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1

Hanford land disposal restrictions plan for mixed wastes  

SciTech Connect

Since the early 1940s, the Hanford Site has been involved in the production and purification of nuclear defense materials. These production activities have resulted in the generation of large quantities of liquid and solid radioactive mixed waste. This waste is subject to regulation under authority of both the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) and the Atomic Energy Act. The State of Washington Department of Ecology (Ecology), the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the US Department of Energy (DOE) have entered into an agreement, the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) to bring Hanford Site Operations into compliance with dangerous waste regulations. The Tri-Party Agreement was amended to require development of the Hanford Land Disposal Restrictions Plan for Mixed Wastes (this plan) to comply with land disposal restrictions requirements for radioactive mixed waste. The Tri-Party Agreement requires, and the this plan provides, the following sections: Waste Characterization Plan, Storage Report, Treatment Report, Treatment Plan, Waste Minimization Plan, a schedule, depicting the events necessary to achieve full compliance with land disposal restriction requirements, and a process for establishing interim milestones. 34 refs., 28 figs., 35 tabs.

Not Available

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

1996 Hanford site report on land disposal restrictions for mixed waste  

SciTech Connect

This report was submitted to meet the requirements of Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order milestone M-26-OIF. This milestone requires the preparation of an annual report that covers characterization, treatment, storage, minimization, and other aspects of land disposal-restricted mixed waste management at the Hanford Site.

Black, D.G.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

1999 Report on Hanford Site land disposal restriction for mixed waste  

SciTech Connect

This report was submitted to meet the requirements of Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) Milestone M-26-011. This milestone requires the preparation of an annual report that covers characterization, treatment, storage, minimization, and other aspects of managing land-disposal-restricted mixed waste at the Hanford Facility.

BLACK, D.G.

1999-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

4

1995 Report on Hanford site land disposal restrictions for mixed waste  

SciTech Connect

This report was submitted to meet the requirements of Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order Milestone M-26-01E. This milestone requires the preparation of an annual report that covers characterization, treatment, storage, minimization, and other aspects of land disposal restricted mixed waste at the Hanford Site. The U.S. Department of Energy, its predecessors, and contractors at the Hanford Site were involved in the production and purification of nuclear defense materials from the early 1940s to the late 1980s. These production activities have generated large quantities of liquid and solid radioactive mixed waste. This waste is subject to regulation under authority of both the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 and Atomic Energy Act of 1954. This report covers mixed waste only. The Washington State Department of Ecology, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and U.S. Department of Energy have entered into an agreement, the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (commonly referred to as the Tri-Party Agreement) to bring the Hanford Site operations into compliance with dangerous waste regulations. The Tri-Party Agreement required development of the original land disposal restrictions (LDRs) plan and its annual updates to comply with LDR requirements for radioactive mixed waste. This report is the fifth update of the plan first issued in 1990. Tri-Party Agreement negotiations completed in 1993 and approved in January 1994 changed and added many new milestones. Most of the changes were related to the Tank Waste Remediation System and these changes are incorporated into this report.

Black, D.G.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

1998 report on Hanford Site land disposal restrictions for mixed waste  

SciTech Connect

This report was submitted to meet the requirements of Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) Milestone M-26-01H. This milestone requires the preparation of an annual report that covers characterization, treatment, storage, minimization, and other aspects of managing land-disposal-restricted mixed waste at the Hanford Facility. The US Department of Energy, its predecessors, and contractors on the Hanford Facility were involved in the production and purification of nuclear defense materials from the early 1940s to the late 1980s. These production activities have generated large quantities of liquid and solid mixed waste. This waste is regulated under authority of both the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of l976 and the Atomic Energy Act of 1954. This report covers only mixed waste. The Washington State Department of Ecology, US Environmental Protection Agency, and US Department of Energy have entered into the Tri-Party Agreement to bring the Hanford Facility operations into compliance with dangerous waste regulations. The Tri-Party Agreement required development of the original land disposal restrictions (LDR) plan and its annual updates to comply with LDR requirements for mixed waste. This report is the eighth update of the plan first issued in 1990. The Tri-Party Agreement requires and the baseline plan and annual update reports provide the following information: (1) Waste Characterization Information -- Provides information about characterizing each LDR mixed waste stream. The sampling and analysis methods and protocols, past characterization results, and, where available, a schedule for providing the characterization information are discussed. (2) Storage Data -- Identifies and describes the mixed waste on the Hanford Facility. Storage data include the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 dangerous waste codes, generator process knowledge needed to identify the waste and to make LDR determinations, quantities stored, generation rates, location and method of storage, an assessment of storage-unit compliance status, storage capacity, and the bases and assumptions used in making the estimates.

Black, D.G.

1998-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

6

1997 Hanford site report on land disposal restrictions for mixed waste  

SciTech Connect

The baseline land disposal restrictions (LDR) plan was prepared in 1990 in accordance with the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (commonly referred to as the Tn-Party Agreement) Milestone M-26-00 (Ecology et al, 1989). The text of this milestone is below. ''LDR requirements include limitations on storage of specified hazardous wastes (including mixed wastes). In accordance with approved plans and schedules, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) shall develop and implement technologies necessary to achieve full compliance with LDR requirements for mixed wastes at the Hanford Site. LDR plans and schedules shall be developed with consideration of other action plan milestones and will not become effective until approved by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) (or Washington State Department of Ecology [Ecology]) upon authorization to administer LDRs pursuant to Section 3006 of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA). Disposal of LDR wastes at any time is prohibited except in accordance with applicable LDR requirements for nonradioactive wastes at all times. The plan will include, but not be limited to, the following: Waste characterization plan; Storage report; Treatment report; Treatment plan; Waste minimization plan; A schedule depicting the events necessary to achieve full compliance with LDR requirements; and A process for establishing interim milestones.

Black, D.G.

1997-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

7

1994 Report on Hanford Site land disposal restrictions for mixed waste  

SciTech Connect

The baseline land disposal restrictions (LDR) plan was prepared in 1990 in accordance with the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (commonly referred to as the Tri-Party Agreement) Milestone M-26-00 (Ecology et al. 1992). The text of this milestone is below. LDR requirements include limitations on storage of specified hazardous wastes (including mixed wastes). In accordance with approved plans and schedules, the US Department of Energy (DOE) shall develop and implement technologies necessary to achieve full compliance with LDR requirements for mixed wastes at the Hanford Site. LDR plans and schedules shall be developed with consideration at other action plan milestones and will not become effective until approved by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) (or Washington State Department of Ecology [Ecology]) upon authorization to administer LDRs pursuant to Section 3006 of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA). Disposal of LDR wastes at any time is prohibited except in accordance with applicable LDR requirements for nonradioactive wastes at all times. The plan will include, but not be limited to, the following: waste characterization plan; storage report; treatment report; treatment plan; waste minimization plan; a schedule depicting the events necessary to achieve full compliance with LDR requirements; a process for establishing interim milestones. The original plan was published in October 1990. This is the fourth of a series of annual updates required by Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-26-01. A Tri-Party Agreement change request approved in March 1992 changed the annual due date from October to April and consolidated this report with a similar one prepared under Milestone M-25-00. The reporting period for this report is from April 1, 1993, to March 31, 1994.

Black, D.G.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

1993 report on Hanford Site land disposal restrictions for mixed wastes  

SciTech Connect

Since the early 1940s, the contractors at the Hanford Site have been involved in the production and purification of nuclear defense materials. These production activities have resulted in the generation of large quantities of liquid and solid radioactive mixed waste (RMW). This waste is subject to regulation under authority of both the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976{sup 2}(RCRA) and Atomic Energy Act{sup 3}. This report covers mixed waste only. Hazardous waste that is not contaminated with radionuclides is not addressed in this report. The Washington State Department of Ecology, US Environmental Protection Agency, and US Department of Energy have entered into an agreement, the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order{sup 1} (commonly referred to as the Tri-Party Agreement) to bring the Hanford Site operations into compliance with dangerous waste regulations. The Tri-Party Agreement required development of the original land disposal restrictions (LDR) plan and its annual updates to comply with LDR requirements for RMW. This report is the third update of the plan first issued in 1990. The Tri-Party Agreement requires, and the baseline plan and annual update reports provide, the information that follows: Waste characterization information; storage data; treatment information; waste reduction information; schedule; and progress.

Black, D.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Land Management and Disposal | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Land Management and Disposal Land Management and Disposal Land Management and Disposal Land Management and Disposal 42 USC 2201(g), Section 161(g), of the AEA 42 USC Section 2224, Section 174 DOE, July 2004, Real Property Desk Guide Requirements: Document Title P.L. 83-703 (68 Stat. 919), Section 161g Grants Special Authority as Required in the Act to Acquire, Sell, Dispose, etc., of Real Property in Furtherance of the Department's Mission (Under the Atomic Energy Act of 1954) P.L. 95-91, 91 Stat. 578 (Sections 302 and 347) Department of Energy Organizational Act of 1977, Delegated Authority for Real Property P.L. 106-580 Federal Property and Administrative Services Act of 1949, As Amended P.L. 105-85 Federal Property and Administrative Services Act of 1949, As Amended 10 CFR 770 Transfer of Real Property at Defense Nuclear Facilities for Economic Development

10

Land disposal of water treatment plant sludge -- A feasibility analysis  

SciTech Connect

In this study, the following alternative disposal methods for the Buffalo Pound Water Treatment Sludge were evaluated: landfilling, discharge into sanitary sewers, long-term lagooning, use in manufacturing, co-composting, alum recovery and land application. Land application was chosen at the best disposal alternative. Preliminary design resulted in a 1% dry alum sludge loading rate (25 tonnes/ha), requiring 35 ha over a nine-year period and a phosphorus fertilizer supplement of about 50kg/ha.

Viraraghavan, T.; Multon, L.M.; Wasylenchuk, E.J.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Environmental Land Use Restriction (Connecticut) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Environmental Land Use Restriction (Connecticut) Environmental Land Use Restriction (Connecticut) Environmental Land Use Restriction (Connecticut) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Connecticut Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Energy and Environmental Protection

12

Reducing biosolids disposal costs using land application in forested areas  

SciTech Connect

Switching biosolids land application from a reclamation site to a forested site significantly reduced the cost of biosolids disposal at the Savannah River Site. Previous beneficial reuse programs focused on reclamation of existing borrow pits. While extremely beneficial, this program became very costly due to the regulatory requirements for groundwater monitoring, soil monitoring and frequent biosolids analyses. A new program was developed to reuse biosolids in forested areas where the biosolids could be used as a soil conditioner and fertilizer to enhance timber yield. The forested land application site was designed so that groundwater monitoring and soil monitoring could be eliminated while biosolids monitoring and site maintenance were minimized. Monitoring costs alone were reduced by 80%. Capital costs for site preparation were also significantly reduced since there was no longer a need for expensive groundwater monitoring wells.

Huffines, R.L.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Shallow Land Disposal Area - PA 45  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Shallow Land Disposal Area - PA 45 Shallow Land Disposal Area - PA 45 FUSRAP Considered Sites Shallow Land Disposal Area, PA Alternate Name(s): Parks Township Shallow Land Disposal Area Nuclear Materials and Equipment Corporation (NUMEC) Babcox and Wilcox Parks Facilities PA.45-1 PA.45-5 PA.45-6 Location: PA Route 66 and Kissimere Road, Parks Township, Apollo, Pennsylvania PA.45-1 Historical Operations: Fabricated nulcear fuel under an NRC license as an extension of NUMEC Apollo production facilities. PA.45-1 PA.45-5 Eligibility Determination: Eligible PA.45-6 Radiological Survey(s): None Site Status: Cleanup in progress by U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. PA.45-6 USACE Website Long-term Care Requirements: To be determined upon completion. Also see Documents Related to Shallow Land Disposal Area, PA

14

Stabilization of a mixed waste sludge for land disposal  

SciTech Connect

A solidification and stabilization technique was developed for a chemically complex mixed waste sludge containing nitrate processing wastes, sewage sludge and electroplating wastewaters, among other wastes. The sludge is originally from a solar evaporation pond and has high concentrations of nitrate salts; cadmium, chromium, and nickel concentrations of concern; and low levels of organic constituents and alpha and beta emitters. Sulfide reduction of nitrate and precipitation of metallic species, followed by evaporation to dryness and solidification of the dry sludge in recycled high density polyethylene with added lime was determined to be a satisfactory preparation for land disposal in a mixed waste repository. The application of post-consumer polyethylene has the added benefit of utilizing another problem-causing waste product. A modified Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure was used to determine required treatment chemical dosages and treatment effectiveness. The waste complexity prohibited use of standard chemical equilibrium methods for prediction of reaction products during treatment. Waste characterization followed by determination of thermodynamic feasibility of oxidation and reduction products. These calculations were shown to be accurate in laboratory testing. 13 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

Powers, S.E.; Zander, A.K. [Clarkson Univ., Potsdam, NY (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

15

Alvenus oil spill debris disposal and the potential of land treatment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ALVENUS OIL SPILL DEBRIS DISPOSAL AND THE POTENTIAL OF LAND TREATMENT A Thesis by KENNETH GREGORY CLARK Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... August 1988 Major Subject: Civil Engineering ALVENUS OIL SPILL DEBRIS DISPOSAL AND THE POTENTIAL OF LAND TREATMENT A Thesis by KENNETH GREGORY CLARK Approved as to style and content by: y W. Harm, r. (Chair of Committee) / r ( Charles...

Clark, Kenneth Gregory

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

16

Septage Disposal, Licensure (Montana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This statute describes licensing requirements for septage disposal, and addresses land disposal and processing facilities.

17

Geotechnical investigation of sewage wastewater disposal sites and use of GIS land use maps to assess environmental hazards: Sohag, upper Egypt  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Land application is the only currently available technique for sewage wastewater disposal along the Nile Valley in Upper Egypt. Wastewater disposal projects have been established in the lowland desert zone ext...

Ahmed M. Youssef; Adly A. Omer; Mohamed S. Ibrahim…

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Audit of the U.S. Department of Energy's Identification and Disposal of Nonessential Land, IG-0399  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Government Government Department of Energy memorandum DATE: January 8, 1997 REPLY TO ATTN TO: IG-1 SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Report on "Audit of the U.S. Department of Energy's Identification and Disposal of Nonessential Land" TO: The Secretary BACKGROUND The Department and its predecessor agencies acquired control of about 2.4 million acres of land to carry out wide-ranging programs. However, recent changes in the world's political climate have had a profound impact on the Department's mission and its need for this land. The Department's mission is now focused on weapons dismantlement, environmental clean-up, technology development, and scientific research. Because of

19

Geochemical investigations at Maxey Flats radioactive waste disposal site. [Shallow land burial  

SciTech Connect

As part of the NRC efforts to develop a data base on source term characteristics for low level wastes, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has produced and analyzed a large amount of data on trench leachate chemistry at existing shallow land burial sites. In this report, we present the results of our investigations at the Maxey Flats, Kentucky disposal site. In particular, data on trench leachate chemistry are reviewed and discussed in terms of mechanisms and processes controlling the composition of trench solutes. Particular emphasis is placed on identifying both intra- and extra-trench factors and processes contributing to source term characteristics, modifications, and uncertainties. BNL research on the Maxey Flats disposal site has provided important information not only on the source term characteristics and the factors contributing to uncertainties in the source term but also some generic insights into such geochemical processes and controls as the mechanics of leachate formation, microbial degradation and development of anoxia, organic complexation and radionuclide mobility, redox inversion and modification of the source term, solubility constraints on solute chemistry, mineral authigenesis, corrosion products and radionuclide scavenging, and the role of organic complexants in geochemical partitioning of radionuclides. A knowledge of such processes and controls affecting the geochemical cycling of radionuclides as well as an understanding of the important factors that contribute to variability and uncertainties in the source term is essential for evaluating the performance of waste package and the site, making valid predictions of release for dose calculations, and for planning site performance monitoring as well as remedial actions. 43 references, 47 figures, 30 tables.

Dayal, R.; Pietrzak, R.F.; Clinton, J.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Risk assessment involving the land disposal of animal waste on Central Texas dairies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with nutrient disposal on two central Texas dairies. Risks were identified by using producer and researcher knowledge to create graphic representations of the disposal systems. These representations, known as event and fault trees, were used in conjunction...

Lee, Thomas Chadwick

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land disposal restrictions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Microbial activity of trench leachates from shallow-land, low-level radioactive waste disposal sites.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...samples collected from disposal sites at Maxey Flats, Ky., and West...trenches at the disposal sites of Maxey Flats, Ky., West Valley...trench water at the Maxey Flats low-level radioactive waste disposal site, p. 747-761...

A J Francis; S Dobbs; B J Nine

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Trees as indicators of subterranean migration of tritium at a commercial shallow land radioactive waste disposal site. [Maxey Flats, KY  

SciTech Connect

Leaf water and tree sap collected from deciduous trees in a natural forest growing outside the fenced exclusion area of the Maxey Flats Waste Disposal Facility in eastern Kentucky, USA were radiochemically analyzed to detect movement of tritium via subterranean flows of water at depths of three meters. These data indicate that trees can be used to detect the subterranean migration of tritium from shallow land burial sites. 4 references, 5 figures, 1 table.

Rickard, W.H.; Kirby, L.J.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Land application of sewage sludge: A guide for land appliers on the requirements of the federal standards for the use or disposal of sewage sludge, 40 CFR part 503  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency promulgated a regulation at 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 503 to ensure that sewage sludge is used or disposed of in a way that protects human health and the environment. Part 503 imposes requirements for the land application, surface disposal, and incineration of sewage sludge. The manual focuses on land application, providing guidance to land appliers of sewage sludge. The purpose of the document is to provide the land applier with sufficient guidance to comply fully with all applicable Part 503 requirements. The guidance is structured to first provide a general understanding of the Rule and its underlying principles, including definitions of sewage sludge, land application, and an explanation of who under the Rule is considered a land applier.

NONE

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Microbial activity of trench leachates from shallow-land, low-level radioactive waste disposal sites.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Ill.; Barnwell, S.C.; West Valley, N.Y.; and Richland, Wash...sites at Maxey Flats, Ky., and West Valley, N.Y., contained 14C, 3H...disposal sites of Maxey Flats, Ky., West Valley, N.Y., Sheffield, Ill...

A J Francis; S Dobbs; B J Nine

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Preparing sewage sludge for land application or surface disposal: A guide for preparers of sewage sludge on the monitoring, record keeping, and reporting requirements of the federal standards for the use of disposal of sewage sludge, 40 CFR part 503  

SciTech Connect

The document focuses on the monitoring, recordkeeping, and reporting requirements that apply to persons who prepare sewage sludge or a material derived from sewage sludge. It defines persons who prepare sewage sludge and then summarizes their general responsibilities. USEPA promulgated at 40 CFR Part 503 Phase 1 of the risk-based regulations that govern the final use or disposal of sewage sludge. The intent of the Federal program is to ensure that the use or disposal of sewage sludge occurs in a way that protects both human health and the environment. The Part 503 regulation establishes general requirements, pollutant limits, operational standards, and management practices, as well as monitoring, recordkeeping, and reporting requirements. These requirements apply to sewage sludge that is land applied, placed on a surface disposal site, or incinerated in a sewage sludge-only incinerator.

Not Available

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Groundwater Monitoring and Tritium-Tracking Plan for the 200 Area State-Approved Land Disposal Site  

SciTech Connect

The 200 Area State-Approved Land Disposal Site (SALDS) is a drainfield which receives treated wastewater, occasionally containing high levels of tritium from treatment of Hanford Site liquid wastes. Only the SALDS proximal wells (699-48-77A, 699-48-77C, and 699-48-77D) have been affected by tritium from the facility thus far; the highest activity observed (2.1E+6 pCi/L) occurred in well 699-48-77D in February 1998. Analytical results of groundwater geochemistry since groundwater monitoring began at the SALDS indicate that all constituents with permit enforcement limits have been below those limits with the exception of one measurement of total dissolved solids (TDS) in 1996. The revised groundwater monitoring sampling and analysis plan eliminates chloroform, acetone, tetrahydrofuran, benzene, and ammonia as constituents. Replicate field measurements will replace laboratory measurements of pH for compliance purposes. A deep companion well to well 699-51-75 will be monitored for tritium deeper in the uppermost aquifer.

Barnett, D. Brent

2000-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

27

Disposal Information - Hanford Site  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Email Page | Print Print Page |Text Increase Font Size Decrease Font Size Disposal of Radioactive Waste at Hanford The Hanford Site operates lined, RCRA Subtitle C land...

28

Effects of land disposal of municipal sewage sludge on soil, streambed sediment, and ground- and surface-water quality at a site near Denver, Colorado  

SciTech Connect

The report describes the effects of burial and land application of municipal sewage sludge on soil and streambed sediment and water quality in the underlying aquifers and surface water within and around the Lowry sewage-sludge-disposal area. The existing ground-water observation-well network at the disposal area was expanded for the study. Surface-water-sampling sites were selected so that runoff could be sampled from intense rainstorms or snowmelt. The sampling frequency for ground-water and surface-water runoff was changed from yearly to quarterly, and soil samples were collected. Four years of data were collected from 1984 to 1987 during the expanded monitoring program at the Lowry sewage-sludge-disposal area. These data, in addition to the data collected by the U.S. Geological Survey from 1981 to 1983, were used to determine effects of sewage-sludge-disposal on soil and streambed sediment and surface- and ground-water quality at the disposal area.

Gaggiani, N.G.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

The Hazardous Waste/Mixed Waste Disposal Facility  

SciTech Connect

The Hazardous Waste/Mixed Waste Disposal Facility (HW/MWDF) will provide permanent Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) permitted storage, treatment, and disposal for hazardous and mixed waste generated at the Department of Energy's (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) that cannot be disposed of in existing or planned SRS facilities. Final design is complete for Phase I of the project, the Disposal Vaults. The Vaults will provide RCRA permitted, above-grade disposal capacity for treated hazardous and mixed waste generated at the SRS. The RCRA Part B Permit application was submitted upon approval of the Permit application, the first Disposal Vault is scheduled to be operational in mid 1994. The technical baseline has been established for Phase II, the Treatment Building, and preliminary design work has been performed. The Treatment Building will provide RCRA permitted treatment processes to handle a variety of hazardous and mixed waste generated at SRS in preparation for disposal. The processes will treat wastes for disposal in accordance with the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) Land Disposal Restrictions (LDR). A RCRA Part B Permit application has not yet been submitted to SCDHEC for this phase of the project. The Treatment Building is currently scheduled to be operational in late 1996.

Bailey, L.L.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

The Hazardous Waste/Mixed Waste Disposal Facility  

SciTech Connect

The Hazardous Waste/Mixed Waste Disposal Facility (HW/MWDF) will provide permanent Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) permitted storage, treatment, and disposal for hazardous and mixed waste generated at the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) that cannot be disposed of in existing or planned SRS facilities. Final design is complete for Phase I of the project, the Disposal Vaults. The Vaults will provide RCRA permitted, above-grade disposal capacity for treated hazardous and mixed waste generated at the SRS. The RCRA Part B Permit application was submitted upon approval of the Permit application, the first Disposal Vault is scheduled to be operational in mid 1994. The technical baseline has been established for Phase II, the Treatment Building, and preliminary design work has been performed. The Treatment Building will provide RCRA permitted treatment processes to handle a variety of hazardous and mixed waste generated at SRS in preparation for disposal. The processes will treat wastes for disposal in accordance with the Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) Land Disposal Restrictions (LDR). A RCRA Part B Permit application has not yet been submitted to SCDHEC for this phase of the project. The Treatment Building is currently scheduled to be operational in late 1996.

Bailey, L.L.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

31

Disposal of boiler ash  

SciTech Connect

As more boilers are converted from oil to solid fuels such as coal, the quantity of ash requiring disposal will increase dramatically. The factors associated with the development of land disposal systems for ash landfills are presented, including ash characterization, site selection procedures, design parameters, and costs.

Atwell, J.S.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

In-Situ Radiological Surveys to Address Nuclear Criticality Safety Requirements During Remediation Activities at the Shallow Land Disposal Area, Armstrong County, Pennsylvania - 12268  

SciTech Connect

Cabrera Services Inc. (CABRERA) is the remedial contractor for the Shallow Land Disposal Area (SLDA) Site in Armstrong County Pennsylvania, a United States (US) Army Corps of Engineers - Buffalo District (USACE) contract. The remediation is being completed under the USACE's Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) which was established to identify, investigate, and clean up or control sites previously used by the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) and its predecessor, the Manhattan Engineer District (MED). As part of the management of the FUSRAP, the USACE is overseeing investigation and remediation of radiological contamination at the SLDA Site in accordance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), 42 US Code (USC), Section 9601 et. seq, as amended and, the National Oil and Hazardous Substance Pollution Contingency Plan (NCP), Title 40 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Section 300.430(f) (2). The objective of this project is to clean up radioactive waste at SLDA. The radioactive waste contains special nuclear material (SNM), primarily U-235, in 10 burial trenches, Cabrera duties include processing, packaging and transporting the waste to an offsite disposal facility in accordance with the selected remedial alternative as defined in the Final Record of Decision (USACE, 2007). Of particular importance during the remediation is the need to address nuclear criticality safety (NCS) controls for the safe exhumation and management of waste containing fissile materials. The partnership between Cabrera Services, Inc. and Measutronics Corporation led to the development of a valuable survey tool and operating procedure that are essential components of the SLDA Criticality Safety and Material Control and Accountability programs. Using proven existing technologies in the design and manufacture of the Mobile Survey Cart, the continued deployment of the Cart will allow for an efficient and reliable methodology to allow for the safe exhumation of the Special Nuclear Material in existing SLDA trenches. (authors)

Norris, Phillip; Mihalo, Mark; Eberlin, John; Lambert, Mike [Cabrera Services (United States); Matthews, Brian [Nuclear Safety Associates (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Organic geochemical studies at a commercial shallow-land disposal site of low-level nuclear waste  

SciTech Connect

The subsurface migration of radionuclides has been studied at a commercial, shallow-land burial site of low-level nuclear waste at Maxey Flats, Kentucky. A variety of radionuclides including /sup 3/H, /sup 238/ /sup 239/ /sup 240/Pu, /sup 60/Co, /sup 137/Cs and /sup 90/Sr have migrated short distances on-site (meters to tens of meters). A number of the mobile radionuclides, notably plutonium and /sup 60/Co, appear to exist as anionic species with organic properties. As a result, we have studied the organic geochemistry of radioactive leachates pumped from a number of waste burial trenches throughout the site. The major aim of the organic research is to elucidate the role of organic compounds in mediating the subsurface migration of the mobile radionuclides in groundwater. A survey study of the hydrophilic and hydrophobic organic content of the waste leachates has revealed that organic compounds are readily leached from the buried waste. Organic chelating agents like EDTA, HEDTA and ED3A are the major hydrophilic organic compounds in the leachates, their concentrations ranging from 78 ppB to 19,511 ppB. A number of carboxylic acids are also present in the leachates, ranging from 675 ppB to 8757 ppB, collectively. A variety of hydrophobic organic compounds including barbiturates and other aromatic compounds, presumably waste-derived, are also present in the leachates, generally at lower ppB concentrations. A detailed chemical speciation study, aimed at determining whether any of the organic compounds identified in the survey study are associated with the mobile radionuclides, was undertaken using leachate from one of the waste trenches. It is clear that EDTA is chelated to plutonium and /sup 60/Co in the leachate, potentially mobilizing these radionuclides. Other radionuclides, /sup 137/Cs and /sup 90/Sr, may be associated with polar organic compounds such as carboxylic acids. 14 references, 2 figures, 2 tables.

Toste, A.P.; Kirby, L.J.; Pahl, T.R.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Results of Tritium Tracking and Groundwater Monitoring at the Hanford Site 200 Area State-Approved Land Disposal Site-FY1999  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Site 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) processes contaminated liquids derived from Hanford Site facilities. The clean water generated by these processes is occasionally enriched in tritium and is discharged to the 200 Area State Approved Land Disposal Site (SALDS). Groundwater monitoring for tritium and other constituents is required by the state-issued permit at 21 wells surrounding the facility. During FY 1999, average tritium activities in most wells declined from average activities in 1998. The exception was deep well 69948-77C, where tritium results were at an all-time high (77,000 pCi/L) as a result of the delayed penetration of effluent deeper into the aquifer. Of the 12 constituents with permit enforcement limits, which are monitored in SALDS proximal wells, all were within limits during FY 1999. Water level measurements in nearby wells indicate that a small hydraulic mound exists around the SALDS facility as a result of discharges. This feature is directing groundwater flow radially outward a short distance before the regional northeasterly flow predominates. Evaluation of this condition indicates that the network is currently adequate for tracking potential effects of the SALDS on the groundwater. Recommendations include the discontinuation of ammonia, benzene, tetrahydrofuran, and acetone from the regular groundwater constituent list; designating background well 299-W8-1 as a tritium-tracking well only, and the use of quadruplicate averages of field pH, instead of a single laboratory measurement, as a permit compliance parameter.

Barnett, D.B.

1999-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

35

Program management plan for development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation efforts associated with Oak Ridge Reservation`s Land Disposal Restrictions Federal Facility Compliance Agreement  

SciTech Connect

This program management plan covers the development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation efforts necessary to identify treatment methods for all the waste listed in Appendix B of the ORR`s LDR/FFCA as well as any new wastes which meet Appendix B criteria. To successfully identify a treatment method, at least a proof-of-principle level of understanding must be obtained: that is, the candidate processes must be demonstrated as effective in treating the wastes to the LDR; however, an optimized process is not required. Where applicable and deemed necessary and where the budgets will support them, pilot-scale demonstrations will be pursued. The overall strategy being adopted in this program will be composed of the following activities: Scoping of the study; characterization; development and screening of alternatives; treatability investigations; and detailed analysis of alternatives.

Conley, T.B.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Restriction Enzymes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Restriction enzymes recognize specific short sequences of (usually) ... target site, sometimes elsewhere, depending on restriction enzyme type).

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Evaluation of isotope migration - land burial. Water chemistry at commercially operated low-level radioactive waste disposal sites. Quarterly progress report, April-June 1980  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the analytical results for tritium content of soil cores taken at the Barnwell, South Carolina, disposal site, field measurements at Barnwell, concentrations of free chelating agents in selected trench waters, and the analyses of water samples collected at the Maxey Flats, Kentucky, disposal site. Tritium contents in soil cores taken below the trenches show a decrease in tritium with depth to a minimum value at approximately ten meters, followed by an increase below this depth. This deeper maximum probably represents the downward movement of the previous years seasonal maxima for water infiltration into the trenches. This amount of downward migration from the trench bottom is approximately what would be expected based on the hydraulic conductivity of these sediments. Field measurements of trench waters at the Barnwell, South Carolina, disposal site indicate that the waters are chemically oxidizing regimes relative to those at Maxey Flats and West Valley. Analyses were performed to determine the amounts of free chelating agents DTPA, EDTA, and NTA in selected trenches at the Maxey Flats, West Valley, Barnwell, and Sheffield, disposal sites. Amounts of free chelating agents were generally below 1 ..mu..g/g, with one sample as high as 28 ..mu..g/g. No drastic changes in trench water compositions were observed relative to previous sampling at Maxey Flats. The experimental interceptor trenches contain detectable amounts of strontium and plutonium. Tritium contents vary from typical disposal trench levels (E7-E8 pCi/L) in trench IT-2E, downward four oders of magnitude in trench IT-5 in a decreasing trend along the line of experimental trenches.

Czyscinski, K.S.; Weiss, A.J.

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Evaluation of isotope migration: land burial. Water chemistry at commercially operated low-level radioactive waste disposal sites. Quarterly progress report, October-December 1979  

SciTech Connect

Decreasing radionuclide sorption, K/sub d/, was observed for /sup 241/Am, /sup 85/Sr, and /sup 60/Co when organic substances were added to well water and shale from the Maxey Flats, Kentucky, disposal site. Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) caused the greatest decrease in K/sub d/. Several reference clays were also used for comparison. Only montmorillonite maintained its sorption capability in the presence of EDTA. Experiments were performed to establish the existence of organoradionuclide complexes in trench waters from the low level radioactive waste disposal sites. Fractionations of trench waters were accomplished by gel filtration chromatography. Preliminary results indicated that cesium isotopes in the trench water from West Valley, New York, may be associated with organic molecules as species with molecular weight less than 700, and that it is unlikely an EDTA complex.

Weiss, A.J.; Colombo, P.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Fees For Disposal Of Hazardous Waste Or Substances (Alabama)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The article lists annual payments to be made to counties, restrictions on disposal of hazardous waste, additional fees collected by counties and penalties.

40

Sorption measurements performed under site-specific conditions - Maxey Flats, Kentucky, and West Valley, New York, disposal sites. [Shallow land burial  

SciTech Connect

Sorption coefficients have been determined using site-specific sediments and trench waters, collected from the Maxey Flats, Kentucky, and West Valley, New York, low-level radioactive waste disposal sites. Experimental apparatus and procedures are described to preserve the anoxic character of the liquid phases during experiments. Experiments using anoxic and oxidized trench waters were performed as functions of solution pH, soil/solution ratio, water and soil composition. The lowest sorption was observed with the combination of anoxic waters and untreated soil - the combination most closely resembling the immediate trench environment. For best results in predictive applications, sorption data should be determined under conditions which simulate those in the field as closely as possible. The total radionuclide retention capacity of reducing geochemical environments is the sum of sorption processes on solid phases, as well as precicipation, and coprecipitation reactions involving iron mineral phases (sulfides and oxyhydroxides).

Pietrzak, R.F.; Czyscinski, K.S.; Weiss, A.J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land disposal restrictions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Evaluation of isotope migration: land burial. Water chemistry at commercially operated low-level radioactive waste disposal sites. Quarterly progress report, April-June 1981  

SciTech Connect

Results are reported for radionuclide sorption experiments performed under anaerobic conditions and as a function of solution/solid ratio for trench shale and waters collected at the Maxey Flats disposal site in Kentucky. The observed degree of sorption (equilibrium K/sub d/) varied unpredictably as a function of solution to solid ratio. Measurements of pH and Eh were performed before and after the determinations to determine if redox conditions were altered significantly during the experiments. The experimental procedure appears capable of maintaining anaerobic conditions during most of the determinations. Changes in solution/solid ratio appear to affect the observed equilibrium sorption more than any variations in redox state during the determinations. However, our final evaluation of the proposed test procedure for measuring sorption of radionuclides from anoxic groundwater is that the test is not completely reliable. Since further improvements in the experimental procedure are not planned, this type of batch sorption test for anoxic waters will be terminated. Organo-radionuclide complex stability experiments in controlled environment chambers were completed. The results indicate that the temporal stability of chelated radionuclides in low redox geochemical environments are not easily predicted from comparisons of appropriate association constants and solubility products. Empirical information is required to reliably predict the behavior of chelated radionuclides under field conditions. Controlled oxidation experiments using disposal site trench waters were initiated. Preliminary results suggest that high contents of dissolved ferrous iron in trench waters can act as redox buffers to preserve low redox conditions during subsurface migration. Data on coprecipitation of radionuclides on ferric oxyhydroxide will be reported when analyses are completed.

Czyscinski, K S; Pietrzak, R F; Weiss, A J

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Converter waste disposal study  

SciTech Connect

The importance of waste management and disposal issues to the converting and print industries is demonstrated by the high response rate to a survey of US and Canadian converters and printers. The 30-item questionnaire measured the impact of reuse, recycling, source reduction, incineration, and landfilling on incoming raw-material packaging, process scrap, and waste inks, coatings, and adhesives. The results indicate that significant amounts of incoming packaging materials are reused in-house or through supplier take-back programs. However, there is very little reuse of excess raw materials and process scrap, suggesting the need for greater source reduction within these facilities as the regulatory climate becomes increasingly restrictive.

Schultz, R.B. (RBS Technologies, Inc., Skokie, IL (United States))

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Assessment of fluidized-bed-combustion solid wastes for land disposal. Volume 5. Appendix G. Final report, June 1980-June 1984  

SciTech Connect

This report, Appendix G, gives results of: (1) an analysis of representative samples of fluidized-bed-combustion (FBC) wastes, (2) an assessment of the characteristics of leachates generated from the wastes under laboratory and field (landfill) conditions, (3) a characterization of the attenuation of the leachates by earth materials that are typical of disposal settings, (4) development of a way to predict the leachate generation behavior of FBC wastes under landfill conditions on the basis of laboratory test results by establishing a rigorous statistical relationship between the laboratory and field-leaching results, and (5) assessment of the compatibility of commonly used landfill-liner materials with FBC waste leachates. FBC is an emerging energy technology that holds promise for both high efficiency of energy conversion and minimization of adverse air-quality impacts. A major advantage of FBC is that high-sulfur coal can be burned without the use of flue-gas desulfurization equipment to meet air-quality standards. The solid residues that are generated in an FBC unit are usually larger in volume and have different properties than the typical bottom ash from a conventional boiler.

Williamson, H.J.; Grimshaw, T.W.; Dunn, J.E.

1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Assessment of fluidized-bed-combustion solid wastes for land disposal. Volume 3. Appendices D and E. Final report, June 1980-June 1984  

SciTech Connect

This report, Appendices D and E, gives results of: (1) an analysis of representative samples of fluidized-bed-combustion (FBC) wastes, (2) an assessment of the characteristics of leachates generated from the wastes under laboratory and field (landfill) conditions, (3) a characterization of the attenuation of the leachates by earth materials that are typical of disposal settings, (4) development of a way to predict the leachate generation behavior of FBC wastes under landfill conditions on the basis of laboratory test results by establishing a rigorous statistical relationship between the laboratory and field-leaching results, and (5) assessment of the compatibility of commonly used landfill-liner materials with FBC waste leachates. FBC is an emerging energy technology that holds promise for both high efficiency of energy conversion and minimization of adverse air-quality impacts. A major advantage of FBC is that high-sulfur coal can be burned without the use of flue-gas desulfurization equipment to meet air-quality standards. The solid residues that are generated in an FBC unit are usually larger in volume and have different properties than the typical bottom ash from a conventional boiler.

Minear, R.A.; Grimshaw, T.W.; Little, W.M.

1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Assessment of fluidized-bed-combustion solid wastes for land disposal. Volume 6. Appendix H. Final report, June 1980-June 1984  

SciTech Connect

This report, Appendix H, gives results of: (1) an analysis of representative samples of fluidized-bed-combustion (FBC) wastes, (2) an assessment of the characteristics of leachates generated from the wastes underlaboratory and field (landfill) conditions, (3) a characterization of the attenuation of the leachates by earth materials that are typical of disposal settings, (4) development of a way to predict the leachate generation behavior of FBC wastes under landfill conditions on the basis of laboratory test results by establishing a rigorous statistical relationship between the laboratory and field-leaching results, and (5) assessment of the compatibility of commonly used landfill-liner materials with FBC waste leachates. FBC is an emerging energy technology that holds promise for both high efficiency of energy conversion and minimization of adverse air-quality impacts. A major advantage of FBC is that high-sulfur coal can be burned without the use of flue-gas desulfurization equipment to meet air-quality standards. The solid residues that are generated in an FBC unit are usually larger in volume and have different properties than the typical bottom ash from a conventional boiler.

Williamson, H.J.; Heinrich, D.L.; Grimshaw, T.W.

1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Assessment of fluidized-bed-combustion solid wastes for land disposal. Volume 7. Appendix I. Final report, June 1980-June 1984  

SciTech Connect

This report, Appendix 1, gives results of: (1) an analysis of representative samples of fluidized-bed-combustion (FBC) wastes, (2) an assessment of the characteristics of leachates generated from the wastes under laboratory and field (landfill) conditions, (3) a characterization of the attenuation of the leachates by earth materials that are typical of disposal settings, (4) development of a way to predict the leachate generation behavior of FBC wastes under landfill conditions on the basis of laboratory test results by establishing a rigorous statistical relationship between the laboratory and field-leaching results, and (5) assessment of the compatibility of commonly used landfill-liner materials with FBC waste leachates. FBC is an emerging energy technology that holds promise for both high efficiency of energy conversion and minimization of adverse air-quality impacts. A major advantage of FBC is that high-sulfur coal can be burned without the use of flue-gas desulfurization equipment to meet air-quality standards. The solid residues that are generated in an FBC unit are usually larger in volume and have different properties than the typical bottom ash from a conventional boiler.

Eklund, A.G.; Grimshaw, T.W.; Minear, R.A.

1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Assessment of fluidized-bed-combustion solid wastes for land disposal. Volume 2. Appendices A through C. Final report, June 1980-June 1984  

SciTech Connect

This report Appendices A through C, gives results of: (1) an analysis of representative samples of fluidized-bed-combustion (FBC) wastes, (2) an assessment of the characteristics of leachates generated from the wastes under laboratory and field (landfill) conditions, (3) a characterization of the attenuation of the leachates by earth materials that are typical of disposal settings, (4) development of a way to predict the leachate generation behavior of FBC wastes under landfill conditions on the basis of laboratory test results by establishing a rigorous statistical relationship between the laboratory and field-leaching results, and (5) assessment of the compatibility of commonly used landfill-liner materials with FBC waste leachates. FBC is an emerging energy technology that holds promise for both high efficiency of energy conversion and minimization of adverse air-quality impacts. A major advantage of FBC is that high-sulfur coal can be burned without the use of flue-gas desulfurization equipment to meet air-quality standards. The solid residues that are generated in an FBC unit are usually larger in volume and have different properties than the typical bottom ash from a conventional boiler.

Little, W.M.; Gibson, T.S.; Grimshaw, T.W.; Eklund, A.G.

1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Assessment of fluidized-bed-combustion solid wastes for land disposal. Volume 1. Final report. Report for June 1980-June 1984  

SciTech Connect

This report, including 10 appendices, gives results of: (1) an analysis of representative samples of fluidized-bed-combustion (FBC) wastes, (2) an assessment of the characteristics of leachates generated from the wastes under laboratory and field (landfill) conditions, (3) a characterization of the attenuation of the leachates by earth materials that are typical of disposal settings, (4) development of a way to predict the leachate generation behavior of FBC wastes under landfill conditions on the basis of laboratory test results by establishing a rigorous statistical relationship between the laboratory and field-leaching results, and (5) assessment of the compatibility of commonly used landfill-liner materials with FBC waste leachates. FBC is an emerging energy technology that holds promise for both high efficiency of energy conversion and minimization of adverse air-quality impacts. A major advantage of FBC is that high-sulfur coal can be burned without the use of flue-gas desulfurization equipment to meet air-quality standards. The solid residues that are generated in an FBC unit are usually larger in volume and have different properties than the typical bottom ash from a conventional boiler.

Grimshaw, T.W.; Minear, R.A.; Eklund, A.G.; Little, W.M.; Dunn, J.E.

1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Assessment of fluidized-bed-combustion solid wastes for land disposal. Volume 4. Appendix F. Final report, June 1980-June 1984  

SciTech Connect

This report, Appendix F, gives results of: (1) an analysis of representative samples of fluidized-bed-combustion (FBC) wastes, (2) an assessment of the characteristics of leachates generated from the wastes under laboratory and field (landfill) conditions, (3) a characterization of the attenuation of the leachates by earth materials that are typical of disposal settings, (4) development of a way to predict the leachate generation behavior of FBC wastes under landfill conditions on the basis of laboratory test results by establishing a rigorous statistical relationship between the laboratory and field-leaching results, and (5) assessment of the compatibility of commonly used landfill-liner materials with FBC waste leachates. FBC is an emerging energy technology that holds promise for both high efficiency of energy conversion and minimization of adverse air-quality impacts. A major advantage of FBC is that high-sulfur coal can be burned without the use of flue-gas desulfurization equipment to meet air-quality standards. The solid residues that are generated in an FBC unit are usually larger in volume and have different properties than the typical bottom ash from a conventional boiler.

Eklund, A.G.; Grimshaw, T.W.

1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Assessment of fluidized-bed-combustion solid wastes for land disposal. Volume 8. Appendix J. Final report, June 1980-June 1984  

SciTech Connect

This report, Appendix J, gives results of: (1) an analysis of representative samples of fluidized-bed-combustion (FBC) wastes, (2) an assessment of the characteristics of leachates generated from the wastes under laboratory and field (landfill) conditions, (3) a characterization of the attenuation of the leachates by earth materials that are typical of disposal settings, (4) development of a way to predict the leachate generation behavior of FBC wastes under landfill conditions on the basis of laboratory test results by establishing a rigorous statistical relationship between the laboratory and field-leaching results, and (5) assessment of the compatibility of commonly used landfill-liner materials with FBC waste leachates. FBC is an emerging energy technology that holds promise for both high efficiency of energy conversion and minimization of adverse air-quality impacts. A major advantage of FBC is that high-sulfur coal can be burned without the use of flue-gas desulfurization equipment to meet air-quality standards. The solid residues that are generated in an FBC unit are usually larger in volume and have different properties than the typical bottom ash from a conventional boiler.

Williamson, H.J.; South, R.C.; Grimshaw, T.W.

1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Definitive design report: Design report project W-025, Radioactive Mixed Waste (RMW) Land Disposal Facility NON-DRAG-OFF. Revision 1, Volume 1 and 2  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to describe the definitive design of the Radioactive Mixed Waste (RMW) Non-Drag-Off disposal facility, Project W-025. This report presents a n of the major landfill design features and a discussion of how each of the criteria is addressed in the design. The appendices include laboratory test results, design drawings, and individual analyses that were conducted in support of the design. Revision 1 of this document incorporates design changes resulting from an increase in the required operating life of the W-025 landfill from 2 to 20 years. The rationale for these design changes is described in Golder Associates Inc. 1991a. These changes include (1) adding a 1.5-foot-thick layer of compacted admix directory-under the primary FML on the floor of the landfill to mitigate the effects of possible stress cracking in the primary flexible membrane liner (FML), and (2) increasing the operations layer thickness from two to three feet over the entire landfill area, to provide additional protection for the secondary admix layer against mechanical damage and the effects of freezing and desiccation. The design of the W-025 Landfill has also been modified in response to the results of the EPA Method 9090 chemical compatibility testing program (Golder Associates Inc. 1991b and 1991c), which was completed after the original design was prepared. This program consisted of testing geosynthetic materials and soil/bentonite admix with synthetic leachate having the composition expected during the life of the W-025 Landfill., The results of this program indicated that the polyester geotextile originally specified for the landfill might be susceptible to deterioration. On this basis, polypropylene geotextiles were substituted as a more chemically-resistant alternative. In addition, the percentage of bentonite in the admix was increased to provide sufficiently low permeability to the expected leachate.

Roscha, V.

1994-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

52

Tritium waste disposal technology in the US  

SciTech Connect

Tritium waste disposal methods in the US range from disposal of low specific activity waste along with other low-level waste in shallow land burial facilities, to disposal of kilocurie amounts in specially designed triple containers in 65' deep augered holes located in an aird region of the US. Total estimated curies disposed of are 500,000 in commercial burial sites and 10 million curies in defense related sites. At three disposal sites in humid areas, tritium has migrated into the ground water, and at one arid site tritium vapor has been detected emerging from the soil above the disposal area. Leaching tests on tritium containing waste show that tritium in the form of HTO leaches readily from most waste forms, but that leaching rates of tritiated water into polymer impregnated concrete are reduced by as much as a factor of ten. Tests on improved tritium containment are ongoing. Disposal costs for tritium waste are 7 to 10 dollars per cubic foot for shallow land burial of low specific activity tritium waste, and 10 to 20 dollars per cubic foot for disposal of high specific activity waste. The cost of packaging the high specific activity waste is 150 to 300 dollars per cubic foot. 18 references.

Albenesius, E.L.; Towler, O.A.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

20 - Nuclear Waste Disposal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Disposal options are outlined, including geological and near-surface disposal. Alternative disposal options are briefly considered. The multi-barrier system is described, including the natural geological barrier and the engineered barrier system. The roles of both EBS and NGB are discussed. Worldwide disposal experience is reviewed and acceptance criteria for disposal are analysed.

M.I. Ojovan; W.E. Lee

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Environmental regulations and technology: use and disposal of municipal waste-water sludge  

SciTech Connect

The document describes the five major sludge use/disposal options currently available--land application, distribution and marketing of sludge products, land-filling, incineration, and ocean disposal--and factors influencing their selection and implementation. It also provides an initial framework for evaluating sludge use/disposal alternatives, and describes accepted and proven use/disposal technologies and Federal regulations pertinent to sludge management.

Not Available

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Shallow Land Disposal Area Public Meeting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

RemedialSite Designation Preliminary Assessment Site Inspection Remedial Investigation Feasibility Study Proposed Plan Record of Decision Project We are here RemedialRemedial A removal action may be initiated

US Army Corps of Engineers

56

Parks Township Shallow Land Disposal Area  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the trenches will also be removed. Uranium, thorium, americium and plutonium contaminated waste has been- ment. Americium and plutonium, whose presence is attributed to storage of equipment used

US Army Corps of Engineers

57

Burning Chemical Waste Disposal Site: Investigation, Assessment and Rehabilitation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A series of underground fires on a site previously used for disposal of chemical wastes from the nylon industry was causing a nuisance and restricting the commercial development of the site and adjacent areas....

D. L. Barry; J. M. Campbell; E. H. Jones

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Dynamics of particle clouds in ambient currents with application to open-water sediment disposal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Open-water sediment disposal is used in many applications around the world, including land reclamation, dredging, and contaminated sediment isolation. Timely examples include the land reclamation campaign currently underway ...

Gensheimer, Robert James, III

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Evaluation of isotope migration - land burial. Water chemistry at commercially operated low-level radioactive waste disposal sites. Status report, October 1979-September 1980. [Maxey Flats, KY and Barnwell, SC  

SciTech Connect

A field and laboratory program was initiated to study the existing commercial low-level radioactive waste disposal sites. This investigation will provide source term data for radionuclides and other solutes in trench waters at the sites and will describe the physical, chemical, and biological properties of the geochemical system that control the movement of radionuclides. In the past year, the disposal sites at Maxey Flats, Kentucky, and Barnwell, South Carolina, were sampled, Maxey Flats for the fourth time, Barnwell for the second. Results of trench water inorganic, organic, and radiochemical analyses are similar to those reported for previous samplings. No overall systematic changes in any disposal trenches were observed during the relatively brief sampling interval. However, changes in some radionuclide and inorganic components were observed in several trenches. Tritium was the most abundant of the radionuclides and was found in all the trench waters. Analyses of water collected from a series of experimental interceptor trenches at Maxey Flats showed them to have a chemical composition intermediate between disposal trench water and local groundwater. Preliminary results of batch sorption tests using site-specific materials from the Barnwell disposal site are reported. Tritium content as a function of depth has been determined in four sediment cores collected from beneath the disposal trenches at the Barnwell facility. Gel filtration chromatography experiments using trench waters from the West Valley, New York, disposal site showed an association between /sup 137/Cs and a portion of the trench water dissolved organic content (DOC). Experiments with spiked trench water (/sup 137/Cs and EDTA) indicated that the organic fraction referred to above was not EDTA.

Czyscinski, K.S.; Weiss, A.J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Salt caverns for oil field waste disposal.  

SciTech Connect

Salt caverns used for oil field waste disposal are created in salt formations by solution mining. When created, caverns are filled with brine. Wastes are introduced into the cavern by pumping them under low pressure. Each barrel of waste injected to the cavern displaces a barrel of brine to the surface. The brine is either used for drilling mud or is disposed of in an injection well. Figure 8 shows an injection pump used at disposal cavern facilities in west Texas. Several types of oil field waste may be pumped into caverns for disposal. These include drilling muds, drill cuttings, produced sands, tank bottoms, contaminated soil, and completion and stimulation wastes. Waste blending facilities are constructed at the site of cavern disposal to mix the waste into a brine solution prior to injection. Overall advantages of salt cavern disposal include a medium price range for disposal cost, large capacity and availability of salt caverns, limited surface land requirement, increased safety, and ease of establishment of individual state regulations.

Veil, J.; Ford, J.; Rawn-Schatzinger, V.; Environmental Assessment; RMC, Consultants, Inc.

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land disposal restrictions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Waste Disposal | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Disposal Waste Disposal Trucks transport debris from Oak Ridges cleanup sites to the onsite CERCLA disposal area, the Environmental Management Waste Management Facility....

62

slc_disposal.cdr  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Disposal Disposal Site This fact sheet provides information about the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 Title I disposal site at Salt Lake City, Utah. This site is managed by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. Salt Lake City, Utah, Disposal Site ENERGY Office of Legacy Management U.S. DEPARTMENT OF Site Description and History Regulatory Setting The Salt Lake Disposal Site is located approximately 81 miles west of Salt Lake City and 2.5 miles south of Interstate 80 on the eastern edge of the Great Salt Lake Desert. The disposal cell is adjacent to Energy Solutions, Inc., a commercial low-level radioactive materials disposal site. The surrounding area is sparsely populated, and the nearest residences are at least 15 miles from the site. Vegetation in the area is sparse and typical of semiarid low shrubland. The disposal cell encapsulates about

63

Waste Disposal (Illinois)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This article lays an outline of waste disposal regulations, permits and fees, hazardous waste management and underground storage tank requirements.

64

Risk assessment of nonhazardous oil-field waste disposal in salt caverns.  

SciTech Connect

Salt caverns can be formed in underground salt formations incidentally as a result of mining or intentionally to create underground chambers for product storage or waste disposal. For more than 50 years, salt caverns have been used to store hydrocarbon products. Recently, concerns over the costs and environmental effects of land disposal and incineration have sparked interest in using salt caverns for waste disposal. Countries using or considering using salt caverns for waste disposal include Canada (oil-production wastes), Mexico (purged sulfates from salt evaporators), Germany (contaminated soils and ashes), the United Kingdom (organic residues), and the Netherlands (brine purification wastes). In the US, industry and the regulatory community are pursuing the use of salt caverns for disposal of oil-field wastes. In 1988, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued a regulatory determination exempting wastes generated during oil and gas exploration and production (oil-field wastes) from federal hazardous waste regulations--even though such wastes may contain hazardous constituents. At the same time, EPA urged states to tighten their oil-field waste management regulations. The resulting restrictions have generated industry interest in the use of salt caverns for potentially economical and environmentally safe oil-field waste disposal. Before the practice can be implemented commercially, however, regulators need assurance that disposing of oil-field wastes in salt caverns is technically and legally feasible and that potential health effects associated with the practice are acceptable. In 1996, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) conducted a preliminary technical and legal evaluation of disposing of nonhazardous oil-field wastes (NOW) into salt caverns. It investigated regulatory issues; the types of oil-field wastes suitable for cavern disposal; cavern design and location considerations; and disposal operations, closure and remediation issues. It determined that if caverns are sited and designed well, operated carefully, closed properly, and monitored routinely, they could, from technical and legal perspectives, be suitable for disposing of oil-field wastes. On the basis of these findings, ANL subsequently conducted a preliminary risk assessment on the possibility that adverse human health effects (carcinogenic and noncarcinogenic) could result from exposure to contaminants released from the NOW disposed of in salt caverns. The methodology for the risk assessment included the following steps: identifying potential contaminants of concern; determining how humans could be exposed to these contaminants; assessing contaminant toxicities; estimating contaminant intakes; and estimating human cancer and noncancer risks. To estimate exposure routes and pathways, four postclosure cavern release scenarios were assessed. These were inadvertent cavern intrusion, failure of the cavern seal, failure of the cavern through cracks, failure of the cavern through leaky interbeds, and partial collapse of the cavern roof. Assuming a single, generic, salt cavern and generic oil-field wastes, potential human health effects associated with constituent hazardous substances (arsenic, benzene, cadmium, and chromium) were assessed under each of these scenarios. Preliminary results provided excess cancer risk and hazard index (for noncancer health effects) estimates that were well within the EPA target range for acceptable exposure risk levels. These results lead to the preliminary conclusion that from a human health perspective, salt caverns can provide an acceptable disposal method for nonhazardous oil-field wastes.

Elcock, D.

1998-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

65

Summary - Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility (ICDF) at Idaho National Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

INL, Idaho INL, Idaho EM Project: Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility ETR Report Date: December 2007 ETR-10 United States Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) External Technical Review of Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility (ICDF) At Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Why DOE-EM Did This Review The Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility (ICDF) is a land disposal facility that is used to dispose of LLW and MLW generated from remedial activities at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). Components of the ICDF include a landfill that is used for disposal of solid waste, an evaporation pond that is used to manage leachate from the landfill and other aqueous wastes (8.3 million L capacity), and a staging and treatment facility. The ICDF is located near the southwest

66

Material Disposal Areas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Material Disposal Areas Material Disposal Areas Material Disposal Areas Material Disposal Areas, also known as MDAs, are sites where material was disposed of below the ground surface in excavated pits, trenches, or shafts. Contact Environmental Communication & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216 Email Material Disposal Areas at LANL The following are descriptions and status updates of each MDA at LANL. To view a current fact sheet on the MDAs, click on LA-UR-13-25837 (pdf). MDA A MDA A is a Hazard Category 2 nuclear facility comprised of a 1.25-acre, fenced, and radiologically controlled area situated on the eastern end of Delta Prime Mesa. Delta Prime Mesa is bounded by Delta Prime Canyon to the north and Los Alamos Canyon to the south.

67

Analysis of the technical capabilities of DOE sites for disposal of residuals from the treatment of mixed low-level waste  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (DOE) has stored or expects to generate over the next five years more than 130,000 m{sup 3} of mixed low-level waste (MLLW). Before disposal, MLLW is usually treated to comply with the land disposal restrictions of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. Depending on the type of treatment, the original volume of MLLW and the radionuclide concentrations in the waste streams may change. These changes must be taken into account in determining the necessary disposal capacity at a site. Treatment may remove the characteristic in some waste that caused it to be classified as mixed. Treatment of some waste may, by reduction of the mass, increase the concentrations of some transuranic radionuclides sufficiently so that it becomes transuranic waste. In this report, the DOE MLLW streams were analyzed to determine after-treatment volumes and radionuclide concentrations. The waste streams were reclassified as residual MLLW or low-level or transuranic waste resulting from treatment. The volume analysis indicated that about 89,000 m{sup 3} of waste will require disposal as residual MLLW. Fifteen DOE sites were then evaluated to determine their capabilities for hosting disposal facilities for some or all of the residual MLLW. Waste streams associated with about 90% of the total residual MLLW volume are likely to present no significant issues for disposal and require little additional analysis. Future studies should focus on the remaining waste streams that are potentially problematic by examining site-specific waste acceptance criteria, alternative treatment processes, alternative waste forms for disposal, and pending changes in regulatory requirements.

Waters, R.D.; Gruebel, M.M.; Langkopf, B.S.; Kuehne, P.B.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Predictive calculations to assess the long-term effect of cementitious materials on the pH and solubility of uranium(VI) in a shallow land disposal environment  

SciTech Connect

One proposed method of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) disposal is to mix the radioactive waste streams with cement, place the mixture in steel barrels, and dispose of the barrels in near-surface unsaturated sediments. Cement or concrete is frequently used in burial grounds, because cement porewaters are buffered at high pH values and lanthanides and actinides; are very insoluble in highly alkaline environments. Therefore, leaching of these contaminants from the combined cement/low-level radioactive waste streams will at least initially be retarded. The calculations performed in this study demonstrate that the pH of cement porewaters will be maintained at a value greater than 10 for 10,000 years under Hanford specific hydrogeochemical conditions. Ten thousand years is the period generally studied in longterm performance assessments per regulatory guidance. The concentrations of dissolved hexavalent uranium [U(VI)], the valence form of dissolved U usually present in oxidizing surface and groundwaters, are also constrained by the high pH and predicted solution compositions over the 10,000-year period, which is favorable from a long-term performance perspective.

Criscenti, L.J.; Serne, R.J.; Krupka, K.M. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Wood, M.I. [Westinghouse Hanford Company, Richland, WA (United States)

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

The disposal of orphan wastes using the greater confinement disposal concept  

SciTech Connect

In the United States, radioactive wastes are conventionally classified as high-level wastes, transuranic wastes, or low-level wastes. Each of these types of wastes, by law, has a ``home`` for their final disposal; i.e., high-level wastes are destined for disposal at the proposed repository at Yucca Mountain, transuranic waste for the proposed Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, and low-level waste for shallow-land disposal sites. However, there are some radioactive wastes within the United States Department of Energy (DOE) complex that do not meet the criteria established for disposal of either high-level waste, transuranic waste, or low-level waste. The former are called ``special-case`` or ``orphan`` wastes. This paper describes an ongoing project sponsored by the DOE`s Nevada Operations Office for the disposal of orphan wastes at the Radioactive Waste Management Site at Area 5 of the Nevada Test Site using the greater confinement disposal (GCD) concept. The objectives of the GCD project are to evaluate the safety of the site for disposal of orphan wastes by assessing compliance with pertinent regulations through performance assessment, and to examine the feasibility of this disposal concept as a cost-effective, safe alternative for management of orphan wastes within the DOE complex. Decisions on the use of GCD or other alternate disposal concepts for orphan wastes can be expected to be addressed in a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement being prepared by DOE. The ultimate decision to use GCD will require a Record of Decision through the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) process. 20 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

Bonano, E.J.; Chu, M.S.Y.; Price, L.L.; Conrad, S.H. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (USA); Dickman, P.T. [Department of Energy, Las Vegas, NV (USA). Nevada Operations Office

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

2009 Performance Assessment for the Saltstone Disposal Facility |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Performance Assessment for the Saltstone Disposal Facility Performance Assessment for the Saltstone Disposal Facility 2009 Performance Assessment for the Saltstone Disposal Facility This Performance Assessment (PA) for the Savannah River Site (SRS) was prepared to support the operation and eventual closure of the Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF). This PA was prepared to demonstrate compliance with the pertinent requirements of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Order 435.1, Change 1, Radioactive Waste Management, Chapter IV, and Title 10, of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 61, Licensing Requirements for Land Disposal of Radioactive Waste, Subpart C as required by the Ronald W. Reagan National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) for Fiscal Year 2005, Section 3116. [DOE O 435.1-1, 10 CFR 61, NDAA_3116]

71

Sludge utilization and disposal in Virginia  

SciTech Connect

This state-of-the-art study was initiated to determine the problem issues, present knowledge about the issues, and additional research needs in the area of land disposal of municipal sewage sludge. Three questionnaires were developed to survey technically oriented professional, county extension agents, and Virginia NPDES permit holders to obtain these groups' views on problems and deficiencies needing further investigation. Another phase of the study was to conduct an extensive review of the literature on the subject of land application of sewage sludge. Listings of pertinent literature relating to land application with specific interest toward potentially toxic metals, pathogens, nitrogen, and phosphorus were obtained and reviewed. Additional research is needed in the following areas: a method that accurately estimates metal availability within the soil; a method to determine the potential for a disease outbreak from controlled application of treated municipal sewage sludge; a more precise method of N-balancing; the impact of P loading on water quality.

Martens, D.C.; McCart, G.D.; Reneau, R.B. Jr; Simpson, T.W.; Ban-Kiat, T.

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

An Effective Waste Management Process for Segregation and Disposal of Legacy Mixed Waste at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM) is a research and development facility that generates many highly diverse, low-volume mixed waste streams. Under the Federal Facility Compliance Act, SNL/NM must treat its mixed waste in storage to meet the Land Disposal Restrictions treatment standards. Since 1989, approximately 70 cubic meters (2500 cubic feet) of heterogeneous, poorly characterized and inventoried mixed waste was placed in storage that could not be treated as specified in the SNL/NM Site Treatment Plan. A process was created to sort the legacy waste into sixteen well- defined, properly characterized, and precisely inventoried mixed waste streams (Treatability Groups) and two low-level waste streams ready for treatment or disposal. From June 1995 through September 1996, the entire volume of this stored mixed waste was sorted and inventoried through this process. This process was planned to meet the technical requirements of the sorting operation and to identify and address the hazards this operation presented. The operations were routinely adapted to safely and efficiently handle a variety of waste matrices, hazards, and radiological conditions. This flexibility was accomplished through administrative and physical controls integrated into the sorting operations. Many Department of Energy facilities are currently facing the prospect of sorting, characterizing, and treating a large inventory of mixed waste. The process described in this paper is a proven method for preparing a diverse, heterogeneous mixed waste volume into segregated, characterized, inventoried, and documented waste streams ready for treatment or disposal.

Hallman, Anne K. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Meyer, Dann [IT Corporation, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Rellergert, Carla A. [Roy F. Weston, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Schriner, Joseph A. [Automated Solutions of Albuquerque, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

An effective waste management process for segregation and disposal of legacy mixed waste at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM) is a research and development facility that generates many highly diverse, low-volume mixed waste streams. Under the Federal Facility Compliance Act, SNL/NM must treat its mixed waste in storage to meet the Land Disposal Restrictions treatment standards. Since 1989, approximately 70 cubic meters (2,500 cubic feet) of heterogeneous, poorly characterized and inventoried mixed waste was placed in storage that could not be treated as specified in the SNL/NM Site Treatment Plan. A process was created to sort the legacy waste into sixteen well-defined, properly characterized, and accurately inventoried mixed waste streams (Treatability Groups) and two low-level waste streams ready for treatment or disposal. From June 1995 through September 1996, the entire volume of this stored mixed waste was sorted and inventoried. This process was planned to meet the technical requirements of the sorting operation and to identify and address the hazards this operation presented. The operations were routinely adapted to safely and efficiently handle a variety of waste matrices, hazards, and radiological conditions. This flexibility was accomplished through administrative and physical controls integrated into the sorting operations. Many Department of Energy facilities are currently facing the prospect of sorting, characterizing, and treating a large inventory of mixed waste. The process described in this report is a proven method for preparing a diverse, heterogeneous mixed waste volume into segregated, characterized, inventoried, and documented waste streams ready for treatment or disposal.

Hallman, A.K. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Meyer, D. [IT Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Rellergert, C.A. [Roy F. Weston, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Schriner, J.A. [Automated Solutions of Albuquerque, Inc., NM (United States)

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Drilling Waste Management Fact Sheet: Land Application  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Land Application Land Application Fact Sheet - Land Application The objective of applying drilling wastes to the land is to allow the soil's naturally occurring microbial population to metabolize, transform, and assimilate waste constituents in place. Land application is a form of bioremediation, and is important enough to be described in its own fact sheet; other forms of bioremediation are described in a separate fact sheet. Several terms are used to describe this waste management approach, which can be considered both treatment and disposal. In general, land farming refers to the repeated application of wastes to the soil surface, whereas land spreading and land treatment are often used interchangeably to describe the one-time application of wastes to the soil surface. Some practitioners do not follow the same terminology convention, and may interchange all three terms. Readers should focus on the technologies rather than on the specific names given to each process.

75

College of Agricultural Sciences Agricultural Research and Cooperative Extension Land Application of Sewage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

College of Agricultural Sciences · Agricultural Research and Cooperative Extension Land Application of Sewage Sludge in Pennsylvania Effects of Biosolids on Soil and Crop Quality ENVIRONME NTAL· ISSUES land application of biosolids represents a beneficial reuse alternative to landfill disposal

Kaye, Jason P.

76

Municipal Sludge disposal economics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Municipal Sludge disposal economics ... Atmospheric emissions of elements on particles from the Parkway sewage-sludge incinerator ... Atmospheric emissions of elements on particles from the Parkway sewage-sludge incinerator ...

Jerry Jones; David Bomberger, Jr.; F Lewis; Joel Jacknow

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Solid waste disposal options: an optimum disposal model for the management of municipal solid waste  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and compostable material was generally burned in backyards. In 1970, the Clean Air Act was passed restricting the burning of leaves and other yard waste. ' These wastes were then disposed in landfills. As landfills reached capacity, commu- nities composted... separation pro- grams because of their "throw-away" mentality. " ~ln in r ttgtt Incineration is the controlled burning of the combustible fraction of solid waste. The first electrical generating station in the United States that was fueled by solid waste...

Haney, Brenda Ann

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

78

Hazardous Waste Disposal Sites (Iowa)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These sections contain information on fees and monitoring relevant to operators of hazardous waste disposal sites.

79

Alternatives to shallow land burial  

SciTech Connect

During FY79 and FY80 the Los Alamos National Laboratory and its contractors performed a preliminary assessment of several alternatives to shallow land burial of low-level waste, including deeper burial, mined cavities, specially engineered storage buildings, well injection of liquid waste, and seabed disposal. Only deeper burial and mined cavities seem acceptable as near-term alternatives. A waste management program using a combination of disposal alternatives is recommended. Research needed to implement the deeper burial and mined cavity options is identified.

Burton, B.W.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Long-Term Surveillance Plan for the Collins Ranch Disposal Site...  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

whether the land and interests are owned by the United States and details h o w long-term care of the disposal site will be carried out. It is based on the DOE's Guidance for...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land disposal restrictions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Lands & Community  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

& Community Transmission Tower Software Public Comments Lands & Community Bonneville Power Administration owns and maintains hundreds of properties in Oregon, Washington,...

82

Use and disposal of waste-water sludge in Illinois. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) proposed Part 503 Rules on sludge were first published in February 1989. Part 503 proposed sludge regulations address five categories of sludge use or disposal: land application, distribution and marketing, monofills, surface disposal sites, and incineration. The report on sludge management in Illinois examines the probable effects that the proposed federal rules on use and disposal of sewage sludge will have on current practices by Illinois publicly owned treatment works outside the City of Chicago.

John, S.F.; Kane, D.N.; Hinesly, T.D.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Hanford Landfill Reaches 15 Million Tons Disposed - Waste Disposal Mark  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Landfill Reaches 15 Million Tons Disposed - Waste Disposal Landfill Reaches 15 Million Tons Disposed - Waste Disposal Mark Shows Success Cleaning Up River Corridor Hanford Landfill Reaches 15 Million Tons Disposed - Waste Disposal Mark Shows Success Cleaning Up River Corridor July 9, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Cameron Hardy, DOE, (509) 376-5365 Cameron.Hardy@rl.doe.gov Mark McKenna, WCH, (509) 372-9032 media@wch-rcc.com RICHLAND, Wash. - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractors have disposed of 15 million tons of contaminated material at the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF) since the facility began operations in 1996. Removing contaminated material and providing for its safe disposal prevents contaminants from reaching the groundwater and the Columbia River. ERDF receives contaminated soil, demolition debris, and solid waste from

84

disposal_cell.cdr  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

With the With the April 24, 1997, ceremonial ground-breaking for disposal facility construction, the Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project (WSSRAP) moved into the final stage of cleanup, treatment, and disposal of uranium- processing wastes. The cleanup of the former uranium- refining plant consisted of three primary operations: Demolition and removal of remaining concrete pads and foundations that supported the 44 structures and buildings on site Treatment of selected wastes Permanent encapsulation of treated and untreated waste in an onsite engineered disposal facility In September l993, a Record of Decision (ROD) was signed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), with concurrence by the Missouri Department of Natural

85

Deed Restrictions for Solar  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This report summarizes the efforts made to address Task 3 - Examples of Residential Deed Restrictions Allowing Solar. The focus of the study is on communities surrounding Houston, Texas.

86

22 - Radioactive waste disposal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Publisher Summary This chapter discusses the disposal of radioactive wastes that arise from a great variety of sources, including the nuclear fuel cycle, beneficial uses of isotopes, and radiation by institutions. Spent fuel contains uranium, plutonium, and highly radioactive fission products. The spent fuel is accumulating, awaiting the development of a high-level waste repository. It is anticipated that a multi-barrier system involving packaging and geologic media will provide protection of the public over the centuries. The favored method of disposal is in a mined cavity deep underground. In some countries, reprocessing the fuel assemblies permits recycling of materials and disposal of smaller volumes of solidified waste. Transportation of wastes is done by casks and containers designed to withstand severe accidents. Low-level wastes come from research and medical procedures and from a variety of activation and fission sources at a reactor site. They generally can be given near-surface burial. Isotopes of special interest are cobalt-60 and cesium-137. Transuranic wastes are being disposed of in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Decommissioning of reactors in the future will contribute a great deal of low-level radioactive waste.

Raymond L. Murray

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Radioactive waste disposal package  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A radioactive waste disposal package comprising a canister for containing vitrified radioactive waste material and a sealed outer shell encapsulating the canister. A solid block of filler material is supported in said shell and convertible into a liquid state for flow into the space between the canister and outer shell and subsequently hardened to form a solid, impervious layer occupying such space.

Lampe, Robert F. (Bethel Park, PA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Waste disposal package  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This is a claim for a waste disposal package including an inner or primary canister for containing hazardous and/or radioactive wastes. The primary canister is encapsulated by an outer or secondary barrier formed of a porous ceramic material to control ingress of water to the canister and the release rate of wastes upon breach on the canister. 4 figs.

Smith, M.J.

1985-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

89

Nuclear Waste Disposal Plan Drafted  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nuclear Waste Disposal Plan Drafted ... Of all the issues haunting nuclear power plants, that of disposing of the radioactive wastes and spent nuclear fuel they generate has been the most vexing. ...

1984-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

90

Technical support document for the surface disposal of sewage sludge. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The document provides the technical background and justification for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) final regulation (40 CFR Part 503) covering the surface disposal of sewage sludge. The document summarizes current practices in land application and presents data supporting the risk assessment methodology used to derive human health and environmental risk-based limits for contaminants in sewage sludge placed on surface disposal sites. The management practices associated with surface disposal are outlined and the different pathways by which contaminants reach highly-exposed individuals (HEIs) through surface disposal are discussed.

Not Available

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Disposable Electrochemical Immunosensor Diagnosis Device Based...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Disposable Electrochemical Immunosensor Diagnosis Device Based on Nanoparticle Probe and Immunochromatographic Strip. Disposable Electrochemical Immunosensor Diagnosis Device Based...

92

Land Division: Uniform Environmental Covenants Program (Alabama) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Land Division: Uniform Environmental Covenants Program (Alabama) Land Division: Uniform Environmental Covenants Program (Alabama) Land Division: Uniform Environmental Covenants Program (Alabama) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Industrial Local Government Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Alabama Program Type Environmental Regulations These regulations apply to environmental covenants arising from environmental response projects conducted under any of the following Alabama Department of Environmental Management programs: Scrap tire remediation sites, Soil and groundwater remediation sites, Leaking storage tank remediation sites, Solid waste disposal sites, Hazardous waste

93

Radioactive waste material disposal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is a process for direct conversion of solid radioactive waste, particularly spent nuclear fuel and its cladding, if any, into a solidified waste glass. A sacrificial metal oxide, dissolved in a glass bath, is used to oxidize elemental metal and any carbon values present in the waste as they are fed to the bath. Two different modes of operation are possible, depending on the sacrificial metal oxide employed. In the first mode, a regenerable sacrificial oxide, e.g., PbO, is employed, while the second mode features use of disposable oxides such as ferric oxide. 3 figs.

Forsberg, C.W.; Beahm, E.C.; Parker, G.W.

1995-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

94

Radioactive waste material disposal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is a process for direct conversion of solid radioactive waste, particularly spent nuclear fuel and its cladding, if any, into a solidified waste glass. A sacrificial metal oxide, dissolved in a glass bath, is used to oxidize elemental metal and any carbon values present in the waste as they are fed to the bath. Two different modes of operation are possible, depending on the sacrificial metal oxide employed. In the first mode, a regenerable sacrificial oxide, e.g., PbO, is employed, while the second mode features use of disposable oxides such as ferric oxide.

Forsberg, Charles W. (155 Newport Dr., Oak Ridge, TN 37830); Beahm, Edward C. (106 Cooper Cir., Oak Ridge, TN 37830); Parker, George W. (321 Dominion Cir., Knoxville, TN 37922)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

The incandescent disposal system  

SciTech Connect

The electrotechnology device being introduced to the low-level waste market is an Incandescent Disposal System (IDS) for volume reduction and vitrification. The process changes the composition of the waste material, usually long molecular chains, into simple molecules and elements. It renders the volume of low-level wastes to a manageable solid vitrified residue, carbon black, and a water discharge. The solid material, which has been vitrified if silica is introduced into the waste stream, is an ideal inert filler. The carbon black is non-leaching and is readily available for vitrification as it comes out of the IDS.

Smith, R.G.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Persistence and Migration of Alkylphenol Ethoxylate Degradation Products Associated with Land-applied Biosolids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) and nonylphenol ethoxylates (NPEOs) enter the environment during the course of land-application of sewage sludge to agricultural lands is a cost-effective alternative for the disposal of sewage sludge (biosolids). Approximately 60% of the 5.6 million tons of sewage sludge generated in the U.S. (2002) is land-applied (National

Newman, Michael C.

97

Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility at Idaho National Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Idaho Operations Idaho Operations Review of the Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility (ICDF) at Idaho National Laboratory By Craig H. Benson, PhD, PE; William H. Albright, PhD; David P. Ray, PE, and John Smegal Sponsored by: The Office of Engineering and Technology (EM-20) 5 December 2007 i TABLE OF CONTENTS 1. INTRODUCTION 1 2. OBJECTIVE AND SCOPE 1 3. LINE OF INQUIRY NO. 1 2 3.1 Containerized Waste 2 3.2 Compacted Mixtures of Soil and Debris 3 3.3 Final Cover Settlement 3 3.4 Leachate Collection System and Leak Detection Zone Monitoring 4 4. LINE OF INQUIRY NO. 2 4 5. LINE OF INQUIRY NO. 3 5 6. SUMMARY OF RECOMMENDATIONS 6 7. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS 6 FIGURES 7 1 1. INTRODUCTION The Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility (ICDF) is a land disposal facility authorized by the US

98

RESTRICTED GRASSMANNIANS SIMON SCOTT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lie groups. Let {ei} i=1 be an orthonormal basis for H and let Hn be the subspace of H spanned by e1RESTRICTED GRASSMANNIANS SIMON SCOTT We begin by reviewing various facts about Grassmannians such p a regularised p- determinant detp : glp - C to be defined (4) det p (1 + T) = det F ((1 + T)e

Bushnell, Colin J.

99

Pioneering Nuclear Waste Disposal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

18 18 19 T he WIPP's first waste receipt, 11 years later than originally planned, was a monumental step forward in the safe management of nuclear waste. Far from ending, however, the WIPP story has really just begun. For the next 35 years, the DOE will face many challenges as it manages a complex shipment schedule from transuranic waste sites across the United States and continues to ensure that the repository complies with all regulatory requirements. The DOE will work to maintain the highest level of safety in waste handling and trans- portation. Coordination with sites Disposal operations require coordination with sites that will ship transuranic waste to the WIPP and include periodic certification of waste characterization and handling practices at those facilities. During the WIPP's

100

Pioneering Nuclear Waste Disposal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 2 3 T he journey to the WIPP began nearly 60 years before the first barrels of transuranic waste arrived at the repository. The United States produced the world's first sig- nificant quantities of transuranic material during the Manhattan Project of World War II in the early 1940s. The government idled its plutonium- producing reactors and warhead manu- facturing plants at the end of the Cold War and scheduled most of them for dismantlement. However, the DOE will generate more transuranic waste as it cleans up these former nuclear weapons facilities. The WIPP is a cor- nerstone of the effort to clean up these facilities by providing a safe repository to isolate transuranic waste in disposal rooms mined out of ancient salt beds, located 2,150 feet below ground. The need for the WIPP

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land disposal restrictions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Assessing risks of contained-in wastes may substitute for treatment, disposal  

SciTech Connect

According to EPA's contained-in rule, soils and groundwater containing RCRA-listed hazardous waste must be managed as hazardous until they no longer contain the waste, no longer exhibit a characteristic, or are delisted. This usually is quite costly. However, for some materials, there is a less expensive alternative -- a risk-based determination that the material is non-hazardous. EPA has not issued clear guidance on how to determine that contained-in materials no longer contain listed wastes. However, the agency says it assumes contained-in materials can be treated to levels that render them non-hazardous. Despite delays in promulgation of EPA's Hazardous Waste Identification Rule, the Agency appears unlikely to provide definitive guidance on managing contained-in materials. Rather, EPA is likely to continue focusing on broader aspects of waste classification. The recent corrective action management unit (CAMU) rule facilitates managing remediation and investigating wastes at RCRA corrective action facilities, and some Superfund sites; RCRA minimum technology requirements and land disposal restrictions do not apply within CAMUs.

Heath, J.S. (Woodward-Clyde Consultants, Denver, CO (United States))

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Laboratory Waste Disposal HAZARDOUS GLASS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Laboratory Waste Disposal HAZARDOUS GLASS Items that could cut or puncture skin or trash- can without any treatment. Hazardous Glass and Plastic: Items that can puncture, cut or scratch if disposed of in normal trash containers. Pasteur pipettes Other pipettes and tips (glass or plastic) Slides and cover

Sheridan, Jennifer

103

CompactCities : analyzing the urban spatial structure in cities with growth restrictions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A compact city form is one that espouses high intensity development within a restrictive geographic area. Its perceived benefits include (a) saving agricultural land (b) inducing shorter commute trips, thus less consumption ...

Oberoi, Amit

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Unreviewed Disposal Question Evaluation: Waste Disposal In Engineered Trench #3  

SciTech Connect

Because Engineered Trench #3 (ET#3) will be placed in the location previously designated for Slit Trench #12 (ST#12), Solid Waste Management (SWM) requested that the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) determine if the ST#12 limits could be employed as surrogate disposal limits for ET#3 operations. SRNL documented in this Unreviewed Disposal Question Evaluation (UDQE) that the use of ST#12 limits as surrogates for the new ET#3 disposal unit will provide reasonable assurance that Department of Energy (DOE) 435.1 performance objectives and measures (USDOE, 1999) will be protected. Therefore new ET#3 inventory limits as determined by a Special Analysis (SA) are not required.

Hamm, L. L.; Smith, F. G. III; Flach, G. P.; Hiergesell, R. A.; Butcher, B. T.

2013-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

105

Long-term surveillance plan for the Collins Ranch Disposal Site, Lakeview, Oregon. Revision 2  

SciTech Connect

This long-term surveillance plan (LTSP) for the Lakeview, Oregon, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project disposal site describes the surveillance activities for the Lakeview (Collins Ranch) disposal cell, which will be referred to as the Collins Ranch disposal cell throughout this document. The US Department of Energy (DOE) will carry out these activities to ensure that the disposal cell continues to function as designed. This final LTSP was prepared as a requirement for acceptance under the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) general license for custody and long-term care of residual radioactive materials. This LTSP documents whether the land and interests are owned by the United States or an Indian tribe, and details how the long-term care of the disposal site will be carried out. It is based on the DOE`s Guidance for Implementing the UMTRA Project Long-term Surveillance Program (DOE, 1992a).

Not Available

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Long-term surveillance plan for the Mexican Hat disposal site, Mexican Hat, Utah  

SciTech Connect

This plan describes the long-term surveillance activities for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project disposal site at Mexican Hat, Utah. The US Department of Energy (DOE) will carry out these activities to ensure that the disposal site continues to function as designed. This long-term surveillance plan (LTSP) was prepared as a requirement for acceptance under the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) general license for custody and long-term care of residual radioactive material (RRM). This LTSPC documents the land ownership interests and details how the long-term care of the disposal site will be accomplished.

NONE

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Recommendation 212: Evaluate additional storage and disposal...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

212: Evaluate additional storage and disposal options Recommendation 212: Evaluate additional storage and disposal options The ORSSAB encourages DOE to evaluate additional storage...

108

Transmittal Memo for Disposal Authorization Statement | Department...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Disposal Facility Federal Review Group (LFRG) has conducted a review of the Savannah River Site (SRS) Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF) 2009 performance assessment (PA) in...

109

ADMINISTRATIVE RECORDS SCHEDULE 4: PROPERTY DISPOSAL RECORDS...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4: PROPERTY DISPOSAL RECORDS (Revision 2) ADMINISTRATIVE RECORDS SCHEDULE 4: PROPERTY DISPOSAL RECORDS (Revision 2) These records pertain to the sales by agencies of real and...

110

PROPERTY DISPOSAL RECORDS | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PROPERTY DISPOSAL RECORDS PROPERTY DISPOSAL RECORDS These records pertain to the sales by agencies of real and personal property surplus to the needs of the Government PROPERTY...

111

Optimization of Waste Disposal - 13338  

SciTech Connect

From 2009 through 2011, remediation of areas of a former fuel cycle facility used for government contract work was conducted. Remediation efforts were focused on building demolition, underground pipeline removal, contaminated soil removal and removal of contaminated sediments from portions of an on-site stream. Prior to conducting the remediation field effort, planning and preparation for remediation (including strategic planning for waste characterization and disposal) was conducted during the design phase. During the remediation field effort, waste characterization and disposal practices were continuously reviewed and refined to optimize waste disposal practices. This paper discusses strategic planning for waste characterization and disposal that was employed in the design phase, and continuously reviewed and refined to optimize efficiency. (authors)

Shephard, E.; Walter, N.; Downey, H. [AMEC E and I, Inc., 511 Congress Street, Suite 200, Portland, ME 04101 (United States)] [AMEC E and I, Inc., 511 Congress Street, Suite 200, Portland, ME 04101 (United States); Collopy, P. [AMEC E and I, Inc., 9210 Sky Park Court, Suite 200, San Diego, CA 92123 (United States)] [AMEC E and I, Inc., 9210 Sky Park Court, Suite 200, San Diego, CA 92123 (United States); Conant, J. [ABB Inc., 5 Waterside Crossing, Windsor, CT 06095 (United States)] [ABB Inc., 5 Waterside Crossing, Windsor, CT 06095 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Land Turtles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Turtles Turtles Nature Bulletin No. 157 May 29, 1948 Forest Preserve District of Cook County William N. Erickson, President Roberts Mann, Supt. of Conservation LAND TURTLES Turtles are four-legged reptiles that originated before the dinosaurs appeared, some 175 million years ago. The distinguishing feature of the turtle is its shell, varying in shape and markings with the different species: an arched upper shell grown fast to the backbone, and a flat lower shell grown fast to the breastbone, the two connected on either side by a bony bridge. In some species, like the box turtles, the lower shell is hinged, enabling the animal to completely conceal its head, tail and limbs by closing the two shells together. Most turtles live in water all or part of the time, but all of them lay their eggs on land, and neither the nest nor the young is attended by the parents. Each species has its own method of nest construction, using the hind legs to dig a hole in the ground, but the eggs are covered and left to be hatched by the heat of the sun. The eggs are relished by many animals such as skunks and squirrels; the young, before their armor hardens, are devoured by birds, mammals, fishes and other turtles.

113

Disposal of soluble salt waste from coal gasification  

SciTech Connect

This paper addresses pollutants in the form of soluble salts and resource recovery in the form of water and land. A design for disposal of soluble salts has been produced. The interactions of its parameters have been shown by a process design study. The design will enable harmonious compliance with United States Public Laws 92-500 and 94-580, relating to water pollution and resource recovery. In the disposal of waste salt solutions, natural water resources need not be contaminated, because an encapsulation technique is available which will immobilize the salts. At the same time it will make useful landforms available, and water as a resource can be recovered. There is a cost minimum when electrodialysis and evaporation are combined, which is not realizable with evaporation alone, unless very low-cost thermal energy is available or unless very high-cost pretreatment for electrodialysis is required. All the processes making up the proposed disposal process are commercially available, although they are nowhere operating commercially as one process. Because of the commercial availability of the processes, the proposed process may be a candidate 'best commercially available treatment' for soluble salt disposal.

McKnight, C.E.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Tank Waste Disposal Program redefinition  

SciTech Connect

The record of decision (ROD) (DOE 1988) on the Final Environmental Impact Statement, Hanford Defense High-Level, Transuranic and Tank Wastes, Hanford Site, Richland Washington identifies the method for disposal of double-shell tank waste and cesium and strontium capsules at the Hanford Site. The ROD also identifies the need for additional evaluations before a final decision is made on the disposal of single-shell tank waste. This document presents the results of systematic evaluation of the present technical circumstances, alternatives, and regulatory requirements in light of the values of the leaders and constitutents of the program. It recommends a three-phased approach for disposing of tank wastes. This approach allows mature technologies to be applied to the treatment of well-understood waste forms in the near term, while providing time for the development and deployment of successively more advanced pretreatment technologies. The advanced technologies will accelerate disposal by reducing the volume of waste to be vitrified. This document also recommends integration of the double-and single-shell tank waste disposal programs, provides a target schedule for implementation of the selected approach, and describes the essential elements of a program to be baselined in 1992.

Grygiel, M.L.; Augustine, C.A.; Cahill, M.A.; Garfield, J.S.; Johnson, M.E.; Kupfer, M.J.; Meyer, G.A.; Roecker, J.H. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Holton, L.K.; Hunter, V.L.; Triplett, M.B. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Chapter 22 - Radioactive Waste Disposal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Publisher Summary This chapter discusses safe disposal of radioactive waste in order to provide safety to workers and the public. Radioactive wastes arise from a great variety of sources, including the nuclear fuel cycle, and from beneficial uses of isotopes and radiation by institutions. Spent fuel contains uranium, plutonium, and highly radioactive fission products. In the United States spent fuel is accumulating, awaiting the development of a high-level waste repository. A multi-barrier system involving packaging and geological media will provide protection of the public over the centuries the waste must be isolated. The favored method of disposal is in a mined cavity deep underground. In other countries, reprocessing the fuel assemblies permits recycling of materials and disposal of smaller volumes of solidified waste. Transportation of wastes is by casks and containers designed to withstand severe accidents. Low-level wastes (LLWs) come from research and medical procedures and from a variety of activation and fission sources at a reactor site. They generally can be given near-surface burial. Isotopes of special interest are cobalt-60 and cesium-137. Transuranic wastes are being disposed of in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Establishment of regional disposal sites by interstate compacts has generally been unsuccessful in the United States. Decontamination of defense sites will be long and costly. Decommissioning of reactors in the future will contribute a great deal of low-level radioactive waste.

Raymond L. Murray

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

A practical profile of integrated safety assessment of near-surface disposal of radwaste at  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Near-surface or shallow land disposal of radioactive waste has been the primary practice at the Pakistan Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology (PINSTECH). The adopted choice of this mode of disposal has been based on a study of the site and the quality and quantity of waste generated at the 5 MW reactor with HEU fuel. Specific measures regarding the radiation safety of the workers and environmental protection have been adopted. The waste disposal operations are conducted to meet local regulatory requirements, IAEA recommendations and internationally endorsed principles such as ALARA (as low as reasonably achievable—economic, social and other relevant factors being considered). The data obtained through the years of operational and management experience have manifested the robustness of the disposal system and reliability of the disposal criterion, and have also served to further refine the latter. Consequently, confidence in the current shallow-land-burial practices has increased. Radiological safety of these practices has been assessed by addressing different aspects of the safety and disposal system. These parameters, as indices of a non-exclusive and operational safety model, are presented.

F Jan; S S Ahmad; S M Hasany; M Aslam

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

RSSC RADIOACTIVE WASTE DISPOSAL 08/2011 7-1 RADIOACTIVE WASTE DISPOSAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

RSSC RADIOACTIVE WASTE DISPOSAL 08/2011 7-1 CHAPTER 7 RADIOACTIVE WASTE DISPOSAL PAGE I. Radioactive Waste Disposal ............................................................................................ 7-2 II. Radiation Control Technique #2 Instructions for Preparation of Radioactive Waste

Slatton, Clint

118

Disposable telemetry cable deployment system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A disposable telemetry cable deployment system for facilitating information retrieval while drilling a well includes a cable spool adapted for insertion into a drill string and an unarmored fiber optic cable spooled onto the spool cable and having a downhole end and a stinger end. Connected to the cable spool is a rigid stinger which extends through a kelly of the drilling apparatus. A data transmission device for transmitting data to a data acquisition system is disposed either within or on the upper end of the rigid stinger.

Holcomb, David Joseph (Sandia Park, NM)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant land management plan  

SciTech Connect

On October 30, 1992, the WIPP Land Withdrawal Act became law. This Act transferred the responsibility for the management of the WIPP Land Withdrawal Area (WILWA) from the Secretary of the Interior to the Secretary of Energy. In accordance with sections 3(a)(1) and (3) of the Act, these lands {open_quotes}{hor_ellipsis}are withdrawn from all forms of entry, appropriation, and disposal under the public land laws{hor_ellipsis}{close_quotes}and are reserved for the use of the Secretary of Energy {open_quotes}{hor_ellipsis}for the construction, experimentation, operation, repair and maintenance, disposal, shutdown, monitoring, decommissioning, and other activities, associated with the purposes of WIPP as set forth in the Department of Energy National Security and Military Applications of Nuclear Energy Act of 1980 and this Act.{close_quotes}. As a complement to this LMP, a MOU has been executed between the DOE and the BLM, as required by section 4(d) of the Act. The state of New Mexico was consulted in the development of the MOU and the associated Statement of Work (SOW).

NONE

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Constrictive Pericarditis and Restrictive Cardiomyopathy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Constrictive pericarditis (CP) and restrictive cardiomyopathy (RCMP) have some similarities in presentation, but their pathophysiology, clinical features, and, more importantly, therapeutic approach are quite ...

Prof. Dr. Frank Rademakers MD; PhD

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land disposal restrictions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Options and costs for offsite disposal of oil and gas exploration and production wastes.  

SciTech Connect

In the United States, most of the exploration and production (E&P) wastes generated at onshore oil and gas wells are disposed of or otherwise managed at the well site. Certain types of wastes are not suitable for onsite management, and some well locations in sensitive environments cannot be used for onsite management. In these situations, operators must transport the wastes offsite for disposal. In 1997, Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne) prepared a report that identified offsite commercial disposal facilities in the United States. This information has since become outdated. Over the past year, Argonne has updated the study through contacts with state oil and gas agencies and commercial disposal companies. The new report, including an extensive database for more than 200 disposal facilities, provides an excellent reference for information about commercial disposal operations. This paper describes Argonne's report. The national study provides summaries of the types of offsite commercial disposal facilities found in each state. Data are presented by waste type and by disposal method. The categories of E&P wastes in the database include: contaminated soils, naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM), oil-based muds and cuttings, produced water, tank bottoms, and water-based muds and cuttings. The different waste management or disposal methods in the database involve: bioremediation, burial, salt cavern, discharge, evaporation, injection, land application, recycling, thermal treatment, and treatment. The database includes disposal costs for each facility. In the United States, most of the 18 billion barrels (bbl) of produced water, 149 million bbl of drilling wastes, and 21 million bbl of associated wastes generated at onshore oil and gas wells are disposed of or otherwise managed at the well site. However, under certain conditions, operators will seek offsite management options for these E&P wastes. Commercial disposal facilities are offsite businesses that accept and manage E&P wastes for a fee. Their services include waste management and disposal, transportation, cleaning of vehicles and tanks, disposal of wash water, and, in some cases, laboratory analysis. Commercial disposal facilities offer a suite of waste management methods and technologies.

Puder, M. G.; Veil, J. A.; Environmental Science Division

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Long-term surveillance plan for the Falls City Disposal Site, Falls City, Texas  

SciTech Connect

This long-term surveillance plan (LTSP) for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Falls City disposal site, Falls City, Texas, describes the surveillance activities for the disposal site. DOE will carry out these activities to ensure that the disposal cell continues to function as designed. This LTSP was prepared as a requirement for acceptance under the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) general license for custody and long-term care of residual radioactive materials. This LTSP documents whether the land and interests are owned by the United States and details how long-term care of the disposal site will be carried out. It is based on the DOE`s Guidance for Implementing the UMTRA Project Long-term Surveillance Program (DOE, 1992a).

NONE

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Long-term Surveillance Plan for the Falls City Disposal Site, Falls City, Texas. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

This long-term surveillance plan (LTSP) for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Falls City disposal site, Falls City, Texas, describes the surveillance activities for the disposal site. The US Department of Energy (DOE) will carry out these activities to ensure that the disposal cell continues to function as designed. This LTSP was prepared as a requirement for acceptance under the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) general license for custody and long-term care of residual radioactive materials. This LTSP documents whether the land and interests are owned by the United States and details how long-term care of the disposal site will be carried out. It is based on the DOE`s Guidance for Implementing the UMTRA Project Long-term Surveillance Program (DOE, 1992a).

NONE

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Long-term surveillance plan for the Collins Ranch disposal site, Lakeview, Oregon  

SciTech Connect

This long-term surveillance plan (LTSP) for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Collins Ranch disposal site, Lakeview, Oregon, describes the surveillance activities for the disposal cell. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) will carry out these activities to ensure that the disposal cell continues to function as designed. This final LTSP was prepared as a requirement for acceptance under the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) general license for custody and long-term care of residual radioactive materials. This LTSP documents whether the land and interests are owned by the United States and details how long-term care of the disposal site will be carried out. It is based on the DOE`s Guidance for Implementing the UMTRA Project Long-term Surveillance Program (DOE, 1992a).

Not Available

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Electrochemical Apparatus with Disposable and Modifiable Parts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electrochemical Apparatus with Disposable and Modifiable Parts Electrochemical Apparatus with Disposable and Modifiable Parts Electrochemical Apparatus with Disposable and Modifiable Parts The invention also includes electrochemical apparatus that can interface with optical instrumentation. If the working electrode is transparent, light from an optical fiber may be directed through the working electrode and into a cuvette. July 3, 2013 Electrochemical Apparatus with Disposable and Modifiable Parts Available for thumbnail of Feynman Center (505) 665-9090 Email Electrochemical Apparatus with Disposable and Modifiable Parts Applications: Electrochemical experiments in solution Electrochemical experiments on surfaces Bulk electrolysis experiments Fuel cells Corrosion studies Academic Labs Teaching and research Benefits: Incorporates disposable, commercially available cuvettes

126

HANFORD ADVISORY BOARD A Site Specific Advisory Board, Chartered...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

other materials requiring macroencapsulation treatment to meet Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Land Disposal Restrictions prior to disposal, the Board provides the...

127

Optimizing High Level Waste Disposal  

SciTech Connect

If society is ever to reap the potential benefits of nuclear energy, technologists must close the fuel-cycle completely. A closed cycle equates to a continued supply of fuel and safe reactors, but also reliable and comprehensive closure of waste issues. High level waste (HLW) disposal in borosilicate glass (BSG) is based on 1970s era evaluations. This host matrix is very adaptable to sequestering a wide variety of radionuclides found in raffinates from spent fuel reprocessing. However, it is now known that the current system is far from optimal for disposal of the diverse HLW streams, and proven alternatives are available to reduce costs by billions of dollars. The basis for HLW disposal should be reassessed to consider extensive waste form and process technology research and development efforts, which have been conducted by the United States Department of Energy (USDOE), international agencies and the private sector. Matching the waste form to the waste chemistry and using currently available technology could increase the waste content in waste forms to 50% or more and double processing rates. Optimization of the HLW disposal system would accelerate HLW disposition and increase repository capacity. This does not necessarily require developing new waste forms, the emphasis should be on qualifying existing matrices to demonstrate protection equal to or better than the baseline glass performance. Also, this proposed effort does not necessarily require developing new technology concepts. The emphasis is on demonstrating existing technology that is clearly better (reliability, productivity, cost) than current technology, and justifying its use in future facilities or retrofitted facilities. Higher waste processing and disposal efficiency can be realized by performing the engineering analyses and trade-studies necessary to select the most efficient methods for processing the full spectrum of wastes across the nuclear complex. This paper will describe technologies being evaluated at Idaho National Laboratory and the facilities we’ve designed to evaluate options and support optimization.

Dirk Gombert

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Spreading lagooned sewage sludge on farm land: A case history  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the development of a project involving the application of approximately 265,000 cubic meters of lagooned sewage sludge from a metropolitan area on privately-owned farm land in an adjacent, rural county. The sludge application project was initiated to enable use of the land occupied by the lagoons for expansion of the sewage treatment plant. The procedures developed will be valuable to those proposing to practice land disposal of stabilized sludge as part of the Nation`s resource conservation program.

Robson, C.M.; Sommers, L.E.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Disposal Practices at the Nevada Test Site 2008 | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Disposal Practices at the Nevada Test Site 2008 Disposal Practices at the Nevada Test Site 2008 Full Document and Summary Versions are available for download Disposal Practices at...

130

New Facility Will Test Disposal Cell Cover Renovation | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Services Ecosystem Management Team New Facility Will Test Disposal Cell Cover Renovation New Facility Will Test Disposal Cell Cover Renovation New Facility Will Test Disposal...

131

Long-Term Performance of Uranium Tailings Disposal Cells - 13340  

SciTech Connect

Recently, there has been interest in the performance and evolution of Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project disposal cell covers because some sites are not compliant with groundwater standards. Field observations of UMTRA disposal cells indicate that rock covers tend to become vegetated and that saturated conductivities in the upper portion of radon barriers may increase due to freeze/thaw cycles and biointrusion. This paper describes the results of modeling that addresses whether these potential changes and transient drainage of moisture in the tailings affect overall performance of the disposal cells. A numerical unsaturated/saturated 3-dimensional flow model was used to simulate whether increases in saturated conductivities in radon barriers with rock covers affect the overall performance of the disposal cells using field data from the Shiprock, NM, UMTRA site. A unique modeling approach allowed simulation with daily climatic conditions to determine changes in moisture and moisture flux from the disposal cell. Modeling results indicated that increases in the saturated conductivity at the top of radon barrier do not influence flux from the tailings with time because the tailings behave similar hydraulically to the radon barrier. The presence of a thin layer of low conductivity material anywhere in the cover or tailings restricts flux in the worst case to the saturated conductivity of that material. Where materials are unsaturated at depth within the radon barrier of tailings slimes, conductivities are typically less than 10{sup -8} centimeters per second. If the low conductivity layer is deep within the disposal cell, its saturated properties are less likely to change with time. The significance of this modeling is that operation and maintenance of the disposal cells can be minimized if they are allowed to progress to a natural condition with some vegetation and soil genesis. Because the covers and underlying tailings have a very low saturated hydraulic conductivity after transient drainage, eventually the amount of moisture leaving the tailings has a negligible effect on groundwater quality. Although some of the UMTRA sites are not in compliance with the groundwater standards, the explanation may be legacy contamination from mining, or earlier higher fluxes from the tailings or unlined processing ponds. Investigation of other legacy sources at the UMTRA sites may help explain persistent groundwater contamination. (authors)

Bostick, Kent; Daniel, Anamary; Pill, Ken [Professional Project Services, Inc., 1100 Bethel Valley Road, Oak Ridge, TN, 37922 (United States)] [Professional Project Services, Inc., 1100 Bethel Valley Road, Oak Ridge, TN, 37922 (United States); Tachiev, Georgio; Noosai, Nantaporn; Villamizar, Viviana [Florida International University, 10555 W. Flagler St., EC 2100, Miami FL, 33174 (United States)] [Florida International University, 10555 W. Flagler St., EC 2100, Miami FL, 33174 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Spent Fuel Disposal Trust Fund (Maine)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Any licensee operating a nuclear power plant in this State shall establish a segregated Spent Nuclear Fuel Disposal Trust Fund in accordance with this subchapter for the eventual disposal of spent...

133

Deep Borehole Disposal Research: Demonstration Site Selection...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Site Selection Guidelines, Borehole Seals Design, and RD&D Needs The U.S. Department of Energy has been investigating deep borehole disposal as one alternative for the disposal...

134

Generic Argillite/Shale Disposal Reference Case  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of eastern Devonian gas shale: Society of PetroleumShale Disposal Reference Case August 2014 Borehole activity: Oil and gas

Zheng, Liange

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Environmental Assessment for the new sanitary sludge land application sites at the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect

Action is necessary to allow the Savannah River Site (SRS) to provide for efficient disposal of sanitary sludge for SRS as forecast by the latest site projections (WSRC, 1991) and modified by the latest US Department of Energy (DOE) planning guidance for SRS (Stello, 1993). From 1986 to 1992, sanitary wastewater sludge was applied on SRS lands in accordance with a South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) permit as part of the reclamation of SRS`s F- and H-Area borrow pits (disturbed land). This reclamation is essentially complete and, if land disposal of sludge is to continue, new land application sites on SRS must be selected as the extended permit for applying sludge to the borrow pits expired in 1992. Currently, sludge is being trucked offsite for disposal by a subcontractor to a Publicly Owned Treatment Works (POTW) near Augusta, Georgia (WSRC, 1992a). This Environmental Assessment (EA) has been prepared by DOE to assess the potential environmental impacts of onsite land disposal of treated sanitary sewage sludge from SRS. The proposed action is to replace the present offsite disposal of the treated sanitary sludge from existing SRS wastewater treatment plants with onsite reuse through land application. The proposed action is independent of SRS production operations and is necessary for more efficient disposal of SRS sanitary sludge at lower costs. The proposed land application at SRS is treated as part of the preliminary Reconfiguration Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) ``No Action`` alternative (DOE, 1991). The sludge from SRS sanitary wastewater treatment plants is nonhazardous. Onsite disposal of this sludge allows SRS to comply with current DOE policies to keep any DOE wastes onsite where possible and to eliminate any potential accidents due to continuing offsite transportation of sanitary wastes (DOE, 1990a).

Not Available

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Alternative techniques for low-level waste shallow land burial  

SciTech Connect

Experience to date relative to the shallow land burial of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) indicates that the physical stability of the disposal unit and the hydrologic isolation of the waste are the two most important factors in assuring disposal site performance. Disposal unit stability can be ensured by providing stable waste packages and waste forms, compacting backfill material, and filling the void spaces between the packages. Hydrologic isolation can be achieved though a combination of proper site selection, subsurface drainage controls, internal trench drainage systems, and immobilization of the waste. A generalized design of a LLW disposal site that would provide the desired long-term isolation of the waste is discussed. While this design will be more costly than current practices, it will provide additional confidence in predicted and reliability and actual site performance.

Levin, G.B.; Mezga, L.J.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Environmental waste disposal contracts awarded  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environmental contracts awarded locally Environmental contracts awarded locally Environmental waste disposal contracts awarded locally Three small businesses with offices in Northern New Mexico awarded nuclear waste clean-up contracts. April 3, 2012 Worker moves drums of transuranic (TRU) waste at a staging area A worker stages drums of transuranic waste at Los Alamos National Laboratory's Technical Area 54. the Lap ships such drums to the U.S. Department of Energy's Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in Southern New Mexico. The Lab annually averages about 120 shipments of TRU waste to WIPP. Contact Small Business Office (505) 667-4419 Email "They will be valuable partners in the Lab's ability to dispose of the waste safely and efficiently." Small businesses selected for environmental work at LANL

138

land | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

land land Dataset Summary Description This dataset is part of a larger internal dataset at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) that explores various characteristics of large solar electric (both PV and CSP) facilities around the United States. This dataset focuses on the land use characteristics for solar facilities that are either under construction or currently in operation. Source Land-Use Requirements for Solar Power Plants in the United States Date Released June 25th, 2013 (5 months ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords acres area average concentrating solar power csp Density electric hectares km2 land land requirements land use land-use mean photovoltaic photovoltaics PV solar statistics Data application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.spreadsheetml.sheet icon Master Solar Land Use Spreadsheet (xlsx, 1.5 MiB)

139

MODIS Land Product Subsets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Validation > MODIS Land Subsets Validation > MODIS Land Subsets MODIS Land Product Subsets Overview Earth, Western Hemisphere The goal of the MODIS Land Product Subsets project is to provide summaries of selected MODIS Land Products for the community to use for validation of models and remote-sensing products and to characterize field sites. Output files contain pixel values of MODIS land products in text format and in GeoTIFF format. In addition, data visualizations (time series plots and grids showing single composite periods) are available. MODIS Land Product Subsets Resources The following MODIS Land Product Subsets resources are maintained by the ORNL DAAC: MODIS Land Products Offered Background Citation Policy Methods and formats MODIS Sinusoidal Grid - Google Earth KMZ Classroom Exercises

140

Myth of nuclear explosions at waste disposal sites  

SciTech Connect

Approximately 25 years ago, an event is said to have occurred in the plains immediately west of the southern Ural mountains of the Soviet Union that is being disputed to this very day. One person says it was an explosion of nuclear wastes buried in a waste disposal site; other people say it was an above-ground test of an atomic weapon; still others suspect that an alleged contaminated area (of unknown size or even existence) is the result of a series of careless procedures. Since the event, a number of articles about the disposal-site explosion hypothesis written by a Soviet exile living in the United Kingdom have been published. Although the Soviet scientist's training and background are in the biological sciences and his knowledge of nuclear physics or chemistry is limited, people who oppose the use of nuclear energy seem to want to believe what he says without question. The work of this Soviet biologist has received wide exposure both in the United Kingdom and the United States. This report presents arguments against the disposal-site explosion hypothesis. Included are discussions of the amounts of plutonium that would be in a disposal site, the amounts of plutonium that would be needed to reach criticality in a soil-water-plutonium mixture, and experiments and theoretical calculations on the behavior of such mixtures. Our quantitative analyses show that the postulated nuclear explosion is so improbable that it is essentially impossible and can be found only in the never-never land of an active imagination. 24 references, 14 figures, 5 tables.

Stratton, W.R.

1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land disposal restrictions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Long-term surveillance plan for the Lowman, Idaho, Disposal site. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

The long-term surveillance plan (LTSP) for the Lowman, Idaho, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project disposal site describes the surveillance activities for the Lowman disposal site, which will be referred to as the Lowman site throughout this document. The US Department of Energy (DOE) will carry out these activities to ensure that the disposal cell continues to function as designed. The radioactive sands at the Lowman site were stabilized on the site. This final LTSP is being submitted to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) as a requirement for issuance of a general license for custody and long-term care for the disposal site. The general license requires that the disposal cell be cared for in accordance with the provisions of this LTSP. The LTSP documents whether the land and interests are owned by the United States or a state, and describes, in detail, how the long-term care of the disposal site will be carried out through the UMTRA Project long-term surveillance program. The Lowman, Idaho, LTSP is based on the DOE`s Guidance for Implementing the UMTRA Project Long-term Surveillance Program, (DOE, 1992).

Not Available

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Long-term surveillance plan for the Lowman, Idaho, disposal site  

SciTech Connect

The long-term surveillance plan (LTSP) for the Lowman, Idaho, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project disposal site describes the surveillance activities for the Lowman disposal cell. The US Department of Energy (DOE) will carry out these activities to ensure that the disposal cell continues to function as designed. This preliminary final LTSP is being submitted to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) as a requirement for issuance of a general license for custody and long-term care for the disposal site. The general license requires that the disposal cell be cared for in accordance with the provisions of this LTSP. The LTSP documents whether the land and interests are owned by the United States or an Indian tribe, and describes, in detail, how the long-term care of the disposal site will be carried out through the UMTRA Project long-term surveillance program. The Lowman, Idaho, LTSP is based on the DOE`s Guidance for Implementing the UMTRA Project Long-term Surveillance Program, (DOE, 1992).

Not Available

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

DOE SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL DISPOSAL CONTAINER  

SciTech Connect

The DOE Spent Nuclear Fuel Disposal Container (SNF DC) supports the confinement and isolation of waste within the Engineered Barrier System of the Mined Geologic Disposal System (MGDS). Disposal containers are loaded and sealed in the surface waste handling facilities, transferred to the underground through the access mains, and emplaced in emplacement drifts. The DOE Spent Nuclear Fuel Disposal Container provides long term confinement of DOE SNF waste, and withstands the loading, transfer, emplacement, and retrieval loads and environments. The DOE SNF Disposal Containers provide containment of waste for a designated period of time, and limit radionuclide release thereafter. The disposal containers maintain the waste in a designated configuration, withstand maximum handling and rockfall loads, limit the individual waste canister temperatures after emplacement. The disposal containers also limit the introduction of moderator into the disposal container during the criticality control period, resist corrosion in the expected repository environment, and provide complete or limited containment of waste in the event of an accident. Multiple disposal container designs may be needed to accommodate the expected range of DOE Spent Nuclear Fuel. The disposal container will include outer and inner barrier walls and outer and inner barrier lids. Exterior labels will identify the disposal container and contents. Differing metal barriers will support the design philosophy of defense in depth. The use of materials with different failure mechanisms prevents a single mode failure from breaching the waste package. The corrosion-resistant inner barrier and inner barrier lid will be constructed of a high-nickel alloy and the corrosion-allowance outer barrier and outer barrier lid will be made of carbon steel. The DOE Spent Nuclear Fuel Disposal Containers interface with the emplacement drift environment by transferring heat from the waste to the external environment and by protecting the DOE waste canisters and their contents from damage/degradation by the external environment. The disposal containers also interface with the SNF by limiting access of moderator and oxidizing agents to the waste. The disposal containers interface with the Ex-Container System's emplacement drift disposal container supports. The disposal containers interface with the Canister Transfer System, Waste Emplacement System, Disposal Container Handling System, and Waste Package Remediation System during loading, handling, transfer, emplacement and remediation of the disposal container.

F. Habashi

1998-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

144

Briefing, Restricted Data Classifiers- June 2014  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This briefing provides the training required by 10 CFR part 1045 for persons who classify documents containing Restricted Data and Formerly Restricted Data.

145

Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 399: Area 18 Disposal Site  

SciTech Connect

The closure report for CAU 399 is just a one page summary listing the coordinates of the disposal site which were given at the time (1995) in Nevada State Plan Coordinates - North American Datum of 1983. The drawing of the use restricted site also listed the coordinates in Nevada State Plan Coordinates - North American Datum of 1983. In the ensuing years the reporting of coordinates has been standardized so that all coordinates are reported in the same manner, which is: NAD 27 UTM Zone 11 N, meters. This Errata Sheet updates the coordinate reporting to the currently accepted method and includes an aerial photo showing the disposal site with the coordinates listed showing the use restricted area.

Navarro Nevada Environmental Services

2010-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

146

Land Reclamation Act (Missouri)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

It is the policy of the state to balance surface mining interests with the conservation of natural resources and land preservation. This Act authorizes the Land Reclamation Commission of the...

147

Bridge Decomposition of Restriction Measures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Motivated by Kesten's bridge decomposition for two-dimensional self-avoiding walks in the upper half plane, we show that the conjectured scaling limit of the half-plane SAW, the SLE(8/3) process, also has an appropriately defined bridge decomposition. This continuum decomposition turns out to entirely be a consequence of the restriction property of SLE(8/3), and as a result can be generalized to the wider class of restriction measures. Specifically we show that the restriction hulls with index less than one can be decomposed into a Poisson Point Process of irreducible bridges in a way that is similar to Ito's excursion decomposition of a Brownian motion according to its zeros.

Tom Alberts; Hugo Duminil-Copin

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Long-term surveillance plan for the Mexican Hat Disposal Site, Mexican Hat, Utah  

SciTech Connect

This plan describes the long-term surveillance activities for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project disposal site at Mexican Hat, Utah. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) will carry out these activities to ensure that the disposal site continues to function as designed. This long-term surveillance plan (LTSP) was prepared as a requirement for acceptance under the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) general license for custody and long-term care of residual radioactive material (RRM). This LTSP (based on the DOE`s Guidance for Implementing the UMTRA Project Long-term Surveillance Program), documents the land ownership interests and details how the long-term care of the disposal site will be accomplished.

NONE

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Enhancements to Generic Disposal System Modeling Capabilities...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

disposal system modeling and analysis capability that takes advantage of high-performance computing (HPC) environments to simulate the important multi-physics phenomena and...

150

Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility - Hanford Site  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Receiving and Processing Facility Waste Sampling and Characterization Facility Waste Treatment Plant Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility Email Email Page | Print Print...

151

Operational Issues at the Environmental Restoration Disposal...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Disposal Facility at Idaho National Laboratory Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF) at Oak Ridge Briefing: Summary and Recommendations of EM Landfill Workshop...

152

Low-level waste management in the South. Task 4. 2 - long-term care requirements. [Shallow land burial  

SciTech Connect

This paper provides an analysis of the long-term care requirements of low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities. Among the topics considered are the technical requirements for long-term care, the experiences of the three inactive and three active commercial disposal facilities concerning perpetual care and maintenance, and the financial management of a perpetual care fund. In addition, certain recommendations for the establishment of a perpetual care fund are provided. The predominant method of disposing of low-level radioactive wastes is shallow land burial. After studying alternative methods of disposal, the U.S Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) concluded that there are no compelling reasons for abandoning this disposal method. Of the 22 shallow land burial facilities in the U.S., the federal government maintains 14 active and two inactive disposal sites. There are three active (Barnwell, South Carolina; Hanford, Washington; and Beatty, Nevada) and three inactive commercial disposal facilities (Maxey Flats, Kentucky; Sheffield, Illinois; and West Valley, New York). The life of a typical facility can be broken into five phases: preoperational, operational, closure, postclosure observation and maintenance, and institutional control. Long-term care of a shallow land burial facility will begin with the disposal site closure phase and continue through the postclosure observation and maintenance and institutional control phases. Since the postclosure observation and maintenance phase will last about five years and the institutional control phase 100 years, the importance of a well planned long-term care program is apparent. 26 references, 1 table.

Not Available

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Process-design manual: Land application of municipal sludge. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The manual presents a rational procedure for the design of municipal-sludge land-application systems. The utilization of sludge in agriculture, forestry, the reclamation of disturbed and marginal lands, and dedicated high-rate surface disposal practices are discussed in detail, with design concepts and criteria presented where available. A two-phased planning approach to site identification, evaluation, and selection along with information on field investigations are also presented. The manual includes examples of each land-application option and case studies of sludge utilization in agriculture and for reclamation of disturbed mining lands.

Not Available

1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Performance assessment methodology and preliminary results for low-level radioactive waste disposal in Taiwan.  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and Taiwan's Institute for Nuclear Energy Research (INER) have teamed together to evaluate several candidate sites for Low-Level Radioactive Waste (LLW) disposal in Taiwan. Taiwan currently has three nuclear power plants, with another under construction. Taiwan also has a research reactor, as well as medical and industrial wastes to contend with. Eventually the reactors will be decomissioned. Operational and decommissioning wastes will need to be disposed in a licensed disposal facility starting in 2014. Taiwan has adopted regulations similar to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC's) low-level radioactive waste rules (10 CFR 61) to govern the disposal of LLW. Taiwan has proposed several potential sites for the final disposal of LLW that is now in temporary storage on Lanyu Island and on-site at operating nuclear power plants, and for waste generated in the future through 2045. The planned final disposal facility will have a capacity of approximately 966,000 55-gallon drums. Taiwan is in the process of evaluating the best candidate site to pursue for licensing. Among these proposed sites there are basically two disposal concepts: shallow land burial and cavern disposal. A representative potential site for shallow land burial is located on a small island in the Taiwan Strait with basalt bedrock and interbedded sedimentary rocks. An engineered cover system would be constructed to limit infiltration for shallow land burial. A representative potential site for cavern disposal is located along the southeastern coast of Taiwan in a tunnel system that would be about 500 to 800 m below the surface. Bedrock at this site consists of argillite and meta-sedimentary rocks. Performance assessment analyses will be performed to evaluate future performance of the facility and the potential dose/risk to exposed populations. Preliminary performance assessment analyses will be used in the site-selection process and to aid in design of the disposal system. Final performance assessment analyses will be used in the regulatory process of licensing a site. The SNL/INER team has developed a performance assessment methodology that is used to simulate processes associated with the potential release of radionuclides to evaluate these sites. The following software codes are utilized in the performance assessment methodology: GoldSim (to implement a probabilistic analysis that will explicitly address uncertainties); the NRC's Breach, Leach, and Transport - Multiple Species (BLT-MS) code (to simulate waste-container degradation, waste-form leaching, and transport through the host rock); the Finite Element Heat and Mass Transfer code (FEHM) (to simulate groundwater flow and estimate flow velocities); the Hydrologic Evaluation of Landfill performance Model (HELP) code (to evaluate infiltration through the disposal cover); the AMBER code (to evaluate human health exposures); and the NRC's Disposal Unit Source Term -- Multiple Species (DUST-MS) code (to screen applicable radionuclides). Preliminary results of the evaluations of the two disposal concept sites are presented.

Arnold, Bill Walter; Chang, Fu-lin (Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Taiwan); Mattie, Patrick D.; Knowlton, Robert G.; Chuang, W-S (Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Taiwan); Chi, L-M (Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Taiwan); Jow, Hong-Nian; Tien, Norman C. (Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Taiwan); Ho, Clifford Kuofei

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Refining Restriction Enzyme Genome Maps  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A genome map is an ordering of a set of clones according to their believed position on a DNA string. Simple heuristics for genome map assembly based on single restriction enzyme with complete digestion data can lead to inaccuracies and ambiguities. This ... Keywords: constraint query languages, genome mapping, set constraints

Peter Z. Revesz

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Soil Segregation Methods for Reducing Transportation and Disposal Costs - 13544  

SciTech Connect

At Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) sites where the selected alternative for contaminated soil is excavation and off-site disposal, the most significant budget items of the remedial action are the costs for transportation and disposal of soil at an off-site facility. At these sites, the objective is to excavate and dispose of only those soils that exceed derived concentration guideline levels. In situ soil segregation using gross gamma detectors to guide the excavation is often challenging at sites where the soil contamination is overlain by clean soil or where the contaminated soil is located in isolated, subsurface pockets. In addition, data gaps are often identified during the alternative evaluation and selection process, resulting in increased uncertainty in the extent of subsurface contamination. In response, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Buffalo District is implementing ex situ soil segregation methods. At the remediated Painesville Site, soils were excavated and fed through a conveyor-belt system, which automatically segregated them into above- and below-cleanup criteria discharge piles utilizing gamma spectroscopy. At the Linde Site and the Shallow Land Disposal Area (SLDA) Site, which are both in the remediation phase, soils are initially segregated during the excavation process using gross gamma detectors and then transported to a pad for confirmatory manual surveying and sampling. At the Linde Site, the ex situ soils are analyzed on the basis of a site-specific method, to establish compliance with beneficial reuse criteria that were developed for the Linde remediation. At the SLDA Site, the ex situ soils are surveyed and sampled based on Multi-Agency Radiation Survey and Site Investigation Manual (MARSSIM) final status survey guidance to demonstrate compliance with the derived concentration guideline levels. At all three sites, the ex situ soils that meet the site- specific DCGLs are retained on-site and used as backfill material. This paper describes the ex situ soil segregation methods, the considerations of each method, and the estimated cost savings from minimizing the volume of soil requiring transportation and off-site disposal. (authors)

Frothingham, David; Andrews, Shawn; Barker, Michelle; Boyle, James; Buechi, Stephen; Graham, Marc; Houston, Linda; Polek, Michael; Simmington, Robert; Spector, Harold [U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Buffalo District, 1776 Niagara St., Buffalo, NY 14207 (United States)] [U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Buffalo District, 1776 Niagara St., Buffalo, NY 14207 (United States); Elliott, Robert 'Dan' [U.S. Army Reserve, 812A Franklin St.,Worcester, MA 01604 (United States)] [U.S. Army Reserve, 812A Franklin St.,Worcester, MA 01604 (United States); Durham, Lisa [Argonne National Laboratory, Environmental Science Division, 9700 S. Cass Ave., Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)] [Argonne National Laboratory, Environmental Science Division, 9700 S. Cass Ave., Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Used Fuel Disposition Campaign Disposal  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Campaign Disposal Research and Development Roadmap Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy Used Fuel Disposition Campaign September 2012 FCR&D-USED-2011-000065 REV 1 DISCLAIMER This information was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the U.S. Government. Neither the U.S. Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, expressed or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness, of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. References herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trade mark, manufacturer, or

158

14 - Lubricant use and disposal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract: Criteria are defined for optimum machine-specific selection of conventional, high-performance and specialty lubricants. Lubrication consolidation is indicated as a means of rationalisation of inventories. Intended use of lubricants may be compromised by oxidation, water and air contamination, additive depletion and accumulation of contaminants, including wear debris, and biological degradation. Strategic oil analysis is described from simple in-shop sensory inspections to primary on-site standard testing and more comprehensive secondary testing methods as an operational maintenance tool for machine and lubricant condition monitoring to estimate remaining lubricant life time and prevent premature machine failure. The disposal of spent lubricants, including waste oil legislation and management, and re-refining technologies, are discussed.

Jan C.J. Bart; Emanuele Gucciardi; Stefano Cavallaro

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Directions in low-level radioactive waste management: A brief history of commercial low-level radioactive waste disposal  

SciTech Connect

This report presents a history of commercial low-level radioactive waste management in the United States, with emphasis on the history of six commercially operated low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities. The report includes a brief description of important steps that have been taken during the 1980s to ensure the safe disposal of low-level waste in the 1990s and beyond. These steps include the issuance of Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations Part 61, Licensing Requirements for the Land Disposal of Radioactive Waste, the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980, the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985, and steps taken by states and regional compacts to establish additional disposal sites. 42 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab.

Not Available

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

WASTE DISPOSAL WORKSHOPS: ANTHRAX CONTAMINATED WASTE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WASTE DISPOSAL WORKSHOPS: ANTHRAX CONTAMINATED WASTE January 2010 Prepared for the Interagency left intentionally blank.] #12;Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy PNNL-SA-69994 under Contract DE-AC05-76RL01830 Waste Disposal Workshops: Anthrax-Contaminated Waste AM Lesperance JF Upton SL

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land disposal restrictions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Asset Management Equipment Disposal Form -Refrigerant Recovery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

enters the waste stream with the charge intact (e.g., motor vehicle air conditioners, refrigeratorsAsset Management Equipment Disposal Form - Refrigerant Recovery Safe Disposal Requirements Under refrigeration, cold storage warehouse refrigeration, chillers, and industrial process refrigeration) has to have

Sin, Peter

162

Title II Disposal Sites Annual Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This report presents the results of long-term surveillance and maintenance activities conducted by the DOE Office of Legacy Management in 2013 at six uranium mill tailings disposal sites reclaimed under Title II of the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) of 1978. These activities verified that the UMTRCA Title II disposal sites remain in compliance with license requirements.

163

Tritiated wastewater treatment and disposal evaluation for 1995  

SciTech Connect

A second annual summary and analysis of potential processes for the mitigation of tritium contained in process effluent, ground water and stored waste is presented. It was prepared to satisfy the Hanford Federal Facility and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) Milestone M-26-05B. Technologies with directed potential for separation of tritium at present environmental levels are organized into two groups. The first group consists of four processes that have or are undergoing significant development. Of these four, the only active project is the development of membrane separation technology at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). Although research is progressing, membrane separation does not present a near term option for the mitigation of tritium. A second grouping of five early stage projects gives an indication of the breadth of interest in low level tritium separation. If further developed, two of these technologies might prove to be candidates for a separation process. At the present, there continues to be no known commercially available process for the practical reduction of the tritium burden in process effluent. Material from last year`s report regarding the occurrence, regulation and management of tritium is updated and included in the appendices of this report. The use of the State Approved Land Disposal Site (SALDS) for disposal of tritiated effluent from the 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) begins in the fall of 1995. This is the most significant event impacting tritium in the environment at the Hanford Site this coming year.

Allen, W.L. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Disposal configuration options for future uses of greater confinement disposal at the Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for disposing of a variety of radioactive and mixed wastes, some of which are considered special-case waste because they do not currently have a clear disposal option. The DOE`s Nevada Field Office contracted with Sandia National Laboratories to investigate the possibility of disposing of some of this special-case waste at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). As part of this investigation, a review of a near-surface and subsurface disposal options that was performed to develop alternative disposal configurations for special-case waste disposal at the NTS. The criteria for the review included (1) configurations appropriate for disposal at the NTS; (2) configurations for disposal of waste at least 100 ft below the ground surface; (3) configurations for which equipment and technology currently exist; and (4) configurations that meet the special requirements imposed by the nature of special-case waste. Four options for subsurface disposal of special-case waste are proposed: mined consolidated rock, mined alluvium, deep pits or trenches, and deep boreholes. Six different methods for near-surface disposal are also presented: earth-covered tumuli, above-grade concrete structures, trenches, below-grade concrete structures, shallow boreholes, and hydrofracture. Greater confinement disposal (GCD) in boreholes at least 100 ft deep, similar to that currently practiced at the GCD facility at the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site at the NTS, was retained as the option that met the criteria for the review. Four borehole disposal configurations are proposed with engineered barriers that range from the native alluvium to a combination of gravel and concrete. The configurations identified will be used for system analysis that will be performed to determine the disposal configurations and wastes that may be suitable candidates for disposal of special-case wastes at the NTS.

Price, L. [Science Applications International Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility Federal Review Group Manual...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility Federal Review Group Manual Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility Federal Review Group Manual This Revision 3 of the Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility...

166

EOS Land Validation Presentations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

EOS Land Validation Presentations EOS Land Validation Presentations Meeting: Land Cover Validation Workshop Date: February 2, 2004 Place: Boston, MA Title: Validation Data Support Activities at the ORNL DAAC (Power Point) Presenter: Bob Cook Meeting: Fall 2003 American Geophysical Union (AGU) Meeting Date: December 9, 2003 Place: San Francisco, CA Title: Ground-Based Data Supporting the Validation of MODIS Land Products (Power Point) Presenter: Larry Voorhees Meeting: Terra and Aqua Products Review Date: March 2003 Place: NASA HQ Title: Supporting the Validation of MODIS Land Products (Power Point) Presenter: Larry Voorhees Meeting: Terra and Aqua Products Review Date: March 2003 Place: NASA HQ Title: MODIS Land Summary (Power Point) Presenter: Chris Justice, University of Maryland Meeting: Spring 2002 American Geophysical Union (AGU) Meeting

167

International Collaboration Activities in Different Geologic Disposal Environments  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This report describes the current status of international collaboration regarding geologic disposal research in the Used Fuel Disposition (UFD) Campaign.  To date, UFD’s International Disposal R...

168

Used Fuel Disposition Campaign Disposal Research and Development...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

related to storage, transportation and disposal of used nuclear fuel (UNF) and high level nuclear waste (HLW) generated by existing and future nuclear fuel cycles. The disposal of...

169

A novel nanoparticle-based disposable electrochemical immunosensor...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

nanoparticle-based disposable electrochemical immunosensor for diagnosis of exposure to toxic organophosphorus agents. A novel nanoparticle-based disposable electrochemical...

170

Changes in Vegetation at the Monticello, Utah, Disposal Site...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Monticello, Utah, Disposal Cell Cover Monitoring the Performance of an Alternative Landfill Cover at the Monticello, Utah, Uranium Mill Tailings Disposal Site Monitoring the...

171

EIS-0200: Managing Treatment, Storage, and Disposal of Radioactive...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

00: Managing Treatment, Storage, and Disposal of Radioactive and Hazardous Waste EIS-0200: Managing Treatment, Storage, and Disposal of Radioactive and Hazardous Waste SUMMARY This...

172

Mitigation action plan for remedial action at the Uranium Mill Tailing Sites and Disposal Site, Rifle, Colorado  

SciTech Connect

The Estes Gulch disposal site is approximately 10 kilometers (6 miles) north of the town of Rifle, off State Highway 13 on Federal land administered by the Bureau of Land Management. The Department of Energy (DOE) will transport the residual radioactive materials (RRM) by truck to the Estes Gulch disposal site via State Highway 13 and place it in a partially below-grade disposal cell. The RRM will be covered by an earthen radon barrier, frost protection layers, and a rock erosion protection layer. A toe ditch and other features will also be constructed to control erosion at the disposal site. After removal of the RRM and disposal at the Estes Gulch site, the disturbed areas at all three sites will be backfilled with clean soils, contoured to facilitate surface drainage, and revegetated. Wetlands areas destroyed at the former Rifle processing sites will be compensated for by the incorporation of now wetlands into the revegetation plan at the New Rifle site. The UMTRA Project Office, supported by the Remedial Action Contractor (RAC) and the Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC), oversees the implementation of the MAP. The RAC executes mitigation measures in the field. The TAC provides monitoring of the mitigation actions in cases where mitigation measures are associated with design features. Site closeout and inspection compliance will be documented in the site completion report.

Not Available

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Bureau of Land Management - Land Use Planning | Open Energy Informatio...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Bureau of Land Management - Land Use Planning Abstract The BLM's Resource Management Plans (Land Use...

174

The Salt Defense Disposal Investigations (SDDI)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Salt Defense Disposal Investigations (SDDI) Salt Defense Disposal Investigations (SDDI) will utilize a newly mined Underground Research Lab (URL) in WIPP to perform a cost effective, proof-of-principle field test of the emplacement of heat-generating radioactive waste and validate modeling efforts. The goals of the SDDI Thermal Test are to: * Demonstrate a proof-of-principle concept for in-drift disposal in salt. * Investigate, in a specific emplacement concept, the response of the salt to heat. * Develop a full-scale response for run-of- mine (ROM) salt. * Develop a validated coupled process model for disposal of heat-generating wastes in salt. * Evaluate the environmental conditions of the

175

Acquisition, Use, and Disposal of Real Estate  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Chapter 17.3 (March 2011) Chapter 17.3 (March 2011) 1 Acquisition, Use, and Disposal of Real Estate References DEAR 917.74 - Acquisition, Use, and Disposal of Real Estate DOE Directives DOE Order 413.3B, Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets, or current version DOE Order 430.1B, Real Property Asset Management, or current version Overview This section provides internal Departmental information and DOE and NNSA points of contact for issues dealing with real estate acquisition, use, and disposal for cost reimbursement and fixed price contracts when in performance of the contract, the contractor will acquire or proposes to acquire use of real property. Background DEAR Subpart 917.74 - Acquisition, Use, and Disposal of Real Estate provides the policy and

176

Policy Issues in Nuclear Waste Disposal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Congressional Research Service, in an issue brief on nuclear waste disposal, compactly described a common assessment when it noted that “nuclear waste has sometimes been called the Achilles’ heel of the nu...

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

A disposable, self-administered electrolyte test  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis demonstrates the novel concept that it is possible to make a disposable, self-administered electrolyte test to be introduced to the general consumer market. Although ion specific electrodes have been used to ...

Prince, Ryan, 1977-

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Available Options for Waste Disposal [and Discussion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...vitrified high-activity waste in properly selected deep...alternatives to present projects of waste disposal, but rather as...benefits will be different. Long-term storage of either spent fuel or vitrified waste, although not an alternative...

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

US nuclear waste: Widespread problem of disposal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... individual states in the United States to develop facilities for disposal of low-level radioactive waste produced by ... produced by nuclear reactors, industry and biomdical research and treatment. The federal Low-Level ...

Christopher Earl

1984-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

180

Assessment of Preferred Depleted Uranium Disposal Forms  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) is in the process of converting about 700,000 metric tons (MT) of depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF6) containing 475,000 MT of depleted uranium (DU) to a stable form more suitable for long-term storage or disposal. Potential conversion forms include the tetrafluoride (DUF4), oxide (DUO2 or DU3O8), or metal. If worthwhile beneficial uses cannot be found for the DU product form, it will be sent to an appropriate site for disposal. The DU products are considered to be low-level waste (LLW) under both DOE orders and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulations. The objective of this study was to assess the acceptability of the potential DU conversion products at potential LLW disposal sites to provide a basis for DOE decisions on the preferred DU product form and a path forward that will ensure reliable and efficient disposal.

Croff, A.G.; Hightower, J.R.; Lee, D.W.; Michaels, G.E.; Ranek, N.L.; Trabalka, J.R.

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land disposal restrictions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

CSMRI Bagged Soil Disposal Summary Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.......................................................................................................................... 1 4. Landfill Acceptance and Equipment Appendix G Daily GPS Coordinants of Disposal Location at BFI Foothills Landfill Appendix H Ambient Landfill (Stoller 2005a). After review of the dose assessment report, the CDPHE approved shipment

182

Disposable Bioreactors: Maturation into Pharmaceutical Glycoprotein Manufacturing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

To summarise: the range of disposable bioreactors available on the market offers flexible, cost efficient and time-saving solutions from early process development to large-scale production. Table 1 gives an overv...

René Brecht

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Water, Land and People  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Water, Land and People Water, Land and People Nature Bulletin No. 251 January 8, 1983 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation WATER, LAND AND PEOPLE "Water, Land and People" is the title of a book which, like "Road to Survival", should be read by every American. Water, and its uses or control, has become a vital national problem. Some places, some years, we have too much of it and suffer disastrous floods. Elsewhere we have too little. In cities like New York and Los Angeles -- even in many inland towns -- and in the western lands which depend upon irrigation, the demand far exceeds the supply. Our Congress is beseeched for huge appropriations to provide flood control, navigation, electric power and irrigation.

184

The roles of land tenure reforms and land markets in the context of population growth and land use intensification in Africa  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This article reviews the past and potential future roles of land tenure reforms and land markets in Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) as responses to population growth in the process of land use intensification and livelihood transformation. The farm size distribution and the existence of an inverse relationship (IR) between farm size and land productivity in SSA and the implications of this relationship for efficiency and equity are investigated. More secure property rights and removal of restrictions on land markets have the potential to create both efficiency and equity benefits, but there are high risks of elite capture of large land areas with inefficient and inequitable outcomes. This situation is the case not only in land-abundant areas but also in urban and peri-urban areas where increasingly larger proportions of people will make their living. Increasing population pressure in densely populated rural areas contributes to more rapid rural–urban migration, and creating alternative livelihood opportunities for the migrating youth population is essential to achieving economic development with social stability.

Stein T. Holden; Keijiro Otsuka

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Pesticide fate in an aboveground disposal system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PESTICIDE FATE IN AN ABOVEGROUND DISPOSAL SYSTEM A Thesis by BRIAN RICHARD VANDERGLAS Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A 8 M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 'l988... Major Subject: Soil Science PESTICIDE FATE IN AN ABOVEGROUND DISPOSAL SYSTEM A Thesis by BRIAN RICHARD VANDERGLAS Approved as to style and content by: K. W. Brown (Chair of Committee) John M. Sweeten (Member) Jack D. Price (Member) E. C. A...

Vanderglas, Brian Richard

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

186

Title I Disposal Sites Annual Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This report presents the results of long-term surveillance and maintenance activities conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM) in 2013 at 19 uranium mill tailings disposal sites established under Title I of the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) of 1978. These activities verified that the UMTRCA Title I disposal sites remain in compliance with license requirements.

187

Clean Cities: National Clean Fleets Partner: Advanced Disposal Services  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Advanced Disposal Services to someone by E-mail Share Clean Cities: National Clean Fleets Partner: Advanced Disposal Services on Facebook Tweet about Clean Cities: National Clean Fleets Partner: Advanced Disposal Services on Twitter Bookmark Clean Cities: National Clean Fleets Partner: Advanced Disposal Services on Google Bookmark Clean Cities: National Clean Fleets Partner: Advanced Disposal Services on Delicious Rank Clean Cities: National Clean Fleets Partner: Advanced Disposal Services on Digg Find More places to share Clean Cities: National Clean Fleets Partner: Advanced Disposal Services on AddThis.com... Goals & Accomplishments Partnerships National Clean Fleets Partnership National Parks Initiative Electric Vehicle Infrastructure Training Program Advanced Vehicle Technology Competitions

188

land.PDF  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 2 AUDIT REPORT SALE OF LAND AT OAK RIDGE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL OFFICE OF AUDIT SERVICES May 2001 DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Washington, DC 20585 May 7, 2001 MEMORANDUM FOR THE SECRETARY FROM: Gregory H. Friedman (Signed) Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Audit Report on the "Sale of Land at Oak Ridge" BACKGROUND Under the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, the U.S. Department of Energy (Department) may sell land in the performance of identified programmatic functions. The functions specified in the Atomic Energy Act include encouraging scientific and industrial progress, controlling special nuclear

189

Generic Disposal System Modeling, Fiscal Year 2011 Progress Report |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Disposal System Modeling, Fiscal Year 2011 Progress Report Disposal System Modeling, Fiscal Year 2011 Progress Report Generic Disposal System Modeling, Fiscal Year 2011 Progress Report The UFD Campaign is developing generic disposal system models (GDSM) of different disposal environments and waste form options. Currently, the GDSM team is investigating four main disposal environment options: mined repositories in three geologic media (salt, clay, and granite) and the deep borehole concept in crystalline rock (DOE 2010d). Further developed the individual generic disposal system (GDS) models for salt, granite, clay, and deep borehole disposal environments. GenericDisposalSystModelFY11.pdf More Documents & Publications Integration of EBS Models with Generic Disposal System Models TSPA Model Development and Sensitivity Analysis of Processes Affecting

190

Fissile Material Disposition Program: Deep Borehole Disposal Facility PEIS data input report for direct disposal. Direct disposal of plutonium metal/plutonium dioxide in compound metal canisters. Version 3.0  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (DOE) is examining options for disposing of excess weapons-usable nuclear materials [principally plutonium (Pu) and highly enriched uranium (HEU)] in a form or condition that is substantially and inherently more difficult to recover and reuse in weapons production. This report is the data input report for the Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS). The PEIS examines the environmental, safety, and health impacts of implementing each disposition alternative on land use, facility operations, and site infrastructure; air quality and noise; water, geology, and soils; biotic, cultural, and paleontological resources; socioeconomics; human health; normal operations and facility accidents; waste management; and transportation. This data report is prepared to assist in estimating the environmental effects associated with the construction and operation of a Deep Borehole Disposal Facility, an alternative currently included in the PEIS. The facility projects under consideration are, not site specific. This report therefore concentrates on environmental, safety, and health impacts at a generic site appropriate for siting a Deep Borehole Disposal Facility.

Wijesinghe, A.M.; Shaffer, R.J.

1996-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

191

Guidance for writing permits for the use or disposal of sewage sludge. Draft report  

SciTech Connect

Section 405(d) of the Clean Water Act (CWA) directs the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to develop regulations containing guidelines for the use and disposal of sewage sludge. On February 19th, 1993, EPA published final regulations at 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 503 as the culmination of a major effort to develop technical standards in response to Section 405(d). These regulations govern three sewage sludge use and disposal practices: land application, surface disposal, and incineration. A key element in EPA's implementation of the Part 503 regulations is educating Agency and State personnel about these new requirements. Although the regulations are generally directly enforceable against all persons involved in the use and disposal of sewage sludge, they will also be implemented through permits issued to treatment works treating domestic sewage as defined in 40 CFR 122.22. Thus, the primary focus of the manual is to assist permit writers in incorporating the Part 503 requirements into permits; it serves as an update to the Guidance for Writing Case-by-Case Permit Conditions for Municipal Sewage Sludge (PB91-145508/HDM).

Not Available

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

A data base for low-level radioactive waste disposal sites  

SciTech Connect

A computerized database was developed to assist the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in evaluating methods and data for characterizing health hazards associated with land and ocean disposal options for low-level radioactive wastes. The data cover 1984 to 1987. The types of sites considered include Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) licensed commercial disposal sites, EPA National Priority List (NPL) sites, US Department of Energy (DOE) Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Project (FUSRAP) and DOE Surplus Facilities Management Program (SFMP) sites, inactive US ocean disposal sites, and DOE/Department of Defense facilities. Sources of information include reports from EPA, the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), as well as direct communication with individuals associated with specific programs. The data include site descriptions, waste volumes and activity levels, and physical and radiological characterization of low-level wastes. Additional information on mixed waste, packaging forms, and disposal methods were compiled, but are not yet included in the database. 55 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

Daum, M.L.; Moskowitz, P.D.

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Long-term surveillance plan for the Bodo Canyon Disposal Site, Durango, Colorado. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

This long-term surveillance plan (LTSP) for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Act on (UMTRA) Project Bodo Canyon disposal site at Durango, Colorado, describes the surveillance activities for the disposal site. The US Department of Energy (DOE) will carry out these activities to ensure that the disposal call continues to function as designed This LTSP was prepared as a requirement for DOE acceptance under the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) general license for custody and long-term care of residual radioactive materials (RRM) from processing uranium ore. This LTSP documents that the land and interests are owned by the United States and details how long-term care of the disposal site will be carried out. It is based on the DOE`s Guidance for Implementing the UMTRA Project Long-term Surveillance Program (DOE, 1992a). Following the introduction, contents of this report include the following: site final condition; site drawings and photographs; permanent site surveillance features; ground water monitoring; annual site inspections; unscheduled inspections; custodial maintenance; corrective action; record keeping and reporting requirements; emergency notification and reporting; quality assurance; personal health and safety; list of contributions; and references.

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Land Management - Hanford Site  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

land. Long-Term Stewardship For more information, contact the Site Real Estate Officer, Boyd Hathaway at (509) 376-7340 or by email at HBBoydHathaway@rl.gov. Last Updated 0331...

195

National Land Cover Data  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

National Land Cover Data National Land Cover Data Metadata also available as Metadata: q Identification_Information q Data_Quality_Information q Spatial_Data_Organization_Information q Spatial_Reference_Information q Entity_and_Attribute_Information q Distribution_Information q Metadata_Reference_Information Identification_Information: Citation: Citation_Information: Originator: United States Geological Survey Publication_Date: Unpublished Material Title: National Land Cover Data Edition: 01 Geospatial_Data_Presentation_Form: raster digital data Other_Citation_Details: Classification and processing of the orginal remote sensing products was done by the Multi-Resolution Land Characterization Consortium and EROS Data Center (U.S. Geological Survey). The Consortium includes the

196

Survey of Critical Wetlands Bureau of Land Management Lands  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Survey of Critical Wetlands Bureau of Land Management Lands South Park, Park County, Colorado 2003 Delivery Colorado State University #12;Survey of Critical Wetlands Bureau of Land Management Lands South place from unique wetlands to high quality grasslands to the bristlecone pine forests to its alpine

197

LABORATORY EXPERIMENTS TO SIMULATE CO2 OCEAN DISPOSAL  

SciTech Connect

This Final Technical Report summarizes the technical accomplishments of an investigation entitled ''Laboratory Experiments to Simulate CO{sub 2} Ocean Disposal'', funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's University Coal Research Program. This investigation responds to the possibility that restrictions on greenhouse gas emissions may be imposed in the future to comply with the Framework Convention on Climate Change. The primary objective of the investigation was to obtain experimental data that can be applied to assess the technical feasibility and environmental impacts of oceanic containment strategies to limit release of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) from coal and other fossil fuel combustion systems into the atmosphere. A number of critical technical uncertainties of ocean disposal of CO{sub 2} were addressed by performing laboratory experiments on liquid CO{sub 2} jet break-up into a dispersed droplet phase, and hydrate formation, under deep ocean conditions. Major accomplishments of this study included: (1) five jet instability regimes were identified that occur in sequence as liquid CO{sub 2} jet disintegration progresses from laminar instability to turbulent atomization; (2) linear regression to the data yielded relationships for the boundaries between the five instability regimes in dimensionless Ohnesorge Number, Oh, and jet Reynolds Number, Re, space; (3) droplet size spectra was measured over the full range of instabilities; (4) characteristic droplet diameters decrease steadily with increasing jet velocity (and increasing Weber Number), attaining an asymptotic value in instability regime 5 (full atomization); and (5) pre-breakup hydrate formation appears to affect the size distribution of the droplet phase primary by changing the effective geometry of the jet.

Stephen M. Masutani

1999-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

198

Microsoft Word - SRSSaltWasteDisposal.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Salt Waste Disposal - References - §3116 Determination (RWR NDAA of 2005) Salt Waste Disposal - References - §3116 Determination (RWR NDAA of 2005) Doc. No. Filename Title Main Document References 1. 2005 RWR DAA §3116 NDAA.pdf "Ronald W. Regan National Defense Authorization Act for FY 2005," Section 3116, 2004. 2. CBU-PIT-2004-00024 CBU-PIT-2004-00024.pdf Ledbetter, L. S., CBU-PIT-2004-00024, 12/01/04 - December Monthly WCS Curie and Volume Inventory Report," Revision 0, December 9, 2004. 3. CBU-PIT-2005-00031 CBU-PIT-2005-00031.pdf Rios-Armstrong, M. A., CBU-PIT-2005-00031, "Decontaminated Salt Solution Volume to be transferred to the Saltstone Disposal Facility from Salt Treatment and Disposition Activities," Revision 0, February 13, 2005.

199

Qualifying radioactive waste forms for geologic disposal  

SciTech Connect

We have developed a phased strategy that defines specific program-management activities and critical documentation for producing radioactive waste forms, from pyrochemical processing of spent nuclear fuel, that will be acceptable for geologic disposal by the US Department of Energy. The documentation of these waste forms begins with the decision to develop the pyroprocessing technology for spent fuel conditioning and ends with production of the last waste form for disposal. The need for this strategy is underscored by the fact that existing written guidance for establishing the acceptability for disposal of radioactive waste is largely limited to borosilicate glass forms generated from the treatment of aqueous reprocessing wastes. The existing guidance documents do not provide specific requirements and criteria for nonstandard waste forms such as those generated from pyrochemical processing operations.

Jardine, L.J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Laidler, J.J.; McPheeters, C.C. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Career Map: Land Acquisition Specialist  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Wind Program's Career Map provides job description information for Land Acquisition Specialist positions.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land disposal restrictions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Pumping-Restriction Theorem for Stochastic Networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We formulate an exact result, which we refer to as the pumping restriction theorem (PRT). It imposes strong restrictions on the currents generated by periodic driving in a generic dissipative system with detailed balance. Our theorem unifies previously known results with the new ones and provides a universal nonperturbative approach to explore further restrictions on the stochastic pump effect in non-adiabatically driven systems.

V. Y. Chernyak; N. A. Sinitsyn

2008-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

202

Proceedings of the tenth annual DOE low-level waste management conference: Session 3: Disposal technology and facility development  

SciTech Connect

This document contains ten papers on various aspects of low-level radioactive waste management. Topics include: design and construction of a facility; alternatives to shallow land burial; the fate of tritium and carbon 14 released to the environment; defense waste management; engineered sorbent barriers; remedial action status report; and the disposal of mixed waste in Texas. Individual papers were processed separately for the data base. (TEM)

Not Available

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Long-term, low-level radwaste volume-reduction strategies. Volume 4. Waste disposal costs. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Volume 4 establishes pricing levels at new shallow land burial grounds. The following conclusions can be drawn from the analyses described in the preceding chapters: Application of volume reduction techniques by utilities can have a significant impact on the volumes of wastes going to low-level radioactive waste disposal sites. Using the relative waste stream volumes in NRC81 and the maximum volume reduction ratios provided by Burns and Roe, Inc., it was calculated that if all utilities use maximum volum

Sutherland, A.A.; Adam, J.A.; Rogers, V.C.; Merrell, G.B.

1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Electrochemical apparatus comprising modified disposable rectangular cuvette  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Electrochemical apparatus includes a disposable rectangular cuvette modified with at least one hole through a side and/or the bottom. Apparatus may include more than one cuvette, which in practice is a disposable rectangular glass or plastic cuvette modified by drilling the hole(s) through. The apparatus include two plates and some means of fastening one plate to the other. The apparatus may be interfaced with a fiber optic or microscope objective, and a spectrometer for spectroscopic studies. The apparatus are suitable for a variety of electrochemical experiments, including surface electrochemistry, bulk electrolysis, and flow cell experiments.

Dattelbaum, Andrew M; Gupta, Gautam; Morris, David E

2013-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

205

Generic Deep Geologic Disposal Safety Case | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Deep Geologic Disposal Safety Case Deep Geologic Disposal Safety Case Generic Deep Geologic Disposal Safety Case The Generic Deep Geologic Disposal Safety Case presents generic information that is of use in understanding potential deep geologic disposal options in the U.S. for used nuclear fuel (UNF) from reactors and high-level radioactive waste (HLW). Potential disposal options include mined disposal in a variety of geologic media (e.g., salt, shale, granite), and deep borehole disposal in basement rock. The Generic Safety Case is intended to be a source of information to provide answers to questions that may arise as the U.S. works to develop strategies to dispose of current and future inventories of UNF and HLW. DOE is examining combinations of generic geologic media and facility designs that could potentially support

206

Environment impact from ash disposal of the thermal power plant 'Kosova A'  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Mining activities impact on environment is as old as these activities themselves. It is estimated that thermal power plants in Kosova produce about 1.6 million tons of ash per year, and all ash produced is disposed as waste material. The main problems for environment pollution are the ash dumps containing more than 40 million tons of ash cover about 150 ha of land. The ash dumps sites of the thermal power plant Kosovo 'A', which are situated among settlement, present one of the most serious problems in the environment and are one of the potential dangers for underground and surface water.

Sabri Avdullahi; Isalm Fejza; Raif Bytyqi

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Some aspects of low-level radioactive-waste disposal in the US  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the NRC supported Shallow Land Burial research program at Brookhaven National Laboraotry and its relationship to the proposed revised ruling on disposal of low level radioactive waste, 10 CFR Part 61. Section of the proposed regulation, which establish the new low level waste classification system and the performance objective placed on waste form, are described briefly. The report also summarizes the preliminary results obtained from the EPA program in which low level waste drums were retrieved from the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans.

Schweitzer, D.G.; Davis, R.E.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Land-use Leakage  

SciTech Connect

Leakage occurs whenever actions to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions in one part of the world unleash countervailing forces elsewhere in the world so that reductions in global emissions are less than emissions mitigation in the mitigating region. While many researchers have examined the concept of industrial leakage, land-use policies can also result in leakage. We show that land-use leakage is potentially as large as or larger than industrial leakage. We identify two potential land-use leakage drivers, land-use policies and bioenergy. We distinguish between these two pathways and run numerical experiments for each. We also show that the land-use policy environment exerts a powerful influence on leakage and that under some policy designs leakage can be negative. International “offsets” are a potential mechanism to communicate emissions mitigation beyond the borders of emissions mitigating regions, but in a stabilization regime designed to limit radiative forcing to 3.7 2/m2, this also implies greater emissions mitigation commitments on the part of mitigating regions.

Calvin, Katherine V.; Edmonds, James A.; Clarke, Leon E.; Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; Kim, Son H.; Wise, Marshall A.; Thomson, Allison M.; Kyle, G. Page

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Status of UFD Campaign International Activities in Disposal Research |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Status of UFD Campaign International Activities in Disposal Status of UFD Campaign International Activities in Disposal Research Status of UFD Campaign International Activities in Disposal Research Several international organizations have made significant progress in the characterization and performance evaluation of other disposal design options and host rock characteristics (clay/shale, granite), most of which were very different from those studied in the United States. The DOE recognizes that close international collaboration is a beneficial and cost effective strategy for advancing disposal science. This report describes the active collaboration opportunities available to U.S. researchers, and presents specific cooperative research activities that have been recently initiated within DOE's disposal research program.

210

On-Site Disposal Facility Inspection Report  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

72.1 0614 On-Site Disposal Facility Inspection Report June 2014 6319-D6320 8972.2 0614 East Face Cell 1 West Face Cell 1 6319D-6322 6319D-6346 8972.3 0614 North Face Cell 1...

211

Low-level-waste-disposal methodologies  

SciTech Connect

This report covers the followng: (1) history of low level waste disposal; (2) current practice at the five major DOE burial sites and six commercial sites with dominant features of these sites and radionuclide content of major waste types summarized in tables; (3) site performance with performance record on burial sites tabulated; and (4) proposed solutions. Shallow burial of low level waste is a continuously evolving practice, and each site has developed its own solutions to the handling and disposal of unusual waste forms. There are no existing national standards for such disposal. However, improvements in the methodology for low level waste disposal are occurring on several fronts. Standardized criteria are being developed by both the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and by DOE. Improved techniques for shallow burial are evolving at both commercial and DOE facilities, as well as through research sponsored by NRC, DOE, and the Environmental Protection Agency. Alternatives to shallow burial, such as deeper burial or the use of mined cavities is also being investigated by DOE.

Wheeler, M.L.; Dragonette, K.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

COUEB N T ED Safe Disposal of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COUEB N T ED Safe Disposal of Household Chemicals: Protect Yourself and Your Community see inside Minutes The 2010 census asks 10 questions that most households can answer in 10 minutes! You will be asked the name, age, gender, race, ethnic group (if Hispanic), and relationship of all persons living at your

Liskiewicz, Maciej

213

Automated Monitoring System for Waste Disposal Sites and Groundwater  

SciTech Connect

A proposal submitted to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Science and Technology, Accelerated Site Technology Deployment (ASTD) program to deploy an automated monitoring system for waste disposal sites and groundwater, herein referred to as the ''Automated Monitoring System,'' was funded in fiscal year (FY) 2002. This two-year project included three parts: (1) deployment of cellular telephone modems on existing dataloggers, (2) development of a data management system, and (3) development of Internet accessibility. The proposed concept was initially (in FY 2002) to deploy cellular telephone modems on existing dataloggers and partially develop the data management system at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). This initial effort included both Bechtel Nevada (BN) and the Desert Research Institute (DRI). The following year (FY 2003), cellular modems were to be similarly deployed at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), and the early data management system developed at the NTS was to be brought to those locations for site-specific development and use. Also in FY 2003, additional site-specific development of the complete system was to be conducted at the NTS. To complete the project, certain data, depending on site-specific conditions or restrictions involving distribution of data, were to made available through the Internet via the DRI/Western Region Climate Center (WRCC) WEABASE platform. If the complete project had been implemented, the system schematic would have looked like the figure on the following page.

S. E. Rawlinson

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Burro Canyon Disposal Cell...  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

materials from the Slick RockOld North Continent site and the Slick RockUnion Carbide site were disposed of in this dedicated disposal cell. The Department of Energys...

215

INNOVATIVE DISPOSAL PRACTICES AT THE NEVADA TEST SITE TO MEET...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Innovative Disposal Practices at the Nevada Test Site to Meet Its Low-Level Waste Generators' Future Disposal Needs E.F. Di Sanza, J.T. Carilli U.S. Department of Energy National...

216

Strategy for the Management and Disposal of Used Nuclear Fuel...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Strategy for the Management and Disposal of Used Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste Strategy for the Management and Disposal of Used Nuclear Fuel and High-Level...

217

Maintenance Guide for DOE Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility ...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Guide for DOE Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility Maintenance Guide for U.S. Department of Energy Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility Performance Assessments and Composite Analyses...

218

Nuclear Waste Disposal: Can the Geologist Guarantee Isolation?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...to check whether waste disposal really does need an almost...been reported recently at Maxey Flats (Kentucky) (26...radioactive waste burial site, inside a fractured rock...effect of the geological disposal is to con-centrate 3530...

G. de Marsily; E. Ledoux; A. Barbreau; J. Margat

1977-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

219

Bureau of Land Management - Land Use Planning Handbook | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bureau of Land Management - Land Use Planning Handbook Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library PermittingRegulatory Guidance - GuideHandbook: Bureau of...

220

MODIS Land Products Subsets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Presentations Presentations Web and Web Services based tool that provides Subsets and Visualization of MODIS land products to facilitate land validation and field site characterization. S.K. Santhana Vannan; R. B. Cook; B. E. Wilson. AGU Fall Meeting, San Francisco, CA, December 14-18 2009 MODIS Land Product Subsets,S.K. Santhana Vannan; R. B. Cook. November, 2009 MODIS Web Service, S.K. Santhana Vannan. ORNL DAAC UWG Meeting, May 2009 Subsetting Tools for MODIS Land Products: Time-series data for field sites, R. B. Cook, S. M. Margle, S. K. Santhana Vannan, S. K. Holladay, and T. W. Beaty. Global Vegetation Workshop, Missoula MT, August 8-10, 2006 MODIS ASCII Subsets, R. B. Cook. May 2006 Subsets of Remote Sensing Products for AmeriFlux Sites: MODIS ASCII Subsets, AmeriFlux Annual Meeting, R. B. Cook, S. M. Margle, S. K. Holladay, F. A. Heinsch, and C. B. Schaaf. October 5-7, 2004, Boulder, Colorado

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land disposal restrictions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

MODIS Land Products Subsets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Introduction Introduction The goal of the MODIS Land Product Subsets project is to provide summaries of selected MODIS Land Products for the community to use for validation of models and remote-sensing products, and to characterize field sites. The MODIS Land Product Subsets are derived from MODIS products that were generated with Collection 4 or later algorithms. Please be advised that these products are subject to continual review and revision. The MODIS land product subsets are provided in ASCII and GeoTIFF format. The subsets are stored as individual text(ASCII) files, each file represents one field site and one MODIS product.The ASCII data covers 7x7 km of the field site. These ASCII files contain comma-delimited rows of parameter values (image bands) for each pixel in the selected area. Each row in the file will contain data from one 8-day, 16-day, or annual period (depending on the temporal frequency of the data product represented).

222

Acceptance of Classified Excess Components for Disposal at Area 5  

SciTech Connect

This slide-show discusses weapons dismantlement and disposal, issues related to classified waste and their solutions.

Poling, Jeanne [National Security Technologies, LLC (United States); Saad, Max [Sandia National Lab., NM (United States)

2012-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

223

Transportation, Aging and Disposal Canister System Performance Specification: Revision 1  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This document provides specifications for selected system components of the Transportation, Aging and Disposal (TAD) canister-based system.

224

Elevation of surficial sediment/basalt contact in the Subsurface Disposal Area, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The elevation of the surficial sediment/basalt contact at the Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA), within the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) is presented to provide a data base for future remedial actions at this site. About 1,300 elevation data from published and unpublished reports, maps, and surveyors notes were compiled to generate maps and cross-sections of the surficial sediment/basalt contact. In general, an east to west trending depression exists in the south central portion of the SDA with basalt closer to land surface on the northern and southern boundaries of the SDA. The lowest elevation of the surficial sediment/basalt contact is 4,979 ft and the greatest is land surface at 5,012 ft. The median elevation of the sediment/basalt interface is 4,994 ft. The median depth to basalt in the SDA is 16 ft if land surface elevation is assumed to be 5,010 ft. The depth from land surface to the sediment/basalt interface ranges from 24 ft in the southeast corner of the SDA to less than 3 ft at the north-central boundary of the SDA.

Hubbell, J.M.

1993-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

225

Disposability Assessment: Aluminum-Based Spent Nuclear Fuel Forms  

SciTech Connect

This report provides a technical assessment of the Melt-Dilute and Direct Al-SNF forms in disposable canisters with respect to meeting the requirements for disposal in the Mined Geologic Disposal System (MGDS) and for interim dry storage in the Treatment and Storage Facility (TSF) at SRS.

Vinson, D.W.

1998-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

226

Landfill Disposal of CCA-Treated Wood with Construction and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Landfill Disposal of CCA-Treated Wood with Construction and Demolition (C&D) Debris: Arsenic phased out of many residential uses in the United States, the disposal of CCA-treated wood remains. Catastrophic events have also led to the concentrated disposal of CCA-treated wood, often in unlined landfills

Florida, University of

227

Restrictions on Federal Employees Acceptance of Gifts  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Restrictions on Federal Employees Acceptance of Gifts Restrictions on Federal Employees Acceptance of Gifts As the holiday season approaches, it is important to remember there are restrictions on Federal employees accepting gifts from outside sources and from other Federal employees. Just as there is no "working lunch" exception to the gift prohibition, there is no "holiday party" exception. A gift includes anything of monetary value, including a gratuity, favor, discount, entertainment, training, transportation, lodging, and meals. Gifts from outside sources. Generally, as a Federal employee, you may not solicit or accept a gift (1) from a "prohibited source" or (2) if given because of your official position. A "prohibited

228

Pollution on the Federal Lands IV: Liability for Hazardous Waste Disposal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

140. E.g. , the Migratory Bird Treaty Act, 16 U.S.C. §§ 703-Species Act, 619 the Migratory Bird Treaty Act, the Marine

Glicksman, Robert L.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

E-Print Network 3.0 - approved land disposal Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

- Department of Mathematics, University of Western Ontario Collection: Mathematics 3 Automobile Repair Shop In 1987, the Alaska Health Project has performed an audit of an...

230

Chapter 8 - Coal Combustion Residue Disposal Options  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Coal combustion residues (CCRs) are presently regulated as solid waste (Subtitle D) under the Resource Conservation Recovery Act. Such classification promotes beneficial use by end-users i.e. mitigating excessive liability. According to the US Environmental Protection agency (USEPA), about 131 million tons of coal combustion residuals—including 71 million tons of fly ash, 20 million tons of bottom ash and boiler slag, and 40 million tons of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) material—were generated in the US in 2007. Of this, approximately 36% was disposed of in landfills, 21% was disposed of in surface impoundments, 38% was beneficially reused, and 5% was used as minefill. Stringent regulation, as Subtitle C (hazardous waste), would impose a perceived liability upon end-users; greatly reducing beneficial use opportunities. Mandatory use of synthetic liners—would not have prevented dike wall failure and fails to consider inherent engineering characteristics of CCRs.

Richard W. Goodwin

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Technical and philosophical aspects of ocean disposal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Di sposai . Geological aspects Physical aspects Chemical aspects Biological aspects CHAPTER II. TECHNICAL ASPECTS OF OCEAN DISPOSAL Types of Waste Materials. Dredged materiais. Industrial wastes, DomestIc sewage wa tes Solid wastes Radloact..., can reduce the passage of light through the water column and cause damaging effects to the marine ecosystem. Each of five major oceans has pronounced gyral, or circular current motion (Fiaure 1. 1). The North Atlantic current system is comprised...

Zapatka, Marchi Charisse

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Widget:RestrictedIFrame | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Widget Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Widget:RestrictedIFrame Jump to: navigation, search This widget allows you to embed certain web pages from a restricted domain set on your wiki page using an iframe tag. Based on a widget by Sergey Chernyshev To insert this widget, use the following code: {{#Widget:RestrictedIFrame |config=uam |width=400 |height=300 |scrolling=auto |border=0 }} 'config' - possible value(s): uam, uamquestionnaire, tat, wfspnational, wfspmotion (will add more as necessary) Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Widget:RestrictedIFrame&oldid=691586" Category:

233

IFITM Proteins Restrict Viral Membrane Hemifusion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

an intermediate of fusion, referred to as a cold arrestedcold arrested state (CAS), PLOS Pathogens | www.plospathogens.org January 2013 | Volume 9 | Issue 1 | e1003124 Restriction of Viral Membrane Fusion

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Restricting query relaxation through user constraints  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes techniques to restrict and to heuristically control relaxation of deductive database queries. The process of query relaxation provides a user with a means to automatically identify new queries that are related to the user`s original query. However, for large databases, many relaxations may be possible. The methods to control and restrict the relaxation process introduced in this paper focus the relaxation process and make it more efficient. User restrictions over the data base domain may be expressed as user constraints. This paper describes how user constraints can restrict relaxed queries. Also, a set of heuristics based on cooperative answering techniques are presented for controlling the relaxation process. Finally, the interaction of the methods for relaxing queries, processing user constraints, and applying the heuristic rules is described.

Gaasterland, T.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Geochemical aspects of radioactive waste disposal  

SciTech Connect

The book addresses various topics related to the geochemistry of waste disposal: natural radioactivity, kinds of radioactive waste, details of possible disposal sites, low-level waste, uranium mill tailing, natural analogs, waste forms, and engineered barriers. Emphasis throughout is on the importance of natural analogs, the behavior of elements resembling those to be put in a waste repository as they occur in natural situations where the temperature, pressure, and movement of ground water are similar to those expected near a repository. The author is convinced that conclusions drawn from the study of analog elements are directly applicable to predictions about radionuclide behavior, and that the observed near-immobility of most of these elements in comparable geologic environments is good evidence that radioactive waste can be disposed of underground with negligible effects on the biosphere. Much of his own research has been in this area, and the best parts of the book are the descriptions of his work on trace elements in the salt minerals at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in southeastern New Mexico, on the movement of radionuclides and their daughter elements from the famous Precambrian reactor at Oklahoma in Gabon, and on the distribution of analog elements in rocks near the contacts of igneous intrusions.

Brookins, D.G.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Final disposal options for mercury/uranium mixed wastes from the Oak Ridge Reservation  

SciTech Connect

Laboratory testing was completed on chemical stabilization and physical encapsulation methods that are applicable (to comply with federal and state regulations) to the final disposal of both hazardous and mixed hazardous elemental mercury waste that is in either of the following categories: (1) waste generated during decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) activities on mercury-contaminated buildings, such as Building 9201-4 at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, or (2) waste stored and regulated under either the Federal Facilities Compliance Agreement or the Federal Facilities Compliance Act. Methods were used that produced copper-mercury, zinc-mercury, and sulfur-mercury materials at room temperature by dry mixing techniques. Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) results for mercury on batches of both the copper-mercury and the sulfur-mercury amalgams consistently produced leachates with less than the 0.2-mg/L Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) regulatory limit for mercury. The results clearly showed that the reaction of mercury with sulfur at room temperature produces black mercuric sulfide, a material that is well suited for land disposal. The results also showed that the copper-mercury and zinc-mercury amalgams had major adverse properties that make them undesirable for land disposal. In particular, they reacted readily in air to form oxides and liberate elemental mercury. Another major finding of this study is that sulfur polymer cement is potentially useful as a physical encapsulating agent for mercuric sulfide. This material provides a barrier in addition to the chemical stabilization that further prevents mercury, in the form of mercuric sulfide, from migrating into the environment.

Gorin, A.H.; Leckey, J.H.; Nulf, L.E.

1994-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

237

MODIS Land Products Subsets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Global Subsetting and Visualization Tool Global Subsetting and Visualization Tool The Global Subsetting and Visualization Tool provides customized subsets of MODIS Land products in ASCII format on demand for any location on Earth. Users select a site (either from a picklist or by entering the site's geographic coordinates) and the area surrounding that site, from one pixel up to 201 x 201 km. The tool is expected to take up to 60 minutes to complete the processing, and the tool will send you an email message containing the URL where you can access the output. The tool provides time series plots of the measurement, an ASCII file of the pixel values for the selected product along with quality information, average and standard deviations for the area selected, and a file that can be imported directly into GIS software. In addition we provide a land cover grid (IGBP classification) of the area, along with an estimate of heterogeneity (Shannon richness and evenness).

238

Innovative Technique Accelerates Waste Disposal at Idaho Site | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Innovative Technique Accelerates Waste Disposal at Idaho Site Innovative Technique Accelerates Waste Disposal at Idaho Site Innovative Technique Accelerates Waste Disposal at Idaho Site May 15, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis A product drum of mixed low-level waste is lowered into a high-density polyethylene macro-pack. A product drum of mixed low-level waste is lowered into a high-density polyethylene macro-pack. Macro-packs from the Idaho site are shown here safely and compliantly disposed. Macro-packs from the Idaho site are shown here safely and compliantly disposed. A product drum of mixed low-level waste is lowered into a high-density polyethylene macro-pack. Macro-packs from the Idaho site are shown here safely and compliantly disposed. IDAHO FALLS, Idaho - An innovative treatment and disposal technique is enabling the Idaho site to accelerate shipments of legacy nuclear waste for

239

DOE Applauds Opening of Historic Disposal Facility | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Applauds Opening of Historic Disposal Facility Applauds Opening of Historic Disposal Facility DOE Applauds Opening of Historic Disposal Facility June 6, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis The Waste Control Specialists Federal Waste Disposal Facility in Andrews, Texas. The Waste Control Specialists Federal Waste Disposal Facility in Andrews, Texas. ANDREWS, Texas - DOE officials participated in an event today to celebrate the opening of the first commercial disposal facility of its kind. EM Senior Advisor Dave Huizenga and several other federal, state and local officials attended the event at Waste Control Specialists (WCS) in Andrews and witnessed the first container being placed in the new state-of-the-art facility. WCS is a waste processing and disposal company. "I am proud to be here today to celebrate this historic event. We

240

Innovative Technique Accelerates Waste Disposal at Idaho Site | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Innovative Technique Accelerates Waste Disposal at Idaho Site Innovative Technique Accelerates Waste Disposal at Idaho Site Innovative Technique Accelerates Waste Disposal at Idaho Site May 15, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis A product drum of mixed low-level waste is lowered into a high-density polyethylene macro-pack. A product drum of mixed low-level waste is lowered into a high-density polyethylene macro-pack. Macro-packs from the Idaho site are shown here safely and compliantly disposed. Macro-packs from the Idaho site are shown here safely and compliantly disposed. A product drum of mixed low-level waste is lowered into a high-density polyethylene macro-pack. Macro-packs from the Idaho site are shown here safely and compliantly disposed. IDAHO FALLS, Idaho - An innovative treatment and disposal technique is enabling the Idaho site to accelerate shipments of legacy nuclear waste for

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land disposal restrictions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

DOE Applauds Opening of Historic Disposal Facility | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Applauds Opening of Historic Disposal Facility DOE Applauds Opening of Historic Disposal Facility DOE Applauds Opening of Historic Disposal Facility June 6, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis The Waste Control Specialists Federal Waste Disposal Facility in Andrews, Texas. The Waste Control Specialists Federal Waste Disposal Facility in Andrews, Texas. ANDREWS, Texas - DOE officials participated in an event today to celebrate the opening of the first commercial disposal facility of its kind. EM Senior Advisor Dave Huizenga and several other federal, state and local officials attended the event at Waste Control Specialists (WCS) in Andrews and witnessed the first container being placed in the new state-of-the-art facility. WCS is a waste processing and disposal company. "I am proud to be here today to celebrate this historic event. We

242

MODIS Land Products Subsets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

methods methods This section describes methods used to generate MODIS Land Subsets for Collection 4 and Collection 5 data products. Methods for Selected Sites (Collections 4 and 5) Methods for North America Tool (Collection 4) Methods for the Global Tool (Collection 5) Methods for Selected Sites (Collection 4 and 5) Source for Selected Site Data: Full MODIS scenes (1200-km x 1200-km) are initially subset to 11-km x 31-km (Collection 4) or 25-km x 25-km (Collection 5) by the MODAPS; these initial subsets contain the field site or flux tower. Reformatting and additional subsetting to 7-km x 7-km containing the field site or flux tower are done by the ORNL DAAC. Tools Used: The ORNL DAAC uses the MODIS Reprojection Tool (MRT) to reformat the MODIS data from HDF-EOS to binary format. A tool developed at ORNL is then used to convert the binary format to ASCII. The MRT is available from the Land Processes DAAC. Whereas the MRT can also be used to reproject data from its native projection to other projections, ORNL chose to forgo the resampling associated with reprojection to minimize data manipulation and distortion. The MOD12Q1 Land Cover Collection 3 data are in I-Sin projection, and the Collection 4 and Collection 5 data are in Sinusoidal projection.

243

Land Stewardship | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Land Stewardship Land Stewardship Land Stewardship Mission The team advocates improved ecosystem health on LM properties in accordance with DOE Order 430.1B, Real Property Asset Management; federal regulations, such as the Endangered Species Act, the Noxious Weed Act, and the Wetlands and Floodplains Act; and in consideration of LM agreements with regulatory agencies and tribes. The team advocates identifying and proposing land management improvements on LM sites that are beneficial to ecosystems and improve remedy sustainability. Improvements are implemented with consideration of adjacent land uses, owners, and political entities. Success is defined when measurable parameters are achieved. Scope The team identifies and evaluates proposals to enhance ecosystem health at

244

Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 139: Waste Disposal Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 139, Waste Disposal Sites, is listed in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) of 1996 (FFACO, 1996). CAU 139 consists of seven Corrective Action Sites (CASs) located in Areas 3, 4, 6, and 9 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS), which is located approximately 65 miles (mi) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada (Figure 1). CAU 139 consists of the following CASs: CAS 03-35-01, Burn Pit; CAS 04-08-02, Waste Disposal Site; CAS 04-99-01, Contaminated Surface Debris; CAS 06-19-02, Waste Disposal Site/Burn Pit; CAS 06-19-03, Waste Disposal Trenches; CAS 09-23-01, Area 9 Gravel Gertie; and CAS 09-34-01, Underground Detection Station. Details of the site history and site characterization results for CAU 139 are provided in the approved Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) (U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office [NNSA/NSO], 2006) and in the approved Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD) (NNSA/NSO, 2007). The purpose of this Corrective Action Plan (CAP) is to present the detailed scope of work required to implement the recommended corrective actions as specified in Section 4.0 of the approved CADD (NNSA/NSO, 2007). The approved closure activities for CAU 139 include removal of soil and debris contaminated with plutonium (Pu)-239, excavation of geophysical anomalies, removal of surface debris, construction of an engineered soil cover, and implementation of use restrictions (URs). Table 1 presents a summary of CAS-specific closure activities and contaminants of concern (COCs). Specific details of the corrective actions to be performed at each CAS are presented in Section 2.0 of this report.

NSTec Environmental Restoration

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

land requirements | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

requirements requirements Dataset Summary Description This dataset is part of a larger internal dataset at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) that explores various characteristics of large solar electric (both PV and CSP) facilities around the United States. This dataset focuses on the land use characteristics for solar facilities that are either under construction or currently in operation. Source Land-Use Requirements for Solar Power Plants in the United States Date Released June 25th, 2013 (5 months ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords acres area average concentrating solar power csp Density electric hectares km2 land land requirements land use land-use mean photovoltaic photovoltaics PV solar statistics Data application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.spreadsheetml.sheet icon Master Solar Land Use Spreadsheet (xlsx, 1.5 MiB)

246

land use | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

use use Dataset Summary Description This dataset is part of a larger internal dataset at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) that explores various characteristics of large solar electric (both PV and CSP) facilities around the United States. This dataset focuses on the land use characteristics for solar facilities that are either under construction or currently in operation. Source Land-Use Requirements for Solar Power Plants in the United States Date Released June 25th, 2013 (5 months ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords acres area average concentrating solar power csp Density electric hectares km2 land land requirements land use land-use mean photovoltaic photovoltaics PV solar statistics Data application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.spreadsheetml.sheet icon Master Solar Land Use Spreadsheet (xlsx, 1.5 MiB)

247

Microsoft Word - DisposalInSaltDifferentThanDisposalInWIPP.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE Issues Statement Concerning Debates Over DOE Issues Statement Concerning Debates Over Waste Disposal in Salt CARLSBAD, N.M., July 24, 2009 - The U.S. Department of Energy and its Carlsbad Field Office recognize and respect the long history that led to the current regulations that govern operations at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The WIPP is authorized to ship and dispose of transuranic (TRU) waste that was created by U.S. defense programs. TRU waste is a category of waste strictly defined by legislation and legal agreements. The WIPP mission includes the safe disposal of two types of defense-related TRU waste, contact-handled (CH) and remote-handled (RH). Both consist of tools, rags, protective clothing, sludges, soil and other materials contaminated with radioactive

248

LBA Land Use and Land Cover Data Set Released  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LBA Land Use and Land Cover Data Sets Released LBA Land Use and Land Cover Data Sets Released The ORNL DAAC announces the release of two image data sets from the Land Use and Land Cover science theme (LC-15 team), a component of the LBA-ECO Large Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia (LBA). LBA-ECO LC-15 SRTM30 Digital Elevation Model Data, Amazon Basin: 2000 . Data set prepared by S. Saatchi. This data set provides a subset of the SRTM30 Digital Elevation Model (DEM) elevation and standard deviation data (STD of the data points used in the averaging) for the Amazon Basin. SRTM30 is a near-global digital elevation model (DEM) comprising a combination of data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), flown in February, 2000, and the earlier U.S. Geological Survey's GTOPO30 data set.

249

Review of Yucca Mountain Disposal Criticality Studies  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management, submitted a license application for construction authorization of a deep geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, in June of 2008. The license application is currently under review by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. However,on March 3, 2010 the DOE filed a motion requesting withdrawal of the license application. With the withdrawal request and the development of the Blue Ribbon Commission to seek alternative strategies for disposing of spent fuel, the status of the proposed repository at Yucca Mountain is uncertain. What is certain is that spent nuclear fuel (SNF) will continue to be generated and some long-lived components of the SNF will eventually need a disposition path(s). Strategies for the back end of the fuel cycle will continue to be developed and need to include the insights from the experience gained during the development of the Yucca Mountain license application. Detailed studies were performed and considerable progress was made in many key areas in terms of increased understanding of relevant phenomena and issues regarding geologic disposal of SNF. This paper reviews selected technical studies performed in support of the disposal criticality analysis licensing basis and the use of burnup credit. Topics include assembly misload analysis, isotopic and criticality validation, commercial reactor critical analyses, loading curves, alternative waste package and criticality control studies, radial burnup data and effects, and implementation of a conservative application model in the criticality probabilistic evaluation as well as other information that is applicable to operations regarding spent fuel outside the reactor. This paper summarizes the work and significant accomplishments in these areas and provides a resource for future, related activities.

Scaglione, John M [ORNL] [ORNL; Wagner, John C [ORNL] [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Absentee Landowners Near a Military Installation in Texas: Use, Motivation, and Emotional Tie to their Land  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.......................................................... 97 Family land. ........................................................................................................................... 98 Leasing land.... ......................................................................................................................... 117 Leasing land. ....................................................................................................................... 118 Hunting on land...

Dankert, Amber 1980-

2012-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

251

Evaluating land application effects  

SciTech Connect

The Philadelphia, PA Water Department embarked on a land application program of its treated wastewater sludge in 1977. Initially, liquid sludge averaging from 1-5% solids was applied to approximately 400 acres of corn, soybeans, and sod at rates sufficient to supply crop nitrogen needs. During the 1978 through 1984 growing seasons, crops and soils were monitored for heavy metals (bioavailability of cadmium, copper, nickel, chromium, lead and zinc) and in 1984 for PCB accumulation. This report summarizes results of the monitoring program until 1984.

Sarkis, K. (Philadelphia Water Department, PA (USA))

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

SES Post Employment Restrictions | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Post Employment Restrictions Post Employment Restrictions SES Post Employment Restrictions Current SES employees who have begun seeking or negotiating for subsequent non-federal employment must immediately recuse themselves from participation in any official matter that involves the prospective employer as an identified party, such as a grant,contract, application, audit, investigation, or lawsuit. The recusal also must extend to any particular matter of general applicabilitythat affects the discrete industry, economic sector, or other defined class of organizations in which the prospective employeroperates, such as a legislative initiative, regulatory proposal, or policy determination that affects the prospective employer asa member of such class. See 5 CFR Part 2635, Subpart F. Former employees are subject to the provisions described below. Former

253

Summary - Disposal Practices at the Nevada Test Site  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nevada Test Site, NV Nevada Test Site, NV EM Project: Area 5 LLRW & MLLW Disposal ETR Report Date: July 2008 ETR-14 United States Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) External Technical Review of Disposal Practices at the Nevada Test Site Why DOE-EM Did This Review Radioactively contaminated materials from the Nevada Test Site (NTS), other DOE facilities and other federal agencies are disposed of at NTS at two low-level radioactive waste (LLRW) management sites: Areas 3 and 5. Disposal operations at Area 3 have been discontinued, but the facility is available for future disposal. The anticipated closure date for Area 3 is 2027. Area 5 is operating and will be expanded to accept future wastes. LLRW and mixed low-level radioactive waste (MLLW) are disposed of in Area 5 in shallow

254

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Maryland Disposal Site - MD 05  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Maryland Disposal Site - MD 05 Maryland Disposal Site - MD 05 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: MARYLAND DISPOSAL SITE (MD.05 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Baltimore - Vicinity , Maryland MD.05-1 Evaluation Year: 1989 MD.05-1 Site Operations: Proposed disposal site - never developed. MD.05-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated Radioactive Materials Handled: None Indicated Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: None Indicated Radiological Survey(s): None Indicated Site Status: Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Also see Documents Related to MARYLAND DISPOSAL SITE MD.05-1 - Report (DOE/OR/20722-131 Revision 0); Site Plan for the Maryland Disposal Site; April 1989 Historical documents may contain links which are no longer valid or to

255

Deep Borehole Disposal Research: Demonstration Site Selection Guidelines,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Deep Borehole Disposal Research: Demonstration Site Selection Deep Borehole Disposal Research: Demonstration Site Selection Guidelines, Borehole Seals Design, and RD&D Needs Deep Borehole Disposal Research: Demonstration Site Selection Guidelines, Borehole Seals Design, and RD&D Needs The U.S. Department of Energy has been investigating deep borehole disposal as one alternative for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel and other radioactive waste forms, along with research and development for mined repositories in salt, granite, and clay, as part of the used fuel disposition (UFD) campaign. The deep borehole disposal concept consists of drilling a borehole on the order of 5,000 m deep, emplacing waste canisters in the lower part of the borehole, and sealing the upper part of the borehole with bentonite and concrete seals. A reference design of the

256

LANL completes excavation of 1940s waste disposal site  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LANL completes excavation LANL completes excavation LANL completes excavation of 1940s waste disposal site The excavation removed about 43,000 cubic yards of contaminated debris and soil from the six-acre site. September 22, 2011 Workers sample contents of LANL's Material Disposal Area B (MDA-B) before excavation Workers sample contents of LANL's Material Disposal Area B (MDA-B) before excavation. Contact Colleen Curran Communicatons Office (505) 664-0344 Email LOS ALAMOS, New Mexico, September 22, 2011-Los Alamos National Laboratory has completed excavation of its oldest waste disposal site, Material Disposal Area B (MDA-B). The excavation removed about 43,000 cubic yards of contaminated debris and soil from the six-acre site. MDA-B was used from 1944-48 as a waste disposal site for Manhattan Project and Cold War-era research and

257

Used Fuel Disposition Campaign Disposal Research and Development Roadmap |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Used Fuel Disposition Campaign Disposal Research and Development Used Fuel Disposition Campaign Disposal Research and Development Roadmap Used Fuel Disposition Campaign Disposal Research and Development Roadmap The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE), Office of Fuel Cycle Technology (OFCT) has established the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign (UFDC) to conduct the research and development (R&D) activities related to storage, transportation and disposal of used nuclear fuel (UNF) and high level nuclear waste (HLW). The Mission of the UFDC is To identify alternatives and conduct scientific research and technology development to enable storage, transportation and disposal of used nuclear fuel and wastes generated by existing and future nuclear fuel cycles. The U.S. has, for the past twenty-plus years, focused efforts on disposing

258

Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Act (Pennsylvania) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Act (Pennsylvania) Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Act (Pennsylvania) Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Act (Pennsylvania) < Back Eligibility Utility Commercial Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Rural Electric Cooperative Transportation Program Info State Pennsylvania Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection This act provides a comprehensive strategy for the siting of commercial low-level waste compactors and other waste management facilities, and to ensure the proper transportation, disposal and storage of low-level radioactive waste. Commercial incineration of radioactive wastes is prohibited. Licenses are required for low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities not licensed to accept low-level radioactive waste. Disposal at

259

Used Fuel Disposition Campaign Disposal Research and Development Roadmap |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Disposal Research and Development Disposal Research and Development Roadmap Used Fuel Disposition Campaign Disposal Research and Development Roadmap The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE), Office of Fuel Cycle Technology (OFCT) has established the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign (UFDC) to conduct the research and development (R&D) activities related to storage, transportation and disposal of used nuclear fuel (UNF) and high level nuclear waste (HLW). The Mission of the UFDC is To identify alternatives and conduct scientific research and technology development to enable storage, transportation and disposal of used nuclear fuel and wastes generated by existing and future nuclear fuel cycles. The U.S. has, for the past twenty-plus years, focused efforts on disposing

260

Disposal Practices at the Nevada Test Site 2008  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Area 5 LLRW & MLLW Disposal Area 5 LLRW & MLLW Disposal ETR Report Date: July 2008 ETR-14 United States Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) External Technical Review of Disposal Practices at the Nevada Test Site Why DOE-EM Did This Review Radioactively contaminated materials from the Nevada Test Site (NTS), other DOE facilities and other federal agencies are disposed of at NTS at two low-level radioactive waste (LLRW) management sites: Areas 3 and 5. Disposal operations at Area 3 have been discontinued, but the facility is available for future disposal. The anticipated closure date for Area 3 is 2027. Area 5 is operating and will be expanded to accept future wastes. LLRW and mixed low-level radioactive

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land disposal restrictions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Mixed waste disposal facilities at the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River Site (SRS) is a key installation of the US Department of Energy (DOE). The site is managed by DOE's Savannah River Field Office and operated under contract by the Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC). The Site's waste management policies reflect a continuing commitment to the environment. Waste minimization, recycling, use of effective pre-disposal treatments, and repository monitoring are high priorities at the site. One primary objective is to safely treat and dispose of process wastes from operations at the site. To meet this objective, several new projects are currently being developed, including the M-Area Waste Disposal Project (Y-Area) which will treat and dispose of mixed liquid wastes, and the Hazardous Waste/Mixed Waste Disposal Facility (HW/MWDF), which will store, treat, and dispose of solid mixed and hazardous wastes. This document provides a description of this facility and its mission.

Wells, M.N.; Bailey, L.L.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Mixed waste disposal facilities at the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River Site (SRS) is a key installation of the US Department of Energy (DOE). The site is managed by DOE`s Savannah River Field Office and operated under contract by the Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC). The Site`s waste management policies reflect a continuing commitment to the environment. Waste minimization, recycling, use of effective pre-disposal treatments, and repository monitoring are high priorities at the site. One primary objective is to safely treat and dispose of process wastes from operations at the site. To meet this objective, several new projects are currently being developed, including the M-Area Waste Disposal Project (Y-Area) which will treat and dispose of mixed liquid wastes, and the Hazardous Waste/Mixed Waste Disposal Facility (HW/MWDF), which will store, treat, and dispose of solid mixed and hazardous wastes. This document provides a description of this facility and its mission.

Wells, M.N.; Bailey, L.L.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

263

Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Regional Facility Act (Pennsylvania) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Regional Facility Act Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Regional Facility Act (Pennsylvania) Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Regional Facility Act (Pennsylvania) < Back Eligibility Utility Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Program Info State Pennsylvania Program Type Environmental Regulations Fees This act establishes a low-level radioactive waste disposal regional facility siting fund that requires nuclear power reactor constructors and operators to pay to the Department of Environmental Resources funds to be utilized for disposal facilities. This act ensures that nuclear facilities and the Department comply with the Low-Level Radioactive Disposal Act. The regional facility siting fund is used for reimbursement of expenses

264

MODIS Land Products Subsets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Geography of the MODIS Land Subsets for selected Field Sites Geography of the MODIS Land Subsets for selected Field Sites The 7- x 7-km grid containing the field or tower site is provided to enable comparison of pixel values of MODIS products with field data collected at a site. The values are intended to be examined over time either as a collection of individual values or combined (e.g., the average and range) within a 3- x 3-km grid or a 5- x 5-km grid around the site. Examples of analyses using the ASCII subset data can be found in presentations. If users would like to examine the MODIS data spatially in a map, we suggest that they obtain the GeoTIFF subsets or MODIS products from the LP DAAC. Please note that the grid and pixel sizes are not exact multiples of 1 km, but are only approximations. For instance, the grid and pixel size for the 1 km Sinusoidal grid is approximately 926 m. For additional information, please view the MODIS Web site.

265

Reactor Pressure Vessel Head Packaging & Disposal  

SciTech Connect

Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) Head replacements have come to the forefront due to erosion/corrosion and wastage problems resulting from the susceptibility of the RPV Head alloy steel material to water/boric acid corrosion from reactor coolant leakage through the various RPV Head penetrations. A case in point is the recent Davis-Besse RPV Head project, where detailed inspections in early 2002 revealed significant wastage of head material adjacent to one of the Control Rod Drive Mechanism (CRDM) nozzles. In lieu of making ASME weld repairs to the damaged head, Davis-Besse made the decision to replace the RPV Head. The decision was made on the basis that the required weld repair would be too extensive and almost impractical. This paper presents the packaging, transport, and disposal considerations for the damaged Davis-Besse RPV Head. It addresses the requirements necessary to meet Davis Besse needs, as well as the regulatory criteria, for shipping and burial of the head. It focuses on the radiological characterization, shipping/disposal package design, site preparation and packaging, and the transportation and emergency response plans that were developed for the Davis-Besse RPV Head project.

Wheeler, D. M.; Posivak, E.; Freitag, A.; Geddes, B.

2003-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

266

Municipal solid waste disposal in Portugal  

SciTech Connect

In recent years municipal solid waste (MSW) disposal has been one of the most important environmental problems for all of the Portuguese regions. The basic principles of MSW management in Portugal are: (1) prevention or reduction, (2) reuse, (3) recovery (e.g., recycling, incineration with heat recovery), and (4) polluter-pay principle. A brief history of legislative trends in waste management is provided herein as background for current waste management and recycling activities. The paper also presents and discusses the municipal solid waste management in Portugal and is based primarily on a national inquiry carried out in 2003 and directed to the MSW management entities. Additionally, the MSW responsibility and management structure in Portugal is presented, together with the present situation of production, collection, recycling, treatment and elimination of MSW. Results showed that 96% of MSW was collected mixed (4% was separately collected) and that 68% was disposed of in landfill, 21% was incinerated at waste-to-energy plants, 8% was treated at organic waste recovery plants and 3% was delivered to sorting. The average generation rate of MSW was 1.32 kg/capita/day.

Magrinho, Alexandre [Mechanical Engineering Department, Escola Superior de Tecnologia de Setubal, Campus IPS, Estefanilha, Setubal (Portugal); Didelet, Filipe [Mechanical Engineering Department, Escola Superior de Tecnologia de Setubal, Campus IPS, Estefanilha, Setubal (Portugal); Semiao, Viriato [Mechanical Engineering Department, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisbon (Portugal)]. E-mail: ViriatoSemiao@ist.utl.pt

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Iraq nuclear facility dismantlement and disposal project  

SciTech Connect

The Al Tuwaitha nuclear complex near Baghdad contains a significant number of nuclear facilities from Saddam Hussein's dictatorship. Because of past military operations, lack of upkeep and looting there is now an enormous radioactive waste problem at Al Tuwaitha. Al Tuwaitha contains uncharacterised radioactive wastes, yellow cake, sealed radioactive sources, and contaminated metals. The current security situation in Iraq hampers all aspects of radioactive waste management. Further, Iraq has never had a radioactive waste disposal facility, which means that ever increasing quantities of radioactive waste and material must be held in guarded storage. The Iraq Nuclear Facility Dismantlement and Disposal Program (the NDs Program) has been initiated by the U.S. Department of State (DOS) to assist the Government of Iraq (GOI) in eliminating the threats from poorly controlled radioactive materials, while building human capacities so that the GOI can manage other environmental cleanups in their country. The DOS has funded the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to provide technical assistance to the GOI via a Technical Cooperation Project. Program coordination will be provided by the DOS, consistent with U.S. and GOI policies, and Sandia National Laboratories will be responsible for coordination of participants and for providing waste management support. Texas Tech University will continue to provide in-country assistance, including radioactive waste characterization and the stand-up of the Iraq Nuclear Services Company. The GOI owns the problems in Iraq and will be responsible for the vast majority of the implementation of the NDs Program. (authors)

Cochran, J.R.; Danneels, J. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Kenagy, W.D. [U.S. Department of State, Bureau of International Security and Nonproliferation, Office of Nuclear Energy, Safety and Security, Washington, DC (United States); Phillips, C.J.; Chesser, R.K. [Center for Environmental Radiation Studies, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Volatility clustering in land markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

analysis. Applying a Lagrange Multiplier (LM) test for AutoRegressive Conditional Heteroskedasticity (ARCH) effects in the Canadian land markets, we find that clustering in land price returns exists in Alberta, Ontario, Quebec, and British Columbia... by even higher volatility and vice versa. III. Data and Descriptive Statistics The monthly land price index for each individual province is obtained from Statistics Canada, covering all of the Canadian provinces (Alberta, Ontario, Quebec...

Bao, Helen X. H.; Huang, Hui; Huang, Yu-Lieh; Lin, Pin-te

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

E-Print Network 3.0 - activity restrictions influence Sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

: 1. SUMMARY OF LEGAL REQUIREMENTS AND RESTRICTIONS 2. PROHIBITED AND RESTRICTED POLITICAL ACTIVITIES... REQUIREMENTS AND RESTRICTIONS a. Campaign Activities -- Contributions...

270

Revision of the Record of Decision for the Department of Energy's Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Disposal Phase  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

56 56 Federal Register / Vol. 69, No. 125 / Wednesday, June 30, 2004 / Notices 1 In addition to more significant quantities of PCB-contaminated waste already at the Hanford site, DOE transferred a small amount of TRU waste with PCBs (4 cubic meters) from the Energy Technology Engineering Site in California to Hanford in December 2002 for characterization, repackaging, and storage pending shipment to WIPP. 67 FR 56989 (Sept. 6, 2002). At that time, DOE designated that particular waste for disposal at WIPP in accordance with the WIPP Land Withdrawal Act. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Revision to the Record of Decision for the Department of Energy's Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Disposal Phase AGENCY: Department of Energy. ACTION: Revision to record of decision. SUMMARY: The Department of Energy

271

Human health-risk assessment for municipal-sludge disposal: benefits of alternative regulatory options. Draft report  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses numerical criteria for the reuse and disposal of municipal sewage sludge and evaluates reductions in human health risks or benefits derived from controlling sludge-disposal practices. Quantitative aggregate risk estimates are projected for 31 contaminants for each of the key sludge-management practices: incineration; monofilling; land application (food chain and non-food chain); and distribution and marketing. The study utilizes state-of-the-art fate, transport, and exposure methodologies in predicting environmental concentrations. The analysis evaluates a number of human-exposure routes including dietary, drinking water, and inhalation pathways. The analysis couples this information with national and local populations exposed along with the Agency's most recent health-effects data in assessing risks. A methodology for quantitatively assessing non-carcinogenic effects from exposure to lead is introduced.

Not Available

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Will new disposal regulations undo decades of progress?  

SciTech Connect

In 1980, the Belville Amendments to RCRA instructed EPA to 'conduct a detailed and comprehensive study and submit a report' to Congress on the 'adverse effects on human health and the environment, if any, of the disposal and utilization' of coal ash. In both 1988 and 1999, EPA submitted reports to Congress and recommended coal ash should not be regulated as hazardous waste. After the failure of a Tennesse power plant's coal ash disposal facility, EPA will be proposing new disposal regulations.

Ward, J. [John Ward Inc. (United States)

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Remedial Action and Waste Disposal Conduct of OperationsMatrix  

SciTech Connect

This Conduct of Operations (CONOPS) matrix incorporates the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF) CONOPS matrix (BHI-00746, Rev. 0). The ERDF CONOPS matrix has been expanded to cover all aspects of the RAWD project. All remedial action and waste disposal (RAWD) operations, including waste remediation, transportation, and disposal at the ERDF consist of construction-type activities as opposed to nuclear power plant-like operations. In keeping with this distinction, the graded approach has been applied to the developmentof this matrix.

M. A. Casbon.

1999-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

274

Commercial low-level radioactive waste disposal in the US  

SciTech Connect

Why are 11 states attempting to develop new low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities? Why is only on disposal facility accepting waste nationally? What is the future of waste disposal? These questions are representative of those being asked throughout the country. This paper attempts to answer these questions in terms of where we are, how we got there, and where we might be going.

Smith, P.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Selected biological investigations on deep sea disposal of industrial wastes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

found at an actual disposal site with respect to waste dilution with time. This technique was incorporated into the standard 96-hour bioassay test to afford a means of obtaining preliminary information regarding the bioaccumulation of each waste... with time from the 16 ocean dispose 1 study by Ball (1973) Laboratory dilution setup used to simulate conditions found at an actual disposal site with regard to waste dilution. 18 20 CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION Until recently man haS considered...

Page, Sandra Lea

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

276

System design for disposal of tritium at TFTR  

SciTech Connect

The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) has cleanup systems which convert tritium gas to the oxide form and absorb it on molecular sieve beds. These beds are regenerated by transferring their moisture content to disposable sieve beds. Preparing this sieve for disposal can be awkward and hazardous. Monitoring the tritium and moisture content of the disposable sieve is not straightforward. Modifications to the regeneration system at the TFTR are being made to address these concerns and others relating to maintainability.

Tuohy, J.M.; Cherdack, R.; Lacy, N.H.

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Land Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

on harnessing biomass. Activities include wood-pellet production, biomass-combined heat and power and forestry and energy-crop development. References: Land Energy1 This...

278

Dredged and Fill Material Disposal (North Dakota) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Dredged and Fill Material Disposal (North Dakota) Dredged and Fill Material Disposal (North Dakota) Dredged and Fill Material Disposal (North Dakota) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State North Dakota Program Type Siting and Permitting This chapter provides regulations for the disposal of dredged and fill

279

Hazardous Waste Treatment, Storage and Disposal Facilities (TSDF...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Treatment, Storage and Disposal Facilities (TSDF) Guidance Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library PermittingRegulatory Guidance - GuideHandbook:...

280

South Carolina Radioactive Waste Transportation and Disposal Act (South Carolina)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Department of Health and Environmental Control is responsible for regulating the transportation of radioactive waste, with some exceptions, into or within the state for storage, disposal, or...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land disposal restrictions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Depleted uranium storage and disposal trade study: Summary report  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this study were to: identify the most desirable forms for conversion of depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF6) for extended storage, identify the most desirable forms for conversion of DUF6 for disposal, evaluate the comparative costs for extended storage or disposal of the various forms, review benefits of the proposed plasma conversion process, estimate simplified life-cycle costs (LCCs) for five scenarios that entail either disposal or beneficial reuse, and determine whether an overall optimal form for conversion of DUF6 can be selected given current uncertainty about the endpoints (specific disposal site/technology or reuse options).

Hightower, J.R.; Trabalka, J.R.

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Canister design for deep borehole disposal of nuclear waste .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The objective of this thesis was to design a canister for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel and other high-level waste in deep borehole repositories… (more)

Hoag, Christopher Ian.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Erosion Control and Revegetation at DOE's Lowman Disposal Site...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Site, Lowman, Idaho More Documents & Publications Title I Disposal Sites Annual Report Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Program 2003 Report Revegetation of the Rocky Flats...

284

Disposal Practices at the Savannah River Site | Department of...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Site More Documents & Publications Compilation of ETR Summaries Disposal Practices at the Nevada Test Site 2008 Briefing: DOE EM ITR Landfill Assessment Project Lessons Learned...

285

Solid Waste Disposal Facilities (Massachusetts) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Solid Waste Disposal Facilities (Massachusetts) Solid Waste Disposal Facilities (Massachusetts) Solid Waste Disposal Facilities (Massachusetts) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative State/Provincial Govt Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Massachusetts Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Environmental Protection These sections articulate rules for the maintenance and operation of solid waste disposal facilities, as well as site assignment procedures. Applications for site assignment will be reviewed by the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection as well as the Department of Public

286

IDRISI Land Change Modeler | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

IDRISI Land Change Modeler IDRISI Land Change Modeler Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: IDRISI Land Change Modeler Agency/Company /Organization: Clark Labs Sector: Land Focus Area: Agriculture, Forestry Topics: Co-benefits assessment, - Environmental and Biodiversity, Resource assessment Resource Type: Maps, Software/modeling tools User Interface: Desktop Application Website: www.clarklabs.org/ Cost: Paid IDRISI Land Change Modeler Screenshot References: IDRISI Land Change Modeler[1] Overview "The Land Change Modeler is revolutionary land cover change analysis and prediction software with tools to analyze, measure and project the impacts of such change on habitat and biodiversity." References ↑ "IDRISI Land Change Modeler" Retrieved from

287

MODIS Land Products Subsets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Introduction Introduction Collection 5 The MODIS data from the Terra and Aqua satellites are being reprocessed using revised algorithms beginning in September 2006. This new set of MODIS Products is called Collection 5. To view the product changes that took place in going from Collection 4 to Collection 5, please visit the following Web site: http://landweb.nascom.nasa.gov/cgi-bin/QA_WWW/newPage.cgi?fileName=MODLAND_C005_changes The ORNL DAAC provides subsets of the Collection 5 MODIS Land Products. Investigators from around the world have shown a great deal of interest in this activity, asking that over 1000 field and flux tower sites be included in Collection 5 subsetting (up from 280 sites for Collection 4 MODIS subsetting). Availability of the Collection 5 Data Products

288

MODIS Land Products Subsets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Data for Selected Field Sites (n=1147) Data for Selected Field Sites (n=1147) Obtain MODIS data for areas centered on selected field sites or flux towers from around the world. The goal of the MODIS Subsets for Selected Field Sites is to prepare summaries of selected MODIS Land Products for the community to use for validation of models and remote sensing products and to characterize field sites. Search for data: By Site from a Map Server from Google Earth (Install Google Earth) From FTP site (ASCII) Methods Data products were first subsetted from one or more 1200x1200-km MODIS tiles to 25 x 25-km arrays by the MODIS Science Data Support Team (MODAPS). These products were further subsetted (7x7) and reformatted from their native HDF-EOS to ASCII using version 2.2 of the MODIS Reprojection Tool (MRT) in combination with code developed at the ORNL DAAC.

289

MODIS Land Products Subsets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MODIS ASCII Subset Products - FTP Access MODIS ASCII Subset Products - FTP Access All of the MODIS ASCII Subsets are available from the ORNL DAAC's ftp site. The directory structure of the ftp site is based on the abbreviated names for the MODIS Products. Terra MODIS products are abbreviated "MOD", Aqua MODIS products are abbreviated "MYD" and combined Terra and Aqua MODIS products are abbreviated "MCD". The abbreviated names also include the version number (also known as collection). For specific products, please refer to the following table: Product Acronym Spatial Resolution Temporal Frequency Terra V005 SIN Aqua V005 SIN Terra/Aqua Combined V005 SIN Surface Reflectance SREF 500 m 8 day composites MOD09A1 MYD09A1 ---------- Land Surface Temperature and Emissivity TEMP 1 km 8 day composites MOD11A2 MYD11A2 ----------

290

Sorting and disposal of hazardous laboratory Radioactive waste  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sorting and disposal of hazardous laboratory waste Radioactive waste Solid radioactive waste or in a Perspex box. Liquid radioactive waste collect in a screw-cap plastic bottle, ½ or 1 L size. Place bottles in a tray to avoid spill Final disposal of both solid and radioactive waste into the yellow barrel

Maoz, Shahar

291

1 INSTRODUCTION In the concept of geological radioactive waste disposal,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 INSTRODUCTION In the concept of geological radioactive waste disposal, argillite is being of the radioactive waste disposal, the host rock will be subjected to various thermo-hydro-mechanical loadings, thermal solicitation comes from the heat emitting from the radioactive waste packages. On one hand

Boyer, Edmond

292

A model approach to radioactive waste disposal at Sellafield  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A model approach to radioactive waste disposal at Sellafield R. 5. Haszeldine* and C. Mc of the great environmentalproblems of our age is the safe disposal of radioactive waste for geological time periods. Britain is currently investigating a potential site for underground burial of waste, near

Haszeldine, Stuart

293

User Guide for Disposal of Unwanted Items and Electronic Waste  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is the Recycle department at 502-6808 o For more information on the UCSF Sustainability program visit: http://sustainability.ucsf.edu/stay_informed/recycling_resources consulting support Ensuring proper reuse, recycle, or disposal Maintaining regulatory and policy compliance metal and wood o Waste/trash management o Recycle, reuse or disposal of materials D&S does not process o

Mullins, Dyche

294

Land Record System PIA, Bonneville Power Administration | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Land Record System PIA, Bonneville Power Administration Land Record System PIA, Bonneville Power Administration Land Record System PIA, Bonneville Power Administration Land Record...

295

Progress in Direct Experiments on the Ocean Disposal of Fossil Fuel CO2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for the First National Conference on Carbon Sequestration, Washington D.C. May 14-17, 2001 for the First National Conference on Carbon Sequestration, Washington D.C. May 14-17, 2001 US DoE-NETL Progress in Direct Experiments on the Ocean Disposal of Fossil Fuel CO 2 Peter G. Brewer (brpe@mbari.org; 831-626-6618) Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute 7700 Sandholdt Road Moss Landing CA 95039 Introduction. My laboratory has now been engaged in carrying out small scale controlled field experiments on the ocean sequestration of fossil fuel CO 2 for about five years, and the field has changed enormously in that time. We have gone from theoretical assessments to experimental results, and from cartoon sketches of imagined outcomes to high-resolution video images of experiments on the ocean floor shared around the world. It seems appropriate therefore to give a brief review, albeit one very much from a

296

Used Fuel Disposition Campaign Disposal Research and Development Roadmap  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Disposal Research and Development Disposal Research and Development Roadmap Rev. 01 Used Fuel Disposition Campaign Disposal Research and Development Roadmap Rev. 01 The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE), Office of Fuel Cycle Technology (OFCT) has established the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign (UFDC) to conduct the research and development (R&D) activities related to storage, transportation and disposal of used nuclear fuel (UNF) and high level nuclear waste (HLW) generated by existing and future nuclear fuel cycles. The disposal of SNF and HLW in a range of geologic media has been investigated internationally. Considerable progress has been made in the U.S and other nations, but gaps in knowledge still exist. This document provides an evaluation and prioritization of R&D opportunities

297

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Cheney Disposal Cell - 008  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cheney Disposal Cell - 008 Cheney Disposal Cell - 008 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Cheney Disposal Cell (008) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location: Evaluation Year: Site Operations: Site Disposition: Radioactive Materials Handled: Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Radiological Survey(s): Site Status: All of the uranium mill tailings and other residual radioactive materials from the former Grand Junction uranium mill site were disposed of in this dedicated disposal cell. The cell is authorized to remain open until 2003 to accept any additional byproduct materials from Title I UMTRA sites and the Monticello, Utah site; e.g. materials from additional vicinity properties that may be identified. The Department of Energy¿s Grand Junction Office is responsible for Long Term Surveillance and Maintenance

298

Summary - Disposal Practices at the Savannah River Site  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ETR-19 United States Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) External Technical Review of the Disposal Practices at the Savannah River Site Why DOE-EM Did This Review Disposal operations have been ongoing at the Savannah River Site (SRS) for over 50 years. Active disposal in E-Area, is near the center of the site. Although a wide range of wastes are being managed at the SRS, only low level radioactive wastes (LLRW) are disposed of on site. Wastes are disposed of in unlined slit and engineered trenches, and in low activity waste and intermediate level vaults. Some wastes are isolated in place with grout and all wastes will be covered with a cap that includes a hydraulic barrier to limit precipitation infiltration. The objective of this review was to

299

Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility Federal Review Group Manual  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

LEVEL WASTE DISPOSAL FACILITY FEDERAL REVIEW GROUP MANUAL REVISION 3 JUNE 2008 (This page intentionally left blank) Low-Level JVllsfe Disposal Fllcili~l' Federal Review Group il1allUlli Revision 3, June 200S Concurrence The Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility Federal Review Group Manual, Revision 3, is approved for use as of the most recent date below. Date Chair, Low-Level Waste Disposal Federal Review Group Andrew WalJo, 1II Deputy Director, Otlice of Nuclear Safety, Quality Assurance, and Environment Department of Energy OHlce of Health, Safety, and Security e C. WilJiams Associate Administrator for Infrastructure and Environment National Nuclear Security Administration Low-Level 'Vaste Disposal Facility Federal Review Group J1aJll/ai

300

NNSA Reaches LEU Disposal Milestone | National Nuclear Security  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Reaches LEU Disposal Milestone | National Nuclear Security Reaches LEU Disposal Milestone | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > About Us > Our History > NNSA Timeline > NNSA Reaches LEU Disposal Milestone NNSA Reaches LEU Disposal Milestone November 08, 2004 Aiken, SC NNSA Reaches LEU Disposal Milestone The National Nuclear Security Administration's reached an important

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land disposal restrictions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

OAK RIDGE CERCLA DISPOSAL FACILITY ACHIEVES SAFETY MILESTONE | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

OAK RIDGE CERCLA DISPOSAL FACILITY ACHIEVES SAFETY MILESTONE OAK RIDGE CERCLA DISPOSAL FACILITY ACHIEVES SAFETY MILESTONE OAK RIDGE CERCLA DISPOSAL FACILITY ACHIEVES SAFETY MILESTONE December 1, 2010 - 12:00pm Addthis OAK RIDGE CERCLA DISPOSAL FACILITY ACHIEVES SAFETY MILESTONE Oak Ridge, TN - The Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF) provides the onsite disposal capability for the majority of cleanup-generated wastes on the Oak Ridge Reservation. EMWMF has continued a long-standing pattern of safe, complaint operations with 3,000 days without a lost workday case since operations commenced on May 28, 2002. The EMWMF has placed 1.5 million tons of waste and fill in the facility. The EMWMF receives waste from many Oak Ridge cleanup projects, including American Recovery and Reinvestment Act-funded projects, multiple

302

Drilling Waste Management Fact Sheet: Offsite Disposal at Commercial  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Commercial Disposal Facilities Commercial Disposal Facilities Fact Sheet - Commercial Disposal Facilities Although drilling wastes from many onshore wells are managed at the well site, some wastes cannot be managed onsite. Likewise, some types of offshore drilling wastes cannot be discharged, so they are either injected underground at the platform (not yet common in the United States) or are hauled back to shore for disposal. According to an American Petroleum Institute waste survey, the exploration and production segment of the U.S. oil and gas industry generated more than 360 million barrels (bbl) of drilling wastes in 1985. The report estimates that 28% of drilling wastes are sent to offsite commercial facilities for disposal (Wakim 1987). A similar American Petroleum Institute study conducted ten years later found that the volume of drilling waste had declined substantially to about 150 million bbl.

303

Research, Development, and Demonstration Roadmap for Deep Borehole Disposal  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Research, Development, and Demonstration Roadmap for Deep Borehole Research, Development, and Demonstration Roadmap for Deep Borehole Disposal Research, Development, and Demonstration Roadmap for Deep Borehole Disposal This roadmap is intended to advance deep borehole disposal (DBD) from its current conceptual status to potential future deployment as a disposal system for spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level waste (HLW). The objectives of the DBD RD&D roadmap include providing the technical basis for fielding a DBD demonstration project, defining the scientific research activities associated with site characterization and postclosure safety, as well as defining the engineering demonstration activities associated with deep borehole drilling, completion, and surrogate waste canister emplacement. Research, Development, and Demonstration Roadmap for Deep Borehole Disposal

304

Gravito-magnetic vacuum spacetimes: kinematic restrictions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We show that there are no vacuum solutions with a purely magnetic Weyl tensor with respect to an observer submitted to kinematic restrictions involving first order differential scalars. This result generalizes previous ones for the vorticity-free and shear-free cases. We use a covariant approach which makes evident that only the Bianchi identities are used and, consequently, the results are also valid for non vacuum solutions with vanishing Cotton tensor.

J. J. Ferrando; J. A. Saez

2003-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

305

Guide for revegetation of mined land in Eastern United States using municipal sludge  

SciTech Connect

The use of municipal sewage sludge to reclaim and revegetate land disturbed by mining activity could deal with two major problems (the 60% of land still unreclaimed and the increasing problem of finding landfills for sewage sludge disposal). An alternative to using sludge as an agricultural fertilizer (and possibly introducing heavy metals into the food chain) is to reclaim marginal and disturbed lands. Guidelines for metal loadings in sludge application for reclamation suggest following those developed for agricultural applications. Regulations to date only cover cadmium, but the guidelines include lead, zinc, curium, and niobium. Other regulations cover permit applications, public participation, site investigations, constraints based on the sludge characteristics, and the selection and management of vegetations. A monitoring program is necessary to assure compliance. The appendix identifies appropriate plants for revegetation. 97 references, 12 figures, 12 tables.

Sopper, W.E.; Seaker, E.M.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Second performance assessment iteration of the Greater Confinement Disposal facility at the Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect

The Greater Confinement Disposal (GCD) facility was established in Area 5 at the Nevada Test Site for containment of waste inappropriate for shallow land burial. Some transuranic (TRU) waste has been disposed of at the GCD facility, and compliance of this disposal system with EPA regulation 40 CFR 191 must be evaluated. We have adopted an iterative approach in which performance assessment results guide site data collection, which in turn influences the parameters and models used in performance assessment. The first iteration was based upon readily available data, and indicated that the GCD facility would likely comply with 40 CFR 191 and that the downward flux of water through the vadose zone (recharge) had a major influence on the results. Very large recharge rates, such as might occur under a cooler, wetter climate, could result in noncompliance. A project was initiated to study recharge in Area 5 by use of three environmental tracers. The recharge rate is so small that the nearest groundwater aquifer will not be contaminated in less than 10,000 years. Thus upward liquid diffusion of radionuclides remained as the sole release pathway. This second assessment iteration refined the upward pathway models and updated the parameter distributions based upon new site information. A new plant uptake model was introduced to the upward diffusion pathway; adsorption and erosion were also incorporated into the model. Several modifications were also made to the gas phase radon transport model. Plutonium solubility and sorption coefficient distributions were changed based upon new information, and on-site measurements were used to update the moisture content distributions. The results of the assessment using these models indicate that the GCD facility is likely to comply with all sections of 40 CFR 191 under undisturbed conditions.

Baer, T.A.; Emery, J.N. [GRAM, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Price, L.L. [Science Applications International Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Olague, N.E. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

GRR/Section 3-TX-f - Lease of Land Trade Lands | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 3-TX-f - Lease of Land Trade Lands GRR/Section 3-TX-f - Lease of Land Trade Lands < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 3-TX-f - Lease of Land Trade Lands 03-TX-f - Lease of Land Trade Lands.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 03-TX-f - Lease of Land Trade Lands.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative This flowchart illustrates the process of leasing Land Trade Lands in Texas. The Texas General Land Office (GLO) administers leases on Land Trade Lands through Title 31 of the Texas Administrative Code Section 155.42.

308

Land application of sludge  

SciTech Connect

This book is the proceedings of a workshop held in Las Vegas, NV in 1985 entitled Effects of Sewage Sludge Quality and Soil Properties on Plant Uptake of Sludge-Applied Trace Constituents. The workshop was in response to the need to utilize the most current available information in the development of regulations and criteria to safely apply and manage the land application of municipal sewage sludge. The participants were undoubtedly the most knowledgeable of this subject matter, and were divided into five separate but related task groups. The groups addressed the following sludge-related topics: (1) role of soil properties on accumulation of trace element by crops; (2) role of sludge properties on accumulation of trace elements by crops; (3) influence of long-term application on accumulation of trace elements by crops; (4) transfer of trace elements to the food chain, and (5) effects of trace organics in agroecosystems and their risk assessment to humans. The text, therefore, parallels those of the results of the task groups. The five main chapters followed a similar format, i.e., having an introduction section, a comprehensive literature review, discussion of recent and current data, and synthesis of the most relevant information.

Page, A.L.; Logan, T.J.; Ryan, J.A. (eds.)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

UC land grants: A photo history  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Berkeley UC land grants: A photo history D Early days: 1862–UCR/CMP UC land grants: A photo history H. In 1987, UC

Editors, By

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

State Land Commission FAQ | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Commission FAQ Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: State Land Commission FAQ Abstract Frequently Asked Questions, California State Land...

311

Generic Argillite/Shale Disposal Reference Case  

SciTech Connect

Radioactive waste disposal in a deep subsurface repository hosted in clay/shale/argillite is a subject of widespread interest given the desirable isolation properties, geochemically reduced conditions, and widespread geologic occurrence of this rock type (Hansen 2010; Bianchi et al. 2013). Bianchi et al. (2013) provides a description of diffusion in a clay-hosted repository based on single-phase flow and full saturation using parametric data from documented studies in Europe (e.g., ANDRA 2005). The predominance of diffusive transport and sorption phenomena in this clay media are key attributes to impede radionuclide mobility making clay rock formations target sites for disposal of high-level radioactive waste. The reports by Hansen et al. (2010) and those from numerous studies in clay-hosted underground research laboratories (URLs) in Belgium, France and Switzerland outline the extensive scientific knowledge obtained to assess long-term clay/shale/argillite repository isolation performance of nuclear waste. In the past several years under the UFDC, various kinds of models have been developed for argillite repository to demonstrate the model capability, understand the spatial and temporal alteration of the repository, and evaluate different scenarios. These models include the coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical (THM) and Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical-Chemical (THMC) models (e.g. Liu et al. 2013; Rutqvist et al. 2014a, Zheng et al. 2014a) that focus on THMC processes in the Engineered Barrier System (EBS) bentonite and argillite host hock, the large scale hydrogeologic model (Bianchi et al. 2014) that investigates the hydraulic connection between an emplacement drift and surrounding hydrogeological units, and Disposal Systems Evaluation Framework (DSEF) models (Greenberg et al. 2013) that evaluate thermal evolution in the host rock approximated as a thermal conduction process to facilitate the analysis of design options. However, the assumptions and the properties (parameters) used in these models are different, which not only make inter-model comparisons difficult, but also compromise the applicability of the lessons learned from one model to another model. The establishment of a reference case would therefore be helpful to set up a baseline for model development. A generic salt repository reference case was developed in Freeze et al. (2013) and the generic argillite repository reference case is presented in this report. The definition of a reference case requires the characterization of the waste inventory, waste form, waste package, repository layout, EBS backfill, host rock, and biosphere. This report mainly documents the processes in EBS bentonite and host rock that are potentially important for performance assessment and properties that are needed to describe these processes, with brief description other components such as waste inventory, waste form, waste package, repository layout, aquifer, and biosphere. A thorough description of the generic argillite repository reference case will be given in Jové Colon et al. (2014).

Zheng, Liange; Jov& #233; Colon, Carlos; Bianchi, Marco; Birkholzer, Jens

2014-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

312

Selection of a method for disposing of leachate grout  

SciTech Connect

A major component of the selected remedy for the remediation of the Maxey Flats Disposal Site (MFDS) is the removal, solidification, and on-site disposal of an estimated 3000000 gal of trench leachate. The Record of Decision (ROD) and its predecessor, the Maxey Flats Feasibility Study Report, proposed as a representative process option that the trench leachate be solidified in the form of large (8 x 8 x 4 ft) concrete blocks and disposed of in trenches. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) had recent experience with this method when solidifying and disposing of {approximately}300000 gal of leachate that was stored in above-ground tanks at the MFDS. The EPA experience proved the capability of a U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC)-approved grout mix to satisfy the requirements of 10CFR61.55-56 for the Class-A liquid waste at the site, i.e., the leachate. However, a technical evaluation of the overall solidification/disposal process implemented by the EPA identified some steps that should be improved if this method is to be implemented safely and efficiently for the solidification and disposal of trench leachate as part of the remedial action. In the light of the EPA experience, the present study modified the option proposed in the ROD to make it more workable. This study also evaluated other methods, including three methods for above grade disposal.

Cockrell, R.G.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

313

Safer Transportation and Disposal of Remote Handled Transuranic Waste - 12033  

SciTech Connect

Since disposal of remote handled (RH) transuranic (TRU) waste at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) began in 2007, the Department of Energy (DOE) has had difficulty meeting the plans and schedule for disposing this waste. PECOS Management Services, Inc. (PECOS) assessed the feasibility of proposed alternate RH-TRU mixed waste containerisation concepts that would enhance the transportation rate of RH-TRU waste to WIPP and increase the utilization of available WIPP space capacity for RH-TRU waste disposal by either replacing or augmenting current and proposed disposal methods. In addition engineering and operational analyses were conducted that addressed concerns regarding criticality, heat release, and worker exposure to radiation. The results of the analyses showed that the concept, development, and use of a concrete pipe based design for an RH-TRU waste shipping and disposal container could be potentially advantageous for disposing a substantial quantity of RHTRU waste at WIPP in the same manner as contact-handled RH waste. Additionally, this new disposal method would eliminate the hazard associated with repackaging this waste in other containers without the requirement for NRC approval for a new shipping container. (authors)

Rojas, Vicente; Timm, Christopher M.; Fox, Jerry V. [PECOS Management Services, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

solar land use | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

solar land use solar land use Home Rosborne318's picture Submitted by Rosborne318(5) Member 2 December, 2013 - 11:06 Request for Information Renewable Energy Generation/Production Shreveport Airport Authority - Response Deadline 2 January 2014 pv land use Solar solar land use Solar Power The Shreveport Airport Authority intends to issue a Request for Proposal (RFP) at some future time for renewable energy generation opportunities on Shreveport Airport property. Files: application/pdf icon solar_rfi_complete.pdf Sfomail's picture Submitted by Sfomail(48) Member 25 June, 2013 - 12:10 Solar Land Use Data on OpenEI acres csp land use how much land land requirements pv land use solar land use square miles I'm happy to announce that a new report on Solar+Land+Use was just released by the National+Renewable+Energy+Laboratory. You can find a brief summary

315

pv land use | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

pv land use pv land use Home Rosborne318's picture Submitted by Rosborne318(5) Member 2 December, 2013 - 11:06 Request for Information Renewable Energy Generation/Production Shreveport Airport Authority - Response Deadline 2 January 2014 pv land use Solar solar land use Solar Power The Shreveport Airport Authority intends to issue a Request for Proposal (RFP) at some future time for renewable energy generation opportunities on Shreveport Airport property. Files: application/pdf icon solar_rfi_complete.pdf Sfomail's picture Submitted by Sfomail(48) Member 25 June, 2013 - 12:10 Solar Land Use Data on OpenEI acres csp land use how much land land requirements pv land use solar land use square miles I'm happy to announce that a new report on Solar+Land+Use was just released by the National+Renewable+Energy+Laboratory. You can find a brief summary

316

On-Site Disposal Facility Inspection Report  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

8947.1 8947.1 09/13 On-Site Disposal Facility Inspection Report September 2013 6319-D6242 8947.2 09/13 East Face Cell 1 West Face Cell 1 6319D-6208 6319D-6231 8947.3 09/13 North Face Cell 1 North Drainage (looking west) 6319D-6206 6319D-6205 8947.4 09/13 East Face Cell 2 West Face Cell 2 6319D-6230 6319D-6209 8947.5 09/13 East Face Cell 3 West Face Cell 3 6319D-6229 6319D-6210 8947.6 09/13 East Face Cell 4 West Face Cell 4 6319D-6227 6319D-62111 8947.7 09/13 East Face Cell 5 West Face Cell 5 6319D-6226 6319D-6213 8947.8 09/13 East Face Cell 6 6319D-6214 6319D-6225 West Face Cell 6 8947.9 09/13 East Face Cell 7 6319D-6215 6319D-6223 West Face Cell 7 8947.10 09/13 East Face Cell 8 6319D-6217 6319D-6220 West Face Cell 8 8947.11 09/13 South Face Cell 8 6319D-6219 6319D-6218 South Drainage (looking west) 8947.12 09/13

317

Fluorescent ballast and lamp disposal issues  

SciTech Connect

All around the world, governments, utility companies, and private businesses are attempting to reduce the amount of energy consumed. In the US alone, new economic strategies and programs are being created to facilitate this process. For instance, the recent enactment of the National Energy Policy Act, the Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA) Green Lights Program, and a surge of utility involvement in Demand Side Management (DSM) Commercial/Industrial Direct Install and Rebate Programs. Many of these problems target commercial/industrial lighting system retrofits as one of the most cost effective avenues for reducing the consumption of energy. Due to this trend, hundreds of millions of lighting ballasts and lamps are being discarded. The benefits of these programs result in enormous reductions in fossil fuels (and subsequent carbon dioxide, sulfur dioxide, and nitrogen oxide emissions) required to generate the displaced electricity. Throughout the US, however, there is an increasing concern for the environmental impacts surrounding the accelerated disposal of both lighting ballasts and lamps. Regulations initially established were for a one by one, retirement (failure) process rather than promoted obsolescence and forced retirement of lamp groups or entire systems (truckloads of old technologies). Recognizing this trend and the potential negative environmental effects, federal, state, and local regulators are reevaluating the impacts and are being asked to promulgate policies to specifically address this situation.

Leishman, D.L. [Alta Resource Management Services, Inc., Springfield, MA (United States)

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Disposal of Rocky Flats residues as waste  

SciTech Connect

Work is underway at the Rocky Flats Plant to evaluate alternatives for the removal of a large inventory of plutonium-contaminated residues from the plant. One alternative under consideration is to package the residues as transuranic wastes for ultimate shipment to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Current waste acceptance criteria and transportation regulations require that approximately 1000 cubic yards of residues be repackaged to produce over 20,000 cubic yards of WIPP certified waste. The major regulatory drivers leading to this increase in waste volume are the fissile gram equivalent, surface radiation dose rate, and thermal power limits. In the interest of waste minimization, analyses have been conducted to determine, for each residue type, the controlling criterion leading to the volume increase, the impact of relaxing that criterion on subsequent waste volume, and the means by which rules changes may be implemented. The results of this study have identified the most appropriate changes to be proposed in regulatory requirements in order to minimize the costs of disposing of Rocky Flats residues as transuranic wastes.

Dustin, D.F.; Sendelweck, V.S. [EG and G Rocky Flats, Inc., Golden, CO (United States). Rocky Flats Plant; Rivera, M.A. [Lamb Associates, Inc., Rockville, MD (United States)

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Disposal of Rocky Flats residues as waste  

SciTech Connect

Work is underway at the Rocky Flats Plant to evaluate alternatives for the removal of a large inventory of plutonium-contaminated residues from the plant. One alternative under consideration is to package the residues as transuranic wastes for ultimate shipment to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Current waste acceptance criteria and transportation regulations require that approximately 1000 cubic yards of residues be repackaged to produce over 20,000 cubic yards of WIPP certified waste. The major regulatory drivers leading to this increase in waste volume are the fissile gram equivalent, surface radiation dose rate, and thermal power limits. In the interest of waste minimization, analyses have been conducted to determine, for each residue type, the controlling criterion leading to the volume increase, the impact of relaxing that criterion on subsequent waste volume, and the means by which rules changes may be implemented. The results of this study have identified the most appropriate changes to be proposed in regulatory requirements in order to minimize the costs of disposing of Rocky Flats residues as transuranic wastes.

Dustin, D.F.; Sendelweck, V.S. (EG and G Rocky Flats, Inc., Golden, CO (United States). Rocky Flats Plant); Rivera, M.A. (Lamb Associates, Inc., Rockville, MD (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Uni Land | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Land Land Jump to: navigation, search Name Uni Land Place Bologna, Italy Zip 40063 Sector Solar Product Italian property company, which buys land without permits and develops it for residential and commerical use before selling it on. The firm is involved with solar project development. Coordinates 44.50483°, 11.345169° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.50483,"lon":11.345169,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land disposal restrictions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Energy Corridors on Federal Lands  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

To improve energy delivery and enhance the electric transmission grid for the future, several government agencies currently are working together to establish a coordinated network of Federal energy corridors on Federal lands throughout the United States.

322

Land and Facility Use Planning  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

The Land and Facility Use Planning process provides a way to guide future site development and reuse based on the shared long-term goals and objectives of the Department, site and its stakeholders. Does not cancel other directives.

1996-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

323

Analysis of fruitland water production treatment and disposal, San Juan Basin. Topical report, October 1991-March 1993  

SciTech Connect

The San Juan Basin produces more coalbed methane than the rest of the world combined. Brackish water is produced with the gas. Water production climbed from 40,000 barrels per day in 1989 to 115,000 bpd by late 1992. Underground injection is used to dispose of virtually all the produced water. Water production is projected to increase to 180,000 bpd in 1995. 650 million to 1.1 billion barrels are projected to be produced over the next 20 years. Restricted injection capacity and aquifer storage capacity may necessitate additional disposal wells and, ultimately, other methods to dispose of the water. Alternative treatment technologies, especially electrodialysis and/or reverse osmosis, may be applicable at costs of $0.17 to $0.22 per barrel, a considerable savings over the $0.80 to $1.00/bbl cost of deep injection. With suitable treatment, the majority of the produced water could be made suitable for agricultural or municipal uses. Reservoir analysis and simulations indicate stimulations can be optimized, and that heating water prior to injection might increase injectivity in some wells.

Cox, D.O.; Decker, A.D.; Stevens, S.H.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Rules and Regulations for the Disposal of Low-Level Radioactive Waste (Nebraska)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These regulations, promulgated by the Department of Environmental Quality, contain provisions pertaining to the disposal of low-level radioactive waste, disposal facilities, and applicable fees.

325

Introduction to DOE Order 435.1 Low Level Radioactive Waste Disposal...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Introduction to DOE Order 435.1 Low Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Requirements Introduction to DOE Order 435.1 Low Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Requirements Christine...

326

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Weight Restriction Increase for Natural Gas  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Weight Restriction Weight Restriction Increase for Natural Gas Vehicles to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Weight Restriction Increase for Natural Gas Vehicles on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Weight Restriction Increase for Natural Gas Vehicles on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Weight Restriction Increase for Natural Gas Vehicles on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Weight Restriction Increase for Natural Gas Vehicles on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Weight Restriction Increase for Natural Gas Vehicles on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Weight Restriction Increase for Natural Gas Vehicles on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search

327

Eco-friendly fly ash utilization: potential for land application  

SciTech Connect

The increase in demand for power in domestic, agricultural, and industrial sectors has increased the pressure on coal combustion and aggravated the problem of fly ash generation/disposal. Consequently the research targeting effective utilization of fly ash has also gained momentum. Fly ash has proved to be an economical substitute for expensive adsorbents as well as a suitable raw material for brick manufacturing, zeolite synthesis, etc. Fly ash is a reservoir of essential minerals but is deficient in nitrogen and phosphorus. By amending fly ash with soil and/or various organic materials (sewage sludge, bioprocess materials) as well as microbial inoculants like mycorrhizae, enhanced plant growth can be realized. Based on the sound results of large scale studies, fly ash utilization has grown into prominent discipline supported by various internationally renowned organizations. This paper reviews attempts directed toward various utilization of fly ash, with an emphasis on land application of organic/microbial inoculants amended fly ash.

Malik, A.; Thapliyal, A. [Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, New Delhi (India)

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Systems engineering programs for geologic nuclear waste disposal  

SciTech Connect

The design sequence and system programs presented begin with general approximate solutions that permit inexpensive analysis of a multitude of possible wastes, disposal media, and disposal process properties and configurations. It then continues through progressively more precise solutions as parts of the design become fixed, and ends with repository and waste form optimization studies. The programs cover both solid and gaseous waste forms. The analytical development, a program listing, a users guide, and examples are presented for each program. Sensitivity studies showing the effects of disposal media and waste form thermophysical properties and repository layouts are presented as examples.

Klett, R. D.; Hertel, Jr., E. S.; Ellis, M. A.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Analysis of alternatives for immobilized low activity waste disposal  

SciTech Connect

This report presents a study of alternative disposal system architectures and implementation strategies to provide onsite near-surface disposal capacity to receive the immobilized low-activity waste produced by the private vendors. The analysis shows that a flexible unit strategy that provides a suite of design solutions tailored to the characteristics of the immobilized low-activity waste will provide a disposal system that best meets the program goals of reducing the environmental, health, and safety impacts; meeting the schedule milestones; and minimizing the life-cycle cost of the program.

Burbank, D.A.

1997-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

330

Demilitarization and disposal technologies for conventional munitions and energetic materials  

SciTech Connect

Technologies for the demilitarization and disposal of conventional munitions and energetic materials are presented. A hazard separation system has been developed to remove hazardous subcomponents before processing. Electronic component materials separation processes have been developed that provide for demilitarization as well as the efficient recycling of materials. Energetic materials demilitarization and disposal using plasma arc and molten metal technologies are currently being investigated. These regulatory compliant technologies will allow the recycling of materials and will also provide a waste form suitable for final disposal.

Lemieux, A.A.; Wheelis, W.T.; Blankenship, D.M.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

The Need for Open Lands  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Need for Open Lands Need for Open Lands Nature Bulletin No. 742 February 8, 1964 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Seymour .Simon, President Roberts Mann, Conservation Editor THE NEED FOR OPEN LANDS There is an old saying: The proof of the pudding is the eating . In other words, if it's good, people enjoy it and beg for more. The proof of the need for open lands -- publicly owned areas for recreational uses and open spaces undisturbed -- is the tremendous and ever-increasing use of those we have. We need more now. Year after year we will need more and more. It is imperative that areas desirable for future use be acquired now or as soon as possible, regardless of cost and even though they may stand idle ' -- vacant and undeveloped -- until more funds become available. Otherwise they may be gone, or the asking price may be a hundred times greater. Open spaces such as farm lands and prairies may have been occupied by residential, commercial or industrial developments. Woodlands may have been cut, stream channels dredged and wetlands drained, destroying all but a memory of their beauty and recreational values. There are compelling reasons for our need of open lands and why we should waste no time in providing more. Those reasons have been confirmed and emphasized by exhaustive studies and statistical analyses nationwide in scope.

332

Hydrogeologic aspects of brine disposal in the East Poplar oil field, Fort Peck Indian Reservation, northeastern Montana  

SciTech Connect

The East Poplar Oil Field encompasses about 70 square miles in the south-central part of the Fort Peck Indian Reservation. Oil production began in 1952 from the Mississippian Madison Group. Production depths range from about 5,500 to 6,000 feet below land surface. Large quantities of brine (water having a dissolved-solids concentration greater than 35,000 milligrams per liter) have been produced with the oil. The brine has a dissolved-solids concentration of as much as 160,000 milligrams per liter. Most of the brine has been disposed of by injection into shallower subsurface formations (mainly the Lower Cretaceous Dakota Sandstone at depths of about 3,300 feet and the Upper Cretaceous Judith River Formation at depths of about 1,000 feet). Smaller quantities of brine have been directed to storage and evaporation pits. Handling, transport, and disposal of the brine have resulted in its movement into and migration through shallow Quaternary alluvial and glacial deposits along the Poplar River valley. Locally, domestic water supplies are obtained from these deposits. The major point, sources of shallow ground-water contamination probably is leakage of brine from corroded disposal-well casing and pipelines. Using electromagnetic geophysical techniques and auger drilling, three saline-water plumes in alluvial deposits and one plum in glacial deposits have been delineated. Dominant constituents in plume areas are sodium and chloride, whereas those in nonplume areas are sodium and bicarbonate.

Craigg, S.D.; Thamke, J.N. (Geological Survey, Helena, MT (United States))

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Control of water infiltration into near surface LLW (low level waste) disposal units: Annual report, October 1985-September 1986  

SciTech Connect

In the humid eastern part of the United States, trench covers have, in general, failed to prevent some of the incident precipitation from percolating downward to buried wastes. It is the purpose of the present work to investigate and demonstrate a procedure or technique that will control water infiltration to buried wastes regardless of above or below ground disposal. Results to date show the proposed procedure to be very promising and are applicable to shallow land burial as well as above ground disposal (e.g., Tumulus). In essence, the technique combines engineered or positive control of run-off, along with a vegetative cover, and is named ''bioengineering management''. To investigate control of infiltration, lysimeters are being used to make complete water balance measurements. The studies have been underway at the Maxey Flats, Kentucky, low-level waste disposal facility for the past three seasonal years. When the original Maxey Flats site closure procedure is followed, it is necessary to pump large amounts of water out of the lysimeters to prevent the water table from rising closer than 2 meters from the surface. Using the bioengineering management procedure, no pumping is required. As a result of the encouraging initial findings in the rather small-scale lysimeters at Maxey Flats, a large-scale facility for demonstration of the bioengineering management technique has been constructed at Beltsville, Maryland. This facility is now operational with the demonstration and data collection underway. 6 refs., 15 figs.

Schulz, R.K.; Ridky, R.W.; O'Donnell, E.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Near BPS Skyrmions and Restricted Harmonic Maps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Motivated by a class of near BPS Skyrme models introduced by Adam, S\\'anchez-Guill\\'en and Wereszczy\\'nski, the following variant of the harmonic map problem is introduced: a map $\\phi:(M,g)\\rightarrow (N,h)$ between Riemannian manifolds is restricted harmonic (RH) if it locally extremizes $E_2$ on its $SDiff(M)$ orbit, where $SDiff(M)$ denotes the group of volume preserving diffeomorphisms of $(M,g)$, and $E_2$ denotes the Dirichlet energy. It is conjectured that near BPS skyrmions tend to RH maps in the BPS limit. It is shown that $\\phi$ is RH if and only if $\\phi^*h$ has exact divergence, and a linear stability theory of RH maps is developed, whence it follows that all weakly conformal maps, for example, are stable RH. Examples of RH maps in every degree class $R^3\\to SU(2)$ and $R^2\\to S^2$ are constructed. It is shown that the axially symmetric BPS skyrmions on which all previous analytic studies of near BPS Skyrme models have been based, are not RH, so each such field can be deformed along $SDiff(R^3)$ to yield BPS skyrmions with lower $E_2$, casting doubt on the predictions of such studies. The problem of minimizing $E_2$ for $\\phi:R^k\\to N$ over all linear volume preserving diffeomorphisms is solved explicitly, and a deformed axially symmetric family of Skyrme fields constructed which are candidates for approximate near BPS skyrmions at low baryon number. The notion of restricted harmonicity is generalized to restricted $F$-criticality where $F$ is any functional on maps $(M,g)\\to (N,h)$ which is, in a precise sense, geometrically natural. The case where $F$ is a linear combination of $E_2$ and $E_4$, the usual Skyrme term, is studied in detail, and it is shown that inverse stereographic projection $R^3\\to S^3\\equiv SU(2)$ is stable restricted $F$-critical for every such $F$.

J. M. Speight

2014-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

335

Reclamation of abandoned mined lands along th Upper Illinois Waterway using dredged material  

SciTech Connect

Sediments were sampled and characterized from 28 actual or proposed maintenance-dredging locations in the Upper Illinois Waterway, that is, the Calumet-Sag Channel, the Des Plaines River downstream of its confluence with the Calumet-Sag Channel, and the Illinois River from the confluence of the Kankakee and Des Plaines rivers to Havana, Illinois. Sufficient data on chemical constituents and physical sediments were obtained to allow the classification of these sediments by currently applicable criteria of the Illinois Environmental Protection Agency for the identification of hazardous, persistent, and potentially hazardous wastes. By these criteria, the potential dredged materials studied were not hazardous, persistent, or potentially hazardous; they are a suitable topsoil/ reclamation medium. A study of problem abandoned surface-mined land sites (problem lands are defined as being acidic and/or sparsely vegetated) along the Illinois River showed that three sites were particularly well suited to the needs of the Corps of Engineers (COE) for a dredged material disposal/reclamation site. Thes sites were a pair of municipally owned sites in Morris, Illinois, and a small corporately owned site east of Ottawa, Illinois, and adjacent to the Illinois River. Other sites were also ranked as to suitability for COE involvement in their reclamation. Reclamation disposal was found to be an economically competitive alternative to near-source confined disposal for Upper Illinois Waterway dredged material.

Van Luik, A; Harrison, W

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

New Expressions for Level-restricted Kostka Polynomials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

consider the two generalizations together giving rise to level- restricted generalized Kostka polynomials KNew Expressions for Level-restricted Kostka Polynomials Anne Schilling 1 and Mark Shimozono 2 ? 1 to level-restriction. In particular we give an explicit characteriza- tion of the image of level

Schilling, Anne

337

Land surface cleanup of plutonium at the Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect

The Nevada Test Site (NTS) covers approximately 3300 km{sup 2} of high desert and is located approximately 100 km northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Soil contaminated by plutonium exists on the NTS and surrounding areas from safety tests conducted in the 1950s and 1960s. About 150 curies of contamination have been measured over 1200 hectares of land surface. Most contamination is found in the top 5 cm of soil but may be found deep as 25 cm. The cost of conventional removal and disposal of the full soil volume has been estimated at over $500,000,000. This study is directed toward minimizing the volume of waste which must be further processed and disposed of by precisely controlling soil removal depth. The following soil removal machines were demonstrated at the NTS: (1) a CMI Corporation Model PR-500FL pavement profiler, (2) a CMI Corporation Model Tr-225B trimmer reclaimer, (3) a Caterpillar Model 623 elevating scraper equipped with laser depth control, (4) a Caterpillar Model 14G motor grader equipped with laser depth control, (5) a Caterpillar Model 637 auger scraper, and (6) a XCR Series Guzzler vacuum truck. 5 refs., 5 figs.

Ebeling, L.L.; Evans, R.B.; Walsh, E.J.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Mahima Neupane Access to land resources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

information followed the sustainable livelihood #12;Mahima Neupane Access to land resources framework (SLF

Richner, Heinz

339

Integrated process for coalbed brine disposal  

SciTech Connect

A brine disposal process is described that converts the brine stream of a coalbed gas producing site into clean water for agricultural use, combustion products and water vapor that can be released into the atmosphere and dry solids that can be recycled for industrial consumption. The process uses a reverse osmosis unit, a submerged combustion evaporator and a pulse combustion dryer. Pretreatment of the brine feedstream is necessary to prevent fouling of the membranes of the reverse osmosis unit and to separate from the brine stream hazardous metal and other constituents that may make the permeate from the reverse osmosis unit unsuitable for agricultural or other use. A chemical modeling code is used to calculate the saturation states of solids that may precipitate and foul the reverse osmosis membranes. Sodium carbonate is added to the brine to precipitate carbonates of Ba, Ca, Mg and Sr prior to filtration, acidification, and passage into the reverse osmosis unit. Optimization of the process in terms of types and amounts of additives is possible with analysis using the modeling code. The minimum amounts of additives to prevent scaling are calculated. In a typical operation, a brine feedstream of 1,000 m{sup 3}/day (6,290 bpd) that may have a total dissolved salt concentration (TDS) of 7,000 ppm will be separated into a permeate stream of 750 m{sup 3}/day (4,718 bpd) with a TDS of 400 ppm and a concentrated brine stream of 250 m{sup 3}/day (1,573 bpd) with a TDS of 26,800 ppm. The submerged combustion evaporator will concentrate this latter stream to a concentration of 268,000 ppm and reduce the volume to 25 m{sup 3}/day (158 bpd). The pulse combustion dryer can dry the concentrated brine mixture to a low moisture salt. Energy costs to operate the reverse osmosis unit are primarily the pumping costs.

Brandt, H. [AQUATECH Services, Inc., Fair Oaks, CA (United States)]|[California Univ., Davis, CA (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Bourcier, W.L.; Jackson, K.J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

A Critical Step Toward Sustainable Nuclear Fuel Disposal | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A Critical Step Toward Sustainable Nuclear Fuel Disposal A Critical Step Toward Sustainable Nuclear Fuel Disposal A Critical Step Toward Sustainable Nuclear Fuel Disposal January 26, 2012 - 2:30pm Addthis Secretary Chu Secretary Chu Former Secretary of Energy The Blue Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future was formed at the direction of the President to conduct a comprehensive review of polices for managing the back end of the nuclear fuel cycle. If we are going to ensure that the United States remains at the forefront of nuclear safety and security, non-proliferation, and nuclear energy technology we must develop an effective strategy and workable plan for the safe and secure management and disposal of used nuclear fuel and nuclear waste. That is why I asked General Scowcroft and Representative Hamilton to draw on their

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land disposal restrictions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Repository Reference Disposal Concepts and Thermal Load Management Analysis  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Repository Reference Disposal Concepts and Thermal Load Management Repository Reference Disposal Concepts and Thermal Load Management Analysis Repository Reference Disposal Concepts and Thermal Load Management Analysis A disposal concept consists of three parts: waste inventory (7 waste types examined), geologic setting (e.g., clay/shale, salt, crystalline, other sedimentary), and the engineering concept of operations (range of generic operational concepts examined). Two major categories for waste package emplacement modes are identified: 1) "open" where extended ventilation can remove heat for many years following waste emplacement underground; and 2) "enclosed" modes for clay/shale and salt media where waste packages are emplaced in direct or close contact with natural or engineered materials which may have temperature limits that constrain thermal

342

Solid Waste Disposal, Hazardous Waste Management Act, Underground Storage  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Disposal, Hazardous Waste Management Act, Underground Disposal, Hazardous Waste Management Act, Underground Storage Act (Tennessee) Solid Waste Disposal, Hazardous Waste Management Act, Underground Storage Act (Tennessee) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fuel Distributor Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Tennessee Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Tennessee Department Of Environment and Conservation The Solid Waste Disposal Laws and Regulations are found in Tenn. Code 68-211. These rules are enforced and subject to change by the Public Waste Board (PWB), which is established by the Division of Solid and Hazardous

343

Disposing of nuclear waste in a salt bed  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Disposing of nuclear waste in a salt bed Disposing of nuclear waste in a salt bed 1663 Los Alamos science and technology magazine Latest Issue:November 2013 All Issues » submit Disposing of nuclear waste in a salt bed Decades' worth of transuranic waste from Los Alamos is being laid to rest at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in southeastern New Mexico March 25, 2013 Disposing of nuclear waste in a salt bed Depending on the impurities embedded within it, the salt from WIPP can be anything from a reddish, relatively opaque rock to a clear crystal like the one shown here. Ordinary salt effectively seals transuranic waste in a long-term repository Transuranic waste, made of items such as lab coats and equipment that have been contaminated by radioactive elements heavier than uranium, is being shipped from the Los Alamos National Laboratory to a long-term storage

344

Repository Reference Disposal Concepts and Thermal Load Management Analysis  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Repository Reference Disposal Concepts and Thermal Load Management Repository Reference Disposal Concepts and Thermal Load Management Analysis Repository Reference Disposal Concepts and Thermal Load Management Analysis A disposal concept consists of three parts: waste inventory (7 waste types examined), geologic setting (e.g., clay/shale, salt, crystalline, other sedimentary), and the engineering concept of operations (range of generic operational concepts examined). Two major categories for waste package emplacement modes are identified: 1) "open" where extended ventilation can remove heat for many years following waste emplacement underground; and 2) "enclosed" modes for clay/shale and salt media where waste packages are emplaced in direct or close contact with natural or engineered materials which may have temperature limits that constrain thermal

345

Disposal Systems Evaluations and Tool Development - Engineered Barrier  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Disposal Systems Evaluations and Tool Development - Engineered Disposal Systems Evaluations and Tool Development - Engineered Barrier System (EBS) Evaluation Disposal Systems Evaluations and Tool Development - Engineered Barrier System (EBS) Evaluation The engineered barrier system (EBS) plays a key role in the long-term isolation of nuclear waste in geological repository environments. This report focuses on the progress made in the evaluation of EBS design concepts, assessment of clay phase stability at repository-relevant conditions, thermodynamic database development for cement and clay phases, and THMC coupled phenomena along with the development of tools and methods to examine these processes. This report also documents the advancements of the Disposal System Evaluation Framework (DSEF) for the development of

346

Integration of EBS Models with Generic Disposal System Models | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Integration of EBS Models with Generic Disposal System Models Integration of EBS Models with Generic Disposal System Models Integration of EBS Models with Generic Disposal System Models This report summarizes research activities on engineered barrier system (EBS) model integration with the generic disposal system model (GDSM), and used fuel degradation and radionuclide mobilization (RM) in support of the EBS evaluation and tool development within the Used Fuel Disposition campaign. This report addresses: predictive model capability for used nuclear fuel degradation based on electrochemical and thermodynamic principles, radiolysis model to evaluate the U(VI)-H2O-CO2 system, steps towards the evaluation of uranium alteration products, discussion of instant release fraction (IRF) of radionuclides from the nuclear fuel, and

347

Integration of EBS Models with Generic Disposal System Models | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Integration of EBS Models with Generic Disposal System Models Integration of EBS Models with Generic Disposal System Models Integration of EBS Models with Generic Disposal System Models This report summarizes research activities on engineered barrier system (EBS) model integration with the generic disposal system model (GDSM), and used fuel degradation and radionuclide mobilization (RM) in support of the EBS evaluation and tool development within the Used Fuel Disposition campaign. This report addresses: predictive model capability for used nuclear fuel degradation based on electrochemical and thermodynamic principles, radiolysis model to evaluate the U(VI)-H2O-CO2 system, steps towards the evaluation of uranium alteration products, discussion of instant release fraction (IRF) of radionuclides from the nuclear fuel, and

348

Southwestern Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Compact (South Dakota) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Southwestern Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Compact (South Southwestern Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Compact (South Dakota) Southwestern Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Compact (South Dakota) < Back Eligibility Utility Investor-Owned Utility Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Fuel Distributor Program Info State South Dakota Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Southwestern Low-Level Radioactive Waste Commission This legislation authorizes the state's entrance into the Southwestern Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Compact, which provides for the cooperative management of low-level radioactive waste. The Compact is administered by a commission, which can regulate and impose fees on in-state radioactive waste generators. The states of Arizona, California,

349

Shell keeps its options open for disposing of Brent Spar  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... Brent Spar, may lead to similar disposal of 50 deep-water oil installations in UK offshore waters that are next in line for decommissioning, Johnston says. "No one knows ... this would have on the marine environment."

Ehsan Masood

1995-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

350

Waste Disposal Site and Radioactive Waste Management (Iowa)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This section describes the considerations of the Commission in determining whether to approve the establishment and operation of a disposal site for nuclear waste. If a permit is issued, the...

351

Proof of Proper Solid Waste Disposal (West Virginia)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This rule provides guidance to persons occupying a residence or operating a business establishment in this state regarding the approved method of providing proof of proper solid waste disposal to...

352

A microelectronic design for low-cost disposable chemical sensors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis demonstrates the novel concept and design of integrated microelectronics for a low-cost disposable chemical sensor. The critical aspects of this chemical sensor are the performance of the microelectronic chip ...

Laval, Stuart S. (Stuart Sean), 1980-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Figure ES2. Annual Indices of Real Disposable Income, Vehicle...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

ES2 Figure ES2. Annual Indices of Real Disposable Income, Vehicle-Miles Traveled, Consumer Price Index (CPI-U), and Real Average Retail Gasoline Price, 1978-2004, 1985100...

354

Nuclear Waste Disposal: Yucca Blowup Theory Bombs, Says Study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...leaked into the storage area, the depleted uranium would quickly saturate it, making...disposing of the 400,000 tons of depleted uranium left over from the arms race...andotherbranches ofthe Public Health Service must demonstrate that...

Gary Taubes

1996-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

355

Canister design for deep borehole disposal of nuclear waste  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The objective of this thesis was to design a canister for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel and other high-level waste in deep borehole repositories using currently available and proven oil, gas, and geothermal drilling ...

Hoag, Christopher Ian

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Design and Installation of a Disposal Cell Cover Field Test ...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

through March 3, 2011, Phoenix, Arizona. C.H. Benson, W.J. Waugh, W.H. Albright, G.M. Smith, R.P. Bush Design and Installation of a Disposal Cell Cover Field Test More Documents...

357

Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the Disposal of Greater...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Friday, February 18, 2011 Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the Disposal of Greater-Than-Class C Low-Level Radioactive Waste and GTCC-Like Waste WASHINGTON The...

358

Disposable Bioreactors for Inoculum Production and Protein Expression  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Table 1 summarizes the disposable bioreactors available on the market today for animal cells and culture volumes from 2.5 mL up to 500 L. If traditional ...

Regine Eibl; Dieter Eibl

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Finding of no significant impact shipment of stabilized mixed waste from the K-25 Site to an off-site commercial disposal facility, Oak Ridge K-25 Site, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA) for the shipment of stabilized mixed waste, removed from K-1407-B and -C ponds, to an off-site commercial disposal facility (Envirocare) for permanent land disposal. Based on the analysis in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an environmental impact statement (EIS) is not required, and DOE is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

NONE

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

360

Salt disposal of heat-generating nuclear waste.  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the state of salt repository science, reviews many of the technical issues pertaining to disposal of heat-generating nuclear waste in salt, and proposes several avenues for future science-based activities to further the technical basis for disposal in salt. There are extensive salt formations in the forty-eight contiguous states, and many of them may be worthy of consideration for nuclear waste disposal. The United States has extensive experience in salt repository sciences, including an operating facility for disposal of transuranic wastes. The scientific background for salt disposal including laboratory and field tests at ambient and elevated temperature, principles of salt behavior, potential for fracture damage and its mitigation, seal systems, chemical conditions, advanced modeling capabilities and near-future developments, performance assessment processes, and international collaboration are all discussed. The discussion of salt disposal issues is brought current, including a summary of recent international workshops dedicated to high-level waste disposal in salt. Lessons learned from Sandia National Laboratories' experience on the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant and the Yucca Mountain Project as well as related salt experience with the Strategic Petroleum Reserve are applied in this assessment. Disposal of heat-generating nuclear waste in a suitable salt formation is attractive because the material is essentially impermeable, self-sealing, and thermally conductive. Conditions are chemically beneficial, and a significant experience base exists in understanding this environment. Within the period of institutional control, overburden pressure will seal fractures and provide a repository setting that limits radionuclide movement. A salt repository could potentially achieve total containment, with no releases to the environment in undisturbed scenarios for as long as the region is geologically stable. Much of the experience gained from United States repository development, such as seal system design, coupled process simulation, and application of performance assessment methodology, helps define a clear strategy for a heat-generating nuclear waste repository in salt.

Leigh, Christi D. (Sandia National Laboratories, Carlsbad, NM); Hansen, Francis D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land disposal restrictions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Global Climate Change,Global Climate Change, Land Cover Change, andLand Cover Change, and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Global Climate Change,Global Climate Change, Land Cover Change, andLand Cover Change Changes · Due to ­ Climate Change ­ Land Cover / Land Use Change ­ Interaction of Climate and Land Cover Change · Resolution ­ Space ­ Time Hydro-Climatic Change · Variability vs. Change (Trends) · Point data

362

A land use decision methodology for mine lands in Appalachia. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the issues associated with the development of methodology for determining appropriate land uses for mined lands in Appalachia. The methodology which has been developed presents a framework which is useful for examining land use options for previously mined land, currently active mine sites and unmined land which has a high value or likelihood for future mining.

Yuill, C.; Gorton, W.T.; Frakes, M.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

LBA Land Use and Land Cover Change Data Sets Released  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

four data sets from the Carbon four data sets from the Carbon Dynamics and Nutrient Dynamics science themes, components of the LBA-ECO Large Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia (LBA). LBA-ECO CD-36 South American Land Data Assimilation System Atmospheric Forcing Data . Data set prepared by L.G.G. de Goncalves, W.J. Shuttleworth, D. Vila, E. Larroza, M.J. Bottino, D.L. Herdies, J.A. Aravequia, J.G. de Mattos, D.L. Toll, M. Rodell and P. Houser. This data set provides South American Land Data Assimilation System (SALDAS) atmospheric forcing data necessary for land surface modeling for South America. The data were derived by combining modeled and observation based sources.The forcing data cover the entire continent of South America at 0.125 degree resolution and are built around the model-calculated values of

364

Geological Disposal Concept Selection Aligned with a Voluntarism Process - 13538  

SciTech Connect

The UK's Radioactive Waste Management Directorate (RWMD) is currently at a generic stage in its implementation programme. The UK site selection process is a voluntarist process and, as yet, no communities have decided to participate. RWMD has set out a process to describe how a geological disposal concept would be selected for the range of higher activity wastes in the UK inventory, including major steps and decision making points, aligned with the stages of the UK site selection process. A platform of information is being developed on geological disposal concepts at various stages of implementation internationally and, in order to build on international experience, RWMD is developing its approach to technology transfer. The UK has a range of different types of higher activity wastes with different characteristics; therefore a range of geological disposal concepts may be needed. In addition to identifying key aspects for considering the compatibility of different engineered barrier systems for different types of waste, RWMD is developing a methodology to determine minimum separation distances between disposal modules in a co-located geological disposal facility. RWMD's approach to geological disposal concept selection is intended to be flexible, recognising the long term nature of the project. RWMD is also committed to keeping alternative radioactive waste management options under review; an approach has been developed and periodic reviews of alternative options will be published. (authors)

Crockett, Glenda; King, Samantha [Nuclear Decommissioning Authority, Building 587, Curie Avenue, Harwell Oxford, Didcot, Oxfordshire, OX11 0RH (United Kingdom)] [Nuclear Decommissioning Authority, Building 587, Curie Avenue, Harwell Oxford, Didcot, Oxfordshire, OX11 0RH (United Kingdom)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

University of Delaware Laboratory Chemical Waste Disposal Guide ALL CHEMICAL WASTE MUST BE DISPOSED OF THROUGH THE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

experiments and procedures Non-Returnable gas cylinders Batteries Spent solvents, Stains, Strippers, Thinners, Fertilizers Formaldehyde and Formalin Solutions Mercury containing items (other heavy metals) Liquid OR SMALL CONTAINERS IMPORTANT: DO NOT DISPOSE OF REACTIVE, AIR SENSITIVE, OR OXIDIZER SAMPLES

Firestone, Jeremy

366

Composite analysis for low-level waste disposal in the 200 area plateau of the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the first iteration of the Composite Analysis for Low-Level Waste Disposal in the 200 Area Plateau of the Hanford Site (Composite Analysis) prepared in response to the U.S. Department of Energy Implementation Plan for the Defense Nuclear Facility Safety Board Recommendation 94-2. The Composite Analysis is a companion document to published analyses of four active or planned low-level waste disposal actions: the solid waste burial grounds in the 200 West Area, the solid waste burial grounds in the 200 East Area, the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility, and the disposal facilities for immobilized low-activity waste. A single Composite Analysis was prepared for the Hanford Site considering only sources on the 200 Area Plateau. The performance objectives prescribed in U.S. Department of Energy guidance for the Composite Analysis were 100 mrem in a year and examination of a lower dose (30 mrem in a year) to ensure the {open_quotes}as low as reasonably achievable{close_quotes} concept is followed. The 100 mrem in a year limit was the maximum allowable all-pathways dose for 1000 years following Hanford Site closure, which is assumed to occur in 2050. These performance objectives apply to an accessible environment defined as the area between a buffer zone surrounding an exclusive waste management area on the 200 Area Plateau, and the Columbia River. Estimating doses to hypothetical future members of the public for the Composite Analysis was a multistep process involving the estimation or simulation of inventories; waste release to the environment; migration through the vadose zone, groundwater, and atmospheric pathways; and exposure and dose. Doses were estimated for scenarios based on agriculture, residential, industrial, and recreational land use. The radionuclides included in the vadose zone and groundwater pathway analyses of future releases were carbon-14, chlorine-36, selenium-79, technetium-99, iodine-129, and uranium isotopes.

Kincaid, C.T.; Bergeron, M.P.; Cole, C.R. [and others

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Sustainable Disposal Cell Covers: Legacy Management Practices, Improvements, and Long-Term Performance  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Sustainable Disposal Cell Covers: Legacy Management Practices, Improvements, and Long-Term Performance

368

Analysis of environmental regulations governing the disposal of geothermal wastes in California  

SciTech Connect

Federal and California regulations governing the disposal of sludges and liquid wastes associated with the production of electricity from geothermal resources were evaluated. Current disposal practices, near/far term disposal requirements, and the potential for alternate disposal methods or beneficial uses for these materials were determined. 36 refs., 3 figs., 15 tabs. (ACR)

Royce, B.A.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Waste disposal technology transfer matching requirement clusters for waste disposal facilities in China  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We outline the differences of Chinese MSW characteristics from Western MSW. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We model the requirements of four clusters of plant owner/operators in China. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We examine the best technology fit for these requirements via a matrix. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Variance in waste input affects result more than training and costs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer For China technology adaptation and localisation could become push, not pull factors. - Abstract: Even though technology transfer has been part of development aid programmes for many decades, it has more often than not failed to come to fruition. One reason is the absence of simple guidelines or decision making tools that help operators or plant owners to decide on the most suitable technology to adopt. Practical suggestions for choosing the most suitable technology to combat a specific problem are hard to get and technology drawbacks are not sufficiently highlighted. Western counterparts in technology transfer or development projects often underestimate or don't sufficiently account for the high investment costs for the imported incineration plant; the differing nature of Chinese MSW; the need for trained manpower; and the need to treat flue gas, bunker leakage water, and ash, all of which contain highly toxic elements. This article sets out requirements for municipal solid waste disposal plant owner/operators in China as well as giving an attribute assessment for the prevalent waste disposal plant types in order to assist individual decision makers in their evaluation process for what plant type might be most suitable in a given situation. There is no 'best' plant for all needs and purposes, and requirement constellations rely on generalisations meaning they cannot be blindly applied, but an alignment of a type of plant to a type of owner or operator can realistically be achieved. To this end, a four-step approach is suggested and a technology matrix is set out to ease the choice of technology to transfer and avoid past errors. The four steps are (1) Identification of plant owner/operator requirement clusters; (2) Determination of different municipal solid waste (MSW) treatment plant attributes; (3) Development of a matrix matching requirement clusters to plant attributes; (4) Application of Quality Function Deployment Method to aid in technology localisation. The technology transfer matrices thus derived show significant performance differences between the various technologies available. It is hoped that the resulting research can build a bridge between technology transfer research and waste disposal research in order to enhance the exchange of more sustainable solutions in future.

Dorn, Thomas, E-mail: thomas.dorn@uni-rostock.de [University of Rostock, Faculty of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, Department Waste Management, Justus-v.-Liebig-Weg 6, 18059 Rostock (Germany); Nelles, Michael, E-mail: michael.nelles@uni-rostock.de [University of Rostock, Faculty of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, Department Waste Management, Justus-v.-Liebig-Weg 6, 18059 Rostock (Germany); Flamme, Sabine, E-mail: flamme@fh-muenster.de [University of Applied Sciences Muenster, Corrensstrasse 25, 48149 Muenster (Germany); Jinming, Cai [Hefei University of Technology, 193 Tunxi Road, 230009 Hefei (China)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

370

Using sludge on land raises more than crops  

SciTech Connect

Applying sludge to croplands has been one solution to the dilemma of accumulating sewage. At the present time, approximately 25 percent of all sludge disposal programs are conducted as land application, specifically land reclamation and agricultural utilization. The application of sludge to croplands is developing from a small and scattered program into a large-scaled program because of the prohibition of ocean dumping of sludge, increased costs for incineration of sludge and its pollution control, and an increasing national production of over 280 million tons/yr of wet sludge. Agricultural utilization of sewage sludge has several notable benefits including the recycling of essential and trace nutrients, improvement of marginal soil with organic matter, increased crop yield, and direct costs comparable to commercial fertilizers. However, cropland utilization of sewage sludge may involve risks if proper management is not followed. Besides the risk of metal contamination of soil and plants which has received considerable notoriety, the overall environmental impact of sludge application programs must also consider the public health hazards of nitrate (Ntheta/sub 3/) pollution and the spread of pathogenic (disease-causing) organisms, and any odor nuisance which may be associated with these programs.

Gerardi, M.H.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Geothermal/Land Use | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal/Land Use Geothermal/Land Use < Geothermal(Redirected from Land Use) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Land Use Leasing Exploration Well Field Power Plant Transmission Environment Water Use Print PDF Geothermal Land Use Planning General Regulatory Roadmap The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and the USDA Forest Service (FS) have prepared a joint Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) to analyze and expedite the leasing of BLM-and FS-administered lands with high potential for renewable geothermal resources in 11 Western states and Alaska. Geothermal Land Use Planning is ... Example Land Use Plans References Information for Publication Standards for EA/EIS/Planning Documents IM 2004-110.pdf Fluid Mineral Leasing and Related Planning and National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Processes April 11, 2004 and

372

land-use | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

land-use land-use Dataset Summary Description This dataset is part of a larger internal dataset at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) that explores various characteristics of large solar electric (both PV and CSP) facilities around the United States. This dataset focuses on the land use characteristics for solar facilities that are either under construction or currently in operation. Source Land-Use Requirements for Solar Power Plants in the United States Date Released June 25th, 2013 (5 months ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords acres area average concentrating solar power csp Density electric hectares km2 land land requirements land use land-use mean photovoltaic photovoltaics PV solar statistics Data application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.spreadsheetml.sheet icon Master Solar Land Use Spreadsheet (xlsx, 1.5 MiB)

373

Disposal of oil field wastes into salt caverns: Feasibility, legality, risk, and costs  

SciTech Connect

Salt caverns can be formed through solution mining in the bedded or domal salt formations that are found in many states. Salt caverns have traditionally been used for hydrocarbon storage, but caverns have also been used to dispose of some types of wastes. This paper provides an overview of several years of research by Argonne National Laboratory on the feasibility and legality of using salt caverns for disposing of oil field wastes, the risks to human populations from this disposal method, and the cost of cavern disposal. Costs are compared between the four operating US disposal caverns and other commercial disposal options located in the same geographic area as the caverns. Argonne`s research indicates that disposal of oil field wastes into salt caverns is feasible and legal. The risk from cavern disposal of oil field wastes appears to be below accepted safe risk thresholds. Disposal caverns are economically competitive with other disposal options.

Veil, J.A. [Argonne National Lab., Washington, DC (United States). Water Policy Program

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Land Reform and Exclusion of Poor Jagat Basnet  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of effective land management, land administration and all land reform processes interrelated, by land reform, it is widely understood to be a process of confiscating someone's land and award or with the land reform because of historical reasons of a power nexus. 6.2 The Historical Process of Land

Richner, Heinz

375

Uncanistered Spent Nuclear fuel Disposal Container System Description Document  

SciTech Connect

The Uncanistered Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Disposal Container System supports the confinement and isolation of waste within the Engineered Barrier System of the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR). Disposal containers are loaded with intact uncanistered assemblies and/or individually canistered SNF assemblies and sealed in the surface waste handling facilities, transferred to the underground through the access drifts, and emplaced in the emplacement drifts. The Uncanistered SNF Disposal Container provides long-term confinement of the commercial SNF placed inside, and withstands the loading, transfer, emplacement, and retrieval loads and environments. The Uncanistered SNF Disposal Container System provides containment of waste for a designated period of time, and limits radionuclide release. The disposal container maintains the waste in a designated configuration, withstands maximum handling and rockfall loads, limits the individual SNF assembly temperatures after emplacement, limits the introduction of moderator into the disposal container during the criticality control period, resists corrosion in the expected handling and repository environments, and provides containment of waste in the event of an accident. Multiple boiling water reactor (BWR) and pressurized water reactor (PWR) disposal container designs are needed to accommodate the expected range of spent fuel assemblies and provide long-term confinement of the commercial SNF. The disposal container will include outer and inner cylinder walls, outer cylinder lids (two on the top, one on the bottom), inner cylinder lids (one on the top, one on the bottom), and an internal metallic basket structure. Exterior labels will provide a means by which to identify the disposal container and its contents. The two metal cylinders, in combination with the cladding, Emplacement Drift System, drip shield, and natural barrier, will support the design philosophy of defense-in-depth. The use of materials with different properties prevents a single mode failure from breaching the waste package. The inner cylinder and inner cylinder lids will be constructed of stainless steel and the outer cylinder and outer cylinder lid will be made of high-nickel alloy. The basket will assist criticality control, provide structural support, and improve heat transfer. The Uncanistered SNF Disposal Container System interfaces with the emplacement drift environment and internal waste by transferring heat from the SNF to the external environment and by protecting the SFN assemblies and their contents from damage/degradation by the external environment. The system also interfaces with the SFN by limiting access of moderator and oxidizing agents of the SFN. The waste package interfaces with the Emplacement Drift System's emplacement drift pallets upon which the wasted packages are placed. The disposal container interfaces with the Assembly Transfer System, Waste Emplacement/Retrieval System, Disposal Container Handling System, and Waste Package Remediation System during loading, handling, transfer, emplacement and retrieval of the disposal container/waste package.

NONE

2000-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

376

Classification of Nuclear Weapons-Related Information (Restricted Data and Formerly Restricted Data)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CLASSIFICATION OF CLASSIFICATION OF NUCLEAR WEAPONS-RELATED INFORMATION Restricted Data and Formerly Restricted Data (RD and FRD) June 2012 2 3 Purpose To familiarize individuals from agencies outside of DOE who may come in contact with RD and FRD with the procedures for identifying, classifying, marking, handling, and declassifying documents containing that information as required by  The Atomic Energy Act and  10 Code of Federal Regulation (CFR) Part 1045, Nuclear Classification and Declassification §1045.35 4 Not the Purpose This briefing does not authorize you to classify or declassify documents containing RD or FRD. Additional training is required to classify documents containing RD or FRD or identify RD or FRD within a document for redaction. Only authorized DOE

377

Global land and water grabbing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...ratio between blue water and irrigation efficiency. Values per unit area refer to green and max blue water per...Arab Emirates, India, United Kingdom, Egypt, China, and Israel (Table 2...land and water grabbing enhance food and energy availability in the grabbing country...

Maria Cristina Rulli; Antonio Saviori; Paolo D’Odorico

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

2011LandesBioscience. Donotdistribute.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Quan,1 James C.A. Bardwell,1 Ursula Jakob,1 Sue Wickner2 and Matthew R. Chapman1, * 1 Department Landes Bioscience RESEARCH PAPER 323 Prion Volume 5 Issue 4 *Correspondence to: Matthew R. Chapman; Email functional amyloid assembly Margery L. Evans,1 Jens C. Schmidt,1 Marianne Ilbert,1 Shannon M. Doyle,2 Shu

Bardwell, James

379

Dry Lands and Desalted Water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Lands and Desalted Wat Desalination can supply water to...desert ceptable level of economics, education ty, rain...the extent to which desalination agri-culture will...be-lieve, is that desalination agriculture is in the...The Engineering Economics of Large-Scale Desalting...

Gale Young

1970-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

380

Unique method of ash disposal can benefit marine life  

SciTech Connect

As more communities turn to waste-to-energy facilities to help solve their solid waste disposal problems, the amount of ash created by these facilities increases. Incineration of solid waste produces particulate residues which are often rich in lead, cadmium, copper, and zinc because of the concentration which occurs as a result of reduction. It has been shown that such metals can sometimes be leached from ash residues, giving rise to special concerns that incineration ashes be disposed of in an environmentally acceptable manner. In urban coastal areas where landfills are few and increasingly distant, ocean disposal of stabilized incineration residues (SIR) may provide an acceptable alternative to current landfill practices. In May 1985, a research program was initiated at the Marine Sciences Research Center to examine the feasibility of utilizing SIR for artificial reef construction in the ocean. Results of these studies showed that particulate incineration residues could be combined with cement to form a solid block possessing physical properties necessary for ocean disposal. The stabilized residues were subjected to regulatory extraction protocols, and in no instance did the metal concentrations in the leachates exceed the regulatory limits for toxicity. Bioassays revealed no adverse effects on the phytoplankton communities exposed to elutriate concentrations higher than could be encountered under normal disposal conditions. The success of the laboratory studies resulted in securing the necessary permits for the placement of an artificial habitat constructed using SIR in coastal wasters. Results from this program are described.

Roethel, F.J.; Breslin, V.T. (State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook (USA))

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land disposal restrictions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Mined Land Reclamation on DOE's Uranium Lease Tracts, Southwestern...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Mined Land Reclamation on DOE's Uranium Lease Tracts, Southwestern Colorado Mined Land Reclamation on DOE's Uranium Lease Tracts, Southwestern Colorado Mined Land Reclamation on...

382

Solar Energy on Public Lands | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Solar Energy on Public Lands Solar Energy on Public Lands This website describes federal policy for deploying utility scale solar on public lands. It includes a roadmap for...

383

Identification of the Apoptosis Activation Cascade Induced in Mammary Carcinomas by Energy Restriction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Induced in Mammary Carcinomas by Energy Restriction Henry J. Thompson...University, Fort Collins, Colorado Energy restriction (ER) inhibits...17: 3237-3245, 1998. 33 Green D. R. Apoptotic pathways...induced in mammary carcinomas by energy restriction. | Energy restriction...

Henry J. Thompson; Zongjian Zhu; and Weiqin Jiang

2004-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

384

Separable states improve protocols with restricted randomness  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is known from Bell's theorem that quantum predictions for some entangled states cannot be mimicked using local hidden variable (LHV) models. From a computer science perspective, LHV models may be interpreted as classical computers operating on a potentially infinite number of correlated bits originating from a common source. As such, Bell inequality violations achieved through entangled states are able to characterise the quantum advantage of certain tasks, so long as the task itself imposes no restriction on the availability of correlated bits. However, if the number of shared bits is limited, additional constraints are placed on the possible LHV models and separable, i.e. disentangled, states may become a useful resource. Bell violations are therefore no longer necessary to achieve a quantum advantage. Here we show that in particular, separable states may improve the so-called random access codes, which is a class of communication problems where one party tries to read a portion of the data held by another distant party in presence of finite shared randomness and limited classical communication. We also show how the bias of classical bits can be used to avoid wrong answers in order to achieve the optimal classical protocol and how the advantage of quantum protocols is linked to quantum discord.

T. K. Chuan; T. Paterek

2014-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

385

Solar Land Use | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Land Use Land Use Jump to: navigation, search (The following text is derived from a National Renewable Energy Laboratory report on solar land use in the United States.)[1] One concern regarding large-scale deployment of solar energy is its potentially significant land use. This article summarizes data and analysis of the land use associated with U.S. utility-scale ground-mounted photovoltaic (PV) and concentrating solar power (CSP) facilities. This article presents total and direct land-use results for various solar technologies and system configurations, on both a capacity and an electricity-generation basis. The total area corresponds to all land enclosed by the site boundary. The direct area comprises land directly occupied by solar arrays, access roads, substations, service buildings, and

386

Land and Atmospheric Science GRAD STUDENT HANDBOOK  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Land and Atmospheric Science GRAD STUDENT HANDBOOK 2011-2012 WELCOME Welcome to the Graduate on the fundamentals of Earth system processes related to land and atmosphere and their coupled interactions. Students

Minnesota, University of

387

Land and Atmospheric Science GRAD STUDENT HANDBOOK  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Land and Atmospheric Science GRAD STUDENT HANDBOOK 2012-2013 WELCOME Welcome to the Graduate on the fundamentals of Earth system processes related to land and atmosphere and their coupled interactions. Students

Minnesota, University of

388

GEORGE LEA FOUNDER'S SCHOLARSHIP PUBLIC LANDS FOUNDATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 GEORGE LEA FOUNDER'S SCHOLARSHIP PUBLIC LANDS FOUNDATION P.O. Box 7226 Arlington, VA 22207 Scholarship Application Form This scholarship is being offered by the Public Lands Foundation, a national non

389

An OWL2 Land Use Ontology: LBCS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper describes the “Land Based Classification Standards” (LBCS) OWL2 ontology used as a basic structure for the “City Information Modelling” (CIM) model developed within a larger research project ... Land u...

Nuno Montenegro; Jorge Gomes; Paulo Urbano…

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

The implications of UIC and NPDES regulations on selection of disposal options for spent geothermal brine  

SciTech Connect

This document reviews and evaluates the various options for the disposal of geothermal wastewater with respect to the promulgated regulations for the protection of surface and groundwaters. The Clean Water Act of 1977 and the Safe Drinking Water Act Amendments are especially important when designing disposal systems for geothermal fluids. The former promulgates regulations concerning the discharge of wastewater into surface waters, while the latter is concerned with the protection of ground water aquifers through the establishment of underground injection control (UIC) programs. There is a specific category for geothermal fluid discharge if injection is to be used as a method of disposal. Prior to February 1982, the UIC regulations required geothermal power plant to use Class III wells and direct use plants to use Class V wells. More stringent regulatory requirements, including construction specification and monitoring, are imposed on the Class III wells. On February 3, 1982, the classification of geothermal injection wells was changed from a Class III to Class V on the basis that geothermal wells do not inject for the extraction of minerals or energy, but rather they are used to inject brines, from which heat has been extracted, into formations from which they were originally taken. This reclassification implies that a substantial cost reduction will be realized for geothermal fluid injection primarily because well monitoring is no longer mandatory. The Clean Water Act of 1977 provides the legal basis for regulating the discharge of liquid effluent into the nation's surface waters, through a permitting system called the National Pollution Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Discharge quantities, rates, concentrations and temperatures are regulated by the NPDES permits. These permits systems are based upon effluent guidelines developed by EPA on an industry by industry basis. For geothermal energy industry, effluent guidelines have not been formulated and are not currently scheduled. There, are however, water quality standards that control the quantity and quality of wastewaters discharged into surface waters. These standards are established by the states in concert with EPA, and frequently result in NPDES conditions more restrictive than those based on effluent guidelines.

None

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

EM Plan Accelerates Uranium-233 Disposal, Saves Taxpayers Half Billion  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EM Plan Accelerates Uranium-233 Disposal, Saves Taxpayers Half EM Plan Accelerates Uranium-233 Disposal, Saves Taxpayers Half Billion Dollars EM Plan Accelerates Uranium-233 Disposal, Saves Taxpayers Half Billion Dollars August 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis For more than 50 years, the uranium-233 (U-233) supply has been stored at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s (ORNL) Building 3019. The facility, located near the center of the ORNL campus, is owned by EM and one of the nation’s few repositories for U-233 and other special nuclear materials dating back to the Manhattan Project. For more than 50 years, the uranium-233 (U-233) supply has been stored at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL) Building 3019. The facility, located near the center of the ORNL campus, is owned by EM and one of the nation's few repositories for U-233 and other special nuclear materials

392

Laboratory to demolish excavation enclosures at Material Disposal Area B  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Excavation Enclosures At MDA B Excavation Enclosures At MDA B Laboratory to demolish excavation enclosures at Material Disposal Area B near DP Road Pre-demolition activities are beginning this week and the work should be completed by the end of March 2013. November 1, 2012 The Laboratory plans to demolish the enclosures used to safely excavate and clean up the Lab's oldest waste disposal site near DP Road in Los Alamos. The Laboratory plans to demolish the enclosures used to safely excavate and clean up the Lab's oldest waste disposal site near DP Road in Los Alamos. Contact Communications Office (505) 667-7000 "We look forward to the day we officially turn the property over for the benefit of our community." Work is beginning this week LOS ALAMOS, New Mexico, November 1, 2012-Los Alamos National Laboratory

393

EIS-0200: Managing Treatment, Storage, and Disposal of Radioactive and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

00: Managing Treatment, Storage, and Disposal of Radioactive 00: Managing Treatment, Storage, and Disposal of Radioactive and Hazardous Waste EIS-0200: Managing Treatment, Storage, and Disposal of Radioactive and Hazardous Waste SUMMARY This EIS evaluates the potential environmental and cost impacts of strategic managment alternatives for managing five types of radioactive and hazardous wastes that have resulted and will continue to result from nuclear defense and research activities at a variety of sites around the United States. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD July 7, 2011 EIS-0200-SA-03: Supplement Analysis Treatment of Transuranic Waste at the Idaho National Laboratory, Carlsbad Field Office March 7, 2008 EIS-0200: Amendment to the Record of Decision Treatment and Storage of Transuranic Waste

394

Laboratory to demolish excavation enclosures at Material Disposal Area B  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Excavation enclosures at MDA B Excavation enclosures at MDA B Laboratory to demolish excavation enclosures at Material Disposal Area B near DP road Pre-demolition activities are beginning this week and the work should be completed by the end of March 2013. November 1, 2012 The Laboratory plans to demolish the enclosures used to safely excavate and clean up the Lab's oldest waste disposal site near DP Road in Los Alamos. The Laboratory plans to demolish the enclosures used to safely excavate and clean up the Lab's oldest waste disposal site near DP Road in Los Alamos. Contact Colleen Curran Communications Office (505) 664-0344 Email "We look forward to the day we officially turn the property over for the benefit of our community." Work is beginning this week LOS ALAMOS, New Mexico, November 1, 2012-Los Alamos National Laboratory

395

EIS-0200: Managing Treatment, Storage, and Disposal of Radioactive and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EIS-0200: Managing Treatment, Storage, and Disposal of Radioactive EIS-0200: Managing Treatment, Storage, and Disposal of Radioactive and Hazardous Waste EIS-0200: Managing Treatment, Storage, and Disposal of Radioactive and Hazardous Waste SUMMARY Final Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement examines the potential environmental and cost impacts of strategic managment alternatives for managing five types of radioactive and hazardous wastes that have resulted and will continue to result from nuclear defense and research activities at a variety of sites around the United States. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD July 7, 2011 EIS-0200-SA-03: Supplement Analysis Treatment of Transuranic Waste at the Idaho National Laboratory, Carlsbad Field Office March 7, 2008

396

Laboratory to demolish excavation enclosures at Material Disposal Area B  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Excavation Enclosures At MDA B Excavation Enclosures At MDA B Laboratory to demolish excavation enclosures at Material Disposal Area B near DP Road Pre-demolition activities are beginning this week and the work should be completed by the end of March 2013. November 1, 2012 The Laboratory plans to demolish the enclosures used to safely excavate and clean up the Lab's oldest waste disposal site near DP Road in Los Alamos. The Laboratory plans to demolish the enclosures used to safely excavate and clean up the Lab's oldest waste disposal site near DP Road in Los Alamos. Contact Communications Office (505) 667-7000 "We look forward to the day we officially turn the property over for the benefit of our community." Work is beginning this week LOS ALAMOS, New Mexico, November 1, 2012-Los Alamos National Laboratory

397

Gas, Heat, Water, Sewerage Collection and Disposal, and Street Railway  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Gas, Heat, Water, Sewerage Collection and Disposal, and Street Gas, Heat, Water, Sewerage Collection and Disposal, and Street Railway Companies (South Carolina) Gas, Heat, Water, Sewerage Collection and Disposal, and Street Railway Companies (South Carolina) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Industrial Installer/Contractor Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Program Info State South Carolina Program Type Generating Facility Rate-Making Siting and Permitting Provider South Carolina Public Service Commission This legislation applies to public utilities and entities furnishing natural gas, heat, water, sewerage, and street railway services to the public. The legislation addresses rates and services, exemptions, investigations, and records. Article 4 (58-5-400 et seq.) of this

398

EM's Richland Operations Office Celebrates Disposal Achievement in 2013 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EM's Richland Operations Office Celebrates Disposal Achievement EM's Richland Operations Office Celebrates Disposal Achievement in 2013 EM's Richland Operations Office Celebrates Disposal Achievement in 2013 December 24, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Workers sample a well used to monitor groundwater at the Hanford site. Workers sample a well used to monitor groundwater at the Hanford site. Workers separate a glove box for removal from Hanford’s Plutonium Finishing Plant. Workers separate a glove box for removal from Hanford's Plutonium Finishing Plant. Workers sample a well used to monitor groundwater at the Hanford site. Workers separate a glove box for removal from Hanford's Plutonium Finishing Plant. RICHLAND, Wash. - EM's Richland Operations Office's 2013 accomplishments ranged from cleaning up buildings and waste sites to treating a record

399

EM Plan Accelerates Uranium-233 Disposal, Saves Taxpayers Half Billion  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EM Plan Accelerates Uranium-233 Disposal, Saves Taxpayers Half EM Plan Accelerates Uranium-233 Disposal, Saves Taxpayers Half Billion Dollars EM Plan Accelerates Uranium-233 Disposal, Saves Taxpayers Half Billion Dollars August 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis For more than 50 years, the uranium-233 (U-233) supply has been stored at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s (ORNL) Building 3019. The facility, located near the center of the ORNL campus, is owned by EM and one of the nation’s few repositories for U-233 and other special nuclear materials dating back to the Manhattan Project. For more than 50 years, the uranium-233 (U-233) supply has been stored at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL) Building 3019. The facility, located near the center of the ORNL campus, is owned by EM and one of the nation's few repositories for U-233 and other special nuclear materials

400

Crystalline ceramics: Waste forms for the disposal of weapons plutonium  

SciTech Connect

At present, there are three seriously considered options for the disposition of excess weapons plutonium: (i) incorporation, partial burn-up and direct disposal of MOX-fuel; (ii) vitrification with defense waste and disposal as glass ``logs``; (iii) deep borehole disposal (National Academy of Sciences Report, 1994). The first two options provide a safeguard due to the high activity of fission products in the irradiated fuel and the defense waste. The latter option has only been examined in a preliminary manner, and the exact form of the plutonium has not been identified. In this paper, we review the potential for the immobilization of plutonium in highly durable crystalline ceramics apatite, pyrochlore, monazite and zircon. Based on available data, we propose zircon as the preferred crystalline ceramic for the permanent disposition of excess weapons plutonium.

Ewing, R.C.; Lutze, W. [New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Weber, W.J. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land disposal restrictions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Earth melter and method of disposing of feed materials  

SciTech Connect

An apparatus, and method of operating the apparatus, wherein a feed material is converted into a glassified condition for subsequent use or disposal. The apparatus is particularly useful for disposal of hazardous or noxious waste materials which are otherwise either difficult or expensive to dispose of. The apparatus is preferably constructed by excavating a melt zone in a quantity of soil or rock, and lining the melt zone with a back fill material if refractory properties are needed. The feed material is fed into the melt zone and, preferably, combusted to an ash, whereupon the heat of combustion is used to melt the ash to a molten condition. Electrodes may be used to maintain the molten feed material in a molten condition, and to maintain homogeneity of the molten materials.

Chapman, Christopher C. (Richland, WA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Subproject L-045H 300 Area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility  

SciTech Connect

The study focuses on the project schedule for Project L-045H, 300 Area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility. The 300 Area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility is a Department of Energy subproject of the Hanford Environmental Compliance Project. The study scope is limited to validation of the project schedule only. The primary purpose of the study is to find ways and means to accelerate the completion of the project, thereby hastening environmental compliance of the 300 Area of the Hanford site. The 300 Area'' has been utilized extensively as a laboratory area, with a diverse array of laboratory facilities installed and operational. The 300 Area Process Sewer, located in the 300 Area on the Hanford Site, collects waste water from approximately 62 sources. This waste water is discharged into two 1500 feet long percolation trenches. Current environmental statutes and policies dictate that this practice be discontinued at the earliest possible date in favor of treatment and disposal practices that satisfy applicable regulations.

Not Available

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Classified Component Disposal at the Nevada National Security Site  

SciTech Connect

The Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) has added the capability needed for the safe, secure disposal of non-nuclear classified components that have been declared excess to national security requirements. The NNSS has worked with U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration senior leadership to gain formal approval for permanent burial of classified matter at the NNSS in the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Complex owned by the U.S. Department of Energy. Additionally, by working with state regulators, the NNSS added the capability to dispose non-radioactive hazardous and non-hazardous classified components. The NNSS successfully piloted the new disposal pathway with the receipt of classified materials from the Kansas City Plant in March 2012.

Poling, J. [NSTec; Arnold, P. [NSTec; Saad, M. [SNL; DiSanza, F.; Cabble, K. [NNSA/NSO

2012-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

404

Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility Complex Waste Acceptance Criteria  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Disposal Facility (ICDF) has been designed to accept CERCLA waste generated within the Idaho National Laboratory. Hazardous, mixed, low-level, and Toxic Substance Control Act waste will be accepted for disposal at the ICDF. The purpose of this document is to provide criteria for the quantities of radioactive and/or hazardous constituents allowable in waste streams designated for disposal at ICDF. This ICDF Complex Waste Acceptance Criteria is divided into four section: (1) ICDF Complex; (2) Landfill; (3) Evaporation Pond: and (4) Staging, Storage, Sizing, and Treatment Facility (SSSTF). The ICDF Complex section contains the compliance details, which are the same for all areas of the ICDF. Corresponding sections contain details specific to the landfill, evaporation pond, and the SSSTF. This document specifies chemical and radiological constituent acceptance criteria for waste that will be disposed of at ICDF. Compliance with the requirements of this document ensures protection of human health and the environment, including the Snake River Plain Aquifer. Waste placed in the ICDF landfill and evaporation pond must not cause groundwater in the Snake River Plain Aquifer to exceed maximum contaminant levels, a hazard index of 1, or 10-4 cumulative risk levels. The defined waste acceptance criteria concentrations are compared to the design inventory concentrations. The purpose of this comparison is to show that there is an acceptable uncertainty margin based on the actual constituent concentrations anticipated for disposal at the ICDF. Implementation of this Waste Acceptance Criteria document will ensure compliance with the Final Report of Decision for the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center, Operable Unit 3-13. For waste to be received, it must meet the waste acceptance criteria for the specific disposal/treatment unit (on-Site or off-Site) for which it is destined.

W. Mahlon Heileson

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Marine One Landing Exercise at Argonne  

SciTech Connect

Marine One and its support helicopters conduct a landing exercise at Argonne prior to the President's visit.

None

2013-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

406

Maintenance Guide for DOE Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4 4 G Approved: XX-XX-XX IMPLEMENTATION GUIDE for use with DOE M 435.1-1 Maintenance Guide for U.S. Department of Energy Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility Performance Assessments and Composite Analyses U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY DOE G 435.1-4 i (and ii) DRAFT XX-XX-XX LLW Maintenance Guide Revision 0, XX-XX-XX Maintenance Guide for U.S. Department of Energy Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility Performance Assessments and Composite Analyses CONTENTS 1. INTRODUCTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 1.1 Purpose . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 1.2 Organization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 1.3 Background . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 1.3.1 Objectives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

407

Monitoring Report for Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act Title II Disposal Sites  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Annual Site Inspection and Annual Site Inspection and Monitoring Report for Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act Title II Disposal Sites November 2012 LMS/S09415 ENERGY Legacy Management U.S. DEPARTMENT OF Sherwood, Washington, Disposal Site, 2012 Sherwood, Washington, Disposal Site, 2012 L-Bar, New Mexico, Disposal Site, 2012 L-Bar, New Mexico, Disposal Site, 2012 Bluewater, New Mexico, Disposal Site, 2012 Bluewater, New Mexico, Disposal Site, 2012 Maybell West, Colorado, Disposal Site, 2012 Maybell West, Colorado, Disposal Site, 2012 This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy,

408

LAND USE AND OWNERSHIP, WILLISTON BASIN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chapter WM LAND USE AND OWNERSHIP, WILLISTON BASIN By T.T. Taber and S.A. Kinney In U.S. Geological........................................WM-1 Map Information for the Williston Basin Land Use And Land Cover Map.........................................................WM-2 Map Information for the Williston Basin Subsurface Ownership map

409

Autonomous Landing of MAVs on an Arbitrarily Textured Landing Site using Onboard Monocular Vision  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Autonomous Landing of MAVs on an Arbitrarily Textured Landing Site using Onboard Monocular Vision a novel solution for micro aerial vehicles (MAVs) to autonomously search for and land on an arbitrary landing site using real- time monocular vision. The autonomous MAV is provided with only one single

Zell, Andreas

410

The Restricted Boussinesq Flows, Their Lax Representations and r  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We present the Lax representations for the restricted Boussinesq flows resulted from the binary nonlinearization,of Lax systems of Boussinesq equation. Furthermore we show this Lax operator satisfies the r-matrix relation. Thus 3N involutive integrals for restricted Boussinesq flows are obtained.

Zhou RuGuang

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

RESTRICTED MODULES AND CONJECTURES FOR MODULES OF CONSTANT JORDAN TYPE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

RESTRICTED MODULES AND CONJECTURES FOR MODULES OF CONSTANT JORDAN TYPE SEMRA ¨OZT¨URK KAPTANO GLU give a method to construct new restricted k[E]-modules of constant Jordan type from k[E]-modules of constant Jordan type and use it to realize several Jordan types. The constraints on the Jordan type

Kaptanoglu, Semra Ozturk

412

RESTRICTED MODULES AND CONJECTURES FOR MODULES OF CONSTANT JORDAN TYPE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

RESTRICTED MODULES AND CONJECTURES FOR MODULES OF CONSTANT JORDAN TYPE SEMRA ¨OZT¨URK KAPTANO GLU Abstract. We introduce the class of restricted k[A]-modules and pt-Jordan types for a finite abelian p on Jordan types for modules of constant Jordan type when t is 1. We state conjectures giving constraints

Kaptanoglu, Semra Ozturk

413

Division of Human Resources Retirement Renewed Membership & Reemployment Restrictions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Division of Human Resources Retirement Renewed Membership & Reemployment Restrictions Questions employer after you have been retired for 12 calendar months. #12;Division of Human Resources Retirement Renewed Membership & Reemployment Restrictions Questions (813) 974-2970 Rev. 02/2012 If you are reemployed

Meyers, Steven D.

414

IMPOSING AND TESTING FOR SHAPE RESTRICTIONS IN FLEXIBLE PARAMETRIC MODELS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

0 IMPOSING AND TESTING FOR SHAPE RESTRICTIONS IN FLEXIBLE PARAMETRIC MODELS 1 Hendrik Wolff and inference to test for shape conditions in parametric models. We show that `regional' shape and test for all shape restrictions required by economic theory simultaneously in the "Berndt and Wood

Kaminsky, Werner

415

DOE Publishes Final Rule Regarding Post-Employment Restrictions |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Publishes Final Rule Regarding Post-Employment Restrictions Publishes Final Rule Regarding Post-Employment Restrictions DOE Publishes Final Rule Regarding Post-Employment Restrictions December 3, 2010 - 6:31pm Addthis The Department of Energy published a final rule establishing procedures under which a former employee of the executive branch may obtain approval to make communications to DOE solely for the purpose of furnishing scientific or technological information during the period the former employee is subject to post-employment restrictions set forth in 18 U.S.C. 207(a), (c), and (d). The post-employment restrictions for Federal employees are set forth in 18 U.S.C § 207 and prohibit former employees from engaging in certain activities on behalf of persons or entities other than the United States, regardless of compensation. Section 207(j)(5),

416

Ethics - Restrictions on Former Employees | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Restrictions on Restrictions on Former Employees Ethics - Restrictions on Former Employees What rules am I subject to after leaving the Government to take a job in the private sector? There is a Federal statute (18 USC 207) known as the "post-employment law" that applies to all former employees after they leave the Government. In general, this law does not prohibit you from working for any particular employer. It may, however, restrict the kinds of things that you do for that employer, depending on what you worked on or were responsible for when you were with the Government. Some additional rules apply to high-level officials and employees who were involved in procurement. After you leave Government service, you may seek specific guidance on these restrictions from your former agency. Do not hesitate to contact your

417

DOE Publishes Final Rule Regarding Post-Employment Restrictions |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Publishes Final Rule Regarding Post-Employment Restrictions Publishes Final Rule Regarding Post-Employment Restrictions DOE Publishes Final Rule Regarding Post-Employment Restrictions December 3, 2010 - 6:31pm Addthis The Department of Energy published a final rule establishing procedures under which a former employee of the executive branch may obtain approval to make communications to DOE solely for the purpose of furnishing scientific or technological information during the period the former employee is subject to post-employment restrictions set forth in 18 U.S.C. 207(a), (c), and (d). The post-employment restrictions for Federal employees are set forth in 18 U.S.C § 207 and prohibit former employees from engaging in certain activities on behalf of persons or entities other than the United States, regardless of compensation. Section 207(j)(5),

418

Ministers block disposal of oil rigs at sea  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... ministers last week ended three years of public controversy about the fate of disused oil rigs in the northeast Atlantic ocean. They decided that most will have to be dismantled ... all environmentalist groups. Oil companies, on the other hand, were disappointed. The UK Offshore Operators Association said the decision to outlaw deep-sea disposal of oil and gas ...

Ehsan Masood

1998-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

419

Design of a Large Explosive Ordnance Disposal Robot  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The explosive ordnance disposal robot (EOD robot) can replace man to reconnoiter, remove and deal with explosives or other dangerous articles in the dangerous environment. We design a large EOD robot which is constituted by the vehicle body, the mechanical ... Keywords: EOD robot, vehicle body, mechanical hand, vision system

Boyu Wei; Junyao Gao; Jianguo Zhu; Kejie Li

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Support of the Iraq nuclear facility dismantlement and disposal program  

SciTech Connect

Available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: Iraq's former nuclear facilities contain large quantities of radioactive materials and radioactive waste. The Iraq Nuclear Facility Dismantlement and Disposal Program (the Iraq NDs Program) is a new program to decontaminate and permanently dispose of radioactive wastes in Iraq. The NDs Program is led by the Government of Iraq, under International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) auspices, with guidance and assistance from a number of countries. The U.S. participants include Texas Tech University and Sandia National Laboratories. A number of activities are ongoing under the broad umbrella of the Iraq NDs Program: drafting a new nuclear law that will provide the legal basis for the cleanup and disposal activities; assembly and analysis of existing data; characterization of soil contamination; bringing Iraqi scientists to the world's largest symposium on radioactive waste management; touring U.S. government and private sector operating radwaste disposal facilities in the U.S., and hosting a planning workshop on the characterization and cleanup of the Al-Tuwaitha Nuclear Facility. (authors)

Coates, Roger [International Atomic Energy Agency - IAEA, Wagramer Strasse 5, P.O. Box 100 - 1400 Vienna (Austria); Cochran, John; Danneels, Jeff [Sandia National Laboratories (United States); Chesser, Ronald; Phillips, Carlton; Rogers, Brenda [Center for Environmental Radiation Studies, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX 79409 (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land disposal restrictions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

On-Farm Storage and Disposal of Sorghum Grain.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

APRIL 1963 ON-FARM - STORAGE AND DISPOSAL OF SORGHUM GRAIN -- THE AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE OF TEXAS TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION R. E. PATTERSON. DIRECTOR. COLLEGE ST+TION, TEXAS IN COOPERATION WITH THE U. S. DEPARTMENT... OF AGRICULTURE summary The sorghum storage space. Utilization increases resulted from an increased awareness and acceptance by feeders and millers...

Brown, Charles W.; Moore, Clarence A.

1963-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Pyroprocessing oxide spent nuclear fuels for efficient disposal  

SciTech Connect

Pyrochemical processing as a means for conditioning spent nuclear fuels for disposal offers significant advantages over the direct disposal option. The advantages include reduction in high-level waste volume; conversion of most of the high-level waste to a low-level waste in which nearly all the transuranics (TRU) have been removed; and incorporation of the TRUs into a stable, highly radioactive waste form suitable for interim storage, ultimate destruction, or repository disposal. The lithium process has been under development at Argonne National Laboratory for use in pyrochemical conditioning of spent fuel for disposal. All of the process steps have been demonstrated in small-scale (0.5-kg simulated spent fuel) experiments. Engineering-scale (20-kg simulated spent fuel) demonstration of the process is underway, and small-scale experiments have been conducted with actual spent fuel from a light water reactor (LWR). The lithium process is simple, operates at relatively low temperatures, and can achieve high decontamination factors for the TRU elements. Ordinary materials, such as carbon steel, can be used for process containment.

McPheeters, C.C.; Pierce, R.D.; Mulcahey, T.P. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Chemical Technology Div.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

423

Disposal of CCA-treated Wood: An Evaluation of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Disposal of CCA-treated Wood: An Evaluation of Existing and Alternative Management Options (FINAL CHARACTERISTICS OF CCA-TREATED WOOD ASH II.1 Sample Preparation 10 II.2 Laboratory Methods 15 II.3 Laboratory Results 24 CHAPTER III, SORTING TECHNOLOGIES FOR SEPARATING TREATED WOOD FROM UNTREATED WOOD III.1

Florida, University of

424

The College of Engineering Electronic Media Disposal Policy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The College of Engineering Electronic Media Disposal Policy COE­EMD­01 1.0 Purpose The purpose of Engineering employees, contractors, consultants, temporary personnel, and other workers responsible electronic information on the medium, such as a computer, personal hand held device, audio or video player

Demirel, Melik C.

425

EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions - Land use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6. Land use 6. Land use 6.1. Total land use, land use change, and forests This chapter presents estimates of carbon sequestration (removal from the atmosphere) and emissions (release into the atmosphere) from forests, croplands, grasslands, and residential areas (urban trees, grass clippings, and food scraps) in the United States. In 2008, land use, land use change, and forests were responsible for estimated net carbon sequestration of 940 MMTCO2e (Table 31), representing 16 percent of total U.S. CO2 emissions. The largest sequestration category in 2008 was forest lands and harvested wood pools,49 with estimated sequestration increasing from 730 MMTCO2e in 1990 to 792 MMTCO2e in 2008. The second-largest carbon sequestration category was urban trees,50 responsible for 57 MMTCO2e in 1990 and 94

426

DISTRIBUTION RESTRICTION: Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-dimensional nature of modern warfare, while full spectrum operations recognized the need to conduct a fluid mix DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY OCTOBER 2011 UNIFIED LAND OPERATIONS ADP 3-0 , #12;This publication is available (ADP) 3-0, Unified Land Operations, provides a common operational concept for a future in which Army

US Army Corps of Engineers

427

Special Analysis: Revision of Saltstone Vault 4 Disposal Limits (U)  

SciTech Connect

New disposal limits have been computed for Vault 4 of the Saltstone Disposal Facility based on several revisions to the models in the existing Performance Assessment and the Special Analysis issued in 2002. The most important changes are the use of a more rigorous groundwater flow and transport model, and consideration of radon emanation. Other revisions include refinement of the aquifer mesh to more accurately model the footprint of the vault, a new plutonium chemistry model accounting for the different transport properties of oxidation states III/IV and V/VI, use of variable infiltration rates to simulate degradation of the closure system, explicit calculation of gaseous releases and consideration of the effects of settlement and seismic activity on the vault structure. The disposal limits have been compared with the projected total inventory expected to be disposed in Vault 4. The resulting sum-of-fractions of the 1000-year disposal limits is 0.2, which indicates that the performance objectives and requirements of DOE 435.1 will not be exceeded. This SA has not altered the conceptual model (i.e., migration of radionuclides from the Saltstone waste form and Vault 4 to the environment via the processes of diffusion and advection) of the Saltstone PA (MMES 1992) nor has it altered the conclusions of the PA (i.e., disposal of the proposed waste in the SDF will meet DOE performance measures). Thus a PA revision is not required and this SA serves to update the disposal limits for Vault 4. In addition, projected doses have been calculated for comparison with the performance objectives laid out in 10 CFR 61. These doses are 0.05 mrem/year to a member of the public and 21.5 mrem/year to an inadvertent intruder in the resident scenario over a 10,000-year time-frame, which demonstrates that the 10 CFR 61 performance objectives will not be exceeded. This SA supplements the Saltstone PA and supersedes the two previous SAs (Cook et al. 2002; Cook and Kaplan 2003).

Cook, J

2005-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

428

Case studies: developing land uses in surface-mine reclamation  

SciTech Connect

Regulations adopted in 1978 by the Office of Surface Mining (OSM) to implement the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 foreclosed many opportunities for development of postmining uses because of the requirement to return land to its approximate original contour (AOC), and the difficulty of qualifying for a variance. The regulations all but eliminated development of postmining uses with economic or community benefits. The effect of those regulations was to develop forestland, farmland, and rangeland similar to that which existed before mining. Recent changes in OSM's regulations have made development of postmining uses more feasible by removing many restrictive conditions and interpretations. This report documents the main types of uses that have been developed as postmining uses - recreation, forestry, housing, community facilities, industry, and commercial and mixed urban uses. Most of the cases presented predate the Act, and thus were not developed in a regulatory situation comparable to the present time. However, they demonstrate the practical feasibility and the benefits to local communities of developing postmining uses. The review of examples and case studies leads to three main conclusions: in certain situations surface-mined land may be an important resource for communities; most successful postmining developments required considerable vision and dedicated effort over many years; and an intended postmining use should be studied and planned during the preparation of mining permits so that the mining operation can be coordinated with the postmining use.

Seddon, J.; Petrich, C.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Preliminary Report on Dual-Purpose Canister Disposal Alternatives (FY13) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Preliminary Report on Dual-Purpose Canister Disposal Alternatives Preliminary Report on Dual-Purpose Canister Disposal Alternatives (FY13) Preliminary Report on Dual-Purpose Canister Disposal Alternatives (FY13) This report documents the first phase of a multi-year project to understand the technical feasibility and logistical implications of direct disposal of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) in existing dual-purpose canisters (DPCs) and other types of storage casks. The first phase includes a set of preliminary disposal concepts and associated technical analyses, identification of additional R&D needs, and a recommendation to proceed with the next phase of the evaluation effort. Preliminary analyses indicate that DPC direct disposal could be technically feasible, at least for certain disposal concepts. DPC disposal concepts include the salt concept, and emplacement

430

NNSS Waste Disposal Proves Vital Resource for DOE Complex | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NNSS Waste Disposal Proves Vital Resource for DOE Complex NNSS Waste Disposal Proves Vital Resource for DOE Complex NNSS Waste Disposal Proves Vital Resource for DOE Complex March 20, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis The Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site The Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site Like most LLW, RTGs disposed of at the NNSS were handled without any special equipment or clothing because of the relatively low dose rate levels. Like most LLW, RTGs disposed of at the NNSS were handled without any special equipment or clothing because of the relatively low dose rate levels. An irradiator from Sandia National Laboratory was disposed of at the RWMS in September 2012. An irradiator from Sandia National Laboratory was disposed of at the RWMS in September 2012. The Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site Like most LLW, RTGs disposed of at the NNSS were handled without any special equipment or clothing because of the relatively low dose rate levels.

431

Analysis of mineral trapping for CO2 disposal in deep aquifers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Mineral Trapping for CO2 Disposal in Deep Aquifers Tianfue~mail: Tianfu Xu@lbl. gov) CO2 disposal into deep aquiferspermit significant sequestration of CO2. We performed batch

Xu, Tianfu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

DEVELOPMENT OF DATABASE ON FECAL SLUDGE COLLECTION, TREATMENT AND DISPOSAL IN THACHIN,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

i DEVELOPMENT OF DATABASE ON FECAL SLUDGE COLLECTION, TREATMENT AND DISPOSAL IN THACHIN, CHAOPRAYA Sludge (FS) management and lacking of data on FS collection, treatment and disposal. Nevertheless, FS

Richner, Heinz

433

Environmental Protection Problems Connected to the Disposal of Ammunition and Explosives by Open Pit Burning  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

At the end of its functional life time, in service ammunition has to be disposed, as welt as the war time ammunition and explosives which are still beiing recovered. Formerly the conventional way of disposing amm...

Drs N. H. A. van Ham; A. Verweij

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Aspects of Nuclear Waste Disposal of Use in Teaching Basic Chemistry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Aspects of Nuclear Waste Disposal of Use in Teaching Basic Chemistry ... Various aspects of nuclear waste disposal are discussed for their value in providing pedagogical examples. ... Radioactivity, Radiation, and the Chemistry of Nuclear Waste ...

Gregory R. Choppin

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Format and Content Guide for DOE Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Format and Content Guide for DOE Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility Format and Content Guide for U.S. Department of Energy Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility Performance Assessments...

436

Format and Content Guide for DOE Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Content Guide for DOE Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility Closure Plans Format and Content Guide for U.S. Department of Energy Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility Closure...

437

Classification and disposal of radioactive wastes: History and legal and regulatory requirements  

SciTech Connect

This document discusses the laws and regulations in the United States addressing classification of radioactive wastes and the requirements for disposal of different waste classes. This review emphasizes the relationship between waste classification and the requirements for permanent disposal.

Kocher, D.C.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

E-Print Network 3.0 - alternative disposal options Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

within the park, up... the dredging area to the disposal site via a 10 or 12" diameter pipeline. Alternatively, if the dredgeate 12... ;EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ii was to be disposed...

439

Concept study: Use of grout vaults for disposal of long-length contaminated equipment  

SciTech Connect

Study considers the potential for use of grout vaults for disposal of untreated long length equipment removed from waste tanks. Looks at ways to access vaults, material handling, regulatory aspects, and advantages and disadvantages of vault disposal.

Clem, D.K.

1994-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

440

Assessment of Disposal Options for DOE-Managed High-Level Radioactive...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Assessment of Disposal Options for DOE-Managed High-Level Radioactive Waste and Spent Nuclear Fuel Assessment of Disposal Options for DOE-Managed High-Level Radioactive Waste and...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land disposal restrictions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Disposal Activities and the Unique Waste Streams at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS)  

SciTech Connect

This slide show documents waste disposal at the Nevada National Security Site. Topics covered include: radionuclide requirements for waste disposal; approved performance assessment (PA) for depleted uranium disposal; requirements; program approval; the Waste Acceptance Review Panel (WARP); description of the Radioactive Waste Acceptance Program (RWAP); facility evaluation; recent program accomplishments, nuclear facility safety changes; higher-activity waste stream disposal; and, large volume bulk waste streams.

Arnold, P.

2012-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

442

River Protection Project (RPP) Tank Waste Retrieval and Disposal Mission Technical Baseline Summary Description  

SciTech Connect

This document is one of the several documents prepared by Lockheed Martin Hanford Corp. to support the U. S. Department of Energy's Tank Waste Retrieval and Disposal mission at Hanford. The Tank Waste Retrieval and Disposal mission includes the programs necessary to support tank waste retrieval; waste feed, delivery, storage, and disposal of immobilized waste; and closure of the tank farms.

DOVALLE, O.R.

1999-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

443

ASSESSING GHG EMISSIONS FROM SLUDGE TREATMENT AND DISPOSAL ROUTES THE METHOD BEHIND GESTABOUES TOOL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ASSESSING GHG EMISSIONS FROM SLUDGE TREATMENT AND DISPOSAL ROUTES ­ THE METHOD BEHIND GESTABOUES TOOL Pradel M., Reverdy, A.L. ORBIT2012 1 Assessing GHG emissions from sludge treatment and disposal. These different disposal routes as well as the sludge treatments produce greenhouse gases (GHG). To help

Boyer, Edmond

444

New Review of Nuclear Waste Disposal Calls for Early Test in New Mexico  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...WIPP spent fuel disposal demonstration...licensing and site selection could...date. Waste disposal will not be inexpen-sive...such as those at Maxey Flats, Kentucky...long-term waste disposal facili-ties...formation at the WIPP site. Satisfying...

WILLIAM D. METZ

1978-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

445

Environmental Impact of Wastewater Disposal in the Florida Keys, Monroe County Tom Higginbotham  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Environmental Impact of Wastewater Disposal in the Florida Keys, Monroe County Tom Higginbotham University of Florida Soil and Water Science #12;Environmental Impact of Wastewater Disposal in the Florida affecting the normally oligotrophic marine waters. Typical methods of wastewater disposal include large

Ma, Lena

446

Alternative Chemicals and Improved Disposal-End Management Practices for CCA-treated Wood  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Alternative Chemicals and Improved Disposal-End Management Practices for CCA-treated Wood (FINAL.7 Costs 54 II.8 Feedback from Wood Treaters and Large-End Users 56 CHAPTER III, DISPOSAL.3 Resource Book for the Wood Disposal Sector 85 CHAPTER IV IV.1 Conclusion and Recommendations IV.2

Florida, University of

447

Generation, Use, Disposal, and Management Options for CCA-Treated Wood  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Generation, Use, Disposal, and Management Options for CCA-Treated Wood May 1998 Helena Solo, INVENTORY OF CCA-TREATED WOOD IN FLORIDA II.1 Characteristics of the Florida Wood Treatment Industry in 1996 10 II.2 Generation and Disposal of Cca-treated Wood 14 II.3 Disposal Reservoirs for Cca-treated Wood

Florida, University of

448

Geothermal/Land Use | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Use Use < Geothermal Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Land Use Leasing Exploration Well Field Power Plant Transmission Environment Water Use Print PDF Geothermal Land Use Planning General Regulatory Roadmap The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and the USDA Forest Service (FS) have prepared a joint Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) to analyze and expedite the leasing of BLM-and FS-administered lands with high potential for renewable geothermal resources in 11 Western states and Alaska. Geothermal Land Use Planning is ... Example Land Use Plans References Information for Publication Standards for EA/EIS/Planning Documents IM 2004-110.pdf Fluid Mineral Leasing and Related Planning and National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Processes April 11, 2004 and

449

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Initial Report for PCB Disposal Authorization (40 CFR {section} 761.75[c])  

SciTech Connect

This initial report is being submitted pursuant to Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) {section} 761.75(c) to request authorization to allow the disposal of transuranic (TRU) wastes containing polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) which are duly regulated under the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA). Approval of this initial report will not affect the disposal of TRU or TRU mixed wastes that do not contain PCBs. This initial report also demonstrates how the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) meets or exceeds the technical standards for a Chemical Waste Landfill. Approval of this request will allow the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to dispose of approximately 88,000 cubic feet (ft3) (2,500 cubic meters [m3]) of TRU wastes containing PCBs subject to regulation under the TSCA. This approval will include only those PCB/TRU wastes, which the TSCA regulations allow for disposal of the PCB component in municipal solid waste facilities or chemical waste landfills (e.g., PCB remediation waste, PC B articles, and bulk PCB product waste). Disposal of TRU waste by the DOE is congressionally mandated in Public Law 102-579 (as amended by the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 1997, Pub. L. 104-201, referred to as the WIPP Land Withdrawal Act [LWA]). Portions of the TRU waste inventory contain hazardous waste constituents regulated under 40 CFR Parts 260 through 279, and/or PCBs and PCB Items regulated under 40 CFR Part 761. Therefore, the DOE TRU waste program must address the disposal requirements for these hazardous waste constituents and PCBs. To facilitate the disposal of TRU wastes containing hazardous waste constituents, the owner/operators received a Hazardous Waste Facility Permit (HWFP) from the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) on October 27, 1999. The permit allows the disposal of TRU wastes subject to hazardous waste disposal requirements (TRU mixed waste). Informational copies of this permit and other referenced documents are available from the WIPP website. To facilitate the disposal of TRU wastes containing PCBs, the owner/operators are hereby submitting this initial report containing information required pursuant to the Chemical Waste Landfill Approval requirements in 40 CFR {section} 761.75(c). Although WIPP is defined as a miscellaneous unit and not a landfill by the New Mexico Hazardous Waste Act, WIPP meets or exceeds all applicable technical standards for chemical waste landfills by virtue of its design and programs as indicated in the Engineering Report (Attachment B). The layout of this initial report is consistent with requirements (i.e., Sections 2.0 through 12.0 following the sequence of 40 CFR {section} 761.75[c][i] -[ix] with sections added to discuss the Contingency and Training Plans; and Attachment B of this initial report addresses the requirements of 40 CFR {section} 761.75[b][1] through [9] in this order). This initial report includes a description of three proposed changes that will be subject to ''conditional approval.'' The first will allow the disposal of remote-handled (RH) PCB/TRU waste at WIPP. The second will allow the establishment of a central confirmation facility at WIPP. The third will allow for an increase in contact-handled Working Copy Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Initial Report for PCB Disposal Authorization DOE/WIPP 02-3196 (CH) waste storage capacities. These proposed changes are discussed further in Section 3.3 of this initial report. ''Conditional approval'' of these requests would allow these activities at WIPP contingent upon: - Approval of the HWFP modification (NMED) and Compliance Certification Application (CCA) change request (Environmental Protection Agency [EPA]) - Inspection of facility prior to implementing the change (if deemed necessary by the EPA) - Written approval from the EPA This initial report also includes the following three requests for waivers to the technical requirements for Chemical Waste Landfills pursuant to 40 CFR {section} 761.75(c)(4): - Hydrologic Conditions (40 CFR {section} 761.75[b][3]) - Monitoring Systems (40 CFR {sect

Westinghouse TRU Solutions

2002-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

450

Montgomery County- Renewable Rights- No Private Restrictions on Renewables  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Provides that “a person must not create or enforce any deed restriction, covenant, rule, or regulation, or take any other action, which would prohibit the owner of any building from installing a...

451

Restricting Legislative Power to Tax in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Government’s authority to impose taxes is one of its most pervasive and fundamental powers. In the United States, this power is granted to Congress by the U.S. Constitution with few explicit restrictions. Moreover, the ...

Kaye, Tracy; Mazza, Stephen W.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

NDAA Section 3116 Waste Determinations with Related Disposal Performance  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NDAA Section NDAA Section 3116 Waste Determinations with Related Disposal Performance Assessments NDAA Section 3116 Waste Determinations with Related Disposal Performance Assessments Section 3116 of the Ronald W. Reagan National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2005 authorizes the Secretary of Energy, in consultation with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, to reclassify certain waste from reprocessing spent nuclear fuel from high-level waste to low-level waste if it meets the criteria set forth in Section 3116. Section 3116 is currently only applicable to Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and the Savannah River Site (SRS). The other two DOE sites with similar waste (residuals remaining after cleaning out tanks and equipment that held liquid high-level waste)

453

The Effects of CO2 Disposal on Marine Nitrification Processes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Effects of CO Effects of CO 2 Disposal on Marine Nitrification Processes Michael H. Huesemann (michael.huesemann@pnl.gov, 360-681-3618) Pacific Northwest National Laboratory - Marine Sciences Laboratory 1529 West Sequim Bay Road Sequim, WA 98382 Ann D. Skillman (ann.skillman@pnl.gov, 360-681-3649) Pacific Northwest National Laboratory - Marine Sciences Laboratory 1529 West Sequim Bay Road Sequim, WA 98382 Eric A. Crecelius (eric.crecelius@pnl.gov, 360-681-3604) Pacific Northwest National Laboratory - Marine Sciences Laboratory 1529 West Sequim Bay Road Sequim, WA 98382 Abstract In an attempt to reduce the threat of global warming, it has been proposed that the rise of atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations be reduced by the ocean disposal of CO 2 from the flue gases of fossil fuel-fired power plants. The release of large amounts of

454

LANL demolishes first containment dome at disposal area  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LANL Demolishes First Containment Dome LANL Demolishes First Containment Dome LANL demolishes first containment dome at disposal area It once housed thousands of drums of radioactive waste that have been shipped to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant for disposal. September 30, 2009 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials.

455

Operational Issues at the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility at Hanford  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hanford Operations Hanford Operations Evaluating Operational Issues at the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility at Hanford By Craig H. Benson, PhD, PE; William H. Albright, PhD; and David P. Ray, PE Sponsored by: The Office of Engineering and Technology (EM-20) 17 June 2007 i TABLE OF CONTENTS EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ii ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS iv INTRODUCTION 1 BACKGROUND 1 Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility 1 Source of Concern 2 LINES OF INQUIRY 2 1. Validate Scope of Identified Problems 2 2. Assess Contractor Evaluation of the Elevated Leachate Level on the Landfill Liner 3 3. Evaluate Adequacy of Landfill Performance in View of the Discovered Falsified Compaction Data and Potential Leachate Level Problems 4

456

Portsmouth Site Delivers First Radioactive Waste Shipment to Disposal  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Delivers First Radioactive Waste Shipment to Delivers First Radioactive Waste Shipment to Disposal Facility in Texas Portsmouth Site Delivers First Radioactive Waste Shipment to Disposal Facility in Texas August 27, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Waste management and transportation personnel worked late to complete the first shipment to WCS. Through a contract with DOE, WCS will treat and accept potentially hazardous waste that has been at the Portsmouth site for decades. Pictured (from left) are Scott Fraser, Joe Hawes, Craig Herrmann, Jim Book, John Lee, John Perry, Josh Knipp, Melissa Dunsieth, Randy Barr, Rick Williams, Janet Harris, Maureen Fischels, Cecil McCoy, Trent Eckert, Anthony Howard and Chris Ashley. Waste management and transportation personnel worked late to complete the first shipment to WCS. Through a contract with DOE, WCS will treat and

457

D11 WASTE DISPOSAL FACILITIES FOR TRANSURANIC WASTE  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

10 CFR Ch. X (1-1-12 Edition) Pt. 1022 D11 WASTE DISPOSAL FACILITIES FOR TRANSURANIC WASTE Siting, construction or expansion, and op- eration of disposal facilities for transuranic (TRU) waste and TRU mixed waste (TRU waste also containing hazardous waste as designated in 40 CFR part 261). D12 INCINERATORS Siting, construction, and operation of in- cinerators, other than research and develop- ment incinerators or incinerators for non- hazardous solid waste (as designated in 40 CFR 261.4(b)). PART 1022-COMPLIANCE WITH FLOODPLAIN AND WETLAND EN- VIRONMENTAL REVIEW REQUIRE- MENTS Subpart A-General Sec. 1022.1 Background. 1022.2 Purpose and scope. 1022.3 Policy. 1022.4 Definitions. 1022.5 Applicability. 1022.6 Public inquiries. Subpart B-Procedures for Floodplain and

458

WIPP Reaches Milestone „ First Disposal Room Filled  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

WIPP Reaches Milestone - First Disposal Room Filled CARLSBAD, N.M., September 4, 2001 - The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Carlsbad Field Office today announced that Room 7 of Panel 1 at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), the first underground room used for disposal operations, has been filled to capacity with transuranic waste. The milestone was reached at about 3:30 p.m. on August 24, as Waste Handling personnel emplaced a shipment of waste from the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. On August 25, Underground Operations personnel completed installation of a chain link mesh barrier and cloth drape across the entrance to the room to officially declare the area "closed." The first shipment of waste, which came

459

Field study of disposed solid wastes from advanced coal processes  

SciTech Connect

Radian Corporation and the North Dakota Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) are funded to develop information to be used by private industry and government agencies for managing solid waste produced by advanced coal processes. This information will be developed by conducting several field studies on disposed wastes from these processes. Data will be collected to characterize these wastes and their interactions with the environments in which they are disposed. Three sites have been selected for the field studies: Colorado Ute's fluidized bed combustion (FBC) unit in Nucla, Colorado; Ohio Edison's limestone injection multistage burner (LIMB) retrofit in Lorain, Ohio; and Freeman United's site using waste from Midwest Grain's FBC unit in central Illinois. A fourth site is under consideration at the Dakota Gasification Company in North Dakota. The first two tasks of this project involved the development of test plans and obtaining site access.

Not Available

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Integrated process for coalbed brine and methane disposal  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes a technology and project to demonstrate and commercialize a brine disposal process for converting the brine stream of a coalbed gas producing site into clean water for agricultural use and dry solids that can be recycled for industrial consumption. The process also utilizes coalbed methane (CBM) released from coal mining for the combustion process thereby substantially reducing the potential for methane emissions to the atmosphere. The technology is ideally suited for the treatment and disposal of produced brines generated from the development of coal mines and coalbed methane resources worldwide. Over the next 10 to 15 years, market potential for brine elimination equipment and services is estimated to be in the range of $1 billion.

Byam, J.W. Jr.; Tait, J.H.; Brandt, H.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land disposal restrictions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Regulatory requirements affecting disposal of asbestos-containing waste  

SciTech Connect

Many U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities are undergoing decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) activities. The performance of these activities may generate asbestos-containing waste because asbestos was formerly used in many building materials, including floor tile, sealants, plastics, cement pipe, cement sheets, insulating boards, and insulating cements. The regulatory requirements governing the disposal of these wastes depend on: (1) the percentage of asbestos in the waste and whether the waste is friable (easily crumbled or pulverized); (2) other physical and chemical characteristics of the waste; and (3) the State in which the waste is generated. This Information Brief provides an overview of the environment regulatory requirements affecting disposal of asbestos-containing waste. It does not address regulatory requirements applicable to worker protection promulgated under the Occupational Safety and Health Act (OSHAct), the Mining Safety and Health Act (MSHA), or the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA).

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Drilling Waste Management Fact Sheet: Disposal in Salt Caverns  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Salt Caverns Salt Caverns Fact Sheet - Disposal in Salt Caverns Introduction to Salt Caverns Underground salt deposits are found in the continental United States and worldwide. Salt domes are large, fingerlike projections of nearly pure salt that have risen to near the surface. Bedded salt formations typically contain multiple layers of salt separated by layers of other rocks. Salt beds occur at depths of 500 to more than 6,000 feet below the surface. Schematic Drawing click to view larger image Schematic Drawing of a Cavern in Domal Salt Schematic Drawing click to view larger image Schematic Drawing of a Cavern in Bedded Salt Salt caverns used for oil field waste disposal are created by a process called solution mining. Well drilling equipment is used to drill a hole

463

Portsmouth Site Delivers First Radioactive Waste Shipment to Disposal  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Portsmouth Site Delivers First Radioactive Waste Shipment to Portsmouth Site Delivers First Radioactive Waste Shipment to Disposal Facility in Texas Portsmouth Site Delivers First Radioactive Waste Shipment to Disposal Facility in Texas August 27, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Waste management and transportation personnel worked late to complete the first shipment to WCS. Through a contract with DOE, WCS will treat and accept potentially hazardous waste that has been at the Portsmouth site for decades. Pictured (from left) are Scott Fraser, Joe Hawes, Craig Herrmann, Jim Book, John Lee, John Perry, Josh Knipp, Melissa Dunsieth, Randy Barr, Rick Williams, Janet Harris, Maureen Fischels, Cecil McCoy, Trent Eckert, Anthony Howard and Chris Ashley. Waste management and transportation personnel worked late to complete the

464

Investigation of porous media structures using NMR restricted diffusion measurements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

INVESTIGATION OF POROUS MEDIA STRUCTURES USING NMR RESTRICTED DIFFUSION MEASUREMENTS A Thesis by PEIZHI MIAO Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1993 Major Subject: Chemical Engineering INVESTIGATION OF POROUS MEDIA STRUCTURES USING NMR RESTRICTED DIFFUSION MEASUREMENTS A Thesis by PEIZHI MIAO Approved ss to style and content by: A. T. Watson (Chair of Committee) C...

Miao, Peizhi

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

465

The effect of restricted highway facilities on traffic operations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

~ ~ ~ ~ 73 ~ ~ ~ ~ . ~ ~ . 74 LIST OF TABLES Table l. iflotor Vehicle degistrations in The 'Jnited States 2. Analysis of Traf. ic Data 3. Frequency Distribution of Vehicle Speeds at Open Site Number 2 4. Frequency Distribution of Vehicle Time... Recording Tace ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ . 25 . 26 . 31 15. Comparison of Vehicle Speeds At Open Site Number 1 And Restricted Site Number 1 . 42 16. Comparison cf Vehicle Speeds At Ooen Site Number 1 And Restricted Site Number 1 . 43 17...

Cloninger, Kriss

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

466

Mediterranean land abandonment and associated biomass variation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Biomass is an important factor in environmental processes, such as erosion, carbon storage, climate change and land degradation. Human-induced changes in plant community systems and… (more)

Hoogeveen, S.S.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Land Use Planning Handbook | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

certain public lands in their natural condition; that will provide food and habitat for fish and wildlife and domestic animals; that will provide for outdoor recreation and human...

468

Bureau of Land Management - Final Programmatic Environmental...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Bureau of Land Management - Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Geothermal Leasing in the Western United States...

469

Relationships among land ownership, land use, and landowner behavior changes in Gillespie and Washington Counties, Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The recent trend of land parcelization and habitat fragmentation has prompted concern among scientists. This concern has led to studies exploring the causes and effects of both events, but has not targeted the owners of land as participants in all...

Steinbach, Mark Shane

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

470

The impacts of land use-induced land cover change on climate extremes.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Simulations from the CSIRO Mk3L climate model, coupled to the CABLE land surface model, indicate that climate extremes indices are significantly affected by land use-induced… (more)

Avila, Francia Bismonte

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Disposal of Draeger Tubes at Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River Site (SRS) is a Department of Energy (DOE) facility located in Aiken, South Carolina that is operated by the Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC). At SRS Draeger tubes are used to identify the amount and type of a particular chemical constituent in the atmosphere. Draeger tubes rely on a chemical reaction to identify the nature and type of a particular chemical constituent in the atmosphere. Disposal practices for these tubes were identified by performing a hazardous waste evaluation per the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Additional investigations were conducted to provide guidance for their safe handling, storage and disposal. A list of Draeger tubes commonly used at SRS was first evaluated to determine if they contained any material that could render them as a RCRA hazardous waste. Disposal techniques for Draeger tubes that contained any of the toxic contaminants listed in South Carolina Hazardous Waste Management Regulations (SCHWMR) R.61-79. 261.24 (b) and/or contained an acid in the liquid form were addressed.

Malik, N.P.

2000-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

472

Pyramiding tumuli waste disposal site and method of construction thereof  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved waste disposal site for the above-ground disposal of low-level nuclear waste as disclosed herein. The disposal site is formed from at least three individual waste-containing tumuli, wherein each tumuli includes a central raised portion bordered by a sloping side portion. Two of the tumuli are constructed at ground level with adjoining side portions, and a third above-ground tumulus is constructed over the mutually adjoining side portions of the ground-level tumuli. Both the floor and the roof of each tumulus includes a layer of water-shedding material such as compacted clay, and the clay layer in the roofs of the two ground-level tumuli form the compacted clay layer of the floor of the third above-ground tumulus. Each tumulus further includes a shield wall, preferably formed from a solid array of low-level handleable nuclear wate packages. The provision of such a shield wall protects workers from potentially harmful radiation when higher-level, non-handleable packages of nuclear waste are stacked in the center of the tumulus.

Golden, Martin P. (Hamburg, NY)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Iraq nuclear facility dismantlement and disposal project (NDs Project).  

SciTech Connect

The Al Tuwaitha nuclear complex near Baghdad contains a number of facilities from Saddam Hussan's nuclear weapons program. Past military operations, lack of upkeep and looting have created an enormous radioactive waste problem at the Al Tuwaitha complex, which contains various, uncharacterized radioactive wastes, yellow cake, sealed radioactive sources, and contaminated metals that must be constantly guarded. Iraq has never had a radioactive waste disposal facility and the lack of a disposal facility means that ever increasing quantities of radioactive material must be held in guarded storage. The Iraq Nuclear Facility Dismantlement and Disposal Program (the NDs Program) has been initiated by the U.S. Department of State (DOS) to assist the Government of Iraq (GOI) in eliminating the threats from poorly controlled radioactive materials, while building human capacities so that the GOI can manage other environmental cleanups in their country. The DOS is funding the IAEA to provide technical assistance via Technical Cooperation projects. Program coordination will be provided by the DOS, consistent with GOI policies, and Sandia National Laboratories will be responsible for coordination of participants and waste management support. Texas Tech University will continue to provide in-country assistance, including radioactive waste characterization and the stand-up of the Iraq Nuclear Services Company. The GOI owns the problems in Iraq and will be responsible for implementation of the NDs Program.

Cochran, John Russell

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Interaction effects of climate and land use/land cover change on soil organic carbon sequestration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Interaction effects of climate and land use/land cover change on soil organic carbon sequestration carbon sequestration Climate change Soil carbon change Historically, Florida soils stored the largest in Florida (FL) have acted as a sink for carbon (C) over the last 40 years. · Climate interacting with land

Grunwald, Sabine

475

Land Ethics for Bureau of Land Management Employees1 Duane DePaepe2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Land Ethics for Bureau of Land Management Employees1 Duane DePaepe2 Abstract: With increased expected to make what is perceived as "right decisions." The ethical dimensions of often highly complex is designed to promote a land ethic awareness among a wide spectrum of bureau employees who contribute

Standiford, Richard B.

476

Parcel-Level Land Architecture and Land Surface Temperature in the Phoenix Metropolitan Area  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Parcel-Level Land Architecture and Land Surface Temperature in the Phoenix Metropolitan Area Xiaoxiao Li1, Yun Ouyang1, Billie Turner II1,2, Sharon Harlan3, Anthony Brazel2 1 School of Sustainability system architecture--composition and configuration of different land-cover classes--on LST in the central

Hall, Sharon J.

477

Disposal of Greater-than-Class C Low-Level Radioactive Waste  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Disposal of Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal of Low-Level Radioactive Waste EVS prepared a draft environmental impact statement (EIS) for disposal of greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste (GTCC LLRW). The EVS Division prepared a draft environmental impact statement (EIS) for disposal of greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste (GTCC LLRW) for the DOE Office of Environmental Management. DOE is now finalizing this EIS and is including a preferred alternative. DOE intends that the final EIS will provide information to support the selection of disposal method(s) and site(s) for GTCC LLRW and GTCC-like waste. In general, GTCC LLRW is not acceptable for near-surface disposal. Typically, the waste form and disposal methods must be different from and more stringent than those specified for Class C LLRW. For GTCC LLRW, the

478

Strategy for the Management and Disposal of Used Nuclear Fuel and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Strategy for the Management and Disposal of Used Nuclear Fuel and Strategy for the Management and Disposal of Used Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste Strategy for the Management and Disposal of Used Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste The Strategy for the Management and Disposal of Used Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste is a framework for moving toward a sustainable program to deploy an integrated system capable of transporting, storing, and disposing of used nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste from civilian nuclear power generation, defense, national security and other activities. Strategy for the Management and Disposal of Used Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste More Documents & Publications Strategy for the Management and Disposal of Used Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste

479

Strategy for the Management and Disposal of Used Nuclear Fuel and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Strategy for the Management and Disposal of Used Nuclear Fuel and Strategy for the Management and Disposal of Used Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste Strategy for the Management and Disposal of Used Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste Issued on January 11, 2013, the Strategy for the Management and Disposal of Used Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste is a framework for moving toward a sustainable program to deploy an integrated system capable of transporting, storing, and disposing of used nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste from civilian nuclear power generation, defense, national security and other activities. Strategy for the Management and Disposal of Used Nuclear Fuel and High Level Radioactive Waste.pdf More Documents & Publications Strategy for the Management and Disposal of Used Nuclear Fuel and

480

MODIS Land Products Subsets Demo  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

GLOBAL Subsetting and GLOBAL Subsetting and Visualization Tool Webinar: Bringing time-series satellite-based land data to the field scientist National Aeronautics and Space Administration www.nasa.gov Suresh K.S. Vannan and Tammy Walker Beaty Oak Ridge National Laboratory Distributed Active Archive Center, ORNL DAAC July 24 and 25, 2013 National Aeronautics and Space Administration Tammy Walker Beaty 2 About ORNL DAAC * The Oak Ridge National Laboratory Distributed Active Archive Center (ORNL DAAC) for biogeochemical dynamics is one of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) data centers managed by the Earth Science Data and Information System (ESDIS) Project, which is responsible for providing users with access to data from NASA's Earth Science

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land disposal restrictions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Rank and Set Restrictions for Homogeneity Analysis in R: The "homals" Package  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rank and Set Restrictions for Homogeneity Analysis in R:various extensions in terms of rank restrictions (nonlinearSection 2.1) in terms of rank restrictions (Section 2.2) and

Mair, Patrick; Leeuw, Jan de

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z