These groups include: CWC Advisory Board: Heather Allen, Department of Chemistry, MPS, allen

Howat, Ian M.

90

Water vapor and the dynamics of climate changes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Water vapor is not only Earth's dominant greenhouse gas. Through the release of latent heat when it condenses, it also plays an active role in dynamic processes that shape the global circulation of the atmosphere and thus climate. Here we present an overview of how latent heat release affects atmosphere dynamics in a broad range of climates, ranging from extremely cold to extremely warm. Contrary to widely held beliefs, atmospheric circulation statistics can change non-monotonically with global-mean surface temperature, in part because of dynamic effects of water vapor. For example, the strengths of the tropical Hadley circulation and of zonally asymmetric tropical circulations, as well as the kinetic energy of extratropical baroclinic eddies, can be lower than they presently are both in much warmer climates and in much colder climates. We discuss how latent heat release is implicated in such circulation changes, particularly through its effect on the atmospheric static stability, and we illustrate the circul...

Schneider, Tapio; Levine, Xavier

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Integrated assessment of global water scarcity over the 21st century under multiple climate change mitigation policies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Water scarcity conditions over the 21st century both globally and regionally are assessed in the context of climate change and climate mitigation policies, by estimating both water availability and water demand within the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM), a leading community integrated assessment model of energy, agriculture, climate, and water. To quantify changes in future water availability, a new gridded water-balance global hydrologic model namely, the Global Water Availability Model (GWAM) is developed and evaluated. Global water demands for six major demand sectors (irrigation, livestock, domestic, electricity generation, primary energy production, and manufacturing) are modeled in GCAM at the regional scale (14 geopolitical regions, 151 sub-regions) and then spatially downscaled to 0.5 o x 0.5o resolution to match the scale of GWAM. Using a baseline scenario (i.e., no climate change mitigation policy) with radiative forcing reaching 8.8 W/m2 (equivalent to the SRES A1Fi emission scenario) and three climate policy scenarios with increasing mitigation stringency of 7.7, 5.5, and 4.2 W/m2 (equivalent to the SRES A2, B2, and B1 emission scenarios, respectively), we investigate the effects of emission mitigation policies on water scarcity. Two carbon tax regimes (a universal carbon tax (UCT) which includes land use change emissions, and a fossil fuel and industrial emissions carbon tax (FFICT) which excludes land use change emissions) are analyzed. The baseline scenario results in more than half of the world population living under extreme water scarcity by the end of the 21st century. Additionally, in years 2050 and 2095, 36% (28%) and 44% (39%) of the global population, respectively, is projected to live in grid cells (in basins) that will experience greater water demands than the amount of available water in a year (i.e., the water scarcity index (WSI) > 1.0). When comparing the climate policy scenarios to the baseline scenario while maintaining the same baseline socioeconomic assumptions, water scarcity declines under a UCT mitigation policy but increases with a FFICT mitigation scenario by the year 2095 particularly with more stringent climate mitigation targets. Under the FFICT scenario, water scarcity is projected to increase driven by higher water demands for bio-energy crops.

Hejazi, Mohamad I.; Edmonds, James A.; Clarke, Leon E.; Kyle, G. Page; Davies, Evan; Chaturvedi, Vaibhav; Wise, Marshall A.; Patel, Pralit L.; Eom, Jiyong; Calvin, Katherine V.

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Florida Environmental Land and Water Management Act (Florida)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The State Land Planning Agency, established within the Department of Economic Opportunity, has the authority to oversee land planning, zoning, and development activities in the state. The Agency is...

93

Graduate Opportunities in Earth Systems Modeling and Climate Impacts on Hydrology and Water Resources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Graduate Opportunities in Earth Systems Modeling and Climate Impacts on Hydrology and Water research assistantships available in the general area of earth systems modeling and climate impacts

94

Ice, Snow and Water: impacts of climate change on California and Himalayan Asia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Climate Change on Water, Biodiversity and LivelihoodsDallas 5. The United Nations World Water Development Report3 (2009) Water in a Changing World Unesco Publishing (

Fenner, R. A.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

On the connection between continental-scale land surface processes and the tropical climate in a coupled ocean-atmosphere-land system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The impact of global tropical climate to perturbations in land surface processes (LSP) are evaluated using perturbations given by different LSP representations of continental-scale in a global climate model that includes atmosphere-ocean interactions. One representation is a simple land scheme, which specifies climatological albedos and soil moisture availability. The other representation is the more comprehensive Simplified Simple Biosphere Model, which allows for interactive soil moisture and vegetation biophysical processes. The results demonstrate that LSP processes such as interactive soil moisture and vegetation biophysical processes have strong impacts on the seasonal mean states and seasonal cycles of global precipitation, clouds, and surface air temperature. The impact is especially significant over the tropical Pacific. To explore the mechanisms for such impact, different LSP representations are confined to selected continental-scale regions where strong interactions of climate-vegetation biophysical processes are present. We find that the largest impact is mainly from LSP perturbations over the tropical African continent. The impact is through anomalous convective heating in tropical Africa due to changes in the surface heat fluxes, which in turn affect basinwide teleconnections in the Pacific through equatorial wave dynamics. The modifications in the equatorial Pacific climate are further enhanced by strong air-sea coupling between surface wind stress and upwelling, as well as effect of ocean memory. Our results further suggest that correct representations of land surface processes, land use change and the associated changes in the deep convection over tropical Africa are crucial to reducing the uncertainty when performing future climate projections under different climate change scenarios.

Ma, Hsi-Yen; Mechoso, C. R.; Xue, Yongkang; Xiao, Heng; Neelin, David; Ji, Xuan

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

96

Adapting California's water management to climate change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

storage, water transfers, conservation, recycling, and desalination to meet changing demands. These same settlers had fewer intellectual, organizational, and economic resources to adapt than present

Pasternack, Gregory B.

97

Water and Climate 1. Peter Rhines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

affects 2 billion people · water-borne diseases kill ... · Environmental crises..... · global warming · 5 Human water resources and environmental tension 1 El ciclo hidrológico mundial 2 Transporte de: the layered oceans and atmosphere · convection: how to move energy, mass, chemical tracers · general

98

WATER AND ENERGY SECTOR VULNERABILITY TO CLIMATE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of California. This paper describes the development and results from an integrated water resource management application includes management of reservoirs, run-of-river hydropower plants, water supply demand locations. Reservoir operations adapt to capture earlier and greater runoff volumes that result from earlier

99

Sustainable Food Sustainable Water Land Use & Wildlife Culture & Commun ble Transport Sustainable Materials Local & Sustainable Food Sustainable Wat  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sustainable Food Sustainable Water Land Use & Wildlife Culture & Commun ble Transport Sustainable Materials Local & Sustainable Food Sustainable Wat appiness Zero Carbon Zero Waste Sustainable Transport Sustainable Materia munity Equity & Local Economy Health & Happiness Zero Carbon Zero Was Water Land Use

Netoff, Theoden

100

Uncertainty in projected impacts of climate change on water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Global Carbon Project · Scenarios trends are averages across all models available for each scenario class1928 2000 Uncertainty in projected impacts of climate change on water Uncertainty in projected-2004Observed Changes: 1970-2004 · High confidence changes in: ­ rainfall intensity ­ extreme temperatures

Maurer,. Edwin P.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land water climate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

ORIGINAL PAPER Managing climate change risks in New York City's water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and wastewater treatment systems, has developed a climate risk management framework through its Climate Change to the effects of climate change must become a regular part of planning for water supply, sewer, wastewaterORIGINAL PAPER Managing climate change risks in New York City's water system: assessment

102

Climate and Land Use Change Processes in East Africa While some regions of East Africa are being preserved as natural areas, others, including the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Climate and Land Use Change Processes in East Africa While some regions of East Africa are being to agriculture. Some members of the Maasai tribe, traditionally a pastoral people, are changing to changes in climate. The land use box will involve further modeling of the effects of these concurrent

103

Development based climate change adaptation and mitigation-conceptual...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

countries AgencyCompany Organization: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) Sector: Climate, Energy, Land, Water Topics: Adaptation, Co-benefits assessment, -...

104

Improving the Water Component of an Agricultural Climate Change Assessment : Issues from the Standpoint of Agricultural Economists  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Improving the Water Component of an Agricultural Climate Change Assessment : Issues from The National Global Climate Change Research Program is supporting appraisals of water and agriculture among assessment. Key Terms; Economics, Climate Change Assessment, Agriculture, Irrigation, Water use tradeoffs

McCarl, Bruce A.

105

Environmental Tracers for Determining Water Resource Vulnerability to Climate Change  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Predicted changes in the climate will have profound impacts on water availability in the Western US, but large uncertainties exist in our ability to predict how natural and engineered hydrological systems will respond. Most predictions suggest that the impacts of climate change on California water resources are likely to include a decrease in the percentage of precipitation that falls as snow, earlier onset of snow-pack melting, and an increase in the number of rain on snow events. These processes will require changes in infrastructure for water storage and flood control, since much of our current water supply system is built around the storage of winter precipitation as mountain snow pack. Alpine aquifers play a critical role by storing and releasing snowmelt as baseflow to streams long after seasonal precipitation and the disappearance of the snow pack, and in this manner significantly impact the stream flow that drives our water distribution systems. Mountain groundwater recharge and, in particular, the contribution of snowmelt to recharge and baseflow, has been identified as a potentially significant effect missing from current climate change impact studies. The goal of this work is to understand the behavior of critical hydrologic systems, with an emphasis on providing ground truth for next generation models of climate-water system interactions by implementing LLNL capabilities in environmental tracer and isotopic science. We are using noble gas concentrations and multiple isotopic tracers ({sup 3}H/{sup 3}He, {sup 35}S, {sup 222}Rn, {sup 2}H/{sup 1}H, {sup 18}O/{sup 16}O, and {sup 13}C/{sup 12}C) in groundwater and stream water in a small alpine catchment to (1) provide a snapshot of temperature, altitude, and physical processes at the time of recharge, (2) determine subsurface residence times (over time scales ranging from months to decades) of different groundwater age components, and (3) deconvolve the contribution of these different groundwater components to alpine stream baseflow. This research is showing that groundwater in alpine areas spends between a few years to several decades in the saturated zone below the surface, before feeding into streams or being pumped for use. This lag time may act to reduce the impact on water resources from extreme wet or dry years. Furthermore, our measurements show that the temperature of water when it reaches the water table during recharge is 4 to 9 degrees higher than would be expected for direct influx of snowmelt, and that recharge likely occurs over diffuse vegetated areas, rather than along exposed rock faces and fractures. These discoveries have implications for how alpine basins will respond to climate effects that lead to more rain than snow and earlier snow pack melting.

Singleton, M

2009-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

106

Terrestrial Water Relations & Climate ChangeTerrestrial Water Relations & Climate Change Jeffrey M Warren, Ph.D.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

warmermore frequent and longer lasting in a future warmer climate" "...precipitation intensity is projected Report "...very likely that heat waves will be more intense, more frequent and longer lasting in a future carbon gain. Leaf water loss Hubbard et al. 2001 #12;9 belowground processesbelowground processes

Gray, Matthew

107

The mutagenic potential of soil and runoff water from land treatment of three hazardous industrial wastes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of agricultural chemicals and the performance of hazardous waste land treatment facilities. This study used a bioassay directed chemical analysis protocol to monitor the environmental fate of mutagenic constituents from a simulated land treatment demonstration...THE MUTAGENIC POTENTIAL OF SOIL AND RUNOFF WATER FROM LAND TREATMENT OF THREE HAZARDOUS INDUSTRIAL WASTES A Thesis by PHEBE DAYOL Submitted to the Graduate College of Te xa s ASM Un i ver s i ty in partial fulfillment of the requirement...

Davol, Phebe

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Texas sea breeze: fact or fiction? : an investigation of Texas climate records for a sea-land breeze signature  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to the region near the coast. The manner in which temperature, humidity, and wind should behave is influenced by the sea-land breeze on the climatic scale is first established. As a whole the coastal stations show varying amounts of evidence of a signature...

Ostermeier, Gregory

2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

109

Impact of land use change on the local climate over the Tibetan Plateau  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Observational data show that the remotely sensed leaf area index (LAI) has a significant downward trend over the east Tibetan Plateau (TP), while a warming trend is found in the same area. Further analysis indicates that this warming trend mainly results from the nighttime warming. The Single-Column Atmosphere Model (SCAM) version 3.1 developed by the National Center for Atmospheric Research is used to investigate the role of land use change in the TP local climate system and isolate the contribution of land use change to the warming. Two sets of SCAM simulations were performed at the Xinghai station that is located near the center of the TP Sanjiang (three rivers) Nature Reserve where the downward LAI trend is largest. These simulations were forced with the high and low LAIs. The modeling results indicate that, when the LAI changes from high to low, the daytime temperature has a slight decrease, while the nighttime temperature increases significantly, which is consistent with the observations. The modeling results further show that the lower surface roughness length plays a significant role in affecting the nighttime temperature increase.

Jin, J.; Lu, S.; Li, S.; Miller, N.L.

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

IEEE JOURNAL OF SELECTED TOPICS IN APPLIED EARTH OBSERVATIONS AND REMOTE SENSING, VOL. 3, NO. 3, SEPTEMBER 2010 219 Impacts of Climate Change and Land Use Changes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

governed by eco- nomic development and air pollution regulations [3]. Variations in incident solar, SEPTEMBER 2010 219 Impacts of Climate Change and Land Use Changes on Land Surface Radiation and Energy Budgets Abstract--Land surface radiation and energy budgets are critical to address a variety

Liang, Shunlin

111

Future Climate Change Impacts on New Mexico's Mountain Sources of Water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

133 Future Climate Change Impacts on New Mexico's Mountain Sources of Water BEYONDTHEYEAROFWATER Conference. FUTURE CLIMATE CHANGE IMPACTS ON NEW MEXICO'S MOUNTAIN SOURCES OF WATER Albert Rango USDA of future climate change and how that is going to impact New Mexico's mountain sources of water. I hope

Johnson, Eric E.

112

How many people can China feed? : assessing the impact of land and water constraints  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Land and water resources are becoming increasingly scarce in China, threatening the nation's ability to feed its growing population. The limitations of these resources must be considered simultaneously to determine China's ...

Watson, Amy Beth, 1980-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Terrestrial water mass load changes from Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of changes in continental water storage, Global Planet.system modeling studies, Water Resour. Res. , 35(2), 583 Time variations of land water storage from an inversion of 2

Seo, K.-W.; Wilson, C. R; Famiglietti, J. S; Chen, J. L; Rodell, M.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

The CSIRO Mk3L climate system model v1.0 coupled to the CABLE land surface scheme v1.4b: evaluation of the control climatology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The CSIRO Mk3L climate system model, a reduced-resolution coupled general circulation model, has previously been described in this journal. The model is configured for millennium scale or multiple century scale simulations. This paper reports the impact of replacing the relatively simple land surface scheme that is the default parameterisation in Mk3L with a sophisticated land surface model that simulates the terrestrial energy, water and carbon balance in a physically and biologically consistent way. An evaluation of the new model s near-surface climatology highlights strengths and weaknesses, but overall the atmospheric variables, including the near-surface air temperature and precipitation, are simulated well. The impact of the more sophisticated land surface model on existing variables is relatively small, but generally positive. More significantly, the new land surface scheme allows an examination of surface carbon-related quantities including net primary productivity which adds significantly to the capacity of Mk3L. Overall, results demonstrate that this reduced-resolution climate model is a good foundation for exploring long time scale phenomena. The addition of the more sophisticated land surface model enables an exploration of important Earth System questions including land cover change and abrupt changes in terrestrial carbon storage.

Mao, Jiafu [ORNL; Phipps, S.J. [University of New South Wales; Pitman, A.J. [University of New South Wales; Wang, Yingping [CSIRO Marine and Atmospheric Research; Abramowitz, G. [University of New South Wales; Pak, B. [CSIRO Marine and Atmospheric Research

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

THE STATE OF THE ENVIRONMENT IN ALLEGHENY COUNTY: Land, Water and Air  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Figure II-1: 1996 Water Pollution Inventory for the US II-2 Figure III-1: Daily Air Quality IndexTHE STATE OF THE ENVIRONMENT IN ALLEGHENY COUNTY: Land, Water and Air MARCH, 2001 Jose R. Argueta Nutrient Effects: II-8 Nutrient Sources II-8 Metals and AMD II-9 Conclusions II-12 PART III: AIR QUALITY

Sibille, Etienne

116

Had my water gone bad? Family members have lived on our land  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to find out. Hated to spend the money, but it gave me peace of mind. " " " We're protecting our family. We for more help. Some labs will do the sampling for you, right at your home. 4. After you collect your waterHad my water gone bad? Family members have lived on our land for generations. Never had a problem

Rhode Island, University of

117

CLIMATE CHANGE IMPACTS ON MUNICIPAL, MINING, AND AGRICULTURAL WATER SUPPLIES IN CHILE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NorthernAmericanmarketduring winter. This region relies entirely on snow and ice- melt streams to provide irrigation water. Santiago-likeareas,humidsubtropicalregions, temperate zones, oceanic-dominated climates, sub- polar areas, alpine tundra, and ice caps. These climates

118

Reservoir Management in Mediterranean Climates through the European Water Framework Directive  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

By 2015, member states to the Water Framework Directive arestate and a Mediterranean-climate country, surface water andPlans member states may designate surface water bodies as

O'Reilly, Clare; Silberblatt, Rafael

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Intercomparison of the Cloud Water Phase among Global Climate Models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mixed-phase clouds (clouds that consist of both cloud droplets and ice crystals) are frequently present in the Earths atmosphere and influence the Earths energy budget through their radiative properties, which are highly dependent on the cloud water phase. In this study, the phase partitioning of cloud water is compared among six global climate models (GCMs) and with Cloud and Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization retrievals. It is found that the GCMs predict vastly different distributions of cloud phase for a given temperature, and none of them are capable of reproducing the spatial distribution or magnitude of the observed phase partitioning. While some GCMs produced liquid water paths comparable to satellite observations, they all failed to preserve sufficient liquid water at mixed-phase cloud temperatures. Our results suggest that validating GCMs using only the vertically integrated water contents could lead to amplified differences in cloud radiative feedback. The sensitivity of the simulated cloud phase in GCMs to the choice of heterogeneous ice nucleation parameterization is also investigated. The response to a change in ice nucleation is quite different for each GCM, and the implementation of the same ice nucleation parameterization in all models does not reduce the spread in simulated phase among GCMs. The results suggest that processes subsequent to ice nucleation are at least as important in determining phase and should be the focus of future studies aimed at understanding and reducing differences among the models.

Komurcu, Muge; Storelvmo, Trude; Tan, Ivy; Lohmann, U.; Yun, Yuxing; Penner, Joyce E.; Wang, Yong; Liu, Xiaohong; Takemura, T.

2014-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

120

Q&A on "Impacts of Wind Farms on Land Surface Temperature" Published by Nature Climate Change on April 29, 2012  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Q&A on "Impacts of Wind Farms on Land Surface Temperature" Published by Nature Climate Change? This study presents the first observational evidence of wind farm impacts on land surface temperature downwind of wind farms. Why do the operating wind turbines warm nighttime temperature? This warming effect

Zhou, Liming

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land water climate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Weather and ClimateWeather and Climate Impacts on WaterImpacts on Water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

://ccc.atmos.colostate.edu Presented at the South Platte Forum, Longmont, CO, October 26, 2005 Prepared by Odie Bliss #12;#12;Water;St. Vrain Creek below Longmont #12;South Platte River at Fort Morgan #12;Reservoir Storage Levels

122

Modeling Climate-Water Impacts on Electricity Sector Capacity Expansion: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Climate change has the potential to exacerbate water availability concerns for thermal power plant cooling, which is responsible for 41% of U.S. water withdrawals. This analysis describes an initial link between climate, water, and electricity systems using the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS) electricity system capacity expansion model. Average surface water projections from Coupled Model Intercomparison Project 3 (CMIP3) data are applied to surface water rights available to new generating capacity in ReEDS, and electric sector growth is compared with and without climate-influenced water rights. The mean climate projection has only a small impact on national or regional capacity growth and water use because most regions have sufficient unappropriated or previously retired water rights to offset climate impacts. Climate impacts are notable in southwestern states that purchase fewer water rights and obtain a greater share from wastewater and other higher-cost water resources. The electric sector climate impacts demonstrated herein establish a methodology to be later exercised with more extreme climate scenarios and a more rigorous representation of legal and physical water availability.

Cohen, S. M.; Macknick, J.; Averyt, K.; Meldrum, J.

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Interactions of Water and Energy Mediate Responses of High-Latitude Terrestrial Ecosystems to Climate Change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A. Arain, 2007: Impacts of peat and vegetation on permafrostdecomposition, water balance, and peat accumulation. Earth2008: High sensitivity of peat decomposition to climate

Subin, Zachary Marc

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Water resources planning under climate change and variability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

costs from climate change exist in agriculture becauseagriculture studies for calculating costs associated with climate changeClimate change adaptation studies have been undertaken in sectors as diverse as agriculture (

O'Hara, Jeffrey Keith

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Modeling Potential Equilibrium States of Vegetation and Terrestrial Water Cycle of Mesoamerica under Climate Change Scenarios*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

precipitation, the impacts of climate change on vegetation and water cycle are predicted with relatively low under Climate Change Scenarios* PABLO IMBACH,1 LUIS MOLINA,1 BRUNO LOCATELLI,# OLIVIER ROUPSARD,1,@ GIL MAHE´ ,& RONALD NEILSON,**,&& LENIN CORRALES,11 MARKO SCHOLZE,## AND PHILIPPE CIAIS @@ 1 Climate Change

Boyer, Edmond

126

Water Availability, Degree Days, and the Potential Impact of Climate Change on Irrigated Agriculture in California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

California, climate change is likely to affect agriculture in two distinct ways. One pathway is the directWater Availability, Degree Days, and the Potential Impact of Climate Change on Irrigated influences on value such as soil quality, to examine the potential effects of climate change on irrigated

Fisher, Anthony C.

127

Integrated Assessment of Hadley Centre (HadCM2) Climate Change Projections on Agricultural Productivity and Irrigation Water Supply in the Conterminous United States.I. Climate change scenarios and impacts on irrigation water supply simulated with the HUMUS model.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes methodology and results of a study by researchers at PNNL contributing to the water sector study of the U.S. National Assessment of Climate Change. The vulnerability of water resources in the conterminous U.S. to climate change in 10-y periods centered on 2030 and 2095--as projected by the HadCM2 general circulation model--was modeled with HUMUS (Hydrologic Unit Model of the U.S.). HUMUS consists of a GIS that provides data on soils, land use and climate to drive the hydrology model Soil Water Assessment Tool (SWAT). The modeling was done at the scale of the 2101 8-digit USGS hydrologic unit areas (HUA). Results are aggregated to the 4-digit and 2-digit (Major Water Resource Region, MWRR) scales for various purposes. Daily records of temperature and precipitation for 1961-1990 provided the baseline climate. Water yields (WY)--sum of surface and subsurface runoff--increases from the baseline period over most of the U.S. in 2030 and 2095. In 2030, WY increases in the western US and decreases in the central and southeast regions. Notably, WY increases by 139 mm from baseline in the Pacific NW. Decreased WY is projected for the Lower Mississippi and Texas Gulf basins, driven by higher temperatures and reduced precipitation. The HadCM2 2095 scenario projects a climate significantly wetter than baseline, resulting in WY increases of 38%. WY increases are projected throughout the eastern U.S. WY also increases in the western U.S. Climate change also affects the seasonality of the hydrologic cycle. Early snowmelt is induced in western basins, leading to dramatically increased WYs in late winter and early spring. The simulations were run at current (365 ppm) and elevated (560 ppm) atmospheric CO2 concentrations to account for the potential impacts of the CO2-fertilization effect. The effects of climate change scenario were considerably greater than those due to elevated CO2 but the latter, overall, decreased losses and augmented increases in water yield.

Rosenberg, Norman J.; Brown, Robert A.; Izaurralde, R Cesar C.; Thomson, Allison M.

2003-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

128

Collaborative Research: The Influence of Cloud Microphysics and Radiation on the Response of Water Vapor and Clouds to Climate Change  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Uncertainties in representing the atmospheric water cycle are major obstacles to an accurate prediction of future climate. This project focused on addressing some of these uncertainties by implementing new physics for convection and radiation into the NCAR climate model. To better understand and eventually better represent these processes, we modified CAM3.5 to use the convection and cloud schemes developed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and the RRTMG rapid radiation code for global models developed by Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. (AER). The impact of the new physics on the CAM3.5 simulation of convection on diurnal and intra-seasonal scales, intra-seasonal oscillations and the distribution of water vapor has been investigated. The effect of the MIT and AER physics also has been tested in the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) regional forecast model. It has been found that the application of the AER radiation and MIT convection produces significant improvements in the modeled diurnal cycle of convection, especially over land, in the NCAR climate model. However, both the standard CAM3.5 (hereinafter STD) and the modified CAM3.5 with the new physics (hereinafter MOD) are still unable to capture the proper spectrum and propagating characteristics of the intra-seasonal oscillations (ISOs). The new physics methods modify, but do not substantially improve, the distribution of upper tropospheric water vapor relative to satellite measurements.

Dr. Kerry Emanuel; Michael J. Iacono

2011-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

129

Impacts of Climate Change and Population Growth on Water Stress Becky Witte  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Impacts of Climate Change and Population Growth on Water Stress by Becky Witte Master's Student shift toward urban areas, current water and wastewater treatment systems may not be adequate to address climate change, energy consumption, pollution, and impacts of human activities on ecosystems. Addressing

Fay, Noah

130

Role of Climate Variability in Modulating the Surface Water and Groundwater Interaction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from the ECHAM4.5 general circulation model indicate that it is possible to quantify groundwater variability; Groundwater-surface water interaction; Hydroclimatology; Forecasting. Introduction ClimateRole of Climate Variability in Modulating the Surface Water and Groundwater Interaction over

Arumugam, Sankar

131

Climate change and water supply, management and use: A literature review  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There is evidence that atmospheric concentrations Of C0{sub 2}, tropospheric 0{sub 3}, and CH{sub 4}, among other gases that contribute to the greenhouse effect, have increased in recent decades, and that these changes may induce changes in global air temperatures and regional climate features in coming years. A literature review was conducted to sample the literature base on which our understanding of the water resource impacts of climate change rests. Water resource issues likely to be important include hydrologic response to climate change, the resilience of water supply systems to changing climatic and hydrologic conditions, and the effects of climate change on water quality and water uses (such as navigation and energy generation). A computer-assisted search of literature on the effects of climate change on these subjects was conducted. All studies were classified by type of paper (e.g., review, discussion, case study), region, water resource variable studied, and source of climate scenario. The resulting bibliography containing more than 200 references was largely annotated. Case studies of potential hydrologic impacts have been more common than studies of impacts on water management or water use, but this apparent research gap is decreasing. Case studies demonstrating methods of incorporating potential risks of climate change into water project planning and management have been performed. Considerable variability in regional coverage exists; the Great Lakes basin and California receive relatively more attention than such regions as New England and the Missouri River basin. General circulation model-based and hypothetical climate scenarios have been the dominant sources of climate scenarios used in case studies, although a variety of other methods for developing climate scenarios have been developed.

Chang, L.H.; Draves, J.D.; Hunsaker, C.T.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Climate Change Assessment for Urban Water Resource Availability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the past two decades, scientific evidence has predicted a significant change in the earths climatic atmosphere. Although there are many studies that demonstrate changes in the atmospheric temperatures, there are few studies that show how climate...

Martinez, Ramiro

2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

133

Post-doctoral Position Title Quantify the net global climate impacts of past and future land-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

objective is to make this protocol widely available so that other earth system modeling groups outside uses and land use changes in global earth system models, and test the impact of various implementation

Pouyanne, Nicolas

134

In the near future, Switzerland is predicted to be affected by climate change, that is bound to impact both water demand and water supply  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and agriculture increases, water supply decreases (ProClim and OcCC, 2007) as climate change alters the hydrologic of the economic impact of climate change and different adaptation strategies in the water sector is essential in Switzerland, mandated by the Federal Office for the Environment (FOEN). 4) Climate change and water resources

135

Modeling land surface processes of the midwestern United States : predicting soil moisture under a warmer climate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This dissertation seeks to quantify the response of soil moisture to climate change in the midwestern United States. To assess this response, a dynamic global vegetation model, Integrated Biosphere Simulator, was coupled ...

Winter, Jonathan (Jonathan Mark)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Changing climatic conditions in the Colorado River Basin: Implications for water resources management in the Las Vegas Valley.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Climate change affects the water available in a region. It also affects the water demand, because of the increase in temperature. A system dynamics model (more)

Dawadi, Srijana

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Ecological catastrophes: threshold responses to climate, soil, and land use drivers of the Dust Bowl  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on effects of abandoned agricultural land in a relatively small area centered on the panhandle of Oklahoma LTER and Jornada Experimental Range, USDA Agricultural Research Service, Las Cruces, NM, (3) Plant a multi-year drought. Combined with spatially-extensive cultivation and overgrazing, the drought led

138

Water resources planning under climate change and variability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Water Reserves. Journal of Environmental Economics and ManagementWater Systems. Journal of Environmental Economics and ManagementWater Reserves. Journal of Environmental Economics and Management

O'Hara, Jeffrey Keith

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Climate Change Impact on Agricultural Water Resources Variability in the Northern Highlands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

' sensitivity to climate change in the Lake Tana Basin, Ethiopia. Projected changes in precipitation climate change caused by increas- ing concentrations of carbon dioxide and other trace gases to affect runoff, the frequency and intensity of floods and droughts, soil moisture, and available water

140

Toward evaluating the effect of climate change on investments in the water resources sector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Toward evaluating the effect of climate change on investments in the water resources sector: insights from the forecast and analysis of hydrological indicators in developing countries* Kenneth of the risks of climate change and the challenges of limiting human influence on the environment

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land water climate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Estimating future global per capita water availability based on changes in climate and population  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

availability a b s t r a c t Human populations are profoundly affected by water stress, or the lack be qualitatively defined as the lack of sufficient fresh water for domestic, agri- cultural, and/or industrial in climate and/or lack of storage capacity in areas that receive variable amounts of water through- out

Minnesota, University of

142

Use of models and observations to assess trends in the 19502005 water balance and climate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) was about 50% of normal during 20002001. The ensuing drought-related water shortage led to seriousUse of models and observations to assess trends in the 19502005 water balance and climate of Upper-driven interannual (and longer) variability is evident. Evaporation and the other components of the water balance

143

Is climate driving safe drinking water availability and access to sanitation facilities? Antarpreet Jutla1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Is climate driving safe drinking water availability and access to sanitation facilities? Antarpreet that safe drinking water and adequate sanitation facilities lead to a considerable reduction in prevalence Spring, MD 2 Water, Sanitation, Hygiene and Health, Department of Public Health and Environment, World

Miami, University of

144

Land disposal of San Luis drain sediments, Panoche Water District, South Dos Palos, California  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), LFR Levine-Fricke (LFR), the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation (USBR) and the Panoche Water District, have completed a pilot-scale test of the viability of land application of selenium- (Se-) enriched San Luis Drain (SLD) sediments. The project was initiated in October 1998 by LBNL. LFR assumed the role of primary subcontractor on the project in July 2001. Substantial portions of this report, describing work performed prior to November 2000, were previously prepared by LBNL personnel. The data set, findings, and recommendations are herein updated with information collected since November 2000. Local land disposal is an attractive option due to its low cost and the proximity of large areas of available land. Two modes of disposal are being tested: (1) the application to a nearby SLD embankment, and (2) the application to and incorporation with nearby farm soils. The study of these options considers the key problems that may potentially arise from this approach. These include disturbance of SLD sediments during dredging, resulting in increased downstream Se concentrations; movement of the land-applied Se to groundwater; reduced productivity of farm crops; and Se uptake by wild and crop plants. This report describes field and laboratory activities carried out from 1998 through February 2002, and results of these investigations.

Zawislanski, Peter; Benson, Sally; TerBerg, Robert; Borglin, Sharon

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Assessment of Stormflow and Water Quality from Undisturbed and Site Prepared Forest Land in East Texas (Interim Report)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TR- 117 1981 Assessment of Stormflow and Water Quality from Undisturbed and Site Prepared Forest Land in East Texas, Interim Report M.G. DeHaven W.H. Blackburn R.W. Knight A.T. Weichert...

DeHaven, M. G.; Blackburn, W. H.; Knight, R. W.; Weichert, A. T.

146

MUREX: a land-surface eld experiment to study the annual cycle of the energy and water budgets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

was fully characterised, and surface water and energy ¯uxes, vegetation biomass, soil moisture pro shortcomings are revealed. Key words. Hydrology (evapotranspiration; soil moisture; water-energy interactionsMUREX: a land-surface ®eld experiment to study the annual cycle of the energy and water budgets J

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

147

Elevated East Antarctic outlet glaciers during warmer-than-present climates in southern Victoria Land  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Elevated East Antarctic outlet glaciers during warmer-than-present climates in southern Victoria August 2011 Keywords: McMurdo Dry Valleys Taylor Dome Taylor Glacier cosmogenic Pliocene Pleistocene We document Plio-Pleistocene changes in the level of Taylor Glacier, an outlet glacier in southern Victoria

Marchant, David R.

148

The Influence of Cloud Microphysics and Radiation on the Response of Water Vapor and Clouds to Climate Change  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Uncertainties in representing the atmospheric water cycle are major obstacles to the accurate prediction of future climate. This project focused on addressing some of these uncertainties by implementing new physics for convection and radiation into the NCAR Community Atmosphere Model (CAM). To better understand and eventually better represent these processes in this major national climate model, we modified CAM3.5 to use the convection and cloud schemes developed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and the RRTMG rapid radiation code for global climate models developed by Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. (AER). The impact of the new physics on the CAM3.5 simulation of convection on diurnal and intra-seasonal scales, on intra-seasonal oscillations and on the distribution of water vapor has been investigated. In addition, the MIT and AER physics packages have been incorporated and tested in combination within the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) regional forecast model for the purpose of evaluating and improving convective and radiative processes on time scales appropriate to weather simulations. It has been found that the application of the AER radiation and MIT convection produces significant improvements in the modeled diurnal cycle of convection, especially over land, in the NCAR climate model. However, both the standard CAM3.5 and the modified CAM3.5 with the new physics are unable to capture the proper spectrum and propagating characteristics of dynamical intra-seasonal oscillations such as the Madden-Julian Oscillation. In addition, it has been shown that the new physics methods modify, but do not substantially improve, the distribution of upper tropospheric water vapor in CAM as established through the comparison of modeled and observed satellite radiances. This suggests that continuing regional discrepancies in water vapor amounts in the climate model may not be solely related to convective or radiative processes. The major results of this project have been described in more detail in a journal article titled ??The Impacts of AER Radiation and MIT Convection on the Water Cycle Simulated by CAM3.5? that will be submitted for publication during Fall 2010.

Emanuel, Kerry; Iacono, Michael J.

2010-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

149

The mobility of water soluble organic compounds in soils from the land application of petroleum waste sludge  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE MOBILITY OF WATER SOLUBLE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN SOILS FROM THE LAND APPLICATION OF PETROLEUM WASTE SLUDGE A Thesis by GORDON BARCUS EVANS, JR. Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&l1 University in partial fulfillment... of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1979 Major Subject: Soil Science THE MOBILITY OF WATER SOLUBLE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN SOILS FROM THE LAND APPLICATION OF PETROLEUM WASTE SLUDGE A Thesis by GORDON BARCUS EVANS, JR. Approved...

Evans, Gordon Barcus

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Ecosystem feedbacks to climate change in California: Development, testing, and analysis using a coupled regional atmosphere and land-surface model (WRF3-CLM3.5)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A regional atmosphere model [Weather Research and Forecasting model version 3 (WRF3)] and a land surface model [Community Land Model, version 3.5 (CLM3.5)] were coupled to study the interactions between the atmosphere and possible future California land-cover changes. The impact was evaluated on California's climate of changes in natural vegetation under climate change and of intentional afforestation. The ability of WRF3 to simulate California's climate was assessed by comparing simulations by WRF3-CLM3.5 and WRF3-Noah to observations from 1982 to 1991. Using WRF3-CLM3.5, the authors performed six 13-yr experiments using historical and future large-scale climate boundary conditions from the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory Climate Model version 2.1 (GFDL CM2.1). The land-cover scenarios included historical and future natural vegetation from the Mapped Atmosphere-Plant-Soil System-Century 1 (MC1) dynamic vegetation model, in addition to a future 8-million-ha California afforestation scenario. Natural vegetation changes alone caused summer daily-mean 2-m air temperature changes of -0.7 to +1 C in regions without persistent snow cover, depending on the location and the type of vegetation change. Vegetation temperature changes were much larger than the 2-m air temperature changes because of the finescale spatial heterogeneity of the imposed vegetation change. Up to 30% of the magnitude of the summer daily-mean 2-m air temperature increase and 70% of the magnitude of the 1600 local time (LT) vegetation temperature increase projected under future climate change were attributable to the climate-driven shift in land cover. The authors projected that afforestation could cause local 0.2-1.2 C reductions in summer daily-mean 2-m air temperature and 2.0-3.7 C reductions in 1600 LT vegetation temperature for snow-free regions, primarily because of increased evapotranspiration. Because some of these temperature changes are of comparable magnitude to those projected under climate change this century, projections of climate and vegetation change in this region need to consider these climate-vegetation interactions.

Subin, Z.M.; Riley, W.J.; Kueppers, L.M.; Jin, J.; Christianson, D.S.; Torn, M.S.

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Water balance in the Amazon basin from a land surface model ensemble  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Despite recent advances in modeling and remote sensing of land surfaces, estimates of the global water budget are still fairly uncertain. The objective of this study is to evaluate the water budget of the Amazon basin based on several state-of-the-art land surface model (LSM) outputs. Water budget variables [total water storage (TWS), evapotranspiration (ET), surface runoff (R) and baseflow (B)] are evaluated at the basin scale using both remote sensing and in situ data. Fourteen LSMs were run using meteorological forcings at a 3-hourly time step and 1-degree spatial resolution. Three experiments are performed using precipitation which has been rescaled to match monthly global GPCP and GPCC datasets and the daily HYBAM dataset for the Amazon basin. R and B are used to force the Hydrological Modeling and Analysis Platform (HyMAP) river routing scheme and simulated discharges are compared against observations at 165 gauges. Simulated ET and TWS are compared against FLUXNET and MOD16A2 evapotranspiration, and GRACE TWS estimates in different catchments. At the basin scale, simulated ET ranges from 2.39mm.d-1 to 3.26mm.d-1 and a low spatial correlation between ET and P indicates that evapotranspiration does not depend on water availability over most of the basin. Results also show that other simulated water budget variables vary significantly as a function of both the LSM and precipitation used, but simulated TWS generally agree at the basin scale. The best water budget simulations resulted from experiments using the HYBAM dataset, mostly explained by a denser rainfall gauge network the daily rescaling.

Getirana, Augusto; Dutra, Emanuel; Guimberteau, Matthieu; Kam, Jonghun; Li, Hongyi; Decharme, Bertrand; Zhang, Zhengqiu J.; Ducharne, Agnes; Boone, Aaron; Balsamo, Gianpaolo; Rodell, Matthew; Mounirou Toure, Ally; Xue, Yongkang; Peters-Lidard, Christa D.; Kumar, Sujay V.; Arsenault, Kristi Rae; Drapeau, Guillaume; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Ronchail, Josyane; Sheffield, Justin

2014-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

152

Using NASA Remote Sensing Data to Reduce Uncertainty of Land-Use Transitions in Global Carbon-Climate Models: Data Management Plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-use transitions and their inherent uncertainty. Our plan for managing these datasets includes quality assessmentUsing NASA Remote Sensing Data to Reduce Uncertainty of Land-Use Transitions in Global Carbon-Climate Models: Data Management Plan L. Chini, G.C. Hurtt, M. Hansen, and P. Potapov Department of Geography

153

Potential climate change effects on Great Lakes hydrodynamics and water quality  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The problem of climate change has become increasingly recognized as a major environmental concern. Its impact can affect many socio-economic and ecosystem components. This book provides a state-of-the-art review of the climate change effects on lake hydrodynamics and water quality. Most of the engineering cases covered deal with the ability of existing infrastructure to cope with extreme weather conditions. The aim is to provide sufficient case studies to illustrate the advancement in modeling research on lake hydrodynamics, thermal stratification, pollutant transport and water quality by highlighting the climate change aspects in the application of these techniques.

Lam, D.C.L.; Schertzer, W.M. [eds.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Water resources planning under climate change and variability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

returns to scale for investment costs. The expectationfor the annualized investment cost is: c e = rC I 1 ? (1/(1Investment Climate Investment -- Cost -- Under Scenario

O'Hara, Jeffrey Keith

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Climate Change and Water Resources in California: The Cost of Conservation versus Supply Augmentation for the East Bay Municipal Utility District  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Climate change is projected to result in increasing water scarcity scenarios in California, and similar Mediterranean

Mourad, Bessma

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Pluralistic Modelling Approaches to Simulating Climate-Land Change Interactions in East Africa  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and the influence of large water bodies, combine with atmospheric trends such as greenhouse gas concentrations. Alexandridis4 1 Department of Forestry and Natural Resources, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47906

Illinois at Chicago, University of

157

Modeling the High Plains Aquifer's Response to Land Use and Climate Change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The High Plains Aquifer is extremely important to the economic life of Kansas and the surrounding states, but water is being withdrawn from the aquifer much faster than it is being recharged. Due to the importance of ...

Dermyer, Reuben

2011-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

158

Evaluating climatic and soil water controls on evapotranspiration at two Amazonian rainforest sites  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

demand and soil water availability between two sites; Manaus, in central Amazonia, where indicate that, in combination with other factors, heterogeneity in soil water retention capacity may exert strong controls on the spatial variation in forest responses to climatic change. # 2007 Elsevier B.V. All

159

A comparison of land surface model soil hydraulic properties estimated by inverse modeling and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of water in the soil. This in turn plays an important role in the water and energy cycles at the land depths in the soil column controls the partitioning of two key energy fluxes of concern in climate modelsA comparison of land surface model soil hydraulic properties estimated by inverse modeling

Small, Eric

160

Climate Change Impacts on Streamflow, Water Quality, and Best Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-efficient technologies A1B: a world with rapid economic growth based upon a balance of various energy sources Development locations Study Objectives: #12;Location of the Columbus, NE and Sioux City, IA climate stations Hydrologic Balance #12;Plant Growth Soil Temperature Pesticide Dynamics Nutrient Cycling Sedimentation Crop

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land water climate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Delays in Reducing Waterborne and Water-related Infectious Diseases in China under Climate Change  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Despite Chinas rapid progress improving water, sanitation and hygiene (WSH) infrastructure and access, in 2011, 471 million people lacked access to improved sanitation, and 401 million people lacked access to household piped water. Infectious diseases are sensitive to changes in climate, particularly temperature, and WSH conditions. To explore possible impacts of climate change on these diseases in China in 2020 and 2030, we coupled estimates of the temperature sensitivity of diarrheal disease and three vector-borne diseases, temperature projections from global climate models using four emissions pathways, WSH-infrastructure development scenarios and projected demographic changes. By 2030, the projected impacts would delay Chinas historically rapid progress toward reducing the burden of WSH-attributable infectious disease by 8-85 months. This developmental delay provides a key summary measure of the impact of climate change in China, and in other societies undergoing rapid social, economic, and environmental change.

Hodges, Maggie; Belle, Jessica; Carlton, Elizabeth; Liang, Song; Li, Huazhong; Luo, Wei; Freeman, Matthew C.; Liu, Yang; Gao, Yang; Hess, Jeremy; Remais, Justin V.

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Water resources planning under climate change and variability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Environmental Economics and Management 34:207-227 Griffin RC, Mjelde JW (2000) Valuing WaterEnvironmental Economics and Management 40:37-55 Riley JG, Scherer CR (1979) Optimal WaterEnvironmental Economics and Management 26:19-30 Loucks DP, Stedinger JR, Haith DA (1981) Water

O'Hara, Jeffrey Keith

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Soil and plant responses from land application of saline-sodic waters: Implications of management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Land application of co-produced waters from coalbed natural gas (CBNG) wells is one management option used in the Powder River Basin (PRB) of Wyoming and Montana. Unfortunately the co-produced CBNG waters may be saline and/or sodic. The objective of this study was to examine the effects of irrigation with CBNG waters on soils and plants in the PRB. Soil properties and vegetation responses resulting from 1 to 4 yr of saline sodic water (electrical conductivity (EC) 1.6-4.8 dS m{sup -1} sodium adsorption ratio (SAR), 17-57 mmol L- applications were studied during 2003 and 2004 field seasons on sites (Ustic Torriorthent Haplocambid, Haplargid and Paleargid) representing native range grasslands seeded grass hayfields and alfalfa hayfields. Parameters measured from each irrigated site were compared directly with representative non-irrigated sites. Soil chemical and physical parameters including pH, EC, SAR, exchangeable sodium percent, texture, bulk density, infiltration and Darcy flux rates, were measured at various depth intervals to 120 cm. Mulitple-year applications of saline sodic water produced consistent trends of increased soil EC AND SAR values to depths of 30 cm reduced surface infiltration rates and lowered Darcy flux rates to 120 cm. Significant differences (p {le} 0.05) were determined between irrigated and non-irrigated areas for EC, SAR infiltration rates and Darcy flux (p {le} 0.10) at most sites. Saline sodic CBNG water applications significantly increased native perennial grass biomass production and cover on irrigated as compared with non-irrigated sites; however overall species evenness decreased. Biological effects were variable and complex reflecting site-specific conditions and water and soil management strategies.

Vance, G.F.; King, L.A.; Ganjegunte, G.K. [University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY (United States). Department for Renewable Resources

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

164

Land-use transition for bioenergy and climate stabilization: model comparison of drivers, impacts and interactions with other land use based mitigation options  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study is a model comparison assessing the drivers and impacts of bioenergy production on the global land system and the interaction with other land use based mitigation options in the context of the EMF 27 project. We compare and evaluate results from three integrated assessment models (GCAM, IMAGE, and ReMIND/MAgPIE). All three models project that dedicated bioenergy crops and biomass residues are a potentially important and cost-effective component of the energy system. But bioenergy deployment levels and feedstock composition vary notably across models as do the implications for land-use and greenhouse gas emissions and the interaction with other land use based mitigation measures. Despite numerous model differences, we identify a few that are likely contributing to differences in land-use and emissions attributable to energy crop deployment.

Popp, Alexander; Rose, Steven K.; Calvin, Katherine V.; Van Vuuren, Detlef; Dietrich, Jan P.; Wise, Marshall A.; Stehfest, Eike; Humpenoder, Florian; Kyle, G. Page; Van Vliet, Jasper; Bauer, Nico; Lotze-Campen, Hermann; Klein, David; Kriegler, Elmar

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Global Climate Modeling of the Martian water cycle with improved microphysics and radiatively active water ice clouds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radiative effects of water ice clouds have noteworthy consequences on the Martian atmosphere, its thermal structure and circulation. Accordingly, the inclusion of such effects in the LMD Mars Global Climate Model (GCM) greatly modifies the simulated Martian water cycle. The intent of this paper is to address the impact of radiatively active clouds on atmospheric water vapor and ice in the GCM and improve its representation. We propose a new enhanced modeling of the water cycle, consisting of detailed cloud microphysics with dynamic condensation nuclei and a better implementation of perennial surface water ice. This physical modeling is based on tunable parameters. This new version of the GCM is compared to the Thermal Emission Spectrometer observations of the water cycle. Satisfying results are reached for both vapor and cloud opacities. However, simulations yield a lack of water vapor in the tropics after Ls=180{\\deg} which is persistent in simulations compared to observations, as a consequence of aphelion c...

Navarro, Thomas; Forget, Franois; Spiga, Aymeric; Millour, Ehouarn; Montmessin, Franck

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Water resources planning under climate change and variability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

transfers or options. Demand-side management includes thepricing schemes, and demand-side management for urban water,of alternate demand side management, particularly

O'Hara, Jeffrey Keith

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Response of evapotranspiration and water availability to the changing climate in Northern Eurasia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Dickinson 2012). ET conveys about half of the solar energy absorbed by the land back to the atmosphere, University of Bristol, Bristol, UK N. Tchebakova V N Sukachev Institute of Forest, Siberian Branch) is a key component of the Earth system. It links the Earth surface energy balance with its water balance

Zhuang, Qianlai

168

New Technique for Retrieving Liquid Water Path over Land using Satellite Microwave Observations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a new methodology for retrieving liquid water path over land using satellite microwave observations. As input, the technique exploits the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer for earth observing plan (EOS) (AMSR-E) polarization-difference signals at 37 and 89 GHz. Regression analysis performed on model simulations indicates that over variable atmospheric and surface conditions the polarization-difference signals can be simply parameterized in terms of the surface emissivity polarization difference ({Delta}{var_epsilon}), surface temperature, liquid water path (LWP), and precipitable water vapor (PWV). The resulting polarization-difference parameterization (PDP) enables fast and direct (noniterative) retrievals of LWP with minimal requirements for ancillary data. Single- and dual-channel retrieval methods are described and demonstrated. Data gridding is used to reduce the effects of instrumental noise. The methodology is demonstrated using AMSR-E observations over the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) site during a six day period in November and December, 2003. Single- and dual-channel retrieval results mostly agree with ground-based microwave retrievals of LWP to within approximately 0.04 mm.

Deeter, M.N.; Vivekanandan, J.

2005-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

169

The impact of tropical cyclones (TC) on global climate is still debated. They rapidly mix the water column beneath them, bringing cold water to the surface.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Climate, 21, 638 Sriver & Huber, 2007, Observational evidence for an ocean heat pump induced by tropicalThe impact of tropical cyclones (TC) on global climate is still debated. They rapidly mix the water column beneath them, bringing cold water to the surface. One way to parameterise this process

Jones, Peter JS

170

The Effects of Climate Change on Water Resources in the West: Introduction and Overview  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the summer of 2000, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) funded a project to perform an experimental end-to-end assessment of the effects of climate change on the western United States. The project was intended both to demonstrate and test a methodology for performing quantitative assessments of climate-driven environmental impacts. A second objective was to provide useful information to regional, state, and local decision-makers, whose job it will be to deal with the conflicting demands that climate change, population increases, and economic growth will place on the water resources of the West. The third objective was to demonstrate the potential value of an Accelerated Climate Prediction Initiative (ACPI). The ACPI was a DOE initiative to accelerate the development, improvement, and application of U.S. climate models and to provide the advanced computational facilities that would be needed to carry out this work. Although the ACPI was not funded, some of its spirit lives on in various DOE and other federal agency projects and programs designed to advance ultra-scale computing and the science of climate simulation. In this volume, we hope to demonstrate what can be achieved if a highly qualified group of scientists are brought together, under relatively light management reins, to take an in-depth look at how future climate change might affect issues of real importance to the citizens of the United States.

Barnett, Tim P.; Malone, Robert; Pennell, William T.; Stammer, Detlet; Semtner, Bret; Washington, Warren M.

2004-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

171

Climate, Water, and Carbon Program A PROPOSAL IN RESPONSE TO THE PROVOST'S CALL FOR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of our daily lives necessitate a deeper understanding of Earth's climate system, which sustains all life and is now threatened and compromised by human activities (population growth, economic development of drastic perturbations in the global carbon cycle. The impact on water resources of this sudden shift

Howat, Ian M.

172

Trout in hot water Understanding the effects of climate change on ecosystems is a complex  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Trout in hot water Understanding the effects of climate change on ecosystems is a complex business as we set out for the Hengill geothermal valley. You might think of Iceland as a cold, dark country up the breakdown of organic matter and nutrients are recycled more quickly, leading to more resources

Brierley, Andrew

173

Climate Variability and Water Supply of the Colorado River Basin Thomas C. Piechota1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and effects on water resources is then discussed. Particular emphasis is placed on identifying climate indices and droughts are analyzed and discussed. 1 Assistant Professor, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, Department) Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) The U.S. Department of Agriculture's Natural

Piechota, Thomas C.

174

Climate Change Impacts for the Conterminous USA: An Integrated Assessment Part 4. Water Resources  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Global warming will impact the hydrologic cycle by increasing the capacity of the atmosphere to hold moisture. Anticipated impacts are generally increased evaporation at low latitudes and increased precipitation at middle and high latitudes. The impacts on specific regions will depend on changes in weather patterns and are certain to be complex. Here we apply a suite of 12 potential climate change scenarios that could occur over the next century as atmospheric CO2 concentrations reach double the pre-industrial level to the Hydrologic Unit Model of the United States (HUMUS) to simulate water supply in the conterminous United States. In Part 4 we examine the sufficiency of this water supply to meet changing demands of irrigated agriculture. General Circulation Models (GCMs) used to simulate climate disagree on whether the US as a whole and its constituent regions will receive more or less precipitation as global warming occurs. The changes in water yield driven by changes in climate will likely be most consequential in the semi-arid western parts of the country where water yield is currently scarce and the resource is intensively managed. Changes of greater than +/-50% with respect to present day water yield are projected in parts of the Midwest and Southwest US. Interannual variability is likely to increase with reduced water yield but decrease with wetter conditions.

Thomson, Allison M.; Brown, Robert A.; Rosenberg, Norman J.; Srinivasan, Ragahvan; Izaurralde, Roberto C.

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

THE EFFECT OF WATER MANAGEMENT AND LAND USE PRACTICES ON THE RESTORATION OF LEE VINING AND RUSH CREEKS1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The implications of existing and potential management practices for the restoration of the stream habitat the condition of stream habitat and should be considered in any restoration plan. The in-stream studies can thusTHE EFFECT OF WATER MANAGEMENT AND LAND USE PRACTICES ON THE RESTORATION OF LEE VINING AND RUSH

Standiford, Richard B.

176

JUNE 2002 311S H M A K I N E T A L . Global Modeling of Land Water and Energy Balances. Part III  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

JUNE 2002 311S H M A K I N E T A L . Global Modeling of Land Water and Energy Balances. Part III of basin discharge. 1. Introduction Global models of land water and energy balance can provide information 44 large river basins for which relatively accurate time series of monthly precipitation (a primary

177

Water Resources and Climate Change in Garden Park, Colorado  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

just how far we can stretch our water.? Quote from: ?A History of Drought in Colorado: Lessons Learned and What Lies Ahead? McKee, et al., 2000 One of the most compelling issues facing Colorado, both now and in the foreseeable future...

Baffa, Thomas W.

2009-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

178

Assessment of Water Resources in A Humid Watershed and A Semi-arid Watershed; Neches River Basin, TX and Canadian River Basin, NM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Water is the most important resource on Earth. Climate and land cover changes are two important factors that directly influenced water resources. This research provides important information for water resources management and contributes...

Heo, Joonghyeok

2013-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

179

Multiple Criteria Analysis and Water Resources Risk  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

­ library search · Water balance, climate change and land-use planning in the Pear Harbor Basin, Hawaii basin DSS to support the search for reasonable strategies of investment in wastewater treatment.K. Stuart Chancellor's Distinguished Chair ­Professor, Department of Management Climate, Water

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

180

The impacts of climate, land use, and demography on fires during the 21st century simulated by CLM-CN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

model of wetland extent and peat accumulation: results forof carbon released from peat and forest fires in Indonesialosses in Alaskan forests and peat- lands, Nature Geosci. ,

Kloster, S.; Mahowald, N. M; Randerson, J. T; Lawrence, P. J

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land water climate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

6/4/13 12:46 PMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 1 of 12http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

6/4/13 12:46 PMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 1 of 12http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php:46 PMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 2 of 12http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php:46 PMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 3 of 12http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php

182

3/11/14 2:53 PMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 1 of 15http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

3/11/14 2:53 PMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 1 of 15http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php:53 PMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 2 of 15http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php:53 PMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 3 of 15http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php

183

7/8/2014 NIDIS Drought and Water Assessment http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php 1/14  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

7/8/2014 NIDIS Drought and Water Assessment http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php/La Plata counties. #12;7/8/2014 NIDIS Drought and Water Assessment http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php;7/8/2014 NIDIS Drought and Water Assessment http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php 3

Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

184

10/7/2014 NIDIS Drought and Water Assessment http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php 1/14  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

10/7/2014 NIDIS Drought and Water Assessment http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php and Water Assessment http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php 2/14 precipitation. #12;10/7/2014 NIDIS Drought and Water Assessment http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php

185

6/27/13 12:20 PMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 1 of 12http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

6/27/13 12:20 PMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 1 of 12http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php:20 PMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 2 of 12http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php Drought and Water Assessment Page 3 of 12http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php

186

10/8/13 3:58 PMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 1 of 12http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

10/8/13 3:58 PMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 1 of 12http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php:58 PMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 2 of 12http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php Drought and Water Assessment Page 3 of 12http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php

187

5/7/13 1:03 PMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 1 of 12http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

5/7/13 1:03 PMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 1 of 12http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php and Water Assessment Page 2 of 12http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php April:03 PMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 3 of 12http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php

188

11/12/2014 NIDIS Drought and Water Assessment http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php 1/14  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

11/12/2014 NIDIS Drought and Water Assessment http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php Drought and Water Assessment http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php 2/14 The San echo this gradient quite clearly. #12;11/12/2014 NIDIS Drought and Water Assessment http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php

189

Impact of Climate Change on Irrigation Water Availability, Crop Water Requirements and Soil Salinity in the SJV, CA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

impact of climate change on irrigated agriculture in the 21potential climate change impacts on irrigated agriculture.climate change on sustainability of irrigated agriculture,

Hopmans, Jan W; Maurer, Edwin P

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

How well do we know northern land cover? Comparison of four global vegetation and wetland products  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer data (GLCC.AVHRR), (2) the Global Land Cover Classification.AVHRR database underestimates evergreen needleleaf forest in favor of mixed forest; and (3) at high latitudes impacts of climate change on land- atmosphere exchanges of energy, water, carbon and green- house gases [e

Smith, Laurence C.

191

Risk Analysis for Water Resources Under Climate Change, Population Growth, and Land Use Change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

preference, and the social cost of carbon." Environmentalpreference, and the social cost of carbon." Environmentalpreference, and the social cost of carbon." Environmental

Kiparsky, Michael

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Risk Analysis for Water Resources Under Climate Change, Population Growth, and Land Use Change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Drought in California and Patagonia During Medieval Time."Drought in California and Patagonia During Medieval Time."Drought in California and Patagonia During Medieval Time."

Kiparsky, Michael

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Risk Analysis for Water Resources Under Climate Change, Population Growth, and Land Use Change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Data source Donnells (11292600), Relief (11291000), Bearsdley BDRstor BDRdstor + BDRrel + BDRevap Beardley Powerhouse, (

Kiparsky, Michael

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Recent Climate Changes in Precipitable Water in the Global Tropics as Revealed in NCEP/NCAR Reanalysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Recent Climate Changes in Precipitable Water in the Global Tropics as Revealed in NCEP: 1 (808) 956-2877 Email: chu@hawaii.edu #12;2 Abstract For the first time, long-term climate changes/NCAR Reanalysis Igor I. Zveryaev and Pao-Shin Chu* P.P. Shirshov Institute of Oceanology, RAS, Moscow, Russia

Hawai'i at Manoa, University of

195

NREL evaluates energy savings potential of heat pump water heaters in homes throughout all U.S. climate zones.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NREL evaluates energy savings potential of heat pump water heaters in homes throughout all U.S. climate zones. Heat pump water heaters (HPWHs) have the potential to significantly reduce energy use is a function of surrounding air temperature, humidity, hot water usage, and the logic controlling the heat pump

196

Arizona has relatively limited water resources due to its arid climate and limited surface water.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

lower, with total industrial uses of water making up around 17% of non agricultural water consumption have begun to spur the development of alternatives to our current petroleum based transportation system of Commerce, Environmental Quality and Water Resources. more problems than they will solve. A useful tool

Fay, Noah

197

Figure 9. Conceptual model for regionally divergent responses of the air-land fluxes to CO2 fertilization, which increases the water-use efficiency of photosynthesis. In dry regions where  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

parameterizations of these processes in models of Mediterranean- climate lands and obtaining a baseline for assessing changes. Acknowledgments NYK is supported by a NOAA Climate and Global Change postdoctoral.1 (2006). I. Y. Fung, S. C. Doney, K. Lindsay, J. John, Evolution of carbon sinks in a changing climate

Krakauer, Nir Y.

198

Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) detection of water storage changes in the Three Gorges Reservoir of China and comparison with in situ measurements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GRACE and a land-atmosphere water balance, Geophys. Res.2008), Analysis of terrestrial water storage changes fromGRACE and GLDAS, Water Resour. Res. , 44, W02433, doi:

Wang, Xianwei; de Linage, Caroline; Famiglietti, James; Zender, Charles S

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Influence of Climate Change Mitigation Technology on Global Demands of Water for Electricity Generation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Globally, electricity generation accounts for a large and potentially growing water demand, and as such is an important component to assessments of global and regional water scarcity. However, the current suiteas well as potential future suitesof thermoelectric generation technologies has a very wide range of water demand intensities, spanning two orders of magnitude. As such, the evolution of the generation mix is important for the future water demands of the sector. This study uses GCAM, an integrated assessment model, to analyze the global electric sectors water demands in three futures of climate change mitigation policy and two technology strategies. We find that despite five- to seven-fold expansion of the electric sector as a whole from 2005 to 2095, global electric sector water withdrawals remain relatively stable, due to the retirement of existing power plants with water-intensive once-through flow cooling systems. In the scenarios examined here, climate policies lead to the large-scale deployment of advanced, low-emissions technologies such as carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS), concentrating solar power, and engineered geothermal systems. In particular, we find that the large-scale deployment of CCS technologies does not increase long-term water consumption from hydrocarbon-fueled power generation as compared with a no-policy scenario without CCS. Moreover, in sensitivity scenarios where low-emissions electricity technologies are required to use dry cooling systems, we find that the consequent additional costs and efficiency reductions do not limit the utility of these technologies in achieving cost-effective whole-system emissions mitigation.

Kyle, G. Page; Davies, Evan; Dooley, James J.; Smith, Steven J.; Clarke, Leon E.; Edmonds, James A.; Hejazi, Mohamad I.

2013-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

200

Macroscale water fluxes 3. Effects of land processes on variability of monthly  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, complemented by information from a global model of the ocean-atmosphere-land system. The first filter causes radiation, and air temperature. Superimposed upon this variation are random (chaotic) fluctuations at all

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land water climate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Water, earth, and fire: Land use and environmental planning in the New Jersey Pine Barrens  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Each major chapter in this land-use planning case study begins with an introductory overview of the historical and ecological context of land-use patterns and the resources on which people depend. Juxtaposed with these scientific analyses is a series of profiles of area residents and their view of the Pine Barrens. The concluding chapters present recommendations designed to help develop a regional plan for the area.

Berger, J.; Sinton, J.W.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

6/11/13 12:15 PMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 1 of 12http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

6/11/13 12:15 PMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 1 of 12http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php:15 PMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 2 of 12http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php Page 3 of 12http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php to-date precipitation

203

7/23/2014 NIDIS Drought and Water Assessment http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php 1/15  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

7/23/2014 NIDIS Drought and Water Assessment http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php and in many of the low-lying areas west #12;7/23/2014 NIDIS Drought and Water Assessment http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php Assessment http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php 3/15 STANDARDIZED PRECIPITATION INDEX

Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

204

4/8/14 4:01 PMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 1 of 14http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

4/8/14 4:01 PMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 1 of 14http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.phphttp://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php The lower elevations of the Colorado river Drought and Water Assessment Page 3 of 14http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php Much

205

5/20/14, 12:27 PMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 1 of 13http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

5/20/14, 12:27 PMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 1 of 13http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php:27 PMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 2 of 13http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php Page 3 of 13http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php The top left image shows

206

12/3/2014 NIDIS Drought and Water Assessment http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php 1/13  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

12/3/2014 NIDIS Drought and Water Assessment http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php Assessment http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php 2/13 amounts fell along;12/3/2014 NIDIS Drought and Water Assessment http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php 3

207

7/2/13 11:02 AMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 1 of 12http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

7/2/13 11:02 AMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 1 of 12http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php of 12http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php Southeast CO and the San Luis Valley Drought and Water Assessment Page 3 of 12http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php

208

10/28/2014 NIDIS Drought and Water Assessment http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php 1/16  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

10/28/2014 NIDIS Drought and Water Assessment http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php Assessment http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php 2/16 East of the divide was also dry and #12;10/28/2014 NIDIS Drought and Water Assessment http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php

209

7/16/13 1:33 PMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 1 of 12http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

7/16/13 1:33 PMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 1 of 12http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php of 12http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php Southeast CO and the San Luis Valley Drought and Water Assessment Page 3 of 12http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php

210

8/13/13 3:45 PMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 1 of 12http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

8/13/13 3:45 PMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 1 of 12http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php of 12http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php Southeast CO is below 70% of average:45 PMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 3 of 12http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php

211

9/9/2014 NIDIS Drought and Water Assessment http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php 1/13  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

9/9/2014 NIDIS Drought and Water Assessment http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php Assessment http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php 2/13 East of the divide was more% of average. #12;9/9/2014 NIDIS Drought and Water Assessment http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php

212

11/25/2014 NIDIS Drought and Water Assessment http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php 1/14  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

11/25/2014 NIDIS Drought and Water Assessment http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php Assessment http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php 2/14 The northern/central and San Drought and Water Assessment http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php 3/14 moisture

213

A Long-term hydrologically based dataset of land surface fluxes and states for the conterminous1 U.S.: Update and extensions2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

To be submitted to the Journal of Climate as an Expedited Contribution18 19 #12;2 ABSTRACT20 We describe United States, intended to aid in studies of water and energy exchanges at the22 land surface. These data of VIC. The previous data set has been widely used in water and33 energy budget studies, climate change

Washington at Seattle, University of

214

Rules and Regulations Governing Geophysical, Seismic or Other Type Exploration on State-Owned Lands Other Than State-Owned Marine Waters (Mississippi)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Rules and Regulations Governing Geophysical, seismic or Other Type Exploration on State-Owned Lands Other than State-Owned Marine Waters is applicable to the Natural Gas Sector and the Coal...

215

ontanans use water in homes, on land, and in industries. We also use the state's streams, rivers, and lakes for recreation. When we  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

M ontanans use water in homes, on land, and in industries. We also use the state's streams, rivers Irrigation use reflects the size and importance of agriculture, the state's largest industry. Water withdrawn, and lakes for recreation. When we use water for such things as cooking, irrigation, or mineral extraction

Dyer, Bill

216

9/24/13 5:05 PMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 1 of 13http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

9/24/13 5:05 PMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 1 of 13http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php are near average for the water year #12;9/24/13 5:05 PMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 2 of 13http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php and Water Assessment Page 3 of 13http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php Standardized

217

NREL Tests Integrated Heat Pump Water Heater Performance in Different Climates (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This technical highlight describes NREL tests to capture information about heat pump performance across a wide range of ambient conditions for five heat pump water heaters (HPWH). These water heaters have the potential to significantly reduce water heater energy use relative to traditional electric resistance water heaters. These tests have provided detailed performance data for these appliances, which have been used to evaluate the cost of saved energy as a function of climate. The performance of HPWHs is dependent on ambient air temperature and humidity and the logic controlling the heat pump and the backup resistance heaters. The laboratory tests were designed to measure each unit's performance across a range of air conditions and determine the specific logic controlling the two heat sources, which has a large effect on the comfort of the users and the energy efficiency of the system. Unlike other types of water heaters, HPWHs are both influenced by and have an effect on their surroundings. Since these effects are complex and different for virtually every house and climate region, creating an accurate HPWH model from the data gathered during the laboratory tests was a main goal of the project. Using the results from NREL's laboratory tests, such as the Coefficient of Performance (COP) curves for different air conditions as shown in Figure 1, an existing HPWH model is being modified to produce more accurate whole-house simulations. This will allow the interactions between the HPWH and the home's heating and cooling system to be evaluated in detail, for any climate region. Once these modeling capabilities are in place, a realistic cost-benefit analysis can be performed for a HPWH installation anywhere in the country. An accurate HPWH model will help to quantify the savings associated with installing a HPWH in the place of a standard electric water heater. In most locations, HPWHs are not yet a cost-effective alternative to natural gas water heaters. The detailed system performance maps that were developed by this testing program will be used to: (1) Target regions of the country that would benefit most from this technology; (2) Identify improvements in current systems to maximize homeowner cost savings; and (3) Explore opportunities for development of advanced hot water heating systems.

Not Available

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Changes in land surface water dynamics since the 1990s and relation to population pressure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and climate research [Solomon et al., 2007; Vörösmarty et al., 2000; Shindell et al., 2004]. How- ever wavelengths. The methodology has been described by Prigent et al. [2001, 2007] and Papa et al. [2010a

219

Simulated effects of climate change on the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Geological Survey, in cooperation with the US Department of Energy, is evaluating the geologic and hydrologic characteristics of the Death Valley regional flow system as part of the Yucca Mountain Project. As part of the hydrologic investigation, regional, three-dimensional conceptual and numerical ground-water-flow models have been developed to assess the potential effects of past and future climates on the regional flow system. A simulation that is based on climatic conditions 21,000 years ago was evaluated by comparing the simulated results to observation of paleodischarge sites. Following acceptable simulation of a past climate, a possible future ground-water-flow system, with climatic conditions that represent a doubling of atmospheric carbon dioxide, was simulated. The steady-state simulations were based on the present-day, steady-state, regional ground-water-flow model. The finite-difference model consisted of 163 rows, 153 columns, and 3 layers and was simulated using MODFLOWP. Climate changes were implemented in the regional ground-water-flow model by changing the distribution of ground-water recharge. Global-scale, average-annual, simulated precipitation for both past- and future-climate conditions developed elsewhere were resampled to the model-grid resolution. A polynomial function that represents the Maxey-Eakin method for estimating recharge from precipitation was used to develop recharge distributions for simulation.

D`Agnese, F.A.; O`Brien, G.M.; Faunt, C.C.; San Juan, C.A.

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Development and application of WRF3.3-CLM4crop to study of agriculture - climate interaction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Global Climate Change and United-States Agriculture, Nature,climate modeling Land surface modeling Agriculture and climate interaction Land use change

Lu, Yaqiong

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land water climate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Habitability of waterworlds: runaway greenhouses, atmospheric expansion and multiple climate states of pure water atmospheres  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

There are four different stable climate states for pure water atmospheres, as might exist on so-called "waterworlds". I map these as a function of solar constant for planets ranging in size from Mars size to 10 Earth-mass. The states are: globally ice covered (Tsnet absorption of sunlight. Across the range of planet sizes, I account for the atmospheres expanding to high altitudes as they warm. The emitting and absorbing surfaces (optical depth of unity) move to high altitude, making their area larger than the planet surfa...

Goldblatt, Colin

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Modeling hydrologic and water quality extremes in a changing climate: A statistical approach based on extreme value theory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modeling hydrologic and water quality extremes in a changing climate: A statistical approach based on extreme value theory Erin Towler,1,2 Balaji Rajagopalan,1,3 Eric Gilleland,2 R. Scott Summers,1 David makes quantifying changes to hydrologic extremes, as well as associated water quality effects

Katz, Richard

223

Integrated Assessment of Global Water Scarcity over the 21st Century under Multiple Climate Change Mitigation Policies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Water scarcity conditions over the 21st century both globally and regionally are assessed in the context of climate change, by estimating both water availability and water demand within the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM), a leading community integrated assessment model of energy, agriculture, climate, and water. To quantify changes in future water availability, a new gridded water-balance global hydrologic model namely, the Global Water Availability Model (GWAM) is developed and evaluated. Global water demands for six major demand sectors (irrigation, livestock, domestic, electricity generation, primary energy production, and manufacturing) are modeled in GCAM at the regional scale (14 geopolitical regions, 151 sub-regions) and then spatially downscaled to 0.5 o x 0.5o resolution to match the scale of GWAM. Using a baseline scenario (i.e., no climate change mitigation policy) with radiative forcing reaching 8.8 W/m2 (equivalent to the SRES A1Fi emission scenario) and a global population of 14 billion by 2095, global annual water demand grows from about 9% of total annual renewable freshwater in 2005 to about 32% by 2095. This results in almost half of the world population living under extreme water scarcity by the end of the 21st century. Regionally, the demand for water exceeds the amount of water availability in two GCAM regions, the Middle East and India. Additionally, in years 2050 and 2095, 20% and 27% of the global population, respectively, is projected to live in areas (grid cells) that will experience greater water demands than the amount of available water in a year (i.e., the water scarcity index (WSI) > 1.0). This study implies an increasingly prominent role for water in future human decisions, and highlights the importance of including water in integrated assessment of global change.

Hejazi, Mohamad I.; Edmonds, James A.; Clarke, Leon E.; Kyle, G. Page; Davies, Evan; Chaturvedi, Vaibhav; Wise, Marshall A.; Patel, Pralit L.; Eom, Jiyong; Calvin, Katherine V.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

2/18/14 1:41 PMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 1 of 13http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2/18/14 1:41 PMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 1 of 13http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php;2/18/14 1:41 PMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 2 of 13http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php to the south #12;2/18/14 1:41 PMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 3 of 13http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php

225

10/22/13 3:38 PMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 1 of 13http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

10/22/13 3:38 PMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 1 of 13http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php:38 PMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 2 of 13http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php STANDARDIZED PRECIPITATION INDEX #12;10/22/13 3:38 PMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 3 of 13http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php

226

4/22/14 2:26 PMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 1 of 13http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

4/22/14 2:26 PMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 1 of 13http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php Drought and Water Assessment Page 2 of 13http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php;4/22/14 2:26 PMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 3 of 13http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php

227

12/17/13 11:06 AMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 1 of 13http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

12/17/13 11:06 AMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 1 of 13http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php .10 and .25 inches #12;12/17/13 11:06 AMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 2 of 13http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php:06 AMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 3 of 13http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php

228

2/25/14 12:10 PMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 1 of 13http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2/25/14 12:10 PMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 1 of 13http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php:10 PMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 2 of 13http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php to the south #12;2/25/14 12:10 PMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 3 of 13http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php

229

1/21/14 3:05 PMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 1 of 13http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1/21/14 3:05 PMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 1 of 13http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php and Water Assessment Page 2 of 13http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php The northern-Dec. #12;1/21/14 3:05 PMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 3 of 13http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php

230

10/1/13 2:46 PMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 1 of 13http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

10/1/13 2:46 PMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 1 of 13http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php are mostly above average for #12;10/1/13 2:46 PMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 2 of 13http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php Drought and Water Assessment Page 3 of 13http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php

231

12/31/13 12:35 PMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 1 of 13http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

12/31/13 12:35 PMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 1 of 13http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php WY received between #12;12/31/13 12:35 PMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 2 of 13http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php and Water Assessment Page 3 of 13http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php The top left

232

4/1/14 2:47 PMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 1 of 13http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

4/1/14 2:47 PMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 1 of 13http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php Drought and Water Assessment Page 2 of 13http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php than, particularly in the Green River basin. #12;4/1/14 2:47 PMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 3 of 13http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php

233

4/16/13 12:22 PMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 1 of 11http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

4/16/13 12:22 PMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 1 of 11http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php Precipitation: #12;4/16/13 12:22 PMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 2 of 11http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php River Forecast Center). #12;4/16/13 12:22 PMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 3 of 11http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php

234

4/30/13 1:29 PMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 1 of 11http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

4/30/13 1:29 PMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 1 of 11http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php Precipitation: #12;4/30/13 1:29 PMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 2 of 11http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php and Water Assessment Page 3 of 11http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php SNOTEL

235

2/11/14 3:28 PMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 1 of 12http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2/11/14 3:28 PMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 1 of 12http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php Drought and Water Assessment Page 2 of 12http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php to the south #12;2/11/14 3:28 PMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 3 of 12http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php

236

4/15/14 12:09 PMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 1 of 13http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

4/15/14 12:09 PMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 1 of 13http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php:09 PMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 2 of 13http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php) with above normal conditons for #12;4/15/14 12:09 PMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 3 of 13http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php

237

6/18/13 2:18 PMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 1 of 13http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

6/18/13 2:18 PMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 1 of 13http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php:18 PMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 2 of 13http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php AND SNOWPACK #12;6/18/13 2:18 PMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 3 of 13http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php

238

11/5/13 2:36 PMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 1 of 13http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

11/5/13 2:36 PMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 1 of 13http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php;11/5/13 2:36 PMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 2 of 13http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php:36 PMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 3 of 13http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php

239

4/23/13 2:01 PMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 1 of 11http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

4/23/13 2:01 PMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 1 of 11http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php Precipitation: #12;4/23/13 2:01 PMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 2 of 11http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php and Water Assessment Page 3 of 11http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php SNOTEL

240

5/13/14, 3:31 PMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 1 of 13http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

5/13/14, 3:31 PMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 1 of 13http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php.00". #12;5/13/14, 3:31 PMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 2 of 13http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php:31 PMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 3 of 13http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land water climate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

The hydrological cycle tirelessly distributes water between land, ocean, atmosphere and cryosphere. Stefan Hagemann and his colleagues at the Max Planck Institute for Meteorology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

substance across the globe, but they also carry along thermal energy in the process ­ albeit hidden into liquid water or freezes to form ice. Conversely, energy input is necessary for ice to melt or sublimeThe hydrological cycle tirelessly distributes water between land, ocean, atmosphere and cryosphere

242

New Mexico Water Resources Research Institute, New Mexico State University http://wrri.nmsu.edu Land application of industrial effluent on a Chihuahuan Desert  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, 2001). Little data are available on the use of native terrestrial ecosystems for waste- water treatmentNew Mexico Water Resources Research Institute, New Mexico State University http://wrri.nmsu.edu Land application of industrial effluent on a Chihuahuan Desert ecosystem: Impact on soil physical

Johnson, Eric E.

243

Decadal Climate Variability: Economic Implications in Agriculture and Water in the Missouri River Basin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Economic research on climate and productivity effects of ocean phenomena has mostly focused on interannual cases such as the El Nio Southern Oscillation. Here Decadal climate variability (DCV) refers to ocean related climate influences of duration...

Fernandez Cadena, Mario

2013-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

244

A framework for benchmarking land models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Land models, which have been developed by the modeling community in the past few decades to predict future states of ecosystems and climate, have to be critically evaluated for their performance skills of simulating ecosystem responses and feedback to climate change. Benchmarking is an emerging procedure to measure performance of models against a set of defined standards. This paper proposes a benchmarking framework for evaluation of land model performances and, meanwhile, highlights major challenges at this infant stage of benchmark analysis. The framework includes (1) targeted aspects of model performance to be evaluated, (2) a set of benchmarks as defined references to test model performance, (3) metrics to measure and compare performance skills among models so as to identify model strengths and deficiencies, and (4) model improvement. Land models are required to simulate exchange of water, energy, carbon and sometimes other trace gases between the atmosphere and land surface, and should be evaluated for their simulations of biophysical processes, biogeochemical cycles, and vegetation dynamics in response to climate change across broad temporal and spatial scales. Thus, one major challenge is to select and define a limited number of benchmarks to effectively evaluate land model performance. The second challenge is to develop metrics of measuring mismatches between models and benchmarks. The metrics may include (1) a priori thresholds of acceptable model performance and (2) a scoring system to combine datamodel mismatches for various processes at different temporal and spatial scales. The benchmark analyses should identify clues of weak model performance to guide future development, thus enabling improved predictions of future states of ecosystems and climate. The near-future research effort should be on development of a set of widely acceptable benchmarks that can be used to objectively, effectively, and reliably evaluate fundamental properties of land models to improve their prediction performance skills.

Luo, Yiqi; Randerson, J.; Abramowitz, G.; Bacour, C.; Blyth, E.; Carvalhais, N.; Ciais, Philippe; Dalmonech, D.; Fisher, J.B.; Fisher, R.; Friedlingstein, P.; Hibbard, Kathleen A.; Hoffman, F. M.; Huntzinger, Deborah; Jones, C.; Koven, C.; Lawrence, David M.; Li, D.J.; Mahecha, M.; Niu, S.L.; Norby, Richard J.; Piao, S.L.; Qi, X.; Peylin, P.; Prentice, I.C.; Riley, William; Reichstein, M.; Schwalm, C.; Wang, Y.; Xia, J. Y.; Zaehle, S.; Zhou, X. H.

2012-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

245

A top-down assessment of energy, water and land use in uranium mining, milling, and refining  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Land, water and energy use are key measures of the sustainability of uranium production into the future. As the most attractive, accessible deposits are mined out, future discoveries may prove to be significantly, perhaps unsustainably, more intensive consumers of environmental resources. A number of previous attempts have been made to provide empirical relationships connecting these environmental impact metrics to process variables such as stripping ratio and ore grade. These earlier attempts were often constrained by a lack of real world data and perform poorly when compared against data from modern operations. This paper conditions new empirical models of energy, water and land use in uranium mining, milling, and refining on contemporary data reported by operating mines. It shows that, at present, direct energy use from uranium production represents less than 1% of the electrical energy produced by the once-through fuel cycle. Projections of future energy intensity from uranium production are also possible by coupling the empirical models with estimates of uranium crustal abundance, characteristics of new discoveries, and demand. The projections show that even for the most pessimistic of scenarios considered, by 2100, the direct energy use from uranium production represents less than 3% of the electrical energy produced by the contemporary once-through fuel cycle.

E. Schneider; B. Carlsen; E. Tavrides; C. van der Hoeven; U. Phathanapirom

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Downscaled climate change impacts on agricultural water resources in Puerto Rico  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to estimate reference evapotranspiration (ET{sub o}), rainfall deficit (rainfall - ET{sub o}) and relative crop yield reduction for a generic crop under climate change conditions for three locations in Puerto Rico: Adjuntas, Mayaguez, and Lajas. Reference evapotranspiration is estimated by the Penman-Monteith method. Rainfall and temperature data were statistically downscaled and evaluated using the DOE/NCAR PCM global circulation model projections for the B1 (low), A2 (mid-high) and A1fi (high) emission scenarios of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Special Report on Emission Scenarios. Relative crop yield reductions were estimated from a function dependent water stress factor, which is a function of soil moisture content. Average soil moisture content for the three locations was determined by means of a simple water balance approach. Results from the analysis indicate that the rainy season will become wetter and the dry season will become drier. The 20-year mean 1990-2010 September rainfall excess (i.e., rainfall - ET{sub o} > 0) increased for all scenarios and locations from 149.8 to 356.4 mm for 2080-2100. Similarly, the 20-year average February rainfall deficit (i.e., rainfall - ET{sub o} < 0) decreased from a -26.1 mm for 1990-2010 to -72.1 mm for the year 2080-2100. The results suggest that additional water could be saved during the wet months to offset increased irrigation requirements during the dry months. Relative crop yield reduction did not change significantly under the B1 projected emissions scenario, but increased by approximately 20% during the summer months under the A1fi emissions scenario. Components of the annual water balance for the three climate change scenarios are rainfall, evapotranspiration (adjusted for soil moisture), surface runoff, aquifer recharge and change in soil moisture storage. Under the A1fi scenario, for all locations, annual evapotranspiration decreased owing to lower soil moisture, surface runoff decreased, and aquifer recharge increased. Aquifer recharge increased at all three locations because the majority of recharge occurs during the wet season and the wet season became wetter. This is good news from a groundwater production standpoint. Increasing aquifer recharge also suggests that groundwater levels may increase and this may help to minimize saltwater intrusion near the coasts as sea levels increase, provided that groundwater use is not over-subscribed.

Harmsen, E.W.; Miller, N.L.; Schlegel, N.J.; Gonzalez, J.E.

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Assessing the impacts of climate change on natural resource systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This volume is a collection of papers addressing the theme of potential impacts of climatic change. Papers are entitled Integrated Assessments of the Impacts of Climatic Change on Natural Resources: An Introductory Editorial; Framework for Integrated Assessments of Global Warming Impacts; Modeling Land Use and Cover as Part of Global Environmental Change; Assessing Impacts of Climatic Change on Forests: The State of Biological Modeling; Integrating Climatic Change and Forests: Economic and Ecological Assessments; Environmental Change in Grasslands: Assessment using Models; Assessing the Socio-economic Impacts of Climatic Change on Grazinglands; Modeling the Effects of Climatic Change on Water Resources- A Review; Assessing the Socioeconomic Consequences of Climate Change on Water Resources; and Conclusions, Remaining Issues, and Next Steps.

Frederick, K.D.; Rosenberg, N.J. [eds.

1994-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

248

Changes in satellite-derived spring vegetation green-up date and its linkage to climate in China from 1982 to 2010  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of CO2 exchange from an old-growth coniferous forest dominated by Norway spruce showed that annual gross climate change through its influences on the exchange of energy, water, and carbon between land surface

Myneni, Ranga B.

249

EcoAdapt Working Paper Series N1 Adaptation to climate change for local development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 EcoAdapt Working Paper Series N°1 Adaptation to climate change for local development Análisis in terms of employment, water situation and land use, at a quantitative and qualitative level, in three and summer pastures, due to the geographic and climatic conditions. hal-01059368,version1-30Aug2014 #12

Boyer, Edmond

250

8/6/13 2:18 PMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 1 of 13http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

8/6/13 2:18 PMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 1 of 13http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php of 13http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php Southeast CO is below 70% of average Assessment Page 3 of 13http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php Standardized

251

Introduction to special section on Impacts of Land Use Change on Water Resources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

agriculture consumes up to 90% of the world's fresh water supplies [Shiklomanov, 2000], with estimated amounts populations but also due to policy shifts that are creating markets for biofuel and agricultural carbon of ground- water resources is a growing problem throughout the world [Konikow and Kendy, 2005], yet

Scanlon, Bridget R.

252

Modelled effects of precipitation on ecosystem carbon and water dynamics in different climatic zones  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ongoing changes in the global climate expose the world s ecosystems not only to increasing CO2 concentrations and temperatures but also to altered precipitation (P) regimes. Using four well-established process-based ecosystem models (LPJ, DayCent, ORCHIDEE, TECO), we explored effects of potential P changes on water limitation and net primary production (NPP) in seven terrestrial ecosystems with distinctive vegetation types in different hydroclimatic zones. We found that NPP responses to P changes differed not only among sites but also within a year at a given site. The magnitudes of NPP change were basically determined by the degree of ecosystem water limitation, which was quantified here using the ratio between atmospheric transpirational demand and soil water supply. Humid sites and/or periods were least responsive to any change in P as compared with moderately humid or dry sites/periods. We also found that NPP responded more strongly to doubling or halving of P amount and a seasonal shift in P occurrence than that to altered P frequency and intensity at constant annual amounts. The findings were highly robust across the four models especially in terms of the direction of changes and largely consistent with earlier P manipulation experiments and modelling results. Overall, this study underscores the widespread importance of P as a driver of change in ecosystems, although the ultimate response of a particular site will depend on the detailed nature and seasonal timing of P change.

Gerten, Dieter [Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, Potsdam, Germany; Luo, Yiqi [University of Oklahoma; Le Maire, Guerric [Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l'Environement, France; Parton, William [University of Colorado, Fort Collins; Keough, Cindy [University of Colorado, Fort Collins; Weng, Ensheng [University of Oklahoma, Norman; Beier, Claus [Riso National Laboratory, Roskilde, Denmark; Ciais, Philippe [Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l'Environement, France; Cramer, Wolfgang [Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, Potsdam, Germany; Dukes, Jeff [University of Massachusetts, Boston; Hanson, Paul J [ORNL; Knapp, Alan [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Linder, Sune [Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Upsalla, Sweden; Nepstad, Daniel [Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI), Woods Hole, MA; Rustad, Lindsey [USDA Forest Service; Sowerby, ALWYN [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Bangor, Gwynedd, United Kingdom

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

12/3/13 3:07 PMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 1 of 13http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

12/3/13 3:07 PMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 1 of 13http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php Juans. #12;12/3/13 3:07 PMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 2 of 13http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.phphttp://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php The top left image shows the Natural

254

8/20/13 2:08 PMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 1 of 12http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

8/20/13 2:08 PMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 1 of 12http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php of 12http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php Southeast CO is below 70% of average INDEX #12;8/20/13 2:08 PMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 3 of 12http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php

255

3/4/14 12:16 PMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 1 of 13http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

3/4/14 12:16 PMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 1 of 13http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php;3/4/14 12:16 PMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 2 of 13http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php Assessment Page 3 of 13http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php precipitation

256

10/29/13 10:57 AMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 1 of 13http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

10/29/13 10:57 AMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 1 of 13http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php more up to #12;10/29/13 10:57 AMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 2 of 13http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php Assessment Page 3 of 13http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php Standardized

257

11/19/13 11:40 AMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 1 of 13http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

11/19/13 11:40 AMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 1 of 13http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php.25-2.00". #12;11/19/13 11:40 AMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 2 of 13http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php of 13http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php The top left image shows the Natural

258

10/15/13 3:06 PMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 1 of 13http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

10/15/13 3:06 PMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 1 of 13http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php of 13http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php Most of the CO Front Range #12;10/15/13 3:06 PMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 3 of 13http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php

259

11/26/13 12:27 PMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 1 of 13http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

11/26/13 12:27 PMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 1 of 13http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php Assessment Page 2 of 13http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php The northern half;11/26/13 12:27 PMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 3 of 13http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php

260

7/9/13 3:20 PMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 1 of 12http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

7/9/13 3:20 PMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 1 of 12http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php of 12http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php Southeast CO and the San Luis Valley;7/9/13 3:20 PMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 3 of 12http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land water climate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

8/27/13 11:54 AMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 1 of 12http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

8/27/13 11:54 AMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 1 of 12http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php of 12http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php Southeast CO is below 70% of average;8/27/13 11:54 AMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 3 of 12http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php

262

8/19/2014 NIDIS Drought and Water Assessment http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php 1/13  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

8/19/2014 NIDIS Drought and Water Assessment http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php 2/13 UT saw some drier areas of less than precipitation. The parts of the UCRB that have been #12;8/19/2014 NIDIS Drought and Water Assessment http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php

Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

263

12/24/13 9:27 AMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 1 of 13http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

12/24/13 9:27 AMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 1 of 13http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php between .25 and .5 inches, with #12;12/24/13 9:27 AMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 2 of 13http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.phphttp://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php The top left image shows the Natural

264

Estimation of land surface water and energy balance flux components and closure relation using conditional sampling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Models of terrestrial water and energy balance include numerical treatment of heat and moisture diffusion in the soil-vegetation-atmosphere continuum. These two diffusion and exchange processes are linked only at a few ...

Farhadi, Leila

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

11/12/13 11:57 AMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 1 of 13http://climate.colostate.edu/%7Edrought/current_assessment.php  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Edrought/current_assessment.php PRECIPITATION The images above use daily precipitation statistics from NWS:57 AMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 2 of 13http://climate.colostate.edu/%7Edrought/current_assessment.php;11/12/13 11:57 AMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 3 of 13http://climate.colostate.edu/%7Edrought/current_assessment.php

266

Global Ecology and Biogeography, (Global Ecol. Biogeogr.) (2013) 22, 470482, DOI: 10.1111/geb.12012 Soil water balance performs better than climatic water variables in tree species  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Global Ecology and Biogeography, (Global Ecol. Biogeogr.) (2013) 22, 470­482, DOI: 10.1111/geb water balance indices to predict the ecological niches of forest tree species. Location: France Methods aiming to determine the ecological niches of plant species and their responses to climate change. Key

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

267

India Water Week 2012 Water, Energy and Food Security : Call for Solutions, 10-14 April 2012, New Delhi ASSESSING THE IMPACT OF CLIMATE CHANGE ON  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

precipitation amounts, timings and intensity rates, and indirectly impact the flux and storage of water and projecting climate change. There is a need to downscale GCM on a basin scale and couple them with relevant by increasing atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases. Atmospheric carbon dioxide levels have continually

Kumar, C.P.

268

Water Rules: In Texas, conservation increasingly the law of the land  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

installing rainwater systems. Richardson requires a permit for rainwater harvesting systems that collect #22;#30;#30; or more gallons of rainwater to ensure proper installation, as those systems typically require some sort of electrical and plumbing... rainwater harvesting rebates and conducting free irrigation system audits. Municipalities are also working to increase in-home conservation by o#17;ering free toilets and showerheads, plumbing repair programs and free water system check-ups. Water...

Wythe, Kathy

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Water Poverty in Sub-Saharan African nation: GIS based index for assessing vulnerability in relation to climate change data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Access to safe water is currently a privilege for the citizens of many developing countries in Asia and Africa. In the last few decades changes in climate have increased concentrations of greenhouse gasses. The results of global warming have had a...

Trakosa, Anastasia

2008-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

270

A Long-term hydrologically based dataset of land surface fluxes and states for the conterminous1 U.S.: Update and extensions2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Real, Santa Clara, CA 95053-056310 11 12 13 14 15 To be submitted to the Journal of Climate and energy exchanges at the20 land surface. These data are gridded at a spatial resolution of 1/16 degree data set has been widely used in water and31 energy budget studies, climate change assessments, drought

Washington at Seattle, University of

271

Retrieving snow mass from GRACE terrestrial water storage change with a land surface model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by the Advanced Very High Resolution Radio- meter (AVHRR) is decreasing since middle 1980s in response to global are variations in surface albedo and surface energy budgets, sensible heat and water vapor fluxes-chan- nel Microwave Radiometer (SMMR) and the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR) provide a capa

Yang, Zong-Liang

272

Stream flows for salmon and society: managing water for human and ecosystem needs in Mediterranean-climate California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

climate change and population growth in Mediterranean-climate change and population growth in Mediterranean-from climate change. I NTRODUCTION Mediterranean-climate

Grantham, Theodore Evan William

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

An Assessment of Use, Need for, and Capacity to Integrate Climate Information Among Water Managers in Southeastern United States and the ACF Basin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An Assessment of Use, Need for, and Capacity to Integrate Climate Information Among Water Managers-year droughts, floods, and associated water management decisions have long concerned water managers in Western states. Similar concerns are now facing water managers in Southeastern states, including those in Georgia

Miami, University of

274

Cheap Artificial AB-Mountains, Extraction of Water and Energy from Atmosphere and Change of Regional Climate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Author suggests and researches a new revolutionary method for changing the climates of entire countries or portions thereof, obtaining huge amounts of cheap water and energy from the atmosphere. In this paper is presented the idea of cheap artificial inflatable mountains, which may cardinally change the climate of a large region or country. Additional benefits: The potential of tapping large amounts of fresh water and energy. The mountains are inflatable semi-cylindrical constructions from thin film (gas bags) having heights of up to 3 - 5 km. They are located perpendicular to the main wind direction. Encountering these artificial mountains, humid air (wind) rises to crest altitude, is cooled and produces rain (or rain clouds). Many natural mountains are sources of rivers, and other forms of water and power production - and artificial mountains may provide these services for entire nations in the future. The film of these gasbags is supported at altitude by small additional atmospheric overpressure and may be...

Bolonkin, Alexander

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Climate Change Impacts on Texas Water: A White Paper Assessment of the Past, Present and Future and Recommendations for Action  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Texas comprises the eastern portion of the Southwest region, where the convergence of climatological and geopolitical forces has the potential to put extreme stress on water resources. Geologic records indicate that Texas experienced large climate changes on millennial time scales in the past, and over the last thousand years, tree-ring records indicate that there were significant periods of drought in Texas. These droughts were of longer duration than the 1950s 'drought of record' that is commonly used in planning, and they occurred independently of human-induced global climate change. Although there has been a negligible net temperature increase in Texas over the past century, temperatures have increased more significantly over the past three decades. Under essentially all climate model projections, Texas is susceptible to significant climate change in the future. Most projections for the 21st century show that with increasing atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations, there will be an increase in temperatures across Texas and a shift to a more arid average climate. Studies agree that Texas will likely become significantly warmer and drier, yet the magnitude, timing, and regional distribution of these changes are uncertain. There is a large uncertainty in the projected changes in precipitation for Texas for the 21st century. In contrast, the more robust projected increase in temperature with its effect on evaporation, which is a dominant component in the region's hydrologic cycle, is consistent with model projections of frequent and extended droughts throughout the state. For these reasons, we recommend that Texas invest resources to investigate and anticipate the impacts of climate change on Texas water resources, with the goal of providing data to inform resource planning. This investment should support development of (1) research programs that provide policy-relevant science; (2) education programs to engage future researchers and policy-makers; and (3) connections between policy-makers, scientists, water resource managers, and other stakeholders. It is proposed that these goals may be achieved through the establishment of a Texas Climate Consortium, consisting of representatives from academia, industry, government agencies, water authorities, and other stakeholders. The mission of this consortium would be to develop the capacity to provide decision makers with the information needed to develop adaptation strategies in the face of future climate change and uncertainty.

Banner, Jay L.; Jackson, Charles S.; Yang, Zong-Liang; Hayhoe, Katharine; Woodhouse, Connie; Gulden, Lindsey; Jacobs, Kathy; North, Gerald; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Washington, Warren M.; Jiang, Xiaoyan; Casteel, Richard

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Surface Water Chemistry in White Oak Creek, North-East Texas: Effect of Land Use  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

watersheds soils, leaches readily to surface waters. Manure can contribute a significant amount of phosphorus loading into adjacent streams from livestock agriculture (James et al. 2007). Contributions from dairy cattle in a watershed in southeastern... New York showed that in-stream fecal deposits from pastured cattle represented 10% of watershed phosphorus loadings (James et al. 2007). Additionally, it was found that livestock grazing along streams and riparian zones can also have adverse...

Watson, Eliza

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

277

New Mexico Water Resources Research Institute, New Mexico State University http://wrri.nmsu.edu Predicting Land Use Change and its Effect on Nonpoint  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

New Mexico Water Resources Research Institute, New Mexico State University http://wrri.nmsu.edu Predicting Land Use Change and its Effect on Nonpoint Source Pollution Jennifer Thacher, and Janie Chermak, Department of Economics, University of New Mexico Project descriptors: Risk aversion, non-point source

Johnson, Eric E.

278

Response of water vapor to interannual variations of SST: Results from NCAR Community Climate Model (CCM2)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper very briefly documents the response of water vapor to interannual changes in sea surface temperature (SST) in two of the most frequently used climate models: the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) community climate model (CCM2) and the GFDL spectral model (R30). The corresponding results from radiosonde data are also presented for reference. A simple linear regression model is used to quantify the response of water vapor to changes in SST in the two simulations. Except for the negative response of water vapor over Australia, CCM2 simulates the major characteristics in the horizontal structure of the water vapor response shown in the radiosonde data. The negative response of water over Australia is also not well simulated by GFDL R30. In addition, GFDL R30 significantly underestimates the positive response over the Indian Ocean. The horizontal contrasts between the negative response over the western Pacific and the positive response over the central and eastern Pacific in the model simulations are larger than in the radiosonde data. The negative response in the subtropical region in CCM2 is more pronounced than in R30. Averaged over the tropics, CCM2 has a larger water vapor response in both the boundary layer and the upper troposphere than R30. The correlations between variations of water vapor in the upper troposphere and those at the surface level are also stronger in CCM2 than in R30. 2 refs., 5 figs.

Sun, De-Zheng [National Center For Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States)

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA Twin Cities Campus Department of Soil, Water, and Climate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-625-1244 Fax: 612-625-2208 http//www.swac.umn.edu GRADUATE PROGRAM IN LAND & ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE Welcome

Minnesota, University of

280

Mississippi Climate & Hydrology Conference  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The GEWEX Continental International Project (GCIP), which started in 1995 and completed in 2001, held its grand finale conference in New Orleans, LA in May 2002. Participants at this conference along with the scientists funded through the GCIP program are invited to contribute a paper to a special issue of Journal of Geophysical Research (JGR). This special JGR issue (called GCIP3) will serve as the final report on scientific research conducted by GCIP investigators. Papers are solicited on the following topical areas, but are not limited to, (1) water energy budget studies; (2) warm season precipitation; (3) predictability and prediction system; (4) coupled land-atmosphere models; (5) climate and water resources applications. The research areas cover observations, modeling, process studies and water resources applications.

Lawford, R.; Huang, J.

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land water climate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

1/14/14 12:01 PMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 1 of 13http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1/14/14 12:01 PMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 1 of 13http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php in southwest CO #12;1/14/14 12:01 PMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 2 of 13http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php-Dec. SNOTEL AND SNOWPACK #12;1/14/14 12:01 PMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 3 of 13http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php

282

3/25/14 2:12 PMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 1 of 14http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

3/25/14 2:12 PMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 1 of 14http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php.10" over the past week. #12;3/25/14 2:12 PMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 2 of 14http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php, particularly in the Green River basin. #12;3/25/14 2:12 PMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 3 of 14http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php

283

Climate-Energy Nexus  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 140-page published proceedings of the workshop include individual articles and PowerPoint slides for all workshop presentations. The proceedings also contain pertinent background information on the China-US Joint Research Center, partnering organizations, and workshop goals and objectives. Overall, the workshop increased the understanding of the impacts of climate change on energy use and renewable energy production as well as the complex relationships among land use, energy production, and ecological restoration. The workshop served as an international platform for scientists and students of different research backgrounds to develop a unified perspective on energy and climate relationships. Such understanding will benefit future cooperation between China and the US in mitigating global climate change. The workshops agenda, which is highly interdisciplinary, explored many potential opportunities for international collaboration in ecosystem management, climate modeling, greenhouse gas emissions, and bioenergy sustainability. International research groups have been suggested in the areas of genomes and biotechnology of energy plants, sustainable management of soil and water resources, carbon sequestration, and microbial processes for ecological cycles. The project has attracted considerable attention from institutes beyond the China-US Joint Research Center partners, and several of them (such as Institute of Qing-Tibet Plateau Research, Institute of Soil and Water Conservation, Institute of Applied Ecology, CAS) have expressed interest in joining the partnership. In addition, the workshop played a significant role in facilitating establishment of private-public partnerships between government and private bioenergy companies (such as L.R. Shugarts and Associates, Inc.), including seed providers (Blade Energy Crops, Thousand Oaks, CA), pilot demonstration projects at coal-producing cities (e.g., Huaibei, Anhui province, China), and the development of methodology for assessment of the sustainable production of biofuels (such as life-cycle analysis, sustainability metrics, and land-use policy). Establishment of two US-China scientific research networks in the area of bioenergy and environmental science is a significant result of the workshop.

Gary Sayler; Randall Gentry; Jie Zhuang

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

U.S. Natural Resources and Climate Change: Concepts and Approaches for Management Adaptation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract Public lands and waters in the United Statesfor protected lands and waters within the United States (to acquire land interests and water rights exists under the

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Impact of Climate Change on Irrigation Water Availability, Crop Water Requirements and Soil Salinity in the SJV, CA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to the Environmental and Water Resources Institute of thesimulation of ground-water flow in the central part of theU.S. Geological Survey water-supply paper ; 2396.

Hopmans, Jan W; Maurer, Edwin P

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Atmospheric Moisture Transports from Ocean to Land and Global Energy Flows in Reanalyses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Atmospheric Moisture Transports from Ocean to Land and Global Energy Flows in Reanalyses KEVIN E energy and hydrological cycles from eight current atmospheric reanalyses and their depiction of changes over time. A brief evaluation of the water and energy cycles in the latest version of the NCAR climate

Fasullo, John

287

Land and Water Use, CO2 Emissions, and Worker Radiological Exposure Factors for the Nuclear Fuel Cycle  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energys Fuel Cycle Technologies program is preparing to evaluate several proposed nuclear fuel cycle options to help guide and prioritize Fuel Cycle Technology research and development. Metrics are being developed to assess performance against nine evaluation criteria that will be used to assess relevant impacts resulting from all phases of the fuel cycle. This report focuses on four specific environmental metrics. land use water use CO2 emissions radiological Dose to workers Impacts associated with the processes in the front-end of the nuclear fuel cycle, mining through enrichment and deconversion of DUF6 are summarized from FCRD-FCO-2012-000124, Revision 1. Impact estimates are developed within this report for the remaining phases of the nuclear fuel cycle. These phases include fuel fabrication, reactor construction and operations, fuel reprocessing, and storage, transport, and disposal of associated used fuel and radioactive wastes. Impact estimates for each of the phases of the nuclear fuel cycle are given as impact factors normalized per unit process throughput or output. These impact factors can then be re-scaled against the appropriate mass flows to provide estimates for a wide range of potential fuel cycles. A companion report, FCRD-FCO-2013-000213, applies the impact factors to estimate and provide a comparative evaluation of 40 fuel cycles under consideration relative to these four environmental metrics.

Brett W Carlsen; Brent W Dixon; Urairisa Pathanapirom; Eric Schneider; Bethany L. Smith; Timothy M. AUlt; Allen G. Croff; Steven L. Krahn

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Adapting urban water systems to a changing climate: Lessons from the millennium drought in southeast Australia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

city vulnerable to water shortages during periods of very5 To bu?er against water shortages, Melbourne recentlyhas shown that a severe water shortage can drive behavior

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Downscaled climate change impacts on agricultural water resources in Puerto Rico  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

impacts uncertainty for water resources in the San JoaquinJournal of the American Water Resources Association.approach for surface subsurface water transport modeling in

Harmsen, E.W.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

A Framework for Analysis of the Uncertainty of Socioeconomic Growth and Climate Change on the Risk of Water Stress: a Case Study in Asia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The sustainability of future water resources is of paramount importance and is affected by many factors, including population, wealth and climate. Inherent in how these factors change in the future is the uncertainty of ...

Fant, C.

291

Ground and Water Source Heat Pump Performance and Design for Southern Climates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ground and water source heat pump systems have very attractive performance characteristics when properly designed and installed. These systems typically consist of a water-to-air or water-to-water heat pump linked to a closed loop vertical...

Kavanaugh, S.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Tillage and seasonal emissions of CO2, N2O and NO across a seed bed and at the field scale in a Mediterranean climate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

County, California, under a Mediterranean climate. We focused on the spatiotemporal variation of GHG in a Mediterranean climate Juhwan Lee a, *, Jan W. Hopmans b , Chris van Kessel a , Amy P. King b , K. Jeannie Evatt of California, Davis, CA 95616, USA b Department of Land, Air, and Water Resources, University of California

van Kessel, Chris

293

Farming: A Climate Change Culprit  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Farming: A Climate Change Culprit Farming: A Climate Change Culprit Simulations run at NERSC show impact of land-use change on African monsoon precipitation June 7, 2014 | Tags:...

294

Climate mitigations impact on global and regional electric power sector water use in the 21st Century  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over the course of this coming century, global electricity use is expected to grow at least five fold and if stringent greenhouse gas emissions controls are in place the growth could be more than seven fold from current levels. Given that the electric power sector represents the second largest anthropogenic use of water and given growing concerns about the nature and extent of future water scarcity driven by population growth and a changing climate, significant concern has been expressed about the electricity sectors use of water going forward. In this paper, the authors demonstrate that an often overlooked but absolutely critical issue that needs to be taken into account in discussions about the sustainability of the electric sectors water use going forward is the tremendous turn over in electricity capital stock that will occur over the course of this century; i.e., in the scenarios examined here more than 80% of global electricity production in the year 2050 is from facilities that have not yet been built. The authors show that because of the large scale changes in the global electricity system, the water withdrawal intensity of electricity production is likely to drop precipitously with the result being relatively constant water withdrawals over the course of the century even in the face of the large growth in electricity usage. The ability to cost effectively reduce the water intensity of power plants with carbon dioxide capture and storage systems in particular is key to constraining overall global water use.

Dooley, James J.; Kyle, G. Page; Davies, Evan

2013-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

295

The Science of Climate Change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

controlling the amounts of water vapor and other greenhouseshortages and conflicts over water-use rights. Any strategythennal expansion of sea water and widespread loss of land

Makundi, Willy R.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Climate Change and National Security  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Land loss Drought and water scarcity Loss of agriculturalexpansion infrastructure of water Poverty Migration Changesdwindling access to fresh water and other consequences of

Alyson, Fleming; Summer, Kelly; Summer, Martin; Lauren, Franck; Jonathan, Mark

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Crop water stress under climate change uncertainty : global policy and regional risk  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fourty percent of all crops grown in the world today are grown using irrigation, and shifting precipitation patterns due to climate change are viewed as a major threat to food security. This thesis examines, in the framework ...

Gueneau, Arthur

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Interactions of Water and Energy Mediate Responses of High-Latitude Terrestrial Ecosystems to Climate Change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to Inclusion of Inland Water Surfaces. J. Clim. , 8, 2691-Estimating sensitivities of water and carbon budgets. J.H. , 1955: Wind Stress Over a Water Surface. Quart. J. Roy.

Subin, Zachary Marc

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

6/10/12 Revolutionary ultrasonic nozzle that will change the way water cleans 1/2www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/11/111109230559.htm  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/11/111109230559.htm See Also: Matter & Energy Nature of Water Solar Energy Nuclear Energy Earth & Climate Water Energy and the Environment Renewable Energy Reference Brownfield land Ultrasound and contaminate other surfaces). As it is able to use cold water, energy is saved on heating water. Power washing

Sóbester, András

300

Cheap Artificial AB-Mountains, Extraction of Water and Energy from Atmosphere and Change of Regional Climate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Author suggests and researches a new revolutionary method for changing the climates of entire countries or portions thereof, obtaining huge amounts of cheap water and energy from the atmosphere. In this paper is presented the idea of cheap artificial inflatable mountains, which may cardinally change the climate of a large region or country. Additional benefits: The potential of tapping large amounts of fresh water and energy. The mountains are inflatable semi-cylindrical constructions from thin film (gas bags) having heights of up to 3 - 5 km. They are located perpendicular to the main wind direction. Encountering these artificial mountains, humid air (wind) rises to crest altitude, is cooled and produces rain (or rain clouds). Many natural mountains are sources of rivers, and other forms of water and power production - and artificial mountains may provide these services for entire nations in the future. The film of these gasbags is supported at altitude by small additional atmospheric overpressure and may be connected to the ground by thin cables. The author has shown (in previous works about the AB-Dome) that this closed AB-Dome allows full control of the weather inside the Dome (the day is always fine, the rain is only at night, no strong winds) and influence to given region. This is a realistic and cheap method of economical irrigation, getting energy and virtual weather control on Earth at the current time.

Alexander Bolonkin

2008-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land water climate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Water Resources, Adaptation to Climate Change and Social Action in East Africa  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

technologies; and poor water supply and environmental sanitation. The region also faces the problem of loss

Richner, Heinz

302

Changing Climates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

these data with predictions from the IPCC. Professor of geography at Texas State University, Dr. David Butler, does climate change research mainly in the Rocky Moun- tains with U.S. Geological Survey funding. He has also done research on how climate...://wiid.twdb.state.tx.us Detailed information about individual water wells. This system uses a geographic information system-based tool to show locations of water wells and download data on water levels and water quality. Reports that were developed about on-site conditions...

Wythe, Kathy

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Case Studies on the Effects of Climate Change on Water, Livestock and Hurricanes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Management ........................................................................................... 7 2.2.3. Bioenergy ..................................................................................................... 9 2.2.4. Technological Progress... to produce a given amount of production (Baker et al. 2013). In this review mitigation strategies will be classified into six broad categories: land use change, crop management, animal management, bioenergy production, forest management, and technological...

Yu, Chin-Hsien

2014-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

304

Climate Change and National Security  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

seas, droughts and fresh water shortages. ? Risk Assessmentinse- curity, water and food shortages, and climate-drivenalso struggle with shortages in fresh water, food and other

Alyson, Fleming; Summer, Kelly; Summer, Martin; Lauren, Franck; Jonathan, Mark

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Climate change risk and response  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Impacts on Californias Water Supply Source Medellin-AzuaraClimate Change on Yields and Water use of Major Californiawith Less: Agricultural Water Conservation and Efficiency in

Kahrl, Fredrich; Roland-Holst, David

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Water Exchanges: Tools to Beat El Nino Climate Variability in Irrigated Agriculture  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Water rights in the Yakima Valley of Washington State were established according to western water law, with seniority being the primary determinant. Temporary transfer of water rights took years for approval, preventing timely response to drought conditions. Mid-1990s legislation provides a mechanism for expedited transfer of water rights in response to drought conditions. Long-range forecasting of droughts allows earlier contingent trading of water rights and adjustments to farming practices. Analysis shows the benefit of transferring water rights from low-value to high-value crops.

Scott, M J.; Vail, Lance W.; Jaksch, John A.; Stockle, Claudio O.; Kemanian, Armen

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Vol. 16, No. 2 May 2006Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment World Climate Research Programme  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

's climate system is an energy cycle that converts absorbed solar radiation into heat and associated, its rapid rotation, and its elliptical orbit about the sun, the solar heating is neither uniform nor ARE A NET SINK OF ENERGY Left panel shows zonal, seasonal average generation of available potential energy

308

Applications of Commercial Heat Pump Water Heaters in Hot, Humid Climates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Heat pump water heaters can provide high-efficiency water heating and supplemental space cooling and dehumidification in commercial buildings throughout the United States. They are particularly attractive in hot, humid areas where cooling loads...

Johnson, K. F.; Shedd, A. C.

309

Effects of land disposal of municipal sewage sludge on soil, streambed sediment, and ground- and surface-water quality at a site near Denver, Colorado  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report describes the effects of burial and land application of municipal sewage sludge on soil and streambed sediment and water quality in the underlying aquifers and surface water within and around the Lowry sewage-sludge-disposal area. The existing ground-water observation-well network at the disposal area was expanded for the study. Surface-water-sampling sites were selected so that runoff could be sampled from intense rainstorms or snowmelt. The sampling frequency for ground-water and surface-water runoff was changed from yearly to quarterly, and soil samples were collected. Four years of data were collected from 1984 to 1987 during the expanded monitoring program at the Lowry sewage-sludge-disposal area. These data, in addition to the data collected by the U.S. Geological Survey from 1981 to 1983, were used to determine effects of sewage-sludge-disposal on soil and streambed sediment and surface- and ground-water quality at the disposal area.

Gaggiani, N.G.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Land Use and Water Efficiency in Current and Potential Future U.S. Corn and Brazilian Sugarcane Ethanol Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ethanol Systems Ethan Warner1, Yimin Zhang1, Helena Chum2 , Robin Newmark1 Biofuels represent technological learning, sugarcane and corn ethanol industries have achieved steady improvements in resource Scope Abstract Conclusions The GHG savings and land energy productivity of both ethanol systems have

311

Improving parameter estimation and water table depth simulation in a land surface model using GRACE water storage and estimated base flow data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2007), Estimating ground water storage changes in thestorage (i.e. , all of the snow, ice, surface water, soil moisture, and ground-

Lo, Min-Hui; Famiglietti, James S; Yeh, P. J.-F.; Syed, T. H

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Climate change, agriculture, water resources: what do we tell those that need to know?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Asked to contribute to this special issue of Climatic Change, just as it is an honor to have served on the journals Editorial Board since, it seems, time immemorial (1983, actually). This issue celebrates the journals having published a full 100 volumesthis in the relatively short time-span since its founding in 1975. I take pleasure in being able to claim guest editorship or co-editorship of fully five percent of these 100 volumes.

Rosenberg, Norman J.

2010-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

313

Plant responses of drip irrigated trees to climate and water stress  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the atmosphere and by the movement of water within the plant preventing the desiccation of leaf tissue. Thus atmospheric evaporative demand determined by net radiation, vapour pressure deficit, wind speed and air temperatures is the major determinant.... Water vapour diffuses outward through the stomata in the process of transpirat. :on. When absorption of water by the roots equals the rate of transpiration, leaf cells remain turgid and stomata stay open. Iiowever, when the soil around the roots...

Punthakey, Jehangir Framroze

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Interactions of Water and Energy Mediate Responses of High-Latitude Terrestrial Ecosystems to Climate Change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the heat capacity of the ice mass and liquid water mass.all the ice (liquid) is melted (frozen). Heat capacities are

Subin, Zachary Marc

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Characterizing and responding to uncertainty in climate change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

climate change assessment. Water Science & Technology 52(of the dynamic nature of water vapor feedback in climate2004). Quantifying the water vapour feedback as- sociated

Lemoine, Derek Mark

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Improved water allocation utilizing probabilistic climate forecasts: Short-term water contracts in a risk management framework  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Thus, integrated supply and demand management can be achieved. In this paper, a single period multiuser, forecast consumers, water managers and reservoir operators, have difficulty interpreting such products in a risk management framework A. Sankarasubramanian,1 Upmanu Lall,2 Francisco Assis Souza Filho,3

Arumugam, Sankar

317

Climate change versus urban drinking water supply and management: a case analysis on the coastal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Informatics, Brandenburg University of Technology at Cottbus, P.O. Box. 101344, D-03013 Cottbus, GERMANY (E-mail: shafinoor@yahoo.com; ishafin@yahoo.com) Abstract Clean urban drinking water supply is now a crucial problem; management. INTRODUCTION Clean urban drinking water supply is now a global problem, and most of the countries

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

318

UK Climate Change Risk Assessment and National  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UK Climate Change Risk Assessment and National Adaptation Programme Meg Patel Defra #12 change #12;Weather & climate impacts - economic, societal, environmental Water consumption per capita;Legislative Framework Climate Change Act 2008 Adaptation Reporting Power 2011 Climate Change Risk Assessment

Wirosoetisno, Djoko

319

The impact of climate change on vadose zone pore waters and its implication for long-term monitoring  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Protecting groundwater is of growing interest as pressure on these resources grows. Recharge of groundwater takes place through the vadose zone, where complex interactions between thermal-hydrological-geochemical processes affect water quality. Monitoring processes in the vadose zone is an important means of evaluating the long-term health of aquifer systems, and has become an integral part of many subsurface engineering efforts. Monitoring such systems, however, may be affected by changes in climate that slowly propagate through vadose zone systems. We describe in this paper the use of NUFT-C, a reactive transport simulator designed to run on a high performance, massively parallel computer, to compare quantitatively the evolution of a deep vadose zone with changes expected from an engineered high-level nuclear waste repository. The results suggest that the impacts from waste emplacement are, in some instances, similar to those that would be observed as a result of climate change, whereas others are distinguishable from evolution of the natural system. Such simulations facilitate design of long-term monitoring programs that take account of these complex effects. The results emphasize the importance of developing long-term baseline measurements and control sites, in order to enhance confidence in interpretations of complexly evolving data sets that will be obtained from multi-decade monitoring efforts.

Glassley, William E.; Nitao, John J.; Grant, Charles W.; Johnson, James W.; Steefel, Carl I.; Kercher, James R.

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Reservoir Management in Mediterranean Climates through the European Water Framework Directive  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

environmental best management practices through cross compliance in part to address this strain on waterwater management: the case of two Portuguese reservoirs with different water quality. International Journal of Environmental

O'Reilly, Clare; Silberblatt, Rafael

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land water climate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Soil loss and leaching, habitat destruction, land and water demand in energy-crop monoculture: some quantitative limits  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The environmental impacts of growing biomass for energy, especially for liquid automotive fuels, are potentially large. They are sensitive to the low power production per unit area (high land requirement) and to net energy balances. Initial quantitative estimates were made for impacts per unit power within several classes of impacts, and conversely, for limits to power produced if one avoids worst-class impacts. The following types of biomass energy technologies are considered: ethanol and methanol from grains and residues (temperate zone); jojoba wax (semi-tropical); ethanol from sugar cane and root crops (tropics); and silviculture for methanol via gasification.

Gutschick, V.P.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Economic Benefit of Land Conservation in Protecting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by plants instead of traveling into the water system #12;Water Storage on Conservation Lands · Upland areas.9 billion · In terms of water quality and groundwater purification, returns of $13.2 billion estimated #12Economic Benefit of Land Conservation in Protecting Water Resources November 2, 2011 Presented by

Demers, Nora Egan

323

The importance of food demand management for climate mitigation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and fertiliser, and the inclusion of climate change as a driver of yield changes and irrigation demand. This would enable estimation of how shortfalls in irrigation water availability might affect future food production. Bioenergy scenarios also lie outside... the scope of the current paper; unless food demand patterns change significantly, there seems to be little spare land for bioenergy developments without a reduction of food availability. However, it is important to note that the model results we present...

Bajelj, Bojana; Richards, Keith S.; Allwood, Julian M.; Smith, Pete; Dennis, John S.; Curmi, Elizabeth; Gilligan, Christopher A.

2014-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

324

Climate Change Would Increase the Water Intensity of Irrigated Corn Rosa Dominguez-Faus,*,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

production in the U.S. is rapidly increasing after the adoption of the Energy Independence and Security Act. The interdependence between energy production and water resources has been emphasized in recent studies.4-12 When Engineering, Rice University, Houston, Texas 77251, United States *S Supporting Information ABSTRACT: Changes

Alvarez, Pedro J.

325

Marginal, Erodible Land Retirement Policy (Minnesota)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

It is state policy to encourage the retirement of marginal, highly erodible land, particularly land adjacent to public waters and drainage systems, from crop production and to reestablish a cover...

326

Climate Change, Drought & Environment  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Afternoon Plenary Session: Current Trends in the Advanced Bioindustry Climate Change, Drought, and EnvironmentMichael Champ, Executive Director, The Sustainable Water Challenge

327

Modeled Interactive Effects of Precipitation, temperature, and [CO2] on Ecosystem Carbon and Water Dynamics in Different Climatic Zones  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Interactive effects of multiple global change factors on ecosystem processes are complex. It is relatively expensive to explore those interactions in manipulative experiments. We conducted a modeling analysis to identify potentially important interactions and to stimulate hypothesis formulation for experimental research. Four models were used to quantify interactive effects of climate warming (T), altered precipitation amounts [doubled (DP) and halved (HP)] and seasonality (SP, moving precipitation in July and August to January and February to create summer drought), and elevated [CO2] (C) on net primary production (NPP), heterotrophic respiration (Rh), net ecosystem production (NEP), transpiration, and runoff.We examined those responses in seven ecosystems, including forests, grasslands, and heathlands in different climate zones. The modeling analysis showed that none of the threeway interactions among T, C, and altered precipitation was substantial for either carbon or water processes, nor consistent among the seven ecosystems. However, two-way interactive effects on NPP, Rh, and NEP were generally positive (i.e. amplification of one factor s effect by the other factor) between T and C or between T and DP. A negative interaction (i.e. depression of one factor s effect by the other factor) occurred for simulated NPP between T and HP. The interactive effects on runoff were positive between T and HP. Four pairs of two-way interactive effects on plant transpiration were positive and two pairs negative. In addition, wet sites generally had smaller relative changes in NPP, Rh, runoff, and transpiration but larger absolute changes in NEP than dry sites in response to the treatments. The modeling results suggest new hypotheses to be tested in multifactor global change experiments. Likewise, more experimental evidence is needed for the further improvement of ecosystem models in order to adequately simulate complex interactive processes.

Luo, Yiqi [University of Oklahoma; Gerten, Dieter [Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, Potsdam, Germany; Le Maire, Guerric [Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l'Environement, France; Parton, William [University of Colorado, Fort Collins; Weng, Ensheng [University of Oklahoma, Norman; Zhou, Xuhuui [University of Oklahoma; Keough, Cindy [University of Colorado, Fort Collins; Beier, Claus [Riso National Laboratory, Roskilde, Denmark; Ciais, Philippe [Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l'Environement, France; Cramer, Wolfgang [Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, Potsdam, Germany; Dukes, Jeff [University of Massachusetts, Boston; Emmett, Bridget [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Bangor, Gwynedd, United Kingdom; Hanson, Paul J [ORNL; Knapp, Alan [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Linder, Sune [Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Upsalla, Sweden; Nepstad, Daniel [Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI), Woods Hole, MA; Rustad, Lindsey [USDA Forest Service

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Climate & Environmental Sciences | Clean Energy | ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Climate & Environment Climate Change Science Institute Earth and Aquatic Sciences Ecosystem Science Environmental Data Science and Systems Energy-Water Resource Systems Human...

329

Land Use and natUraL resoUrces  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Land Use and natUraL resoUrces summer 2012 Including: Climate Change and Local Planning Strategies Overview of Environmental Statistics Green Building Design Studio CONTINuING AND PrOFessIONAL eDuCATION #12Ndar........................................................................................................................4 laNd USe plaNNiNg Climate Change and Local Planning Strategies

California at Davis, University of

330

Recent Advances in Regional Climate System Modeling and Climate Change Analyses of Extreme Heat  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

California hydrology. J. Am. Water Resources Association 39,Land Surface and Ground Water Model for use in WatershedN.L. , 2003: California Water Resources Research, CEC Sept

Miller, Norman L.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Bringing climate change down to earth : science and participation in Canadian and Australian climate change campaigns  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

while reducing air and water pollutants. Individualclimate change, rivers and water, forests, land health andand cooling, 11.1% from water heating, 7.5% from appliances,

Padolsky, Miriam Elana

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

MEDITERRANEAN CLIMATE STREAMS Review paper Riparian vegetation research in Mediterranean-climate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MEDITERRANEAN CLIMATE STREAMS Review paper Riparian vegetation research in Mediterranean-climate are from land-use conversion to agriculture, streamflow regulation, nutrient enrichment, and climate change editors: N. Bonada & V. H. Resh / Streams in Mediterranean climate regions: lessons learned from the last

Stella, John C.

333

Sustainable Land Management in Northern Namibia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and low water holding capacity (Bolivia) #12;Perspective Similar soil (Kavango) #12;Increased Demand for Food + Energy Production Expansion onto Less Resilient Lands Reduced Production per Unit Area

334

Climate Science and Drought  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Texas Climate Change and Drought Wendy Gordon, Ph.D. The University of Texas ? Austin Environmental Science Institute Texas Wildfires 2011 From the beginning of the fire season on November 15, 2010 to October 31, 2011 nearly 28,000 fires had... have been particularly severe due to the ongoing 2011 Southern US drought, and exacerbating the problem is land management practices, the unusual convergence of strong winds, unseasonably warm temperatures, and low humidity. Climate...

Gordon, W.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Stream flows for salmon and society: managing water for human and ecosystem needs in Mediterranean-climate California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of vineyard water management on environmental flows to (i)in water management practices on environmental flows.of environmental flow allocations in water management has

Grantham, Theodore Evan William

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Stream flows for salmon and society: managing water for human and ecosystem needs in Mediterranean-climate California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of vineyard water management on environmental flows to (i)of environmental flow allocations in water management hasin water management practices on environmental flows.

Grantham, Theodore Evan William

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Environment News Service for the latest environmental news, current issues, climate, water, food, forests, species, energy, education. RSS feed. | | | | |Home About News Index Services My Account Events | Search February 2, 2006  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Environment News Service for the latest environmental news, current issues, climate, water, food ) U.S. Energy Department Nuclear fission powers today's nuclear plants. When heavy nuclei split available energy source with essentially unlimited supply and manageable environmental impact," according

338

Efficient Water Use & Management  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Goals Water Use Goal 4: Efficient Water Use & Management Aware of the arid climate of northern New Mexico, water reduction and conservation remains a primary concern at LANL....

339

Colorado Climate Winter 1999/2000 Vol. 1, No. 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Colorado Climate Winter 1999/2000 Vol. 1, No. 1 Inside: What Is Climate? 1999 Water Year Review Climate on the Web Drought in Colorado #12;Colorado Climate Center Atmospheric Science Department Colorado ................................................................................................................................... 12 Drought in Colorado

340

ii Colorado Climate Table of Contents  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;ii Colorado Climate Table of Contents Web: http://climate.atmos.colostate.edu Colorado Climate Winter 2001-2002 Vol. 3, No. 1 Why Is the Park Range Colorado's Snowfall Capital? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10 The Cold-Land Processes Field Experiment: North-Central Colorado

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land water climate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Novel Growth Substrates and Smart Irrigation Strategies to Reduce Water Consumption of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

's Greenhouse Industry Faculty Advisor: Markus Tuller (SWES) Department of Agricultural and Biosystems Changing from rockwool to coconut coir Eurofresh Farms, Willcox, AZ #12;Conventional Irrigation Left on outside climate Use of unproductive land Better use of resources (water, energy, space, capital

Fay, Noah

342

Climate and Environmental Sciences Division Strategic Plan Water is a key component of the earth and human  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and subsurface processes, as well as climate and earth system modeling and integrated assessment modeling and plan the development of next- generation human-earth system models for improving long-term predictions

Wood, Robert

343

Physically-Based Global Downscaling: Climate Change Projections for a Full Century  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A global atmosphere/land model with an embedded subgrid orography scheme is used to simulate the period 1977-2100 using ocean surface conditions and radiative constituent concentrations for a climate change scenario. Climate variables simulated for multiple elevation classes are mapping according to the high-resolution of topography in ten regions with complex terrain. Analysis of changes in the simulated climate lead to the following conclusions. Changes in precipitation vary widely, with precipitation increasing more with increasing altitude in some region, decreasing more with altitude in others, and changing little in still others. In some regions the sign of the precipitation change depends on surface elevation. Changes in surface air temperature are rather uniform, with at most a two-fold difference between the largest and smallest changes within a region. In most cases the warming increases with altitude. Changes in snow water are highly dependent on altitude. Absolute changes usually increase with altitude, while relative changes decrease. In places where snow accumulates, an artificial upper bound on snow water limits the sensitivity of snow water to climate change considerably. The simulated impact of climate change on regional mean snow water varies widely, with little impact in regions in which the upper bound on snow water is the dominant snow water sink, moderate impact in regions with a mixture of seasonal and permanent snow, and profound impacts on regions with little permanent snow.

Ghan, Steven J.; Shippert, Timothy R.

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Physically-Based Global Downscaling Climate Change Projections for a Full Century  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A global atmosphere/land model with an embedded subgrid orography scheme is used to simulate the period 1977-2100 using ocean surface conditions and radiative constituent concentrations for a climate change scenario. Climate variables simulated for multiple elevation classes are mapping according to a high-resolution elevation dataset in ten regions with complex terrain. Analysis of changes in the simulated climate leads to the following conclusions. Changes in precipitation vary widely, with precipitation increasing more with increasing altitude in some region, decreasing more with altitude in others, and changing little in still others. In some regions the sign of the precipitation change depends on surface elevation. Changes in surface air temperature are rather uniform, with at most a two-fold difference between the largest and smallest changes within a region; in most cases the warming increases with altitude. Changes in snow water are highly dependent on altitude. Absolute changes usually increase with altitude, while relative changes decrease. In places where snow accumulates, an artificial upper bound on snow water limits the sensitivity of snow water to climate change considerably. The simulated impact of climate change on regional mean snow water varies widely, with little impact in regions in which the upper bound on snow water is the dominant snow water sink, moderate impact in regions with a mixture of seasonal and permanent snow, and profound impacts on regions with little permanent snow.

Ghan, Steven J.; Shippert, Timothy R.

2005-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

345

Climate-Soil-Vegetation Control on Groundwater Table Dynamics and its Feedbacks in a Climate Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Among the three dynamically linked branches of the water cycle, including atmospheric, surface, and subsurface water, groundwater is the largest reservoir and an active component of the hydrologic system. Because of the inherent slow response time, groundwater may be particularly relevant for long time-scale processes such as multi-years or decadal droughts. This study uses regional climate simulations with and without surface water groundwater interactions for the conterminous U.S. to assess the influence of climate, soil, and vegetation on groundwater table dynamics, and its potential feedbacks to regional climate. Analysis shows that precipitation has a dominant influence on the spatial and temporal variations of groundwater table depth (GWT). The simulated GWT is found to decrease sharply with increasing precipitation. Our simulation also shows some distinct spatial variations that are related to soil porosity and hydraulic conductivity. Vegetation properties such as minimum stomatal resistance, and root depth and fraction are also found to play an important role in controlling the groundwater table. Comparing two simulations with and without groundwater table dynamics, we find that groundwater table dynamics mainly influences the partitioning of soil water between the surface (0 0.5 m) and subsurface (0.5 5 m) rather than total soil moisture. In most areas, groundwater table dynamics increases surface soil moisture at the expense of the subsurface, except in regions with very shallow groundwater table. The change in soil water partitioning between the surface and subsurface is found to strongly correlate with the partitioning of surface sensible and latent heat fluxes. The evaporative fraction (EF) is generally higher during summer when groundwater table dynamics is included. This is accompanied by increased cloudiness, reduced diurnal temperature range, cooler surface temperature, and increased cloud top height. Although both convective and non-convective precipitation are enhanced, the higher EF changes the partitioning to favor more non-convective precipitation, but this result could be sensitive to the convective parameterization used. Compared to simulations without groundwater table dynamics, the dry bias in the summer precipitation is slightly reduced over the central and eastern U.S. Groundwater table dynamics can provide important feedbacks to atmospheric processes, and these feedbacks are stronger in regions with deeper groundwater table, because the interactions between surface and subsurface are weak when the groundwater table is deep. This increases the sensitivity of surface soil moisture to precipitation anomalies, and therefore enhances land surface feedbacks to the atmosphere through changes in soil moisture and evaporative fraction. By altering the groundwater table depth, land use change and groundwater withdrawal can alter land surface response and feedback to the climate system.

Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Huang, Maoyi; Qian, Yun; Liang, Xu

2010-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

346

Regional Climate Model Projections for the State of Washington  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Global climate models do not have sufficient spatial resolution to represent the atmospheric and land surface processes that determine the unique regional heterogeneity of the climate of the State of Washington. If future large-scale weather patterns interact differently with the local terrain and coastlines than current weather patterns, local changes in temperature and precipitation could be quite different from the coarse-scale changes projected by global models. Regional climate models explicitly simulate the interactions between the large-scale weather patterns simulated by a global model and the local terrain. We have performed two 100-year climate simulations using the Weather and Research Forecasting (WRF) model developed at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR). One simulation is forced by the NCAR Community Climate System Model version 3 (CCSM3) and the second is forced by a simulation of the Max Plank Institute, Hamburg, global model (ECHAM5). The mesoscale simulations produce regional changes in snow cover, cloudiness, and circulation patterns associated with interactions between the large-scale climate change and the regional topography and land-water contrasts. These changes substantially alter the temperature and precipitation trends over the region relative to the global model result or statistical downscaling. To illustrate this effect, we analyze the changes from the current climate (1970-1999) to the mid 21st century (2030-2059). Changes in seasonal-mean temperature, precipitation, and snowpack are presented. Several climatological indices of extreme daily weather are also presented: precipitation intensity, fraction of precipitation occurring in extreme daily events, heat wave frequency, growing season length, and frequency of warm nights. Despite somewhat different changes in seasonal precipitation and temperature from the two regional simulations, consistent results for changes in snowpack and extreme precipitation are found in both simulations.

Salathe, E.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Qian, Yun; Zhang, Yongxin

2010-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

347

Hanford Federal Facility state of Washington leased land  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report was prepared to provide information concerning past solid and hazardous waste management practices for all leased land at the US DOE Hanford Reservation. This report contains sections including land description; land usage; ground water, air and soil monitoring data; and land uses after 1963. Numerous appendices are included which provide documentation of lease agreements and amendments, environmental assessments, and site surveys.

Not Available

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

LAND AND WATER USE CHARACTERISTICS AND HUMAN HEALTH INPUT PARAMETERS FOR USE IN ENVIRONMENTAL DOSIMETRY AND RISK ASSESSMENTS AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Operations at the Savannah River Site (SRS) result in releases of small amounts of radioactive materials to the atmosphere and to the Savannah River. For regulatory compliance purposes, potential offsite radiological doses are estimated annually using computer models that follow U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Regulatory Guides. Within the regulatory guides, default values are provided for many of the dose model parameters but the use of site-specific values by the applicant is encouraged. A detailed survey of land and water use parameters was conducted in 1991 and is being updated here. These parameters include local characteristics of meat, milk and vegetable production; river recreational activities; and meat, milk and vegetable consumption rates as well as other human usage parameters required in the SRS dosimetry models. In addition, the preferred elemental bioaccumulation factors and transfer factors to be used in human health exposure calculations at SRS are documented. Based on comparisons to the 2009 SRS environmental compliance doses, the following effects are expected in future SRS compliance dose calculations: (1) Aquatic all-pathway maximally exposed individual doses may go up about 10 percent due to changes in the aquatic bioaccumulation factors; (2) Aquatic all-pathway collective doses may go up about 5 percent due to changes in the aquatic bioaccumulation factors that offset the reduction in average individual water consumption rates; (3) Irrigation pathway doses to the maximally exposed individual may go up about 40 percent due to increases in the element-specific transfer factors; (4) Irrigation pathway collective doses may go down about 50 percent due to changes in food productivity and production within the 50-mile radius of SRS; (5) Air pathway doses to the maximally exposed individual may go down about 10 percent due to the changes in food productivity in the SRS area and to the changes in element-specific transfer factors; and (6) Air pathway collective doses may go down about 30 percent mainly due to the decrease in the inhalation rate assumed for the average individual.

Jannik, T.; Karapatakis, D.; Lee, P.; Farfan, E.

2010-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

349

Impact of Pacific and Atlantic sea surface temperatures on interannual and decadal variations of GRACE land water storage in tropical South America  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

stress, i.e. , the ground water storage [Toomey et al. ,and longer time scales, as ground water storage multidecadal

de Linage, Caroline; Kim, Hyungjun; Famiglietti, James S; Yu, Jin-Yi

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

4, 30553085, 2007 Winter climate affects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HESSD 4, 3055­3085, 2007 Winter climate affects long-term trends in stream water nitrate H. A. de and Earth System Sciences Winter climate affects long-term trends in stream water nitrate in acid Winter climate affects long-term trends in stream water nitrate H. A. de Wit et al. Title Page Abstract

Boyer, Edmond

351

Land and Atmospheric Science GRAD STUDENT HANDBOOK  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and managed ecosystems the sources, transport, and fate of pollutants in soil, air, and water: Environmental Sciences, Policy and Management Agricultural Industries and Marketing The Department occupies. The Department of Soil, Water, and Climate created this graduate program in 2009

Minnesota, University of

352

Questions of bias in climate models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The recent work by Shindell usefully contributes to the debate over estimating climate sensitivity by highlighting an important aspect of the climate system: that climate forcings that occur over land result in a more rapid temperature response than forcings that are distributed more uniformly over the globe. While, as noted in this work, simple climate models may be biased by assuming the same temperature response for all forcing agents, the implication that the MAGICC model is biased in this way is not correct.

Smith, Steven J.; Wigley, Tom M.; Meinshausen, Malte; Rogelj, Joeri

2014-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

353

Role of modern climate and hydrology in world oil preservation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The accumulation of oil requires a favorable source, a reservoir, good seal-rock quality, and suitably timed thermal history and structuring. The accumulated oil, especially its light fractions, may be subsequently removed by hydrologically controlled processes such as water washing, biodegradation, and tilting of the oil-water contact. These processes are dependent on the climate. In regions that have become increasingly cold or dry during late Cenozoic time, low rainfall, low ground-water flow rates, and low input of nutrients and microorganisms have protected the oil; in warm or temperate rainy climates, high flow rates and high input of nutrients and microorganisms have led to partial or total removal of oil. Thus, most of the rich (>500,000 barrels/day) oil provinces on land are in cold or dry regions, where water is recharged in highlands that receive little rain (<500 mm/yr), such as Texas, Oklahoma, Wyoming, Alaska's North Slope, California, Algeria, Libya, Egypt, the Middle East, the Volga-Ural basin, and western Siberia. Where upland recharge areas are warm or temperate and rainy, as in the eastern United States, western Europe, sub-Saharan Africa, Brazil, India, and most of China, rich oil provinces on land (outside young deltas) are rare, and biodegradation is widespread. 32 refs., 2 figs.

Szatmari, P. (Petrobras Research Center, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil))

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

An Investigation of Hydrological Aspects of Water Harvesting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Water harvesting is a potential source of water for arid and semiarid lands. The objectives of this study were to determine combinations of land surface treatments and land forming which result in efficient but inexpensive water harvesting...

Wilke, O.; Runkles, J.; Wendt, C.

355

Appropriate Technologies and Systems to respond to Climate Change, Improved Water Resources Management, Waste Management and Sanitation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Resources Management, Waste Management and Sanitation A Review of Water Information Systems in the English to adequately manage the resource and institute measures to equitably allocate water among the various competing in the management of the resource. This paper examines the water information systems of St. Lucia, Jamaica

Barthelat, Francois

356

Climate Change Guidance: A Pragmatic Approach to Client  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

10/21/11 Climate Change Guidance: A Pragmatic Approach to Client Needs Climate, Water and Ecosystems- Shaping the Great Plains October 13, 2011 #12;10/21/11 Climate Change Guidance: A Pragmatic Approach to Client NeedsClimate Science ­ 2011 ·Yes, the climate is changing. ·Climate science is changing

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

357

A Conceptual Framework for Estimating Bioenerg-Related Land-Use Change and Its Impacts over Time  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

bioenergy program land-use baseline (i.e. , one in which prices,BIOENERGY POLICIES ON CLIMATE AND CLIMATE IMPACTS POLICY ACTION ENERGY SYSTEMS MATERIALS LAND USE, ECOSYSTEMS ECONOMIC SYSTEM (PRICES)Prices, yields, supply curves, and land uses can change over time, year-by-year, in the with bioenergy

Delucchi, Mark

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Change in Urban Land Use and Associated Attributes in the Upper San Francisco Estuary, 1990-2006  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bay watershed. Environmental Management Water Plan Land andwater quality in Georgian Bay. Environmental Management 44(

Stoms, David M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Relative efficiency of land surface energy balance components  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

[1] The partitioning of available energy into dissipative fluxes over land surfaces is dependent on the state variable of the surface energy balance (land surface temperature) and the state variable of the surface water ...

Bateni, S. M.

360

Siting Renewable Energy: Land Use and Regulatory Context  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This article takes up the increasingly important land use question of siting for renewable energy. As concern over climate change grows, new policies are being crafted at all levels of government to support renewable energy as a way of reducing...

Outka, Uma

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land water climate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

ESTIMATING RISK TO CALIFORNIA ENERGY INFRASTRUCTURE FROM PROJECTED CLIMATE CHANGE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1997. Climate Change and Water Resources. Climatic Change2006. Cost and Value of Water Use at Combined-Cycle Power2006. Cost and Value of Water Use at Combined-Cycle Power

Sathaye, Jayant

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Performance of a Heat Pump Water Heater in the Hot-Humid Climate, Windermere, Florida (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over recent years, heat pump water heaters (HPWHs) have become more readily available and more widely adopted in the marketplace. For a 6-month period, the Building America team Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings monitored the performance of a GE Geospring HPWH in Windermere, Florida. The study found that the HPWH performed 144% more efficiently than a traditional electric resistance water heater, saving approximately 64% on water heating annually. The monitoring showed that the domestic hot water draw was a primary factor affecting the system's operating efficiency.

Metzger, C.; Puttagunta, S.; Williamson, J.

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Uncertainty Analysis of Runoff Simulations and Parameter Identifiability in the Community Land Model Evidence from MOPEX Basins  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With the emergence of earth system models as important tools for understanding and predicting climate change and implications to mitigation and adaptation, it has become increasingly important to assess the fidelity of the land component within earth system models to capture realistic hydrological processes and their response to the changing climate and quantify the associated uncertainties. This study investigates the sensitivity of runoff simulations to major hydrologic parameters in version 4 of the Community Land Model (CLM4) by integrating CLM4 with a stochastic exploratory sensitivity analysis framework at 20 selected watersheds from the Model Parameter Estimation Experiment (MOPEX) spanning a wide range of climate and site conditions. We found that for runoff simulations, the most significant parameters are those related to the subsurface runoff parameterizations. Soil texture related parameters and surface runoff parameters are of secondary significance. Moreover, climate and soil conditions play important roles in the parameter sensitivity. In general, site conditions within water-limited hydrologic regimes and with finer soil texture result in stronger sensitivity of output variables, such as runoff and its surface and subsurface components, to the input parameters in CLM4. This study demonstrated the feasibility of parameter inversion for CLM4 using streamflow observations to improve runoff simulations. By ranking the significance of the input parameters, we showed that the parameter set dimensionality could be reduced for CLM4 parameter calibration under different hydrologic and climatic regimes so that the inverse problem is less ill posed.

Huang, Maoyi; Hou, Zhangshuan; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Ke, Yinghai; Liu, Ying; Fang, Zhufeng; Sun, Yu

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

How to Integrate Climate Change Adaptation into National-Level...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Integrate Climate Change Adaptation into National-Level Policy and Planning in the Water Sector Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: How to Integrate Climate...

365

Economic Damages from Climate Change: An Assessment of Market Impacts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2: Projected Decrease in Water Equivalent of Sierra Snowpackof Averages Impacts on Water Sea Level Rise Temperature-Laboratory. Co-Director, Water Program, California Climate

Hanemann, W Michael; Dale, Larry

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

www.extension.ucdavis.edu/landuse Land Use and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

includes courses on land use, environmental law and policy, natural resources management, water policy, water quality management, housing and community development, transportation management, GIS applications.......................................................................13 A Low Impact Design Approach to Storm Water Management........................................13

Thomases, Becca

367

INVESTIGATIONS ON THE IMPACTS OF LAND-COVER CHANGES AND/OR INCREASED CO2 CONCENTRATIONS ON FOUR REGIONAL WATER CYCLES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

REGIONAL WATER CYCLES AND THEIR INTERACTIONS WITH THE GLOBAL WATER CYCLE By Zhao Li RECOMMENDED-COVER CHANGES AND/OR INCREASED CO2 CONCENTRATIONS ON FOUR REGIONAL WATER CYCLES AND THEIR INTERACTIONS WITH THE GLOBAL WATER CYCLE A THESIS Presented to the Faculty of the University of Alaska Fairbanks In Partial

Moelders, Nicole

368

Evaluating land application effects  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Philadelphia, PA Water Department embarked on a land application program of its treated wastewater sludge in 1977. Initially, liquid sludge averaging from 1-5% solids was applied to approximately 400 acres of corn, soybeans, and sod at rates sufficient to supply crop nitrogen needs. During the 1978 through 1984 growing seasons, crops and soils were monitored for heavy metals (bioavailability of cadmium, copper, nickel, chromium, lead and zinc) and in 1984 for PCB accumulation. This report summarizes results of the monitoring program until 1984.

Sarkis, K. (Philadelphia Water Department, PA (USA))

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Stormwater, Climate Change and Wisconsin's Coastal Communities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stormwater, Climate Change and Wisconsin's Coastal Communities Johnson Foundation at Wingspread · Precipitation and high water · Adapting to our changing climate · Assisting coastal communities Photo: WDNR #12 source of risk from changing climate. City of Green Bay watershed - #12;Predicted climate includes

Sheridan, Jennifer

370

Case Study of Stratified Chilled Water Storage Utilization for Comfort and Process Cooling in a Hot, Humid Climate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the system and its operation is followed by presentation of operating data taken during 1997. INTRODUCTION Chilled water thermal energy storage ('TES) in naturally stratified tanks has been shown to be a valuable central cooling plant load management... and humid environment and presents new data on the performance of a large stratified chilled water storage tank. Figure 1. Plant Schematic. SITE The case study site is the Dallas, TX world headquarters of a major semiconductor manufacturer. The 6...

Bahnfleth, W. P.; Musser, A.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

METEOROLOGY 5503 CLIMATE DYNAMICS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

­ Present Average Climate System Behavior (14 lectures) History; Vision of Victor Starr; Global Budgets of Angular Momentum, Energy, Water Vapor; Regional Water Budget; Meridional Ocean Heat Transport 3 and Indices: Diagnostic Tools (wind stress curl, velocity potential, outgoing LW radiation); ENSO cycles

Droegemeier, Kelvin K.

372

COLORADO CLIMATE PREPAREDNESS PROJECT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COLORADO CLIMATE PREPAREDNESS PROJECT FINAL REPORT Prepared by the Western Water Assessment for the State of Colorado #12;#12;Authors Kristen Averyt University of Colorado Boulder, CU-NOAA Western Water Assessment Kelsey Cody University of Colorado Boulder, Environmental Studies Program Eric Gordon University

Neff, Jason

373

Fall 2001 Vol. 2, No. 4 ii Colorado Climate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Colorado Climate Fall 2001 Vol. 2, No. 4 #12;ii Colorado Climate Table of Contents On Being a Small . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Colorado Climate in Review . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 A Review of the 2001 WaterYear in Colorado

374

Statistics and Climate Models Cari Kaufman  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the Climate System · Atmosphere · Ocean · Cryosphere · Land surface, biosphere · Atmospheric chemistry SAMSI Components of climate models: · Radiation - input, absorption, and emission · Dynamics - movement of energy's planetary radiation budget · Can run on a desktop computer · Predict surface temperature · Usually are 0-D

375

Iowa Land Recycling and Environmental Remediation Standards Act (Iowa)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This chapter establishes remediation standards for land, other than standards for water quality, hazardous conditions, underground storage tanks, and groundwater protection, which are discussed in...

376

Hawaii Department of Land and Natural Resources Commission on...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hawaii Department of Land and Natural Resources Commission on Water Resource Management Address: Kalanimoku Building 1151 Punchbowl Street Room 227 Place: Honolulu, Hawaii Zip:...

377

Variability in North Pacific intermediate and deep water ventilation during Heinrich events in two coupled climate models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Ocean Research Institute, University of Tokyo, Japan d International Pacific Research Center, University water warming in the Pacific Ocean. The sensitivities of the Pacific meridional overturning circulation Pacific. Our models simulate broad features observed in several paleoproxy data of the Pacific Ocean

Chikamoto, Megumi O.

378

ABSTRACT: Water resource management in West Africa is often a complicated process due to inadequate resources, climatic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the Volta River Basin include high popu- lation densities, population growth rate, poverty, watershed sizeABSTRACT: Water resource management in West Africa is often a complicated process due to inadequate Basin, West Africa.) Taylor, Joie C., Nick van de Giesen, and Tammo S. Steenhuis, 2006. West Africa

Walter, M.Todd

379

Inland Wetlands and Water Courses Regulations (Connecticut)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Regulated activities in or near inland wetlands and water courses include the removal or depositing of material, land or water obstruction or alteration, construction, pollution, or water diversion...

380

Climate change and tropical biodiversity: a new focus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Climate change and tropical biodiversity: a new focus Jedediah Brodie1 , Eric Post2 and William F, Australia Considerable efforts are focused on the consequences of climate change for tropical rainforests climatic changes and human land use) remain understudied. Key concerns are that aridification could

Wisenden, Brian D.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land water climate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

The Los Alamos coupled climate model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To gain a full understanding of the Earth`s climate system, it is necessary to understand physical processes in the ocean, atmosphere, land and sea ice. In addition, interactions between components are very important and models which couple all of the components into a single coupled climate model are required. A climate model which couples ocean, sea ice, atmosphere and land components is described. The component models are run as autonomous processes coupled to a flux coupler through a flexible communications library. Performance considerations of the model are examined, particularly for running the model on distributed-shared-memory machine architectures.

Jones, P.W.; Malone, R.C.; Lai, C.A.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

382

Three Essays on Climate Change Impacts, Adaptation and Mitigation in Agriculture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

regionally detailed dynamic land allocation model is developed and applied for studying interrelationships between limited natural resources (e.g. land and groundwater), climate change, bioenergy demands and agricultural production. We find out...

Wang, Wei Wei

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

383

How Climate Change is Playing Out in Minnesota: Extreme Weather  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

How Climate Change is Playing Out in Minnesota: Extreme Weather Dr. Mark Seeley Dept of Soil, Water Climate Headlines Data Sources Changing Minnesota Climate Features Climate Consequences Implications for Severe Weather #12;Three Reasons to Accept That Climate Change is Real #12;#12;Stationary (1) Cyclical (2

Minnesota, University of

384

Antioch University and EPA Webinar: Assessing Vulnerability of Water Conveyance Infrastructure from a Changing Climate in the Context of a Changing Landscape  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presenter: Michael Simpson, Co-Director, Antioch Center for Climate Preparedness and Community Resilience; Chair, Department of Environmental Studies

385

Review of water, lighting, and cooling energy efficiency measures for low-income homes located in warm climates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In support of the U.S. Department of Energy`s Weatherization Assistance Program, Oak Ridge National Laboratory has performed a literature review of weatherization measures applicable for homes located in warm climate regions. Sources for this information included: (1) documented engineering estimates, (2) vendor information, (3) reported performance from research and field tests, and (4) direct discussions with researchers, vendors, and field reporters. Estimated savings are extrapolated from reported energy savings and applied to the end-use energy consumption for low-income homes reported by the Energy Information Administration. Additionally, installation costs, savings-to-investment ratios, and parameters indicating performance sensitivity to issues such as occupancy, construction, client education, and maintenance requirements are presented. The report is comprised of two sections: (1) an overview of measure performance, and (2) an appendix. The overview of measures is in a tabular format, which allows for quick reference. More detailed discussions and references for each measure are presented in the Appendix and it is highly recommended that these be reviewed prior to measure selection.

Martin, M.A.; Gettings, M.B.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

HYDROPOWER RELICENSING AND CLIMATE CHANGE1 Joshua H. Viers2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HYDROPOWER RELICENSING AND CLIMATE CHANGE1 Joshua H. Viers2 ABSTRACT: Hydropower represents impacts to natural and human communities, future long-term fixed licenses of hydropower operation. (KEY TERMS: climate change; environmental regulations; hydropower; relicensing; water law; water policy

Schladow, S. Geoffrey

387

The Outcome of the Climate Conference in Copehagen and its Implication...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Outcome of the Climate Conference in Copehagen and its Implications for the Land Transport Sector Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: The Outcome of the...

388

How will changes in global climate influence California?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

future climate change impacts on water for agriculture andclimate change that will be important for California agriculture

Weare, B C

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

From Climate-change Spaghetti to Climate-change Distributions for 21st-Century California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

effects of climate change on water resources in the West:U.S. Geological Survey Water Resources Investigations Reportwarming and Californias water future. UC Davis Center for

Dettinger, Michael D.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Land Tenure Center 50th Anniversary Celebration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to produce food to feed their own populations and to supply products designed to meet international market concessions/acquisitions. Jeff Dorsey will present recent findings about how water rights fit into land rights, and Glen Reynolds to talk about the Tribal "recovery" of treaty rights over water with the status

Sheridan, Jennifer

391

Land and Atmospheric Science GRAD STUDENT HANDBOOK  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, transport, and fate of pollutants in soil, air, and water; improving and protecting land, air, and water, Policy and Management Agricultural Industries and Marketing The Department occupies the entire Soil are predominantly occupied by Soil Morphology and Genesis, Environmental Biophysics, and Atmospheric Sciences, plus

Minnesota, University of

392

The Community Climate System Model Version 4  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The fourth version of the Community Climate System Model (CCSM4) was recently completed and released to the climate community. This paper describes developments to all the CCSM components, and documents fully coupled pre-industrial control runs compared to the previous version, CCSM3. Using the standard atmosphere and land resolution of 1{sup o} results in the sea surface temperature biases in the major upwelling regions being comparable to the 1.4{sup o} resolution CCSM3. Two changes to the deep convection scheme in the atmosphere component result in the CCSM4 producing El Nino/Southern Oscillation variability with a much more realistic frequency distribution than the CCSM3, although the amplitude is too large compared to observations. They also improve the representation of the Madden-Julian Oscillation, and the frequency distribution of tropical precipitation. A new overflow parameterization in the ocean component leads to an improved simulation of the deep ocean density structure, especially in the North Atlantic. Changes to the CCSM4 land component lead to a much improved annual cycle of water storage, especially in the tropics. The CCSM4 sea ice component uses much more realistic albedos than the CCSM3, and the Arctic sea ice concentration is improved in the CCSM4. An ensemble of 20th century simulations runs produce an excellent match to the observed September Arctic sea ice extent from 1979 to 2005. The CCSM4 ensemble mean increase in globally-averaged surface temperature between 1850 and 2005 is larger than the observed increase by about 0.4 C. This is consistent with the fact that the CCSM4 does not include a representation of the indirect effects of aerosols, although other factors may come into play. The CCSM4 still has significant biases, such as the mean precipitation distribution in the tropical Pacific Ocean, too much low cloud in the Arctic, and the latitudinal distributions of short-wave and long-wave cloud forcings.

Gent, Peter R.; Danabasoglu, Gokhan; Donner, Leo J.; Holland, Marika M.; Hunke, Elizabeth C.; Jayne, Steve R.; Lawrence, David M.; Neale, Richard; Rasch, Philip J.; Vertenstein, Mariana; Worley, Patrick; Yang, Zong-Liang; Zhang, Minghua

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Chesapeake Forest Lands (Maryland)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Chesapeake Forest Lands are most of the former land holdings of the Chesapeake Forest Products Company, which now includes more than 66,000 acres in five lower Eastern Shore counties. These...

394

School Land Board (Texas)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The School Land Board oversees the use of land owned by the state or held in trust for use and benefit by the state or one of its departments, boards, or agencies. The Board is responsible for...

395

Paradigm or Paradox: Can we Attribute Species Changes to Global Climate Change in Light of Decreasing Water Temperatures in Central California?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

California and Adjacent Waters. University of Californiamarmoratus) in California waters as assessed in 2005. ReportMonitoring MPAs in Deep Water off Central California: 2007

Breaker, Laurence; Cailliet, Gregor; Launer, Andrea; Wadsworth, Tom

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Climate Change and Water Resources in California: The Cost of Conservation versus Supply Augmentation for the East Bay Municipal Utility District  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gammon, Rovert. 2009. Sierra Water Grab. East Bay Express,www.eastbayexpress.com/news/sierra_water_grab/Content? oid=UCB: 1070. Maddaus Water Management. Conservation

Mourad, Bessma

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Sandia National Laboratories: Energy-Water Nexus Overview  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ClimateClimateEnvironmentWater & EnvironmentWater Infrastructure SecurityEnergy-Water Nexus Overview Energy-Water Nexus Overview U.S. Energy Sustainability The Missing Piece U.S....

398

The rapidly evolving field of decadal climate prediction, using initialized climate models to produce time-evolving predictions of regional climate, is producing new results for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and it is on those time scales of interest to water managers that decadal climate prediction is being appliedThe rapidly evolving field of decadal climate prediction, using initialized climate models to produce time-evolving predictions of regional climate, is producing new results for predictions

399

12/10/13 12:46 PMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 1 of 13http://climate.colostate.edu/%7Edrought/current_assessment.php  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Edrought/current_assessment.php PRECIPITATION The images above use daily precipitation statistics from NWS 2 of 13http://climate.colostate.edu/%7Edrought/current_assessment.php Eastern Colorado in contrast://climate.colostate.edu/%7Edrought/current_assessment.php The top left image shows the Natural Resources Conservation Service

400

1/7/14 11:54 AMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 1 of 13http://climate.colostate.edu/%7Edrought/current_assessment.php  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Edrought/current_assessment.php PRECIPITATION The images above use daily precipitation statistics from NWS Assessment Page 2 of 13http://climate.colostate.edu/%7Edrought/current_assessment.php falling in Carbon of 13http://climate.colostate.edu/%7Edrought/current_assessment.php The top left image shows the Natural

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land water climate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Glaciers, ice sheets, and sea level: effect of a CO/sub 2/-induced climatic change  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The workshop examined the basic questions of how much water has been exchanged between land ice and ocean during the last century, what is happening now, and, given existing climate-modeling prediction, how much exchange can be expected in the next century. In addition, the evidence for exchange was examined and gaps in that evidence were identified. The report includes the 23 presentations made at the workshop, summarizes the workshop discussion, and presents the Committee's findings and recommendations. Separate abstracts have been prepared for the 23 presentations.

none,

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

E-Print Network 3.0 - antarctic climate signature Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Climate... to the penguins, seabirds, seals and whales. The signature of lead from automobile fuel in Antarctic ice cores... ;11Planet Earth Winter 2006 climate system. Water...

403

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric composition climate Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

hydrocarbons). These gases are all of consequence for climate... of water in the greenhouse effect An important suite of climate ... Source: Martin, Ellen - Department of...

404

Montana - Land Use License Application | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 -Energieprojekte3 Climate Zone Subtype A. Places inMonson042161°,Lands |Lands

405

Lakes & Reservoirs: Research and Management 2002 7: 189199 Modelling the impact of historical land uses on  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

uses on surface-water quality using groundwater flow and solute-transport models Karen G. Wayland,1-use effects on surface-water quality. Key words groundwater lag time, groundwater modelling, land use, water quality, watersheds. INTRODUCTION The biogeochemistry of surface water and groundwater are related to land

406

Individualism Submerged: Climate Change and the Perils of an Engineered Environment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of a Warming Climate on Water Availa- bility in Snow-of Natural Water Supplies . c.radiation or ameliorate sea-water inundation. In place of

Chepaitis, Daniel J.; Panagakis, Andrea K.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Knowledge Action Networks: Connecting regional climate change assessments to local action  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Impacts of Climate Change on Water In Africa, Cambridge (2009, a workshop of the Global Water Initiative. ConferenceCalifornia, San Diego; Global Water Initiative, University

Kennel, Charles; Daultrey, Sally

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

FINAL REPORT WIND POWER WARM SPRINGS RESERVATION TRIBAL LANDS DOE GRANT NUMBER DE-FG36-07GO17077 SUBMITTED BY WARM SPRINGS POWER & WATER ENTERPRISES A CORPORATE ENTITY OF THE CONFEDERATED TRIBES OF WARM SPRINGS WARM SPRINGS, OREGON  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Wind Generation Feasibility Warm Springs Power and Water Enterprises (WSPWE) is a corporate entity owned by the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation, located in central Oregon. The organization is responsible for managing electrical power generation facilities on tribal lands and, as part of its charter, has the responsibility to evaluate and develop renewable energy resources for the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs. WSPWE recently completed a multi-year-year wind resource assessment of tribal lands, beginning with the installation of wind monitoring towers on the Mutton Mountains site in 2003, and collection of on-site wind data is ongoing. The study identified the Mutton Mountain site on the northeastern edge of the reservation as a site with sufficient wind resources to support a commercial power project estimated to generate over 226,000 MWh per year. Initial estimates indicate that the first phase of the project would be approximately 79.5 MW of installed capacity. This Phase 2 study expands and builds on the previously conducted Phase 1 Wind Resource Assessment, dated June 30, 2007. In order to fully assess the economic benefits that may accrue to the Tribes through wind energy development at Mutton Mountain, a planning-level opinion of probable cost was performed to define the costs associated with key design and construction aspects of the proposed project. This report defines the Mutton Mountain project costs and economics in sufficient detail to allow the Tribes to either build the project themselves or contract with a developer under the most favorable terms possible for the Tribes.

Jim Manion; Michael Lofting; Wil Sando; Emily Leslie; Randy Goff

2009-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

409

Modifying the Soil and Water Assessment Tool to Simulate Cropland Carbon Flux: Model Development and Initial Evaluation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Climate change is one of the most compelling modern issues and has important implications for almost every aspect of natural and human systems. The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) model has been applied worldwide to support sustainable land and water management in a changing climate. However, the inadequacies of the existing carbon algorithm in SWAT limit its application in assessing impacts of human activities on CO2 emission, one important source of greenhouse gases (GHGs) that traps heat in the earth system and results in global warming. In this research, we incorporate a revised version of the CENTURY carbon model into SWAT to describe dynamics of soil organic matter (SOM)- residue and simulate land-atmosphere carbon exchange.

Zhang, Xuesong; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Arnold, Jeffrey; Williams, Jimmy R.; Srinivasan, Raghavan

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

ORIGINAL ARTICLE Influence of land terracing on agricultural and ecological  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the months from March to June of the year with less rainfall, the water supply for crop growth is mainly on the sloping land which promotes soil and water erosion during heavy rains. The associated agricultural to store and retain much water, promoting more favorable interactions between water and fertilizer. During

Wang, Zhi "Luke"

411

Arctic Landscapes --Complex, Connected and Vulnerable to a Changing Climate Geophysical Dynamics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and reliability of climate projections. Earth System Models Models serve as tools for integration and synthesis-atmosphere interactions and their representation in Earth Systems Models. Land-Atmosphere Interactions Land surface for projections of future climate. Representation of heterogene- ity in Earth System Models will be advanced

412

Evaluating periodicities in peat-based climate proxy records Graeme T. Swindles a,*, R. Timothy Patterson b  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Evaluating periodicities in peat-based climate proxy records Graeme T. Swindles a,*, R. Timothy). Palaeohydrological reconstructions from ombrotrophic peat- lands agree well with other proxy climate data (Baker et

Patterson, Timothy

413

GUNNISON BASIN CLIMATE CHANGE VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Climate change is already changing ecosystems and affecting people in the southwestern United States, as well as ecosystem services, e.g., water supply. The climate of the Gunnison Basin, Colorado Fish and Wildlife Service, US Forest Service, Upper Gunnison River Water Conservancy District, Western

Neff, Jason

414

Climate Change 2007: Mitigation of Climate Change.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2007: Mitigation of Climate Change. Full report. WorkingIntergovernmental Panel on Climate Change www.webcda.it LaIntergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Il Rapporto

Schiavon, Stefano; Zecchin, Roberto

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Climate Change in Arizona: Current Knowledge and Future  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

's premier climate scientists discuss the impacts of climate change on Arizona's water, energy, healthClimate Change in Arizona: Current Knowledge and Future Collaborations Among the State Universities 230 Arizona State University, Tempe Campus Join us for a cross-university climate forum, as Arizona

Zhang, Junshan

416

Climate change impact on the Mediterranean Sea circulation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Climate change impact on the Mediterranean Sea circulation: a regional modelling approach Samuel number of studies about the stability of the THC in climate change scenario. A large range of climate Sea (Artegiani et al., 1997) which is the main source of the Eastern Mediterranean Deep Water. Past-climate

Ribes, Aurélien

417

The DOE Water Cycle Pilot Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Department of Energy (DOE) multi-laboratory Water Cycle Pilot Study (WCPS) investigated components of the local water budget at the Walnut River Watershed in Kansas to study the relative importance of various processes and to determine the feasibility of observational water budget closure. An extensive database of local meteorological time series and land surface characteristics was compiled. Numerical simulations of water budget components were generated and, to the extent possible, validated for three nested domains within the Southern Great Plains; the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement/Cloud Atmospheric Radiation Testbed (ARM/CART), the Walnut River Watershed (WRW), and the Whitewater Watershed (WW), Kansas A 2-month Intensive Observation Period (IOP) was conducted to gather detailed observations relevant to specific details of the water budget, including fine-scale precipitation, streamflow, and soil moisture measurements not made routinely by other programs. Event and season al water isotope (delta 18O, delta D) sampling in rainwater, streams, soils, lakes, and wells provided a means of tracing sources and sinks within and external to the WW, WRW, and the ARM/CART domains. The WCPS measured changes in leaf area index for several vegetation types, deep groundwater variations at two wells, and meteorological variables at a number of sites in the WRW. Additional activities of the WCPS include code development toward a regional climate model with water isotope processes, soil moisture transect measurements, and water level measurements in ground water wells.

Miller, N.L.; King, A.W.; Miller, M.A.; Springer, E.P.; Wesely, M.L.; Bashford, K.E.; Conrad, M.E.; Costigan, K.; Foster, P.N.; Gibbs, H.K.; Jin, J.; Klazura, J.; Lesht, B.M.; Machavaram, M.V.; Pan, F.; Song, J.; Troyan, D.; Washington-Allen, R.A.

2003-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

418

Productivity, livelihood and risk in large-scale land acquisition and contract farming  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recent reports on land and water grabs in low-income countries gained attention in the international development community as these forms of investments in agricultural land often cause human rights violations and negative environmental impacts...

Grtner, Elisa

2013-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

419

Description of Model Data for SNL13.2-00-Land: A  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Description of Model Data for SNL13.2-00-Land: A 13.2 MW Land-based Turbine Model with SNL100-00 Blades D. Todd Griffith, Brian R. Resor Sandia National Laboratories Wind and Water...

420

Climate mitigation and the future of tropical landscapes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Land use change to meet 21st Century demands for food, fuel, and fiber will occur in the context of both a changing climate as well as societal efforts to mitigate climate change. This changing natural and human environment will have large consequences for forest resources, terrestrial carbon storage and emissions, and food and energy crop production over the next century. Any climate change mitigation policies enacted will change the environment under which land-use decisions are made and alter global land use change patterns. Here we use the GCAM integrated assessment model to explore how climate mitigation policies that achieve a climate stabilization at 4.5 W m-2 radiative forcing in 2100 and value carbon in terrestrial ecosystems interact with future agricultural productivity and food and energy demands to influence land use in the tropics. The regional land use results are downscaled from GCAM regions to produce gridded maps of tropical land use change. We find that tropical forests are preserved only in cases where a climate mitigation policy that values terrestrial carbon is in place, and crop productivity growth continues throughout the century. Crop productivity growth is also necessary to avoid large scale deforestation globally and enable the production of bioenergy crops. The terrestrial carbon pricing assumptions in GCAM are effective at avoiding deforestation even when cropland must expand to meet future food demand.

Thomson, Allison M.; Calvin, Katherine V.; Chini, Louise Parsons; Hurtt, George; Edmonds, James A.; Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; Frolking, Steve; Wise, Marshall A.; Janetos, Anthony C.

2010-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land water climate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Toward evaluating the effect of climate change on investments in the water resources sector: insights from the forecast and analysis of hydrological indicators in developing countries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The World Bank has recently developed a method to evaluate the effects of climate change on six hydrological indicators across 8951 basins of the world. The indicators are designed for decision-makers and stakeholders to ...

Jacobsen, Michael

422

Harmonization of Land-Use Scenarios for the Period 1500-2100: 600 Years of Global Gridded Annual Land-Use Transitions, Wood Harvest, and Resulting Secondary Lands  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In preparation for the fifth Assessment Report (AR5) of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), the international community is developing new advanced Earth System Models (ESM) to assess the combined effects of human activities (e.g. land use and fossil fuel emissions) on the carbon-climate system. In addition, four Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) scenarios of the future (2005-2100) are being provided by four Integrated Assessment Model (IAM) teams to be used as input to the ESMs for future carbon-climate projections (Moss et al., 2010). The diversity of approaches and requirements among IAMs and ESMs for tracking land-use change, along with the dependence of model projections on land-use history, presents a challenge for effectively passing data between these communities and for smoothly transitioning from the historical estimates to future projections. Here, a harmonized set of land-use scenarios are presented that smoothly connects historical reconstructions of land use with future projections, in the format required by ESMs.

Hurtt, George; Chini, Louise Parsons; Frolking, Steve; Betts, Richard; Feddema, Johannes; Fischer, Gavin M.; Fisk, J.P.; Hibbard, Kathleen A.; Houghton, R. A.; Janetos, Anthony C.; Jones, C.; Kindermann, G.; Kinoshita, Tsuguki; Goldeweijk, Kees K.; Riahi, Keywan; Shevliakova, Elena; Smith, Steven J.; Stehfest, Eike; Thomson, Allison M.; Thornton, P.; Van Vuuren, Detlef; Wang, Y.

2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

423

Fire dynamics during the 20th century simulated by the Community Land Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fire is an integral Earth System process that interacts with climate in multiple ways. Here we assessed the parametrization of fires in the Community Land Model (CLM-CN) and improved the ability of the model to reproduce ...

Kloster, S.; Mahowald, N. M.; Randerson, J. T.; Thornton, P. E.; Hoffman, F. M.; Levis, Samuel; Lawrence, Peter J.; Feddema, Johannes J.; Oleson, Keith W.; Lawrence, David M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Estimation of turbulent surface heat fluxes using sequences of remotely sensed land surface temperature  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fluxes of heat and moisture at the land-surface play a significant role in the climate system. These fluxes interact with the overlying atmosphere and influence the characteristics of the planetary boundary layer (e.g. ...

Bateni, Sayed Mohyeddin

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Impact of land use change on a hydro-meteorological event in Kampala, Uganda  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Impact of land use change on a hydro-meteorological event in Kampala, Uganda Problem statement Kampala is the capital city of Uganda on the northern shores of Lake Victoria. Here, future climate change

Jetten, Victor

426

Zoning administrators and others con-cerned with airport land use will soon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Zoning administrators and others con- cerned with airport land use will soon have help when of the current regulatory rules and climate. The manual describes proce- dural requirements and guidelines, along

Minnesota, University of

427

Hydrologic Response to Climate Variability, Climate Change, and Climate Extreme in the U.S.: Climate Model Evaluation and Projections  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Water resources are sensitive to climate variability and change; predictions of seasonal to interannual climate variations and projections of long-term climate trends can provide significant values in managing water resources. This study examines the control (19751995) and future (19952100) climate simulated by a global climate model (GCM) and a regional climate simulation driven by the GCM control simulation for the U.S. Comparison of the regional climate simulation with observations across 13 subregions showed that the simulation captured the seasonality and the distributions of precipitation rate quite well. The GCM control and climate change simulations showed that, as a result of a 1% increase in greenhouse gas concentrations per year, there will be a warming of 23C across the U.S. from 2000 to 2100. Although precipitation is not projected to change during this century, the warming trend will increase evapotranspiration to reduce annual basin mean runoff over five subregions along the coastal and south-central U.S.

Leung, Lai R.; Qian, Yun

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Predictability and Diagnosis of Low-Frequency Climate Processes in the Pacific  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Predicting the climate for the coming decades requires understanding both natural and anthropogenically forced climate variability. This variability is important because it has major societal impacts, for example by causing floods or droughts on land or altering fishery stocks in the ocean. Our results fall broadly into three topics: evaluating global climate model predictions; regional impacts of climate changes over western North America; and regional impacts of climate changes over the eastern North Pacific Ocean.

Dr. Arthur J. Miller

2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

429

Change in Urban Land Use and Associated Attributes in the Upper San Francisco Estuary, 1990-2006  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bay watershed. Environmental Management Water Plan Land andwater quality in Georgian Bay. Environmental Management 44(water quality in a coastal river and lagoonal estuary. Environmental Management

Stoms, David M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Chapter 1 Climate monitoring The European Commission strategy for global climate change studies and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter 1 Climate monitoring The European Commission strategy for global climate change studies, Jerusalem, Israel Precipitation as a centerpiece in Climate Change Water is the lifeblood of our livelihood on Earth. Temperature-driven inhabitable areas are due to too cold temperatures, and not due to excessively

Daniel, Rosenfeld

431

Response of the water balance to climate change in the United States over the 20th and 21st centuries: Results from the VEMAP Phase 2 model intercomparisons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

distribution: The role of the water balance, Am. Nat. , 135,NPP): The importance of water avail- ability, Global Change1982a), Ecological optimality in water-limited natural soil-

Gordon, W. S; Famiglietti, J. S

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

UNIVERSITET Horizon 2020 Climate Action, Resource Efficiency and Raw Materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

"Climate" and the European Innovation Partnerships "Water" and "Raw Materials" - talking with reference:50-13:15 Parallel sessions A. JPI Climate B. EIP Water and Raw Materials Anja Skjoldborg, Environmental Science, JPI. Fighting and adapting to climate change 2. Protection of the environment, sustainable management of natural

433

Regional climate model data used within the SWURVE project 2: addressing uncertainty in regional climate model data Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 11(1), 10851096, 2007  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.Ekstrom@uea.ac.uk Abstract To aid assessments of the impact of climate change on water related activities in the case study on the impacts of climate change on specific water management activities (Kilsby, 2007). Uncertainties linked, temperature, rainfall, Europe Introduction As climate model projections are often used in climate change

Boyer, Edmond

434

Water Sustainability Program Challenges to Sustainable Water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

· Drought, Climate Change · Growth and the need for additional supplies · Water and Energy · Water the Southwest, nation, semi-arid and arid regions, and the world. · Today's program provides just a glimpse to and utilization of renewable supplies · Transboundary water issues · The surface water/groundwater interface

Cushing, Jim. M.

435

Climate Dynamics manuscript No. (will be inserted by the editor)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

different14 land ice distributions represent present-day and cold-climate conditions. In each15 case of the different runs19 is observed. The cold climate runs lead to meridional sea-ice extents that are dif-20 by the Israel-US Binational Science foundation. Y. Ashkenazy Department of Solar Energy and Environmental

Ashkenazy, Yossi "Yosef"

436

Division of Water, Part 666: Regulation for Administration and Management of the Wild, Scenic and Recreational Rivers System in New York State Excepting Private Land in the Adirondack Park (New York)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This Act establishes statewide regulations for the management, protection, enhancement and control of land use and development in river areas on all designated wild, scenic and recreational rivers...

437

Arkansas Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) in cooperation with the US Geological Survey and the National Institutes for Water Resources has focused wastewater disposal systems, ground water modeling and land use mapping, water resource economics, water

438

The Thermodynamic Influence of Subgrid Orography in a Global Climate Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Assessments of the impacts of climate change typically require information at scales of 10 km or less. Such a resolution will not be achieved by global climate models for many years. We have developed an alternative to explicit resolution that can meet the needs of climate change impact assessment now. We have applied to a global climate model a physically-based subgrid-scale treatment of the influence of orography on temperature, clouds, precipitation, and land surface hydrology. The treatment represents subgrid variations in surface elevation in terms of fractional area distributions of discrete elevation classes. For each class it calculates the height rise/descent of air parcels traveling through the grid cell, and applies the influence of the rise/descent to the temperature and humidity profiles of the elevation class. Cloud, radiative, and surface processes are calculated separately for each elevation class using the same physical parameterizations used by the model without the subgrid parameterization. The simulated climate fields for each elevation class can then be distributed in post-processing according to the spatial distribution of surface elevation within each grid cell. Parallel 10-year simulations with and without the subgrid treatment have been performed. The simulated temperature, precipitation and snow water are mapped to 2.5 minute (~5 km) resolution and compared with gridded analyses of station measurements. The simulation with the subgrid scheme produces a much more realistic distribution of snow water and significantly more realistic distributions of temperature and precipitation than the simulation without the subgrid scheme. Moreover, the grid cell means of most other fields are virtually unchanged by the subgrid scheme. This suggests that the tuning of the climate model without the subgrid scheme is also applicable to the model with the scheme.

Ghan, Steven J.; Bian, Xindi; Hunt, Allen G.; Coleman, Andre M.

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Land Use and natUraL resoUrces  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

............................................................................................9 Cultural Resource Management: CEQA, NEPA and Section 106 and Natural Resources Department UC Davis Extension #12;3 COnTEnTs Land Use PLanning Community InvolvementLand Use and natUraL resoUrces spring 2014 new Courses: Tribal Water Law and Policy Effective

California at Davis, University of

440

Contribution of land-atmosphere coupling to recent European summer heat waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Contribution of land-atmosphere coupling to recent European summer heat waves E. M. Fischer,1 S. I February 2007; published 24 March 2007. [1] Most of the recent European summer heat waves have been climate simulations with and without land-atmosphere coupling for four selected major summer heat waves

Fischlin, Andreas

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land water climate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

NOAA's National Climatic Data Center Sectoral Engagement Fact Sheet  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ecosystems National Security Tourism Transportation Water Resources NOAA Satellite and Information Service National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service (NESDIS) National Climatic DataNOAA's National Climatic Data Center Sectoral Engagement Fact Sheet AGRICULTURE Overview A wide

442

NOAA's National Climatic Data Center Sectoral Engagement Fact Sheet  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2010 NOAA Satellite and Information Service National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Ecosystems National Security Tourism Transportation Water Resources Climate information can be usedNOAA's National Climatic Data Center Sectoral Engagement Fact Sheet COASTAL HAZARDS OVERVIEW Global

443

WATER RESOURCES PLANNING ACT Q:\\COMP\\WATER1\\WRPA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

103 WATER RESOURCES PLANNING ACT Q:\\COMP\\WATER1\\WRPA December 29, 2000 #12;Q:\\COMP\\WATER1\\WRPA December 29, 2000 #12;105 WATER RESOURCES PLANNING ACT [As Amended Through P.L. 106­580, Dec. 29, 2000 planning of water and related land resources, through the establishment of a water resources council

US Army Corps of Engineers

444

Land Use and natUraL resoUrces  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in other areas. Students in our Green Building and Sustainable Design and Renewable Energy certificate1 Land Use and natUraL resoUrces Fall 2013 Including: Mitigation and Conservation Banking Climate making changes in our lives. We move to another city, change jobs or change our diet to be healthier. UC

California at Davis, University of

445

Sustainable bioenergy production from marginal lands in the US Midwest  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Long-term measurements of global warming impact coupled with spatially explicit modeling suggests that both climate benefits and the production potential of cellulosic crops grown on marginal lands of the US North Central region are substantial but will be insufficient to meet long-term biofuel needs.

Gelfand, Ilya; Sahajpal, Ritvik; Zhang, Xuesong; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Gross, Katherine L.; Robertson, G. P.

2013-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

446

Climate Systems and Climate Change Is Climate Change Real?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter 10 Climate Systems and Climate Change #12;Is Climate Change Real? 1980 1898 2005 2003 #12;Arctic Sea Ice Changes #12;Observed Global Surface Air Temperature #12;! Current climate: weather station data, remote sensing data, numerical modeling using General Circulation Models (GCM) ! Past climate

Pan, Feifei

447

Impacts of Climate Change on Energy Consumption and Peak Demand in Buildings: A Detailed Regional Approach  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents the results of numerous commercial and residential building simulations, with the purpose of examining the impact of climate change on peak and annual building energy consumption over the portion of the Eastern Interconnection (EIC) located in the United States. The climate change scenario considered (IPCC A2 scenario as downscaled from the CASCaDE data set) has changes in mean climate characteristics as well as changes in the frequency and duration of intense weather events. This investigation examines building energy demand for three annual periods representative of climate trends in the CASCaDE data set at the beginning, middle, and end of the century--2004, 2052, and 2089. Simulations were performed using the Building ENergy Demand (BEND) model which is a detailed simulation platform built around EnergyPlus. BEND was developed in collaboration with the Platform for Regional Integrated Modeling and Analysis (PRIMA), a modeling framework designed to simulate the complex interactions among climate, energy, water, and land at decision-relevant spatial scales. Over 26,000 building configurations of different types, sizes, vintages, and, characteristics which represent the population of buildings within the EIC, are modeled across the 3 EIC time zones using the future climate from 100 locations within the target region, resulting in nearly 180,000 spatially relevant simulated demand profiles for each of the 3 years. In this study, the building stock characteristics are held constant based on the 2005 building stock in order to isolate and present results that highlight the impact of the climate signal on commercial and residential energy demand. Results of this analysis compare well with other analyses at their finest level of specificity. This approach, however, provides a heretofore unprecedented level of specificity across multiple spectrums including spatial, temporal, and building characteristics. This capability enables the ability to perform detailed hourly impact studies of building adaptation and mitigation strategies on energy use and electricity peak demand within the context of the entire grid and economy.

Dirks, James A.; Gorrissen, Willy J.; Hathaway, John E.; Skorski, Daniel C.; Scott, Michael J.; Pulsipher, Trenton C.; Huang, Maoyi; Liu, Ying; Rice, Jennie S.

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Impacts World 2013, International Conference on Climate Change Effects, Potsdam, May 27-30  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Impacts World 2013, International Conference on Climate Change Effects, Potsdam, May 27-30 1 to integrate information and data on climate change and its impacts in a similar way for a number of sectors (climate, hydrology, ecosystems, agriculture, land use) among others through a web portal and integrated

Haak, Hein

449

Waste and Climate Change ISWA WHITE PAPER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

waste prevention, recycling and reuse, biological treatment with land use of products, energy recoveryWaste and Climate Change ISWA WHITE PAPER #12;Preface 3 Re-evaluating waste: ISWA key messages 4 ISWA Commitments 6 Introduction 7 Technologies 8 Material recovery 14 Organic recovery 16 Energy

450

CHANGING OUR WAYS SCOTLAND'S CLIMATE CHANGE PROGRAMME  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Introduction 15 Overview of emission trends at sector level 15 Energy sector 18 Transport sector 29 Agriculture, forestry and land use sector 37 Business sector 44 Residential sector 51 Public sector 56 Waste management in light of sound scientific evidence that Scotland's climate will change significantly over the coming

451

Climate Change Adaptation in the Cariboo-Chilcotin The Stakeholder Series: Climate Change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: ­ Water allocation and use ­ Land-based planning and aquatics ­ Flood protection and management-scientific, accessible · Usable, practical and tangible · Examples and best practices from Canada and the world #12 Government Services · Planning · Airport, roads/streets, storm water · Water systems· Water systems

Northern British Columbia, University of

452

ENVIRONMENTAL COMPLIANCE SERVICES CENTER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT OF MILITARY LANDS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

· Environmental Database Development and Management · Storm Water Modeling #12;ENVIRONMENTAL COMPLIANCE SERVICES CENTER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT OF MILITARY LANDS CEMML of environmental managers. The Center provides assistance to environmental managers in compliance areas such as air

453

Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Quality, Microbial Methods · Wastewater Treatment Technology · Wastewater Reuse/Disposal · Watershed. Subjects cover, in general, water resources sustainability, climate and climate change influence on water/Non-Point/Runoff · Ocean Outfall Biomonitoring · General Marine Water Quality · Economics/Policy/Law · Climate

454

An update on modeling land-ice/ocean interactions in CESM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This talk is an update on ongoing land-ice/ocean coupling work within the Community Earth System Model (CESM). The coupling method is designed to allow simulation of a fully dynamic ice/ocean interface, while requiring minimal modification to the existing ocean model (the Parallel Ocean Program, POP). The method makes use of an immersed boundary method (IBM) to represent the geometry of the ice-ocean interface without requiring that the computational grid be modified in time. We show many of the remaining development challenges that need to be addressed in order to perform global, century long climate runs with fully coupled ocean and ice sheet models. These challenges include moving to a new grid where the computational pole is no longer at the true south pole and several changes to the coupler (the software tool used to communicate between model components) to allow the boundary between land and ocean to vary in time. We discuss benefits for ice/ocean coupling that would be gained from longer-term ocean model development to allow for natural salt fluxes (which conserve both water and salt mass, rather than water volume).

Asay-davis, Xylar [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2011-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

455

Integrated Science and Computing Support for National Climate Service PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Thomas J. Wilbanks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-of-the-art advanced climate change modeling, beginning with im- plications of climate change for water-sector decision making as a test case, with some additional attention to decision making related to climate change risks service types of decision support by identifying climate science-related questions of interest to US water

456

Idaho National Laboratory/Nuclear Power Industry Strategic Plan for Light Water Reactor Research and Development An Industry-Government Partnership to Address Climate Change and Energy Security  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The dual issues of energy security and climate change mitigation are driving a renewed debate over how to best provide safe, secure, reliable and environmentally responsible electricity to our nation. The combination of growing energy demand and aging electricity generation infrastructure suggests major new capacity additions will be required in the years ahead.

Electric Power Research

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Integrated Assessment of Hadley Centre (HadCM2) Climate-Change Impacts on Agricultural Productivity and Irrigation Water Supply in the Conterminous United States. Part II. Regional Agricultural Production in 2030 and 2095.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study used scenarios of the HadCM2 GCM and the EPIC agroecosystem model to evaluate climate change impacts on crop yields and ecosystem processes. Baseline climate data were obtained from records for 1961-1990. The scenario runs for 2025-2034 and 2090-2099 were extracted from a HadCM2 run. EPIC was run on 204 representative farms under current climate and two 10-y periods centered on 2030 and 2095, each at CO2 concentrations of 365 and 560 ppm. Texas, New Mexico, Colorado, Utah, Arizona, and California are projected to experience significant temperature increases by 2030. Slight cooling is expected by 2030 in Alabama, Florida, Maine, Montana, Idaho, and Utah. Larger areas are projected to experience increased warming by 2095. Uniform precipitation increases are expected by 2030 in the NE. These increases are predicted to expand to the eastern half of the country by 2095. EPIC simulated yield increases for the Great Lakes, Corn Belt and Northeast regions. Simulated yields of irrigated corn yields were predicted to increase in almost all regions. Soybean yields could decrease in the Northern and Southern Plains, the Corn Belt, Delta, Appalachian, and Southeast regions and increase in the Lakes and Northeast regions. Simulated wheat yields exhibited upward yield trends under scenarios of climate change. National corn production in 2030 and 2095 could be affected by changes in three major producing regions. In 2030, corn production could increase in the Corn Belt and Lakes regions but decrease in the Northern Plains leading to an overall decrease in national production. National wheat production is expected to increase during both future periods. A proxy indicator was developed to provide a sense of where in the country, and when water would be available to satisfy change in irrigation demand for corn and alfalfa production as these are influenced by the HadCM2 scenarios and CO2-fertilization.

Izaurralde, R Cesar C.; Rosenberg, Norman J.; Brown, Robert A.; Thomson, Allison M.

2003-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

458

Iowa Water Center Annual Technical Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

our land management systems perform well under both sides of the precipitation norm? How will water? A variety of issues linking land management and water quantity and quality at multiple scales require precipitation, should be questioned. Do our land management systems perform well under both sides

459

Sensitivity of Surface Flux Simulations to Hydrologic Parameters Based on an Uncertainty Quantification Framework Applied to the Community Land Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Uncertainties in hydrologic parameters could have significant impacts on the simulated water and energy fluxes and land surface states, which will in turn affect atmospheric processes and the carbon cycle. Quantifying such uncertainties is an important step toward better understanding and quantification of uncertainty of integrated earth system models. In this paper, we introduce an uncertainty quantification (UQ) framework to analyze sensitivity of simulated surface fluxes to selected hydrologic parameters in the Community Land Model (CLM4) through forward modeling. Thirteen flux tower footprints spanning a wide range of climate and site conditions were selected to perform sensitivity analyses by perturbing the parameters identified. In the UQ framework, prior information about the parameters was used to quantify the input uncertainty using the Minimum-Relative-Entropy approach. The quasi-Monte Carlo approach was applied to generate samples of parameters on the basis of the prior pdfs. Simulations corresponding to sampled parameter sets were used to generate response curves and response surfaces and statistical tests were used to rank the significance of the parameters for output responses including latent (LH) and sensible heat (SH) fluxes. Overall, the CLM4 simulated LH and SH show the largest sensitivity to subsurface runoff generation parameters. However, study sites with deep root vegetation are also affected by surface runoff parameters, while sites with shallow root zones are also sensitive to the vadose zone soil water parameters. Generally, sites with finer soil texture and shallower rooting systems tend to have larger sensitivity of outputs to the parameters. Our results suggest the necessity of and possible ways for parameter inversion/calibration using available measurements of latent/sensible heat fluxes to obtain the optimal parameter set for CLM4. This study also provided guidance on reduction of parameter set dimensionality and parameter calibration framework design for CLM4 and other land surface models under different hydrologic and climatic regimes.

Hou, Zhangshuan; Huang, Maoyi; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Lin, Guang; Ricciuto, Daniel M.

2012-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

460

Review: Global Climate Change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

introduction to global climate change, the greenhouseReview: Global Climate Change: A Primer By Orrin H PilkeyPilkey, Keith C. Global Climate Change: a primer. Durham,

Smith, Jennifer

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land water climate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Apportioning Climate Change Costs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Apportioning Climate Change Costs Daniel A. Farber* I. II.ON CLIMATE CHANGE FOUR QUESTIONS ABOUTof how to respond to climate change. Most public attention

Farber, Daniel A.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Climate Engineering Responses to Climate Emergencies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Novim Climate Engineering Responses to Climate Emergencies Jason J. Blackstock David S. Battisti Santa Barbara, California #12;Climate Engineering Responses to Climate Emergencies This report should, A. A. N. Patrinos, D. P. Schrag, R. H. Socolow and S. E. Koonin, Climate Engineering Responses

Battisti, David

463

Survey of Critical Wetlands Bureau of Land Management Lands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Survey of Critical Wetlands Bureau of Land Management Lands South Park, Park County, Colorado 2003 Delivery Colorado State University #12;Survey of Critical Wetlands Bureau of Land Management Lands South place from unique wetlands to high quality grasslands to the bristlecone pine forests to its alpine

464

Soil degradation, global warming and climate impacts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

will demonstrate one methodology for assessing the potential large-scale impacts of soil degradation on African climates and water resources. In addition it will compare and contrast these impacts to those expected from global warming and compare impacts for differ...- ent watershed regions on the continent. 2. METHODS In order to make a similar comparison between pro- jected climate change scenarios due to global warming Inter-Research 2001 *E-mail: feddema@ku.edu Soil degradation, global warming and climate...

Feddema, Johannes J.; Freire, Sergio Carneiro

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Extreme Climate Event Trends: The Data Mining and Evaluation of the A1FI Scenario for 2000???2100  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors discuss the implications and resulting alterations of the hydrologic cycle as Earth climate evolves from 2000-2100. Climate simulations based on the assumptions implicit in the A1F1 scenario for the period 2000-2100 using CCSM3 are analyzed. In particular, we will assess the changes in the surface latent and sensible heat energy budget, the Indian regional water budgets including trends in the timing and duration of the Indian monsoon and the resulting impacts on mean river flow and hydroelectric power generation potential. These analyses will also be examined within the context of heat index, droughts, floods and related estimates of societal robustness and resiliency. We will interpret these new A1F1 results within the context of the previous climate simulations based on the SRES A2 and B1 scenarios forced with land cover and atmospheric CO2. Analyses of historical records in the context of the Indian Monsoon Rainfall (IMR) have suggested an evolving relation of IMR with natural climate variability caused by El Nino events. We will report on the combined effects of natural climate variability and global warming on IMR and assess the trend of extreme rain and temperature events in a warming environment.

Erickson III, David J [ORNL; Ganguly, Auroop R [ORNL; Steinhaeuser, Karsten J K [ORNL; Branstetter, Marcia L [ORNL; Oglesby, Robert [University of Nebraska, Lincoln; Hoffman, Forrest M [ORNL; Buja, Lawrence [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Climate variability and climate change vulnerability and adaptation. Workshop summary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Representatives from fifteen countries met in Prague, Czech Republic, on September 11-15, 1995, to share results from the analysis of vulnerability and adaptation to global climate change. The workshop focused on the issues of global climate change and its impacts on various sectors of a national economy. The U.N. Framework Convention on Climate Change (FCCC), which has been signed by more than 150 governments worldwide, calls on signatory parties to develop and communicate measures they are implementing to respond to global climate change. An analysis of a country`s vulnerability to changes in the climate helps it identify suitable adaptation measures. These analyses are designed to determine the extent of the impacts of global climate change on sensitive sectors such as agricultural crops, forests, grasslands and livestock, water resources, and coastal areas. Once it is determined how vulnerable a country may be to climate change, it is possible to identify adaptation measures for ameliorating some or all of the effects.The objectives of the vulnerability and adaptation workshop were to: The objectives of the vulnerability and adaptation workshop were to: Provide an opportunity for countries to describe their study results; Encourage countries to learn from the experience of the more complete assessments and adjust their studies accordingly; Identify issues and analyses that require further investigation; and Summarize results and experiences for governmental and intergovernmental organizations.

Bhatti, N.; Cirillo, R.R. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Dixon, R.K. [U.S. Country Studies Program, Washington, DC (United States)] [and others

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

467

atlantic climate region: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Stability of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Drijfhout, Sybren 42 The effect of cold climate upon North Atlantic Deep Water formation in a simple ocean-atmosphere model...

468

Prospective Climate Change Impact on Large Rivers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.g. long-term trends could affect hydropower, ecosystems and aquatic species...). 1917 2005 Athabasca; #12;4 Reduced Water Supply from Reservoirs Climate Change Issues in the US 1. Rainfall vs Snowmelt; 21 Prospective Climate Change Impact on Large Rivers in the US and South Korea Pierre Y. Julien Dept

Julien, Pierre Y.

469

ii Colorado Climate Table of Contents  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;ii Colorado Climate Table of Contents An Unusually Heavy Snowfall in North Central Colorado . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 A Brief History of Colorado's Most Notable Snowstorms" . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18 Colorado Climate Water Year 2003 Vol. 4, No. 1-4 If you have a photo or slide that your would like

470

The Future of Global Water Stress: An Integrated Assessment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in developing countries. Uncertain regional climate chang processes of policy development and implementation, climate change research needs to focus on improving decades under integrated projections of socioeconomic growth and climate change. We employ a Water

471

COLLABORATIVE RESEARCH: TOWARDS ADVANCED UNDERSTANDING AND PREDICTIVE CAPABILITY OF CLIMATE CHANGE IN THE ARCTIC USING A HIGH-RESOLUTION REGIONAL ARCTIC CLIMATE SYSTEM MODEL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The motivation for this project was to advance the science of climate change and prediction in the Arctic region. Its primary goals were to (i) develop a state-of-the-art Regional Arctic Climate system Model (RACM) including high-resolution atmosphere, land, ocean, sea ice and land hydrology components and (ii) to perform extended numerical experiments using high performance computers to minimize uncertainties and fundamentally improve current predictions of climate change in the northern polar regions. These goals were realized first through evaluation studies of climate system components via one-way coupling experiments. Simulations were then used to examine the effects of advancements in climate component systems on their representation of main physics, time-mean fields and to understand variability signals at scales over many years. As such this research directly addressed some of the major science objectives of the BER Climate Change Research Division (CCRD) regarding the advancement of long-term climate prediction.

Gutowski, William J.

2013-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

472

Climate Change and Extinctions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lectures presents: Climate Change and Extinctions Happening2013. He will present a climate change extinction model that

Sinervo, Barry

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

194 / JOURNAL OF WATER RESOURCES PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT / JULY/AUGUST 1999 INDICATORS OF IMPACTS OF GLOBAL CLIMATE CHANGE ON U.S.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

194 / JOURNAL OF WATER RESOURCES PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT / JULY/AUGUST 1999 INDICATORS OF IMPACTS of the indicators, regional reservoir storage vulnerability, is a particularly useful index summarizing (U.S.) to investigate the integrated impacts of potential global warming on water resources. Impacts

Vogel, Richard M.

474

Energy and land use  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report addresses the land use impacts of past and future energy development and summarizes the major federal and state legislation which influences the potential land use impacts of energy facilities and can thus influence the locations and timing of energy development. In addition, this report describes and presents the data which are used to measure, and in some cases, predict the potential conflicts between energy development and alternative uses of the nation's land resources. The topics section of this report is divided into three parts. The first part describes the myriad of federal, state and local legislation which have a direct or indirect impact upon the use of land for energy development. The second part addresses the potential land use impacts associated with the extraction, conversion and combustion of energy resources, as well as the disposal of wastes generated by these processes. The third part discusses the conflicts that might arise between agriculture and energy development as projected under a number of DOE mid-term (1990) energy supply and demand scenarios.

Not Available

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Land-use Leakage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Leakage occurs whenever actions to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions in one part of the world unleash countervailing forces elsewhere in the world so that reductions in global emissions are less than emissions mitigation in the mitigating region. While many researchers have examined the concept of industrial leakage, land-use policies can also result in leakage. We show that land-use leakage is potentially as large as or larger than industrial leakage. We identify two potential land-use leakage drivers, land-use policies and bioenergy. We distinguish between these two pathways and run numerical experiments for each. We also show that the land-use policy environment exerts a powerful influence on leakage and that under some policy designs leakage can be negative. International offsets are a potential mechanism to communicate emissions mitigation beyond the borders of emissions mitigating regions, but in a stabilization regime designed to limit radiative forcing to 3.7 2/m2, this also implies greater emissions mitigation commitments on the part of mitigating regions.

Calvin, Katherine V.; Edmonds, James A.; Clarke, Leon E.; Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; Kim, Son H.; Wise, Marshall A.; Thomson, Allison M.; Kyle, G. Page

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Report on Produced Water  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

of the pond, as well as the quality of the produced water. In semiarid regions, hot, dry air moving from a land surface will result in high evaporation rates for smaller ponds. As...

477

Arkansas Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) program in cooperation with the US Geological Survey and the National Institutes for Water Resources has wastewater disposal systems, ground water modeling and land use mapping, erosion and pollution, water quality

478

Chapter 9: Impacts of exurban development on water quality Authors: Kathleen A. Lohse and Adina M. Merenlender  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

water conditions. In particular, little is known about how different types of urban land use, especially land use impact--land-use change models can be important decision support tools to identify areas options, and to identify options that result in water and land conservation. Agricultural and urban land

Merenlender, Adina

479

Getting Our Feet Wet: Water Management at Mt. Laguna in Cleveland National Forest  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Regional Water Quality Control Board, Watershed Managementof Land Management (BLM) Tests preserve water quality, whichRegional Water Quality Control Board. Watershed Management

Mumby, William Cade

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

E-Print Network 3.0 - army field water Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Progress Summary: efforts in water and related land resources management. U.S. Army Engineer Institute for Water... : System-Wide Water Resources Programs Partners: U.S....

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land water climate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Climate Change and Human Health National Center for Environmental Health  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Climate Change and Human Health National Center for Environmental Health Division of Environmental and Prevention October 17, 2012 #12;Coastal flooding Climate change effects: ·Temperature ·Sea level,civil conflict Anxiety,despair,depression Civil conflict Climate Change Health Effects Food & water Malnutrition

482

book reviews Climate Changeon the Great Lakes Basin. 1992.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

,personal communication). The second paper, "Effects of Climate Change on the Water Resources of the Great is a compilation of five papers presented at the Symposium of Climate Change on the Great Lakes Basin held as part- ested in learning more a out climate change issues andstudiesintheGreatL kesisadvisedtoconsultthe

483

Location Specific Summarization of Climatic and Agricultural Trends  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

@cs.nyu.edu, lakshmi@cs.nyu.edu ABSTRACT Climate change can directly impact agriculture. Failure in different aspects of agriculture due to climate change and other influencing factors, are extremely rampant in several agrarian) identify target topics of interest within climate and agriculture (such as soil, water) and construct

Subramanian, Lakshminarayanan

484

Thunderstorms in a changing climate: A cloudresolving modeling study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

prediction of surface water and groundwater dynamics under projected climate change scenarios Thunderstorms in a changing climate: A cloudresolving modeling study Joseph Galewsky@unm.edu One of the potential impacts of a changing climate is an increase in the severity of thunderstorms

Maccabe, Barney

485

Campus Sustainability Goals Energy & Climate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Campus Sustainability Goals Energy & Climate By 2014, reduce greenhouse gas emissions to 1990 use to 10% below 2008 levels by 2020. Built Environment Design future projects to minimize energy and water consumption and wastewater production; incorporate sustainable design principles into capital

Jacobs, Lucia

486

The Carpe Diem West Academy: a compendium of tools, training, and best practices for water resources planning in an era of climate uncertainty  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Carpe Diem West Academy: a compendium of tools, training, and best practices for water Academy (carpediemwestacademy.org). It reviews and characterizes over 100 extant tools, training resources

Miami, University of

487

Uncertainty in climate science and climate policy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Uncertainty in climate science and climate policy Jonathan Rougier University of Bristol, UK Michel1.tex. 1 Introduction This essay, written by a statistician and a climate scientist, describes our view of the gap that exists between current practice in mainstream climate science, and the practical

488

Now, Ze assumes |K|2 for water. But what about when we are looking at ice (Smith, 1984, J. Climate and Applied Met., 23, 1258-1260)?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to measure since the dielectric strength is incorporated as part of the radar constant). #12;Ice Water Water drops to radar 2. Dielectric factor decrease across melting level 3. Drop breakup and fall speed changesBZe Substituting values for |K|w 2 and |K|i 2, means we have to add 6.5 ­ 7.2 dB to our dBZe measurement to get

Rutledge, Steven

489

Course Information and Syllabus Water Policy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

October 26 The Potential Impacts of Climate Change on Water Systems October 28 Water Policy Responses to Climate Change November 2 Stormwater Management and Rainwater Harvesting November 4 Desalination November 9 Water Quality, Wastewater Treatment, and Water Recycling November 11 UCSB HOLIDAY November 16

California at Santa Barbara, University of

490

Course Information and Syllabus Water Policy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Potential Impacts of Climate Change on Water Systems October 27 NO CLASS MEETING November 1 Water Policy Responses to Climate Change November 3 Stormwater Management and Rainwater Harvesting November 8 Desalination November 10 Water Quality, Wastewater Treatment, and Water Recycling November 15 Economics

California at Santa Barbara, University of

491

Soil erosion from sugar beet in Central Europe in response to climate change induced seasonal precipitation variations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of adaptive land-use management for climate change response strategies in the agricultural sector. 2007; Conservation agriculture; Erosion modelling 1. Introduction Climate change of anthropogenic origin is widelySoil erosion from sugar beet in Central Europe in response to climate change induced seasonal

Quinton, John

492

Sandia National Laboratories: Climate  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared0Energy AdvancedEnergyEnergyMapping Water Availability inClimate

493

150 G. Marland et al. / Climate Policy 3 (2003) 149157 Strategies to mitigate anthropogenic climate change recognize that carbon sequestration in the terrestrial biosphere  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

anthropogenic climate change recognize that carbon sequestration in the terrestrial biosphere can reduce to create a system of credits and debits wherein emission or sequestration of carbon in the biosphere; Carbon sequestration; Land use change; Land surface change; Surface energy balance 1. Introduction Human

Niyogi, Dev

494

Title: Canada Land Inventory: Land Capability for Recreation Data Creator /  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Title: Canada Land Inventory: Land Capability for Recreation Data Creator / Copyright Owner: National Archives of Canada, Visual and Sound Archives Division Publisher: National Archives of Canada, Visual and Sound Archives Division; developed under the auspices of Environment Canada; distributed

495

Title: Canada Land Inventory: Land Capability for Ungulates Data Creator /  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Title: Canada Land Inventory: Land Capability for Ungulates Data Creator / Copyright Owner: National Archives of Canada, visual and Sound Archives Division Publisher: National Archives of Canada, Visual and Sound Archives Division; developed under the auspices of Environment Canada; distributed

496

Title: Canada Land Inventory: Land Capability for Agriculture Data Creator /  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Title: Canada Land Inventory: Land Capability for Agriculture Data Creator / Copyright Owner: National Archives of Canada, Visual and Sound Archives Division Publisher: National Archives of Canada, Visual and Sound Archives Division; developed under the auspices of Environment Canada; distributed

497

A High-Resolution Global Climate Simulation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A major factor limiting the quality and usefulness of global climate models is the coarse spatial resolution of these models. Global climate models today are typically run at resolutions of {approx}300 km (or even coarser) meaning that the smallest features represented are 300 km across. As Figure 1 shows, this resolution does not allow adequate representation of small or even large topographic features (e.g. the Sierra Nevada mountains). As a result of this and other problems, coarse-resolution global models do not come close to accurately simulating climate on regional spatial scales (e.g. within California). Results on continental and larger sales are much more realistic. An important consequence of this inability to simulate regional climate is that global climate model results cannot be used as the basis of assessments of potential societal impacts of climate change (e.g. effects on agriculture in the Central Valley, on management of water resources, etc.).

Duffy, P B

2001-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

498

Climate Change, Adaptation, and Development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Climate Change, Adaptation, and Development Daniel H. Cole*THE COSTS OF CLIMATE CHANGE . ADAPTATIONCONVENTION ON CLIMATE CHANGE . IV. A.

Cole, Daniel H.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

499

National Forest Land Scheme  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Community Right to Buy. Communities are encouraged to register an interest in the land they wish to buy Ministers to make a late registration of interest. When Forestry Commission Scotland decides to sell, a community organisation could consider the opportunities for working in partnership with Forestry Commission

500

Clearing Debris from Land  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

level. Burial ? Tree debris can be buried, but the cost is high. ? Use a chipping machine to eliminate smaller branches and reduce the amount of burial space needed. Landfill ? You can place tree debris in erosion gullies (where the land is not prac...

McFarland, Mark L.

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z