National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for land water climate

  1. Risk Analysis for Water Resources Under Climate Change, Population Growth, and Land Use Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kiparsky, Michael

    2010-01-01

    R. B. Lammers (2000). "Global water resources: Vulnerabilityin two small watersheds." Water Resources Research 18(3).of a warming climate on water availability in snow-dominated

  2. Global Climate Change,Global Climate Change, Land Cover Change, andLand Cover Change, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Global Climate Change,Global Climate Change, Land Cover Change, andLand Cover Change, and HydrologyHydrology Steven Fassnacht Watershed Science Colorado State University The Importance of Climate · Climate affects the environment and us ­ Ecology: vegetation and animals ­ Water Systems ­ People

  3. Climate and Energy-Water-Land System Interactions Technical Report to the U.S. Department of Energy in Support of the National Climate Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skaggs, Richard; Hibbard, Kathleen A.; Frumhoff, Peter; Lowry, Thomas; Middleton, Richard; Pate, Ron; Tidwell, Vincent C.; Arnold, J. G.; Averyt, Kristen; Janetos, Anthony C.; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Rice, Jennie S.; Rose, Steven K.

    2012-03-01

    This report provides a framework to characterize and understand the important elements of climate and energy-water-land (EWL) system interactions. It identifies many of the important issues, discusses our understanding of those issues, and presents a long-term research program research needs to address the priority scientific challenges and gaps in our understanding. Much of the discussion is organized around two discrete case studies with the broad themes of (1) extreme events and (2) regional intercomparisons. These case studies help demonstrate unique ways in which energy-water-land interactions can occur and be influenced by climate.

  4. Risk Analysis for Water Resources Under Climate Change, Population Growth, and Land Use Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kiparsky, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Vulnerability from climate change acid population growth."2004). "Emissions pathways, climate change, and impacts onthe Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). J. J.

  5. Risk Analysis for Water Resources Under Climate Change, Population Growth, and Land Use Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kiparsky, Michael

    2010-01-01

    for California." Climatic Change 76(3-4): 361-387. Thompsonrisk assessments." Climatic Change 89(3): 371-394. Brekke,small forecast ensembles." Climatic Change 76(1-2): 149-168.

  6. Risk Analysis for Water Resources Under Climate Change, Population Growth, and Land Use Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kiparsky, Michael

    2010-01-01

    scale. Thus, analysis of flood risk, sub-monthly instream-on water supply risk, and does not address flood risk.water resources modeling, flood risk and water supply risk

  7. Risk Analysis for Water Resources Under Climate Change, Population Growth, and Land Use Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kiparsky, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Potential Evapotranspiration .. 39 2.9.2 Applied water demands 39 2.10 Urban demands and supplies.. 40 2.11 In-stream flows and hydropower .

  8. Land-ocean contrasts under climate change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Byrne, Michael P

    2015-01-01

    Observations and climate models show a pronounced land-ocean contrast in the responses of surface temperature and the hydrological cycle to global warming: Land temperatures increase more than ocean temperatures, low-level ...

  9. MODELING LAND SURFACE PROCESSES IN SHORT-TERM WEATHER AND CLIMATE STUDIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Zong-Liang

    , glaciers, inland water, mountains, animals, human beings, their shelters, and much more. Land surface@mail.utexas.edu Website: www.geo.utexas.edu/climate (Manuscript received 31 January 2003) Land exchanges momentum, energy, water, aerosols, carbon dioxide and other trace gases with its overlying atmosphere. The land surface

  10. Water Resources and Climate Change in Garden Park, Colorado

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baffa, Thomas W.

    2009-12-18

    This paper examines whether groundwater can provide adequate water supplies for land use change and future development in Garden Park, Colorado. A climatic water budget model was used to determine the amount and adequacy of the groundwater supply...

  11. Interaction effects of climate and land use/land cover change on soil organic carbon sequestration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grunwald, Sabine

    Interaction effects of climate and land use/land cover change on soil organic carbon sequestration carbon sequestration Climate change Soil carbon change Historically, Florida soils stored the largest in Florida (FL) have acted as a sink for carbon (C) over the last 40 years. · Climate interacting with land

  12. Climate Effects of Global Land Cover Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gibbard, S G; Caldeira, K; Bala, G; Phillips, T; Wickett, M

    2005-08-24

    There are two competing effects of global land cover change on climate: an albedo effect which leads to heating when changing from grass/croplands to forest, and an evapotranspiration effect which tends to produce cooling. It is not clear which effect would dominate in a global land cover change scenario. We have performed coupled land/ocean/atmosphere simulations of global land cover change using the NCAR CAM3 atmospheric general circulation model. We find that replacement of current vegetation by trees on a global basis would lead to a global annual mean warming of 1.6 C, nearly 75% of the warming produced under a doubled CO{sub 2} concentration, while global replacement by grasslands would result in a cooling of 0.4 C. These results suggest that more research is necessary before forest carbon storage should be deployed as a mitigation strategy for global warming. In particular, high latitude forests probably have a net warming effect on the Earth's climate.

  13. Climate change and land use in Florida: Interdependencies and opportunities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    Climate change and land use in Florida: Interdependencies and opportunities Stephen Mulkey, Ph June 2007 Revised 30 September 2007 #12;Climate change and land use ­ Report to the Century Commission - S. Mulkey, June 2007 2 Executive summary Over this century anthropogenic climate change will present

  14. Pollution on the Federal Lands II: Water Pollution Law

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glicksman, Robert L.

    1993-01-01

    text. FEDERAL LANDS WATER POLLUTION nonpoint sources. 19at 622. FEDERAL LANDS WATER POLLUTION The third requirement,n.25. FEDERAL LANDS WATER POLLUTION form a nondiscretionary

  15. Climate policy implications for agricultural water demand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chaturvedi, Vaibhav; Hejazi, Mohamad I.; Edmonds, James A.; Clarke, Leon E.; Kyle, G. Page; Davies, Evan; Wise, Marshall A.; Calvin, Katherine V.

    2013-03-28

    Energy, water and land are scarce resources, critical to humans. Developments in each affect the availability and cost of the others, and consequently human prosperity. Measures to limit greenhouse gas concentrations will inevitably exact dramatic changes on energy and land systems and in turn alter the character, magnitude and geographic distribution of human claims on water resources. We employ the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM), an integrated assessment model to explore the interactions of energy, land and water systems in the context of alternative policies to limit climate change to three alternative levels: 2.5 Wm-2 (445 ppm CO2-e), 3.5 Wm-2 (535 ppm CO2-e) and 4.5 Wm-2 (645 ppm CO2-e). We explore the effects of two alternative land-use emissions mitigation policy options—one which taxes terrestrial carbon emissions equally with fossil fuel and industrial emissions, and an alternative which only taxes fossil fuel and industrial emissions but places no penalty on land-use change emissions. We find that increasing populations and economic growth could be anticipated to almost triple demand for water for agricultural systems across the century even in the absence of climate policy. In general policies to mitigate climate change increase agricultural demands for water still further, though the largest changes occur in the second half of the century, under both policy regimes. The two policies examined profoundly affected both the sources and magnitudes of the increase in irrigation water demands. The largest increases in agricultural irrigation water demand occurred in scenarios where only fossil fuel emissions were priced (but not land-use change emission) and were primarily driven by rapid expansion in bioenergy production. In these scenarios water demands were large relative to present-day total available water, calling into question whether it would be physically possible to produce the associated biomass energy. We explored the potential of improved water delivery and irrigation system efficiencies. These could potentially reduce demands substantially. However, overall demands remained high under our fossil-fuel-only tax policy. In contrast, when all carbon was priced, increases in agricultural water demands were smaller than under the fossil-fuel-only policy and were driven primarily by increased demands for water by non-biomass crops such as rice. Finally we estimate the geospatial pattern of water demands and find that regions such as China, India and other countries in south and east Asia might be expected to experience greatest increases in water demands.?

  16. LAND USE AND WATER QUALITY MANAGEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;LAND USE AND WATER QUALITY MANAGEMENT IN THE BRIDGE CREEK BASIN Prepared for: Water Quality Branch Environmental Protection Dept. BC Environment Victoria, B.C. and Fraser Pollution Abatement Office ..................................................... WATER QUALITY OF UNDISTURBED AREAS ....................... LAND USE EFFECTS ON WATER QUALITY

  17. CLIMATE CHANGE AND WATER SUPPLY SECURITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CLIMATE CHANGE AND WATER SUPPLY SECURITY: Reconfiguring Groundwater Management to Reduce with climate change, present a significant planning challenge for California's water agencies. This research Drought Vulnerability A White Paper from the California Energy Commission's California Climate

  18. Making Sustainable Energy Choices: Insights on the Energy/Water/Land Nexus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-10-01

    This periodic publication summarizes insights from the body of NREL analysis work. In this issue of Analysis Insights, we examine the implications of our energy choices on water, land use, climate, developmental goals, and other factors. Collectively, NREL's work helps policymakers and investors understand and evaluate energy choices within the complex web of connections, or nexus, between energy, water, and land.

  19. WATER AND ENERGY SECTOR VULNERABILITY TO CLIMATE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    WATER AND ENERGY SECTOR VULNERABILITY TO CLIMATE WARMING IN THE SIERRA NEVADA: Water Year explores the sensitivity of water indexing methods to climate change scenarios to better understand how water management decisions and allocations will be affected by climate change. Many water management

  20. Climate Change: High Water Impacts and Adaptation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    Climate Change: High Water Impacts and Adaptation David S. Liebl and Kenneth W. Potter Co of global climate change­ WICCI Stormwater Working Group #12;Projected Climate Change 200-2100 What Global

  1. Watershed response and land energy feedbacks under climate change depend upon groundwater.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maxwell, R M; Kollet, S J

    2008-06-10

    Human induced climate change will have a significant impact on the hydrologic cycle, creating changes in fresh water resources, land cover, and feedbacks that are difficult to characterize, which makes it an issue of global importance. Previous studies have not included subsurface storage in climate change simulations and feedbacks. A variably-saturated groundwater flow model with integrated overland flow and land surface model processes is used to examine the interplay between coupled water and energy processes under climate change conditions. A case study from the Southern Great Plains (SGP) USA, an important agricultural region that is susceptible to drought, is used as the basis for three scenarios simulations using a modified atmospheric forcing dataset to reflect predicted effects due to human-induced climate change. These scenarios include an increase in the atmospheric temperature and variations in rainfall amount and are compared to the present-day climate case. Changes in shallow soil saturation and groundwater levels are quantified as well as the corresponding energy fluxes at the land surface. Here we show that groundwater and subsurface lateral flow processes are critical in understanding hydrologic response and energy feedbacks to climate change and that certain regions are more susceptible to changes in temperature, while others to changes in precipitation. This groundwater control is critical for understanding recharge and drought processes, possible under future climate conditions.

  2. Climate and Water: from the perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

    Climate and Water: from the perspective of the Colorado State Climatologist August 31, 2010 Nolan Climatologist do? · Climate vs. Weather · Some highlights of our Colorado climate · The Water Year and why we use it · Seasonality and variability · Detecting Climate trends ­ not so easy ­ Temperature varies

  3. Impact of Agricultural Practice on Regional Climate in a CoupledLand Surface Mesoscale Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooley, H.S.; Riley, W.J.; Torn, M.S.; He, Y.

    2004-07-01

    The land surface has been shown to form strong feedbacks with climate due to linkages between atmospheric conditions and terrestrial ecosystem exchanges of energy, momentum, water, and trace gases. Although often ignored in modeling studies, land management itself may form significant feedbacks. Because crops are harvested earlier under drier conditions, regional air temperature, precipitation, and soil moisture, for example, affect harvest timing, particularly of rain-fed crops. This removal of vegetation alters the land surface characteristics and may, in turn, affect regional climate. We applied a coupled climate(MM5) and land-surface (LSM1) model to examine the effects of early and late winter wheat harvest on regional climate in the Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility in the Southern Great Plains, where winter wheat accounts for 20 percent of the land area. Within the winter wheat region, simulated 2 m air temperature was 1.3 C warmer in the Early Harvest scenario at mid-day averaged over the two weeks following harvest. Soils in the harvested area were drier and warmer in the top 10 cm and wetter in the 10-20 cm layer. Midday soils were 2.5 C warmer in the harvested area at mid-day averaged over the two weeks following harvest. Harvest also dramatically altered latent and sensible heat fluxes. Although differences between scenarios diminished once both scenarios were harvested, the short-term impacts of land management on climate were comparable to those from land cover change demonstrated in other studies.

  4. Retrieving snow mass from GRACE terrestrial water storage change with a land surface model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Zong-Liang

    Retrieving snow mass from GRACE terrestrial water storage change with a land surface model Guo snow water equivalent (SWE) product is critical for climate and hydrology studies in Arctic regions changes in terrestrial water storage (TWS), of which snow mass is the primary component in winter Arctic

  5. Climate Change Mitigation Through Land-Use Measures in the Agriculture...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Climate Change Mitigation Through Land-Use Measures in the Agriculture and Forestry Sectors Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Climate Change Mitigation...

  6. Climate Change and Water Resources in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vuille, Mathias

    Climate Change and Water Resources in the Tropical Andes Mathias Vuille Inter-American Development Bank Environmental Safeguards Unit TECHNICAL NOTE No. IDB-TN-515 March 2013 #12;Climate Change-American Development Bank Felipe Herrera Library Vuille, Mathias. Climate change and water resources in the tropical

  7. CLIMATE CHANGE ADAPTATIONS FOR LOCAL WATER MANAGEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CLIMATE CHANGE ADAPTATIONS FOR LOCAL WATER MANAGEMENT IN THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY AREA water managers can adapt by changing water supply portfolios and operations. An engineering economic A White Paper from the California Energy Commission's California Climate Change Center JULY 2012 CEC

  8. Greenhouse gas policy influences climate via direct effects of land-use change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, Andrew D.; Collins, William D.; Edmonds, James A.; Torn, Margaret S.; Janetos, Anthony C.; Calvin, Katherine V.; Thomson, Allison M.; Chini, Louise M.; Mao, Jiafu; Shi, Xiaoying; Thornton, Peter; Hurtt, George; Wise, Marshall A.

    2013-06-01

    Proposed climate mitigation measures do not account for direct biophysical climate impacts of land-use change (LUC), nor do the stabilization targets modeled for the 5th Climate Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5) Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs). To examine the significance of such effects on global and regional patterns of climate change, a baseline and alternative scenario of future anthropogenic activity are simulated within the Integrated Earth System Model, which couples the Global Change Assessment Model, Global Land-use Model, and Community Earth System Model. The alternative scenario has high biofuel utilization and approximately 50% less global forest cover compared to the baseline, standard RCP4.5 scenario. Both scenarios stabilize radiative forcing from atmospheric constituents at 4.5 W/m2 by 2100. Thus, differences between their climate predictions quantify the biophysical effects of LUC. Offline radiative transfer and land model simulations are also utilized to identify forcing and feedback mechanisms driving the coupled response. Boreal deforestation is found to strongly influence climate due to increased albedo coupled with a regional-scale water vapor feedback. Globally, the alternative scenario yields a 21st century warming trend that is 0.5 °C cooler than baseline, driven by a 1 W/m2 mean decrease in radiative forcing that is distributed unevenly around the globe. Some regions are cooler in the alternative scenario than in 2005. These results demonstrate that neither climate change nor actual radiative forcing are uniquely related to atmospheric forcing targets such as those found in the RCP’s, but rather depend on particulars of the socioeconomic pathways followed to meet each target.

  9. Climate Mitigation Policy Implications for Global Irrigation Water Demand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chaturvedi, Vaibhav; Hejazi, Mohamad I.; Edmonds, James A.; Clarke, Leon E.; Kyle, G. Page; Davies, Evan; Wise, Marshall A.

    2013-08-22

    Energy, water and land are scarce resources, critical to humans. Developments in each affect the availability and cost of the others, and consequently human prosperity. Measures to limit greenhouse gas concentrations will inevitably exact dramatic changes on energy and land systems and in turn alter the character, magnitude and geographic distribution of human claims on water resources. We employ the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM), an integrated assessment model to explore the interactions of energy, land and water systems in the context of alternative policies to limit climate change to three alternative levels: 2.5 Wm-2 (445 ppm CO2-e), 3.5 Wm-2 (535 ppm CO2-e) and 4.5 Wm-2 (645 ppm CO2-e). We explore the effects of alternative land-use emissions mitigation policy options—one which values terrestrial carbon emissions equally with fossil fuel and industrial emissions, and an alternative which places no penalty on land-use change emissions. We find that increasing populations and economic growth could be anticipated to lead to increased demand for water for agricultural systems (+200%), even in the absence of climate change. In general policies to mitigate climate change will increase agricultural demands for water, regardless of whether or not terrestrial carbon is valued or not. Burgeoning demands for water are driven by the demand for bioenergy in response to emissions mitigation policies. We also find that the policy matters. Increases in the demand for water when terrestrial carbon emissions go un-prices are vastly larger than when terrestrial system carbon emissions are prices at the same rate as fossil fuel and industrial emissions. Our estimates for increased water demands when terrestrial carbon systems go un-priced are larger than earlier studies. We find that the deployment of improved irrigation delivery systems could mitigate some of the increase in water demands, but cannot reverse the increases in water demands when terrestrial carbon emissions go un-priced. Finally we estimates that the geospatial pattern of water demands could stress some parts of the world, e.g. China, India and other countries in south and east Asia, earlier and more intensely than in other parts of the world, e.g. North America.

  10. Impacts of Land-Use and Biofuels Policy on Climate: Temperature and Localized Impacts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Impacts of Land-Use and Biofuels Policy on Climate: Temperature and Localized Impacts Willow on recycled paper #12;1 Impacts of Land-Use and Biofuels Policy on Climate: Temperature and Localized Impacts to agricultural production, including growing biofuels, and (ii) Observed Land Supply Response (OLSR

  11. Green Lands Blue Water 2014 Fall Conference

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Green Lands Blue Water 2014 Fall Conference will be held from November 19–20, 2014, at the Richland Community College in Decatur, Illinois. The event will focus on bioenergy and sustainable agriculture and explore topics ranging from logistics, energy conversion technologies, and markets for grass biomass. BETO Sustainability Program Technology Manager Kristen Johnson will be speaking about the Energy Department’s perspective on sustainable bioenergy landscapes and will focus on BETO’s recent work with landscape design. The conference will be November 19–20 only. On November 18, participants may choose to participate in a pre-conference field tour.

  12. What is the importance of climate model bias when projecting the impacts of climate change on land surface processes?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, M. L.; Rajagopalan, K.; Chung, S. H.; Jiang, X.; Harrison, J. H.; Nergui, T.; Guenther, Alex B.; Miller, C.; Reyes, J.; Tague, C. L.; Choate, J. S.; Salathe, E.; Stockle, Claudio O.; Adam, J. C.

    2014-05-16

    Regional climate change impact (CCI) studies have widely involved downscaling and bias-correcting (BC) Global Climate Model (GCM)-projected climate for driving land surface models. However, BC may cause uncertainties in projecting hydrologic and biogeochemical responses to future climate due to the impaired spatiotemporal covariance of climate variables and a breakdown of physical conservation principles. Here we quantify the impact of BC on simulated climate-driven changes in water variables(evapotranspiration, ET; runoff; snow water equivalent, SWE; and water demand for irrigation), crop yield, biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC), nitric oxide (NO) emissions, and dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) export over the Pacific Northwest (PNW) Region. We also quantify the impacts on net primary production (NPP) over a small watershed in the region (HJ Andrews). Simulation results from the coupled ECHAM5/MPI-OM model with A1B emission scenario were firstly dynamically downscaled to 12 km resolutions with WRF model. Then a quantile mapping based statistical downscaling model was used to downscale them into 1/16th degree resolution daily climate data over historical and future periods. Two series climate data were generated according to the option of bias-correction (i.e. with bias-correction (BC) and without bias-correction, NBC). Impact models were then applied to estimate hydrologic and biogeochemical responses to both BC and NBC meteorological datasets. These im20 pact models include a macro-scale hydrologic model (VIC), a coupled cropping system model (VIC-CropSyst), an ecohydrologic model (RHESSys), a biogenic emissions model (MEGAN), and a nutrient export model (Global-NEWS). Results demonstrate that the BC and NBC climate data provide consistent estimates of the climate-driven changes in water fluxes (ET, runoff, and water demand), VOCs (isoprene and monoterpenes) and NO emissions, mean crop yield, and river DIN export over the PNW domain. However, significant differences rise from projected SWE, crop yield from dry lands, and HJ Andrews’s ET between BC and NBC data. Even though BC post-processing has no significant impacts on most of the studied variables when taking PNW as a whole, their effects have large spatial variations and some local areas are substantially influenced. In addition, there are months during which BC and NBC post-processing produces significant differences in projected changes, such as summer runoff. Factor-controlled simulations indicate that BC post-processing of precipitation and temperature both substantially contribute to these differences at region scales. We conclude that there are trade-offs between using BC climate data for offline CCI studies vs. direct modeled climate data. These trade-offs should be considered when designing integrated modeling frameworks for specific applications; e.g., BC may be more important when considering impacts on reservoir operations in mountainous watersheds than when investigating impacts on biogenic emissions and air quality (where VOCs are a primary indicator).

  13. Impacts of Land Use and Biofuels Policy on Climate: Temperature and Localized Impacts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hallgren, Willow

    2012-08-06

    The impact on climate of future land use and energy policy scenarios is explored using two landuse frameworks: (i) Pure Cost Conversion Response (PCCR), or 'extensification', where the price of land is the only constraint ...

  14. Hawaii Bioenergy Master Plan Land and Water Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with phytoremediation and bioremediation processes; · Document methods to increase water use efficiency for bioenergyHawaii Bioenergy Master Plan Land and Water Resources Submitted to Hawaii Natural Energy Institute of any bioenergy crops in Hawaii is the availability of the land and water necessary to produce

  15. Sensitivity of global tropical climate to land surface processes: Mean state and interannual variability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma, Hsi-Yen; Xiao, Heng; Mechoso, C. R.; Xue, Yongkang

    2013-03-01

    This study examines the sensitivity of global tropical climate to land surface processes (LSP) using an atmospheric general circulation model both uncoupled (with prescribed SSTs) and coupled to an oceanic general circulation model. The emphasis is on the interactive soil moisture and vegetation biophysical processes, which have first order influence on the surface energy and water budgets. The sensitivity to those processes is represented by the differences between model simulations, in which two land surface schemes are considered: 1) a simple land scheme that specifies surface albedo and soil moisture availability, and 2) the Simplified Simple Biosphere Model (SSiB), which allows for consideration of interactive soil moisture and vegetation biophysical process. Observational datasets are also employed to assess the reality of model-revealed sensitivity. The mean state sensitivity to different LSP is stronger in the coupled mode, especially in the tropical Pacific. Furthermore, seasonal cycle of SSTs in the equatorial Pacific, as well as ENSO frequency, amplitude, and locking to the seasonal cycle of SSTs are significantly modified and more realistic with SSiB. This outstanding sensitivity of the atmosphere-ocean system develops through changes in the intensity of equatorial Pacific trades modified by convection over land. Our results further demonstrate that the direct impact of land-atmosphere interactions on the tropical climate is modified by feedbacks associated with perturbed oceanic conditions ("indirect effect" of LSP). The magnitude of such indirect effect is strong enough to suggest that comprehensive studies on the importance of LSP on the global climate have to be made in a system that allows for atmosphere-ocean interactions.

  16. Potential influence of climate-induced vegetation shifts on future land use and associated land carbon fluxes in Northern Eurasia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kicklighter, David

    Climate change will alter ecosystem metabolism and may lead to a redistribution of vegetation and changes in fire regimes in Northern Eurasia over the 21st century. Land management decisions will interact with these ...

  17. Multiobjective calibration and sensitivity of a distributed land surface water and energy balance model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Houser, Paul R; Gupta, Hoshin V; Shuttleworth, W. James; Famiglietti, James S

    2001-01-01

    distributed land surface water and energy balance model Pauldistributed land surface water and energy balance model (because models of water and energy balance, Ph.D.

  18. Water resources planning under climate change and variability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Hara, Jeffrey Keith

    2007-01-01

    Scenario to Climatic Changes. Water Resources Management 19:2006) Quantifying the Urban Water Supply Impacts of Climateto the Shape of Supply? Water Demand Under Heterogeneous

  19. Link between land-ocean warming contrast and surface relative humidities in simulations with coupled climate models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Byrne, Michael Patrick

    Simulations of warming climates with coupled climate models exhibit strong land-ocean contrasts in changes in surface temperature and relative humidity, but little land-ocean contrast in changes in equivalent potential ...

  20. Effects of climate change, land-use change, and invasive species on the ecology of the Cumberland forests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dale, Virginia H; Lannom, Karen O.; Hodges, Donald G.; Tharp, M Lynn; Fogel, Jonah

    2009-02-01

    Effects of climate change, land-use change, and invasive species on the ecology of the Cumberland forests

  1. Managing United States Public Lands in Response to Climate Change: A View From the Ground Up

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neff, Jason

    Managing United States Public Lands in Response to Climate Change: A View From the Ground Up and resource managers, it is not yet clear how issues related to climate change will be incorporated into on in which climate change or carbon management may intersect other use goals: forests, biofuels, and grazing

  2. SOIL, WATER, AND CLIMATE MS DEFENSE SEMINAR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    SOIL, WATER, AND CLIMATE MS DEFENSE SEMINAR Case study for Determining the Presence of the Moorsh- Forming Process in Drained Peat (Markey Muck) Soils, Anoka County, Minnesota, USA by Allyz Kramer Polacsek Soil Science Advisor: Jay Bell Friday, May 15, 2009 9:00 ­ 10:00 am S415 Soil Science Building ABSTRACT

  3. Predicting Ground Water Nitrate Concentration from Land Use

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vogel, Richard M.

    to assess the effects of land use on ground water quality. Exploratory data analysis was applied to historic-foot radius of a well are reliable predictors of nitrate concentration in ground water. Similarly with highly permeable materials to evaluate potential effects of development on ground water quality

  4. China's food production under water and land limitations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoisungwan, Piyatida

    2010-01-01

    The future availability of the natural resources (water and land) needed for food production is highly uncertain. Evidence shows diminishing natural resources and growing food demand throughout many parts of the world. ...

  5. Framework to analyze Risk of Climate Change on Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keller, Arturo A.

    climate- related physical or regulatory water shortage risks for power generation · Technology development : ­ Improved and Advanced Cooling Technologies project Our focus here EDF-EPRI "Water-Climate" partnership #12Framework to analyze Risk of Climate Change on Water and Energy Sustainability Denis AELBRECHT

  6. A Global Land System Framework for Integrated Climate-Change Assessments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schlosser, C. Adam

    Land ecosystems play a major role in the global cycles of energy, water, carbon and nutrients. A Global Land System (GLS) framework has been developed for the Integrated Global Systems Model Version 2 (IGSM2) to simulate ...

  7. Quantifying the effect of land use and land cover changes on green water and blue water in northern part of China 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, X.; Ren, L.; Yuan, F.; Singh, V. P.; Fang, X.; Yu, Z.; Zhang, W.

    2009-06-12

    ) and runoff. The LULC data showed that from 1980 to 1996 grass land and water body had decreased and forest land and crop land had increased. This change caused the evaporation from vegetation interception and vegetation transpiration to increase, whereas...

  8. Trade-offs of different land and bioenergy policies on the path to achieving climate targets.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Calvin, Katherine V.; Wise, Marshall A.; Kyle, G. Page; Patel, Pralit L.; Clarke, Leon E.; Edmonds, James A.

    2014-04-16

    Many papers have shown that bioenergy and land-use are potentially important elements in a strategy to limit anthropogenic climate change. But, significant expansion of bioenergy production can have a large terrestrial footprint. In this paper, we test the implications for land use, the global energy system, carbon cycle, and carbon prices of meeting a specific climate target, using a single fossil fuel and industrial sector policy instrument—the carbon tax, but with five alternative bioenergy and land-use policy architectures. We find that the policies we examined have differing effects on the different segments of the economy. Comprehensive land policies can reduce land-use change emissions, increasing allowable emissions in the energy system, but have implications for the cost of food. Bioenergy taxes and constraints, on the other hand, have little effect on food prices, but can result in increased carbon and energy prices.

  9. Modeling the Summertime Climate of Southwest Asia: The Role of Land Surface Processes in Shaping the Climate of Semiarid Regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marcella, Marc P.

    Presented is a study on the role of land surface processes in determining the summertime climate over the semiarid region of southwest Asia. In this region, a warm surface air temperature bias of 3.5°C is simulated in the ...

  10. The Impacts of Land Cover Change on Climate over China 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Liang

    2015-06-22

    experienced significant land cover changes, such as urbanization (Hua et al. 2008; Zhou et al. 2004), agricultural expansion (Zhang 2000), and desertification (Wang et al. 2006a; Xue 1996). Even though there have been several studies focusing on land... processes (Kalnay and Cai 2003). By using the OMR method, Zhang et al. (2005) suggest that urbanization in southern China, deforestation, and desertification in northern China may increase surface temperature, while vegetation cover increases may decrease...

  11. CHAPTER ELEVEN The microbial ecology of land and water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burke, Ian

    CHAPTER ELEVEN The microbial ecology of land and water contaminated with radioactive waste: towards the development of bioremediation options for the nuclear industry A N D R E A G E I S S L E R , S O N J A S E L E via a number of mechanisms which are potentially useful for scalable, cost-effective bioremediation

  12. Surface Water Chemistry in White Oak Creek, North-East Texas: Effect of Land Use 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Eliza

    2012-02-14

    Over the last few decades increasing attention has been paid to the effects of land use activities and land management on stream water quality. Recent research has largely focused on dominant land uses such as urban development and agricultural...

  13. Stable water isotope simulation by current land-surface schemes:Results of IPILPS phase 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henderson-Sellers, A.; Fischer, M.; Aleinov, I.; McGuffie, K.; Riley, W.J.; Schmidt, G.A.; Sturm, K.; Yoshimura, K.; Irannejad, P.

    2005-10-31

    Phase 1 of isotopes in the Project for Intercomparison of Land-surface Parameterization Schemes (iPILPS) compares the simulation of two stable water isotopologues ({sup 1}H{sub 2} {sup 18}O and {sup 1}H{sup 2}H{sup 16}O) at the land-atmosphere interface. The simulations are off-line, with forcing from an isotopically enabled regional model for three locations selected to offer contrasting climates and ecotypes: an evergreen tropical forest, a sclerophyll eucalypt forest and a mixed deciduous wood. Here we report on the experimental framework, the quality control undertaken on the simulation results and the method of intercomparisons employed. The small number of available isotopically-enabled land-surface schemes (ILSSs) limits the drawing of strong conclusions but, despite this, there is shown to be benefit in undertaking this type of isotopic intercomparison. Although validation of isotopic simulations at the land surface must await more, and much more complete, observational campaigns, we find that the empirically-based Craig-Gordon parameterization (of isotopic fractionation during evaporation) gives adequately realistic isotopic simulations when incorporated in a wide range of land-surface codes. By introducing two new tools for understanding isotopic variability from the land surface, the Isotope Transfer Function and the iPILPS plot, we show that different hydrological parameterizations cause very different isotopic responses. We show that ILSS-simulated isotopic equilibrium is independent of the total water and energy budget (with respect to both equilibration time and state), but interestingly the partitioning of available energy and water is a function of the models' complexity.

  14. Improving parameter estimation and water table depth simulation in a land surface model using GRACE water storage and estimated base flow data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lo, Min-Hui; Famiglietti, James S; Yeh, P. J.-F.; Syed, T. H

    2010-01-01

    spatially variable water and energy balance processes, Waterdistributed land surface water and energy balance model, J.

  15. Analysis of U.S. Water Resources under Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blanc, E.

    The MIT Integrated Global System Model (IGSM) framework, extended to include a Water Resource System (WRS) component, is applied to an integrated assessment of effects of alternative climate policy scenarios on U.S. water ...

  16. Modeling Water Resource Systems under Climate Change: IGSM-WRS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strzepek, K.

    Through the integration of a Water Resource System (WRS) component, the MIT Integrated Global System Model (IGSM) framework has been enhanced to study the effects of climate change on managed water-resource systems. ...

  17. Fourth Annual Report The Climate, Water, and Carbon Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howat, Ian M.

    i Fourth Annual Report The Climate, Water, and Carbon Program A Targeted Investment in Excellence, and Carbon Program (CWC) is pleased to provide this Fourth Annual Report for review by OAA and OR;1 Fourth Annual Report The Climate, Water, and Carbon Program June 30, 2010 I. Executive Summary Narrative

  18. Page 1 of 10 SWS 5234: ENVIRONMENTAL SOIL, WATER, AND LAND USE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    Page 1 of 10 SWS 5234: ENVIRONMENTAL SOIL, WATER, AND LAND USE: SYLLABUS AND SCHEDULE 2012 Table of Contents SWS 5234: Environmental Soil, Water, and Land Use: Syllabus and Schedule 2012 ........... 1: .................................................................................................................... 3 DISTANCE EDUCATION PARTICIPATION

  19. Impact of modern climate change on the intercommunication: Global ocean-land (Northern Hemisphere)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lobanova, H.V.; Lobanov, V.A.; Stepanenko, S.R.

    1996-12-31

    Two main temperature gradients define the synoptic and climatic conditions on the earth in general: equator-pole gradient and ocean-land gradient. The analysis of temperature on the basis of new cyclic-different-scales conception has been fulfilled in every important part of the climatic system in the Northern Hemisphere for assessment of their vulnerability to modern climate change. Historical time series of monthly surface temperature have been used for this aim in the points of regular grid over the Northern Hemisphere from 1891 to 1992. The main feature of the temperature in main climatic parts of the earth is a complexity of its spatial structure. New methods of spatial decomposition have been developed for the division of this complex fields structure into characteristics of mean value of the field and index of its non-homogeneity or spatial variation. It has been established, that the temperature gradient between ocean and land is increasing that is characterized of the increasing of an intensity of synoptic processes, their spatial non-homogeneity and more frequent appearance of the extreme synoptic events. The models of intercommunications between coefficients of temperature spatial decomposition over the ocean and land have been developed for two time period and the increasing of the relationships closeness has been established between ocean and land as well as the decrease of main planet gradient: the pole(the Polar ocean)-equator.

  20. Simulating the Biogeochemical and Biogeophysical Impacts of Transient Land Cover Change and Wood Harvest in the Community Climate System Model (CCSM4) from 1850 to 2100

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, Peter J.; Feddema, Johannes J.; Bonan, Gordon B.; Meehl, Gerald A.; O’ Neill, Brian C.; Oleson, Keith W.; Levis, Samuel; Lawrence, David M.; Kluzek, Erik; Lindsay, Keith

    2012-05-01

    To assess the climate impacts of historical and projected land cover change in the Community Climate System Model, version 4 (CCSM4), new time series of transient Community Land Model, version 4 (CLM4) plant functional ...

  1. California's water futures: How water conservation and varying Delta exports affect water supply in the face of climate change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lund, Jay R.

    i California's water futures: How water conservation and varying Delta exports affect water supply implications of changes in urban water conservation, Delta export capacity, and a dry form of climate warming desalination, and expanded water recycling. Results indicate that, depending on climate and Delta export

  2. Exchanges across Land-Water-Scape Boundaries in Urban Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vermont, University of

    , and institutional behavior Key words: urban; cities; watershed; boundaries; nitrate; water; pollution; land cover Pollution M.L. Cadenasso,a S.T.A. Pickett,b P.M. Groffman,b L.E. Band,c G.S. Brush,d M.F. Galvin,e J Resources, University of Vermont, Burlington, Vermont, USA k Baltimore City Department of Public Works

  3. Optimal Use of Groundwater and Surface Water to Reduce Land Subsidence 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Acosta-Gonzalez, G.; Reddell, D. L.

    1980-01-01

    Optimal Use of Groundwater and Surface Water to Reduce Land Subsidence G. Acosta-Gonzalez D.L. Reddell Texas Water Resources Institute Texas A&M University ...

  4. CAREER: Climate Informed Uncertainty Analyses for Integrated Water Resources Sustainability Principal Investigator: Sankarasubramanian Arumugam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arumugam, Sankar

    CAREER: Climate Informed Uncertainty Analyses for Integrated Water Resources Sustainability the relative roles of climate variability in modulating seasonal streamflow and water quality variability over forecasts in improving water supply and water quality management and in developing adaptive water management

  5. Three Essays on Climate Variability, Water and Agricultural Production 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ding, Jinxiu

    2014-07-23

    examine the implications of increasing drought frequency in the Edwards Aquifer (EA) region of Texas on municipal, industrial, and agricultural water; land allocation; environmental flows; and welfare. To carry out this study we expand a regional...

  6. Water Body Temperature Model for Assessing Climate Change Impacts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    climatological data and thermal pollution from river-based power plants to historical river flow data in orderWater Body Temperature Model for Assessing Climate Change Impacts on Thermal Cooling Ken Strzepek Climate Change Impacts on Thermal Cooling Ken Strzepek* , Charles Fant* , Yohannes Gebretsadik , Megan

  7. Tool investigates population, climate impacts on global water...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    climate and popu-lation data sources and develop prelimi-nary per capita water availability projec-tions at a global scale," said Esther Parish of the Oak Ridge National...

  8. Piyahu Nadu - Land of Flowing Waters: The Water Transfer from Owens Valley to Los Angeles 1913-1939

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Chantal

    2014-01-01

    Exchanging of Certain Land and Water Rights in California. ”of the West’s First Great Water Transfer. Stanford: StanfordThe Euro-Americans monopolized water for their cattle while

  9. Vermont FPR: Land and Water Conservation Fund | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEt Al.,Turin, NewArkansas: EnergyVentnor City,Act|DivisionFPR: Land and Water

  10. Predicted change in global secondary organic aerosol concentrations in response to future climate, emissions, and land use change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heald, C. L.; Henze, D. K.; Horowitz, L. W.; Feddema, Johannes J.; Lamarque, J. F.; Guenther, A.; Hess, P. G.; Vitt, F.; Seinfeld, J. H.; Goldstein, A. H.; Fung, I.

    2008-03-01

    The sensitivity of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) concentration to changes in climate and emissions is investigated using a coupled global atmosphere-land model driven by the year 2100 IPCC A1B scenario predictions. The Community Atmosphere Model...

  11. U.S. Geological Survey Climate and Land Use Change Science Strategy--A Framework for Understanding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    U.S. Geological Survey Climate and Land Use Change Science Strategy--A Framework for Understanding. Clockwise left to right: Landsat 7 image of circular patterns in crop land near Garden City, Kansas, spring 2012. Photograph by Jerrod Wheeler, U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). Crop irrigation, South Dakota

  12. Marine and coastal ecosystems include estuaries and coastal waters and lands. Within these systems are sensitive habitats, marine sanctuaries, national parks, aquaculture, fisheries, and tourism activities. Informed and responsible

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    information on how weather and climate trends affect ecosystems, local communities, regulatory requirements of weather and climate on marine and coastal ecosystems. This type of information can help decision makersOverview Marine and coastal ecosystems include estuaries and coastal waters and lands. Within

  13. Permits and Easements for Construction and Related Activities on Public Lands and Waters (Iowa)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These rules establish procedures and regulate the evaluation and issuance of permits for construction or other related activities that alter the physical characteristics of public lands and waters...

  14. Global Soil Change: Land Use, Soil and Water SWS4231C, SWS5234

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    Global Soil Change: Land Use, Soil and Water SWS4231C, SWS5234 Course Syllabus: Fall 2014 that can be found at: https://catalog

  15. Integrated assessment of global water scarcity over the 21st century under multiple climate change mitigation policies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hejazi, Mohamad I.; Edmonds, James A.; Clarke, Leon E.; Kyle, G. Page; Davies, Evan; Chaturvedi, Vaibhav; Wise, Marshall A.; Patel, Pralit L.; Eom, Jiyong; Calvin, Katherine V.

    2014-08-01

    Water scarcity conditions over the 21st century both globally and regionally are assessed in the context of climate change and climate mitigation policies, by estimating both water availability and water demand within the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM), a leading community integrated assessment model of energy, agriculture, climate, and water. To quantify changes in future water availability, a new gridded water-balance global hydrologic model – namely, the Global Water Availability Model (GWAM) – is developed and evaluated. Global water demands for six major demand sectors (irrigation, livestock, domestic, electricity generation, primary energy production, and manufacturing) are modeled in GCAM at the regional scale (14 geopolitical regions, 151 sub-regions) and then spatially downscaled to 0.5 o x 0.5o resolution to match the scale of GWAM. Using a baseline scenario (i.e., no climate change mitigation policy) with radiative forcing reaching 8.8 W/m2 (equivalent to the SRES A1Fi emission scenario) and three climate policy scenarios with increasing mitigation stringency of 7.7, 5.5, and 4.2 W/m2 (equivalent to the SRES A2, B2, and B1 emission scenarios, respectively), we investigate the effects of emission mitigation policies on water scarcity. Two carbon tax regimes (a universal carbon tax (UCT) which includes land use change emissions, and a fossil fuel and industrial emissions carbon tax (FFICT) which excludes land use change emissions) are analyzed. The baseline scenario results in more than half of the world population living under extreme water scarcity by the end of the 21st century. Additionally, in years 2050 and 2095, 36% (28%) and 44% (39%) of the global population, respectively, is projected to live in grid cells (in basins) that will experience greater water demands than the amount of available water in a year (i.e., the water scarcity index (WSI) > 1.0). When comparing the climate policy scenarios to the baseline scenario while maintaining the same baseline socioeconomic assumptions, water scarcity declines under a UCT mitigation policy but increases with a FFICT mitigation scenario by the year 2095 particularly with more stringent climate mitigation targets. Under the FFICT scenario, water scarcity is projected to increase driven by higher water demands for bio-energy crops.

  16. Ice, Snow and Water: impacts of climate change on California and Himalayan Asia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fenner, R. A.

    2009-01-01

    of Climate Change on Water, Biodiversity and Livelihoods”Dallas 5. The United Nations World Water Development Report3 (2009) “Water in a Changing World” Unesco Publishing (

  17. Graduate Opportunities in Earth Systems Modeling and Climate Impacts on Hydrology and Water Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graduate Opportunities in Earth Systems Modeling and Climate Impacts on Hydrology and Water research assistantships available in the general area of earth systems modeling and climate impacts

  18. Case Studies on the Effects of Climate Change on Water, Livestock and Hurricanes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Chin-Hsien

    2014-07-25

    This dissertation investigates the agricultural impacts of climate change in three ways addressing water implications of mitigation strategies, feedlot livestock productivity vulnerability induced by climate change and ...

  19. Managing Nutrition and Health in a Changing Climate: A Yellowknives Dene First Nation Perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duran, Nelida

    2015-01-01

    on accessing the land and waters to harvest. Participantsharvest. Participants are concerned about the contamination of species that inhabit the land and waters.water and are aware of the hardship the climate creates for members who harvest

  20. Water and Climate 1. Peter Rhines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    basins are cyclically created by plate tectonics. So, why don t the seas become saturated with salt....and hence we have life #12;#12;water not water #12;#12;· Salt enters the seas from weathering of rocks eventually? That would be about 26.5% salinity (26.5 g of salt in 100 g. of seawater

  1. Water Scarcity, Climate Change, and Water Quality: Three Economic Essays 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cai, Yongxia

    2010-07-14

    ........................................................ 22 Figure 2-6. Marginal benefit curve when water demand is non-rival ............................. 22 Figure 2-7. Water shortage for major cities in Texas (thousand ac-ft) ........................... 47 Figure 2-8. Water surplus for major cities... (thousand ac-ft) ............................................ 49 Figure 2-9. Water shortage for major industrial counties (thousand ac-ft) ..................... 52 Figure 2-10. Water surplus for major industrial counties (thousand ac...

  2. Dielectric signatures of adsorbed and salty liquid water at the Phoenix landing site, Mars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stillman, David E.

    Dielectric signatures of adsorbed and salty liquid water at the Phoenix landing site, Mars David E was measured by the Thermal and Electrical Conductivity Probe (TECP) on the Phoenix lander. We interpret liquid water at the Phoenix landing site, Mars, J. Geophys. Res., 116, E09005, doi:10.1029/2011JE003838

  3. On the connection between continental-scale land surface processes and the tropical climate in a coupled ocean-atmosphere-land system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma, Hsi-Yen; Mechoso, C. R.; Xue, Yongkang; Xiao, Heng; Neelin, David; Ji, Xuan

    2013-11-15

    The impact of global tropical climate to perturbations in land surface processes (LSP) are evaluated using perturbations given by different LSP representations of continental-scale in a global climate model that includes atmosphere-ocean interactions. One representation is a simple land scheme, which specifies climatological albedos and soil moisture availability. The other representation is the more comprehensive Simplified Simple Biosphere Model, which allows for interactive soil moisture and vegetation biophysical processes. The results demonstrate that LSP processes such as interactive soil moisture and vegetation biophysical processes have strong impacts on the seasonal mean states and seasonal cycles of global precipitation, clouds, and surface air temperature. The impact is especially significant over the tropical Pacific. To explore the mechanisms for such impact, different LSP representations are confined to selected continental-scale regions where strong interactions of climate-vegetation biophysical processes are present. We find that the largest impact is mainly from LSP perturbations over the tropical African continent. The impact is through anomalous convective heating in tropical Africa due to changes in the surface heat fluxes, which in turn affect basinwide teleconnections in the Pacific through equatorial wave dynamics. The modifications in the equatorial Pacific climate are further enhanced by strong air-sea coupling between surface wind stress and upwelling, as well as effect of ocean memory. Our results further suggest that correct representations of land surface processes, land use change and the associated changes in the deep convection over tropical Africa are crucial to reducing the uncertainty when performing future climate projections under different climate change scenarios.

  4. NIDIS Weekly Climate, Water Drought Assessment Summary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

    to the already above average conditions present in these areas. Water year precipitation percentile rankings are in good condition at the majority of mountainous locations, with the exception of the Sangre de Cristo rankings range from 7 ­ 27. #12;Streamflow Seven day average discharge conditions across the UCRB

  5. Environmental Tracers for Determining Water Resource Vulnerability to Climate Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singleton, M

    2009-07-08

    Predicted changes in the climate will have profound impacts on water availability in the Western US, but large uncertainties exist in our ability to predict how natural and engineered hydrological systems will respond. Most predictions suggest that the impacts of climate change on California water resources are likely to include a decrease in the percentage of precipitation that falls as snow, earlier onset of snow-pack melting, and an increase in the number of rain on snow events. These processes will require changes in infrastructure for water storage and flood control, since much of our current water supply system is built around the storage of winter precipitation as mountain snow pack. Alpine aquifers play a critical role by storing and releasing snowmelt as baseflow to streams long after seasonal precipitation and the disappearance of the snow pack, and in this manner significantly impact the stream flow that drives our water distribution systems. Mountain groundwater recharge and, in particular, the contribution of snowmelt to recharge and baseflow, has been identified as a potentially significant effect missing from current climate change impact studies. The goal of this work is to understand the behavior of critical hydrologic systems, with an emphasis on providing ground truth for next generation models of climate-water system interactions by implementing LLNL capabilities in environmental tracer and isotopic science. We are using noble gas concentrations and multiple isotopic tracers ({sup 3}H/{sup 3}He, {sup 35}S, {sup 222}Rn, {sup 2}H/{sup 1}H, {sup 18}O/{sup 16}O, and {sup 13}C/{sup 12}C) in groundwater and stream water in a small alpine catchment to (1) provide a snapshot of temperature, altitude, and physical processes at the time of recharge, (2) determine subsurface residence times (over time scales ranging from months to decades) of different groundwater age components, and (3) deconvolve the contribution of these different groundwater components to alpine stream baseflow. This research is showing that groundwater in alpine areas spends between a few years to several decades in the saturated zone below the surface, before feeding into streams or being pumped for use. This lag time may act to reduce the impact on water resources from extreme wet or dry years. Furthermore, our measurements show that the temperature of water when it reaches the water table during recharge is 4 to 9 degrees higher than would be expected for direct influx of snowmelt, and that recharge likely occurs over diffuse vegetated areas, rather than along exposed rock faces and fractures. These discoveries have implications for how alpine basins will respond to climate effects that lead to more rain than snow and earlier snow pack melting.

  6. How emissions, climate, and land use change will impact mid-century air quality over the United States: a focus on effects at national parks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Val Martin, M.

    We use a global coupled chemistry–climate–land model (CESM) to assess the integrated effect of climate, emissions and land use changes on annual surface O[subscript 3] and PM[subscript 2.5] in the United States with a focus ...

  7. Impact of land use change on the local climate over the Tibetan Plateau

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jin, J.; Lu, S.; Li, S.; Miller, N.L.

    2010-04-01

    Observational data show that the remotely sensed leaf area index (LAI) has a significant downward trend over the east Tibetan Plateau (TP), while a warming trend is found in the same area. Further analysis indicates that this warming trend mainly results from the nighttime warming. The Single-Column Atmosphere Model (SCAM) version 3.1 developed by the National Center for Atmospheric Research is used to investigate the role of land use change in the TP local climate system and isolate the contribution of land use change to the warming. Two sets of SCAM simulations were performed at the Xinghai station that is located near the center of the TP Sanjiang (three rivers) Nature Reserve where the downward LAI trend is largest. These simulations were forced with the high and low LAIs. The modeling results indicate that, when the LAI changes from high to low, the daytime temperature has a slight decrease, while the nighttime temperature increases significantly, which is consistent with the observations. The modeling results further show that the lower surface roughness length plays a significant role in affecting the nighttime temperature increase.

  8. Resilient Lands and Waters Initiative: 2nd tranche 6/24/15

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in vulnerable regions, enhance carbon storage capacity, and support management needs, and to follow upon those...............................................................................................................................................2 California Headwaters Partnership-agency institutions and partnerships (see attached Q&A). These Resilient Lands and Waters represent a range of scales

  9. How many people can China feed? : assessing the impact of land and water constraints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Amy Beth, 1980-

    2004-01-01

    Land and water resources are becoming increasingly scarce in China, threatening the nation's ability to feed its growing population. The limitations of these resources must be considered simultaneously to determine China's ...

  10. Effect of water table dynamics on land surface hydrologic memory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lo, Min-Hui; Famiglietti, James S

    2010-01-01

    Theory and observations, Water Resour. Res. , 34, 765–776.and macroscale models of water and energy balance, Ph.D.of capillary flux on the soil water balance in a stochastic

  11. California Central Valley Water Rights in a Changing Climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwarz, Andrew Mark

    2015-01-01

    storage resulting from climate change at between 15% to 19%.Khan A, Schwarz A. 2010. Climate change characterization and2013. Indicators of climate change in California. [city? (

  12. Article accepted for publication in: Land and Water Magazine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that flow to a waste water treatment plant. During large storm events, when the capacity of the treatment

  13. Water and energy footprints of bioenergy crop production on marginal lands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Jiquan

    of Zoology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824, USA Abstract Water and energy demandsWater and energy footprints of bioenergy crop production on marginal lands A . K . B H A R D WA J and S . K . H A M I LT O N *w} *Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center, Michigan State University, East

  14. Bioenergy crop productivity and potential climate change mitigation from marginal lands in the United States: An

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhuang, Qianlai

    ÀChampaign, Urbana, IL 61801, USA Abstract Growing biomass feedstocks from marginal lands is becoming an increasingly

  15. NOAA, 2012 Climate Prediction Applications Science Workshop (CPASW), Climate Services for Water and other Natural Resources: Abstract Submission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miami, University of

    types of modeling systems, the Ensemble Streamflow Prediction System (ESP) and the Statistical Water observations, verification, climate variability, and climate sensitivity. The NWS began looking at ways resources managers who may schedule hydro power, manage reservoirs, plant crops, and plan for floods

  16. Evaporative water losses of exercising sheep in neutral and hot climates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Evaporative water losses of exercising sheep in neutral and hot climates T Othman KG Johnson, DW, Australia Hot climates require an accelerated water loss to allowed for thermoregulation (Rai et al, 1979, Trop Anim Hlth Prod, 11, 51-56). The water losses associated with locomotion should be greater

  17. Contribution potential of glaciers to water availability in different climate regimes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marzeion, Ben

    Contribution potential of glaciers to water availability in different climate regimes Georg Kaser availability in river systems under the influence of ongoing global climate change. We estimate the contribution potential of seasonally delayed glacier melt water to total water availability in large river

  18. Intercomparison of the Cloud Water Phase among Global Climate Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Komurcu, Muge; Storelvmo, Trude; Tan, Ivy; Lohmann, U.; Yun, Yuxing; Penner, Joyce E.; Wang, Yong; Liu, Xiaohong; Takemura, T.

    2014-03-27

    Mixed-phase clouds (clouds that consist of both cloud droplets and ice crystals) are frequently present in the Earth’s atmosphere and influence the Earth’s energy budget through their radiative properties, which are highly dependent on the cloud water phase. In this study, the phase partitioning of cloud water is compared among six global climate models (GCMs) and with Cloud and Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization retrievals. It is found that the GCMs predict vastly different distributions of cloud phase for a given temperature, and none of them are capable of reproducing the spatial distribution or magnitude of the observed phase partitioning. While some GCMs produced liquid water paths comparable to satellite observations, they all failed to preserve sufficient liquid water at mixed-phase cloud temperatures. Our results suggest that validating GCMs using only the vertically integrated water contents could lead to amplified differences in cloud radiative feedback. The sensitivity of the simulated cloud phase in GCMs to the choice of heterogeneous ice nucleation parameterization is also investigated. The response to a change in ice nucleation is quite different for each GCM, and the implementation of the same ice nucleation parameterization in all models does not reduce the spread in simulated phase among GCMs. The results suggest that processes subsequent to ice nucleation are at least as important in determining phase and should be the focus of future studies aimed at understanding and reducing differences among the models.

  19. Hawaii Bioenergy Master Plan Land and Water Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    production including selection of biomass feedstocks, modeling of crop water use; technologies including of biomass feedstocks, agricultural practices, and any other factors; and · Estimate and document biofuel

  20. Modeling Climate-Water Impacts on Electricity Sector Capacity Expansion: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cohen, S. M.; Macknick, J.; Averyt, K.; Meldrum, J.

    2014-05-01

    Climate change has the potential to exacerbate water availability concerns for thermal power plant cooling, which is responsible for 41% of U.S. water withdrawals. This analysis describes an initial link between climate, water, and electricity systems using the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS) electricity system capacity expansion model. Average surface water projections from Coupled Model Intercomparison Project 3 (CMIP3) data are applied to surface water rights available to new generating capacity in ReEDS, and electric sector growth is compared with and without climate-influenced water rights. The mean climate projection has only a small impact on national or regional capacity growth and water use because most regions have sufficient unappropriated or previously retired water rights to offset climate impacts. Climate impacts are notable in southwestern states that purchase fewer water rights and obtain a greater share from wastewater and other higher-cost water resources. The electric sector climate impacts demonstrated herein establish a methodology to be later exercised with more extreme climate scenarios and a more rigorous representation of legal and physical water availability.

  1. Alaska Division of Mining Land and Water | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowaWisconsin: Energy ResourcesAirAlamo Heights,Game Jump to:Mining Land and

  2. Water and heat transport in boreal soils: Implications for soil response to climate change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01

    G. An integrated model of soil, hydrology, and vegetatione n v Water and heat transport in boreal soils: Implicationsfor soil response to climate change Zhaosheng Fan a, ? ,

  3. Pan-Arctic land–atmospheric fluxes of methane and carbon dioxide in response to climate change over the 21st century

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, Xudong

    Future changes of pan-Arctic land–atmospheric methane (CH[subscript 4]) and carbon dioxide (CO[subscript 2]) depend on how terrestrial ecosystems respond to warming climate. Here, we used a coupled hydrology–biogeochemistry ...

  4. Land Use and Land Cover Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Daniel; Polsky, Colin; Bolstad, Paul V.; Brody, Samuel D.; Hulse, David; Kroh, Roger; Loveland, Thomas; Thomson, Allison M.

    2014-05-01

    A contribution to the 3rd National Climate Assessment report, discussing the following key messages: 1. Choices about land-use and land-cover patterns have affected and will continue to affect how vulnerable or resilient human communities and ecosystems are to the effects of climate change. 2. Land-use and land-cover changes affect local, regional, and global climate processes. 3. Individuals, organizations, and governments have the capacity to make land-use decisions to adapt to the effects of climate change. 4. Choices about land use and land management provide a means of reducing atmospheric greenhouse gas levels.

  5. Q&A on "Impacts of Wind Farms on Land Surface Temperature" Published by Nature Climate Change on April 29, 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Liming

    1 Q&A on "Impacts of Wind Farms on Land Surface Temperature" Published by Nature Climate Change? This study presents the first observational evidence of wind farm impacts on land surface temperature downwind of wind farms. Why do the operating wind turbines warm nighttime temperature? This warming effect

  6. Ice, Snow and Water: impacts of climate change on California and Himalayan Asia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fenner, R. A.

    2009-01-01

    BRIEFING NOTE  Ice, Snow  and Water: impacts of climate of declining mountain snows and glacier retreat  in impacts of declining mountain snows on water availability in

  7. Opal Waters, Rising Seas: How Sociocultural Inequality Reduces Resilience to Climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Green, Donna

    218 Chapter 12 Opal Waters, Rising Seas: How Sociocultural Inequality Reduces Resilience to Climate in the north indicate increasing extreme events: #12;Opal Waters, Rising Seas 219 monsoonal rain projected

  8. BCS 311: Land and Environments of the Circumpolar World Module 7 Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhatt, Uma

    Climate Change Developed by Richard D. Boone1,3 and Uma S. Bhatt2,3 1 is to give students an overview of climate change in the Arctic, including objective is to gain an overview of the recent climate change record, the causes

  9. Future Climate Change Impacts on New Mexico's Mountain Sources of Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hanley, Kathryn A.

    133 Future Climate Change Impacts on New Mexico's Mountain Sources of Water BEYONDTHEYEAROFWATER Conference. FUTURE CLIMATE CHANGE IMPACTS ON NEW MEXICO'S MOUNTAIN SOURCES OF WATER Albert Rango USDA-ARS-Jornada Experimental Range, Las Cruces, NM Enrique Vivoni, New Mexico Tech, Socorro, NM David Gutzler, University

  10. Climate Change Impacts on Western Lake Erie, Detroit River, and Lake St. Clair Water Levels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -- - --- Climate Change Impacts on Western Lake Erie, Detroit River, and Lake St. Clair WaterConditionsScenario 36 #12;#12;-- - ---- Climate Change Impacts on Western Lake Erie, Detroit River, and Lake St. Clair and frequenciesof Lake St. Clair,Detroit River, and western Lake Erie water levelsare computed

  11. Climate change and water supply, management and use: A literature review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, L.H.; Draves, J.D.; Hunsaker, C.T.

    1992-05-01

    There is evidence that atmospheric concentrations Of C0{sub 2}, tropospheric 0{sub 3}, and CH{sub 4}, among other gases that contribute to the greenhouse effect, have increased in recent decades, and that these changes may induce changes in global air temperatures and regional climate features in coming years. A literature review was conducted to sample the literature base on which our understanding of the water resource impacts of climate change rests. Water resource issues likely to be important include hydrologic response to climate change, the resilience of water supply systems to changing climatic and hydrologic conditions, and the effects of climate change on water quality and water uses (such as navigation and energy generation). A computer-assisted search of literature on the effects of climate change on these subjects was conducted. All studies were classified by type of paper (e.g., review, discussion, case study), region, water resource variable studied, and source of climate scenario. The resulting bibliography containing more than 200 references was largely annotated. Case studies of potential hydrologic impacts have been more common than studies of impacts on water management or water use, but this apparent research gap is decreasing. Case studies demonstrating methods of incorporating potential risks of climate change into water project planning and management have been performed. Considerable variability in regional coverage exists; the Great Lakes basin and California receive relatively more attention than such regions as New England and the Missouri River basin. General circulation model-based and hypothetical climate scenarios have been the dominant sources of climate scenarios used in case studies, although a variety of other methods for developing climate scenarios have been developed.

  12. The Role of Plate Tectonic-Climate Coupling and Exposed Land Area in the Development of Habitable Climates on Rocky Planets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foley, Bradford J

    2015-01-01

    The long-term carbon cycle is vital for maintaining liquid water oceans on rocky planets due to the negative climate feedbacks involved in silicate weathering. Plate tectonics plays a crucial role in driving the long-term carbon cycle because it is responsible for CO$_2$ degassing at ridges and arcs, the return of CO$_2$ to the mantle through subduction, and supplying fresh, weatherable rock to the surface via uplift and orogeny. However, the presence of plate tectonics itself may depend on climate according to recent geodynamical studies showing that cool surface temperatures are important for maintaining vigorous plate tectonics. Using a simple carbon cycle model, I show that the negative climate feedbacks inherent in the long-term carbon cycle are uninhibited by climate's effect on plate tectonics. Furthermore, initial atmospheric CO$_2$ conditions do not impact the final climate state reached when the carbon cycle comes to equilibrium, as long as liquid water is present and silicate weathering can occur. ...

  13. Climate Change Assessment for Urban Water Resource Availability 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martinez, Ramiro

    2011-08-08

    In the past two decades, scientific evidence has predicted a significant change in the earth’s climatic atmosphere. Although there are many studies that demonstrate changes in the atmospheric temperatures, there are few studies that show how climate...

  14. 11.4 CLIP: CLIMATE-LAND INTERACTION PROJECT--INVESTIGATING HUMAN-CLIMATE INTERACTIONS IN EAST AFRICA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    AFRICA Brent M. Lofgren* Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory, Ann Arbor, Michigan Nathan J Africa is a region with an economy that is rapidly developing in a variety of sectors, an ex- panding to have significant effects on climate in other parts of Africa, leading to feedback between vegetation

  15. Using Land to Mitigate Climate Change: Hitting the Target, Recognizing the Trade-offs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    model, the Program seeks to: discover new interactions among natural and human climate system components that will shape our future; and improve methods to model, monitor and verify greenhouse gas emissions and climatic environmental conditions there may be implications for food prices. Using an integrated global system model, we

  16. Cumulative soil chemistry changes from land application of saline-sodic waters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ganjegunte, G.K.; King, L.A.; Vance, G.F. [University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY (United States). Department for Renewable Resources

    2008-09-15

    Management of large volumes (60,000 ha-m) of co-production water associated with coal bed natural gas (CBNG) water extraction is a potential concern in the Powder River Basin (PRB) of Wyoming and Montana due to elevated water salinity and sodicity levels. Land application of saline-sodic CBNG water is a common water management method being practiced in the PRB, which can result in deterioration in soil quality. The objective of this study was to evaluate effects from 1 to 4 yr of land application with CBNG water on soil chemical properties at six study sites (fine to loamy, mixed to smectitic, mesic, Ustic Ardisols and Entisols) in the Wyoming PRB region. Changes in chemistry of soils collected from six depths irrigated with CBNG water were compared with representative non-irrigated soils. Applications of CBNG water significantly increased soil EC, SAR, and ESP values (up to 21, 74, and 24 times, respectively) compared with non-irrigated soils. Differences in soil chemical properties between an irrigated and non-irrigated coarse-textured soil were less than that of fine-textured soils, emphasizing texture as an important factor for salinity buildup. Pretreatment of CBNG water using a sulfur burner and application of gypsum and elemental S soil amendments reduced soil pH but did not prevent the build-up of salts and sodium. Study results suggest that current CBNG water management strategies are not as effective as projected. Additional research is needed to develop management strategies appropriate for mitigating adverse effects of CBNG water irrigation.

  17. Post-doctoral Position Title Quantify the net global climate impacts of past and future land-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pouyanne, Nicolas

    objective is to make this protocol widely available so that other earth system modeling groups outside uses and land use changes in global earth system models, and test the impact of various implementation

  18. Impact of Agricultural Practice on Regional Climate in a Coupled Land Surface Mesoscale Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cooley, H.S.; Riley, W.J.; Torn, M.S.; He, Y.

    2004-01-01

    winter wheat belt on the mesoscale environment, Monthlygeneration Penn State/NCAR mesoscale model (MM5), NCAR,in a Coupled Land Surface Mesoscale Model H.S. Cooley Energy

  19. Isoprene emissions over Asia 1979-2012 : impact of climate and land use changes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stavrakou, T.; Muller, J. F.; Bauwens, M.; De Smedt, I.; Roozendael, Van M.; Guenther, Alex B.; Wild, M.; Xia, X.

    2014-05-12

    Due to the scarcity of observational constraints and the rapidly changing environment in East and Southeast Asia, isoprene emissions predicted by models are expected to bear substantial uncertainties. The aim of this study is to improve upon the existing bottom-up estimates, and investigate the temporal evolution of the fluxes in Asia over 1979-2012. To this purpose, we calculate the hourly emissions at 0.5% ×0.5% resolution using the MEGAN-MOHYCAN model driven by ECMWF ERA-Interim climatology. This study incorporates (i) changes in land use, including the rapid expansion of oil palms, (ii) meteorological variability according to ERA-Interim, (iii) long-term changes in solar radiation (dimming/brightening) constrained by surface network radiation measurements,and (iv) recent experimental evidence that South Asian tropical forests are much weaker isoprene emitters than previously assumed, and on the other hand, that oil palms hold a strong isoprene emission capacity. These effects lead to a significant lowering (factor of two) in the total isoprene fluxes over the studied domain, and to emission reductions reaching a factor of 3.5 in Southeast Asia. The bottom-up annual isoprene emissions for 2005 are estimated at 7.0, 4.8, 8.3, 2.9 Tg in China, India, Indonesia and Malaysia, respectively. Changes in temperature and solar radiation are the major drivers of the interannual variability and trend in the emissions. An annual positive flux trend of 0.2% and 0.52% is found in Asia and China, respectively, through the entire period, related to positive trend in temperature and solar radiation. The impact of oil palm expansion in Indonesia and Malaysia is to enhance the trends over that region, e.g. from 1.17% to 1.5% in 1979-2005 in Malaysia. A negative emission trend is derived in India (?0.4 %), owing to the negative trend in solar radiation data associated to the strong dimming effect likely due to increasing aerosol loadings. The bottom-up emissions are evaluated using top-down isoprene emission estimates derived from inverse modelling constrained by GOME-2/MetOp-A formaldehyde columns through 2007-2012. The satellite-based estimates appear to support our assumptions, and confirm the lower emission rate in tropical forests of Indonesia and Malaysia. Additional flux measurements are clearly needed to better characterize the spatial variability of emission factors. Finally, a decreasing trend in the top-down Chinese emissions inferred after 2007, is in line with the cooling episode recorded in China after that year, thus suggesting that the satellite HCHO columns are able to capture climate-induced changes in emissions.

  20. California Central Valley Water Rights in a Changing Climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwarz, Andrew Mark

    2015-01-01

    contemplated to preserve stored water for critical periods.analysis in California water resources planning studies [California Department of Water Resources. [cited 2013 02

  1. Modeling land surface processes of the midwestern United States : predicting soil moisture under a warmer climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winter, Jonathan (Jonathan Mark)

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation seeks to quantify the response of soil moisture to climate change in the midwestern United States. To assess this response, a dynamic global vegetation model, Integrated Biosphere Simulator, was coupled ...

  2. ORIGINAL PAPER Managing climate change risks in New York City's water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to the effects of climate change must become a regular part of planning for water supply, sewer, wastewater Protection (NYCDEP), the agency responsible for managing New York City's (NYC) water supply, sewer focuses on the water supply, sewer, and wastewater treatment systems of NYC, but has wide application

  3. Water, climate change, and sustainability in the southwest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the Environment and Department of Geography, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1496 Edited by B. L to fires and pathogenic outbreaks. Although the high temperatures and aridity are consistent with projected gasses or is a product of natural climatic variability. Climate models indicate that the 21st century

  4. Planning for the Future: Climate Adaptation in Hazard Mitigation Plans and Comprehensive Water Resource Management Plans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bailey, Gregory

    This project investigated whether hazard mitigation plans (HMPs) and comprehensive water resource management plans (CWRMPs) completed by cities and towns in Massachusetts account for the long term effects of climate change. ...

  5. The influence of land-use composition on fecal contamination of riverine source water in southern British Columbia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mazumder, Asit

    The influence of land-use composition on fecal contamination of riverine source water in southern to become contaminated with pathogens is related to the production and transport of fecal waste from within the local catchment area. Identifying specific relationships between land-use types and fecal contamination

  6. The impact of land cover change on carbon and water cycling in the US Central Plains grasslands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buck, Tyler

    2010-07-30

    Using the eddy covariance technique, the impact of land cover variability on carbon and water cycling was examined at three different grasslands in Northeast Kansas. One site 8 km north of Lawrence, Kansas at the Nelson Environmental Study Area...

  7. The mobility of water soluble organic compounds in soils from the land application of petroleum waste sludge 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Gordon Barcus

    1979-01-01

    THE MOBILITY OF WATER SOLUBLE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN SOILS FROM THE LAND APPLICATION OF PETROLEUM WASTE SLUDGE A Thesis by GORDON BARCUS EVANS, JR. Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&l1 University in partial fulfillment... of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1979 Major Subject: Soil Science THE MOBILITY OF WATER SOLUBLE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN SOILS FROM THE LAND APPLICATION OF PETROLEUM WASTE SLUDGE A Thesis by GORDON BARCUS EVANS, JR. Approved...

  8. Water balance in the Amazon basin from a land surface model ensemble

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Getirana, Augusto; Dutra, Emanuel; Guimberteau, Matthieu; Kam, Jonghun; Li, Hongyi; Decharme, Bertrand; Zhang, Zhengqiu J.; Ducharne, Agnes; Boone, Aaron; Balsamo, Gianpaolo; Rodell, Matthew; Mounirou Toure, Ally; Xue, Yongkang; Peters-Lidard, Christa D.; Kumar, Sujay V.; Arsenault, Kristi Rae; Drapeau, Guillaume; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Ronchail, Josyane; Sheffield, Justin

    2014-12-06

    Despite recent advances in modeling and remote sensing of land surfaces, estimates of the global water budget are still fairly uncertain. The objective of this study is to evaluate the water budget of the Amazon basin based on several state-of-the-art land surface model (LSM) outputs. Water budget variables [total water storage (TWS), evapotranspiration (ET), surface runoff (R) and baseflow (B)] are evaluated at the basin scale using both remote sensing and in situ data. Fourteen LSMs were run using meteorological forcings at a 3-hourly time step and 1-degree spatial resolution. Three experiments are performed using precipitation which has been rescaled to match monthly global GPCP and GPCC datasets and the daily HYBAM dataset for the Amazon basin. R and B are used to force the Hydrological Modeling and Analysis Platform (HyMAP) river routing scheme and simulated discharges are compared against observations at 165 gauges. Simulated ET and TWS are compared against FLUXNET and MOD16A2 evapotranspiration, and GRACE TWS estimates in different catchments. At the basin scale, simulated ET ranges from 2.39mm.d-1 to 3.26mm.d-1 and a low spatial correlation between ET and P indicates that evapotranspiration does not depend on water availability over most of the basin. Results also show that other simulated water budget variables vary significantly as a function of both the LSM and precipitation used, but simulated TWS generally agree at the basin scale. The best water budget simulations resulted from experiments using the HYBAM dataset, mostly explained by a denser rainfall gauge network the daily rescaling.

  9. Pluralistic Modelling Approaches to Simulating Climate-Land Change Interactions in East Africa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Alexandridis4 1 Department of Forestry and Natural Resources, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47906 food production systems, crop prices and market dynamics, human behavioural factors such as risk with atmospheric trends such as greenhouse gas concentrations, to loop back to regional and global climate change

  10. Effects of climatic chance on surface water and energy balances of sorghum and cotton in West Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zeng, Wen

    1994-01-01

    Global climatic change may be occurring due to the increase of carbon dioxide and other "greenhouse" gases in the atmosphere. Effects of climatic change on surface water and energy balances of sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L. ...

  11. Sandia Energy - Bureau of Land Management

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bureau of Land Management Home Climate & Earth Systems Sustainable Subsurface Energy Development Program Leadership Bureau of Land Management Bureau of Land ManagementMaelyn...

  12. Ecosystem feedbacks to climate change in California: Development, testing, and analysis using a coupled regional atmosphere and land-surface model (WRF3-CLM3.5)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Subin, Z.M.; Riley, W.J.; Kueppers, L.M.; Jin, J.; Christianson, D.S.; Torn, M.S.

    2010-11-01

    A regional atmosphere model [Weather Research and Forecasting model version 3 (WRF3)] and a land surface model [Community Land Model, version 3.5 (CLM3.5)] were coupled to study the interactions between the atmosphere and possible future California land-cover changes. The impact was evaluated on California's climate of changes in natural vegetation under climate change and of intentional afforestation. The ability of WRF3 to simulate California's climate was assessed by comparing simulations by WRF3-CLM3.5 and WRF3-Noah to observations from 1982 to 1991. Using WRF3-CLM3.5, the authors performed six 13-yr experiments using historical and future large-scale climate boundary conditions from the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory Climate Model version 2.1 (GFDL CM2.1). The land-cover scenarios included historical and future natural vegetation from the Mapped Atmosphere-Plant-Soil System-Century 1 (MC1) dynamic vegetation model, in addition to a future 8-million-ha California afforestation scenario. Natural vegetation changes alone caused summer daily-mean 2-m air temperature changes of -0.7 to +1 C in regions without persistent snow cover, depending on the location and the type of vegetation change. Vegetation temperature changes were much larger than the 2-m air temperature changes because of the finescale spatial heterogeneity of the imposed vegetation change. Up to 30% of the magnitude of the summer daily-mean 2-m air temperature increase and 70% of the magnitude of the 1600 local time (LT) vegetation temperature increase projected under future climate change were attributable to the climate-driven shift in land cover. The authors projected that afforestation could cause local 0.2-1.2 C reductions in summer daily-mean 2-m air temperature and 2.0-3.7 C reductions in 1600 LT vegetation temperature for snow-free regions, primarily because of increased evapotranspiration. Because some of these temperature changes are of comparable magnitude to those projected under climate change this century, projections of climate and vegetation change in this region need to consider these climate-vegetation interactions.

  13. In the near future, Switzerland is predicted to be affected by climate change, that is bound to impact both water demand and water supply

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lenstra, Arjen K.

    In the near future, Switzerland is predicted to be affected by climate change, that is bound in Switzerland, mandated by the Federal Office for the Environment (FOEN). 4) Climate change and water resources of future water resources in Switzerland. Two possible solutions: -Randomly reduce water availability -Use

  14. Circumpolar Deep Water Circulation and Variability in a Coupled Climate Model AGUS SANTOSO AND MATTHEW H. ENGLAND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santoso, Agus

    Circumpolar Deep Water Circulation and Variability in a Coupled Climate Model AGUS SANTOSO Deep Water (CDW) is analyzed using a long-term integration of a coupled climate model. The variability into the Southern Ocean via North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW). Salinity dipole anomalies appear to propagate around

  15. Delays in Reducing Waterborne and Water-related Infectious Diseases in China under Climate Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hodges, Maggie; Belle, Jessica; Carlton, Elizabeth; Liang, Song; Li, Huazhong; Luo, Wei; Freeman, Matthew C.; Liu, Yang; Gao, Yang; Hess, Jeremy; Remais, Justin V.

    2014-12-01

    Despite China’s rapid progress improving water, sanitation and hygiene (WSH) infrastructure and access, in 2011, 471 million people lacked access to improved sanitation, and 401 million people lacked access to household piped water. Infectious diseases are sensitive to changes in climate, particularly temperature, and WSH conditions. To explore possible impacts of climate change on these diseases in China in 2020 and 2030, we coupled estimates of the temperature sensitivity of diarrheal disease and three vector-borne diseases, temperature projections from global climate models using four emissions pathways, WSH-infrastructure development scenarios and projected demographic changes. By 2030, the projected impacts would delay China’s historically rapid progress toward reducing the burden of WSH-attributable infectious disease by 8-85 months. This developmental delay provides a key summary measure of the impact of climate change in China, and in other societies undergoing rapid social, economic, and environmental change.

  16. Human choice and climate change. Volume 2: Resources and technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rayner, S.; Malone, E.L.

    1997-12-31

    Foreward: Preface; Introduction; The natural science of global climate change; Land and water use; Coastal zones and oceans; Energy and industry; Energy and social systems; Technological change; and Sponsoring organizations, International Advisory Board, and project participants.

  17. Identifying Potential Land Use-derived Solute Sources to Stream Baseflow Using Ground Water Models and GIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to assess the impact of different baseflow solute contributions to surface water chemistry. Numerous field systems, locations of oil brine fields and high- density human populations) likely exist. Impacts of otherBoutt 1 Identifying Potential Land Use-derived Solute Sources to Stream Baseflow Using Ground Water

  18. Water resources planning under climate change and variability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Hara, Jeffrey Keith

    2007-01-01

    transfers or options. Demand-side management includes thepricing schemes, and demand-side management for urban water,of alternate demand side management, particularly

  19. Analysis of U.S. Water Resources under Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    sectors, with detailed sub-models employed for analysis of irrigation and electric power. The water system*§ , and John Reilly* Abstract The MIT Integrated Global System Model (IGSM) framework, extended to include a Water Resource System (WRS) component, is applied to an integrated assessment of effects of alternative

  20. Water vapor and the dynamics of climate changes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schneider, Tapio

    Water vapor is not only Earth's dominant greenhouse gas. Through the release of latent heat when it condenses, it also plays an active role in dynamic processes that shape the global circulation of the atmosphere and thus ...

  1. Economic impacts of climate change on water resources in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A national-scale simulation-optimization model was created to generate estimates of economic impacts, commercial and industrial water use, and hydroelectric power generation. Environmental flows below minimal

  2. Future land use plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-08-31

    The US Department of Energy`s (DOE) changing mission, coupled with the need to apply appropriate cleanup standards for current and future environmental restoration, prompted the need for a process to determine preferred Future Land Uses for DOE-owned sites. DOE began the ``Future Land Use`` initiative in 1994 to ensure that its cleanup efforts reflect the surrounding communities` interests in future land use. This plan presents the results of a study of stakeholder-preferred future land uses for the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), located in central Long Island, New York. The plan gives the Laboratory`s view of its future development over the next 20 years, as well as land uses preferred by the community were BNL ever to cease operations as a national laboratory (the post-BNL scenario). The plan provides an overview of the physical features of the site including its history, topography, geology/hydrogeology, biological inventory, floodplains, wetlands, climate, and atmosphere. Utility systems and current environmental operations are described including waste management, waste water treatment, hazardous waste management, refuse disposal and ground water management. To complement the physical descriptions of the site, demographics are discussed, including overviews of the surrounding areas, laboratory population, and economic and non-economic impacts.

  3. Evaluation of Potential Impacts on Great Lakes Water Resources Based on Climate Scenarios of Two GCMs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evaluation of Potential Impacts on Great Lakes Water Resources Based on Climate Scenarios of Two Mete- orological Office's Hadley Centre (model HadCM2) have been used to derive potential impacts in the satisfaction of the interests of commercial navigation, recreational boating, riparians, and hydropower due

  4. Climate Change and California Water where do we go from here?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maurer,. Edwin P.

    equity - Lowest estimate for 21st century Scenarios of CO2 emissions CO2 concentrations Lag Impacts, climate sensitive industries (agriculture, tourism), 5th largest economy in world · Water supply in CA Hold? How society changes in the future: "Scenarios" of greenhouse gas emissions: A1fi: Rapid economic

  5. T emporal structure in the deep-water temperature of four Swiss lakes: A short-term climatic change indicator?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Livingstone, David M.

    7 T emporal structure in the deep-water temperature of four Swiss lakes: A short-term climatic in the hypolimnion. Since in temperate latitudes coupling between deep water and atmosphere is at its strongest in atmospheric forcing on the deep-water temper- ature may well be greater than any seasonal influences. The deep-water

  6. Climatic forcing of eastern Mediterranean deep-water formation and benthic ecosystems during the past 22 000 years

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilli, Adrian

    Climatic forcing of eastern Mediterranean deep-water formation and benthic ecosystems during) suggest a high spatiotemporal variability of deep-water oxygenation and biogeochemical processes maximum, cool surface waters and high evaporation resulted in maximum convection and oxic deep-waters

  7. Land–Ocean Warming Contrast over a Wide Range of Climates: Convective Quasi-Equilibrium Theory and Idealized Simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Byrne, Michael Patrick

    Surface temperatures increase at a greater rate over land than ocean in simulations and observations of global warming. It has previously been proposed that this land–ocean warming contrast is related to different changes ...

  8. Effects of climate change on Pacific Northwest water-related resources: Summary of preliminary findings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott, M.J.; Sands, R.D.; Vail, L.W.; Chatters, J.C.; Neitzel, D.A.; Shankle, S.A.

    1993-12-01

    The Pacific Northwest Case Study is a multi-agency analysis of atmospheric/climatic change impacts on the Pacific Northwest (which includes Washington, Oregon, Idaho, and portions of the Columbia River Basin in Western Montana). The purpose of the case study, which began in fiscal year 1991, was to develop and test analytical tools, as well as to develop an assessment of the effects of climate change on climate-sensitive natural resources of the Pacific Northwest and economic sectors dependent on them. The overall study, jointly funded by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the US Environmental Protection Agency, was a broad-based, reconnaissance-level study to identify potential climate impacts on agriculture, coastal resources, forest resources, and irrigation in the Pacific Northwest. DOE participated in the reconnaissance study, with responsibility for hydroelectric and water supply issues. While this report briefly discusses a broader array of water issues, attention is mainly focused on three aspects of the water study: (1) the effects of the region`s higher temperatures on the demand for electric power (which in turn puts additional demand on hydroelectric resources of the region); (2) the effects of higher temperatures and changes, both in precipitation amounts and seasonality, on river flows and hydroelectric supply; and (3) the effect of higher temperatures and changed precipitation amounts and seasonality on salmonid resources -- particularly the rearing conditions in tributaries of the Columbia River Basin. Because the meaning of regional climate forecasts is still quite uncertain, most of the preliminary findings are based on sensitivity analyses and historical analog climate scenarios.

  9. The influence of geology and land use on arsenic in stream sediments and ground waters in New England, USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The influence of geology and land use on arsenic in stream sediments and ground waters in New England, USA Gilpin R. Robinson Jr. a,*, Joseph D. Ayotte b a US Geological Survey, 954 National Center, Reston, VA 20192, United States b US Geological Survey, 361 Commerce Way, Pembroke, NH 03275-3719, United

  10. Water balance in the amazon basin from a land surface model ensemble

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-01-01

    land surface and Earth system models. J. Hydro- meteor. ,of the Community Earth System Model (CESM; Vertenstein et

  11. Assessment of Water Resources in A Humid Watershed and A Semi-arid Watershed; Neches River Basin, TX and Canadian River Basin, NM 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heo, Joonghyeok

    2013-07-16

    Water is the most important resource on Earth. Climate and land cover changes are two important factors that directly influenced water resources. This research provides important information for water resources management and contributes...

  12. We are fishing out the oceans, killing off the wild animals, cutting down the forests, denuding the mountains, using up the fresh water, even turning land into

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurucz, Robert L.

    the mountains, using up the fresh water, even turning land into desert. We are polluting the oceans, the fresh water, the land, the air. We waste most of the energy coming from the sun and from the earth. Instead of using the energy to make capital investments that benefit the whole earth, such as pollution remediation

  13. Forecasting the response of Earth's surface to future climatic and land use changes: A review of methods and research needs

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Pelletier, Jon D.; Murray, A. Brad; Pierce, Jennifer L.; Bierman, Paul R.; Breshears, David D.; Crosby, Benjamin T.; Ellis, Michael; Foufoula-Georgiou, Efi; Heimsath, Arjun M.; Houser, Chris; et al

    2015-07-14

    In the future, Earth will be warmer, precipitation events will be more extreme, global mean sea level will rise, and many arid and semiarid regions will be drier. Human modifications of landscapes will also occur at an accelerated rate as developed areas increase in size and population density. We now have gridded global forecasts, being continually improved, of the climatic and land use changes (C&LUC) that are likely to occur in the coming decades. However, besides a few exceptions, consensus forecasts do not exist for how these C&LUC will likely impact Earth-surface processes and hazards. In some cases, we havemore »the tools to forecast the geomorphic responses to likely future C&LUC. Fully exploiting these models and utilizing these tools will require close collaboration among Earth-surface scientists and Earth-system modelers. This paper assesses the state-of-the-art tools and data that are being used or could be used to forecast changes in the state of Earth's surface as a result of likely future C&LUC. We also propose strategies for filling key knowledge gaps, emphasizing where additional basic research and/or collaboration across disciplines are necessary. The main body of the paper addresses cross-cutting issues, including the importance of nonlinear/threshold-dominated interactions among topography, vegetation, and sediment transport, as well as the importance of alternate stable states and extreme, rare events for understanding and forecasting Earth-surface response to C&LUC. Five supplements delve into different scales or process zones (global-scale assessments and fluvial, aeolian, glacial/periglacial, and coastal process zones) in detail.« less

  14. Habitability of waterworlds: runaway greenhouses, atmospheric expansion and multiple climate states of pure water atmospheres

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldblatt, Colin

    2015-01-01

    There are four different stable climate states for pure water atmospheres, as might exist on so-called "waterworlds". I map these as a function of solar constant for planets ranging in size from Mars size to 10 Earth-mass. The states are: globally ice covered (Ts< 245K), cold and damp (270 < Ts< 290K), hot and moist (350< Ts< 550K) and very hot and dry (Ts< 900K). No stable climate exists for 290< Ts < 350K or 550 < Ts < 900K. The union of hot moist and cold damp climates describe the liquid water habitable zone, the width and location of which depends on planet mass. At each solar constant, two or three different climate states are stable. This is a consequence of strong non-linearities in both thermal emission and the net absorption of sunlight. Across the range of planet sizes, I account for the atmospheres expanding to high altitudes as they warm. The emitting and absorbing surfaces (optical depth of unity) move to high altitude, making their area larger than the planet surfa...

  15. Land and water use characteristics in the vicinity of the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamby, D.M.

    1991-03-01

    Routine operations at the Savannah River Site (SRS) result in the release of small amounts of radionuclides to the atmosphere and to the Savannah River. The resulting radiological doses to the offsite maximum individual and the offsite population within 50 miles of the SRS are estimated on a yearly basis. These estimates are generated using dose models prescribed for the commercial nuclear power industry by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The NRC provides default values for dose model parameters for facilities not having enough data to develop site-specific values. A survey of land and water use characteristics for the Savannah River area has been conducted to determine as many site-specific values as possible for inclusion in the dose models used at the SRS. These site parameters include local characteristics of meat, milk, and vegetable production; river recreational activities; and meat, milk, and vegetable consumption rates. The report that follows describes the origin of the NRC default values, the methodology for deriving regional data, the results of the study, and the derivations of region-specific usage and consumption rates. 33 refs., 3 figs., 8 tabs.

  16. Ocean Water Clarity and the Ocean General Circulation in a Coupled Climate Model ANAND GNANADESIKAN AND WHIT G. ANDERSON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gnanadesikan, Anand

    shortwave penetration in the high-latitude Southern Ocean causes an increase in the formation of mode waterOcean Water Clarity and the Ocean General Circulation in a Coupled Climate Model ANAND GNANADESIKAN Jersey (Manuscript received 11 October 2007, in final form 17 July 2008) ABSTRACT Ocean water clarity

  17. NREL evaluates energy savings potential of heat pump water heaters in homes throughout all U.S. climate zones.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NREL evaluates energy savings potential of heat pump water heaters in homes throughout all U.S. climate zones. Heat pump water heaters (HPWHs) have the potential to significantly reduce energy use is a function of surrounding air temperature, humidity, hot water usage, and the logic controlling the heat pump

  18. Water Scarcity in the Andes: A Comparison of Local Perceptions and Observed Climate, Land Use

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lopez-Carr, David

    and Socioeconomic Changes Felipe Murtinho & Christina Tague & Bert de Bievre & Hallie Eakin & David Lopez-Carr, AZ, USA D. Lopez-Carr Geography Department, University California Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA

  19. Risk Analysis for Water Resources Under Climate Change, Population Growth, and Land Use Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kiparsky, Michael

    2010-01-01

    to use forecasts." Risk Analysis 25(5): 1265- Oreskes, N. (P. C. (1977). "Mean-Risk Analysis with Risk Associated withChavas, J. -P. (2004). Risk Analysis in Theory and Practice.

  20. Risk Analysis for Water Resources Under Climate Change, Population Growth, and Land Use Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kiparsky, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Monthly required flows (cfs) based on 1922-1992 averageminimum fishery flow schedules (cfs). Note that in practiceminimum flows in WEAP (cfs). After Table 6-8 in (USBR

  1. Risk Analysis for Water Resources Under Climate Change, Population Growth, and Land Use Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kiparsky, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Lach, D. , H. Ingram and S. Rayner (2005). "Maintaining thePielke, R. , G. Prins, S. Rayner and D. Sarewitz (2007). "Nature 445(7128): 597-598. Rayner, S. , D. Lach and H.

  2. Water Quality Protection and Management Prof. Dr.-Ing. habil. Herwig Lehmann

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rotation and Land Preparation easures 1. Farm Ponds 2. Water Harvesting Measures 1. Checkdam/Reservoir 2Water Quality Protection and Management Prof. Dr.-Ing. habil. Herwig Lehmann University of Hannover Use & Land Cover TopographyTopography Semi arid/Sub- humid Climatic Watershed Quantitative Water

  3. NREL Tests Integrated Heat Pump Water Heater Performance in Different Climates (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-01-01

    This technical highlight describes NREL tests to capture information about heat pump performance across a wide range of ambient conditions for five heat pump water heaters (HPWH). These water heaters have the potential to significantly reduce water heater energy use relative to traditional electric resistance water heaters. These tests have provided detailed performance data for these appliances, which have been used to evaluate the cost of saved energy as a function of climate. The performance of HPWHs is dependent on ambient air temperature and humidity and the logic controlling the heat pump and the backup resistance heaters. The laboratory tests were designed to measure each unit's performance across a range of air conditions and determine the specific logic controlling the two heat sources, which has a large effect on the comfort of the users and the energy efficiency of the system. Unlike other types of water heaters, HPWHs are both influenced by and have an effect on their surroundings. Since these effects are complex and different for virtually every house and climate region, creating an accurate HPWH model from the data gathered during the laboratory tests was a main goal of the project. Using the results from NREL's laboratory tests, such as the Coefficient of Performance (COP) curves for different air conditions as shown in Figure 1, an existing HPWH model is being modified to produce more accurate whole-house simulations. This will allow the interactions between the HPWH and the home's heating and cooling system to be evaluated in detail, for any climate region. Once these modeling capabilities are in place, a realistic cost-benefit analysis can be performed for a HPWH installation anywhere in the country. An accurate HPWH model will help to quantify the savings associated with installing a HPWH in the place of a standard electric water heater. In most locations, HPWHs are not yet a cost-effective alternative to natural gas water heaters. The detailed system performance maps that were developed by this testing program will be used to: (1) Target regions of the country that would benefit most from this technology; (2) Identify improvements in current systems to maximize homeowner cost savings; and (3) Explore opportunities for development of advanced hot water heating systems.

  4. Impact of Climate Change on Irrigation Water Availability, Crop Water Requirements and Soil Salinity in the SJV, CA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hopmans, Jan W; Maurer, Edwin P

    2008-01-01

    on Irrigation Water Availability, Crop Water Requirementsreduced surface water availability can be managed byrequirement and water availability (surface water and

  5. Making Science Useful to Decision Makers: Climate Forecasts, Water Management, and Knowledge Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feldman, David L; Ingram, Helen M

    2009-01-01

    Climate Change Science Program and the Subcommittee on Global Change Research, NOAA’s National Climatic Data Center,

  6. MONTANA STATE UNIVERSITY DEPARTMENT OF LAND RESOURCES & ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES Requirements for a Minor in Water Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    for a Minor in Water Resources 2014 2015 Catalog Name/# Course Title Credits Semester Year EXCEPTIONS ENSC 272CS Water Resources 3 F S Choose one) 3 Student: Date: Advisor: Date: Certifying Officer: Date: The Water Resources Minor is designed

  7. MONTANA STATE UNIVERSITY DEPARTMENT OF LAND RESOURCES & ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES Requirements for a Minor in Water Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    for a Minor in Water Resources 2015 2016 Catalog Name/# Course Title Credits Semester Year EXCEPTIONS ENSC 272CS Water Resources 3 F S Choose one) 3 Student: Date: Advisor: Date: Certifying Officer: Date: The Water Resources Minor is designed

  8. Constraining water table depth simulations in a land surface model using estimated baseflow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lo, MH; Yeh, PJF; Famiglietti, JS

    2008-01-01

    northeastern Kansas. Adv Water Resour 2002;25:221–38. [68]ing between runoff and soil water storage and differentcycles of base?ow and water table depth show signif- icant

  9. Integrated Assessment of Global Water Scarcity over the 21st Century under Multiple Climate Change Mitigation Policies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hejazi, Mohamad I.; Edmonds, James A.; Clarke, Leon E.; Kyle, G. Page; Davies, Evan; Chaturvedi, Vaibhav; Wise, Marshall A.; Patel, Pralit L.; Eom, Jiyong; Calvin, Katherine V.

    2014-01-01

    Water scarcity conditions over the 21st century both globally and regionally are assessed in the context of climate change, by estimating both water availability and water demand within the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM), a leading community integrated assessment model of energy, agriculture, climate, and water. To quantify changes in future water availability, a new gridded water-balance global hydrologic model – namely, the Global Water Availability Model (GWAM) – is developed and evaluated. Global water demands for six major demand sectors (irrigation, livestock, domestic, electricity generation, primary energy production, and manufacturing) are modeled in GCAM at the regional scale (14 geopolitical regions, 151 sub-regions) and then spatially downscaled to 0.5 o x 0.5o resolution to match the scale of GWAM. Using a baseline scenario (i.e., no climate change mitigation policy) with radiative forcing reaching 8.8 W/m2 (equivalent to the SRES A1Fi emission scenario) and a global population of 14 billion by 2095, global annual water demand grows from about 9% of total annual renewable freshwater in 2005 to about 32% by 2095. This results in almost half of the world population living under extreme water scarcity by the end of the 21st century. Regionally, the demand for water exceeds the amount of water availability in two GCAM regions, the Middle East and India. Additionally, in years 2050 and 2095, 20% and 27% of the global population, respectively, is projected to live in areas (grid cells) that will experience greater water demands than the amount of available water in a year (i.e., the water scarcity index (WSI) > 1.0). This study implies an increasingly prominent role for water in future human decisions, and highlights the importance of including water in integrated assessment of global change.

  10. From land use to land cover: Restoring the afforestation signal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    integrated assessment - earth system model and the implications for CMIP5 RCP simulations Climate projections depend on scenarios of fossil fuel emissions and land use change, and...

  11. Palynological evidence of climate change and land degradation in the Lake Baringo area, Kenya, East Africa, since AD 1650

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Kam-biu

    Sciences, School of the Coast and Environment, Louisiana State University, 1002Y Energy, Coast which coincide with the Little Ice Age (LIA) period in Europe. The Baringo record shows that land some of the best archives for paleoenvironmental record in the African tropics (c.f. Battarbee, 2000

  12. Climate in China ! Climate is weather over time.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pan, Feifei

    Climate in China #12;! Climate is weather over time. ! Climatology is the study of climate. ! Climatic regions are areas with similar weather statistics. ! Climate influences ecosystems. ! On land, the location of climatic regions determines the location of ecosystems (e.g., forest, grassland, savanna

  13. Irrigation cooling effect: Regional climate forcing by land-use change Lara M. Kueppers,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kueppers, Lara M.

    records has mostly focused on the influence of urban heat islands. Here we use a regional climate model to show that a regional irrigation cooling effect (ICE) exists, opposite in sign to urban heat island on the influence of urban heat islands [Kalnay and Cai, 2003; Parker, 2004; Trenberth, 2004]. However, irrigated

  14. Ice, Snow and Water: impacts of climate change on California and Himalayan Asia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fenner, R. A.

    2009-01-01

    in Asia. Progress Climate science and technology has enabledClimate Change Think Globally, Assess Regionally, Act Locally”, Issues in Science and Technology

  15. Water Rules: In Texas, conservation increasingly the law of the land 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2013-01-01

    actions against violators. Previously, they had to enforce these violations through criminal proceedings. Many cities turn o? water to the irrigation system a?er repeated o?enses. Rainwater harvesting In ????, the Legislature passed several laws... on the amount of water anticipated to be saved, o?en suggesting that customers include other sources of water such as air-conditioner condensate to increase the amount of water saved. Additionally, some cities require permits or registrations before or a?er...

  16. Climate2012 State of the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    Climate2012 State of the #12;2 State of the Climate 2012 Climate2012 State of the The previous State of the Climate, released in March 2010 (www.csiro.au/Outcomes/Climate/Understanding/State-of-the- Climate.aspx) highlighted a multi-decadal warming trend over Australia's land and oceans, an increase

  17. Assessing the impacts of climate change on natural resource systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frederick, K.D.; Rosenberg, N.J. [eds.

    1994-11-30

    This volume is a collection of papers addressing the theme of potential impacts of climatic change. Papers are entitled Integrated Assessments of the Impacts of Climatic Change on Natural Resources: An Introductory Editorial; Framework for Integrated Assessments of Global Warming Impacts; Modeling Land Use and Cover as Part of Global Environmental Change; Assessing Impacts of Climatic Change on Forests: The State of Biological Modeling; Integrating Climatic Change and Forests: Economic and Ecological Assessments; Environmental Change in Grasslands: Assessment using Models; Assessing the Socio-economic Impacts of Climatic Change on Grazinglands; Modeling the Effects of Climatic Change on Water Resources- A Review; Assessing the Socioeconomic Consequences of Climate Change on Water Resources; and Conclusions, Remaining Issues, and Next Steps.

  18. The mutagenic potential of soil and runoff water from land treatment of three hazardous industrial wastes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davol, Phebe

    1987-01-01

    compounds in the environment. Dibble and Bartha (1979) observed an increase in concentration of condensed ring fractions as oily wastes degrade in soil. The accumulation of PNAs in the soil at a land treatment facility is of concern since many... pentachlorophenol and creosote as preservative agents. The effluent from the treatment process was pumped from a concrete storage basin to a large lagoon where the solids were allowed to settle while the liquids evaporated. At the ti me the waste was collected...

  19. A top-down assessment of energy, water and land use in uranium mining, milling, and refining

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    E. Schneider; B. Carlsen; E. Tavrides; C. van der Hoeven; U. Phathanapirom

    2013-11-01

    Land, water and energy use are key measures of the sustainability of uranium production into the future. As the most attractive, accessible deposits are mined out, future discoveries may prove to be significantly, perhaps unsustainably, more intensive consumers of environmental resources. A number of previous attempts have been made to provide empirical relationships connecting these environmental impact metrics to process variables such as stripping ratio and ore grade. These earlier attempts were often constrained by a lack of real world data and perform poorly when compared against data from modern operations. This paper conditions new empirical models of energy, water and land use in uranium mining, milling, and refining on contemporary data reported by operating mines. It shows that, at present, direct energy use from uranium production represents less than 1% of the electrical energy produced by the once-through fuel cycle. Projections of future energy intensity from uranium production are also possible by coupling the empirical models with estimates of uranium crustal abundance, characteristics of new discoveries, and demand. The projections show that even for the most pessimistic of scenarios considered, by 2100, the direct energy use from uranium production represents less than 3% of the electrical energy produced by the contemporary once-through fuel cycle.

  20. Role of the Bering Strait in the thermohaline circulation and abrupt climate change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Aixue

    is more stable than in the last glacial period. During the last glacial period, abrupt climate change not clear whether the differences of those abrupt climate change events between the last glacial period burst in the North Atlantic associated with the discharge of land glacier melt water. The possible

  1. Modeling Impacts of Land-Use/Land-Cover Change and Variable Precipitation on Hydrology and Water Quality of a Coastal Watershed in Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Castillo, Cesar Ricardo

    2013-05-31

    for the M-A region was conducted by classifying two Landsat images for the years 1990 and 2010. A large degree of LULC change occurred within the M-A region during this time; with 27.1% of the land area experiencing LULC change. Furthermore, developed land...

  2. Safety problems of water-development works designed for land reclamation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shchedrin, V. N.; Kosichenko, Yu. M.

    2011-11-15

    A safety declaration is a fundamental document assuring the safety of water-development works, their correspondence to safety criteria, the design, and active technical regulations and rules.

  3. A framework for benchmarking land models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luo, Yiqi; Randerson, J.; Abramowitz, G.; Bacour, C.; Blyth, E.; Carvalhais, N.; Ciais, Philippe; Dalmonech, D.; Fisher, J.B.; Fisher, R.; Friedlingstein, P.; Hibbard, Kathleen A.; Hoffman, F. M.; Huntzinger, Deborah; Jones, C.; Koven, C.; Lawrence, David M.; Li, D.J.; Mahecha, M.; Niu, S.L.; Norby, Richard J.; Piao, S.L.; Qi, X.; Peylin, P.; Prentice, I.C.; Riley, William; Reichstein, M.; Schwalm, C.; Wang, Y.; Xia, J. Y.; Zaehle, S.; Zhou, X. H.

    2012-10-09

    Land models, which have been developed by the modeling community in the past few decades to predict future states of ecosystems and climate, have to be critically evaluated for their performance skills of simulating ecosystem responses and feedback to climate change. Benchmarking is an emerging procedure to measure performance of models against a set of defined standards. This paper proposes a benchmarking framework for evaluation of land model performances and, meanwhile, highlights major challenges at this infant stage of benchmark analysis. The framework includes (1) targeted aspects of model performance to be evaluated, (2) a set of benchmarks as defined references to test model performance, (3) metrics to measure and compare performance skills among models so as to identify model strengths and deficiencies, and (4) model improvement. Land models are required to simulate exchange of water, energy, carbon and sometimes other trace gases between the atmosphere and land surface, and should be evaluated for their simulations of biophysical processes, biogeochemical cycles, and vegetation dynamics in response to climate change across broad temporal and spatial scales. Thus, one major challenge is to select and define a limited number of benchmarks to effectively evaluate land model performance. The second challenge is to develop metrics of measuring mismatches between models and benchmarks. The metrics may include (1) a priori thresholds of acceptable model performance and (2) a scoring system to combine data–model mismatches for various processes at different temporal and spatial scales. The benchmark analyses should identify clues of weak model performance to guide future development, thus enabling improved predictions of future states of ecosystems and climate. The near-future research effort should be on development of a set of widely acceptable benchmarks that can be used to objectively, effectively, and reliably evaluate fundamental properties of land models to improve their prediction performance skills.

  4. Economic Essays on Water Resources Management of the Texas Lower Rio Grande Valley 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leidner, Andrew

    2012-07-16

    and reduced revenue to agriculture from land and water-right sales. On balance, climate change scenarios with population increases to 2060 are associated with fewer acres farmed, cropping pattern shifts to higher-value crops, and increasing irrigation...

  5. Technical Report: Impacts of Land Management and Climate on Agroecosystem Greenhouse Gas Exchange in the Upper Midwest United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Timothy J. Griffis; John M. Baker

    2007-07-01

    Our research is designed to improve the scientific understanding of how carbon is cycled between the land and atmosphere within a heavily managed landscape that is characteristic of the Upper Midwest. The Objectives are: 1) Quantify the seasonal and interannual variation of net ecosystem CO2 exchange of agricultural ecosystems in the Upper Midwest grown under different management strategies; 2) Partition net ecosystem CO2 exchange into photosynthesis and ecosystem respiration by combining micrometeorological and stable isotope techniques; 3) Examine the seasonal variation in canopy-scale photosynthetic discrimination and the isotope ratios of ecosystem respiration and photosynthesis.

  6. Anthropogenic NOx emissions alter the intrinsic water-use efficiency (WUEi) for Quercus cerris stands under Mediterranean climate conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mencuccini, Maurizio

    Anthropogenic NOx emissions alter the intrinsic water-use efficiency (WUEi) for Quercus cerris Road, Edinburgh EH9 3JN, United Kingdom NOx emissions enhance WUEi for a Mediterranean tree species rings for assessing changes in WUEi; while the influence of climate and NOx emission was explored

  7. Water Poverty in Sub-Saharan African nation: GIS based index for assessing vulnerability in relation to climate change data 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trakosa, Anastasia

    2008-08-13

    Access to safe water is currently a privilege for the citizens of many developing countries in Asia and Africa. In the last few decades changes in climate have increased concentrations of greenhouse gasses. The results of global warming have had a...

  8. Assessing the Effectiveness of Water Quality Best Management Practices for Grazing-Lands 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clary, Calvin Russell

    2013-12-10

    grazing evaluated how stocking rate affected bacterial loading. E. coli concentrations in runoff samples were compared between plots with various stocking rates. GPS collars were used to determine how a shade pavilion, water source, or rip-rap effected...

  9. TECHNICAL REPORTS Global land use patterns and increasing pressures on water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Virginia Tech

    in CUSoil (Amereq Corp., New York) separated from compacted clay loam subsoil (1.6 g cm-3 ) by a geotextile allowing water to pool above the subsoil. Roots penetrated the geotextile and subsoil and increased average

  10. Estimation of land surface water and energy balance flux components and closure relation using conditional sampling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farhadi, Leila

    2012-01-01

    Models of terrestrial water and energy balance include numerical treatment of heat and moisture diffusion in the soil-vegetation-atmosphere continuum. These two diffusion and exchange processes are linked only at a few ...

  11. Integrated Drought Modeling For Texas Under Climate Change Impact With Implications For Water Resources Planning 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rajsekhar, Deepthi

    2014-12-02

    Drought is a deficiency in the hydro climatic variable of interest that is experienced for an extended period of time. In many parts of the world, it is a normal, recurring feature of climate and is therefore inevitable. Adequate monitoring...

  12. Water-use efficiency for alternative cooling technologies in arid climates Energy and Buildings, Volume 43, Issues 23, FebruaryMarch 2011, Pages 631-638

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    Water-use efficiency for alternative cooling technologies in arid climates Energy and Buildings, Volume 43, Issues 2­3, February­March 2011, Pages 631-638 Theresa Pistochini, Mark Modera 1 Water-site water use and the impact of poor water quality on their performance. While compressor-based systems do

  13. Adapting urban water systems to a changing climate: Lessons from the millennium drought in southeast Australia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01

    in Melbourne, Australia. J. Water Sustainability 2011, 1, 31out of “Wastewater” for human water security and ecosystem2012, 337, (10) Using and saving water: Water restrictions;

  14. The Impact of Climate Change on Air QualityRelated Meteorological Conditions in California. Part I: Present Time Simulation Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Shu-Hua

    The Impact of Climate Change on Air Quality­Related Meteorological Conditions in California. Part I on meteorology and air quality conditions in Cal- ifornia by dynamically downscaling Parallel Climate Model (PCM: Present Time Simulation Analysis ZHAN ZHAO Department of Land, Air, and Water Resources, University

  15. Aquatic and Marine Biology If you'd rather be on water than on land, this major is for you. Aquatic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miles, Will

    Aquatic and Marine Biology If you'd rather be on water than on land, this major is for you. Aquatic and marine biology is the study of living organisms in freshwater and ocean environments. Stetson University and marine ecosystems. A Distinctive Program 1. All students complete a capstone senior research project

  16. Evaluation of Methods to Assess and Reduce Bacterial Contamination of Surface Water from Grazing Lands 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wagner, Kevin

    2012-10-19

    or unstable streambanks, increasing water supply reliability during droughts, and increasing weight gains in beef cattle by 0.1 to 0.2 kg/day (0.2 to 0.4 lb/day) (Willms et al. 1994; Buchanan 1996; Porath 2002; Willms et al. 2002; Veira 2003; Dickard 1998... and Grazing Management ......... 78 4.4.2 Comparison of BoBac to SR and Grazing Management .......... 80 4.4.3 Comparison of AllBac and BoBac Gene Copy Concentrations to E. coli Levels...

  17. Impact of Climate Change on Irrigation Water Availability, Crop Water Requirements and Soil Salinity in the SJV, CA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hopmans, Jan W; Maurer, Edwin P

    2008-01-01

    to the Environmental and Water Resources Institute of thesimulation of ground-water flow in the central part of theU.S. Geological Survey water-supply paper ; 2396.

  18. Impacts of Climate Change on Biofuels Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melillo, Jerry M.

    2014-04-30

    The overall goal of this research project was to improve and use our biogeochemistry model, TEM, to simulate the effects of climate change and other environmental changes on the production of biofuel feedstocks. We used the improved version of TEM that is coupled with the economic model, EPPA, a part of MIT’s Earth System Model, to explore how alternative uses of land, including land for biofuels production, can help society meet proposed climate targets. During the course of this project, we have made refinements to TEM that include development of a more mechanistic plant module, with improved ecohydrology and consideration of plant-water relations, and a more detailed treatment of soil nitrogen dynamics, especially processes that add or remove nitrogen from ecosystems. We have documented our changes to TEM and used the model to explore the effects on production in land ecosystems, including changes in biofuels production.

  19. Mississippi Climate & Hydrology Conference

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lawford, R.; Huang, J.

    2002-05-01

    The GEWEX Continental International Project (GCIP), which started in 1995 and completed in 2001, held its grand finale conference in New Orleans, LA in May 2002. Participants at this conference along with the scientists funded through the GCIP program are invited to contribute a paper to a special issue of Journal of Geophysical Research (JGR). This special JGR issue (called GCIP3) will serve as the final report on scientific research conducted by GCIP investigators. Papers are solicited on the following topical areas, but are not limited to, (1) water energy budget studies; (2) warm season precipitation; (3) predictability and prediction system; (4) coupled land-atmosphere models; (5) climate and water resources applications. The research areas cover observations, modeling, process studies and water resources applications.

  20. Climate, energy, and the A New Theory of Everything

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sprott, Julien Clinton

    Climate, energy, and the economy: A New Theory of Everything by Jim Pawley, jbpawley% of the Earth's land surface. Water use has tripled and in US exceeds rainfall. Fossil fuel has gone up by 400%. Humans and their animals now represent about 98% of terrestrial, vertebrate biomass. The planet stayed

  1. Plant Water Use in Owens Valley, CA: Understanding the Influence of Climate and Depth to Groundwater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pataki, Diane E

    2008-01-01

    plant responses to water stress, plant chemical composition,Phreatophytes (Geological Survey Water-Supply Paper 1423).T. E. Dawson. 2006. Depth of water acquisition by invading

  2. Reservoir Management in Mediterranean Climates through the European Water Framework Directive

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Reilly, Clare; Silberblatt, Rafael

    2009-01-01

    a reservoir sediment release. Water Resources Research 36:of good ecological potential in water bodies designatedas heavily modified water bodies because of impounding

  3. 12/31/13 12:35 PMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 1 of 13http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

    and Water Assessment Page 3 of 13http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php The top left percentile rankings. The top right image shows sub-basin averaged snow water equivalent accumulations as a percent of average. The images below show accumulated snow water equivalent in inches (green) compared

  4. 2/25/14 12:10 PMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 1 of 13http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

    ://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php SNOTEL AND SNOWPACK The top left image shows the Natural Resources Conservation Service's SNOTEL water-year- to-date precipitation percentile rankings. The top right image shows sub-basin averaged snow water equivalent accumulations as a percent of average. The images below show accumulated snow water equivalent

  5. 11/5/13 2:36 PMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 1 of 13http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

    ://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php The top left image shows the Natural Resources Conservation Service's SNOTEL water-year- to-date precipitation percentile rankings. The top right image shows sub-basin averaged snow water equivalent accumulations as a percent of average. The images below show accumulated snow water equivalent in inches (green

  6. 5/7/13 1:03 PMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 1 of 12http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

    ://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php The top left image shows the Natural Resources Conservation Service's SNOTEL water-year- to-date precipitation percentile rankings. The top right image shows sub-basin averaged snow water equivalent accumulations as a percent of average. The images below show accumulated snow water equivalent in inches (green

  7. 12/17/13 11:06 AMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 1 of 13http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

    ://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php The top left image shows the Natural Resources Conservation Service's SNOTEL water-year- to-date precipitation percentile rankings. The top right image shows sub-basin averaged snow water equivalent accumulations as a percent of average. The images below show accumulated snow water equivalent in inches (green

  8. 5/13/14, 3:31 PMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 1 of 13http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

    ://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php The top left image shows the Natural Resources Conservation Service's SNOTEL water-year- to-date precipitation percentile rankings. The top right image shows sub-basin averaged snow water equivalent accumulations as a percent of average. The images below show accumulated snow water equivalent in inches (green

  9. 1/21/14 3:05 PMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 1 of 13http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

    ://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php SNOTEL AND SNOWPACK The top left image shows the Natural Resources Conservation Service's SNOTEL water-year- to-date precipitation percentile rankings. The top right image shows sub-basin averaged snow water equivalent accumulations as a percent of average. The images below show accumulated snow water equivalent

  10. 5/6/14 4:55 PMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 1 of 12http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

    ://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php The top left image shows the Natural Resources Conservation Service's SNOTEL water-year- to-date precipitation percentile rankings. The top right image shows sub-basin averaged snow water equivalent accumulations as a percent of average. The images below show accumulated snow water equivalent in inches (green

  11. 2/11/14 3:28 PMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 1 of 12http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

    ://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php SNOTEL AND SNOWPACK The top left image shows the Natural Resources Conservation Service's SNOTEL water-year- to-date precipitation percentile rankings. The top right image shows sub-basin averaged snow water equivalent accumulations as a percent of average. The images below show accumulated snow water equivalent

  12. 6/18/13 2:18 PMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 1 of 13http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

    ://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php The top left image shows the Natural Resources Conservation Service's SNOTEL water-year- to-date precipitation percentile rankings. The top right image shows sub-basin averaged snow water equivalent accumulations as a percent of average. The images below show accumulated snow water equivalent in inches (green

  13. 5/28/13 1:18 PMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 1 of 11http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

    ://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php The top left image shows the Natural Resources Conservation Service's SNOTEL water-year- to-date precipitation percentile rankings. The top right image shows sub-basin averaged snow water equivalent accumulations as a percent of average. The images below show accumulated snow water equivalent in inches (green

  14. 1/14/14 12:01 PMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 1 of 13http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

    ://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php The top left image shows the Natural Resources Conservation Service's SNOTEL water-year- to-date precipitation percentile rankings. The top right image shows sub-basin averaged snow water equivalent accumulations as a percent of average. The images below show accumulated snow water equivalent in inches (green

  15. 12/10/13 12:46 PMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 1 of 13http://climate.colostate.edu/%7Edrought/current_assessment.php

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

    's SNOTEL water-year- to-date precipitation percentile rankings. The top right image shows sub-basin averaged snow water equivalent accumulations as a percent of average. The images below show accumulated12/10/13 12:46 PMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 1 of 13http://climate.colostate.edu/%7

  16. 1/28/14 1:51 PMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 1 of 13http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

    ://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php The top left image shows the Natural Resources Conservation Service's SNOTEL water-year- to-date precipitation percentile rankings. The top right image shows sub-basin averaged snow water equivalent accumulations as a percent of average. The images below show accumulated snow water equivalent in inches (green

  17. 6/4/13 12:46 PMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 1 of 12http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

    ://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php The top left image shows the Natural Resources Conservation Service's SNOTEL water-year- to-date precipitation percentile rankings. The top right image shows sub-basin averaged snow water equivalent accumulations as a percent of average. The images below show accumulated snow water equivalent in inches (green

  18. 1/7/14 11:54 AMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 1 of 13http://climate.colostate.edu/%7Edrought/current_assessment.php

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

    Resources Conservation Service's SNOTEL water-year- to-date precipitation percentile rankings. The top right below show accumulated snow water equivalent in inches (green) compared to average (blue) and last year1/7/14 11:54 AMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 1 of 13http://climate.colostate.edu/%7

  19. 2/4/14 11:25 AMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 1 of 13http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

    ://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php The top left image shows the Natural Resources Conservation Service's SNOTEL water-year- to-date precipitation percentile rankings. The top right image shows sub-basin averaged snow water equivalent accumulations as a percent of average. The images below show accumulated snow water equivalent in inches (green

  20. 5/27/14, 12:30 PMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 1 of 14http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

    ://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php SNOTEL AND SNOWPACK The top left image shows the Natural Resources Conservation Service's SNOTEL water-year- to-date precipitation percentile rankings. The top right image shows sub-basin averaged snow water equivalent accumulations as a percent of average. The images below show accumulated snow water equivalent

  1. 2/18/14 1:41 PMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 1 of 13http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

    ://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php SNOTEL AND SNOWPACK The top left image shows the Natural Resources Conservation Service's SNOTEL water-year- to-date precipitation percentile rankings. The top right image shows sub-basin averaged snow water equivalent accumulations as a percent of average. The images below show accumulated snow water equivalent

  2. 11/26/13 12:27 PMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 1 of 13http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

    ://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php The top left image shows the Natural Resources Conservation Service's SNOTEL water-year- to-date precipitation percentile rankings. The top right image shows sub-basin averaged snow water equivalent accumulations as a percent of average. The images below show accumulated snow water equivalent in inches (green

  3. Climate-Energy Nexus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary Sayler; Randall Gentry; Jie Zhuang

    2010-07-01

    The 140-page published proceedings of the workshop include individual articles and PowerPoint slides for all workshop presentations. The proceedings also contain pertinent background information on the China-US Joint Research Center, partnering organizations, and workshop goals and objectives. Overall, the workshop increased the understanding of the impacts of climate change on energy use and renewable energy production as well as the complex relationships among land use, energy production, and ecological restoration. The workshop served as an international platform for scientists and students of different research backgrounds to develop a unified perspective on energy and climate relationships. Such understanding will benefit future cooperation between China and the US in mitigating global climate change. The workshop’s agenda, which is highly interdisciplinary, explored many potential opportunities for international collaboration in ecosystem management, climate modeling, greenhouse gas emissions, and bioenergy sustainability. International research groups have been suggested in the areas of genomes and biotechnology of energy plants, sustainable management of soil and water resources, carbon sequestration, and microbial processes for ecological cycles. The project has attracted considerable attention from institutes beyond the China-US Joint Research Center partners, and several of them (such as Institute of Qing-Tibet Plateau Research, Institute of Soil and Water Conservation, Institute of Applied Ecology, CAS) have expressed interest in joining the partnership. In addition, the workshop played a significant role in facilitating establishment of private-public partnerships between government and private bioenergy companies (such as L.R. Shugarts and Associates, Inc.), including seed providers (Blade Energy Crops, Thousand Oaks, CA), pilot demonstration projects at coal-producing cities (e.g., Huaibei, Anhui province, China), and the development of methodology for assessment of the sustainable production of biofuels (such as life-cycle analysis, sustainability metrics, and land-use policy). Establishment of two US-China scientific research networks in the area of bioenergy and environmental science is a significant result of the workshop.

  4. GPS precipitable water measurements used in the analysis of California and Nevada climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Means, James Douglas

    2011-01-01

    Remote-Sensing Of Atmospheric Water-Vapor Using The GlobalWet Delays Onto Precipitable Water, Journal of AppliedRivers, Floods and the Water Resources of California, Water,

  5. Ground and Water Source Heat Pump Performance and Design for Southern Climates 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kavanaugh, S.

    1988-01-01

    Ground and water source heat pump systems have very attractive performance characteristics when properly designed and installed. These systems typically consist of a water-to-air or water-to-water heat pump linked to a closed loop vertical...

  6. A Framework for Analysis of the Uncertainty of Socioeconomic Growth and Climate Change on the Risk of Water Stress: a Case Study in Asia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fant, C.

    The sustainability of future water resources is of paramount importance and is affected by many factors, including population, wealth and climate. Inherent in how these factors change in the future is the uncertainty of ...

  7. Climate Update Nolan Doesken

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Climate Update Nolan Doesken Colorado Climate Center Presented to Water Availability Task Force precip #12;Mtd ppt #12;Mtd ppt PRISM Climate Group, Oregon State University #12;Climate divisions defined by Dr. Klaus Wolter of NOAA's Climate Diagnostic Center in Boulder, CO #12;#12;Division 1 ­ Grand Lake 1

  8. Land and Water Use, CO2 Emissions, and Worker Radiological Exposure Factors for the Nuclear Fuel Cycle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brett W Carlsen; Brent W Dixon; Urairisa Pathanapirom; Eric Schneider; Bethany L. Smith; Timothy M. AUlt; Allen G. Croff; Steven L. Krahn

    2013-08-01

    The Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy’s Fuel Cycle Technologies program is preparing to evaluate several proposed nuclear fuel cycle options to help guide and prioritize Fuel Cycle Technology research and development. Metrics are being developed to assess performance against nine evaluation criteria that will be used to assess relevant impacts resulting from all phases of the fuel cycle. This report focuses on four specific environmental metrics. • land use • water use • CO2 emissions • radiological Dose to workers Impacts associated with the processes in the front-end of the nuclear fuel cycle, mining through enrichment and deconversion of DUF6 are summarized from FCRD-FCO-2012-000124, Revision 1. Impact estimates are developed within this report for the remaining phases of the nuclear fuel cycle. These phases include fuel fabrication, reactor construction and operations, fuel reprocessing, and storage, transport, and disposal of associated used fuel and radioactive wastes. Impact estimates for each of the phases of the nuclear fuel cycle are given as impact factors normalized per unit process throughput or output. These impact factors can then be re-scaled against the appropriate mass flows to provide estimates for a wide range of potential fuel cycles. A companion report, FCRD-FCO-2013-000213, applies the impact factors to estimate and provide a comparative evaluation of 40 fuel cycles under consideration relative to these four environmental metrics.

  9. Climate mitigation’s impact on global and regional electric power sector water use in the 21st Century

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dooley, James J.; Kyle, G. Page; Davies, Evan

    2013-08-05

    Over the course of this coming century, global electricity use is expected to grow at least five fold and if stringent greenhouse gas emissions controls are in place the growth could be more than seven fold from current levels. Given that the electric power sector represents the second largest anthropogenic use of water and given growing concerns about the nature and extent of future water scarcity driven by population growth and a changing climate, significant concern has been expressed about the electricity sector’s use of water going forward. In this paper, the authors demonstrate that an often overlooked but absolutely critical issue that needs to be taken into account in discussions about the sustainability of the electric sector’s water use going forward is the tremendous turn over in electricity capital stock that will occur over the course of this century; i.e., in the scenarios examined here more than 80% of global electricity production in the year 2050 is from facilities that have not yet been built. The authors show that because of the large scale changes in the global electricity system, the water withdrawal intensity of electricity production is likely to drop precipitously with the result being relatively constant water withdrawals over the course of the century even in the face of the large growth in electricity usage. The ability to cost effectively reduce the water intensity of power plants with carbon dioxide capture and storage systems in particular is key to constraining overall global water use.

  10. Managing Nutrition and Health in a Changing Climate: A Yellowknives Dene First Nation Perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duran, Nelida

    2015-01-01

    difficulty on land, water, and air alike. The difficultyof physical elements such as air, water, land, etc. , butbiophysical environment (air, water, land, etc. ). Per the

  11. Forecasting the response of Earth's surface to future climatic and land use changes: A review of methods and research needs: FORECASTING EARTH'S SURFACE RESPONSE

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Pelletier, Jon D.; Brad Murray, A.; Pierce, Jennifer L.; Bierman, Paul R.; Breshears, David D.; Crosby, Benjamin T.; Ellis, Michael; Foufoula-Georgiou, Efi; Heimsath, Arjun M.; Houser, Chris; et al

    2015-07-14

    In the future, Earth will be warmer, precipitation events will be more extreme, global mean sea level will rise, and many arid and semiarid regions will be drier. Human modifications of landscapes will also occur at an accelerated rate as developed areas increase in size and population density. We now have gridded global forecasts, being continually improved, of the climatic and land use changes (C&LUC) that are likely to occur in the coming decades. However, besides a few exceptions, consensus forecasts do not exist for how these C&LUC will likely impact Earth-surface processes and hazards. In some cases, we havemore »the tools to forecast the geomorphic responses to likely future C&LUC. Fully exploiting these models and utilizing these tools will require close collaboration among Earth-surface scientists and Earth-system modelers. This paper assesses the state-of-the-art tools and data that are being used or could be used to forecast changes in the state of Earth's surface as a result of likely future C&LUC. We also propose strategies for filling key knowledge gaps, emphasizing where additional basic research and/or collaboration across disciplines are necessary. The main body of the paper addresses cross-cutting issues, including the importance of nonlinear/threshold-dominated interactions among topography, vegetation, and sediment transport, as well as the importance of alternate stable states and extreme, rare events for understanding and forecasting Earth-surface response to C&LUC. Five supplements delve into different scales or process zones (global-scale assessments and fluvial, aeolian, glacial/periglacial, and coastal process zones) in detail.« less

  12. A framework for benchmarking land models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01

    processes (exchanges of water and energy) and biogeochemicalsimulation of the water and energy balance (Pitman, 2003).models. Exchange of water and energy between land sur- face

  13. Sandia Energy - Sandia Co-Hosts "Climate Risk Forum: Bridging...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Co-Hosts "Climate Risk Forum: Bridging Climate Science and Actuarial Practice" Home Climate Water Security Facilities News Global Climate & Energy NISAC News & Events Analysis...

  14. Climate Change Action Pack Climate & Habitats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gunawardena, Arunika

    Climate Change Action Pack Climate & Habitats B A C K G R O U DN C H E C K ! Habitat, Food, Water. Disease,predation,pollution, accidents and climatic conditions are among other limiting factors which can affect an animal's ability to meet its needs. This section will look further into the impact of Climate

  15. Crop water stress under climate change uncertainty : global policy and regional risk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gueneau, Arthur

    2012-01-01

    Fourty percent of all crops grown in the world today are grown using irrigation, and shifting precipitation patterns due to climate change are viewed as a major threat to food security. This thesis examines, in the framework ...

  16. Farming: A Climate Change Culprit

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Farming: A Climate Change Culprit Farming: A Climate Change Culprit Simulations run at NERSC show impact of land-use change on African monsoon precipitation June 7, 2014 | Tags:...

  17. Plant Water Use in Owens Valley, CA: Understanding the Influence of Climate and Depth to Groundwater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pataki, Diane E

    2008-01-01

    J.R. Ehleringer. 2006. Water extraction times for plant andstems were sampled for water extraction and stable isotopeCA). Following the water extraction, roots were removed from

  18. Terrestrial water mass load changes from Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seo, K.-W.; Wilson, C. R; Famiglietti, J. S; Chen, J. L; Rodell, M.

    2006-01-01

    3d is the dynamic filter water storage map using GRACE SHfrom the four basin filters in mm water thickness. Noisefrom the four basin filters in mm water thickness. Error

  19. Cheap Artificial AB-Mountains, Extraction of Water and Energy from Atmosphere and Change of Regional Climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Bolonkin

    2008-05-11

    Author suggests and researches a new revolutionary method for changing the climates of entire countries or portions thereof, obtaining huge amounts of cheap water and energy from the atmosphere. In this paper is presented the idea of cheap artificial inflatable mountains, which may cardinally change the climate of a large region or country. Additional benefits: The potential of tapping large amounts of fresh water and energy. The mountains are inflatable semi-cylindrical constructions from thin film (gas bags) having heights of up to 3 - 5 km. They are located perpendicular to the main wind direction. Encountering these artificial mountains, humid air (wind) rises to crest altitude, is cooled and produces rain (or rain clouds). Many natural mountains are sources of rivers, and other forms of water and power production - and artificial mountains may provide these services for entire nations in the future. The film of these gasbags is supported at altitude by small additional atmospheric overpressure and may be connected to the ground by thin cables. The author has shown (in previous works about the AB-Dome) that this closed AB-Dome allows full control of the weather inside the Dome (the day is always fine, the rain is only at night, no strong winds) and influence to given region. This is a realistic and cheap method of economical irrigation, getting energy and virtual weather control on Earth at the current time.

  20. Reservoir Management in Mediterranean Climates through the European Water Framework Directive

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Reilly, Clare; Silberblatt, Rafael

    2009-01-01

    floods downstream of impoundments by storing water upstream,upstream spawning habitat (Morris & Fan, 1998). Downstream

  1. Improving parameter estimation and water table depth simulation in a land surface model using GRACE water storage and estimated base flow data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lo, Min-Hui; Famiglietti, James S; Yeh, P. J.-F.; Syed, T. H

    2010-01-01

    variations of river water storage from a multiple satellite2007), Estimating ground water storage changes in theAnalysis of terrestrial water storage changes from GRACE and

  2. Estimated impacts of soil degradation on the African water balance and climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feddema, Johannes J.

    1998-01-01

    This study uses a well-established water balance methodology, the Thornthwaite-Mather approach, to evaluate the effects of soil water holding capacity assumptions on estimates of African evapotranspiration rates, moisture deficit, and moisture...

  3. Applications of Commercial Heat Pump Water Heaters in Hot, Humid Climates 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, K. F.; Shedd, A. C.

    1992-01-01

    Heat pump water heaters can provide high-efficiency water heating and supplemental space cooling and dehumidification in commercial buildings throughout the United States. They are particularly attractive in hot, humid areas where cooling loads...

  4. Plant Responses of Drip Irrigated Trees to Climate and Water Stress 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Punthakey, J. F.; McFarland, M. J.; Rodrigue, P. B.; Worthington, J. W.

    1982-01-01

    Past irrigation research has shown that peach (prunus persica) trees vary in their field response to water stress, and the degree of stress is a function of the plants' environment. Water deficits reduce plant growth and ...

  5. Climate change and human health: Spatial modeling of water availability, malnutrition, and livelihoods in Mali, Africa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lopez-Carr, David

    , and livelihoods in Mali, Africa Marta M. Jankowskaa,*,1 , David Lopez-Carrb,1 , Chris Funkc , Gregory J. Husakd Malnutrition Mali-Africa Livelihoods a b s t r a c t This study develops a novel approach for projecting climate trends in the Sahel in relation to shifting livelihood zones and health outcomes. Focusing on Mali

  6. Role of Climate Variability in Modulating the Surface Water and Groundwater Interaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arumugam, Sankar

    levels with El Niño/ Southern Oscillation (ENSO) index, NINO3.4, shows that interannual variability between JAS groundwater levels and JAS NINO3.4 is not statistically significant. Precipitation forecasts exists on the association between low-frequency climatic variability [e.g., El Niño/Southern Oscillation

  7. Now, Ze assumes |K|2 for water. But what about when we are looking at ice (Smith, 1984, J. Climate and Applied Met., 23, 1258-1260)?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rutledge, Steven

    for the particle to appear as a large water drop. #12;Rain-Snow lines- with an advertisement for dual-Pol! ZDRZeNow, Ze assumes |K|2 for water. But what about when we are looking at ice (Smith, 1984, J. Climate and Applied Met., 23, 1258-1260)? For water drops in the Rayleigh regime Z = Ze. Ze applies for Mie regime

  8. Assessment of Stormflow and Water Quality from Undisturbed and Site Prepared Forest Land in East Texas (Interim Report) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeHaven, M. G.; Blackburn, W. H.; Knight, R. W.; Weichert, A. T.

    1982-01-01

    The commercial forestlands of East Texas and Louisiana are the most water-efficient producing areas of the two states. Current and projected water shortages for Texas makes this water-rich area extremely important to future ...

  9. Land Use and Wildfire: A Review of Local Interactions and Teleconnections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelly, Maggi

    2015-01-01

    R.A. , Sr. Land use and climate change. Science 2005, 310,change contributes to climate change, which in turns impacts

  10. Evaluating climatic and soil water controls on evapotranspiration at two Amazonian rainforest sites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in revised form 28 November 2007 Accepted 3 December 2007 Keywords: Amazon Soil moisture Hydraulic­atmosphere interaction is the Amazon basin, which plays a key role in the global cycles of carbon, water and energy hydraulic data including water release and unsaturated hydraulic conductivity curves were collected

  11. Ecological controls on water-cycle response to climate variability in deserts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scanlon, Bridget R.

    sites for waste disposal (4). For example, the proposed U.S. repository to isolate highly radioactive are critical for water resources and waste disposal in deserts. Desert environments are particularly vulnerable in response to elevated winter precipitation reduced soil water storage to half of that in a nonvegetated

  12. Implications of High Renewable Electricity Penetration in the U.S. for Water Use, Greenhouse Gas Emissions, Land-Use, and Materials Supply

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Recent work found that renewable energy could supply 80% of electricity demand in the contiguous United States in 2050 at the hourly level. This paper explores some of the implications of achieving such high levels of renewable electricity for supply chains and the environment in scenarios with renewable supply up to such levels. Transitioning to high renewable electricity supply would lead to significant reductions in greenhouse gas emissions and water use, with only modest land-use implications. While renewable energy expansion implies moderate growth of the renewable electricity supply chains, no insurmountable long-term constraints to renewable electricity technology manufacturing capacity or materials supply are identified.

  13. The role of water vapor feedback in unperturbed climate variability and global warming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, A.; Manabe, Syukuro

    1999-08-01

    To understand the role of water vapor feedback in unperturbed surface temperature variability, a version of the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory coupled ocean-atmosphere model is integrated for 1,000 yr in two configurations, one with water vapor feedback and one without. To understand the role of water vapor feedback in global warming, two 500-yr integrations were also performed in which CO{sub 2} was doubled in both model configurations. The final surface global warming in the model with water vapor feedback is 3.38 C, while in the one without it is only 1.05 C. However, the model`s water vapor feedback has a larger impact on surface warming in response to a doubling of CO{sub 2} than it does on internally generated, low-frequency, global-mean surface temperature anomalies. Water vapor feedback`s strength therefore depends on the type of temperature anomaly it affects. Finally, the authors compare the local and global-mean surface temperature time series from both unperturbed variability experiments to the observed record. The experiment without water vapor feedback does not have enough global-scale variability to reproduce the magnitude of the variability in the observed global-mean record, whether or not one removes the warming trend observed over the past century. In contrast, the amount of variability in the experiment with water vapor feedback is comparable to that of the global-mean record, provided the observed warming trend is removed. Thus, the authors are unable to simulate the observed levels of variability without water vapor feedback.

  14. Sandia Energy - The Energy-Water Nexus, 2012 Edition

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy-Water Nexus, 2012 Edition Home Climate Energy Nuclear Energy Water Security News Global Climate & Energy News & Events Global Climate & Energy The Energy-Water Nexus, 2012...

  15. A modelling approach to carbon, water and energy feedbacks and interactions across the land-atmosphere interface. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Timothy C

    2007-01-01

    The climate is changing and the rate of this change is expected to increase. In the 20th century global surface temperatures rose by 0.6 (±0.2) K. Based on current model predictions, and economic forecasts, global temperature ...

  16. Water and heat transport in boreal soils: Implications for soil response to climate change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01

    upward gradients of water potential energy (mainly due towater movement could be an important factor in seasonal soil energywater movement through boreal soil is a critical factor for accurate simulations of energy (

  17. Weather Forecasts are for Wimps: Why Water Resource Managers Do Not Use Climate Forecasts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rayner, Steve; Lach, Denise; Ingram, Helen

    2005-01-01

    and Winter, S. G. : 1960, Weather Information and EconomicThe ENSO Signal 7, 4–6. WEATHER FORECASTS ARE FOR WIMPSWEATHER FORECASTS ARE FOR WIMPS ? : WHY WATER RESOURCE

  18. Water Body Temperature Model for Assessing Climate Change Impacts on Thermal Cooling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strzepek, K.

    We develop and test a physically based semi-Lagrangian water body temperature model to apply climatological data and thermal pollution from river-based power plants to historical river flow data in order to better understand ...

  19. Modelled effects of precipitation on ecosystem carbon and water dynamics in different climatic zones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dukes, Jeffrey

    for Sustainable Energy, Biosystems Department, Building BIO-309, Frederiksborgvej 399, 4000 Roskilde, Denmark, kCent, ORCHIDEE, TECO), we explored effects of potential P changes on water limitation and net primary production

  20. A cell is not a pan of water: Problems with using [delta]D composition in wood cellulose to interpret climate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terwilliger, V.J.; Deniro, M.J. (Univ. of Kansas, Lawrence (United States) Univ. of California, Santa Barbara (United States))

    1993-06-01

    If the isotopic composition of hydrogen in tree ring cellulose is related to that of water at the site of cellulose synthesis, then it records climatic information. Relationships between [delta]D tree ring cellulose and climate have been found, yet the mechanisms of hydrogen fractionation in the synthesis of wood cellulose were not examined. We grew avocadoes in water of controlled isotopic composition at different humidities until their stems became woody. Ambient humidity was consistently related to the isotopic composition of leaf water and leaf cellulose but not to wood cellulose. Both leaf and wood cellulose [delta]D values were higher than those of environmental water indicating that some of the hydrogen had been reallocated from stored post photosynthetic compounds. Effects of stored compounds on the isotopic composition of wood cellulose could significantly confound paleoclimatic reconstructions from this method.

  1. Improving parameter estimation and water table depth simulation in a land surface model using GRACE water storage and estimated base flow data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lo, Min-Hui; Famiglietti, James S; Yeh, P. J.-F.; Syed, T. H

    2010-01-01

    model using GRACE water storage and estimated base flow data,model using GRACE water storage and estimated base flow datawith esti- mated base flow data in the model calibration.

  2. Identification and preliminary characterization of global water resource issues which may be affected by CO/sub 2/-induced climate change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Callaway, J.M.; Cohen, M.L.; Currie, J.W.

    1984-04-01

    The objectives were to: (1) identify, characterize, and define existing or projected regional and global water resource management issues which may be affected by CO/sub 2/-induced climate changes; and (2) develop research priorities for acquiring additional information about the potential effects of a CO/sub 2/-induced climate change on the availability and allocation of freshwater supplies. The research was broken into four work elements: (1) identification of water resource management issues on a global and regional basis; (2) identification of a subset of generic CO/sub 2/-related water resource management issues believed to have the highest probability of being affected, beneficially or adversely, by a CO/sub 2/-induced climate change; (3) selection of specific sites for examining the potential effect of a CO/sub 2/-induced climate change on these issues; and (4) conducting detailed case studies at these sites, the results from which will be used to identify future research and data needs in the area of water resources. This report summarizes the research related to the first three work elements. 6 figures, 9 tables.

  3. Reducing Extreme Weather Impacts: Building a Weather-Ready Nation For more than 140 years, the National Weather Service (NWS) has provided weather, water, and climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reducing Extreme Weather Impacts: Building a Weather-Ready Nation For more than 140 years, the National Weather Service (NWS) has provided weather, water, and climate information to protect lives also been a year of extreme weather events. The impact of these events, both on lives and the economy

  4. Colorado Climate Winter 1999/2000 Vol. 1, No. 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado Climate Winter 1999/2000 Vol. 1, No. 1 Inside: What Is Climate? 1999 Water Year Review Climate on the Web Drought in Colorado #12;Colorado Climate Center Atmospheric Science Department Colorado ..................................................................................................................................................... 1 What Is Climate

  5. Using NASA Remote Sensing Data to Reduce Uncertainty of Land-Use Transitions in Global Carbon-Climate Models: Data Management Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Using NASA Remote Sensing Data to Reduce Uncertainty of Land-Use Transitions in Global Carbon University of Maryland The following Data Management Plan was part of the NASA ROSES 2012 Proposal Using NASA), as described below. We will follow all guidelines in the NASA Earth Science Data and Information Policy, along

  6. Future Flooding in Houston: Modeling the Impacts of Climate and Land Cover Change on Hydrology in the Buffalo-San Jacinto Watershed 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blount, William Kyle

    2013-02-04

    was recently rated as the fourth fastest growing city in the US with a current population of 6.23 million and a growth rate of two percent (Fisher, 2012). Harris County is also one of the fastest growing counties in the United States (Kever, 2012...://www.hydro.washington.edu/Lettenmaier/Models/VIC/Documentation/Ro uting/UH.shtml>. Jiang, X., Yang, Z., 2012. Projected changes of temperature and precipitation in Texas from downscaled global climate models. Climate Research, 53(3): 229-244. Kever, J., 5 April 2012. Harris leads nation's other counties in growth...

  7. Climate Change Impact on Agricultural Water Resources Variability in the Northern Highlands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in water availability. Increased evaporation, combined with changes in pre- cipitation, has the potential for irrigation and hydroelectric generation. In addition, watershed hydrology is affected by vegetation types-fed agriculture could be reduced by up to 50%, in countries which depend mainly on rain-fed agriculture. Assessing

  8. Water Availability, Degree Days, and the Potential Impact of Climate Change on Irrigated Agriculture in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Anthony C.

    in temperature, precipitation, solar radiation or atmospheric carbon dioxide may affect crop yield and the demand would increase that demand. Another potential pathway is through the supply of water for irrigation for Global Conflict and Cooperation. Department of Economics, University of California, San Diego, 9500

  9. TOWARDS SUSTAINABLE LAND MANAGEMENT IN THE DRYLANDS: SCIENTIFIC CONNECTIONS IN MONITORING AND ASSESSING DRYLAND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lehmann, Johannes

    ; Accepted 29 November 2010 ABSTRACT The United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification and its sister in land management undertaken to address dryland degradation and desertification can simultaneously reduce words: resilience; sustainable land management; desertification; land degradation; climate change

  10. Hawaii Department of Land and Natural Resources Commission on...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hawaii Department of Land and Natural Resources Commission on Water Resource Management Jump to: navigation, search Name: Hawaii Department of Land and Natural Resources Commission...

  11. Soil suitability index identifies potential areas for groundwater banking on agricultural lands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    the Department of Land, Air and Water Resources at UC Davis;the Department of Land, Air and Water Resources at UC Davis;the Department of Land, Air and Water Resources at UC Davis;

  12. Climate Change, Drought & Environment

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Afternoon Plenary Session: Current Trends in the Advanced Bioindustry Climate Change, Drought, and Environment—Michael Champ, Executive Director, The Sustainable Water Challenge

  13. Preliminary evaluation of the performance, water use, and current application trends of evaporative coolers in California climates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Y.J.; Hanford, J.W.; Wu, H.F.

    1992-09-01

    This paper describes the latest results of an ongoing analysis investigating the potential for evaporative cooling as an energy-efficient alternative to standard air-conditioning in California residences. In particular, the study uses detailed numerical models of evaporative coolers linked with the DOE-2 building energy simulation program to study the issues of indoor comfort, energy and peak demand savings with and without supplemental air-conditioning and consumptive water use. In addition, limited surveys are used to assess the current market availability of evaporative cooling in California, typical contractor practices and costs, and general acceptance of the technology among engineers, contractors, and manufacturers. The results show that evaporative coolers can provide significant energy and peak demand savings in California residences, but the impact of the increased indoor humidity on human comfort remains an unanswered question that requires further research and clarification. Evaluated against ASHRAE comfort standards developed primarily for air-conditioning both direct and two-stage evaporative coolers would not maintain comfort at peak cooling conditions due to excessive humidity. However, using bioclimatic charts that place human comfort at the 80% relative humidity line, the study suggests that direct evaporative coolers will work in mild coastal climates, while two-stage models should provide adequate comfort in Title 24 houses throughout California, except in the Imperial Valley. The study also shows that evaporative coolers will increase household water consumption by less than 6% on an annual basis, and as much as 23% during peak cooling months, and that the increases in water cost are minimal compared to the electricity savings. Lastly, a survey of engineers and contractors revealed generally positive experiences with evaporative coolers, with operational cost savings, improved comfort, unproved air quality as the primary benefits in their use.

  14. Modeled Interactive Effects of Precipitation, temperature, and [CO2] on Ecosystem Carbon and Water Dynamics in Different Climatic Zones

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luo, Yiqi [University of Oklahoma; Gerten, Dieter [Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, Potsdam, Germany; Le Maire, Guerric [Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l'Environement, France; Parton, William [University of Colorado, Fort Collins; Weng, Ensheng [University of Oklahoma, Norman; Zhou, Xuhuui [University of Oklahoma; Keough, Cindy [University of Colorado, Fort Collins; Beier, Claus [Riso National Laboratory, Roskilde, Denmark; Ciais, Philippe [Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l'Environement, France; Cramer, Wolfgang [Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, Potsdam, Germany; Dukes, Jeff [University of Massachusetts, Boston; Emmett, Bridget [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Bangor, Gwynedd, United Kingdom; Hanson, Paul J [ORNL; Knapp, Alan [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Linder, Sune [Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Upsalla, Sweden; Nepstad, Daniel [Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI), Woods Hole, MA; Rustad, Lindsey [USDA Forest Service

    2008-01-01

    Interactive effects of multiple global change factors on ecosystem processes are complex. It is relatively expensive to explore those interactions in manipulative experiments. We conducted a modeling analysis to identify potentially important interactions and to stimulate hypothesis formulation for experimental research. Four models were used to quantify interactive effects of climate warming (T), altered precipitation amounts [doubled (DP) and halved (HP)] and seasonality (SP, moving precipitation in July and August to January and February to create summer drought), and elevated [CO2] (C) on net primary production (NPP), heterotrophic respiration (Rh), net ecosystem production (NEP), transpiration, and runoff.We examined those responses in seven ecosystems, including forests, grasslands, and heathlands in different climate zones. The modeling analysis showed that none of the threeway interactions among T, C, and altered precipitation was substantial for either carbon or water processes, nor consistent among the seven ecosystems. However, two-way interactive effects on NPP, Rh, and NEP were generally positive (i.e. amplification of one factor s effect by the other factor) between T and C or between T and DP. A negative interaction (i.e. depression of one factor s effect by the other factor) occurred for simulated NPP between T and HP. The interactive effects on runoff were positive between T and HP. Four pairs of two-way interactive effects on plant transpiration were positive and two pairs negative. In addition, wet sites generally had smaller relative changes in NPP, Rh, runoff, and transpiration but larger absolute changes in NEP than dry sites in response to the treatments. The modeling results suggest new hypotheses to be tested in multifactor global change experiments. Likewise, more experimental evidence is needed for the further improvement of ecosystem models in order to adequately simulate complex interactive processes.

  15. Scale variability of water, land, and energy resource interactions and their influence on the food system in Uganda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukuve, Feriha Mugisha; Fenner, Richard A.

    2015-08-04

    hand, and policies to spur economic growth on the other such as increased energy production (hydropower and biofuels) and industrialisation, which may conflict with the overarching food security objective. Crucially however, policies to address... competition between water-use for agricultural purposes versus hydropower production to meet energy objectives. McCartney & Girma (2012) investigated the trade- offs between hydropower production and irrigation water use for the Nile’s riparian countries...

  16. Carbon Accounting and Economic Model Uncertainty of Emissions from Biofuels-Induced Land Use Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plevin, Richard J; Beckman, Jayson; Golub, Alla A; Witcover, Julie; O'??Hare, Michael

    2015-01-01

    the GTAP-BIO framework. Climate Change Economics 2012, 03, (in the GTAP-BIO framework. Climate Change Economics 03 (03),Land Use Data for Climate Change Analysis. Routledge Press.

  17. Water, water everywhere,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eberhard, Marc O.

    1 Water, water everywhere, but is it safe to drink? An Inquiry-based unit investigating the journey of your drinking water from source to tap of drinking water will contain different contaminants, based on surrounding land uses (guided inquiry activity

  18. Water Resources Forests & Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Water Resources Forests & Water More than half of the nation's freshwater supply originates on forestland. Healthy and sustainable forests can help ensure a continuous supply of clean and abundant water. Not only does forestland provide the cleanest water of any land use, it also helps absorb rainfall

  19. Land system architecture: Using land systems to adapt and mitigate global environmental change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turner, B.L.; Janetos, Anthony C.; Verbug, Peter H.; Murray, Alan T.

    2013-04-01

    Land systems (mosaics of land use and cover) are human environment systems, the changes in which drive and respond to local to global environmental changes, climate to macro-economy (Foley et al., 2005). Changes in land systems have been the principal proximate cause in the loss of habitats and biota globally, long contributed to atmospheric greenhouse gases, and hypothesized to have triggered climate changes in the early Holocene (Ruddiman, 2003). Land use, foremost agriculture, is the largest source of biologically active nitrogen to the atmosphere, critical to sources and sinks of carbon, and a major component in the hydrologic cycle (e.g., Bouwman et al., 2011). Changes in land systems also affect regional climate (Feddema et al., 2005; Pielke, 2005), ecosystem functions, and the array of ecosystem services they provide. Land systems, therefore, are a central feature of how humankind manages its relationship with nature-intended or not, or whether this relationship proceeds sustainably or not.

  20. Dependence of groundwater recharge in the Niles Cone Groundwater Basin on climate variability and inter-basin water transfers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balakrishnan, Krishnachandran

    2012-01-01

    2011. ibid Alameda County Water District Website. Sheikh,Overview of Institutional and Water Use Issue, CongressionalAzuara, J. et al. 2009. Water management and adaptation with

  1. Efficient Water Use & Management

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Water Use Goal 4: Efficient Water Use & Management Aware of the arid climate of northern New Mexico, water reduction and conservation remains a primary concern at LANL. Energy...

  2. Terrestrial Water Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodell, M; Chambers, D P; Famiglietti, Jay

    2013-01-01

    with Subantarctic Mode Water. J. Geophys. Res. , 116,Global Climate] Stratospheric water vapor [in “State of the18 2. Total column water

  3. Effect of water stress on growth, water consumption and yield of silage maize under flood irrigation in a semiarid climate of Tadla (Morocco)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Effect of water stress on growth, water consumption and yield of silage maize under flood Abstract The field study of crops response to water stress is important to reduce agricultural water use in areas where the water resources are limited. This study was carried out during two growing periods

  4. 1, 255285, 2005 Extreme climates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    , orography, and oceanic heat transport on extreme climates V. Romanova 1 , G. Lohmann 2,1 , and K. Grosfeld 2 to assess the possibility that land albedo, atmospheric CO2, orography and oceanic heat transport may cause5-covered Earth is the high land albedo in combination with initial temperatures set equal to the freezing point

  5. A reduced order modeling approach to represent subgrid-scale hydrological dynamics for regional- and climate-scale land-surface simulations: application in a polygonal tundra landscape

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Pau, G. S. H.; Bisht, G.; Riley, W. J.

    2014-04-04

    Existing land surface models (LSMs) describe physical and biological processes that occur over a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. For example, biogeochemical and hydrological processes responsible for carbon (CO2, CH4) exchanges with the atmosphere range from molecular scale (pore-scale O2 consumption) to tens of kilometer scale (vegetation distribution, river networks). Additionally, many processes within LSMs are nonlinearly coupled (e.g., methane production and soil moisture dynamics), and therefore simple linear upscaling techniques can result in large prediction error. In this paper we applied a particular reduced-order modeling (ROM) technique known as "Proper Orthogonal Decomposition mapping method" that reconstructs temporally-resolvedmore »fine-resolution solutions based on coarse-resolution solutions. We applied this technique to four study sites in a polygonal tundra landscape near Barrow, Alaska. Coupled surface-subsurface isothermal simulations were performed for summer months (June–September) at fine (0.25 m) and coarse (8 m) horizontal resolutions. We used simulation results from three summer seasons (1998–2000) to build ROMs of the 4-D soil moisture field for the four study sites individually (single-site) and aggregated (multi-site). The results indicate that the ROM produced a significant computational speedup (> 103) with very small relative approximation error (« less

  6. DEPARTMENT OF LAND RESOURCES AND ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, Rick L.

    of invasive plant species, soil nutrient management, bioremediation, land reclamation ecology of natural systems, chemical fate and transport, water quality, crop

  7. Ocean Heat Transport and Water Vapor Greenhouse in a Warm Equable Climate: A New Look at the Low Gradient Paradox

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rose, Brian E. J.

    The authors study the role of ocean heat transport (OHT) in the maintenance of a warm, equable, ice-free climate. An ensemble of idealized aquaplanet GCM calculations is used to assess the equilibrium sensitivity of global ...

  8. Climate and Environmental Sciences Division Strategic Plan Water is a key component of the earth and human

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, Robert

    , and subsurface processes, as well as climate and earth system modeling and integrated assessment modeling and plan the development of next- generation human-earth system models for improving long-term predictions

  9. Climate & Water Balance Changes in the Caspian Region Astrakhan 19-20 Oct 2010 SATELLITE ALTIMETRY TO SUPPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    recording Often gappy or collection stopped Just tables (no metadata) Language differences Jiloy, Zhiloy is dependent upon good calibration/validation of the satellite sensors with in situ observations. #12;Climate

  10. Runoff Variability and Transboundary Water Management: An Assessment of Risk to Regional Agreements From Likely Climatic Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CHATTERJEE, INDRANI

    2014-01-01

    change and the stability of water allocation agreements.change and the stability of water allocation agreements.Do nations go to war over water? Nature 458:282-283 Barret,

  11. Physically-Based Global Downscaling: Climate Change Projections for a Full Century

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghan, Steven J.; Shippert, Timothy R.

    2006-05-01

    A global atmosphere/land model with an embedded subgrid orography scheme is used to simulate the period 1977-2100 using ocean surface conditions and radiative constituent concentrations for a climate change scenario. Climate variables simulated for multiple elevation classes are mapping according to the high-resolution of topography in ten regions with complex terrain. Analysis of changes in the simulated climate lead to the following conclusions. Changes in precipitation vary widely, with precipitation increasing more with increasing altitude in some region, decreasing more with altitude in others, and changing little in still others. In some regions the sign of the precipitation change depends on surface elevation. Changes in surface air temperature are rather uniform, with at most a two-fold difference between the largest and smallest changes within a region. In most cases the warming increases with altitude. Changes in snow water are highly dependent on altitude. Absolute changes usually increase with altitude, while relative changes decrease. In places where snow accumulates, an artificial upper bound on snow water limits the sensitivity of snow water to climate change considerably. The simulated impact of climate change on regional mean snow water varies widely, with little impact in regions in which the upper bound on snow water is the dominant snow water sink, moderate impact in regions with a mixture of seasonal and permanent snow, and profound impacts on regions with little permanent snow.

  12. Physically-Based Global Downscaling Climate Change Projections for a Full Century

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghan, Steven J.; Shippert, Timothy R.

    2005-04-15

    A global atmosphere/land model with an embedded subgrid orography scheme is used to simulate the period 1977-2100 using ocean surface conditions and radiative constituent concentrations for a climate change scenario. Climate variables simulated for multiple elevation classes are mapping according to a high-resolution elevation dataset in ten regions with complex terrain. Analysis of changes in the simulated climate leads to the following conclusions. Changes in precipitation vary widely, with precipitation increasing more with increasing altitude in some region, decreasing more with altitude in others, and changing little in still others. In some regions the sign of the precipitation change depends on surface elevation. Changes in surface air temperature are rather uniform, with at most a two-fold difference between the largest and smallest changes within a region; in most cases the warming increases with altitude. Changes in snow water are highly dependent on altitude. Absolute changes usually increase with altitude, while relative changes decrease. In places where snow accumulates, an artificial upper bound on snow water limits the sensitivity of snow water to climate change considerably. The simulated impact of climate change on regional mean snow water varies widely, with little impact in regions in which the upper bound on snow water is the dominant snow water sink, moderate impact in regions with a mixture of seasonal and permanent snow, and profound impacts on regions with little permanent snow.

  13. Climate impacts of a large-scale biofuels expansion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hallgren, Willow

    A global biofuels program will potentially lead to intense pressures on land supply and cause widespread transformations in land use. These transformations can alter the Earth climate system by increasing greenhouse gas ...

  14. India Water Week 2012 Water, Energy and Food Security : Call for Solutions, 10-14 April 2012, New Delhi ASSESSING THE IMPACT OF CLIMATE CHANGE ON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, C.P.

    India Water Week 2012 ­ Water, Energy and Food Security : Call for Solutions, 10-14 April 2012, New in terms of the mean and its variability over a certain time-span and a certain area" and a statistically

  15. Argentina-Climate Change Mitigation and Agriculture in Latin...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Organization Inter-American Development Bank, The Regional Fund for Agricultural Technology, Government of New Zealand Sector Climate, Land Focus Area Agriculture Topics...

  16. Sandia Energy - Sandia, the Atlantic Council, and NM Water Resource...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sandia, the Atlantic Council, and NM Water Resource Research Institute Sponsor Roundtable on Western Water Scarcity Home Climate Water Security Partnership News Global Climate &...

  17. Climate Science and Climate Economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Anthony

    2014-01-01

    the World Bank by the Potsdam Institute for Climate ImpactResearch and Climate Analytics.of carbon under non-linear climate response. ESRI working

  18. IP_Climate_Poster 121312

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of a publication or guarantee its technical correctness. Title: Northern New Mexico Climate, Water Year 2012 at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Poster, Individual Permit for...

  19. 4, 30553085, 2007 Winter climate affects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    HESSD 4, 3055­3085, 2007 Winter climate affects long-term trends in stream water nitrate H. A. de and Earth System Sciences Winter climate affects long-term trends in stream water nitrate in acid Winter climate affects long-term trends in stream water nitrate H. A. de Wit et al. Title Page Abstract

  20. Runoff Variability and Transboundary Water Management: An Assessment of Risk to Regional Agreements From Likely Climatic Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CHATTERJEE, INDRANI

    2014-01-01

    the water sectors such as hydro power, water storage, multiwater supply, agriculture and hydro-power are the three mostper year, followed by hydro-power, which has a yearly demand

  1. Investigation of North American vegetation variability under recent climate: A study using the SSiB4/TRIFFID biophysical/dynamic vegetation model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Z; Xue, Y; Macdonald, G; Cox, PM; Collatz, GJ

    2015-01-01

    G. M. , 2010. Climate Change and Water in SouthwesternSpecial Feature: Water, climate change, and sustainability18th Conference on Climate Change. https://ams.confex.com/

  2. Water Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    District: WV 1 Research Category: Water Quality Focus Category: Waste Water, Treatment, Recreation Descriptors: post mining land use, waste water,water quality, site selection, waste reduction, parameter

  3. Questions of bias in climate models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Steven J.; Wigley, Tom M.; Meinshausen, Malte; Rogelj, Joeri

    2014-08-27

    The recent work by Shindell usefully contributes to the debate over estimating climate sensitivity by highlighting an important aspect of the climate system: that climate forcings that occur over land result in a more rapid temperature response than forcings that are distributed more uniformly over the globe. While, as noted in this work, simple climate models may be biased by assuming the same temperature response for all forcing agents, the implication that the MAGICC model is biased in this way is not correct.

  4. Climate Change Guidance: A Pragmatic Approach to Client

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    10/21/11 Climate Change Guidance: A Pragmatic Approach to Client Needs Climate, Water and Ecosystems- Shaping the Great Plains October 13, 2011 #12;10/21/11 Climate Change Guidance: A Pragmatic Approach to Client NeedsClimate Science ­ 2011 ·Yes, the climate is changing. ·Climate science is changing

  5. Technology Solutions Case Study: Performance of a Heat Pump Water Heater in the Hot-Humid Climate, Windermere, Florida

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-11-01

    Over recent years, heat pump water heaters (HPWHs) have become more readily available and more widely adopted in the marketplace. For a 6-month period, the Building America team Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings monitored the performance of a GE Geospring HPWH in Windermere, Florida. The study found that the HPWH performed 144% more efficiently than a traditional electric resistance water heater, saving approximately 64% on water heating annually. The monitoring showed that the domestic hot water draw was a primary factor affecting the system's operating efficiency.

  6. Performance of a Heat Pump Water Heater in the Hot-Humid Climate, Windermere, Florida (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Metzger, C.; Puttagunta, S.; Williamson, J.

    2013-11-01

    Over recent years, heat pump water heaters (HPWHs) have become more readily available and more widely adopted in the marketplace. For a 6-month period, the Building America team Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings monitored the performance of a GE Geospring HPWH in Windermere, Florida. The study found that the HPWH performed 144% more efficiently than a traditional electric resistance water heater, saving approximately 64% on water heating annually. The monitoring showed that the domestic hot water draw was a primary factor affecting the system's operating efficiency.

  7. Technical Note/ Impact of Coastal Land Reclamation on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiao, Jiu Jimmy

    of fresh ground water resource because the reclaimed land can be an additional aquifer and rain rechargeTechnical Note/ Impact of Coastal Land Reclamation on Ground Water Level and the Sea Water a significant effect on local ground water systems. Steady-state analytic solutions based on Dupuit and Ghyben

  8. Sandia Energy - Water Availability, Cost, and Use

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Water Availability, Cost, and Use Home Climate & Earth Systems WaterEnergy Nexus Decision Models for Integrating EnergyWater Energy and Water in the Western and Texas...

  9. WATER-TRAPPED WORLDS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Menou, Kristen [Department of Astronomy, Columbia University, 550 West 120th Street, New York, NY 10027 (United States)

    2013-09-01

    Although tidally locked habitable planets orbiting nearby M-dwarf stars are among the best astronomical targets to search for extrasolar life, they may also be deficient in volatiles and water. Climate models for this class of planets show atmospheric transport of water from the dayside to the nightside, where it is precipitated as snow and trapped as ice. Since ice only slowly flows back to the dayside upon accumulation, the resulting hydrological cycle can trap a large amount of water in the form of nightside ice. Using ice sheet dynamical and thermodynamical constraints, I illustrate how planets with less than about a quarter the Earth's oceans could trap most of their surface water on the nightside. This would leave their dayside, where habitable conditions are met, potentially dry. The amount and distribution of residual liquid water on the dayside depend on a variety of geophysical factors, including the efficiency of rock weathering at regulating atmospheric CO{sub 2} as dayside ocean basins dry up. Water-trapped worlds with dry daysides may offer similar advantages as land planets for habitability, by contrast with worlds where more abundant water freely flows around the globe.

  10. Statistical estimation of water distribution system pipe break risk 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yamijala, Shridhar

    2009-05-15

    of support or bedding. 5) Soil movement: Subsidence due to mining, filled land etc. Differential consolidation or geological changes. Changes in water table or soil moisture content. Extremes of climate such as frost heave or clay shrinkage. Loss....021 and 0.014 for pit cast iron and sandspun cast iron pipes respectively, when they employed a similar modeling approach on other datasets. 16 The Shamir and Howard models are one of the first attempts to statistically analyze break records...

  11. Relative efficiency of land surface energy balance components

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bateni, S. M.

    [1] The partitioning of available energy into dissipative fluxes over land surfaces is dependent on the state variable of the surface energy balance (land surface temperature) and the state variable of the surface water ...

  12. Future Regional Climates Jason Evans,a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Jason

    Chapter 9 Future Regional Climates Jason Evans,a John McGregorb , and Kendal McGuffiec a Climate of Dynamical Downscaling 235 9.3.1.6. Future Development in Dynamical Downscaling 235 9.3.2. Statistical' Future Climate and Its Probability 242 9.5. Achieving Regional Climate Predictions 243 9.5.1. Water

  13. Uncertainty Analysis of Runoff Simulations and Parameter Identifiability in the Community Land Model – Evidence from MOPEX Basins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Maoyi; Hou, Zhangshuan; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Ke, Yinghai; Liu, Ying; Fang, Zhufeng; Sun, Yu

    2013-12-01

    With the emergence of earth system models as important tools for understanding and predicting climate change and implications to mitigation and adaptation, it has become increasingly important to assess the fidelity of the land component within earth system models to capture realistic hydrological processes and their response to the changing climate and quantify the associated uncertainties. This study investigates the sensitivity of runoff simulations to major hydrologic parameters in version 4 of the Community Land Model (CLM4) by integrating CLM4 with a stochastic exploratory sensitivity analysis framework at 20 selected watersheds from the Model Parameter Estimation Experiment (MOPEX) spanning a wide range of climate and site conditions. We found that for runoff simulations, the most significant parameters are those related to the subsurface runoff parameterizations. Soil texture related parameters and surface runoff parameters are of secondary significance. Moreover, climate and soil conditions play important roles in the parameter sensitivity. In general, site conditions within water-limited hydrologic regimes and with finer soil texture result in stronger sensitivity of output variables, such as runoff and its surface and subsurface components, to the input parameters in CLM4. This study demonstrated the feasibility of parameter inversion for CLM4 using streamflow observations to improve runoff simulations. By ranking the significance of the input parameters, we showed that the parameter set dimensionality could be reduced for CLM4 parameter calibration under different hydrologic and climatic regimes so that the inverse problem is less ill posed.

  14. Siting Renewable Energy: Land Use and Regulatory Context

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Outka, Uma

    2010-01-01

    This article takes up the increasingly important land use question of siting for renewable energy. As concern over climate change grows, new policies are being crafted at all levels of government to support renewable energy as a way of reducing...

  15. Numerical Simulation of Land Subsidence in the Los Banos-Kettleman City Area, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Larson, Keith J; Basagaoglu, Hakan; Marino, Miguel A

    1999-01-01

    risk assessment of land subsidence in Shanhai. EnvironmentalF. and Riley, F. S. 1984. Land Subsidence in the San Joaquinand Miller, R. E. 1975. Land subsidence due to ground water

  16. Numerical Simulation of Land Subsidence in the Los Banos-Kettleman City Area, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Larson, Keith J; Basagaoglu, Hakan; Marino, Miguel

    2001-01-01

    risk assessment of land subsidence in Shanhai. EnvironmentelObserved and simulated land subsidence for extenso meter 1 .and Miller, R. E. 1975. land subsidence due to ground water

  17. Terry Land

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservationBio-Inspired Solar FuelTechnologyTel: Name: Rm. Tel: Location:TerrachanicsTerry Land

  18. CLIMATE RISK AND CLIMATE CHANGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smerdon, Jason E.

    CLIMATE RISK AND CLIMATE CHANGE Scenarios of what the climate will be like 50 to 100 years from now associated with climate change demand these efforts continue. However, the long time horizons have led many decision makers to regard climate change as a problem of the distant future. But is it? I n many regions

  19. The transition from water to land is one of the most fascinating enig-mas of evolution. In particular, the evolution of limbs from ances-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Halazonetis, Thanos

    . In particular, the evolution of limbs from ances- tral fish fins remains a mystery. Both fish and land animals similar 3-dimensional DNA or- ganization of the fish and mouse clusters, which indicates that the main mechanism used to pattern tetrapod limbs was already pres- ent in fish. However, when inserted

  20. Since Iceland was settled 1100 y ago, declines in vegetated land cover has been accompanied by severe wind and water erosion. Interaction of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Archer, Steven R.

    Since Iceland was settled 1100 y ago, declines in vegetated land cover has been accompanied microtopography (i.e. hummock shape and size). DEGRADATION OF ICELANDIC RANGELANDS: PROCESSESS AND PROPERTIES J&M University, College Station, 2Soil Conservation Service, Gunnarsholt, Iceland, 3Agricultural Research

  1. Framework for Probabilistic Projections of Energy-Relevant Streamflow Indicators under Climate Change Scenarios for the U.S.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagener, Thorsten; Mann, Michael; Crane, Robert

    2014-04-29

    This project focuses on uncertainty in streamflow forecasting under climate change conditions. The objective is to develop easy to use methodologies that can be applied across a range of river basins to estimate changes in water availability for realistic projections of climate change. There are three major components to the project: Empirical downscaling of regional climate change projections from a range of Global Climate Models; Developing a methodology to use present day information on the climate controls on the parameterizations in streamflow models to adjust the parameterizations under future climate conditions (a trading-space-for-time approach); and Demonstrating a bottom-up approach to establishing streamflow vulnerabilities to climate change. The results reinforce the need for downscaling of climate data for regional applications, and further demonstrates the challenges of using raw GCM data to make local projections. In addition, it reinforces the need to make projections across a range of global climate models. The project demonstrates the potential for improving streamflow forecasts by using model parameters that are adjusted for future climate conditions, but suggests that even with improved streamflow models and reduced climate uncertainty through the use of downscaled data, there is still large uncertainty is the streamflow projections. The most useful output from the project is the bottom-up vulnerability driven approach to examining possible climate and land use change impacts on streamflow. Here, we demonstrate an inexpensive and easy to apply methodology that uses Classification and Regression Trees (CART) to define the climate and environmental parameters space that can produce vulnerabilities in the system, and then feeds in the downscaled projections to determine the probability top transitioning to a vulnerable sate. Vulnerabilities, in this case, are defined by the end user.

  2. Environment News Service for the latest environmental news, current issues, climate, water, food, forests, species, energy, education. RSS feed. | | | | |Home About News Index Services My Account Events | Search February 2, 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Environment News Service for the latest environmental news, current issues, climate, water, food, forests, species, energy, education. RSS feed. | | | | |Home About News Index Services My Account Events Kingdom and the United States at the beginning of the year. The core topics for the G8 meeting are energy

  3. ESTIMATING RISK TO CALIFORNIA ENERGY INFRASTRUCTURE FROM PROJECTED CLIMATE CHANGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sathaye, Jayant

    2011-01-01

    the California Coast. ” Climatic Change 87 (Suppl. 1), S57–and Water Resources. ” Climatic Change Fried, J. , M. Torn,in California. ” Climatic Change 87:139–151. Frederick, K.

  4. Journal of Climate EARLY ONLINE RELEASE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Myneni, Ranga B.

    THE LAND AND OCEAN COMPONENTS OF THE GLOBAL CARBON CYCLE IN THE CMIP5 EARTH SYSTEM MODELS. J. Climate. doi27 We assess the ability of 18 Earth System Models to simulate the land and ocean carbon cycle SYSTEM MODELS2 3 4 A. Anav 1* , P. Friedlingstein 1 , M. Kidston 2 , L. Bopp 2 , P. Ciais 2 , P. Cox 1

  5. Variability in North Pacific intermediate and deep water ventilation during Heinrich events in two coupled climate models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chikamoto, Megumi O.

    ventilation and ocean biogeochemical properties to northern North Atlantic glacial freshwater perturbations the last glacial period (Dansgaard et al., 1993). Some of the associated warm­cold transitions discharge caused by melting icebergs reduces the surface water density in the North Atlantic Ocean, thereby

  6. The Role of Multimodel Climate Forecasts in Improving Water and Energy Management over the Tana River Basin, Kenya

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arumugam, Sankar

    - logical ensembles are used in a reservoir model to allocate water for power generation by ensuring clima. Retrospective reservoir analysis shows that inflow forecasts developed from single GCM and multiple GCMs perform the single- model inflow forecasts by reducing uncertainty and the overconfidence of individual model

  7. High-resolution temporal record of Holocene ground-water chemistry: Tracing links between climate and hydrology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banner, Jay L.

    growth layers in Holocene spe- leothems from Barbados, West Indies, reveals high-resolution temporal. carbonate mineral reactions, as reflected in 87 Sr/86 Sr values of modern Barbados ground waters variations in rainfall on Barbados that are predicted by this hydrologic model. INTRODUCTION In spite

  8. With specialisations in: Earth and Climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goelzer, Heiko

    these interact · Hands-on training in the use of qualitative and quantitative geographical research techniques ECTS) Specialisation (63 ECTS) Master thesis (30 ECTS) #12;Earth and Climate The Earth and Climate of land surface and atmospheric processes shaping the physical environment and acquire quantitative skills

  9. Review of water, lighting, and cooling energy efficiency measures for low-income homes located in warm climates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, M.A.; Gettings, M.B.

    1998-02-01

    In support of the U.S. Department of Energy`s Weatherization Assistance Program, Oak Ridge National Laboratory has performed a literature review of weatherization measures applicable for homes located in warm climate regions. Sources for this information included: (1) documented engineering estimates, (2) vendor information, (3) reported performance from research and field tests, and (4) direct discussions with researchers, vendors, and field reporters. Estimated savings are extrapolated from reported energy savings and applied to the end-use energy consumption for low-income homes reported by the Energy Information Administration. Additionally, installation costs, savings-to-investment ratios, and parameters indicating performance sensitivity to issues such as occupancy, construction, client education, and maintenance requirements are presented. The report is comprised of two sections: (1) an overview of measure performance, and (2) an appendix. The overview of measures is in a tabular format, which allows for quick reference. More detailed discussions and references for each measure are presented in the Appendix and it is highly recommended that these be reviewed prior to measure selection.

  10. Antioch University and EPA Webinar: Assessing Vulnerability of Water Conveyance Infrastructure from a Changing Climate in the Context of a Changing Landscape

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presenter: Michael Simpson, Co-Director, Antioch Center for Climate Preparedness and Community Resilience; Chair, Department of Environmental Studies

  11. 2015 Tribal Lands and Environment Forum

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Institute for Tribal Environmental Professionals (ITEP) are hosting the annual Tribal Lands and Environment Forum. The four-day forum will feature special trainings, field trips, and breakout sessions focused on tribal water programs.

  12. Modeling Land Biogeochemistry Term Spring 2015

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    :30 pm or by appointment Course Description Dynamic land models are widely used as part of Earth system models and serve to represent exchange of energy (heat radiation momentum), water, carbon, and nutrients

  13. Climate change and tropical biodiversity: a new focus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisenden, Brian D.

    Climate change and tropical biodiversity: a new focus Jedediah Brodie1 , Eric Post2 and William F, Australia Considerable efforts are focused on the consequences of climate change for tropical rainforests climatic changes and human land use) remain understudied. Key concerns are that aridification could

  14. UCC UNIVERSITIES CLIMATE UNIVERSITY CLIMATE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kidston, Joseph

    CONSORTIUM UCC UNIVERSITIES CLIMATE UNIVERSITY CLIMATE World-class excellence Internationally recognised Australia based www.monash.edu.au/climate-consortium CONSORTIUM An International Collaborative of the institutional leads within the UCC: The University Climate Consortium (UCC) comprises four research intensive

  15. Water Rights Challenges to Coho Recovery in Coastal California Watersheds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alford, Chris

    2009-01-01

    related to land-use and water extraction can have a greatwater resources, water extraction is likely to shift from

  16. Land Use and Water Efficiency in Current and Potential Future U.S. Corn and Brazilian Sugarcane Ethanol Systems (Poster), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield MunicipalTechnical Report:Speeding accessby aLED Street LightingFrom theHighI _s - s i sApplicationLand

  17. Climate change: Effects on reef island resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oberdorfer, J.A.; Buddemeier, R.W.

    1988-06-27

    The salinity, depth, quantity, and reliability of fresh groundwater resources on coral reef islands and coastlines are environmentally important parameters. Groundwater influences or controls the terrestrial flora, salinity, and nutrient levels in the near-shore benthic environment, the rate and nature of sediment diagenesis, and the density of human habitation. Data from a number of Indo-Pacific reef islands suggest that freshwater inventory is a function of rainfall and island dimensions. A numerical model (SUTRA) has been used to simulate the responses of atoll island groundwater to changes in recharge (precipitation), sea level, and loss of island area due to flooding. The model has been calibrated for Enjebi Island, Enewetak Atoll, where a moderately permeable, water-table aquifer overlies a high-permeability formation. Total freshwater inventory is a monotonic but nonlinear function of recharge. If recharge and island area are constant, rising sea level increases the inventory of fresh water by increasing the useful volume of the aquifer above the high-permeability zone. Flooding of land area reduces the total freshwater inventory approximately in proportion to the loss of recharge area. The most significant results of the model simulation, however, are the findings that the inventory of low-salinity water (and by extrapolation, potable water) is disproportionately sensitive to changes in recharge, island dimensions, or recharge. Island freshwater resources may therefore be unexpectedly vulnerable to climate change.

  18. Carbon Density and Anthropogenic Land Use Influences on Net Land-Use Change Emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Steven J.; Rothwell, Andrew J.

    2013-10-08

    We examine historical and future land-use emissions using a simple mechanistic carbon-cycle model with regional and ecosystem specific parameterizations. Our central estimate of net terrestrial land-use change emissions, exclusive of climate feedbacks, is 250 GtC over the last three hundred years. This estimate is most sensitive to assumptions for preindustrial forest and soil carbon densities. We also find that estimates are sensitive to the treatment of crop and pasture lands. These sensitivities also translate into differences in future terrestrial uptake in the RCP4.5 land-use scenario. This estimate of future uptake is lower than the native values from the GCAM integrated assessment model result due to lower net reforestation in the RCP4.5 gridded land-use data product

  19. MONTANA STATE UNIVERSITY DEPARTMENT OF LAND RESOURCES & ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES Degree Requirements for a B. S. in Environmental Sciences Soil & Water Science Option

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    of the following two semester Math Sequences: M 165Q & Calculus for Technology I 3 F S (F) M 166Q above) 3 F ERTH 432R (on demand) Surface Water Resources 3 GEO 309 Sedimentation and Stratigraphy 4

  20. Climate & Environmental Sciences | Clean Energy | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    global scales. Focus Areas Climate Change Science Institute Earth and Aquatic Sciences Ecosystem Science Energy-Water Resource Systems Environmental Data Science and Systems...

  1. Campus Sustainability Goals Energy & Climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacobs, Lucia

    Campus Sustainability Goals Energy & Climate By 2014, reduce greenhouse gas emissions to 1990 and water consumption and wastewater production; incorporate sustainable design principles into capital levels. Food & Dining By 2020, increase sustainable food purchases by campus foodservice providers

  2. Climate Change and Water Resources in California: The Cost of Conservation versus Supply Augmentation for the East Bay Municipal Utility District

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mourad, Bessma

    2009-01-01

    Gammon, Rovert. 2009. Sierra Water Grab. East Bay Express,www.eastbayexpress.com/news/sierra_water_grab/Content? oid=UCB: 1070. Maddaus Water Management.   Conservation

  3. Climate Models and Climate Change Guillaume Mauger

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Climate Models and Climate Change Guillaume Mauger gmauger@uw.edu Climate Impacts Group University of Washington Outline: · Climate Change 101 · Why do we care? · Climate models: · About, UncertainDes, Performance, and Projec

  4. Abrupt Climate Change R. B. Alley,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    - tained Earth-surface conditions within the narrow liquid-water window conducive to life for about 4 change has focused on the climatic consequences of greenhouse-gas emissions and their impacts- sibility that large climate changes could occur quickly. Such abrupt climate changes could have natural

  5. Global Consequences of Land Use Jonathan A. Foley,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schweik, Charles M.

    , fiber, water, and shelter to more than six billion people. Global croplands, pastures, plantations in atmospheric composition to the extensive modification of Earth_s ecosystems (3­6). For example, land and ecosystem services, such as food, fiber, shelter, and fresh- water. On the other hand, some forms of land

  6. The Community Climate System Model Version 4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gent, Peter R.; Danabasoglu, Gokhan; Donner, Leo J.; Holland, Marika M.; Hunke, Elizabeth C.; Jayne, Steve R.; Lawrence, David M.; Neale, Richard; Rasch, Philip J.; Vertenstein, Mariana; Worley, Patrick; Yang, Zong-Liang; Zhang, Minghua

    2011-10-01

    The fourth version of the Community Climate System Model (CCSM4) was recently completed and released to the climate community. This paper describes developments to all the CCSM components, and documents fully coupled pre-industrial control runs compared to the previous version, CCSM3. Using the standard atmosphere and land resolution of 1{sup o} results in the sea surface temperature biases in the major upwelling regions being comparable to the 1.4{sup o} resolution CCSM3. Two changes to the deep convection scheme in the atmosphere component result in the CCSM4 producing El Nino/Southern Oscillation variability with a much more realistic frequency distribution than the CCSM3, although the amplitude is too large compared to observations. They also improve the representation of the Madden-Julian Oscillation, and the frequency distribution of tropical precipitation. A new overflow parameterization in the ocean component leads to an improved simulation of the deep ocean density structure, especially in the North Atlantic. Changes to the CCSM4 land component lead to a much improved annual cycle of water storage, especially in the tropics. The CCSM4 sea ice component uses much more realistic albedos than the CCSM3, and the Arctic sea ice concentration is improved in the CCSM4. An ensemble of 20th century simulations runs produce an excellent match to the observed September Arctic sea ice extent from 1979 to 2005. The CCSM4 ensemble mean increase in globally-averaged surface temperature between 1850 and 2005 is larger than the observed increase by about 0.4 C. This is consistent with the fact that the CCSM4 does not include a representation of the indirect effects of aerosols, although other factors may come into play. The CCSM4 still has significant biases, such as the mean precipitation distribution in the tropical Pacific Ocean, too much low cloud in the Arctic, and the latitudinal distributions of short-wave and long-wave cloud forcings.

  7. Primitive Land Plants 37 PRIMITIVE LAND PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koptur, Suzanne

    appeared at this time. Both of these groups of plants had life cycles, involving two generations. One of the year these mosses will produce tiny sporophytes. Prior to this generation, the tiny plants producedPrimitive Land Plants 37 PRIMITIVE LAND PLANTS These are the plants that were present soon after

  8. Runoff characteristics and the influence of land cover in drylands of western Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Yun

    2009-06-02

    In dryland regions, where water is a limited resource, land use/land cover has undergone and continues to undergo significant change mainly due to human activities. The nature of runoff from dryland regions and the influence of land use/land cover...

  9. Evaluating climate models: Should we use weather or climate observations?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oglesby, Robert J [ORNL; Erickson III, David J [ORNL

    2009-12-01

    Calling the numerical models that we use for simulations of climate change 'climate models' is a bit of a misnomer. These 'general circulation models' (GCMs, AKA global climate models) and their cousins the 'regional climate models' (RCMs) are actually physically-based weather simulators. That is, these models simulate, either globally or locally, daily weather patterns in response to some change in forcing or boundary condition. These simulated weather patterns are then aggregated into climate statistics, very much as we aggregate observations into 'real climate statistics'. Traditionally, the output of GCMs has been evaluated using climate statistics, as opposed to their ability to simulate realistic daily weather observations. At the coarse global scale this may be a reasonable approach, however, as RCM's downscale to increasingly higher resolutions, the conjunction between weather and climate becomes more problematic. We present results from a series of present-day climate simulations using the WRF ARW for domains that cover North America, much of Latin America, and South Asia. The basic domains are at a 12 km resolution, but several inner domains at 4 km have also been simulated. These include regions of complex topography in Mexico, Colombia, Peru, and Sri Lanka, as well as a region of low topography and fairly homogeneous land surface type (the U.S. Great Plains). Model evaluations are performed using standard climate analyses (e.g., reanalyses; NCDC data) but also using time series of daily station observations. Preliminary results suggest little difference in the assessment of long-term mean quantities, but the variability on seasonal and interannual timescales is better described. Furthermore, the value-added by using daily weather observations as an evaluation tool increases with the model resolution.

  10. CLIMATE SCIENCE Water,water,intheair

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eltz, Thomas

    of such recycling in a part of the brain associated with learning and memory is not clear, but the researchers array. This acts as the template for a mould made from a soft polymer, from which endless replicas

  11. Representing northern peatland microtopography and hydrology within the Community Land Model

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Shi, X.; Thornton, P. E.; Ricciuto, D. M.; Hanson, P. J.; Mao, J.; Sebestyen, S. D.; Griffiths, N. A.; Bisht, G.

    2015-02-20

    Predictive understanding of northern peatland hydrology is a necessary precursor to understanding the fate of massive carbon stores in these systems under the influence of present and future climate change. Current models have begun to address microtopographic controls on peatland hydrology, but none have included a prognostic calculation of peatland water table depth for a vegetated wetland, independent of prescribed regional water tables. We introduce here a new configuration of the Community Land Model (CLM) which includes a fully prognostic water table calculation for a vegetated peatland. Our structural and process changes to CLM focus on modifications needed to representmore »the hydrologic cycle of bogs environment with perched water tables, as well as distinct hydrologic dynamics and vegetation communities of the raised hummock and sunken hollow microtopography characteristic of peatland bogs. The modified model was parameterized and independently evaluated against observations from an ombrotrophic raised-dome bog in northern Minnesota (S1-Bog), the site for the Spruce and Peatland Responses Under Climatic and Environmental Change experiment (SPRUCE). Simulated water table levels compared well with site-level observations. The new model predicts significant hydrologic changes in response to planned warming at the SPRUCE site. At present, standing water is commonly observed in bog hollows after large rainfall events during the growing season, but simulations suggest a sharp decrease in water table levels due to increased evapotranspiration under the most extreme warming level, nearly eliminating the occurrence of standing water in the growing season. Simulated soil energy balance was strongly influenced by reduced winter snowpack under warming simulations, with the warming influence on soil temperature partly offset by the loss of insulating snowpack in early and late winter. The new model provides improved predictive capacity for seasonal hydrological dynamics in northern peatlands, and provides a useful foundation for investigation of northern peatland carbon exchange.« less

  12. Modifying the Soil and Water Assessment Tool to Simulate Cropland Carbon Flux: Model Development and Initial Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Xuesong; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Arnold, Jeffrey; Williams, Jimmy R.; Srinivasan, Raghavan

    2013-10-01

    Climate change is one of the most compelling modern issues and has important implications for almost every aspect of natural and human systems. The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) model has been applied worldwide to support sustainable land and water management in a changing climate. However, the inadequacies of the existing carbon algorithm in SWAT limit its application in assessing impacts of human activities on CO2 emission, one important source of greenhouse gases (GHGs) that traps heat in the earth system and results in global warming. In this research, we incorporate a revised version of the CENTURY carbon model into SWAT to describe dynamics of soil organic matter (SOM)- residue and simulate land-atmosphere carbon exchange.

  13. 9 M.y. record of southern Nevada climate from Yucca Mountain secondary minerals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whelan, J.F.; Moscati, R.J.

    1998-12-01

    Yucca Mountain, Nevada, is presently the object of intense study as a potential permanent repository for the Nation`s high-level radioactive wastes. The mountain consists of a thick sequence of volcanic tuffs within which the depth to water table ranges from 500 to 700 meters below the land surface. This thick unsaturated zone (UZ), which would host the projected repository, coupled with the present day arid to semi-arid climate, is considered a favorable attribute of the site. Evaluation of the site includes defining the relation between climate variability, as the input function or driver of site- and regional-scale ground-water flow, and the possible future transport and release of radionuclides to the accessible environment. Secondary calcite and opal have been deposited in the UZ by meteoric waters that infiltrated through overlying soils and percolated through the tuffs. The oxygen isotopic composition ({delta}{sup 18}O values) of these minerals reflect contemporaneous meteoric waters and the {delta}{sup 13}C values reflect soil organic matter, and hence the resident plant community, at the time of infiltration. Recent U/Pb age determinations of opal in these occurrences, coupled with the {delta}{sup 13}C values of associated calcite, allow broadbrush reconstructions of climate patterns during the past 9 M.y.

  14. Discovery of Climate Indices using Clustering Michael Steinbach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, Vipin

    predictive power for some land areas; and still other indices may represent potentially new Earth science temperature anomaly in a region off the coast of Peru, is a climate index that is associated with the El Nino

  15. Oak Ridge reservation land-use plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bibb, W. R.; Hardin, T. H.; Hawkins, C. C.; Johnson, W. A.; Peitzsch, F. C.; Scott, T. H.; Theisen, M. R.; Tuck, S. C.

    1980-03-01

    This study establishes a basis for long-range land-use planning to accommodate both present and projected DOE program requirements in Oak Ridge. In addition to technological requirements, this land-use plan incorporates in-depth ecological concepts that recognize multiple uses of land as a viable option. Neither environmental research nor technological operations need to be mutually exclusive in all instances. Unique biological areas, as well as rare and endangered species, need to be protected, and human and environmental health and safety must be maintained. The plan is based on the concept that the primary use of DOE land resources must be to implement the overall DOE mission in Oak Ridge. This document, along with the base map and overlay maps, provides a reasonably detailed description of the DOE Oak Ridge land resources and of the current and potential uses of the land. A description of the land characteristics, including geomorphology, agricultural productivity and soils, water courses, vegetation, and terrestrial and aquatic animal habitats, is presented to serve as a resource document. Essentially all DOE land in the Oak Ridge area is being fully used for ongoing DOE programs or has been set aside as protected areas.

  16. Investigation of North American vegetation variability under recent climate: A study using the SSiB4/TRIFFID biophysical/dynamic vegetation model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Z; Xue, Y; Macdonald, G; Cox, PM; Collatz, GJ

    2015-01-01

    over land surface water and energy exchange. The coupled12 authors), 2003: Energy, water and broad-scale geographicof energy, water, or water-energy balance explain ©2015

  17. Climate Change 2007: Mitigation of Climate Change.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schiavon, Stefano; Zecchin, Roberto

    2007-01-01

    2007: Mitigation of Climate Change. Full report. WorkingIntergovernmental Panel on Climate Change www.webcda.it LaIntergovernmental Panel on Climate Change”. Il Rapporto

  18. Arctic Landscapes --Complex, Connected and Vulnerable to a Changing Climate Geophysical Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and reliability of climate projections. Earth System Models Models serve as tools for integration and synthesis-atmosphere interactions and their representation in Earth Systems Models. Land-Atmosphere Interactions Land surface for projections of future climate. Representation of heterogene- ity in Earth System Models will be advanced

  19. An Urban Parameterization for a Global Climate Model. Part I: Formulation and Evaluation for Two Cities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oleson, Keith W.; Bonan, Gordon B.; Feddema, Johannes J.; Vertenstein, M.; Grimmond, C.S.B.

    2008-01-01

    stream_size 70935 stream_content_type text/plain stream_name Feddema_Urban_Parameterization_Climate Model_PtI.pdf.txt stream_source_info Feddema_Urban_Parameterization_Climate Model_PtI.pdf.txt Content-Encoding UTF-8 Content-Type..., all of these studies have focused on land use/land cover re- lated to changes in vegetation types. Urbanization, or the expansion of built-up areas, is an important yet less studied aspect of anthropogenic land use/land cover change in climate science...

  20. Predictability and Diagnosis of Low-Frequency Climate Processes in the Pacific

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Arthur J. Miller

    2008-10-15

    Predicting the climate for the coming decades requires understanding both natural and anthropogenically forced climate variability. This variability is important because it has major societal impacts, for example by causing floods or droughts on land or altering fishery stocks in the ocean. Our results fall broadly into three topics: evaluating global climate model predictions; regional impacts of climate changes over western North America; and regional impacts of climate changes over the eastern North Pacific Ocean.

  1. Climate Research Ocean Climate Sta1ons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Climate Research Ocean Climate Sta1ons PI: Meghan Cronin Co Lab Review 2 hClimate Sta-ons are moored buoys #12;Ocean Climate Sta1ons 2014 PMEL Lab Review 5 Contribu-ng to NOAA's Goals

  2. 3/4/14 12:16 PMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 1 of 13http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

    year precipitation through February. Below normal water year #12;3/4/14 12:16 PMNIDIS Drought and Water Resources Conservation Service's SNOTEL water-year- to-date precipitation percentile rankings. The top right below show accumulated snow water equivalent in inches (green) compared to average (blue) and last year

  3. WATER RESOURCES PLANNING ACT Q:\\COMP\\WATER1\\WRPA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    103 WATER RESOURCES PLANNING ACT Q:\\COMP\\WATER1\\WRPA December 29, 2000 #12;Q:\\COMP\\WATER1\\WRPA December 29, 2000 #12;105 WATER RESOURCES PLANNING ACT [As Amended Through P.L. 106­580, Dec. 29, 2000 planning of water and related land resources, through the establishment of a water resources council

  4. Estimation of turbulent surface heat fluxes using sequences of remotely sensed land surface temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bateni, Sayed Mohyeddin

    2011-01-01

    Fluxes of heat and moisture at the land-surface play a significant role in the climate system. These fluxes interact with the overlying atmosphere and influence the characteristics of the planetary boundary layer (e.g. ...

  5. Harmonization of Land-Use Scenarios for the Period 1500-2100: 600 Years of Global Gridded Annual Land-Use Transitions, Wood Harvest, and Resulting Secondary Lands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hurtt, George; Chini, Louise Parsons; Frolking, Steve; Betts, Richard; Feddema, Johannes; Fischer, Gavin M.; Fisk, J.P.; Hibbard, Kathleen A.; Houghton, R. A.; Janetos, Anthony C.; Jones, C.; Kindermann, G.; Kinoshita, Tsuguki; Goldeweijk, Kees K.; Riahi, Keywan; Shevliakova, Elena; Smith, Steven J.; Stehfest, Eike; Thomson, Allison M.; Thornton, P.; Van Vuuren, Detlef; Wang, Y.

    2011-08-08

    In preparation for the fifth Assessment Report (AR5) of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), the international community is developing new advanced Earth System Models (ESM) to assess the combined effects of human activities (e.g. land use and fossil fuel emissions) on the carbon-climate system. In addition, four Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) scenarios of the future (2005-2100) are being provided by four Integrated Assessment Model (IAM) teams to be used as input to the ESMs for future carbon-climate projections (Moss et al., 2010). The diversity of approaches and requirements among IAMs and ESMs for tracking land-use change, along with the dependence of model projections on land-use history, presents a challenge for effectively passing data between these communities and for smoothly transitioning from the historical estimates to future projections. Here, a harmonized set of land-use scenarios are presented that smoothly connects historical reconstructions of land use with future projections, in the format required by ESMs.

  6. Water demands for electricity generation in the U.S.: Modeling different scenarios for the water–energy nexus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Lu; Hejazi, Mohamad I.; Patel, Pralit L.; Kyle, G. Page; Davies, Evan; Zhou, Yuyu; Clarke, Leon E.; Edmonds, James A.

    2015-05-01

    Water withdrawal for electricity generation in the United States accounts for approximately half the total freshwater withdrawal. With steadily growing electricity demands, a changing climate, and limited water supplies in many water-scarce states, meeting future energy and water demands poses a significant socio-economic challenge. Employing an integrated modeling approach that can capture the energy-water interactions at regional and national scales is essential to improve our understanding of the key drivers that govern those interactions and the role of national policies. In this study, the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM), a technologically-detailed integrated model of the economy, energy, agriculture and land use, water, and climate systems, was extended to model the electricity and water systems at the state level in the U.S. (GCAM-USA). GCAM-USA was employed to estimate future state-level electricity generation and consumption, and their associated water withdrawals and consumption under a set of six scenarios with extensive details on the generation fuel portfolio, cooling technology mix, and their associated water use intensities. Six scenarios of future water demands of the U.S. electric-sector were explored to investigate the implications of socioeconomics development and growing electricity demands, climate mitigation policy, the transition of cooling systems, electricity trade, and water saving technologies. Our findings include: 1) decreasing water withdrawals and substantially increasing water consumption from both climate mitigation and the conversion from open-loop to closed-loop cooling systems; 2) open trading of electricity benefiting energy scarce yet demand intensive states; 3) within state variability under different driving forces while across state homogeneity under certain driving force ; 4) a clear trade-off between water consumption and withdrawal for the electricity sector in the U.S. The paper discusses this withdrawal-consumption trade-off in the context of current national policies and regulations that favor decreasing withdrawals (increasing consumptive use), and the role of water saving technologies. The highly-resolved nature of this study both geographically and technologically provides a useful platform to address scientific and policy relevant and emerging issues at the heart of the water-energy nexus in the U.S.

  7. WATER TRAPPING ON TIDALLY LOCKED TERRESTRIAL PLANETS REQUIRES SPECIAL CONDITIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Jun; Abbot, Dorian S.; Liu, Yonggang; Hu, Yongyun

    2014-12-01

    Surface liquid water is essential for standard planetary habitability. Calculations of atmospheric circulation on tidally locked planets around M stars suggest that this peculiar orbital configuration lends itself to the trapping of large amounts of water in kilometers-thick ice on the night side, potentially removing all liquid water from the day side where photosynthesis is possible. We study this problem using a global climate model including coupled atmosphere, ocean, land, and sea ice components as well as a continental ice sheet model driven by the climate model output. For a waterworld, we find that surface winds transport sea ice toward the day side and the ocean carries heat toward the night side. As a result, nightside sea ice remains O(10 m) thick and nightside water trapping is insignificant. If a planet has large continents on its night side, they can grow ice sheets O(1000 m) thick if the geothermal heat flux is similar to Earth's or smaller. Planets with a water complement similar to Earth's would therefore experience a large decrease in sea level when plate tectonics drives their continents onto the night side, but would not experience complete dayside dessiccation. Only planets with a geothermal heat flux lower than Earth's, much of their surface covered by continents, and a surface water reservoir O(10%) of Earth's would be susceptible to complete water trapping.

  8. REVIEW Open Access Climate-smart agriculture global research agenda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pasternack, Gregory B.

    , climate risk management and energy and biofuels (theme 1); and modelling adaptation and uncertainty; (4) reductions in the risk that can present formidable barriers for farmers during adoption of new technology and practices; and (5) an understanding of how climate affects the rural labour force, land tenure

  9. Valuing climate impacts in integrated assessment models: the MIT IGSM*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    interactions among natural and human climate system components; objectively assess uncertainty in economic, monitor and verify greenhouse gas emissions and climatic impacts. This reprint is one of a series intended to their daily lives--crop yield, food prices, premature death, flooding or drought events, land use change

  10. Sandia Energy - White House Business Council Roundtable on Water

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Protected: White House Business Council Roundtable on Water Home Climate Water Security Protected: White House Business Council Roundtable on Water Previous Next Protected: White...

  11. Climate Systems and Climate Change Is Climate Change Real?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pan, Feifei

    Chapter 10 Climate Systems and Climate Change #12;Is Climate Change Real? 1980 1898 2005 2003 #12;Arctic Sea Ice Changes #12;Observed Global Surface Air Temperature #12;! Current climate: weather station data, remote sensing data, numerical modeling using General Circulation Models (GCM) ! Past climate

  12. Idaho National Laboratory/Nuclear Power Industry Strategic Plan for Light Water Reactor Research and Development An Industry-Government Partnership to Address Climate Change and Energy Security

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Electric Power Research

    2007-11-01

    The dual issues of energy security and climate change mitigation are driving a renewed debate over how to best provide safe, secure, reliable and environmentally responsible electricity to our nation. The combination of growing energy demand and aging electricity generation infrastructure suggests major new capacity additions will be required in the years ahead.

  13. Impacts of Climate Change on Energy Consumption and Peak Demand in Buildings: A Detailed Regional Approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dirks, James A.; Gorrissen, Willy J.; Hathaway, John E.; Skorski, Daniel C.; Scott, Michael J.; Pulsipher, Trenton C.; Huang, Maoyi; Liu, Ying; Rice, Jennie S.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the results of numerous commercial and residential building simulations, with the purpose of examining the impact of climate change on peak and annual building energy consumption over the portion of the Eastern Interconnection (EIC) located in the United States. The climate change scenario considered (IPCC A2 scenario as downscaled from the CASCaDE data set) has changes in mean climate characteristics as well as changes in the frequency and duration of intense weather events. This investigation examines building energy demand for three annual periods representative of climate trends in the CASCaDE data set at the beginning, middle, and end of the century--2004, 2052, and 2089. Simulations were performed using the Building ENergy Demand (BEND) model which is a detailed simulation platform built around EnergyPlus. BEND was developed in collaboration with the Platform for Regional Integrated Modeling and Analysis (PRIMA), a modeling framework designed to simulate the complex interactions among climate, energy, water, and land at decision-relevant spatial scales. Over 26,000 building configurations of different types, sizes, vintages, and, characteristics which represent the population of buildings within the EIC, are modeled across the 3 EIC time zones using the future climate from 100 locations within the target region, resulting in nearly 180,000 spatially relevant simulated demand profiles for each of the 3 years. In this study, the building stock characteristics are held constant based on the 2005 building stock in order to isolate and present results that highlight the impact of the climate signal on commercial and residential energy demand. Results of this analysis compare well with other analyses at their finest level of specificity. This approach, however, provides a heretofore unprecedented level of specificity across multiple spectrums including spatial, temporal, and building characteristics. This capability enables the ability to perform detailed hourly impact studies of building adaptation and mitigation strategies on energy use and electricity peak demand within the context of the entire grid and economy.

  14. Climate Change Science and Impacts In the Western Lake Superior Region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    Climate Change Science and Impacts In the Western Lake Superior Region Duluth September 22, 2011 David S. Liebl Mark Seeley Dept. of Soil, Water and Climate University Of Minnesota #12;Overview · Understanding climate change · WICCI climate projections · Minnesota's changing climate · Projected impacts

  15. 11/19/13 11:40 AMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 1 of 13http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

    Resources Conservation Service's SNOTEL water-year- to-date precipitation percentile rankings. The top right below show accumulated snow water equivalent in inches (green) compared to average (blue) and last year11/19/13 11:40 AMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 1 of 13http

  16. 11/12/13 11:57 AMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 1 of 13http://climate.colostate.edu/%7Edrought/current_assessment.php

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

    /current_assessment.php The top left image shows the Natural Resources Conservation Service's SNOTEL water-year- to-date precipitation percentile rankings. The top right image shows sub-basin averaged snow water equivalent accumulations as a percent of average. The images below show accumulated snow water equivalent in inches (green

  17. 5/12/2015 NIDIS Drought and Water Assessment http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php 1/16

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

    . Water Year 2015 Precipitation (OctApril): The Water Year percent of normal continues to be below normal5/12/2015 NIDIS Drought and Water Assessment httpCoRaHS, and CoAgMet stations. From top to bottom, and left to right: most recent 7days of accumulated

  18. 5/14/13 1:41 PMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 1 of 11http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

    rankings. The top right image shows sub-basin averaged snow #12;5/14/13 1:41 PMNIDIS Drought and Water accumulations as a percent of average. The images below show accumulated snow water equivalent in inches (green5/14/13 1:41 PMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 1 of 11http

  19. 5/21/13 11:32 AMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 1 of 11http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

    rankings. The top right image shows sub-basin averaged snow water equivalent accumulations as a percent of average. The images below show accumulated #12;5/21/13 11:32 AMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 35/21/13 11:32 AMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 1 of 11http

  20. 4/15/14 12:09 PMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 1 of 13http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

    's SNOTEL water-year- to-date precipitation percentile rankings. The top right image shows sub-basin averaged snow water equivalent accumulations as a percent of average. The images below show accumulated4/15/14 12:09 PMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 1 of 13http

  1. 4/30/13 1:29 PMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 1 of 11http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

    . SNOTEL AND SNOWPACK The top left image shows the Natural Resources Conservation Service's SNOTEL water-year- to-date precipitation percentile rankings. The top right image shows sub-basin averaged snow water equivalent accumulations as a percent of average. The images below show accumulated snow water equivalent

  2. 5/20/14, 12:27 PMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 1 of 13http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

    . The top right image shows sub-basin averaged snow water equivalent accumulations as a percent of average. The images below show accumulated snow water equivalent in inches (green) compared to average (blue) and last5/20/14, 12:27 PMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 1 of 13http

  3. 3/18/14 1:17 PMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 1 of 14http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

    below normal moisture through much of the valley bottom in February. Water Year Precipitation (Oct and Baca counties saw less than 50% of their normal water year precipitation through February. Below normal. The top right image shows sub-basin averaged snow water equivalent accumulations as a percent of average

  4. 12/23/2014 NIDIS Drought and Water Assessment http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php 1/13

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

    moisture for the water year through November. Portions of Kiowa and Prowers are slightly below normal's SNOTEL water yeartodate precipitation percentile rankings. The top right image shows subbasin averaged snow water equivalent accumulations as a percent of average. The images below show accumulated snow

  5. 12/3/13 3:07 PMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 1 of 13http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

    Resources Conservation Service's SNOTEL water-year- to-date precipitation percentile rankings. The top right below show accumulated snow water equivalent in inches (green) compared to average (blue) and last year12/3/13 3:07 PMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 1 of 13http

  6. 4/16/13 12:22 PMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 1 of 11http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

    . The top right image shows sub-basin averaged snow water equivalent accumulations as a percent of average. The images below show accumulated snow water equivalent in inches (green) compared to average (blue) and last4/16/13 12:22 PMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 1 of 11http

  7. 4/23/13 2:01 PMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 1 of 11http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

    . SNOTEL AND SNOWPACK The top left image shows the Natural Resources Conservation Service's SNOTEL water-year- to-date precipitation percentile rankings. The top right image shows sub-basin averaged snow water equivalent accumulations as a percent of average. The images below show accumulated snow water equivalent

  8. 4/22/14 2:26 PMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 1 of 13http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

    's SNOTEL water-year- to-date precipitation percentile rankings. The top right image shows sub-basin averaged snow water equivalent accumulations as a percent of average. The images below show accumulated4/22/14 2:26 PMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 1 of 13http

  9. 12/24/13 9:27 AMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 1 of 13http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

    Resources Conservation Service's SNOTEL water-year- to-date precipitation percentile rankings. The top right below show accumulated snow water equivalent in inches (green) compared to average (blue) and last year12/24/13 9:27 AMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 1 of 13http

  10. 6/11/13 12:15 PMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 1 of 12http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

    percentile rankings. The top right image shows sub-basin averaged snow water equivalent accumulations as a percent of average. The images below show accumulated snow water equivalent in inches (green) compared6/11/13 12:15 PMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 1 of 12http

  11. 3/11/14 2:53 PMNIDIS Drought and Water Assessment Page 1 of 15http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

    below normal moisture through much of the valley bottom in February. Water Year Precipitation (Oct February. Below normal water year precipitation predominates much of the lower Arkansas valley. SNOTEL AND SNOWPACK The top left image shows the Natural Resources Conservation Service's SNOTEL water-year- to

  12. Sandia Energy - Energy and Water Data Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy and Water Data Portal Home Climate & Earth Systems WaterEnergy Nexus Decision Models for Integrating EnergyWater Energy and Water in the Western and Texas Interconnects...

  13. he climate contrarian voice has beenprominentinmediadiscus-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Risbey, James S.

    discredited because the warming isn't strictly monotonic. In practice, climate change is imposed on top produces a US warming record that is virtually identical to NOAA's. The New Zealand land record is now. If the method of science can be viewed as a house of cards, then an attack on any one of those cards

  14. Sustainable bioenergy production from marginal lands in the US Midwest

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gelfand, Ilya; Sahajpal, Ritvik; Zhang, Xuesong; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Gross, Katherine L.; Robertson, G. P.

    2013-01-24

    Long-term measurements of global warming impact coupled with spatially explicit modeling suggests that both climate benefits and the production potential of cellulosic crops grown on marginal lands of the US North Central region are substantial but will be insufficient to meet long-term biofuel needs.

  15. Sandia Energy - Arctic Climate Measurements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Arctic Climate Measurements Home Climate & Earth Systems Climate Measurement & Modeling Arctic Climate Measurements Arctic Climate Measurementscwdd2015-05-08T01:51:20+00:00 A...

  16. An update on modeling land-ice/ocean interactions in CESM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Asay-davis, Xylar

    2011-01-24

    This talk is an update on ongoing land-ice/ocean coupling work within the Community Earth System Model (CESM). The coupling method is designed to allow simulation of a fully dynamic ice/ocean interface, while requiring minimal modification to the existing ocean model (the Parallel Ocean Program, POP). The method makes use of an immersed boundary method (IBM) to represent the geometry of the ice-ocean interface without requiring that the computational grid be modified in time. We show many of the remaining development challenges that need to be addressed in order to perform global, century long climate runs with fully coupled ocean and ice sheet models. These challenges include moving to a new grid where the computational pole is no longer at the true south pole and several changes to the coupler (the software tool used to communicate between model components) to allow the boundary between land and ocean to vary in time. We discuss benefits for ice/ocean coupling that would be gained from longer-term ocean model development to allow for natural salt fluxes (which conserve both water and salt mass, rather than water volume).

  17. U.S. House Committee on Natural Resources Subcommittee on National Parks, Forests and Public Lands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boynton, Walter R.

    U.S. House Committee on Natural Resources Subcommittee on National Parks, Forests and Public Lands assessments of the impacts of climate change. Notably, these include: the report Global Warming and the Free House, Global Climate Change Impacts in the United States. By the way, this last national assessment

  18. Review: Global Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    introduction to global climate change, the greenhouseReview: Global Climate Change: A Primer By Orrin H PilkeyPilkey, Keith C. Global Climate Change: a primer. Durham,

  19. Apportioning Climate Change Costs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farber, Daniel A.

    2008-01-01

    Apportioning Climate Change Costs Daniel A. Farber* I. II.ON CLIMATE CHANGE FOUR QUESTIONS ABOUTof how to respond to climate change. Most public attention

  20. Climate Engineering Responses to Climate Emergencies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Battisti, David

    Novim Climate Engineering Responses to Climate Emergencies Jason J. Blackstock David S. Battisti Santa Barbara, California #12;Climate Engineering Responses to Climate Emergencies This report should, A. A. N. Patrinos, D. P. Schrag, R. H. Socolow and S. E. Koonin, Climate Engineering Responses

  1. CLIMATE AND CLIMATE CHANGE CERTAINTIES AND UNCERTAINTIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwartz, Stephen E.

    CLIMATE AND CLIMATE CHANGE CERTAINTIES AND UNCERTAINTIES Stephen E. Schwartz http://www.ecd.bnl.gov/steve/schwartz.html December 4, 2001 Updated, March 4, 2002 #12;OUTLINE · Overview of the Earth climate system · Increased concentrations of "greenhouse gases" · Radiative forcing of climate change · Climate system response

  2. Water Resources Challenges in the Next Decade and Beyond - Global Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerald Sehlke

    2008-05-01

    One of the most pressing issues facing water resources professionals in the next decade is “Global Change” and its impacts on humans and the environment. Global change research focuses on the anthropogenic aspects of climate change, land use change, water resources development and urbanization. Global change, at its root, is driven by two major factors; first, the overall size and growth of the human population, and second, by a combination of our life styles, our economies and technology development. Arguably, much of the success associated with human survival and prosperity has been related to our ability to control and utilize water resources to our benefit. However, while such development has helped extend human longevity, health and prosperity, our activities have greatly altered the earth’s climate and land and water resources. The hydrological and biological capacity of the earth must be shared by all living creatures. The challenges for water resources professionals in the next decade and beyond are to limit our population growth, to moderate our life styles and economies, and to develop technologies that will provide for our human needs, yet protect and maintain the earth’s environment for all current and future inhabitants.

  3. Biosphere-atmosphere interactions over semi-arid regions : modeling the role of mineral aerosols and irrigation in the regional climate system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marcella, Marc Pace

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation describes the role of land surface processes in shaping semi-arid climates, namely those of Southwest Asia and Northwest Africa. The interactions between dust emissions, irrigation, and climate processes ...

  4. Sensitivity of Surface Flux Simulations to Hydrologic Parameters Based on an Uncertainty Quantification Framework Applied to the Community Land Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hou, Zhangshuan; Huang, Maoyi; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Lin, Guang; Ricciuto, Daniel M.

    2012-08-10

    Uncertainties in hydrologic parameters could have significant impacts on the simulated water and energy fluxes and land surface states, which will in turn affect atmospheric processes and the carbon cycle. Quantifying such uncertainties is an important step toward better understanding and quantification of uncertainty of integrated earth system models. In this paper, we introduce an uncertainty quantification (UQ) framework to analyze sensitivity of simulated surface fluxes to selected hydrologic parameters in the Community Land Model (CLM4) through forward modeling. Thirteen flux tower footprints spanning a wide range of climate and site conditions were selected to perform sensitivity analyses by perturbing the parameters identified. In the UQ framework, prior information about the parameters was used to quantify the input uncertainty using the Minimum-Relative-Entropy approach. The quasi-Monte Carlo approach was applied to generate samples of parameters on the basis of the prior pdfs. Simulations corresponding to sampled parameter sets were used to generate response curves and response surfaces and statistical tests were used to rank the significance of the parameters for output responses including latent (LH) and sensible heat (SH) fluxes. Overall, the CLM4 simulated LH and SH show the largest sensitivity to subsurface runoff generation parameters. However, study sites with deep root vegetation are also affected by surface runoff parameters, while sites with shallow root zones are also sensitive to the vadose zone soil water parameters. Generally, sites with finer soil texture and shallower rooting systems tend to have larger sensitivity of outputs to the parameters. Our results suggest the necessity of and possible ways for parameter inversion/calibration using available measurements of latent/sensible heat fluxes to obtain the optimal parameter set for CLM4. This study also provided guidance on reduction of parameter set dimensionality and parameter calibration framework design for CLM4 and other land surface models under different hydrologic and climatic regimes.

  5. Climate variability and climate change vulnerability and adaptation. Workshop summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhatti, N.; Cirillo, R.R.; Dixon, R.K.

    1995-12-31

    Representatives from fifteen countries met in Prague, Czech Republic, on September 11-15, 1995, to share results from the analysis of vulnerability and adaptation to global climate change. The workshop focused on the issues of global climate change and its impacts on various sectors of a national economy. The U.N. Framework Convention on Climate Change (FCCC), which has been signed by more than 150 governments worldwide, calls on signatory parties to develop and communicate measures they are implementing to respond to global climate change. An analysis of a country`s vulnerability to changes in the climate helps it identify suitable adaptation measures. These analyses are designed to determine the extent of the impacts of global climate change on sensitive sectors such as agricultural crops, forests, grasslands and livestock, water resources, and coastal areas. Once it is determined how vulnerable a country may be to climate change, it is possible to identify adaptation measures for ameliorating some or all of the effects.The objectives of the vulnerability and adaptation workshop were to: The objectives of the vulnerability and adaptation workshop were to: Provide an opportunity for countries to describe their study results; Encourage countries to learn from the experience of the more complete assessments and adjust their studies accordingly; Identify issues and analyses that require further investigation; and Summarize results and experiences for governmental and intergovernmental organizations.

  6. Extreme Climate Event Trends: The Data Mining and Evaluation of the A1FI Scenario for 2000???2100

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erickson III, David J; Ganguly, Auroop R; Steinhaeuser, Karsten J K; Branstetter, Marcia L; Oglesby, Robert; Hoffman, Forrest M; Buja, Lawrence

    2008-01-01

    The authors discuss the implications and resulting alterations of the hydrologic cycle as Earth climate evolves from 2000-2100. Climate simulations based on the assumptions implicit in the A1F1 scenario for the period 2000-2100 using CCSM3 are analyzed. In particular, we will assess the changes in the surface latent and sensible heat energy budget, the Indian regional water budgets including trends in the timing and duration of the Indian monsoon and the resulting impacts on mean river flow and hydroelectric power generation potential. These analyses will also be examined within the context of heat index, droughts, floods and related estimates of societal robustness and resiliency. We will interpret these new A1F1 results within the context of the previous climate simulations based on the SRES A2 and B1 scenarios forced with land cover and atmospheric CO2. Analyses of historical records in the context of the Indian Monsoon Rainfall (IMR) have suggested an evolving relation of IMR with natural climate variability caused by El Nino events. We will report on the combined effects of natural climate variability and global warming on IMR and assess the trend of extreme rain and temperature events in a warming environment.

  7. 3/10/2015 NIDIS Drought and Water Assessment http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php 1/15

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

    /White have below normal moisture #12;3/10/2015 NIDIS Drought and Water Assessment http3/10/2015 NIDIS Drought and Water Assessment httpCoRaHS, and CoAgMet stations. From top to bottom, and left to right: most recent 7days of accumulated

  8. 11/25/2014 NIDIS Drought and Water Assessment http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php 1/14

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

    . The distinction between above areas with above and below a normal water year here is very spotty. Western11/25/2014 NIDIS Drought and Water Assessment httpCoRaHS, and CoAgMet stations. From top to bottom, and left to right: most recent 7days of accumulated

  9. 10/21/2014 NIDIS Drought and Water Assessment http://climate.colostate.edu/~drought/current_assessment.php 1/14

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

    between above areas with above and below a normal water year here is very spotty. Western Colorado10/21/2014 NIDIS Drought and Water Assessment httpCoRaHS, and CoAgMet stations. From top to bottom, and left to right: most recent 7-days of accumulated

  10. UNSATURATED ZONE CALCITE 813C EVIDENCE OF SOUTHERN NEVADA CLIMATES DURING THE PAST 9 MILLION YEARS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JOSEPH F. WHELAN AND RICHARD J. MOSCATI

    1998-01-26

    Yucca Mountain, Nevada, is presently the object of intense study as a potential permanent repository for the Nation's high-level radioactive wastes. The mountain consists of a thick sequence of volcanic tuffs in which the depth to the water table ranges from 500 to 700 meters below the land surface. This thick unsaturated zone (UZ), which would host the projected repository, coupled with the present-day arid to semi-arid environment, is considered a positive argument for the site. Evaluation of the site includes defining the relationship between climate variability, as the input function or driver of site- and regional-scale ground-water flow, and the possible transport and release of radionuclides. Secondary calcite and opal have been deposited in the UZ by meteoric waters that infiltrated through overlying soils and percolated through the tuffs. The oxygen isotopic composition ({delta}{sup 18}O values) of these minerals reflect contemporaneous meteoric waters and the {delta}{sup 13}C values reflect soil organic matter, and hence the resident plant community, at the time of infiltration (Whelan et al., 1994). Recent U/Pb age determinations of opal in these occurrences allows the {delta}{sup 13}C values of associated calcite to be used to reconstruct general climate variations during the past 9 M.y.

  11. "Managing Department Climate Change"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    "Managing Department Climate Change" #12;Presenters · Ronda Callister Professor, Department Department Climate? · Assesment is essential for determining strategies for initiating change · In a research climate · Each panelist will describe an intervention designed to improve department climate ­ Ronda

  12. Global climate change crosses state boundaries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Changnon, S.A.

    1996-12-31

    The hot, dry summer of 1988 brought the specter of global warming a bit too close for comfort. {open_quotes}Scorching heat, not scientific models, attracted media attention,{close_quotes} says Stanley A. Changnon, senior scientist with the Illinois State Water Survey in Champaign, Illinois. Rising temperatures in the late 1980`s prompted individual states to begin to take action to curb greenhouse-gas emissions. A 1990 report by the National Governors Association identified two guiding principles for addressing climate change issues. {open_quotes}First, that energy policy must be at the center of any efforts to control greenhouse-gas emissions. Second, that state can...restrict emissions through state policies related to public utilities, land use, transportation, and even taxation,{close_quotes} Changnon says. Even if concerns for global warming prove to be overblown, states decided to act for broader economic and environmental reasons. Such initiatives not only save money, but they improve air quality and leave the nation more energy independent,{close_quotes} Changnon says.

  13. Climate Change and Extinctions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sinervo, Barry

    2013-01-01

    Lectures presents: Climate Change and Extinctions Happening2013. He will present a climate change extinction model that

  14. RESOURCES FOR OUTDOOR WATER USE DETERMINATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Melody, Moya

    2014-01-01

    multiple estimates of future water consumption for each yearto produce a single estimate of water use for each forecastDepartment of Land, Air and Water Resources, UC Davis, and

  15. COLLABORATIVE RESEARCH: TOWARDS ADVANCED UNDERSTANDING AND PREDICTIVE CAPABILITY OF CLIMATE CHANGE IN THE ARCTIC USING A HIGH-RESOLUTION REGIONAL ARCTIC CLIMATE SYSTEM MODEL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gutowski, William J.

    2013-02-07

    The motivation for this project was to advance the science of climate change and prediction in the Arctic region. Its primary goals were to (i) develop a state-of-the-art Regional Arctic Climate system Model (RACM) including high-resolution atmosphere, land, ocean, sea ice and land hydrology components and (ii) to perform extended numerical experiments using high performance computers to minimize uncertainties and fundamentally improve current predictions of climate change in the northern polar regions. These goals were realized first through evaluation studies of climate system components via one-way coupling experiments. Simulations were then used to examine the effects of advancements in climate component systems on their representation of main physics, time-mean fields and to understand variability signals at scales over many years. As such this research directly addressed some of the major science objectives of the BER Climate Change Research Division (CCRD) regarding the advancement of long-term climate prediction.

  16. Title: Canada Land Inventory: Land Capability for Agriculture Data Creator /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Ontario, Prince Edward Island, Quebec, Saskatchewan Keywords (Subject): Land Use, Soils, Agriculture

  17. Title: Canada Land Inventory: Land Capability for Forestry Data Creator /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Ontario, Prince Edward Island, Quebec, Saskatchewan #12;Keywords (Subject): Land Use, Soils, Vegetation

  18. Drought Update Colorado Climate Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2003 Water Year 2nd Min Year - 1950 #12;© 2003 by The Colorado Climate Center. 7 Division 3 Montrose #2 Water Year (through October '02 - April '03) 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 O C T N O V D EC JAN FEB M A R AP R M A Y JUN JUL AU G SE P Months AccumulatedPrecipitation(Inches) 30 Year Averages-1971-2000 Max Year

  19. Global Climate Change and Agriculture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Izaurralde, Roberto C.

    2009-01-01

    The Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change released in 2007 significantly increased our confidence about the role that humans play in forcing climate change. There is now a high degree of confidence that the (a) current atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) far exceed those of the pre-industrial era, (b) global increases in CO2 arise mainly from fossil fuel use and land use change while those of CH4 and N2O originate primarily from agricultural activities, and (c) the net effect of human activities since 1750 has led to a warming of the lower layers of the atmosphere, with an increased radiative forcing of 1.6 W m-2. Depending on the scenario of human population growth and global development, mean global temperatures could rise between 1.8 and 4.0 °C by the end of the 21st century.

  20. Uncertainty in climate science and climate policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Uncertainty in climate science and climate policy Jonathan Rougier University of Bristol, UK Michel1.tex. 1 Introduction This essay, written by a statistician and a climate scientist, describes our view of the gap that exists between current practice in mainstream climate science, and the practical

  1. Use of Climate Data in Climate Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    von Storch, Hans

    Use of Climate Data in Climate Research A Random Walk Through the MPI Hans von Storch Max and Technical Committee of the Global Climate Observing System in Hamburg, Germany September 19 - 22, 1994 #12;For which- Purposes do we Use 0bserved Data · Climate modelling - Design of parameterisations

  2. RELATING CLIMATE FORCINGS AND CLIMATE RESPONSE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwartz, Stephen E.

    RELATING CLIMATE FORCINGS AND CLIMATE RESPONSE Stephen E. Schwartz Upton NY USA Bern, Switzerland change are tightly correlated. Forcing by GHGs only leads to extremely low climate sensitivity, well to rapid changes in forcings by stratospheric volcanic aerosols. Climate sensitivity is quite low, probably

  3. Climate Summary Working toward Climate Resilience

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    1 Climate Summary Working toward Climate Resilience A Summary Prepared for the Town of Germantown and decision-making as requested by the Town of Germantown. It identifies historic climate trends and introduces future projections and strategies to address the climate hazards most likely to affect Hudson

  4. CLIMATE VARIABILITY, CLIMATE CHANGE, AND WESTERN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keeton, William S.

    CHAPTER 13 CLIMATE VARIABILITY, CLIMATE CHANGE, AND WESTERN WILDFIRE WITH IMPLICATIONS FOR THE URBAN­WILDLAND INTERFACE William S. Keeton, Philip W. Mote and Jerry F. Franklin ABSTRACT Climate change hazards by the warmer, drier summers projected for much of the western U.S. by climate models would

  5. CLIMATE AND CLIMATE CHANGE SCIENTIFIC BACKGROUND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwartz, Stephen E.

    CLIMATE AND CLIMATE CHANGE SCIENTIFIC BACKGROUND FOR INFORMED DECISION-MAKING Stephen E. Schwartz Climate Research Unit, East Anglia UK #12;INDICATIONS OF SYSTEMATIC WARMING IN RECENT YEARS The 1990s were call the anthropocene climate regime. Over the 20th century, human population quadrupled and energy

  6. USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-193. 2004. 43 Recent Projections of 21st-Century Climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Westerling, Anthony L.

    in the atmosphere. The model, part of the Department of Energy-funded Accelerated Climate Prediction Initiative, and ecosystems. Simulated temperatures in climate-model grid cells over Northern California began to warm notably by the coupled global atmosphere-ocean-ice- land Parallel Climate Model (PCM) in response to historical

  7. Land-use Leakage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Calvin, Katherine V.; Edmonds, James A.; Clarke, Leon E.; Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; Kim, Son H.; Wise, Marshall A.; Thomson, Allison M.; Kyle, G. Page

    2009-12-01

    Leakage occurs whenever actions to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions in one part of the world unleash countervailing forces elsewhere in the world so that reductions in global emissions are less than emissions mitigation in the mitigating region. While many researchers have examined the concept of industrial leakage, land-use policies can also result in leakage. We show that land-use leakage is potentially as large as or larger than industrial leakage. We identify two potential land-use leakage drivers, land-use policies and bioenergy. We distinguish between these two pathways and run numerical experiments for each. We also show that the land-use policy environment exerts a powerful influence on leakage and that under some policy designs leakage can be negative. International “offsets” are a potential mechanism to communicate emissions mitigation beyond the borders of emissions mitigating regions, but in a stabilization regime designed to limit radiative forcing to 3.7 2/m2, this also implies greater emissions mitigation commitments on the part of mitigating regions.

  8. Energy and land use

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-12-01

    This report addresses the land use impacts of past and future energy development and summarizes the major federal and state legislation which influences the potential land use impacts of energy facilities and can thus influence the locations and timing of energy development. In addition, this report describes and presents the data which are used to measure, and in some cases, predict the potential conflicts between energy development and alternative uses of the nation's land resources. The topics section of this report is divided into three parts. The first part describes the myriad of federal, state and local legislation which have a direct or indirect impact upon the use of land for energy development. The second part addresses the potential land use impacts associated with the extraction, conversion and combustion of energy resources, as well as the disposal of wastes generated by these processes. The third part discusses the conflicts that might arise between agriculture and energy development as projected under a number of DOE mid-term (1990) energy supply and demand scenarios.

  9. Climate Change, Adaptation, and Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cole, Daniel H.

    2008-01-01

    Climate Change, Adaptation, and Development Daniel H. Cole*THE COSTS OF CLIMATE CHANGE . ADAPTATIONCONVENTION ON CLIMATE CHANGE . IV. A.

  10. NREL Evaluates Performance of Heat Pump Water Heaters (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-02-01

    NREL evaluates energy savings potential of heat pump water heaters in homes throughout all U.S. climate zones.

  11. Climate Sensitivity of the Community Climate System Model, Version 4

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bitz, Cecilia M.; Shell, K. M.; Gent, P. R.; Bailey, D. A.; Danabasoglu, G.; Armour, K. C.; Holland, M. M.; Kiehl, J. T.

    2012-05-01

    Equilibrium climate sensitivity of the Community Climate System Model Version 4 (CCSM4) is 3.20°C for 1° horizontal resolution in each component. This is about a half degree Celsius higher than in the previous version (CCSM3). The transient climate sensitivity of CCSM4 at 1° resolution is 1.72°C, which is about 0.2°C higher than in CCSM3. These higher climate sensitivities in CCSM4 cannot be explained by the change to a preindustrial baseline climate. We use the radiative kernel technique to show that from CCSM3 to CCSM4, the global mean lapse-rate feedback declines in magnitude, and the shortwave cloud feedback increases. These twomore »warming effects are partially canceled by cooling due to slight decreases in the global mean water-vapor feedback and longwave cloud feedback from CCSM3 to CCSM4. A new formulation of the mixed-layer, slab ocean model in CCSM4 attempts to reproduce the SST and sea ice climatology from an integration with a full-depth ocean, and it is integrated with a dynamic sea ice model. These new features allow an isolation of the influence of ocean dynamical changes on the climate response when comparing integrations with the slab ocean and full-depth ocean. The transient climate response of the full-depth ocean version is 0.54 of the equilibrium climate sensitivity when estimated with the new slab ocean model version for both CCSM3 and CCSM4. We argue the ratio is the same in both versions because they have about the same zonal mean pattern of change in ocean surface heat flux, which broadly resembles the zonal mean pattern of net feedback strength.« less

  12. Water Balance AnalysisWater Balance Analysis C. P. KumarC. P. Kumar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, C.P.

    Water Balance AnalysisWater Balance Analysis C. P. KumarC. P. Kumar Scientist `F'Scientist `FIntroduction ØØ Hydrologic CycleHydrologic Cycle ØØ Basic Concept of Water BalanceBasic Concept of Water Balance ØØ Water Balance of Unsaturated ZoneWater Balance of Unsaturated Zone ØØ Water Balance at Land

  13. Higher U.S. Crop Prices Trigger Little Area Expansion so Marginal Land for Biofuel Crops Is Limited

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swinton, S.; Babcock, Bruce; James, Laura; Bandaru, Varaprasad

    2011-06-12

    By expanding energy biomass production on marginal lands that are not currently used for crops, food price increases and indirect climate change effects can be mitigated. Studies of the availability of marginal lands for dedicated bioenergy crops have focused on biophysical land traits, ignoring the human role in decisions to convert marginal land to bioenergy crops. Recent history offers insights about farmer willingness to put non-crop land into crop production. The 2006-09 leap in field crop prices and the attendant 64% gain in typical profitability led to only a 2% increase in crop planted area, mostly in the prairie states

  14. Climate Update September 24, 2003 WATF meeting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2003 Water Year 2nd Min Year - 1950 #12;Division 3 Mesa Verde NP 2003 Water Year (through October '02.ncdc.noaa.gov/oa/climate/research/prelim/drought/st005dv00pcp.html #12;Water Year 2003 (October 2002 ­ August 2003) precipitation as a percent of the 1971-2000 averages. #12;WY 2003 Temperature Departures Water Year 2003 -6 -4 -2 0 2 4 6 8 10 Oct Nov

  15. 150 G. Marland et al. / Climate Policy 3 (2003) 149157 Strategies to mitigate anthropogenic climate change recognize that carbon sequestration in the terrestrial biosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niyogi, Dev

    2003-01-01

    anthropogenic climate change recognize that carbon sequestration in the terrestrial biosphere can reduce to create a system of credits and debits wherein emission or sequestration of carbon in the biosphere; Carbon sequestration; Land use change; Land surface change; Surface energy balance 1. Introduction Human

  16. Climate Action Plan 2013 Update

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rose, Michael R.

    UC Irvine Climate Action Plan 2013 Update #12;CLIMATE ACTION PLAN - 2013 UPDATE 1 TABLE OF CONTENTS CLIMATE PROTECTION GOALS...............................................................18 OPPORTUNITIES-2050 CLIMATE NEUTRALITY.........................................................29 MEDICALCENTER IMPLEMENTATION

  17. February 2012 Towards Integrated Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    February 2012 Towards Integrated Water Resources Management A Conceptual Framework for U.S.Army Corps of Engineers Water and Related Land Resources Implementation Studies 2012-VSP-01 #12;Throughout its history, the Institute for Water Resources (IWR) has invited preeminent water resources

  18. Tree Death Study's Climate Change Connections

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    McDowell, Nate

    2014-06-25

    What are the exact physiological mechanisms that lead to tree death during prolonged drought and rising temperatures? These are the questions that scientists are trying to answer at a Los Alamos National Laboratory research project called SUMO. SUMO stands for SUrvival/MOrtality study; it's a plot of land on the Lab's southern border that features 18 climate controlled tree study chambers and a large drought structure that limits rain and snowfall. Scientists are taking a wide variety of measurements over a long period of time to determine what happens during drought and warming, and what the connections and feedback loops might be between tree death and climate change.

  19. Tree Death Study's Climate Change Connections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDowell, Nate

    2012-09-10

    What are the exact physiological mechanisms that lead to tree death during prolonged drought and rising temperatures? These are the questions that scientists are trying to answer at a Los Alamos National Laboratory research project called SUMO. SUMO stands for SUrvival/MOrtality study; it's a plot of land on the Lab's southern border that features 18 climate controlled tree study chambers and a large drought structure that limits rain and snowfall. Scientists are taking a wide variety of measurements over a long period of time to determine what happens during drought and warming, and what the connections and feedback loops might be between tree death and climate change.

  20. The Outcome of the Climate Conference in Copehagen and its Implication...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    The Outcome of the Climate Conference in Copehagen and its Implications for the Land Transport Sector Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: The Outcome of the...

  1. The economic impacts of climate change : evidence from agricultural profits and random fluctuations in weather

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deschênes, Olivier

    2006-01-01

    This paper measures the economic impact of climate change on US agricultural land by estimating the effect of the presumably random year-to-year variation in temperature and precipitation on agricultural profits. Using ...

  2. The Economic Impacts of Climate Change: Evidence from Agricultural Profits and Random Fluctuations of Weather

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deschenes, Olivier.

    This paper measures the economic impact of climate change on agricultural land in the United States by estimating the effect of the presumably random year-to-year variation in temperature and precipitation on agricultural ...

  3. Plugging Abandoned Water Wells 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2002-02-28

    is abandoned without proper plugging, upward flow of salty water from the deeper aquifer may cause contamination of the shallow, fresh water aquifer. Also, any pollu- tants that occur in one zone can migrate to another zone through a well. Unplugged abandoned... wells may deplete pres- sure within an aquifer. Pressure in artesian aquifers decreases as water discharges at land surface or to less pressurized aquifers. Eventually a drop in pres- sure causes flowing wells to stop flowing and the water level...

  4. Climate Change Scoping Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Climate Change Scoping Plan a amework for change as approved Prepared by the California AirBackgroundBackgroundBackground ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 4444 1. Climate Change Policy in California1. Climate Change Policy in California1. Climate Change Policy in California1. Climate Change Policy in California

  5. Climate change action plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delivery Climate change action plan 2009-2011 #12;2 | Climate change action plan ©istockphoto.com #12;Climate Change Action Plan Climate change action plan | 3 Contents Overview 4 Preface and Introduction 5 Climate change predictions for Scotland 6 The role of forestry 7 Protecting and managing

  6. Climate Change Scoping Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Climate Change Scoping Plan a amework for change Prepared by the California Air Resources BoardBackgroundBackgroundBackground ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 4444 1. Climate Change Policy in California1. Climate Change Policy in California1. Climate Change Policy in California1. Climate Change Policy in California

  7. Research priorities in land use and land-cover change for the Earth system and integrated assessment modelling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hibbard, Kathy; Janetos, Anthony; van Vuuren, Detlef P.; Pongtatz, Julia; Rose, Steven K.; Betts, Richard; Herold, Martin; Feddema, Johannes J.

    2010-01-01

    for integration into ESMs and IAMs. A key application will be for the detection and attribution of historical climate change; previous detection and attribution studies have been unable to include land-cover change credibly in their range of potential drivers... Index time series, fire observations, night-time lights, hot-spot detection, etc.), a new level of data products and information on land dynamics will soon become available for different time periods since about 1990 (Herold et al., 2008b). 4. Moving...

  8. ADAPTATION OF FORESTS AND PEOPLETO CLIMATE CHANGE 3 Future Environmental Impacts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plattner, Gian-Kasper

    ,stable,growth,and fast growth) of climate change scenarios commonly used to quantitatively assess climate change impacts of these benefits are easily offset as climate warms and the adaptive capacity of currently water limited ecosystems,forests currently house the largest fraction of biodiversity; unmitigated climate change threatens

  9. DOI 10.1007/s00382-014-2430-z The energy balance over land and oceans: an assessment based

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischlin, Andreas

    1 3 DOI 10.1007/s00382-014-2430-z Clim Dyn The energy balance over land and oceans: an assessment ocean to land transports), and revisit the global mean energy balance. Keywords Global energy balance The energy balance of the Earth is a fundamental determinant of the climatic conditions on our planet. Thanks

  10. Bringing Water into an Integrated Assessment Framework

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Thomson, Allison M.; Sands, Ronald; Pitcher, Hugh M.

    2010-11-30

    We developed a modeling capability to understand how water is allocated within a river basin and examined present and future water allocations among agriculture, energy production, other human requirements, and ecological needs. Water is an essential natural resource needed for food and fiber production, household and industrial uses, energy production, transportation, tourism and recreation, and the functioning of natural ecosystems. Anthropogenic climate change and population growth are anticipated to impose unprecedented pressure on water resources during this century. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) researchers have pioneered the development of integrated assessment (IA) models for the analysis of energy and economic systems under conditions of climate change. This Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) effort led to the development of a modeling capability to evaluate current and future water allocations between human requirements and ecosystem services. The Water Prototype Model (WPM) was built in STELLA®, a computer modeling package with a powerful interface that enables users to construct dynamic models to simulate and integrate many processes (biological, hydrological, economics, sociological). A 150,404-km2 basin in the United States (U.S.) Pacific Northwest region served as the platform for the development of the WPM. About 60% of the study basin is in the state of Washington with the rest in Oregon. The Columbia River runs through the basin for 874 km, starting at the international border with Canada and ending (for the purpose of the simulation) at The Dalles dam. Water enters the basin through precipitation and from streamflows originating from the Columbia River at the international border with Canada, the Spokane River, and the Snake River. Water leaves the basin through evapotranspiration, consumptive uses (irrigation, livestock, domestic, commercial, mining, industrial, and off-stream power generation), and streamflow through The Dalles dam. Water also enters the Columbia River via runoff from land. The model runs on a monthly timescale to account for the impact of seasonal variations of climate, streamflows, and water uses. Data for the model prototype were obtained from national databases and ecosystem model results. The WPM can be run from three sources: 1) directly from STELLA, 2) with the isee Player®, or 3) the web version of WPM constructed with NetSim® software. When running any of these three versions, the user is presented a screen with a series of buttons, graphs, and a table. Two of the buttons provide the user with background and instructions on how to run the model. Currently, there are five types of scenarios that can be manipulated alone or in combination using the Sliding Input Devices: 1) interannual variability (e.g., El Niño), 2) climate change, 3) salmon policy, 4) future population, and 5) biodiesel production. Overall, the WPM captured the effects of streamflow conditions on hydropower production. Under La Niña conditions, more hydropower is available during all months of the year, with a substantially higher availability during spring and summer. Under El Niño conditions, hydropower would be reduced, with a total decline of 15% from normal weather conditions over the year. A policy of flow augmentation to facilitate the spring migration of smolts to the ocean would also reduce hydropower supply. Modeled hydropower generation was 23% greater than the 81 TWh reported in the 1995 U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) database. The modeling capability presented here contains the essential features to conduct basin-scale analyses of water allocation under current and future climates. Due to its underlying data structure iv and conceptual foundation, the WPM should be appropriate to conduct IA modeling at national and global scales.

  11. Assessing climate impacts of planning policies-An estimation for the urban region of Leipzig (Germany)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwarz, Nina Bauer, Annette Haase, Dagmar

    2011-03-15

    Local climate regulation by urban green areas is an important urban ecosystem service, as it reduces the extent of the urban heat island and therefore enhances quality of life. Local and regional planning policies can control land use changes in an urban region, which in turn alter local climate regulation. Thus, this paper describes a method for estimating the impacts of current land uses as well as local and regional planning policies on local climate regulation, using evapotranspiration and land surface emissivity as indicators. This method can be used by practitioners to evaluate their policies. An application of this method is demonstrated for the case study Leipzig (Germany). Results for six selected planning policies in Leipzig indicate their distinct impacts on climate regulation and especially the role of their spatial extent. The proposed method was found to easily produce a qualitative assessment of impacts of planning policies on climate regulation.

  12. Climate Change and Litigation (on line) Environmental litigation is not a new area of law. In fact, water and/or air pollution has led to cases being brought

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Judd, Martin

    7 Climate Change and Litigation (on line) Environmental litigation is not a new area of law courts for more than a century, or even more. Climate change, however, poses a new set of challenges for litigation. Despite such obstacles, climate change litigation is expanding also as a strategic option

  13. Finding GIS data: Land cover and land use in Kansas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Houser, Rhonda

    2006-12-08

    classes with no key to indicate class descriptions. The student understands how human actions modify the physical environment. The student helps create both a hard copy and digital pie chart that shows relative land cover class areas. The student... helps create a digital pie chart that shows relative land cover class areas. The student helps create a pie chart by hand that shows relative land cover class areas. The student creates e a pie chart by hand that shows relative land cover class...

  14. Protecting climate with forests.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01

    Changing feedbacks in the climate–biosphere system Front.313–32 Bonan G B 2008 Forests and climate change: forcings,feedbacks, and the climate benefits of forests Science

  15. Climate Code Foundation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barnes, Nick; Jones, David

    2011-07-05

    Climate Code Foundation - who are we? A non-profit organisation founded in August 2010; our goal is to promote the public understanding of climate science, by increasing the visibility and clarity of the software used in climate science...

  16. Climate Data Operators (CDO)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Climate Data Operators (CDO) Climate Data Operators (CDO) Description and Overview CDO is a large tool set for working on climate data. NetCDF 34, GRIB including SZIP compression,...

  17. Perspective Indigenous Lands, Protected Areas, and Slowing Climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vermont, University of

    , Washington, D.C., United States of America, 2 Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, Brazil, 3, Brazil, 6 Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, United States of America, 7 Environmental Defense Fund, Washington, D.C., United States of America, 8 World Wildlife Fund-Brazil, Brasilia, Brazil, 9 Union

  18. Sandia Energy - Electric Power Generation and Water Use Data

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electric Power Generation and Water Use Data Home Climate & Earth Systems WaterEnergy Nexus Decision Models for Integrating EnergyWater Energy and Water in the Western and Texas...

  19. Stumped by Detroit's Vacant Land Process?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischer, Lucia; Kiani, Naria; O'Brien-Kovari, Lilly; Ordower, Aaron

    2014-01-01

    Stumped by Detroit's Vacant Land Process?Illustrating the Role of the Detroit Land Bank AuthorityLos Angeles STUMPED BY DETROIT’S VACANT LAND PROCESS?

  20. Evaluating Water Vapor in the NCAR CAM3 Climate Model with RRTMG/McICA using Modeled and Observed AIRS Spectral Radiances

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submitKansasCommunitiesof Energy8) Wigner Home ·the Effect ofEvaluating Water

  1. Chennai Urban Land Market Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dowall, David E; Monkkonen, Paavo

    2007-01-01

    for 2003 and 2004 land price data (Tables 13 and 14), adding25 Table 12: Price Gradient Regression Results for35 Table 15: Average Price of Land in Residential Plots and

  2. Climate change cripples forests

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Climate Change Cripples Forests Climate change cripples forests A team of scientists concluded that in the warmer and drier Southwest of the near future, widespread tree mortality...

  3. Climate change cripples forests

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Climate change cripples forests Climate change cripples forests A team of scientists concluded that in the warmer and drier Southwest of the near future, widespread tree mortality...

  4. Chapter 20 Climate

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in bold and acronyms are defined in Chapter 32, Glossary and Acronyms. Chapter 20 Climate This chapter describes existing climate conditions in the project area, and how the...

  5. Governing Change: An Institutional Geography of Rural Land Use, Environmental Management, and Change in the North Coastal Basin of California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Short, Anne Garrity

    2010-01-01

    Rurality." Progress in Human Geography, 30, Hansen, A. J. ,Exurban' Sierra." cultural geographies, 10, 469-491. Waters,Change: An Institutional Geography of Rural Land Use,

  6. Climatic Data Center Climatic Data Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA's ational Climatic Data Center NOAA's ational Climatic Data Center 2008 Annual Report 2008NerS 12-16 DAtA ceNter iNFrAStrUctUre 16-20 USer eNGAGemeNt 21-24 eDUcAtioN/oUtreAch/WorKShoPS 26-31 em) National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) served the Nation as an authoritative resource for climate information

  7. Global Climate Change Impacts:Global Climate Change Impacts: Implications for Climate EngineeringImplications for Climate Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polz, Martin

    Global Climate Change Impacts:Global Climate Change Impacts: Implications for Climate EngineeringImplications for Climate Engineering Thomas R. Karl Lead, NOAA climate services Director, NOAA National Climatic Data Center Global Climate Change Impacts in the United States October 29, 2009 #12;2Global Climate Change

  8. Issues in using landscape indicators to assess land changes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kline, Keith L [ORNL; Dale, Virginia H [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    Landscape indicators, when combined with information about environmental conditions (such as habitat potential, biodiversity, carbon and nutrient cycling, and erosion) and socioeconomic forces, can provide insights about changing ecosystem services. They also provide information about opportunities for improving natural resources management. Landscape indicators rely on data regarding land cover, land management and land functionality. Challenges in using landscape indicators to assess change and effects include (1) measures of land management and attributes that are reliable, robust and consistent for all areas on the Earth do not exist, and thus land cover is more frequently utilized; (2) multiple types of land cover and management are often found within a single landscape and are constantly changing, which complicates measurement and interpretation; and (3) while causal analysis is essential for understanding and interpreting changes in indicator values, the interactions among multiple causes and effects over time make accurate attribution among many drivers of change particularly difficult. Because of the complexity, sheer number of variables, and limitations of empirical data on land changes, models are often used to illustrate and estimate values for landscape indicators, and those models have several problems. Recommendations to improve our ability to assess the effects of changes in land management include refinement of questions to be more consistent with available information and the development of data sets based on systematic measurement over time of spatially explicit land qualities such as carbon and nutrient stocks, water and soil quality, net primary productivity, habitat and biodiversity. Well-defined and consistent land-classification systems that are capable of tracking changes in these and other qualities that matter to society need to be developed and deployed. Because landscapes are so dynamic, it is crucial to develop ways for the scientific community to work together to collect data and develop tools that will enable better analysis of causes and effects and to develop robust management recommendations that will increases land s capacity to meet societal needs in a changing world.

  9. International Finance and Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Junshan

    International Finance and Climate Change Thursday, October 17, 2013 Breakfast ­ 8:30 a Principal Climate Change Specialist, Climate Business Group at International Finance Corporation, World Bank Group Vladimir Stenek Senior Climate Change Specialist, Climate Business Department of the International

  10. Global climate feedbacks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manowitz, B.

    1990-10-01

    The important physical, chemical, and biological events that affect global climate change occur on a mesoscale -- requiring high spatial resolution for their analysis. The Department of Energy has formulated two major initiatives under the US Global Change Program: ARM (Atmospheric Radiation Measurements), and CHAMMP (Computer Hardware Advanced Mathematics and Model Physics). ARM is designed to use ground and air-craft based observations to document profiles of atmospheric composition, clouds, and radiative fluxes. With research and models of important physical processes, ARM will delineate the relationships between trace gases, aerosol and cloud structure, and radiative transfer in the atmosphere, and will improve the parameterization of global circulation models. The present GCMs do not model important feedbacks, including those from clouds, oceans, and land processes. The purpose of this workshop is to identify such potential feedbacks, to evaluate the uncertainties in the feedback processes (and, if possible, to parameterize the feedback processes so that they can be treated in a GCM), and to recommend research programs that will reduce the uncertainties in important feedback processes. Individual reports are processed separately for the data bases.

  11. On the magnitude of positive feedback between future climate change and the carbon cycle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dufresne, Jean-Louis

    - pogenic emissions are expected to continue in the com- ing decades. The corresponding atmospheric CO 2 con by [Cox et al., 2000] using the Hadley Center HadCM3 climate model coupled to a car- bon cycle model emissions and the land and ocean sinks. Starting from an initial state where the coupled climate carbon

  12. Georgia Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Resources System; - Water Resources Sector National Assessment of the Potential Consequences of Climate (for rainfall estimation, rainfall-runoff, agricultural planning, hydropower scheduling, and lake

  13. Effect of Urbanization and Climate Change on Hydrological Processes over the San Antonio River Basin, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Gang

    2014-11-18

    flood peaks. Meanwhile, climate change has led to more frequent extreme events. Therefore, a thorough understanding of the hydrological processes under urbanization and climate change is indispensable for sustainable water management...

  14. Aggressive landing maneuvers for unmanned aerial vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bayraktar, Selcuk

    2006-01-01

    VTOL (Vertical Take Off and Landing) vehicle landing is considered to be a critically difficult task for both land, marine, and urban operations. This thesis describes one possible control approach to enable landing of ...

  15. PEER-REVIEWED PUBLICATIONS: Land, L. S., 1964, Eolian cross-bedding in the beach dune environment, Sapelo Island, Georgia.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Zong-Liang

    , Sedimentation in a meandering estuary. Sedimentology, v. 6, p. 191-207. Land, L. S., 1966, Diagenesis from a fossil water table. Sedimentology, v. 14, p. 175-185. Land, L. S., and Epstein, S., 1970, Late Pleistocene diagenesis and dolomitization, North Jamaica. Sedimentology, v. 14, p. 184-200. Land, L. S

  16. A Spatial Modeling Framework to Evaluate Domestic Biofuel-Induced Potential Land Use Changes and Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : land availability, land suitability, LUC decision-making, and induced CO2 emissions. Using high obtain estimates for average total LUC emissions of 6.1, 2.2, 1.0, 2.2, and 2.4 gCO2e/MJ for Corn-15 fuels remain the major source of energy worldwide, raising concerns about both climate change due to CO2

  17. CCM3 as applied to an idealized all land zonally symmetric planet, Terra Blanda 3 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mahajan, Salil

    2005-02-17

    the original NCAR Community Climate Model 3 with modified boundary conditions and solar forcings. Terra Blanda 3 is a simulation of an all land, north-south symmetrical planet, which stays on the equinox throughout the run, and has no non-linearity associated... Community Climate Model 3 (CCM3) is run on an idealized all land zonally symmetric planet (Terra Blanda) with no seasonality, no snow and fixed soil moisture to obtain a stationary time series effectively much longer than conventional runs with geography...

  18. Plant Response and Environmental Data from the Oldfield Community Climate and Atmospheric Manipulation (OCCAM) Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Oldfield Community Climate and Atmospheric Manipulation (OCCAM) project is a joint effort of ORNL and the University of Tennessee to investigate community and ecosystem response to global change, specifically looking at the interactive effects of atmospheric carbon dioxide, surface temperatures, and soil moisture. The plants studied for their response to warming temperatures, elevated carbon dioxide, and altered water availability include C3 and C4 grasses, forbs, and legumes. These plants are typical of an old-field ecosystem that establishes itself on unused agricultural land. The results of the research focus on species abundance, production, phenology, and what is going on chemically below ground. Data are currently available from 2003 through July, 2008.

  19. Private water rights in Scots law 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robbie, Jill Jean

    2013-07-03

    This thesis examines the rights of landowners in Scotland in relation to water flowing through their land. In the first part of the thesis, it is argued that water is a communal thing which is incapable of ownership (or ...

  20. Arkansas Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    quality of surface water and groundwater, especially non-point source pollution and sensitive ecosystems wastewater disposal systems, ground water modeling and land use mapping, erosion and pollution, water qualityArkansas Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 2012 Arkansas Water Resources Center

  1. Climatic Change An Interdisciplinary,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reale, Marco

    1 23 Climatic Change An Interdisciplinary, International Journal Devoted to the Description, Causes and Implications of Climatic Change ISSN 0165-0009 Volume 107 Combined 3-4 Climatic Change (2011) 107:247-265 DOI available until 12 months after publication. #12;Climatic Change (2011) 107:247­265 DOI 10.1007/s10584

  2. CLIMATE PRODUCTS Basic Climatology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CLIMATE PRODUCTS Basic Climatology Colorado Climate Center Funding provided by NOAA Sectoral the computer or a telephone system Data are collected by the National Climatic Data Center (NCDC), where) The original observations relate to WEATHER, not CLIMATE. But if we look at this information over a much longer

  3. Climate Science Andreas Schmittner

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmittner, Andreas

    Climate Science Andreas Schmittner Associate Professor College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences Oregon State University Climate Change: A Workshop for Oregon Educators, Aug. 11, 2015 #12;Outline Past Present Future #12;Past Paleoclimate · How can we reconstruct past climate? · How did climate

  4. Climate Change and Transportation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    1 Climate Change and Transportation Addressing Climate Change in the Absence of Federal Guidelines;6 WSDOT Efforts · Climate Change Team · Project Level GHG Approach · Planning Level GHG Approach · Alternative Fuels Corridor · Recent legislation and research #12;7 WSDOT Efforts: Climate Change Team

  5. TECHNICAL BASIS DOCUMENT NO. 1: CLIMATE AND INFILTRATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NA

    2004-05-01

    For the past 20 years, extensive field, laboratory, and modeling investigations have been performed at Yucca Mountain, which have led to the development of a number of conceptual models of infiltration and climate for the Yucca Mountain region around the repository site (Flint, A.L. et al. 2001; Wang and Bodvarsson 2003). Evaluating the amount of infiltrating water entering the subsurface is important, because this water may affect the percolation flux, which, in turn, controls seepage into the waste emplacement drifts and radionuclide transport from the repository to the water table. Forecasting of climatic data indicates that during the next 10,000 years at Yucca Mountain, the present-day climate should persist for 400 to 600 years, followed by a warmer and much wetter monsoon climate for 900 to 1,400 years, and by a cooler and wetter glacial-transition climate for the remaining 8,000 to 8,700 years. The analysis of climatic forecasting indicates that long-term climate conditions are generally predictable from a past climate sequence, while short-term climate conditions and weather predictions may be more variable and uncertain. The use of past climate sequences to bound future climate sequences involves several types of uncertainties, such as (1) uncertainty in the timing of future climate, (2) uncertainty in the methodology of climatic forecasting, and (3) uncertainty in the earth's future physical processes. Some of the uncertainties of the climatic forecasting are epistemic (reducible) and aleatoric (irreducible). Because of the size of the model domain, INFIL treats many flow processes in a simplified manner. For example, uptake of water by roots occurs according to the ''distributed model'', in which available water in each soil layer is withdrawn in proportion to the root density in that layer, multiplied by the total evapotranspirative demand. Runoff is calculated simply as the excess of precipitation over a sum of infiltration and water storage in the root zone. More significantly, water movement throughout the soil profile is treated according to the bucket model, in which the amount of water that moves down from one layer to the next is equal to the mass of water in excess of field capacity in the upper layer. The development of a numerical model of infiltration involves a number of abstractions and simplifications to represent the complexity of environmental conditions at Yucca Mountain, such as the arid climate, mountain-type topography, heterogeneous soils and fractured rock, and irregular soil-rock interface.

  6. Hawaii--the Land of Pele, Goddess of Fire The Big Island of Hawai'i is one of the only places on Earth where new land

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    del Moral, Roger

    Hawaii--the Land of Pele, Goddess of Fire The Big Island of Hawai'i is one of the only places the influence of age, lava type, proximity to mature vegetation, and climatic stresses. On Hawaii, we attended the annual meeting of the International Association for Vegetation Science on Hawaii, where he met

  7. Soil Carbon Change and Net Energy Associated with Biofuel Production on Marginal Lands: A Regional Modeling Perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bandaru, Varaprasad; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Manowitz, David H.; Link, Robert P.; Zhang, Xuesong; Post, W. M.

    2013-12-01

    The use of marginal lands (MLs) for biofuel production has been contemplated as a promising solution for meeting biofuel demands. However, there have been concerns with spatial location of MLs, their inherent biofuel potential, and possible environmental consequences with the cultivation of energy crops. Here, we developed a new quantitative approach that integrates high-resolution land cover and land productivity maps and uses conditional probability density functions for analyzing land use patterns as a function of land productivity to classify the agricultural lands. We subsequently applied this method to determine available productive croplands (P-CLs) and non-crop marginal lands (NC-MLs) in a nine-county Southern Michigan. Furthermore, Spatially Explicit Integrated Modeling Framework (SEIMF) using EPIC (Environmental Policy Integrated Climate) was used to understand the net energy (NE) and soil organic carbon (SOC) implications of cultivating different annual and perennial production systems.

  8. Improvement of snowpack simulations in a regional climate model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jin, J.; Miller, N.L.

    2011-01-10

    To improve simulations of regional-scale snow processes and related cold-season hydroclimate, the Community Land Model version 3 (CLM3), developed by the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), was coupled with the Pennsylvania State University/NCAR fifth-generation Mesoscale Model (MM5). CLM3 physically describes the mass and heat transfer within the snowpack using five snow layers that include liquid water and solid ice. The coupled MM5–CLM3 model performance was evaluated for the snowmelt season in the Columbia River Basin in the Pacific Northwestern United States using gridded temperature and precipitation observations, along with station observations. The results from MM5–CLM3 show a significant improvement in the SWE simulation, which has been underestimated in the original version of MM5 coupled with the Noah land-surface model. One important cause for the underestimated SWE in Noah is its unrealistic land-surface structure configuration where vegetation, snow and the topsoil layer are blended when snow is present. This study demonstrates the importance of the sheltering effects of the forest canopy on snow surface energy budgets, which is included in CLM3. Such effects are further seen in the simulations of surface air temperature and precipitation in regional weather and climate models such as MM5. In addition, the snow-season surface albedo overestimated by MM5–Noah is now more accurately predicted by MM5–CLM3 using a more realistic albedo algorithm that intensifies the solar radiation absorption on the land surface, reducing the strong near-surface cold bias in MM5–Noah. The cold bias is further alleviated due to a slower snowmelt rate in MM5–CLM3 during the early snowmelt stage, which is closer to observations than the comparable components of MM5–Noah. In addition, the over-predicted precipitation in the Pacific Northwest as shown in MM5–Noah is significantly decreased in MM5 CLM3 due to the lower evaporation resulting from the longer snow duration.

  9. Interannual variations of river water storage from a multiple satellite approach: A case study for the Rio Negro River basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frappart, Frédéric; Papa, Fabrice; Famiglietti, James S; Prigent, Catherine; Rossow, William B; Seyler, Frédérique

    2008-01-01

    Climate Experiment (GRACE) water storage estimates, Geophys.2008), Analysis of terrestrial water storage changes fromGRACE and GLDAS, Water Resour. Res. , 44, W02433, doi:

  10. Relative Roles of Changes in CO2 and Climate to Equilibrium Responses of Net Primary Production and Carbon Storage of the Terrestrial Biosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -GFDL) and a 2-dimensional climate model (Land-Ocean climate model at Massachusetts Institute of TechnologyRelative Roles of Changes in CO2 and Climate to Equilibrium Responses of Net Primary Production Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA 3 National Biological Service, Alaska Cooperative Fish

  11. Community Land Model Version 3.0 (CLM3.0) Developer's Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoffman, FM

    2004-12-21

    This document describes the guidelines adopted for software development of the Community Land Model (CLM) and serves as a reference to the entire code base of the released version of the model. The version of the code described here is Version 3.0 which was released in the summer of 2004. This document, the Community Land Model Version 3.0 (CLM3.0) User's Guide (Vertenstein et al., 2004), the Technical Description of the Community Land Model (CLM) (Oleson et al., 2004), and the Community Land Model's Dynamic Global Vegetation Model (CLM-DGVM): Technical Description and User's Guide (Levis et al., 2004) provide the developer, user, or researcher with details of implementation, instructions for using the model, a scientific description of the model, and a scientific description of the Dynamic Global Vegetation Model integrated with CLM respectively. The CLM is a single column (snow-soil-vegetation) biogeophysical model of the land surface which can be run serially (on a laptop or personal computer) or in parallel (using distributed or shared memory processors or both) on both vector and scalar computer architectures. Written in Fortran 90, CLM can be run offline (i.e., run in isolation using stored atmospheric forcing data), coupled to an atmospheric model (e.g., the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM)), or coupled to a climate system model (e.g., the Community Climate System Model Version 3 (CCSM3)) through a flux coupler (e.g., Coupler 6 (CPL6)). When coupled, CLM exchanges fluxes of energy, water, and momentum with the atmosphere. The horizontal land surface heterogeneity is represented by a nested subgrid hierarchy composed of gridcells, landunits, columns, and plant functional types (PFTs). This hierarchical representation is reflected in the data structures used by the model code. Biophysical processes are simulated for each subgrid unit (landunit, column, and PFT) independently, and prognostic variables are maintained for each subgrid unit. Vertical heterogeneity is represented by a single vegetation layer, 10 layers for soil, and up to five layers for snow, depending on the snow depth. For computational efficiency, gridcells are grouped into ''clumps'' which are divided in cyclic fashion among distributed memory processors. Additional parallel performance is obtained by distributing clumps of gridcells across shared memory processors on computer platforms that support hybrid Message Passing Interface (MPI)/OpenMP operation. Significant modifications to the source code have been made over the last year to support efficient operation on newer vector architectures, specifically the Earth Simulator in Japan and the Cray X1 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (Homan et al., 2004). These code modifications resulted in performance improvements even on the scalar architectures widely used for running CLM presently. To better support vectorized processing in the code, subgrid units (columns and PFTs) are grouped into ''filters'' based on their process-specific categorization. For example, filters (vectors of integers) referring to all snow, non-snow, lake, non-lake, and soil covered columns and PFTs within each clump are built and maintained when the model is run. Many loops within the scientific subroutines use these filters to indirectly address the process-appropriate subgrid units.

  12. Climate impacts of a large-scale biofuels expansion*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Climate impacts of a large-scale biofuels expansion* Willow Hallgren, C. Adam Schlosser, Erwan impacts of a large-scale biofuels expansion Willow Hallgren,1 C. Adam Schlosser,1 Erwan Monier,1 David March 2013. [1] A global biofuels program will potentially lead to intense pressures on land supply

  13. FY08 LDRD Final Report Regional Climate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bader, D C; Chin, H; Caldwell, P M

    2009-05-19

    An integrated, multi-model capability for regional climate change simulation is needed to perform original analyses to understand and prepare for the impacts of climate change on the time and space scales that are critical to California's future environmental quality and economic prosperity. Our intent was to develop a very high resolution regional simulation capability to address consequences of climate change in California to complement the global modeling capability that is supported by DOE at LLNL and other institutions to inform national and international energy policies. The California state government, through the California Energy Commission (CEC), institutionalized the State's climate change assessment process through its biennial climate change reports. The bases for these reports, however, are global climate change simulations for future scenarios designed to inform international policy negotiations, and are primarily focused on the global to continental scale impacts of increasing emissions of greenhouse gases. These simulations do not meet the needs of California public and private officials who will make major decisions in the next decade that require an understanding of climate change in California for the next thirty to fifty years and its effects on energy use, water utilization, air quality, agriculture and natural ecosystems. With the additional development of regional dynamical climate modeling capability, LLNL will be able to design and execute global simulations specifically for scenarios important to the state, then use those results to drive regional simulations of the impacts of the simulated climate change for regions as small as individual cities or watersheds. Through this project, we systematically studied the strengths and weaknesses of downscaling global model results with a regional mesoscale model to guide others, particularly university researchers, who are using the technique based on models with less complete parameterizations or coarser spatial resolution. Further, LLNL has now built a capability in state-of-the-science mesoscale climate modeling that complements that which it has in global climate simulation, providing potential sponsors with an end-to-end simulation and analysis program.

  14. 2007 Radiation & Climate GRC ( July 29-August 3, 2007)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    William Collins Nancy Ryan Gray

    2008-06-01

    The theme of the fifth Gordon Research Conference on Radiation and Climate is 'Integrating multiscale measurements and models for key climate questions'. The meeting will feature lectures, posters, and discussion regarding these issues. The meeting will focus on insights from new types of satellite and in situ data and from new approaches to modeling processes in the climate system. The program on measurements will highlight syntheses of new satellite data on cloud, aerosols, and chemistry and syntheses of satellite and sub-orbital observations from field programs. The program on modeling will address both the evaluation of cloud-resolving and regional aerosol models using new types of measurements and the evidence for processes and physics missing from global models. The Conference will focus on two key climate questions. First, what factors govern the radiative interactions of clouds and aerosols with regional and global climate? Second, how well do we understand the interaction of radiation with land surfaces and with the cryosphere?

  15. The contribution of future agricultural trends in the US Midwest to global climate change mitigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomson, Allison M.; Kyle, G. Page; Zhang, Xuesong; Bandaru, Varaprasad; West, Tristram O.; Wise, Marshall A.; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Calvin, Katherine V.

    2014-01-19

    Land use change is a complex response to changing environmental and socioeconomic systems. Historical drivers of land use change include changes in the natural resource availability of a region, changes in economic conditions for production of certain products and changing policies. Most recently, introduction of policy incentives for biofuel production have influenced land use change in the US Midwest, leading to concerns that bioenergy production systems may compete with food production and land conservation. Here we explore how land use may be impacted by future climate mitigation measures by nesting a high resolution agricultural model (EPIC – Environmental Policy Indicator Climate) for the US Midwest within a global integrated assessment model (GCAM – Global Change Assessment Model). This approach is designed to provide greater spatial resolution and detailed agricultural practice information by focusing on the climate mitigation potential of agriculture and land use in a specific region, while retaining the global economic context necessary to understand the far ranging effects of climate mitigation targets. We find that until the simulated carbon prices are very high, the US Midwest has a comparative advantage in producing traditional food and feed crops over bioenergy crops. Overall, the model responds to multiple pressures by adopting a mix of future responses. We also find that the GCAM model is capable of simulations at multiple spatial scales and agricultural technology resolution, which provides the capability to examine regional response to global policy and economic conditions in the context of climate mitigation.

  16. National Water Program Impact Report, 2004-2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and extension projects. #12;Contents CSREES National Water Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3The Land Grant University System National Water Program Impact Report, 2004-2005 Regional A network that responds to water resource issues by advancing knowledge through research, education

  17. Staff summary of Issues & Recommendations Water Transactions (CBWTP)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Staff summary of Issues & Recommendations Water Transactions (CBWTP) *Preliminary draft, please Section Section VIII. D. Land and Water Acquisition Funds (pg 62) Overview: Recommenders support continuing the water transactions program, requiring all transactions use consistent criteria, adding

  18. Tribal Climate Change Webinars: BIA's Climate Change Competitive...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    climate adaptation, ocean and coastal planning, and youth internships. SpeakersSean Hart, BIA Climate Change Coordinator, andRachael Novak, BIA Climate Science Coordinator,...

  19. Formulating Climate Change Scenarios to Inform Climate - Resilient...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Formulating Climate Change Scenarios to Inform Climate - Resilient Development Strategies Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Formulating Climate Change...

  20. Climate Action Champions: Sonoma County Regional Climate Protection...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Sonoma County Regional Climate Protection Authority, CA Climate Action Champions: Sonoma County Regional Climate Protection Authority, CA In 2005, nine cities and the County of...