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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

Strategic Focus Areas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Focus Areas Lockheed Martin on behalf of Sandia National Laboratories will consider grant requests that best support the Corporation's strategic focus areas and reflect effective...

2

Decontamination & decommissioning focus area  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In January 1994, the US Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE EM) formally introduced its new approach to managing DOE`s environmental research and technology development activities. The goal of the new approach is to conduct research and development in critical areas of interest to DOE, utilizing the best talent in the Department and in the national science community. To facilitate this solutions-oriented approach, the Office of Science and Technology (EM-50, formerly the Office of Technology Development) formed five Focus AReas to stimulate the required basic research, development, and demonstration efforts to seek new, innovative cleanup methods. In February 1995, EM-50 selected the DOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) to lead implementation of one of these Focus Areas: the Decontamination and Decommissioning (D & D) Focus Area.

NONE

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Focus Area Summary  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

information provided was consolidated from the original five focus areas for the EM information provided was consolidated from the original five focus areas for the EM Corporate QA Board. The status of QAP/QIP approvals etc. was accurate at the time of posting; however, additional approvals may have been achieved since that time. If you have any questions about the information provided, please contact Bob Murray at robert.murray@em.doe.gov Task # Task Description Status 1.1 Develop a brief questionnaire to send out to both commercial and EM contractors to describe their current approach for identifying the applicable QA requirements for subcontractors, tailoring the requirements based upon risk, process for working with procurement to ensure QA requirements are incorporated into subcontracts, and implementing verification of requirement flow-down by their

4

Focus Area 3 Deliverables  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 - Commercial Grade item and Services 3 - Commercial Grade item and Services Dedication Implementation and Nuclear Services Office of Environmental Management And Energy Facility Contractors Group Quality Assurance Improvement Project Plan Project Focus Area Task # and Description Deliverable Project Area 3-Commercial Grade Item and Services Dedication 3.1-Complete a survey of selected EM contractors to identify the process and basis for their CGI dedication program including safety classification of items being dedicated for nuclear applications within their facilities Completed Survey Approvals: Yes/No/NA Project Managers: S. Waisley, D. Tuttel Yes Executive Committee: D. Chung, J. Yanek, N. Barker, D. Amerine No EM QA Corporate Board: No Energy Facility Contractors Group

5

Focus Areas | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mission » Focus Areas Mission » Focus Areas Focus Areas Safety With this focus on cleanup completion and risk reducing results, safety still remains the utmost priority. EM will continue to maintain and demand the highest safety performance. All workers deserve to go home as healthy as they were when they came to the job in the morning. There is no schedule or milestone worth any injury to the work force. Project Management EM is increasing its concentration on project management to improve its overall performance toward cost-effective risk reduction. This will involve review of validated project baselines, schedules, and assumptions about effective identification and management of risks. Instrumental in refining the technical and business approaches to project management are the senior

6

Tanks focus area. Annual report  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management is tasked with a major remediation project to treat and dispose of radioactive waste in hundreds of underground storage tanks. These tanks contain about 90,000,000 gallons of high-level and transuranic wastes. We have 68 known or assumed leaking tanks, that have allowed waste to migrate into the soil surrounding the tank. In some cases, the tank contents have reacted to form flammable gases, introducing additional safety risks. These tanks must be maintained in the safest possible condition until their eventual remediation to reduce the risk of waste migration and exposure to workers, the public, and the environment. Science and technology development for safer, more efficient, and cost-effective waste treatment methods will speed up progress toward the final remediation of these tanks. The DOE Office of Environmental Management established the Tanks Focus Area to serve as the DOE-EM`s technology development program for radioactive waste tank remediation in partnership with the Offices of Waste Management and Environmental Restoration. The Tanks Focus Area is responsible for leading, coordinating, and facilitating science and technology development to support remediation at DOE`s four major tank sites: the Hanford Site in Washington State, Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory in Idaho, Oak Ridge Reservation in Tennessee, and the Savannah River Site in South Carolina. The technical scope covers the major functions that comprise a complete tank remediation system: waste retrieval, waste pretreatment, waste immobilization, tank closure, and characterization of both the waste and tank. Safety is integrated across all the functions and is a key component of the Tanks Focus Area program.

Frey, J.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

7

NETL: Energy System Dynamics Focus Area  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy System Dynamics Onsite Research Energy System Dynamics Energy System Dynamics (ESD) is a focus area of the National Energy Technology Laboratory's Office of Research and...

8

Tanks Focus Area annual report FY2000  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) continues to face a major radioactive waste tank remediation effort with tanks containing hazardous and radioactive waste resulting from the production of nuclear materials. With some 90 million gallons of waste in the form of solid, sludge, liquid, and gas stored in 287 tanks across the DOE complex, containing approximately 650 million curies, radioactive waste storage tank remediation is the nation's highest cleanup priority. Differing waste types and unique technical issues require specialized science and technology to achieve tank cleanup in an environmentally acceptable manner. Some of the waste has been stored for over 50 years in tanks that have exceeded their design lives. The challenge is to characterize and maintain these contents in a safe condition and continue to remediate and close each tank to minimize the risks of waste migration and exposure to workers, the public, and the environment. In 1994, the DOE's Office of Environmental Management (EM) created a group of integrated, multiorganizational teams focusing on specific areas of the EM cleanup mission. These teams have evolved into five focus areas managed within EM's Office of Science and Technology (OST): Tanks Focus Area (TFA); Deactivation and Decommissioning Focus Area; Nuclear Materials Focus Area; Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area; and Transuranic and Mixed Waste Focus Area.

None

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Focus Areas 1 and 4 Deliverables  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 - Requirements Flow Down 1 - Requirements Flow Down and Focus Area #4 - Graded Approach to Quality Assurance Graded Approach Model and Expectation Page 1 of 18 Office of Environmental Management And Energy Facility Contractors Group Quality Assurance Improvement Project Plan Project Focus Area Task # and Description Deliverable Project Area 1: Requirements Flow Down Task #1.9 - Complete White Paper covering procurement QA process flow diagram Draft White Paper and Amended Flow Diagram Project Area 4: Graded Approach Implementation Task #4.4 - In coordination with Project Focus Area #1, provide an EM expectation for application of the graded approach to procurement. EM Graded Approach Procedure for Procurements Approvals: Yes/No/NA Project Managers: S. Waisley, D. Tuttel Y

10

Summary of Weldon Spring Site Focus Area  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

of Weldon Spring Site Focus Area of Weldon Spring Site Focus Area Work Session February 5, 2003 Weldon Spring Interpretive Center Focus Area: Monitoring and Maintenance This was the third of three work sessions that focus on specific issues addressed in the draft Long-Term Stewardship Plan for the Weldon Spring, Missouri, Site, dated August 9, 2002. At 6:00 p.m., before the start of the work session, Dan Collette, Technical Support Manager for S.M. Stoller, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Grand Junction Office (GJO) contractor, gave a demonstration of the on-line document retrieval and geographic information systems. Introduction Dave Geiser, DOE Headquarters Director of the Office of Long-Term Stewardship, discussed a DOE Headquarters proposal to establish the Office of Legacy Management in fiscal year 2004.

11

Property:Focus Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Area Area Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type String. The allowed values for this property are: Building Energy Efficiency Economic and Workforce Development Electrical Assessment Energy and Greenhouse Gas Baselining Transportation Energy Supply Load Reduction Policy and Human Behavior Renewable Energy Food Supply Pages using the property "Focus Area" Showing 2 pages using this property. N National Residential Efficiency Measures Database + Building Energy Efficiency + P PyTurbSim + Renewable Energy + Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Property:Focus_Area&oldid=307138#SMWResults" What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load)

12

Mixed waste characterization, treatment & disposal focus area  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The mission of the Mixed Waste Characterization, Treatment, and Disposal Focus Area (referred to as the Mixed Waste Focus Area or MWFA) is to provide treatment systems capable of treating DOE`s mixed waste in partnership with users, and with continual participation of stakeholders, tribal governments, and regulators. The MWFA deals with the problem of eliminating mixed waste from current and future storage in the DOE complex. Mixed waste is waste that contains both hazardous chemical components, subject to the requirements of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), and radioactive components, subject to the requirements of the Atomic Energy Act. The radioactive components include transuranic (TRU) and low-level waste (LLW). TRU waste primarily comes from the reprocessing of spent fuel and the use of plutonium in the fabrication of nuclear weapons. LLW includes radioactive waste other than uranium mill tailings, TRU, and high-level waste, including spent fuel.

NONE

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

TECHNICAL INTEGRATION ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT FOCUS AREAS  

SciTech Connect

This contract involved a team of companies led by WPI (formerly the Waste Policy Institute). In addition to WPI, the team included four subcontractors--TRW (formerly BDM Federal), SAIC, Energetics, and the University of North Dakota Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC). The team of companies functioned as a ''seamless team'' assembled to support the Environmental Management Program Focus Areas. Staff resources were applied in the following offices: Richland, Washington, Idaho Falls, Idaho, Morgantown, West Virginia, Grand Forks, North Dakota, Aiken, South Carolina, Gaithersburg, Maryland, and Blacksburg, Virginia. These locations represented a mixture of site support offices at the field focus area locations and central staff to support across the focus areas. The management of this dispersed resource base relied on electronic communication links to allow the team to function as a ''virtual office'' to address tasks with the best qualified staff matched to the task assignments. A variety of tasks were assigned and successfully completed throughout the life of the contract that involved program planning and analysis, program execution, program information management and communication and data transmission.

Carey R. Butler

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

TECHNICAL INTEGRATION ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT FOCUS AREAS  

SciTech Connect

This contract involved a team of companies led by WPI (formerly the Waste Policy Institute). In addition to WPI, the team included four subcontractors--TRW (formerly BDM Federal), SAIC, Energetics, and the University of North Dakota Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC). The team of companies functioned as a ''seamless team'' assembled to support the Environmental Management Program Focus Areas. Staff resources were applied in the following offices: Richland, Washington, Idaho Falls, Idaho, Morgantown, West Virginia, Grand Forks, North Dakota, Aiken, South Carolina, Gaithersburg, Maryland, and Blacksburg, Virginia. These locations represented a mixture of site support offices at the field focus area locations and central staff to support across the focus areas. The management of this dispersed resource base relied on electronic communication links to allow the team to function as a ''virtual office'' to address tasks with the best qualified staff matched to the task assignments. A variety of tasks were assigned and successfully completed throughout the life of the contract that involved program planning and analysis, program execution, program information management and communication and data transmission.

Carey R. Butler

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Mixed Waste Focus Area program management plan  

SciTech Connect

This plan describes the program management principles and functions to be implemented in the Mixed Waste Focus Area (MWFA). The mission of the MWFA is to provide acceptable technologies that enable implementation of mixed waste treatment systems developed in partnership with end-users, stakeholders, tribal governments and regulators. The MWFA will develop, demonstrate and deliver implementable technologies for treatment of mixed waste within the DOE Complex. Treatment refers to all post waste-generation activities including sampling and analysis, characterization, storage, processing, packaging, transportation and disposal.

Beitel, G.A.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Landfill stabilization focus area: Technology summary  

SciTech Connect

Landfills within the DOE Complex as of 1990 are estimated to contain 3 million cubic meters of buried waste. The DOE facilities where the waste is predominantly located are at Hanford, the Savannah River Site (SRS), the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), the Nevada Test Site (NTS), and the Rocky Flats Plant (RFP). Landfills include buried waste, whether on pads or in trenches, sumps, ponds, pits, cribs, heaps and piles, auger holes, caissons, and sanitary landfills. Approximately half of all DOE buried waste was disposed of before 1970. Disposal regulations at that time permitted the commingling of various types of waste (i.e., transuranic, low-level radioactive, hazardous). As a result, much of the buried waste throughout the DOE Complex is presently believed to be contaminated with both hazardous and radioactive materials. DOE buried waste typically includes transuranic-contaminated radioactive waste (TRU), low-level radioactive waste (LLW), hazardous waste per 40 CFR 26 1, greater-than-class-C waste per CFR 61 55 (GTCC), mixed TRU waste, and mixed LLW. The mission of the Landfill Stabilization Focus Area is to develop, demonstrate, and deliver safer,more cost-effective and efficient technologies which satisfy DOE site needs for the remediation and management of landfills. The LSFA is structured into five technology areas to meet the landfill remediation and management needs across the DOE complex. These technology areas are: assessment, retrieval, treatment, containment, and stabilization. Technical tasks in each of these areas are reviewed.

NONE

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Radioactive tank waste remediation focus area  

SciTech Connect

EM`s Office of Science and Technology has established the Tank Focus Area (TFA) to manage and carry out an integrated national program of technology development for tank waste remediation. The TFA is responsible for the development, testing, evaluation, and deployment of remediation technologies within a system architecture to characterize, retrieve, treat, concentrate, and dispose of radioactive waste stored in the underground stabilize and close the tanks. The goal is to provide safe and cost-effective solutions that are acceptable to both the public and regulators. Within the DOE complex, 335 underground storage tanks have been used to process and store radioactive and chemical mixed waste generated from weapon materials production and manufacturing. Collectively, thes tanks hold over 90 million gallons of high-level and low-level radioactive liquid waste in sludge, saltcake, and as supernate and vapor. Very little has been treated and/or disposed or in final form.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

FY 2000 Deactivation and Decommissioning Focus Area Annual Report  

SciTech Connect

This document describes activities of the Deactivation and Decommissioning Focus Area for the past year.

None

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

111th Congressional Districts and Land Area | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Land Area Law DataTools Law You are here Data.gov Communities Law Data 111th Congressional Districts and Land Area Dataset Summary Description This dataset contains a...

20

Mixed waste focus area alternative technologies workshop  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the Mixed Waste Focus Area (MWFA)-sponsored Alternative Technology Workshop held in Salt Lake City, Utah, from January 24--27, 1995. The primary workshop goal was identifying potential applications for emerging technologies within the Options Analysis Team (OAT) ``wise`` configuration. Consistent with the scope of the OAT analysis, the review was limited to the Mixed Low-Level Waste (MLLW) fraction of DOE`s mixed waste inventory. The Los Alamos team prepared workshop materials (databases and compilations) to be used as bases for participant review and recommendations. These materials derived from the Mixed Waste Inventory Report (MWIR) data base (May 1994), the Draft Site Treatment Plan (DSTP) data base, and the OAT treatment facility configuration of December 7, 1994. In reviewing workshop results, the reader should note several caveats regarding data limitations. Link-up of the MWIR and DSTP data bases, while representing the most comprehensive array of mixed waste information available at the time of the workshop, requires additional data to completely characterize all waste streams. A number of changes in waste identification (new and redefined streams) occurred during the interval from compilation of the data base to compilation of the DSTP data base with the end result that precise identification of radiological and contaminant characteristics was not possible for these streams. To a degree, these shortcomings compromise the workshop results; however, the preponderance of waste data was linked adequately, and therefore, these analyses should provide useful insight into potential applications of alternative technologies to DOE MLLW treatment facilities.

Borduin, L.C.; Palmer, B.A.; Pendergrass, J.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Technology Analysis Group

1995-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land focus area" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Landed Costs of Imported Crude by Area  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Area Area (Dollars per Barrel) Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Average Landed Cost 95.72 97.41 96.90 101.19 103.27 102.19 1973-2013 Persian Gulf 102.31 101.35 101.26 103.15 104.94 104.24 1996-2013 Total OPEC 101.76 101.62 101.21 103.96 105.34 105.33 1973-2013 Non OPEC 90.79 93.50 93.49 98.66 101.65 100.05 1973-2013 Selected Countries Canada 83.02 86.83 88.26 94.16 98.81 96.09 1973-2013 Colombia 101.42 100.70 99.47 102.47 106.04 105.49 1996-2013 Angola 105.56 106.32 106.73 110.43 111.75 115.03 1996-2013 Mexico 100.63 100.07 97.56 101.87 101.52 101.12 1975-2013

22

Mixed Waste Focus Area: Department of Energy complex needs report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Assistant Secretary for the Office of Environmental Management (EM) at the US Department of Energy (DOE) initiated a new approach in August of 1993 to environmental research and technology development. A key feature of this new approach included establishment of the Mixed Waste Characterization, Treatment, and Disposal Focus Area (MWFA). The mission of the MWFA is to identify, develop, and implement needed technologies such that the major environmental management problems related to meeting DOE`s commitments for treatment of mixed wastes under the Federal Facility Compliance Act (FFCA), and in accordance with the Land Disposal Restrictions (LDR) of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), can be addressed, while cost-effectively expending the funding resources. To define the deficiencies or needs of the EM customers, the MWFA analyzed Proposed Site Treatment Plans (PSTPs), as well as other applicable documents, and conducted site visits throughout the summer of 1995. Representatives from the Office of Waste Management (EM-30), the Office of Environmental Restoration (EM-40), and the Office of Facility Transition and Management (EM-60) at each site visited were requested to consult with the Focus Area to collaboratively define their technology needs. This report documents the needs, deficiencies, technology gaps, and opportunities for expedited treatment activities that were identified during the site visit process. The defined deficiencies and needs are categorized by waste type, namely Wastewaters, Combustible Organics, Sludges/Soils, Debris/Solids, and Unique Wastes, and will be prioritized based on the relative affect the deficiency has on the DOE Complex.

Roach, J.A.

1995-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

23

Land and Renewable Resources [EVS Program Area  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Land and Renewable Resources EVS's environmental scientists conduct environmental impact statements to help the nation create a framework for developing renewable energy...

24

Independent Oversight Focus Area Review, DOE Nuclear Facilities - April  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Independent Oversight Focus Area Review, DOE Nuclear Facilities - Independent Oversight Focus Area Review, DOE Nuclear Facilities - April 2010 Independent Oversight Focus Area Review, DOE Nuclear Facilities - April 2010 April 2010 Review of Specific Administrative Controls at DOE Nuclear Facilities The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Independent Oversight, within the Office of Health Safety and Security occasionally reviews specific focus areas. Focus areas are aspects of safety programs that Independent Oversight determines warrant increased management attention based on reviews of performance data, inspection results, and operating experience across DOE sites. Due, in part, to operating experience and previous inspection results. DOE selected specific administrative controls (SACs) as a focus area. SACs are new or revised technical safety requirements (TSRs)

25

The Gasifier Optimization and Plant Supporting Systems area focuses...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gasifier Optimization and Plant Supporting Systems area focuses on the development of technologies and models to improve the performance of advanced gasifiers. Specifically,...

26

Aquifer Protection Area Land Use Regulations (Connecticut)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These regulations describe allowable activities within aquifer protection areas, the procedure by which such areas are delineated, and relevant permit requirements. The regulations also describe...

27

Land-Cover Dynamics in an Urban Area of Ghana  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objectives of this study were to quantify land-cover changes. A short-term projection of land-cover distribution in a 2400-ha (1 ha = 10 000 m2 ) area of northern Ghana was generated. Landsat Thematic Mapper images acquired in 1984, 1992, and ...

Ademola K. Braimoh; Paul L. G. Vlek

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Wind and Temperature Structure over a Land-Water-Land Area  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wind and temperature data obtained on 5 June 1984 during the resund experiment are analyzed. The day was characterized by moderately strong winds blowing from a heated land area over a colder water surface and then over a second heated land ...

J. C. Doran; Sven-Erik Gryning

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Preliminary Assessment SHALLOW LAND DISPOSAL AREA, PARKS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

mine haulage-ways. Room and pillar construction allows approximately one-third of the coal to remain be forecasted (ARCO, 1995). Trench 10, in the lower trench area, is excavated into coal mine spoils, where the Upper Freeport Coal seam was once strip-mined. The base of trench 10 rests on a clay and shale layer

US Army Corps of Engineers

30

Landed Costs of Imported Crude by Area  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Average Landed Cost 67.97 93.33 60.23 76.50 102.92 101.00 1973-2012 Persian Gulf 69.83 93.59 62.15 78.60 108.01 107.74 1973-2012 Total OPEC 71.14 95.49 61.90 78.28 107.84 107.56 1973-2012 Non OPEC 63.96 90.59 58.58 74.68 98.64 95.05 1973-2012 Selected Countries Canada 60.38 90.00 57.60 72.80 89.92 84.24 1973-2012 Colombia 70.91 93.43 58.50 74.25 102.57 107.07 1973-2012 Angola 71.27 98.18 61.32 80.61 114.05 114.95 1973-2012 Mexico 62.31 85.97 57.35 72.86 101.21 102.45 1973-2012 Nigeria 78.01 104.83 68.01 83.14 116.43 116.88 1973-2012 Saudi Arabia 70.78 94.75 62.14 79.29 108.83 108.15 1973-2012 United Kingdom 72.47 96.95 63.87 80.29 118.45 W 1973-2012 Venezuela

31

Magnetotellurics At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009) Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Magnetotellurics At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009) Exploration Activity Details Location Salt Wells Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Magnetotellurics Activity Date 2008 - 2008 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Vulcan increased exploration efforts in the summer and fall of 2008, during which time the company drilled two temperature gradient holes (86-15 O on Pad 1 and 17-16 O on Pad 3); conducted seismic, gravity and magnetotelluric surveys; and drilled deep exploration wells at Pads 6 and 8 and binary wells at Pads 1, 2, 4, and 7. Notes Data from these wells is proprietary, and so were unavailable for inclusion

32

PNNL: Biological Sciences - A Subsurface Science Scientific Focus Area -  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Role of Microenvironments and Transition Zones in Subsurface Reactive Role of Microenvironments and Transition Zones in Subsurface Reactive Contaminant Transport Subsurface Science Scientific Focus Area (SFA) The Subsurface Science Scientific Focus Area (SFA) is funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Biological and Environmental Research. The SFA team is performing integrated, multidisciplinary, science-theme-focused research on the role of microenvironments and transition zones in the reactive transport of technetium (Tc), uranium (U), and plutonium (Pu). The primary environmental system being studied is the groundwater-river interaction zone in the 300 area of the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. Ringold Sediments Redox boundary in Ringold sediments about 2.5 m below the Hanford-Ringold contact. The boundary is the point where oxygen and other terminal electron

33

Basic science research to support the nuclear material focus area  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy's (DOE'S) Office of Environmental Management (EM) is responsible for managing more than 760,000 metric tons of nuclear material that is excess to the current DOE weapons program, as a result of shutdown of elements of the weapons program, mainly during the 1990s. EMowned excess nuclear material comprises a variety of material types, including uranium, plutonium, other actinides and other radioactive elements in numerous forms, all of which must be stabilized for storage and ultimate disposition. Much of this quantity has been in storage for many years. Shutdown of DOE sites and facilities requires removal of nuclear material and consolidation at other sites, and may be delayed by the lack of available technology. Within EM, the Office of Science and Technology (OST) is dedicated to providing timely, relevant technology to accelerate completion and reduce cleanup cost of the DOE environmental legacy. OST is organized around five focus areas, addressing crucial areas of end-user-defined technology need. The Focus Areas regularly identify potential technical solutions for which basic scientific research is needed to determine if the technical solution can be developed and deployed. To achieve a portfolio of projects that is balanced between near-term priorities driven by programmatic risks (such as site closure milestones) and long-term, high-consequence needs that depend on extensive research and development, OST has established the Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP) to develop the scientific basis for solutions to long-term site needs. The EMSP directs calls for proposals to address scientific needs of the focus areas. Needs are identified and validated annually by individual sites in workshops conducted across the complex. The process captures scope and schedule requirements of the sites, so that focus areas can identify technology that can be delivered to sites in time to complete site cleanup. The Nuclear Material Focus Area (NMFA) has identified over two hundred science and technology needs, of which more than thirty are science needs.

Boak, J. M. (Jeremy M.); Eller, P. Gary; Chipman, N. A.; Castle, P. M.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Basic Science Research to Support the Nuclear Materials Focus Area  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of Environmental Management (EM) is responsible for managing more than 760,000 metric tons of nuclear material that is excess to the current DOE weapons program, as a result of shutdown of elements of the weapons program, mainly during the 1990s. EMowned excess nuclear material comprises a variety of material types, including uranium, plutonium, other actinides and other radioactive elements in numerous forms, all of which must be stabilized for storage and ultimate disposition. Much of this quantity has been in storage for many years. Shutdown of DOE sites and facilities requires removal of nuclear material and consolidation at other sites, and may be delayed by the lack of available technology. Within EM, the Office of Science and Technology (OST) is dedicated to providing timely, relevant technology to accelerate completion and reduce cleanup cost of the DOE environmental legacy. OST is organized around five focus areas, addressing crucial areas of end-user-defined technology need. The Focus Areas regularly identify potential technical solutions for which basic scientific research is needed to determine if the technical solution can be developed and deployed. To achieve a portfolio of projects that is balanced between near-term priorities driven by programmatic risks (such as site closure milestones) and long-term, high-consequence needs that depend on extensive research and development, OST has established the Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP) to develop the scientific basis for solutions to long-term site needs. The EMSP directs calls for proposals to address scientific needs of the focus areas. Needs are identified and validated annually by individual sites in workshops conducted across the complex. The process captures scope and schedule requirements of the sites, so that focus areas can identify technology that can be delivered to sites in time to complete site cleanup. The Nuclear Material Focus Area (NMFA) has identified over two hundred science and technology needs, of which more than thirty are science needs.

Chipman, N. A.; Castle, P. M.; Boak, J. M.; Eller, P. G.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

35

Tanks Focus Area Site Needs Assessment FY 2000  

SciTech Connect

This document summarizes the Tanks Focus Area (TFA's) process of collecting, analyzing, and responding to high-level radioactive tank waste science and technology needs developed from across the DOE complex in FY 2000. The document also summarizes each science and technology need, and provides an initial prioritization of TFA's projected work scope for FY 2001 and FY 2002.

Allen, Robert W.

2000-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

36

WORKSHOP THEMES The workshop will focus on the following areas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WORKSHOP THEMES The workshop will focus on the following areas: a) Greenhouse Gas Emissions from related Greenhouse Gas Emissions c) Technological Solutions to Greenhouse Emissions from and Greenhouse Gas Emissions New Delhi, India February 10-11, 2011 ORGANIZED BY AND SPONSORED BY #12;WORKSHOP

37

Contaminant plumes containment and remediation focus area. Technology summary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EM has established a new approach to managing environmental technology research and development in critical areas of interest to DOE. The Contaminant Plumes Containment and Remediation (Plumes) Focus Area is one of five areas targeted to implement the new approach, actively involving representatives from basic research, technology implementation, and regulatory communities in setting objectives and evaluating results. This document presents an overview of current EM activities within the Plumes Focus Area to describe to the appropriate organizations the current thrust of the program and developing input for its future direction. The Plumes Focus Area is developing remediation technologies that address environmental problems associated with certain priority contaminants found at DOE sites, including radionuclides, heavy metals, and dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs). Technologies for cleaning up contaminants of concern to both DOE and other federal agencies, such as volatile organic compounds (VOCs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and other organics and inorganic compounds, will be developed by leveraging resources in cooperation with industry and interagency programs.

NONE

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Nuclear Materials Focus Area Fiscal Year 2002 Mid Year Review  

SciTech Connect

The Nuclear Materials Focus Area (NMFA) held its annual mid-year review on February 12 and 14, 2002, in Santa Fe, New Mexico. The purpose of this review was to examine both the technical aspects and the programmatic aspects of its technology development program. The focus area activities were reviewed by a panel consisting of personnel representing the end users of the technologies, and technical experts in nuclear materials. This year's review was somewhat different than in the past, as the stress was on how well the various projects being managed through the NMFA aligned with the two thrust areas and nine key goals and priorities recently issued by the Deputy Assistant Secretary for DOE's Office of Environmental Management (EM).

Thiel, E.C.; Fuhrman, P.W.

2002-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

39

Nuclear Materials Focus Area Fiscal Year 2002 Mid Year Review  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Nuclear Materials Focus Area (NMFA) held its annual mid-year review on February 12 and 14, 2002, in Santa Fe, New Mexico. The purpose of this review was to examine both the technical aspects and the programmatic aspects of its technology development program. The focus area activities were reviewed by a panel consisting of personnel representing the end users of the technologies, and technical experts in nuclear materials. This year's review was somewhat different than in the past, as the stress was on how well the various projects being managed through the NMFA aligned with the two thrust areas and nine key goals and priorities recently issued by the Deputy Assistant Secretary for DOE's Office of Environmental Management (EM).

Thiel, Elizabeth Chilcote

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Higher U.S. Crop Prices Trigger Little Area Expansion so Marginal Land for Biofuel Crops Is Limited  

SciTech Connect

By expanding energy biomass production on marginal lands that are not currently used for crops, food price increases and indirect climate change effects can be mitigated. Studies of the availability of marginal lands for dedicated bioenergy crops have focused on biophysical land traits, ignoring the human role in decisions to convert marginal land to bioenergy crops. Recent history offers insights about farmer willingness to put non-crop land into crop production. The 2006-09 leap in field crop prices and the attendant 64% gain in typical profitability led to only a 2% increase in crop planted area, mostly in the prairie states

Swinton, S.; Babcock, Bruce; James, Laura; Bandaru, Varaprasad

2011-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land focus area" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Mixed waste characterization, treatment, and disposal focus area. Technology summary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents details about the technology development programs of the Department of Energy. In this document, waste characterization, thermal treatment processes, non-thermal treatment processes, effluent monitors and controls, development of on-site innovative technologies, and DOE business opportunities are applied to environmental restoration. The focus areas for research are: contaminant plume containment and remediation; mixed waste characterization, treatment, and disposal; high-level waste tank remediation; landfill stabilization; and decontamination and decommissioning.

NONE

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Tanks focus area multiyear program plan - FY96-FY98  

SciTech Connect

The Tanks Focus Area (TFA) Multiyear Program Plan (MYPP) presents the recommended TFA technical program. The recommendation covers a 3-year funding outlook (FY96-FY98), with an emphasis on FY96 and FY97. In addition to defining the recommended program, this document also describes the processes used to develop the program, the implementation strategy for the program, the references used to write this report, data on the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) tank site baselines, details on baseline assumptions and the technical elements, and a glossary.

NONE

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Tanks Focus Area site needs assessment FY 2000  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the process used by the Tanks Focus Area (TFA) to analyze and develop responses to technology needs submitted by five major U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites with radioactive tank waste problems, and the initial results of the analysis. The sites are the Hanford Site, Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), Savannah River Site (SRS), and West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP). During the past year, the TFA established a link with DOE's Fernald site to exchange, on a continuing basis, mutually beneficial technical information and assistance.

RW Allen

2000-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

44

NETL: Carbon Storage - CO2 Utilization Focus Area  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CO2 Utilization CO2 Utilization Carbon Storage CO2 Utilization Focus Area Carbon dioxide (CO2) utilization efforts focus on pathways and novel approaches for reducing CO2 emissions by developing beneficial uses for the CO2 that will mitigate CO2 emissions in areas where geologic storage may not be an optimal solution. CO2 can be used in applications that could generate significant benefits. It is possible to develop alternatives that can use captured CO2 or convert it to useful products such chemicals, cements, or plastics. Revenue generated from the utilized CO2 could also offset a portion of the CO2 capture cost. Processes or concepts must take into account the life cycle of the process to ensure that additional CO2 is not produced beyond what is already being removed from or going into the atmosphere. Furthermore, while the utilization of CO2 has some potential to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to the atmosphere, CO2 has certain disadvantages as a chemical reactant. Carbon dioxide is rather inert and non-reactive. This inertness is the reason why CO2 has broad industrial and technical applications. Each potential use of CO2 has an energy requirement that needs to be determined; and the CO2 produced to create the energy for the specific utilization process must not exceed the CO2 utilized.

45

NETL: Carbon Storage - Simulation and Risk Assessment Focus Area  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Simulation and Risk Assessment Simulation and Risk Assessment Carbon Storage Simulation and Risk Assessment Focus Area The Simulation and Risk Assessment Focus Area is an integrated effort to develop advanced simulation models of the subsurface and integrate the results into a risk assessment that includes both technical and programmatic risks. As the simulation models are refined with new data, the uncertainty surrounding the identified risks decreases, which in turn provides a more accurate risk assessment and mitigation plan for each project site. Both qualitative and quantitative protocols will be developed to ensure the safe and permanent storage of carbon dioxide (CO2). Results from the simulation models will be incorporated into risk assessments on a project-by-project basis and on a larger basin-scale. As carbon capture and storage (CCS) becomes deployed in major basins, macro model results will be needed to manage reservoirs for pressure management, plume migration, and potential risks of multiple CO2 injection projects across the basin.

46

Tanks focus area multiyear program plan FY97-FY99  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) continues to face a major tank remediation problem with approximately 332 tanks storing over 378,000 ml of high-level waste (HLW) and transuranic (TRU) waste across the DOE complex. Most of the tanks have significantly exceeded their life spans. Approximately 90 tanks across the DOE complex are known or assumed to have leaked. Some of the tank contents are potentially explosive. These tanks must be remediated and made safe. How- ever, regulatory drivers are more ambitious than baseline technologies and budgets will support. Therefore, the Tanks Focus Area (TFA) began operation in October 1994. The focus area manages, coordinates, and leverages technology development to provide integrated solutions to remediate problems that will accelerate safe and cost-effective cleanup and closure of DOE`s national tank system. The TFA is responsible for technology development to support DOE`s four major tank sites: Hanford Site (Washington), INEL (Idaho), Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) (Tennessee), and Savannah River Site (SRS) (South Carolina). Its technical scope covers the major functions that comprise a complete tank remediation system: safety, characterization, retrieval, pretreatment, immobilization, and closure.

NONE

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Radioactive Tank Waste Remediation Focus Area. Technology summary  

SciTech Connect

In February 1991, DOE`s Office of Technology Development created the Underground Storage Tank Integrated Demonstration (UST-ID), to develop technologies for tank remediation. Tank remediation across the DOE Complex has been driven by Federal Facility Compliance Agreements with individual sites. In 1994, the DOE Office of Environmental Management created the High Level Waste Tank Remediation Focus Area (TFA; of which UST-ID is now a part) to better integrate and coordinate tank waste remediation technology development efforts. The mission of both organizations is the same: to focus the development, testing, and evaluation of remediation technologies within a system architecture to characterize, retrieve, treat, concentrate, and dispose of radioactive waste stored in USTs at DOE facilities. The ultimate goal is to provide safe and cost-effective solutions that are acceptable to both the public and regulators. The TFA has focused on four DOE locations: the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington, the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) near Idaho Falls, Idaho, the Oak Ridge Reservation in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, and the Savannah River Site (SRS) in Aiken, South Carolina.

NONE

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Subsurface contamination focus area technical requirements. Volume II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is our vision, a vision that replaces the ad hoc or {open_quotes}delphi{close_quotes} method which is to get a group of {open_quotes}experts{close_quotes} together and make decisions based upon opinion. To fulfill our vision for the Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area (SCFA), it is necessary to generate technical requirements or performance measures which are quantitative or measurable. Decisions can be supported if they are based upon requirements or performance measures which can be traced to the origin (documented) and are verifiable, i.e., prove that requirements are satisfied by inspection (show me), demonstration, analysis, monitoring, or test. The data from which these requirements are derived must also reflect the characteristics of individual landfills or plumes so that technologies that meet these requirements will necessarily work at specific sites. Other subjective factors, such as stakeholder concerns, do influence decisions. Using the requirements as a basic approach, the SCFA can depend upon objective criteria to help influence the areas of subjectivity, like the stakeholders. In the past, traceable requirements were not generated, probably because it seemed too difficult to do so. There are risks that the requirements approach will not be accepted because it is new and represents a departure from the historical paradigm.

Nickelson, D.; Nonte, J.; Richardson, J.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Tanks Focus Area site needs assessment FY 1998  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the process used by the Tanks Focus Area (TFA) to analyze and develop responses to technology needs submitted by four major US Department of Energy (DOE) sites with radioactive tank waste problems, and the initial results of the analysis. The sites are the Hanford Site, Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), and Savannah River Site (SRS). This document describes the TFA`s process of collecting site needs, analyzing them, and creating technical responses to the sites. It also summarizes the information contained within the TFA needs database, portraying information provided by four major DOE sites with tank waste problems. The overall TFA program objective is to deliver a tank technology program that reduces the current cost, and the operational and safety risks of tank remediation. The TFA`s continues to enjoy close, cooperative relationships with each site. During the past year, the TFA has fostered exchanges of technical information between sites. These exchanges have proven to be healthy for all concerned. The TFA recognizes that site technology needs often change, and the TFA must be prepared not only to amend its program in response, but to help the sites arrive at the best technical approach to solve revised site needs.

NONE

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Plutonium Focus Area research and development plan. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) committed to a research and development program to support the technology needs for converting and stabilizing its nuclear materials for safe storage. The R and D Plan addresses five of the six material categories from the 94-1 Implementation Plan: plutonium (Pu) solutions, plutonium metals and oxides, plutonium residues, highly enriched uranium, and special isotopes. R and D efforts related to spent nuclear fuel (SNF) stabilization were specifically excluded from this plan. This updated plan has narrowed the focus to more effectively target specific problem areas by incorporating results form trade studies. Specifically, the trade studies involved salt; ash; sand, slag, and crucible (SS and C); combustibles; and scrub alloy. The plan anticipates possible disposition paths for nuclear materials and identifies resulting research requirements. These requirements may change as disposition paths become more certain. Thus, this plan represents a snapshot of the current progress and will continue to be updated on a regular basis. The paper discusses progress in safeguards and security, plutonium stabilization, special isotopes stabilization, highly-enriched uranium stabilization--MSRE remediation project, storage technologies, engineered systems, core technology, and proposed DOE/Russian technology exchange projects.

NONE

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

The Mixed Waste Focus Area: Status and accomplishments  

SciTech Connect

The Mixed Waste Focus Area began operations in February of 1995. Its mission is to provide acceptable technologies that enable implementation of mixed waste treatment systems developed in partnership with end-users, stakeholders, tribal governments, and regulators. The MWFA will develop, demonstrate, and deliver implementable technologies for treatment of mixed waste within the DOE complex. Treatment refers to all post waste-generation activities including sampling and analysis, characterization, storage, processing, packaging, transportation, and disposal. The MWFA`s mission arises from the Resources Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) as amended by the Federal Facility Compliance Act. Each DOE site facility that generates or stores mixed waste prepared a plan, the Site Treatment Plan, for developing treatment capacities and treating that waste. Agreements for each site were concluded with state regulators, resulting in Consent Orders providing enforceable milestones for achieving treatment of the waste. The paper discusses the implementation of the program, its status, accomplishments and goals for FY1996, and plans for 1997.

Conner, J.E. [Dept. of Energy, Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Idaho Operations Office; Williams, R.E. [Lockheed Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Mixed waste focus area technical baseline report. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) established the Mixed Waste Characterization, Treatment, and Disposal Focus Area (MWFA) to develop and facilitate implementation of technologies required to meet the Department`s commitments for treatment of mixed low-level and transuranic wastes. The mission of the MWFA is to provide acceptable technologies, developed in partnership with end-users, stakeholders, tribal governments, and regulators, that enable implementation of mixed waste treatment systems. To accomplish this mission, a technical baseline was established in 1996 that forms the basis for determining which technology development activities will be supported by the MWFA. This technical baseline is revised on an annual basis to reflect changes in the DOE Mixed Waste Management strategies, changes in the MWFA technical baseline development process, and MWFA accomplishments. This report presents the first revision to the technical baseline and the resulting prioritized list of deficiencies that the MWFA will address. This report also reflects a higher level of stakeholder involvement in the prioritization of the deficiencies. This document summarizes the data and the assumptions upon which this work was based, as well as information concerning the DOE Office of Environmental Management (EM) mixed waste technology development needs.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Landed Costs of Imported Crude by Area - U.S. Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Landed Costs of Imported Crude by Area (Dollars per Barrel) Period: Download Series History: Definitions, Sources & Notes: Area: Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug ...

54

Focus Area 3 - Enabling Technologies : BioEnergy Science Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Enabling Technologies BESC researchers in (Enabling Technologies) characterization, modeling, and data management areas are engaged in 1) applying advanced technologies to analyze...

55

Laboratory Scientific Focus Area Guidance | U.S. DOE Office of...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Closed Funding Opportunity Announcements (FOAs) Closed Lab Announcements Award Search Peer Review Policy Grants & Contracts Guidance Laboratory Scientific Focus Area...

56

Artificial Neural Network estimation of soil erosion and nutrient concentrations in runoff from land application areas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The transport of sediment and nutrients from land application areas is an environmental concern. New methods are needed for estimating soil and nutrient concentrations of runoff from cropland areas on which manure is applied. Artificial Neural Networks ... Keywords: Artificial Neural Network (ANN), Land application, Manure runoff, Nitrogen, Nutrient losses, Phosphorus, Soil erosion, Water quality

Minyoung Kim; John E. Gilley

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Shallow Land Disposal Area - PA 45  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Shallow Land Disposal Area - PA 45 Shallow Land Disposal Area - PA 45 FUSRAP Considered Sites Shallow Land Disposal Area, PA Alternate Name(s): Parks Township Shallow Land Disposal Area Nuclear Materials and Equipment Corporation (NUMEC) Babcox and Wilcox Parks Facilities PA.45-1 PA.45-5 PA.45-6 Location: PA Route 66 and Kissimere Road, Parks Township, Apollo, Pennsylvania PA.45-1 Historical Operations: Fabricated nulcear fuel under an NRC license as an extension of NUMEC Apollo production facilities. PA.45-1 PA.45-5 Eligibility Determination: Eligible PA.45-6 Radiological Survey(s): None Site Status: Cleanup in progress by U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. PA.45-6 USACE Website Long-term Care Requirements: To be determined upon completion. Also see Documents Related to Shallow Land Disposal Area, PA

58

5.2 FY14 Focus Area Self-Assessments 0913  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

AFRD Focus Area Self-Assessments Selection of 2014 Focus Areas AFRD identified two Focus Areas that will be evaluated as part of the ES&H Self- Assessment process for Fiscal Year 2014 (FY14): Focus Area 1. Compressed Gas and Cryogen Safety This Focus Area was recommended by the AFRD ES&H Operations Committee and approved by the Division Director because of potential impact on safety of personnel and to evaluate compliance with requirements. Compressed gas and/or cryogens are used in most AFRD technical areas. The safe handling of compressed gas and cryogens is most closely associated with the 4th ISM Core Function, performing work within controls. A search of the Lessons Learned/Best Practices Database reveals three LBNL Lessons. Two of them are related to a 2013 injury at the ALS from losing control while handling

59

Modeling urban growth and land use/land cover change in the Houston Metropolitan Area from 2002 - 2030  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Houston-Galveston-Brazoria Consolidated Metropolitan Statistical Area (Houston CMSA) has experienced rapid population growth during the past decades and is the only major US metropolitan area with no zoning regulations. We use SLEUTH, a spatially explicit cellular automata model, to simulate future (2002-2030) urban growth in the Houston metropolitan area, one of the fastest growing metropolises in the United States during the past decades. The model is calibrated with historical data for the period 1974-2002 that are extracted from a time series of satellite images. The dataset consists of four historical urban extents (1974, 1984, 1992, 2002), two land use layers (1992, 2002), five transportation layers (1974, 1984, 1990, 2002, 2025), slope layer, hillshade layer, and excluded layer. Future growth patterns are predicted based on growth coefficients derived during the calibration phase. After calibrating the model successfully, the spatial pattern of urban growth of the Houston CMSA for the period from 2002 to 2030 is predicted. Within SLEUTH, growth in the Houston CMSA is predominately "organic" with most growth occurring along the urban/rural fringe. Projected increases in urban area from 2002 to 2030 parallel projected increases in population growth within the Houston CMSA. We design three specific scenarios to simulate the spatial consequences of urban growth under different environmental conditions. The first scenario is to simulate the unmanaged growth with no restrictions. The second scenario is to project the moderate growth trend by taking into consideration environmental protection, specifically for agricultural areas, forests and wetlands. The last scenario is to simulate the managed growth with maximum environmental protection. Adjusting the level of protection for different land cover types was found to markedly affect the land use changes in the Houston CMSA. Without any protection on resource lands, Houston CMSA is estimated to lose 2,000 km2 of forest land by 2030, about 600 km2 of agricultural land, and approximately 400 km2 of wetland. Approximately half of all resource land could be saved by the third scenario, managed growth with maximum protection.

Oguz, Hakan

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Focused  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

milling: milling: Depth control for three-dimensional microfabrication M. J. Vasile, a) Z. Niu, R. Nassar, W. Zhang, and S. Liu Institute for Micromanufacturing, Louisiana Tech University, Ruston, Louisiana 71272 ͑Received 29 May 1997; accepted 28 July 1997͒ Ion milling with a focused ion beam ͑FIB͒ is a potential method for making micromolds, which will then be the primary elements in the mass production of micro- or mini-objects by embossing or injection molding. The challenge lies in controlling the ion milling to produce cavities with predefined, arbitrary geometric cross-sections. This work involves programming variations as a function of position into the algorithm that generates the dwell times in the pixel address scheme of a FIB. These variations are done according to whether an axis of symmetry or a plane of symmetry determines the final geometry, and the result is 26 new

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land focus area" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Focused  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

milling milling of diamond: Effects of H 2 O on yield, surface morphology and microstructure D. P. Adams, a) M. J. Vasile, T. M. Mayer, and V. C. Hodges Thin Film, Vacuum and Packaging Department, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 ͑Received 1 July 2003; accepted 22 August 2003; published 24 November 2003͒ The effects of H 2 O vapor introduced during focused ion beam ͑FIB͒ milling of diamond͑100͒ are examined. In particular, we determine the yield, surface morphology, and microstructural damage that results from FIB sputtering and H 2 O-assisted FIB milling processes. Experiments involving 20 keV Ga ϩ bombardment to doses ϳ10 18 ions/cm 2 are conducted at a number of fixed ion incidence angles, ␪. For each ␪ selected, H 2 O-assisted ion milling shows an increased material removal rate compared with FIB sputtering ͑no gas assist͒. The amount by which the

62

MEETING NOTES Shallow Land Disposal Area (SLDA) FUSRAP Site  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1900s, the Upper Freeport Coal seam was deep mined beneath the majority of the site. Coal was later feet. The Upper Freeport coal was strip mined from the majority of the lower trench area strip mined from the western end of the site. Nuclear Materials and Equipment Corporation (NUMEC) owned

US Army Corps of Engineers

63

Thermal Gradient Holes At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009)  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Thermal Gradient Holes At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009) Thermal Gradient Holes At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient Holes At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009) Exploration Activity Details Location Salt Wells Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Thermal Gradient Holes Activity Date 2008 - 2008 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Vulcan increased exploration efforts in the summer and fall of 2008, during which time the company drilled two temperature gradient holes (86-15 O on Pad 1 and 17-16 O on Pad 3); conducted seismic, gravity and magnetotelluric surveys; and drilled deep exploration wells at Pads 6 and 8 and binary wells at Pads 1, 2, 4, and 7. Notes

64

Single-Well and Cross-Well Seismic At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Single-Well and Cross-Well Seismic At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Single-Well and Cross-Well Seismic At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Single-Well and Cross-Well Seismic At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009) Exploration Activity Details Location Salt Wells Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic Activity Date 2008 - 2008 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Vulcan increased exploration efforts in the summer and fall of 2008, during which time the company drilled two temperature gradient holes (86-15 O on Pad 1 and 17-16 O on Pad 3); conducted seismic, gravity and magnetotelluric surveys; and drilled deep exploration wells at Pads 6 and 8 and binary

65

Exploratory Well At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Exploratory Well At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009) Exploratory Well At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Exploratory Well At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009) Exploration Activity Details Location Salt Wells Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Exploratory Well Activity Date 2008 - 2008 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Vulcan increased exploration efforts in the summer and fall of 2008, during which time the company drilled two temperature gradient holes (86-15 O on Pad 1 and 17-16 O on Pad 3); conducted seismic, gravity and magnetotelluric surveys; and drilled deep exploration wells at Pads 6 and 8 and binary wells at Pads 1, 2, 4, and 7. Notes Data from these wells is proprietary, and so were unavailable for inclusion

66

Ground Gravity Survey At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009)  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009) Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Ground Gravity Survey At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009) Exploration Activity Details Location Salt Wells Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Ground Gravity Survey Activity Date 2008 - 2008 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Vulcan increased exploration efforts in the summer and fall of 2008, during which time the company drilled two temperature gradient holes (86-15 O on Pad 1 and 17-16 O on Pad 3); conducted seismic, gravity and magnetotelluric surveys; and drilled deep exploration wells at Pads 6 and 8 and binary wells at Pads 1, 2, 4, and 7. Notes Data from these wells is proprietary, and so were unavailable for inclusion

67

Sustainable Land Management Through Market-Oriented Commodity...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Livestock Research Institute Sector: Land Focus Area: Agriculture Topics: Market analysis, Background analysis Resource Type: Publications, Lessons learnedbest practices...

68

Forward-Looking Assimilation of MODIS-Derived Snow-Covered Area into a Land Surface Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Snow cover over land has a significant impact on the surface radiation budget, turbulent energy fluxes to the atmosphere, and local hydrological fluxes. For this reason, inaccuracies in the representation of snow-covered area (SCA) within a land ...

Benjamin F. Zaitchik; Matthew Rodell

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Area-Averaged Surface Fluxes in a Semiarid Region with Partly Irrigated Land: Lessons Learned from EFEDA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The European Field Experiment in a Desertification-Threatened Area (EFEDA) provides a comprehensive land surface dataset for a semiarid Mediterranean environment with natural vegetation and cultivated dry and irrigated land. This paper discusses ...

M. Anna Osann Jochum; Hendrik A. R. de Bruin; Albert A. M. Holtslag; Alfonso Calera Belmonte

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

H2A Delivery: GH2 and LH2 Forecourt Land Areas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

GH2 and LH2 Forecourt GH2 and LH2 Forecourt GH2 and LH2 Forecourt Land Areas Land Areas Hydrogen Delivery Analysis Meeting May 8-9, 2007 Columbia, Maryland TIAX LLC Matthew Hooks 1601 S. D Anza Blvd. hooks.matthew@TIAXLLC.com Cupertino CA, 95014 Tel. 408-517-1550 Reference: D0348 © 2007 TIAX LLC General Assumptions ƒ Forecourt stations with fewer than 6 hydrogen dispensers will have both hydrogen and gasoline dispensers on-site (6 total) ƒ Forecourt area (not including convenience store) will be allocated based on relative number of hydrogen/gasoline dispensers ƒ All stations with more than 6 hydrogen dispensers will only dispense hydrogen ƒ 100% of forecourt area (not including convenience store) will be allocated to hydrogen delivery ƒ Area allocated to hydrogen storage will be in excess of the

71

Harnessing the Power of the Sun, Solar Impulse Plane Lands in DC Area |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Harnessing the Power of the Sun, Solar Impulse Plane Lands in DC Harnessing the Power of the Sun, Solar Impulse Plane Lands in DC Area Harnessing the Power of the Sun, Solar Impulse Plane Lands in DC Area June 17, 2013 - 6:15pm Addthis Watch Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz give remarks at the Solar Impulse Press Conference in Washington, D.C. Erin R. Pierce Erin R. Pierce Digital Communications Specialist, Office of Public Affairs More on Solar Impulse View a slideshow of photos from today's event on Secretary Moniz's Facebook Page. Today, Secretary Moniz spoke at an event welcoming the arrival of the solar-powered Solar Impulse plane at Dulles International Airport near Washington, D.C. During the event, held at the National Air and Space Museum's Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center, Secretary Moniz highlighted the rapid expansion of the solar industry in the United States over the past

72

Harnessing the Power of the Sun, Solar Impulse Plane Lands in DC Area |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Harnessing the Power of the Sun, Solar Impulse Plane Lands in DC Harnessing the Power of the Sun, Solar Impulse Plane Lands in DC Area Harnessing the Power of the Sun, Solar Impulse Plane Lands in DC Area June 17, 2013 - 6:15pm Addthis Watch Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz give remarks at the Solar Impulse Press Conference in Washington, D.C. Erin R. Pierce Erin R. Pierce Digital Communications Specialist, Office of Public Affairs More on Solar Impulse View a slideshow of photos from today's event on Secretary Moniz's Facebook Page. Today, Secretary Moniz spoke at an event welcoming the arrival of the solar-powered Solar Impulse plane at Dulles International Airport near Washington, D.C. During the event, held at the National Air and Space Museum's Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center, Secretary Moniz highlighted the rapid expansion of the solar industry in the United States over the past

73

Observed Structure of a Land Breeze Head in the Tokyo Metropolitan Area  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The penetration of a land breeze front and its turbulence structure was observed at the center of the Tokyo metropolitan area on 2728 January 1983. A turbulence sonde, small tethersonde and an acoustic sounder were used for the experiment. The ...

Toshimasa Ohara; Itsushi Uno; Shinji Wakamatsu

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Helicopter Electromagnetic Survey of the Model Land Area, Southeastern Miami-Dade County, Florida  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Helicopter Electromagnetic Survey of the Model Land Area, Southeastern Miami-Dade County, Florida, Southeastern Miami-Dade County, Florida: U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report 2012­1176, 77 p. Any use of Environmental Resources Management (Miami-Dade County, Florida) DOI depth of investigation DRG digital raster

75

An Aerial Radiological Survey of the Yucca Mountain Project Proposed Land Withdrawal and Adjacent Areas  

SciTech Connect

An aerial radiological survey of the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) proposed land withdrawal was conducted from January to April 2006, and encompassed a total area of approximately 284 square miles (73,556 hectares). The aerial radiological survey was conducted to provide a sound technical basis and rigorous statistical approach for determining the potential presence of radiological contaminants in the Yucca Mountain proposed Land withdrawal area. The survey site included land areas currently managed by the Bureau of Land Management, the U.S. Air Force as part of the Nevada Test and Training Range or the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) as part of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The survey was flown at an approximate ground speed of 70 knots (36 meters per second), at a nominal altitude of 150 ft (46 m) above ground level, along a set of parallel flight lines spaced 250 ft (76 m) apart. The flight lines were oriented in a north-south trajectory. The survey was conducted by the DOE NNSA/NSO Remote Sensing Laboratory-Nellis, which is located in Las Vegas, Nevada. The aerial survey was conducted at the request of the DOE Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management. The primary contaminant of concern was identified by YMP personnel as cesium-137 ({sup 137}Cs). Due to the proposed land withdrawal area's proximity to the historical Nuclear Rocket Development Station (NRDS) facilities located on the NTS, the aerial survey system required sufficient sensitivity to discriminate between dispersed but elevated {sup 137}Cs levels from those normally encountered from worldwide fallout. As part of that process, the survey also measured and mapped the exposure-rate levels that currently existed within the survey area. The inferred aerial exposure rates of the natural terrestrial background radiation varied from less than 3 to 22 microroentgens per hour. This range of exposure rates was primarily due to the surface geological features within the survey area. The survey area has extensive areas of desert valleys, mountain ranges, extinct volcanic cones, and old lava flows. With the exception of five areas identified within the NRDS boundaries (discussed later in this report), there were no areas within the survey that exceeded aerial survey minimum detectable concentration levels of 0.4 through 0.7 picocuries per gram (pCi/g). The {sup 137}Cs levels do not exceed typical worldwide fallout levels for the continental United States.

Craig Lyons, Thane Hendricks

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

A Program to Stabilize Nuclear Materials as Managed by the Plutonium Focus Area  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the program to stabilize nuclear materials, consistent with the Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (EM) plan, Accelerating Cleanup: Paths to Closure. The program is managed by the Plutonium Stabilization and Disposition Focus Area, which defines and manages technology development programs to stabilize nuclear materials and assure their subsequent safe storage and final disposition. The scope of the Plutonium Stabilization and Disposition Focus Area (PFA) activities includes non-weapons plutonium materials, special isotopes, and other fissile materials. The PFA provides solutions to site-specific and complex wide technology issues associated with plutonium remediation, stabilization, and preparation for disposition. Our paper describes an important programmatic function of the Department of Energy nuclear materials stabilization program, including the tie-in of policy to research needs and funding for the nuclear materials disposition area. The PFA uses a rigorous systems engineering determination of technology needs and gaps, under the guidance of a Technical Advisory Panel, consisting of complex-wide experts. The Research and Development planning provides an example for other waste areas and should be of interest to Research and Development managers. The materials disposition maps developed by the PFA and described in this paper provide an evaluation of research needs, data gaps and subsequent guidance for the development of technologies for nuclear materials disposition. This paper also addresses the PFA prioritization methodology and its ability to forecast actual time to implementation.

B. Kenley (Kenley Consulting); B. Scott; B. Seidel (ANL-W); D. Knecht (LMITCO); F. Southworth; K. Osborne (DOE-ID); N. Chipman; T. Creque

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

land | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

land land Dataset Summary Description This dataset is part of a larger internal dataset at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) that explores various characteristics of large solar electric (both PV and CSP) facilities around the United States. This dataset focuses on the land use characteristics for solar facilities that are either under construction or currently in operation. Source Land-Use Requirements for Solar Power Plants in the United States Date Released June 25th, 2013 (5 months ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords acres area average concentrating solar power csp Density electric hectares km2 land land requirements land use land-use mean photovoltaic photovoltaics PV solar statistics Data application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.spreadsheetml.sheet icon Master Solar Land Use Spreadsheet (xlsx, 1.5 MiB)

78

Women and land : acces to and use of land and natural resources in the communal areas of rural South Africa.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The typical face of poverty in South Africa is African, rural, and female. As the primary users of rural land, women engage in farming (more)

Ursula F. Arends

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Historical Perspective on Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area (SCFA) Success: Counting the Things That Really Count  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area, (SCFA) is committed to, and has been accountable for, identifying and providing solutions for the most pressing subsurface contamination problems in the DOE Complex. The SCFA program is a DOE end user focused and problem driven organization that provides the best technical solutions for the highest priority problems. This paper will discuss in some detail specific examples of the most successful, innovative technical solutions and the DOE sites where they were deployed or demonstrated. These solutions exhibited outstanding performance in FY 2000/2001 and appear poised to achieve significant success in saving end users money and time. They also provide a reduction in risk to the environment, workers, and the public while expediting environmental clean up of the sites.

Wright, J. A. Jr.; Middleman, L. I.

2002-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

80

IDRISI Land Change Modeler | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

IDRISI Land Change Modeler IDRISI Land Change Modeler Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: IDRISI Land Change Modeler Agency/Company /Organization: Clark Labs Sector: Land Focus Area: Agriculture, Forestry Topics: Co-benefits assessment, - Environmental and Biodiversity, Resource assessment Resource Type: Maps, Software/modeling tools User Interface: Desktop Application Website: www.clarklabs.org/ Cost: Paid IDRISI Land Change Modeler Screenshot References: IDRISI Land Change Modeler[1] Overview "The Land Change Modeler is revolutionary land cover change analysis and prediction software with tools to analyze, measure and project the impacts of such change on habitat and biodiversity." References ↑ "IDRISI Land Change Modeler" Retrieved from

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land focus area" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Plutonium stabilization and disposition focus area, FY 1999 and FY 2000 multi-year program plan  

SciTech Connect

Consistent with the Environmental Management`s (EM`s) plan titled, ``Accelerating Cleanup: Paths to Closure``, and ongoing efforts within the Executive Branch and Congress, this Multi-Year Program Plan (MYPP) for the Plutonium Focus Area was written to ensure that technical gap projects are effectively managed and measured. The Plutonium Focus Area (PFA) defines and manages technology development programs that contribute to the effective stabilization of nuclear materials and their subsequent safe storage and final disposition. The scope of PFA activities includes the complete spectrum of plutonium materials, special isotopes, and other fissile materials. The PFA enables solutions to site-specific and complex-wide technology issues associated with plutonium remediation, stabilization, and preparation for disposition. The report describes the current technical activities, namely: Plutonium stabilization (9 studies); Highly enriched uranium stabilization (2 studies); Russian collaboration program (2 studies); Packaging and storage technologies (6 studies); and PFA management work package/product line (3 studies). Budget information for FY 1999 and FY 2000 is provided.

NONE

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Mixed Waste Focus Area Mercury Working Group: An integrated approach to mercury waste treatment and disposal  

SciTech Connect

In May 1996, the US Department of Energy (DOE) Mixed Waste Focus Area (MWFA) initiated the Mercury Working Group (HgWG). The HgWG was established to address and resolve the issues associated with mercury contaminated mixed wastes. During the MWFA`s initial technical baseline development process, three of the top four technology deficiencies identified were related to the need for amalgamation, stabilization, and separation removal technologies for the treatment of mercury and mercury contaminated mixed waste. The HgWG is assisting the MWFA in soliciting, identifying, initiating, and managing efforts to address these areas. The focus of the HgWG is to better establish the mercury related treatment technologies at the DOE sites, refine the MWFA technical baseline as it relates to mercury treatment, and make recommendations to the MWFA on how to most effectively address these needs. Based on the scope and magnitude of the mercury mixed waste problem, as defined by HgWG, solicitations and contract awards have been made to the private sector to demonstrate both the amalgamation and stabilization processes using actual mixed wastes. Development efforts are currently being funded that will address DOE`s needs for separation removal processes. This paper discusses the technology selection process, development activities, and the accomplishments of the HgWG to date through these various activities.

Conley, T.B.; Morris, M.I.; Osborne-Lee, I.W.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Mixed waste focus area integrated master schedule (current as of May 6, 1996)  

SciTech Connect

The mission of the Mixed Waste Characterization, Treatment, and Disposal Focus Area (MWFA) is to provide acceptable treatment systems, developed in partnership with users and with the participation of stakeholders, tribal governments, and regulators, that are capable of treating the Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) mixed wastes. In support of this mission, the MWTA produced the Mixed Waste Focus Area Integrated Technical Baseline Report, Phase I Volume 1, January 16, 1996, which identified a prioritized list of 30 national mixed waste technology deficiencies. The MWFA is targeting funding toward technology development projects that address the current list of deficiencies. A clear connection between the technology development projects and the EM-30 and EM-40 treatment systems that they support is essential for optimizing the MWFA efforts. The purpose of the Integrated Master Schedule (IMS) is to establish and document these connections and to ensure that all technology development activities performed by the MWFA are developed for timely use in those treatment systems. The IMS is a list of treatment systems from the Site Treatment Plans (STPs)/Consent Orders that have been assigned technology development needs with associated time-driven schedules, Technology deficiencies and associated technology development (TD) needs have been identified for each treatment system based on the physical, chemical, and radiological characteristics of the waste targeted for the treatment system. The schedule, the technology development activities, and the treatment system have been verified through the operations contact from the EM-30 organization at the site.

NONE

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

The mixed waste focus area mercury working group: an integrated approach for mercury treatment and disposal  

SciTech Connect

In May 1996, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Mixed Waste Focus Area (MWFA) initiated the Mercury Work Group (HgWG), which was established to address and resolve the issues associated with mercury- contaminated mixed wastes. Three of the first four technology deficiencies identified during the MWFA technical baseline development process were related to mercury amalgamation, stabilization, and separation/removal. The HgWG will assist the MWFA in soliciting, identifying, initiating, and managing all the efforts required to address these deficiencies. The focus of the HgWG is to better establish the mercury-related treatment needs at the DOE sites, refine the MWFA technical baseline as it relates to mercury treatment, and make recommendations to the MWFA on how to most effectively address these needs. The team will initially focus on the sites with the most mercury-contaminated mixed wastes, whose representatives comprise the HgWG. However, the group will also work with the sites with less inventory to maximize the effectiveness of these efforts in addressing the mercury- related needs throughout the entire complex.

Conley, T.B.; Morris, M.I. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Holmes-Burns, H. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Petersell, J. [AIMS, Inc., Golden, CO (United States); Schwendiman, L. [Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Numerical Simulation of Land Subsidence in the Los Banos-Kettleman City Area, California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

risk assessment of land subsidence in Shanhai. EnvironmentelObserved and simulated land subsidence for extenso meter 1 .and Miller, R. E. 1975. land subsidence due to ground water

Larson, Keith J; Basagaoglu, Hakan; Marino, Miguel

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Numerical Simulation of Land Subsidence in the Los Banos-Kettleman City Area, California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

risk assessment of land subsidence in Shanhai. EnvironmentalF. and Riley, F. S. 1984. Land Subsidence in the San Joaquinand Miller, R. E. 1975. Land subsidence due to ground water

Larson, Keith J; Basagaoglu, Hakan; Marino, Miguel A

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Economic Effects of Land Subsidence Due to Excessive Groundwater Withdrawal in the Texas Gulf Coast Area  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Land surface subsidence continues to be a destructive force in the Texas Gulf Coast area. The sinking of the surface has been linked by engineers to the withdrawal of groundwater. Subsidence causes damages and property value losses as saltwater encroachment is increased, property is permanently inundated, and temporary flooding is intensified. This study provides estimates of private and public costs attributable to land subsidence in a 945 square mile area that has subsided one foot or more since 1943. Estimates are divided into three sub-areas within this total area to provide insight into the incidence of subsidence-related costs. The sub-areas considered in this study were sub-area I, an 83 square mile area between Houston and Baytown containing square mile sample blocks adjacent to the upper Galveston bay and/or Buffalo Bayou and the Houston Ship Channel; sub-area II, the 25 square mile area surrounding Clear Lake and adjacent land fronting on Galveston bay; and sub-area III, the remaining area within the total 945 square mile area that had experienced subsidence of approximately two feet or more since 1943. Personal interviews, using questionnaires designed for reporting of damages and property value losses by a random sample of owners of residential, commercial and industrial property, comprised the data base for estimating total private costs attributable to subsidence. Public costs (federal, state, county and municipal) were obtained from personal interviews with public officials. In total, over 1100 interviews were conducted in the study area. Data from these interviews were expanded to total cost estimates for the subsiding area. Physical effects of surface subsidence were found to be largely dependent upon location of the property. Most damages and losses in property value occur in those areas in close proximity to Galveston bay and/or major waterways. Temporary flooding, permanent inundation, bulkheading and landfilling were the major subsidence-related causes of cost and/or losses in property value. Structural damages, largely from subsidence aggravated surface faults, were also significant. These comprised a higher proportion of damages in areas remote from the waterfront than in low lying areas subject to frequent flooding or permanent inundation. Estimated annual costs and property value losses totaled over $31.7 million per year for the study area as a whole. These were primarily costs to residential, commercial and industrial property owners, but included over $.5 million per year in public costs for damage abatement or repair to public facilities. Estimated costs by sub-areas revealed a higher incidence and intensity of damage and property value loss in waterfront (I and II) than in non-waterfront areas (III). Estimated costs in sub-areas I, II and III were $8.79 million, $5 million and $17.4 million, respectively. Sub-area I, which made up about 8.8 percent of the total study area, experienced 27.7 percent of total subsidence-related costs. Sub-area II experienced 15.8 percent of total costs while occupying only 3 percent of the total study area. And, although sub-area III had almost 55 percent of the total costs, it includes over 88 percent of the total area. Hence, subsidence damages and losses in property value are concentrated heavily in areas in close proximity to the immediate coastline of Galveston bay, Buffalo Bayou, Clear Lake and Taylor Lake. Other sections throughout the study area experienced damages and property losses but less frequently and less intensively. A comparative analysis of the total costs of groundwater pumping with alternative surface water importation was developed to examine the economic feasibility of importing surface water to displace groundwater as a means of avoiding annual subsidence costs. A break-even analysis revealed that for the five year period 1969-73, the importation of surface water to meet all the area's water needs (up to 198.16 billion gallons per year) would have been economically justifi

Jones, L. L.; Larson, J.

1975-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Tanks Focus Area Alternative Salt Processing Research and Development Program Plan  

SciTech Connect

In March 2000, DOE-Headquarters (HQ) requested the Tanks Focus Area (TFA) to assume management responsibility for the Salt Processing Project technology development program at Savannah River Site. The TFA was requested to conduct several activities, including review and revision of the technology development roadmaps, development of down-selection criteria, and preparation of a comprehensive Research and Development (R&D) Program Plan for three candidate cesium removal technologies, as well as the Alpha and strontium removal processes that must also be carried out. The three cesium removal candidate technologies are Crystalline Silicotitanate (CST) Non-Elutable Ion Exchange, Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX), and Small Tank Tetraphenylborate Precipitation (STTP). This plan describes the technology development needs for each process that must be satisfied in order to reach a down-selection decision, as well as continuing technology development required to support conceptual design activities.

Harmon, Harry D.

2000-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

89

Tanks Focus Area Alternative Salt Processing Research and Development Program Plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In March 2000, DOE-Headquarters (HQ) requested the Tanks Focus Area (TFA)to assume management responsibility for the Salt Processing Project technology development program at Savannah River Site. The TFA was requested to conduct several activities, including review and revision of the technology development roadmaps, development of down-selection criteria, and preparation of a comprehensive Research and Development (R&D) Program Plan for three candidate cesium removal technologies, as well as the Alpha and strontium removal processes that must also be carried out. The three cesium removal candidate technologies are Crystalline Silicotitanate (CST) Non-Elutable Ion Exchange, Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX), and Small Tank Tetraphenylborate Precipitation (STTP). This plan describes the technology development needs for each process that must be satisfied in order to reach a down-selection decision, as well as continuing technology development required to support conceptual design activities.

Harmon, Harry D.

2000-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

90

Subsurface Contaminant Focus Area: Monitored Natural Attenuation (MNA)--Programmatic, Technical, and Regulatory Issues  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Natural attenuation processes are commonly used for remediation of contaminated sites. A variety of natural processes occur without human intervention at all sites to varying rates and degrees of effectiveness to attenuate (decrease) the mass, toxicity, mobility, volume, or concentration of organic and inorganic contaminants in soil, groundwater, and surface water systems. The objective of this review is to identify potential technical investments to be incorporated in the Subsurface Contaminant Focus Area Strategic Plan for monitored natural attenuation. When implemented, the technical investments will help evaluate and implement monitored natural attenuation as a remediation option at DOE sites. The outcome of this review is a set of conclusions and general recommendations regarding research needs, programmatic guidance, and stakeholder issues pertaining to monitored natural attenuation for the DOE complex.

Krupka, Kenneth M.; Martin, Wayne J.

2001-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

91

Investigation of the Effects of Different Land Use and Land Cover Patterns on Mesoscale Meteorological Simulations in the Taiwan Area  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) land use (LU) data employed in the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model classify most LU types in Taiwan as mixtures of irrigated cropland and forest, which is not an accurate representation of current ...

Fang-Yi Cheng; Yu-Ching Hsu; Pay-Liam Lin; Tang-Huang Lin

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Mixed Waste Focus Area integrated technical baseline report, Phase 1: Volume 1  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) established the Mixed Waste Characterization, Treatment, and Disposal Focus Area (MWFA) to develop and facilitate implementation of technologies required to meet the Department`s commitments for treatment of mixed low-level and transuranic wastes. The mission of the MWFA is to provide acceptable treatment systems, developed in partnership with users and with participation of stakeholders, tribal governments, and regulators, that are capable of treating DOE`s mixed waste. These treatment systems include all necessary steps such as characterization, pretreatment, and disposal. To accomplish this mission, a technical baseline is being established that forms the basis for determining which technology development activities will be supported by the MWFA. The technical baseline is the prioritized list of deficiencies, and the resulting technology development activities needed to overcome these deficiencies. This document presents Phase I of the technical baseline development process, which resulted in the prioritized list of deficiencies that the MWFA will address. A summary of the data and the assumptions upon which this work was based is included, as well as information concerning the DOE Office of Environmental Management (EM) mixed waste technology development needs. The next phase in the technical baseline development process, Phase II, will result in the identification of technology development activities that will be conducted through the MWFA to resolve the identified deficiencies.

1996-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

93

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Precious Lands Wildlife Management Area, Technical Report 2000-2003.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Nez Perce Tribe (NPT) currently manages a 15,325 acre parcel of land known as the Precious Lands Wildlife Management Area that was purchased as mitigation for losses incurred by construction of the four lower Snake River dams. The Management Area is located in northern Wallowa County, Oregon and southern Asotin County, Washington (Figure 1). It is divided into three management parcels--the Buford parcel is located on Buford Creek and straddles the WA-OR state line, and the Tamarack and Basin parcels are contiguous to each other and located between the Joseph Creek and Cottonwood Creek drainages in Wallowa County, OR. The project was developed under the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980 (P.L. 96-501), with funding from the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). The acreage protected under this contract will be credited to BPA as habitat permanently dedicated to wildlife and wildlife mitigation. A modeling strategy known as Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was developed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and adopted by BPA as a habitat equivalency accounting system. Nine wildlife species models were used to evaluate distinct cover type features and provide a measure of habitat quality. Models measure a wide range of life requisite variables for each species and monitor overall trends in vegetation community health and diversity. One product of HEP is an evaluation of habitat quality expressed in Habitat Units (HUs). This HU accounting system is used to determine the amount of credit BPA receives for mitigation lands. After construction of the four lower Snake River dams, a HEP loss assessment was conducted to determine how many Habitat Units were inundated behind the dams. Twelve target species were used in that evaluation: Canada goose, mallard, river otter, downy woodpecker, song sparrow, yellow warbler, marsh wren, western meadowlark, chukar, ring-necked pheasant, California quail, and mule deer. The U.S. Army Corp of Engineers and the Washington Department of fish and Wildlife subsequently purchased numerous properties to mitigate for the identified Snake River losses. These projects, however, were not sufficient to mitigate for all the HU's lost. The Northwest Power Planning Council amended the remaining 26,774 HU's into their 1994-1995 Fish and Wildlife Program as being unmitigated (NPPC 2000), which allowed the Nez Perce Tribe to contract with BPA to provide HU's through the Precious Lands Project. The Precious Lands project contains a different composition of cover types than those assessed during the lower Snake loss assessment. For example, no mallard or Canada goose habitat exists on Precious Lands but the area does contain conifer forest, which was not present on the area inundated by dam construction. These cover type differences have resulted in a slightly different suite of species for the current HEP assessment. Target species for Precious Lands are downy woodpecker, yellow warbler, song sparrow, California Quail, mule deer, sharp-tailed grouse (brood rearing), west em meadowlark, beaver, and black-capped chickadee. This list is a reflection of the available cover types and the management objectives of the Nez Perce Tribe. For example, chukar was not used in the present assessment because it is an introduced Eurasian game bird that does not provide an accurate representation of the ecological health of the native grasslands it was supposed to represent. Initial model runs using the chukar confirmed this suspicion so the brood-rearing section of the sharp-tailed grouse model was used instead. Additionally, the beaver model was used in place of the river otter model because the otter model used in the loss assessment was not a published model, was overly simplistic, and did not provide an accurate assessment of riparian condition. The beaver model, however, provides a detailed evaluation of overstory class structure that the NPT felt was a good compliment to the yellow warbler and song sparrow models that evaluated understory shrub layers. Overall, such substituti

Kozusko, Shana

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Limited-Area Model Sensitivity to the Complexity of Representation of the Land Surface Energy Balance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

By coupling a multimode land surface scheme with a regional climate model, three scientific issues are addressed in this paper: (i) the regional model's sensitivity to the different levels of complexity presented by the land surface ...

H. Zhang; A. Henderson-Sellers; A. J. Pitman; C. E. Desborough; J. L. McGregor; J. J. Katzfey

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

The Effects of Remotely Sensed Plant Functional Type and Leaf Area Index on Simulations of Boreal Forest Surface Fluxes by the NCAR Land Surface Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The land surface models used with atmospheric models typically characterize landscapes in terms of generalized biome types. However, the advent of highspatial resolution satellite-derived data products such as land cover and leaf area index (LAI)...

Keith W. Oleson; Gordon B. Bonan

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

TFA Tank Focus Area - multiyear program plan FY98-FY00  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) continues to face a major radioactive waste tank remediation problem with hundreds of waste tanks containing hundreds of thousands of cubic meters of high-level waste (HLW) and transuranic (TRU) waste across the DOE complex. Approximately 80 tanks are known or assumed to have leaked. Some of the tank contents have reacted to form flammable gases, introducing additional safety risks. These tanks must be maintained in a safe condition and eventually remediated to minimize the risk of waste migration and/or exposure to workers, the public, and the environment. However, programmatic drivers are more ambitious than baseline technologies and budgets will support. Science and technology development investments are required to reduce the technical and programmatic risks associated with the tank remediation baselines. The Tanks Focus Area (TFA) was initiated in 1994 to serve as the DOE`s Office of Environmental Management`s (EM`s) national technology development program for radioactive waste tank remediation. The national program was formed to increase integration and realize greater benefits from DOE`s technology development budget. The TFA is responsible for managing, coordinating, and leveraging technology development to support DOE`s four major tank sites: Hanford Site (Washington), Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) (Idaho), Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) (Tennessee), and Savannah River Site (SRS) (South Carolina). Its technical scope covers the major functions that comprise a complete tank remediation system: waste retrieval, waste pretreatment, waste immobilization, tank closure, and characterization of both the waste and tank with safety integrated into all the functions. The TFA integrates program activities across organizations that fund tank technology development EM, including the Offices of Waste Management (EM-30), Environmental Restoration (EM-40), and Science and Technology (EM-50).

NONE

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

TFA Tanks Focus Area Multiyear Program Plan FY00-FY04  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) continues to face a major radioactive waste tank remediation problem with hundreds of waste tanks containing hundreds of thousands of cubic meters of high-level waste (HLW) and transuranic (TRU) waste across the DOE complex. Approximately 68 tanks are known or assumed to have leaked contamination to the soil. Some of the tank contents have reacted to form flammable gases, introducing additional safety risks. These tanks must be maintained in a safe condition and eventually remediated to minimize the risk of waste migration and/or exposure to workers, the public, and the environment. However, programmatic drivers are more ambitious than baseline technologies and budgets will support. Science and technology development investments are required to reduce the technical and programmatic risks associated with the tank remediation baselines. The Tanks Focus Area (TFA) was initiated in 1994 to serve as the DOE Office of Environmental Management's (EM's) national technology development program. for radioactive waste tank remediation. The national program was formed to increase integration and realize greater benefits from DOE's technology development budget. The TFA is responsible for managing, coordinating, and leveraging technology development to support DOE's five major tank sites: Hanford Site (Washington), Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) (Idaho), Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) (Tennessee), Savannah River Site (SRS) (South Carolina), and West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) (New York). Its technical scope covers the major functions that comprise a complete tank remediation system: waste retrieval, waste pretreatment, waste immobilization, tank closure, and characterization of both the waste and tank with safety integrated into all the functions. The TFA integrates program activities across EM organizations that fund tank technology development, including the Offices of Waste Management (EM-30), Environmental Restoration (EM-40), and Science and Technology (EM-50 or OST).

BA Carteret; JH Westsik; LR Roeder-Smith; RL Gilchrist; RW Allen; SN Schlahta; TM Brouns

1999-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

98

An assessment of the available windy land area and wind energy potential in the contiguous United States  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Estimates of land areas with various levels of wind energy resource and resultant wind energy potential have been developed for each state in the contiguous United States. The estimates are based on published wind resource data and account for the exclusion of some windy lands as a result of environmental and land-use considerations. Despite these exclusions, the amount of wind resource estimated over the contiguous United States is surprisingly large and has the potential to supply a substantial fraction of the nation's energy needs, even with the use of today's wind turbine technology. Although this study shows that, after exclusions, only about 0.6% of the land area in the contiguous United States is characterized by high wind resource (comparable to that found in windy areas of California where wind energy is being cost-effectively developed), the wind electric potential that could be extracted with today's technology from these areas across the United States is equivalent to about 20% of the current US electric consumption. Future advances in wind turbine technology will further enhance the potential of wind energy. As advances in turbine technology allow areas of moderate wind resource to be developed, more than a tenfold increase in the wind energy potential is possible. These areas, which cover large sections of the Great Plains and are widely distributed throughout many other sections of the country, have the potential of producing more than three times the nation's current electric consumption. 9 refs., 12 figs., 13 tabs.

Elliott, D.L.; Wendell, L.L.; Gower, G.L.

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Inhalation of primary motor vehicle emissions: Effects of urbanpopulation and land area  

SciTech Connect

Urban population density can influence transportation demand, as expressed through average daily vehicle-kilometers traveled per capita (VKT). In turn, changes in transportation demand influence total passenger vehicle emissions. Population density can also influence the fraction of total emissions that are inhaled by the exposed urban population. Equations are presented that describe these relationships for an idealized representation of an urban area. Using analytic solutions to these equations, we investigate the effect of three changes in urban population and urban land area (infill, sprawl, and constant-density growth) on per capita inhalation intake of primary pollutants from passenger vehicles. The magnitude of these effects depends on density-emissions elasticity ({var_epsilon}{sub e}), a normalized derivative relating change in population density to change in vehicle emissions. For example, if urban population increases, per capita intake is less with infill development than with constant-density growth if {var_epsilon}{sub e} is less than -0.5, while for {var_epsilon}{sub e} greater than -0.5 the reverse is true.

Marshall, Julian D.; McKone, Thomas E.; Nazaroff, William W.

2004-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

100

Mesocell Study Area Snow Distributions for the Cold Land Processes Experiment (CLPX)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Cold Land Processes Experiment (CLPX) had a goal of describing snow-related features over a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. This required linking disparate snow tools and datasets into one coherent, integrated package. Simulating ...

Glen E. Liston; Christopher A. Hiemstra; Kelly Elder; Donald W. Cline

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land focus area" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Focused ion beam patterned Fe thin films A study by selective area Stokes polarimetry and soft x-Ray microscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We demonstrate the potential to modify the magnetic behavior and structural properties of ferromagnetic thin films using focused ion beam 'direct-write' lithography. Patterns inspired by the split-ring resonators often used as components in meta-materials were defined upon 15 nm Fe films using a 30 keV Ga{sup +} focused ion beam at a dose of 2 x 10{sup 16} ions cm{sup -2}. Structural, chemical and magnetic changes to the Fe were studied using transmission soft X-ray microscopy at the ALS, Berkeley CA. X-ray absorption spectra showed a 23% reduction in the thickness of the film in the Ga irradiated areas, but no chemical change to the Fe was evident. X-ray images of the magnetic reversal process show domain wall pinning around the implanted areas, resulting in an overall increase in the coercivity of the film. Transmission electron microscopy showed significant grain growth in the implanted regions.

Cook, P. J.; Shen, T. H.; Grundy, P. J.; Im, M.-Y.; Fischer, P.; Morton, S. A.; Kilcoyne, A. L. D.

2010-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

102

land requirements | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

requirements requirements Dataset Summary Description This dataset is part of a larger internal dataset at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) that explores various characteristics of large solar electric (both PV and CSP) facilities around the United States. This dataset focuses on the land use characteristics for solar facilities that are either under construction or currently in operation. Source Land-Use Requirements for Solar Power Plants in the United States Date Released June 25th, 2013 (5 months ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords acres area average concentrating solar power csp Density electric hectares km2 land land requirements land use land-use mean photovoltaic photovoltaics PV solar statistics Data application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.spreadsheetml.sheet icon Master Solar Land Use Spreadsheet (xlsx, 1.5 MiB)

103

land use | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

use use Dataset Summary Description This dataset is part of a larger internal dataset at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) that explores various characteristics of large solar electric (both PV and CSP) facilities around the United States. This dataset focuses on the land use characteristics for solar facilities that are either under construction or currently in operation. Source Land-Use Requirements for Solar Power Plants in the United States Date Released June 25th, 2013 (5 months ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords acres area average concentrating solar power csp Density electric hectares km2 land land requirements land use land-use mean photovoltaic photovoltaics PV solar statistics Data application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.spreadsheetml.sheet icon Master Solar Land Use Spreadsheet (xlsx, 1.5 MiB)

104

From Petascale to Exascale: Eight Focus Areas of R&D Challenges for HPC Simulation Environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Programming models bridge the gap between the underlying hardware architecture and the supporting layers of software available to applications. Programming models are different from both programming languages and application programming interfaces (APIs). Specifically, a programming model is an abstraction of the underlying computer system that allows for the expression of both algorithms and data structures. In comparison, languages and APIs provide implementations of these abstractions and allow the algorithms and data structures to be put into practice - a programming model exists independently of the choice of both the programming language and the supporting APIs. Programming models are typically focused on achieving increased developer productivity, performance, and portability to other system designs. The rapidly changing nature of processor architectures and the complexity of designing an exascale platform provide significant challenges for these goals. Several other factors are likely to impact the design of future programming models. In particular, the representation and management of increasing levels of parallelism, concurrency and memory hierarchies, combined with the ability to maintain a progressive level of interoperability with today's applications are of significant concern. Overall the design of a programming model is inherently tied not only to the underlying hardware architecture, but also to the requirements of applications and libraries including data analysis, visualization, and uncertainty quantification. Furthermore, the successful implementation of a programming model is dependent on exposed features of the runtime software layers and features of the operating system. Successful use of a programming model also requires effective presentation to the software developer within the context of traditional and new software development tools. Consideration must also be given to the impact of programming models on both languages and the associated compiler infrastructure. Exascale programming models must reflect several, often competing, design goals. These design goals include desirable features such as abstraction and separation of concerns. However, some aspects are unique to large-scale computing. For example, interoperability and composability with existing implementations will prove critical. In particular, performance is the essential underlying goal for large-scale systems. A key evaluation metric for exascale models will be the extent to which they support these goals rather than merely enable them.

Springmeyer, R; Still, C; Schulz, M; Ahrens, J; Hemmert, S; Minnich, R; McCormick, P; Ward, L; Knoll, D

2011-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

105

Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area (SCFA) Lead Laboratory Providing Technical Assistance to the DOE Weapons Complex in Subsurface Contamination  

SciTech Connect

The Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area (SCFA), a DOE-HQ EM-50 organization, is hosted and managed at the Savannah River Site in Aiken, South Carolina. SCFA is an integrated program chartered to find technology and scientific solutions to address DOE subsurface environmental restoration problems throughout the DOE Weapons Complex. Since its inception in 1989, the SCFA program has resulted in a total of 269 deployments of 83 innovative technologies. Until recently, the primary thrust of the program has been to develop, demonstrate, and deploy those remediation technology alternatives that are solutions to technology needs identified by the DOE Sites. Over the last several years, the DOE Sites began to express a need not only for innovative technologies, but also for technical assistance. In response to this need, DOE-HQ EM-50, in collaboration with and in support of a Strategic Lab Council recommendation directed each of its Focus Areas to implement a Lead Laboratory Concept to enhance their technical capabilities. Because each Focus Area is unique as defined by the contrast in either the type of contaminants involved or the environments in which they are found, the Focus Areas were given latitude in how they set up and implemented the Lead Lab Concept. The configuration of choice for the SCFA was a Lead-Partner Lab arrangement. Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) teamed with the SCFA as the Focus Area's Lead Laboratory. SRTC then partnered with the DOE National Laboratories to create a virtual consulting function within DOE. The National Laboratories were established to help solve the Nation's most difficult problems, drawing from a resource pool of the most talented and gifted scientists and engineers. Following that logic, SRTC, through the Lead-Partner Lab arrangement, has that same resource base to draw from to provide assistance to any SCFA DOE customer throughout the Complex. This paper briefly describes how this particular arrangement is organized and provides case histories that illustrate its strengths in solving problems and offering solutions. The program is designed to minimize red tape, maximize value, and to rapidly and cost effectively disseminate solutions to common problems facing the DOE.

Wright, J. A. Jr.; Corey, J. C.

2002-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

106

land-use | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

land-use land-use Dataset Summary Description This dataset is part of a larger internal dataset at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) that explores various characteristics of large solar electric (both PV and CSP) facilities around the United States. This dataset focuses on the land use characteristics for solar facilities that are either under construction or currently in operation. Source Land-Use Requirements for Solar Power Plants in the United States Date Released June 25th, 2013 (5 months ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords acres area average concentrating solar power csp Density electric hectares km2 land land requirements land use land-use mean photovoltaic photovoltaics PV solar statistics Data application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.spreadsheetml.sheet icon Master Solar Land Use Spreadsheet (xlsx, 1.5 MiB)

107

Mixed Waste Focus Area mercury contamination product line: An integrated approach to mercury waste treatment and disposal  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (DOE) Mixed Waste Focus Area (MWFA) is tasked with ensuring that solutions are available for the mixed waste treatment problems of the DOE complex. During the MWFA`s initial technical baseline development process, three of the top four technology deficiencies identified were related to the need for amalgamation, stabilization, and separation/removal technologies for the treatment of mercury and mercury-contaminated mixed waste. The focus area grouped mercury-waste-treatment activities into the mercury contamination product line under which development, demonstration, and deployment efforts are coordinated to provide tested technologies to meet the site needs. The Mercury Working Group (HgWG), a selected group of representatives from DOE sites with significant mercury waste inventories, is assisting the MWFA in soliciting, identifying, initiating, and managing efforts to address these areas. Based on the scope and magnitude of the mercury mixed waste problem, as defined by HgWG, solicitations and contract awards have been made to the private sector to demonstrate amalgamation and stabilization processes using actual mixed wastes. Development efforts are currently being funded under the product line that will address DOE`s needs for separation/removal processes. This paper discusses the technology selection process, development activities, and the accomplishments of the MWFA to date through these various activities.

Hulet, G.A. [Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Conley, T.B.; Morris, M.I. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Contribution of Land Use Changes to Near-Surface Air Temperatures during Recent Summer Extreme Heat Events in the Phoenix Metropolitan Area  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The impact of 19732005 land useland cover (LULC) changes on near-surface air temperatures during four recent summer extreme heat events (EHEs) are investigated for the arid Phoenix, Arizona, metropolitan area using the Weather Research and ...

Susanne Grossman-Clarke; Joseph A. Zehnder; Thomas Loridan; C. Sue B. Grimmond

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Mixed Waste Focus Area Working Group: An Integrated Approach to Mercury Waste Treatment and Disposal. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

May 1996, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Mixed Waste Focus Area (MWFA) initiated the Mercury Work Group (HgWG). The HgWG was established to address and resolve the issues associated with Mercury- contaminated mixed wastes (MWs). During the initial technical baseline development process of the MWFA, three of the top four technology deficiencies identified were related to (1) amalgamation, (2) stabilization, and (3) separation and removal for the treatment of mercury and mercury-contaminated mixed waste (MW). The HgWG is assisting the MWFA in soliciting, identifying, initiating, and managing efforts to address these needs.

Morris, M.I.; Conley, T.B.; Osborne-Lee, I.W.

1997-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

110

The Nuclear Material Focus Area Roadmapping Process Utilizing Environmental Management Complex-Wide Nuclear Material Disposition Pathways  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the process that the Nuclear Materials Focus Area (NMFA) has developed and utilizes in working with individual Department of Energy (DOE) sites to identify, address, and prioritize research and development efforts in the stabilization, disposition, and storage of nuclear materials. By associating site technology needs with nuclear disposition pathways and integrating those with site schedules, the NMFA is developing a complex wide roadmap for nuclear material technology development. This approach will leverage technology needs and opportunities at multiple sites and assist the NMFA in building a defensible research and development program to address the nuclear material technology needs across the complex.

Sala, D. R.; Furhman, P.; Smith, J. D.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

111

Focus Area 2 Deliverables  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 - Adequate NQA-1 Suppliers 2 - Adequate NQA-1 Suppliers Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 J U N 2 2 2069 MEMORANDUM FOR DISTRIBUTION FROM: DAE Y. CHUNG DEPUTY ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR SAFETY MANAGEMENT AND OPERATIONS ENVIRONlMENTAL MANAGEMENT SUBJECT: Issuance of the Office of Environmental Management Nuclear Supplier Alert System The Office of Environmental Management (EM) and the Energy Facility Contractors Group (EFCOG) Quality Assurance (QA) Corporate Board has developed a Nuclear Supplier Alert System as part of its EMIEFCOG QA Improvement Project Plan. This Corporate Board deliverable was approved by the voting members in the last meeting held on March 19,2009. This system is critical to mitigating past weaknesses in supplier qualification and oversight that have resulted in: I

112

Focus Area 5 Deliverables  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5 - Line Management Understanding of QA 5 - Line Management Understanding of QA and Oversight Top Right Quadrant: Quality Assurance Point of Contact: Sandra Waisley * Issues: Users will provide current or on-going QA issues of concern that impact work being done correctly, timely, and safely. Input could be from recent assessments, trends, Performance Metrics, number of open action items, recurring issues, etc. Example: Issue #1: Training database was not updated for a 60 day period following termination of training coordinator * Risks: Users will identify risks that impact the project (can be related to "issues" [above] or any other FPD identified risk) being done correctly, timely, and safely. Example: Risk #1: Unqualified personnel may have performed hazardous work

113

Tanks Focus Area  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Partnership Partnership Project Number 08.1.3.1.7, DOE-EM 21 K. Brown (Presenter), Senior Research Scientist, CRESP/Vanderbilt U. D. Esh, M. Furman, J. Phillip, US NRC D. Kosson, S. Mahadevan, A. Garrabrants, CRESP/Vanderbilt U. H. van der Sloot, J.C.L. Meeussen, R. Comans, P. Seignette, ECN (NL) E. Garboczi, K. Snyder, J. Bullard, NIST (US) E. Samson, J. Marchand, SIMCO, Inc. (Canada) C. Langton, G. Flach, R. Seitz, G. Taylor, S. Marra, SRNL DOE Project Manager: Al Baione U.S. DOE Office of Waste Processing Technical Exchange 19-21 May 2009 2 Partnership Members Department of Energy - Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) * Principal supporting agency * Primary end-user Nuclear Regulatory Commission (US NRC) * Oversight & Research Divisions * Primary end-user

114

Comparison of Modeled and Observed Accumulated Convective Precipitation in Mountainous and Flat Land Areas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Convective precipitation is the main cause of extreme rainfall events in small areas. Its primary characteristics are both large spatial and temporal variability. For this reason, the monitoring of accumulated precipitation fields (liquid and ...

Mladjen ?uri?; Dejan Janc

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Environment, safety, health, and quality plan for the TRU- Contaminated Arid Soils Project of the Landfill Stabilization Focus Area Program  

SciTech Connect

The Landfill Stabilization Focus Area (LSFA) is a program funded by the US Department of Energy Office of Technology Development. LSFA supports the applied research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation of a suite of advanced technologies that together form a comprehensive remediation system for the effective and efficient remediation of buried waste. The TRU-Contaminated Arid Soils project is being conducted under the auspices of the LSFA Program. This document describes the Environment, Safety, Health, and Quality requirements for conducting LSFA/Arid Soils activities at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Topics discussed in this report, as they apply to LSFA/Arid Soils operations, include Federal, State of Idaho, and Environmental Protection Agency regulations, Health and Safety Plans, Quality Program, Data Quality Objectives, and training and job hazard analysis. Finally, a discussion is given on CERCLA criteria and system and performance audits as they apply to the LSFA Program.

Watson, L.R.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Survey of Revegetated Areas on the Fitzner/Eberhardt Arid Lands Ecology Reserve: Status and Initial Monitoring Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During 2010, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Richland Operations Office removed a number of facilities and debris from the Fitzner/Eberhardt Arid Lands Ecology Reserve (ALE), which is part of the Hanford Reach National Monument (HRNM). Revegetation of disturbed sites is necessary to stabilize the soil, reduce invasion of these areas by exotic weeds, and to accelerate re-establishment of native plant communities. Seven revegetation units were identified on ALE based on soils and potential native plant communities at the site. Native seed mixes and plant material were identified for each area based on the desired plant community. Revegetation of locations affected by decommissioning of buildings and debris removal was undertaken during the winter and early spring of 2010 and 2011, respectively. This report describes both the details of planting and seeding for each of the units, describes the sampling design for monitoring, and summarizes the data collected during the first year of monitoring. In general, the revegetation efforts were successful in establishing native bunchgrasses and shrubs on most of the sites within the 7 revegetation units. Invasion of the revegetation areas by exotic annual species was minimal for most sites, but was above initial criteria in 3 areas: the Hodges Well subunit of Unit 2, and Units 6 and 7.

Downs, Janelle L.; Link, Steven O.; Rozeboom, Latricia L.; Durham, Robin E.; Cruz, Rico O.; Mckee, Sadie A.

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

USGS-Land Cover Institute (LCI) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

USGS-Land Cover Institute (LCI) USGS-Land Cover Institute (LCI) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: USGS-Land Cover Institute (LCI) Agency/Company /Organization: United States Geological Survey Sector: Land Focus Area: Land Use Topics: Resource assessment Resource Type: Maps User Interface: Website Website: landcover.usgs.gov/landcoverdata.php Cost: Free USGS-Land Cover Institute (LCI) Screenshot References: USGS-Land Cover Institute (LCI)[1] "Welcome to the U.S Geological Survey (USGS) Land Cover Institute (LCI). The USGS currently houses the institute at the Center for Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS) in Sioux Falls, South Dakota. The LCI will address land cover topics from local to global scales, and in both domestic and international settings. The USGS through the Land Cover Institute

118

Agriculture and Land Use National Greenhouse Gas Inventory Software | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Agriculture and Land Use National Greenhouse Gas Inventory Software Agriculture and Land Use National Greenhouse Gas Inventory Software Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Agriculture and Land Use National Greenhouse Gas Inventory Software Agency/Company /Organization: Colorado State University Partner: United States Agency for International Development, United States Forest Service, United States Environmental Protection Agency Sector: Land Focus Area: Forestry, Agriculture Topics: GHG inventory Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Desktop Application Website: www.nrel.colostate.edu/projects/ghgtool/index.php Cost: Free Agriculture and Land Use National Greenhouse Gas Inventory Software Screenshot References: Agriculture and Land Use National Greenhouse Gas Inventory Software[1]

119

Cleanup and treatment (CAT) test: a land-area decontamination project utilizing a vacuum method of soil removal  

SciTech Connect

Areas 11 and 13 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) are contaminated with varying concentrations of Pu-239, 240 and Am-241. An investigation of a vacuum method of soil removal, the Cleanup and Treatment (CAT) test, was conducted over a 3-month period in the plutonium safety shot or Plutonium Valley portion of Area 11. Soil in Plutonium Valley is of the Aridisol Order. The surface 0 to 10 cm is a gravelly loam, and is strongly alkaline (pH 8.8). A large truck-mounted vacuum unit, rather than conventional earth-moving equipment, was used as the primary soil collection unit. Effectiveness of the vacuum method of soil removal was evaluated in relation to conventional earthmoving procedures, particularly in terms of volume reduction of removed soil achieved over conventional techniques. Radiological safety considerations associated with use of the vacuum unit were evaluated in relation to their impact on a full-scale land decontamination program. Environmental and operational impacts of devegetation with retention of root crowns or root systems were investigated. It is concluded that the CAT test was successful under difficult environmental conditions.

Orcutt, J.A.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Land Use History  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study focuses on the cultural-historical environment of the 88,900-acre (35,560-ha) Valles Caldera National Preserve (VCNP) over the past four centuries of Spanish, Mexican, and U.S. governance. It includes a review and synthesis of available published and unpublished historical, ethnohistorical, and ethnographic literature about the human occupation of the area now contained within the VCNP. Documents include historical maps, texts, letters, diaries, business records, photographs, land and mineral patents, and court testimony. This study presents a cultural-historical framework of VCNP land use that will be useful to land managers and researchers in assessing the historical ecology of the property. It provides VCNP administrators and agents the cultural-historical background needed to develop management plans that acknowledge traditional associations with the Preserve, and offers managers additional background for structuring and acting on consultations with affiliated communities.

United States; Forest Service; Kurt F. Anschuetz

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land focus area" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Evaluation of Land Surface Models in Reproducing Satellite Derived Leaf Area Index over the High-Latitude Northern Hemisphere. Part II: Earth System Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: Leaf Area Index (LAI) is a key parameter in the Earth System Models (ESMs) since it strongly affects land-surface boundary conditions and the exchange of matter and energy with the atmosphere. Observations and data products derived from satellite remote sensing are important for the validation and evaluation of ESMs from regional to global scales. Several decades worth of satellite data products are now available at global scale which represents a unique opportunity to contrast observations against model results. The objective of this study is to assess whether ESMs correctly reproduce the spatial variability of LAI when compared with satellite data and to compare the length of the growing season in the different models with the satellite data. To achieve this goal we analyse outputs from 11 coupled carbon-climate models that are based on the set of new global model simulations planned in support of the IPCC Fifth Assessment Report. We focus on the average LAI and the length of the growing season on Northern Hemisphere over the period 19862005. Additionally we compare the results with previous analyses (Part I) of

Ro Anav; Guillermo Murray-tortarolo; Pierre Friedlingstein; Stephen Sitch; Shilong Piao; Zaichun Zhu

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Phase I Focused Corrective Measures Study/Feasibility Study for the L-Area Oil and Chemical Basin (904-83G)  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the completed Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Focused Corrective Measures Study/Feasibility Study (CMS/FS) for the L-Area Oil and Chemical Basin (LAOCB)/L-Area Acid Caustic Basin (9LAACB) Solid Waste Management Unit/Operable Unit (SWMU/OU) at the Savannah River Site (SRS).

Palmer, E. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States)

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

EIS-0442: Reauthorization of Permits, Maintenance, and Vegetation Management on Western Area Power Administration Transmission Lines on Forest Service Lands, Colorado, Nebraska, and Utah  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This EIS is being prepared jointly by DOEs Western Area Power Administration and the U.S. Forest Service. The EIS evaluates the potential environmental impacts of Westerns proposed changes to vegetation management along its transmission line rights-of-way on National Forest System lands in Colorado, Utah, and Nebraska.

124

Seasonal and Interannual Variations of Evapotranspiration and Energy Exchange over Different Land Surfaces in a Semiarid Area of China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Seasonal and interannual variations of evapotranspiration (ET) and energy exchange were estimated over degraded grassland and cropland land surfaces in a semiarid region of northeastern China using the eddy covariance technique from 2003 to 2008. ...

Liu Huizhi; Feng Jianwu

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Relationships among Remotely Sensed Data, Surface Energy Balance, and Area-Averaged Fluxes over Partially Vegetated Land Surfaces  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Numerous recent field experiments have examined the use of remote sensing to estimate land surface fluxes of latent and sensible heat using combinations of thermal, visible, and near-infrared data. While substantial progress has been made, ...

M. A. Friedl

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

AVHRR-Derived Land Surface Conditions for Flux Simulations with a Mesoscale Model over the HAPEX-Sahel Study Area  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The description of land surface conditions at a spatial scale adapted to climate and meteorological models is at the core of major problems in environment studies. In this regard, the information routinely provided by remote sensing observations ...

Roselyne Lacaze; Sylvie Donier; Pierre Lacarrre; Jean-Louis Roujean

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Behind "successful" land acquisition : a case study of the Van Quan new urban area project in Hanoi, Vietnam  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The transition to a market economy has sparked Vietnam's unprecedented urbanization and industrialization. In order to accommodate the spiraling land demand triggered by urban and economic growth, the Vietnamese government ...

Bui, Phuong Anh, M. C. P. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Emerging factors associated with the decline of a gray fox population and multi-scale land cover associations of mesopredators in the Chicago metropolitan area.  

SciTech Connect

Statewide surveys of furbearers in Illinois indicate gray (Urocyon cinereoargenteus) and red (Vulpes vulpes) foxes have experienced substantial declines in relative abundance, whereas other species such as raccoons (Procyon lotor) and coyotes (Canis latrans) have exhibited dramatic increases during the same time period. The cause of the declines of gray and red foxes has not been identified, and the current status of gray foxes remains uncertain. Therefore, I conducted a large-scale predator survey and tracked radiocollared gray foxes from 2004 to 2007 in order to determine the distribution, survival, cause-specific mortality sources and land cover associations of gray foxes in an urbanized region of northeastern Illinois, and examined the relationships between the occurrence of gray fox and the presence other species of mesopredators, specifically coyotes and raccoons. Although generalist mesopredators are common and can reach high densities in many urban areas their urban ecology is poorly understood due to their secretive nature and wariness of humans. Understanding how mesopredators utilize urbanized landscapes can be useful in the management and control of disease outbreaks, mitigation of nuisance wildlife issues, and gaining insight into how mesopredators shape wildlife communities in highly fragmented areas. I examined habitat associations of raccoons, opossums (Didelphis virginiana), domestic cats (Felis catus), coyotes, foxes (gray and red), and striped skunks (Mephitis mephitis) at multiple spatial scales in an urban environment. Gray fox occurrence was rare and widely dispersed, and survival estimates were similar to other studies. Gray fox occurrence was negatively associated with natural and semi-natural land cover types. Fox home range size increased with increasing urban development suggesting that foxes may be negatively influenced by urbanization. Gray fox occurrence was not associated with coyote or raccoon presence. However, spatial avoidance and mortality due to coyote predation was documented and disease was a major mortality source for foxes. The declining relative abundance of gray fox in Illinois is likely a result of a combination of factors. Assessment of habitat associations indicated that urban mesopredators, particularly coyotes and foxes, perceived the landscape as relatively homogeneous and that urban mesopredators interacted with the environment at scales larger than that accommodated by remnant habitat patches. Coyote and fox presence was found to be associated with a high degree of urban development at large and intermediate spatial scales. However, at a small spatial scale fox presence was associated with high density urban land cover whereas coyote presence was associated with urban development with increased forest cover. Urban habitats can offer a diversity of prey items and anthropogenic resources and natural land cover could offer coyotes daytime resting opportunities in urban areas where they may not be as tolerated as smaller foxes. Raccoons and opossums were found to utilize moderately developed landscapes with interspersed natural and semi-natural land covers at a large spatial scale, which may facilitate dispersal movements. At intermediate and small spatial scales, both species were found to utilize areas that were moderately developed and included forested land cover. These results indicated that raccoons and opossums used natural areas in proximity to anthropogenic resources. At a large spatial scale, skunk presence was associated with highly developed landscapes with interspersed natural and semi-natural land covers. This may indicate that skunks perceived the urban matrix as more homogeneous than raccoons or opossums. At an intermediate spatial scale skunks were associated with moderate levels of development and increased forest cover, which indicated that they might utilize natural land cover in proximity to human-dominated land cover. At the smallest spatial scale skunk presence was associated with forested land cover surrounded by a suburban matrix. Compared to raccoon

Willingham, Alison N.; /Ohio State U.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Research Focus  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Focus Focus Work at FEERC is centered on three interrelated areas of research: fuels, engines, and emis- sions. FEERC scientists study the impacts of fuel properties on advanced combustion processes as well as on emissions and emission control strategies and devices. The range of fuels studied includes gaseous (natural gas) and liquid fuels from conventional and unconventional fossil- based sources, as well as non-petroleum fuels from synthetic and renewable sources. The FEERC conducts research on innovative internal combustion engine technologies and control systems for improved efficiency. Combining novel diagnostic and experimental methods with modeling, the Center's scientists also develop improved understanding of the functions and key mechanisms of emission control devices

130

An area-dependent wind function for estimating open water evaporation using land-based meteorological data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We propose a generally applicable formula for estimating evaporation rate from open water bodies which utilizes readily available land-based meteorological data. We follow the well-known aerodynamic approach in which evaporation rate is modelled as the ... Keywords: Evaporation, Lake, Open water, Pond, Uncertainty, Water body, Wind function, Wind speed

D. L. McJannet; I. T. Webster; F. J. Cook

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

A Simple Parcel Method for Prediction of Cumulus Onset and Area-Averaged Cloud Amount over Heterogeneous Land Surfaces  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this note is to compare several methods for predicting the onset and quantitative amount of cloud cover over heterogeneous land surfaces. Among the methods tested are that of Wilde et al. (1985) and a new, simple parcel approach. ...

Peter J. Wetzel

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Improved Hydrogen Gas Getters for TRU Waste Transuranic and Mixed Waste Focus Area - Phase 2 Final Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Alpha radiolysis of hydrogenous waste and packaging materials generates hydrogen gas in radioactive storage containers. For that reason, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) limits the flammable gas (hydrogen) concentration in the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) containers to 5 vol% of hydrogen in air, which is the lower explosion limit. Consequently, a method is needed to prevent the build up of hydrogen to 5 vol% during the storage and transport of the TRUPACT-II containers (up to 60 days). One promising option is the use of hydrogen getters. These materials scavenge hydrogen from the gas phase and irreversibly bind it in the solid phase. One proven getter is a material called 1,4-bis (phenylethynyl) benzene, or DEB. It has the needed binding rate and capacity, but some of the chemical species that might be present in the containers could interfere with its ability to remove hydrogen. This project is focused upon developing a protective polymeric membrane coating for the DEB getter material, which comes in the form of small, irregularly shaped particles. This report summarizes the experimental results of the second phase of the development of the materials.

Stone, Mark Lee

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Mozambique-Biofuels, Land Access and Rural Livelihoods | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Biofuels, Land Access and Rural Livelihoods Biofuels, Land Access and Rural Livelihoods Jump to: navigation, search Name Mozambique-Biofuels, Land Access and Rural Livelihoods Agency/Company /Organization International Institute for Environment and Development Sector Energy, Land Focus Area Biomass, - Biofuels, Forestry, Agriculture Topics Implementation, Co-benefits assessment, - Energy Access, Resource assessment, Background analysis Resource Type Publications, Case studies/examples Website http://www.iied.org/pubs/pdfs/ Country Mozambique UN Region Eastern Africa References Mozambique-Biofuels, Land Access and Rural Livelihoods[1] Mozambique-Biofuels, Land Access and Rural Livelihoods Screenshot Background "This report documents how the spread of biofuels is affecting land access for poorer groups in Mozambique, and what actions are being taken,

134

MODIS Land Products Subsets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ORNL DAAC MODIS Land Product Subsets MODIS Collection 5 Global Subsetting and Visualization Tool Create subset for user selected site, area, product, and time period. Data for...

135

Hierarchical Marginal Land Assessment for Land Use Planning  

SciTech Connect

Marginal land provides an alternative potential for food and bioenergy production in the face of limited land resources; however, effective assessment of marginal lands is not well addressed. Concerns over environmental risks, ecosystem services and sustainability for marginal land have been widely raised. The objective of this study was to develop a hierarchical marginal land assessment framework for land use planning and management. We first identified major land functions linking production, environment, ecosystem services and economics, and then classified land resources into four categories of marginal land using suitability and limitations associated with major management goals, including physically marginal land, biologically marginal land, environmental-ecological marginal land, and economically marginal land. We tested this assessment framework in south-western Michigan, USA. Our results indicated that this marginal land assessment framework can be potentially feasible on land use planning for food and bioenergy production, and balancing multiple goals of land use management. We also compared our results with marginal land assessment from the Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) and land capability classes (LCC) that are used in the US. The hierarchical assessment framework has advantages of quantitatively reflecting land functions and multiple concerns. This provides a foundation upon which focused studies can be identified in order to improve the assessment framework by quantifying high-resolution land functions associated with environment and ecosystem services as well as their criteria are needed to improve the assessment framework.

Kang, Shujiang [ORNL; Post, Wilfred M [ORNL; Wang, Dali [ORNL; Nichols, Dr Jeff A [ORNL; Bandaru, Vara Prasad [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Land use requirements for ground-mounted solar power facilities. | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Land use requirements for ground-mounted solar power facilities. Land use requirements for ground-mounted solar power facilities. Dataset Summary Description This dataset is part of a larger internal dataset at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) that explores various characteristics of large solar electric (both PV and CSP) facilities around the United States. This dataset focuses on the land use characteristics for solar facilities that are either under construction or currently in operation. Source Land-Use Requirements for Solar Power Plants in the United States Date Released June 25th, 2013 (5 months ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords acres area average concentrating solar power csp Density electric hectares km2 land land requirements land use land-use mean photovoltaic photovoltaics PV solar statistics Data application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.spreadsheetml.sheet icon Master Solar Land Use Spreadsheet (xlsx, 1.5 MiB)

137

Revegetation Plan for Areas of the Fitzner-Eberhardt Arid Lands Ecology Reserve Affected by Decommissioning of Buildings and Infrastructure and Debris Clean-up Actions  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Richland Operations Office is working to remove a number of facilities on the Fitzner Eberhardt Arid Lands Ecology Reserve (ALE), which is part of the Hanford Reach National Monument. Decommissioning and removal of buildings and debris on ALE will leave bare soils and excavated areas that need to be revegetated to prevent erosion and weed invasion. Four main areas within ALE are affected by these activities (DOE 2009;DOE/EA-1660F): 1) facilities along the ridgeline of Rattlesnake Mountain, 2) the former Nike missile base and ALE HQ laboratory buildings, 3) the aquatic research laboratory at Rattlesnake Springs area, and 4) a number of small sites across ALE where various types of debris remain from previous uses. This revegetation plan addresses the revegetation and restoration of those land areas disturbed by decommissioning and removal of buildings, facilities and associated infrastructure or debris removal. The primary objective of the revegetation efforts on ALE is to establish native vegetation at each of the sites that will enhance and accelerate the recovery of the native plant community that naturally persists at that location. Revegetation is intended to meet the direction specified by the Environmental Assessment (DOE 2009; DOE/EA-1660F) and by Stipulation C.7 of the Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) for the Rattlesnake Mountain Combined Community Communication Facility and InfrastructureCleanup on the Fitzner/Eberhardt Arid Lands Ecology Reserve, Hanford Site, Richland Washington(DOE 2009; Appendix B). Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) under contract with CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company (CPRC) and in consultation with the tribes and DOE-RL developed a site-specific strategy for each of the revegetation units identified within this document. The strategy and implementation approach for each revegetation unit identifies an appropriate native species mix and outlines the necessary site preparation activities and specific methods for seeding and planting at each area. evegetation work is scheduled to commence during the first quarter of FY 2011 to minimize the amount of time that sites are unvegetated and more susceptible to invasion by non-native weedy annual species.

Downs, Janelle L.; Durham, Robin E.; Larson, Kyle B.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Tribal and public involvement in the U.S. Department of Energy Mixed Waste Focus Area -- First quarter status report for the period ending December 31, 1995  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (DOE) Mixed Waste Focus Area (MWFA) began operations in February 1995 to provide technologies for the design, construction, and operation of implementable mixed waste treatment systems as identified in DOE Site Treatment Plans of the Federal Facilities Compliance Act. Implementable mixed waste treatment systems means that they meet the MWFA success criteria and that potential barriers to implementing those treatment systems have been identified and eliminated through effective communications and meaningful involvement with regulators, stakeholders, and tribal governments. The Regulatory and External Liaison Product Area of the MWFA is responsible for ensuring that possible teaming arrangements are considered and integrated into the MWFA technology development and decision-making processes. The Tribal and Public Involvement Team of the MWFA Regulatory and External Liaison Product Area has initiated a variety of activities to facilitate tribal and stakeholder involvement within the MWFA. This document discusses the status of those activities as of the end of the first quarter of the 1996 fiscal year and describes applicable lessons learned and process improvements.

Owens, K.J.

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Since 1995, under its Land Legacy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

program, The Conservation Fund has helped protect 272,751 acres and raised $15 million for land protection. The Conservation Fund has launched the final phase of its American Land Legacy initiative to protect 200 sites around the country by 2001. The effort focuses on acquisition of threatened landscapes, critical wildlife habitat, watershed areas, prime outdoor recreational opportunities, key historical sites and community greenways. Since starting the project in 1995, the Fund and its partners have protected 1,300 acres per week. As part of the Land Legacy initiative, the Fund is working to triple the size of its revolving fund, which is used solely to finance land protection, to $30 million. With our new resources, the Fund will be able to move more effectively to save valuable land under threat of development, said John Turner, the Funds president and chief executive officer. As we move into a new century, this effort will provide us with new tools to address the growing needs of the conservation community. The third component of the Land Legacy program involves the expansion of educational opportunities to bolster the leadership skills of conservation professionals. Land legacy sites: The Funds Legacy initiative has helped preserve 85 natural, cultural and managed landscapes covering 272,751 acres valued at $222 million and acquired at a cost of $86 million. Continued on page 6

unknown authors

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

An integrated multi-criteria scenario evaluation web tool for participatory land-use planning in urbanized areas: The Ecosystem Portfolio Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Land-use land-cover change is one of the most important and direct drivers of changes in ecosystem functions and services. Given the complexity of the decision-making, there is a need for Internet-based decision support systems with scenario evaluation ... Keywords: Decision support, Ecological value, Ecosystem restoration, Land-use planning, Quality of life, Sea level rise mitigation, Sustainability

W. B. Labiosa; W. M. Forney; A. -M. Esnard; D. Mitsova-Boneva; R. Bernknopf; P. Hearn; D. Hogan; L. Pearlstine; D. Strong; H. Gladwin; E. Swain

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land focus area" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

AREA  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

AREA AREA FAQ # Question Response 316 vs DCAA FAQ 1 An inquiry from CH about an SBIR recipient asking if a DCAA audit is sufficient to comply with the regulation or if they need to add this to their audit they have performed yearly by a public accounting firm. 316 audits are essentially A-133 audits for for-profit entities. They DO NOT replace DCAA or other audits requested by DOE to look at indirect rates or incurred costs or closeouts. DCAA would never agree to perform A-133 or our 316 audits. They don't do A-133 audits for DOD awardees. The purpose of the audits are different, look at different things and in the few instances of overlap, from different perspectives. 316

142

The Multi-Scale Mass Transfer Processes Controlling Natural Attenuation and Engineered Remediation: An IFC Focused on Hanfords 300 Area Uranium Plume Quality Assurance Project Plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of the project is to conduct research at an Integrated Field-Scale Research Challenge Site in the Hanford Site 300 Area, CERCLA OU 300-FF-5 (Figure 1), to investigate multi-scale mass transfer processes associated with a subsurface uranium plume impacting both the vadose zone and groundwater. The project will investigate a series of science questions posed for research related to the effect of spatial heterogeneities, the importance of scale, coupled interactions between biogeochemical, hydrologic, and mass transfer processes, and measurements/approaches needed to characterize a mass-transfer dominated system. The research will be conducted by evaluating three (3) different hypotheses focused on multi-scale mass transfer processes in the vadose zone and groundwater, their influence on field-scale U(VI) biogeochemistry and transport, and their implications to natural systems and remediation. The project also includes goals to 1) provide relevant materials and field experimental opportunities for other ERSD researchers and 2) generate a lasting, accessible, and high-quality field experimental database that can be used by the scientific community for testing and validation of new conceptual and numerical models of subsurface reactive transport.

Fix, N. J.

2008-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

143

Agriculture, Forestry and Other Land Use Mitigation Project Database | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Agriculture, Forestry and Other Land Use Mitigation Project Database Agriculture, Forestry and Other Land Use Mitigation Project Database Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Agriculture, Forestry and Other Land Use Mitigation Project Database Agency/Company /Organization: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations Sector: Land Focus Area: Forestry, Agriculture Resource Type: Dataset Website: www.fao.org/climatechange/67148/en/ RelatedTo: Mitigation of Climate Change in Agriculture (MICCA) Project Agriculture, Forestry and Other Land Use Mitigation Project Database Screenshot References: AFOLU Mitigation Database[1] Global Survey of Agricultural Mitigation Projects Paper[2] "The AFOLU MP database endeavors to gather information on all mitigation activities currently ongoing within the agricultural and forestry sectors

144

Land use and land cover, 1978 Hot Springs, South Dakota, Nebraska  

SciTech Connect

Land use and land cover of the area surrounding Hot Springs, South Dakota in 1978 is presented in map form. (ACR)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Global Observation of Forest and Land Cover Dynamics (GOFC-GOLD) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

of Forest and Land Cover Dynamics (GOFC-GOLD) of Forest and Land Cover Dynamics (GOFC-GOLD) Jump to: navigation, search Name Global Observation of Forest and Land Cover Dynamics (GOFC-GOLD) Agency/Company /Organization World Meteorological Organization, United Nations Educational Scientific and Cultural Organization, United Nations Environment Programme, International Council for Science, Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations Sector Land, Climate Focus Area Biomass, Forestry, Agriculture Topics GHG inventory Resource Type Software/modeling tools Website http://www.fao.org/gtos/gofc-g References Global Observation of Forest and Land Cover Dynamics (GOFC-GOLD)[1] Global Observation of Forest and Land Cover Dynamics (GOFC-GOLD) Screenshot "Global Observation of Forest and Land Cover Dynamics (GOFC-GOLD) is a

146

Climate Change Mitigation Through Land-Use Measures in the Agriculture and  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Climate Change Mitigation Through Land-Use Measures in the Agriculture and Climate Change Mitigation Through Land-Use Measures in the Agriculture and Forestry Sectors Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Climate Change Mitigation Through Land-Use Measures in the Agriculture and Forestry Sectors Agency/Company /Organization: International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD) Sector: Energy, Land, Climate Focus Area: Forestry, Agriculture Topics: Policies/deployment programs Resource Type: Publications Website: www.iisd.org/pdf/2009/climate_change_mitigation_land_use.pdf References: Climate Change Mitigation Through Land-Use Measures in the Agriculture and Forestry Sectors[1] Overview "This paper reviews the status of the post-2012 negotiations on climate change mitigation through land-use measures in the agriculture and forestry

147

Multi-Scale Mass Transfer Processes Controlling Natural Attenuation and Engineered Remediation: An IFRC Focused on Hanfords 300 Area Uranium Plume  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Integrated Field-Scale Subsurface Research Challenge (IFRC) at the Hanford Site 300 Area uranium (U) plume addresses multi-scale mass transfer processes in a complex hydrogeologic setting where groundwater and riverwater interact. A series of forefront science questions on mass transfer are posed for research which relate to the effect of spatial heterogeneities; the importance of scale; coupled interactions between biogeochemical, hydrologic, and mass transfer processes; and measurements and approaches needed to characterize and model a mass-transfer dominated system. The project was initiated in February 2007, with CY 2007 and CY 2008 progress summarized in preceding reports. The site has 35 instrumented wells, and an extensive monitoring system. It includes a deep borehole for microbiologic and biogeochemical research that sampled the entire thickness of the unconfined 300 A aquifer. Significant, impactful progress has been made in CY 2009 with completion of extensive laboratory measurements on field sediments, field hydrologic and geophysical characterization, four field experiments, and modeling. The laboratory characterization results are being subjected to geostatistical analyses to develop spatial heterogeneity models of U concentration and chemical, physical, and hydrologic properties needed for reactive transport modeling. The field experiments focused on: (1) physical characterization of the groundwater flow field during a period of stable hydrologic conditions in early spring, (2) comprehensive groundwater monitoring during spring to characterize the release of U(VI) from the lower vadose zone to the aquifer during water table rise and fall, (3) dynamic geophysical monitoring of salt-plume migration during summer, and (4) a U reactive tracer experiment (desorption) during the fall. Geophysical characterization of the well field was completed using the down-well Electrical Resistance Tomography (ERT) array, with results subjected to robust, geostatistically constrained inversion analyses. These measurements along with hydrologic characterization have yielded 3D distributions of hydraulic properties that have been incorporated into an updated and increasingly robust hydrologic model. Based on significant findings from the microbiologic characterization of deep borehole sediments in CY 2008, down-hole biogeochemistry studies were initiated where colonization substrates and spatially discrete water and gas samplers were deployed to select wells. The increasingly comprehensive field experimental results, along with the field and laboratory characterization, are leading to a new conceptual model of U(VI) flow and transport in the IFRC footprint and the 300 Area in general, and insights on the microbiological community and associated biogeochemical processes. A significant issue related to vertical flow in the IFRC wells was identified and evaluated during the spring and fall field experimental campaigns. Both upward and downward flows were observed in response to dynamic Columbia River stage. The vertical flows are caused by the interaction of pressure gradients with our heterogeneous hydraulic conductivity field. These impacts are being evaluated with additional modeling and field activities to facilitate interpretation and mitigation. The project moves into CY 2010 with ambitious plans for a drilling additional wells for the IFRC well field, additional experiments, and modeling. This research is part of the ERSP Hanford IFRC at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.

Zachara, John M.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Christensen, John N.; Conrad, Mark E.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Freshley, Mark D.; Haggerty, Roy; Hammon, Glenn; Kent, Douglas B.; Konopka, Allan; Lichtner, Peter C.; Liu, Chongxuan; McKinley, James P.; Murray, Christopher J.; Rockhold, Mark L.; Rubin, Yoram; Vermeul, Vincent R.; Versteeg, Roelof J.; Ward, Anderson L.; Zheng, Chunmiao

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Estimating Carbon Supply Curves for Global Forests and Other Land Uses |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Estimating Carbon Supply Curves for Global Forests and Other Land Uses Estimating Carbon Supply Curves for Global Forests and Other Land Uses Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Estimating Carbon Supply Curves for Global Forests and Other Land Uses Agency/Company /Organization: Resources for the Future Sector: Land Focus Area: Forestry, Agriculture Topics: GHG inventory, Resource assessment Resource Type: Guide/manual Website: www.rff.org/documents/RFF-DP-01-19.pdf Estimating Carbon Supply Curves for Global Forests and Other Land Uses Screenshot References: Estimating Carbon Supply Curves for Global Forests and Other Land Uses[1] Abstract "This study develops cumulative carbon "supply curves" for global forests utilizing an dynamic timber supply model for sequestration of forest carbon. Because the period of concern is the next century, and

149

Manual for Social Impact Assessment of Land-Based Carbon Projects | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Manual for Social Impact Assessment of Land-Based Carbon Projects Manual for Social Impact Assessment of Land-Based Carbon Projects Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Manual for Social Impact Assessment of Land-Based Carbon Projects Agency/Company /Organization: Forest Trends, The Climate, Community and Biodiversity (CCB) Alliance, The Rainforest Alliance, Flora and Fauna International Partner: United Nations Development Programme, U.S. Agency for International Development Sector: Land Focus Area: Agriculture, Forestry Topics: Co-benefits assessment Resource Type: Guide/manual Complexity/Ease of Use: Simple Website: www.forest-trends.org/documents/files/doc_2436.pdf Cost: Free Manual for Social Impact Assessment of Land-Based Carbon Projects Screenshot References: Manual for Social Impact Assessment of Land-Based Carbon Projects[1]

150

Sustainable Land Management Through Market-Oriented Commodity Development:  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sustainable Land Management Through Market-Oriented Commodity Development: Sustainable Land Management Through Market-Oriented Commodity Development: Case studies from Ethiopia Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Sustainable Land Management Through Market-Oriented Commodity Development: Case studies from Ethiopia Agency/Company /Organization: International Livestock Research Institute Sector: Land Focus Area: Agriculture Topics: Market analysis, Background analysis Resource Type: Publications, Lessons learned/best practices Website: mahider.ilri.org/bitstream/10568/2372/1/WP_21_final.pdf Country: Ethiopia UN Region: "Sub-Saharan Africa" is not in the list of possible values (Eastern Africa, Middle Africa, Northern Africa, Southern Africa, Western Africa, Caribbean, Central America, South America, Northern America, Central Asia, Eastern Asia, Southern Asia, South-Eastern Asia, Western Asia, Eastern Europe, Northern Europe, Southern Europe, Western Europe, Australia and New Zealand, Melanesia, Micronesia, Polynesia, Latin America and the Caribbean) for this property.

151

Assessment of Biomass Resources from Marginal Lands in APEC Countries |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

from Marginal Lands in APEC Countries from Marginal Lands in APEC Countries Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Assessment of Biomass Resources from Marginal Lands in APEC Countries Name Assessment of Biomass Resources from Marginal Lands in APEC Countries Agency/Company /Organization National Renewable Energy Laboratory Sector Energy Focus Area Biomass Topics Resource assessment Resource Type Dataset, Maps, Publications Website http://www.biofuels.apec.org/p Country Australia, Brunei, Canada, Chile, China, Indonesia, Japan, South Korea, Malaysia, Mexico, New Zealand, Papua New Guinea, Peru, Philippines, Russia, Chinese Taipei, Thailand, United States, Vietnam Australia and New Zealand, South-Eastern Asia, Northern America, South America, Eastern Asia, South-Eastern Asia, Eastern Asia, Eastern Asia, South-Eastern Asia, Central America, Australia and New Zealand, Melanesia, South America, South-Eastern Asia, Eastern Europe, , South-Eastern Asia, Northern America, South-Eastern Asia

152

INDEPENDENT CONFIRMATORY SURVEY REPORT FOR THE REACTOR BUILDING, HOT LABORATORY, PRIMARY PUMP HOUSE, AND LAND AREAS AT THE PLUM BROOK REACTOR FACILITY, SANDUSKY, OHIO  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 1941, the War Department acquired approximately 9,000 acres of land near Sandusky, Ohio and constructed a munitions plant. The Plum Brook Ordnance Works Plant produced munitions, such as TNT, until the end of World War II. Following the war, the land remained idle until the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics later called the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) obtained 500 acres to construct a nuclear research reactor designed to study the effects of radiation on materials used in space flight. The research reactor was put into operation in 1961 and was the first of fifteen test facilities eventually built by NASA at the Plum Brook Station. By 1963, NASA had acquired the remaining land at Plum Brook for these additional test facilities

Erika N. Bailey

2011-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

153

Russian Land Cover Data Sets Released, January 7, 2004  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Russian Land Cover Data Sets Released, January 7, 2004 The ORNL DAAC announces the release of 12 map data products -- land cover, forested area, forest carbon content, and...

154

FOCUS COOLING  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

www.datacenterdynamics.com www.datacenterdynamics.com FOCUS COOLING Issue 28, March/April 2013 LBNL'S NOVEL APPROACH TO COOLING Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and APC by Schneider Electric test a unique double-exchanger cooling system LBNL program manager Henry Coles says can cut energy use by half A s part of a demonstration sponsored by the California Energy Commission in support of the Silicon Valley Leadership Group's data center summit, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) collaborated with APC by Schneider Electric to demonstrate a novel prototype data center cooling device. The device was installed at an LBNL data center in Berkeley, California. It included two air-to-water heat exchangers. Unlike common single-heat-exchanger configurations, one of these was supplied with

155

The Underground Test Area Project of the Nevada Test Site: Building Confidence in Groundwater Flow and Transport Models at Pahute Mesa Through Focused Characterization Studies  

SciTech Connect

Pahute Mesa at the Nevada Test Site contains about 8.0E+07 curies of radioactivity caused by underground nuclear testing. The Underground Test Area Subproject has entered Phase II of data acquisition, analysis, and modeling to determine the risk to receptors from radioactivity in the groundwater, establish a groundwater monitoring network, and provide regulatory closure. Evaluation of radionuclide contamination at Pahute Mesa is particularly difficult due to the complex stratigraphy and structure caused by multiple calderas in the Southwestern Nevada Volcanic Field and overprinting of Basin and Range faulting. Included in overall Phase II goals is the need to reduce the uncertainty and improve confidence in modeling results. New characterization efforts are underway, and results from the first year of a three-year well drilling plan are presented.

Pawloski, G A; Wurtz, J; Drellack, S L

2009-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

156

EOS Land Validation Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

EOS Land Validation The EOS Land Validation Project Overview EOS Land Validation Logo The objective of the EOS Land Validation Project is to achieve consistency, completeness,...

157

Multi-Scale Mass Transfer Processes Controlling Natural Attenuation and Engineered Remediation: An IFRC Focused on Hanfords 300 Area Uranium Plume January 2011 to January 2012  

SciTech Connect

The Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) at the Hanford Site 300 Area uranium (U) plume addresses multi-scale mass transfer processes in a complex subsurface biogeochemical setting where groundwater and riverwater interact. A series of forefront science questions on reactive mass transfer motivates research. These questions relate to the effect of spatial heterogeneities; the importance of scale; coupled interactions between biogeochemical, hydrologic, and mass transfer processes; and measurements and approaches needed to characterize and model a mass-transfer dominated biogeochemical system. The project was initiated in February 2007, with CY 2007, CY 2008, CY 2009, and CY 2010 progress summarized in preceding reports. A project peer review was held in March 2010, and the IFRC project acted upon all suggestions and recommendations made in consequence by reviewers and SBR/DOE. These responses have included the development of 'Modeling' and 'Well-Field Mitigation' plans that are now posted on the Hanford IFRC web-site, and modifications to the IFRC well-field completed in CY 2011. The site has 35 instrumented wells, and an extensive monitoring system. It includes a deep borehole for microbiologic and biogeochemical research that sampled the entire thickness of the unconfined 300 A aquifer. Significant, impactful progress has been made in CY 2011 including: (i) well modifications to eliminate well-bore flows, (ii) hydrologic testing of the modified well-field and upper aquifer, (iii) geophysical monitoring of winter precipitation infiltration through the U-contaminated vadose zone and spring river water intrusion to the IFRC, (iv) injection experimentation to probe the lower vadose zone and to evaluate the transport behavior of high U concentrations, (v) extended passive monitoring during the period of water table rise and fall, and (vi) collaborative down-hole experimentation with the PNNL SFA on the biogeochemistry of the 300 A Hanford-Ringold contact and the underlying redox transition zone. The modified well-field has functioned superbly without any evidence for well-bore flows. Beyond these experimental efforts, our site-wide reactive transport models (PFLOTRAN and eSTOMP) have been updated to include site geostatistical models of both hydrologic properties and adsorbed U distribution; and new hydrologic characterization measurements of the upper aquifer. These increasingly robust models are being used to simulate past and recent U desorption-adsorption experiments performed under different hydrologic conditions, and heuristic modeling to understand the complex functioning of the smear zone. We continued efforts to assimilate geophysical logging and 3D ERT characterization data into our site wide geophysical model, with significant and positive progress in 2011 that will enable publication in 2012. Our increasingly comprehensive field experimental results and robust reactive transport simulators, along with the field and laboratory characterization, are leading to a new conceptual model of U(VI) flow and transport in the IFRC footprint and the 300 Area in general, and insights on the microbiological community and associated biogeochemical processes influencing N, S, C, Mn, and Fe. Collectively these findings and higher scale models are providing a unique and unparalleled system-scale understanding of the biogeochemical function of the groundwater-river interaction zone.

Zachara, John M.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Christensen, John N.; Conrad, Mark S.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Freshley, Mark D.; Haggerty, Roy; Hammond, Glenn E.; Kent, Douglas B.; Konopka, Allan; Lichtner, Peter C.; Liu, Chongxuan; McKinley, James P.; Murray, Christopher J.; Rockhold, Mark L.; Rubin, Yoram; Vermeul, Vincent R.; Versteeg, Roelof J.; Zheng, Chunmiao

2012-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

158

Multi-Scale Mass Transfer Processes Controlling Natural Attenuation and Engineered Remediation: An IFRC Focused on Hanfords 300 Area Uranium Plume January 2011 to January 2012  

SciTech Connect

The Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) at the Hanford Site 300 Area uranium (U) plume addresses multi-scale mass transfer processes in a complex subsurface biogeochemical setting where groundwater and riverwater interact. A series of forefront science questions on reactive mass transfer motivates research. These questions relate to the effect of spatial heterogeneities; the importance of scale; coupled interactions between biogeochemical, hydrologic, and mass transfer processes; and measurements and approaches needed to characterize and model a mass-transfer dominated biogeochemical system. The project was initiated in February 2007, with CY 2007, CY 2008, CY 2009, and CY 2010 progress summarized in preceding reports. A project peer review was held in March 2010, and the IFRC project acted upon all suggestions and recommendations made in consequence by reviewers and SBR/DOE. These responses have included the development of 'Modeling' and 'Well-Field Mitigation' plans that are now posted on the Hanford IFRC web-site, and modifications to the IFRC well-field completed in CY 2011. The site has 35 instrumented wells, and an extensive monitoring system. It includes a deep borehole for microbiologic and biogeochemical research that sampled the entire thickness of the unconfined 300 A aquifer. Significant, impactful progress has been made in CY 2011 including: (i) well modifications to eliminate well-bore flows, (ii) hydrologic testing of the modified well-field and upper aquifer, (iii) geophysical monitoring of winter precipitation infiltration through the U-contaminated vadose zone and spring river water intrusion to the IFRC, (iv) injection experimentation to probe the lower vadose zone and to evaluate the transport behavior of high U concentrations, (v) extended passive monitoring during the period of water table rise and fall, and (vi) collaborative down-hole experimentation with the PNNL SFA on the biogeochemistry of the 300 A Hanford-Ringold contact and the underlying redox transition zone. The modified well-field has functioned superbly without any evidence for well-bore flows. Beyond these experimental efforts, our site-wide reactive transport models (PFLOTRAN and eSTOMP) have been updated to include site geostatistical models of both hydrologic properties and adsorbed U distribution; and new hydrologic characterization measurements of the upper aquifer. These increasingly robust models are being used to simulate past and recent U desorption-adsorption experiments performed under different hydrologic conditions, and heuristic modeling to understand the complex functioning of the smear zone. We continued efforts to assimilate geophysical logging and 3D ERT characterization data into our site wide geophysical model, with significant and positive progress in 2011 that will enable publication in 2012. Our increasingly comprehensive field experimental results and robust reactive transport simulators, along with the field and laboratory characterization, are leading to a new conceptual model of U(VI) flow and transport in the IFRC footprint and the 300 Area in general, and insights on the microbiological community and associated biogeochemical processes influencing N, S, C, Mn, and Fe. Collectively these findings and higher scale models are providing a unique and unparalleled system-scale understanding of the biogeochemical function of the groundwater-river interaction zone.

Zachara, John M.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Christensen, John N.; Conrad, Mark S.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Freshley, Mark D.; Haggerty, Roy; Hammond, Glenn E.; Kent, Douglas B.; Konopka, Allan; Lichtner, Peter C.; Liu, Chongxuan; McKinley, James P.; Murray, Christopher J.; Rockhold, Mark L.; Rubin, Yoram; Vermeul, Vincent R.; Versteeg, Roelof J.; Zheng, Chunmiao

2012-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

159

The Great DOE Land Rush?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

area manager. co, 1800 ha-about 15% of the lab's land- (NERP), at the Savannah River site in South But some DOE officials argue that could be transferred as early as 2001 to the...

160

Effect of focused solar power on the structure and phase ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EFFECT OF FOCUSED SOLAR POWER ON THE STRUCTURE ... soldering, single-crystal growing, and remelting in both land-based and space facilities [1].

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land focus area" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

MODIS Land Products Subsets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Global Subsetting and Visualization Tool Global Subsetting and Visualization Tool The Global Subsetting and Visualization Tool provides customized subsets of MODIS Land products in ASCII format on demand for any location on Earth. Users select a site (either from a picklist or by entering the site's geographic coordinates) and the area surrounding that site, from one pixel up to 201 x 201 km. The tool is expected to take up to 60 minutes to complete the processing, and the tool will send you an email message containing the URL where you can access the output. The tool provides time series plots of the measurement, an ASCII file of the pixel values for the selected product along with quality information, average and standard deviations for the area selected, and a file that can be imported directly into GIS software. In addition we provide a land cover grid (IGBP classification) of the area, along with an estimate of heterogeneity (Shannon richness and evenness).

162

Tanzania-Biofuels, Land Access and Rural Livelihoods | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tanzania-Biofuels, Land Access and Rural Livelihoods Tanzania-Biofuels, Land Access and Rural Livelihoods Agency/Company /Organization International Institute for Environment and Development Sector Energy, Land Focus Area Renewable Energy, Biomass, Forestry, Agriculture Topics Co-benefits assessment, Implementation, Resource assessment, Background analysis Resource Type Publications Website http://www.iied.org/pubs/pdfs/ Country Tanzania UN Region "Sub-Saharan Africa" is not in the list of possible values (Eastern Africa, Middle Africa, Northern Africa, Southern Africa, Western Africa, Caribbean, Central America, South America, Northern America, Central Asia, Eastern Asia, Southern Asia, South-Eastern Asia, Western Asia, Eastern Europe, Northern Europe, Southern Europe, Western Europe, Australia and New Zealand, Melanesia, Micronesia, Polynesia, Latin America and the Caribbean) for this property.

163

Land Transport Sector in Bangladesh: An Analysis Toward Motivating GHG  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Transport Sector in Bangladesh: An Analysis Toward Motivating GHG Transport Sector in Bangladesh: An Analysis Toward Motivating GHG Emission Reduction Strategies Jump to: navigation, search Name Land Transport Sector in Bangladesh: An Analysis Toward Motivating GHG Emission Reduction Strategies Agency/Company /Organization Hiroshima University Focus Area Transportation Topics Co-benefits assessment, GHG inventory, Pathways analysis Resource Type Publications Website http://ir.lib.hiroshima-u.ac.j Program Start 2010 Country Bangladesh UN Region South-Eastern Asia References Land Transport Sector in Bangladesh: An Analysis Toward Motivating GHG Emission Reduction Strategies[1] This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. References ↑ "Land Transport Sector in Bangladesh: An Analysis Toward Motivating GHG Emission Reduction Strategies"

164

Decontamination and decommissioning focus area. Technology summary  

SciTech Connect

This report presents details of the facility deactivation, decommissioning, and material disposition research for development of new technologies sponsored by the Department of Energy. Topics discussed include; occupational safety, radiation protection, decontamination, remote operated equipment, mixed waste processing, recycling contaminated metals, and business opportunities.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Future land use plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy`s (DOE) changing mission, coupled with the need to apply appropriate cleanup standards for current and future environmental restoration, prompted the need for a process to determine preferred Future Land Uses for DOE-owned sites. DOE began the ``Future Land Use`` initiative in 1994 to ensure that its cleanup efforts reflect the surrounding communities` interests in future land use. This plan presents the results of a study of stakeholder-preferred future land uses for the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), located in central Long Island, New York. The plan gives the Laboratory`s view of its future development over the next 20 years, as well as land uses preferred by the community were BNL ever to cease operations as a national laboratory (the post-BNL scenario). The plan provides an overview of the physical features of the site including its history, topography, geology/hydrogeology, biological inventory, floodplains, wetlands, climate, and atmosphere. Utility systems and current environmental operations are described including waste management, waste water treatment, hazardous waste management, refuse disposal and ground water management. To complement the physical descriptions of the site, demographics are discussed, including overviews of the surrounding areas, laboratory population, and economic and non-economic impacts.

NONE

1995-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

166

Solar Land Use | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Land Use Land Use Jump to: navigation, search (The following text is derived from a National Renewable Energy Laboratory report on solar land use in the United States.)[1] One concern regarding large-scale deployment of solar energy is its potentially significant land use. This article summarizes data and analysis of the land use associated with U.S. utility-scale ground-mounted photovoltaic (PV) and concentrating solar power (CSP) facilities. This article presents total and direct land-use results for various solar technologies and system configurations, on both a capacity and an electricity-generation basis. The total area corresponds to all land enclosed by the site boundary. The direct area comprises land directly occupied by solar arrays, access roads, substations, service buildings, and

167

Drilling Waste Management Fact Sheet: Land Application  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Land Application Land Application Fact Sheet - Land Application The objective of applying drilling wastes to the land is to allow the soil's naturally occurring microbial population to metabolize, transform, and assimilate waste constituents in place. Land application is a form of bioremediation, and is important enough to be described in its own fact sheet; other forms of bioremediation are described in a separate fact sheet. Several terms are used to describe this waste management approach, which can be considered both treatment and disposal. In general, land farming refers to the repeated application of wastes to the soil surface, whereas land spreading and land treatment are often used interchangeably to describe the one-time application of wastes to the soil surface. Some practitioners do not follow the same terminology convention, and may interchange all three terms. Readers should focus on the technologies rather than on the specific names given to each process.

168

Effects of urban land cover modifications in a mesoscale meteorological model on surface temperature and heat fluxes in the Phoenix metropolitan area.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and latent heat fluxes and therefore the ground temperature, Tg. Evaporation, E, for each grid cell temperature and heat fluxes in the Phoenix metropolitan area. S. Grossman-Clarke1, J.A. Zehnder2, and W) satellite images [2]. The data were upscaled to a 30-second grid and used to augment and correct

Hall, Sharon J.

169

A Greener Focus: 2012 Ford Focus Electric  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Greener Focus: 2012 Ford Focus Electric Greener Focus: 2012 Ford Focus Electric JOHN DAVIS: With its 2012 re-design, the Focus compact has become Ford's core global program. Focus is already generating offspring, including small vans, a high performance hatchback, and this car - the Ford Focus Electric. It's actually one of only several new plug-ins and hybrids due from the blue oval this year. So let's go for a drive in the EV Focus and see if this green approach means greener pastures for Ford. At first glance, the 2012 Ford Focus Electric doesn't look that much different than the compact, front-

170

Reconnaissance geochemical assessment of the Clover Mountains Bureau of Land Management Wilderness Study Area (NV-050-139), Lincoln County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of a mineral survey of the Clover Mountains Wilderness Study Area, Lincoln County, Nevada. The Clover Mountains Geology-Energy-Minerals (GEM) Resource Area (GRA) includes the Clover Mountains Wilderness Study Area (WSA) NV 050-0139. The GRA is located in south-central Lincoln County, Nevada, near the town of Caliente. There are two mining districts on the periphery of the WSA: (1) the Pennsylvania district, just northwest of the WSA, which is still active and has produced about $50,000 worth of gold, silver, and copper; (2) the Viola district, on the southern boundary of the WSA, the total production of which was less than $400,000, mostly from fluorspar. No patented or unpatented claims exist within the WSA. The rocks exposed in the WSA are almost entirely Tertiary rhyolites; below these rocks are Paleozoic and Mesozoic sedimentary rocks that have been locally mineralized, as in the Pennsylvania district. Stream-sediment and heavy-mineral-concentrate samples were collected and analyzed spectrographically by the US Geological Survey. The analytical results indicate that anomalous concentrations of thorium and barium occur along the western border of the WSA. Minor thorium, barium, and tin anomalies are scattered throughout the WSA. 6 refs., 5 tabs. (ACR)

Hoffman, J.D.; Day, G.W.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

MODIS Land Products Subsets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Introduction Introduction The goal of the MODIS Land Product Subsets project is to provide summaries of selected MODIS Land Products for the community to use for validation of models and remote-sensing products, and to characterize field sites. The MODIS Land Product Subsets are derived from MODIS products that were generated with Collection 4 or later algorithms. Please be advised that these products are subject to continual review and revision. The MODIS land product subsets are provided in ASCII and GeoTIFF format. The subsets are stored as individual text(ASCII) files, each file represents one field site and one MODIS product.The ASCII data covers 7x7 km of the field site. These ASCII files contain comma-delimited rows of parameter values (image bands) for each pixel in the selected area. Each row in the file will contain data from one 8-day, 16-day, or annual period (depending on the temporal frequency of the data product represented).

172

ARM - Field Campaign - 2008 VAMOS Ocean-Cloud-Atmos-Land Study (VOCALS)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8 VAMOS Ocean-Cloud-Atmos-Land Study (VOCALS) 8 VAMOS Ocean-Cloud-Atmos-Land Study (VOCALS) Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : 2008 VAMOS Ocean-Cloud-Atmos-Land Study (VOCALS) 2008.10.14 - 2008.11.13 Lead Scientist : Peter Daum For data sets, see below. Description The DOE G-1 aircraft was deployed to Arica, Chile as part of the NSF VAMOS Ocean-Cloud- Atmospheric-Land Study (VOCALS). The purpose of VOCALS is to develop an understanding of the physical and chemical processes central to the climate system of the Southeast Pacific. In this region, extensive areas of marine clouds exist (coverage about 70% in October). The ASP component of VOCALS focused on aerosols, and how their chemical and microphysical properties, and their ability to act as CCN differ between

173

Land Turtles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Turtles Turtles Nature Bulletin No. 157 May 29, 1948 Forest Preserve District of Cook County William N. Erickson, President Roberts Mann, Supt. of Conservation LAND TURTLES Turtles are four-legged reptiles that originated before the dinosaurs appeared, some 175 million years ago. The distinguishing feature of the turtle is its shell, varying in shape and markings with the different species: an arched upper shell grown fast to the backbone, and a flat lower shell grown fast to the breastbone, the two connected on either side by a bony bridge. In some species, like the box turtles, the lower shell is hinged, enabling the animal to completely conceal its head, tail and limbs by closing the two shells together. Most turtles live in water all or part of the time, but all of them lay their eggs on land, and neither the nest nor the young is attended by the parents. Each species has its own method of nest construction, using the hind legs to dig a hole in the ground, but the eggs are covered and left to be hatched by the heat of the sun. The eggs are relished by many animals such as skunks and squirrels; the young, before their armor hardens, are devoured by birds, mammals, fishes and other turtles.

174

Land Reclamation and the Resource Extraction Reclamation Act (Florida)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Department of Environmental Protection's Mining Program is responsible for enacting and implementing regulations pertaining to land reclamation. The program primarily focuses on the reclamation...

175

Land use siting considerations for hydrothermal energy facilities  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydrothermal resources are described and discussion is focused on some of the land use and social considerations involved in siting hydrothermal power plants. (MHR)

Oakes, K.M.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

EA-1640: Transfer of Land and Facilities within the East Tennessee...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

40: Transfer of Land and Facilities within the East Tennessee Technology Park and Surrounding Area, Oak Ridge, Tennessee EA-1640: Transfer of Land and Facilities within the East...

177

EA-1936: Proposed Changes to Parcel ED-1 Land Uses, Utility Infrastruc...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6: Proposed Changes to Parcel ED-1 Land Uses, Utility Infrastructure, and Natural Area Management Responsibility, Oak Ridge, Tennessee EA-1936: Proposed Changes to Parcel ED-1 Land...

178

The Need for Open Lands  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Need for Open Lands Need for Open Lands Nature Bulletin No. 742 February 8, 1964 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Seymour .Simon, President Roberts Mann, Conservation Editor THE NEED FOR OPEN LANDS There is an old saying: The proof of the pudding is the eating . In other words, if it's good, people enjoy it and beg for more. The proof of the need for open lands -- publicly owned areas for recreational uses and open spaces undisturbed -- is the tremendous and ever-increasing use of those we have. We need more now. Year after year we will need more and more. It is imperative that areas desirable for future use be acquired now or as soon as possible, regardless of cost and even though they may stand idle ' -- vacant and undeveloped -- until more funds become available. Otherwise they may be gone, or the asking price may be a hundred times greater. Open spaces such as farm lands and prairies may have been occupied by residential, commercial or industrial developments. Woodlands may have been cut, stream channels dredged and wetlands drained, destroying all but a memory of their beauty and recreational values. There are compelling reasons for our need of open lands and why we should waste no time in providing more. Those reasons have been confirmed and emphasized by exhaustive studies and statistical analyses nationwide in scope.

179

New Technologies to Reclaim Arid Lands User's Manual  

SciTech Connect

Approximately 70 percent of all U.S. military training lands are located in arid and semi-arid areas. Training activities in such areas frequently adversely affect vegetation, damaging plants and reducing the resilience of vegetation to recover once disturbed. Fugitive dust resulting from a loss of vegetation creates additional problems for human health, increasing accidents due to decreased visibility, and increasing maintenance costs for roads, vehicles, and equipment. Under conventional technologies to mitigate these impacts, it is estimated that up to 35 percent of revegetation projects in arid areas will fail due to unpredictable natural environmental conditions, such as drought, and reclamation techniques that were inadequate to restore vegetative cover in a timely and cost-effective manner. New reclamation and restoration techniques are needed in desert ranges to help mitigate the adverse effects of military training and other activities to arid-land environments. In 1999, a cooperative effort between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the US. Department of Defense (DoD), and selected university scientists was undertaken to focus on mitigating military impacts in arid lands. As arid lands are impacted due to DoD and DOE activities, biological and soil resources are gradually lost and the habitat is altered. A conceptual model of that change in habitat quality is described for varying levels of disturbance in the Mojave Desert. As the habitat quality degrades and more biological and physical resources are lost from training areas, greater costs are required to return the land to sustainable levels. The purpose of this manual is to assist land managers in recognizing thresholds associated with habitat degradation and provide reclamation planning and techniques that can reduce the costs of mitigation for these impacted lands to ensure sustainable use of these lands. The importance of reclamation planning is described in this manual with suggestions about establishing project objectives, scheduling, budgeting, and selecting cost-effective techniques. Reclamation techniques include sections describing: (1) erosion control (physical, chemical, and biological), (2) site preparation, (3) soil amendments, (4) seeding, (5) planting, (6) grazing and weed control, (7) mulching, (8) irrigation, and (9) site protection. Each section states the objectives of the technique, the principles, an in-depth look at the techniques, and any special considerations as it relates to DoD or DOE lands. The need for monitoring and remediation is described to guide users in monitoring reclamation efforts to evaluate their cost-effectiveness. Costs are provided for the proposed techniques for the major deserts of the southwestern U.S. showing the average and range of costs. A set of decision tools are provided in the form of a flow diagram and table to guide users in selecting effective reclamation techniques to achieve mitigation objectives. Recommendations are provided to help summarize key reclamation principles and to assist users in developing a successful program that contributes to sustainable uses of DoD and DOE lands. The users manual is helpful to managers in communicating to installation management the needs and consequences of training decisions and the costs required to achieve successful levels of sustainable use. This users manual focuses on the development of new reclamation techniques that have been implemented at the National Training Center at Fort Irwin, California, and are applicable to most arid land reclamation efforts.

W. K. Ostler

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions - Land use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6. Land use 6. Land use 6.1. Total land use, land use change, and forests This chapter presents estimates of carbon sequestration (removal from the atmosphere) and emissions (release into the atmosphere) from forests, croplands, grasslands, and residential areas (urban trees, grass clippings, and food scraps) in the United States. In 2008, land use, land use change, and forests were responsible for estimated net carbon sequestration of 940 MMTCO2e (Table 31), representing 16 percent of total U.S. CO2 emissions. The largest sequestration category in 2008 was forest lands and harvested wood pools,49 with estimated sequestration increasing from 730 MMTCO2e in 1990 to 792 MMTCO2e in 2008. The second-largest carbon sequestration category was urban trees,50 responsible for 57 MMTCO2e in 1990 and 94

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land focus area" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

An interactive land use VRML application (ILUVA) with servlet assist  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We summarize progress achieved on an interactive land use VRML application (ILUVA) with servlet assist. The purpose of this application is to enable one to take a virtual land area and add buildings, roadways, landscaping and other features. The application ...

Lee A. Belfore, II; Suresh Chitithoti

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Sharpening the Focus of Yolo County Land Use Policy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

amendments also pro- vided a tax exemption for biofuels beginning in 2002 and increased subsi- dies in Ukraine, their reductions were made possible by their wholesale transitions from extremely energy to increased use of wind and biomass, with minor contributions from increased use of biofuels, solar energy

Hammock, Bruce D.

183

Bioenergy and land-use competition in Northeast Brazil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bioenergy and land-use competition in Northeast Brazil Christian Azar Department of Physical of Brazil on "good" versus "bad" lands is investigated. It is shown that the value of the higher yields) lands. The focus of the analysis is on the Northeast of Brazil (NE), where the prospects for dedicated

184

Using land value capture to fund rail transit extensions in Mexico City and Santiago de Chile  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The effects of rail rapid transit on land uses and land values are discussed. Rail transit can enhance accessibility, and can raise the demand for locating in areas around stations, increasing land value, and in some cases ...

Covarrubias, Alvaro, 1973-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Landed Costs of Imported Crude by Area  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: See Definitions ...

186

MODIS Land Products Subsets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Shaaf, and the FLUXNET validation communities to choose sites and to identify the land products needed for validation. We also worked with MODAPS on subsetting the Land...

187

Africa Land Use (1980)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Africa Land Use (1980) image Brown, S., and G. Gaston. 1996. Tropical Africa: Land Use, Biomass, and Carbon Estimates For 1980. ORNLCDIAC-92, NDP-055. Carbon Dioxide Information...

188

Land Validation web site  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

web site A web site is now available for the Land Validation project. It was created with the purpose of facilitating communication among MODIS Land Validation Principal...

189

Focus on Obesity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

AOCS focuses on obesity with this fully searchable multimedia CD ROM. Focus on Obesity Health Nutrition DVD & CD-ROMs Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Biochemistry AOCS Press AOCS focuses on obesity with this fully searchable multimedia CD ROM.

190

Focusing in Linear Accelerators  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

Review of the theory of focusing in linear accelerators with comments on the incompatibility of phase stability and first-order focusing in a simple accelerator.

McMillan, E. M.

1950-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

191

Monitoring of landscape change for waste land rehabilitation in Haizhou opencast coal mine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Land rehabilitation is being carried out throughout the whole country. But in many areas, the main purpose of land rehabilitation is to increase the overall cultivated land area which neglects the eco-construction. Important tasks of modern landscape ... Keywords: land rehabilitation, landscape ecology, monitoring, opencast coal mine

Yingyi Chen; Daoliang Li

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

MODIS Land Product Subsets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Validation > MODIS Land Subsets Validation > MODIS Land Subsets MODIS Land Product Subsets Overview Earth, Western Hemisphere The goal of the MODIS Land Product Subsets project is to provide summaries of selected MODIS Land Products for the community to use for validation of models and remote-sensing products and to characterize field sites. Output files contain pixel values of MODIS land products in text format and in GeoTIFF format. In addition, data visualizations (time series plots and grids showing single composite periods) are available. MODIS Land Product Subsets Resources The following MODIS Land Product Subsets resources are maintained by the ORNL DAAC: MODIS Land Products Offered Background Citation Policy Methods and formats MODIS Sinusoidal Grid - Google Earth KMZ Classroom Exercises

193

Application for State Land Use Lease: Miscellaneous Easement...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Reference Material: Application for State Land Use Lease: Miscellaneous EasementROW Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions...

194

Application for State Land Use Lease: Commercial/Multi-Family...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Reference Material: Application for State Land Use Lease: CommercialMulti-Family Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0)...

195

Focused natural deduction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Natural deduction for intuitionistic linear logic is known to be full of non-deterministic choices. In order to control these choices, we combine ideas from intercalation and focusing to arrive at the calculus of focused natural deduction. The calculus ...

Taus Brock-Nannestad; Carsten Schrmann

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

MODIS Land Products Subsets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Data for Selected Field Sites (n=1147) Data for Selected Field Sites (n=1147) Obtain MODIS data for areas centered on selected field sites or flux towers from around the world. The goal of the MODIS Subsets for Selected Field Sites is to prepare summaries of selected MODIS Land Products for the community to use for validation of models and remote sensing products and to characterize field sites. Search for data: By Site from a Map Server from Google Earth (Install Google Earth) From FTP site (ASCII) Methods Data products were first subsetted from one or more 1200x1200-km MODIS tiles to 25 x 25-km arrays by the MODIS Science Data Support Team (MODAPS). These products were further subsetted (7x7) and reformatted from their native HDF-EOS to ASCII using version 2.2 of the MODIS Reprojection Tool (MRT) in combination with code developed at the ORNL DAAC.

197

Alternating phase focused linacs  

SciTech Connect

A heavy particle linear accelerator employing rf fields for transverse and ongitudinal focusing as well as acceleration. Drift tube length and gap positions in a standing wave drift tube loaded structure are arranged so that particles are subject to acceleration and succession of focusing and defocusing forces which contain the beam without additional magnetic or electric focusing fields.

Swenson, Donald A. (Los Alamos, NM)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

U.S. Landed Costs of Crude Oil (Dollars per Barrel)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

98.51: 95.72: 97.41: 96.90: 101.03: 102.86 ... Landed Costs of Imported Crude by Area; Landed Costs of Imported Crude by Area ...

199

U.S. Landed Costs of Canada Crude Oil (Dollars per Barrel)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Release Date: 9/3/2013: Next Release Date: 10/1/2013: Referring Pages: Landed Costs of Imported Crude by Area; Landed Costs of Imported Crude by Area

200

Land animal sizes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Land animal sizes Name: tamar c Status: NA Age: NA Location: NA Country: NA Date: Around 1993 Question: Why are today's land mammals so much smaller than prehistoric mammals?...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land focus area" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

The Common Land Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Common Land Model (CLM) was developed for community use by a grassroots collaboration of scientists who have an interest in making a general land model available for public use and further development. The major model characteristics include ...

Yongjiu Dai; Xubin Zeng; Robert E. Dickinson; Ian Baker; Gordon B. Bonan; Michael G. Bosilovich; A. Scott Denning; Paul A. Dirmeyer; Paul R. Houser; Guoyue Niu; Keith W. Oleson; C. Adam Schlosser; Zong-Liang Yang

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

School Land Board (Texas)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The School Land Board oversees the use of land owned by the state or held in trust for use and benefit by the state or one of its departments, boards, or agencies. The Board is responsible for...

203

LBA Land Use and Land Cover Data Set Released  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Land Use and Land Cover Data Set Released The ORNL DAAC announces the release of an image data set from the Land Use and Land Cover science theme, a component of the LBA-ECO Large...

204

Influence of Land Cover Change on Regional Water Cycles in Eastern Siberia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study evaluated the effect of recent eastern Siberian land surface changes, such as water surface expansion, on water-energy fluxes and precipitation and focused on land surface parameters using a three-dimensional atmospheric model [the ...

Ryuhei Yoshida; Masahiro Sawada; Takeshi Yamazaki; Takeshi Ohta; Tetsuya Hiyama

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

GLACE: The Global LandAtmosphere Coupling Experiment. Part I: Overview  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Global LandAtmosphere Coupling Experiment (GLACE) is a model intercomparison study focusing on a typically neglected yet critical element of numerical weather and climate modeling: landatmosphere coupling strength, or the degree to which ...

Randal D. Koster; Y. C. Sud; Zhichang Guo; Paul A. Dirmeyer; Gordon Bonan; Keith W. Oleson; Edmond Chan; Diana Verseghy; Peter Cox; Harvey Davies; Eva Kowalczyk; C. T. Gordon; Shinjiro Kanae; David Lawrence; Ping Liu; David Mocko; Cheng-Hsuan Lu; Ken Mitchell; Sergey Malyshev; Bryant McAvaney; Taikan Oki; Tomohito Yamada; Andrew Pitman; Christopher M. Taylor; Ratko Vasic; Yongkang Xue

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Focus on Solar Energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Focus on Solar Energy. Why a net-zero energy house? ... Solar Energy Presentation. Additional information, tools, weblinks, and photos from the day. ...

2012-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

207

Land mine detecting robot capable of path planning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of Landmine detecting robot is to cover maximum possible area, presentation of landmines and the left over area on a visual map with accuracy in millimeters. This paper presents a prototype model of land mine detecting robot that is powerful ... Keywords: PIC microcontroller, graphical user interface, image processing, land mine detection, robot path mapping

Muhammad Zubair; Muhammad Ahmad Choudhry

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

EOS Land Validation Presentations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

EOS Land Validation Presentations EOS Land Validation Presentations Meeting: Land Cover Validation Workshop Date: February 2, 2004 Place: Boston, MA Title: Validation Data Support Activities at the ORNL DAAC (Power Point) Presenter: Bob Cook Meeting: Fall 2003 American Geophysical Union (AGU) Meeting Date: December 9, 2003 Place: San Francisco, CA Title: Ground-Based Data Supporting the Validation of MODIS Land Products (Power Point) Presenter: Larry Voorhees Meeting: Terra and Aqua Products Review Date: March 2003 Place: NASA HQ Title: Supporting the Validation of MODIS Land Products (Power Point) Presenter: Larry Voorhees Meeting: Terra and Aqua Products Review Date: March 2003 Place: NASA HQ Title: MODIS Land Summary (Power Point) Presenter: Chris Justice, University of Maryland Meeting: Spring 2002 American Geophysical Union (AGU) Meeting

209

Focus Group I  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CARBON SEQUESTRATION - A COMMUNITY FOCUS GROUP STUDY OF CARBON SEQUESTRATION - A COMMUNITY FOCUS GROUP STUDY OF ATTITUDES IN WILLISTON, NORTH DAKOTA Sheila K. Hanson, Energy & Environmental Research Center Daniel J. Daly, Energy & Environmental Research Center Edward N. Steadman, Energy & Environmental Research Center John A. Harju, Energy & Environmental Research Center June 2005 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY In April 2005, representatives of the Plains CO 2 Reduction (PCOR) Partnership, led by the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) at the University of North Dakota, held two focus groups in Williston, North Dakota. A total of sixteen people participated; seven on April 20 and nine on April 21. The purpose of the focus group research was to gain insight into the public perception of carbon sequestration from

210

Focus on trans Fat  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This comprehensive CD-ROM contains a surplus of information regarding trans fats. Focus on trans Fat Health Nutrition Biochemistry Trans DVD & CD-ROMs Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Food Science This comprehensive CD-ROM contains a

211

Focus on Biodiesel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

AOCS spotlights the topic of renewable energy with this comprehensive CD-ROM containing various Powerpoint presentations, abstracts, book chapters, technical tables, biodiesel standards, and numerous links to Internet resources. Focus on Biodiesel Biofuel

212

Land-use barriers and incentives to the use of solar energy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The impact of land-use issues on solar technologies is analyzed and attention is focused specifically on a discussion of on-site uses of active and passive solar heating and cooling. The first area discussed involves land-use regulations which prohibit the installation of solar collectors. Such regulations include both public regulations (zoning laws) and private regulations (restrictive convenants). The widely discussed issue of secure access to sunlight, also known as solar rights, comprises the bulk of the report. The many different proposed methods of ensuring solar access are compared to an ideal solar right. The solar access problem is divided into two parts: access in new developments and access in existing neighborhoods. Solar access in new developments can be provided fairly easily, if desired, by a combination of land-use tools which allow for the flexible siting of buildings and restrictive convenants to control vegetation. The problem of access in existing neighborhoods does not lend itself to easy solutions. No proposals approximate the ideal. The main solutions analyzed-privately negotiated easements, zoning laws, and allocated sun rights, have drawbacks. The final area addressed is the variety of ways in which land-use regulations can be structured to provide an incentive to install solar equipment.

Spivak, P.

1979-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

MODIS Land Products Subsets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Citation When using subsets of MODIS Land Products from the ORNL DAAC, please use the citation: Oak Ridge National Laboratory Distributed Active Archive Center (ORNL DAAC). 2011....

214

National Land Cover Data  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

products was done by the Multi-Resolution Land Characterization Consortium and EROS Data Center (U.S. Geological Survey). The Consortium includes the Environmental Monitoring and...

215

Sugar Land, TX -  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Petroleum Engineering Alumnus Recognized by Secretary of Energy for Work at National Lab Sugar Land, TX - The National Energy Technology Laboratory is proud to announce that...

216

Sagittal focusing Laue monochromator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An x-ray focusing device generally includes a slide pivotable about a pivot point defined at a forward end thereof, a rail unit fixed with respect to the pivotable slide, a forward crystal for focusing x-rays disposed at the forward end of the pivotable slide and a rearward crystal for focusing x-rays movably coupled to the pivotable slide and the fixed rail unit at a distance rearward from the forward crystal. The forward and rearward crystals define reciprocal angles of incidence with respect to the pivot point, wherein pivoting of the slide about the pivot point changes the incidence angles of the forward and rearward crystals while simultaneously changing the distance between the forward and rearward crystals.

Zhong; Zhong (Stony Brook, NY), Hanson; Jonathan (Wading River, NY), Hastings; Jerome (Stanford, CA), Kao; Chi-Chang (Setauket, NY), Lenhard; Anthony (Medford, NY), Siddons; David Peter (Cutchogue, NY), Zhong; Hui (Coram, NY)

2009-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

217

Vertical Velocity Focus Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Velocity Focus Group Velocity Focus Group ARM 2008 Science Team Meeting Norfolk, VA March 10-14 Background Vertical velocity measurements have been at the top of the priority list of the cloud modeling community for some time. Doppler measurements from ARM profiling radars operating at 915-MHz, 35-GHz and 94-GHz have been largely unexploited. The purpose of this new focus group is to develop vertical velocity ARM products suitable for modelers. ARM response to their request has been slow. Most ARM instruments are suitable for cloud observations and have limited capabilities in precipitation Using ARM datasets for evaluating and improving cloud parameterization in global climate models (GCMs) is not straightforward, due to gigantic scale mismatches. Consider this... Looking only vertically drastically limits opportunities

218

2. Annual Quantities of Land Clearing Debris Generated and Used (1) Sectors that generate Land Clearing Debris:  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Land clearing debris is defined as growing stock and other timber sources cut or otherwise destroyed in the process of converting forest land to non-forest uses. 1 Growing stock that is removed in silvicultural operations such as pre-commercial thinning is also included in this definition. Land clearing debris is typically in the form of tree tops and branches, trees cut or knocked down and left on site, and stumps. In non-forested areas, such as grasslands and desert, land clearing debris may include soil, rocks, and shrubs, although fuel is primarily derived from previously forested areas.

unknown authors

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Customer-Focused Deployment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Customer-Focused Customer-Focused Deployment SAM RASHKIN Chief Architect Building Technologies Program February 29, 2012 Building America Meeting 2 | INNOVATION & INTEGRATION: Transforming the Energy Efficiency Market Buildings.Energy.gov 'Good Government' As-A-System IECC Code: Mandates technologies and practices proven reliable and cost- effective ENERGY STAR: Recognizes Builders Who Deliver Significantly Above Code Performance Builders Challenge: Recognizes Leading Builders Applying Proven Innovations and Best Practices Building America: Develops New Innovations and Best Practices 3 | INNOVATION & INTEGRATION: Transforming the Energy Efficiency Market Buildings.Energy.gov Disseminating Research Results: Building America Resource Tool 4 | INNOVATION & INTEGRATION: Transforming the Energy Efficiency Market

220

Water, Land and People  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Water, Land and People Water, Land and People Nature Bulletin No. 251 January 8, 1983 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation WATER, LAND AND PEOPLE "Water, Land and People" is the title of a book which, like "Road to Survival", should be read by every American. Water, and its uses or control, has become a vital national problem. Some places, some years, we have too much of it and suffer disastrous floods. Elsewhere we have too little. In cities like New York and Los Angeles -- even in many inland towns -- and in the western lands which depend upon irrigation, the demand far exceeds the supply. Our Congress is beseeched for huge appropriations to provide flood control, navigation, electric power and irrigation.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land focus area" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

csp land use | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

csp land use Home Sfomail's picture Submitted by Sfomail(48) Member 25 June, 2013 - 12:10 Solar Land Use Data on OpenEI acres csp land use how much land land requirements pv land...

222

how much land | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

by Sfomail(48) Member 25 June, 2013 - 12:10 Solar Land Use Data on OpenEI acres csp land use how much land land requirements pv land use solar land use square miles I'm...

223

land requirements | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

by Sfomail(48) Member 25 June, 2013 - 12:10 Solar Land Use Data on OpenEI acres csp land use how much land land requirements pv land use solar land use square miles I'm...

224

Focus Article Nuclear winter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Focus Article Nuclear winter Alan Robock Nuclear winter is the term for a theory describing the climatic effects of nuclear war. Smoke from the fires started by nuclear weapons, especially the black, sooty smoke from cities and industrial facilities, would be heated by the Sun, lofted into the upper

Robock, Alan

225

Subsetting Tools Available for New MODIS Land Products (Collection 5)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Subsetting Tools Available for New MODIS Land Products (Collection 5) Subsetting Tools Available for New MODIS Land Products (Collection 5) The ORNL DAAC announces two tools for subsetting land products from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensors onboard the Terra and Aqua satellites. The first tool allows users to obtain MODIS land products for 1,052 selected sites worldwide in ASCII format (7 x 7 km) and in GeoTIFF format (25 x 25 km). To access this tool see http://daac.ornl.gov/modisfixedsite. The global subsetting tool creates MODIS land product subsets for user-selected areas worldwide from one pixel up to 201 x 201 km area and for a user-selected time period during the MODIS record. To access this tool, please see http://daac.ornl.gov/modisglobal. Both tools subset the following MODIS Land Products:

226

On Climate Impacts of a Potential Expansion of Urban Land in Europe  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over the last two decades, a disproportional increase of urban land area in comparison with the population growth has been observed in many countries of Europe, and this trend is predicted to continue. The conversion of vegetated land into urban ...

K. Trusilova; M. Jung; G. Churkina

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

A technical modeler's interface for urbansim, a system for integrated land use, transportation, and environmental modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Patterns of land use and available transportation systems play a critical role in determining the economic vitality, livability, and sustainability of urban areas. Transportation interacts strongly with land use. For example, automobile-oriented development ...

Alan Borning; Paul Waddell

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Smart growth and the transportationb - Land use connection: What does the research tell us?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rail Plans on Land Values in Station Areas. Journal of Planning Education and ResearchResearch Program (TCRP), which concluded that urban railRail Services and Commercial Land Values. Transportation Research

Handy, Susan

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Land-Use and Ecosystems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Land-Use and Ecosystems Terrestrial Carbon Management Data Sets and Analyses National Land Cover Data 1992 (2005), and 2001 (2008) Carbon Flux to the Atmosphere from Land-Use...

230

Strategic Focus Points  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Focus Points Focus Points June 2011 1. Establish the human capital and organizational foundation to create a high-performing organization. 2. Implement a cyber risk-management and incident response program that ensures effective security of Federal and M&O networks, provides appropriate flexibility, and meets legal requirements and OMB expectations. 3. Improve IT Services (EITS) into a best-in-class provider from both a technical and business perspective. 4. Implement and institutionalize a reformed, integrated information management governance process that respects the goal to treat M&Os distinctively different than true Federal entities. 5. Transition to 5-year planning and programming, using the NNSA Planning, Programming, Budgeting and Evaluation (PPBE) process as a starting point to include resource and requirements validation.

231

land.PDF  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 2 AUDIT REPORT SALE OF LAND AT OAK RIDGE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL OFFICE OF AUDIT SERVICES May 2001 DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Washington, DC 20585 May 7, 2001 MEMORANDUM FOR THE SECRETARY FROM: Gregory H. Friedman (Signed) Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Audit Report on the "Sale of Land at Oak Ridge" BACKGROUND Under the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, the U.S. Department of Energy (Department) may sell land in the performance of identified programmatic functions. The functions specified in the Atomic Energy Act include encouraging scientific and industrial progress, controlling special nuclear

232

NASA Land Validation Campaign Data  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Products > Validation NASA Land Validation Campaign Data Land Validation Campaigns The goal of the EOS Validation Program is the comprehensive assessment of all EOS science data...

233

Land use politics southern style : the case of cash proffers in Virginia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The linkage between the political dynamics at the state level and actual implementation of land use regulations at the local level is the focus of this dissertation. This focus is explored through the genesis and efficacy ...

McKay, Shannon Ashley

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

National Land Cover Data  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

National Land Cover Data National Land Cover Data Metadata also available as Metadata: q Identification_Information q Data_Quality_Information q Spatial_Data_Organization_Information q Spatial_Reference_Information q Entity_and_Attribute_Information q Distribution_Information q Metadata_Reference_Information Identification_Information: Citation: Citation_Information: Originator: United States Geological Survey Publication_Date: Unpublished Material Title: National Land Cover Data Edition: 01 Geospatial_Data_Presentation_Form: raster digital data Other_Citation_Details: Classification and processing of the orginal remote sensing products was done by the Multi-Resolution Land Characterization Consortium and EROS Data Center (U.S. Geological Survey). The Consortium includes the

235

Sugar Land, TX -  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Alumnus Recognized by Secretary of Energy for Work at National Lab Sugar Land, TX - The National Energy Technology Laboratory is proud to announce that U.S. Air Force Academy...

236

MODIS Land Products Subsets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(Meter) MCD12Q1 LC MODISTerra+Aqua Lan Cover ( LC ) Type Yearly L3 Global 500m SIN Grid annual 500 MCD12Q2 LCD MODISTerra+Aqua Land Cover Dynamics ( LCD ) Yearly L3 Global...

237

OpenEI - land  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

en.openei.orgdatasetstaxonomyterm4150 en Land use requirements for ground-mounted solar power facilities. http:en.openei.orgdatasetsnode454

This dataset is part of...

238

Land Use Baseline Report Savannah River Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document is to serve as a resource for Savannah River Site managers, planners, and SRS stakeholders by providing a general description of the site and land-use factors important to future use decisions and plans. The intent of this document is to be comprehensive in its review of SRS and the surrounding area.

Noah, J.C.

1995-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

239

Findings: LANL outsourcing focus groups  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In March 1996, a series of 24 3-hour dialog focus groups were held with randomly selected Laboratory employees and contractors to gain their perceptions regarding potentials and problems for privatization and consolidation. A secondary goal was to educate and inform the workforce about potentials and issues in privatization and consolidation. Two hundred and thirty-six participants engaged in a learning session and structured input exercises resulting in 2,768 usable comments. Comments were categorized using standard qualitative methods; resulting categories included positive and negative comments on four models (consolidation, spin offs, outsourcing, and corporate partnering) and implications for the workforce, the Laboratory, and the local economy. Categories were in the areas of increasing/decreasing jobs, expertise, opportunity/salary/benefits, quality/efficiency, and effect on the local area and economy. An additional concern was losing Laboratory culture and history. Data were gathered and categorized on employee opinion regarding elements of successful transition to the four models, and issues emerged in the areas of terms and conditions of employment; communication; involvement; sound business planning; ethics and fairness; community infrastructure. From the aggregated opinion of the participants, it is recommended that decision-makers: Plan using sound business principles and continually communicate plans to the workforce; Respect workforce investments in the Laboratory; Tell the workforce exactly what is going on at all times; Understand that economic growth in Northern New Mexico is not universally viewed as positive; and Establish dialog with stakeholders on growth issues.

Jannotta, M.J.; McCabe, V.B.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

240

Policy and Financing for Sustainable Land Management in Sub-Saharan Africa  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Policy and Financing for Sustainable Land Management in Sub-Saharan Africa Policy and Financing for Sustainable Land Management in Sub-Saharan Africa Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Policy and Financing for Sustainable Land Management in Sub-Saharan Africa Agency/Company /Organization: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations Sector: Land Focus Area: Forestry, Agriculture Topics: Finance, Policies/deployment programs Resource Type: Guide/manual, Lessons learned/best practices Website: www.caadp.net/pdf/Policy%20and%20Financing%20for%20SLM%20in%20Sub-Saha UN Region: "Sub-Saharan Africa" is not in the list of possible values (Eastern Africa, Middle Africa, Northern Africa, Southern Africa, Western Africa, Caribbean, Central America, South America, Northern America, Central Asia, Eastern Asia, Southern Asia, South-Eastern Asia, Western Asia, Eastern Europe, Northern Europe, Southern Europe, Western Europe, Australia and New Zealand, Melanesia, Micronesia, Polynesia, Latin America and the Caribbean) for this property.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land focus area" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Development of High Resolution Land Surface Parameters for the Community Land Model  

SciTech Connect

There is a growing need for high-resolution land surface parameters as land surface models are being applied at increasingly higher spatial resolution offline as well as in regional and global models. The default land surface parameters for the most recent version of the Community Land Model (i.e. CLM 4.0) are at 0.5 or coarser resolutions, released with the Community Earth System Model (CESM). Plant Functional Types (PFTs), vegetation properties such as Leaf Area Index (LAI), Stem Area Index (SAI), and non-vegetated land covers were developed using remotely sensed datasets retrieved in late 1990s and the beginning of this century. In this study, we developed new land surface parameters for CLM 4.0, specifically PFTs, LAI, SAI and non-vegetated land cover composition, at 0.05 resolution globally based on the most recent MODIS land cover and improved MODIS LAI products. Compared to the current CLM 4.0 parameters, the new parameters produced a decreased coverage by bare soil and trees, but an increased coverage by shrub, grass, and cropland. The new parameters result in a decrease in global seasonal LAI, with the biggest decrease in boreal forests; however, the new parameters also show a large increase in LAI in tropical forest. Differences between the new and the current parameters are mainly caused by changes in the sources of remotely sensed data and the representation of land cover in the source data. Advantages and disadvantages of each dataset were discussed in order to provide guidance on the use of the data. The new high-resolution land surface parameters have been used in a coupled land-atmosphere model (WRF-CLM) applied to the western U.S. to demonstrate their use in high-resolution modeling. A remapping method from the latitude/longitude grid of the CLM data to the WRF grids with map projection was also demonstrated. Future work will include global offline CLM simulations to examine the impacts of source data resolution and subsequent land parameter changes on simulated land surface processes.

Ke, Yinghai; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Huang, Maoyi; Coleman, Andre M.; Li, Hongyi; Wigmosta, Mark S.

2012-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

242

CARBON SEQUESTRATION ON SURFACE MINE LANDS  

SciTech Connect

An area planted in 2004 on Bent Mountain in Pike County was shifted to the Department of Energy project to centralize an area to become a demonstration site. An additional 98.3 acres were planted on Peabody lands in western Kentucky and Bent Mountain to bring the total area under study by this project to 556.5 acres as indicated in Table 2. Major efforts this quarter include the implementation of new plots that will examine the influence of differing geologic material on tree growth and survival, water quality and quantity and carbon sequestration. Normal monitoring and maintenance was conducted and additional instrumentation was installed to monitor the new areas planted.

Donald H. Graves; Christopher Barton; Richard Sweigard; Richard Warner

2005-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

243

Wind Development on Tribal Lands  

SciTech Connect

Background: The Rosebud Sioux Tribe (RST) is located in south central South Dakota near the Nebraska border. The nearest community of size is Valentine, Nebraska. The RST is a recipient of several Department of Energy grants, written by Distributed Generation Systems, Inc. (Disgen), for the purposes of assessing the feasibility of its wind resource and subsequently to fund the development of the project. Disgen, as the contracting entity to the RST for this project, has completed all the pre-construction activities, with the exception of the power purchase agreement and interconnection agreement, to commence financing and construction of the project. The focus of this financing is to maximize the economic benefits to the RST while achieving commercially reasonable rates of return and fees for the other parties involved. Each of the development activities required and its status is discussed below. Land Resource: The Owl Feather War Bonnet 30 MW Wind Project is located on RST Tribal Trust Land of approximately 680 acres adjacent to the community of St. Francis, South Dakota. The RST Tribal Council has voted on several occasions for the development of this land for wind energy purposes, as has the District of St. Francis. Actual footprint of wind farm will be approx. 50 acres. Wind Resource Assessment: The wind data has been collected from the site since May 1, 2001 and continues to be collected and analyzed. The latest projections indicate a net capacity factor of 42% at a hub height of 80 meters. The data has been collected utilizing an NRG 9300 Data logger System with instrumentation installed at 30, 40 and 65 meters on an existing KINI radio tower. The long-term annual average wind speed at 65-meters above ground level is 18.2 mph (8.1 mps) and 18.7 mph (8.4 mps) at 80-meters agl. The wind resource is excellent and supports project financing.

Ken Haukaas; Dale Osborn; Belvin Pete

2008-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

244

Case studies of geothermal leasing and development on federal lands  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In response to a widely expressed need to examine the impact of the federal regulatory system on the rate of geothermal power development, the Department of Energy-Division of Geothermal Energy (DGE) has established a Streamlining Task Force in cooperation with appropriate federal agencies. The intent is to find a way of speeding development by modification of existing laws or regulations or by better understanding and mechanization of the existing ones. The initial focus was on the leasing and development of federal lands. How do the existing processes work? Would changes produce positive results in a variety of cases? These are questions which must be considered in a national streamlining process. This report presents case studies of federal leasing actions on seven diverse locations in the western region. Characteristics of existing high geothermal potential areas are quite diverse; geography, environment, industry interest and the attitudes and activities of the responsible federal land management agencies and the interested public vary widely. Included are descriptions of post and current activities in leasing exploration and development and discussions of the probable future direction of activities based on current plans. Implications of these plans are presented. The case studies were based on field interviews with the appropriate State and District BLM officer and with the regional forester's office and the particular forest office. Documentation was utilized to the extent possible and has been included in whole or in part in appendices as appropriate.

Trummel, Marc

1978-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

245

Mixed waste focus area technical baseline report. Volume 2  

SciTech Connect

As part of its overall program, the MWFA uses a national mixed waste data set to develop approaches for treating mixed waste that cannot be treated using existing capabilities at DOE or commercial facilities. The current data set was originally compiled under the auspices of the 1995 Mixed Waste Inventory Report. The data set has been updated over the past two years based on Site Treatment Plan revisions and clarifications provided by individual sites. The current data set is maintained by the MWFA staff and is known as MWFA97. In 1996, the MWFA developed waste groupings, process flow diagrams, and treatment train diagrams to systematically model the treatment of all mixed waste in the DOE complex. The purpose of the modeling process was to identify treatment gaps and corresponding technology development needs for the DOE complex. Each diagram provides the general steps needed to treat a specific type of waste. The NWFA categorized each MWFA97 waste stream by waste group, treatment train, and process flow. Appendices B through F provide the complete listing of waste streams by waste group, treatment train, and process flow. The MWFA97 waste strewn information provided in the appendices is defined in Table A-1.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

SLAC Science Focus Area | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ferrihydrite banner Nano biogenic uraninite Energy and biogeochemistry: Nuclear fuel and weapons production have produced radionuclide and heavy metal contamination in terrestrial...

247

Focus Area 1 - Biomass Formation and Modification : BioEnergy...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Formation and Modification BESC biomass formation and modification research involves working directly with two potential bioenergy crops (switchgrass and Populus) to develop...

248

Focus Area 2 - Biomass Deconstruction and Conversion : BioEnergy...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Deconstruction and Conversion BESC research in biomass deconstruction and conversion targets CBP by studying model organisms and thermophilic anaerobes to understand novel...

249

SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory: SLAC Science Focus Area...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

accelerated closure of costly large-scale DOE legacy site operations such as the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site1. The SLAC SFA is working to leverage SR studies to...

250

TFA Tanks Focus Area midyear review report FY 2000  

SciTech Connect

In accordance with EM's office of Science and Technology (OST), the TFA is committed to assessing the maturity of technology development projects and ensuring their readiness for implementation and subsequent deployment. The TFA conducts an annual Midyear Review to document the status of ongoing projects, reaffirm and document user commitment to selected projects, and to improve the effective deployment of technology by determining and documenting the readiness of selected projects to move ahead. Since 1995, OST has used a linear technology maturation model that spans through seven defined stages of maturity, from basic research to implementation. Application of this Stage/Gate model to technology development resulted in prescriptive and somewhat cumbersome review procedures, resulting in limited and inconsistent use. Subsequently, in February 2000, OST issued revised guidance in an effort to streamline the technology tracking and review process. While the new OST guidance reinforces peer review requirements and the use of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) for independent reviews, it also implements a simplified Gate model. The TFA is now responsible for providing auditable documentation for passing only three stages of technology maturity: ready for research (Gate 0); ready for development (Gate 2); ready for demonstration (Gate 5). The TFA Midyear Review is a key element in the overall review procedure, as the tracking evidence for all active projects is required to be available at this time. While the Midyear Report contains an overview of the status of all TFA reviews and projects, not all the reviews were conducted during the Midyear Review. The TFA used a phased approach to accomplish the Midyear Review requirements.

LR Roeder-Smith

2000-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

251

TFA Tanks Focus Area midyear review report FY 2000  

SciTech Connect

In accordance with EM's office of Science and Technology (OST), the TFA is committed to assessing the maturity of technology development projects and ensuring their readiness for implementation and subsequent deployment. The TFA conducts an annual Midyear Review to document the status of ongoing projects, reaffirm and document user commitment to selected projects, and to improve the effective deployment of technology by determining and documenting the readiness of selected projects to move ahead. Since 1995, OST has used a linear technology maturation model that spans through seven defined stages of maturity, from basic research to implementation. Application of this Stage/Gate model to technology development resulted in prescriptive and somewhat cumbersome review procedures, resulting in limited and inconsistent use. Subsequently, in February 2000, OST issued revised guidance in an effort to streamline the technology tracking and review process. While the new OST guidance reinforces peer review requirements and the use of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) for independent reviews, it also implements a simplified Gate model. The TFA is now responsible for providing auditable documentation for passing only three stages of technology maturity: ready for research (Gate 0); ready for development (Gate 2); ready for demonstration (Gate 5). The TFA Midyear Review is a key element in the overall review procedure, as the tracking evidence for all active projects is required to be available at this time. While the Midyear Report contains an overview of the status of all TFA reviews and projects, not all the reviews were conducted during the Midyear Review. The TFA used a phased approach to accomplish the Midyear Review requirements.

LR Roeder-Smith

2000-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

252

SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory: SLAC Science Focus Area...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Clark, S D. Conradson, and J.R. Bargar (2008) Structure of biogenic UO2 produced by Shewanella Oneidensis, strain MR-1. Environ. Sci. Technol., 42, 7898-7904. K.-U. Ulrich, D....

253

SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory: SLAC Science Focus Area...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

nuclear waste repositories. The need to understand the biogeochemical factors controlling Pu mobility in the environment is driven not only by regulatory requirements, but also by...

254

Tanks Focus Area Site Needs Assessment - FY 2001  

SciTech Connect

The TFA uses a systematic process for developing its annual program that draws from the tanks science and technology development needs expressed by the five DOE tank waste sites. TFA's annual program development process is iterative and involves the following steps: Collection of site needs; Needs analysis; Development of technical responses and initial prioritization; Refinement of the program for the next fiscal year; Formulation of the Corporate Review Budget (CRB); Preparation of Program Execution Guidance (PEG) for the next FY Revision of the Multiyear Program Plan (MYPP). This document describes the outcomes of the first phase of this process, from collection of site needs to the initial prioritization of technical activities. The TFA received site needs in October - December 2000. A total of 170 site needs were received, an increase of 30 over the previous year. The needs were analyzed and integrated, where appropriate. Sixty-six distinct technical responses were drafted and prioritized. In addition, seven strategic tasks were approved to compete for available funding in FY 2002 and FY 2003. Draft technical responses were prepared and provided to the TFA Site Representatives and the TFA User Steering Group (USG) for their review and comment. These responses were discussed at a March 15, 2001, meeting where the TFA Management Team established the priority listing in preparation for input to the DOE Office of Science and Technology (OST) budget process. At the time of publication of this document, the TFA continues to finalize technical responses as directed by the TFA Management Team and clarify the intended work scopes for FY 2002 and FY 2003.

Allen, Robert W.; Josephson, Gary B.; Westsik, Joseph H.; Nickola, Cheryl L.

2001-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

255

Suggested IMI Focus Area A Mature Industry's Demographics:  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Existing plants should be able to reduce energy costs by 10 ... should see a 25% to 30% energy reduction. ... at are less than 25% of the average times. ...

2012-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

256

SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory: SLAC Science Focus Area...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

settings. Dan Giammar Dan Giammar (PI) Dan is an Assistant Professor in the Department Energy, Environmental, and Chemical Engineering at Washington University in St. Louis,...

257

SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory: SLAC Science Focus Area...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

program. The inner portion of the particles is well ordered and similar to stoichiometric or near-stoichiometric UO2.0, and the material consequently exhibits a solubility...

258

Energy and land use  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report addresses the land use impacts of past and future energy development and summarizes the major federal and state legislation which influences the potential land use impacts of energy facilities and can thus influence the locations and timing of energy development. In addition, this report describes and presents the data which are used to measure, and in some cases, predict the potential conflicts between energy development and alternative uses of the nation's land resources. The topics section of this report is divided into three parts. The first part describes the myriad of federal, state and local legislation which have a direct or indirect impact upon the use of land for energy development. The second part addresses the potential land use impacts associated with the extraction, conversion and combustion of energy resources, as well as the disposal of wastes generated by these processes. The third part discusses the conflicts that might arise between agriculture and energy development as projected under a number of DOE mid-term (1990) energy supply and demand scenarios.

Not Available

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Land use and energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides estimates of the amount of land required by past and future energy development in the United States and examines major federal legislation that regulates the impact of energy facilities on land use. An example of one land use issue associated with energy development - the potential conflict between surface mining and agriculture - is illustrated by describing the actual and projected changes in land use caused by coal mining in western Indiana. Energy activities addressed in the report include extraction of coal, oil, natural gas, uranium, oil shale, and geothermal steam; uranium processing; preparation of synfuels from coal; oil refineries; fossil-fuel, nuclear, and hydro-electric power plants; biomass energy farms; and disposal of solid wastes generated during combustion of fossil fuels. Approximately 1.1 to 3.3 x 10/sup 6/ acres were devoted to these activities in the United States in 1975. As much as 1.8 to 2.0 x 10/sup 6/ additional acres could be required by 1990 for new, nonbiomass energy development. The production of grain for fuel ethanol could require an additional 16.9 to 55.7 x 10/sup 6/ acres by 1990. Federal laws that directly or indirectly regulate the land-use impacts of energy facilities include the National Environmental Protection Act, Clean Air Act, Federal Water Pollution Control Act, Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act, and Coastal Zone Management Act. The major provisions of these acts, other relevant federal regulations, and similar state and local regulatons are described in this report. Federal legislation relating to air quality, water quality, and the management of public lands has the greatest potential to influence the location and timing of future energy development in the United States.

Robeck, K.E.; Ballou, S.W.; South, D.W.; Davis, M.J.; Chiu, S.Y.; Baker, J.E.; Dauzvardis, P.A.; Garvey, D.B.; Torpy, M.F.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Land and Water Developments (Newfoundland and Labrador) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Land and Water Developments (Newfoundland and Labrador) Land and Water Developments (Newfoundland and Labrador) Land and Water Developments (Newfoundland and Labrador) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Developer Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Home Weatherization Program Info State Newfoundland and Labrador Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Newfoundland and Labrador Department of Environment and Conservation This policy applies to public water supply areas designated by the province of Newfoundland and Labrador. The policy limits development in public water supply areas unless they meet specific conditions, and have the approval of the Minister of the Department of Environment and Conservation.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land focus area" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Approaches used for Clearance of Lands from Nuclear Facilities among  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Approaches used for Clearance of Lands from Nuclear Facilities Approaches used for Clearance of Lands from Nuclear Facilities among Several Countries: Evaluation for Regulatory Input Approaches used for Clearance of Lands from Nuclear Facilities among Several Countries: Evaluation for Regulatory Input The study entitled, "Approaches used for Clearance of Lands from Nuclear Facilities among Several Countries: Evaluation for Regulatory Input," focuses on the issue of showing compliance with given clearance levels for site release (also called derived concentration guideline levels, DCGL:s). The Swedish Radiation Safety Authority (SSM) intends to continue working on establishing such clearance levels in Sweden. As a starting point, SSM foresees that levels applied will depend on the features of the specific site and on the expected future use of the land, for example

262

MODIS Land Products Subsets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Presentations Presentations Web and Web Services based tool that provides Subsets and Visualization of MODIS land products to facilitate land validation and field site characterization. S.K. Santhana Vannan; R. B. Cook; B. E. Wilson. AGU Fall Meeting, San Francisco, CA, December 14-18 2009 MODIS Land Product Subsets,S.K. Santhana Vannan; R. B. Cook. November, 2009 MODIS Web Service, S.K. Santhana Vannan. ORNL DAAC UWG Meeting, May 2009 Subsetting Tools for MODIS Land Products: Time-series data for field sites, R. B. Cook, S. M. Margle, S. K. Santhana Vannan, S. K. Holladay, and T. W. Beaty. Global Vegetation Workshop, Missoula MT, August 8-10, 2006 MODIS ASCII Subsets, R. B. Cook. May 2006 Subsets of Remote Sensing Products for AmeriFlux Sites: MODIS ASCII Subsets, AmeriFlux Annual Meeting, R. B. Cook, S. M. Margle, S. K. Holladay, F. A. Heinsch, and C. B. Schaaf. October 5-7, 2004, Boulder, Colorado

263

Arid Lands Ecology Facility management plan  

SciTech Connect

The Arid Lands Ecology (ALE) facility is a 312-sq-km tract of land that lies on the western side of the Hanford Site in southcentral Washington. The US Atomic Energy Commission officially set aside this land area in 1967 to preserve shrub-steppe habitat and vegetation. The ALE facility is managed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the US Department of Energy (DOE) for ecological research and education purposes. In 1971, the ALE facility was designated the Rattlesnake Hills Research Natural Area (RNA) as a result of an interagency federal cooperative agreement, and remains the largest RNA in Washington. it is also one of the few remaining large tracts of shrub-steppe vegetation in the state retaining a predominant preeuropean settlement character. This management plan provides policy and implementation methods for management of the ALE facilities consistent with both US Department of Energy Headquarters and the Richland Field Office decision (US Congress 1977) to designate and manage ALE lands as an RNA and as a component of the DOE National Environmental Research Park System.

None

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Geothermal resource area 9: Nye County. Area development plan  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geothermal Resource area 9 encompasses all of Nye County, Nevada. Within this area there are many different known geothermal sites ranging in temperature from 70/sup 0/ to over 265/sup 0/ F. Fifteen of the more major sites have been selected for evaluation in this Area Development Plan. Various potential uses of the energy found at each of the resource sites discussed in this Area Development Plan were determined after evaluating the area's physical characteristics, land ownership and land use patterns, existing population and projected growth rates, and transportation facilities, and comparing those with the site specific resource characteristics. The uses considered were divided into five main categories: electrical generation, space heating, recreation, industrial process heat, and agriculture. Within two of these categories certain subdivisions were considered separately. The findings about each of the 15 geothermal sites considered in this Area Development Plan are summarized.

Pugsley, M.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

The land use climate change energy nexus  

SciTech Connect

Landscape ecology focuses on the spatial patterns and processes of ecological and human interactions. These patterns and processes are being altered both by changing human resource-management practices and changing climate conditions associated, in part, with increases in atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases. Dominant resource extraction and land management activities involve energy, and the use of fossil energy is one of the key drivers behind increasing greenhouse gas emissions as well as land-use changes. Alternative energy sources (such as wind, solar, nuclear, and bioenergy) are being explored to reduce greenhouse gas emission rates. Yet, energy production, including alternative-energy options, can have a wide range of effects on land productivity, surface cover, albedo, and other factors that affect carbon, water and energy fluxes and, in turn, climate. Meanwhile, climate influences the potential output, relative efficiencies and sustainability of alternative energy sources. Thus climate change, energy choices, and land-use change are linked, and any analysis in landscape ecology that considers one of these factors should consider them all. This analysis explores the implications of those linkages and points out ecological patterns and processes that may be affected by these interactions.

Dale, Virginia H [ORNL; Efroymson, Rebecca Ann [ORNL; Kline, Keith L [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

County Land Preservation and Use Commissions (Iowa)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This ordinance creates Land Preservation and Use Commissions in each county to provide for the orderly use and development of land, to protect agricultural land from nonagricultural development,...

267

Multimodel Analysis of Energy and Water Fluxes: Intercomparisons between Operational Analyses, a Land Surface Model, and Remote Sensing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using data from seven global model operational analyses (OA), one land surface model, and various remote sensing retrievals, the energy and water fluxes over global land areas are intercompared for 2003/04. Remote sensing estimates of ...

Raghuveer K. Vinukollu; Justin Sheffield; Eric F. Wood; Michael G. Bosilovich; David Mocko

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

On the Use of GOES Thermal Data to Study Effects of Land Use on Diurnal Temperature Fluctuation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) infrared data were used to study the effect of land use on the diurnal surface temperature fluctuation. Five major land use types in southern Florida: the sandy soil agricultural area; the ...

S. F. Shih; E. Chen

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Global Retrospective Estimation of Soil Moisture Using the Variable Infiltration Capacity Land Surface Model, 198093  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A daily set of surface meteorological forcings, model-derived surface moisture fluxes, and state variables for global land areas for the period of 197993 is described. The forcing dataset facilitates global simulations and evaluation of land ...

Bart Nijssen; Reiner Schnur; Dennis P. Lettenmaier

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Geothermal energy and the land resource: conflicts and constraints in The Geysers-Calistoga KGRA  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study of potential land-related impacts of geothermal power development in The Geysers region focuses on Lake County because it has most of the undeveloped resource and the least regulatory capability. First, the land resource is characterized in terms of its ecological, hydrological, agricultural, and recreational value; intrinsic natural hazards; and the adequacy of roads and utility systems. Based on those factors, the potential land-use conflicts and constraints that geothermal development may encounter in the region are identified and the availability and relative suitability of land for such development is determined. A brief review of laws and powers germane to geothermal land-use regulation is included.

O'Banion, K.; Hall, C.

1980-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

271

Feasibility Study of Anaerobic Digestion of Food Waste in St. Bernard, Louisiana. A Study Prepared in Partnership with the Environmental Protection Agency for the RE-Powering America's Land Initiative: Siting Renewable Energy on Potentially Contaminated Land and Mine Sites  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) developed the RE-Powering America's Land initiative to re-use contaminated sites for renewable energy generation when aligned with the community's vision for the site. The former Kaiser Aluminum Landfill in St. Bernard Parish, Louisiana, was selected for a feasibility study under the program. Preliminary work focused on selecting a biomass feedstock. Discussions with area experts, universities, and the project team identified food wastes as the feedstock and anaerobic digestion (AD) as the technology.

Moriarty, K.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Cerenkov Particle Identification in FOCUS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe the algorithm used to identify charged tracks in the fixed-target charm-photoproduction experiment FOCUS.

The FOCUS Collaboration

2001-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

273

MODIS Land Products Subsets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

methods methods This section describes methods used to generate MODIS Land Subsets for Collection 4 and Collection 5 data products. Methods for Selected Sites (Collections 4 and 5) Methods for North America Tool (Collection 4) Methods for the Global Tool (Collection 5) Methods for Selected Sites (Collection 4 and 5) Source for Selected Site Data: Full MODIS scenes (1200-km x 1200-km) are initially subset to 11-km x 31-km (Collection 4) or 25-km x 25-km (Collection 5) by the MODAPS; these initial subsets contain the field site or flux tower. Reformatting and additional subsetting to 7-km x 7-km containing the field site or flux tower are done by the ORNL DAAC. Tools Used: The ORNL DAAC uses the MODIS Reprojection Tool (MRT) to reformat the MODIS data from HDF-EOS to binary format. A tool developed at ORNL is then used to convert the binary format to ASCII. The MRT is available from the Land Processes DAAC. Whereas the MRT can also be used to reproject data from its native projection to other projections, ORNL chose to forgo the resampling associated with reprojection to minimize data manipulation and distortion. The MOD12Q1 Land Cover Collection 3 data are in I-Sin projection, and the Collection 4 and Collection 5 data are in Sinusoidal projection.

274

Sale of Water Resource Land (Maine) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sale of Water Resource Land (Maine) Sale of Water Resource Land (Maine) Sale of Water Resource Land (Maine) < Back Eligibility Municipal/Public Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Maine Program Type Siting and Permitting This rule requires an eight month advance notice period whenever a consumer-owned water utility intends to transfer water resource land, defined as any land or real property owned by a water utility for the purposes of providing a source of supply, storing water or protecting sources of supply or water storage, including reservoirs, lakes, ponds, rivers or streams, wetlands and watershed areas. The rule also provides an assignable right of first refusal to the municipality or municipalities

275

Renewable Energy Potential on Tribal Lands Webinar | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Potential on Tribal Lands Webinar Potential on Tribal Lands Webinar Renewable Energy Potential on Tribal Lands Webinar February 27, 2013 11:00AM MST Webinar The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Tribal Energy Program, and Western Area Power Administration are pleased to continue their sponsorship of the Tribal Renewable Energy Webinar Series. American Indian land comprises 2% of U.S. land but contains an estimated 5% of all renewable energy resources. Attend this webinar for an introduction to the recently released National Renewable Energy Laboratory on tribal renewable energy resources. Learn about location, siting, and transmission issues and opportunities for feasible renewable energy development on

276

Effect of anthropogenic land-use and land cover changes on climate and land carbon storage in CMIP5 projections for the 21st century  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effects of land-use changes on climate are assessed using specified-concentration simulations complementary to the RCP2.6 and 8.5 scenarios performed for the fifth coupled model intercomparison project (CMIP5). This analysis focuses on ...

V. Brovkin; L. Boysen; V. K. Arora; J. P. Boisier; P. Cadule; L. Chini; M. Claussen; P. Friedlingstein; V. Gayler; B. J. J. M. van den Hurk; G. C. Hurtt; C. D. Jones; E. Kato; N. de Noblet-Ducoudr; F. Pacifico; J. Pongratz; M. Weiss

277

Land Stewardship | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Land Stewardship Land Stewardship Land Stewardship Mission The team advocates improved ecosystem health on LM properties in accordance with DOE Order 430.1B, Real Property Asset Management; federal regulations, such as the Endangered Species Act, the Noxious Weed Act, and the Wetlands and Floodplains Act; and in consideration of LM agreements with regulatory agencies and tribes. The team advocates identifying and proposing land management improvements on LM sites that are beneficial to ecosystems and improve remedy sustainability. Improvements are implemented with consideration of adjacent land uses, owners, and political entities. Success is defined when measurable parameters are achieved. Scope The team identifies and evaluates proposals to enhance ecosystem health at

278

Chapter 37 Land Disposal Restrictions (Kentucky) | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7 Land Disposal Restrictions (Kentucky) Chapter 37 Land Disposal Restrictions (Kentucky) Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor...

279

Spatial decision support system for land assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Keywords: GIS, agriculture planning, artificial intelligence, decision support system, expert system, geoinformatics, geoinformation system, land evaluation, land use planning

Cludio Chauke Nehme; Margareth Simes

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Issues in using landscape indicators to assess land changes  

SciTech Connect

Landscape indicators, when combined with information about environmental conditions (such as habitat potential, biodiversity, carbon and nutrient cycling, and erosion) and socioeconomic forces, can provide insights about changing ecosystem services. They also provide information about opportunities for improving natural resources management. Landscape indicators rely on data regarding land cover, land management and land functionality. Challenges in using landscape indicators to assess change and effects include (1) measures of land management and attributes that are reliable, robust and consistent for all areas on the Earth do not exist, and thus land cover is more frequently utilized; (2) multiple types of land cover and management are often found within a single landscape and are constantly changing, which complicates measurement and interpretation; and (3) while causal analysis is essential for understanding and interpreting changes in indicator values, the interactions among multiple causes and effects over time make accurate attribution among many drivers of change particularly difficult. Because of the complexity, sheer number of variables, and limitations of empirical data on land changes, models are often used to illustrate and estimate values for landscape indicators, and those models have several problems. Recommendations to improve our ability to assess the effects of changes in land management include refinement of questions to be more consistent with available information and the development of data sets based on systematic measurement over time of spatially explicit land qualities such as carbon and nutrient stocks, water and soil quality, net primary productivity, habitat and biodiversity. Well-defined and consistent land-classification systems that are capable of tracking changes in these and other qualities that matter to society need to be developed and deployed. Because landscapes are so dynamic, it is crucial to develop ways for the scientific community to work together to collect data and develop tools that will enable better analysis of causes and effects and to develop robust management recommendations that will increases land s capacity to meet societal needs in a changing world.

Kline, Keith L [ORNL; Dale, Virginia H [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land focus area" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Focus  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the year 2009. With rising global temperatures, scientists worry about the potential impact that the thawing perma- frost and ensuing release of trapped carbon might have on the...

282

Mirror alignment and focus of point-focus solar concentrators  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Distributed point-focusing solar concentrators are being developed for dish-Stirling systems and other applications. Many of these concentrators make use of faceted mirrors that have to be accurately aligned. Some of the solar concentrator designs use stretched-membrane facets that also require focusing. Accurate mirror alignment and focus of faceted solar concentrators have two benefits. First, the concentration ratio of the concentrator/receiver (collector) system is improved with accurate alignment and focus. The receiver aperture diameter can therefore be smaller, thereby reducing thermal losses from the receiver and improving the overall efficiency of the collector. Second, and perhaps more importantly, flux intensities on the receiver can be sensitive to facet alignment and focus. In this paper, the theory and practical application of an alignment and focusing technique are presented. In the technique, light from an artificial source is reflected from the concentrator`s facets to a target. From basic geometric principles, the shape and location of the reflected light on the target can be predicted. Alignment is accomplished by adjusting the facets aim so that the reflected image falls on the predetermined location. To focus a stretched-membrane facet, the reflected image size is adjusted to match that of the target. The governing equations used to draw the alignment targets are developed and the practical application of the technique to the alignment and focus of the Cummins Power Generation, Inc. CPG-460 are presented. Alignment uncertainty associated with this technique on the CPG-460 is also discussed.

Diver, R.B.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

LBA Land Use and Land Cover Data Set Released  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LBA Land Use and Land Cover Data Sets Released LBA Land Use and Land Cover Data Sets Released The ORNL DAAC announces the release of two image data sets from the Land Use and Land Cover science theme (LC-15 team), a component of the LBA-ECO Large Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia (LBA). LBA-ECO LC-15 SRTM30 Digital Elevation Model Data, Amazon Basin: 2000 . Data set prepared by S. Saatchi. This data set provides a subset of the SRTM30 Digital Elevation Model (DEM) elevation and standard deviation data (STD of the data points used in the averaging) for the Amazon Basin. SRTM30 is a near-global digital elevation model (DEM) comprising a combination of data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), flown in February, 2000, and the earlier U.S. Geological Survey's GTOPO30 data set.

284

Industries in focus | ENERGY STAR  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ENERGY STAR Energy Performance Indicators for plants Industries in focus Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers...

285

CARBON SEQUESTRATION OF SURFACE MINE LANDS  

SciTech Connect

The January-March 2004 Quarter was dedicated to tree planting activities in two locations in Kentucky. During year one of this project there was no available mine land to plant in the Hazard area so 107 acres were planted in the Martin county mine location. This year 120 acres was planted in the Hazard area to compensate for the prior year and an additional 57 acres was planted on Peabody properties in western Kentucky. An additional set of special plots were established on each of these areas that contained 4800 seedlings each for special carbon sequestration determinations. Plantings were also conducted to continue compaction and water quality studies on two newly established areas as well as confirmed measurements on the first years plantings. Total plantings on this project now amount to 357 acres containing 245,960 tree seedlings.

Donald H. Graves; Christopher Barton; Richard Sweigard; Richard Warner

2004-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

286

MODIS Land Products Subsets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Geography of the MODIS Land Subsets for selected Field Sites Geography of the MODIS Land Subsets for selected Field Sites The 7- x 7-km grid containing the field or tower site is provided to enable comparison of pixel values of MODIS products with field data collected at a site. The values are intended to be examined over time either as a collection of individual values or combined (e.g., the average and range) within a 3- x 3-km grid or a 5- x 5-km grid around the site. Examples of analyses using the ASCII subset data can be found in presentations. If users would like to examine the MODIS data spatially in a map, we suggest that they obtain the GeoTIFF subsets or MODIS products from the LP DAAC. Please note that the grid and pixel sizes are not exact multiples of 1 km, but are only approximations. For instance, the grid and pixel size for the 1 km Sinusoidal grid is approximately 926 m. For additional information, please view the MODIS Web site.

287

A LandAtmospheric Interaction Study in the Coastal Tropical City of San Juan, Puerto Rico  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper focuses on the surfaceatmospheric interaction in a tropical coastal city including the validation of an atmospheric modeling and an impact study of land-cover and land-use (LCLU) changes. The Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS)...

Daniel E. Comarazamy; Jorge E. Gonzlez; Jeffrey C. Luvall; Douglas L. Rickman; Pedro J. Mulero

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Scaling Water and Energy Fluxes in Climate Systems: Three Land-Atmospheric Modeling Experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effects of small-scale heterogeneity in land-surface characteristics on the large-scale fluxes of water and energy in the land-atmosphere system have become a central focus of many of the climatology research experiments. The acquisition of ...

Eric F. Wood; Venkataraman Lakshmi

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Land Transport Sector in Bangladesh: An Analysis Toward Motivating...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Toward Motivating GHG Emission Reduction Strategies AgencyCompany Organization Hiroshima University Focus Area Transportation Topics Co-benefits assessment, GHG inventory,...

290

Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Interactions in the Southeastern Pacific: The VOCALS Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The present paper describes the VAMOS Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study (VOCALS), an international research program focused on the improved understanding and modeling of the southeastern Pacific (SEP) climate system on diurnal to interannual timescales. ...

C. R. Mechoso; R. Wood; R. Weller; C. S. Bretherton; A. D. Clarke; H. Coe; C. Fairall; J. T. Farrar; G. Feingold; R. Garreaud; C. Grados; J. McWilliams; S. P. de Szoeke; S. E. Yuter; P. Zuidema

291

Seasonal Predictability of Daily Rainfall Characteristics in Central Northern Chile for Dry-Land Management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The seasonal predictability of daily winter rainfall characteristics relevant to dry-land management was investigated in the Coquimbo region of central northern Chile, with focus on the seasonal rainfall total, daily rainfall frequency, and mean ...

Koen Verbist; Andrew W. Robertson; Wim M. Cornelis; Donald Gabriels

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

MODIS Land Products Subsets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Introduction Introduction Collection 5 The MODIS data from the Terra and Aqua satellites are being reprocessed using revised algorithms beginning in September 2006. This new set of MODIS Products is called Collection 5. To view the product changes that took place in going from Collection 4 to Collection 5, please visit the following Web site: http://landweb.nascom.nasa.gov/cgi-bin/QA_WWW/newPage.cgi?fileName=MODLAND_C005_changes The ORNL DAAC provides subsets of the Collection 5 MODIS Land Products. Investigators from around the world have shown a great deal of interest in this activity, asking that over 1000 field and flux tower sites be included in Collection 5 subsetting (up from 280 sites for Collection 4 MODIS subsetting). Availability of the Collection 5 Data Products

293

MODIS Land Products Subsets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MODIS ASCII Subset Products - FTP Access MODIS ASCII Subset Products - FTP Access All of the MODIS ASCII Subsets are available from the ORNL DAAC's ftp site. The directory structure of the ftp site is based on the abbreviated names for the MODIS Products. Terra MODIS products are abbreviated "MOD", Aqua MODIS products are abbreviated "MYD" and combined Terra and Aqua MODIS products are abbreviated "MCD". The abbreviated names also include the version number (also known as collection). For specific products, please refer to the following table: Product Acronym Spatial Resolution Temporal Frequency Terra V005 SIN Aqua V005 SIN Terra/Aqua Combined V005 SIN Surface Reflectance SREF 500 m 8 day composites MOD09A1 MYD09A1 ---------- Land Surface Temperature and Emissivity TEMP 1 km 8 day composites MOD11A2 MYD11A2 ----------

294

Focus Groups | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Outreach & Collaboration » Focus Groups Outreach & Collaboration » Focus Groups Focus Groups A forum for interface between union worker representatives and senior DOE managers and stakeholders to address key issues and concerns from worker perspectives, share information regarding HSS activities and programs, and identify potential opportunities to work together to improve worker health and safety at DOE sites. Learn more about the HSS Focus Groups... Labor Management Meetings and Activities HSS provides forums for communication between labor and management related to worker health, safety and security improvements across the DOE complex. 10 CFR 851 Worker Safety and Health Program The 10 C.F.R. 851 Work Group promotes excellence in the implementation of 10 C.F.R. 851, "Worker Safety and Health" and continuous improvement in the

295

Focus On.... Biodiversity and Conservation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Focus On.... Biodiversity and Conservation This resource guide aims to provide useful, detailed, high quality sources of information on biodiversity and conservation for students in Higher and Further and Conservation Introduction.....................................................................................3

Miranda, Eduardo Reck

296

FEMP Focus: Fall 2003 Issue  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

event of utility interruptions, and will provide 68 percent (56,402 megawatt-hours per year) of the Base's electricity requirement. FEMP Focus: As a FEMP constituent, how do you...

297

LANL: Facility Focus: Sigma Complex  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Energy under contract DE-AC52-06NA25396. A U.S. Department of Energy Laboratory. www.lanl.govorgsmst Materials Science and Technology Division Facility Focus Materials...

298

Fueling area site assessment  

SciTech Connect

This report provides results of a Site Assessment performed at the Fuel Storage Area at Buckley ANG Base in Aurora, Colorado. Buckley ANG Base occupies 3,328 acres of land within the City of Aurora in Arapahoe County, Colorado. The Fuel Storage Area (also known as the Fueling Area) is located on the west side of the Base at the intersection of South Powderhorn Street and East Breckenridge Avenue. The Fueling Area consists of above ground storage tanks in a bermed area, pumps, piping, valves, an unloading stand and a fill stand. Jet fuel from the Fueling Area is used to support aircraft operations at the Base. Jet fuel is stored in two 200,000 gallon above ground storage tanks. Fuel is received in tanker trucks at the unloading stand located south and east of the storage tanks. Fuel required for aircraft fueling and other use is transferred into tanker trucks at the fill stand and transported to various points on the Base. The Fuel Storage Area has been in operation for over 20 years and handles approximately 7 million gallons of jet fuel annually.

1996-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

299

The Relationship between Land Use and Temperature Change in Dallas County, Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study examines the relationship between land use and temperature change in Dallas County, TX. The purpose of this research is to analyze the relationship between temperature and land use and to identify the primary factors contributing to the formation of urban heat islands based on different categories of land use. Specifically, this research analyzes the elements that contribute to the urban heat island effect in Dallas County using temperature data provided by remote sensing imagery and parcel-based land use data using Geographic Information System (GIS) technique and a correlation analysis method, which was employed to analyze the relationship between temperature and land use. The results of this study showed that every land use category has different temperature averages and those patterns were observed similarly in both 2000 and 2005. Parking, airport, commercial, industrial, and residential areas have relatively high temperatures. In contrast, water, undeveloped area and parks showed relatively low temperatures. Another major finding was ratio of land use composition affected the temperature of census tracts. Correlation analyses of land use and temperature in 2000 and 2005 indicate that various types of land use categories have significant relationships with temperature. Among them commercial, industrial, residential, parking, and infrastructure, are positively associated with temperature, while undeveloped, parks, water, and dedicated areas are negatively associated with temperature. Areas with a high ratio of commercial use showed the highest and undeveloped areas showed the lowest relationship. Furthermore, through the analysis of the relationship between land use and temperature change for five years (2000-2005), this study finds that temperature change depends on the ratio of each land use category change. The results of this study can help local planning and policy decisions which are related to urban land use planning concerning temperature change such as zoning, environmental regulations and open space preservation.

Kim, Hee Ju

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Land reclamation beautifies coal mines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The article explains how the Mississippi Agricultural and Forestry Experiments station, MAFES, has helped prepare land exploited by strip mining at North American Coal Corporation's Red Hills Mine. The 5,800 acre lignite mine is over 200 ft deep and uncovers six layers of coal. About 100 acres of land a year is mined and reclaimed, mostly as pine plantations. 5 photos.

Coblentz, B. [MSU Ag Communications (United States)

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land focus area" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Energy Corridors on Federal Lands | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Corridors on Federal Lands Energy Corridors on Federal Lands Energy Corridors on Federal Lands In many areas of the United States, the infrastructure required to deliver energy has not always kept pace with growth in demand. To improve energy delivery and enhance the electric transmission grid for the future, several government agencies currently are working together to establish a coordinated network of Federal energy corridors on Federal lands throughout the United States. Energy corridors would help address growing energy demand by facilitating future siting of oil, gas, and hydrogen pipelines and electricity transmission and distribution facilities, while also protecting the environment. As the agency-preferred siting locations, the energy transport corridors will provide industry and the public with

302

Bureau of Land Management - Campground, Utah | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Land Management - Campground, Utah Land Management - Campground, Utah Bureau of Land Management - Campground, Utah October 7, 2013 - 9:47am Addthis Photo of Field Station at Red Cliffs Campground in Utah's Cedar City District The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) has remote field stations in Arizona, California, Utah, Idaho, and Alaska. This photograph shows the field station at Red Cliffs Campground in Utah's Cedar City District. Photovoltaic power systems allow the people working in these remote areas to have the convenience of continuous power. "The comfort and convenience of having 24-hour continuous power has been greatly appreciated by the users," said Trent Duncan of BLM, the mechanical engineer for the project. A standardized system design based on existing BLM systems was developed

303

Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach: Resources for Public Lands  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Resources Public Power Regional Activities State Activities State Lands Siting Resources for Public Lands This page lists wind-related resources and tools such as publications, Web resources, and news about public lands. Search the Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach initiative's Database Choose a Type of Information All News Publications Web Resource Videos Choose # of Records per Page Default (10 per page) 5 25 50 To search the titles, enter a word or phrase. Start Search Clear Contents Total of 24 records found. Page 1 of 5, Sorted by descending date Filtered by: Public Lands 1 2 3 4 5 Next Page >> Date sort by ascending date sort by descending date State sort by ascending state sort by descending state Type of Information Program Area Title sort by ascending title sort by descending title

304

Renewable Energy Project Leasing on Tribal Lands Webinar | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Project Leasing on Tribal Lands Webinar Project Leasing on Tribal Lands Webinar Renewable Energy Project Leasing on Tribal Lands Webinar June 26, 2013 11:00AM MDT Webinar The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Tribal Energy Program, and Western Area Power Administration are pleased to continue their sponsorship of the Tribal Renewable Energy Webinar Series. According to the Intertribal Council on Utility Policy, wind resources on tribal lands in the Great Plains alone could power more than 50 million homes. The HEARTH Act of 2012 provides the opportunity for Tribes to eliminate delays, costs, federal environmental reviews, federal administrative and judicial litigation, and risks associated with Bureau of

305

Closed BLM Public Lands: Geothermal Leases Not Permitted | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Closed BLM Public Lands: Geothermal Leases Not Permitted Closed BLM Public Lands: Geothermal Leases Not Permitted Dataset Summary Description The U.S. Bureau of Land Management (BLM) released a series of GIS layers of public lands closed to geothermal leases (obtaining leases is not permitted in these regions). The various types of closed areas included here are: National Monuments, National Recreation Areas, National Conservation Areas, National Wildlife Refuges, National Historic Trails, Wilderness Areas, Wilderness Study Areas, and the Island Park Geothermal Area. The GIS layers were made available upon publication of the BLM's Nationwide Geothermal Resources Leasing Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS). Each GIS layer contains: .SBX, .XML, .SHX, .DBF (.XLS), .PRJ, .SBN, and .SHP data.

306

Geothermal resource area 3: Elko County. Area development plan  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geothermal Resource Area 3 includes all of the land in Elko County, Nevada. There are in excess of 50 known thermal anomalies in this area. Several of the more major resources have been selected for detailed description and evaluation in this Area Development Plan. The other resources are considered too small, too low in temperature, or too remote to be considered for development in the near future. Various potential uses of the energy found at each of the studied resource sites in Elko County were determined after evaluating the area's physical characteristics; the land ownership and land use patterns; existing population and projected growth rates; transportation facilities and energy requirements. These factors were then compared with resource site specific data to determine the most likely uses of the resource. The uses considered in this evaluation were divided into five main categories: electrical generation, space heating, recreation, industrial process heat, and agriculture. Within two of these categories several subdivisions were considered separately. It was determined that several of the geothermal resources evaluated in the Area Development Plan could be commercially developed. The potential for development for the seven sites considered in this study is summarized.

Pugsley, M.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Data Sets Released from Two LBA Land Use-Land Change Teams  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Two land Use-Land Change Teams The ORNL DAAC and the LBA DIS announce the release of two data sets from the Land Use-Land Change teams, a component of the LBA-ECO Large Scale...

308

Biofuels, land and water : a systems approach to sustainability.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

There is a strong societal need to evaluate and understand the sustainability of biofuels, especially because of the significant increases in production mandated by many countries, including the United States. Sustainability will be a strong factor in the regulatory environment and investments in biofuels. Biomass feedstock production is an important contributor to environmental, social, and economic impacts from biofuels. This study presents a systems approach where the agricultural, energy, and environmental sectors are considered as components of a single system, and environmental liabilities are used as recoverable resources for biomass feedstock production. We focus on efficient use of land and water resources. We conducted a spatial analysis evaluating marginal land and degraded water resources to improve feedstock productivity with concomitant environmental restoration for the state of Nebraska. Results indicate that utilizing marginal land resources such as riparian and roadway buffer strips, brownfield sites, and marginal agricultural land could produce enough feedstocks to meet a maximum of 22% of the energy requirements of the state compared to the current supply of 2%. Degraded water resources such as nitrate-contaminated groundwater and wastewater were evaluated as sources of nutrients and water to improve feedstock productivity. Spatial overlap between degraded water and marginal land resources was found to be as high as 96% and could maintain sustainable feedstock production on marginal lands. Other benefits of implementing this strategy include feedstock intensification to decrease biomass transportation costs, restoration of contaminated water resources, and mitigation of greenhouse gas emissions.

Gopalakrishnan, G.; Negri, M. C.; Wang, M.; Wu, M.; Snyder, S. W.; LaFreniere, L.

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Carbon Sequestration on Surface Mine Lands  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The first quarter of 2004 was dedicated to tree planting activities in two locations in Kentucky. During the first year of this project there was not available mine land to plant in the Hazard area, so 107 acres were planted in the Martin County mine location. This year 120 acres were planted in the Hazard area to compensate for the prior year and an additional 57 acres were planted on Peabody properties in western Kentucky. Additional sets of special plots were established on each of these areas that contained 4800 seedlings each for carbon sequestration demonstrations. Plantings were also conducted to continue compaction and water quality studies on the newly established areas as well as continual measurements of the first year's plantings. Total plantings on this project now amount to 357 acres containing 245,960 seedlings. During the second quarter of this year monitoring systems were established for all the new research areas. Weather data pertinent to the research as well as hydrology and water quality monitoring continues to be conducted on all areas. Studies established to assess specific questions pertaining to carbon flux and the invasion of the vegetation by small mammals are being quantified. Experimental practices initiated with this research project will eventually allow for the planting on long steep slopes with loose grading systems and allow mountain top removal areas to be constructed with loose spoil with no grading of the final layers of rooting material when establishing trees for the final land use designation. Monitoring systems have been installed to measure treatment effects on both above and below ground carbon and nitrogen pools in the planting areas. Soil and tissue samples were collected from both years planting and analyses were conducted in the laboratory. Examination of decomposition and heterotropic respiration on carbon cycling in the reforestation plots continued during the reporting period. Entire planted trees were extracted from the study area to evaluate carbon accumulation as a function of time on the mine sites. These trees were extracted and separated into the following components: foliage, stems, branches, and roots. Each component was evaluated to determine the contribution of each to the total sequestration value. The fourth quarter of the year was devoted to analyzing the first two years tree planting activities and the evaluation of the results. These analyses included the species success at each of the sites and quantifying the data for future year determination of research levels. Additional detailed studies have been planned to further quantify total carbon storage accumulation on the study areas. At least 124 acres of new plantings will be established in 2005 to bring the total to 500 acres or more in the study area across the state of Kentucky.

Donald H. Graves; Christopher Barton; Bon Jun Koo; Richard Sweigard; Richard Warner

2004-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

310

The Footprint of Urban Areas on Global Climate as Characterized by MODIS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One mechanism for climate change is the collected impact of changes in land cover or land use. Such changes are especially significant in urban areas where much of the worlds population lives. Satellite observations provide a basis for ...

Menglin Jin; Robert E. Dickinson; Da Zhang

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Land-Based Wind Potential Changes in the Southeastern United States (Presentation)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent advancements in utility-scale wind turbine technology and pricing have vastly increased the potential land area where turbines can be deployed in the United States. This presentation quantifies the new developable land potential (e.g., capacity curves), visually identifies new areas for possible development (e.g., new wind resource maps), and begins to address deployment barriers to wind in new areas for modern and future turbine technology.

Roberts, J. O.

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Magnetically focused liquid drop radiator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A magnetically focused liquid drop radiator for application in rejecting energy from a spacecraft, characterized by a magnetizable liquid or slurry disposed in operative relationship within the liquid droplet generator and its fluid delivery system, in combination with magnetic means disposed in operative relationship around a liquid droplet collector of the LDR. The magnetic means are effective to focus streams of droplets directed from the generator toward the collector, thereby to assure that essentially all of the droplets are directed into the collector, even though some of the streams may be misdirected as they leave the generator. The magnetic focusing means is also effective to suppress splashing of liquid when the droplets impinge on the collector.

Botts, T.E.; Powell, J.R.; Lenard, R.

1984-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

313

Montana State Land Board | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Land Board Jump to: navigation, search Name Montana State Land Board Place Helena, Montana Website http:dnrc.mt.govLandBoardS References Webpage1 This article is a stub. You...

314

POLLUTION AND LAND USE: OPTIMUM AND DECENTRALIZATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with land and labor inputs and pollution emissions as a by-isolating the role of land use in pollution control we: i)land and the composite good, and disutility from the pollution

Hochman, Oded; Rausser, Gordon C.; Arnott, Richard J

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Analytical LandAtmosphere Radiometer Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Conversion of radiometric land surface temperature (?r) to an equivalent isothermal (aerodynamic) surface temperature (?i) is important in balancing the land surface energy budget with satellite-based ?r measurements. An analytical land...

Ayman Suleiman; Richard Crago

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Land Record System PIA, Bonneville Power Administration | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Land Record System PIA, Bonneville Power Administration Land Record System PIA, Bonneville Power Administration Land Record System PIA, Bonneville Power Administration Land Record...

317

EA-365 Centre Land Trading Limited | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5 Centre Land Trading Limited EA-365 Centre Land Trading Limited Order Authorizing Centre Land Trading Limited to export electric energy to Canada EA-365 Centre Land Trading...

318

PIA - Land Record System (SWPA) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Land Record System (SWPA) PIA - Land Record System (SWPA) PIA - Land Record System (SWPA) PIA - Land Record System (SWPA) More Documents & Publications Thursday, February 14, 2008...

319

Land Use for Wind, Solar, and Geothermal Electricity Generation Facilities in the United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides data and analysis of the land use associated with utility-scale wind, photovoltaic (PV), concentrating solar power (CSP), and geothermal projects. The analysts evaluated 458 existing or proposed projects, representing (as of 2012 third quarter) 51% of installed wind capacity, 80% of PV and CSP capacity, and all known geothermal power plants in the United States. The report identifies two major land use classes: 1) direct area (land permanently or temporarily disturbed due to ...

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

320

GRR/Section 3-TX-f - Lease of Land Trade Lands | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 3-TX-f - Lease of Land Trade Lands GRR/Section 3-TX-f - Lease of Land Trade Lands < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 3-TX-f - Lease of Land Trade Lands 03-TX-f - Lease of Land Trade Lands.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 03-TX-f - Lease of Land Trade Lands.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative This flowchart illustrates the process of leasing Land Trade Lands in Texas. The Texas General Land Office (GLO) administers leases on Land Trade Lands through Title 31 of the Texas Administrative Code Section 155.42.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land focus area" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

LANDS WITH WILDERNESS CHARACTERISTICS, RESOURCE MANAGEMENT PLAN CONSTRAINTS, AND LAND EXCHANGES: CROSS-JURISDICTIONAL MANAGEMENT AND IMPACTS ON UNCONVENTIONAL FUEL DEVELOPMENT IN UTAHS UINTA BASIN  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Utah is rich in oil shale and oil sands resources. Chief among the challenges facing prospective unconventional fuel developers is the ability to access these resources. Access is heavily dependent upon land ownership and applicable management requirements. Understanding constraints on resource access and the prospect of consolidating resource holdings across a fragmented management landscape is critical to understanding the role Utahs unconventional fuel resources may play in our nations energy policy. This Topical Report explains the historic roots of the crazy quilt of western land ownership, how current controversies over management of federal public land with wilderness character could impact access to unconventional fuels resources, and how land exchanges could improve management efficiency. Upon admission to the Union, the State of Utah received the right to title to more than one-ninth of all land within the newly formed state. This land is held in trust to support public schools and institutions, and is managed to generate revenue for trust beneficiaries. State trust lands are scattered across the state in mostly discontinuous 640-acre parcels, many of which are surrounded by federal land and too small to develop on their own. Where state trust lands are developable but surrounded by federal land, federal land management objectives can complicate state trust land development. The difficulty generating revenue from state trust lands can frustrate state and local government officials as well as citizens advocating for economic development. Likewise, the prospect of industrial development of inholdings within prized conservation landscapes creates management challenges for federal agencies. One major tension involves whether certain federal public lands possess wilderness character, and if so, whether management of those lands should emphasize wilderness values over other uses. On December 22, 2010, Secretary of the Interior Ken Salazar issued Secretarial Order 3310, Protecting Wilderness Characteristics on Lands Managed by the Bureau of Land Management. Supporters argue that the Order merely provides guidance regarding implementation of existing legal obligations without creating new rights or duties. Opponents describe Order 3310 as subverting congressional authority to designate Wilderness Areas and as closing millions of acres of public lands to energy development and commodity production. While opponents succeeded in temporarily defunding the Orders implementation and forcing the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) to adopt a more collaborative approach, the fundamental questions remain: Which federal public lands possess wilderness characteristics and how should those lands be managed? The closely related question is: How might management of such resources impact unconventional fuel development within Utah? These questions remain pressing independent of the Order because the BLM, which manages the majority of federal land in Utah, is statutorily obligated to maintain an up-to-date inventory of federal public lands and the resources they contain, including lands with wilderness characteristics. The BLM is also legally obligated to develop and periodically update land use plans, relying on information obtained in its public lands inventory. The BLM cannot sidestep these hard choices, and failure to consider wilderness characteristics during the planning process will derail the planning effort. Based on an analysis of the most recent inventory data, lands with wilderness characteristics whether already subject to mandatory protection under the Wilderness Act, subject to discretionary protections as part of BLM Resource Management Plan revisions, or potentially subject to new protections under Order 3310 are unlikely to profoundly impact oil shale development within Utahs Uinta Basin. Lands with wilderness characteristics are likely to v have a greater impact on oil sands resources, particularly those resources found in the southern part of the state. Management requirements independent of l

Keiter, Robert; Ruple, John; Holt, Rebecca; Tanana, Heather; McNeally, Phoebe; Tribby, Clavin

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

HANFORD SITE CLEANUP OBJECTIVES INCONSISTENTWITH PROJECTED LAND...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

HANFORD SITE CLEANUP OBJECTIVES INCONSISTENTWITH PROJECTED LAND USES, IG-0446 HANFORD SITE CLEANUP OBJECTIVES INCONSISTENTWITH PROJECTED LAND USES, IG-0446 The cleanup of the...

323

FAHR: focused A* heuristic recomputation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we introduce Focused A* Heuristic Recomputation (FAHR), an enhancement to A* search that can detect and correct large discrepancies between the heuristic cost-to-go estimate and the true cost function. In situations where these large discrepancies ...

Matthew McNaughton; Chris Urmson

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

EA-1936: Proposed Changes to Parcel ED-1 Land Uses, Utility Infrastructure,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6: Proposed Changes to Parcel ED-1 Land Uses, Utility 6: Proposed Changes to Parcel ED-1 Land Uses, Utility Infrastructure, and Natural Area Management Responsibility, Oak Ridge, Tennessee EA-1936: Proposed Changes to Parcel ED-1 Land Uses, Utility Infrastructure, and Natural Area Management Responsibility, Oak Ridge, Tennessee SUMMARY NOTE: This EA has been cancelled. This EA will evaluate the environmental impacts of DOE's proposed modifications to the allowable land uses, utility infrastructure, and Natural Area management responsibility for Parcel ED-1. The purpose of the modifications is to enhance the development potential of the Horizon Center business/industrial park, while ensuring protection of the adjacent Natural Area. The area addressed by the proposed action was evaluated for various industrial/business uses in the

325

borrow_area.cdr  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

information information at Weldon Spring, Missouri. This site is managed by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. developed by the former WSSRAP Community Relations Department to provide comprehensive descriptions of key activities that took place throughout the cleanup process The Missouri Department of Conservation (MDC) approved a plan on June 9, 1995, allowing the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) at the Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project (WSSRAP) to excavate nearly 2 million cubic yards of clay material from land in the Weldon Spring Conservation Area. Clay soil from a borrow area was used to construct the permanent disposal facility at the Weldon Spring site. Clay soil was chosen to construct the disposal facility because it has low permeability when

326

Uni Land | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Land Land Jump to: navigation, search Name Uni Land Place Bologna, Italy Zip 40063 Sector Solar Product Italian property company, which buys land without permits and develops it for residential and commerical use before selling it on. The firm is involved with solar project development. Coordinates 44.50483°, 11.345169° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.50483,"lon":11.345169,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

327

Riparian Rights: State Land (Indiana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The state reserves the power to sell, transfer, and convey, as provided by law, rights-of-way in public land for several purposes, including pipelines, gas pipelines, water pipelines, sewer lines,...

328

OpenEI - land requirements  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

en.openei.orgdatasetstaxonomyterm4180 en Land use requirements for ground-mounted solar power facilities. http:en.openei.orgdatasetsnode454

This dataset is part of...

329

OpenEI - land use  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

en.openei.orgdatasetstaxonomyterm4160 en Land use requirements for ground-mounted solar power facilities. http:en.openei.orgdatasetsnode454

This dataset is part of...

330

EA-1927: PGDP EA for Potential Land and Facility Transfers  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

DOEs Portsmouth/Paducah Project Office is preparing an EA for a proposal to convey DOE land and facilities at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant to the Paducah Area Community Reuse Organization and potentially other parties in furtherance of reindustrialization and reuse for economic development purposes.

331

Regional Cost Estimates for Reclamation Practices on Arid and Semiarid Lands  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Army uses the Integrated Training Area Management program for managing training land. One of the major objectives of the Integrated Training Area Management program has been to develop a method for estimating training land carrying capacity in a sustainable manner. The Army Training and Testing Area Carrying Capacity methodology measures training load in terms of Maneuver Impact Miles. One Maneuver Impact Mile is the equivalent impact of an M1A2 tank traveling one mile while participating in an armor battalion field training exercise. The Army Training and Testing Area Carrying Capacity methodology is also designed to predict land maintenance costs in terms of dollars per Maneuver Impact Mile. The overall cost factor is calculated using the historical cost of land maintenance practices and the effectiveness of controlling erosion. Because land maintenance costs and effectiveness are influenced by the characteristics of the land, Army Training and Testing Area Carrying Capacity cost factors must be developed for each ecological region of the country. Costs for land maintenance activities are presented here for the semiarid and arid regions of the United States. Five ecoregions are recognized, and average values for reclamation activities are presented. Because there are many variables that can influence costs, ranges for reclamation activities are also presented. Costs are broken down into six major categories: seedbed preparation, fertilization, seeding, planting, mulching, and supplemental erosion control. Costs for most land reclamation practices and materials varied widely within and between ecological provinces. Although regional cost patterns were evident for some practices, the patterns were not consistent between practices. For the purpose of estimating land reclamation costs for the Army Training and Testing Area Carrying Capacity methodology, it may be desirable to use the ''Combined Average'' of all provinces found in the last row of each table to estimate costs for arid lands in general.

W. K. Ostler

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

SGP Cloud and Land Surface Interaction Campaign (CLASIC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 SGP Cloud and Land Surface Interaction Campaign (CLASIC): Science and Implementation Plan June 2007 Mark A. Miller, Principal Investigator and The CLASIC Steering Committee: Roni Avissar, Larry Berg, Sylvia Edgerton, Marc Fischer, Tom Jackson, Bill Kustas, Pete Lamb, Greg McFarquhar, Qilong Min, Beat Schmid, Margaret Torn, and Dave Turner Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research M.R. Miller et al., DOE/SC-ARM-0703 Executive Summary The Cloud and Land Surface Interaction Campaign is a field experiment designed to collect a comprehensive data set that can be used to quantify the interactions that occur between the atmosphere, biosphere, land surface, and subsurface. A particular focus will be on how these

333

Environment Canada research on land treatment of petroleum wastes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of the studies presented in this book is to identify wastes which can be applied to land in an environmentally acceptable manner and to provide information on which to base guidelines for the proper application of such wastes to land. The information which has been collected to date has focused on the persistence and fate of oil and toxic constituents of petroleum wastes when applied to soil, potential environmental impacts and risk to human health associated with application to land, and site managements techniques which enhance treatment of organic constituents of wastes while protecting environmental quality. The potential for contamination of groundwater, the accumulation of hazardous substances in soil and effects on plant growth have undergone the most intensive investigation to date. Impingement on air quality has received limited study.

Bulman, T.L.; Scroggins, R.P. (Wastewater Technolgy Centre, Burlington, Ontario (CA))

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Land-Cover Change Analyses in the Volta Basin of Ghana  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Multitemporal Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) images for 1984, 1992, and 1999 were used to map and detect land-cover changes in a 5400-km2 area within the Volta Lake basin of Ghana. The most dominant land-cover change was the conversion of natural ...

Ademola K. Braimoh; Paul L. G. Vlek

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

REMOTE SENSING TECHNIQUES FOR LAND USE CLASSIFICATION OF RIO JAUCA WATERSHED USING IKONOS IMAGES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

REMOTE SENSING TECHNIQUES FOR LAND USE CLASSIFICATION OF RIO JAUCA WATERSHED USING IKONOS IMAGES-Mayagüez E-mail: edwinmm80@yahoo.com Key words: GIS, remote sensing, land use, supervised classification resource and supplies water to the metropolitan area. Remote sensing techniques can be used to assess

Gilbes, Fernando

336

Maximum Surface Albedo of Seasonally Snow-Covered Lands in the Northern Hemisphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Areally weighted clear sky surface albedo of snow-covered land in the middle and high latitudes of the Northern Hemisphere was measured from satellite imagery in A 11 latitude-longitude cells. The study area included 87% of the land polewards ...

David A. Robinson; George Kukla

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

China's changing landscape during the 1990s: Large-scale land transformations estimated with satellite data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

China's changing landscape during the 1990s: Large-scale land transformations estimated January 2005. [1] Land-cover changes in China are being powered by demand for food for its growing increased by 2.99 million hectares and urban areas increased by 0.82 million hectares. In northern China

338

Automatic environmental quality assessment for mixed-land zones using lidar and intelligent techniques  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Human impact on the natural environment is an evident global fact. Natural, industrial and touristic areas coexist in a more than delicate balance. In Andalusia, in the south of Spain, the Regional Ministry for the Environment is responsible for the ... Keywords: Classification, Decision trees, Intelligent techniques, LULC, Land cover, Land uses, Lidar

Jorge Garcia-Gutierrez; Luis Gonalves-Seco; Jose C. Riquelme-Santos

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

solar land use | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

solar land use solar land use Home Rosborne318's picture Submitted by Rosborne318(5) Member 2 December, 2013 - 11:06 Request for Information Renewable Energy Generation/Production Shreveport Airport Authority - Response Deadline 2 January 2014 pv land use Solar solar land use Solar Power The Shreveport Airport Authority intends to issue a Request for Proposal (RFP) at some future time for renewable energy generation opportunities on Shreveport Airport property. Files: application/pdf icon solar_rfi_complete.pdf Sfomail's picture Submitted by Sfomail(48) Member 25 June, 2013 - 12:10 Solar Land Use Data on OpenEI acres csp land use how much land land requirements pv land use solar land use square miles I'm happy to announce that a new report on Solar+Land+Use was just released by the National+Renewable+Energy+Laboratory. You can find a brief summary

340

pv land use | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

pv land use pv land use Home Rosborne318's picture Submitted by Rosborne318(5) Member 2 December, 2013 - 11:06 Request for Information Renewable Energy Generation/Production Shreveport Airport Authority - Response Deadline 2 January 2014 pv land use Solar solar land use Solar Power The Shreveport Airport Authority intends to issue a Request for Proposal (RFP) at some future time for renewable energy generation opportunities on Shreveport Airport property. Files: application/pdf icon solar_rfi_complete.pdf Sfomail's picture Submitted by Sfomail(48) Member 25 June, 2013 - 12:10 Solar Land Use Data on OpenEI acres csp land use how much land land requirements pv land use solar land use square miles I'm happy to announce that a new report on Solar+Land+Use was just released by the National+Renewable+Energy+Laboratory. You can find a brief summary

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land focus area" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Effects of land markets and land management on ecosystem function: A framework for modelling exurban land-change  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents the conceptual design and application of a new land-change modelling framework that represents geographical, sociological, economic, and ecological aspects of a land system. The framework provides an overarching design that can be ... Keywords: Agent-based modelling, Carbon storage and flux, Exurban development, Land-use and land-cover change, Policy

Derek T. Robinson, Shipeng Sun, Meghan Hutchins, Rick L. Riolo, Daniel G. Brown, Dawn C. Parker, Tatiana Filatova, William S. Currie, Sarah Kiger

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

The effects of agricultural land use patterns on pollutant runoff from watersheds: rangeland/pastureland and row cropping  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Much attention is being focused on water quality in rivers, lakes and streams. One of the contributors of pollution to rivers, lakes and streams is runoff from agriculture in the form of nutrients, pesticides and suspended solids. This study was designed to look at the amount of these substances produced in subwatersheds from corn, grain sorghum and cotton farming along the Colorado River in Travis and Bastrop counties. The study also looked at rangeland and row cropped familand to estimate which land use type produced more runoff and pollution to receiving streams. Best management practices were also looked at as a means of limiting the amount of runoff and pollution transport from row cropped areas. Three automated sampling sites were set up to collect water samples after rainfall events. Two of the sites were set up to sample from streams that drained subwatersheds of a tributary to the Colorado River. The land use at one subwatershed consisted primarily of rangeland and pastureland while the land use at the other site consisted mainly of row cropped farmland. The third site was set up to sample on a row cropped farm that employed certain best management practices. The accepted convention is that rangeland produces less runoff @ row cropped areas and therefore contributes less pollutants to receiving waters. The findings from this project generally support this. Additionally, it was found, through computer modeling, that best management practices in the form of terracing, contour plowing and filter strips significantly reduced the amount of runoff and pollutants that move off site from row cropped areas during rainfall events. The implications of these findings are that, where possible, efforts should be made to implement best management practices to reduce the amount of runoff and pollution to receiving waters. Producers also need to be educated as to how to implement and maintain best management practices to obtain optimal benefits.

Jayne, Andrew A.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Bioenergy and the importance of land use policy in a carbon-constrained world  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Policies aimed at limiting anthropogenic climate change would result in significant transformations of the energy and land-use systems. However, increasing the demand for bioenergy could have a tremendous impact on land use, and can result in land clearing and deforestation. Wise et al. (2009a,b) analyzed an idealized policy to limit the indirect land use change emissions from bioenergy. The policy, while effective, would be difficult, if not impossible, to implement in the real world. In this paper, we consider several different land use policies that deviate from this first-best, using the Joint Global Change Research Institutes Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM). Specifically, these new frameworks are (1) a policy that focuses on just the above-ground or vegetative terrestrial carbon rather than the total carbon, (2) policies that focus exclusively on incentivizing and protecting forestland, and (3) policies that apply an economic penalty on the use of biomass as a proxy to limit indirect land use change emissions. For each policy, we examine its impact on land use, land-use change emissions, atmospheric CO2 concentrations, agricultural supply, and food prices.

Calvin, Katherine V.; Edmonds, James A.; Wise, Marshall A.

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Regional Focus on GM Crop Regulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ON "Abrupt and Gradual Extinction Among Late Permian LandVertebrates in the Karoo Basin, South AfricaVertebrates in the Karoo Basin, South Africa" Peter D.Ward, Roger Buick, Douglas H. Erwin Our data from the land vertebrate record of the Permian-Triassic transition of the Karoo Basin of South Africa support both gradual

Church, George M.

345

LBA Land Use and Land Cover Change Data Sets Released  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

four data sets from the Carbon four data sets from the Carbon Dynamics and Nutrient Dynamics science themes, components of the LBA-ECO Large Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia (LBA). LBA-ECO CD-36 South American Land Data Assimilation System Atmospheric Forcing Data . Data set prepared by L.G.G. de Goncalves, W.J. Shuttleworth, D. Vila, E. Larroza, M.J. Bottino, D.L. Herdies, J.A. Aravequia, J.G. de Mattos, D.L. Toll, M. Rodell and P. Houser. This data set provides South American Land Data Assimilation System (SALDAS) atmospheric forcing data necessary for land surface modeling for South America. The data were derived by combining modeled and observation based sources.The forcing data cover the entire continent of South America at 0.125 degree resolution and are built around the model-calculated values of

346

Baselines For Land-Use Change In The Tropics: Application To Avoided Deforestation Projects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the area of the pilot carbon sequestration projects in theseLUCS = Land Use and Carbon Sequestration model, and GEOMOD =in Mexico: making carbon sequestration a by-product of

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

NASA Cold Land Processes Experiment (CLPX 2002/03): Spaceborne Remote Sensing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes satellite data collected as part of the 2002/03 Cold Land Processes Experiment (CLPX). These data include multispectral and hyperspectral optical imaging, and passive and active microwave observations of the test areas. The ...

Robert E. Davis; Thomas H. Painter; Rick Forster; Don Cline; Richard Armstrong; Terry Haran; Kyle McDonald; Kelly Elder

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Using the Special Sensor Microwave/Imager to Monitor Land Surface Temperatures, Wetness, and Snow Cover  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The worldwide network of in situ land surface temperatures archived in near-real time at the National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) has limited applications, since many areas are poorly represented or provide no observations. Satellite measurements ...

Alan Basist; Norman C. Grody; Thomas C. Peterson; Claude N. Williams

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Modeling Land Surface Processes and Heavy Rainfall in Urban Environments: Sensitivity to Urban Surface Representations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High-resolution simulations with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model are used in conjunction with observational analyses to investigate land surface processes and heavy rainfall over the Baltimore-Washington metropolitan area. ...

Dan Li; Elie Bou-Zeid; Mary Lynn Baeck; Stephen Jessup; James A. Smith

350

The Utilization of Nimbus-7 SMMR Measurements to Delineate Rainfall over Land  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In light of previous theoretical calculations, an empirical-statistical analysis using satellite multifrequency dual polarized passive microwave data to detect rainfall areas over land was performed. The addition of information from a lower ...

Edward Rodgers; Honnappa Siddalingaiah

1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Reseeding "Go-Back" Land in The Flint Hills of Kansas'  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

224 Reseeding "Go-Back" Land in The Flint Hills of Kansas' CLENTON E. OWENSBY AND KLING L. ANDERSON in the Kansas Flint Hills, once cultivated, is now being allowed to "go-back" to grassland. Such areas have

Owensby, Clenton E.

352

Impacts of Land Surface Model Complexity on a Regional Simulation of a Tropical Synoptic Event  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A multimode Chameleon Surface Model (CHASM) with different levels of complexity in parameterizing surface energy balance is coupled to a limited-area model (DARLAM) to investigate the impacts of complexity in land surface representations on the ...

H. Zhang; J. L. McGregor; A. Henderson-Sellers; J. J. Katzfey

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Effects of Light and Commuter Rail Transit on Land Prices: Experiences in San Diego County  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

While this research did not prove that rail investmentsof Rail Transit Accessibility. Transportation ResearchRail Plans on Land Values in Station Areas. Journal of Planning Education and Research,

Cervero, Robert

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Research Areas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Areas Areas Research Areas Print Scientists from a wide variety of fields come to the ALS to perform experiements. Listed below are some of the most common research areas covered by ALS beamlines. Below each heading are a few examples of the specific types of topics included in that category. Click on a heading to learn more about that research area at the ALS. Energy Science Photovoltaics, photosynthesis, biofuels, energy storage, combustion, catalysis, carbon capture/sequestration. Bioscience General biology, structural biology. Materials/Condensed Matter Correlated materials, nanomaterials, magnetism, polymers, semiconductors, water, advanced materials. Physics Atomic, molecular, and optical (AMO) physics; accelerator physics. Chemistry Surfaces/interfaces, catalysts, chemical dynamics (gas-phase chemistry), crystallography, physical chemistry.

355

Federal Energy Management Program: Program Areas  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

program areas of the Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) focus on specific energy management actions to help Federal agencies deploy the available technologies appropriate...

356

Charge-Focusing Readout of Time Projection Chambers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Time projection chambers (TPCs) have found a wide range of applications in particle physics, nuclear physics, and homeland security. For TPCs with high-resolution readout, the readout electronics often dominate the price of the final detector. We have developed a novel method which could be used to build large-scale detectors while limiting the necessary readout area. By focusing the drift charge with static electric fields, we would allow a small area of electronics to be sensitive to particle detection for a much larger detector volume. The resulting cost reduction could be important in areas of research which demand large-scale detectors, including dark matter searches and detection of special nuclear material. We present simulations made using the software package Garfield of a focusing structure to be used with a prototype TPC with pixel readout. This design should enable significant focusing while retaining directional sensitivity to incoming particles. We also present first experimental results and compare them with simulation.

S. J. Ross; M. T. Hedges; I. Jaegle; M. D. Rosen; I. S. Seong; T. N. Thorpe; S. E. Vahsen; J. Yamaoka

2013-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

357

Charge-Focusing Readout of Time Projection Chambers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Time projection chambers (TPCs) have found a wide range of applications in particle physics, nuclear physics, and homeland security. For TPCs with high-resolution readout, the readout electronics often dominate the price of the final detector. We have developed a novel method which could be used to build large-scale detectors while limiting the necessary readout area. By focusing the drift charge with static electric fields, we would allow a small area of electronics to be sensitive to particle detection for a much larger detector volume. The resulting cost reduction could be important in areas of research which demand large-scale detectors, including dark matter searches and detection of special nuclear material. We present simulations made using the software package Garfield of a focusing structure to be used with a prototype TPC with pixel readout. This design should enable significant focusing while retaining directional sensitivity to incoming particles. We also present first experimental results and com...

Ross, S J; Jaegle, I; Rosen, M D; Seong, I S; Thorpe, T N; Vahsen, S E; Yamaoka, J

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Land-Use Requirements for Solar Power Plants in the United States  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report provides data and analysis of the land use associated with utility-scale ground-mounted solar facilities, defined as installations greater than 1 MW. We begin by discussing standard land-use metrics as established in the life-cycle assessment literature and then discuss their applicability to solar power plants. We present total and direct land-use results for various solar technologies and system configurations, on both a capacity and an electricity-generation basis. The total area corresponds to all land enclosed by the site boundary. The direct area comprises land directly occupied by solar arrays, access roads, substations, service buildings, and other infrastructure. As of the third quarter of 2012, the solar projects we analyze represent 72% of installed and under-construction utility-scale PV and CSP capacity in the United States.

Ong, S.; Campbell, C.; Denholm, P.; Margolis, R.; Heath, G.

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Non-focusing active warhead  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A non-nuclear, non-focusing, active warhead that comprises a high explosive charge contained within a casing of reactive metal is disclosed. When the high explosive is detonated, the reactive metal is dispersed and reacts with the air, which significantly increases the explosive yield of the warhead. The active warhead produces therefore much higher blast effects with significantly reduced weight compared to conventional munitions. The warhead is highly effective against such targets as aircraft which typically have thin fuselages, for example. The explosiveness of this warhead can be enhanced further by elevating the temperature and therefore the reactivity of the reactive metal before or during the explosion. New methods of enhancing the reactivity of the metal are also taught. 4 figs.

Hornig, H.C.

1998-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

360

Research Areas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Areas Print Research Areas Print Scientists from a wide variety of fields come to the ALS to perform experiements. Listed below are some of the most common research areas covered by ALS beamlines. Below each heading are a few examples of the specific types of topics included in that category. Click on a heading to learn more about that research area at the ALS. Energy Science Photovoltaics, photosynthesis, biofuels, energy storage, combustion, catalysis, carbon capture/sequestration. Bioscience General biology, structural biology. Materials/Condensed Matter Correlated materials, nanomaterials, magnetism, polymers, semiconductors, water, advanced materials. Physics Atomic, molecular, and optical (AMO) physics; accelerator physics. Chemistry Surfaces/interfaces, catalysts, chemical dynamics (gas-phase chemistry), crystallography, physical chemistry.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land focus area" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

GRR/Section 3-CA-a - State Land Leasing Process and Land Access...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

3-CA-a - State Land Leasing Process and Land Access (ROWs) < GRR Jump to: navigation, search Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleGRRSection3-CA-a-StateLand...

362

Comparison of Water-Related Land Cover Types in Six 1-km Global Land Cover Datasets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Land cover classification is a fundamental and vital activity that is helpful for understanding natural dynamics and the human impacts of land surface processes. Available multiple 1-km global land cover datasets have been compared to identify ...

Tosiyuki Nakaegawa

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Geothermal/Land Use | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal/Land Use Geothermal/Land Use < Geothermal(Redirected from Land Use) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Land Use Leasing Exploration Well Field Power Plant Transmission Environment Water Use Print PDF Geothermal Land Use Planning General Regulatory Roadmap The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and the USDA Forest Service (FS) have prepared a joint Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) to analyze and expedite the leasing of BLM-and FS-administered lands with high potential for renewable geothermal resources in 11 Western states and Alaska. Geothermal Land Use Planning is ... Example Land Use Plans References Information for Publication Standards for EA/EIS/Planning Documents IM 2004-110.pdf Fluid Mineral Leasing and Related Planning and National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Processes April 11, 2004 and

364

Diversity at Fermilab - Fermilab Diversity Focus Groups  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fermilab Diversity Focus Groups Diversity Focus Groups: Message from the Director Representative Groups Report The recent APS Report on diversity provided a wake-up call that...

365

COOPERATIVE LAND REUSE PROGRAM  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this study was to determine what financial return, if any, DOE would realize if they invest solely in removal of the asbestos from these three Hanford steam plants and the associated large bore distribution piping at the site. Once the asbestos was removed the strategy was to bring in companies that specialize in salvage and material re-use and have them remove, at no cost to DOE, the plants and the associated large bore piping. The salvage companies we contacted had said that if they didn't have to remove asbestos, they may be able to realize enough value from these plants to offset their demolition and/or dismantling cost. The results were not what we expected but they do offer DOE some favorable financial alternatives to their present approach. The study concluded that there was very little salvage and/or re-use value remaining in the steam plant material that could be used to offset the demolition and/or dismantling cost. The notable exception to this is the removal of the 24 inch steam piping that runs from 200E to 200W areas (see IDM executive summary under Dismantling cost). It is estimated that the re-use value of the 24-inch piping would more than pay for the dismantling cost of this piping. On a more favorable note, it does appear as though the cost of conventional demolition can be reduced by a factor of 3 to 5 if the asbestos is removed first and the demolition is performed using competitive and commercial practices. Both estimates in this study are similar except that IDM did not include floor slab removal nor remove the same quantity of piping. This is why we are using a range of 3 to 5 as a reduction factor. The IDM estimate (using union labor) for demolition after removal of asbestos was approximately $1.5M versus $10.0M for accomplishing the work using Hanford practices and rates.

Unknown

1999-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

366

The IAGL Land Surface Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A model that computes the fluxes of energy and momentum between the land surface and the atmosphere is presented. It is designed to serve as a lower boundary in a mesoscale atmospheric model and is intended to be used to study the influence of ...

Koen De Ridder; Guy Schayes

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Extreme Maximum Land Surface Temperatures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There are numerous reports in the literature of observations of land surface temperatures. Some of these, almost all made in situ, reveal maximum values in the 5070C range, with a few, made in desert regions, near 80C. Consideration of a ...

J. R. Garratt

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

An update on land-ice modeling in the CESM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mass loss from land ice, including the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets as well as smaller glacier and ice caps, is making a large and growing contribution to global sea-level rise. Land ice is only beginning to be incorporated in climate models. The goal of the Land Ice Working Group (LIWG) is to develop improved land-ice models and incorporate them in CESM, in order to provide useful, physically-based sea-level predictions. LJWG efforts to date have led to the inclusion of a dynamic ice-sheet model (the Glimmer Community Ice Sheet Model, or Glimmer-CISM) in the Community Earth System Model (CESM), which was released in June 2010. CESM also includes a new surface-mass-balance scheme for ice sheets in the Community Land Model. Initial modeling efforts are focused on the Greenland ice sheet. Preliminary results are promising. In particular, the simulated surface mass balance for Greenland is in good agreement with observations and regional model results. The current model, however, has significant limitations: The land-ice coupling is one-way; we are using a serial version of Glimmer-CISM with the shallow-ice approximation; and there is no ice-ocean coupling. During the next year we plan to implement two-way coupling (including ice-ocean coupling with a dynamic Antarctic ice sheet) with a parallel , higher-order version of Glimmer-CISM. We will also add parameterizations of small glaciers and ice caps. With these model improvements, CESM will be able to simulate all the major contributors to 21st century global sea-level rise. Results of the first round of simulations should be available in time to be included in the Fifth Assessment Report (ARS) of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change.

Lipscomb, William H [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2011-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

369

Land Validation Holdings, PROVE, June 2001  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PROVE Data and Images Released PROVE Data and Images Released Data and images are now available from the Prototype Validation Exercise (PROVE), a field campaign conducted in May 1997 at the Jornada Experimental Range near Las Cruces, New Mexico. The Jornada Experimental Range is an expansive plateau on the Chihuahuan Desert and hosts a complex mosaic of grasses and shrubs that were characterized during PROVE. PROVE researchers collected land and atmospheric measurements for use in validating data from Earth Observing System (EOS) satellites. Measurements included surface reflectance, surface temperature, albedo, and leaf area index, among other parameters. We anticipate that additional data associated with papers published in a recent special issue of Remote Sensing of the Environment (October 2000) will be registered in the ORNL

370

Prairie Land Electric Coop Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electric Coop Inc Electric Coop Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name Prairie Land Electric Coop Inc Place Kansas Utility Id 13799 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location SPP NERC SPP Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png CONTROLLED PRIVATE AREA LIGHTING: HPS 150 W Lighting CONTROLLED PRIVATE AREA LIGHTING: HPS 175W Lighting CONTROLLED PRIVATE AREA LIGHTING: HPS 200 W Lighting CONTROLLED PRIVATE AREA LIGHTING: HPS 400W Lighting CONTROLLED PRIVATE AREA LIGHTING: MV 1000W Flood Lighting CONTROLLED PRIVATE AREA LIGHTING: MV 175W Lighting

371

Land-use conflicts in The Geysers-Calistoga KGRA: a preliminary study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This preliminary study of potential land use conflicts of geothermal development in The Geysers region, one component of the LLL/LBL socioeconomic program, focuses on Lake County because it has most of the undeveloped resource and the least regulatory capability. The land resource is characterized in terms of its ecological, hydrological, agricultural, and recreational value; intrinsic natural hazards; and the adequacy of roads and utility systems and each factor is depicted on a map. Then those factors are analyzed for potential conflicts with both geothermal and urban development and the conflicts displayed on respective maps. A brief review of laws and methods germane to geothermal land-use regulation is included.

O'Banion, K.; Hall, C.; Haven, K.

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

SIAM Workshop: Focus on Diversity  

SciTech Connect

The Fourth SlAM Graduate Student Focus on Diversity workshop was held on July 12, 2000 at the Westin Rio Mar Hotel in Rio Grande, Puerto Rico. The Department of Energy provided partial support for this event. The day-long workshop consisted of several different activities. The meeting opened with a discussion of some data collected by the American Mathematical Society on Ph.D.'s awarded in the U.S. to citizens and non-citizens, further classified as blacks, latinos, asians and native americans. The activity continued with nine technical talks by underrepresented minority graduate students, informal luncheon and pizza breaks to foster social interaction, and an evening forum chaired by Dr. Richard Tapia (Rice University) in which issues related to the participation of minorities in national meetings and proposal writing where discussed. These sessions were open to the entire SIAM community and served to highlight the progress, achievements, and aspirations of the workshop participants. The students attended as well the three SlAM plenary talks during the day and the community lecture in the evening. The activity had a lively participation of students and representatives from various academic institutions and sponsoring agencies. In particular, we had the participation of 24 undergraduate students from the Mathematics REU program of the University of Puerto Rico at Humacao.

2000-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

373

Land Use Requirements of Modern Wind Power Plants in the United States  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report provides data and analysis of the land use associated with modern, large wind power plants (defined as greater than 20 megawatts (MW) and constructed after 2000). The analysis discusses standard land-use metrics as established in the life-cycle assessment literature, and then discusses their applicability to wind power plants. The report identifies two major 'classes' of wind plant land use: 1) direct impact (i.e., disturbed land due to physical infrastructure development), and 2) total area (i.e., land associated with the complete wind plant project). The analysis also provides data for each of these classes, derived from project applications, environmental impact statements, and other sources. It attempts to identify relationships among land use, wind plant configuration, and geography. The analysts evaluated 172 existing or proposed projects, which represents more than 26 GW of capacity. In addition to providing land-use data and summary statistics, they identify several limitations to the existing wind project area data sets, and suggest additional analysis that could aid in evaluating actual land use and impacts associated with deployment of wind energy.

Denholm, P.; Hand, M.; Jackson, M.; Ong, S.

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Classification of public lands valuable for geothermal steam and associated geothermal resources  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Organic Act of 1879 (43 USC 31) that established the US Geological Survey provided, among other things, for the classification of the public lands and for the examination of the geological structure, mineral resources, and products of the national domain. In order to provide uniform executive action in classifying public lands, standards for determining which lands are valuable for mineral resources, for example, leasable mineral lands, or for other products are prepared by the US Geological Survey. This report presents the classification standards for determining which Federal lands are classifiable as geothermal steam and associated geothermal resources lands under the Geothermal Steam Act of 1970 (84 Stat. 1566). The concept of a geothermal resouces province is established for classification of lands for the purpose of retention in Federal ownership of rights to geothermal resources upon disposal of Federal lands. A geothermal resources province is defined as an area in which higher than normal temperatures are likely to occur with depth and in which there is a resonable possiblity of finding reservoir rocks that will yield steam or heated fluids to wells. The determination of a known geothermal resources area is made after careful evaluation of the available geologic, geochemical, and geophysical data and any evidence derived from nearby discoveries, competitive interests, and other indicia. The initial classification required by the Geothermal Steam Act of 1970 is presented.

Goodwin, L.H.; Haigler, L.B.; Rioux, R.L.; White, D.E.; Muffler, L.J.P.; Wayland, R.G.

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

McKenzie River Focus Watershed Coordination, 2002-2003 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

BPA funding, in conjunction with contributions from numerous partners organizations, supports the McKenzie Watershed Council's efforts to coordinate restoration and monitoring programs of federal, state, local government, and residents within the watershed. A primary goal of the Council's program is to improve resource stewardship and conserve fish, wildlife, and water quality resources. The MWC will always have a baseline program centered on relationship building and information sharing. This watershed program is strengthened by the completion of the BPA funded Sub-basin Assessment, Conservation Strategy and the establishment of a Benchmarks system, thus, providing the MWC a prioritized framework for restoration efforts. Objectives for FY03 included: (1) Continued coordination of McKenzie Watershed activities among diverse groups that restore fish and wildlife habitat in the watershed, with a focus on the lower McKenzie, including private lands and the McKenzie-Willamette confluence area; (2) Influence behavior of watershed residents to benefit watershed function though a strategic and comprehensive outreach and education program, utilizing Assessment and Conservation Strategy information to provide a context for prioritized action; (3) Continue to maintain and sustain a highly functional watershed council; (4) Maintain and improve water quality concerns through the continuation of Council-sponsored monitoring and evaluation programs; and (5) Continue to secure other funding for watershed restoration and protection projects and council operations.

Thrailkil, Jim

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Emergency Tests Focus on Lab Radioactivity Analyses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Emergency Tests Focus on Lab Radioactivity Analyses. For Immediate ... Berne. Radioanalytical emergency response exercise. Journal ...

2013-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

377

OpenEI Community - solar land use  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

90 en Solar Land Use Data on OpenEI http:en.openei.orgcommunityblogsolar-land-use-data-openei

378

Minerals on School and Public Lands  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Commissioner of School and Public Lands is authorized to lease the mineral interests of such lands for development. Section 5-7 of the SD Codified Laws describes provisions for the leasing of...

379

Time Scales of Land Surface Hydrology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper intends to investigate the time scales of land surface hydrology and enhance the understanding of the hydrological cycle between the atmosphere, vegetation, and soil. A three-layer model for land surface hydrology is developed to study ...

Aihui Wang; Xubin Zeng; Samuel S. P. Shen; Qing-Cun Zeng; Robert E. Dickinson

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

The Global Land Data Assimilation System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Global Land Data Assimilation System (GLDAS) has been developed. Its purpose is to ingest satellite- and ground-based observational data products, using advanced land surface modeling and data assimilation techniques, in order to generate ...

M. Rodell; P. R. Houser; U. Jambor; J. Gottschalck; K. Mitchell; C-J. Meng; K. Arsenault; B. Cosgrove; J. Radakovich; M. Bosilovich; J. K. Entin*J. P. Walker; D. Lohmann; D. Toll

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land focus area" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

A land-use systems approach to represent land-use dynamics at continental and global scales  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Most of the current global land cover datasets and global scale land-use models use a classification of land cover based on the dominant land cover type within a distinct region or pixel. Such a classification disregards the diversity and intensity of ... Keywords: Global, IMAGE, Land-use change, Land-use intensification, Land-use systems

Aurlien Letourneau; Peter H. Verburg; Elke Stehfest

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Oregon Department of State Lands | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Oregon Department of State Lands Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Oregon Department of State Lands Name Oregon Department of State Lands Address 775 Summer Street, Suite 100 Place...

383

Hawaii Department of Land and Natural Resources Office of Conservation...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Office of Conservation and Coastal Lands Jump to: navigation, search Name Hawaii Department of Land and Natural Resources Office of Conservation and Coastal Lands From Open Energy...

384

Global scale hydrology - Advances in land surface modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Research into global scale hydrology is an expanding area that includes researchers from the meteorology, climatology, ecology and hydrology communities. This paper reviews research in this area carried out in the United States during the last IUGG quadrennial period of 1987-1990. The review covers the representation of land-surface hydrologic processes for general circulation models (GCMs), sensitivity analysis of these representations on global hydrologic fields like precipitation, regional studies of climate that have global hydrologic implications, recent field studies and experiments whose aims are the improved understanding of land surface-atmospheric interactions, and the use of remotely sensed data for the further understanding of the spatial variability of surface hydrologic processes that are important at regional and global climate scales. 76 refs.

Wood, E.F. (USAF, Geophysics Laboratory, Hanscom AFB, MA (United States))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

HSS Focus and Work Group Meetings | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

HSS Focus and Work Group Meetings HSS Focus and Work Group Meetings HSS Focus and Work Group Meetings As part of the DOE Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) outreach effort, the HSS Focus Group was formed in March 2007 to initiate dialogue and interface with labor unions, DOE Program Secretarial Offices, and stakeholders in areas of mutual interest and concern related to health, safety, security, and the environment. In an ongoing effort to further the improvement of health, safety, environmental, and security performance within the Department, DOE is engaged in the establishment of work groups to pursue health and safety improvements across the DOE Complex. These efforts support DOE's responsibility as owner/manager to protect its greatest asset: the worker. The work groups support DOE's integrated safety management system and

386

Radiological Areas  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Revision to Clearance Policy Associated with Recycle of Scrap Metals Originating from Revision to Clearance Policy Associated with Recycle of Scrap Metals Originating from Radiological Areas On July 13, 2000, the Secretary of Energy imposed an agency-wide suspension on the unrestricted release of scrap metal originating from radiological areas at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities for the purpose of recycling. The suspension was imposed in response to concerns from the general public and industry groups about the potential effects of radioactivity in or on material released in accordance with requirements established in DOE Order 5400.5, Radiation Protection of the Public and Environment. The suspension was to remain in force until DOE developed and implemented improvements in, and better informed the public about, its release process. In addition, in 2001 the DOE announced its intention to prepare a

387

Geothermal resource area 11, Clark County area development plan  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geothermal Resource Area 11 includes all of the land in Clark County, Nevada. Within this area are nine geothermal anomalies: Moapa Area, Las Vegas Valley, Black Canyon, Virgin River Narrows, Roger's Springs, Indian Springs, White Rock Springs, Brown's Spring, and Ash Creek Spring. All of the geothermal resources in Clark County have relatively low temperatures. The highest recorded temperature is 145{sup 0}F at Black Canyon. The temperatures of the other resources range from 70 to 90{sup 0}F. Because of the low temperature of the resources and, for the most part, the distance of the resources from any population base, the potential for the development of the resources are considered to be somewhat limited.

Pugsley, M.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

EA-1332: Leasing Land for the Siting, Construction and Operation of a  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

32: Leasing Land for the Siting, Construction and Operation of 32: Leasing Land for the Siting, Construction and Operation of a Commercial AM Radio Antenna at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico EA-1332: Leasing Land for the Siting, Construction and Operation of a Commercial AM Radio Antenna at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts for the proposal to lease approximately 3 acres of land at the U.S. Department of Energy's Los Alamos National Laboratory on the southeast tip of Technical Area 54 for the siting, construction and operation of an AM radio broadcasting antenna. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD February 16, 2000 EA-1332: Finding of No Significant Impact Leasing Land for the Siting, Construction and Operation of a Commercial AM

389

Final Hanford Comprehensive Land-Use Plan Environmental Impact Statement, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington  

SciTech Connect

This Final ''Hanford Comprehensive Land-Use Plan Environmental Impact Statement'' (HCP EIS) is being used by the Department of Energy (DOE) and its nine cooperating and consulting agencies to develop a comprehensive land-use plan (CLUP) for the Hanford Site. The DOE will use the Final HCP EIS as a basis for a Record of Decision (ROD) on a CLUP for the Hanford Site. While development of the CLUP will be complete with release of the HCP EIS ROD, full implementation of the CLUP is expected to take at least 50 years. Implementation of the CLUP would begin a more detailed planning process for land-use and facility-use decisions at the Hanford Site. The DOE would use the CLUP to screen proposals. Eventually, management of Hanford Site areas would move toward the CLUP land-use goals. This CLUP process could take more than 50 years to fully achieve the land-use goals.

N /A

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

US areal wind resource estimates considering environmental and land-use exclusions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In support of the US Department of Energy's National Energy Strategy initiative, estimates of the land area with various levels of wind energy resource have been developed for each state in the contiguous United States. The estimates are based on published wind resource data and account for the exclusion of some land owing to environmental of land-use considerations. These exclusions assume that 100% of the environmentally sensitive land and various percentages of land designated as urban, agricultural or range would be unavailable for wind energy development. Despite these exclusions, the amount of wind resource thus estimated is surprisingly large. For example, estimates of available wind resource and resultant wind electric potential from advanced turbine technology show that a group of 12 states in the midsection of the country could produce more than three times the nation's 1987 electric energy consumption. 1 ref., 7 figs., 1 tab.

Elliott, D.L.; Wendell, L.L.; Gower, G.L.

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

US areal wind resource estimates considering environmental and land-use exclusions  

SciTech Connect

In support of the US Department of Energy's National Energy Strategy initiative, estimates of the land area with various levels of wind energy resource have been developed for each state in the contiguous United States. The estimates are based on published wind resource data and account for the exclusion of some land owing to environmental of land-use considerations. These exclusions assume that 100% of the environmentally sensitive land and various percentages of land designated as urban, agricultural or range would be unavailable for wind energy development. Despite these exclusions, the amount of wind resource thus estimated is surprisingly large. For example, estimates of available wind resource and resultant wind electric potential from advanced turbine technology show that a group of 12 states in the midsection of the country could produce more than three times the nation's 1987 electric energy consumption. 1 ref., 7 figs., 1 tab.

Elliott, D.L.; Wendell, L.L.; Gower, G.L.

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Geothermal Resource Area 5, Churchill, Douglas, Lyon and Storey Counties area development plan  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Within this four county area there are many known geothermal resources ranging in temperature from 70 to over 350{sup 0}F. Thirteen of these resources are considered major and have been selected for evaluation. Various potential uses of the energy found were determined after evaluating the study area's physical characteristics, land ownership and land use patterns, existing population and projected growth rates, and transportation facilities. These factors were then compared with the site specific resource characteristics. The uses considered were divided into five main categories: electrical generation; space heating; recreation; industrial process heat; and agriculture.

Pugsley, M.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

FEMP/NTDP Technology Focus New Technology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FEMP/NTDP Technology Focus New Technology Demonstration Program Technology Focus FEMPFederal Energy their decision making process relative to energy management systems design, specification, procurement. Future topics will concentrate on more practical aspects including applications software, product

394

Diversity at Fermilab - Fermilab Diversity Focus Groups  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Focus Group Report Pier Oddone Pier Oddone From November 2008 through January 2009, 23 focus groups gave a cross-section of Fermilab employees and users the opportunity to provide...

395

On the Proper Use of Satellite-Derived Leaf Area Index in Climate Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Satellite-observed leaf area index (LAI) is increasingly being used in climate modeling. In common land surface models, LAI is specified for the vegetated part only. In contrast, satellite LAI is defined for the total area including both ...

Jianjun Ge

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Exploring the Impact of Land Cover and Topography on Rainfall Maxima in the Netherlands  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The relative contribution of topography and land use on precipitation is analyzed in this paper for a forested area in the Netherlands. This area has an average yearly precipitation sum that can be 75100 mm higher than the rest of the country. To ...

H. W. ter Maat; E. J. Moors; R. W. A. Hutjes; A. A. M. Holtslag; A. J. Dolman

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Diagnosing LandAtmosphere Interaction from a Regional Climate Model Simulation over West Africa  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Landatmosphere interaction at climatological time scales in a large area that includes the West African Sahel has been explicitly explored in a regional climate model (RegCM) simulation using a range of diagnostics. First, areas and seasons of ...

Bart J. J. M. van den Hurk; Erik van Meijgaard

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

On the focusing of thermal images  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we present a new thermographic image database, suitable for the analysis of automatic focusing measures. This database contains the images of 10 scenes, each of which is represented once for each of 96 different focus positions. Using this ... Keywords: Database, Focus, Image quality, Thermal image

Marcos Faundez-Zanuy; Ji? Mekyska; Virginia Espinosa-Dur

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Focus Windows: A Tool for Automated Provers ?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Focus Windows: A Tool for Automated Provers ? Florina Piroi Research Institute For Symbolic or understand the validity of a particular step. Focus windows were #12;rst introduced as a technique for proof the implementation and the use of the focus windows technique in the frame of the Theorema system [3]. One

400

May 19, 2011, HSS/Union Focus Group Meeting - Agenda  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

16-11 16-11 HSS Focus Group Telecom Meeting Worker Health, Safety and Security Improvement Priorities/Task Activities May 19, 2011 Proposed AGENDA Introductory Remarks........................................................................ Glenn Podonsky Meeting Purpose/Intended Outcomes/Process.................. Pete Stafford/Mari-Jo Campagnone Priority Improvement Areas/Tasks Discussion * Safety & Security Reform.................................Bill Eckroade/Steve Kirchhoff/Unions * Background HSS/Union Focus Group Initial Workgroups....................... Pete Stafford * Worker Health and Safety Topical Discussions [Status/Priorities/Path Forward] Training Safety Standards 851 Implementation/Training/Enforcement

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land focus area" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

HelioFocus | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

HelioFocus HelioFocus Jump to: navigation, search Name HelioFocus Place Israel Zip 74036 Sector Efficiency, Solar Product Israel-based firm engaged in the development of modular, high efficiency concentrated solar power (CSP)systems. References HelioFocus[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. HelioFocus is a company located in Israel . References ↑ "HelioFocus" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=HelioFocus&oldid=346456" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations Stubs What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load)

402

Session 12: Land Subsidence and Microseismicity Associated with Geopressured-Geothermal Fluid Production  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Subsidence and fault-related surface displacements are the chief environmental concerns related to the long-term production of large volumes of fluids from geopressured-geothermal reservoirs. Environmental monitoring efforts at the three designed test well sites in Louisiana (Parcperdue, Sweet Lake, and Gladys McCall) have focused on leveling surveys, recording of microseismic events, and tiltmeter installation to provide baseline and fluid-production-related data useful in measuring land-surface and faulting effects of testing. Analysis of pretesting land-surface elevation surveys has revealed a complex pattern of subsidence related to sediment compaction, basin subsidence, and possibly to ground-water production and soil wetting and drying. The relative importance of each of these is not clear and the impact of geopressured-geothermal fluid production has not been determined. A three-year period of microseismic monitoring has produced reports by contractors of some 1000 suspected microseismic events; many of these require further verification. 64 events were recorded at Parcperdue, 141 at Gladys McCall, and 893 at Sweet Lake. Considering only events recorded by 5 stations or more reduces the total to 316, of which only six have the classic microseismic event characteristics. Analysis of all recorded events and their relation to fluid production and/or disposal is continuing. Tiltmeter data from Sweet Lake indicate that ground deformation correlates with fluid production and seismicity. This relationship is being studied and will be compared with data from Gladys McCall gathered during fluid production. The complexity of background subsidence and fault-related processes in the Gulf Coast area makes identification of processes directly related to geopressured-geothermal fluid production very difficult. Data from Sweet Lake suggest a correlation; hopefully, results from Gladys McCall will clarify interpretations made thus far.

Groat, C.G.

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

The Prediction of Nearshore Wind-induced Surface Currents from Wind Velocities Measured at Nearby Land Stations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper aims to find a fast and efficient way to predict the wind-induced components of surface currents in a nearshore coastal area of several hundred square kilometers from wind velocities measured at nearby land stations. Ocean Surface ...

Betty Ng

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

The Impact of Root Weighting on the Response of Transpiration to Moisture Stress in Land Surface Schemes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Land surface schemes (LSSs) for large-scale climate models use a variety of different methods to represent the influence of soil moisture on transpiration. One area in which they differ is in the treatment of vertical soil moisture distribution. ...

Carl E. Desborough

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

A Dynamic Simulation of the Indirect Land Use Implications of Recent Biofuel Production and Use in the United States.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The global indirect land use change (ILUC) implications of biofuel use in the United States of America (USA) from 2001 to 2010 are evaluated with a dynamic general equilibrium model. The effects of biofuels production on agricultural land area vary by year; from a net expansion of 0.17 ha per 1000 gallons produced (2002) to a net contraction of 0.13 ha per 1000 gallons (2018) in Case 1 of our simulation. In accordance with the general narrative about the implications of biofuel policy, agricultural land area increased in many regions of the world. However, oil-export dependent economies experienced agricultural land contraction because of reductions in their revenues. Reducing crude oil imports is a major goal of biofuel policy, but the land use change implications have received little attention in the literature. Simulations evaluating the effects of doubling supply elasticities for land and fossil resources show that these parameters can significantly influence the land use change estimates. Therefore, research that provides empirically-based and spatially-detailed agricultural land-supply curves and capability to project future fossil energy prices is critical for improving estimates of the effects of biofuel policy on land use.

Oladosu, Gbadebo A [ORNL] [ORNL; Kline, Keith L [ORNL] [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Water and land availability for energy farming. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The physical and economic availability of land and water resources for energy farming were determined. Ten water subbasins possessing favorable land and water availabilities were ranked according to their overall potential for biomass production. The study results clearly identify the Southeast as a favorable area for biomass farming. The Northwest and North-Central United States should also be considered on the basis of their highly favorable environmental characteristics. Both high and low estimates of water availability for 1985 and 2000 in each of 99 subbasins were prepared. Subbasins in which surface water consumption was more than 50% of surface water supply were eliminated from the land availability analysis, leaving 71 subbasins to be examined. The amount of acreage potentially available for biomass production in these subbasins was determined through a comparison of estimated average annual net returns developed for conventional agriculture and forestry with net returns for several biomass production options. In addition to a computerized method of ranking subbasins according to their overall potential for biomass production, a methodology for evaluating future energy farm locations was developed. This methodology included a general area selection procedure as well as specific site analysis recommendations. Thirty-five general factors and a five-step site-specific analysis procedure are described.

Schooley, F.A.; Mara, S.J.; Mendel, D.A.; Meagher, P.C.; So, E.C.

1979-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Geothermal/Land Use | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Use Use < Geothermal Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Land Use Leasing Exploration Well Field Power Plant Transmission Environment Water Use Print PDF Geothermal Land Use Planning General Regulatory Roadmap The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and the USDA Forest Service (FS) have prepared a joint Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) to analyze and expedite the leasing of BLM-and FS-administered lands with high potential for renewable geothermal resources in 11 Western states and Alaska. Geothermal Land Use Planning is ... Example Land Use Plans References Information for Publication Standards for EA/EIS/Planning Documents IM 2004-110.pdf Fluid Mineral Leasing and Related Planning and National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Processes April 11, 2004 and

408

Impacts of Array Configuration on Land-Use Requirements for Large-Scale Photovoltaic Deployment in the United States: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

Land use is often cited as an important issue for renewable energy technologies. In this paper we examine the relationship between land-use requirements for large-scale photovoltaic (PV) deployment in the U.S. and PV-array configuration. We estimate the per capita land requirements for solar PV and find that array configuration is a stronger driver of energy density than regional variations in solar insolation. When deployed horizontally, the PV land area needed to meet 100% of an average U.S. citizen's electricity demand is about 100 m2. This requirement roughly doubles to about 200 m2 when using 1-axis tracking arrays. By comparing these total land-use requirements with other current per capita land uses, we find that land-use requirements of solar photovoltaics are modest, especially when considering the availability of zero impact 'land' on rooftops. Additional work is need to examine the tradeoffs between array spacing, self-shading losses, and land use, along with possible techniques to mitigate land-use impacts of large-scale PV deployment.

Denholm, P.; Margolis, R. M.

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Impacts of Array Configuration on Land-Use Requirements for Large-Scale Photovoltaic Deployment in the United States: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Land use is often cited as an important issue for renewable energy technologies. In this paper we examine the relationship between land-use requirements for large-scale photovoltaic (PV) deployment in the U.S. and PV-array configuration. We estimate the per capita land requirements for solar PV and find that array configuration is a stronger driver of energy density than regional variations in solar insolation. When deployed horizontally, the PV land area needed to meet 100% of an average U.S. citizen's electricity demand is about 100 m2. This requirement roughly doubles to about 200 m2 when using 1-axis tracking arrays. By comparing these total land-use requirements with other current per capita land uses, we find that land-use requirements of solar photovoltaics are modest, especially when considering the availability of zero impact 'land' on rooftops. Additional work is need to examine the tradeoffs between array spacing, self-shading losses, and land use, along with possible techniques to mitigate land-use impacts of large-scale PV deployment.

Denholm, P.; Margolis, R. M.

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Impacts of Array Configuration on Land Use Requirements for Large-Scale Photovoltaic Deployment in the United States  

SciTech Connect

Land use is often cited as an important issue for renewable energy technologies. In this paper we examine the relationship between land-use requirements for large-scale photovoltaic (PV) deployment in the U.S. and PV-array configuration. We estimate the per capita land requirements for solar PV and find that array configuration is a stronger driver of energy density than regional variations in solar insolation. When deployed horizontally, the PV land area needed to meet 100% of an average U.S. citizen's electricity demand is about 100 m{sup 2}. This requirement roughly doubles to about 200 m{sup 2} when using 1-axis tracking arrays. By comparing these total land-use requirements with other current per capita land uses, we find that land-use requirements of solar photovoltaics are modest, especially when considering the availability of zero impact 'land' on rooftops. Additional work is need to examine the tradeoffs between array spacing, self-shading losses, and land use, along with possible techniques to mitigate land-use impacts of large-scale PV deployment.

Denholm, P.; Margolis, R. M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

The OceanLandAtmosphere Model: Optimization and Evaluation of Simulated Radiative Fluxes and Precipitation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work continues the presentation and evaluation of the OceanLandAtmosphere Model (OLAM), focusing on the models ability to represent radiation and precipitation. OLAM is a new, state-of-the-art earth system model, capable of user-specified ...

David Medvigy; Robert L. Walko; Martin J. Otte; Roni Avissar

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Summary Report from Theory Focus Session on Hydrogen Storage Materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Theory Focus Session on Hydrogen Storage Materials DOE Hydrogen Program Assessment of Modeling Needs for Hydrogen Storage This report provides a summary of feedback from co-organizers, speakers and participants of the Department of Energy's (DOE) Theory Focus Session on Hydrogen Storage Materials, held Thursday, May 18, 2006, Crystal City, VA, in conjunction with the DOE Hydrogen Program Annual Merit Review, May 16-19, 2006. Session co-organizers: Chris Wolverton (Ford), Karl Johnson (University of Pittsburgh), Maciek Gutowski (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory) Goal of focus session: Identify critical areas, key barriers and gaps in current theory/modeling approaches for hydrogen storage materials and technologies Role of modeling and simulation in design of H

413

Tribal Energy Webinar Focuses on Electric Grid | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Webinar Focuses on Electric Grid Webinar Focuses on Electric Grid Tribal Energy Webinar Focuses on Electric Grid March 19, 2013 - 1:21pm Addthis Learn about how and why the electric grid works in a new webinar, Understanding the Grid, to be held on Wednesday, March 27, from 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Mountain time. This is the third in a series of free tribal energy webinars sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Tribal Energy Program, and Western Area Power Administration (WAPA). The webinar will be presented by Jim Charters, a utility transmission system consultant and former WAPA employee. The complex electric grid and how and why it works, including information about generating entities and

414

Electrostatic lens to focus an ion beam to uniform density  

SciTech Connect

A focusing lens for an ion beam having a gaussian or similar density profile is provided. The lens is constructed to provide an inner zero electrostatic field, and an outer electrostatic field such that ions entering this outer field are deflected by an amount that is a function of their distance from the edge of the inner field. The result is a beam that focuses to a uniform density in a manner analogous to that of an optical ring lens. In one embodiment, a conically-shaped network of fine wires is enclosed within a cylindrical anode. The wire net together with the anode produces a voltage field that re-directs the outer particles of the beam while the axial particles pass undeflected through a zero field inside the wire net. The result is a focused beam having a uniform intensity over a given target area and at a given distance from the lens.

Johnson, Cleland H. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1977-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

415

Observations of underdense plasma lens focusing of relativistic electron beams  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Focusing of a 15 MeV, 19 nC electron bunch by an underdense plasma lens operated just beyond the threshold of the underdense condition has been demonstrated in experiments at the Fermilab NICADD Photoinjector Laboratory (FNPL). The strong 1.9 cm focal-length plasma-lens focused both transverse directions simultaneously and reduced the minimum area of the beam spot by a factor of 23. Analysis of the beam-envelope evolution observed near the beam waist shows that the spherical aberrations of this underdense lens are lower than those of an overdense plasma lens, as predicted by theory. Correlations between the beam charge and the properties of the beam focus corroborate this conclusion.

Thompson, M.C.; /UCLA /LLNL, Livermore; Badakov, H.; Rosenzweig, J.B.; Travish, G.; /UCLA; Fliller, R.; Kazakevich, G.M.; Piot, P.; Santucci, J.; /Fermilab; Li, J.; Tikhoplav, R.; /Rochester U.

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Environmental assessment of spatial plan policies through land use scenarios  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a method based on scenario analysis to compare the environmental effects of different spatial plan policies in a range of possible futures. The study aimed at contributing to overcome two limitations encountered in Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) for spatial planning: poor exploration of how the future might unfold, and poor consideration of alternative plan policies. Scenarios were developed through what-if functions and spatial modeling in a Geographical Information System (GIS), and consisted in maps that represent future land uses under different assumptions on key driving forces. The use of land use scenarios provided a representation of how the different policies will look like on the ground. This allowed gaining a better understanding of the policies' implications on the environment, which could be measured through a set of indicators. The research undertook a case-study approach by developing and assessing land use scenarios for the future growth of Caia, a strategically-located and fast-developing town in rural Mozambique. The effects of alternative spatial plan policies were assessed against a set of environmental performance indicators, including deforestation, loss of agricultural land, encroachment of flood-prone areas and wetlands and access to water sources. In this way, critical environmental effects related to the implementation of each policy were identified and discussed, suggesting possible strategies to address them. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Research Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The method contributes to two critical issues in SEA: exploration of the future and consideration of alternatives. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Future scenarios are used to test the environmental performance of different spatial plan policies in uncertainty conditions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Spatially-explicit land use scenarios provide a representation of how different policies will look like on the ground.

Geneletti, Davide, E-mail: davide.geneletti@ing.unitn.it

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

417

Attributing land-use change carbon emissions to exported biomass  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, a simple, transparent and robust method is developed in which land-use change (LUC) emissions are retrospectively attributed to exported biomass products based on the agricultural area occupied for the production. LUC emissions account for approximately one-fifth of current greenhouse gas emissions. Increasing agricultural exports are becoming an important driver of deforestation. Brazil and Indonesia are used as case studies due to their significant deforestation in recent years. According to our study, in 2007, approximately 32% and 15% of the total agricultural land harvested and LUC emissions in Brazil and Indonesia respectively were due to exports. The most important exported single items with regard to deforestation were palm oil for Indonesia and bovine meat for Brazil. To reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions effectively worldwide, leakage of emissions should be avoided. This can be done, for example, by attributing embodied LUC emissions to exported biomass products. With the approach developed in this study, controversial attribution between direct and indirect LUC and amortization of emissions over the product life cycle can be overcome, as the method operates on an average basis and annual level. The approach could be considered in the context of the UNFCCC climate policy instead of, or alongside with, other instruments aimed at reducing deforestation. However, the quality of the data should be improved and some methodological issues, such as the allocation procedure in multiproduct systems and the possible dilution effect through third parties not committed to emission reduction targets, should be considered. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CO{sub 2} emissions from land use changes are highly important. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Attribution of land use changes for products is difficult. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Simple and robust method is developed to attribute land use change emissions.

Saikku, Laura, E-mail: laura.saikku@helsinki.fi [University of Helsinki, P.O Box 65, 00014 University of Helsinki (Finland); Soimakallio, Sampo, E-mail: sampo.soimakallio@vtt.fi [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, P.O. Box 1000, 02044 VTT (Finland); Pingoud, Kim, E-mail: kim.pingoud@vtt.fi [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, P.O. Box 1000, 02044 VTT (Finland)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

418

Land Assemblage Tax Credit Program (Missouri) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Assemblage Tax Credit Program (Missouri) Assemblage Tax Credit Program (Missouri) Land Assemblage Tax Credit Program (Missouri) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Developer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Systems Integrator Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Missouri Program Type Personal Tax Incentives Provider Missouri Department of Economic Development The Land Assemblage Tax Credit Programs the redevelopment of blighted areas in Missouri into productive use. Redevelopers must incur acquisition costs for at least 50 acres of 75+ acre parcels, enter into redevelopment agreement, and be approved for redevelopment incentives. The maximum aggregate amount of tax credits for all projects is $95 million and while

419

Workshop proceedings: Developing the scientific basis for long-term land management of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

Responses to a survey on the INEEL Comprehensive Facility and Land Use Plan (US DOE 1996a) indicated the need for additional discussion on environmental resources, disturbance, and land use issues on the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). As a result, in September 1997, a workshop evaluated the existing scientific basis and determined future data needs for long-term land management on the INEEL. This INEEL Long-Term Land Management Workshop examined existing data on biotic, abiotic, and heritage resources and how these resources have been impacted by disturbance activities of the INEEL. Information gained from this workshop will help guide land and facility use decisions, identify data gaps, and focus future research efforts. This report summarizes background information on the INEEL and its long-term land use planning efforts, presentations and discussions at the workshop, and the existing data available at the INEEL. In this document, recommendations for future INEEL land use planning, research efforts, and future workshops are presented. The authors emphasize these are not policy statements, but comments and suggestions made by scientists and others participating in the workshop. Several appendices covering land use disturbance, legal drivers, land use assumptions and workshop participant comments, workshop participants and contributors, and the workshop agenda are also included.

Sperber, T.D.; Reynolds, T.D. [eds.] [Environmental Science and Research Foundation, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Breckenridge, R.P. [ed.] [Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Land Reclamation Act (Missouri) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reclamation Act (Missouri) Land Reclamation Act (Missouri) Eligibility Commercial Construction Industrial Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government MunicipalPublic...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land focus area" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Marginal Lands: Concept, Assessment and Management  

SciTech Connect

Marginal lands have received wide attention for their potential to improve food security and support bioenergy production. However, environmental, ecosystem service, and sustainability concerns have been widely raised over the use of marginal land. Knowledge of the extent, location, and quality of marginal lands as well as their assessment and management are limited and diverse. This paper provides a review of the historical development of marginal concept, its application and assessment. Limitations and priority research needs of marginal land assessment and management were discussed.

Kang, Shujiang [ORNL; Post, Wilfred M [ORNL; West, Tristram O. [Joint Global Change Research Institute, PNNL; Bandaru, Vara Prasad [ORNL; Izaurralde, Dr. R. Cesar [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Wang, Dali [ORNL; Nichols, Dr Jeff A [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

OPPORTUNITY COST OF LAND AND URBAN GROWTH.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This study examines the impact of the opportunity cost of urban land on urban growth. Based on prices, costs and productivity data on agricultural commodities (more)

Jiang, Bo

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Mediterranean land abandonment and associated biomass variation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Biomass is an important factor in environmental processes, such as erosion, carbon storage, climate change and land degradation. Human-induced changes in plant community systems and (more)

Hoogeveen, S.S.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Land Use Regulation with Durable Capital  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

prices, land rents, capital intensity of housing and housingrents and capital intensities. A richer formulation, inof development and the capital intensity of development. His

Quigley, John M.; Swoboda, Aaron

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

MODIS Land Products Subsets Web Service  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Web Service The MODIS Web service provides users with subsets of MODIS Land Products through standards based SOAP (Simple Object Access Protocol) Web service. Through the Web...

426

Large 718 Forgings for Land Based Turbines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since the development of the first gas turbine, the drive for lower cost electrical power has lead to more efficient land based power systems. Increased efficiency ...

427

Louisiana Coastal Land Loss Video Release  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Today, the U.S. Geological Survey National Wetlands Research Center is pleased to announce the release of a new Louisiana coastal land loss video, ...

428

Agriculture, land use, and commercial biomass energy  

SciTech Connect

In this paper we have considered commercial biomass energy in the context of overall agriculture and land-use change. We have described a model of energy, agriculture, and land-use and employed that model to examine the implications of commercial biomass energy or both energy sector and land-use change carbon emissions. In general we find that the introduction of biomass energy has a negative effect on the extent of unmanaged ecosystems. Commercial biomass introduces a major new land use which raises land rental rates, and provides an incentive to bring more land into production, increasing the rate of incursion into unmanaged ecosystems. But while the emergence of a commercial biomass industry may increase land-use change emissions, the overall effect is strongly to reduce total anthropogenic carbon emissions. Further, the higher the rate of commercial biomass energy productivity, the lower net emissions. Higher commercial biomass energy productivity, while leading to higher land-use change emissions, has a far stronger effect on fossil fuel carbon emissions. Highly productive and inexpensive commercial biomass energy technologies appear to have a substantial depressing effect on total anthropogenic carbon emissions, though their introduction raises the rental rate on land, providing incentives for greater rates of deforestation than in the reference case.

Edmonds, J.A.; Wise, M.A.; Sands, R.D.; Brown, R.A.; Kheshgi, H.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Renewable Energy Development on Tribal Lands (Brochure)  

SciTech Connect

Brochure describes the Tribal Energy Program, which provides American Indian tribes with financial and technical assistance for developing renewable energy projects on tribal land.

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Renewable Energy Development on Tribal Lands  

SciTech Connect

Brochure describes the Tribal Energy Program, which provides American Indian tribes with financial and technical assistance for developing renewable energy projects on tribal land.

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Landholders, Residential Land Conversion, and Market Signals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

465 Margulis: Landholders, Residential Land Conversion, and1983. An Analysis of Residential Developer Location FactorsHow Regulation Affects New Residential Development. New

Margulis, Harry L.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Needs of Non Energy-Focused Contractors  

SciTech Connect

To better understand the informational needs of non energy-focused contractors, including what information they need to motivate them to become energy-focused, the BARA team studied the type of information provided by the national programs, trade associations, and manufacturers that were researched for the related technical report: Effective Communication of Energy Efficiency. While that report focused on the delivery method, format, and strategy of the information, this study examines the content being put forward.

Liaukus, C.

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

EA-1640: Transfer of Land and Facilities within the East Tennessee  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

40: Transfer of Land and Facilities within the East Tennessee 40: Transfer of Land and Facilities within the East Tennessee Technology Park and Surrounding Area, Oak Ridge, Tennessee EA-1640: Transfer of Land and Facilities within the East Tennessee Technology Park and Surrounding Area, Oak Ridge, Tennessee Summary DOE's Oak Ridge Operations Office issued a final EA and a finding of no significant impact for a proposal to convey DOE property located at the East Tennessee Technology Park and the surrounding area to the Community Reuse Organization of East Tennessee, City of Oak Ridge, other agencies, or private entities for mixed use economic development. Public Comment Opportunities. No public comment opportunities available at this time. Documents Available for Download October 5, 2011 EA-1640: Final Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant

434

Low voltage operation of plasma focus  

SciTech Connect

Plasma foci of compact sizes and operating with low energies (from tens of joules to few hundred joules) have found application in recent years and have attracted plasma-physics scientists and engineers for research in this direction. We are presenting a low energy and miniature plasma focus which operates from a capacitor bank of 8.4 {mu}F capacity, charged at 4.2-4.3 kV and delivering approximately 52 kA peak current at approximately 60 nH calculated circuit inductance. The total circuit inductance includes the plasma focus inductance. The reported plasma focus operates at the lowest voltage among all reported plasma foci so far. Moreover the cost of capacitor bank used for plasma focus is nearly 20 U.S. dollars making it very cheap. At low voltage operation of plasma focus, the initial breakdown mechanism becomes important for operation of plasma focus. The quartz glass tube is used as insulator and breakdown initiation is done on its surface. The total energy of the plasma focus is approximately 75 J. The plasma focus system is made compact and the switching of capacitor bank energy is done by manual operating switch. The focus is operated with hydrogen and deuterium filled at 1-2 mbar.

Shukla, Rohit; Sharma, S. K.; Banerjee, P.; Das, R.; Deb, P.; Prabahar, T.; Das, B. K.; Adhikary, B.; Shyam, A. [Energetics and Electromagnetics Division, Facility for Electromagnetic Systems, Bhabha Atomic Research Center, Visakhapatanam, A.P. 530012 (India)

2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

435

Focus Transformer Steel - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Strain Gradient and Degradation in Magnetic Properties: Focus Transformer Steel. Author(s), Satish Kumar Shekhawat, Basavaraj V., Vijay

436

Zeiss NVision Focused Ion Beam Users Manual  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... magnification. Follow up by focusing the image, using knob (11) on the Hard Panel to image and orient the sample 12. ...

2013-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

437

Novel Sources for Focused-ion Beams  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... production techniques. This new technique uses a variety of atomic sources to produce highly focused ion beams, with tightly controlled energy. ...

2012-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

438

Geothermal resource area 6: Lander and Eureka Counties. Area development plan  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geothermal Resource Area 6 includes Lander and Eureka Counties. There are several different geothermal resources ranging in temperature from 70/sup 0/F to in excess of 400/sup 0/F within this two country area. Eleven of these resources are considered major and have been selected for evaluation in this Area Development Plan. The various potential uses of the energy found at each of the 11 resource sites were determined after evaluating the study area's physical characteristics, land ownership and land use patterns, existing population and projected growth rates, and transportation facilities. These were then compared with the site specific resource characteristics. The uses considered were divided into five main categories: electrical generation, space heating, recreation, industrial process heat, and agriculture. Within two of these categories certain subdivisions were considered separately. The findings about each of the 11 geothermal sites considered are summarized.

Pugsley, M.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Geothermal Resource Area 6: Lander and Eureka Counties. Area development plan  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geothermal Resource Area 6 includes Lander and Eureka Counties. There are several different geothermal resources ranging in temperature from 70/sup 0/F to in excess of 400/sup 0/F within this two county area. Eleven of these resources are considered major and have been selected for evaluation in this area development plan. The various potential uses of the energy found at each of the 11 resource sites were determined after evaluating the study area's physical characteristics, land ownership and land use patterns, existing population and projected growth rates, and transportation facilities. These were then compared with the site specific resource characteristics. The uses considered were divided into five main categories: electrical generation, space heating, recreation, industrial process heat, and agriculture. Within two of these categories certain subdivisions were considered separately. The findings about each of the geothermal sites considered are summarized.

Robinson, S.; Pugsley, M.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

The Influence of Land Use/Land Cover on Climatological Values of the Diurnal Temperature Range  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The diurnal temperature range (DTR) at weather observation stations that make up the U.S. Historical Climatology Network was evaluated with respect to the predominant land use/land cover associated with the stations within three radii intervals (...

Kevin P. Gallo; David R. Easterling; Thomas C. Peterson

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land focus area" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Impact of Land Model Calibration on Coupled Land-Atmosphere Prediction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Land-atmosphere (L-A) interactions play a critical role in determining the diurnal evolution of both planetary boundary layer (PBL) and land surface heat and moisture budgets, as well as controlling feedbacks with clouds and precipitation that ...

Joseph A. Santanello; Jr.; Sujay V. Kumar; Christa D. Peters-Lidard; Ken Harrison; Shujia Zhou

442

An Improved Land Surface Emissivity Parameter for Land Surface Models Using Global Remote Sensing Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Because land surface emissivity (?) has not been reliably measured, global climate model (GCM) land surface schemes conventionally set this parameter as simply constant, for example, 1 as in the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (...

Menglin Jin; Shunlin Liang

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Greenhouse Gas Policy Development in the Land Use, Land-Use Change...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Policy Development in the Land Use, Land-Use Change and Forestry (LULUCF) Sector J. Kinsman (jkinsman@eei.org; 202-508-5711) Edison Electric Institute 701 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W....

444

Biophysical Evaluation of Land-Cover Products for LandClimate Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The need for accurate characterization of the land surface as boundary conditions in climate models has been recognized widely in the climate modeling community. A large number of land-cover datasets are currently used in climate models either to ...

Jianjun Ge; Nathan Torbick; Jiaguo Qi

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

A New Characterization of the Land Surface Heterogeneity over Africa for Use in Land Surface Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Information related to land surface is immensely important to global change science. For example, land surface changes can alter regional climate through its effects on fluxes of water, energy, and carbon. In the past decades, data sources and ...

Armel Thibaut Kaptu Tchuent; Jean-Louis Roujean; Agns Bgu; Sietse O. Los; Aaron A. Boone; Jean-Franois Mahfouf; Dominique Carrer; Badiane Daouda

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Three LBA-ECO Land Use and Land Cover Science Theme Data Sets...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The ORNL DAAC announces the publication of land cover classifications for Mato Grosso, Brazil, for the years 2000-2001 and 2003-2004. LBA-ECO LC-22 Land Cover from MODIS Vegetation...

447

Understanding and Mapping Land-Use and Land-Cover Change along Bolivia's Corredor Bioceancio  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Corredor Bioceanico is a major transportation project connecting the agricultural heartlands of South America to the Atlantic and Pacific coasts. The final link is in southeastern Bolivia - an underdeveloped area that is home to two indigenous groups and globally-significant woodlands and wetlands. Infrastructure developments - comprising a major highway upgrade, revitalized railway services and increased flows along gas pipelines to Brazil - pose major threats to livelihoods and the region's ecological integrity. There are two broad objectives: (i) to map and quantify the spatial patterns of land change using a time-series of coarse and medium resolution satellite imagery; and (ii) to understand the socio-economic and political drivers of change by linking household surveys and interviews with farmers; environmental, climatic, and political data; and classified satellite imagery. Overall, large-scale deforestation has occurred along the Corredor Bioceanico for mechanized commercial production of oil-seed crops such as soybeans and sunflower. The significance of these findings is that agriculture-driven deforestation is pushing into sensitive areas threatening world-renowned ecosystems such as the Chaco, Chiquitano and Pantanal as well as noteworthy national parks. Though quantity remains relatively small compared to other parts of South America, rates of forest loss match or exceed those of more publicized regions such as Rondonia or Mato Grosso, Brazil. Moreover, rates of forest loss are accelerating linearly with time due to policies implemented by incumbent president Evo Morales. Results also show that in the first years of cultivation, pasture is the dominant land-use, but it quickly gives way to intensively cropped farmland. The main findings in terms of percentage area cleared according to forest type is that farmers appear to be favoring transitional forest types on deep and poorly drained soils of alluvial plains. Semi-structured interviews with farmers and representatives of key institutions illustrate that price determined by the global market is not proportionally the most dominant motive driving LULCC in the lowlands of Santa Cruz, Bolivia - an area seen as a quintessential neoliberal frontier.

Redo, Daniel J.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

MODIS Land Products Subsets Demo  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

GLOBAL Subsetting and GLOBAL Subsetting and Visualization Tool Webinar: Bringing time-series satellite-based land data to the field scientist National Aeronautics and Space Administration www.nasa.gov Suresh K.S. Vannan and Tammy Walker Beaty Oak Ridge National Laboratory Distributed Active Archive Center, ORNL DAAC July 24 and 25, 2013 National Aeronautics and Space Administration Tammy Walker Beaty 2 About ORNL DAAC * The Oak Ridge National Laboratory Distributed Active Archive Center (ORNL DAAC) for biogeochemical dynamics is one of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) data centers managed by the Earth Science Data and Information System (ESDIS) Project, which is responsible for providing users with access to data from NASA's Earth Science

449

Flathead River Focus Watershed Coordinator, 2005-2006 Annual Report.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has long been involved with funding of the Cooperative Habitat Protection and Improvement with Private Landowners program in accordance with the Northwest Power Planning Council's (NPPC) Fish & Wildlife Program (Section 7.7). Section 7.7B.1 requires the establishment of ''at least one model watershed coordinator selected by each representative state''. This project was initiated in 1997 with the purpose of fulfilling the NWPCC's watershed program within the Flathead River basin in western Montana. Currently, the Flathead watershed has been radically altered by hydropower and other land uses. With the construction of Hungry Horse, Bigfork and Kerr dams, the Flathead River system has been divided into isolated populations. Bull trout have been listed as threatened by the US Fish and Wildlife Service and westslope cutthroat trout have been petitioned for listing. Many streams in the drainage have been destabilized during recent decades. Past legal and illegal species introductions are also causing problems. This project fosters in-kind, out-of-place mitigation to offset the impacts of hydroelectric power to 72 miles of the South Fork of the Flathead River and its tributaries upstream of Hungry Horse Dam. Key subbasins within the Flathead drainage, which are critical to native species restoration, are experiencing rapid changes in land ownership and management direction. Subdivision and residential development of agricultural and timber lands adjacent to waterways in the drainage pose one of the greatest threats to weak but recoverable stocks of trout species. Plum Creek Timber Company, a major landholder in the Flathead drainage is currently divesting itself of large tracks of its lakeshore and streamside holdings. Growth of small tract development throughout the area and its tributaries is occurring at a record rate. Immediate to short-term action is required to protect stream corridors through many of these areas if cost-effective recovery efforts are to be implemented. In order to adequately address the issues, other segments of society and other (non-BPA) funding sources must be incorporated into the solution. As stated in the 1994 Fish and Wildlife Program (section 7.7), ''Comprehensive watershed management should enhance and expedite implementation of actions by clearly identifying gaps in programs and knowledge, by striving over time to resolve conflicts, and by keying on activities that address priorities''. A watershed coordinator helps to initiate and facilitate efforts for addressing the issues mentioned above and pulling together a plan for mitigation. Local support is essential before local governments and individual citizens are going to allow government initiatives to be implemented.

DuCharme, Lynn (Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes of the Flathead Nation, Pablo, MT)

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Flathead River Focus Watershed Coordinator, 2004-2005 Annual Report.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has long been involved with funding of the Cooperative Habitat Protection and Improvement with Private Landowners program in accordance with the Northwest Power Planning Council's (NPPC) Fish & Wildlife Program (Section 7.7). Section 7.7B.1 requires the establishment of ''at least one model watershed coordinator selected by each representative state''. This project was initiated in 1997 with the purpose of fulfilling the NWPCC's watershed program within the Flathead River basin in western Montana. Currently, the Flathead watershed has been radically altered by hydropower and other land uses. With the construction of Hungry Horse, Bigfork and Kerr dams, the Flathead River system has been divided into isolated populations. Bull trout have been listed as threatened by the US Fish and Wildlife Service and westslope cutthroat trout have been petitioned for listing. Many streams in the drainage have been destabilized during recent decades. Past legal and illegal species introductions are also causing problems. This project fosters in-kind, out-of-place mitigation to offset the impacts of hydroelectric power to 72 miles of the South Fork of the Flathead River and its tributaries upstream of Hungry Horse Dam. Key subbasins within the Flathead drainage, which are critical to native species restoration, are experiencing rapid changes in land ownership and management direction. Subdivision and residential development of agricultural and timber lands adjacent to waterways in the drainage pose one of the greatest threats to weak but recoverable stocks of trout species. Plum Creek Timber Company, a major landholder in the Flathead drainage is currently divesting itself of large tracks of its lakeshore and streamside holdings. Growth of small tract development throughout the area and its tributaries is occurring at a record rate. Immediate to short-term action is required to protect stream corridors through many of these areas if cost-effective recovery efforts are to be implemented. In order to adequately address the issues, other segments of society and other (non-BPA) funding sources must be incorporated into the solution. As stated in the 1994 Fish and Wildlife Program (section 7.7), ''Comprehensive watershed management should enhance and expedite implementation of actions by clearly identifying gaps in programs and knowledge, by striving over time to resolve conflicts, and by keying on activities that address priorities''. A watershed coordinator helps to initiate and facilitate efforts for addressing the issues mentioned above and pulling together a plan for mitigation. Local support is essential before local governments and individual citizens are going to allow government initiatives to be implemented.

DuCharme, Lynn (Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes of the Flathead Nation, Pablo, MT)

2006-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

451

ION BEAM FOCUSING MEANS FOR CALUTRON  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An ion beam focusing arrangement for calutrons is described. It provides a virtual focus of origin for the ion beam so that the ions may be withdrawn from an arc plasma of considerable width providing greater beam current and accuracy. (T.R.H.)

Backus, J.G.

1959-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Explicitly Accounting for Protected Lands within the GCAM 3.0  

SciTech Connect

The Global Change Assessment Model Version 3.0 defines three different levels of Protected Lands within the agricultural and landuse component. These three different scenarios effectively cordon off 3.5% (5.0 million km2) of the Earths terrestrial lands in the de minimus Protected Land Scenario, 5.0% (7.20 million km2) in the Core Protected Land Scenario, and 8.2% (11.8 million km2) in the Expanded Protected Land Scenario. None of these scenarios represents the right level of Protected Lands for the planet today or tomorrow. Rather, the goal is to create a range of scenarios that can be used in modeling human responses to climate change and the impact those would have on managed and unmanaged terrestrial lands. These scenarios harness the wealth of information in the United Nations Environment Programme World Conservation Monitoring Centres World Database on Protected Areas and its categories of explicit degrees of protection.

Dooley, James J.; Zhou, Yuyu

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Focus on Energy Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Focus on Energy Program Focus on Energy Program Focus on Energy Program < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Institutional Local Government Multi-Family Residential Nonprofit Residential Schools State Government Tribal Government Savings Category Bioenergy Buying & Making Electricity Solar Heating & Cooling Swimming Pool Heaters Water Heating Wind Program Info State Wisconsin Program Type Public Benefits Fund Wisconsin Focus on Energy supports statewide programs that promote energy efficiency and renewable energy*. The program was initially created by Act 9 of 1999 as a public benefit fund (PBF), which also provided energy assistance programs for low-income residents (the [http://homeenergyplus.wi.gov/ Home Energy Plus Program]). Focus on Energy was restructured in March 2006 by S.B. 459 (2005 Act 141). This law, most

454

Independent Oversight Focused Program Review, Argonne National  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Focused Program Review, Argonne National Focused Program Review, Argonne National Laboratory-West - May 2001 Independent Oversight Focused Program Review, Argonne National Laboratory-West - May 2001 May 2001 Focused Program Review at Argonne National Laboratory-West The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Emergency Management Oversight, within the Secretary of Energy's Office of Independent Oversight and Performance Assurance, conducted a focused review of the emergency management program at Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W) in May 2001. There were two primary objectives for this review: to evaluate the extent to which the emergency planning hazards assessment (EPHA) document serves as an effective foundation for the ANL-W emergency management program, and to determine whether the necessary interfaces have been established among

455

Biofuels and indirect land use change  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biofuels and indirect land use change The case for mitigation October 2011 #12;About this study), Malaysian Palm Oil Board, National Farmers Union, Novozymes, Northeast Biofuels Collaborative, Patagonia Bio contributed views on a confidential basis. #12;1Biofuels and indirect land use change The case for mitigation

456

Audit of the U.S. Department of Energy's Identification and Disposal of Nonessential Land, IG-0399  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Government Government Department of Energy memorandum DATE: January 8, 1997 REPLY TO ATTN TO: IG-1 SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Report on "Audit of the U.S. Department of Energy's Identification and Disposal of Nonessential Land" TO: The Secretary BACKGROUND The Department and its predecessor agencies acquired control of about 2.4 million acres of land to carry out wide-ranging programs. However, recent changes in the world's political climate have had a profound impact on the Department's mission and its need for this land. The Department's mission is now focused on weapons dismantlement, environmental clean-up, technology development, and scientific research. Because of

457

June 26 Webinar to Explore Renewable Energy Project Leasing on Tribal Lands  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

June 26 Webinar to Explore Renewable Energy Project Leasing on June 26 Webinar to Explore Renewable Energy Project Leasing on Tribal Lands June 26 Webinar to Explore Renewable Energy Project Leasing on Tribal Lands June 19, 2013 - 7:28pm Addthis The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Indian Energy, the DOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's Tribal Energy Program, and the Western Area Power Administration will present the next Tribal Renewable Energy Series webinar, "Renewable Energy Project Leasing on Tribal Lands," on Wednesday, June 26, 2013, from 1:00 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. Eastern Time. According to the Intertribal Council on Utility Policy, wind resources on tribal lands in the Great Plains alone could power more than 50 million homes. This webinar will explore the opportunities for Tribes to reap the

458

Urban land use, air toxics and public health: Assessing hazardous exposures at the neighborhood scale  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Land use data are increasingly understood as important indicators of potential environmental health risk in urban areas where micro-scale or neighborhood level hazard exposure data are not routinely collected. This paper aims to offer a method for estimating the distribution of air toxics in urban neighborhoods using land use information because actual air monitoring data rarely exist at this scale. Using Geographic Information System spatial modeling tools, we estimate air toxics concentrations across neighborhoods in New York City and statistically compare our model with the US Environmental Protection Agency's National Air Toxic Assessment and air monitoring data across three NYC neighborhoods. We conclude that land use data can act as a good proxy for estimating neighborhood scale air toxics, particularly in the absence of monitoring data. In addition, the paper suggests that land use data can expand the reach of environmental impact assessments that routinely exclude analyses of potential exposures to urban air toxics at the neighborhood scale.

Corburn, Jason [Columbia University, Graduate School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation and School of International and Public Affairs, 400 Avery Hall, 1172 Amsterdam Ave. New York, NY 10027 (United States)]. E-mail: jtc2105@columbia.edu

2007-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

459

Land disposal of San Luis drain sediments: Progress Report October 1998 through November 2000  

SciTech Connect

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), in collaboration with the US Bureau of Reclamation and the Panoche Water District, is conducting a pilot-scale test of the viability of land application of selenium (Se)-enriched San Luis Drain (SLD) sediments. Local land disposal is an attractive option due to its low cost and the proximity of large areas of available land. Two modes of disposal are being tested: (1) the application to a nearby SLD embankment, and (2) the application to and incorporation with nearby farm soils. The study of these options considers the key problems which may potentially arise from this approach. These include disturbance of SLD sediments during dredging, resulting in increased downstream Se concentrations; movement of the land-applied Se to the groundwater; increased exposure to the biota; and reduced productivity of farm crops. This report describes field and laboratory activities carried out from 1998 through November 2000, as well as the results of these investigations.

Zawislanski, P.T.; Benson, S.M.; TerBerg, R.; Borglin, S.E.

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Land-use practices in Ouro Preto do Oeste, Rondonia, Brazil  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Road development and colonization projects have brought about wide-scale deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon. The state of Rondonia, located in the western Amazon Basin, best exemplifies the problems related to land-use changes because it has the highest rates of deforestation in the Amazon Basin. In order to identify the main land-use practices in Rondonia, interviews with local farmers were carried out in the central part of Rondonia, in the PIC (Integrated Colonization Project) Ouro Preto do Oeste. This is the oldest colonization project in the state. The governmental colonization programs attracted migrants to the area through the construction of roads and infrastructure necessary for the colonists to occupy the land for agricultural practices. The interviews were done on lots of the PIC Ouro Preto and in PAD Urupa to define the background of the colonists, their land-use practices, their economic situation, and their relationships with governmental institutions.

Pedlowski, M.A.; Dale, V.H.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z