Sample records for land surface interaction

  1. SGP Cloud and Land Surface Interaction Campaign (CLASIC): Measurement Platforms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MA Miller; R Avissar; LK Berg; SA Edgerton; ML Fischer; TJ Jackson; B. Kustas; PJ Lamb; G McFarquhar; Q Min; B Schmid; MS Torn; DD Tuner

    2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Cloud and Land Surface Interaction Campaign (CLASIC) will be conducted from June 8 to June 30, 2007, at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility (ACRF) Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. Data will be collected using eight aircraft equipped with a variety of specialized sensors, four specially instrumented surface sites, and two prototype surface radar systems. The architecture of CLASIC includes a high-altitude surveillance aircraft and enhanced vertical thermodynamic and wind profile measurements that will characterize the synoptic scale structure of the clouds and the land surface within the ACRF SGP site. Mesoscale and microscale structures will be sampled with a variety of aircraft, surface, and radar observations. An overview of the measurement platforms that will be used during the CLASIC are described in this report. The coordination of measurements, especially as it relates to aircraft flight plans, will be discussed in the CLASIC Implementation Plan.

  2. SGP Cloud and Land Surface Interaction Campaign (CLASIC): Science and Implementation Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MA Miller; R Avissar; LK Berg; SA Edgerton; ML Fischer; T Jackson; B.Kustas; PJ Lamb; GM McFarquhar; Q Min; B Schmid; MS Torn; DD Turner

    2007-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Cloud and Land Surface Interaction Campaign is a field experiment designed to collect a comprehensive data set that can be used to quantify the interactions that occur between the atmosphere, biosphere, land surface, and subsurface. A particular focus will be on how these interactions modulate the abundance and characteristics of small and medium size cumuliform clouds that are generated by local convection. These interactions are not well understood and are responsible for large uncertainties in global climate models, which are used to forecast future climate states. The campaign will be conducted from June 8 to June 30, 2007, at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Southern Great Plains site. Data will be collected using eight aircraft equipped with a variety of specialized sensors, four specially instrumented surface sites, and two prototype surface radar systems. The architecture of Cloud and Land Surface Interaction Campaign includes a high-altitude surveillance aircraft and enhanced vertical thermodynamic and wind profile measurements that will characterize the synoptic scale structure of the clouds and the land surface within the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Southern Great Plains site. Mesoscale and microscale structures will be sampled with a variety of aircraft, surface, and radar observations.

  3. Fundamental to the Cloud Land Surface Interaction Campaign (CLASIC) is understanding the relationships of the atmosphere and the land surface

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun with Big Sky Learning Fun with Big Sky Learning| EMSL007 Cloud Land

  4. Land-atmosphere interactions in an high resolution atmospheric simulation coupled with a surface data assimilation scheme

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Entekhabi, Dara

    A valid tool for the retrieving of the turbulent fluxes that characterize the surface energy budget is constituted by the remote sensing of land surface states. In this study sequences of satellite-derived observations ...

  5. Estimation of turbulent surface heat fluxes using sequences of remotely sensed land surface temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bateni, Sayed Mohyeddin

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fluxes of heat and moisture at the land-surface play a significant role in the climate system. These fluxes interact with the overlying atmosphere and influence the characteristics of the planetary boundary layer (e.g. ...

  6. Relative efficiency of land surface energy balance components

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bateni, S. M.

    [1] The partitioning of available energy into dissipative fluxes over land surfaces is dependent on the state variable of the surface energy balance (land surface temperature) and the state variable of the surface water ...

  7. Land-atmosphere interaction and radiative-convective equilibrium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cronin, Timothy (Timothy Wallace)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    I present work on several topics related to land-atmosphere interaction and radiative-convective equilibrium: the first two research chapters invoke ideas related to land-atmosphere interaction to better understand ...

  8. Interaction effects of climate and land use/land cover change on soil organic carbon sequestration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grunwald, Sabine

    Interaction effects of climate and land use/land cover change on soil organic carbon sequestration carbon sequestration Climate change Soil carbon change Historically, Florida soils stored the largest in Florida (FL) have acted as a sink for carbon (C) over the last 40 years. · Climate interacting with land

  9. Parcel-Level Land Architecture and Land Surface Temperature in the Phoenix Metropolitan Area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Sharon J.

    Parcel-Level Land Architecture and Land Surface Temperature in the Phoenix Metropolitan Area Xiaoxiao Li1, Yun Ouyang1, Billie Turner II1,2, Sharon Harlan3, Anthony Brazel2 1 School of Sustainability system architecture--composition and configuration of different land-cover classes--on LST in the central

  10. Carbon Sequestration on Surface Mine Lands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donald Graves; Christopher Barton; Richard Sweigard; Richard Warner; Carmen Agouridis

    2006-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the implementation of the federal Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 (SMCRA) in May of 1978, many opportunities have been lost for the reforestation of surface mines in the eastern United States. Research has shown that excessive compaction of spoil material in the backfilling and grading process is the biggest impediment to the establishment of productive forests as a post-mining land use (Ashby, 1998, Burger et al., 1994, Graves et al., 2000). Stability of mine sites was a prominent concern among regulators and mine operators in the years immediately following the implementation of SMCRA. These concerns resulted in the highly compacted, flatly graded, and consequently unproductive spoils of the early post-SMCRA era. However, there is nothing in the regulations that requires mine sites to be overly compacted as long as stability is achieved. It has been cultural barriers and not regulatory barriers that have contributed to the failure of reforestation efforts under the federal law over the past 27 years. Efforts to change the perception that the federal law and regulations impede effective reforestation techniques and interfere with bond release must be implemented. Demonstration of techniques that lead to the successful reforestation of surface mines is one such method that can be used to change perceptions and protect the forest ecosystems that were indigenous to these areas prior to mining. The University of Kentucky initiated a large-scale reforestation effort to address regulatory and cultural impediments to forest reclamation in 2003. During the three years of this project 383,000 trees were planted on over 556 acres in different physiographic areas of Kentucky (Table 1, Figure 1). Species used for the project were similar to those that existed on the sites before mining was initiated (Table 2). A monitoring program was undertaken to evaluate growth and survival of the planted species as a function of spoil characteristics and reclamation practice. In addition, experiments were integrated within the reforestation effort to address specific questions pertaining to sequestration of carbon (C) on these sites.

  11. Effect of Land Surface Heterogeneity on Satellite Near-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Jeff

    in regulating the energy and water balance at the soil surface and it is therefore a crucial variable for many. SMOS will carry an L-band (1.4GHz) microwave radiometer and will provide near-surface soil moisture highly heterogeneous land surface conditions. The principal objectives of this research are to (i) test

  12. Development of High Resolution Land Surface Parameters for the Community Land Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ke, Yinghai; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Huang, Maoyi; Coleman, Andre M.; Li, Hongyi; Wigmosta, Mark S.

    2012-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    There is a growing need for high-resolution land surface parameters as land surface models are being applied at increasingly higher spatial resolution offline as well as in regional and global models. The default land surface parameters for the most recent version of the Community Land Model (i.e. CLM 4.0) are at 0.5° or coarser resolutions, released with the Community Earth System Model (CESM). Plant Functional Types (PFTs), vegetation properties such as Leaf Area Index (LAI), Stem Area Index (SAI), and non-vegetated land covers were developed using remotely sensed datasets retrieved in late 1990’s and the beginning of this century. In this study, we developed new land surface parameters for CLM 4.0, specifically PFTs, LAI, SAI and non-vegetated land cover composition, at 0.05° resolution globally based on the most recent MODIS land cover and improved MODIS LAI products. Compared to the current CLM 4.0 parameters, the new parameters produced a decreased coverage by bare soil and trees, but an increased coverage by shrub, grass, and cropland. The new parameters result in a decrease in global seasonal LAI, with the biggest decrease in boreal forests; however, the new parameters also show a large increase in LAI in tropical forest. Differences between the new and the current parameters are mainly caused by changes in the sources of remotely sensed data and the representation of land cover in the source data. Advantages and disadvantages of each dataset were discussed in order to provide guidance on the use of the data. The new high-resolution land surface parameters have been used in a coupled land-atmosphere model (WRF-CLM) applied to the western U.S. to demonstrate their use in high-resolution modeling. A remapping method from the latitude/longitude grid of the CLM data to the WRF grids with map projection was also demonstrated. Future work will include global offline CLM simulations to examine the impacts of source data resolution and subsequent land parameter changes on simulated land surface processes.

  13. Other Surface Impoundments and Land Applications (Oklahoma)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A water quality permit is required from the Department of Environmental Quality to construct, install, operate or close any industrial surface impoundment, industrial septic tank or treatment...

  14. Sensitivity of Global Tropical Climate to Land Surface Processes: Mean State and Interannual Variability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xue, Yongkang

    to be made in a system that allows for atmosphere­ocean interactions. 1. Introduction Future projections influence on the surface energy and water budgets. The sensitivity to those processes is represented in the intensity of equatorial Pacific trades modified by convection over land. The results further demonstrate

  15. Ion/Surface Reactions and Ion Soft-Landing. | EMSL

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  16. Sensitivity of global tropical climate to land surface processes: Mean state and interannual variability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma, Hsi-Yen; Xiao, Heng; Mechoso, C. R.; Xue, Yongkang

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study examines the sensitivity of global tropical climate to land surface processes (LSP) using an atmospheric general circulation model both uncoupled (with prescribed SSTs) and coupled to an oceanic general circulation model. The emphasis is on the interactive soil moisture and vegetation biophysical processes, which have first order influence on the surface energy and water budgets. The sensitivity to those processes is represented by the differences between model simulations, in which two land surface schemes are considered: 1) a simple land scheme that specifies surface albedo and soil moisture availability, and 2) the Simplified Simple Biosphere Model (SSiB), which allows for consideration of interactive soil moisture and vegetation biophysical process. Observational datasets are also employed to assess the reality of model-revealed sensitivity. The mean state sensitivity to different LSP is stronger in the coupled mode, especially in the tropical Pacific. Furthermore, seasonal cycle of SSTs in the equatorial Pacific, as well as ENSO frequency, amplitude, and locking to the seasonal cycle of SSTs are significantly modified and more realistic with SSiB. This outstanding sensitivity of the atmosphere-ocean system develops through changes in the intensity of equatorial Pacific trades modified by convection over land. Our results further demonstrate that the direct impact of land-atmosphere interactions on the tropical climate is modified by feedbacks associated with perturbed oceanic conditions ("indirect effect" of LSP). The magnitude of such indirect effect is strong enough to suggest that comprehensive studies on the importance of LSP on the global climate have to be made in a system that allows for atmosphere-ocean interactions.

  17. MUREX: a land-surface eld experiment to study the annual cycle of the energy and water budgets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    was fully characterised, and surface water and energy ¯uxes, vegetation biomass, soil moisture pro shortcomings are revealed. Key words. Hydrology (evapotranspiration; soil moisture; water-energy interactionsMUREX: a land-surface ®eld experiment to study the annual cycle of the energy and water budgets J

  18. An overview of the First International Satellite Land Surface Climatology Project (ISLSCP) Field Experiment (FIFE)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sellers, P.J.; Hall, F.G. (NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States)); Asrar, G.; Murphy, R.E. (NASA Headquarters, Washington, DC (United States)); Strebel, D.E. (VERSAR, Inc., Columbia, MD (United States))

    1992-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This article provides an overview of the First International Satellite Land Surface Climatology Project (ISLSCP) Field Experiment (FIFE). This is an international land-surface-atmosphere experiment conducted on a 15km [times] 15km site near Manhattan, Kansas. Its purpose is to study the role biological processes play in the interaction between the atmosphere and the vegetatively covered earth. It brings together workers from meteorology, biology, and remote sensing, requiring them to work together to bring the project to a successful result. The two main objectives are to provide experimental information on how land-surface-atmosphere interactions are mediated, by biological processes, on a scale from plants to the entire site for comparison with models of the same, and to apply remote sensing to the measurement of these interactions, since it is the only hope to monitor such processes over areas of relevance for general circulation models. This paper provides a history of the project, discusses early research efforts leading up to the main data collection phase, provides nomenclature and information on the site identification. It gives a broad overview of the project. Specific results are summarized in additional papers in this special journal issue devoted to this projects results.

  19. Improving land-surface model hydrology: Is an explicit aquifer model better than a deeper soil profile?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    land-surface model hydrology: Is an explicit aquifer modelAL. : LAND-SURFACE MODEL HYDROLOGY Changnon, S. , et al. (land-surface model hydrology: Is an explicit aquifer model

  20. On the connection between continental-scale land surface processes and the tropical climate in a coupled ocean-atmosphere-land system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma, Hsi-Yen; Mechoso, C. R.; Xue, Yongkang; Xiao, Heng; Neelin, David; Ji, Xuan

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The impact of global tropical climate to perturbations in land surface processes (LSP) are evaluated using perturbations given by different LSP representations of continental-scale in a global climate model that includes atmosphere-ocean interactions. One representation is a simple land scheme, which specifies climatological albedos and soil moisture availability. The other representation is the more comprehensive Simplified Simple Biosphere Model, which allows for interactive soil moisture and vegetation biophysical processes. The results demonstrate that LSP processes such as interactive soil moisture and vegetation biophysical processes have strong impacts on the seasonal mean states and seasonal cycles of global precipitation, clouds, and surface air temperature. The impact is especially significant over the tropical Pacific. To explore the mechanisms for such impact, different LSP representations are confined to selected continental-scale regions where strong interactions of climate-vegetation biophysical processes are present. We find that the largest impact is mainly from LSP perturbations over the tropical African continent. The impact is through anomalous convective heating in tropical Africa due to changes in the surface heat fluxes, which in turn affect basinwide teleconnections in the Pacific through equatorial wave dynamics. The modifications in the equatorial Pacific climate are further enhanced by strong air-sea coupling between surface wind stress and upwelling, as well as effect of ocean memory. Our results further suggest that correct representations of land surface processes, land use change and the associated changes in the deep convection over tropical Africa are crucial to reducing the uncertainty when performing future climate projections under different climate change scenarios.

  1. Pluralistic Modelling Approaches to Simulating Climate-Land Change Interactions in East Africa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with atmospheric trends such as greenhouse gas concentrations, to loop back to regional and global climate change dynamics (Giorgi and Mearns 1999). Developing robust forecasts of land use change is essential in the proper simulation of land-climate interactions. Forecasts of land use at regional scales require several

  2. Impacts of feral hogs on reclaimed surface-mined lands in eastern Texas: a management perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mersinger, Robert C.

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During the last decade, surface lignite mines in eastern Texas have experienced damage to reclaimed lands by feral hogs (Sus scrota). Specifically, feral hogs have caused damage to vegetative plantings used in the reclamation process of surface...

  3. A comparison of land surface model soil hydraulic properties estimated by inverse modeling and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Small, Eric

    of water in the soil. This in turn plays an important role in the water and energy cycles at the land depths in the soil column controls the partitioning of two key energy fluxes of concern in climate modelsA comparison of land surface model soil hydraulic properties estimated by inverse modeling

  4. amip ii land-surface: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Standards Process Breakout Session June 15, 2005 Robert Wolfe NASA GSFC Code 614.5 & Raytheon ITSS 12;June 15, 2005 - Wolfe - San Diego 2 MODIS Land Surface Reflectance products:...

  5. Coupling the High Complexity Land Surface Model ACASA to the Mesoscale Model WRF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, L.

    In this study, the Weather Research and Forecasting Model (WRF) is coupled with the Advanced Canopy-Atmosphere-Soil Algorithm (ACASA), a high complexity land surface model. Although WRF is a state-of-the-art regional ...

  6. Plasma-Surface Interactions on Liquids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. Bastasz; W. Eckstein

    2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Liquid plasma-facing surfaces have been suggested as an option for advanced fusion devices, particularly in regions where solid materials may not survive over long operating periods. Because liquid surfaces can be replenished, they offer the possibility of tolerating intense particle bombardment and of recovering from off-normal events. As a preliminary step in understanding the nature of plasma-surface interactions on liquids, the authors consider some of the surface processes occurring in liquids undergoing irradiation by energetic particles. These include (1) sputtering, (2) segregation of liquid component species and impurities, (3) evaporation, and (4) trapping and release of incident particles. Aspects of these processes are examined for several candidate liquids, which represent three types of low-Z liquids: pure metals (Li), metallic alloys (Sn-Li), and compound insulators (Li{sub 2}BeF{sub 4}).

  7. TNRC 51 - Land, Timber and Surface Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  8. Soft Landing of Complex Molecules on Surfaces. | EMSL

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  9. VIIRS narrowband to broadband land surface albedo conversion: formula and validation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liang, Shunlin

    albedo, such as the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR), Moderate Resolution Imaging broadband albedo (0.4­4.0 mm) of land surfaces from Visible/Infrared Imager/Radiometer Suite (VIIRS algorithm. 1. Introduction Albedo is a critical variable for accurate climate and surface energy balance

  10. Climate Policy 3 (2003) 149157 The climatic impacts of land surface change and carbon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pielke, Roger A.

    recognize that carbon sequestration in the terrestrial biosphere can reduce the build-up of carbon dioxide of the surface energy budget can affect the local, regional, and global climate. Given the goal of mitigatingClimate Policy 3 (2003) 149­157 The climatic impacts of land surface change and carbon management

  11. The Probability Distribution of Land Surface Wind Speeds ADAM H. MONAHAN AND YANPING HE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, Yanping

    al. 2004), wind extremes (e.g., Gastineau and Soden 2009), and wind power climatologies (e.g., Troen) and the prediction of the wind power re- source and extreme surface winds in present and future climates (e.g., TroenThe Probability Distribution of Land Surface Wind Speeds ADAM H. MONAHAN AND YANPING HE School

  12. SGP Cloud and Land Surface Interaction Campaign (CLASIC)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  13. ARM - Cloud and Land Surface Interaction Campaign (CLASIC)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  14. ARM - Field Campaign - Cloud LAnd Surface Interaction Campaign (CLASIC)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  15. Land surface temperature estimation over the Northern Great Plains using passive microwave data from Nimbus 7

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lambert, Vicki Michelle

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    'ounds at the 95% Conffdence Level for Area! Case Study Grid Cells 65 74 LIST OF FIGURES Figure The electromagnetic spectrum Measured transmittance in the band 5. 0-25. 0 pm Detection of passive microwave energy by a passive microwave sensor . Page 15... brightness temperature versus land surface temperature for each of the four SMMR channels at row 08 column 22 Comparison of passive microwave brightness temperature versus land surface temperature for API & 5 mm and API & 5 mm for the 0. 818 channel...

  16. Stable water isotope simulation by current land-surface schemes:Results of IPILPS phase 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henderson-Sellers, A.; Fischer, M.; Aleinov, I.; McGuffie, K.; Riley, W.J.; Schmidt, G.A.; Sturm, K.; Yoshimura, K.; Irannejad, P.

    2005-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Phase 1 of isotopes in the Project for Intercomparison of Land-surface Parameterization Schemes (iPILPS) compares the simulation of two stable water isotopologues ({sup 1}H{sub 2} {sup 18}O and {sup 1}H{sup 2}H{sup 16}O) at the land-atmosphere interface. The simulations are off-line, with forcing from an isotopically enabled regional model for three locations selected to offer contrasting climates and ecotypes: an evergreen tropical forest, a sclerophyll eucalypt forest and a mixed deciduous wood. Here we report on the experimental framework, the quality control undertaken on the simulation results and the method of intercomparisons employed. The small number of available isotopically-enabled land-surface schemes (ILSSs) limits the drawing of strong conclusions but, despite this, there is shown to be benefit in undertaking this type of isotopic intercomparison. Although validation of isotopic simulations at the land surface must await more, and much more complete, observational campaigns, we find that the empirically-based Craig-Gordon parameterization (of isotopic fractionation during evaporation) gives adequately realistic isotopic simulations when incorporated in a wide range of land-surface codes. By introducing two new tools for understanding isotopic variability from the land surface, the Isotope Transfer Function and the iPILPS plot, we show that different hydrological parameterizations cause very different isotopic responses. We show that ILSS-simulated isotopic equilibrium is independent of the total water and energy budget (with respect to both equilibration time and state), but interestingly the partitioning of available energy and water is a function of the models' complexity.

  17. Impact of Agricultural Practice on Regional Climate in a CoupledLand Surface Mesoscale Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooley, H.S.; Riley, W.J.; Torn, M.S.; He, Y.

    2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The land surface has been shown to form strong feedbacks with climate due to linkages between atmospheric conditions and terrestrial ecosystem exchanges of energy, momentum, water, and trace gases. Although often ignored in modeling studies, land management itself may form significant feedbacks. Because crops are harvested earlier under drier conditions, regional air temperature, precipitation, and soil moisture, for example, affect harvest timing, particularly of rain-fed crops. This removal of vegetation alters the land surface characteristics and may, in turn, affect regional climate. We applied a coupled climate(MM5) and land-surface (LSM1) model to examine the effects of early and late winter wheat harvest on regional climate in the Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility in the Southern Great Plains, where winter wheat accounts for 20 percent of the land area. Within the winter wheat region, simulated 2 m air temperature was 1.3 C warmer in the Early Harvest scenario at mid-day averaged over the two weeks following harvest. Soils in the harvested area were drier and warmer in the top 10 cm and wetter in the 10-20 cm layer. Midday soils were 2.5 C warmer in the harvested area at mid-day averaged over the two weeks following harvest. Harvest also dramatically altered latent and sensible heat fluxes. Although differences between scenarios diminished once both scenarios were harvested, the short-term impacts of land management on climate were comparable to those from land cover change demonstrated in other studies.

  18. Land-use transition for bioenergy and climate stabilization: model comparison of drivers, impacts and interactions with other land use based mitigation options

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Popp, Alexander; Rose, Steven K.; Calvin, Katherine V.; Van Vuuren, Detlef; Dietrich, Jan P.; Wise, Marshall A.; Stehfest, Eike; Humpenoder, Florian; Kyle, G. Page; Van Vliet, Jasper; Bauer, Nico; Lotze-Campen, Hermann; Klein, David; Kriegler, Elmar

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study is a model comparison assessing the drivers and impacts of bioenergy production on the global land system and the interaction with other land use based mitigation options in the context of the EMF 27 project. We compare and evaluate results from three integrated assessment models (GCAM, IMAGE, and ReMIND/MAgPIE). All three models project that dedicated bioenergy crops and biomass residues are a potentially important and cost-effective component of the energy system. But bioenergy deployment levels and feedstock composition vary notably across models as do the implications for land-use and greenhouse gas emissions and the interaction with other land use based mitigation measures. Despite numerous model differences, we identify a few that are likely contributing to differences in land-use and emissions attributable to energy crop deployment.

  19. A Subbasin-based framework to represent land surface processes in an Earth System Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tesfa, Teklu K.; Li, Hongyi; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Huang, Maoyi; Ke, Yinghai; Sun, Yu; Liu, Ying

    2014-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Realistically representing spatial heterogeneity and lateral land surface processes within and between modeling units in earth system models is important because of their implications to surface energy and water exchange. The traditional approach of using regular grids as computational units in land surface models and earth system models may lead to inadequate representation of lateral movements of water, energy and carbon fluxes, especially when the grid resolution increases. Here a new subbasin-based framework is introduced in the Community Land Model (CLM), which is the land component of the Community Earth System Model (CESM). Local processes are represented assuming each subbasin as a grid cell on a pseudo grid matrix with no significant modifications to the existing CLM modeling structure. Lateral routing of water within and between subbasins is simulated with the subbasin version of a recently-developed physically based routing model, Model for Scale Adaptive River Routing (MOSART). As an illustration, this new framework is implemented in the topographically diverse region of the U.S. Pacific Northwest. The modeling units (subbasins) are delineated from high-resolution Digital Elevation Model while atmospheric forcing and surface parameters are remapped from the corresponding high resolution datasets. The impacts of this representation on simulating hydrologic processes are explored by comparing it with the default (grid-based) CLM representation. In addition, the effects of DEM resolution on parameterizing topography and the subsequent effects on runoff processes are investigated. Limited model evaluation and comparison showed that small difference between the averaged forcing can lead to more significant difference in the simulated runoff and streamflow because of nonlinear horizontal processes. Topographic indices derived from high resolution DEM may not improve the overall water balance, but affect the partitioning between surface and subsurface runoff. More systematic analyses are needed to determine the relative merits of the subbasin representation compared to the commonly used grid-based representation, especially when land surface models are approaching higher resolutions.

  20. The effect of soil hydraulic properties vs. soil texture in land surface models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Small, Eric

    depths in the soil column controls the partitioning of the two key energy fluxes of concern in climateThe effect of soil hydraulic properties vs. soil texture in land surface models E. D. Gutmann and E and difficulties in scaling existing data. In particular, the spatial distribution of Soil Hydraulic Properties

  1. Diurnal and seasonal variations of wind farm impacts on land surface temperature over western Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Liming

    Diurnal and seasonal variations of wind farm impacts on land surface temperature over western Texas for the period of 2003­2011 over a region in West-Central Texas, where four of the world's largest wind farms by comparing the LST changes between wind farm pixels (WFPs) and nearby non wind farm pixels (NNWFPs) using

  2. Scales of temporal and spatial variability of midlatitude land surface temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vinnikov, Konstantin

    ] Meteorologists have used land surface temperature (LST) in the energy balance equations for a long time high spatial resolution infrared satellite observation of LST is possible only during clearsky weather conditions. Micro- wave radiometers that can monitor LST in cloudy conditions are not yet able to provide

  3. The influence of the land surface on hydrometeorology and ecology: new advances from modeling and satellite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Small, Eric

    Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and EOS Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR and through model initialization of soil moisture from High Resolution Land Data Assimilation System (HRLDAS moisture and sensible heat fluxes. For example, the variations of surface energy and moisture fluxes

  4. Analysis of badlands: coupling of tectonic and land surface processes in the Pyrenees of Spain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baer, Christian

    Analysis of badlands: coupling of tectonic and land surface processes in the Pyrenees of Spain MSc to rainstorms. In north-east Spain, sediment from rapidly eroding badlands has significantly reduced reservoir-funded research consortium (SESAM II) with partners at the University of Lleida, Spain

  5. Developing a TeraGrid Based Land Surface Hydrology and Weather Modeling Interface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Wen

    Developing a TeraGrid Based Land Surface Hydrology and Weather Modeling Interface Hsin-I Chang1 iclimate@purdue.edu -------------------- -------------------- 1 INTRODUCTION Real world hydrologic cyberinfrastructure (CI) has been articulated in many workshops and meetings of the environmental and hydrologic

  6. The effect of stratigraphy and soil plasticity on the settlement characteristics of reclaimed surface mined land

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rangel, Jorge Enrique

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE EFFECT OF STRATIGRAPHY AND SOIL PLASTICITY ON THE SETTLEMENT CHARACTERISTICS OF FECLAIMED SURFACE MINED I~D A Thesis GORGE ENRIQUE RANGEL Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the regni ement... by (Chairman of Committee) (Membe") Member) (Head Department) ABSTRACT THE EFFECT OF STRATIGRAPHY AND SOIL PLASTICITY ON THE SETTLEHEN CHARACTERISTICS OF RECLAIMED SURFACE HINED LAND (December, 1979) Jorge Enrique Rangel, Geophysical Engineer Central...

  7. Land surface skin temperatures from a combined analysis of microwave and infrared satellite observations for an all-weather

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    are homogeneous over large scales, with nearly constant albe- dos, high heat capacity, and infinite moisture supply. In contrast, land surfaces are highly variable in space, have lower heat capacity and limited vapor, cloud liquid water, and surface emissivities over land from a combined analysis of Special Sensor

  8. Charge Retention by Gold Clusters on Surfaces Prepared Using Soft Landing of Mass Selected Ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Grant E.; Priest, Thomas A.; Laskin, Julia

    2012-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Monodisperse gold clusters have been prepared on surfaces in different charge states through soft landing of mass-selected ions. Ligand-stabilized gold clusters were prepared in methanol solution by reduction of chloro(triphenylphosphine)gold(I) with borane tert-butylamine complex in the presence of 1,3-bis(diphenylphosphino)propane. Electrospray ionization was used to introduce the clusters into the gas-phase and mass-selection was employed to isolate a single ionic cluster species (Au11L53+, L = 1,3-bis(diphenylphosphino)propane) which was delivered to surfaces at well controlled kinetic energies. Using in-situ time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) it is demonstrated that the Au11L53+ cluster retains its 3+ charge state when soft landed onto the surface of a 1H,1H,2H,2H-

  9. Effect of Surface Site Interactions on Potentiometric Titration...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    accumulation behavior on single crystal faces of metal oxide minerals. Citation: Chatman SME, PP Zarzycki, T Preocanin, and KM Rosso.2013."Effect of Surface Site Interactions on...

  10. Physical Mechanisms of Interaction of Cold Plasma with Polymer Surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bormashenko, Edward; Multanen, Victor; Shulzinger, Evgeny; Chaniel, Gilad

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Physical mechanisms of the interaction of cold plasmas with organic surfaces are discussed. Trapping of plasma ions by the CH2 groups of polymer surfaces resulting in their electrical charging is treated. Polyethylene surfaces were exposed to the cold radiofrequency air plasma for different intervals of time. The change in the wettability of these surfaces was registered. The experimentally established characteristic time scales of the interaction of cold plasma with polymer surfaces are inversely proportional to the concentration of ions. The phenomenological kinetic model of the electrical charging of polymer surfaces by plasmas is introduced and analyzed.

  11. RAMI4PILPS: An intercomparison of formulations for the partitioning of solar radiation in land surface models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ni-Meister, Wenge

    RAMI4PILPS: An intercomparison of formulations for the partitioning of solar radiation in land for the partitioning of solar radiation in land surface models, J. Geophys. Res., 116, G02019, doi:10.1029/2010JG001511 [e.g., Zeng et al., 2000; Dai et al., 2004]. The partitioning of solar radiation between

  12. Scalability of grid- and subbasin-based land surface modeling approaches for hydrologic simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tesfa, Teklu K.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Huang, Maoyi; Li, Hongyi; Voisin, Nathalie; Wigmosta, Mark S.

    2014-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper investigates the relative merits of grid- and subbasin-based land surface modeling approaches for hydrologic simulations, with a focus on their scalability (i.e., abilities to perform consistently across a range of spatial resolutions) in simulating runoff generation. Simulations produced by the grid- and subbasin-based configurations of the Community Land Model (CLM) are compared at four spatial resolutions (0.125o, 0.25o, 0.5o and 1o) over the topographically diverse region of the U.S. Pacific Northwest. Using the 0.125o resolution simulation as the “reference”, statistical skill metrics are calculated and compared across simulations at 0.25o, 0.5o and 1o spatial resolutions of each modeling approach at basin and topographic region levels. Results suggest significant scalability advantage for the subbasin-based approach compared to the grid-based approach for runoff generation. Basin level annual average relative errors of surface runoff at 0.25o, 0.5o, and 1o compared to 0.125o are 3%, 4%, and 6% for the subbasin-based configuration and 4%, 7%, and 11% for the grid-based configuration, respectively. The scalability advantages of the subbasin-based approach are more pronounced during winter/spring and over mountainous regions. The source of runoff scalability is found to be related to the scalability of major meteorological and land surface parameters of runoff generation. More specifically, the subbasin-based approach is more consistent across spatial scales than the grid-based approach in snowfall/rainfall partitioning, which is related to air temperature and surface elevation. Scalability of a topographic parameter used in the runoff parameterization also contributes to improved scalability of the rain driven saturated surface runoff component, particularly during winter. Hence this study demonstrates the importance of spatial structure for multi-scale modeling of hydrological processes, with implications to surface heat fluxes in coupled land-atmosphere modeling.

  13. Infrared Land Surface Emissivity in the Vicinity of the ARM SGP Central Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFunInfrared Land Surface Emissivity in the Vicinity of the ARM SGP Central

  14. Development and application of WRF3.3-CLM4crop to study of agriculture - climate interaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Yaqiong

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Global Climate Change and United-States Agriculture, Nature,climate modeling Land surface modeling Agriculture and climate interaction Land use change

  15. A Physically Based Runoff Routing Model for Land Surface and Earth System Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Hongyi; Wigmosta, Mark S.; Wu, Huan; Huang, Maoyi; Ke, Yinghai; Coleman, Andre M.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.

    2013-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A new physically based runoff routing model, called the Model for Scale Adaptive River Transport (MOSART), has been developed to be applicable across local, regional, and global scales. Within each spatial unit, surface runoff is first routed across hillslopes and then discharged along with subsurface runoff into a ‘‘tributary subnetwork’’ before entering the main channel. The spatial units are thus linked via routing through the main channel network, which is constructed in a scale-consistent way across different spatial resolutions. All model parameters are physically based, and only a small subset requires calibration.MOSART has been applied to the Columbia River basin at 1/ 168, 1/ 88, 1/ 48, and 1/ 28 spatial resolutions and was evaluated using naturalized or observed streamflow at a number of gauge stations. MOSART is compared to two other routing models widely used with land surface models, the River Transport Model (RTM) in the Community Land Model (CLM) and the Lohmann routing model, included as a postprocessor in the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) model package, yielding consistent performance at multiple resolutions. MOSART is further evaluated using the channel velocities derived from field measurements or a hydraulic model at various locations and is shown to be capable of producing the seasonal variation and magnitude of channel velocities reasonably well at different resolutions. Moreover, the impacts of spatial resolution on model simulations are systematically examined at local and regional scales. Finally, the limitations ofMOSART and future directions for improvements are discussed.

  16. Water balance in the Amazon basin from a land surface model ensemble

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Getirana, Augusto; Dutra, Emanuel; Guimberteau, Matthieu; Kam, Jonghun; Li, Hongyi; Decharme, Bertrand; Zhang, Zhengqiu J.; Ducharne, Agnes; Boone, Aaron; Balsamo, Gianpaolo; Rodell, Matthew; Mounirou Toure, Ally; Xue, Yongkang; Peters-Lidard, Christa D.; Kumar, Sujay V.; Arsenault, Kristi Rae; Drapeau, Guillaume; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Ronchail, Josyane; Sheffield, Justin

    2014-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Despite recent advances in modeling and remote sensing of land surfaces, estimates of the global water budget are still fairly uncertain. The objective of this study is to evaluate the water budget of the Amazon basin based on several state-of-the-art land surface model (LSM) outputs. Water budget variables [total water storage (TWS), evapotranspiration (ET), surface runoff (R) and baseflow (B)] are evaluated at the basin scale using both remote sensing and in situ data. Fourteen LSMs were run using meteorological forcings at a 3-hourly time step and 1-degree spatial resolution. Three experiments are performed using precipitation which has been rescaled to match monthly global GPCP and GPCC datasets and the daily HYBAM dataset for the Amazon basin. R and B are used to force the Hydrological Modeling and Analysis Platform (HyMAP) river routing scheme and simulated discharges are compared against observations at 165 gauges. Simulated ET and TWS are compared against FLUXNET and MOD16A2 evapotranspiration, and GRACE TWS estimates in different catchments. At the basin scale, simulated ET ranges from 2.39mm.d-1 to 3.26mm.d-1 and a low spatial correlation between ET and P indicates that evapotranspiration does not depend on water availability over most of the basin. Results also show that other simulated water budget variables vary significantly as a function of both the LSM and precipitation used, but simulated TWS generally agree at the basin scale. The best water budget simulations resulted from experiments using the HYBAM dataset, mostly explained by a denser rainfall gauge network the daily rescaling.

  17. Interaction of CO with Surface PdZn Alloys. | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFunInfrared Land SurfaceVirus-InfectedIntelligent

  18. Plasma Diagnostics and Plasma-Surface Interactions in Inductively Coupled Plasmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Titus, Monica Joy

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Plasma Diagnostics and Plasma-Surface Interactions inLieberman Spring 2010 Plasma Diagnostics and Plasma-SurfaceJoy Titus Abstract Plasma Diagnostics and Plasma-Surface

  19. Fluorocarbons: Surface Free Energies and van der Waals Interaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chan, Derek Y C

    Letters Fluorocarbons: Surface Free Energies and van der Waals Interaction Calum J. Drummond energies have been calculated for solid fluorocarbon materials by employing a method that utilizes of fluorocarbon polymers as ultra low-adhesive (optimally "non-stick") materials. Among similar classes

  20. Interaction between water cluster ions and mica surface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryuto, Hiromichi, E-mail: ryuto@kuee.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Ohmura, Yuki; Nakagawa, Minoru; Takeuchi, Mitsuaki; Takaoka, Gikan H. [Photonics and Electronics Science and Engineering Center, Kyoto University, Nishikyo, Kyoto 615-8510 (Japan)

    2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Water cluster ion beams were irradiated on mica surfaces to investigate the interaction between molecular cluster ions and a mica surface. The contact angle of the mica surface increased with increasing dose of the water cluster ion beam, but the increase in the contact angle was smaller than that induced by an ethanol cluster ion beam. The surface roughness also increased with increasing dose of the water cluster ion beam, whereas the intensity of K 2p x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy peaks decreased with increasing dose of the water cluster ion beam. The decrease in the number of potassium atoms together with the increase in the surface roughness may be the causes of the increase in the contact angle.

  1. Inverse Modeling of Hydrologic Parameters Using Surface Flux and Runoff Observations in the Community Land Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Yu; Hou, Zhangshuan; Huang, Maoyi; Tian, Fuqiang; Leung, Lai-Yung R.

    2013-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This study demonstrates the possibility of inverting hydrologic parameters using surface flux and runoff observations in version 4 of the Community Land Model (CLM4). Previous studies showed that surface flux and runoff calculations are sensitive to major hydrologic parameters in CLM4 over different watersheds, and illustrated the necessity and possibility of parameter calibration. Two inversion strategies, the deterministic least-square fitting and stochastic Markov-Chain Monte-Carlo (MCMC) - Bayesian inversion approaches, are evaluated by applying them to CLM4 at selected sites. The unknowns to be estimated include surface and subsurface runoff generation parameters and vadose zone soil water parameters. We find that using model parameters calibrated by the least-square fitting provides little improvements in the model simulations but the sampling-based stochastic inversion approaches are consistent - as more information comes in, the predictive intervals of the calibrated parameters become narrower and the misfits between the calculated and observed responses decrease. In general, parameters that are identified to be significant through sensitivity analyses and statistical tests are better calibrated than those with weak or nonlinear impacts on flux or runoff observations. Temporal resolution of observations has larger impacts on the results of inverse modeling using heat flux data than runoff data. Soil and vegetation cover have important impacts on parameter sensitivities, leading to the different patterns of posterior distributions of parameters at different sites. Overall, the MCMC-Bayesian inversion approach effectively and reliably improves the simulation of CLM under different climates and environmental conditions. Bayesian model averaging of the posterior estimates with different reference acceptance probabilities can smooth the posterior distribution and provide more reliable parameter estimates, but at the expense of wider uncertainty bounds.

  2. Q&A on "Impacts of Wind Farms on Land Surface Temperature" Published by Nature Climate Change on April 29, 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Liming

    1 Q&A on "Impacts of Wind Farms on Land Surface Temperature" Published by Nature Climate Change? This study presents the first observational evidence of wind farm impacts on land surface temperature downwind of wind farms. Why do the operating wind turbines warm nighttime temperature? This warming effect

  3. Surface interactions in nonreactive coadsorption: H/sub 2/ and CO on transition-metal surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, J.M.

    1983-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A short overview is given of the nonreactive coadsorption of hydrogen and carbon monoxide on transition metals with particular attention given to Ni(100) single-crystal surfaces where complex interactions are noted. Data derived from several complimentary surface science techniques are presented. Different organizations of the coadsorbed species are found on different crystal faces emphasizing structure sensitivity. The relation between these results and catalytic processes is noted.

  4. Wildfire Risk Mapping over the State of Mississippi: Land Surface Modeling Approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooke, William H. [Mississippi State University (MSU); Mostovoy, Georgy [Mississippi State University (MSU); Anantharaj, Valentine G [ORNL; Jolly, W. Matt [USDA Forest Service

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Three fire risk indexes based on soil moisture estimates were applied to simulate wildfire probability over the southern part of Mississippi using the logistic regression approach. The fire indexes were retrieved from: (1) accumulated difference between daily precipitation and potential evapotranspiration (P-E); (2) top 10 cm soil moisture content simulated by the Mosaic land surface model; and (3) the Keetch-Byram drought index (KBDI). The P-E, KBDI, and soil moisture based indexes were estimated from gridded atmospheric and Mosaic-simulated soil moisture data available from the North American Land Data Assimilation System (NLDAS-2). Normalized deviations of these indexes from the 31-year mean (1980-2010) were fitted into the logistic regression model describing probability of wildfires occurrence as a function of the fire index. It was assumed that such normalization provides more robust and adequate description of temporal dynamics of soil moisture anomalies than the original (not normalized) set of indexes. The logistic model parameters were evaluated for 0.25 x0.25 latitude/longitude cells and for probability representing at least one fire event occurred during 5 consecutive days. A 23-year (1986-2008) forest fires record was used. Two periods were selected and examined (January mid June and mid September December). The application of the logistic model provides an overall good agreement between empirical/observed and model-fitted fire probabilities over the study area during both seasons. The fire risk indexes based on the top 10 cm soil moisture and KBDI have the largest impact on the wildfire odds (increasing it by almost 2 times in response to each unit change of the corresponding fire risk index during January mid June period and by nearly 1.5 times during mid September-December) observed over 0.25 x0.25 cells located along the state of Mississippi Coast line. This result suggests a rather strong control of fire risk indexes on fire occurrence probability over this region.

  5. Utilizing CLASIC observations and multiscale models to study the impact of improved Land surface representation on modeling cloud- convection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Niyogi, Devdutta S. [Purdue

    2013-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The CLASIC experiment was conducted over the US southern great plains (SGP) in June 2007 with an objective to lead an enhanced understanding of the cumulus convection particularly as it relates to land surface conditions. This project was design to help assist with understanding the overall improvement of land atmosphere convection initiation representation of which is important for global and regional models. The study helped address one of the critical documented deficiency in the models central to the ARM objectives for cumulus convection initiation and particularly under summer time conditions. This project was guided by the scientific question building on the CLASIC theme questions: What is the effect of improved land surface representation on the ability of coupled models to simulate cumulus and convection initiation? The focus was on the US Southern Great Plains region. Since the CLASIC period was anomalously wet the strategy has been to use other periods and domains to develop the comparative assessment for the CLASIC data period, and to understand the mechanisms of the anomalous wet conditions on the tropical systems and convection over land. The data periods include the IHOP 2002 field experiment that was over roughly same domain as the CLASIC in the SGP, and some of the DOE funded Ameriflux datasets.

  6. Influence of Dynamic Land Use and Land Cover Change on Simulated Global Terrestrial Carbon and Nitrogen Cycles, Climate-carbon Cycle Feedbacks, and Interactions with Rising CO2 and Anthropogenic Nitrogen Deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thornton, Peter E [ORNL; Hoffman, Forrest M [ORNL; Hurtt, George C [University of Hew Hampshire

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Previous work has demonstrated the sensitivity of terrestrial net carbon exchange to disturbance history and land use patterns at the scale of individual sites or regions. Here we show the influence of land use and land cover dynamics over the historical period 1850-present on global-scale carbon, nutrient, water, and energy fluxes. We also explore the spatial and temporal details of interactions among land use and disturbance history, rising atmospheric carbon dioxide consentation, and increasing anthropogenic nitrogen deposition. Our simulations show that these interactions are significant, and that their importance grows over time, expressed as a fraction of the independent forcing terms. We conclude with an analysis of the influence of these interactions on the sign and magnitude of global climate-carbon cycle feedbacks.

  7. How can we use MODIS land surface temperature to validate long-term urban model simulations?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Leiqiu; Brunsell, Nathaniel A.; Monaghan, Andrew J.; Barlage, Michael; Wilhelmi, Olga V.

    2014-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

    of Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data and simulations from the High-Resolution Land Data Assimilation System (HRLDAS) over Greater Houston, Texas, U.S. For the satellite cloud mask (SCM) method, prior to comparison, the cloud mask...

  8. Ecosystem feedbacks to climate change in California: Development, testing, and analysis using a coupled regional atmosphere and land-surface model (WRF3-CLM3.5)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Subin, Z.M.; Riley, W.J.; Kueppers, L.M.; Jin, J.; Christianson, D.S.; Torn, M.S.

    2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A regional atmosphere model [Weather Research and Forecasting model version 3 (WRF3)] and a land surface model [Community Land Model, version 3.5 (CLM3.5)] were coupled to study the interactions between the atmosphere and possible future California land-cover changes. The impact was evaluated on California's climate of changes in natural vegetation under climate change and of intentional afforestation. The ability of WRF3 to simulate California's climate was assessed by comparing simulations by WRF3-CLM3.5 and WRF3-Noah to observations from 1982 to 1991. Using WRF3-CLM3.5, the authors performed six 13-yr experiments using historical and future large-scale climate boundary conditions from the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory Climate Model version 2.1 (GFDL CM2.1). The land-cover scenarios included historical and future natural vegetation from the Mapped Atmosphere-Plant-Soil System-Century 1 (MC1) dynamic vegetation model, in addition to a future 8-million-ha California afforestation scenario. Natural vegetation changes alone caused summer daily-mean 2-m air temperature changes of -0.7 to +1 C in regions without persistent snow cover, depending on the location and the type of vegetation change. Vegetation temperature changes were much larger than the 2-m air temperature changes because of the finescale spatial heterogeneity of the imposed vegetation change. Up to 30% of the magnitude of the summer daily-mean 2-m air temperature increase and 70% of the magnitude of the 1600 local time (LT) vegetation temperature increase projected under future climate change were attributable to the climate-driven shift in land cover. The authors projected that afforestation could cause local 0.2-1.2 C reductions in summer daily-mean 2-m air temperature and 2.0-3.7 C reductions in 1600 LT vegetation temperature for snow-free regions, primarily because of increased evapotranspiration. Because some of these temperature changes are of comparable magnitude to those projected under climate change this century, projections of climate and vegetation change in this region need to consider these climate-vegetation interactions.

  9. Sensitivity of Surface Flux Simulations to Hydrologic Parameters Based on an Uncertainty Quantification Framework Applied to the Community Land Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hou, Zhangshuan; Huang, Maoyi; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Lin, Guang; Ricciuto, Daniel M.

    2012-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Uncertainties in hydrologic parameters could have significant impacts on the simulated water and energy fluxes and land surface states, which will in turn affect atmospheric processes and the carbon cycle. Quantifying such uncertainties is an important step toward better understanding and quantification of uncertainty of integrated earth system models. In this paper, we introduce an uncertainty quantification (UQ) framework to analyze sensitivity of simulated surface fluxes to selected hydrologic parameters in the Community Land Model (CLM4) through forward modeling. Thirteen flux tower footprints spanning a wide range of climate and site conditions were selected to perform sensitivity analyses by perturbing the parameters identified. In the UQ framework, prior information about the parameters was used to quantify the input uncertainty using the Minimum-Relative-Entropy approach. The quasi-Monte Carlo approach was applied to generate samples of parameters on the basis of the prior pdfs. Simulations corresponding to sampled parameter sets were used to generate response curves and response surfaces and statistical tests were used to rank the significance of the parameters for output responses including latent (LH) and sensible heat (SH) fluxes. Overall, the CLM4 simulated LH and SH show the largest sensitivity to subsurface runoff generation parameters. However, study sites with deep root vegetation are also affected by surface runoff parameters, while sites with shallow root zones are also sensitive to the vadose zone soil water parameters. Generally, sites with finer soil texture and shallower rooting systems tend to have larger sensitivity of outputs to the parameters. Our results suggest the necessity of and possible ways for parameter inversion/calibration using available measurements of latent/sensible heat fluxes to obtain the optimal parameter set for CLM4. This study also provided guidance on reduction of parameter set dimensionality and parameter calibration framework design for CLM4 and other land surface models under different hydrologic and climatic regimes.

  10. Comparison of avian species diversity and densities on non-mined and reclaimed surface-mined land in east-central Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wenzel, Dawn Nicole

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Surface mining often changes the native landscape and vegetation of an area. Reclamation is used to counter this change, with the goal of restoring the land to its original pre-mined state. The process of reclamation creates early successional...

  11. The Influence of Boundary Layer Processes on the Diurnal Variation of the Climatological Near-Surface Wind Speed Probability Distribution over Land*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, Yanping

    diurnally varying vertical structure of the leading three climatological moments of near-surface wind speed-Surface Wind Speed Probability Distribution over Land* YANPING HE School of Earth and Ocean Sciences wind speed probability distribution is essential for surface flux estimation and wind power management

  12. A Survey of Changes in Cloud Cover and Cloud Types over Land from Surface Observations, 197196

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hochberg, Michael

    , offsetting the small positive trend that had been found for the ocean, and resulting in no significant trend for the land­ocean average. Significant regional trends are found for many cloud types. The night trends agree of their effects on solar radiation, terrestrial radiation, and precipitation. These effects depend on cloud height

  13. Impact of land use and precipitation changes on surface temperature trends in Argentina

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kalnay, Eugenia

    with the introduction of satellite data. [5] It is not clear what causes this lack of apparent warming in this region studies [Lim et al., 2005, 2008] indicate that the response to global warming may be st to most other land areas, over most of Argentina there has been net cooling, not warming (about �0.04°C

  14. Coverage Dependent Charge Reduction of Cationic Gold Clusters on Surfaces Prepared Using Soft Landing of Mass-selected Ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Grant E.; Priest, Thomas A.; Laskin, Julia

    2012-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The ionic charge state of monodisperse cationic gold clusters on surfaces may be controlled by selecting the coverage of mass-selected ions soft landed onto a substrate. Polydisperse diphosphine-capped gold clusters were synthesized in solution by reduction of chloro(triphenylphosphine)gold(I) with borane tert-butylamine in the presence of 1,3-bis(diphenylphosphino)propane. The polydisperse gold clusters were introduced into the gas phase by electrospray ionization and mass selection was employed to select a multiply charged cationic cluster species (Au11L53+, m/z = 1409, L = 1,3-bis(diphenylphosphino)propane) which was delivered to the surfaces of four different self-assembled monolayers on gold (SAMs) at coverages of 1011 and 1012 clusters/mm2. Employing the spatial profiling capabilities of in-situ time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) it is shown that, in addition to the chemical functionality of the monolayer (as demonstrated previously: ACS Nano, 2012, 6, 573) the coverage of cationic gold clusters on the surface may be used to control the distribution of ionic charge states of the soft-landed multiply charged clusters. In the case of a 1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorodecanethiol SAM (FSAM) almost complete retention of charge by the deposited Au11L53+ clusters was observed at a lower coverage of 1011 clusters/mm2. In contrast, at a higher coverage of 1012 clusters/mm2, pronounced reduction of charge to Au11L52+ and Au11L5+ was observed on the FSAM. When soft landed onto 16- and 11-mercaptohexadecanoic acid surfaces on gold (16,11-COOH-SAMs), the mass-selected Au11L53+ clusters exhibited partial reduction of charge to Au11L52+ at lower coverage and additional reduction of charge to both Au11L52+ and Au11L5+ at higher coverage. The reduction of charge was found to be more pronounced on the surface of the shorter (thinner) C11 than the longer (thicker) C16-COOH-SAM. On the surface of the 1-dodecanethiol (HSAM) monolayer, the most abundant charge state was found to be Au11L52+ at lower coverage and Au11L5+ at higher coverage, respectively. A coverage-dependent electron tunneling mechanism is proposed to account for the observed reduction of charge of mass-selected multiply charged gold clusters soft landed on SAMs. The results demonstrate that one of the critical parameters that influence the chemical and physical properties of supported metal clusters, ionic charge state, may be controlled by selecting the coverage of charged species soft landed onto surfaces.

  15. Influence of plasma surface interactions on tokamak startup

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goswami, Rajiv [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382428 (India)] [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382428 (India)

    2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The startup phase of a tokamak is a complex phenomenon involving burnthrough of the low-Z impurities and rampup of I{sub p}, the plasma current. The design considerations of a tokamak are closely connected with the startup modeling. Plasma evolution is analysed using a zero-dimensional model. The particle and energy balance is considered of two subclasses of plasmas which are penetrable by neutral gas, together with another component, neutrals trapped in the wall. The first subclass includes plasmas being penetrated by slow neutrals of (?few eV) temperature. The second includes plasmas being penetrated only by fast neutrals having a temperature comparable to that of the ions. The impact of impurities on energy balance is considered through their generation by ion induced desorption of adsorbed oxygen on the first wall and physical and chemical sputtering of carbon. The paper demonstrates self-consistently that the evolution of initial phase of the discharge is intimately linked to the condition of the plasma facing components (PFCs) and the resultant plasma surface interactions.

  16. Multiobjective calibration and sensitivity of a distributed land surface water and energy balance model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Houser, Paul R; Gupta, Hoshin V; Shuttleworth, W. James; Famiglietti, James S

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    identification and energy balance models on a tallgrassdata for surface energy balance evaluation of a semiaridWatershed. We are energy balance components over a semiarid

  17. Optimal use of land surface temperature data to detect changes in tropical forest cover

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in the visible and near infrared, and vegetation indices (derived from visible and near infrared wavelengths. [ 5 ]the usefulness of visible and near?infrared surface reflec-

  18. Direct measurements of ensemble particle and surface interactions on homogeneous and patterned substrates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Hung-Jen

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    in colloidal ensembles levitated above macroscopic surfaces. TIRM and VM are well established optical microscopy techniques for measuring normal and lateral colloidal excursions near macroscopic planar surfaces. The interactions between particle-particle...

  19. Effect of the surface on the secondary structure of soft landed peptide

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed NewcatalystNeutronEnvironmentZIRKLE FRUITYearEffect ofReactions: AofofLanded

  20. Interaction of soft x-ray laser pulse radiation with aluminum surface: Nano-meter size surface modification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ishino, Masahiko; Faenov, Anatoly; Tanaka, Momoko; Hasegawa, Noboru; Nishikino, Masaharu; Tamotsu, Satoshi; Pikuz, Tatiana; Inogamov, Nail; Zhakhovsky, Vasily; Skobelev, Igor; Fortov, Vladimir; Khohlov, Viktor; Shepelev, Vadim; Ohba, Toshiyuki; Kaihori, Takeshi; Ochi, Yoshihiro; Imazono, Takashi; Kawachi, Tetsuya [Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Kyoto 619-0215 (Japan); Joint Institute for High Temperatures, Russian Academy of Science, Moscow 125412 (Russian Federation); Graduate School of Humanities and Science, Nara Women's University, Nara 630-8506 (Japan); Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics, Russian Academy of Science, Chernogolovka 142432 (Russian Federation); Institute for Computer Aided Design, Russian Academy of Science, Moscow 123056 (Russian Federation)

    2012-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Interaction of soft x-ray laser radiation with material and caused modification of the exposed surface has both physical and practical interests. We irradiated the focusing soft x-ray laser (SXRL) pulses having a wavelength of 13.9 nm and the duration of 7 ps to aluminum (Al) surface. After the SXRL irradiation process, the irradiated Al surface was observed with a scanning electron microscope. The surface modifications caused by SXRL single pulse exposure were clearly seen. In addition, it was found that the conical structures having around 100 nm in diameters were formed in the shallow features. The nano-meter size modified structures at Al surface induced by SXRL pulse is interesting as the newly surface structure. Hence, the SXRL beam would be a candidate for a tool of micromachining. We also provide a thermomechanical modeling of SXRL interaction with Al briefly to explain the surface modification.

  1. Retrieving snow mass from GRACE terrestrial water storage change with a land surface model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Zong-Liang

    by the Advanced Very High Resolution Radio- meter (AVHRR) is decreasing since middle 1980s in response to global are variations in surface albedo and surface energy budgets, sensible heat and water vapor fluxes-chan- nel Microwave Radiometer (SMMR) and the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR) provide a capa

  2. An update on modeling land-ice/ocean interactions in CESM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Asay-davis, Xylar [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2011-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This talk is an update on ongoing land-ice/ocean coupling work within the Community Earth System Model (CESM). The coupling method is designed to allow simulation of a fully dynamic ice/ocean interface, while requiring minimal modification to the existing ocean model (the Parallel Ocean Program, POP). The method makes use of an immersed boundary method (IBM) to represent the geometry of the ice-ocean interface without requiring that the computational grid be modified in time. We show many of the remaining development challenges that need to be addressed in order to perform global, century long climate runs with fully coupled ocean and ice sheet models. These challenges include moving to a new grid where the computational pole is no longer at the true south pole and several changes to the coupler (the software tool used to communicate between model components) to allow the boundary between land and ocean to vary in time. We discuss benefits for ice/ocean coupling that would be gained from longer-term ocean model development to allow for natural salt fluxes (which conserve both water and salt mass, rather than water volume).

  3. Molecular surface electrostatic potentials in the analysis of non-hydrogen-bonding noncovalent interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murray, J.S.; Paulsen, K.; Politzer, P.

    1993-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrostatic potentials computed on molecular surfaces are used to analyze some noncovalent interactions that are not in the category of hydrogen bonding, e.g. halogen bonding. The systems examined include halogenated methanes, substituted benzenes, s-tetrazine and 1,3-bisphenylurea. The data were obtained by ab initio SCF calculations. Electrostatic potentials, Non-hydrogen-bonding noncovalent interactions, Molecular surfaces.

  4. Gas-surface interaction and boundary conditions for the Boltzmann equation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mieussens, Luc

    Gas-surface interaction and boundary conditions for the Boltzmann equation St´ephane Brull, Pierre Equation. The interaction between the wall atoms and the gas molecules within a thin surface layer of the gas in the bulk flow. Boundary conditions are formally derived from this model by using classical

  5. Bragg spectroscopy for measuring Casimir-Polder interactions with Bose-Einstein condensates above corrugated surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gustavo A. Moreno; Diego A. R. Dalvit; Esteban Calzetta

    2010-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a method to probe dispersive atom-surface interactions by measuring via two-photon Bragg spectroscopy the dynamic structure factor of a Bose-Einstein condensate above corrugated surfaces. This method takes advantage of the condensate coherence to reveal the spatial Fourier components of the lateral Casimir-Polder interaction energy.

  6. Role of Climate Variability in Modulating the Surface Water and Groundwater Interaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arumugam, Sankar

    from the ECHAM4.5 general circulation model indicate that it is possible to quantify groundwater variability; Groundwater-surface water interaction; Hydroclimatology; Forecasting. Introduction ClimateRole of Climate Variability in Modulating the Surface Water and Groundwater Interaction over

  7. Climate and Energy-Water-Land System Interactions Technical Report to the U.S. Department of Energy in Support of the National Climate Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skaggs, Richard; Hibbard, Kathleen A.; Frumhoff, Peter; Lowry, Thomas; Middleton, Richard; Pate, Ron; Tidwell, Vincent C.; Arnold, J. G.; Averyt, Kristen; Janetos, Anthony C.; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Rice, Jennie S.; Rose, Steven K.

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides a framework to characterize and understand the important elements of climate and energy-water-land (EWL) system interactions. It identifies many of the important issues, discusses our understanding of those issues, and presents a long-term research program research needs to address the priority scientific challenges and gaps in our understanding. Much of the discussion is organized around two discrete case studies with the broad themes of (1) extreme events and (2) regional intercomparisons. These case studies help demonstrate unique ways in which energy-water-land interactions can occur and be influenced by climate.

  8. Mid-21st Century Changes to Surface Hydrology Over the Los Angeles Region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwartz, Marla Ann

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    regional climate and hydrology modeling. Earth Interactions,Brutsaert, W. , 2005. Hydrology: An Introduction. New York:advanced land-surface/hydrology model with the Penn State/

  9. A continuous satellitederived global record of land surface evapotranspiration from 1983 to 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montana, University of

    using advanced very high resolution radiometer (AVHRR) GIMMS NDVI, NCEP/NCAR Reanalysis (NNR) daily climatologies, terrestrial water, and energy budgets and longterm water cycle changes. Citation: Zhang, K., J. S a critical link between terrestrial water, carbon, and surface energy exchanges. The world has experienced

  10. Diurnal cycle of land surface temperature in a desert encroachment zone as observed from satellites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Donglian

    Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) that are limited in their ability to capture the full diurnal) project and the Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program, the ARM Mobile of the surface from satellites are possible. Infrared radiometers on polar orbiting satellites have been used

  11. Evaluation of Satellite Estimates of Land Surface Temperature from GOES over the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Donglian

    , and it is an indicator of the energy balance at the earth's surface (Sellers et al. 1988). LST retrievals are more for several decades. The focus was on polar-orbiting systems, such as the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) and the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), because of global coverage

  12. Effect of One-Dimensional Field Data Assimilation on Land Surface Model Flux Estimates with Implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Jeff

    .W. Western1 1 Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, The University of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia 2 CSIRO Marine and Atmospheric Research, Aspendale, Victoria, Australia Email: r Model (CBM) represent the exchange of energy and water between the earth's surface and lower atmosphere

  13. Influence of steps on the interaction between adsorbed hydrogen atoms and a nickel surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sibener, Steven

    practical phenomena such as hydrogen stor- age, corrosion, and embrittlement. One of the goals of surfaceInfluence of steps on the interaction between adsorbed hydrogen atoms and a nickel surface Aubrey T-dimensional phase behavior of adsorbed hydrogen on a Ni surface using helium atom scattering. Specifically

  14. The impact of groundwater-land surface interactions on hydrologic persistence in macroscale modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    that baseflow tends to dominate streamflow signal for most of these basins (only shown for French Broad streamflow for the French Broad River, and increased the lagged- correlation for end-of-month storage on the French Broad River Monocacy River MON Rappahannock River RAP Tygart Valley TYG Bluestone River BLU East

  15. Surface Water Chemistry in White Oak Creek, North-East Texas: Effect of Land Use

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Eliza

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    watersheds soils, leaches readily to surface waters. Manure can contribute a significant amount of phosphorus loading into adjacent streams from livestock agriculture (James et al. 2007). Contributions from dairy cattle in a watershed in southeastern... New York showed that in-stream fecal deposits from pastured cattle represented 10% of watershed phosphorus loadings (James et al. 2007). Additionally, it was found that livestock grazing along streams and riparian zones can also have adverse...

  16. Linear relationship between water wetting behavior and microscopic interactions of super-hydrophilic surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Jian; Guo, Pan [Division of Interfacial Water and Key Laboratory of Interfacial Physics and Technology, Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Science, Shanghai 201800 (China) [Division of Interfacial Water and Key Laboratory of Interfacial Physics and Technology, Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Science, Shanghai 201800 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Wang, Chunlei; Shi, Guosheng, E-mail: shiguosheng@sinap.ac.cn; Fang, Haiping [Division of Interfacial Water and Key Laboratory of Interfacial Physics and Technology, Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Science, Shanghai 201800 (China)] [Division of Interfacial Water and Key Laboratory of Interfacial Physics and Technology, Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Science, Shanghai 201800 (China)

    2013-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Using molecular dynamics simulations, we show a fine linear relationship between surface energies and microscopic Lennard-Jones parameters of super-hydrophilic surfaces. The linear slope of the super-hydrophilic surfaces is consistent with the linear slope of the super-hydrophobic, hydrophobic, and hydrophilic surfaces where stable water droplets can stand, indicating that there is a universal linear behavior of the surface energies with the water-surface van der Waals interaction that extends from the super-hydrophobic to super-hydrophilic surfaces. Moreover, we find that the linear relationship exists for various substrate types, and the linear slopes of these different types of substrates are dependent on the surface atom density, i.e., higher surface atom densities correspond to larger linear slopes. These results enrich our understanding of water behavior on solid surfaces, especially the water wetting behaviors on uncharged super-hydrophilic metal surfaces.

  17. Nonadditivity of Polymeric and Charged Surface Interactions: Consequences for Doped Lamellar Phases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O. A. Croze; M. E. Cates

    2005-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We explore theoretically the modifications to the interactions between charged surfaces across an ionic solution caused by the presence of dielectric polymers. Although the chains are neutral, the polymer physics and the electrostatics are coupled; the intra-surface electric fields polarise any low permittivity species (e.g., polymer) dissolved in a high permittivity solvent (e.g., water). This coupling enhances the polymer depletion from the surfaces and increases the screening of electrostatic interactions with respect to a model which treats polymeric and electrostatic effects as independent. As a result, the range of the ionic contribution to the osmotic interaction between surfaces is decreased, while that of the polymeric contribution is increased. These changes modify the total interaction in a nonadditive manner. Building on the results for parallel surfaces, we investigate the effect of this coupling on the phase behaviour of polymer-doped smectics.

  18. Reactive Landing of Peptide Ions on Self-Assembled Monolayer Surfaces: A

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared at 278, 298, andEpidermalOxide Fuel Cells -Surfaces. |

  19. Earth is a dynamic, living oasis in the desolation of space. The land, oceans, and air interact in complex ways to give our planet a unique set

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Earth is a dynamic, living oasis in the desolation of space. The land, oceans, and air interact in this process. In the mid 1980s, NASA developed a systems-based approach to studying the Earth and called it "Earth System Science" to advance the knowledge of Earth as a planet. Space-based observations

  20. A Long-term hydrologically based dataset of land surface fluxes and states for the conterminous1 U.S.: Update and extensions2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    Real, Santa Clara, CA 95053-056310 11 12 13 14 15 To be submitted to the Journal of Climate and energy exchanges at the20 land surface. These data are gridded at a spatial resolution of 1/16 degree data set has been widely used in water and31 energy budget studies, climate change assessments, drought

  1. A Long-term hydrologically based dataset of land surface fluxes and states for the conterminous1 U.S.: Update and extensions2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    To be submitted to the Journal of Climate as an Expedited Contribution18 19 #12;2 ABSTRACT20 We describe United States, intended to aid in studies of water and energy exchanges at the22 land surface. These data of VIC. The previous data set has been widely used in water and33 energy budget studies, climate change

  2. Modeling the Effects of Irrigation on Land Surface Fluxes and States over the Conterminous United States: Sensitivity to Input Data and Model Parameters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leng, Guoyong; Huang, Maoyi; Tang, Qiuhong; Sacks, William J.; Lei, Huimin; Leung, Lai-Yung R.

    2013-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Previous studies on irrigation impacts on land surface fluxes/states were mainly conducted as sensitivity experiments, with limited analysis of uncertainties from the input data and model irrigation schemes used. In this study, we calibrated and evaluated the performance of irrigation water use simulated by the Community Land Model version 4 (CLM4) against observations from agriculture census. We investigated the impacts of irrigation on land surface fluxes and states over the conterminous United States (CONUS) and explored possible directions of improvement. Specifically, we found large uncertainty in the irrigation area data from two widely used sources and CLM4 tended to produce unrealistically large temporal variations of irrigation demand for applications at the water resources region scale over CONUS. At seasonal to interannual time scales, the effects of irrigation on surface energy partitioning appeared to be large and persistent, and more pronounced in dry than wet years. Even with model calibration to yield overall good agreement with the irrigation amounts from the National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS), differences between the two irrigation area datasets still dominate the differences in the interannual variability of land surface response to irrigation. Our results suggest that irrigation amount simulated by CLM4 can be improved by (1) calibrating model parameter values to account for regional differences in irrigation demand and (2) accurate representation of the spatial distribution and intensity of irrigated areas.

  3. Long-range interactions between probes, particles and surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ritchie, R.H.; Manson, J.R.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A brief review is given of some applications of a novel form of self-energy theory. These include the image force experienced by an electron near a metal, the van der Waals interaction between two molecules and the polarization potential of atomic scattering theory.

  4. Scattering approach to dispersive atom-surface interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dalvit, Diego [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Messina, Riccardo [LAB KASTLER BROSSEL; Maia Neto, Paulo [INSTITUTO DE FISICA UFRJ; Lambrecht, Astrid [LAB KASTLER BROSSEL; Reynaud, Serge [LAB KASTLER BROSSEL

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We develop the scattering approach for the dispersive force on a ground state atom on top of a corrugated surface. We present explicit results to first order in the corrugation amplitude. A variety of analytical results are derived in different limiting cases, including the van der Waals and Casimir-Polder regimes. We compute numerically the exact first-order dispersive potential for arbitrary separation distances and corrugation wavelengths, for a Rubidium atom on top of a silicon or gold corrugated surface. We consider in detail the correction to the proximity force approximation, and present a very simple approximation algorithm for computing the potential.

  5. DOI: 10.1002/ijch.201100129 GasSurface Interactions on Quasicrystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Curtarolo, Stefano

    DOI: 10.1002/ijch.201100129 Gas­Surface Interactions on Quasicrystals Stefano Curtarolo,[a] Wahyu-energy electron dif- fraction (LEED) and grand canonical Monte Carlo (GCMC) was performed for Xe adsorption

  6. Surfactant effects on the interaction of a three dimensional vortex pair with a free surface; and,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Xiang, 1969-

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In part I of the thesis, a canonical problem of three dimensional surfactant hydrody namics, the three-dimensional laminar interaction between a clean or contaminated free surface and a vortical flow underneath is considered. ...

  7. Excited level anisotropy produced by ion-solid and ion-liquid surface interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Chin Shuang

    2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    EXCITED LEPEL ANISOTPOPY PRODUCED BY ION-SOLID AND ION-LIQUID SURFACE INTERACTIONS A Thesis CHIN SHUANG LEE Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE December 1977 Major Subject: Physics EXCITED LEVEL ANISOTROPY PRODUCED BY ION-SOLID AND ION-LIQUID SURFACE 'INTERACTIONS A Thesis by CHIN SHUANG LEE Approved as to style and content by: Chairman of Committee Head of Departmert Member...

  8. Spherical Torus Plasma Interactions with Large-Area Liquid Lithium Surfaces in CDX-U

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Los Angeles, University of

    - 1 - Spherical Torus Plasma Interactions with Large-Area Liquid Lithium Surfaces in CDX-U R. KAITA of this concept, key liquid lithium-plasma interaction questions are being addressed in the CDX-U device[2 (PPPL) is a spherical torus (ST) dedicated to the exploration of liquid lithium as a potential solution

  9. Elastic displacements and step interactions on metallic surfaces: GIXD and ab initio study of Au(332)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    -range displacement fields generated by atomic relaxations at the steps.10 It is generally assumed that the most authors have come up with elastic models to describe step-step interactions.10,11,12,13,14 In generalElastic displacements and step interactions on metallic surfaces: GIXD and ab initio study of Au

  10. Surface based remote sensing of aerosol-cloud interactions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security AdministrationcontrollerNanocrystalline GalliumSuppression of conductivitySurface based remote sensing

  11. Interaction of a surface glow discharge with a gas flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aleksandrov, A. L., E-mail: a_alex@itam.nsc.ru; Schweigert, I. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Khristianovich Institute of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics, Siberian Branch (Russian Federation)

    2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A surface glow discharge in a gas flow is of particular interest as a possible tool for controlling the flow past hypersonic aircrafts. Using a hydrodynamic model of glow discharge, two-dimensional calculations for a kilovolt surface discharge in nitrogen at a pressure of 0.5 Torr are carried out in a stationary gas, as well as in a flow with a velocity of 1000 m/s. The discharge structure and plasma parameters are investigated near a charged electrode. It is shown that the electron energy in a cathode layer reaches 250-300 eV. Discharge is sustained by secondary electron emission. The influence of a high-speed gas flow on the discharge is considered. It is shown that the cathode layer configuration is flow-resistant. The distributions of the electric field and electron energy, as well as the ionization rate profile in the cathode layer, do not change qualitatively under the action of the flow. The basic effect of the flow's influence is a sharp decrease in the region of the quasineutral plasma surrounding the cathode layer due to fast convective transport of ions.

  12. Exploring the interaction between lithium ion and defective graphene surface using dispersion corrected DFT studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vijayakumar, M.; Hu, Jian Z.

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    To analyze the lithium ion interaction with realistic graphene surfaces, we carried out dispersion corrected DFT-D3 studies on graphene with common point defects and chemisorbed oxygen containing functional groups along with defect free graphene surface. Our study reveals that, the interaction between lithium ion (Li+) and graphene is mainly through the delocalized ? electron of pure graphene layer. However, the oxygen containing functional groups pose high adsorption energy for lithium ion due to the Li-O ionic bond formation. Similarly, the point defect groups interact with lithium ion through possible carbon dangling bonds and/or cation-? type interactions. Overall these defect sites render a preferential site for lithium ions compared with pure graphene layer. Based on these findings, the role of graphene surface defects in lithium battery performance were discussed.

  13. Materials of interaction : responsive materials in the design of transformable interactive surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coelho, Marcelo

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Materials that embody computational properties are reshaping the ways in which we design, interact and communicate. This thesis looks at the topic of form transformation and how to bring the programmability and versatility ...

  14. Particle-Surface Interaction Databases in ALADDIN Format

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    These databases are listed as recommended resources by CFADC. They represent older data and are not necessarily DOE-originated or funded. However, they are cited in the DOE Data Explorer because of their availability through a DOE Data Center. The citations for these databases are: 1) Energy Dependence of Ion-Induced Sputtering Yields of Monatomic Solids in the Low Energy Region. N. Matsunami, Y. Yamamura, N. Itoh, H. Tawara, T. Kawamura. Report IPPJ-AM-52, Institute of Plasma Physics (National Institute for Fusion Science), Nagoya, Japan (1987); 2) Energy Dependence of the Yields of Ion-Induced Sputtering of Monatomic Solids. N. Maksunami, Y. Yamaura, Y. Itikawa, N. Itoh, Y. Kazumata, S. Miyagawer, K. Morita, R. Strimizu, H. Tawara. Report IPPJ-AM-32, Institute of Plasma Physics (National Institute for Fusion Science), Nagoya, Japan (1988); 3) Particle Reflection from Surfaces - A Recommended Data Base. E. W. Thomas, R. K. Janev and J. J. Smith. Report IAEA INDC(NDS)-249, July 1991; 4) Sputtering Data. W. Eckstein, C. Garcia-Rosales, J. Roth and W. Ottenberger. Max-Plank-Institute fur Plasmaphysik Report IPP9/82 (1993); 5) An Evaluated Database for Sputtering. E. W. Thomas, R. K. Janev, J. Botero, J. J. Smith and Y. Qiu. Report IAEA INDC(NDS)-287 (1993).

  15. Variation and Trends of Landscape Dynamics, Land Surface Phenology and Net Primary Production of the Appalachian Mountains

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Yeqiao; Zhao, Jianjun; Zhou, Yuyu; Zhang, Hongyan

    2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The gradients of the Appalachian Mountains in elevations and latitudes provide a unique regional perspective of landscape variations in the eastern United States and a section of the southeastern Canada. This study reveals patterns and trends of landscape dynamics, land surface phenology and ecosystem production along the Appalachian Mountains using time series data from Global Inventory Modeling and Mapping Studies (GIMMS) and AVHRR Global Production Efficiency Model (GloPEM) datasets. We analyzed the spatial and temporal patterns of Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), length of growing season (LOS) and net primary production (NPP) of selected ecoregions along the Appalachian Mountains regions. We compared the results out of the Appalachian Mountains regions in different spatial contexts including the North America and the Appalachian Trail corridor area. To reveal latitudinal variations we analyzed data and compared the results between 30°N-40°N and 40°N-50°N latitudes. The result revealed significant decreases in annual peak NDVI in the Appalachian Mountains regions. The trend for the Appalachian Mountains regions was -0.0018 (R2=0.55, P<0.0001) NDVI unit decrease per year during 25 years between 1982 and 2006. The LOS had prolonged 0.3 day yr-1 during 25 years over the Appalachian Mountains regions. The NPP increased by 2.68 gC m-2yr-2 in Appalachian Mountains regions from 1981 to 2000. The comparison with the North America reveals the effects of topography and ecosystem compositions of the Appalachian Mountains. The comparison with the Appalachian Trail corridor area provides a regional mega-transect view of the measured variables.

  16. Interactions Between the Daytime Mixed Layer and the Surface: Oklahoma Mesonet and EBBR Heat Fluxes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFunInfrared Land SurfaceVirus-InfectedIntelligentCO2 with Oxygencell

  17. What is the importance of climate model bias when projecting the impacts of climate change on land surface processes?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, M. L.; Rajagopalan, K.; Chung, S. H.; Jiang, X.; Harrison, J. H.; Nergui, T.; Guenther, Alex B.; Miller, C.; Reyes, J.; Tague, C. L.; Choate, J. S.; Salathe, E.; Stockle, Claudio O.; Adam, J. C.

    2014-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Regional climate change impact (CCI) studies have widely involved downscaling and bias-correcting (BC) Global Climate Model (GCM)-projected climate for driving land surface models. However, BC may cause uncertainties in projecting hydrologic and biogeochemical responses to future climate due to the impaired spatiotemporal covariance of climate variables and a breakdown of physical conservation principles. Here we quantify the impact of BC on simulated climate-driven changes in water variables(evapotranspiration, ET; runoff; snow water equivalent, SWE; and water demand for irrigation), crop yield, biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC), nitric oxide (NO) emissions, and dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) export over the Pacific Northwest (PNW) Region. We also quantify the impacts on net primary production (NPP) over a small watershed in the region (HJ Andrews). Simulation results from the coupled ECHAM5/MPI-OM model with A1B emission scenario were firstly dynamically downscaled to 12 km resolutions with WRF model. Then a quantile mapping based statistical downscaling model was used to downscale them into 1/16th degree resolution daily climate data over historical and future periods. Two series climate data were generated according to the option of bias-correction (i.e. with bias-correction (BC) and without bias-correction, NBC). Impact models were then applied to estimate hydrologic and biogeochemical responses to both BC and NBC meteorological datasets. These im20 pact models include a macro-scale hydrologic model (VIC), a coupled cropping system model (VIC-CropSyst), an ecohydrologic model (RHESSys), a biogenic emissions model (MEGAN), and a nutrient export model (Global-NEWS). Results demonstrate that the BC and NBC climate data provide consistent estimates of the climate-driven changes in water fluxes (ET, runoff, and water demand), VOCs (isoprene and monoterpenes) and NO emissions, mean crop yield, and river DIN export over the PNW domain. However, significant differences rise from projected SWE, crop yield from dry lands, and HJ Andrews’s ET between BC and NBC data. Even though BC post-processing has no significant impacts on most of the studied variables when taking PNW as a whole, their effects have large spatial variations and some local areas are substantially influenced. In addition, there are months during which BC and NBC post-processing produces significant differences in projected changes, such as summer runoff. Factor-controlled simulations indicate that BC post-processing of precipitation and temperature both substantially contribute to these differences at region scales. We conclude that there are trade-offs between using BC climate data for offline CCI studies vs. direct modeled climate data. These trade-offs should be considered when designing integrated modeling frameworks for specific applications; e.g., BC may be more important when considering impacts on reservoir operations in mountainous watersheds than when investigating impacts on biogenic emissions and air quality (where VOCs are a primary indicator).

  18. The CSIRO Mk3L climate system model v1.0 coupled to the CABLE land surface scheme v1.4b: evaluation of the control climatology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mao, Jiafu [ORNL; Phipps, S.J. [University of New South Wales; Pitman, A.J. [University of New South Wales; Wang, Yingping [CSIRO Marine and Atmospheric Research; Abramowitz, G. [University of New South Wales; Pak, B. [CSIRO Marine and Atmospheric Research

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The CSIRO Mk3L climate system model, a reduced-resolution coupled general circulation model, has previously been described in this journal. The model is configured for millennium scale or multiple century scale simulations. This paper reports the impact of replacing the relatively simple land surface scheme that is the default parameterisation in Mk3L with a sophisticated land surface model that simulates the terrestrial energy, water and carbon balance in a physically and biologically consistent way. An evaluation of the new model s near-surface climatology highlights strengths and weaknesses, but overall the atmospheric variables, including the near-surface air temperature and precipitation, are simulated well. The impact of the more sophisticated land surface model on existing variables is relatively small, but generally positive. More significantly, the new land surface scheme allows an examination of surface carbon-related quantities including net primary productivity which adds significantly to the capacity of Mk3L. Overall, results demonstrate that this reduced-resolution climate model is a good foundation for exploring long time scale phenomena. The addition of the more sophisticated land surface model enables an exploration of important Earth System questions including land cover change and abrupt changes in terrestrial carbon storage.

  19. Combined surface solar brightening and increasing greenhouse effect support recent intensification of the global land-based hydrological cycle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischlin, Andreas

    Combined surface solar brightening and increasing greenhouse effect support recent intensification. Scha¨r (2008), Combined surface solar brightening and increasing greenhouse effect support recent

  20. Excessive broadening of hydrogen Balmer lines for discharge-surface interaction monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Konjevic, N.; Majstorovic, G. Lj.; Sisovic, N.M. [Faculty of Physics, University of Belgrade, 11001 Belgrade, P.O. Box 368 (Serbia and Montenegro); Military Academy, 11105 Belgrade, Generala Pavla Jurisica-Sturma 33 (Serbia and Montenegro); Faculty of Physics, University of Belgrade, 11001 Belgrade, P.O. Box 368 (Serbia and Montenegro)

    2005-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A comparative study of the hydrogen H{sub {alpha}} line shapes in titanium and stainless steel hollow cathode discharges, run with hydrogen or argon-hydrogen mixture illustrates the possibility of using the excessively broadened part of line profile for heavy particle-cathode surface interaction monitoring.

  1. Interactions of mobile helium clusters with surfaces and grain boundaries of plasma-exposed tungsten

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, Lin; Maroudas, Dimitrios, E-mail: maroudas@ecs.umass.edu [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Massachusetts 01003-9303 (United States); Hammond, Karl D.; Wirth, Brian D. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996 (United States)

    2014-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We report results of atomistic computations for the interactions of small mobile helium clusters (He{sub n}) with free surfaces and grain boundaries (GBs) in tungsten toward development of continuum drift-diffusion-reaction models for the dynamics of mobile helium clusters in plasma-exposed tungsten. Molecular-statics (MS) simulations based on reliable many-body interatomic potentials are carried out for He{sub n} (1???n???7) clusters near sinks to obtain the potential energy profiles of the He{sub n} clusters as a function of the clusters' center-of-mass distance from a sink. Sinks investigated include surfaces, GBs, and regions in the vicinity of junctions where GBs intersect free surfaces. Elastic interaction potentials based on elastic inclusion theory provide an excellent description of the MS results for the cluster-sink interactions. The key parameter in the elastic models is the sink segregation strength, which is found to increase with increasing cluster size. Such cluster-sink interactions are responsible for the migration of small helium clusters by drift and for helium segregation on surfaces and grain boundaries in tungsten. Such helium segregation on sinks is observed in large-scale molecular-dynamics simulations of helium aggregation in model polycrystalline tungsten at 933?K upon helium implantation.

  2. ELECTRONIC PROCESSES IN THE INTERACTION OF IONS WITH SOLIDS AND SURFACES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muiño, Ricardo Díez

    , ETSII, UPV/EHU, Alda. Urquijo s/n, 48013 Bilbao, Spain 2 Departamento de F#19;#16;sica de Materiales-UPV/EHU, Aptdo. 1072, 20080 San Sebasti#19;an, Spain 3 Donostia International Physics Center (DIPC), P. Manuel de Lardizabal 4, 20018 San Sebasti#19;an, Spain Short title: Interaction of ions with solids and surfaces #12

  3. Interactions of ozone and pathogens on the surface structure of Norway spruce needles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Interactions of ozone and pathogens on the surface structure of Norway spruce needles K. Ojanperä S and pathogens. It also acts as a barrier to air pollutants (Jeffree, 1986). The epicuticular wax of Norway and then a plate-like wax structure (Sauter and Voss, 1986). The life span of healthy needles of Norway spruce

  4. Ab-Initio Quantum Dynamics Calculation of Hydrogen Interaction with Surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katsumoto, Shingo

    hydrogen economy [7], infrastructures have to be built. Development of efficient processes for hydro- gen, from an economics point-of- view, the transition to an economy based on hydrogen (energy) couldAb-Initio Quantum Dynamics Calculation of Hydrogen Interaction with Surfaces --Exploiting

  5. PUBLISHED ONLINE: 29 APRIL 2012 | DOI: 10.1038/NCLIMATE1505 Impacts of wind farms on land surface temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Liming

    LETTERS PUBLISHED ONLINE: 29 APRIL 2012 | DOI: 10.1038/NCLIMATE1505 Impacts of wind farms on land a region in west-central Texas, where four of the world's largest wind farms are located7 . Our results farms relative to nearby non-wind-farm regions. We attribute this warming primarily to wind farms as its

  6. On the Interaction between Marine Boundary Layer Cellular Cloudiness and Surface Heat Fluxes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kazil, J.; Feingold, G.; Wang, Hailong; Yamaguchi, T.

    2014-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The interaction between marine boundary layer cellular cloudiness and surface uxes of sensible and latent heat is investigated. The investigation focuses on the non-precipitating closed-cell state and the precipitating open-cell state at low geostrophic wind speed. The Advanced Research WRF model is used to conduct cloud-system-resolving simulations with interactive surface fluxes of sensible heat, latent heat, and of sea salt aerosol, and with a detailed representation of the interaction between aerosol particles and clouds. The mechanisms responsible for the temporal evolution and spatial distribution of the surface heat fluxes in the closed- and open-cell state are investigated and explained. It is found that the horizontal spatial structure of the closed-cell state determines, by entrainment of dry free tropospheric air, the spatial distribution of surface air temperature and water vapor, and, to a lesser degree, of the surface sensible and latent heat flux. The synchronized dynamics of the the open-cell state drives oscillations in surface air temperature, water vapor, and in the surface fluxes of sensible and latent heat, and of sea salt aerosol. Open-cell cloud formation, cloud optical depth and liquid water path, and cloud and rain water path are identified as good predictors of the spatial distribution of surface air temperature and sensible heat flux, but not of surface water vapor and latent heat flux. It is shown that by enhancing the surface sensible heat flux, the open-cell state creates conditions by which it is maintained. While the open-cell state under consideration is not depleted in aerosol, and is insensitive to variations in sea-salt fluxes, it also enhances the sea-salt flux relative to the closed-cell state. In aerosol-depleted conditions, this enhancement may replenish the aerosol needed for cloud formation, and hence contribute to the perpetuation of the open-cell state as well. Spatial homogenization of the surface fluxes is found to have only a small effect on cloud properties in the investigated cases. This indicates that sub-grid scale spatial variability in the surface flux of sensible and latent heat and of sea salt aerosol may not be required in large scale and global models to describe marine boundary layer cellular cloudiness.

  7. Investigation of Soil Moisture - Vegetation Interactions in Oklahoma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ford, Trenton W.

    2013-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    , but not well understood climate factor. This study examines soil moisture-vegetation health interactions using both in situ observations and land surface model simulations. For the observational study, soil moisture is taken from 20 in situ Oklahoma Mesonet...

  8. Global Climate Change,Global Climate Change, Land Cover Change, andLand Cover Change, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Global Climate Change,Global Climate Change, Land Cover Change, andLand Cover Change Changes · Due to ­ Climate Change ­ Land Cover / Land Use Change ­ Interaction of Climate and Land Cover Change · Resolution ­ Space ­ Time Hydro-Climatic Change · Variability vs. Change (Trends) · Point data

  9. Interaction of light with the ZnO surface: Photon induced oxygen "breathing," oxygen vacancies, persistent photoconductivity,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shalish, Ilan

    Interaction of light with the ZnO surface: Photon induced oxygen "breathing," oxygen vacancies donation of oxygen vacancies. Our findings suggest that the observed decomposition of the ZnO lattice may. The formation of oxygen-vacancy rich surface is suggested to induce surface delta doping, causing accumulation

  10. Effects of land disposal of municipal sewage sludge on soil, streambed sediment, and ground- and surface-water quality at a site near Denver, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gaggiani, N.G.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The report describes the effects of burial and land application of municipal sewage sludge on soil and streambed sediment and water quality in the underlying aquifers and surface water within and around the Lowry sewage-sludge-disposal area. The existing ground-water observation-well network at the disposal area was expanded for the study. Surface-water-sampling sites were selected so that runoff could be sampled from intense rainstorms or snowmelt. The sampling frequency for ground-water and surface-water runoff was changed from yearly to quarterly, and soil samples were collected. Four years of data were collected from 1984 to 1987 during the expanded monitoring program at the Lowry sewage-sludge-disposal area. These data, in addition to the data collected by the U.S. Geological Survey from 1981 to 1983, were used to determine effects of sewage-sludge-disposal on soil and streambed sediment and surface- and ground-water quality at the disposal area.

  11. Recolonization of surface-mined lands by pocket gophers (Geomys breviceps) in East Texas Post Oak Savannah

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gutierrez, Paula B

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Surface mining involves the use of heavy equipment that would theoretically create underground vibrations sensed by pocket gophers. To determine if vibrations cause pocket gopher movement away from areas being mined, gopher movements were monitored...

  12. E-Print Network 3.0 - anthropogenic land-use change Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Global Non-Proximal Ecosystem Service Summary: Anthropogenic Land Cover Change Wetlandswater management Dams River Engineering Land use impervious surfaces... Anthropogenic land...

  13. Role of Polymer Segment?Particle Surface Interactions in Controlling Nanoparticle Dispersions in Concentrated Polymer Solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, So Youn; Zukoski, Charles F. (UIUC)

    2014-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The microstructure of particles suspended in concentrated polymer solutions is examined with small-angle X-ray scattering and small-angle neutron scattering. Of interest are changes to long wavelength particle density fluctuations in ternary mixtures of silica nanoparticles suspended in concentrated solutions of poly(ethylene glycol). The results are understood in terms of application of the pseudo-two-component polymer reference interaction site model (PRISM) theory modified to account for solvent addition via effective contact strength of interfacial attraction, {var_epsilon}{sub pc}, in an implicit manner. The combined experimental-theoretical study emphasizes the complex interactions between solvent, polymer, and particle surface that control particle miscibility but also demonstrate that these factors can all be understood in terms of variations of {var_epsilon}{sub pc}.

  14. deForm: An interactive malleable surface for capturing 2.5D arbitrary objects, tools and touch

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ishii, Hiroshi

    We introduce a novel input device, deForm, that supports 2.5D touch gestures, tangible tools, and arbitrary objects through real-time structured light scanning of a malleable surface of interaction. DeForm captures ...

  15. Effects of vegetation and soil moisture on the simulated land surface processes from the coupled WRF/Noah model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Small, Eric

    simulations. Meso- scale models, which have been used not only for numerical weather prediction but also surface and atmosphere into numerical weather or climate prediction. This study describes coupled WRF [Chen et al., 1997; Pielke et al., 1997]. Numerical weather prediction with high spatial and tempo- ral

  16. The land use climate change energy nexus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dale, Virginia H [ORNL; Efroymson, Rebecca Ann [ORNL; Kline, Keith L [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Landscape ecology focuses on the spatial patterns and processes of ecological and human interactions. These patterns and processes are being altered both by changing human resource-management practices and changing climate conditions associated, in part, with increases in atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases. Dominant resource extraction and land management activities involve energy, and the use of fossil energy is one of the key drivers behind increasing greenhouse gas emissions as well as land-use changes. Alternative energy sources (such as wind, solar, nuclear, and bioenergy) are being explored to reduce greenhouse gas emission rates. Yet, energy production, including alternative-energy options, can have a wide range of effects on land productivity, surface cover, albedo, and other factors that affect carbon, water and energy fluxes and, in turn, climate. Meanwhile, climate influences the potential output, relative efficiencies and sustainability of alternative energy sources. Thus climate change, energy choices, and land-use change are linked, and any analysis in landscape ecology that considers one of these factors should consider them all. This analysis explores the implications of those linkages and points out ecological patterns and processes that may be affected by these interactions.

  17. Atmosphere-Land-Surface Interaction over the Southern Great Plains: Diagnosis of Mechanisms from SGP ARM Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sumant Nigam

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Work reported included analysis of pentad (5 day) averaged data, proposal of a hypothesis concerning the key role of the Atlantic Multi-decadal Oscillation in 20th century drought and wet periods over the Great Plains, analysis of recurrent super-synoptic evolution of the Great Plains low-level jet, and study of pentad evolution of the 1988 drought and 1993 flood over the Great Plains from a NARR perspective on the atmospheric and terrestrial water balance.

  18. ER2 Instrumentation and Measurements for CLASIC (Cloud Land Surface Interaction Campaign) June-2007 SGP {Author-Jimmy Voyles}

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed NewcatalystNeutronEnvironment >Dange1·DangerEPADetection R. De Souza 1 ,ER2

  19. Helical Peptide Arrays on Self-Assembled Monolayer Surfaces Through Soft and Reactive Landing of Mass-Selected Ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Peng; Laskin, Julia

    2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ?-helix – the common building block of the protein secondary structure - plays an important role in determining protein structure and function. The biological function of the ?-helix is mainly attributed to its large macrodipole originating from the alignment of individual dipole moments of peptide bonds. Preparation of directionally aligned ?-helical peptide layers on substrates has attracted significant attention because the resulting strong net dipole is useful for a variety of applications in photonics, , molecular electronics, and catalysis. - In addition, conformationally-selected ?-helical peptide arrays can be used for detailed characterization of molecular recognition steps critical for protein folding, enzyme function and DNA binding by proteins. Existing technologies for the production of ?-helical peptide surfaces are based on a variety of solution phase synthetic strategies - that usually require relatively large quantities of purified materials.

  20. Coastal Public Lands Management Act (Texas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The coastal public lands of the state are managed in accordance with the following principles: (a) The natural resources of the surface land, including their aesthetic value and their ability to...

  1. On the role of long range interactions for the adsorption of sexithiophene on Ag(110) surface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matos, Jeronimo; Rojas, Tomas; Yildirim, Handan, E-mail: hyildirim@purdue.edu, E-mail: Abdelkader.Kara@ucf.edu; Kara, Abdelkader, E-mail: hyildirim@purdue.edu, E-mail: Abdelkader.Kara@ucf.edu [Department of Physics, University of Central Florida, Orlando, Florida, 32816 (United States)] [Department of Physics, University of Central Florida, Orlando, Florida, 32816 (United States)

    2014-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The adsorption characteristics of the sexithiophene (6T) molecule on Ag(110) are studied using density functional theory with the inclusion of van der Waals (vdW) interactions. The stable adsorption configurations on 6T on Ag(110) as well as the nature of bonding the Ag substrate are evaluated. We also assess the performance of the vdW-DF method in describing the adsorption, energetics, heights, as well as the interface characteristics with the Ag(110) surface. We find two lowest adsorption energy configurations, at which the 6T molecule aligns with its molecular long axis parallel and perpendicular to the [001] direction, to be energetically close to each other, suggesting that they may coexist. Our findings indicate a significant increase in the 6T adsorption energies upon the inclusion of vdW interactions with the highest increase obtained using the opt-type functionals, in particular with the optB86b-vdW functional. The revPBE-vdW and rPW86-vdW2 functionals lead to less enhancement in adsorption energies that is attributed to the strong repulsive nature of these functionals, in agreement with earlier predictions. Upon adsorption of the 6T molecule, the changes in the atomic and electronic structures of the 6T molecule and Ag surface are found to be negligible; there is no charge transfer, and no interface state is observed. The work function is reduced upon adsorption with the largest change is ?0.6 eV obtained using the optB88-vdW functional. The results are in good agreement with the available experimental observations of the adsorption configurations and the work function changes. Based on our results, we conclude that the nature of bonding for 6T on Ag(110) can be classified as strong physisorption.

  2. Natural gas conversion to higher hydrocarbons using plasma interactions with surfaces. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sackinger, W.M.; Kamath, V.A.; Morgan, B.L.; Airey, R.W.

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experiments are reported in which a methane plasma is created, and the methyl ions and hydrogen ions are accelerated within a microchannel array so that they interact with neutral methane molecules on the inside surfaces of the microchannels. No catalysts are used, and the device operates at room temperature. Impact energies of the ions are in the range of 10 eV to greater than 100 eV, and the energy delivered in the interaction at the surfaces causes the production of larger hydrocarbon molecules, such as C{sub 2}H{sub 2}, C{sub 2}H{sub 4}, and C{sub 2}H{sub 6}, along with C{sub 3}, C{sub 4}, C{sub 5}m C{sub 6}, C{sub 7}m and C{sub 8} molecules. There is a decreasing percentage of larger molecules produced, in comparison with the C{sub 2} and C{sub 3} types. Conversion effectiveness is greater at higher pressure, due to the increased ionic activity. The yield of the higher hydrocarbons depends upon the external voltage used, and voltage can be used as a control parameter to adjust the output mixture proportions. A conversion energy of 2.59 kilowatt hours/killogram of output has been demonstrated, and a reduction of this by a factor of 10 is possible using known techniques. In batch experiments, the selectivity for C{sub 2} has varied from 47% to 88%, and selectivity for C{sub 6} has ranged from 0% to 12.8%. Other hydrocarbon selectivities also span a wide and useful range. The estimated costs for hydrocarbons produced with this technology are in the range of $200 per tonne, in production quantities, depending upon natural gas costs. Pilot production experiments are recommended to make these estimates more precise, and to address strategies for scaling the technology up to production levels. Applications are discussed.

  3. Interaction of atomic hydrogen with the {beta}-SiC(100) 3x2 surface and subsurface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D'angelo, M.; Enriquez, H.; Rodriguez, N.; Aristov, V. Yu.; Soukiassian, P.; Tejeda, A.; Michel, E. G.; Pedio, M.; Ottaviani, C.; Perfetti, P. [Laboratoire SIMA, DSM-DRECAM-SPCSI, Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique, Saclay, Bat. 462, 91191 Gif sur Yvette Cedex, France and Departement de Physique, Universite de Paris-Sud, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, 28049 Madrid, Spain and Laboratoire SIMA, DSM-DRECAM-SPCSI, Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique, Saclay, Bat. 462, 91191 Gif sur Yvette Cedex (France); ISM-CNR, Via del fosso del cavaliere 100, 00133, Rome (Italy) and Elettra Sincrotrone Trieste, 34012 Basovizza (Italy)

    2007-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate clean and atomic hydrogen exposed {beta}-SiC(100) 3x2 surfaces by synchrotron radiation-based Si 2p core-level photoemission spectroscopy. The clean 3x2 surface reconstruction exhibits three surface and subsurface components. Upon hydrogen exposures, those surface and subsurface components are shifted to lower binding energies by large values, indicating significant charge transfer to the surface and subsurface regions, in excellent agreement with the recently discovered H-induced {beta}-SiC(100) 3x2 surface metallization. In addition, the interaction of hydrogen results in a large reactive component at Si 2p supporting an asymmetric charge transfer in the third plane below the surface, in agreement with previous experimental investigations. However, the results are inconsistent with recent ab initio theoretical ''frozen'' calculations predicting H atom to be in a bridge-bond position.

  4. 2{pi} spectrometer: A new apparatus for the investigation of ion surface interaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morosov, V.A.; Kalinin, A.; Szilagyi, Z.; Barat, M.; Roncin, P. [Laboratoire des Collisions Atomiques et Moleculaires, Bat 351, Universite Paris Sud, Orsay Cedex F 91405 (France)] [Laboratoire des Collisions Atomiques et Moleculaires, Bat 351, Universite Paris Sud, Orsay Cedex F 91405 (France)

    1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new spectrometer for studying ion surface interaction is described. This apparatus is built around a secondary electron and ion detector with a very large acceptance angle and made of 16 individual microchannel plate detectors located on a half sphere. A simultaneous detection of the scattered projectiles with an additional position sensitive detector allows measurements of the correlation between all these particles using a multicoincidence technique. With this spectrometer, a large variety of measurements are possible such as the energy spectra of the secondary electrons as well as the statistics of the number of ejected electrons, the scattering pattern of the reflected projectiles and their charge-state distribution, the analysis of the sputtered ions. Some examples are given concerning the impact of multiply charged ions on a LiF single crystal. The dependence of the secondary electron multiplicity as a function of the charge state, of the surface channeling condition, and of the scattering angle of the reflected ion, is given as a type of information provided by the analysis of the correlation. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  5. Effect of alkali metals on the interaction of O/sub 2/ and CO with some transition-metal surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kiskinova, M.

    1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The interactions of O/sub 2/ and CO with alkali covered Ni, Ru, and Pt are reviewed with emphasis on the author's own studies. It is shown that the presence of alkalis changes the coadsorbates adsorption rates, heats of adsorption, and dissociative propensity, the strength of the effect depending on the alkali nature and coverage. The differences for the three substrates are interpreted comparing the properties of the clean surface. A detailed analysis of the coadsorbate--modifier interactions suggests that they depend on the adsorption state of the alkali species and the coadsorbate--substrate bond strength. Evidence of the formation of patches of ''surface complexes'' coexisting with the unperturbed surface is given and discussed in terms of strong direct alkali--coadsorbate interactions.

  6. Surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeMaio, Ernest Vincent, 1964-

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Surfaces is a collection of four individual essays which focus on the characteristics and tactile qualities of surfaces within a variety of perceived landscapes. Each essay concentrates on a unique surface theme and purpose; ...

  7. Forces of Interaction between Surfaces Bearing Looped Polymer Brushes in Good Solvent.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alonzo, Jose [Clemson University; Mays, Jimmy [ORNL; Kilbey, II, S Michael [ORNL

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In a previous publication we suggested [Huang et al., Macromolecules, 2008, 41, 1745-1752] that looped polymer brushes formed by tethering chains by both ends to a surface may exhibit a polydispersity-like effect due to a distribution of distances between tethering points, leading to segment density profiles dominated by a long and diffuse exponentially-decaying tail. To study this issue in more detail, the force profiles (forces of interaction as a function of separation distance) of a series of looped polymer brushes made by preferential adsorption of poly(2-vinylpyridine)-polystyrene-poly(2-vinylpyridine) (PVP-b-PS-b-PVP) triblock copolymers of varying molecular weight and asymmetry ratio are measured using the surface forces apparatus. The force profiles are analyzed using an equivalent diblock model, which considers the triblock copolymer brushes as being comprised of two diblock copolymers of half the PS molecular weight. While scaling the dependencies of the interaction energy and distance on molecular weight, the tethering density and segment size coalesce the measured force profiles to the universal profile, it is necessary to include polydispersity in the description of the equilibrium structure. This is done using the self-consistent field model of Milner et al. [Macromolecules, 1988, 21, 2610-2619]. For looped brushes formed from the symmetric and moderately symmetric triblock copolymers we find that the polydispersity due to molecular weight distribution effectively accounts for the observed force profiles. On the other hand, agreement between the measured and predicted force profiles of looped brushes formed from highly asymmetric copolymers at low degrees-of-compression is achieved only if a much smaller value of the polydispersity index is used in the fitting. The implication of these results is that the shape of the segment density profiles is not due to the previously proposed anchor-induced polydispersity arising due to loop formation; however in the case of highly asymmetric copolymers, loop formation may constrain the stretching of the chains relative to what is expected for brushes formed from the equivalent diblock copolymer.

  8. A modelling approach to carbon, water and energy feedbacks and interactions across the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer BOREAS - (the) BOReal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study C - Carbon CABi A modelling approach to carbon, water and energy feedbacks and interactions across the land partitioning of energy, the evapotranspiration of water and if the land-surface is a sink or a source of CO2

  9. The impacts of land use-induced land cover change on climate extremes.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Avila, Francia Bismonte

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??Simulations from the CSIRO Mk3L climate model, coupled to the CABLE land surface model, indicate that climate extremes indices are significantly affected by land use-induced… (more)

  10. Chapter 37 Land Disposal Restrictions (Kentucky)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This administrative regulation establishes requirements for land disposal of hazardous waste. These include- surface impound exemptions, prohibitions on disposal and storage and treatment standards...

  11. The role of hydrophobic surfaces in altering water mediated peptide-petide interactions in an aqueous environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoo, Soohaeng; Xantheas, Sotiris S.

    2011-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Using Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics within the density functional framework, we calculated the effective force acting on water-mediated peptide-peptide interaction between antiparallel ?-sheets in an aqueous environment and also in the vicinity of a hydrophobic surface. From the magnitude of the effective force (corresponding to the slope of the free energy as a function of the inter-peptide distance) and its sign (a negative value indicating an effective attraction whereas a positive value an effective repulsion) we can elucidate the fundamental differences of the water-mediated peptide-peptide interactions in those two environments. The computed effective forces indicate that the water-mediated interaction between peptides in an aqueous environment is attractive in the range of inter-peptide distance d=7-8 Ĺ when hydrophobic surfaces are not nearby. Due to the stabilization of the water molecules bridging between the two beta-sheets, a free energy barrier exists between the direct and indirect (water-mediated) inter-peptide interactions. However, when the peptides are in the proximity of hydrophobic surfaces, this free energy barrier decreases because the hydrophobic surfaces enhance the inter-peptide attraction by the destabilization and ease-to-libration of the bridging water molecules between them. This work was supported by the Chemical Sciences, Geosciences and Biosciences Division, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, US Department of Energy. Battelle operates the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy.

  12. Interaction of Streptavidin-Based Peptide-MHC Oligomers (Tetramers) with Cell-Surface T Cell Receptors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stone, Jennifer D.

    he binding of oligomeric peptide–MHC (pMHC) complexes to cell surface TCR can be considered to approximate TCR–pMHC interactions at cell-cell interfaces. In this study, we analyzed the equilibrium binding of streptavidin-based ...

  13. Quantifying aerosol direct radiative effect with Multiangle Imaging Spectroradiometer observations: Top-of-atmosphere albedo change by aerosols based on land surface types

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Yang; Li, Qinbin; Kahn, Ralph A; Randerson, James T; Diner, David J

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    www.eosweb.larc.nasa.gov). References Abdou, W. A. , D. J.B. J. Gaitley, and W. A. Abdou (2007), The MISR radiometricAOD) retrievals over land [Abdou et al. , 2005], as well as

  14. A tribological study of the interaction between surface micro texturing and viscoelastic lubricants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hupp, Sara J. (Sara Jean), 1979-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An experimental study is performed on micro textured surfaces using both elastic and Newtonian fluids in order to understand the effect of surface texturing and fluid rheology on sliding friction under lubricated conditions. ...

  15. Interactions between Mica Surfaces in a Polystyrene-Cyclopentane Solution Near the O-Temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klein, Jacob

    'ACOV ALMOG* AND JACOB KLEIN*'t 'l *Polymer Department, Weizmann Institute, Rehovot, lsrael, and t of distance D between the surfaces (4-7). Thus two mica surfaces bearing ad- sorbed polystyrene in cyclohexane approach (6). On the other hand, when the surfaces bear ad- sorbed polyethylene oxide in an aqueous

  16. Ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopic study of the interaction of potassium with carbon monoxide and benzene on the Pt(111) surface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kudo, M.; Garfunkel, E.L.; Somorjai, G.A.

    1985-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The interaction of potassium with carbon monoxide and benezene has been studied on the Pt(111) crystal surface by ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS). The adsorptive changes reported in previous studies for carbon monoxide and benzene when potassium is coadsorbed are correlated with the UPS results presented here and are explained with the aid of a molecular orbital analysis. The authors find that the valence molecular orbitals increase their binding energy slightly when the potassium is coadsorbed, implying a model in which the adsorbates sense the potassium-induced changes in dipole field at the surface. 36 references, 11 figures.

  17. Multifunctional ultra-high vacuum apparatus for studies of the interactions of chemical warfare agents on complex surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilmsmeyer, Amanda R.; Morris, John R. [Department of Chemistry, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061 (United States)] [Department of Chemistry, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061 (United States); Gordon, Wesley O.; Mantooth, Brent A.; Lalain, Teri A. [Research and Technology Directorate, U.S. Army Edgewood Chemical Biological Center, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland 21010 (United States)] [Research and Technology Directorate, U.S. Army Edgewood Chemical Biological Center, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland 21010 (United States); Davis, Erin Durke [OptiMetrics, Inc., Abingdon, Maryland 21009 (United States)] [OptiMetrics, Inc., Abingdon, Maryland 21009 (United States)

    2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A fundamental understanding of the surface chemistry of chemical warfare agents is needed to fully predict the interaction of these toxic molecules with militarily relevant materials, catalysts, and environmental surfaces. For example, rules for predicting the surface chemistry of agents can be applied to the creation of next generation decontaminants, reactive coatings, and protective materials for the warfighter. Here, we describe a multifunctional ultra-high vacuum instrument for conducting comprehensive studies of the adsorption, desorption, and surface chemistry of chemical warfare agents on model and militarily relevant surfaces. The system applies reflection-absorption infrared spectroscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and mass spectrometry to study adsorption and surface reactions of chemical warfare agents. Several novel components have been developed to address the unique safety and sample exposure challenges that accompany the research of these toxic, often very low vapor pressure, compounds. While results of vacuum-based surface science techniques may not necessarily translate directly to environmental processes, learning about the fundamental chemistry will begin to inform scientists about the critical aspects that impact real-world applications.

  18. Surface water interaction with the flood plain in the lower Virgin River, Clark County, Nevada.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pompeo, Jeffrie L.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??Development of existing surface water rights on the Virgin River would decrease Southern Nevada's dependency on the Colorado River. Three monitoring sites were established to… (more)

  19. Integrated simulation of plasma surface interaction during edge localized modes and disruptions: Self-consistent approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harilal, S. S.

    that are transported during ELMs to the divertor surface. ELMs, therefore, can result in excessive divertor erosion, lithium, and neon in multidimensional geometry to inte- grate core, SOL parameters, and divertor surface-like devices during an ELM can then increase from %5 MW/m2 to %300­3000 MW/m2 . The erosion losses of divertor

  20. Evanescent wave and video microscopy methods for directly measuring interactions between surface-immobilized biomolecules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Everett, William Neil

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Spatial and temporal tracking of passively diffusing functionalized colloids continues to be an improving and auspicious approach to measuring weak specific and non-specific biomolecular interactions. Evidence of this is given by the recent increase...

  1. Title of Document: PLASMA-SURFACE INTERACTIONS OF MODEL POLYMERS FOR ADVANCED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anlage, Steven

    is a critical step in nano-manufacturing. We have studied the interactions of PRs and polymers in fluorocarbon was found. Additionally, fluorocarbon (FC) deposition on the damaged PR affected roughening in two opposing

  2. Study of Interfacial Interactions Using Thing Film Surface Modification: Radiation and Oxidation Effects in Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sridharan, Kumar; Zhang, Jinsuo

    2014-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Interfaces play a key role in dictating the long-term stability of materials under the influence of radiation and high temperatures. For example, grain boundaries affect corrosion by way of providing kinetically favorable paths for elemental diffusion, but they can also act as sinks for defects and helium generated during irradiation. Likewise, the retention of high-temperature strength in nanostructured, oxide-dispersion strengthened steels depends strongly on the stoichiometric and physical stability of the (Y, Ti)-oxide particles/matrix interface under radiation and high temperatures. An understanding of these interfacial effects at a fundamental level is important for the development of materials for extreme environments of nuclear reactors. The goal of this project is to develop an understanding stability of interfaces by depositing thin films of materials on substrates followed by ion irradiation of the film-substrate system at elevated temperatures followed by post-irradiation oxidation treatments. Specifically, the research will be performed by depositing thin films of yttrium and titanium (~500 nm) on Fe-12%Cr binary alloy substrate. Y and Ti have been selected as thin-film materials because they form highly stable protective oxides layers. The Fe-12%Cr binary alloy has been selected because it is representative of ferritic steels that are widely used in nuclear systems. The absence of other alloying elements in this binary alloy would allow for a clearer examination of structures and compositions that evolve during high-temperature irradiations and oxidation treatments. The research is divided into four specific tasks: (1) sputter deposition of 500 nm thick films of Y and Ti on Fe-12%Cr alloy substrates, (2) ion irradiation of the film-substrate system with 2MeV protons to a dose of 2 dpa at temperatures of 300°C, 500°C, and 700°C, (3) oxidation of as-deposited and ion-irradiated samples in a controlled oxygen environment at 500°C and 700°C, (4) multi-scale computational modeling involving first- principle molecular dynamics (FPMD) and coarse-grained dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) approaches to develop theories underlying the evolution and stability of structures and phases. Samples from Tasks 1 to 3 (above) will be rigorously characterized and analyzed using scanning electron microscopy, Auger electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, Rutherford back scatter spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. Expected outcomes of the experimental work include a quantitative understanding film-substrate interface mixing, evolution of defects and other phases at the interface, interaction of interfaces with defects, and the ability of the Y and Ti films to mitigate irradiation-assisted oxidation. The aforementioned experimental work will be closely coupled with multi-scale molecular dynamics (MD) modeling to understand the reactions at the surface, the transport of oxidant through the thin film, and the stabilities of the deposited thin films under radiation and oxidation. Simulations of materials property changes under conditions of radiation and oxidation require multiple size domains and a different simulation scheme for each of these domains. This will be achieved by coupling the FPMD and coarse-grained kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC). This will enable the comparison of the results of each simulation approach with the experimental results.

  3. Preparation and in situ Characterization of Surfaces Using Soft...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in situ Characterization of Surfaces Using Soft-Landing in a Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Preparation and in situ Characterization of Surfaces Using Soft-Landing...

  4. Precipitation, Recycling, and Land Memory: An Integrated Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dirmeyer, Paul A.

    A synthesis of several approaches to quantifying land–atmosphere interactions is presented. These approaches use data from observations or atmospheric reanalyses applied to atmospheric tracer models and stand-alone land ...

  5. Manipulating surface diffusion and elastic interactions to obtain quantum dot multilayer arrangements over different length scales

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Placidi, E., E-mail: ernesto.placidi@ism.cnr.it; Arciprete, F. [Istituto di Struttura della Materia, CNR, Via del Fosso del Cavaliere 100, 00133 Rome (Italy); Universitŕ di Roma “Tor Vergata”, Dipartimento di Fisica, via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00133 Rome (Italy); Latini, V.; Latini, S.; Patella, F. [Universitŕ di Roma “Tor Vergata”, Dipartimento di Fisica, via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00133 Rome (Italy); Magri, R. [Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche, Informatiche e Matematiche (FIM), Universitŕ di Modena e Reggio Emilia, and Centro S3 CNR-Istituto Nanoscienze, Via Campi 213/A, 4100 Modena (Italy); Scuderi, M.; Nicotra, G. [CNR-IMM, Strada VIII, 5, 95121 Catania (Italy)

    2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An innovative multilayer growth of InAs quantum dots on GaAs(100) is demonstrated to lead to self-aggregation of correlated quantum dot chains over mesoscopic distances. The fundamental idea is that at critical growth conditions is possible to drive the dot nucleation only at precise locations corresponding to the local minima of the Indium chemical potential. Differently from the known dot multilayers, where nucleation of new dots on top of the buried ones is driven by the surface strain originating from the dots below, here the spatial correlations and nucleation of additional dots are mostly dictated by a self-engineering of the surface occurring during the growth, close to the critical conditions for dot formation under the fixed oblique direction of the incoming As flux, that drives the In surface diffusion.

  6. Interactions of CO and surface K: Negligible CO adsorption on K/Ag(111)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roop, B.; Blass, P.M.; Zhou, X.; White, J.M.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Unlike transition metals which are active for chemisorption of CO, Ag(111) shows no tendency to adsorb CO at 100 K even when various amounts of K are added. This observation supports the proposal of Solymosi and Berko (Ref. 1) that bonding of CO with the host metal plays an important role in the interactions of K and CO on transition metals.

  7. Les processus de surface `a l'echelle globale et leurs interactions avec

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Madeleine, Jean-Baptiste

    Mer Océan Atmosphère océanique Biogeochmie La construction d'un mod`ele du syst`eme terre passe par le biomass NPP #12;2.1. Les interactions syst`eme racinaire et humidit´e du sol

  8. Preliminary Surface Pressure Measurements of Transitional, Hypersonic Shock Boundary Layer Interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Arlington, University of

    96-4541 M P Re rms X (T Preliminary Surface Pressure Measurements of Transitional, Hypersonic Shock moves into the hypersonic realm. A critical aspect in designing an airbreathing hy- personic vehicle a number of recent investigations in un- derstanding hypersonic, laminar and turbulent, shock wave

  9. Spectral behavior of the coupled land-atmosphere system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gentine, Pierre

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The main objective of this thesis is to understand the daily cycle of the energy coupling between the land and the atmosphere in response to a forcing of incoming radiation at their common boundary, the land surface. This ...

  10. Interaction of acetonitrile with the surfaces of amorphous and crystalline ice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schaff, J.E.; Roberts, J.T.

    1999-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The adsorption of acetonitrile (CH{sub 3}CN) on ultrathin films of ice under ultrahigh vacuum was investigated with temperature-programmed desorption ass spectrometry (TPD) and Fourier transform infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (FTIRAS). Two types of film were studied, amorphous and crystalline. On the amorphous films, two sates of adsorbed acetonitrile were observed by TPD and FTIRAS. One of the states is attributed to acetonitrile that is hydrogen bonded to agree OH group at the ice surface; the other state is assigned to acetonitrile that is purely physiorbed. Evidence for the hydrogen-bonded state is two-fold. First, there is a large kinetic isotope effect for desorption from H{sub 2}O-and D{sub 2}O-ice: the desorption temperatures from ice-h{sub 2} and ice-d{sub 2} are {approximately}161 and {approximately}176 K, respectively. Second, the C{triple{underscore}bond}N stretching frequency (2,265 cm{sup {minus}1}) is 16 cm{sup {minus}1} is greater than that of physisorbed acetonitrile, and it is roughly equal to that of acetonitrile which is hydrogen bonded to an OH group at the air-liquid water interface. On the crystalline films, there is no evidence for a hydrogen-bonded state in the TPD spectra. The FTIRAS spectra do show that some hydrogen-bonded acetonitrile is present but at a maximum coverage that is roughly one-sixth of that on the amorphous surface. The difference between the amorphous and crystalline surfaces cannot be attributed to a difference n surface areas. Rather, this work provides additional evidence that the surface chemical properties of amorphous ice are different from those of crystalline ice.

  11. Interaction of mineral surfaces with simple organci molecules by diffuse reflectance IR spectroscopy (DRIFT)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joan Thomas; Michael Kelley

    2007-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Diffuse reflectance Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (DRIFTS) was used to characterize multi-layers of lysine, glutamic acid and salicylic acid on ?-alumina and kaolinite surfaces. The results agreed well with those previously obtained by ATR-IR in aqueous media where available, indicating that DRIFT may be regarded as effectively an in-situ spectroscopy for these materials. In the case of salicylic acid adsorption onto ?-alumina, DRIFTS was used to identify monolayer coverage and to detect molecules down to coverage of 3% of a monolayer. The spectroscopic results as to coverage were confirmed by analysis of the solutions used for treatment. The spectra obtained allowed identification of changes in the bonding environment with increasing surface coverage. DRIFTS, offers several advantages in terms of materials, experimental technique and data treatment, motivating further investigations.

  12. Liquid Lithium Limiter Effects on Tokamak Plasmas and Plasma-Liquid Surface Interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. Kaita; R. Majeski; R. Doerner; G. Antar; M. Baldwin; R. Conn; P. Efthimion; M. Finkenthal; D. Hoffman; B. Jones; S. Krashenninikov; H. Kugel; S. Luckhardt; R. Maingi; J. Menard; T. Munsat; D. Stutman; G. Taylor; J. Timberlake; V. Soukhanovskii; D. Whyte; R. Woolley; L. Zakharov

    2002-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present results from the first experiments with a large area liquid lithium limiter in a magnetic fusion device, and its effect on improving plasma performance by reducing particle recycling. Using large area liquid metal surfaces in any major fusion device is unlikely before a test on a smaller scale. This has motivated its demonstration in the CDX-U spherical torus with a unique, fully toroidal lithium limiter. The highest current discharges were obtained with a liquid lithium limiter. There was a reduction in recycling, as indicated by a significant decrease in the deuterium-alpha emission and oxygen radiation. How these results might extrapolate to reactors is suggested in recycling/retention experiments with liquid lithium surfaces under high-flux deuterium and helium plasma bombardment in PISCES-B. Data on deuterium atoms retained in liquid lithium indicate retention of all incident ions until full volumetric conversion to lithium deuteride. The PISCES-B results also show a material loss mechanism that lowers the maximum operating temperature compared to that for the liquid surface equilibrium vapor pressure. This may restrict the lithium temperature in reactors.

  13. Improving parameter estimation and water table depth simulation in a land surface model using GRACE water storage and estimated base flow data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lo, Min-Hui; Famiglietti, James S; Yeh, P. J.-F.; Syed, T. H

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2007), Estimating ground water storage changes in thestorage (i.e. , all of the snow, ice, surface water, soil moisture, and ground-

  14. Effects of Land Surface Characteristics on Pedogenesis, Biological Soil Crust Community Diversity, and Ecosystem Functions in a Mojave Desert Piedmont Landscape

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pietrasiak, Nicole

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2000. Desert pavement characteristics on wadi-terrace andalluvial fan surfaces: Wadi Al-Bih, U.A.E. and Oman.

  15. Impact of Pacific and Atlantic sea surface temperatures on interannual and decadal variations of GRACE land water storage in tropical South America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Linage, Caroline; Kim, Hyungjun; Famiglietti, James S; Yu, Jin-Yi

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    re season severity in South America using sea surface tem-storage in tropical South America, J. Geophys. Res. Atmos. ,hydroclimatology of tropical South America is characterized

  16. Editorial, Workshop on New Directions for Advanced Computer Simulations and Experiments in Fusion-Related Plasma-Surface Interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hogan, John T [ORNL; Krstic, Predrag S [ORNL; Meyer, Fred W [ORNL

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Because plasma-boundary physics encompasses some of the most important unresolved issues for both the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) project and future fusion power reactors, there is a strong interest in the fusion community for better understanding and characterization of plasma-wall interactions. Chemical and physical sputtering cause the erosion of the limiters/divertor plates and vacuum vessel walls (made of C, Be and W, for example) and degrade fusion performance by diluting the fusion fuel and excessively cooling the core, while carbon redeposition could produce long-term in-vessel tritium retention, degrading the superior thermo-mechanical properties of the carbon materials. Mixed plasma-facing materials are proposed, requiring optimization for different power and particle flux characteristics. Knowledge of material properties as well as characteristics of the plasma-material interaction are prerequisites for such optimizations. Computational power will soon reach hundreds of teraflops, so that theoretical and plasma science expertise can be matched with new experimental capabilities in order to mount a strong response to these challenges. To begin to address such questions, a Workshop on New Directions for Advanced Computer Simulations and Experiments in Fusion-Related Plasma-Surface Interactions for Fusion (PSIF) was held at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory from 21 to 23 March, 2005. The purpose of the workshop was to bring together researchers in fusion related plasma-wall interactions in order to address these topics and to identify the most needed and promising directions for study, to exchange opinions on the present depth of knowledge of surface properties for the main fusion-related materials, e.g., C, Be and W, especially for sputtering, reflection, and deuterium (tritium) retention properties. The goal was to suggest the most important next steps needed for such basic computational and experimental work to be facilitated by researchers in fusion, material, and physical sciences. Representatives from many fusion research laboratories attended, and 25 talks were given, the majority of them making up the content of these Workshop proceedings. The presentations of all talks and further information on the Workshop are available at http://www-cfadc.phy.ornl.gov/psif/home.html. The workshop talks dealt with identification of needs from the perspective of integrated fusion simulation and ITER design, recent developments and perspectives on computation of plasma-facing surface properties using the current and expected new generation of computation capability, and with the status of dedicated laboratory experiments which characterize the underlying processes of PSIF. The Workshop summary and conclusions are being published in Nuclear Fusion 45 (2005).

  17. Spherical Torus Plasma Interactions with Large-area Liquid Lithium Surfaces in CDX-U

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. Kaita; R. Majeski; M. Boaz; P. Efthimion; B. Jones; D. Hoffman; H. Kugel; J. Menard; T. Munsat; A. Post-Zwicker; V. Soukhanovskii; J. Spaleta; G. Taylor; J. Timberlake; R. Woolley; L. Zakharov; M. Finkenthal; D. Stutman; G. Antar; R. Doerner; S. Luckhardt; R. Maingi; M. Maiorano; S. Smith

    2002-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The Current Drive Experiment-Upgrade (CDX-U) device at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) is a spherical torus (ST) dedicated to the exploration of liquid lithium as a potential solution to reactor first-wall problems such as heat load and erosion, neutron damage and activation, and tritium inventory and breeding. Initial lithium limiter experiments were conducted with a toroidally-local liquid lithium rail limiter (L3) from the University of California at San Diego. Spectroscopic measurements showed a clear reduction of impurities in plasmas with the L3, compared to discharges with a boron carbide limiter. The evidence for a reduction in recycling was less apparent, however. This may be attributable to the relatively small area in contact with the plasma, and the presence of high-recycling surfaces elsewhere in the vacuum chamber. This conclusion was tested in subsequent experiments with a fully toroidal lithium limiter that was installed above the floor of the vacuum vessel. The new limiter covered over ten times the area of the L3 facing the plasma. Experiments with the toroidal lithium limiter have recently begun. This paper describes the conditioning required to prepare the lithium surface for plasma operations, and effect of the toroidal liquid lithium limiter on discharge performance.

  18. Combustion-turbulence interaction in the turbulent boundary layer over a hot surface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ng, T.T.; Cheng, R.K.; Robben, F.; Talbot, L.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The turbulence-combustion interaction in a reacting turbulent boundary layer over a heated flat plate was studied. Ethylene/air mixture with equivalence ratio of 0.35 was used. The free stream velocity was 10.5 m/s and the wall temperature was 1250/sup 0/K. Combustion structures visualization was provided by high-speed schlieren photographs. Fluid density statistics were deduced from Rayleigh scattering intensity measurements. A single-component laser Doppler velocimetry system was used to obtain mean and root-mean-square velocity distributions, the Reynolds stress, the streamwise and the cross-stream turbulent kinetic energy diffusion, and the production of turbulent kinetic energy by Reynolds stress. The combustion process was dominated by large-scale turbulent structures of the boundary layer. Combustion causes expansion of the boundary layer. No overall self-similarity is observed in either the velocity or the density profiles. Velocity fluctuations were increased in part of the boundary layer and the Reynolds stress was reduced. The turbulent kinetic energy diffusion pattern was changed significantly and a modification of the boundary layer assumption will be needed when dealing with this problem analytically. 11 figures, 1 table.

  19. Bacteria-Mineral Interactions on the Surfaces of Metal-Resistant Bacteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malkin, A J

    2010-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The extraordinary ability of indigenous microorganisms, like metal-resistant bacteria, for biotransformation of toxic compounds is of considerable interest for the emerging area of environmental bioremediation. However, the underlying mechanisms by which metal-resistant bacteria transform toxic compounds are currently unknown and await elucidation. The project's objective was to study stress-induced responses of metal-resistant bacteria to environmental changes and chemical stimulants. This project involved a multi-institutional collaboration of our LLNL group with the group of Dr. H.-Y. Holman (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory). In this project, we have utilized metal-resistant bacteria Arthrobacter oxydans as a model bacterial system. We have utilized atomic force microscopy (AFM) to visualize for the first time at the nanometer scale formation of stress-induced structures on bacterial surfaces in response to Cr (VI) exposure. We have demonstrated that structure, assembly, and composition of these stress-induced structures are dependent on Cr (VI) concentrations. Our AFM observations of the appearance and development of stress-induced layers on the surfaces of Arthrobacter oxydans bacteria exposed to Cr (VI) were confirmed by Dr. Holman's biochemical, electron microscopy, and synchrotron infrared spectromicroscopy studies. In general, in vitro imaging of live microbial and cellular systems represents one of the most challenging issues in application of AFM. Various approaches for immobilization of bacteria on the substrate for in vitro imaging were tested in this project. Imaging of live bacteria was achieved, however further optimization of experimental methods are needed for high-resolution visualization of the cellular environmental structural dynamics by AFM. This project enhanced the current insight into molecular architecture, structural and environmental variability of bacterial systems. The project partially funded research for two book chapters (1,2), and we anticipate one more publication (3). The publications describe development of methods and results of studies of structural dynamics of metal-resistant bacteria that contribute to more comprehensive understanding of the architecture, function, and environmental dynamics of bacterial and cellular systems. The results of this LDRD were presented in invited talks and contributed presentations at five national and international conferences and five seminar presentations at the external institutions. These included invited talks at the conferences of Gordon Research, Materials Research and American Chemical Societies. Our scientific results and methodologies developed in this project enabled us to receive new funding for the multiyear project 'Chromium transformation pathways in metal-reducing bacteria' funded by the University of California Lab Fees Program ($500,000, 5/1/09 - 4/30/2012), with our proposal being ranked 1st from a total of 138 in the Earth, Energy, Environmental & Space Sciences panel.

  20. MULTISCALE ATOMISTIC SIMULATION OF METAL-OXYGEN SURFACE INTERACTIONS: METHODOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENT, THEORETICAL INVESTIGATION, AND CORRELATION WITH EXPERIMENT - FINAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PI: Yang, Judith C., Mechanical Eng. & Materials Science, University of Pittsburgh; Co-PI: McGaughey, Alan, Mechanical Eng., Carnegie Mellon University; Sinnott, Susan and Phillpot, Simon, Materials Science & Eng., University of Florida

    2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Our long-term vision is for a comprehensive and fundamental understanding of a critical gas-surface reaction, nano-oxidation�������¢���������������� from the adsorption of oxygen atoms on the metal surface to the coalescence of the bulk oxide�������¢����������������via coordinated multi-scale theoretical and in situ experimental efforts. Reaching this goal necessitates close collaborations between theorists and experimentalists, and the development and utilization of unique and substantial theoretical and experimental tools. Achievement of this goal will be a major breakthrough in dynamic surface/interface reactions that will dramatically impact several scientific fields. Many of these are of interest to DOE, such as thin films and nanostructures that use oxidation for processing, heteroepitaxy, oxidation and corrosion, environmental stability of nano-devices, catalysis, fuel cells and sensors. The purpose of this specific DOE program was the support for the theoretical effort. Our focus for the first round of funding has been the development of a Kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) code to simulate the complexities of oxygen interactions with a metal surface. Our primary deliverable is a user-friendly, general and quite versatile KMC program, called Thin Film Oxidation (TFOx). TFOx-2D presently simulates the general behavior of irreversible 2-dimensional nucleation and growth of epitaxial islands on a square or rectangular lattice. The TFOx model explicitly considers a very large range of elementary steps, including deposition, adsorption, dissociation of gas molecules (such as O2), surface diffusion, aggregation, desorption and substrate-mediated indirect interactions between static adatoms. This capability allows for the description of the numerous physical processes involved in nucleation and growth. The large number of possible input parameters used in this program provides a rich environment for the simulation of epitaxial growth or oxidation of thin films. As a first demonstration of the power of TFOx-2D, the input parameters were systematically altered to observe how various physical processes impact morphologies. It was noted that potential gradients, developed to simulate medium-range substrate mediated interactions such as strain, and the probability of an adatom attaching to an island, have the largest effect on island morphologies. Nanorods, and round, square and dendritic shapes have all been observed (see section 2E) which correlate well with experimental observations of the wide range of oxide morphologies produced during in situ oxidation of Cu thin films. The people involved in the development and utilization of TFOx included a post-doc, Dr. Rich McAfee, and a graduate student, Ms. Xuetian Han. Both joined this program in August 2002. Dr. McAfee has been at Brashear Co., in Pittsburgh, PA since June 2004. To allow TFOx to be accessible to the rest of the scientific community, a web-site describing TFOx has been developed: www.tfox.org. No unexpended funds are expected at the completion of the current funding cycle. For in-depth development of the theoretical effort, the Principle Investigator (PI) proposed in the initial grant to collaborate with Dr. Maria Bartelt at Lawrence Livermore National Lab (LLNL). A graduate student, Dr. Guangwen Zhou, was supported within this DOE program for several months, where he was to collaborate with Dr. Bartelt. Unfortunately, Dr. Bartelt became very ill during this time and passed away in 2003. The focus of Dr. Zhou�������¢����������������s thesis work (completed in December, 2003) was the wide

  1. Preparing sewage sludge for land application or surface disposal: A guide for preparers of sewage sludge on the monitoring, record keeping, and reporting requirements of the federal standards for the use of disposal of sewage sludge, 40 CFR part 503

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The document focuses on the monitoring, recordkeeping, and reporting requirements that apply to persons who prepare sewage sludge or a material derived from sewage sludge. It defines persons who prepare sewage sludge and then summarizes their general responsibilities. USEPA promulgated at 40 CFR Part 503 Phase 1 of the risk-based regulations that govern the final use or disposal of sewage sludge. The intent of the Federal program is to ensure that the use or disposal of sewage sludge occurs in a way that protects both human health and the environment. The Part 503 regulation establishes general requirements, pollutant limits, operational standards, and management practices, as well as monitoring, recordkeeping, and reporting requirements. These requirements apply to sewage sludge that is land applied, placed on a surface disposal site, or incinerated in a sewage sludge-only incinerator.

  2. MODIS Collection 5 global land cover: Algorithm refinements and characterization of new datasets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    information is required to parameterize land surface processes in regional-to-global scale Earth system models

  3. Interaction of copper oxides with reaction medium in heterogeneous catalytic oxidation of carbon monoxide by molecular oxygen. IV. IR spectroscopic study of carbon monoxide interaction with copper oxide surface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lokhov, Y.A.; Popovskii, V.V.; Sadykov, V.A.; Tikhov, S.F.

    1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An IR spectroscopic study has been made of the interaction of CO with CuO prepared in different ways, and the interaction of O/sub 2/ with carbon monoxide preadsorbed on CuO. A number of Cu/sup +/CO surface complexes have been detected (2114-2148 cm/sup -1/) with a heat of adsorption about 79.5-180 kJ/mole. From an analysis of the nature of these complexes, we have evaluated the processes taking place on the CuO surface when it interacts with CO and have compared the properties of massive CuO with those of CuO on oxide supports. The data are interpreted on the assumption that extended defects - dislocations - exist and play an important role, determining to a considerable degree the properties of the massive CuO in the reaction of CO oxidation.

  4. Proceedings of US/Japan workshop, Q219 on high heat flux components and plasma surface interactions for next fusion devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ulrickson, M.A.; Stevens, P.L.; Hino, T.; Hirohata, Y. [eds.] [eds.

    1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains the viewgraphs from the proceedings of US/Japan Workshop on High Heat Flux Components and Plasma Surface Interactions for Next Fusion Devices. Some of the general topics covered by this report are: PFC/PSI in tokamak and helical devices; development of high heat flux components; PSIS and plasma facing materials;tritium; and material damage.

  5. Ab Initio Study of the Interaction of Water with Cluster Models of the Aluminum Terminated (0001) r-Aluminum Oxide Surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schlegel, H. Bernhard

    Ab Initio Study of the Interaction of Water with Cluster Models of the Aluminum Terminated (0001) r-Aluminum to hydroxylation of the aluminum terminated surface, the two water process was found to be the most exothermic, occurring within 10-2 s. I. Introduction As one of the most important ceramic materials, R-aluminum oxide

  6. Chesapeake Forest Lands (Maryland)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Chesapeake Forest Lands are most of the former land holdings of the Chesapeake Forest Products Company, which now includes more than 66,000 acres in five lower Eastern Shore counties. These...

  7. School Land Board (Texas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The School Land Board oversees the use of land owned by the state or held in trust for use and benefit by the state or one of its departments, boards, or agencies. The Board is responsible for...

  8. Tuning the interaction between propagating and localized surface plasmons for surface enhanced Raman scattering in water for biomedical and environmental applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shioi, Masahiko, E-mail: shioi.masahiko@jp.panasonic.com [Device Solutions Center, Panasonic Corporation, 3-4, Hikaridai, Seika-cho, Soraku-gun, Kyoto 619-0237 (Japan); Department of Electric and Electronic Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Kobe University, Rokkodai, Nada, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan); Jans, Hilde [Interuniversity Microelectronics Center VZW., Kapeldreef 75, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Lodewijks, Kristof [Interuniversity Microelectronics Center VZW., Kapeldreef 75, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Department of Electrical Engineering, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200 D, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Van Dorpe, Pol; Lagae, Liesbet [Interuniversity Microelectronics Center VZW., Kapeldreef 75, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Department of Physics, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200 D, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Kawamura, Tatsuro [Device Solutions Center, Panasonic Corporation, 3-4, Hikaridai, Seika-cho, Soraku-gun, Kyoto 619-0237 (Japan)

    2014-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    With a view to biomedical and environmental applications, we investigate the plasmonic properties of a rectangular gold nanodisk array in water to boost surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) effects. To control the resonance wavelengths of the surface plasmon polariton and the localized surface plasmon, their dependence on the array period and diameter in water is studied in detail using a finite difference time domain method. A good agreement is obtained between calculated resonant wavelengths and those of gold nanodisk arrays fabricated using electron beam lithography. For the optimized structure, a SERS enhancement factor of 7.8?×?10{sup 7} is achieved in water experimentally.

  9. Proceedings of 1999 U.S./Japan Workshop (99FT-05) On High Heat Flux Components and Plasma Surface Interactions for Next Fusion Devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NYGREN,RICHARD E.; STAVROS,DIANA T.

    2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 1999 US-Japan Workshop on High Heat Flux Components and Plasma Surface Interactions in Next Step Fusion Devices was held at the St. Francis Hotel in Santa Fe, New Mexico, on November 1-4, 1999. There were 42 presentations as well as discussion on technical issues and planning for future collaborations. The participants included 22 researchers from Japan and the United States as well as seven researchers from Europe and Russia. There have been important changes in the programs in both the US and Japan in the areas of plasma surface interactions and plasma facing components. The US has moved away from a strong focus on the ITER Project and has introduced new programs on use of liquid surfaces for plasma facing components, and operation of NSTX has begun. In Japan, the Large Helical Device began operation. This is the first large world-class confinement device operating in a magnetic configuration different than a tokamak. In selecting the presentations for this workshop, the organizers sought a balance between research in laboratory facilities or confinement devices related to plasma surface interactions and experimental research in the development of plasma facing components. In discussions about the workshop itself, the participants affirmed their preference for a setting where ''work-in-progress'' could be informally presented and discussed.

  10. Interfacial interaction of in situ Cu growth on tetrasulfide self-assembled monolayer on plasma treated parylene surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Gwo-Ching

    treated parylene surface S. Pimanpang,a Pei-I Wang, Jasbir S. Juneja, G.-C. Wang, and T.-M. Lu Center forms a self-assembled monolayer SAM only on a parylene surface treated with either He plasma or N2 groups on the plasma treated parylene surface facilitate the formation of tetrasulfide SAM

  11. Shape evolution and shape coexistence in Pt isotopes: comparing interacting boson model configuration mixing and Gogny mean-field energy surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. E. Garcia-Ramos; K. Heyde; L. M. Robledo; R. Rodriguez-Guzman

    2014-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The evolution of the total energy surface and the nuclear shape in the isotopic chain $^{172-194}$Pt are studied in the framework of the interacting boson model, including configuration mixing. The results are compared with a self-consistent Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov calculation using the Gogny-D1S interaction and a good agreement between both approaches shows up. The evolution of the deformation parameters points towards the presence of two different coexisting configurations in the region 176 $\\leq$ A $\\leq$ 186.

  12. Carbon Sequestration on Surface Mine Lands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donald H. Graves; Christopher Barton; Richard Sweigard; Richard Warner

    2005-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A major effort this quarter was to inventory all the planted areas to evaluate the diameter and height growth as well as determine survival rates. Soil bulk density and compaction continue to be evaluated on all the areas to determine the effects on tree growth and survival. The hydrologic quantity and quality are continuously monitored and quantified. Much effort was also expended in preparing technical presentations for professional meeting and field trips for a variety of audiences.

  13. Potential influence of climate-induced vegetation shifts on future land use and associated land carbon fluxes in Northern Eurasia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kicklighter, D W

    Climate change will alter ecosystem metabolism and may lead to a redistribution of vegetation and changes in fire regimes in Northern Eurasia over the 21st century. Land management decisions will interact with these ...

  14. Lakes & Reservoirs: Research and Management 2002 7: 189199 Modelling the impact of historical land uses on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    uses on surface-water quality using groundwater flow and solute-transport models Karen G. Wayland,1-use effects on surface-water quality. Key words groundwater lag time, groundwater modelling, land use, water quality, watersheds. INTRODUCTION The biogeochemistry of surface water and groundwater are related to land

  15. Self-Assembly of Collagen on Flat Surfaces: The Interplay of Collagen-Collagen and Collagen-Substrate Interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ciobanu, Cristian

    Self-Assembly of Collagen on Flat Surfaces: The Interplay of Collagen-Collagen and Collagen also self-assemble in vitro from solution. While previous in vitro studies showed that the p such control could be exerted are still elusive. To address this issue and to be able to simulate self-assembly

  16. Survey of Critical Wetlands Bureau of Land Management Lands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Survey of Critical Wetlands Bureau of Land Management Lands South Park, Park County, Colorado 2003 Delivery Colorado State University #12;Survey of Critical Wetlands Bureau of Land Management Lands South place from unique wetlands to high quality grasslands to the bristlecone pine forests to its alpine

  17. The surface structure of ?-uranophane and its interaction with Eu(III) – An integrated computational and fluorescence spectroscopy study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuta, Jadwiga; Wang, Zheming; Wisuri, Katy; Wander, Matthew C F.; Wall, Nathalie; Clark, Aurora E.

    2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Uranophane is a rare U(VI) secondary silicate mineral formed in nature by the oxidation of the primary mineral uraninite. It is also relevant to the long-term geochemistry of nuclear waste repositories, where it can be formed under oxidizing conditions and has the potential to act as a secondary barrier to the migration of radionuclides through mineral sorption reactions. A combination of classical molecular dynamics and ab-initio density functional theory (DFT) has been employed to investigate the uranophane|water interface as well as the interfacial reactivity of the U(VI) silicate toward acidic conditions and radionuclide ion sorption. The sorption simulations have been complemented by experimental sorption studies and laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy to help identify the molecular structure of the surface sorbed species. Experimental distances and essential coordination numbers are properly captured by the simulation results within bulk uranophane, while interfacial water is found to orient primarily with the hydrogen-atoms directed towards the negatively charged surface. Sorption sites for water are observed to belong to 3 different groups: (1) those involving uranyl oxygen, (2) involving uranyl and silica hydroxyl oxygen atoms, and (3) involving hydroxyl hydrogen. The pKa of the surface -OH groups have been calculated using a variety of models, including a bond valence approach and utilization of the energetics of deprotonation within DFT. Under basic conditions, deprotonation of the Si-OH groups is likely responsible for uranophane dissolution. Finally, the stability and structure of surface sorbed Eu3+ has been examined, with a stable inner-sphere species being observed.

  18. THEORETICAL STUDY ON THE INTERACTION BETWEEN XENON AND POSITIVE SILVER CLUSTERS IN GAS PHASE AND ON THE (001) CHABAZITE SURFACE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunter, D.

    2009-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A systematic study on the adsorption of xenon on silver clusters in the gas phase and on the (001) surface of silver-exchanged chabazite is reported. Density functional theory at the B3LYP level with the cluster model was employed. The results indicate that the dominant part of the binding is the {sigma} donation, which is the charge transfer from the 5p orbital of Xe to the 5s orbital of Ag and is not the previously suggested d{sub {pi}}-d{sub {pi}} back-donation. A correlation between the binding energy and the degree of {sigma} donation is found. Xenon was found to bind strongly to silver cluster cations and not to neutral ones. The binding strength decreases as the cluster size increases for both cases, clusters in the gas-phase and on the chabazite surface. The Ag{sup +} cation is the strongest binding site for xenon both in gas phase and on the chabazite surface with the binding energies of 73.9 and 14.5 kJ/mol, respectively. The results also suggest that the smaller silver clusters contribute to the negative chemical shifts observed in the {sup 129}Xe NMR spectra in experiments.

  19. Role of solid-state interactions in the acid-catalyzed thermolysis of surface-attached diphenylalkanes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buchanan, A.C. III; Britt, P.F.; Biggs, C.A.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The cross-linked, network structure of coal may impose constraints on conventional reaction mechanisms as a consequence of restricted mass transport. We have examined this phenomenon for thermal reactions through the study of model compounds that are covalently anchored to an inert silica surface (1). We have now initiated studies that employ these immobilized model compounds as solid-state probes in modeling fundamental aspects of catalyzed, heterogeneous reactions of coal. There have been numerous recent reports on the development of unsupported, highly dispersed catalysts for improving the conversion and product selectivity in coal liquefaction (2,3) and hydropyrolysis (4). A potential advantage of such dispersed catalysts is the improved contact between the coal, solvent vehicle if present, hydrogen gas, and the catalyst surface, particularly when catalysts with very small particle sizes can be generated. In this paper, we report initial results from a model system that begins to address the mechanistic question of if, in the early stages of coal dissolution, significant activation of solid coal particles by solid catalyst can occur. For this study, surface-immobilized 1,3-diphenylpropane ({approx}DPP) has been employed as a model for related trimethylene (and longer) aliphatic linking groups between aromatic clusters in coal, and its reactivity in the presence of a dispersed aluminosilicate at 310--375{degree}C has been investigated. 8 refs., 2 figs.

  20. Surface plasmon resonance method for probing interactions in nanostructures: CdS nanoparticles linked to Au and Ag substrates by self-assembled hexanedithiol and aminoethanethiol monolayers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hutter, E.; Fendler, J. H.; Roy, D.

    2001-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Self-assembled hexanedithiol (HDT) and aminoethanethiol (AET) monolayers (SAMs), {approx}0.4--0.8 nm in thickness, are used to link {approx}5 nm diam CdS nanoparticles covalently and electrostatically onto Au and Ag substrates. The resulting nanostructures are probed with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) measurements. The CdS nanoparticle--SAM--substrate interactions manifesting themselves in the dielectric functions of the multilayered systems, are detected in the SPR data, and are discussed in terms of a phenomenological six-layer model. The SPR response of the Ag substrate is more sensitive to neighboring interactions than the Au substrate. The SEM images show that the CdS, connected either by HDT or AET onto Ag substrates, forms crystalline structures. The interactions responsible for this crystallization are absent in samples employing Au substrates, in which case only {approx}5 nm diam CdS nanoparticles are detected by SEM. The experimental results of the present article, analyzed in detail using Fresnel and Maxwell equations, demonstrate how the SPR technique can be used to characterize layered nanostructured materials. {copyright} 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  1. Effect of nonlinear optical three-wave interaction on the lasing parameters of a dual-wavelength vertical-external-cavity surface-emitting laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morozov, M Yu; Morozov, Yu A [Kotel'nikov Institute of Radio Engineering and Electronics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Saratov Branch, Saratov (Russian Federation); Krasnikova, I V [Yu A Gagarin Saratov State Technical University, Saratov (Russian Federation)

    2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The influence of nonlinear optical interaction in a semiconductor dual-wavelength vertical-external-cavity surface-emitting laser on the main parameters of dual-wavelength radiation and lasing in the long-wavelength part of the mid-IR range, obtained in this laser as a result of nonlinear wave mixing, is investigated. An increase in the pump power leads to saturation of the short-wavelength lasing intensity and to a more rapid rise in the long-wavelength lasing intensity in comparison with the linear increase in lasing intensity in these regions in the absence of nonlinear interaction. Under the conditions of nonlinear interaction, the carrier concentration in the active layers is not stabilised near the lasing threshold but changes with an increase in the pump intensity and provides the corresponding gain in the laser active region, thus maintaining steadystate lasing. Some ways for modifying the laser active region in order to obtain the most efficient lasing in the mid-IR range are proposed. (nonlinear optical phenomena)

  2. Energy and land use

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report addresses the land use impacts of past and future energy development and summarizes the major federal and state legislation which influences the potential land use impacts of energy facilities and can thus influence the locations and timing of energy development. In addition, this report describes and presents the data which are used to measure, and in some cases, predict the potential conflicts between energy development and alternative uses of the nation's land resources. The topics section of this report is divided into three parts. The first part describes the myriad of federal, state and local legislation which have a direct or indirect impact upon the use of land for energy development. The second part addresses the potential land use impacts associated with the extraction, conversion and combustion of energy resources, as well as the disposal of wastes generated by these processes. The third part discusses the conflicts that might arise between agriculture and energy development as projected under a number of DOE mid-term (1990) energy supply and demand scenarios.

  3. Land-use Leakage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Calvin, Katherine V.; Edmonds, James A.; Clarke, Leon E.; Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; Kim, Son H.; Wise, Marshall A.; Thomson, Allison M.; Kyle, G. Page

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Leakage occurs whenever actions to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions in one part of the world unleash countervailing forces elsewhere in the world so that reductions in global emissions are less than emissions mitigation in the mitigating region. While many researchers have examined the concept of industrial leakage, land-use policies can also result in leakage. We show that land-use leakage is potentially as large as or larger than industrial leakage. We identify two potential land-use leakage drivers, land-use policies and bioenergy. We distinguish between these two pathways and run numerical experiments for each. We also show that the land-use policy environment exerts a powerful influence on leakage and that under some policy designs leakage can be negative. International “offsets” are a potential mechanism to communicate emissions mitigation beyond the borders of emissions mitigating regions, but in a stabilization regime designed to limit radiative forcing to 3.7 2/m2, this also implies greater emissions mitigation commitments on the part of mitigating regions.

  4. Energy balance and partition in Inner Mongolia steppe ecosystems with different land use types

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Jiquan

    Energy balance and partition in Inner Mongolia steppe ecosystems with different land use types surface, including radiation balance, energy partitioning, aerodynamic characteristics, leaf area index records of the surface energy balance are currently available for grassland ecosystems, especially

  5. Title: Canada Land Inventory: Land Capability for Recreation Data Creator /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Title: Canada Land Inventory: Land Capability for Recreation Data Creator / Copyright Owner: National Archives of Canada, Visual and Sound Archives Division Publisher: National Archives of Canada, Visual and Sound Archives Division; developed under the auspices of Environment Canada; distributed

  6. Title: Canada Land Inventory: Land Capability for Ungulates Data Creator /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Title: Canada Land Inventory: Land Capability for Ungulates Data Creator / Copyright Owner: National Archives of Canada, visual and Sound Archives Division Publisher: National Archives of Canada, Visual and Sound Archives Division; developed under the auspices of Environment Canada; distributed

  7. Title: Canada Land Inventory: Land Capability for Agriculture Data Creator /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Title: Canada Land Inventory: Land Capability for Agriculture Data Creator / Copyright Owner: National Archives of Canada, Visual and Sound Archives Division Publisher: National Archives of Canada, Visual and Sound Archives Division; developed under the auspices of Environment Canada; distributed

  8. National Forest Land Scheme

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Community Right to Buy. Communities are encouraged to register an interest in the land they wish to buy Ministers to make a late registration of interest. When Forestry Commission Scotland decides to sell, a community organisation could consider the opportunities for working in partnership with Forestry Commission

  9. Clearing Debris from Land

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McFarland, Mark L.

    2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    level. Burial ? Tree debris can be buried, but the cost is high. ? Use a chipping machine to eliminate smaller branches and reduce the amount of burial space needed. Landfill ? You can place tree debris in erosion gullies (where the land is not prac...

  10. Ge interactions on HfO{sub 2} surfaces and kinetically driven patterning of Ge nanocrystals on HfO{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stanley, Scott K.; Joshi, Sachin V.; Banerjee, Sanjay K.; Ekerdt, John G. [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712-0231 (United States); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712-0240 (United States); Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712-0231 (United States)

    2006-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Germanium interactions are studied on HfO{sub 2} surfaces, which are prepared through physical vapor deposition (PVD) and by atomic layer deposition. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and temperature-programed desorption are used to follow the reactions of germanium on HfO{sub 2}. Germanium chemical vapor deposition at 870 K on HfO{sub 2} produces a GeO{sub x} adhesion layer, followed by growth of semiconducting Ge{sup 0}. PVD of 0.7 ML Ge (accomplished by thermally cracking GeH{sub 4} over a hot filament) also produces an initial GeO{sub x} layer, which is stable up to 800 K. PVD above 2.0 ML deposits semiconducting Ge{sup 0}. Temperature programed desorption experiments of {approx}1.0 ML Ge from HfO{sub 2} at 400-1100 K show GeH{sub 4} desorption below 600 K and GeO desorption above 850 K. These results are compared to Ge on SiO{sub 2} where GeO desorption is seen at 550 K. Exploiting the different reactivity of Ge on HfO{sub 2} and SiO{sub 2} allows a kinetically driven patterning scheme for high-density Ge nanoparticle growth on HfO{sub 2} surfaces that is demonstrated.

  11. A framework for benchmarking land models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luo, Yiqi; Randerson, J.; Abramowitz, G.; Bacour, C.; Blyth, E.; Carvalhais, N.; Ciais, Philippe; Dalmonech, D.; Fisher, J.B.; Fisher, R.; Friedlingstein, P.; Hibbard, Kathleen A.; Hoffman, F. M.; Huntzinger, Deborah; Jones, C.; Koven, C.; Lawrence, David M.; Li, D.J.; Mahecha, M.; Niu, S.L.; Norby, Richard J.; Piao, S.L.; Qi, X.; Peylin, P.; Prentice, I.C.; Riley, William; Reichstein, M.; Schwalm, C.; Wang, Y.; Xia, J. Y.; Zaehle, S.; Zhou, X. H.

    2012-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Land models, which have been developed by the modeling community in the past few decades to predict future states of ecosystems and climate, have to be critically evaluated for their performance skills of simulating ecosystem responses and feedback to climate change. Benchmarking is an emerging procedure to measure performance of models against a set of defined standards. This paper proposes a benchmarking framework for evaluation of land model performances and, meanwhile, highlights major challenges at this infant stage of benchmark analysis. The framework includes (1) targeted aspects of model performance to be evaluated, (2) a set of benchmarks as defined references to test model performance, (3) metrics to measure and compare performance skills among models so as to identify model strengths and deficiencies, and (4) model improvement. Land models are required to simulate exchange of water, energy, carbon and sometimes other trace gases between the atmosphere and land surface, and should be evaluated for their simulations of biophysical processes, biogeochemical cycles, and vegetation dynamics in response to climate change across broad temporal and spatial scales. Thus, one major challenge is to select and define a limited number of benchmarks to effectively evaluate land model performance. The second challenge is to develop metrics of measuring mismatches between models and benchmarks. The metrics may include (1) a priori thresholds of acceptable model performance and (2) a scoring system to combine data–model mismatches for various processes at different temporal and spatial scales. The benchmark analyses should identify clues of weak model performance to guide future development, thus enabling improved predictions of future states of ecosystems and climate. The near-future research effort should be on development of a set of widely acceptable benchmarks that can be used to objectively, effectively, and reliably evaluate fundamental properties of land models to improve their prediction performance skills.

  12. Please cite this article in press as: J.N. Brooks, et al., Modeling of plasma/lithium-surface interactions in NSTX: Status and key issues. Fusion Eng. Des. (2011), doi:10.1016/j.fusengdes.2011.08.002

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harilal, S. S.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    .elsevier.com/locate/fusengdes Modeling of plasma/lithium-surface interactions in NSTX: Status and key issues J.N. Brooks , A. Hassanein history: Available online xxx Keywords: Lithium NSTX Plasma material interactions Erosion a b s t r a c nuclear science facility or DEMO. Accordingly, we have been analyzing lithium plasma surface interactions

  13. Surface Coal Mining Regulations (Mississippi)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Surface Coal Mining Regulations are a combination of permitting requirements and environmental regulations that limit how, where and when coal can be mined. It protects lands that are under...

  14. Aggressive landing maneuvers for unmanned aerial vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bayraktar, Selcuk

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    VTOL (Vertical Take Off and Landing) vehicle landing is considered to be a critically difficult task for both land, marine, and urban operations. This thesis describes one possible control approach to enable landing of ...

  15. IEEE JOURNAL OF SELECTED TOPICS IN APPLIED EARTH OBSERVATIONS AND REMOTE SENSING, VOL. 3, NO. 3, SEPTEMBER 2010 219 Impacts of Climate Change and Land Use Changes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liang, Shunlin

    governed by eco- nomic development and air pollution regulations [3]. Variations in incident solar, SEPTEMBER 2010 219 Impacts of Climate Change and Land Use Changes on Land Surface Radiation and Energy Budgets Abstract--Land surface radiation and energy budgets are critical to address a variety

  16. CATHETER SURFACE INTERACTIONS WITH HUMAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MĂĽftĂĽ, Sinan

    and Porosity positively impacts lubricity and reduces tissue trauma. Con: Hydrogel tends to delaminate due of Polyurethane Catheter (uncoated) Polyurethane coated with Poly (MCP-co- BMA) polymer Test enviroments: Vacuum

  17. Abstracts and parameter index database for reports pertaining to the unsaturated zone and surface water-ground water interactions at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bloomsburg, G.; Finnie, J.; Horn, D.; King, B.; Liou, J. [Idaho Univ., Moscow, ID (United States)

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is a product generated by faculty at the University of Idaho in support of research and development projects on Unsaturated Zone Contamination and Transport Processes, and on Surface Water-Groundwater Interactions and Regional Groundwater Flow at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. These projects are managed by the State of Idaho`s INEL Oversight Program under a grant from the US Department of Energy. In particular, this report meets project objectives to produce a site-wide summary of hydrological information based on a literature search and review of field, laboratory and modeling studies at INEL, including a cross-referenced index to site-specific physical, chemical, mineralogic, geologic and hydrologic parameters determined from these studies. This report includes abstracts of 149 reports with hydrological information. For reports which focus on hydrological issues, the abstracts are taken directly from those reports; for reports dealing with a variety of issues beside hydrology, the abstracts were generated by the University of Idaho authors concentrating on hydrology-related issues. Each abstract is followed by a ``Data`` section which identifies types of technical information included in a given report, such as information on parameters or chemistry, mineralogy, stream flows, water levels. The ``Data`` section does not include actual values or data.

  18. User`s Guide: Database of literature pertaining to the unsaturated zone and surface water-ground water interactions at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, L.F.

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since its beginnings in 1949, hydrogeologic investigations at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) have resulted in an extensive collection of technical publications providing information concerning ground water hydraulics and contaminant transport within the unsaturated zone. Funding has been provided by the Department of Energy through the Department of Energy Idaho Field Office in a grant to compile an INEL-wide summary of unsaturated zone studies based on a literature search. University of Idaho researchers are conducting a review of technical documents produced at or pertaining to the INEL, which present or discuss processes in the unsaturated zone and surface water-ground water interactions. Results of this review are being compiled as an electronic database. Fields are available in this database for document title and associated identification number, author, source, abstract, and summary of information (including types of data and parameters). AskSam{reg_sign}, a text-based database system, was chosen. WordPerfect 5.1{copyright} is being used as a text-editor to input data records into askSam.

  19. Evaluating land application effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarkis, K. (Philadelphia Water Department, PA (USA))

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Philadelphia, PA Water Department embarked on a land application program of its treated wastewater sludge in 1977. Initially, liquid sludge averaging from 1-5% solids was applied to approximately 400 acres of corn, soybeans, and sod at rates sufficient to supply crop nitrogen needs. During the 1978 through 1984 growing seasons, crops and soils were monitored for heavy metals (bioavailability of cadmium, copper, nickel, chromium, lead and zinc) and in 1984 for PCB accumulation. This report summarizes results of the monitoring program until 1984.

  20. Proposed Conveyance of Land

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 - SeptemberMicroneedles for4-16HamadaBaO/Al2O3 leanProposalConveyance of Land at the

  1. Absentee Landowners Near a Military Installation in Texas: Use, Motivation, and Emotional Tie to their Land

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dankert, Amber 1980-

    2012-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    .......................................................... 97 Family land. ........................................................................................................................... 98 Leasing land.... ......................................................................................................................... 117 Leasing land. ....................................................................................................................... 118 Hunting on land...

  2. Comparing and modeling land use organization in cities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lenormand, Maxime; Cantú-Ros, Oliva G; Louail, Thomas; Herranz, Ricardo; Barthelemy, Marc; Frías-Martínez, Enrique; Miguel, Maxi San; Ramasco, José J

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The advent of geolocated ICT technologies opens the possibility of exploring how people use space in cities, bringing an important new tool for urban scientists and planners, especially for regions where data is scarce or not available. Here we apply a functional network approach to determine land use patterns from mobile phone records. The versatility of the method allows us to run a systematic comparison between Spanish cities of various sizes. The method detects four major land use types that correspond to different temporal patterns. The proportion of these types, their spatial organization and scaling show a strong similarity between all cities that breaks down at a very local scale, where land use mixing is specific to each urban area. Finally, we introduce a model inspired by Schelling's segregation, able to explain and reproduce these results with simple interaction rules between different land uses.

  3. RCRA, superfund and EPCRA hotline training module. Introduction to: Land disposal units (40 cfr parts 264/265, subparts k, l, m, n) updated July 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The module provides an overview of the requirements for landfills, surface impoundments, waste piles, and land treatment units. It summarizes the differences between interim status (Part 265) and permitted (Part 264) standards for land disposal units. It defines `surface impoundment` and distinguishes surface impoundments from tanks and describes surface impoundment retrofitting and retrofitting variance procedures. It explains the connection between land disposal standards, post-closure, and groundwater monitoring.

  4. Land Stewardship | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Improvements are implemented with consideration of adjacent land uses, owners, and political entities. Success is defined when measurable parameters are achieved. Scope The team...

  5. Interactive Uses of the NSDL: .Atmospheric Visualization Collection

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFunInfrared Land SurfaceVirus-InfectedIntelligentCO2 withInteractive Map

  6. Title: Canada Land Inventory: Land Capability for Forestry Data Creator /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Title: Canada Land Inventory: Land Capability for Forestry Data Creator / Copyright Owner: National Archives of Canada, Visual and Sound Archives Division; Publisher: National Archives of Canada, Visual and Sound Archives Division; developed under the auspices of Environment Canada; distributed by Natural

  7. Title: Canada Land Inventory: 1966 Land Use Data Creator /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Title: Canada Land Inventory: 1966 Land Use Data Creator / Copyright Owner: National Archives of Canada, Visual and Sound Archives Division Publisher: National Archives of Canada, Visual and Sound Archives Division; developed under the auspices of Environment Canada; distributed by Natural Resources

  8. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Influence of land terracing on agricultural and ecological

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Zhi "Luke"

    the months from March to June of the year with less rainfall, the water supply for crop growth is mainly on the sloping land which promotes soil and water erosion during heavy rains. The associated agricultural to store and retain much water, promoting more favorable interactions between water and fertilizer. During

  9. Land, Food & Community III LFS 450 -W2009 Term 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farrell, Anthony P.

    the basis for our understanding of, and interaction with, the ecological, economic and social systems Systems at UBC Farm Morgan Reid and Duncan McHugh, LFS Learning Centre #12;2 Land, Food & Community III (3-822-9607 UBC Food System Project Coordinator Sophia Baker-French sophiabakerfrench@yahoo.com Teaching

  10. 4, 42654295, 2007 Impact of land-use

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    methodol- ogy which involves coupling a land-use change model with a water balance model and a groundwater groundwater model. Results show that the average recharge slowly de- creases for all scenarios, the decreases / Esc Printer-friendly Version Interactive Discussion EGU 1 Introduction Groundwater is a major source

  11. Standard BYU QuikSCAT and Seawinds Land/Ice Image Products David G. Long

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, David G.

    Standard BYU QuikSCAT and Seawinds Land/Ice Image Products David G. Long Revised By: Brandon R originally designed for wind observation, scatterometers have proven useful in a variety of land and ice developed and applied to the data. These algorithms produce images of the surface o at enhanced resolution

  12. Fire dynamics during the 20th century simulated by the Community Land Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kloster, S.; Mahowald, N. M.; Randerson, J. T.; Thornton, P. E.; Hoffman, F. M.; Levis, Samuel; Lawrence, Peter J.; Feddema, Johannes J.; Oleson, Keith W.; Lawrence, David M.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fire is an integral Earth System process that interacts with climate in multiple ways. Here we assessed the parametrization of fires in the Community Land Model (CLM-CN) and improved the ability of the model to reproduce ...

  13. Land Application of Poultry Lagoon Effluent L. J. Aldrich1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukhtar, Saqib

    1 Land Application of Poultry Lagoon Effluent by L. J. Aldrich1 , C. L. Munster2 , V. A. Haby3 , J poultry operations. Therefore, field research was conducted at College Station and Overton, TX, to evaluate the effects of poultry lagoon effluent on soil, vegetation and surface runoff quality. Two

  14. Oil and Gas on Public Lands (Texas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The School Land Board may choose to lease lands for the production of oil and natural gas, on the condition that oil and gas resources are leased together and separate from other minerals. Lands...

  15. Mined land reclamation by biological reactivation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gozon, J.S.; Konya, C.J.; Lukovic, S.S.; Lundquist, R.G.; Olah, J.

    1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A mine reclamation technique, developed in Europe, restores land to full productivity within two years without topsoil replacement. The method deliberately reestablishes within one year following mining, the required biological balance between microbes, enzymes, and trace elements in the rock spoil rather than waiting five or more years for natural processes to restore balance. The technique is called Biological Reactivation (BR). This paper discusses the feasibility of BR reclamation after surface mining operations in the US. Staff of the Ohio Mining and Mineral Resources Research Institute completed an OSM-sponsored research project on BR in which physical and chemical tests characterized 140 spoil samples obtained from 10 surface mining operations. Test results indicated that Biological Reactivation technology could be effectively applied, at least in the test areas sampled within Appalachia. Preliminary estimates make clear that the new technique reduces reclamation costs on prime farmland by approximately 95% compared to topsoil segregation and replacement methods.

  16. Land application of sludge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Page, A.L.; Logan, T.J.; Ryan, J.A. (eds.)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This book is the proceedings of a workshop held in Las Vegas, NV in 1985 entitled Effects of Sewage Sludge Quality and Soil Properties on Plant Uptake of Sludge-Applied Trace Constituents. The workshop was in response to the need to utilize the most current available information in the development of regulations and criteria to safely apply and manage the land application of municipal sewage sludge. The participants were undoubtedly the most knowledgeable of this subject matter, and were divided into five separate but related task groups. The groups addressed the following sludge-related topics: (1) role of soil properties on accumulation of trace element by crops; (2) role of sludge properties on accumulation of trace elements by crops; (3) influence of long-term application on accumulation of trace elements by crops; (4) transfer of trace elements to the food chain, and (5) effects of trace organics in agroecosystems and their risk assessment to humans. The text, therefore, parallels those of the results of the task groups. The five main chapters followed a similar format, i.e., having an introduction section, a comprehensive literature review, discussion of recent and current data, and synthesis of the most relevant information.

  17. Process-design manual: Land application of municipal sludge. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The manual presents a rational procedure for the design of municipal-sludge land-application systems. The utilization of sludge in agriculture, forestry, the reclamation of disturbed and marginal lands, and dedicated high-rate surface disposal practices are discussed in detail, with design concepts and criteria presented where available. A two-phased planning approach to site identification, evaluation, and selection along with information on field investigations are also presented. The manual includes examples of each land-application option and case studies of sludge utilization in agriculture and for reclamation of disturbed mining lands.

  18. Final report for the project "Improving the understanding of surface-atmosphere radiative interactions by mapping surface reflectance over the ARM CART site" (award DE-FG02-02ER63351)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alexander P. Trishchenko; Yi Luo; Konstantin V. Khlopenkov, William M. Park; Zhanqing Li; Maureen Cribb

    2008-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Surface spectral reflectance (albedo) is a fundamental variable affecting the transfer of solar radiation and the Earth’s climate. It determines the proportion of solar energy absorbed by the surface and reflected back to the atmosphere. The International Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) identified surface albedo among key factors influencing climate radiative forcing. Accurate knowledge of surface reflective properties is important for advancing weather forecasting and climate change impact studies. It is also important for determining radiative impact and acceptable levels of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere, which makes this work strongly linked to major scientific objectives of the Climate Change Research Division (CCRD) and Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program. Most significant accomplishments of eth project are listed below. I) Surface albedo/BRDF datasets from 1995 to the end of 2004 have been produced. They were made available to the ARM community and other interested users through the CCRS public ftp site ftp://ftp.ccrs.nrcan.gc.ca/ad/CCRS_ARM/ and ARM IOP data archive under “PI data Trishchenko”. II) Surface albedo properties over the ARM SGP area have been described for 10-year period. Comparison with ECMWF data product showed some deficiencies in the ECMWF surface scheme, such as missing some seasonal variability and no dependence on sky-conditions which biases surface energy budget and has some influence of the diurnal cycle of upward radiation and atmospheric absorption. III) Four surface albedo Intensive Observation Period (IOP) Field Campaigns have been conducted for every season (August, 2002, May 2003, February 2004 and October 2004). Data have been prepared, documented and transferred to ARM IOP archive. Nine peer-reviewed journal papers and 26 conference papers have been published.

  19. Minerals on Public Lands (Texas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Any tract of land that belongs to the state, including islands, salt and freshwater lakes, bays, inlets, marshes, and reefs owned by the state within tidewater limits, the part of the Gulf of...

  20. Delaware Land Protection Act (Delaware)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Land Protection Act requires the Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control to work with the Delaware Open Space Council to develop standards and criteria for determining the...

  1. Land and Facility Use Planning

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1996-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The Land and Facility Use Planning process provides a way to guide future site development and reuse based on the shared long-term goals and objectives of the Department, site and its stakeholders. Does not cancel other directives.

  2. Georgia Surface Mining Act of 1968 (Georgia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This law regulates all surface mining in Georgia, including the coastal zone. It includes provisions to “advance the protection of fish and wildlife and the protection and restoration of land,...

  3. ELEMENTARY PARTICLE INTERACTIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    EFREMENKO, YURI; HANDLER, THOMAS; KAMYSHKOV, YURI; SIOPSIS, GEORGE; SPANIER, STEFAN

    2013-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The High-Energy Elementary Particle Interactions group at UT during the last three years worked on the following directions and projects: Collider-based Particle Physics; Neutrino Physics, particularly participation in “NO?A”, “Double Chooz”, and “KamLAND” neutrino experiments; and Theory, including Scattering amplitudes, Quark-gluon plasma; Holographic cosmology; Holographic superconductors; Charge density waves; Striped superconductors; and Holographic FFLO states.

  4. An update on land-ice modeling in the CESM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lipscomb, William H [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2011-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Mass loss from land ice, including the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets as well as smaller glacier and ice caps, is making a large and growing contribution to global sea-level rise. Land ice is only beginning to be incorporated in climate models. The goal of the Land Ice Working Group (LIWG) is to develop improved land-ice models and incorporate them in CESM, in order to provide useful, physically-based sea-level predictions. LJWG efforts to date have led to the inclusion of a dynamic ice-sheet model (the Glimmer Community Ice Sheet Model, or Glimmer-CISM) in the Community Earth System Model (CESM), which was released in June 2010. CESM also includes a new surface-mass-balance scheme for ice sheets in the Community Land Model. Initial modeling efforts are focused on the Greenland ice sheet. Preliminary results are promising. In particular, the simulated surface mass balance for Greenland is in good agreement with observations and regional model results. The current model, however, has significant limitations: The land-ice coupling is one-way; we are using a serial version of Glimmer-CISM with the shallow-ice approximation; and there is no ice-ocean coupling. During the next year we plan to implement two-way coupling (including ice-ocean coupling with a dynamic Antarctic ice sheet) with a parallel , higher-order version of Glimmer-CISM. We will also add parameterizations of small glaciers and ice caps. With these model improvements, CESM will be able to simulate all the major contributors to 21st century global sea-level rise. Results of the first round of simulations should be available in time to be included in the Fifth Assessment Report (ARS) of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change.

  5. Surface InP/In{sub 0.48}Ga{sub 0.52}P quantum dots: Carrier recombination dynamics and their interaction with fluorescent dyes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hestroffer, Karine [Institute of Physics, Humboldt–University Berlin, 12489 Berlin (Germany) [Institute of Physics, Humboldt–University Berlin, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Max Born Institute for Nonlinear Optics and Ultrafast Spectroscopy, 2A Max–Born–Str., 12489 Berlin (Germany); CEA–CNRS group “Nanophysique et Semiconducteurs,” Institut Néel/CNRS–Univ. J. Fourier and CEA Grenoble, INAC, SP2M, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38 054 Grenoble (France); Braun, Robert; Ugur, Asli; Hackbarth, Steffen; Röder, Beate; Hatami, Fariba [Institute of Physics, Humboldt–University Berlin, 12489 Berlin (Germany)] [Institute of Physics, Humboldt–University Berlin, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Tomm, Jens W. [Max Born Institute for Nonlinear Optics and Ultrafast Spectroscopy, 2A Max–Born–Str., 12489 Berlin (Germany)] [Max Born Institute for Nonlinear Optics and Ultrafast Spectroscopy, 2A Max–Born–Str., 12489 Berlin (Germany)

    2013-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe the properties and carrier dynamics of surface InP quantum dots (QDs) on In{sub 0.48}Ga{sub 0.52}P, lattice-matched to GaAs (100). The structures were grown using gas-source molecular beam epitaxy. The average height and lateral size of the dots are in the range of 2–6 and 30–50 nm, respectively. The photoluminescence of the surface dots peaks between 750 and 830 nm, depending on the growth conditions, and is red-shifted compared to the emission of the capped QDs grown under similar conditions. The integrated photoluminescence intensity is comparable to that of the capped QDs. The decay time of both surface and capped QDs is around 1 ns at 15 K. The strong luminescence of surface QDs is explained by the effect of acting vacuum/air as an effective barrier and saturated surface states. Enhancement of the QDs luminescence is observed for the samples coated with a fluorescent dye.

  6. RCRA/UST, superfund and EPCRA hotline training module. Introduction to: Land disposal units (40 CFR parts 264/265, subparts K, L, M, N) updated as of July 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The module provides and overview of the requirements for landfills, surface impoundments, waste piles, and land treatment units. It summarizes the differences between Interim Status (Part 265) and Permitted (Part 264) standards for land disposal units. It defines surface impoundment and distinguishes surface impoundments from tanks. It explains the connection between land disposal standards, post-closure, and groundwater monitoring. It cites the statutory and regulatory minimum technological requirements and describes surface impoundment retrofitting and retrofitting variance procedures.

  7. Temporal Land Cover Analysis for Net Ecosystem Improvement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ke, Yinghai; Coleman, Andre M.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.

    2013-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We delineated 8 watersheds contributing to previously defined river reaches within the 1,468-km2 historical floodplain of the tidally influenced lower Columbia River and estuary. We assessed land-cover change at the watershed, reach, and restoration site scales by reclassifying remote-sensing data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Coastal Change Analysis Program’s land cover/land change product into forest, wetland, and urban categories. The analysis showed a 198.3 km2 loss of forest cover during the first 6 years of the Columbia Estuary Ecosystem Restoration Program, 2001–2006. Total measured urbanization in the contributing watersheds of the estuary during the full 1996-2006 change analysis period was 48.4 km2. Trends in forest gain/loss and urbanization differed between watersheds. Wetland gains and losses were within the margin of error of the satellite imagery analysis. No significant land cover change was measured at restoration sites, although it was visible in aerial imagery, therefore, the 30-m land-cover product may not be appropriate for assessment of early-stage wetland restoration. These findings suggest that floodplain restoration sites in reaches downstream of watersheds with decreasing forest cover will be subject to increased sediment loads, and those downstream of urbanization will experience effects of increased impervious surfaces on hydrologic processes.

  8. The influence of surface interactions on the reversibility of ferri/ferrocyanide at boron-doped diamond thin-film electrodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Granger, M.C.; Swain, G.M.

    1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The electrochemistry of four redox analytes [Fe(CN){sub 6}{sup {minus}3/{minus}4}, Ru(NH{sub 3}){sub 6}{sup +2/+3}, IrCl{sub 6}{sup {minus}2/{minus}3}, and methyl viologen, MV{sup +2/+/0}] was investigated at polycrystalline, boron-doped diamond thin-film electrodes before and after anodic polarization and hydrogen plasma treatment. The as-deposited diamond surface is predominantly hydrogen treatment, and quasi-reversible cyclic voltammograms ({Delta}E{sub p} of 60--80 mV) were observed for all of these couples at 0.1 V/s. After anodic polarization in H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, the surface atomic O/C ratio, as determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, increased from 0.02 to ca. 0.20. Concomitant with the increase in surface oxygen, the {Delta}E{sub p} for Fe(CN){sub 6}{sup {minus}3/{minus}4} increased to over 200 mV, while the {Delta}E{sub p} values for the other redox systems remained relatively unchanged. After acid washing and rehydrogenating the surface in hydrogen plasma (i.e., atomic hydrogen), the {Delta}E{sub p} for Fe(CN){sub 6}{sup {minus}3/{minus}4} returned to ca. 80 mV, while the {Delta}E{sub p} values for the other three redox analytes remained close to the original values. The results demonstrate the electron transfer for ferri/ferrocyanide is very sensitive to the presence of surface carbon-oxygen functionalities and that the electron transfer involves a site associated with the hydrogen-terminated surface. The results also unequivocally rule out the influence of adventitious nondiamond phases as the sole sites for the electron transfer.

  9. Formulas for the force dipole interaction of surface line defects in homoepitaxy This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text article.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Margetis, Dionisios

    decays as R-3 . This behavior is contrasted with the elastic interaction energy arising in heteroepitaxy of contents for this issue, or go to the journal homepage for more Home Search Collections Journals About energy per unit length between line defects (steps) of the same sign that form perturbations of circles

  10. Land Reclamation Program annual report, 1979

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Argonne Land Reclamation Program, sponsored by the United States Department of Energy's Assistant Secretary for Environment, is a joint effort of two Argonne divisions: Energy and Environmental Systems and Environmental Impact Studies. The program is carried out by a multidisciplinary team of scientists and engineers and has three primary objectives: (1) to develop energy-efficient and cost-effective mining and reclamation techniques; (2) to assist industry in evaluating the viability of environmental regulations and demonstrating techniques to meet these regulations; and (3) to supply data and evaluation techniques to decisionmakers concerned with trade-offs between energy development and environmental quality. Six integrated field research sites have been established to address problems associated with surface mining operations. This program relies heavily on input from industry and has developed working arrangements with coal companies at each of the current mining sites. A major area of interest is the development of a ten-year environmental mining and reclamation research plan for the Assistant Secretary for Environment. The Land Reclamation Program assigns the highest priority to the transfer to users of information generated by its research.

  11. Coal conversion siting on coal mined lands: water quality issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Triegel, E.K.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The siting of new technology coal conversion facilities on land disturbed by coal mining results in both environmental benefits and unique water quality issues. Proximity to mining reduces transportation requirements and restores disrupted land to productive use. Uncertainties may exist, however, in both understanding the existing site environment and assessing the impact of the new technology. Oak Ridge National Laboratory is currently assessing the water-related impacts of proposed coal conversion facilities located in areas disturbed by surface and underground coal mining. Past mining practices, leaving highly permeable and unstable fill, may affect the design and quality of data from monitoring programs. Current mining and dewatering, or past underground mining may alter groundwater or surface water flow patterns or affect solid waste disposal stability. Potential acid-forming material influences the siting of waste disposal areas and the design of grading operations. These and other problems are considered in relation to the uncertainties and potentially unique problems inherent in developing new technologies.

  12. Analysis of the densification of reclaimed surface mined land

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schneider, William Joseph

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    exposures 2500 ft north of the spoil pile. The height is measured in ft from the top of the main lignite. 18 Geologic Section 2 based on pit exposures 800 ft north of the spoil pile. The height is measured in ft from the top of the main lignite... pit. For scale, the line is 25 ft. 25 15 Channel sands at the north end of the pit. For scale, the line is ten ft. 26 Unconformable contact (arrow) of the northern channel and the lignite. For scale, the picture is about 8 ft wide. 27 17 Minor...

  13. Role of land surface processes in South American monsoon development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xue, Y; de Sales, F; Li, W P; Mechoso, C R; Nobre, C A; Juang, H M

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the La Plata Basin in South America. J. Hydrometeor. , 3,of precipitation over South America. J. Climate, 15, Weaver,climate exist over South America? J. Climate, 11, 1020–1040.

  14. ABSTRACT: Increased riverine nitrogen (N) fluxes have been strongly correlated with land use changes and are now one of the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vallino, Joseph J.

    in the Ipswich River basin in Massachusetts and to evaluate the effect of future land use scenarios on the water with the hydrology of the basin are likely to control the magnitude of nitrate loads to the aquatic system and nutrient fluxes from the land surface and soil profile to rivers and then down the river drainage network

  15. The new GFDL global atmosphere and land model AM2/LM2: Evaluation with prescribed SST simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bretherton, Chris

    The new GFDL global atmosphere and land model AM2/LM2: Evaluation with prescribed SST simulations climatology, and components from previous models used at GFDL. The land model, known as LM2, includes soil of the coupled model AM2/LM2 is evaluated with a series of prescribed sea-surface temperature (SST) simulations

  16. Hawaii Department of Land and Natural Resources Office of Conservation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Office of Conservation and Coastal Lands Jump to: navigation, search Name: Hawaii Department of Land and Natural Resources Office of Conservation and Coastal Lands From Open Energy...

  17. Mapping Savanna Land Change of Belize 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilson, Lauren

    2011-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

    was assessed using a confusion matrix. The results of the research confirmed the capabilities of Landsat imagery for mapping savannas and their land use. The classification of forest and savanna along with major land use pressures from agriculture...

  18. Minerals on School and Public Lands

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Commissioner of School and Public Lands is authorized to lease the mineral interests of such lands for development. Section 5-7 of the SD Codified Laws describes provisions for the leasing of...

  19. GEORGE LEA FOUNDER'S SCHOLARSHIP PUBLIC LANDS FOUNDATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 GEORGE LEA FOUNDER'S SCHOLARSHIP PUBLIC LANDS FOUNDATION P.O. Box 7226 Arlington, VA 22207 Scholarship Application Form This scholarship is being offered by the Public Lands Foundation, a national non

  20. Sale of Water Resource Land (Maine)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This rule requires an eight month advance notice period whenever a consumer-owned water utility intends to transfer water resource land, defined as any land or real property owned by a water...

  1. Marginal, Erodible Land Retirement Policy (Minnesota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    It is state policy to encourage the retirement of marginal, highly erodible land, particularly land adjacent to public waters and drainage systems, from crop production and to reestablish a cover...

  2. Tropical Africa: Land use, biomass, and carbon estimates for 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, S. [Environmental Protection Agency, Corvallis, OR (United States). Western Ecology Division; Gaston, G. [Environmental Protection Agency, Corvallis, OR (United States). National Research Council; Daniels, R.C. [ed.] [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes the contents of a digital database containing maximum potential aboveground biomass, land use, and estimated biomass and carbon data for 1980 and describes a methodology that may be used to extend this data set to 1990 and beyond based on population and land cover data. The biomass data and carbon estimates are for woody vegetation in Tropical Africa. These data were collected to reduce the uncertainty associated with the possible magnitude of historical releases of carbon from land use change. Tropical Africa is defined here as encompassing 22.7 x 10{sup 6} km{sup 2} of the earth`s land surface and includes those countries that for the most part are located in Tropical Africa. Countries bordering the Mediterranean Sea and in southern Africa (i.e., Egypt, Libya, Tunisia, Algeria, Morocco, South Africa, Lesotho, Swaziland, and Western Sahara) have maximum potential biomass and land cover information but do not have biomass or carbon estimate. The database was developed using the GRID module in the ARC/INFO{sup TM} geographic information system. Source data were obtained from the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), the U.S. National Geophysical Data Center, and a limited number of biomass-carbon density case studies. These data were used to derive the maximum potential and actual (ca. 1980) aboveground biomass-carbon values at regional and country levels. The land-use data provided were derived from a vegetation map originally produced for the FAO by the International Institute of Vegetation Mapping, Toulouse, France.

  3. Land & Water Conservation Program Conservation Easements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    Land & Water Conservation Program Conservation Easements: A Step by Step Guide PRELIMINARY STEPS: Step 1: Landowner expresses interest in land conservation. Step 2: Discuss the land with the landowner officially designated as prime. Source: municipal conservation commission or NH DES, Wetlands Bureau.* o Deer

  4. LAND USE AND OWNERSHIP, WILLISTON BASIN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapter WM LAND USE AND OWNERSHIP, WILLISTON BASIN By T.T. Taber and S.A. Kinney In U.S. Geological........................................WM-1 Map Information for the Williston Basin Land Use And Land Cover Map.........................................................WM-2 Map Information for the Williston Basin Subsurface Ownership map

  5. Autonomous Landing of MAVs on an Arbitrarily Textured Landing Site using Onboard Monocular Vision

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zell, Andreas

    Autonomous Landing of MAVs on an Arbitrarily Textured Landing Site using Onboard Monocular Vision a novel solution for micro aerial vehicles (MAVs) to autonomously search for and land on an arbitrary landing site using real- time monocular vision. The autonomous MAV is provided with only one single

  6. Analysis of the IR-spectral behavior of adsorbed CO formed in H/sub 2/ + CO/sub 2/ surface interaction over supported rhodium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Solymosi, F.; Pasztor, M.

    1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The interaction of hydrogen and carbon dioxide has been investigated by means of infrared spectroscopy on alumina-supported Rh of different crystallite sizes produced by reduction at 573-1173 K with a view to explaining the infrared spectrum of the adsorbed CO produced which is basically different from that observed following CO adsorption on the same samples. It appeared that the adsorbed CO formed on CO/sub 2/ or H/sub 2/ + CO/sub 2/ adsorption did not lead to the formation of gem-dicarbonyl, i.e., to disruption of the Rh-Rh bond. This behavior is attributed to the presence of adsorbed hydrogen and to the formation of Rh carbonyl hydride, which prevents the disruptive effect of adsorbed CO.

  7. Land application of sewage sludge: A guide for land appliers on the requirements of the federal standards for the use or disposal of sewage sludge, 40 CFR part 503

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency promulgated a regulation at 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 503 to ensure that sewage sludge is used or disposed of in a way that protects human health and the environment. Part 503 imposes requirements for the land application, surface disposal, and incineration of sewage sludge. The manual focuses on land application, providing guidance to land appliers of sewage sludge. The purpose of the document is to provide the land applier with sufficient guidance to comply fully with all applicable Part 503 requirements. The guidance is structured to first provide a general understanding of the Rule and its underlying principles, including definitions of sewage sludge, land application, and an explanation of who under the Rule is considered a land applier.

  8. Technology for Increasing Geothermal Energy Productivity. Computer Models to Characterize the Chemical Interactions of Goethermal Fluids and Injectates with Reservoir Rocks, Wells, Surface Equiptment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nancy Moller Weare

    2006-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This final report describes the results of a research program we carried out over a five-year (3/1999-9/2004) period with funding from a Department of Energy geothermal FDP grant (DE-FG07-99ID13745) and from other agencies. The goal of research projects in this program were to develop modeling technologies that can increase the understanding of geothermal reservoir chemistry and chemistry-related energy production processes. The ability of computer models to handle many chemical variables and complex interactions makes them an essential tool for building a fundamental understanding of a wide variety of complex geothermal resource and production chemistry. With careful choice of methodology and parameterization, research objectives were to show that chemical models can correctly simulate behavior for the ranges of fluid compositions, formation minerals, temperature and pressure associated with present and near future geothermal systems as well as for the very high PT chemistry of deep resources that is intractable with traditional experimental methods. Our research results successfully met these objectives. We demonstrated that advances in physical chemistry theory can be used to accurately describe the thermodynamics of solid-liquid-gas systems via their free energies for wide ranges of composition (X), temperature and pressure. Eight articles on this work were published in peer-reviewed journals and in conference proceedings. Four are in preparation. Our work has been presented at many workshops and conferences. We also considerably improved our interactive web site (geotherm.ucsd.edu), which was in preliminary form prior to the grant. This site, which includes several model codes treating different XPT conditions, is an effective means to transfer our technologies and is used by the geothermal community and other researchers worldwide. Our models have wide application to many energy related and other important problems (e.g., scaling prediction in petroleum production systems, stripping towers for mineral production processes, nuclear waste storage, CO2 sequestration strategies, global warming). Although funding decreases cut short completion of several research activities, we made significant progress on these abbreviated projects.

  9. The interactive effects of pH, surface tension, and solution density for flotation systems for separation of equivalent-density materials: separation of ABS from HIPS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karvelas, D.E.; Jody, B.J.; Pomykala, J.A.; Daniels, E.J.

    1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents the results of research being conducted at Argonne National Laboratory, to develop a cost-effective and environmentally acceptable process for the separation of high-value plastics from discarded household appliances. The process under development has separated high-purity (greater than 99.5%) acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene (ABS) and high-impact polystyrene (HIPS) from commingled plastics generated by appliance-shredding and metal recovery operations. Plastics of similar densities, such as ABS and HIPS are further separated by using a chemical solution. By controlling the surface tension, the density and the temperature of the chemical solution, we are able to selectively float/separate plastics that have equivalent densities. In laboratory-scale tests, this technique has proven highly effective in recovering high-purity plastics materials from discarded household appliances and other obsolete durable goods. A pilot plant is under construction to demonstrate and assess the technical and economic performance of this process. In this paper, we examine the technical and economic issues that affect the recovery and separation of plastics and provide an update on Argonne`s plastics separation research and development activities.

  10. Assessment of Uncertainties in the Response of the African Monsoon Precipitation to Land Use change simulated by a regional model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hagos, Samson M.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Xue, Yongkang; Boone, Aaron; de Sales, Fernando; Neupane, Naresh; Huang, Maoyi; Yoon, Jin-Ho

    2014-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Land use and land cover over Africa have changed substantially over the last sixty years and this change has been proposed to affect monsoon circulation and precipitation. This study examines the uncertainties on the effect of these changes on the African Monsoon system and Sahel precipitation using an ensemble of regional model simulations with different combinations of land surface and cumulus parameterization schemes. Although the magnitude of the response covers a broad range of values, most of the simulations show a decline in Sahel precipitation due to the expansion of pasture and croplands at the expense of trees and shrubs and an increase in surface air temperature.

  11. Phosphine-stabilised Au{sub 9} clusters interacting with titania and silica surfaces: The first evidence for the density of states signature of the support-immobilised cluster

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andersson, Gunther G., E-mail: gunther.andersson@flinders.edu.au, E-mail: vladimir.golovko@canterbury.ac.nz, E-mail: greg.metha@adelaide.edu.au; Al Qahtani, Hassan S. [Flinders Centre for NanoScale Science and Technology, Flinders University, Adelaide SA 5001 (Australia); Golovko, Vladimir B., E-mail: gunther.andersson@flinders.edu.au, E-mail: vladimir.golovko@canterbury.ac.nz, E-mail: greg.metha@adelaide.edu.au [Flinders Centre for NanoScale Science and Technology, Flinders University, Adelaide SA 5001 (Australia); The MacDiarmid Institute for Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology, Department of Chemistry, University of Canterbury, Christchurch 8140 (New Zealand); Alvino, Jason F.; Bennett, Trystan; Wrede, Oliver; Mejia, Sol M.; Metha, Gregory F., E-mail: gunther.andersson@flinders.edu.au, E-mail: vladimir.golovko@canterbury.ac.nz, E-mail: greg.metha@adelaide.edu.au [Department of Chemistry, University of Adelaide, Adelaide SA 5005 (Australia); Adnan, Rohul [The MacDiarmid Institute for Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology, Department of Chemistry, University of Canterbury, Christchurch 8140 (New Zealand); Chemistry Department, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Gunby, Nathaniel; Anderson, David P. [The MacDiarmid Institute for Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology, Department of Chemistry, University of Canterbury, Christchurch 8140 (New Zealand)

    2014-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Chemically made, atomically precise phosphine-stabilized clusters Au{sub 9}(PPh{sub 3}){sub 8}(NO{sub 3}){sub 3} were deposited on titania and silica from solutions at various concentrations and the samples heated under vacuum to remove the ligands. Metastable induced electron spectroscopy was used to determine the density of states at the surface, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy for analysing the composition of the surface. It was found for the Au{sub 9} cluster deposited on titania that the ligands react with the titania substrate. Based on analysis using the singular value decomposition algorithm, the series of MIE spectra can be described as a linear combination of 3 base spectra that are assigned to the spectra of the substrate, the phosphine ligands on the substrate, and the Au clusters anchored to titania after removal of the ligands. On silica, the Au clusters show significant agglomeration after heat treatment and no interaction of the ligands with the substrate can be identified.

  12. Wind Development on Tribal Lands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ken Haukaas; Dale Osborn; Belvin Pete

    2008-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Background: The Rosebud Sioux Tribe (RST) is located in south central South Dakota near the Nebraska border. The nearest community of size is Valentine, Nebraska. The RST is a recipient of several Department of Energy grants, written by Distributed Generation Systems, Inc. (Disgen), for the purposes of assessing the feasibility of its wind resource and subsequently to fund the development of the project. Disgen, as the contracting entity to the RST for this project, has completed all the pre-construction activities, with the exception of the power purchase agreement and interconnection agreement, to commence financing and construction of the project. The focus of this financing is to maximize the economic benefits to the RST while achieving commercially reasonable rates of return and fees for the other parties involved. Each of the development activities required and its status is discussed below. Land Resource: The Owl Feather War Bonnet 30 MW Wind Project is located on RST Tribal Trust Land of approximately 680 acres adjacent to the community of St. Francis, South Dakota. The RST Tribal Council has voted on several occasions for the development of this land for wind energy purposes, as has the District of St. Francis. Actual footprint of wind farm will be approx. 50 acres. Wind Resource Assessment: The wind data has been collected from the site since May 1, 2001 and continues to be collected and analyzed. The latest projections indicate a net capacity factor of 42% at a hub height of 80 meters. The data has been collected utilizing an NRG 9300 Data logger System with instrumentation installed at 30, 40 and 65 meters on an existing KINI radio tower. The long-term annual average wind speed at 65-meters above ground level is 18.2 mph (8.1 mps) and 18.7 mph (8.4 mps) at 80-meters agl. The wind resource is excellent and supports project financing.

  13. Meeting the Demand for Biofuels: Impact on Land Use and Carbon Mitigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khanna, Madhu; Jain, Atul; Onal, Hayri; Scheffran, Jurgen; Chen, Xiaoguang; Erickson, Matt; Huang, Haixiao; Kang, Seungmo.

    2011-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this research was to develop an integrated, interdisciplinary framework to investigate the implications of large scale production of biofuels for land use, crop production, farm income and greenhouse gases. In particular, we examine the mix of feedstocks that would be viable for biofuel production and the spatial allocation of land required for producing these feedstocks at various gasoline and carbon emission prices as well as biofuel subsidy levels. The implication of interactions between energy policy that seeks energy independence from foreign oil and climate policy that seeks to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions for the optimal mix of biofuels and land use will also be investigated. This project contributes to the ELSI research goals of sustainable biofuel production while balancing competing demands for land and developing policy approaches needed to support biofuel production in a cost-effective and environmentally friendly manner.

  14. Interactive effects of maternal and environmental exposure to coal combustion wastes decrease survival of larval southern toads (Bufo terrestris)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFunInfrared Land SurfaceVirus-InfectedIntelligentCO2 withInteractive

  15. Global Biofuels Modeling and Land Use

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Biofuels Modeling and Land Use DOE Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) 2015 Project Peer Review Strategic Analysis & Cross-cutting Sustainability March 25 2015 Gbadebo Oladosu...

  16. Marginal Lands: Concept, Assessment and Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kang, Shujiang [ORNL; Post, Wilfred M [ORNL; West, Tristram O. [Joint Global Change Research Institute, PNNL; Bandaru, Vara Prasad [ORNL; Izaurralde, Dr. R. Cesar [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Wang, Dali [ORNL; Nichols, Dr Jeff A [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Marginal lands have received wide attention for their potential to improve food security and support bioenergy production. However, environmental, ecosystem service, and sustainability concerns have been widely raised over the use of marginal land. Knowledge of the extent, location, and quality of marginal lands as well as their assessment and management are limited and diverse. This paper provides a review of the historical development of marginal concept, its application and assessment. Limitations and priority research needs of marginal land assessment and management were discussed.

  17. Landholders, Residential Land Conversion, and Market Signals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Margulis, Harry L.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    465– Margulis: Landholders, Residential Land Conversion, and1983. An Analysis of Residential Developer Location FactorsHow Regulation Affects New Residential Development. New

  18. Albeni Falls land acquisitions.indd

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Idaho The Bonneville Power Administration is working with the Idaho Department of Fish and Game to acquire and manage two parcels of land in northern Idaho to preserve,...

  19. Sustainable Land Management in Northern Namibia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and low water holding capacity (Bolivia) #12;Perspective Similar soil (Kavango) #12;Increased Demand for Food + Energy Production Expansion onto Less Resilient Lands Reduced Production per Unit Area

  20. Title: Canada Land Inventory: Land Capability for Waterfowl Wildlife Data Creator /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Title: Canada Land Inventory: Land Capability for Waterfowl Wildlife Data Creator / Copyright Owner: National Archives of Canada, Visual and Sound Archives Division Publisher: National Archives of Canada, Visual and Sound Archives Division; developed under the auspices of Environment Canada; distributed

  1. Texas Uranium Exploration, Surface Mining, and Reclamation Act (Texas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Railroad Commission of Texas is the regulatory authority for uranium surface mining. Law authorizes the Commission to assure that reclamation of mining sites is possible, to protect land owners...

  2. RESTORING SUSTAINABLE FORESTS ON APPALACHIAN MINED LANDS FOR WOOD PRODUCTS, RENEWABLE ENERGY, CARBON SEQUESTRATION, AND OTHER ECOSYSTEM SERVICES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jonathan Aggett

    2003-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall purpose of this project is to evaluate the biological and economic feasibility of restoring high-quality forests on mined land, and to measure carbon sequestration and wood production benefits that would be achieved from forest restoration procedures. In this segment of work, our goal was to review methods for estimating tree survival, growth, yield and value of forests growing on surface mined land in the eastern coalfields of the USA, and to determine the extent to which carbon sequestration is influenced by these factors. Public Law 95-87, the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 (SMCRA), mandates that mined land be reclaimed in a fashion that renders the land at least as productive after mining as it was before mining. In the central Appalachian region, where prime farmland and economic development opportunities for mined land are scarce, the most practical land use choices are hayland/pasture, wildlife habitat, or forest land. Since 1977, the majority of mined land has been reclaimed as hayland/pasture or wildlife habitat, which is less expensive to reclaim than forest land, since there are no tree planting costs. As a result, there are now hundreds of thousands of hectares of grasslands and scrublands in various stages of natural succession located throughout otherwise forested mountains in the U.S. A literature review was done to develop the basis for an economic feasibility study of a range of land-use conversion scenarios. Procedures were developed for both mixed hardwoods and white pine under a set of low product prices and under a set of high product prices. Economic feasibility is based on land expectation values. Further, our review shows that three types of incentive schemes might be important: (1) lump sum payment at planting (and equivalent series of annual payments); (2) revenue incentive at harvest; and (3) benefit based on carbon volume.

  3. Exploring the interaction between lithium ion and defective graphene...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Exploring the interaction between lithium ion and defective graphene surface using dispersion corrected DFT studies. Exploring the interaction between lithium ion and defective...

  4. APPLIED BIOLOGY 360 ~ FOOD & ENVIRONMENT II (Agroecology II) Faculty of Land and Food Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farrell, Anthony P.

    : APBI 360 uses a systems approach to investigate the functions and interactions of plants and animals/ 204 pp Gliessman, S.R. 2007. Agroecology ­ The Ecology of Sustainable Food Systems. Second Edition1 APPLIED BIOLOGY 360 ~ FOOD & ENVIRONMENT II (Agroecology II) Faculty of Land and Food Systems

  5. Fitting coupled potential energy surfaces for large systems: Method and construction of a 3-state representation for phenol photodissociation in the full 33 internal degrees of freedom using multireference configuration interaction determined data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhu, Xiaolei, E-mail: virtualzx@gmail.com; Yarkony, David R., E-mail: yarkony@jhu.edu [Department of Chemistry, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States)

    2014-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A recently reported algorithm for representing adiabatic states coupled by conical intersections using a quasi-diabatic state Hamiltonian in four and five atom systems is extended to treat nonadiabatic processes in considerably larger molecules. The method treats all internal degrees of freedom and uses electronic structure data from ab initio multireference configuration interaction wave functions with nuclear configuration selection based on quasi-classical surface hopping trajectories. The method is shown here to be able to treat ?30 internal degrees of freedom including dissociative and large amplitude internal motion. Two procedures are introduced which are essential to the algorithm, a null space projector which removes basis functions from the fitting process until they are needed and a partial diagonalization technique which allows for automated, but accurate, treatment of the vicinity of extended seams of conical intersections of two or more states. These procedures are described in detail. The method is illustrated using the photodissociaton of phenol, C{sub 6}H{sub 5}OH(X{sup ~1}A{sup ?}) + hv ? C{sub 6}H{sub 5}OH(A{sup ~1}A{sup ?}, B{sup ~1}A{sup ??}) ? C{sub 6}H{sub 5}O(X{sup ~2}B{sub 1}, A{sup ~2}B{sub 2}) + H as a test case. Ab initio electronic structure data for the 1,2,3{sup 1}A states of phenol, which are coupled by conical intersections, are obtained from multireference first order configuration interaction wave functions. The design of bases to simultaneously treat large amplitude motion and dissociation is described, as is the ability of the fitting procedure to smooth the irregularities in the electronic energies attributable to the orbital changes that are inherent to nonadiabatic processes.

  6. Surface Soil

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Surface Soil Surface Soil We compare local soil samples with samples collected from northern New Mexico locations that are beyond the range of potential influence from normal...

  7. Land Information Systems in Developing Countries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Barbara, University of

    development. Afrika-Studiesentrum, Lieden: Andersson, Sune (1986). Cadastre as a Base for Land Information-378. Andersson, Sune (1988). Examples and Lessons in LIS. International Federation of Surveyors- FIG Land Information System Workshop. Bali, Indonesia: FIG. 253-256. Andersson, Sune (1988). Problems and Issues

  8. 21 Sustainable Land Management and Global Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richner, Heinz

    427 21 Sustainable Land Management and Global Development: Factors Affecting Land Users' Efforts for Sustainable Development: Foundations, Experiences, and Perspectives 428 North-South perspectives 21 the concept of sustainable develop- ment and a clearer focus on operational implications, Hurni and colleagues

  9. Biofuels and indirect land use change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biofuels and indirect land use change The case for mitigation October 2011 #12;About this study), Malaysian Palm Oil Board, National Farmers Union, Novozymes, Northeast Biofuels Collaborative, Patagonia Bio contributed views on a confidential basis. #12;1Biofuels and indirect land use change The case for mitigation

  10. Economic Benefit of Land Conservation in Protecting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demers, Nora Egan

    by plants instead of traveling into the water system #12;Water Storage on Conservation Lands · Upland areas.9 billion · In terms of water quality and groundwater purification, returns of $13.2 billion estimated #12Economic Benefit of Land Conservation in Protecting Water Resources November 2, 2011 Presented by

  11. SPECIES COMPOSITION OF INDUSTRIAL TRAWL FISH LANDINGS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    346; SPECIES COMPOSITION OF INDUSTRIAL TRAWL FISH LANDINGS IN NEW ENGLAND, 1958 SPECIAL SCIENTIFIC REPORT-FISHERIES Na 346 #12;#12;United States Department of the Interior, Fred A. Seaton, Secretary FishKernan, Director SPECIES COMPOSITION OF INDUSTRIAL TRAWL-FISH LANDINGS IN NEW ENGLAND, 1958 by Robert L. Edwards

  12. Practice Note Planning for brownfield land

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Practice Note Planning for brownfield land regeneration to woodland and wider green infrastructure 1FCPN022 Gail Atkinson and Kieron Doick March 2014 The regeneration of brownfield land to green of brownfield regeneration to woodland in order to inform project planning, raise awareness of lessons learnt

  13. Global land cover mapping from MODIS: algorithms and early results M.A. Friedl a,*, D.K. McIver a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    for Remote Sensing, Boston University, 675 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, MA 02215, USA b Conservation, and radiometric attributes provides significant new opportunities and challenges for remote sensing-based land characteristics of the land surface influence sur- face­atmosphere fluxes of sensible heat, latent heat

  14. Quantifying turbidity current interactions with topography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Straub, Kyle M

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis advances our understanding of how transport properties of turbidity currents are mediated by interactions with seafloor topography, specifically channelized surfaces. Turbidity currents are responsible for ...

  15. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, Land Management Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To reflect the requirement of section 4 of the Wastes Isolation Pilot Plant Land Withdrawal Act (the Act) (Public Law 102-579), this land management plan has been written for the withdrawal area consistent with the Federal Land Policy and Management Act of 1976. The objective of this document, per the Act, is to describe the plan for the use of the withdrawn land until the end of the decommissioning phase. The plan identifies resource values within the withdrawal area and promotes the concept of multiple-use management. The plan also provides opportunity for participation in the land use planning process by the public and local, State, and Federal agencies. Chapter 1, Introduction, provides the reader with the purpose of this land management plan as well as an overview of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Chapter 2, Affected Environment, is a brief description of the existing resources within the withdrawal area. Chapter 3, Management Objectives and Planned Actions, describes the land management objectives and actions taken to accomplish these objectives.

  16. Vision-Based Precision Landings of a Tailsitter UAV.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Millet, Paul Travis 1982-

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??We present a method of performing precision landings of a vertical take-off and landing (VTOL) unmanned air vehicle (UAV) with the use of an onboard… (more)

  17. Green Infrastructure and Flood Resiliency-Land Use Management...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Green Infrastructure and Flood Resiliency-Land Use Management as an Adaptation Strategy in the Built Environment Green Infrastructure and Flood Resiliency-Land Use Management as an...

  18. arid land: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and indirect land use change The case for mitigation 359 Practice Note Planning for brownfield land Renewable Energy Websites Summary: space can deliver multiple benefits to...

  19. Hydroelectric Resources on State Lands (Montana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This chapter authorizes the leasing of state lands for the development of hydroelectric resources. It provides regulations for the granting and duration of leases, as well as for the inspection of...

  20. 2015 Tribal Lands and Environment Forum

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Institute for Tribal Environmental Professionals (ITEP) are hosting the annual Tribal Lands and Environment Forum. The four-day forum will feature special trainings, field trips, and breakout...

  1. Land Assemblage Tax Credit Program (Missouri)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Land Assemblage Tax Credit Programs the redevelopment of blighted areas in Missouri into productive use. Redevelopers must incur acquisition costs for at least 50 acres of 75+ acre parcels,...

  2. Management and Use of Public Lands (Virginia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation may elect to lease its lands for the development of mineral interests (defined herein as petroleum, natural gas, coal, ore, rock and any other...

  3. Land Application of Organic Fertilizers or Amendments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harmel, Daren; Mechell, Justin; Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2007-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Applying organic materials to your land can add beneficial nutrients to the soil. But when too much is applied, or when it is applied incorrectly, organic material can cause environmental problems. This publication will help you select the proper...

  4. A framework for benchmarking land models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    their inclu- sion in Earth system models (ESMs). State-of-land models cou- pled to Earth system models should simulateland models within Earth system models, however, can help

  5. Biomass Energy and Competition for Land

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reilly, John

    We describe an approach for incorporating biomass energy production and competition for land into the MIT Emissions Prediction and Policy Analysis (EPPA) model, a computable general equilibrium model of the world economy, ...

  6. Marine Habitats and Land Use (Virginia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Virginia Marine Resources Commission has jurisdiction over submerged lands off the state's coast and in inland rivers and streams, wetlands and tidal wetlands, coastal sand dunes and beaches,...

  7. Global climate change, land management, and biosolids application to semiarid grasslands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loftin, S.R. [Forest Service, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Rocky Mountain Forest and Range Experiment Station

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Global climate change combined with improper land management, including over-grazing, can lead to a severe reduction in plant cover and soil productivity. This process is especially common in arid and semiarid regions with sparse vegetation cover. New and innovative methods of land management are needed to restore and maintain these ecosystems in a productive and sustainable state. Research conducted in New Mexico on the Rio Puerco Resource Area and the Sevilleta National Wildlife Refuge has shown that biosolids (municipal sewage sludge) application to semiarid grasslands can increase soil nutrient availability, increase plant cover and productivity, and decrease surface runoff and soil erosion without harming environmental quality.

  8. Wilderness designation of Bureau of Land Management lands and impacts on the availability of energy resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oakes, E.H.; Voelker, A.H.

    1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1964 Congress mandated the establishment of the National Wilderness Preservation System - a collection of federal lands dedicated to the preservation of selected parts of our once vast wilderness. Because wilderness management precludes many traditional land uses, controversy has plagued the efforts of land-management agencies to select and recommend areas for wilderness inclusion. This study examines potential impacts on the supply of energy resources from the possible withdrawal by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) of some part of the 24.3 million acres of public lands now under study for inclusion in the wilderness system. Except for uranium, the energy-resource potential of the total WSA-acreage is low. Wilderness designation of some WSAs is therefore not expected to cause serious impacts on the future availability of energy resources. Because the significance of land withdrawals by the BLM will depend to some extent on the availability of other federal lands for mineral activities, an up-to-date estimate of the current and future status-of-access to western federal lands for mineral activities was prepared. Overall conclusions of the report are that (1) the inclusion of some BLM land in the National Wilderness Preservation System will not interfere with the nation's required supply of energy resources, (2) there is sufficient federal land currently available in the West for mineral activities, (3) the availability of western federal land for mineral activities will increase in the future, (4) the administration should continue to support the major land-review programs, and (5) the administration should accelerate the review process for WSAs in regions that have a high energy-resource potential.

  9. Interaction of wide-band-gap single crystals with 248-nm excimer laser irradiation. X. Laser-induced near-surface absorption in single-crystal NaCl

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dickinson, J. Thomas

    are expected to play an important role in optical break- down and surface damage. II. EXPERIMENT The results of a few thousand kelvin even in the absence of visible surface damage. The origin of the laser absorption radiation. As much as 20% of the incident radiation at 248 nm must be absorbed in the near-surface region

  10. Hanford Federal Facility state of Washington leased land

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report was prepared to provide information concerning past solid and hazardous waste management practices for all leased land at the US DOE Hanford Reservation. This report contains sections including land description; land usage; ground water, air and soil monitoring data; and land uses after 1963. Numerous appendices are included which provide documentation of lease agreements and amendments, environmental assessments, and site surveys.

  11. CCM3 as applied to an idealized all land zonally symmetric planet, Terra Blanda 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mahajan, Salil

    2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    with an energy balance model (EBM) which uses the Green?s function (North and Cahalan, 1981) to evaluate the surface temperature field owing to diffusion, truncated at degree 15 and degree 7 30. The EBM truncated at degree 15 showed a similar response, while... processes. It comprises component models of land surface, mixed layer slab- ocean and thermodynamic sea-ice, which are coupled with the atmospheric model. The model also exhibits systematic known biases at the surface and the top of the atmosphere energy...

  12. Community Land Use Planning on First Nations Reserves and the Influence of Land Tenure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Associate Professor Joan Phillip Supervisor Lands Manager Penticton Indian Band Date Defended to Joan Phillip, PIB's land manager and my committee member and project mentor, for helping to guide me Armstrong. Your classes, writings, and conversations opened a world of learning and introspection that I

  13. Neutrino Properties Before and After KamLAND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Pakvasa; J. W. F. Valle

    2003-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We review neutrino oscillation physics, including the determination of mass splittings and mixings from current solar, atmospheric, reactor and accelerator neutrino data. A brief discussion is given of cosmological and astrophysical implications. Non-oscillation phenomena such as neutrinoless double beta decay would, if discovered, probe the absolute scale of neutrino mass and also reveal their Majorana nature. Non-oscillation descriptions in terms of spin-flavor precession (SFP) and non-standard neutrino interactions (NSI) currently provide an excellent fit of the solar data. However they are at odds with the first results from the KamLAND experiment which imply that, despite their theoretical interest, non-standard mechanisms can only play a sub-leading role in the solar neutrino anomaly. Accepting the LMA-MSW solution, one can use the current solar neutrino data to place important restrictions on non-standard neutrino properties, such as neutrino magnetic moments. Both solar and atmospheric neutrino data can also be used to place constraints on neutrino instability as well as the more exotic possibility of $CPT$ and Lorentz Violation. Weillustrate the potential of future data from experiments such as KamLAND, Borexino and the upcoming neutrino factories in constraining non-standard neutrino properties.

  14. Land Tenure, Land Use, and Land Reform at Dwesa–Cwebe, South Africa: Local Transformations and the Limits of the State

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fay, Derick A

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Reverse Resettlement in South Africa’s Transkei. (Ph.D.Land and Development in South Africa's Black Rural Areas (the Land Question in South Africa, Michael de Klerk, ed. (

  15. Theoretical studies of molecular interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lester, W.A. Jr. [Univ. of California, Berkeley (United States)

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This research program is directed at extending fundamental knowledge of atoms and molecules including their electronic structure, mutual interaction, collision dynamics, and interaction with radiation. The approach combines the use of ab initio methods--Hartree-Fock (HF) multiconfiguration HF, configuration interaction, and the recently developed quantum Monte Carlo (MC)--to describe electronic structure, intermolecular interactions, and other properties, with various methods of characterizing inelastic and reaction collision processes, and photodissociation dynamics. Present activity is focused on the development and application of the QMC method, surface catalyzed reactions, and reorientation cross sections.

  16. Interactive Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    project assignment of an interactive social space, built up from autonomously operating smart building, interactive spaces in which people and buildings engage in a mutual relationship with one other. By connecting the data and experiences that develop though this relationship between buildings and their inhabitants

  17. Use of composts in revegetating arid lands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandt, C.A.; Hendrickson, P.L.

    1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Compost has been suggested as a soil amendment for arid lands at the US Department of Energy's Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. The operating contractor of the site, Westinghouse Hanford Company, requested that the Pacific Northwest Laboratory conduct a literature review to compile additional information on the use of compost amendments and their benefits. This report provides background information on the factors needed for plant growth and the consequences of severe soil disturbance. This report also discussed the characteristics of composts relative to other amendments and how they each affect plant growth. Finally,regulatory requirements that could affect land application of sludge-based compost on the Hanford Site are reviewed.

  18. Dike/Drift Interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    E. Gaffiney

    2004-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents and documents the model components and analyses that represent potential processes associated with propagation of a magma-filled crack (dike) migrating upward toward the surface, intersection of the dike with repository drifts, flow of magma in the drifts, and post-magma emplacement effects on repository performance. The processes that describe upward migration of a dike and magma flow down the drift are referred to as the dike intrusion submodel. The post-magma emplacement processes are referred to as the post-intrusion submodel. Collectively, these submodels are referred to as a conceptual model for dike/drift interaction. The model components and analyses of the dike/drift interaction conceptual model provide the technical basis for assessing the potential impacts of an igneous intrusion on repository performance, including those features, events, and processes (FEPs) related to dike/drift interaction (Section 6.1).

  19. Ecological perspectives of land use history: The Arid Lands Ecology (ALE) Reserve

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hinds, N R; Rogers, L E

    1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this study was to gather information on the land use history of the Arid Land Ecology (ALE) Reserve so that current ecological research could be placed within a historical perspective. The data were gathered in the early 1980s by interviewing former users of the land and from previously published research (where available). Interviews with former land users of the ALE Reserve in Benton County, Washington, revealed that major land uses from 1880 to 1940 were homesteading, grazing, oil/gas production, and road building. Land use practices associated with grazing and homesteading have left the greatest impact on the landscape. Disturbed sites where succession is characterized by non-native species, plots where sagebrush was railed away, and sheep trails are major indications today of past land uses. Recent estimates of annual bunchgrass production do ALE do not support the widespread belief that bunchgrass were more productive during the homesteading era, though the invasion of cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum), Jim Hill mustard (Sisymbrium altissium), and other European alien plant species has altered pre-settlement succession patterns. 15 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Constructing use in surface parking lots : strategies for enhancing lots as part-time public spaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ziegenfuss, Kathleen Kane

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Surface parking lots occupy vast amounts of land in urbanized areas-at times covering up to 40% of land in downtown areas in the United States. It is estimated that there are seven parking spaces for every vehicle in the ...

  1. Do Firms Interact Strategically? A Structural Model of the Multi-Stage Investment Timing Game

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, C.-Y. Cynthia

    interactions take place on U.S. federal lands in the Gulf of Mexico. In particular, it analyzes whether a firm, Ariel Pakes, Jack Porter, Juan Robalino, Stephen Ryan, M ichael Springborn, Jam es Stock, Stephen Weinb

  2. Retrieval of DNA using soft-landing after mass analysis by ESI-FTICR for enzymatic manipulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feng, B.; Wunschel, D.S.; Masselon, C.D.; Pasa-Tolic, L.; Smith, R.D.

    1999-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The DNA modifications that lead to mutations are of direct interest for, e.g. the understanding of DNA damage recognition and repair. The characterization of the modified oligonucleotides and enzymatic responses to specific DNA modifications are of primary concern, but also present major analytical challenges. Among the available techniques, mass spectrometry has become an increasingly important tool for the study of oligonucleotides, their mutations, and interactions. Conventionally, mass spectrometry provides mass and structural information (e.g. from dissociation experiments and the use of tandem mass spectrometry). However, the small quantities of material analyzed and the destructive nature of conventional mass spectrometric detection (e.g., due to high energy impact on particle multiplier surfaces) have precluded subsequent use of mass separated biopolymers. The authors report the use of mass spectrometry in conjunction with soft-landing for the high-resolution analysis, separation, and selective collection of oligonucleotides, and their subsequent retrieval for enzymatic manipulation. Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry coupled with electrospray ionization (ESI-FTICR) allows nondestructive (i.e., image current) measurement of the mass-to-charge ratios (m/z) of ions with high sensitivity, resolution, and mass accuracy.

  3. Arid Lands Ecology Facility management plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Arid Lands Ecology (ALE) facility is a 312-sq-km tract of land that lies on the western side of the Hanford Site in southcentral Washington. The US Atomic Energy Commission officially set aside this land area in 1967 to preserve shrub-steppe habitat and vegetation. The ALE facility is managed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the US Department of Energy (DOE) for ecological research and education purposes. In 1971, the ALE facility was designated the Rattlesnake Hills Research Natural Area (RNA) as a result of an interagency federal cooperative agreement, and remains the largest RNA in Washington. it is also one of the few remaining large tracts of shrub-steppe vegetation in the state retaining a predominant preeuropean settlement character. This management plan provides policy and implementation methods for management of the ALE facilities consistent with both US Department of Energy Headquarters and the Richland Field Office decision (US Congress 1977) to designate and manage ALE lands as an RNA and as a component of the DOE National Environmental Research Park System.

  4. Land Tenure Center 50th Anniversary Celebration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    to produce food to feed their own populations and to supply products designed to meet international market concessions/acquisitions. Jeff Dorsey will present recent findings about how water rights fit into land rights, and Glen Reynolds to talk about the Tribal "recovery" of treaty rights over water with the status

  5. 2012 Landes Bioscience. Do not distribute.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, John D.

    -type calcium channels, which involved a proline rich domain (PRD) in the intracellular II­III loop-9; May/June 2012; © 2012 Landes Bioscience RESEARCH PAPER RESEARCH PAPER Introduction Calcium influx through voltage gated calcium channels (VGCCs) mediates a range of key physiological functions

  6. Computer program design for land treatment systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, R.K. (Clemson Univ. SC (USA)); Jantrania, A.

    1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Municipal Sludge Land Application expert System (MuSLAXS)is as expert system developed for site assessment and design analysis of municipal sludge application on agricultural land. The system has knowledge on the technical and regulatory aspects of sludge land application and understanding of soil-plant systems for South Carolina. It can be effectively used outside South Carolina with modifications to incorporate specific regulations on land treatment and soil and crop database. A database supports this expert system and provides appropriate default values for sludge and soil characteristics, and fertilizer recommendations for crops commonly grown in South Carolina. Information on the sludge characteristics is gathered from the user, if it is available, or it is retrieved from the sludge database. Based on the recommendations by the EPA and the expert, a list of 22 constituents, for which the sludge should be analyzed is developed. This list includes: total solids, volatile solids, total nitrogen (TNK), ammonia-nitrogen, organic-nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium, sulfur, cadmium, copper, lead, nickel, zinc, PCBs, calcium, magnesium, chromium, boron, arsenic, aluminum, cobalt, and molybdenum.

  7. Environment and Land in Bushbuckridge, South Africa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Environment and Land in Bushbuckridge, South Africa © 2002, Professor Robert Thornton Department of Anthropology University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa Acknowledgements: Research), and by the Centre for Science Development, Human Sciences Research Council, Pretoria, South Africa. Printed:24 April

  8. Land Use Baseline Report Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noah, J.C.

    1995-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is to serve as a resource for Savannah River Site managers, planners, and SRS stakeholders by providing a general description of the site and land-use factors important to future use decisions and plans. The intent of this document is to be comprehensive in its review of SRS and the surrounding area.

  9. www.publiclandsday.org Public Lands Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    awareness of local public lands and issues #12;www.publiclandsday.org Facebook.com - Fan Page http://www.facebook.com/pages/create.php #12;www.publiclandsday.org Facebook Fan Page http://www.facebook.com/pages/create.php #12;www.publiclandsday.org Facebook Fan Page #12;www.publiclandsday.org Facebook Fan Page #12;www.publiclandsday.org Facebook Event

  10. Center for Environmental Management of Military Lands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for professionalism and hard work. Sincerely, Dr. Lee Barber, Director Center for Environmental Management of MilitaryCenter for Environmental Management of Military Lands 1490 Campus Delivery Fort Collins, Colorado extent been due to our ability to address our sponsors' natural and cultural resource management

  11. Climate Effects of Global Land Cover Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gibbard, S G; Caldeira, K; Bala, G; Phillips, T; Wickett, M

    2005-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    There are two competing effects of global land cover change on climate: an albedo effect which leads to heating when changing from grass/croplands to forest, and an evapotranspiration effect which tends to produce cooling. It is not clear which effect would dominate in a global land cover change scenario. We have performed coupled land/ocean/atmosphere simulations of global land cover change using the NCAR CAM3 atmospheric general circulation model. We find that replacement of current vegetation by trees on a global basis would lead to a global annual mean warming of 1.6 C, nearly 75% of the warming produced under a doubled CO{sub 2} concentration, while global replacement by grasslands would result in a cooling of 0.4 C. These results suggest that more research is necessary before forest carbon storage should be deployed as a mitigation strategy for global warming. In particular, high latitude forests probably have a net warming effect on the Earth's climate.

  12. Recent Trends in Land Tenure in Texas.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Motheral, Joe

    1944-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and a live- stock program was instituted. Long term cash leases presented problems during this period of fluctuating commodity prices, One- year farm rental agreements, on the other hand, failed to provide the necessary inducements for the long... ............................................................................. 24 Effect of changes in land tenure on community institutions .................... 25 Landlord-tenant relations ........................................................................................ 26 Farm rental agreements...

  13. Bureau of Land Management Oil Shale Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utah, University of

    Bureau of Land Management Oil Shale Development Unconventional Fuels Conference University of Utah May 17, 2011 #12;#12;Domestic Oil Shale Resources Primary oil shale resources in the U.S. are in the Green River Formation in Wyoming, Utah, and Colorado. 72 % of this oil shale resource is on Federal

  14. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant land management plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On October 30, 1992, the WIPP Land Withdrawal Act became law. This Act transferred the responsibility for the management of the WIPP Land Withdrawal Area (WILWA) from the Secretary of the Interior to the Secretary of Energy. In accordance with sections 3(a)(1) and (3) of the Act, these lands {open_quotes}{hor_ellipsis}are withdrawn from all forms of entry, appropriation, and disposal under the public land laws{hor_ellipsis}{close_quotes}and are reserved for the use of the Secretary of Energy {open_quotes}{hor_ellipsis}for the construction, experimentation, operation, repair and maintenance, disposal, shutdown, monitoring, decommissioning, and other activities, associated with the purposes of WIPP as set forth in the Department of Energy National Security and Military Applications of Nuclear Energy Act of 1980 and this Act.{close_quotes}. As a complement to this LMP, a MOU has been executed between the DOE and the BLM, as required by section 4(d) of the Act. The state of New Mexico was consulted in the development of the MOU and the associated Statement of Work (SOW).

  15. Landing Footprint Computation for Entry Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mease, Kenneth D.

    footprint provides critical information for mission planning in both nominal and abort situations, and solving a family of optimal control problems rapidly and reliably is a daunting task. Thus the challenge portion3 of the Shuttle Abort Flight Manager (SAFM) generates landing footprints in a manner

  16. Land and Atmospheric Science GRAD STUDENT HANDBOOK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    , transport, and fate of pollutants in soil, air, and water; improving and protecting land, air, and water, Policy and Management Agricultural Industries and Marketing The Department occupies the entire Soil are predominantly occupied by Soil Morphology and Genesis, Environmental Biophysics, and Atmospheric Sciences, plus

  17. developments. interactive

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jaun, André

    interactive course: ffl web­pages for hyper­linked lecture notes, student exercises and projects, ffl java teachers: ffl public on the web y : lecture notes including the JBONE applet, ffl on demand: source Java

  18. Programmable surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Amy (Amy Teh-Yu)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Robotic vehicles walk on legs, roll on wheels, are pulled by tracks, pushed by propellers, lifted by wings, and steered by rudders. All of these systems share the common character of momentum transport across their surfaces. ...

  19. Soil erosion and conservation as affcted by land use and land tenure, El Pital Watershed, Nicaragua

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Somarriba-Chang, Matilde de los Angeles

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . This trend is associated with increased fragmentation of farms associated with the agrarian reform activities of the 1980's, during which many of the large land-holdings were confiscated and redistributed to many peasant families. Also the increasing...

  20. Characterizing the Impact of Land Use and Land Cover Change on Freshwater Inflows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferijal, Teuku

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    in mean annual and winter precipitation. Analyses of Landsat images of the watershed using an unsupervised classification method showed an increase in forest, urban and irrigated land by 13, 42 and 7%, respectively, from 1987 to 2002. Urbanized areas were...

  1. Resource Management Services: Land Use, Part 501: Use of Flood Control Lands (New York)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    No regulated activity or development is allowed to take place on lands used for flood control purposes unless a permit is obtained. These regulations describe provisions for the application,...

  2. EA-1779: Proposed Changes to the Sanitary Biosolids Land Application Program on the Oak Ridge Reservation, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal to amend (e.g., by changing setback requirements from surface water features and potential channels to groundwater) the Sanitary Biosolids Land Application Program at the Oak Ridge Reservation in Oak Ridge, Tennessee.

  3. Surface Meteorology, Barrow, Alaska, Area A, B, C and D, Ongoing from 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hinzman, Larry; Busey, Bob; Cable, William; Romanovsky, Vladimir

    2014-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Meteorological data are being collected at several points within four intensive study areas in Barrow. These data assist in the calculation of the energy balance at the land surface and are also useful as inputs into modeling activities.

  4. Surface Meteorology, Barrow, Alaska, Area A, B, C and D, Ongoing from 2012

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Hinzman, Larry; Busey, Bob; Cable, William; Romanovsky, Vladimir

    Meteorological data are being collected at several points within four intensive study areas in Barrow. These data assist in the calculation of the energy balance at the land surface and are also useful as inputs into modeling activities.

  5. Parameter estimation of coupled water and energy balance models based on stationary constraints of surface states

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Jian

    [1] We use a conditional averaging approach to estimate the parameters of a land surface water and energy balance model and then use the estimated parameters to partition net radiation into latent, sensible, and ground ...

  6. Method for large-scale fabrication of atomic-scale structures on material surfaces using surface vacancies

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lim, Chong Wee (Urbana, IL); Ohmori, Kenji (Urbana, IL); Petrov, Ivan Georgiev (Champaign, IL); Greene, Joseph E. (Champaign, IL)

    2004-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for forming atomic-scale structures on a surface of a substrate on a large-scale includes creating a predetermined amount of surface vacancies on the surface of the substrate by removing an amount of atoms on the surface of the material corresponding to the predetermined amount of the surface vacancies. Once the surface vacancies have been created, atoms of a desired structure material are deposited on the surface of the substrate to enable the surface vacancies and the atoms of the structure material to interact. The interaction causes the atoms of the structure material to form the atomic-scale structures.

  7. Symposium Essay: The Energy-Land Use Nexus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Outka, Uma

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Symposium Essay explores the contours of the 'energy-land use nexus' – the rich set of interrelationships between land use and energy production and consumption. This underexplored nexus encapsulates barriers and ...

  8. Geothermal Power Plants — Minimizing Land Use and Impact

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    For energy production and development, geothermal power plants don't use much land compared to coal and nuclear power plants. And the environmental impact upon the land they use is minimal.

  9. Natural Streambed and Land Preservation Act of 1975 (Montana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Natural Streambed and Land Preservation Act of 1975 aims to prevent the environmental degradation of streams and land resources, and to provide reasonable remedies for the depletion of these...

  10. Chapter 10. Land Application of Biosolids Gregory K. Evanylo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaye, Jason P.

    Chapter 10. Land Application of Biosolids Gregory K. Evanylo Department of Crop and Soil..................................................................................................................... 228 What are biosolids and how are they different from sewage sludge?......................... 228 Benefits of land application of biosolids

  11. Conditions and effectiveness of land use as a mobility tool

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Ming, 1963 Apr. 22-

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation examines the potential of land use as a mobility tool to affect travel, a subject of long and ongoing policy debate. Land use strategies such as densification, mixed-use development, and non-driving-oriented ...

  12. Florida Environmental Land and Water Management Act (Florida)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The State Land Planning Agency, established within the Department of Economic Opportunity, has the authority to oversee land planning, zoning, and development activities in the state. The Agency is...

  13. Green Lands Blue Water 2014 Fall Conference | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Green Lands Blue Water 2014 Fall Conference Green Lands Blue Water 2014 Fall Conference November 18, 2014 10:00AM CST to November 20, 2014 4:00PM CST Richland Community College...

  14. CULTURAL RESOURCES SERVICES CENTER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT OF MILITARY LANDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CULTURAL RESOURCES SERVICES CENTER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT OF MILITARY LANDS CEMML | 1490) provides assistance to military land managers for technical support in cultural resources management planning and compliance. The goal is to ensure that these diverse, nonrenewable resources are adequately

  15. RADBOUDUNIVERSITY NIJMEGEN, THE NETHERLANDS ICT for Ethiopia's land

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lucas, Peter

    RADBOUDUNIVERSITY NIJMEGEN, THE NETHERLANDS ICT for Ethiopia's land administration Bachelor Thesis Information Science Sander van Hooft 7/15/2009 Supervisor: Luca Consoli, Phd. #12;ICT for Ethiopia........................................................................................... 5 4.1 Ethiopia's history of land administration

  16. BRITISH COLUMBIA LAND USE PLANNING: BACKCOUNTRY TOURISM PERSPECTIVES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BRITISH COLUMBIA LAND USE PLANNING: BACKCOUNTRY TOURISM PERSPECTIVES by Rebekah Edwards-Craig B of Research Project: British Columbia Land Use Planning: Backcountry Tourism Perspectives Supervisory, including the backcountry tourism and outdoor recreation sectors, at a disadvantage in such planning

  17. CARBON SEQUESTRATION THROUGH CHANGES IN LAND USE IN OREGON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION CARBON SEQUESTRATION THROUGH CHANGES IN LAND USE IN OREGON: COSTS, and J. Kadyszewski (Winrock International). 2007. Carbon Sequestration Through Changes in Land Use Curves, and Pilot Actions for Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration in Oregon. Report to Winrock

  18. Materializing interaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coelho, Marcelo

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At the boundary between people, objects and spaces, we encounter a broad range of surfaces. Their properties perform functional roles such as permeability, comfort or illumination, while conveying information such as an ...

  19. Onset of surface superconductivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giamarchi, T.; Beal-Monod, M.T. (Laboratoire de Physique des Solides, Universite Paris-Sud 91405 Orsay, (France)); Valls, O.T. (Laboratoire de Physique des Solides, Universite Paris-Sud, 91405 Orsay, (France) Center for the Science and Application of Superconductivity, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455 (USA))

    1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We examine the onset of superconductivity in the surface region of a metal. Surface effects are particularly important in systems with a short bulk coherence length {xi}{sub 0}. We show that, to the accuracy of the calculation, the surface transition temperature {ital T}{sub {ital c}{ital S}} equals the bulk transition temperature {ital T}{sub {ital c}{ital B}} if the electron-electron interaction is of the standard BCS form, i.e., a single attractive square well, extending up to some critical energy {omega}{sub 0} much smaller than the Fermi energy {var epsilon}{sub {ital F}}. If one takes into account, in addition, the repulsive part of the interaction extending beyond {omega}{sub 0} up to energies of order {var epsilon}{sub {ital F}}, then one may have {ital T}{sub {ital c}{ital S}}{gt}{ital T}{sub {ital c}{ital B}} in certain cases, although, due to restrictions imposed on the parameter values by various physical conditions, the relative increase of {ital T}{sub {ital c}} is very small, typically 10{sup {minus}3}, at least in the weak coupling limit. However, we also find a considerable gap enhancement, of order 20%, near the surface which could be of interest for critical-current measurements. Therefore we suggest an experimental reexamination of systems with short {xi}{sub 0}, i.e., superconducting degenerate semiconductors and the new high-{ital T}{sub {ital c}} oxides in confined geometries where the surface-to-volume ratio is non-negligible.

  20. An appraisal of the Texas veterans' land program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dorries, W. L.

    1955-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , and Mr. L. C. Jackson, Executive Secretary of the Veterans' Land Board, who made the Land Board records available for this study. Credit also belongs to the many veterans who gave information concerning their land purchases. Finally, the writer 'V... is indebted to his wife, Virginia Dorries^ for reading the disserta- tion and offering valuable suggestions. m CONTENTS I. Introduction and historical background--------------------- - 1 II. Provisions for a Veterans* Land Board purchase--------------- 1...

  1. E-Print Network 3.0 - aeroengines surface damage Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    . Crouch, "Interaction Between a Crack and an Inhomogeneity with Surface Elasticity and Surface Tension... ," Biophysical Journal, Vol. 95, 2008, 3956- 3963. 63. H. Kahn, A....

  2. Methods and apparatuses for preparing a surface to have catalytic activity

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cooks, Robert G. (West Lafayette, IN); Peng, Wen-Ping (West Lafayette, IN); Ouyang, Zheng (West Lafayette, IN); Goodwin, Michael P. (West Lafayette, IN)

    2011-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention provides methods and apparatuses that utilize mass spectrometry for preparation of a surface to have catalytic activity through molecular soft-landing of mass selected ions. Mass spectrometry is used to generate combinations of atoms in a particular geometrical arrangement, and ion soft-landing selects this molecular entity or combination of entities and gently deposits the entity or combination intact onto a surface.

  3. Late Quaternary history of Washington Land, North Greenland OLE BENNIKE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ingólfsson, Ólafur

    Late Quaternary history of Washington Land, North Greenland OLE BENNIKE Bennike, O. 2002 (September): Late Quaternary history of Washington Land, North Greenland. Boreas, Vol. 31, 260­272. Oslo. ISSN 0300-9483. During the last glacial stage, Washington Land in western North Greenland was probably completely inun

  4. Land Acquisition Prepared by: Ben Floyd, Economic & Engineering Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Land Acquisition Prepared by: Ben Floyd, Economic & Engineering Services May 2004 Introduction Land taxpayer pockets"), and require no specific economic return to justify the expenditure. · There is also a general perception that long-term negative economic impacts may result if additional lands are taken out

  5. MSU Departmental Assessment Plan Department: Land Resources and Environmental Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    MSU Departmental Assessment Plan 2007-2009 Department: Land Resources and Environmental Sciences (cross-college) #12;Student Outcomes Assessment Plan Land Resources and Environmental Sciences Department The Department of Land Resources and Environmental Sciences (LRES) will undertake a continuing assessment

  6. Measuring the poverty reduction potential of land in rural Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sadoulet, Elisabeth

    Measuring the poverty reduction potential of land in rural Mexico Frederico Finan, Elisabeth debate on the role of land as an instrument for poverty reduction, we analyze the conditions under which access to land reduces poverty in Mexican rural communities. Semi-parametric regression results show

  7. PETROLEUM LAND MANAGEMENT (PLMA) Bachelor of Commerce Degree

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Habib, Ayman

    PETROLEUM LAND MANAGEMENT (PLMA) Bachelor of Commerce Degree The Haskayne School of Business offers a Bachelor of commerce degree with a concentration in Petroleum Land Management that prepares graduates average, and other documentation. Two third-year courses, PLMA 475 (Introduction to Petroleum Land

  8. Sharpening the Focus of Yolo County Land Use Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferrara, Katherine W.

    Sharpening the Focus of Yolo County Land Use Policy Kurt R. Richter University of California Agricultural Issues Center October 2009 #12;Sharpening the Focus of Yolo County Land Use Policy II University of California Agricultural Issues Center #12;Sharpening the Focus of Yolo County Land Use Policy III Making

  9. Scenarios of Future Socio-Economics, Energy, Land Use, and Radiative Forcing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eom, Jiyong; Moss, Richard H.; Edmonds, James A.; Calvin, Katherine V.; Clarke, Leon E.; Dooley, James J.; Kim, Son H.; Kopp, Roberrt; Kyle, G. Page; Luckow, Patrick W.; Patel, Pralit L.; Thomson, Allison M.; Wise, Marshall A.; Zhou, Yuyu

    2013-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    This chapter explores uncertainty in future scenarios of energy, land use, emissions and radiative forcing that span the range in the literature for radiative forcing, but also consider uncertainty in two other dimensions, challenges to mitigation and challenges to adaptation. We develop a set of six scenarios that we explore in detail including the underlying the context in which they are set, assumptions that drive the scenarios, the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM), used to produce quantified implications for those assumptions, and results for the global energy and land-use systems as well as emissions, concentrations and radiative forcing. We also describe the history of scenario development and the present state of development of this branch of climate change research. We discuss the implications of alternative social, economic, demographic, and technology development possibilities, as well as potential stabilization regimes for the supply of and demand for energy, the choice of energy technologies, and prices of energy and agricultural commodities. Land use and land cover will also be discussed with the emphasis on the interaction between the demand for bioenergy and crops, crop yields, crop prices, and policy settings to limit greenhouse gas emissions.

  10. ENHANCEMENT OF TERRESTRIAL CARBON SINKS THROUGH RECLAMATION OF ABANDONED MINE LANDS IN THE APPALACHIAN REGION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary D. Kronrad

    2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S.D.I. Office of Surface Mining (OSM) estimates that there are approximately 1 million acres of abandoned mine land (AML) in the Appalachian region. AML lands are classified as areas that were inadequately reclaimed or were left unreclaimed prior to the passage of the 1977 Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act, and where no federal or state laws require any further reclamation responsibility to any company or individual. Reclamation and afforestation of these sites have the potential to provide landowners with cyclical timber revenues, generate environmental benefits to surrounding communities, and sequester carbon in the terrestrial ecosystem. Through a memorandum of understanding, the OSM and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) have decided to investigate reclaiming and afforesting these lands for the purpose of mitigating the negative effects of anthropogenic carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. This study determined the carbon sequestration potential of northern red oak (Quercus rubra L.), one of the major reclamation as well as commercial species, planted on West Virginia AML sites. Analyses were conducted to (1) calculate the total number of tons that can be stored, (2) determine the cost per ton to store carbon, and (3) calculate the profitability of managing these forests for timber production alone and for timber production and carbon storage together. The Forest Management Optimizer (FORMOP) was used to simulate growth data on diameter, height, and volume for northern red oak. Variables used in this study included site indices ranging from 40 to 80 (base age 50), thinning frequencies of 0, 1, and 2, thinning percentages of 20, 25, 30, 35, and 40, and a maximum rotation length of 100 years. Real alternative rates of return (ARR) ranging from 0.5% to 12.5% were chosen for the economic analyses. A total of 769,248 thinning and harvesting combinations, net present worths, and soil expectation values were calculated in this study. Results indicate that the cost per ton to sequester carbon ranges from $6.54 on site index 80 land at a 12.5% ARR to $36.68 on site index 40 land at an ARR of 0.5%. Results also indicate that the amount of carbon stored during one rotation ranges between 38 tons per acre on site index 40 land to 58 tons per acre on site index 80 land. The profitability of afforestation on these AML sites in West Virginia increases as the market price for carbon increases from $0 to $100 per ton.

  11. Impacts of Land-use Changes on Biofuels ORNL History of Exploring Changes in Land Use in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Impacts of Land-use Changes on Biofuels ORNL History of Exploring Changes in Land Use in the United. Building from their work on environmental costs and benefits associated with biofuel production, ORNL positively impact the sustainability of the biofuels industry. Building understanding of land-use change from

  12. Rutgers Cooperative Extension graduated 27 New Jersey landscapers and land care providers from their first Organic Land Care Certification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goodman, Robert M.

    the waste recycling process that naturally occurs in a forest or grassland. "In the case of organic land-day program where they learned new skills related to sustainable, environ- mentally-friendly land care practices that im- prove soil health, pro- mote biodiversity, and reduce negative im- pacts on home land

  13. NE Oregon Wildlife Project "Precious Lands"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NE Oregon Wildlife Project "Precious Lands" Managed by The Nez Perce Tribe Angela C. Sondenaa, Ph Oct 1996 Helm 10,306 $2,660,674.00 Sept 1998 Graham Tree farm 158 $402,453.00 Aug 1999 Beach Ranch 1 of shrub sub-canopy Project Goals: 40-70% tree canopy cover 35-65% shrub canopy cover > 3.5 snags 6-10" dbh

  14. Bureau of Land Management- Campground, Utah

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) has remote field stations in Arizona, California, Utah, Idaho, and Alaska. This photograph shows the field station at Red Cliffs Campground in Utah's Cedar City District. Photovoltaic power systems allow the people working in these remote areas to have the convenience of continuous power. "The comfort and convenience of having 24-hour continuous power has been greatly appreciated by the users," said Trent Duncan of BLM, the mechanical engineer for the project.

  15. Tropical Africa: Land Use, Biomass, and Carbon Estimates for 1980 (NDP-055)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, S.

    2002-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes the contents of a digital database containing maximum potential aboveground biomass, land use, and estimated biomass and carbon data for 1980. The biomass data and carbon estimates are associated with woody vegetation in Tropical Africa. These data were collected to reduce the uncertainty associated with estimating historical releases of carbon from land use change. Tropical Africa is defined here as encompassing 22.7 x 10{sup 6} km{sup 2} of the earth's land surface and is comprised of countries that are located in tropical Africa (Angola, Botswana, Burundi, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, Congo, Benin, Equatorial Guinea, Ethiopia, Djibouti, Gabon, Gambia, Ghana, Guinea, Ivory Coast, Kenya, Liberia, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Mozambique, Namibia, Niger, Nigeria, Guinea-Bissau, Zimbabwe (Rhodesia), Rwanda, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Somalia, Sudan, Tanzania, Togo, Uganda, Burkina Faso (Upper Volta), Zaire, and Zambia). The database was developed using the GRID module in the ARC/INFO{trademark} geographic information system. Source data were obtained from the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), the U.S. National Geophysical Data Center, and a limited number of biomass-carbon density case studies. These data were used to derive the maximum potential and actual (ca. 1980) aboveground biomass values at regional and country levels. The land-use data provided were derived from a vegetation map originally produced for the FAO by the International Institute of Vegetation Mapping, Toulouse, France.

  16. An international land-biosphere model benchmarking activity for the IPCC Fifth Assessment Report (AR5)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoffman, Forrest M [ORNL; Randerson, James T [ORNL; Thornton, Peter E [ORNL; Bonan, Gordon [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR); Erickson III, David J [ORNL; Fung, Inez [University of California, Berkeley

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The need to capture important climate feedbacks in general circulation models (GCMs) has resulted in efforts to include atmospheric chemistry and land and ocean biogeochemistry into the next generation of production climate models, called Earth System Models (ESMs). While many terrestrial and ocean carbon models have been coupled to GCMs, recent work has shown that such models can yield a wide range of results (Friedlingstein et al., 2006). This work suggests that a more rigorous set of global offline and partially coupled experiments, along with detailed analyses of processes and comparisons with measurements, are needed. The Carbon-Land Model Intercomparison Project (C-LAMP) was designed to meet this need by providing a simulation protocol and model performance metrics based upon comparisons against best-available satellite- and ground-based measurements (Hoffman et al., 2007). Recently, a similar effort in Europe, called the International Land Model Benchmark (ILAMB) Project, was begun to assess the performance of European land surface models. These two projects will now serve as prototypes for a proposed international land-biosphere model benchmarking activity for those models participating in the IPCC Fifth Assessment Report (AR5). Initially used for model validation for terrestrial biogeochemistry models in the NCAR Community Land Model (CLM), C-LAMP incorporates a simulation protocol for both offline and partially coupled simulations using a prescribed historical trajectory of atmospheric CO2 concentrations. Models are confronted with data through comparisons against AmeriFlux site measurements, MODIS satellite observations, NOAA Globalview flask records, TRANSCOM inversions, and Free Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) site measurements. Both sets of experiments have been performed using two different terrestrial biogeochemistry modules coupled to the CLM version 3 in the Community Climate System Model version 3 (CCSM3): the CASA model of Fung, et al., and the carbon-nitrogen (CN) model of Thornton. Comparisons of the CLM3 offline results against observational datasets have been performed and are described in Randerson et al. (2009). CLM version 4 has been evaluated using C-LAMP, showing improvement in many of the metrics. Efforts are now underway to initiate a Nitrogen-Land Model Intercomparison Project (N-LAMP) to better constrain the effects of the nitrogen cycle in biosphere models. Presented will be new results from C-LAMP for CLM4, initial N-LAMP developments, and the proposed land-biosphere model benchmarking activity.

  17. Symmetry Energy in Nuclear Surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pawel Danielewicz; Jenny Lee

    2008-12-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Interplay between the dependence of symmetry energy on density and the variation of nucleonic densities across nuclear surface is discussed. That interplay gives rise to the mass dependence of the symmetry coefficient in an energy formula. Charge symmetry of the nuclear interactions allows to introduce isoscalar and isovector densities that are approximately independent of the magnitude of neutron-proton asymmetry.

  18. Symmetry Energy in Nuclear Surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Danielewicz, Pawel

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Interplay between the dependence of symmetry energy on density and the variation of nucleonic densities across nuclear surface is discussed. The interplay leads to a dependence of the symmetry coefficient, in energy formula, on nuclear mass. Charge symmetry of nuclear interactions allows to introduce isoscalar and isovector densities that are approximately independent of neutron-proton asymmetry.

  19. AiR surface: AiR surface 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tanaka, Jiro

    AiR surface: 1 PDA AiR surface 1 1: AiR surface () () 2 [1] [2] 3 AiR surface AiR surface surface surface surface 3.1 surface [3]( 3 ) surface 3.2 surface surface AiR surface 4 AiR surface surface AiR surface: Virtual Touch Panel

  20. Watershed response and land energy feedbacks under climate change depend upon groundwater.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maxwell, R M; Kollet, S J

    2008-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Human induced climate change will have a significant impact on the hydrologic cycle, creating changes in fresh water resources, land cover, and feedbacks that are difficult to characterize, which makes it an issue of global importance. Previous studies have not included subsurface storage in climate change simulations and feedbacks. A variably-saturated groundwater flow model with integrated overland flow and land surface model processes is used to examine the interplay between coupled water and energy processes under climate change conditions. A case study from the Southern Great Plains (SGP) USA, an important agricultural region that is susceptible to drought, is used as the basis for three scenarios simulations using a modified atmospheric forcing dataset to reflect predicted effects due to human-induced climate change. These scenarios include an increase in the atmospheric temperature and variations in rainfall amount and are compared to the present-day climate case. Changes in shallow soil saturation and groundwater levels are quantified as well as the corresponding energy fluxes at the land surface. Here we show that groundwater and subsurface lateral flow processes are critical in understanding hydrologic response and energy feedbacks to climate change and that certain regions are more susceptible to changes in temperature, while others to changes in precipitation. This groundwater control is critical for understanding recharge and drought processes, possible under future climate conditions.

  1. Water and Energy Interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McMahon, James E.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DOE). 2008. Fossil Energy: Coal Mining and Transportation.aspects of generating energy from coal. Land reclamation andthat required for producing energy from coal. Traditionally,

  2. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR THE PROPOSED WITHDRAWAL OF PUBLIC LANDS WITHIN AND SURROUNDING THE CALIENTE RAIL CORRIDOR, NEVADA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DOE

    2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose for agency action is to preclude surface entry and the location of new mining claims, subject to valid existing rights, within and surrounding the Caliente rail corridor as described in the Yucca Mountain FEIS (DOE 2002). This protective measure is needed to enhance the safe, efficient, and uninterrupted evaluation of land areas for potential rail alignments within the Caliente rail corridor. The evaluation will assist the DOE in determining, through the Rail Alignment environmental impact statement (EIS) process, whether to construct a branch rail line, and to provide support to the BLM in deciding whether or not to reserve a ROW for the rail line under the Federal Land Policy and Management Act (FLPMA). The BLM participated as a cooperating agency in preparing this EA because it is the responsible land manager and BLM staff could contribute resource specific expertise.

  3. Autonomous land navigation in a structured environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klarer, P.R. (Sandia National Lab., Advanced Technology Div., Albuquerque, NM (US))

    1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes a hardware and software system developed to perform autonomous navigation of a land vehicle in a structured environment. The vehicle used for development and testing of the system was the Jeep Cherokee Mobile Robotics Testbed Vehicle developed at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque. Since obstacle detection and avoidance have not yet been incorporated into the system, a structured environment is postulated that presumes the paths to be traversed are free of obstacles. The system performs path planning and execution based on maps constructed using the vehicle's on board navigation system and map-maker. The system software, hardware and performance data are discussed.

  4. Autonomous land navigation in a structured environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klarer, P.R.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes a hardware and software system developed to perform autonomous navigation of a land vehicle in a structured environment. The vehicle used for development and testing of the system was the Jeep Cherokee Mobile Robotics Testbed Vehicle developed at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque. Since obstacle detection and avoidance have not yet been incorporated into the system, a structured environment is postulated that presumes the paths to be traversed are free of obstacles. The system performs path planning and execution based on maps constructed using the vehicle's onboard navigation system and mapmaker. The system software, hardware, and performance data are discussed. 6 refs.

  5. Land Use License | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 - 429Lacey, Washington:Lakeville, MN) Jump to:LamarJump to:Lanco Solar Pvt LtdLand

  6. Land-Use Change Data Analysis

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeatMulti-Dimensionalthe10 DOEWashington,LM-04-XXXX OfficeLand and Facility Use Policy

  7. Land and Renewable Resources | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickrinformationPostdocs space Combined Routes12thnearPortalLand and

  8. Albeni Falls land acquisitions.indd

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAbout theOFFICE OF RESEARCH ANDCONTACTS GeorgeLand acquisitions benefi t

  9. AMAROK PIKAP: INTERACTIVE PERCUSSION PLAYING AUTOMOBILE*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yanikoglu, Berrin

    AMAROK PIKAP: INTERACTIVE PERCUSSION PLAYING AUTOMOBILE* Selçuk ARTUT Sabanci University Faculty project utilizes an interactive system on the surface of an automobile that is specially modified of an automobile campaign: Amarok Pikap. The structure that forms the design will also be subjected to a technical

  10. Cotton and Protein Interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goheen, Steven C.; Edwards, J. V.; Rayburn, Alfred R.; Gaither, Kari A.; Castro, Nathan J.

    2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The adsorbent properties of important wound fluid proteins and cotton cellulose are reviewed. This review focuses on the adsorption of albumin to cotton-based wound dressings and some chemically modified derivatives targeted for chronic wounds. Adsorption of elastase in the presence of albumin was examined as a model to understand the interactive properties of these wound fluid components with cotton fibers. In the chronic non-healing wound, elastase appears to be over-expressed, and it digests tissue and growth factors, interfering with the normal healing process. Albumin is the most prevalent protein in wound fluid, and in highly to moderately exudative wounds, it may bind significantly to the fibers of wound dressings. Thus, the relative binding properties of both elastase and albumin to wound dressing fibers are of interest in the design of more effective wound dressings. The present work examines the binding of albumin to two different derivatives of cotton, and quantifies the elastase binding to the same derivatives following exposure of albumin to the fiber surface. An HPLC adsorption technique was employed coupled with a colorimetric enzyme assay to quantify the relative binding properties of albumin and elastase to cotton. The results of wound protein binding are discussed in relation to the porosity and surface chemistry interactions of cotton and wound proteins. Studies are directed to understanding the implications of protein adsorption phenomena in terms of fiber-protein models that have implications for rationally designing dressings for chronic wounds.

  11. Experimental investigation of a thermionic converter with developed surface electrodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luke, J.R.; El-Genk, M.S.; Adrian, J.M. [Institute for Space and Nuclear Power Studies/Chemical and Nuclear Engineering Department University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico87131 (United States)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A thermionic converter with developed planar electrode surfaces is designed and tested. One of the electrodes has concentric circular grooves cut into its surface, while the other electrode surface is smooth. The grooves are 0.5 mm deep and 0.5 mm wide, having lands that are 1.0 mm wide. The experimental setup is flexible so that either the smooth or developed surface electrode can be operated as the emitter, with the other operating as the collector. The I-V characteristics and power output are compared for the two electrode arrangements. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  12. Experimental investigation of a thermionic converter with developed surface electrodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luke, James R.; El-Genk, Mohamed S.; Adrian, John M. [Institute for Space and Nuclear Power Studies/Chemical and Nuclear Engineering Department University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131 (United States)

    1997-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A thermionic converter with developed planar electrode surfaces is designed and tested. One of the electrodes has concentric circular grooves cut into its surface, while the other electrode surface is smooth. The grooves are 0.5 mm deep and 0.5 mm wide, having lands that are 1.0 mm wide. The experimental setup is flexible so that either the smooth or developed surface electrode can be operated as the emitter, with the other operating as the collector. The I-V characteristics and power output are compared for the two electrode arrangements.

  13. Interactive Jobs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickrinformation for and NovelFEG-SEM with0, FirstIntelligenceInteractive

  14. Land Use Change in theLand Use Change in the United States:United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    : Accommodating a Growing Biofuels Market Amelia French M.S. Candidate University of Tennessee, Knoxville. Turhollow, R.L.Graham, B.J. Stokes, and D.C. Erbach. 2005. Biomass as feedstock for a bioenergy/Demand of Biofuels? Traditional Crops Perennials Changing Markets Higher Market Values More Land Use #12

  15. OCEAN-ATMOSPHERE INTERACTION AND TROPICAL CLIMATE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, Shang-Ping

    radiation is the ultimate source of energy for motions in the atmosphere and ocean. Most absorption of solar radiation takes place on the Earth surface, the majority of which is occupied by oceans. Thus oceanic modulate surface radiative flux. Thus, the ocean and atmosphere are a coupled system and their interaction

  16. Application of Municipal Sewage Sludge to Forest and Degraded Land

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D.H. Marx, C. R. Berry, and P. P. Kormanik

    1995-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper summarizes research done over a decade at the Savannah River Site and elsewhere in the South evaluating the benefits of land application of municipal wastes. Studies have demonstrated that degraded lands, ranging from borrow pits to mine spoils can be successfully revegetated using a mixture of composed municipal sewage sludge and other amendments. The studies have demonstrated a practical approach to land application and restoration.

  17. Land Transport Sector in Bangladesh: An Analysis Toward Motivating...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Bangladesh: An Analysis Toward Motivating GHG Emission Reduction Strategies Jump to: navigation, search Name Land Transport Sector in Bangladesh: An Analysis Toward Motivating GHG...

  18. Coordination of Federal Transmission Permitting on Federal Lands...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    transmission facilities on federal lands. In most instances, the Departments of Agriculture or Interior will be the Lead Agency, since they have jurisdiction over most of the...

  19. Land Reclamation and the Resource Extraction Reclamation Act (Florida)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Environmental Protection's Mining Program is responsible for enacting and implementing regulations pertaining to land reclamation. The program primarily focuses on the reclamation...

  20. Sustainable Land Management Through Market-Oriented Commodity...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Market-Oriented Commodity Development: Case studies from Ethiopia Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Sustainable Land Management Through Market-Oriented...

  1. Energy Corridors on Federal Lands | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    of Federal Lands in States Identified by EPAct 2005 (August 2011) Related Links West-wide Energy Corridor Programmatic EIS Information Center East-wide Energy Corridor Programmatic...

  2. Bureau of Land Management - Notice of Intent to Conduct Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Conduct Geothermal Resource Exploration Operations Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Form: Bureau of Land Management - Notice of Intent to Conduct...

  3. Iowa Land Recycling and Environmental Remediation Standards Act (Iowa)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This chapter establishes remediation standards for land, other than standards for water quality, hazardous conditions, underground storage tanks, and groundwater protection, which are discussed in...

  4. Geothermal Direct-Use — Minimizing Land Use and Impact

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    With geothermal direct-use applications, land use issues usually only arise during exploration and development when geothermal reservoirs are located in or near urbanized areas, critical habitat...

  5. What's Happening in the Texas Farm and Ranch Land Market.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrews, F. B.; Wooten, A. B.

    1965-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the 1963 Texas land market activity is based on information JJ. obtained from 26 sample counties in 16 of the 17 type-of-farming area\\. In each sample county, specific data were obtained from warranty deed recortl\\ cri all bona fide sales containing 20... farm and ranch income has fluctuated. Results of the 196r land market study deviated from this pattern. Land prices continued to ~icr and volume of land sales increased, reversing its position from the trend of a constant decrease. Net farm and ranch...

  6. CALIFORNIA ENERGY EFFECT OF LAND USE CHOICES ON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Manager Natural Gas and Special Projects Office Rosella Shapiro Deputy Director Fuels and Transportation to Efficient Land Use Planning .................................................................. 2 Trends

  7. Land Acquisition protects fish habitat in Wahkiakum County -...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (BPA) is proposing to fund the Columbia Land Trust (CLT) through its contract with the Lower Columbia River Estuary Partnership (LCREP) to acquire 305 acres of hillside forest,...

  8. Reclamation of Land Used for Mineral Mining (Virginia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This legislation aims to provide for the rehabilitation and conservation of land affected by the mining of minerals through proper planning, proper use of appropriate methods of mining,...

  9. Hawaii Department of Land and Natural Resources Commission on...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hawaii Department of Land and Natural Resources Commission on Water Resource Management Address: Kalanimoku Building 1151 Punchbowl Street Room 227 Place: Honolulu, Hawaii Zip:...

  10. Bureau of Land Management, Colorado collaborate to advance efficient...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Colorado collaborate to advance efficient geothermal development Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Memorandum: Bureau of Land Management, Colorado...

  11. Hawaii Department of Land and Natural Resources Division of Forestry...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Name: Hawaii Department of Land and Natural Resources Division of Forestry and Wildlife Address: Kalanimoku Building 1151 Punchbowl St., Room 325 Place: Honolulu, Hawaii Zip:...

  12. Precision Measurement of Neutrino Oscillation Parameters with KamLAND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ODonnell, Thomas Michael

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    default and new reactor-spectra calculations are given inusing the default reactor-spectrum calculation presented incores for reactor neutrino flux calculations for the KamLAND

  13. Precision Measurement of Neutrino Oscillation Parameters with KamLAND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Donnell, Thomas

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    default and new reactor-spectra calculations are given inusing the default reactor-spectrum calculation presented incores for reactor neutrino flux calculations for the KamLAND

  14. The Role of Interactions and Mergers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Combes

    1998-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Galaxy evolution depends strongly on the environment. Dynamical interactions and subsequent evolution make galaxies more concentrated, with higher surface densities, and also trigger star-formation, which consumes the available cold gas. Already at z=0, a large variety of galaxy types are observed, with different evolution stages, from the unevolved gas rich dwarf irregulars, or low surface brightness galaxies, to early-type concentrated galaxies, with no remaining gas. The dynamical processes of galaxy interactions, including internal evolution, are reviewed and evidence is shown of much larger interaction/merging rate at high redshift.

  15. Residential agents and land use change modelling 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fontaine, Corentin M.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Urbanisation is driven by the complex interactions of many physical and human factors where human actions and decisions, individually and collectively, ultimately shape the patterns of urban landscapes. Agentbased modelling ...

  16. Changes in Cloud Cover and Cloud Types Over the Ocean from Surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hochberg, Michael

    atmosphere) #12;Clouds, Radiation, and SST Low Clouds - Cool the ocean surface High Clouds - WarmingChanges in Cloud Cover and Cloud Types Over the Ocean from Surface Observations, 1954-2008 Ryan Eastman Stephen G. Warren Carole J. Hahn #12;Clouds Over the Ocean The ocean is cloudy, more-so than land

  17. Regulations for Land Disturbing Activities (North Carolina)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The law requires installation and maintenance of sufficient erosion control practices to retain sediment within the boundaries of the site. It also requires that surfaces be non-erosive and stable...

  18. Autonomous land navigation: A demonstration of retrotraverse

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klarer, P.R.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes a hardware and software system developed to perform autonomous navigation of a land vehicle in a structured environment. The vehicle used for development and testing of the system was the Jeep Cherokee Mobile Robotics Testbed Vehicle developed at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque. Since obstacle detection/avoidance has not yet been incorporated into the system, a structured environment is postulated that presumes the paths to be traversed are obstacle-free. The system performs path planning and execution (following) based on maps constructed using the vehicle's navigation system and onboard map-maker. The system configuration allows a map to be generated and stored during teleoperation of the vehicle, which may then be inverted and autonomously followed to perform ''retrotraverse'' back to the path start point. The system software, hardware, and performance data are discussed. 9 refs.

  19. Status of corrective measures technology for shallow land burial at arid sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abeele, W.V.; Nyhan, J.W.; Drennon, B.J.; Lopez, E.A.; Herrera, W.J.; Langhorst, G.J.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The field research program involving corrective measure technologies for arid shallow land burial sites is described. Soil erosion and infiltration of water into a simulated trench cap with various surface treatments was measured and compared with similar data from agricultural systems across the United States. Report of field testing of biointrusion barriers continues at a closed-out waste disposal site at Los Alamos. Final results of an experiment designed to determine the effects of subsidence on the performance of a cobble-gravel biobarrier system are reported, as well as the results of hydrologic modeling activities involving biobarrier systems. 11 refs., 10 figs.

  20. Global Soil Change: Land Use, Soil and Water SWS4231C, SWS5234

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    of the soil system to withstand global-scale perturbations (e.g., climate or land use change, spread Properties 4. Land Use Change Impacts on Soils 5. Land Use and Agriculture (Irrigation and Fertilization In Soil) 6. Land Use and Soil Erosion 7. Climate Change Impacts on Soils 8. Land Use-Climate

  1. Land application uses for dry flue gas desulfurization by-products: Phase 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dick, W.; Bigham, J.; Forster, R.; Hitzhusen, F.; Lal, R.; Stehouwer, R.; Traina, S.; Wolfe, W.; Haefner, R.; Rowe, G.

    1999-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    New flue gas desulfurization (FGD) scrubbing technologies create a dry, solid by-product material consisting of excess sorbent, reaction product that contains sulfate and sulfite, and coal fly ash. Generally, dry FGD by-products are treated as solid wastes and disposed in landfills. However, landfill sites are becoming scarce and tipping fees are constantly increasing. Provided the environmental impacts are socially and scientifically acceptable, beneficial uses via recycling can provide economic benefits to both the producer and the end user of the FGD. A study titled ''Land Application Uses for Dry Flue Gas Desulfurization By-Products'' was initiated in December, 1990 to develop and demonstrate large volume, beneficial uses of FGD by-products. Phase 1 and Phase 2 reports have been published by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), Palo Alto, CA. Phase 3 objectives were to demonstrate, using field studies, the beneficial uses of FGD by-products (1) as an amendment material on agricultural lands and on abandoned surface coal mine land, (2) as an engineering material for soil stabilization and raid repair, and (3) to assess the environmental and economic impacts of such beneficial uses. Application of dry FGD by-product to three soils in place of agricultural limestone increased alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) and corn (Zea may L.) yields. No detrimental effects on soil and plant quality were observed.

  2. The Impact of Biofuel Mandates on Land Use Suhail Ahmad

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Impact of Biofuel Mandates on Land Use by Suhail Ahmad B.E., Avionics Engineering National, Technology and Policy Program #12;#12;3 The Impact of Biofuel Mandates on Land Use by Suhail Ahmad Submitted of Master of Science in Technology and Policy ABSTRACT The use of biofuels in domestic transportation sector

  3. Land Use and natUraL resoUrces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    ............................................................................................9 Cultural Resource Management: CEQA, NEPA and Section 106 and Natural Resources Department UC Davis Extension #12;3 COnTEnTs Land Use PLanning Community InvolvementLand Use and natUraL resoUrces spring 2014 new Courses: Tribal Water Law and Policy Effective

  4. Assessment of Biomass Resources from Marginal Lands in APEC Economies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milbrandt, A.; Overend, R. P.

    2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this study is to examine the marginal lands in Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) economies and evaluate their biomass productivity potential. Twelve categories of marginal lands are identified using the Global Agro-Ecological Zones system of the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization.

  5. Analysis of Land Suitable for Algae State of Hawaii

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Analysis of Land Suitable for Algae Production State of Hawaii Prepared for the U.S. Department agency thereof. #12;Analysis of Land Suitable for Algae Production State of Hawaii Prepared by Mele University of Hawaii at Manoa August 2011 #12;i Executive Summary Algae are considered to be a viable crop

  6. FERTILISER APPLICATION IN LAND REGENERATION BPG NOTE 7

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and are covered in BPG Note 6: Application of sewage sludges and composts. When to apply fertiliser MineralFERTILISER APPLICATION IN LAND REGENERATION BPG NOTE 7 Best Practice Guidance for Land Regeneration to solve any mineral deficiencies that may arise later. The best way to decide whether further applications

  7. Hawaii Bioenergy Master Plan Land and Water Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hawaii Bioenergy Master Plan Land and Water Resources Submitted to Hawaii Natural Energy Institute, SLH 2007, Part III, "The primary objective of the bioenergy master plan shall be to develop a Hawaii of any bioenergy crops in Hawaii is the availability of the land and water necessary to produce

  8. Bioenergy and land-use competition in Northeast Brazil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bioenergy and land-use competition in Northeast Brazil Christian Azar Department of Physical policies are warranted if use of degraded lands for bioenergy plantations is desired. 1. Introduction There are two main categories of bioenergy: residues and dedicated plantations. In this paper, we exclusively

  9. Climate change and land use in Florida: Interdependencies and opportunities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    Climate change and land use in Florida: Interdependencies and opportunities Stephen Mulkey, Ph June 2007 Revised 30 September 2007 #12;Climate change and land use ­ Report to the Century Commission - S. Mulkey, June 2007 2 Executive summary Over this century anthropogenic climate change will present

  10. Global Ice and Land Climate Studies Using Scatterometer Image Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, David G.

    1 Global Ice and Land Climate Studies Using Scatterometer Image Data David G. Long Brigham Young CA 91109 ben@pacific.jpl.nasa.gov Sasan.Saatchi@jpl.nasa.gov Cheryl Bertoia U. S. National Ice Center: Long, D. G., M. R. Drinkwater, B. Holt, S. Saatchi, and C. Bertoia, Global ice and land climate studies

  11. In this issue: New Tax Incentives for Land in Conservation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    In this issue: · New Tax Incentives for Land in Conservation · Florida's Outstanding Tree Farmers Quantifies Economic Impact of Private, Working Forests · New Longleaf Book for Landowners and Foresters · Get Landowners and Resource Professionals Volume 16, No. 4 Spring 2010 New Tax Incentives for Land

  12. National Forest Land Scheme case study Broadford and Strath Community

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    National Forest Land Scheme case study Broadford and Strath Community Company: Broadford Wood.forestry.gov.uk/nfls1National Forest Land Scheme case study #12;BSCC has almost 200 members: voting membership is open covers the IV42 and IV49 post codes: about 240km2 . Much of the area comprises moorland and hills

  13. National Forest Land Scheme case study Kilfinan Community Forest Company

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ;The hill grazing land that became Acharossan Forest was acquired by the Forestry Commission in 1963National Forest Land Scheme case study Kilfinan Community Forest Company: Acharossan Forest The applicant Kilfinan Community Forest Company (KCFC) is a charitable company limited by guarantee established

  14. Geospatial Analysis of Renewable Energy Technical Potential on Tribal Lands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doris, E.; Lopez, A.; Beckley, D.

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This technical report uses an established geospatial methodology to estimate the technical potential for renewable energy on tribal lands for the purpose of allowing Tribes to prioritize the development of renewable energy resources either for community scale on-tribal land use or for revenue generating electricity sales.

  15. Simulating Sustainability: Conjunctive Land and Water Management in the Upper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fay, Noah

    Simulating Sustainability: Conjunctive Land and Water Management in the Upper Santa Cruz River Water Issue: Introduction and Context This research project addresses a chronic water management issue in Arizona: management and allocation of water supplies in areas undergoing rapid growth and land use changes

  16. Land Use and natUraL resoUrces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    Land Use and natUraL resoUrces summer 2012 Including: Climate Change and Local Planning Strategies Overview of Environmental Statistics Green Building Design Studio CONTINuING AND PrOFessIONAL eDuCATION #12Ndar........................................................................................................................4 laNd USe plaNNiNg Climate Change and Local Planning Strategies

  17. MSU Departmental Assessment Plan Department: Land Resources and Environmental Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    MSU Departmental Assessment Plan 2009-2010 Department: Land Resources and Environmental Sciences: Ecology and Environmental Sciences (cross-college) #12;Student Outcomes Assessment Plan Land Resources Department Head: Tracy M. Sterling Assessment Coordinator: Cathy Zabinski Degrees/Majors/Options Offered

  18. LAND USE CHANGE IN BRAZIL: INTEGRATING ECOLOGY, ECONOMICS AND POLICY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for smaller farmers to buy land and increased the incentives for migrating to the frontier generating a race attracted migrants from others regions, searching for agricultural land ; It remains a frontier region the financial support to wait the advance of frontier to eventually begin any activity; #12;Also

  19. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Surface Water Protection: A Watershed Approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coty, J

    2009-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This surface water protection plan (plan) provides an overview of the management efforts implemented at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) that support a watershed approach to protect surface water. This plan fulfills a requirement in the Department of Energy (DOE) Order 450.1A to demonstrate a watershed approach for surface water protection that protects the environment and public health. This plan describes the use of a watershed approach within which the Laboratory's current surface water management and protections efforts have been structured and coordinated. With more than 800 million acres of land in the U.S. under federal management and stewardship, a unified approach across agencies provides enhanced resource protection and cost-effectiveness. The DOE adopted, along with other federal agencies, the Unified Federal Policy for a Watershed Approach to Federal Land and Resource Management (UFP) with a goal to protect water quality and aquatic ecosystems on federal lands. This policy intends to prevent and/or reduce water pollution from federal activities while fostering a cost-effective watershed approach to federal land and resource management. The UFP also intends to enhance the implementation of existing laws (e.g., the Clean Water Act [CWA] and National Environmental Policy Act [NEPA]) and regulations. In addition, this provides an opportunity for the federal government to serve as a model for water quality stewardship using a watershed approach for federal land and resource activities that potentially impact surface water and its uses. As a federal land manager, the Laboratory is responsible for a small but important part of those 800 million acres of land. Diverse land uses are required to support the Laboratory's mission and provide an appropriate work environment for its staff. The Laboratory comprises two sites: its main site in Livermore, California, and the Experimental Test Site (Site 300), near Tracy, California. The main site is largely developed yet its surface water system encompasses two arroyos, an engineered detention basin (Lake Haussmann), storm channels, and wetlands. Conversely, the more rural Site 300 includes approximately 7,000 acres of largely undeveloped land with many natural tributaries, riparian habitats, and wetland areas. These wetlands include vernal pools, perennial seeps, and emergent wetlands. The watersheds within which the Laboratory's sites lie provide local and community ecological functions and services which require protection. These functions and services include water supply, flood attenuation, groundwater recharge, water quality improvement, wildlife and aquatic habitats, erosion control, and (downstream) recreational opportunities. The Laboratory employs a watershed approach to protect these surface water systems. The intent of this approach, presented in this document, is to provide an integrated effort to eliminate or minimize any adverse environmental impacts of the Laboratory's operations and enhance the attributes of these surface water systems, as possible and when reasonable, to protect their value to the community and watershed. The Laboratory's watershed approach to surface water protection will use the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Watershed Framework and guiding principles of geographic focus, scientifically based management and partnerships1 as a foundation. While the Laboratory's unique site characteristics result in objectives and priorities that may differ from other industrial sites, these underlying guiding principles provide a structure for surface water protection to ensure the Laboratory's role in environmental stewardship and as a community partner in watershed protection. The approach includes pollution prevention, continual environmental improvement, and supporting, as possible, community objectives (e.g., protection of the San Francisco Bay watershed).

  20. Idaho National Laboratory Comprehensive Land Use and Environmental Stewardship Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    No name listed on publication

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Land and facility use planning and decisions at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Site are guided by a comprehensive site planning process in accordance with Department of Energy Policy 430.1, 'Land and Facility Use Policy,' that integrates mission, economic, ecologic, social, and cultural factors. The INL Ten-Year Site Plan, prepared in accordance with Department of Energy Order 430.1B, 'Real Property Asset Management,' outlines the vision and strategy to transform INL to deliver world-leading capabilities that will enable the Department of Energy to accomplish its mission. Land use planning is the overarching function within real property asset management that integrates the other functions of acquisition, recapitalization, maintenance, disposition, real property utilization, and long-term stewardship into a coordinated effort to ensure current and future mission needs are met. All land and facility use projects planned at the INL Site are considered through a formal planning process that supports the Ten-Year Site Plan. This Comprehensive Land Use and Environmental Stewardship Report describes that process. The land use planning process identifies the current condition of existing land and facility assets and the scope of constraints across INL and in the surrounding region. Current land use conditions are included in the Comprehensive Land Use and Environmental Stewardship Report and facility assets and scope of constraints are discussed in the Ten-Year Site Plan. This report also presents the past, present, and future uses of land at the INL Site that are considered during the planning process, as well as outlining the future of the INL Site for the 10, 30, and 100-year timeframes.

  1. Mapping the Potential for Biofuel Production on Marginal Lands: Differences in Definitions, Data and Models across Scales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewis, Sarah M

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    land for plantation of Jatropha curcas as feedstocks forMarginal chinensis, 3. Jatropha grow energy plants, or landand economic constraints Jatropha curcas Marginal land ?land

  2. Mapping the Potential for Biofuel Production on Marginal Lands: Differences in Definitions, Data and Models across Scales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewis, Sarah M

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    D. Land availability for biofuel production. Environ. Sci.of land available for biofuel production. Environ. Sci.so marginal land for biofuel crops is limited. Energy Policy

  3. Understanding the drivers affecting land use change in Ecuador: an application of the Land Change Modeler software 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krishna Rajan, Dhruva

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in forest cover, satellite images (years 1996 and 2001) were used to produce land cover maps which were then used with the software to estimate probabilities of pixels changing from forests to other land use types. Various drivers of deforestation input...

  4. Coal surface structure and thermodynamics. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larsen, J.W.; Wernett, P.C.; Glass, A.S.; Quay, D.; Roberts, J.

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Coals surfaces were studied using static surface adsorption measurements, low angle x-ray scattering (LAXS), inverse gas chromatography (IGC) and a new {sup 13}C NMR relaxation technique. A comparison of surface areas determined by hydrocarbon gas adsorption and LAXS led to the twin conclusions that the hydrocarbons had to diffuse through the solid to reach isolated pores and that the coal pores do not form interconnected networks, but are largely isolated. This conclusion was confirmed when IGC data for small hydrocarbons showed no discontinuities in their size dependence as usually observed with porous solids. IGC is capable of providing adsorption thermodynamics of gases on coal surfaces. The interactions of non-polar molecules and coal surfaces are directly proportioned to the gas molecular polarizability. For bases, the adsorption enthalpy is equal to the polarizability interaction plus the heat of hydrogen bond formation with phenol. Amphoteric molecules have more complex interactions. Mineral matter can have highly specific effects on surface interactions, but with most of the molecules studied is not an important factor.

  5. Redefining the typology of land use in the age of big data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Liqun, M.C.P. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Land use classification is important as a standard for land use description and management. However, current land use classification systems are problematic. Labels such as "residential use" and "commercial use" do not ...

  6. The effect of dust blowback on spatial orientation estimation during lunar landing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tritchler, Stephanie E. (Stephanie Elaine)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Landing is a dangerous and complex phase of any flight. Landing on an airless, dusty world presents unique challenges to perception, including dust blowback. During crewed lunar landings, astronauts will either be directly ...

  7. From negotiation to auction : Land-Conveyance Reform in China and its institutional and social impacts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Zhiyu (Zhiyu Jerry)

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The land market and the associated land-development-control mechanism in China have been experiencing a series of reforms since the 1990s, of which Land Conveyance Reform (LCR) in 2004 is a very recent and an important ...

  8. Using land value capture to fund rail transit extensions in Mexico City and Santiago de Chile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Covarrubias, Alvaro, 1973-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effects of rail rapid transit on land uses and land values are discussed. Rail transit can enhance accessibility, and can raise the demand for locating in areas around stations, increasing land value, and in some cases ...

  9. Review: The Hanford Reach: A Land of Contrasts by Susan Zwinger and Stamford D. Smith

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sowards, Adam M.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Review: The Hanford Reach: A Land of Contrasts By SusanSmith (Photographer).The Hanford Reach: A Land of Contrasts.addition. Simply put, The Hanford Reach: A Land of Contrasts

  10. Surface Energy,Surface Energy, Surface Tension & Shape of CrystalsSurface Tension & Shape of Crystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subramaniam, Anandh

    Surface Energy,Surface Energy, Surface Tension & Shape of CrystalsSurface Tension & Shape of shapes of crystals are important: (i) growth shape and (ii) equilibrium shape Surface/interface energy surfaces. The joining of two phases creates an interface. (Two orientations of the same crystalline phase

  11. Vacancies below the ,,111... surface of Pd Russel P. Kauffman*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rappe, Andrew M.

    Vacancies below the ,,111... surface of Pd Russel P. Kauffman* Department of Physics, Muhlenberg is used to investigate vacancies at or below the 111 surface of palladium and in the bulk. An accurate. The interaction of the vacancy, a point defect, with a surface, a planar defect, is investigated. Also studied

  12. Self-assembly of two-dimensional nanoclusters observed with STM: From surface molecules to surface superstructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hasegawa, Shuji

    Self-assembly of two-dimensional nanoclusters observed with STM: From surface molecules to surface on the Si 111 - 3 3-Ag surface at submonolayer Au coverage. Self-assembly of these Au nanoclusters leads nanoclus- ter are discussed in terms of a substrate-mediated interaction among the Au adatoms, and the self-assembling

  13. The relationship between land use and organochlorine compounds in streambed sediment and fish in the Central Columbia Plateau, Washington and Idaho, USA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Munn, M.D.; Gruber, S.J. [Geological Survey, Tacoma, WA (United States). Water Resources Div.

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors analyzed streambed sediment and fish in the Central Columbia Plateau in eastern Washington and Idaho for organochlorine pesticides and polychlorinated biphenyls ({Sigma}PCB). The objective was to assess the effects of land use on the occurrence and distribution of these compounds; land uses in the study area included forest, dryland and irrigated farming, and urban. The authors detected 16 organochlorine compounds in streambed sediment and fish tissue; fish usually had more compounds and a greater frequency of detection. The most frequently detected compound was {Sigma}DDT (sum of six isomers), which was found in 52% of bed sediment samples and 94% of whole fish composite samples. The other commonly detected compounds were dimethyl tetrachloroterephthalate (DCPA), dieldrin, hexachlorobenzene, and {Sigma}chlordane. Forest was the only land use with no detections of organochlorine compounds in either fish or bed sediment. Hexachlorobenzene was the only organochlorine pesticide detected at concentrations that differed significantly among land uses: concentrations were higher in the dryland farming areas than in the irrigated farming or urban areas. In agricultural areas irrigated by surface water, {Sigma}DDT concentrations in both streambed sediment and fish tissue were related to the percentage of land irrigated by water delivered via furrows (gravity irrigation), although {Sigma}DDT was not detectable in bed sediments until gravity irrigation exceeded 30%. Because of the relation between gravity irrigation and soil erosion, the study supports the importance of controlling soil erosion in order to reduce the overall loading of organochlorine compounds to surface waters.

  14. OVERVIEW OF MUNICIPAL AND INDUSTRIAL LAND APPLICATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balser, Teri C.

    BE "RIGHT IN YOUR BACKYARD" Variety of municipal and industrial wastes Inexpensive supply of plant - Heavy metals, organic compounds, pathogens - Nutrient loading (N and P) - Nitrate leaching or P loss Beneficially re-use nutrients and/or organic material Protect the quality of the soil, and surface water

  15. Land application of poultry lagoon effluent

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aldrich, Lance John

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    College Station, TX (clay soil) and near Overton, TX (loamy soil) where 912 mm and 1,058 mm were received over the study period, respectively. Surface water runoff was collected in steel containers buried flush with the ground at the down slope end...

  16. Fuel Cell Hybrid Bus Lands at Hickam AFB: Hydrogen Fuel Cell...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hybrid Bus Lands at Hickam AFB: Hydrogen Fuel Cell & Infrastructure Technologies Program, Fuel Cell Bus Demonstration Project (Fact Sheet) Fuel Cell Hybrid Bus Lands at Hickam AFB:...

  17. Coupling GIS and LCA for biodiversity assessments of land use: Part 1: Inventory modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geyer, Roland; Stoms, David M.; Lindner, Jan P.; Davis, Frank W.; Wittstock, Bastian

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of land use Part 1: Inventory modeling Roland Geyer & Davidthe use of GIS-based inventory modeling to generatedemonstrated that GIS-based inventory modeling of land use

  18. E-Print Network 3.0 - area land reclamation Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Engineering ; Biology and Medicine 27 LAND USE SUITABILITY INDEX FOR USE IN HARDEE COUNTY Summary: by that date, no soils ("land areas") directly resulting from mining or...

  19. Production of Wind or Solar Energy on School and Public Lands (Nebraska)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These regulations govern the implementation and development of wind and solar resources on lands under the jurisdiction of the Board of Educational Lands and Funds

  20. EA-1927: Conveyance of Land and Facilities at the Paducah Gaseous...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    27: Conveyance of Land and Facilities at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant for Economic Development Purposes, Paducah, Kentucky EA-1927: Conveyance of Land and Facilities at the...

  1. E-Print Network 3.0 - automated cultivation land Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    it is hard to see how the authors' proposed land cover classification can... advance eco- logical understanding of anthro- pogenic ecosystems. The system's land units, ......

  2. EPA RE-Powering America's Lands: Kansas City Municipal Farm Site...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    EPA RE-Powering America's Lands: Kansas City Municipal Farm Site -- Biomass Power Analysis Re-direct Destination: Through the RE-Powering America's Land initiative, the economic...

  3. Converting Limbo Lands to Energy-Generating Stations: Renewable Energy Technologies on Underused, Formerly Contaminated Sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mosey, G.; Heimiller, D.; Dahle, D.; Vimmerstedt, L.; Brady-Sabeff, L.

    2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report addresses the potential for using 'Limbo Lands' (underused, formerly contaminated sites, landfills, brownfields, abandoned mine lands, etc. ) as sites for renewable energy generating stations.

  4. E-Print Network 3.0 - arid land ecology Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    rapidly across the land- scape, leaving glacial till in their wake. As with arid coppice dunes, management... ecological sites are located in the land- scape figure using...

  5. E-Print Network 3.0 - arid lands ecology Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    rapidly across the land- scape, leaving glacial till in their wake. As with arid coppice dunes, management... ecological sites are located in the land- scape figure using...

  6. Exploration and Development of Oil and Gas on School and Public Lands (Nebraska)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This statute authorizes the Board of School Lands and Funds to lease school and public lands under its jurisdiction for oil and gas exploration and development purposes.

  7. E-Print Network 3.0 - airport land reclamation Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AirportAirport Suvarnabhumi Airport... ,Suvarnabhumi Airport, Bangkok, ThailandBangkok, Thailand 12;OverviewOverview Magnitudes and Financing... -- Land purchased inLand...

  8. E-Print Network 3.0 - agricultural land final Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Biology and Medicine ; Environmental Sciences and Ecology 2 Sharpening the Focus of Yolo County Land Use Policy Summary: agricultural production and land development in each...

  9. E-Print Network 3.0 - agricultural land based Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Biology and Medicine ; Environmental Sciences and Ecology 6 Sharpening the Focus of Yolo County Land Use Policy Summary: Developing land use policies based on the agricultural...

  10. Fire-related carbon emissions from land use transitions in southern Amazonia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2008 Fire-related carbon emissions from land use transitionscontribute to atmospheric carbon emissions, including forest2008), Fire-related carbon emissions from land use

  11. Land reform, regional planning and socioeconomic development in Brazil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Souza, Saulo

    2011-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

    baseline study of PCT settings 96 4.1 Introduction 96 4.2 Access to land under the Land Bill Programme 99 4.3 Agriculture and livestock production on PCT settlements 111 4.4 The standard of living of PCT beneficiaries 119 4.5 The surveyed sites vis... of governance for plan-led land reform 145 Figure 5.3: An illustrative diagram for the regional planning cycle 180 10 ABBREVIATIONS CONTAG National Confederation of Agricultural Workers FUNDEB Basic Education Fund HDI...

  12. Spreading lagooned sewage sludge on farm land: A case history

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robson, C.M.; Sommers, L.E.

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the development of a project involving the application of approximately 265,000 cubic meters of lagooned sewage sludge from a metropolitan area on privately-owned farm land in an adjacent, rural county. The sludge application project was initiated to enable use of the land occupied by the lagoons for expansion of the sewage treatment plant. The procedures developed will be valuable to those proposing to practice land disposal of stabilized sludge as part of the Nation`s resource conservation program.

  13. Surface heterogeneity impacts on boundary layer dynamics via energy balance partitioning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brunsell, Nathaniel A.; Mechem, David B.; Anderson, M. C.

    2011-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    energy balance partitioning N. A. Brunsell1, D. B. Mechem1, and M. C. Anderson2 1Dept. of Geography, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS, USA 2Hydrology and Remote Sensing Laboratory, USDA. Beltsville, MD, USA Received: 22 June 2010 – Published in Atmos... responsible for altering surface heat and moisture fluxes. Twelve coupled land surface – large eddy simulation scenarios with four different length scales of surface variability under three different horizontal wind speeds are used in the analysis. The base...

  14. Interactive portraiture : designing intimate interactive experiences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zuckerman, Orit

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis I present a set of interactive portrait experiences that strive to create an intimate connection between the viewer and the portrayed subject; an emotional experience, one of personal reflection. My interactive ...

  15. A validation of heat and carbon fluxes from highresolution land surface and regional models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D'Andrea, Fabio

    ) or regional climate models (RCMs) [Alessandri et al., 2007; Steiner et al., 2009]. [3., 2006; Alessandri et al., 2007; Jarlan et al., 2008; Steiner et al., 2009]. However, the SVAT models models do not account for the role of terrestrial vegetation in the carbon cycle variability [Alessandri

  16. Possible relation between land surface feedback and the post-landfall structure of monsoon depressions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niyogi, Dev

    rainfall received over the IMR. [3] The offshore evolution of MDs is well studied [e.g., Goswami, 1987 track and caused widespread flooding over northeast India, before dissipating over north- west India. MD (30 km, 10 km grid spacing; Figure S1) with the YSU PBL scheme, Grell- Devenyi convective

  17. Optimal use of land surface temperature data to detect changes in tropical forest cover

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The historical MODIS NDVI climatology record is used to filldiffer- ence from this climatology, and its corresponding

  18. Coupled heat and vapor transport: The thermostat effect of a freely evaporating land surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Szilagyi, Jozsef

    Szilagyi1,2 and Aaron Schepers3 1 Department of Hydraulic and Water Resources Engineering, Budapest problems across a variety of disciplines [Kunsch, 1998; Szilagyi and Jozsa, 2009a, 2009b; Bhat et al., 2011

  19. Use of the Richards equation in land surface parameterizations Deborah H. Lee1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    equation, and an analytical kinematic wave solution of Richards equation. Comparisons show that depth

  20. Correcting the orbit drift effect on AVHRR land surface skin temperature measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jin, Menglin

    results in a significant cooling effect on their afternoon path Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer, and are combined with satellite observations to remove the cooling effect. Applying this methodology to eighteen of these satellites' lifetime (Price 1991, Hurrell and International Journal of Remote Sensing ISSN 0143-1161 print

  1. Evaluation of MERRA Land Surface Estimates in Preparation for the Soil Moisture Active Passive Mission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montana, University of

    Scanning Radiometer for Earth Observing System (EOS) (AMSR-E)] remote sensing and earlier generation.001) in the midlatitudes, where its accuracy is directly proportional to the quality of MERRA precipitation. In the high products) to define biophysical attri- butes and water, mass, and energy exchanges (e.g., Running et al

  2. Changes in land surface water dynamics since the 1990s and relation to population pressure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and climate research [Solomon et al., 2007; Vörösmarty et al., 2000; Shindell et al., 2004]. How- ever wavelengths. The methodology has been described by Prigent et al. [2001, 2007] and Papa et al. [2010a

  3. Modeling land surface processes of the midwestern United States : predicting soil moisture under a warmer climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winter, Jonathan (Jonathan Mark)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation seeks to quantify the response of soil moisture to climate change in the midwestern United States. To assess this response, a dynamic global vegetation model, Integrated Biosphere Simulator, was coupled ...

  4. Quantifying the thermodynamic entropy budget of the land surface: is this useful?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brunsell, Nathaniel A.; Schymanski, S.J.; Kleidon, A.

    2011-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    As a system is moved away from a state of thermodynamic equilibrium, spatial and temporal heterogeneity is induced. A possible methodology to assess these impacts is to examine the thermodynamic entropy budget and ...

  5. Estimation of land surface water and energy balance flux components and closure relation using conditional sampling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farhadi, Leila

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Models of terrestrial water and energy balance include numerical treatment of heat and moisture diffusion in the soil-vegetation-atmosphere continuum. These two diffusion and exchange processes are linked only at a few ...

  6. Nesting ecology of dickcissels on reclaimed surface-mined lands in Freestone County, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dixon, Thomas Pingul

    2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    were selected and bunchgrasses were avoided. Oak (Quercus spp.) saplings remained an important nesting substrate throughout the breeding season. On a larger scale, nest-site selection was likely to occur farther from wooded riparian areas and closer...

  7. Optimal use of land surface temperature data to detect changes in tropical forest cover

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Climate Change (2005), Eleventh Conference of Parties (COP), Agenda item 6: Reducing emissions from deforestation in developing countries,

  8. Charge Retention by Gold Clusters on Surfaces Prepared Using Soft Landing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed New Substation SitesStandingtheir AtmosphericAnalysisVents Using1of Mass Selected

  9. Preparation and in situ Characterization of Surfaces Using Soft-Landing in

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 - SeptemberMicroneedles for medical point07.06 Agenda 2006UptakeDOEforlithium-iona

  10. Application for State Land Use Lease: Surface Lease (SL) - Coastal | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 East 300AlgoilEnergy Information the Army Permit: Engineering Form 4345

  11. Soft-Landing of Peptide IOns Onto Self-Assembled Monolayer Surfaces: an

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administrationcontroller systemsBiSite CulturalDepartment ofat Home |EMSL SodiumOverview. |

  12. Soft-Landing of Peptides onto Self-Assembled Monolayer Surfaces. | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administrationcontroller systemsBiSite CulturalDepartment ofat Home |EMSL SodiumOverview.

  13. Eos, Vol. 93, No. 15, 10 April 2012 Land surface air temperature is one of the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    as "the temperature indicated by a thermometer exposed to the air in a place sheltered from direct solar developed by the late seventeenth century, and D. G. Fahrenheit invented the mercury thermometer in 1714, the liquid-in-glass thermometer (such as the mercury thermometer) was widely used. In particular, maximum

  14. Harmonization of Land-Use Scenarios for the Period 1500-2100: 600 Years of Global Gridded Annual Land-Use Transitions, Wood Harvest, and Resulting Secondary Lands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hurtt, George; Chini, Louise Parsons; Frolking, Steve; Betts, Richard; Feddema, Johannes; Fischer, Gavin M.; Fisk, J.P.; Hibbard, Kathleen A.; Houghton, R. A.; Janetos, Anthony C.; Jones, C.; Kindermann, G.; Kinoshita, Tsuguki; Goldeweijk, Kees K.; Riahi, Keywan; Shevliakova, Elena; Smith, Steven J.; Stehfest, Eike; Thomson, Allison M.; Thornton, P.; Van Vuuren, Detlef; Wang, Y.

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    In preparation for the fifth Assessment Report (AR5) of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), the international community is developing new advanced Earth System Models (ESM) to assess the combined effects of human activities (e.g. land use and fossil fuel emissions) on the carbon-climate system. In addition, four Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) scenarios of the future (2005-2100) are being provided by four Integrated Assessment Model (IAM) teams to be used as input to the ESMs for future carbon-climate projections (Moss et al., 2010). The diversity of approaches and requirements among IAMs and ESMs for tracking land-use change, along with the dependence of model projections on land-use history, presents a challenge for effectively passing data between these communities and for smoothly transitioning from the historical estimates to future projections. Here, a harmonized set of land-use scenarios are presented that smoothly connects historical reconstructions of land use with future projections, in the format required by ESMs.

  15. Controlling ice nucleation through surface hydrophilicity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephen J. Cox; Shawn M. Kathmann; Ben Slater; Angelos Michaelides

    2015-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Ice formation is one of the most common and important processes on Earth and almost always occurs at the surface of a material. A basic understanding of how the physiochemical properties of a material's surface affects its ability to form ice has remained elusive. Here we use molecular dynamics simulations to directly probe heterogeneous ice nucleation at an hexagonal surface of a nanoparticle of varying hydrophilicity. Surprisingly, we find that structurally identical surfaces can both inhibit and promote ice formation and analogous to a chemical catalyst, it is found that an optimal interaction between the surface and the water exists for promoting ice nucleation. We use our microscopic understanding of the mechanism to design a modified surface in silico with enhanced ice nucleating ability.

  16. Pluralistic Modelling Approaches to Simulating Climate-Land Change Interactions in East Africa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Illinois at Chicago, University of

    , and the influence of large water bodies, combine with atmospheric trends such as greenhouse gas concentrations. Alexandridis4 1 Department of Forestry and Natural Resources, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47906

  17. Land Use-Transport Interaction Modelling: A Review of the Literature and Future Research Directions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Acheampong, Ransford A.; Silva, Elisabete A.

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in the Eindhoven region in the Netherlands, and Curacao, La Victoria and Caracas in Venezuela, respectively. TRESIS has been used to investigate strategic level policy initiatives for Sydney, Melbourne, Adelaide, Brisbane, Perth and Canberra in Australia. Few...

  18. Chesapeake Bay Land Margin Ecosystem Research (LMER): Trophic Interactions in Estuarine Systems (TIES)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    transects, and in association with mid-water trawls and a hydraulic control bottom feature. We are moving Zone), and mid-water trawls. Acoustic data from the hydraulic control point in April and July were, that current shoals downstream but deepens upstream, rendering the upstream flow more subcritical

  19. The Spatial Consequences of Autarky in Land-Use Regulation: Strategic Interaction or Parallelism?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monkkonen, Paavo; Quigley, John M.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    No. P07-002 Part 1, 2007. Quigley, John M. , Steven Raphael,E.L. Glaeser and J.M. Quigley, eds. , Lincoln Institute,Paavo Monkkonen, John M. Quigley, Stephen Raphael, Larry A.

  20. The Spatial Consequences of Autarky in Land-Use Regulation: Strategic Interaction or Parallelism?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monkkonen, Paavo; Quigley, John M.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    P07-002 Part 1, 2007. Quigley, John M. , Steven Raphael, and2), 1996: 209–241. Quigley, John M. Regulation and PropertyInstitute, 2007: 46-66. Quigley, John M. , Steven Raphael,