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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land change modeler" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Residential agents and land use change modelling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Urbanisation is driven by the complex interactions of many physical and human factors where human actions and decisions, individually and collectively, ultimately shape the patterns of urban landscapes. Agentbased modelling ...

Fontaine, Corentin M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Understanding the drivers affecting land use change in Ecuador: an application of the Land Change Modeler software  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in forest cover, satellite images (years 1996 and 2001) were used to produce land cover maps which were then used with the software to estimate probabilities of pixels changing from forests to other land use types. Various drivers of deforestation input...

Krishna Rajan, Dhruva

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

A Spatial Simulation Model of Land Use Changes in a Piedmont County in Georgia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Spatial Simulation Model of Land Use Changes in a Piedmont County in Georgia Monica Goigel Turner* Institute of Ecology University of Georgia Athens, Georgia ABSTRACT A spatial simulation model was developed be explicitly included in simulation models to gain an understanding of landscape level phenomena, and at least

Turner, Monica G.

4

Global Climate Change,Global Climate Change, Land Cover Change, andLand Cover Change, and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Global Climate Change,Global Climate Change, Land Cover Change, andLand Cover Change Changes · Due to ­ Climate Change ­ Land Cover / Land Use Change ­ Interaction of Climate and Land Cover Change · Resolution ­ Space ­ Time Hydro-Climatic Change · Variability vs. Change (Trends) · Point data

5

Pluralistic Modelling Approaches to Simulating Climate-Land Change Interactions in East Africa  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with atmospheric trends such as greenhouse gas concentrations, to loop back to regional and global climate change dynamics (Giorgi and Mearns 1999). Developing robust forecasts of land use change is essential in the proper simulation of land-climate interactions. Forecasts of land use at regional scales require several

6

Research priorities in land use and land-cover change for the Earth system and integrated assessment modelling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

). Copyright ? 2010 Royal Meteorological Society and Crown Copyright. KEY WORDS land use; land cover; Earth system models; integrated assessment models; research priorities Received 12 January 2009; Revised 9 March 2010; Accepted 14 March 2010 1. Introduction 1... biogeophysical, socio- economic and human decision-making perspectives. The Earth System Modeling (ESM) and the Integrated Assessment Modeling (IAM) communities play an impor- tant role in understanding and quantifying Earth system analysis and, specifically...

Hibbard, Kathy; Janetos, Anthony; van Vuuren, Detlef P.; Pongtatz, Julia; Rose, Steven K.; Betts, Richard; Herold, Martin; Feddema, Johannes J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Assessment of Uncertainties in the Response of the African Monsoon Precipitation to Land Use change simulated by a regional model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Land use and land cover over Africa have changed substantially over the last sixty years and this change has been proposed to affect monsoon circulation and precipitation. This study examines the uncertainties on the effect of these changes on the African Monsoon system and Sahel precipitation using an ensemble of regional model simulations with different combinations of land surface and cumulus parameterization schemes. Although the magnitude of the response covers a broad range of values, most of the simulations show a decline in Sahel precipitation due to the expansion of pasture and croplands at the expense of trees and shrubs and an increase in surface air temperature.

Hagos, Samson M.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Xue, Yongkang; Boone, Aaron; de Sales, Fernando; Neupane, Naresh; Huang, Maoyi; Yoon, Jin-Ho

2014-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

8

Simulating the Biogeochemical and Biogeophysical Impacts of Transient Land Cover Change and Wood Harvest in the Community Climate System Model (CCSM4) from 1850 to 2100  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

To assess the climate impacts of historical and projected land cover change in the Community Climate System Model, version 4 (CCSM4), new time series of transient Community Land Model, version 4 (CLM4) plant functional ...

Lawrence, Peter J.; Feddema, Johannes J.; Bonan, Gordon B.; Meehl, Gerald A.; O’ Neill, Brian C.; Oleson, Keith W.; Levis, Samuel; Lawrence, David M.; Kluzek, Erik; Lindsay, Keith

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Land-use change trajectories up to 2050: insights from a global agro-economic model comparison  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Changes in agricultural land use have important implications for environmental services. Previous studies of agricultural land-use futures have been published indicating large uncertainty due to different model assumptions and methodologies. In this article we present a first comprehensive comparison of global agro-economic models that have harmonized drivers of population, GDP, and biophysical yields. The comparison allows us to ask two research questions: (1) How much cropland will be used under different socioeconomic and climate change scenarios? (2) How can differences in model results be explained? The comparison includes four partial and six general equilibrium models that differ in how they model land supply and amount of potentially available land. We analyze results of two different socioeconomic scenarios and three climate scenarios (one with constant climate). Most models (7 out of 10) project an increase of cropland of 1025% by 2050 compared to 2005 (under constant climate), but one model projects a decrease. Pasture land expands in some models, which increase the treat on natural vegetation further. Across all models most of the cropland expansion takes place in South America and sub-Saharan Africa. In general, the strongest differences in model results are related to differences in the costs of land expansion, the endogenous productivity responses, and the assumptions about potential cropland.

Schmitz, Christoph; van Meijl, Hans; Kyle, G. Page; Nelson, Gerald C.; Fujimori, Shinichiro; Gurgel, Angelo; Havlik, Petr; Heyhoe, Edwina; Mason d'Croz, Daniel; Popp, Alexander; Sands, Ronald; Tabeau, Andrzej; van der Mensbrugghe, Dominique; von Lampe, Martin; Wise, Marshall A.; Blanc, Elodie; Hasegawa, Tomoko; Kavallari, Aikaterini; Valin, Hugo

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Carbon Accounting and Economic Model Uncertainty of Emissions from Biofuels-Induced Land Use Change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

distributions for soybean biodiesel (food fixed) . . . . . .distributions for soybean biodiesel (food not fixed) . . .land use from expanded biodiesel production. Technical

Plevin, Richard J; Beckman, Jayson; Golub, Alla A; Witcover, Julie; O'??Hare, Michael

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Modeling urban growth and land use/land cover change in the Houston Metropolitan Area from 2002 - 2030  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

spatially explicit cellular automata model, to simulate future (2002-2030) urban growth in the Houston metropolitan area, one of the fastest growing metropolises in the United States during the past decades. The model is calibrated with historical data...

Oguz, Hakan

2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

12

Soil Carbon Change and Net Energy Associated with Biofuel Production on Marginal Lands: A Regional Modeling Perspective  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of marginal lands (MLs) for biofuel production has been contemplated as a promising solution for meeting biofuel demands. However, there have been concerns with spatial location of MLs, their inherent biofuel potential, and possible environmental consequences with the cultivation of energy crops. Here, we developed a new quantitative approach that integrates high-resolution land cover and land productivity maps and uses conditional probability density functions for analyzing land use patterns as a function of land productivity to classify the agricultural lands. We subsequently applied this method to determine available productive croplands (P-CLs) and non-crop marginal lands (NC-MLs) in a nine-county Southern Michigan. Furthermore, Spatially Explicit Integrated Modeling Framework (SEIMF) using EPIC (Environmental Policy Integrated Climate) was used to understand the net energy (NE) and soil organic carbon (SOC) implications of cultivating different annual and perennial production systems.

Bandaru, Varaprasad; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Manowitz, David H.; Link, Robert P.; Zhang, Xuesong; Post, W. M.

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Climate Effects of Global Land Cover Change  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There are two competing effects of global land cover change on climate: an albedo effect which leads to heating when changing from grass/croplands to forest, and an evapotranspiration effect which tends to produce cooling. It is not clear which effect would dominate in a global land cover change scenario. We have performed coupled land/ocean/atmosphere simulations of global land cover change using the NCAR CAM3 atmospheric general circulation model. We find that replacement of current vegetation by trees on a global basis would lead to a global annual mean warming of 1.6 C, nearly 75% of the warming produced under a doubled CO{sub 2} concentration, while global replacement by grasslands would result in a cooling of 0.4 C. These results suggest that more research is necessary before forest carbon storage should be deployed as a mitigation strategy for global warming. In particular, high latitude forests probably have a net warming effect on the Earth's climate.

Gibbard, S G; Caldeira, K; Bala, G; Phillips, T; Wickett, M

2005-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

14

What is the importance of climate model bias when projecting the impacts of climate change on land surface processes?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Regional climate change impact (CCI) studies have widely involved downscaling and bias-correcting (BC) Global Climate Model (GCM)-projected climate for driving land surface models. However, BC may cause uncertainties in projecting hydrologic and biogeochemical responses to future climate due to the impaired spatiotemporal covariance of climate variables and a breakdown of physical conservation principles. Here we quantify the impact of BC on simulated climate-driven changes in water variables(evapotranspiration, ET; runoff; snow water equivalent, SWE; and water demand for irrigation), crop yield, biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC), nitric oxide (NO) emissions, and dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) export over the Pacific Northwest (PNW) Region. We also quantify the impacts on net primary production (NPP) over a small watershed in the region (HJ Andrews). Simulation results from the coupled ECHAM5/MPI-OM model with A1B emission scenario were firstly dynamically downscaled to 12 km resolutions with WRF model. Then a quantile mapping based statistical downscaling model was used to downscale them into 1/16th degree resolution daily climate data over historical and future periods. Two series climate data were generated according to the option of bias-correction (i.e. with bias-correction (BC) and without bias-correction, NBC). Impact models were then applied to estimate hydrologic and biogeochemical responses to both BC and NBC meteorological datasets. These im20 pact models include a macro-scale hydrologic model (VIC), a coupled cropping system model (VIC-CropSyst), an ecohydrologic model (RHESSys), a biogenic emissions model (MEGAN), and a nutrient export model (Global-NEWS). Results demonstrate that the BC and NBC climate data provide consistent estimates of the climate-driven changes in water fluxes (ET, runoff, and water demand), VOCs (isoprene and monoterpenes) and NO emissions, mean crop yield, and river DIN export over the PNW domain. However, significant differences rise from projected SWE, crop yield from dry lands, and HJ Andrewss ET between BC and NBC data. Even though BC post-processing has no significant impacts on most of the studied variables when taking PNW as a whole, their effects have large spatial variations and some local areas are substantially influenced. In addition, there are months during which BC and NBC post-processing produces significant differences in projected changes, such as summer runoff. Factor-controlled simulations indicate that BC post-processing of precipitation and temperature both substantially contribute to these differences at region scales. We conclude that there are trade-offs between using BC climate data for offline CCI studies vs. direct modeled climate data. These trade-offs should be considered when designing integrated modeling frameworks for specific applications; e.g., BC may be more important when considering impacts on reservoir operations in mountainous watersheds than when investigating impacts on biogenic emissions and air quality (where VOCs are a primary indicator).

Liu, M. L.; Rajagopalan, K.; Chung, S. H.; Jiang, X.; Harrison, J. H.; Nergui, T.; Guenther, Alex B.; Miller, C.; Reyes, J.; Tague, C. L.; Choate, J. S.; Salathe, E.; Stockle, Claudio O.; Adam, J. C.

2014-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

15

Biofuels and indirect land use change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biofuels and indirect land use change The case for mitigation October 2011 #12;About this study), Malaysian Palm Oil Board, National Farmers Union, Novozymes, Northeast Biofuels Collaborative, Patagonia Bio contributed views on a confidential basis. #12;1Biofuels and indirect land use change The case for mitigation

16

Ecosystem feedbacks to climate change in California: Development, testing, and analysis using a coupled regional atmosphere and land-surface model (WRF3-CLM3.5)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A regional atmosphere model [Weather Research and Forecasting model version 3 (WRF3)] and a land surface model [Community Land Model, version 3.5 (CLM3.5)] were coupled to study the interactions between the atmosphere and possible future California land-cover changes. The impact was evaluated on California's climate of changes in natural vegetation under climate change and of intentional afforestation. The ability of WRF3 to simulate California's climate was assessed by comparing simulations by WRF3-CLM3.5 and WRF3-Noah to observations from 1982 to 1991. Using WRF3-CLM3.5, the authors performed six 13-yr experiments using historical and future large-scale climate boundary conditions from the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory Climate Model version 2.1 (GFDL CM2.1). The land-cover scenarios included historical and future natural vegetation from the Mapped Atmosphere-Plant-Soil System-Century 1 (MC1) dynamic vegetation model, in addition to a future 8-million-ha California afforestation scenario. Natural vegetation changes alone caused summer daily-mean 2-m air temperature changes of -0.7 to +1 C in regions without persistent snow cover, depending on the location and the type of vegetation change. Vegetation temperature changes were much larger than the 2-m air temperature changes because of the finescale spatial heterogeneity of the imposed vegetation change. Up to 30% of the magnitude of the summer daily-mean 2-m air temperature increase and 70% of the magnitude of the 1600 local time (LT) vegetation temperature increase projected under future climate change were attributable to the climate-driven shift in land cover. The authors projected that afforestation could cause local 0.2-1.2 C reductions in summer daily-mean 2-m air temperature and 2.0-3.7 C reductions in 1600 LT vegetation temperature for snow-free regions, primarily because of increased evapotranspiration. Because some of these temperature changes are of comparable magnitude to those projected under climate change this century, projections of climate and vegetation change in this region need to consider these climate-vegetation interactions.

Subin, Z.M.; Riley, W.J.; Kueppers, L.M.; Jin, J.; Christianson, D.S.; Torn, M.S.

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

A framework for benchmarking land models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Land models, which have been developed by the modeling community in the past few decades to predict future states of ecosystems and climate, have to be critically evaluated for their performance skills of simulating ecosystem responses and feedback to climate change. Benchmarking is an emerging procedure to measure performance of models against a set of defined standards. This paper proposes a benchmarking framework for evaluation of land model performances and, meanwhile, highlights major challenges at this infant stage of benchmark analysis. The framework includes (1) targeted aspects of model performance to be evaluated, (2) a set of benchmarks as defined references to test model performance, (3) metrics to measure and compare performance skills among models so as to identify model strengths and deficiencies, and (4) model improvement. Land models are required to simulate exchange of water, energy, carbon and sometimes other trace gases between the atmosphere and land surface, and should be evaluated for their simulations of biophysical processes, biogeochemical cycles, and vegetation dynamics in response to climate change across broad temporal and spatial scales. Thus, one major challenge is to select and define a limited number of benchmarks to effectively evaluate land model performance. The second challenge is to develop metrics of measuring mismatches between models and benchmarks. The metrics may include (1) a priori thresholds of acceptable model performance and (2) a scoring system to combine datamodel mismatches for various processes at different temporal and spatial scales. The benchmark analyses should identify clues of weak model performance to guide future development, thus enabling improved predictions of future states of ecosystems and climate. The near-future research effort should be on development of a set of widely acceptable benchmarks that can be used to objectively, effectively, and reliably evaluate fundamental properties of land models to improve their prediction performance skills.

Luo, Yiqi; Randerson, J.; Abramowitz, G.; Bacour, C.; Blyth, E.; Carvalhais, N.; Ciais, Philippe; Dalmonech, D.; Fisher, J.B.; Fisher, R.; Friedlingstein, P.; Hibbard, Kathleen A.; Hoffman, F. M.; Huntzinger, Deborah; Jones, C.; Koven, C.; Lawrence, David M.; Li, D.J.; Mahecha, M.; Niu, S.L.; Norby, Richard J.; Piao, S.L.; Qi, X.; Peylin, P.; Prentice, I.C.; Riley, William; Reichstein, M.; Schwalm, C.; Wang, Y.; Xia, J. Y.; Zaehle, S.; Zhou, X. H.

2012-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

18

The land use climate change energy nexus  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Landscape ecology focuses on the spatial patterns and processes of ecological and human interactions. These patterns and processes are being altered both by changing human resource-management practices and changing climate conditions associated, in part, with increases in atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases. Dominant resource extraction and land management activities involve energy, and the use of fossil energy is one of the key drivers behind increasing greenhouse gas emissions as well as land-use changes. Alternative energy sources (such as wind, solar, nuclear, and bioenergy) are being explored to reduce greenhouse gas emission rates. Yet, energy production, including alternative-energy options, can have a wide range of effects on land productivity, surface cover, albedo, and other factors that affect carbon, water and energy fluxes and, in turn, climate. Meanwhile, climate influences the potential output, relative efficiencies and sustainability of alternative energy sources. Thus climate change, energy choices, and land-use change are linked, and any analysis in landscape ecology that considers one of these factors should consider them all. This analysis explores the implications of those linkages and points out ecological patterns and processes that may be affected by these interactions.

Dale, Virginia H [ORNL; Efroymson, Rebecca Ann [ORNL; Kline, Keith L [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

CARBON SEQUESTRATION THROUGH CHANGES IN LAND USE IN OREGON  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION CARBON SEQUESTRATION THROUGH CHANGES IN LAND USE IN OREGON: COSTS, and J. Kadyszewski (Winrock International). 2007. Carbon Sequestration Through Changes in Land Use Curves, and Pilot Actions for Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration in Oregon. Report to Winrock

20

Interaction effects of climate and land use/land cover change on soil organic carbon sequestration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Interaction effects of climate and land use/land cover change on soil organic carbon sequestration carbon sequestration Climate change Soil carbon change Historically, Florida soils stored the largest in Florida (FL) have acted as a sink for carbon (C) over the last 40 years. · Climate interacting with land

Grunwald, Sabine

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land change modeler" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Impacts of Land-use Changes on Biofuels ORNL History of Exploring Changes in Land Use in the United States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Impacts of Land-use Changes on Biofuels ORNL History of Exploring Changes in Land Use in the United. Building from their work on environmental costs and benefits associated with biofuel production, ORNL positively impact the sustainability of the biofuels industry. Building understanding of land-use change from

22

The impacts of land use-induced land cover change on climate extremes.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Simulations from the CSIRO Mk3L climate model, coupled to the CABLE land surface model, indicate that climate extremes indices are significantly affected by land use-induced (more)

Avila, Francia Bismonte

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Land Use Change in theLand Use Change in the United States:United States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: Accommodating a Growing Biofuels Market Amelia French M.S. Candidate University of Tennessee, Knoxville. Turhollow, R.L.Graham, B.J. Stokes, and D.C. Erbach. 2005. Biomass as feedstock for a bioenergy/Demand of Biofuels? Traditional Crops Perennials Changing Markets Higher Market Values More Land Use #12

Gray, Matthew

24

Mapping Savanna Land Change of Belize  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

was assessed using a confusion matrix. The results of the research confirmed the capabilities of Landsat imagery for mapping savannas and their land use. The classification of forest and savanna along with major land use pressures from agriculture...

Wilson, Lauren

2011-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

25

A framework for benchmarking land models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

their inclu- sion in Earth system models (ESMs). State-of-land models cou- pled to Earth system models should simulateland models within Earth system models, however, can help

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Climate change and land use in Florida: Interdependencies and opportunities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Climate change and land use in Florida: Interdependencies and opportunities Stephen Mulkey, Ph June 2007 Revised 30 September 2007 #12;Climate change and land use ­ Report to the Century Commission - S. Mulkey, June 2007 2 Executive summary Over this century anthropogenic climate change will present

Watson, Craig A.

27

Global Biofuels Modeling and Land Use  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Biofuels Modeling and Land Use DOE Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) 2015 Project Peer Review Strategic Analysis & Cross-cutting Sustainability March 25 2015 Gbadebo Oladosu...

28

Predicted change in global secondary organic aerosol concentrations in response to future climate, emissions, and land use change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The sensitivity of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) concentration to changes in climate and emissions is investigated using a coupled global atmosphere-land model driven by the year 2100 IPCC A1B scenario predictions. The ...

Heald, C. L.; Henze, D. K.; Horowitz, L. W.; Feddema, Johannes J.; Lamarque, J. F.; Guenther, A.; Hess, P. G.; Vitt, F.; Seinfeld, J. H.; Goldstein, A. H.; Fung, I.

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Development of High Resolution Land Surface Parameters for the Community Land Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There is a growing need for high-resolution land surface parameters as land surface models are being applied at increasingly higher spatial resolution offline as well as in regional and global models. The default land surface parameters for the most recent version of the Community Land Model (i.e. CLM 4.0) are at 0.5 or coarser resolutions, released with the Community Earth System Model (CESM). Plant Functional Types (PFTs), vegetation properties such as Leaf Area Index (LAI), Stem Area Index (SAI), and non-vegetated land covers were developed using remotely sensed datasets retrieved in late 1990s and the beginning of this century. In this study, we developed new land surface parameters for CLM 4.0, specifically PFTs, LAI, SAI and non-vegetated land cover composition, at 0.05 resolution globally based on the most recent MODIS land cover and improved MODIS LAI products. Compared to the current CLM 4.0 parameters, the new parameters produced a decreased coverage by bare soil and trees, but an increased coverage by shrub, grass, and cropland. The new parameters result in a decrease in global seasonal LAI, with the biggest decrease in boreal forests; however, the new parameters also show a large increase in LAI in tropical forest. Differences between the new and the current parameters are mainly caused by changes in the sources of remotely sensed data and the representation of land cover in the source data. Advantages and disadvantages of each dataset were discussed in order to provide guidance on the use of the data. The new high-resolution land surface parameters have been used in a coupled land-atmosphere model (WRF-CLM) applied to the western U.S. to demonstrate their use in high-resolution modeling. A remapping method from the latitude/longitude grid of the CLM data to the WRF grids with map projection was also demonstrated. Future work will include global offline CLM simulations to examine the impacts of source data resolution and subsequent land parameter changes on simulated land surface processes.

Ke, Yinghai; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Huang, Maoyi; Coleman, Andre M.; Li, Hongyi; Wigmosta, Mark S.

2012-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

30

E-Print Network 3.0 - anthropogenic land-use change Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Global Non-Proximal Ecosystem Service Summary: Anthropogenic Land Cover Change Wetlandswater management Dams River Engineering Land use impervious surfaces... Anthropogenic land...

31

Land use and climate change in Miami-Dade County  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Miami-Dade County, Florida, was one of the earliest jurisdictions to adopt a climate change plan in 1993. Land use features prominently in this plan as a means to reduce greenhouse gases through development patterns that ...

Peckett, Haley Rose

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Land-Use Change Data Analysis  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeatMulti-Dimensionalthe10 DOEWashington,LM-04-XXXX OfficeLand and Facility Use Policy

33

Global Change Biology (2000) 6, 317328 Soil Carbon Sequestration and Land-Use Change: Processes and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Global Change Biology (2000) 6, 317­328 Soil Carbon Sequestration and Land-Use Change: Processes in enhanced soil carbon sequestration with changes in land-use and soil management. We review literature, and indicates the relative importance of some factors that influence the rates of organic carbon sequestration

Post, Wilfred M.

34

Global Soil Change: Land Use, Soil and Water SWS4231C, SWS5234  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the soil system to withstand global-scale perturbations (e.g., climate or land use change, spread Properties 4. Land Use Change Impacts on Soils 5. Land Use and Agriculture (Irrigation and Fertilization In Soil) 6. Land Use and Soil Erosion 7. Climate Change Impacts on Soils 8. Land Use-Climate

Ma, Lena

35

An update on land-ice modeling in the CESM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mass loss from land ice, including the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets as well as smaller glacier and ice caps, is making a large and growing contribution to global sea-level rise. Land ice is only beginning to be incorporated in climate models. The goal of the Land Ice Working Group (LIWG) is to develop improved land-ice models and incorporate them in CESM, in order to provide useful, physically-based sea-level predictions. LJWG efforts to date have led to the inclusion of a dynamic ice-sheet model (the Glimmer Community Ice Sheet Model, or Glimmer-CISM) in the Community Earth System Model (CESM), which was released in June 2010. CESM also includes a new surface-mass-balance scheme for ice sheets in the Community Land Model. Initial modeling efforts are focused on the Greenland ice sheet. Preliminary results are promising. In particular, the simulated surface mass balance for Greenland is in good agreement with observations and regional model results. The current model, however, has significant limitations: The land-ice coupling is one-way; we are using a serial version of Glimmer-CISM with the shallow-ice approximation; and there is no ice-ocean coupling. During the next year we plan to implement two-way coupling (including ice-ocean coupling with a dynamic Antarctic ice sheet) with a parallel , higher-order version of Glimmer-CISM. We will also add parameterizations of small glaciers and ice caps. With these model improvements, CESM will be able to simulate all the major contributors to 21st century global sea-level rise. Results of the first round of simulations should be available in time to be included in the Fifth Assessment Report (ARS) of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change.

Lipscomb, William H [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2011-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

36

Bioenergy to Biodiversity: Downscaling scenarios of land use change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bioenergy crops are a key component of Scotlands strategy to meet 2050 carbon emissions targets. The introduction of these crops could have large scale impacts on the biodiversity of lowland farmland. These impacts depend on the change in land use...

MacKenzie, Ian

2009-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

37

Land degradation and climate change: a sin of omission?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

not solely responsible for the lack of awareness of the impacts of poor management practices, but we do play temperatures and the consequent increase in evaporative demand. During large rainfall events, land degradation a contributing role. At best, our increasing focus on climate change has an opportunity cost: there is less time

38

Simulating land use change in China from a global perspective  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and consequent crop production with prescribed population, GDP and yield data. The model simulates a decline markets and turbulence in global energy markets can affect food prices and supply costs. Therefore% of the global population with less than 9% of the world's cultivated land (Chen 2007). Furthermore, heavy

Palmer, Paul

39

Watershed response and land energy feedbacks under climate change depend upon groundwater.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Human induced climate change will have a significant impact on the hydrologic cycle, creating changes in fresh water resources, land cover, and feedbacks that are difficult to characterize, which makes it an issue of global importance. Previous studies have not included subsurface storage in climate change simulations and feedbacks. A variably-saturated groundwater flow model with integrated overland flow and land surface model processes is used to examine the interplay between coupled water and energy processes under climate change conditions. A case study from the Southern Great Plains (SGP) USA, an important agricultural region that is susceptible to drought, is used as the basis for three scenarios simulations using a modified atmospheric forcing dataset to reflect predicted effects due to human-induced climate change. These scenarios include an increase in the atmospheric temperature and variations in rainfall amount and are compared to the present-day climate case. Changes in shallow soil saturation and groundwater levels are quantified as well as the corresponding energy fluxes at the land surface. Here we show that groundwater and subsurface lateral flow processes are critical in understanding hydrologic response and energy feedbacks to climate change and that certain regions are more susceptible to changes in temperature, while others to changes in precipitation. This groundwater control is critical for understanding recharge and drought processes, possible under future climate conditions.

Maxwell, R M; Kollet, S J

2008-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

40

INCORPORATING NATURAL VARIATION INTO TIME SERIES-BASED LAND COVER CHANGE IDENTIFICATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INCORPORATING NATURAL VARIATION INTO TIME SERIES-BASED LAND COVER CHANGE IDENTIFICATION VARUN in forests. The bulk of work in identifying land cover changes using remote sensing data involves image

Minnesota, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land change modeler" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

2000): Soil carbon sequestration and land-use change: processes and potential  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

matter dynamics that may result in enhanced soil carbon sequestration with changes in land-use and soil

W. M. Post; K. C. Kwon

42

IPCC estimates for emissions from land-use change, notably deforestation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IPCC estimates for emissions from land-use change, notably deforestation SYSTEM?KOLOGIE ETHZ., 2008. IPCC estimates for emissions from land-use change, notably deforestation Systems Ecology Report. Photo by Nathalie Baumgartner (2005) #12;A. Fischlin Emissions from land-use change (deforestation) 1

Fischlin, Andreas

43

Can we reconcile differences in estimates of carbon fluxes from land-use change and forestry for the 1990s?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from land-use change and forestry LUC area (100 km 2 yr ?1 )land-use change and forestry Table 6. Sum of Terrestrialfrom land-use change and forestry for the 1990s? A. Ito 1 ,

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Baselines For Land-Use Change In The Tropics: Application ToAvoided Deforestation Projects  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Although forest conservation activities particularly in thetropics offer significant potential for mitigating carbon emissions,these types of activities have faced obstacles in the policy arena causedby the difficulty in determining key elements of the project cycle,particularly the baseline. A baseline for forest conservation has twomain components: the projected land-use change and the correspondingcarbon stocks in the applicable pools such as vegetation, detritus,products and soil, with land-use change being the most difficult toaddress analytically. In this paper we focus on developing and comparingthree models, ranging from relatively simple extrapolations of pasttrends in land use based on simple drivers such as population growth tomore complex extrapolations of past trends using spatially explicitmodels of land-use change driven by biophysical and socioeconomicfactors. The three models of the latter category used in the analysis atregional scale are The Forest Area Change (FAC) model, the Land Use andCarbon Sequestration (LUCS) model, and the Geographical Modeling (GEOMOD)model. The models were used to project deforestation in six tropicalregions that featured different ecological and socioeconomic conditions,population dynamics, and uses of the land: (1) northern Belize; (2) SantaCruz State, Bolivia; (3) Parana State in Brazil; (4) Campeche, Mexico;(5) Chiapas, Mexico; and (6) Michoacan, Mexico. A comparison of all modeloutputs across all six regions shows that each model produced quitedifferent deforestation baseline. In general, the simplest FAC model,applied at the national administrative-unit scale, projected the highestamount of forest loss (four out of six) and the LUCS model the leastamount of loss (four out of five). Based on simulations of GEOMOD, wefound that readily observable physical and biological factors as well asdistance to areas of past disturbance were each about twice as importantas either sociological/demographic or economic/infrastructure factors(less observable) in explaining empirical land-use patterns. We proposefrom the lessons learned, a methodology comprised of three main steps andsix tasks can be used to begin developing credible baselines. We alsopropose that the baselines be projected over a 10-year period because,although projections beyond 10 years are feasible, they are likely to beunrealistic for policy purposes. In the first step, an historic land-usechange and deforestation estimate is made by determining the analyticdomain (size of the region relative to the size of proposed project),obtaining historic data, analyzing candidate historic baseline drivers,and identifying three to four major drivers. In the second step, abaseline of where deforestation is likely to occur --a potential land-usechange (PLUC) map is produced using a spatial model such as GEOMOD thatuses the key drivers from step one. Then rates of deforestation areprojected over a 10-year baseline period using any of the three models.Using the PLUC maps, projected rates of deforestation, and carbon stockestimates, baselineprojections are developed that can be used for projectGHG accounting and crediting purposes: The final step proposes that, atagreed interval (eg, +10 years), the baseline assumptions about baselinedrivers be re-assessed. This step reviews the viability of the 10-yearbaseline in light of changes in one or more key baseline drivers (e.g.,new roads, new communities, new protected area, etc.). The potentialland-use change map and estimates of rates of deforestation could beredone at the agreed interval, allowing the rates and changes in spatialdrivers to be incorporated into a defense of the existing baseline, orderivation of a new baseline projection.

Brown, Sandra; Hall, Myrna; Andrasko, Ken; Ruiz, Fernando; Marzoli, Walter; Guerrero, Gabriela; Masera, Omar; Dushku, Aaron; Dejong,Ben; Cornell, Joseph

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Carbon Calculator for Land Use Change from Biofuels Production (CCLUB). Users' manual and technical documentation.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Carbon Calculator for Land Use Change from Biofuels Production (CCLUB) calculates carbon emissions from land use change (LUC) for four different ethanol production pathways including corn grain ethanol and cellulosic ethanol from corn stover, miscanthus, and switchgrass. This document discusses the version of CCLUB released May 31, 2012 which includes corn, as did the previous CCLUB version, and three cellulosic feedstocks: corn stover, miscanthus, and switchgrass. CCLUB calculations are based upon two data sets: land change areas and above- and below-ground carbon content. Table 1 identifies where these data are stored and used within the CCLUB model, which is built in MS Excel. Land change area data is from Purdue University's Global Trade Analysis Project (GTAP) model, a computable general equilibrium (CGE) economic model. Section 2 describes the GTAP data CCLUB uses and how these data were modified to reflect shrubland transitions. Feedstock- and spatially-explicit below-ground carbon content data for the United States were generated with a surrogate model for CENTURY's soil organic carbon sub-model (Kwon and Hudson 2010) as described in Section 3. CENTURY is a soil organic matter model developed by Parton et al. (1987). The previous CCLUB version used more coarse domestic carbon emission factors. Above-ground non-soil carbon content data for forest ecosystems was sourced from the USDA/NCIAS Carbon Online Estimator (COLE) as explained in Section 4. We discuss emission factors used for calculation of international greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in Section 5. Temporal issues associated with modeling LUC emissions are the topic of Section 6. Finally, in Section 7 we provide a step-by-step guide to using CCLUB and obtaining results.

Mueller, S; Dunn, JB; Wang, M (Energy Systems); (Univ. of Illinois at Chicago)

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

46

Climate and Land Use Change Processes in East Africa While some regions of East Africa are being preserved as natural areas, others, including the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Climate and Land Use Change Processes in East Africa While some regions of East Africa are being to agriculture. Some members of the Maasai tribe, traditionally a pastoral people, are changing to changes in climate. The land use box will involve further modeling of the effects of these concurrent

47

Bioenergy crop productivity and potential climate change mitigation from marginal lands in the United States: An  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bioenergy crop productivity and potential climate change mitigation from marginal lands bioenergy crops grown on marginal lands in the United States. Two broadly tested cellulosic crops June 2014 Introduction Bioenergy, an important renewable energy produced from biological materials

Zhuang, Qianlai

48

Greenhouse gas policy influences climate via direct effects of land-use change  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Proposed climate mitigation measures do not account for direct biophysical climate impacts of land-use change (LUC), nor do the stabilization targets modeled for the 5th Climate Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5) Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs). To examine the significance of such effects on global and regional patterns of climate change, a baseline and alternative scenario of future anthropogenic activity are simulated within the Integrated Earth System Model, which couples the Global Change Assessment Model, Global Land-use Model, and Community Earth System Model. The alternative scenario has high biofuel utilization and approximately 50% less global forest cover compared to the baseline, standard RCP4.5 scenario. Both scenarios stabilize radiative forcing from atmospheric constituents at 4.5 W/m2 by 2100. Thus, differences between their climate predictions quantify the biophysical effects of LUC. Offline radiative transfer and land model simulations are also utilized to identify forcing and feedback mechanisms driving the coupled response. Boreal deforestation is found to strongly influence climate due to increased albedo coupled with a regional-scale water vapor feedback. Globally, the alternative scenario yields a 21st century warming trend that is 0.5 C cooler than baseline, driven by a 1 W/m2 mean decrease in radiative forcing that is distributed unevenly around the globe. Some regions are cooler in the alternative scenario than in 2005. These results demonstrate that neither climate change nor actual radiative forcing are uniquely related to atmospheric forcing targets such as those found in the RCPs, but rather depend on particulars of the socioeconomic pathways followed to meet each target.

Jones, Andrew D.; Collins, William D.; Edmonds, James A.; Torn, Margaret S.; Janetos, Anthony C.; Calvin, Katherine V.; Thomson, Allison M.; Chini, Louise M.; Mao, Jiafu; Shi, Xiaoying; Thornton, Peter; Hurtt, George; Wise, Marshall A.

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Integrated Dynamic Gloabal Modeling of Land Use, Energy and Economic Growth  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of this collaborative project is to integrate an existing general equilibrium energy-economic growth model with a biogeochemical cycles and biophysical models in order to more fully explore the potential contribution of land use-related activities to future emissions scenarios. Land cover and land use change activities, including deforestation, afforestation, and agriculture management, are important source of not only CO2, but also non-CO2 GHGs. Therefore, contribution of land-use emissions to total emissions of GHGs is important, and consequently their future trends are relevant to the estimation of climate change and its mitigation. This final report covers the full project period of the award, beginning May 2006, which includes a sub-contract to Brown University later transferred to the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) when Co-PI Brian O'Neill changed institutional affiliations.

Atul Jain, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL

2009-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

50

Climate Change Mitigation Through Land-Use Measures in the Agriculture...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and Forestry Sectors Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Climate Change Mitigation Through Land-Use Measures in the Agriculture and Forestry...

51

Improving land-surface model hydrology: Is an explicit aquifer model better than a deeper soil profile?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

land-surface model hydrology: Is an explicit aquifer modelAL. : LAND-SURFACE MODEL HYDROLOGY Changnon, S. , et al. (land-surface model hydrology: Is an explicit aquifer model

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Economic and Physical Modeling of Land Use in GCAM 3.0 and an Application to Agricultural Productivity, Land, and Terrestrial Carbon  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We explore the impact of changes in agricultural productivity on global land use and terrestrial carbon using the new agriculture and land use modeling approach developed for Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM) version 3.0. This approach models economic land use decisions with regional, physical, and technological specificity while maintaining economic and physical integration with the rest of the GCAM model. Physical land characteristics and quantities are tracked explicitly, and crop production practices are modeled discretely to facilitate coupling with physical models. Economic land allocation is modeled with non-linear functions in a market equilibrium rather than through a constrained optimization. In this paper, we explore three scenarios of future agriculture productivity in all regions of the globe over this century, ranging from a high growth to a zero growth level. The higher productivity growth scenario leads to lower crop prices, increased production of crops in developing nations, preservation of global forested lands and lower terrestrial carbon emissions. The scenario with no productivity improvement results in higher crop prices, an expansion of crop production in the developed world, loss of forested lands globally, and higher terrestrial carbon emissions.

Wise, Marshall A.; Calvin, Katherine V.; Kyle, G. Page; Luckow, Patrick; Edmonds, James A.

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Coupling GIS and LCA for biodiversity assessments of land use: Part 1: Inventory modeling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of land use Part 1: Inventory modeling Roland Geyer & Davidthe use of GIS-based inventory modeling to generatedemonstrated that GIS-based inventory modeling of land use

Geyer, Roland; Stoms, David M.; Lindner, Jan P.; Davis, Frank W.; Wittstock, Bastian

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

IDRISI Land Change Modeler | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat Jump to:PhotonHolyName HousingIIIDrive Ltd JumpIDGWP Wind Farm

55

LAND USE CHANGE IN BRAZIL: INTEGRATING ECOLOGY, ECONOMICS AND POLICY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for smaller farmers to buy land and increased the incentives for migrating to the frontier generating a race attracted migrants from others regions, searching for agricultural land ; It remains a frontier region the financial support to wait the advance of frontier to eventually begin any activity; #12;Also

56

China's changing landscape during the 1990s: Large-scale land transformations estimated with satellite data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

China's changing landscape during the 1990s: Large-scale land transformations estimated January 2005. [1] Land-cover changes in China are being powered by demand for food for its growing increased by 2.99 million hectares and urban areas increased by 0.82 million hectares. In northern China

57

Involving Geospatial Information in the Analysis of Land-Cover Change along the Tanzania Coast  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Involving Geospatial Information in the Analysis of Land-Cover Change along the Tanzania Coast.1080/08920750590883132 Involving Geospatial Information in the Analysis of Land-Cover Change along the Tanzania Coast YEQIAO WANG and the area of woodland interspersed with agriculture increased. This study demonstrates how geospatial

Wang, Y.Q. "Yeqiao"

58

Soil carbon sequestration and land-use change: processes and potential  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Soil carbon sequestration and land-use change: processes and potential W . M . P O S T * and K . C that may result in enhanced soil carbon sequestration with changes in land-use and soil management. We carbon accumulation. This data summary provides a guide to approximate rates of SOC sequestration

59

Impact of land use change on a hydro-meteorological event in Kampala, Uganda  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Impact of land use change on a hydro-meteorological event in Kampala, Uganda Problem statement Kampala is the capital city of Uganda on the northern shores of Lake Victoria. Here, future climate change

Jetten, Victor

60

Impact of land use change on the local climate over the Tibetan Plateau  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Observational data show that the remotely sensed leaf area index (LAI) has a significant downward trend over the east Tibetan Plateau (TP), while a warming trend is found in the same area. Further analysis indicates that this warming trend mainly results from the nighttime warming. The Single-Column Atmosphere Model (SCAM) version 3.1 developed by the National Center for Atmospheric Research is used to investigate the role of land use change in the TP local climate system and isolate the contribution of land use change to the warming. Two sets of SCAM simulations were performed at the Xinghai station that is located near the center of the TP Sanjiang (three rivers) Nature Reserve where the downward LAI trend is largest. These simulations were forced with the high and low LAIs. The modeling results indicate that, when the LAI changes from high to low, the daytime temperature has a slight decrease, while the nighttime temperature increases significantly, which is consistent with the observations. The modeling results further show that the lower surface roughness length plays a significant role in affecting the nighttime temperature increase.

Jin, J.; Lu, S.; Li, S.; Miller, N.L.

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land change modeler" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Evaluating runoff simulations from the Community Land Model 4.0 using observations from flux towers and a mountainous watershed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Land Model (CLM) is the land component within the Community Earth System Model (CESM) (formerly known earth system model b

62

Characterizing the Impact of Land Use and Land Cover Change on Freshwater Inflows  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in mean annual and winter precipitation. Analyses of Landsat images of the watershed using an unsupervised classification method showed an increase in forest, urban and irrigated land by 13, 42 and 7%, respectively, from 1987 to 2002. Urbanized areas were...

Ferijal, Teuku

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

63

Hydrology: The Influence of Climate Change and/or Land Cover/Use Change Steven R. Fassnacht, Colorado State University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydrology: The Influence of Climate Change and/or Land Cover/Use Change Steven R. Fassnacht. Precipitation and temperature are the main drivers of hydrological systems, which influence water availability in those temperatures has decreased. Hydrologic changes are occurring due to a changing climate. For snow

64

Managing United States Public Lands in Response to Climate Change: A View From the Ground Up  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on public lands. Though climate change is now well recognized by federal agencies and their local land Federal agencies Á Forestry Á Fuels management Á Decision making Introduction Increases in the atmospheric ranging from renewable energy standards to emissions trading schemes, voluntary projects set up

Neff, Jason

65

Assessing Naturalness in Northern Great Lakes Forests Based on Historical Land-Cover and Vegetation Changes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

was developed to assess to what degree landscapes represent a natural state. Protected areas are often regarded Land-use history Land-use change Naturalness Logging Great Lakes Protected areas Introduction the question to what degree protected areas represent a natural state. To assess this question conservation

66

The Community Land Model and Its Climate Statistics as a Component of the Community Climate System Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to the Fourth Assessment Report (AR4) by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change [IPCC; i.e., the followThe Community Land Model and Its Climate Statistics as a Component of the Community Climate System carried out with the new version of the Community Climate System Model (CCSM). This paper reports

Hoffman, Forrest M.

67

Land Use Change Detection of Lowland Savanna in Belize  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Savanna ecosystems cover one fifth of the earths usable land and are home to billions of people and species. The ecosystem is threatened by human activities to a large extent, for instance, by grazing livestock, agriculture and fire management...

Chen, Long

2012-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

68

LAND USE CHANGE IN BRAZIL: INTEGRATING ECOLOGY, ECONOMICS AND POLICY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for smaller farmers to buy land and increased the incentives for migrating to the frontier generating a race ; It remains a frontier region, mainly due to the long distance from main centers; Almost 85% of its original the financial support to wait the advance of frontier to eventually begin any activity; #12;Also

69

Simulated watershed responses to land cover changes using the Regional Hydro-Ecological Simulation System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Simulated watershed responses to land cover changes using the Regional Hydro-Ecological Simulation Old Main Hill, Logan, UT, 84322-8200, USA Abstract: In this work, we used the Regional Hydro

Tarboton, David

70

What Drives Land Cover Change in Eastern Escarpment of Wello, Ethiopia?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

What Drives Land Cover Change in Eastern Escarpment of Wello, Ethiopia? Amare Bantider, Dilla University, Ethiopia; Hans Hurni, Centre for Development and Environment (CDE), University of Bern, Switzerland; Gete Zeleke, Global Mountain Program, Ethiopia Multiple factors, many operating concomitantly

Richner, Heinz

71

Developing a TeraGrid Based Land Surface Hydrology and Weather Modeling Interface  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Developing a TeraGrid Based Land Surface Hydrology and Weather Modeling Interface Hsin-I Chang1 iclimate@purdue.edu -------------------- -------------------- 1 INTRODUCTION Real world hydrologic cyberinfrastructure (CI) has been articulated in many workshops and meetings of the environmental and hydrologic

Jiang, Wen

72

The Potential Impact of Climate Change in the Norfolk Arable Land Management Initiative  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to assess the effects of climate change on agriculture, parts of the sector will be adversely affectedThe Potential Impact of Climate Change in the Norfolk Arable Land Management Initiative (NALMI-Mortlock, Queens University, Belfast * Contact: d.viner@uea.ac.uk C R U This poster presents climate change

Feigon, Brooke

73

Comparing and modeling land use organization in cities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The advent of geolocated ICT technologies opens the possibility of exploring how people use space in cities, bringing an important new tool for urban scientists and planners, especially for regions where data is scarce or not available. Here we apply a functional network approach to determine land use patterns from mobile phone records. The versatility of the method allows us to run a systematic comparison between Spanish cities of various sizes. The method detects four major land use types that correspond to different temporal patterns. The proportion of these types, their spatial organization and scaling show a strong similarity between all cities that breaks down at a very local scale, where land use mixing is specific to each urban area. Finally, we introduce a model inspired by Schelling's segregation, able to explain and reproduce these results with simple interaction rules between different land uses.

Lenormand, Maxime; Cant-Ros, Oliva G; Louail, Thomas; Herranz, Ricardo; Barthelemy, Marc; Fras-Martnez, Enrique; Miguel, Maxi San; Ramasco, Jos J

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

ModelingLandBiogeochemistry Term Spring 2014  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Earth system models and serve to represent exchange of energy (heat radiation momentum), water, carbon

Ma, Lena

75

From land use to land cover: Restoring the afforestation signal in a coupled integrated assessment - earth system model and the implications for CMIP5 RCP simulations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Climate projections depend on scenarios of fossil fuel emissions and land use change, and the IPCC AR5 parallel process assumes consistent climate scenarios across Integrated Assessment and Earth System Models (IAMs and ESMs). To facilitate consistency, CMIP5 used a novel land use harmonization to provide ESMs with seamless, 1500-2100 land use trajectories generated by historical data and four IAMs. However, we have identified and partially addressed a major gap in the CMIP5 land coupling design. The CMIP5 Community ESM (CESM) global afforestation is only 22% of RCP4.5 afforestation from 2005 to 2100. Likewise, only 17% of the Global Change Assessment Models (GCAMs) 2040 RCP4.5 afforestation signal, and none of the pasture loss, were transmitted to CESM within a newly integrated model. This is a critical problem because afforestation is necessary for achieving the RCP4.5 climate stabilization. We attempted to rectify this problem by modifying only the ESM component of the integrated model, enabling CESM to simulate 66% of GCAMs afforestation in 2040, and 94% of GCAMs pasture loss as grassland and shrubland losses. This additional afforestation increases vegetation carbon gain by 19 PgC and decreases atmospheric CO2 gain by 8 ppmv from 2005 to 2040, implying different climate scenarios between CMIP5 GCAM and CESM. Similar inconsistencies likely exist in other CMIP5 model results, primarily because land cover information is not shared between models, with possible contributions from afforestation exceeding model-specific, potentially viable forest area. Further work to harmonize land cover among models will be required to adequately rectify this problem.

Di Vittorio, Alan; Chini, Louise M.; Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; Mao, Jiafu; Shi, Xiaoying; Truesdale, John E.; Craig, Anthony P.; Calvin, Katherine V.; Jones, Andrew D.; Collins, William D.; Edmonds, James A.; Hurtt, George; Thornton, Peter E.; Thomson, Allison M.

2014-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

76

Integrated Assessment Modeling of Carbon Sequestration and Land Use Emissions Using Detailed Model Results and Observations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report outlines the progress on the development and application of Integrated Assessment Modeling of Carbon Sequestrations and Land Use Emissions supported by the DOE Office of Biological and Environmental Research (OBER), U.S. Department of Energy, Grant No. DOE-DE-FG02-01ER63069. The overall objective of this collaborative project between the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was to unite the latest advances in carbon cycle research with scientifically based models and policy-related integrated assessment tools that incorporate computationally efficient representations of the latest knowledge concerning science and emission trajectories, and their policy implications. As part of this research we accomplished the following tasks that we originally proposed: (1) In coordination with LLNL and ORNL, we enhanced the Integrated Science Assessment Model's (ISAM) parametric representation of the ocean and terrestrial carbon cycles that better represent spatial and seasonal variations, which are important to study the mechanisms that influence carbon sequestration in the ocean and terrestrial ecosystems; (2) Using the MiniCAM modeling capability, we revised the SRES (IPCC Special Report on Emission Scenarios; IPCC, 2000) land use emission scenarios; and (3) On the application front, the enhanced version of ISAM modeling capability is applied to understand how short- and long-term natural carbon fluxes, carbon sequestration, and human emissions contribute to the net global emissions (concentrations) trajectories required to reach various concentration (emission) targets. Under this grant, 21 research publications were produced. In addition, this grant supported a number of graduate and undergraduate students whose fundamental research was to learn a disciplinary field in climate change (e.g., ecological dynamics and ocean circulations) and then complete research on how this field could be linked to the other factors we need to consider in its dynamics (e.g., land use, ocean and terrestrial carbon sequestration and climate change).

Dr. Atul Jain

2005-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

77

IEEE JOURNAL OF SELECTED TOPICS IN APPLIED EARTH OBSERVATIONS AND REMOTE SENSING, VOL. 3, NO. 3, SEPTEMBER 2010 219 Impacts of Climate Change and Land Use Changes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

governed by eco- nomic development and air pollution regulations [3]. Variations in incident solar, SEPTEMBER 2010 219 Impacts of Climate Change and Land Use Changes on Land Surface Radiation and Energy Budgets Abstract--Land surface radiation and energy budgets are critical to address a variety

Liang, Shunlin

78

Baselines For Land-Use Change In The Tropics: Application To Avoided Deforestation Projects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in Mexico: making carbon sequestration a by-product ofthe area of the pilot carbon sequestration projects in theseLUCS = Land Use and Carbon Sequestration model, and GEOMOD =

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

A comparison of land surface model soil hydraulic properties estimated by inverse modeling and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of water in the soil. This in turn plays an important role in the water and energy cycles at the land depths in the soil column controls the partitioning of two key energy fluxes of concern in climate modelsA comparison of land surface model soil hydraulic properties estimated by inverse modeling

Small, Eric

80

A Markov model of land use dynamics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The application of the Markov chain to modeling agricultural succession is well known. In most cases, the main problem is the inference of the model, i.e. the estimation of the transition matrix. In this work we present methods to estimate the transition matrix from historical observations. In addition to the estimator of maximum likelihood (MLE), we also consider the Bayes estimator associated with the Jeffreys prior. This Bayes estimator will be approximated by a Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method. We also propose a method based on the sojourn time to test the adequation of Markov chain model to the dataset.

Campillo, Fabien; Raherinirina, Angelo; Rakotozafy, Rivo

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land change modeler" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

RESEARCH ARTICLE Impacts of changing climate and land use on vegetation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RESEARCH ARTICLE Impacts of changing climate and land use on vegetation dynamics in a Mediterranean coast and in regions that are expected to experience a mediterranean-type climate in the future. Samartin Á O. Heiri Á W. Tinner Institute of Plant Sciences and Oeschger Centre for Climate Change Research

Bern, Universität

82

Refining Landscape Change Models through Outlier Analysis in the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Refining Landscape Change Models through Outlier Analysis in the Muskegon Watershed of Michigan significantly to the state economy, accounting for nearly 20% of its economic output (Michigan Land Use, 1965; Lee, 1973; Wegener, 1994), and model refinement/advancement, in large part due to advances

Walker, Robert T.

83

A Conceptual Framework for Estimating Bioenerg-Related Land-Use Change and Its Impacts over Time  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

bioenergy program land-use baseline (i.e. , one in which prices,BIOENERGY POLICIES ON CLIMATE AND CLIMATE IMPACTS POLICY ACTION ENERGY SYSTEMS MATERIALS LAND USE, ECOSYSTEMS ECONOMIC SYSTEM (PRICES)Prices, yields, supply curves, and land uses can change over time, year-by-year, in the with bioenergy

Delucchi, Mark

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

The impact of climate, CO2, nitrogen deposition and land use change on simulated contemporary global river flow  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The impact of climate, CO2, nitrogen deposition and land use change on simulated contemporary., 38, L08704, doi:10.1029/ 2011GL046773. 1. Introduction [2] Climate change and human activities and Fung [2008] found that climate and land use change play more important roles than the stomatal closure

Hoffman, Forrest M.

85

Changes in ecosystem services and runoff due to land use change in the watersheds of San Antonio, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

services. Barbier (1994) identified wetland ecosystem services as prevention of storm damage, flood and water flow control, support of fisheries, nutrient and waste absorption, recreation and water transport, agriculture, wildlife products, wood products...CHANGES IN ECOSYSTEM SERVICES AND RUNOFF DUE TO LAND USE CHANGE IN THE WATERSHEDS OF SAN ANTONIO, TEXAS A Thesis by HEATHER GRACE HARRIS Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment...

Harris, Heather Grace

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Impact of Agricultural Practice on Regional Climate in a CoupledLand Surface Mesoscale Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The land surface has been shown to form strong feedbacks with climate due to linkages between atmospheric conditions and terrestrial ecosystem exchanges of energy, momentum, water, and trace gases. Although often ignored in modeling studies, land management itself may form significant feedbacks. Because crops are harvested earlier under drier conditions, regional air temperature, precipitation, and soil moisture, for example, affect harvest timing, particularly of rain-fed crops. This removal of vegetation alters the land surface characteristics and may, in turn, affect regional climate. We applied a coupled climate(MM5) and land-surface (LSM1) model to examine the effects of early and late winter wheat harvest on regional climate in the Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility in the Southern Great Plains, where winter wheat accounts for 20 percent of the land area. Within the winter wheat region, simulated 2 m air temperature was 1.3 C warmer in the Early Harvest scenario at mid-day averaged over the two weeks following harvest. Soils in the harvested area were drier and warmer in the top 10 cm and wetter in the 10-20 cm layer. Midday soils were 2.5 C warmer in the harvested area at mid-day averaged over the two weeks following harvest. Harvest also dramatically altered latent and sensible heat fluxes. Although differences between scenarios diminished once both scenarios were harvested, the short-term impacts of land management on climate were comparable to those from land cover change demonstrated in other studies.

Cooley, H.S.; Riley, W.J.; Torn, M.S.; He, Y.

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Description of Model Data for SNL13.2-00-Land: A  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Description of Model Data for SNL13.2-00-Land: A 13.2 MW Land-based Turbine Model with SNL100-00 Blades D. Todd Griffith, Brian R. Resor Sandia National Laboratories Wind and Water...

88

Coupling the High Complexity Land Surface Model ACASA to the Mesoscale Model WRF  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this study, the Weather Research and Forecasting Model (WRF) is coupled with the Advanced Canopy-Atmosphere-Soil Algorithm (ACASA), a high complexity land surface model. Although WRF is a state-of-the-art regional ...

Xu, L.

89

Hydraulic Effects of Changes in Bottom-Land Vegetation on Three  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydraulic Effects of Changes in Bottom-Land Vegetation on Three Major Floods, Gila RiverKelvey, Director Library of Congress Cataloging in Publication Data Burkham, D. E. 1927 Hydraulic effects 19.16:655-J 1. Gila River-Floods. 2. Hydraulics. 3. Botany-Ecology-Gila River. 1. Title: Hydraulic

90

Land use changes and raptor conservation in steppe habitats of Eastern Kazakhstan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Land use changes and raptor conservation in steppe habitats of Eastern Kazakhstan Jose Antonio Sa, 480060 Almaty, Kazakhstan d Estacion Biologica de Don~ana, CSIC, Avd. Maria Luisa s/n, Pabellon del in western Europe. During June 1999 we conducted road surveys of raptors in Eastern Kazakhstan to detect

Carrete, Martina

91

Publications on Land Use/Cover Change and Deforestation Peer-Reviewed Articles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Publications on Land Use/Cover Change and Deforestation Peer-Reviewed Articles Pricope, N. G., G. López-Carr, D. Redo, M. Bonilla, M. Levy (2013). Deforestation and reforestation of Latin America and the Caribbean (2001-2010). Biotropica. 45(2): 262-271. López-Carr, D. and J. Burgdorfer (2013) "Deforestation

Lopez-Carr, David

92

Land Use Change Effects on Forest Carbon Cycling Throughout the Southern United States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and deforestation on carbon cycling in forest floor and soil from 1900 to 2050 throughout 13 states in the southern because afforestation causes a gradual gain in carbon stocks for many decades, while deforestation causes Tg C, and deforestation caused emission of 49 Tg C. However, the net effect of land use change

93

Pressure-State-Response in Land Resource Changes, Lake Tana Basin, Ethiopia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pressure-State-Response in Land Resource Changes, Lake Tana Basin, Ethiopia Birru Yitaferu, Amhara Regional Agricultural Research Institute, Ethiopia; Hans Hurni, Centre for Development and Environment (CDE), University of Bern, Switzerland; Gete Zeleke, Global Mountain Program, Ethiopia Lake Tana Basin (LTB

Richner, Heinz

94

Climate Policy 3 (2003) 149157 The climatic impacts of land surface change and carbon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

recognize that carbon sequestration in the terrestrial biosphere can reduce the build-up of carbon dioxide of the surface energy budget can affect the local, regional, and global climate. Given the goal of mitigatingClimate Policy 3 (2003) 149­157 The climatic impacts of land surface change and carbon management

Pielke, Roger A.

95

Energy and greenhouse gas emission effects of corn and cellulosic ethanol with technology improvements and land use changes.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Use of ethanol as a transportation fuel in the United States has grown from 76 dam{sup 3} in 1980 to over 40.1 hm{sup 3} in 2009 - and virtually all of it has been produced from corn. It has been debated whether using corn ethanol results in any energy and greenhouse gas benefits. This issue has been especially critical in the past several years, when indirect effects, such as indirect land use changes, associated with U.S. corn ethanol production are considered in evaluation. In the past three years, modeling of direct and indirect land use changes related to the production of corn ethanol has advanced significantly. Meanwhile, technology improvements in key stages of the ethanol life cycle (such as corn farming and ethanol production) have been made. With updated simulation results of direct and indirect land use changes and observed technology improvements in the past several years, we conducted a life-cycle analysis of ethanol and show that at present and in the near future, using corn ethanol reduces greenhouse gas emission by more than 20%, relative to those of petroleum gasoline. On the other hand, second-generation ethanol could achieve much higher reductions in greenhouse gas emissions. In a broader sense, sound evaluation of U.S. biofuel policies should account for both unanticipated consequences and technology potentials. We maintain that the usefulness of such evaluations is to provide insight into how to prevent unanticipated consequences and how to promote efficient technologies with policy intervention.

Wang, M.; Han, J.; Haq, Z; Tyner, .W.; Wu, M.; Elgowainy, A. (Energy Systems)

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Risk Analysis for Water Resources Under Climate Change, Population Growth, and Land Use Change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2006). Climate Change Impacts on Water for Agriculture in2006). Climate Change Impacts on Water for Agriculture infuture climate change impacts on water for agriculture and

Kiparsky, Michael

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Global climate change, land management, and biosolids application to semiarid grasslands  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Global climate change combined with improper land management, including over-grazing, can lead to a severe reduction in plant cover and soil productivity. This process is especially common in arid and semiarid regions with sparse vegetation cover. New and innovative methods of land management are needed to restore and maintain these ecosystems in a productive and sustainable state. Research conducted in New Mexico on the Rio Puerco Resource Area and the Sevilleta National Wildlife Refuge has shown that biosolids (municipal sewage sludge) application to semiarid grasslands can increase soil nutrient availability, increase plant cover and productivity, and decrease surface runoff and soil erosion without harming environmental quality.

Loftin, S.R. [Forest Service, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Rocky Mountain Forest and Range Experiment Station

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

98

Irrigation cooling effect: Regional climate forcing by land-use change Lara M. Kueppers,1,2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of temperature. The potentially confounding impact of land-cover and land- use change on trends in temperature signal caused by greenhouse gas increases. Citation: Kueppers, L.M., M. A. Snyder, and L. C. Sloan (2007-use change are known to alter local, regional and global climate. For example, conversion of natural vegeta

Kueppers, Lara M.

99

A resource complex for Sandy Neck Beach : an exploration in building on an ever-changing land  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis is an exploration into a spit of land, called Sandy Neck Beach on Cape Cod, Massachusetts. It is a barrier beach system which is experiencing many changes. These changes are manifest not only in its physical ...

Solarz, Cynthia L. (Cynthia Lynne)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Changes in Farmers Welfare from Land Requisition in the Process of Rapid Urbanization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Nanjing University, Nanjing, 210093, China b The Key Laboratory of the Coastal Zone Exploitation and Protection, Ministry of Land and Resources, Nanjing, 210024, China c Department of Geography and Geographic Information Science, University of Illinois... . Management World (4),17-26. Fisher,A.C.,2000. Investment under uncertainty and option value in environmental economics. Resource and Energy Economics (22),197-204. ?? Gao,J.Y.,Qiao,R.F.,Zhang,A.L.,2007. Fuzzy evaluation of farmers' welfare change...

Li, Huan; Huang, Xianjin; Kwan, Mei-Po; Bao, Helen X. H.; Jefferson, Steven

2014-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land change modeler" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Connecting seas: western Palaearctic continental flyway for water birds in the perspective of changing land use  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of changing land use and climate M E N N O B A R T R . VA N E E R D E N *, R U D O L F H . D R E N T w, J U L I A S TA H L w and J A N P. B A K K E R z *Institute for Inland Water Management and Wastewater Treatment RIZA, PO Box 17, 8200 AA Lelystad, The Netherlands, wAnimal Ecology Group, Centre for Ecological

Kleyer, Michael

102

An update on modeling land-ice/ocean interactions in CESM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This talk is an update on ongoing land-ice/ocean coupling work within the Community Earth System Model (CESM). The coupling method is designed to allow simulation of a fully dynamic ice/ocean interface, while requiring minimal modification to the existing ocean model (the Parallel Ocean Program, POP). The method makes use of an immersed boundary method (IBM) to represent the geometry of the ice-ocean interface without requiring that the computational grid be modified in time. We show many of the remaining development challenges that need to be addressed in order to perform global, century long climate runs with fully coupled ocean and ice sheet models. These challenges include moving to a new grid where the computational pole is no longer at the true south pole and several changes to the coupler (the software tool used to communicate between model components) to allow the boundary between land and ocean to vary in time. We discuss benefits for ice/ocean coupling that would be gained from longer-term ocean model development to allow for natural salt fluxes (which conserve both water and salt mass, rather than water volume).

Asay-davis, Xylar [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2011-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

103

``Climate Modelling & Global Change'' scientific report ``Climate Modelling & Global Change'' Team  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

``Climate Modelling & Global Change'' scientific report ``Climate Modelling & Global Change'' Team) : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 6 2.2 Anthropogenic climate change studies: scenario experiments (96) : : : : : : : : : 7 2 following its creation, the ``Climate Modelling & Global Change'' team had to make its proofs in order

104

Lakes & Reservoirs: Research and Management 2002 7: 189199 Modelling the impact of historical land uses on  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

uses on surface-water quality using groundwater flow and solute-transport models Karen G. Wayland,1-use effects on surface-water quality. Key words groundwater lag time, groundwater modelling, land use, water quality, watersheds. INTRODUCTION The biogeochemistry of surface water and groundwater are related to land

105

Fire dynamics during the 20th century simulated by the Community Land Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fire is an integral Earth System process that interacts with climate in multiple ways. Here we assessed the parametrization of fires in the Community Land Model (CLM-CN) and improved the ability of the model to reproduce ...

Kloster, S.; Mahowald, N. M.; Randerson, J. T.; Thornton, P. E.; Hoffman, F. M.; Levis, Samuel; Lawrence, Peter J.; Feddema, Johannes J.; Oleson, Keith W.; Lawrence, David M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Analytic solutions for the land temperature in an Earth system model of intermediate Mark Williamson  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Analytic solutions for the land temperature in an Earth system model of intermediate complexity. Analytic solutions for the temporal evolution of the land temperature are obtained for an Earth system and atmosphere radiation balance in a developing EMIC project named GENIE (Grid Enabled Integrated Earth system

Williamson, Mark

107

A Physically Based Runoff Routing Model for Land Surface and Earth System Models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new physically based runoff routing model, called the Model for Scale Adaptive River Transport (MOSART), has been developed to be applicable across local, regional, and global scales. Within each spatial unit, surface runoff is first routed across hillslopes and then discharged along with subsurface runoff into a tributary subnetwork before entering the main channel. The spatial units are thus linked via routing through the main channel network, which is constructed in a scale-consistent way across different spatial resolutions. All model parameters are physically based, and only a small subset requires calibration.MOSART has been applied to the Columbia River basin at 1/ 168, 1/ 88, 1/ 48, and 1/ 28 spatial resolutions and was evaluated using naturalized or observed streamflow at a number of gauge stations. MOSART is compared to two other routing models widely used with land surface models, the River Transport Model (RTM) in the Community Land Model (CLM) and the Lohmann routing model, included as a postprocessor in the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) model package, yielding consistent performance at multiple resolutions. MOSART is further evaluated using the channel velocities derived from field measurements or a hydraulic model at various locations and is shown to be capable of producing the seasonal variation and magnitude of channel velocities reasonably well at different resolutions. Moreover, the impacts of spatial resolution on model simulations are systematically examined at local and regional scales. Finally, the limitations ofMOSART and future directions for improvements are discussed.

Li, Hongyi; Wigmosta, Mark S.; Wu, Huan; Huang, Maoyi; Ke, Yinghai; Coleman, Andre M.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.

2013-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

108

Land-use transition for bioenergy and climate stabilization: model comparison of drivers, impacts and interactions with other land use based mitigation options  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study is a model comparison assessing the drivers and impacts of bioenergy production on the global land system and the interaction with other land use based mitigation options in the context of the EMF 27 project. We compare and evaluate results from three integrated assessment models (GCAM, IMAGE, and ReMIND/MAgPIE). All three models project that dedicated bioenergy crops and biomass residues are a potentially important and cost-effective component of the energy system. But bioenergy deployment levels and feedstock composition vary notably across models as do the implications for land-use and greenhouse gas emissions and the interaction with other land use based mitigation measures. Despite numerous model differences, we identify a few that are likely contributing to differences in land-use and emissions attributable to energy crop deployment.

Popp, Alexander; Rose, Steven K.; Calvin, Katherine V.; Van Vuuren, Detlef; Dietrich, Jan P.; Wise, Marshall A.; Stehfest, Eike; Humpenoder, Florian; Kyle, G. Page; Van Vliet, Jasper; Bauer, Nico; Lotze-Campen, Hermann; Klein, David; Kriegler, Elmar

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

A new GIS toolbox for integrating massive heterogeneous GIS data for land use change analysis A new GIS toolbox for integrating  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, environmental impacts, biogas maize, permanent grassland, Germany. 1. Introduction Agricultural land use.laggner@ti.bund.de Abstract Agricultural land use in Germany and related im- pacts on the environment and the use of natural statistical analysis, we summarize impacts of increased biogas production on agricultural land use change

Köbben, Barend

110

Downscaling Global Land Cover Projections from an Integrated Assessment Model for Use in Regional Analyses: Results and Evaluation for the US from 2005 to 2095  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Projections of land cover change generated from Integrated Assessment Models (IAM) and other economic-based models can be applied for analyses of environmental impacts at subregional and landscape scales. For those IAM and economic models that project land use at the sub-continental or regional scale, these projections must be downscaled and spatially distributed prior to use in climate or ecosystem models. Downscaling efforts to date have been conducted at the national extent with relatively high spatial resolution (30m) and at the global extent with relatively coarse spatial resolution (0.5 degree).

West, Tristram O.; Le Page, Yannick LB; Huang, Maoyi; Wolf, Julie; Thomson, Allison M.

2014-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

111

Climate Models from the Joint Global Change Research Institute  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

Staff at the Joint Institute develop and use models to simulate the economic and physical impacts of global change policy options. The GCAM, for example, gives analysts insight into how regional and national economies might respond to climate change mitigation policies including carbon taxes, carbon trading, and accelerated deployment of energy technology. Three available models are Phoenix, GCAM, and EPIC. Phoenix is a global, dynamic recursive, computable general equilibrium model that is solved in five-year time steps from 2005 through 2100 and divides the world into twenty-four regions. Each region includes twenty-six industrial sectors. Particular attention is paid to energy production in Phoenix. There are nine electricity-generating technologies (coal, natural gas, oil, biomass, nuclear, hydro, wind, solar, and geothermal) and four additional energy commodities: crude oil, refined oil products, coal, and natural gas. Phoenix is designed to answer economic questions related to international climate and energy policy and international trade. Phoenix replaces the Second Generation Model (SGM) that was formerly used for general equilibrium analysis at JGCRI. GCAM is the Global Change Assessment Model, a partial equilibrium model of the world with 14 regions. GCAM operates in 5 year time steps from 1990 to 2095 and is designed to examine long-term changes in the coupled energy, agriculture/land-use, and climate system. GCAM includes a 151-region agriculture land-use module and a reduced form carbon cycle and climate module in addition to its incorporation of demographics, resources, energy production and consumption. The model has been used extensively in a number of assessment and modeling activities such as the Energy Modeling Forum (EMF), the U.S. Climate Change Technology Program, and the U.S. Climate Change Science Program and IPCC assessment reports. GCAM is now freely available as a community model. The Environmental Policy Integrated Climate (EPIC) Model is a process-based agricultural systems model composed of simulation components for weather, hydrology, nutrient cycling, pesticide fate, tillage, crop growth, soil erosion, crop and soil management and economics. Staff at PNNL have been involved in the development of this model by integrating new sub-models for soil carbon dynamics and nitrogen cycling.

112

EA-1779: Proposed Changes to the Sanitary Biosolids Land Application Program on the Oak Ridge Reservation, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal to amend (e.g., by changing setback requirements from surface water features and potential channels to groundwater) the Sanitary Biosolids Land Application Program at the Oak Ridge Reservation in Oak Ridge, Tennessee.

113

An international land-biosphere model benchmarking activity for the IPCC Fifth Assessment Report (AR5)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The need to capture important climate feedbacks in general circulation models (GCMs) has resulted in efforts to include atmospheric chemistry and land and ocean biogeochemistry into the next generation of production climate models, called Earth System Models (ESMs). While many terrestrial and ocean carbon models have been coupled to GCMs, recent work has shown that such models can yield a wide range of results (Friedlingstein et al., 2006). This work suggests that a more rigorous set of global offline and partially coupled experiments, along with detailed analyses of processes and comparisons with measurements, are needed. The Carbon-Land Model Intercomparison Project (C-LAMP) was designed to meet this need by providing a simulation protocol and model performance metrics based upon comparisons against best-available satellite- and ground-based measurements (Hoffman et al., 2007). Recently, a similar effort in Europe, called the International Land Model Benchmark (ILAMB) Project, was begun to assess the performance of European land surface models. These two projects will now serve as prototypes for a proposed international land-biosphere model benchmarking activity for those models participating in the IPCC Fifth Assessment Report (AR5). Initially used for model validation for terrestrial biogeochemistry models in the NCAR Community Land Model (CLM), C-LAMP incorporates a simulation protocol for both offline and partially coupled simulations using a prescribed historical trajectory of atmospheric CO2 concentrations. Models are confronted with data through comparisons against AmeriFlux site measurements, MODIS satellite observations, NOAA Globalview flask records, TRANSCOM inversions, and Free Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) site measurements. Both sets of experiments have been performed using two different terrestrial biogeochemistry modules coupled to the CLM version 3 in the Community Climate System Model version 3 (CCSM3): the CASA model of Fung, et al., and the carbon-nitrogen (CN) model of Thornton. Comparisons of the CLM3 offline results against observational datasets have been performed and are described in Randerson et al. (2009). CLM version 4 has been evaluated using C-LAMP, showing improvement in many of the metrics. Efforts are now underway to initiate a Nitrogen-Land Model Intercomparison Project (N-LAMP) to better constrain the effects of the nitrogen cycle in biosphere models. Presented will be new results from C-LAMP for CLM4, initial N-LAMP developments, and the proposed land-biosphere model benchmarking activity.

Hoffman, Forrest M [ORNL; Randerson, James T [ORNL; Thornton, Peter E [ORNL; Bonan, Gordon [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR); Erickson III, David J [ORNL; Fung, Inez [University of California, Berkeley

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

The Carbon-Land Model Intercomparison Project (C-LAMP): A Model-Data Comparison System for Evaluation of Coupled Biosphere-Atmosphere Models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The need to capture important climate feebacks in general circulation models (GCMs) has resulted in new efforts to include atmospheric chemistry and land and ocean biogeochemistry into the next generation of production climate models, now often referred to as Earth System Models (ESMs). While many terrestrial and ocean carbon models have been coupled to GCMs, recent work has shown that such models can yield a wide range of results, suggesting that a more rigorous set of offline and partially coupled experiments, along with detailed analyses of processes and comparisons with measurements, are warranted. The Carbon-Land Model Intercomparison Project (C-LAMP) provides a simulation protocol and model performance metrics based upon comparisons against best-available satellite- and ground-based measurements (Hoffman et al., 2007). C-LAMP provides feedback to the modeling community regarding model improvements and to the measurement community by suggesting new observational campaigns. C-LAMP Experiment 1 consists of a set of uncoupled simulations of terrestrial carbon models specifically designed to examine the ability of the models to reproduce surface carbon and energy fluxes at multiple sites and to exhibit the influence of climate variability, prescribed atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), nitrogen (N) deposition, and land cover change on projections of terrestrial carbon fluxes during the 20th century. Experiment 2 consists of partially coupled simulations of the terrestrial carbon model with an active atmosphere model exchanging energy and moisture fluxes. In all experiments, atmospheric CO{sub 2} follows the prescribed historical trajectory from C{sup 4}MIP. In Experiment 2, the atmosphere model is forced with prescribed sea surface temperatures (SSTs) and corresponding sea ice concentrations from the Hadley Centre; prescribed CO{sub 2} is radiatively active; and land, fossil fuel, and ocean CO{sub 2} fluxes are advected by the model. Both sets of experiments have been performed using two different terrestrial biogeochemistry modules coupled to the Community Land Model version 3 (CLM3) in the Community Climate System Model version 3 (CCSM3): The CASA model of Fung, et al., and the carbon-nitrogen (CN) model of Thornton. Comparisons against Ameriflus site measurements, MODIS satellite observations, NOAA flask records, TRANSCOM inversions, and Free Air CO{sub 2} Enrichment (FACE) site measurements, and other datasets have been performed and are described in Randerson et al. (2009). The C-LAMP diagnostics package was used to validate improvements to CASA and CN for use in the next generation model, CLM4. It is hoped that this effort will serve as a prototype for an international carbon-cycle model benchmarking activity for models being used for the Inter-governmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Fifth Assessment Report. More information about C-LAMP, the experimental protocol, performance metrics, output standards, and model-data comparisons from the CLM3-CASA and CLM3-CN models are available at http://www.climatemodeling.org/c-lamp.

Hoffman, Forrest M [ORNL; Randerson, Jim [University of California, Irvine; Thornton, Peter E [ORNL; Mahowald, Natalie [Cornell University; Bonan, Gordon [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR); Running, Steven [University of Montana, Missoula; Fung, Inez [University of California, Berkeley

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

The Impact of Observed Vegetation Changes on LandAtmosphere Feedbacks During Drought  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Water Desalination and Reuse Centre, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology, Thuwal, Saudi conditions of the advanced research Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Model to assess the influence. 2010). Some changes in the climate and extreme weather events in Australia have been attributed

Evans, Jason

116

Change detection with heterogeneous data using ecoregional stratification, statistical summaries and a land allocation algorithm  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-cover classification based on aerial photo interpretation was combined with 2000 AVHRR satellite imagery to derive land; Rogan et al., 2002), the vast majority of applications are based on data derived from the same sensor a methodology for combining a photo-digitized historical land-cover map with contemporary satellite imagery

Brown, Daniel G.

117

The new GFDL global atmosphere and land model AM2/LM2: Evaluation with prescribed SST simulations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The new GFDL global atmosphere and land model AM2/LM2: Evaluation with prescribed SST simulations climatology, and components from previous models used at GFDL. The land model, known as LM2, includes soil of the coupled model AM2/LM2 is evaluated with a series of prescribed sea-surface temperature (SST) simulations

Bretherton, Chris

118

A Subbasin-based framework to represent land surface processes in an Earth System Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Realistically representing spatial heterogeneity and lateral land surface processes within and between modeling units in earth system models is important because of their implications to surface energy and water exchange. The traditional approach of using regular grids as computational units in land surface models and earth system models may lead to inadequate representation of lateral movements of water, energy and carbon fluxes, especially when the grid resolution increases. Here a new subbasin-based framework is introduced in the Community Land Model (CLM), which is the land component of the Community Earth System Model (CESM). Local processes are represented assuming each subbasin as a grid cell on a pseudo grid matrix with no significant modifications to the existing CLM modeling structure. Lateral routing of water within and between subbasins is simulated with the subbasin version of a recently-developed physically based routing model, Model for Scale Adaptive River Routing (MOSART). As an illustration, this new framework is implemented in the topographically diverse region of the U.S. Pacific Northwest. The modeling units (subbasins) are delineated from high-resolution Digital Elevation Model while atmospheric forcing and surface parameters are remapped from the corresponding high resolution datasets. The impacts of this representation on simulating hydrologic processes are explored by comparing it with the default (grid-based) CLM representation. In addition, the effects of DEM resolution on parameterizing topography and the subsequent effects on runoff processes are investigated. Limited model evaluation and comparison showed that small difference between the averaged forcing can lead to more significant difference in the simulated runoff and streamflow because of nonlinear horizontal processes. Topographic indices derived from high resolution DEM may not improve the overall water balance, but affect the partitioning between surface and subsurface runoff. More systematic analyses are needed to determine the relative merits of the subbasin representation compared to the commonly used grid-based representation, especially when land surface models are approaching higher resolutions.

Tesfa, Teklu K.; Li, Hongyi; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Huang, Maoyi; Ke, Yinghai; Sun, Yu; Liu, Ying

2014-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

119

Land use change in Maasailand drivers, dynamics and impacts on largeherbivores and agro-pastoralism  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Maasailand of Kenya and Tanzania supports one of the richest wildlife populations remaining on Earth. However, over the last century, Maasailand has experienced land transformation notably through conversion of former ...

Msoffe, Fortunata Urban

2010-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

120

Land-Based Wind Potential Changes in the Southeastern United States (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent advancements in utility-scale wind turbine technology and pricing have vastly increased the potential land area where turbines can be deployed in the United States. This presentation quantifies the new developable land potential (e.g., capacity curves), visually identifies new areas for possible development (e.g., new wind resource maps), and begins to address deployment barriers to wind in new areas for modern and future turbine technology.

Roberts, J. O.

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land change modeler" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

INTERNATIONAL REGIONAL SCIENCE REVIEW (Vol. 25, No. 2, 2002)Walker et al. / LAND USE IN FOREST FRONTIERS LAND USE AND LAND COVER CHANGE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for inputs (including labor), outputs, and capital. The risk model is specified and estimated, using survey that integrates demography with market-based factors such as transportation costs and accessibility. In essence and Resource Use in the Amazon (SBR-95-11965)," and also by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration

Walker, Robert T.

122

``Climate Modelling & Global Change'' scientific report 1 ``Climate Modelling & Global Change'' Team  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

``Climate Modelling & Global Change'' scientific report 1 ``Climate Modelling & Global Change of the tropical climate : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 6 2.2 Shortterm variability studies : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 8 2.3 Climate drift sensitivity studies

123

Wildfire Risk Mapping over the State of Mississippi: Land Surface Modeling Approach  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Three fire risk indexes based on soil moisture estimates were applied to simulate wildfire probability over the southern part of Mississippi using the logistic regression approach. The fire indexes were retrieved from: (1) accumulated difference between daily precipitation and potential evapotranspiration (P-E); (2) top 10 cm soil moisture content simulated by the Mosaic land surface model; and (3) the Keetch-Byram drought index (KBDI). The P-E, KBDI, and soil moisture based indexes were estimated from gridded atmospheric and Mosaic-simulated soil moisture data available from the North American Land Data Assimilation System (NLDAS-2). Normalized deviations of these indexes from the 31-year mean (1980-2010) were fitted into the logistic regression model describing probability of wildfires occurrence as a function of the fire index. It was assumed that such normalization provides more robust and adequate description of temporal dynamics of soil moisture anomalies than the original (not normalized) set of indexes. The logistic model parameters were evaluated for 0.25 x0.25 latitude/longitude cells and for probability representing at least one fire event occurred during 5 consecutive days. A 23-year (1986-2008) forest fires record was used. Two periods were selected and examined (January mid June and mid September December). The application of the logistic model provides an overall good agreement between empirical/observed and model-fitted fire probabilities over the study area during both seasons. The fire risk indexes based on the top 10 cm soil moisture and KBDI have the largest impact on the wildfire odds (increasing it by almost 2 times in response to each unit change of the corresponding fire risk index during January mid June period and by nearly 1.5 times during mid September-December) observed over 0.25 x0.25 cells located along the state of Mississippi Coast line. This result suggests a rather strong control of fire risk indexes on fire occurrence probability over this region.

Cooke, William H. [Mississippi State University (MSU); Mostovoy, Georgy [Mississippi State University (MSU); Anantharaj, Valentine G [ORNL; Jolly, W. Matt [USDA Forest Service

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

A Functional Test Platform for the Community Land Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A functional test platform is presented to create direct linkages between site measurements and the process-based ecosystem model within the Community Earth System Models (CESM). The platform consists of three major parts: 1) interactive user interfaces, 2) functional test model and 3) observational datasets. It provides much needed integration interfaces for both field experimentalists and ecosystem modelers to improve the model s representation of ecosystem processes within the CESM framework without large software overhead.

Xu, Yang [ORNL] [ORNL; Thornton, Peter E [ORNL] [ORNL; King, Anthony Wayne [ORNL] [ORNL; Steed, Chad A [ORNL] [ORNL; Gu, Lianhong [ORNL] [ORNL; Schuchart, Joseph [ORNL] [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Uncertainty Analysis of Runoff Simulations and Parameter Identifiability in the Community Land Model Evidence from MOPEX Basins  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With the emergence of earth system models as important tools for understanding and predicting climate change and implications to mitigation and adaptation, it has become increasingly important to assess the fidelity of the land component within earth system models to capture realistic hydrological processes and their response to the changing climate and quantify the associated uncertainties. This study investigates the sensitivity of runoff simulations to major hydrologic parameters in version 4 of the Community Land Model (CLM4) by integrating CLM4 with a stochastic exploratory sensitivity analysis framework at 20 selected watersheds from the Model Parameter Estimation Experiment (MOPEX) spanning a wide range of climate and site conditions. We found that for runoff simulations, the most significant parameters are those related to the subsurface runoff parameterizations. Soil texture related parameters and surface runoff parameters are of secondary significance. Moreover, climate and soil conditions play important roles in the parameter sensitivity. In general, site conditions within water-limited hydrologic regimes and with finer soil texture result in stronger sensitivity of output variables, such as runoff and its surface and subsurface components, to the input parameters in CLM4. This study demonstrated the feasibility of parameter inversion for CLM4 using streamflow observations to improve runoff simulations. By ranking the significance of the input parameters, we showed that the parameter set dimensionality could be reduced for CLM4 parameter calibration under different hydrologic and climatic regimes so that the inverse problem is less ill posed.

Huang, Maoyi; Hou, Zhangshuan; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Ke, Yinghai; Liu, Ying; Fang, Zhufeng; Sun, Yu

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Figure 9. Conceptual model for regionally divergent responses of the air-land fluxes to CO2 fertilization, which increases the water-use efficiency of photosynthesis. In dry regions where  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

parameterizations of these processes in models of Mediterranean- climate lands and obtaining a baseline for assessing changes. Acknowledgments NYK is supported by a NOAA Climate and Global Change postdoctoral.1 (2006). I. Y. Fung, S. C. Doney, K. Lindsay, J. John, Evolution of carbon sinks in a changing climate

Krakauer, Nir Y.

127

Q&A on "Impacts of Wind Farms on Land Surface Temperature" Published by Nature Climate Change on April 29, 2012  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Q&A on "Impacts of Wind Farms on Land Surface Temperature" Published by Nature Climate Change? This study presents the first observational evidence of wind farm impacts on land surface temperature downwind of wind farms. Why do the operating wind turbines warm nighttime temperature? This warming effect

Zhou, Liming

128

The Relationship between Land Use and Temperature Change in Dallas County, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to the formation of urban heat islands based on different categories of land use. Specifically, this research analyzes the elements that contribute to the urban heat island effect in Dallas County using temperature data provided by remote sensing imagery and parcel...

Kim, Hee Ju

2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

129

The effects of climate change and extreme weather events on land use  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

scenario anticipates a diminished water supply in the future.Thus, to safeguard future income from events such as heavy rainfall, cold spells, and heat waves. Implementing sustainable land management (SLM was tested as a water conservation measure. Mulching reduces evaporation in the short term, providing

Richner, Heinz

130

INTERRELAITONS BETWEEN VARIABILITY OF GROUND-LEVEL OZONE AND LAND COVER CHANGE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ozone monitoring stations in Connecticut and Rohde Island were used for the analysis. The monitoring stations were classified into different categories based on their locations and land cover characteristics. Cars and gasoline-burning engines are large sources of VOCs. VOCs also come from consumer products

Wang, Y.Q. "Yeqiao"

131

A Survey of Changes in Cloud Cover and Cloud Types over Land from Surface Observations, 197196  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, offsetting the small positive trend that had been found for the ocean, and resulting in no significant trend for the land­ocean average. Significant regional trends are found for many cloud types. The night trends agree of their effects on solar radiation, terrestrial radiation, and precipitation. These effects depend on cloud height

Hochberg, Michael

132

Impact of land use and precipitation changes on surface temperature trends in Argentina  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with the introduction of satellite data. [5] It is not clear what causes this lack of apparent warming in this region studies [Lim et al., 2005, 2008] indicate that the response to global warming may be st to most other land areas, over most of Argentina there has been net cooling, not warming (about ?0.04°C

Kalnay, Eugenia

133

247VECTORIZING THE COMMUNITY LAND MODEL VECTORIZING THE COMMUNITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

systems models (including the CLM) on vector architectures. However, the prior development of the CLM in Japan and the Cray X1 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) spawned renewed interest in running Earth

Hoffman, Forrest M.

134

Linking MODFLOW with an Agent-Based Land-Use Model to Support Decision Making  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Linking MODFLOW with an Agent-Based Land-Use Model to Support Decision Making by Howard W. Reeves1 improve water resources management by illustrating the nonlinear behavior of the coupled system (Pahl systems arise from the decisions of many individuals and groups (Holland 1995; Batty 2005). For the agent

Illinois at Chicago, University of

135

The effect of soil hydraulic properties vs. soil texture in land surface models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

depths in the soil column controls the partitioning of the two key energy fluxes of concern in climateThe effect of soil hydraulic properties vs. soil texture in land surface models E. D. Gutmann and E and difficulties in scaling existing data. In particular, the spatial distribution of Soil Hydraulic Properties

Small, Eric

136

The influence of the land surface on hydrometeorology and ecology: new advances from modeling and satellite  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and EOS Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR and through model initialization of soil moisture from High Resolution Land Data Assimilation System (HRLDAS moisture and sensible heat fluxes. For example, the variations of surface energy and moisture fluxes

Small, Eric

137

Spatial perspectives in state-and-transition models: a missing link to land management?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

REVIEW Spatial perspectives in state-and-transition models: a missing link to land management to select or justify management actions. State transitions are characteristi- cally heterogeneous in space transitions at each scale and that can be considered in empirical studies, STM narratives and management

138

Land use and land cover change: the effects of woody plant encroachment and prescribed fire on biodiversity and ecosystem carbon dynamics in a southern great plains mixed grass savanna  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LAND USE AND LAND COVER CHANGE: THE EFFECTS OF WOODY PLANT ENCROACHMENT AND PRESCRIBED FIRE ON BIODIVERSITY AND ECOSYSTEM CARBON DYNAMICS IN A SOUTHERN GREAT PLAINS MIXED GRASS SAVANNA A Dissertation by EMILY BROOKE HOLLISTER Submitted... PLANT ENCROACHMENT AND PRESCRIBED FIRE ON BIODIVERSITY AND ECOSYSTEM CARBON DYNAMICS IN A SOUTHERN GREAT PLAINS MIXED GRASS SAVANNA A Dissertation by EMILY BROOKE HOLLISTER Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial...

Hollister, Emily Brooke

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

139

Greenhouse gas policy influences climate via direct effects of land-use change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

intheCommunityEarthSystemModel(CESM1): Seasonaluse Model, and Community Earth System Model. The alternativenow passed to the Earth system models (Taylor, Stouffer, &

Jones, A.D.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

The CSIRO Mk3L climate system model v1.0 coupled to the CABLE land surface scheme v1.4b: evaluation of the control climatology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The CSIRO Mk3L climate system model, a reduced-resolution coupled general circulation model, has previously been described in this journal. The model is configured for millennium scale or multiple century scale simulations. This paper reports the impact of replacing the relatively simple land surface scheme that is the default parameterisation in Mk3L with a sophisticated land surface model that simulates the terrestrial energy, water and carbon balance in a physically and biologically consistent way. An evaluation of the new model s near-surface climatology highlights strengths and weaknesses, but overall the atmospheric variables, including the near-surface air temperature and precipitation, are simulated well. The impact of the more sophisticated land surface model on existing variables is relatively small, but generally positive. More significantly, the new land surface scheme allows an examination of surface carbon-related quantities including net primary productivity which adds significantly to the capacity of Mk3L. Overall, results demonstrate that this reduced-resolution climate model is a good foundation for exploring long time scale phenomena. The addition of the more sophisticated land surface model enables an exploration of important Earth System questions including land cover change and abrupt changes in terrestrial carbon storage.

Mao, Jiafu [ORNL; Phipps, S.J. [University of New South Wales; Pitman, A.J. [University of New South Wales; Wang, Yingping [CSIRO Marine and Atmospheric Research; Abramowitz, G. [University of New South Wales; Pak, B. [CSIRO Marine and Atmospheric Research

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land change modeler" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Inverse Modeling of Hydrologic Parameters Using Surface Flux and Runoff Observations in the Community Land Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study demonstrates the possibility of inverting hydrologic parameters using surface flux and runoff observations in version 4 of the Community Land Model (CLM4). Previous studies showed that surface flux and runoff calculations are sensitive to major hydrologic parameters in CLM4 over different watersheds, and illustrated the necessity and possibility of parameter calibration. Two inversion strategies, the deterministic least-square fitting and stochastic Markov-Chain Monte-Carlo (MCMC) - Bayesian inversion approaches, are evaluated by applying them to CLM4 at selected sites. The unknowns to be estimated include surface and subsurface runoff generation parameters and vadose zone soil water parameters. We find that using model parameters calibrated by the least-square fitting provides little improvements in the model simulations but the sampling-based stochastic inversion approaches are consistent - as more information comes in, the predictive intervals of the calibrated parameters become narrower and the misfits between the calculated and observed responses decrease. In general, parameters that are identified to be significant through sensitivity analyses and statistical tests are better calibrated than those with weak or nonlinear impacts on flux or runoff observations. Temporal resolution of observations has larger impacts on the results of inverse modeling using heat flux data than runoff data. Soil and vegetation cover have important impacts on parameter sensitivities, leading to the different patterns of posterior distributions of parameters at different sites. Overall, the MCMC-Bayesian inversion approach effectively and reliably improves the simulation of CLM under different climates and environmental conditions. Bayesian model averaging of the posterior estimates with different reference acceptance probabilities can smooth the posterior distribution and provide more reliable parameter estimates, but at the expense of wider uncertainty bounds.

Sun, Yu; Hou, Zhangshuan; Huang, Maoyi; Tian, Fuqiang; Leung, Lai-Yung R.

2013-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

142

Investigating the effect of farmer land-use decisions on rural landscapes using an agent-based model approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Land use and cover change (LUCC) is increasingly recognised as one of the most visible impacts of humans on nature. In rural areas, most of the observed LUCC is associated with agricultural activities. This has traditionally been attributed...

Karali, Eleni

2012-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

143

The Effects of Quality Control on Decreasing Error Propagation in the LandScan USA Population Distribution Model: A Case Study of Philadelphia County  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Landscan USA is a high resolution dasymetric model incorporating multiple ancillary variables to distribute populations. LandScan USA is a valuable tool in determining the population at risk during emergency response situations. However, a critical evaluation is necessary to produce user confidence regarding model accuracy through the verification and validation of model outputs. Unfortunately, dynamic models, such as population distribution, are often not validated due to the difficulty of having multiple input datasets and lack of validated data. A validated dataset allows analysis of model accuracy, as well as quantifying the benefits and costs of improving input datasets compared to find a balance for producing the best model. This paper examines inaccuracies present within the input variables of two national school datasets incorporated in the model. Schools were chosen since a validated school dataset exists for Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania. Quality control efforts utilized throughout the LandScan USA process are quantified to determine the degree of quality control necessary to have a statistically significant effect on model output. Typical LandScan USA quality control resulted in 43% of school enrollment values changed, compared to 89% for the validated dataset. Normal quality control methods resulted in 36% of schools being spatially relocated compared to 87% for the validated dataset. However, the costs of increasing quality control from normal to the validated dataset equated to a 600% increase in manual labor time for statistically insignificant improvements in LandScan USA daytime. This study enabled validation verification of not only the quality control process for LandScan USA, but also provides confidence in model output and use for policy issues, planning and emergency situations.

Patterson, Lauren [University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill; Urban, Marie L [ORNL; Myers, Aaron T [ORNL; Bhaduri, Budhendra L [ORNL; Bright, Eddie A [ORNL; Coleman, Phil R [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Optimal use of land surface temperature data to detect changes in tropical forest cover  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Climate Change (2005), Eleventh Conference of Parties (COP), Agenda item 6: Reducing emissions from deforestation in developing countries,

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Change in Urban Land Use and Associated Attributes in the Upper San Francisco Estuary, 1990-2006  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bay watershed. Environmental Management Water Plan Land andwater quality in Georgian Bay. Environmental Management 44(

Stoms, David M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

RAMI4PILPS: An intercomparison of formulations for the partitioning of solar radiation in land surface models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RAMI4PILPS: An intercomparison of formulations for the partitioning of solar radiation in land for the partitioning of solar radiation in land surface models, J. Geophys. Res., 116, G02019, doi:10.1029/2010JG001511 [e.g., Zeng et al., 2000; Dai et al., 2004]. The partitioning of solar radiation between

Ni-Meister, Wenge

147

Model building for flavor changing Higgs couplings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

If $t\\rightarrow hq$ ($q=c,u$) or $h\\rightarrow\\tau\\ell$ ($\\ell=\\mu,e$) decays are observed, it will be a clear signal of new physics. We investigate whether natural and viable flavor models can saturate the present direct upper bounds without violating the indirect constraints from low energy loop processes. We carry out our analysis in two theoretical frameworks: minimal flavor violation (MFV) and Froggatt-Nielsen symmetry (FN). The simplest models in either framework predict flavor changing couplings that are too small to be directly observed. Yet, in the MFV framework, it is possible to have lepton flavor changing Higgs couplings close to the bound if spurions related to heavy singlet neutrinos play a role. In the FN framework, it is possible to have large flavor changing couplings in both the up and the charged lepton sectors if supersymmetry plays a role.

Avital Dery; Aielet Efrati; Yosef Nir; Yotam Soreq; Vasja Susi?

2014-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

148

Utilizing CLASIC observations and multiscale models to study the impact of improved Land surface representation on modeling cloud- convection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The CLASIC experiment was conducted over the US southern great plains (SGP) in June 2007 with an objective to lead an enhanced understanding of the cumulus convection particularly as it relates to land surface conditions. This project was design to help assist with understanding the overall improvement of land atmosphere convection initiation representation of which is important for global and regional models. The study helped address one of the critical documented deficiency in the models central to the ARM objectives for cumulus convection initiation and particularly under summer time conditions. This project was guided by the scientific question building on the CLASIC theme questions: What is the effect of improved land surface representation on the ability of coupled models to simulate cumulus and convection initiation? The focus was on the US Southern Great Plains region. Since the CLASIC period was anomalously wet the strategy has been to use other periods and domains to develop the comparative assessment for the CLASIC data period, and to understand the mechanisms of the anomalous wet conditions on the tropical systems and convection over land. The data periods include the IHOP 2002 field experiment that was over roughly same domain as the CLASIC in the SGP, and some of the DOE funded Ameriflux datasets.

Niyogi, Devdutta S. [Purdue

2013-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

149

Community Land Model Version 3.0 (CLM3.0) Developer's Guide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document describes the guidelines adopted for software development of the Community Land Model (CLM) and serves as a reference to the entire code base of the released version of the model. The version of the code described here is Version 3.0 which was released in the summer of 2004. This document, the Community Land Model Version 3.0 (CLM3.0) User's Guide (Vertenstein et al., 2004), the Technical Description of the Community Land Model (CLM) (Oleson et al., 2004), and the Community Land Model's Dynamic Global Vegetation Model (CLM-DGVM): Technical Description and User's Guide (Levis et al., 2004) provide the developer, user, or researcher with details of implementation, instructions for using the model, a scientific description of the model, and a scientific description of the Dynamic Global Vegetation Model integrated with CLM respectively. The CLM is a single column (snow-soil-vegetation) biogeophysical model of the land surface which can be run serially (on a laptop or personal computer) or in parallel (using distributed or shared memory processors or both) on both vector and scalar computer architectures. Written in Fortran 90, CLM can be run offline (i.e., run in isolation using stored atmospheric forcing data), coupled to an atmospheric model (e.g., the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM)), or coupled to a climate system model (e.g., the Community Climate System Model Version 3 (CCSM3)) through a flux coupler (e.g., Coupler 6 (CPL6)). When coupled, CLM exchanges fluxes of energy, water, and momentum with the atmosphere. The horizontal land surface heterogeneity is represented by a nested subgrid hierarchy composed of gridcells, landunits, columns, and plant functional types (PFTs). This hierarchical representation is reflected in the data structures used by the model code. Biophysical processes are simulated for each subgrid unit (landunit, column, and PFT) independently, and prognostic variables are maintained for each subgrid unit. Vertical heterogeneity is represented by a single vegetation layer, 10 layers for soil, and up to five layers for snow, depending on the snow depth. For computational efficiency, gridcells are grouped into ''clumps'' which are divided in cyclic fashion among distributed memory processors. Additional parallel performance is obtained by distributing clumps of gridcells across shared memory processors on computer platforms that support hybrid Message Passing Interface (MPI)/OpenMP operation. Significant modifications to the source code have been made over the last year to support efficient operation on newer vector architectures, specifically the Earth Simulator in Japan and the Cray X1 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (Homan et al., 2004). These code modifications resulted in performance improvements even on the scalar architectures widely used for running CLM presently. To better support vectorized processing in the code, subgrid units (columns and PFTs) are grouped into ''filters'' based on their process-specific categorization. For example, filters (vectors of integers) referring to all snow, non-snow, lake, non-lake, and soil covered columns and PFTs within each clump are built and maintained when the model is run. Many loops within the scientific subroutines use these filters to indirectly address the process-appropriate subgrid units.

Hoffman, FM

2004-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

150

Transformed shoreline-following horizontal coordinates in a mesoscale model: A sea-land-breeze case study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A hydrostatic and incompressible mesoscale model with transformed horizontal coordinates is presented. The model is applied to study the sea-land-breeze circulation over Rio de La Plata. One of the new coordinates is shoreline-following and the other one is locally quasi-perpendicular to the first one. The original set of equations in the Cartesian coordinates is rewritten in the curvilinear coordinates. This transformation is useful provided that the curvilinear coordinates are close to being orthogonal. The horizontal domain covers 250 km [times] 250 km, and the vertical domain is 2 km deep. To predict the sea-land-breeze circulation the model is integrated over 12 h. The forcing of the model is a cyclic perturbation of the surface temperature. The changes in the wind direction during the day are in good agreement with the observations from six weather stations in the region. The same program code is applied to uniform domains of different resolutions in order to test the coordinate transformation. Results show that the predictions based upon the variable-resolution version resemble ones obtained using high uniform resolution but consume only one-fourth the computer time needed by the latter. Comparison of the vertical velocity patterns predicted by the model to the cumulus clouds distribution observed from satellite images show a very good agreement too. The authors believe that all these results justify the use of the coordinate transformation in this type of model, although further verifications are needed in order to draw more definitive conclusions. 28 refs., 11 figs.

Berri, G.J.; Nunez, M.N. (Universidad de Buenos Aires (Argentina) Pabellon II Ciudad Universitaria, Buenos Aires (Argentina))

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

GIS-Based Cellular Automaton Model to allocate Kansas High Plains Irrigated Agriculture Land Use  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GIS-Based Cellular Automaton Model to Allocate Irrigated Agriculture Land Use Peiwen Chiu Kansas State University GIS Day 2013 November 20, 2013 University of Kansas High Plains/Ogallala Aquifer 8 States 186,000 mi2 480,000 km2 http... of Acreage From the Model Iterations Whats Next This work was supported in part by the National Science Foundation (grant GEO0909515) and the United States Department of Agriculture/Agricultural Research Service (Ogallala Aquifer Initiative). Any findings...

Chiu, Peiwen

2014-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

152

The Changing US Electric Sector Business Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Changing US Electric Sector Business Model CATEE 2013 Clean Air Through Energy Efficiency Conference San Antonio, Texas December 17, 2013 ESL-KT-13-12-57 CATEE 2013: Clean Air Through Energy Efficiency Conference, San Antonio, Texas Dec. 16...-18 Copyright 2013 Deloitte Development LLC. All rights reserved. Fundamentals of the US Electric Sector Business Model Todays Challenges Faced by U.S. Electric Sector The Math Does Not Lie: A Look into the Sectors Future Disruption to Today...

Aliff, G.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Finding of no significant impact: Changes in the sanitary sludge land application program on the Oak Ridge Reservation, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has completed an environmental assessment (DOE/EA-1042) that evaluates potential impacts of proposed changes in the sanitary sludge land application program on the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Changes in lifetime sludge land application limits and radionuclide loading are proposed, and two new sources of sewage sludge from DOE facilities would be transported to the City of Oak Ridge Publicly Owned Treatment Works (COR POTW). Lifetime sludge land application limits would increase from 22 tons/acre to 50 tons/acre, which is the limit approved and permitted by the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC). With the approval of TDEC, the permissible radiological dose from sludge land application would change from the current limit of 2x background radionuclide concentrations in receiving soils to a risk-based dose limit of 4 millirem (mrem) per year for the maximally exposed individual. Sludge land application sites would not change from those that are currently part of the program. Based on the results of the analysis reported in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major federal action that would significantly affect the quality of the human environment within the context of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA). Therefore, preparation of an environmental impact statement (EIS) is not necessary, and DOE is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI). 70 refs., 2 figs., 17 tabs.

NONE

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Forecasting land use change and its environmental impact at a watershed scale  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

can also degrade the quality of the storm water runoff. Monitoring and modeling studies have shown: Urbanization; Hydrologic modeling; Runoff; Non-point source pollution; GIS; Forecasting 1. Introduction behavior due to urbanization include increased lake and wetlands water levels (Calder et al., 1995

155

Resource Assessment and Land Use Change Light Duty Vehicles/Fuels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

investments in research and development to expand biofuel production Biomass feedstock supplies needed maintained by University of Tennessee for second generation biofuels Forest sector model to derive supply #12;Biomass Program Strategic Analysis Activities Strategic Analysis Impact Assessment TEA Pathway

156

Please cite this article in press as: Otero, I., et al., Loss of water availability and stream biodiversity under land abandonment and climate change in a Mediterranean catchment (Olzinelles, NE Spain). Land Use Policy (2010), doi:10.1016/j.landusepol.201  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

biodiversity under land abandonment and climate change in a Mediterranean catchment (Olzinelles, NE Spain under land abandonment and climate change in a Mediterranean catchment (Olzinelles, NE Spain) Iago-cover change Warming Mediterranean catchment Water courses Aquatic fauna a b s t r a c t In the north rim

Gracia, Carlos

157

Scalability of grid- and subbasin-based land surface modeling approaches for hydrologic simulations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper investigates the relative merits of grid- and subbasin-based land surface modeling approaches for hydrologic simulations, with a focus on their scalability (i.e., abilities to perform consistently across a range of spatial resolutions) in simulating runoff generation. Simulations produced by the grid- and subbasin-based configurations of the Community Land Model (CLM) are compared at four spatial resolutions (0.125o, 0.25o, 0.5o and 1o) over the topographically diverse region of the U.S. Pacific Northwest. Using the 0.125o resolution simulation as the reference, statistical skill metrics are calculated and compared across simulations at 0.25o, 0.5o and 1o spatial resolutions of each modeling approach at basin and topographic region levels. Results suggest significant scalability advantage for the subbasin-based approach compared to the grid-based approach for runoff generation. Basin level annual average relative errors of surface runoff at 0.25o, 0.5o, and 1o compared to 0.125o are 3%, 4%, and 6% for the subbasin-based configuration and 4%, 7%, and 11% for the grid-based configuration, respectively. The scalability advantages of the subbasin-based approach are more pronounced during winter/spring and over mountainous regions. The source of runoff scalability is found to be related to the scalability of major meteorological and land surface parameters of runoff generation. More specifically, the subbasin-based approach is more consistent across spatial scales than the grid-based approach in snowfall/rainfall partitioning, which is related to air temperature and surface elevation. Scalability of a topographic parameter used in the runoff parameterization also contributes to improved scalability of the rain driven saturated surface runoff component, particularly during winter. Hence this study demonstrates the importance of spatial structure for multi-scale modeling of hydrological processes, with implications to surface heat fluxes in coupled land-atmosphere modeling.

Tesfa, Teklu K.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Huang, Maoyi; Li, Hongyi; Voisin, Nathalie; Wigmosta, Mark S.

2014-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

158

The relationships between biomass burning, land-cover/use change, and the distribution of carbonaceous aerosols in mainland Southeast Asia: A review and synthesis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 The relationships between biomass burning, land-cover/use change, and the distribution. 793, The Ohio State University March 3, 2007 Biomass burning is a major source of black carbon directly and indirectly. Uncertainty regarding the contribution of biomass burning to the concentration

Shi, Tao

159

New Mexico Water Resources Research Institute, New Mexico State University http://wrri.nmsu.edu Predicting Land Use Change and its Effect on Nonpoint  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

New Mexico Water Resources Research Institute, New Mexico State University http://wrri.nmsu.edu Predicting Land Use Change and its Effect on Nonpoint Source Pollution Jennifer Thacher, and Janie Chermak, Department of Economics, University of New Mexico Project descriptors: Risk aversion, non-point source

Johnson, Eric E.

160

Wood density in forests of Brazil's `arc of deforestation': Implications for biomass and flux of carbon from land-use change in Amazonia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wood density in forests of Brazil's `arc of deforestation': Implications for biomass and flux of deforestation'', where most of the carbon flux from land-use change takes place. This paper presents new wood of deforestation, using locally collected species weighted by their volume in large local inventories. Mean wood

Camara, Gilberto

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land change modeler" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Modeling land surface processes of the midwestern United States : predicting soil moisture under a warmer climate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This dissertation seeks to quantify the response of soil moisture to climate change in the midwestern United States. To assess this response, a dynamic global vegetation model, Integrated Biosphere Simulator, was coupled ...

Winter, Jonathan (Jonathan Mark)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Change in Urban Land Use and Associated Attributes in the Upper San Francisco Estuary, 1990-2006  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bay watershed. Environmental Management Water Plan Land andwater quality in Georgian Bay. Environmental Management 44(water quality in a coastal river and lagoonal estuary. Environmental Management

Stoms, David M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

A Conceptual Framework for Estimating Bioenerg-Related Land-Use Change and Its Impacts over Time  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

energy crops, whether corn, soybeans, switchgrass, trees, or something else, inevitably will put pressure on land uses worldwide and bring into cultivation

Delucchi, Mark

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Development of a total landed cost and risk analysis model for global strategic sourcing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Total landed cost and supply chain risk analysis are methods that many companies use to assess strategic sourcing decisions. For this project, landed cost is defined as those costs associated with material movement from a ...

Feller, Brian (Brian C.)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

ABSTRACT: Increased riverine nitrogen (N) fluxes have been strongly correlated with land use changes and are now one of the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the Ipswich River basin in Massachusetts and to evaluate the effect of future land use scenarios on the water with the hydrology of the basin are likely to control the magnitude of nitrate loads to the aquatic system and nutrient fluxes from the land surface and soil profile to rivers and then down the river drainage network

Vallino, Joseph J.

166

THE APPLICATION OF THE LAND TRANSFORMATION, GROUNDWATER FLOW AND SOLUTE TRANSPORT MODELS FOR MICHIGAN'S GRAND TRAVERSE BAY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 THE APPLICATION OF THE LAND TRANSFORMATION, GROUNDWATER FLOW AND SOLUTE TRANSPORT MODELS). The two hydrogeologic models that are being used here allow us to explore the dynamics of groundwater flow Meeting, New Orleans, Louisiana, March 14, 2001. #12;2 INTRODUCTION Grand Traverse Bay and the Grand

167

Water balance in the Amazon basin from a land surface model ensemble  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Despite recent advances in modeling and remote sensing of land surfaces, estimates of the global water budget are still fairly uncertain. The objective of this study is to evaluate the water budget of the Amazon basin based on several state-of-the-art land surface model (LSM) outputs. Water budget variables [total water storage (TWS), evapotranspiration (ET), surface runoff (R) and baseflow (B)] are evaluated at the basin scale using both remote sensing and in situ data. Fourteen LSMs were run using meteorological forcings at a 3-hourly time step and 1-degree spatial resolution. Three experiments are performed using precipitation which has been rescaled to match monthly global GPCP and GPCC datasets and the daily HYBAM dataset for the Amazon basin. R and B are used to force the Hydrological Modeling and Analysis Platform (HyMAP) river routing scheme and simulated discharges are compared against observations at 165 gauges. Simulated ET and TWS are compared against FLUXNET and MOD16A2 evapotranspiration, and GRACE TWS estimates in different catchments. At the basin scale, simulated ET ranges from 2.39mm.d-1 to 3.26mm.d-1 and a low spatial correlation between ET and P indicates that evapotranspiration does not depend on water availability over most of the basin. Results also show that other simulated water budget variables vary significantly as a function of both the LSM and precipitation used, but simulated TWS generally agree at the basin scale. The best water budget simulations resulted from experiments using the HYBAM dataset, mostly explained by a denser rainfall gauge network the daily rescaling.

Getirana, Augusto; Dutra, Emanuel; Guimberteau, Matthieu; Kam, Jonghun; Li, Hongyi; Decharme, Bertrand; Zhang, Zhengqiu J.; Ducharne, Agnes; Boone, Aaron; Balsamo, Gianpaolo; Rodell, Matthew; Mounirou Toure, Ally; Xue, Yongkang; Peters-Lidard, Christa D.; Kumar, Sujay V.; Arsenault, Kristi Rae; Drapeau, Guillaume; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Ronchail, Josyane; Sheffield, Justin

2014-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

168

Population and Climate Change:Population and Climate Change: Coupling Population Models withCoupling Population Models with  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Coupling Population Models with Earth System ModelsEarth System Models Eugenia Kalnay, Safa Motesharrei, Jorge Rivas Change: Fully Coupling Population and Earth System Models" My research at the U. of Maryland #12

Kalnay, Eugenia

169

EA-1042: Proposed Changes to the Sanitary Sludge Land Application Program on the Oak Ridge Reservation, Oak Ridge, Tennesee  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposal to raise the sludge land application loading limits from the current, self-imposed conservative 48 metric tons/ha lifetime loading to the...

170

Modeling Climate Change Adaptation: Challenges, Recent Developments and Future Directions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modeling Climate Change Adaptation: Challenges, Recent Developments and Future Directions Karen of modeling practice in the field of integrated assessment of climate change and ways forward. Past efforts assessments of climate change have concentrated on developing baseline emissions scenarios and analyzing

Wing, Ian Sue

171

Business Model Change in Early-Stage Entrepreneurial Firms Facing High Uncertainty BUSINESS MODEL CHANGE IN EARLY-STAGE ENTREPRENEURIAL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Business Model Change in Early-Stage Entrepreneurial Firms Facing High Uncertainty 1 BUSINESS MODEL Business School, U.K. Changing business models is inevitable for early-stage entrepreneurial firms striving in elements of business models in a set of eight early-stage university spin-offs. Findings suggest

Mottram, Nigel

172

Mapping the Potential for Biofuel Production on Marginal Lands: Differences in Definitions, Data and Models across Scales  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

land for plantation of Jatropha curcas as feedstocks forMarginal chinensis, 3. Jatropha grow energy plants, or landand economic constraints Jatropha curcas Marginal land ?land

Lewis, Sarah M

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Mapping the Potential for Biofuel Production on Marginal Lands: Differences in Definitions, Data and Models across Scales  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

D. Land availability for biofuel production. Environ. Sci.of land available for biofuel production. Environ. Sci.so marginal land for biofuel crops is limited. Energy Policy

Lewis, Sarah M

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Recent Advances in Regional Climate System Modeling and Climate Change Analyses of Extreme Heat  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

California hydrology. J. Am. Water Resources Association 39,Land Surface and Ground Water Model for use in WatershedN.L. , 2003: California Water Resources Research, CEC Sept

Miller, Norman L.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Modeling Product Line Architectures through Change Sets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

architecture (PLA) § Software architecture for product line · Single, monolithic architecture for multiple products · Variation points to differentiate among products 3/17 KAIST SE LAB 2010 PLA > Engineer or guard PLA PLA PLA Engineer or guard Engineer or guard Change set & Relation Change set

Bae, Doo-Hwan

176

JUNE 2002 311S H M A K I N E T A L . Global Modeling of Land Water and Energy Balances. Part III  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

JUNE 2002 311S H M A K I N E T A L . Global Modeling of Land Water and Energy Balances. Part III of basin discharge. 1. Introduction Global models of land water and energy balance can provide information 44 large river basins for which relatively accurate time series of monthly precipitation (a primary

177

Predictive Fallout Composition Modeling: Improvements and Applications of the Defense Land Fallout Interpretive Code  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper outlines several improvements to the Particle Activity Module of the Defense Land Fallout Interpretive Code (DELFIC). The modeling of each phase of the fallout process is discussed within DELFIC to demonstrate the capabilities and limitations with the code for modeling and simulation. Expansion of the DELFIC isotopic library to include actinides and light elements is shown. Several key features of the new library are demonstrated, including compliance with ENDF/B-VII standards, augmentation of hardwired activated soil and actinide decay calculations with exact Bateman calculations, and full physical and chemical fractionation of all material inventories. Improvements to the radionuclide source term are demonstrated, including the ability to specify heterogeneous fission types and the ability to import source terms from irradiation calculations using the Oak Ridge Isotope Generation (ORIGEN) code. Additionally, the dose, kerma, and effective dose conversion factors are revised. Finally, the application of DELFIC for consequence management planning and forensic analysis is presented. For consequence management, DELFIC is shown to provide disaster recovery teams with simulations of real-time events, including the location, composition, time of arrival, activity rates, and dose rates of fallout, accounting for site-specific atmospheric effects. The results from DELFIC are also demonstrated for use by nuclear forensics teams to plan collection routes (including the determination of optimal collection locations), estimate dose rates to collectors, and anticipate the composition of material at collection sites. These capabilities give mission planners the ability to maximize their effectiveness in the field while minimizing risk to their collectors.

Hooper, David A [ORNL; Jodoin, Vincent J [ORNL; Lee, Ronald W [ORNL; Monterial, Mateusz [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Can we reconcile differences in estimates of carbon fluxes from land-use change and forestry for the 1990s?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) and Food and Agricultureuse change to agriculture and pasture and the climate changeAgriculture, Fort Worth, TX, USA, 1991. UNFCCC (United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change):

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Berkeley Lab's Bill Collins talks about Modeling the Changing...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Berkeley Lab's Bill Collins talks about Modeling the Changing Earth System: Prospects and Challenges. From the 2014 NERSC User's Group Meeting Berkeley Lab's Bill Collins talks...

180

Thunderstorms in a changing climate: A cloudresolving modeling study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

prediction of surface water and groundwater dynamics under projected climate change scenarios Thunderstorms in a changing climate: A cloudresolving modeling study Joseph Galewsky@unm.edu One of the potential impacts of a changing climate is an increase in the severity of thunderstorms

Maccabe, Barney

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land change modeler" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Towards a Model of Systemic Change in University STEM Education  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Despite numerous calls for the transformation of undergraduate STEM education, there is still a lack of successful models for creating large-scale, systemic cultural changes in STEM departments. To date, change efforts have generally focused on one of three areas: developing reflective teachers, disseminating curricula and pedagogy, or enacting institutional policy. These efforts illustrate many of the challenges of departmental change; in particular, they highlight the need for a holistic approach that integrates across all three of these levels: individual faculty, whole departments, and university policymakers. To address these challenges, as part of our campus-wide AAU-sponsored effort in STEM education transformation, we import and integrate models of change from multiple perspectives. We draw from models in organizational change, from departmental and disciplinary change in STEM education, and from efforts to support individual efforts such as the development and dissemination model. As a result, our de...

Reinholz, Daniel L; Dancy, Melissa H; Finkelstein, Noah; Deetz, Stanley

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

How can we use MODIS land surface temperature to validate long-term urban model simulations?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data and simulations from the High-Resolution Land Data Assimilation System (HRLDAS) over Greater Houston, Texas, U.S. For the satellite cloud mask (SCM) method, prior to comparison, the cloud mask...

Hu, Leiqiu; Brunsell, Nathaniel A.; Monaghan, Andrew J.; Barlage, Michael; Wilhelmi, Olga V.

2014-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

183

The Evaluation of Transportation and Land Use Plans Using Linked Economic and GIS Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Attempts to base the economic evaluation travel no state isurban economyand and economic evaluations. for devlsing andEvaluation of Transportation and Land Use Plans Using Linked Economic and

Johnston, Robert A.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Post-doctoral Position Title Quantify the net global climate impacts of past and future land-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

objective is to make this protocol widely available so that other earth system modeling groups outside uses and land use changes in global earth system models, and test the impact of various implementation

Pouyanne, Nicolas

185

Predicting Land-Ice Retreat and Sea-Level Rise with the Community Earth System Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Coastal stakeholders need defensible predictions of 21st century sea-level rise (SLR). IPCC assessments suggest 21st century SLR of {approx}0.5 m under aggressive emission scenarios. Semi-empirical models project SLR of {approx}1 m or more by 2100. Although some sea-level contributions are fairly well constrained by models, others are highly uncertain. Recent studies suggest a potential large contribution ({approx}0.5 m/century) from the marine-based West Antarctic Ice Sheet, linked to changes in Southern Ocean wind stress. To assess the likelihood of fast retreat of marine ice sheets, we need coupled ice-sheet/ocean models that do not yet exist (but are well under way). CESM is uniquely positioned to provide integrated, physics based sea-level predictions.

Lipscomb, William [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

186

Three Essays on Climate Change Impacts, Adaptation and Mitigation in Agriculture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

regionally detailed dynamic land allocation model is developed and applied for studying interrelationships between limited natural resources (e.g. land and groundwater), climate change, bioenergy demands and agricultural production. We find out...

Wang, Wei Wei

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

187

Modeling the Effects of Irrigation on Land Surface Fluxes and States over the Conterminous United States: Sensitivity to Input Data and Model Parameters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Previous studies on irrigation impacts on land surface fluxes/states were mainly conducted as sensitivity experiments, with limited analysis of uncertainties from the input data and model irrigation schemes used. In this study, we calibrated and evaluated the performance of irrigation water use simulated by the Community Land Model version 4 (CLM4) against observations from agriculture census. We investigated the impacts of irrigation on land surface fluxes and states over the conterminous United States (CONUS) and explored possible directions of improvement. Specifically, we found large uncertainty in the irrigation area data from two widely used sources and CLM4 tended to produce unrealistically large temporal variations of irrigation demand for applications at the water resources region scale over CONUS. At seasonal to interannual time scales, the effects of irrigation on surface energy partitioning appeared to be large and persistent, and more pronounced in dry than wet years. Even with model calibration to yield overall good agreement with the irrigation amounts from the National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS), differences between the two irrigation area datasets still dominate the differences in the interannual variability of land surface response to irrigation. Our results suggest that irrigation amount simulated by CLM4 can be improved by (1) calibrating model parameter values to account for regional differences in irrigation demand and (2) accurate representation of the spatial distribution and intensity of irrigated areas.

Leng, Guoyong; Huang, Maoyi; Tang, Qiuhong; Sacks, William J.; Lei, Huimin; Leung, Lai-Yung R.

2013-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

188

EA-1936: Proposed Changes to Parcel ED-1 Land Uses, Utility Infrastructure, and Natural Area Management Responsibility, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

NOTE: This EA has been cancelled. This EA will evaluate the environmental impacts of DOEs proposed modifications to the allowable land uses, utility infrastructure, and Natural Area management responsibility for Parcel ED-1. The purpose of the modifications is to enhance the development potential of the Horizon Center business/industrial park, while ensuring protection of the adjacent Natural Area. The area addressed by the proposed action was evaluated for various industrial/business uses in the Environmental Assessment Addendum for the Proposed Title Transfer of Parcel ED-1, DOE/EA-1113-A.

189

Learning Structural Changes of Gaussian Graphical Models in Controlled Experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Graphical models are widely used in scienti fic and engineering research to represent conditional independence structures between random variables. In many controlled experiments, environmental changes or external stimuli can often alter the conditional dependence between the random variables, and potentially produce significant structural changes in the corresponding graphical models. Therefore, it is of great importance to be able to detect such structural changes from data, so as to gain novel insights into where and how the structural changes take place and help the system adapt to the new environment. Here we report an effective learning strategy to extract structural changes in Gaussian graphical model using l1-regularization based convex optimization. We discuss the properties of the problem formulation and introduce an efficient implementation by the block coordinate descent algorithm. We demonstrate the principle of the approach on a numerical simulation experiment, and we then apply the algorithm to...

Zhang, Bai

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Modeling Water Resource Systems under Climate Change: IGSM-WRS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Through the integration of a Water Resource System (WRS) component, the MIT Integrated Global System Model (IGSM) framework has been enhanced to study the effects of climate change on managed water-resource systems. ...

Strzepek, K.

191

A Framework for Modeling Uncertainty in Regional Climate Change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this study, we present a new modeling framework and a large ensemble of climate projections to investigate the uncertainty in regional climate change over the US associated with four dimensions of uncertainty. The sources ...

Monier, Erwan

192

RICCI Sophie Global Change and Climate Modeling Team  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RICCI Sophie Global Change and Climate Modeling Team CERFACS - Toulouse, FRANCE Technical Report TR covariance matrix#17;. This hypothesis stems from the T S water mass properties conservation over long term

193

Language acquisition and implication for language change: A computational model.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Computer modeling techniques, when applied to language acquisition problems, give an often unrealized insight into the diachronic change that occurs in language over successive generations. This paper shows that using ...

Clark, Robert A J

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Constraining Climate Model Parameters from Observed 20th Century Changes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present revised probability density functions for climate model parameters (effective climate sensitivity, the rate of deep-ocean heat uptake, and the strength of the net aerosol forcing) that are based on climate change ...

Forest, Chris Eliot

195

Technology and Technical Change in the MIT EPPA Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Potential technology change has a strong influence on projections of greenhouse gas emissions and costs of control, and computable general equilibrium (CGE) models are a common device for studying these phenomena. Using ...

Jacoby, Henry D.

196

RESEARCH ARTICLE Climate change model predicts 33 % rice yield decrease  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RESEARCH ARTICLE Climate change model predicts 33 % rice yield decrease in 2100 in Bangladesh parameters on rice. The effects of climate change on yield of a popular winter rice cultivar in Bangladesh online: 12 June 2012 # INRA and Springer-Verlag, France 2012 Abstract In Bangladesh, projected climate

Boyer, Edmond

197

Archaeology in the Kilauea East Rift Zone: Part 1, Land-use model and research design, Kapoho, Kamaili and Kilauea Geothermal Subzones, Puna District, Hawaii Island  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Puna Geothermal Resource Subzones (GRS) project area encompasses approximately 22,000 acres centered on the Kilauea East Rift Zone in Puna District, Hawaii Island. The area is divided into three subzones proposed for geothermal power development -- Kilauea Middle East Rift, Kamaili and Kapoho GRS. Throughout the time of human occupation, eruptive episodes along the rift have maintained a dynamic landscape. Periodic volcanic events, for example, have changed the coastline configuration, altered patterns of agriculturally suitable sediments, and created an assortment of periodically active, periodically quiescent, volcanic hazards. Because of the active character of the rift zone, then, the area`s occupants have always been obliged to organize their use of the landscape to accommodate a dynamic mosaic of lava flow types and ages. While the specific configuration of settlements and agricultural areas necessarily changed in response to volcanic events, it is possible to anticipate general patterns in the manner in which populations used the landscape through time. This research design offers a model that predicts the spatial results of long-term land-use patterns and relates them to the character of the archaeological record of that use. In essence, the environmental/land-use model developed here predicts that highest population levels, and hence the greatest abundance and complexity of identifiable prehistoric remains, tended to cluster near the coast at places that maximized access to productive fisheries and agricultural soils. With the possible exception of a few inland settlements, the density of archaeological remains expected to decrease with distance from the coastline. The pattern is generally supported in the regions existing ethnohistoric and archaeological record.

Burtchard, G.C.; Moblo, P. [International Archaeological Research Inst., Inc., Honolulu, HI (United States)

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Biomechanical and Neuromuscular Changes in Jump Landings Due to Short or Long Term Ankle Bracing and Fatigue.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??In order to prevent ankle sprain, prophylactic ankle bracing is common practice for many sports. The purpose of this dissertation was to investigate changes in (more)

Stafford, Elizabeth Decatur

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

4, 42654295, 2007 Impact of land-use  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

methodol- ogy which involves coupling a land-use change model with a water balance model and a groundwater groundwater model. Results show that the average recharge slowly de- creases for all scenarios, the decreases / Esc Printer-friendly Version Interactive Discussion EGU 1 Introduction Groundwater is a major source

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

200

Sensitivity of Surface Flux Simulations to Hydrologic Parameters Based on an Uncertainty Quantification Framework Applied to the Community Land Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Uncertainties in hydrologic parameters could have significant impacts on the simulated water and energy fluxes and land surface states, which will in turn affect atmospheric processes and the carbon cycle. Quantifying such uncertainties is an important step toward better understanding and quantification of uncertainty of integrated earth system models. In this paper, we introduce an uncertainty quantification (UQ) framework to analyze sensitivity of simulated surface fluxes to selected hydrologic parameters in the Community Land Model (CLM4) through forward modeling. Thirteen flux tower footprints spanning a wide range of climate and site conditions were selected to perform sensitivity analyses by perturbing the parameters identified. In the UQ framework, prior information about the parameters was used to quantify the input uncertainty using the Minimum-Relative-Entropy approach. The quasi-Monte Carlo approach was applied to generate samples of parameters on the basis of the prior pdfs. Simulations corresponding to sampled parameter sets were used to generate response curves and response surfaces and statistical tests were used to rank the significance of the parameters for output responses including latent (LH) and sensible heat (SH) fluxes. Overall, the CLM4 simulated LH and SH show the largest sensitivity to subsurface runoff generation parameters. However, study sites with deep root vegetation are also affected by surface runoff parameters, while sites with shallow root zones are also sensitive to the vadose zone soil water parameters. Generally, sites with finer soil texture and shallower rooting systems tend to have larger sensitivity of outputs to the parameters. Our results suggest the necessity of and possible ways for parameter inversion/calibration using available measurements of latent/sensible heat fluxes to obtain the optimal parameter set for CLM4. This study also provided guidance on reduction of parameter set dimensionality and parameter calibration framework design for CLM4 and other land surface models under different hydrologic and climatic regimes.

Hou, Zhangshuan; Huang, Maoyi; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Lin, Guang; Ricciuto, Daniel M.

2012-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land change modeler" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

One-way coupling of an integrated assessment model and a water resources model: evaluation and implications of future changes over the US Midwest  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An integrated model is being developed to advance our understanding of the interactions between human activities, terrestrial system and water cycle, and how system interactions will be affected by a changing climate at the regional scale. As a first step towards that goal, a global integrated assessment model including a waterdemand model is coupled offline with a land surface hydrology routing water resources management model. A spatial and temporal disaggregation approach is developed to project the annual regional water demand simulations into a daily time step and subbasin representation. The model demonstrated reasonable ability to represent the historical flow regulation and water supply over the Midwest (Missouri, Upper Mississippi and Ohio). Implications for the future flow regulation, water supply and supply deficit are investigated using a climate change projection with the B1 emission scenario which affects both natural flow and water demand. Over the Midwest, changes in flow regulation are mostly driven by the change in natural flow due to the limited storage capacity over the Ohio and Upper Mississippi river basins. The changes in flow and demand have a combined effect on the Missouri Summer regulated flow. The supply deficit tends to be driven by the change in flow over the region. Spatial analysis demonstrates the relationship between the supply deficit and the change in demand over urban areas not along a main river or with limited storage, and over areas upstream of groundwater dependent fields with therefore overestimated demand.

Voisin, Nathalie; Liu, Lu; Hejazi, Mohamad I.; Tesfa, Teklu K.; Li, Hongyi; Huang, Maoyi; Liu, Ying; Leung, Lai-Yung R.

2013-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

202

Toward an Earth System Modeling Approach to Simulate Irrigation...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

the Community Land Model version 4 (CLM4) against observations from agricultural census data, improving the model's simulations of hydrological changes resulting from irrigation...

203

Carbon Accounting and Economic Model Uncertainty of Emissions from Biofuels-Induced Land Use Change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

due to first and second generation biofuels and uncertaintyIntroducing First and Second Generation Biofuels into GTAP

Plevin, Richard J; Beckman, Jayson; Golub, Alla A; Witcover, Julie; O'??Hare, Michael

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Carbon Accounting and Economic Model Uncertainty of Emissions from Biofuels-Induced Land Use Change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of U.S. Croplands for Biofuels Increases Greenhouse GasesLife-Cycle Assessment of Biofuels. Environmental Science &cellulosic ethanol. Biotechnol Biofuels 6 (1), 51. Elliott,

Plevin, Richard J; Beckman, Jayson; Golub, Alla A; Witcover, Julie; O'??Hare, Michael

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Retrieving snow mass from GRACE terrestrial water storage change with a land surface model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by the Advanced Very High Resolution Radio- meter (AVHRR) is decreasing since middle 1980s in response to global are variations in surface albedo and surface energy budgets, sensible heat and water vapor fluxes-chan- nel Microwave Radiometer (SMMR) and the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR) provide a capa

Yang, Zong-Liang

206

Pluralistic Modelling Approaches to Simulating Climate-Land Change Interactions in East Africa  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and the influence of large water bodies, combine with atmospheric trends such as greenhouse gas concentrations. Alexandridis4 1 Department of Forestry and Natural Resources, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47906

Illinois at Chicago, University of

207

Modeling the High Plains Aquifer's Response to Land Use and Climate Change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The High Plains Aquifer is extremely important to the economic life of Kansas and the surrounding states, but water is being withdrawn from the aquifer much faster than it is being recharged. Due to the importance of ...

Dermyer, Reuben

2011-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

208

Carbon Accounting and Economic Model Uncertainty of Emissions from Biofuels-Induced Land Use Change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

USEPA (2010, Feb 3). Renewable fuel standard program (RFS2)Ispra, 2010; p 150. USEPA Renewable Fuel Standard Program (European Parliament, Renewable Energy Directive 2009/28/EC.

Plevin, Richard J; Beckman, Jayson; Golub, Alla A; Witcover, Julie; O'??Hare, Michael

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Carbon Accounting and Economic Model Uncertainty of Emissions from Biofuels-Induced Land Use Change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Impacts of United States Biofuel Policies: The Importance ofcoproduct substitution in the biofuel era. Agribusiness 27 (CGE: assessing the EU biofuel mandates with the MIRAGE-BioF

Plevin, Richard J; Beckman, Jayson; Golub, Alla A; Witcover, Julie; O'??Hare, Michael

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Changes in soil organic carbon storage predicted by Earth system models during the 21st century  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

carbon changes in Earth system models K. E. O. Todd-Brown etcarbon changes in Earth system models K. E. O. Todd-Brown etcarbon changes in Earth system models K. E. O. Todd-Brown et

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Forest cover, carbon sequestration, and wildlife habitat: policy review and modeling of tradeoffs among land-use  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Forest cover, carbon sequestration, and wildlife habitat: policy review and modeling of tradeoffs and services, including timber production, carbon sequestration and storage, scenic amenities, and wildlife habitat. International efforts to mitigate climate change through forest carbon sequestration

Rissman, Adena

212

Regional-Scale Climate Change: Observations and Model Simulations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This collaborative proposal addressed key issues in understanding the Earth??s climate system, as highlighted by the U.S. Climate Science Program. The research focused on documenting past climatic changes and on assessing future climatic changes based on suites of global and regional climate models. Geographically, our emphasis was on the mountainous regions of the world, with a particular focus on the Neotropics of Central America and the Hawaiian Islands. Mountain regions are zones where large variations in ecosystems occur due to the strong climate zonation forced by the topography. These areas are particularly susceptible to changes in critical ecological thresholds, and we conducted studies of changes in phonological indicators based on various climatic thresholds.

Raymond S. Bradley; Henry F. Diaz

2010-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

213

arid land: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and indirect land use change The case for mitigation 359 Practice Note Planning for brownfield land Renewable Energy Websites Summary: space can deliver multiple benefits to...

214

Influence of Dynamic Land Use and Land Cover Change on Simulated Global Terrestrial Carbon and Nitrogen Cycles, Climate-carbon Cycle Feedbacks, and Interactions with Rising CO2 and Anthropogenic Nitrogen Deposition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Previous work has demonstrated the sensitivity of terrestrial net carbon exchange to disturbance history and land use patterns at the scale of individual sites or regions. Here we show the influence of land use and land cover dynamics over the historical period 1850-present on global-scale carbon, nutrient, water, and energy fluxes. We also explore the spatial and temporal details of interactions among land use and disturbance history, rising atmospheric carbon dioxide consentation, and increasing anthropogenic nitrogen deposition. Our simulations show that these interactions are significant, and that their importance grows over time, expressed as a fraction of the independent forcing terms. We conclude with an analysis of the influence of these interactions on the sign and magnitude of global climate-carbon cycle feedbacks.

Thornton, Peter E [ORNL; Hoffman, Forrest M [ORNL; Hurtt, George C [University of Hew Hampshire

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

An Interactive Multi-Model for Consensus on Climate Change  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project purports to develop a new scheme for forming consensus among alternative climate models, that give widely divergent projections as to the details of climate change, that is more intelligent than simply averaging the model outputs, or averaging with ex post facto weighting factors. The method under development effectively allows models to assimilate data from one another in run time with weights that are chosen in an adaptive training phase using 20th century data, so that the models synchronize with one another as well as with reality. An alternate approach that is being explored in parallel is the automated combination of equations from different models in an expert-system-like framework.

Kocarev, Ljupco [University of California, San Diego] [University of California, San Diego

2014-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

216

Bioenergy and the importance of land use policy in a carbon-constrained world  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Policies aimed at limiting anthropogenic climate change would result in significant transformations of the energy and land-use systems. However, increasing the demand for bioenergy could have a tremendous impact on land use, and can result in land clearing and deforestation. Wise et al. (2009a,b) analyzed an idealized policy to limit the indirect land use change emissions from bioenergy. The policy, while effective, would be difficult, if not impossible, to implement in the real world. In this paper, we consider several different land use policies that deviate from this first-best, using the Joint Global Change Research Institutes Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM). Specifically, these new frameworks are (1) a policy that focuses on just the above-ground or vegetative terrestrial carbon rather than the total carbon, (2) policies that focus exclusively on incentivizing and protecting forestland, and (3) policies that apply an economic penalty on the use of biomass as a proxy to limit indirect land use change emissions. For each policy, we examine its impact on land use, land-use change emissions, atmospheric CO2 concentrations, agricultural supply, and food prices.

Calvin, Katherine V.; Edmonds, James A.; Wise, Marshall A.

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

COLLABORATIVE RESEARCH: TOWARDS ADVANCED UNDERSTANDING AND PREDICTIVE CAPABILITY OF CLIMATE CHANGE IN THE ARCTIC USING A HIGH-RESOLUTION REGIONAL ARCTIC CLIMATE SYSTEM MODEL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The motivation for this project was to advance the science of climate change and prediction in the Arctic region. Its primary goals were to (i) develop a state-of-the-art Regional Arctic Climate system Model (RACM) including high-resolution atmosphere, land, ocean, sea ice and land hydrology components and (ii) to perform extended numerical experiments using high performance computers to minimize uncertainties and fundamentally improve current predictions of climate change in the northern polar regions. These goals were realized first through evaluation studies of climate system components via one-way coupling experiments. Simulations were then used to examine the effects of advancements in climate component systems on their representation of main physics, time-mean fields and to understand variability signals at scales over many years. As such this research directly addressed some of the major science objectives of the BER Climate Change Research Division (CCRD) regarding the advancement of long-term climate prediction.

Gutowski, William J.

2013-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

218

A physical model to estimate snowfall over land using AMSU-B observations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Weinman,3 W. S. Olson,4,5 D.-E. Chang,6 G. Skofronick-Jackson,7 and J. R. Wang7 Received 26 February 2007.-J., J. A. Weinman, W. S. Olson, D.-E. Chang, G. Skofronick-Jackson, and J. R. Wang (2008), A physical; Skofronick-Jackson et al., 2004; Liu, 2004; Noh et al., JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. 113, D09201

Houze Jr., Robert A.

219

West Virginia University is a land-grant, research institution founded in 1867. WVU is a student-centered learning community meeting the changing needs of West Virginia and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 West Virginia University is a land-grant, research institution founded in 1867. WVU is a student-centered learning community meeting the changing needs of West Virginia and the nation through teaching, research, service, and technology. The West Virginia University Undergraduate Catalog 2010­2011 is a general source

Mohaghegh, Shahab

220

West Virginia University is a land-grant, research institution founded in 1867. WVU is a student-centered learning community meeting the changing needs of West Virginia and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 West Virginia University is a land-grant, research institution founded in 1867. WVU is a student-centered learning community meeting the changing needs of West Virginia and the nation through teaching, research, service, and technology. The West Virginia University Undergraduate Catalog 2009­2010 is a general source

Mohaghegh, Shahab

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land change modeler" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

A validation of heat and carbon fluxes from highresolution land surface and regional models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) or regional climate models (RCMs) [Alessandri et al., 2007; Steiner et al., 2009]. [3., 2006; Alessandri et al., 2007; Jarlan et al., 2008; Steiner et al., 2009]. However, the SVAT models models do not account for the role of terrestrial vegetation in the carbon cycle variability [Alessandri

D'Andrea, Fabio

222

THE CARBON-LAND MODEL INTERCOMPARISON PROJECT (C-LAMP): A PROTOTYPE FOR COUPLED BIOSPHERE-ATMOSPHERE MODEL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

often referred to as Earth System Models (ESMs). While a number of terrestrial and ocean carbon models

Hoffman, Forrest M.

223

Multiobjective calibration and sensitivity of a distributed land surface water and energy balance model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

identification and energy balance models on a tallgrassdata for surface energy balance evaluation of a semiaridWatershed. We are energy balance components over a semiarid

Houser, Paul R; Gupta, Hoshin V; Shuttleworth, W. James; Famiglietti, James S

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Using NASA Remote Sensing Data to Reduce Uncertainty of Land-Use Transitions in Global Carbon-Climate Models: Data Management Plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-use transitions and their inherent uncertainty. Our plan for managing these datasets includes quality assessmentUsing NASA Remote Sensing Data to Reduce Uncertainty of Land-Use Transitions in Global Carbon-Climate Models: Data Management Plan L. Chini, G.C. Hurtt, M. Hansen, and P. Potapov Department of Geography

225

Harmonization of Land-Use Scenarios for the Period 1500-2100: 600 Years of Global Gridded Annual Land-Use Transitions, Wood Harvest, and Resulting Secondary Lands  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In preparation for the fifth Assessment Report (AR5) of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), the international community is developing new advanced Earth System Models (ESM) to assess the combined effects of human activities (e.g. land use and fossil fuel emissions) on the carbon-climate system. In addition, four Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) scenarios of the future (2005-2100) are being provided by four Integrated Assessment Model (IAM) teams to be used as input to the ESMs for future carbon-climate projections (Moss et al., 2010). The diversity of approaches and requirements among IAMs and ESMs for tracking land-use change, along with the dependence of model projections on land-use history, presents a challenge for effectively passing data between these communities and for smoothly transitioning from the historical estimates to future projections. Here, a harmonized set of land-use scenarios are presented that smoothly connects historical reconstructions of land use with future projections, in the format required by ESMs.

Hurtt, George; Chini, Louise Parsons; Frolking, Steve; Betts, Richard; Feddema, Johannes; Fischer, Gavin M.; Fisk, J.P.; Hibbard, Kathleen A.; Houghton, R. A.; Janetos, Anthony C.; Jones, C.; Kindermann, G.; Kinoshita, Tsuguki; Goldeweijk, Kees K.; Riahi, Keywan; Shevliakova, Elena; Smith, Steven J.; Stehfest, Eike; Thomson, Allison M.; Thornton, P.; Van Vuuren, Detlef; Wang, Y.

2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

226

Land cover time profiles from linear mixture models applied to MODIS images P. Oliveira a,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the coarse spatial resolution of satellites such as the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) (e and AQUA launched on December 18, 1999 and on May 4, 2002, respectively. MODIS images correspond to high the pixel. In linear models (LMM) the electromagnetic energy interacts with a single component before being

Gonçalves, Paulo

227

Effect of One-Dimensional Field Data Assimilation on Land Surface Model Flux Estimates with Implications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.W. Western1 1 Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, The University of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia 2 CSIRO Marine and Atmospheric Research, Aspendale, Victoria, Australia Email: r Model (CBM) represent the exchange of energy and water between the earth's surface and lower atmosphere

Walker, Jeff

228

A Three-Dimensional Ocean-Seaice-Carbon Cycle Model and its Coupling to a Two-Dimensional Atmospheric Model: Uses in Climate Change Studies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We describe the coupling of a three-dimensional ocean circulation model, with explicit thermodynamic seaice and ocean carbon cycle representations, to a two-dimensional atmospheric/land model. This coupled system has been ...

Dutkiewicz, Stephanie.

229

Quantifying aerosol direct radiative effect with Multiangle Imaging Spectroradiometer observations: Top-of-atmosphere albedo change by aerosols based on land surface types  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

www.eosweb.larc.nasa.gov). References Abdou, W. A. , D. J.B. J. Gaitley, and W. A. Abdou (2007), The MISR radiometricAOD) retrievals over land [Abdou et al. , 2005], as well as

Chen, Yang; Li, Qinbin; Kahn, Ralph A; Randerson, James T; Diner, David J

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

CEMENTITIOUS BARRIERS MODELING FOR PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENTS OF SHALLOW LAND BURIAL OF LOW LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTE - 9243  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Cementitious Barriers Partnership (CBP) was created to develop predictive capabilities for the aging of cementitious barriers over long timeframes. The CBP is a multi-agency, multi-national consortium working under a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Management (EM-21) funded Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) with the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) as the lead laboratory. Members of the CBP are SRNL, Vanderbilt University, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC), National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), SIMCO Technologies, Inc. (Canada), and the Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN). A first step in developing advanced tools is to determine the current state-of-the-art. A review has been undertaken to assess the treatment of cementitious barriers in Performance Assessments (PA). Representatives of US DOE sites which have PAs for their low level waste disposal facilities were contacted. These sites are the Idaho National Laboratory, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Nevada Test Site, and Hanford. Several of the more arid sites did not employ cementitious barriers. Of those sites which do employ cementitious barriers, a wide range of treatment of the barriers in a PA was present. Some sites used conservative, simplistic models that even though conservative still showed compliance with disposal limits. Other sites used much more detailed models to demonstrate compliance. These more detailed models tend to be correlation-based rather than mechanistically-based. With the US DOE's Low Level Waste Disposal Federal Review Group (LFRG) moving towards embracing a risk-based, best estimate with an uncertainties type of analysis, the conservative treatment of the cementitious barriers seems to be obviated. The CBP is creating a tool that adheres to the LFRG chairman's paradigm of continuous improvement.

Taylor, G

2009-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

231

Final report on "Modeling Diurnal Variations of California Land Biosphere CO2 Fluxes"  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In Mediterranean climates, the season of water availability (winter) is out of phase with the season of light availability and atmospheric demand for moisture (summer). Multi-year half-hourly observations of sap flow velocities in 26 evergreen trees in a small watershed in Northern California show that different species of evergreen trees have different seasonalities of transpiration: Douglas-firs respond immediately to the first winter rain, while Pacific madrones have peak transpiration in the dry summer. Using these observations, we have derived species-specific parameterization of normalized sap flow velocities in terms of insolation, vapor pressure deficit and near-surface soil moisture. A simple 1-D boundary layer model showed that afternoon temperatures may be higher by 1 degree Celsius in an area with Douglas-firs than with Pacific madrones. The results point to the need to develop a new representation of subsurface moisture, in particular pools beneath the organic soil mantle and the vadose zone. Our ongoing and future work includes coupling our new parameterization of transpiration with new representation of sub-surface moisture in saprolite and weathered bedrock. The results will be implemented in a regional climate model to explore vegetation-climate feedbacks, especially in the dry season.

Fung, Inez

2014-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

232

Climate change and uncertainty in ecological niche modeling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

enhance regional climate change impact studies." Eos Trans.hydrologic impacts of climate change in the Sierra Nevada,of a century of climate change on small-mammal communities

Alvarez, Otto

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Modeling the per capita ecological footprint for Dallas County, Texas: Examining demographic, environmental value, land-use, and spatial influences  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This study addresses factors driving the variation in the per capita Ecological Footprint (EF) in Dallas County, Texas. A main hypothesis was that scientifically estimated demography, environmental values, spatial attributes, and land-use patterns...

Ryu, Hyung Cheal

2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

234

Modeling for Free Surface Flow with Phase Change  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The development of predictive capability for free surface flow with phase change is essential to evaluate liquid wall protection schemes for various fusion chambers in IFE and MFE. This paper presents a numerical methodology for free surface flow with heat and mass transfer to help resolve feasibility issues encountered in the aforementioned fusion engineering fields. The numerical methodology is conducted within the framework of the incompressible flow with the heat and mass transfer model. We present a new second-order projection method, in conjunction with Approximate-Factorization techniques (AF method) for incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. The level set method was used to capture the free surface of the flow and the deformation of the droplets accurately. This numerical investigation identifies the physics characterizing transient heat and mass transfer of the droplet and the free surface flow. The preliminary results show that the numerical methodology is successful in modeling the free surface with heat and mass transfer, though some severe deformation such as breaking and merging occurs. The versatility of the numerical methodology shows that the work can easily handle complex physical conditions in fusion science and engineering.

Luo Xiaoyong; Ni Mingjiu; Ying, Alice; Abdou, M. [University of California, Los Angeles (United States)

2005-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

235

Results from the Carbon-Land Model Intercomparison Project (C-LAMP) and Availability of the Data on the Earth System Grid (ESG)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the Carbon-Land Model Intercomparison Project (C-LAMP) being carried out through a collaboration between the Community Climate System Model (CCSM) Biogeochemistry Working Group, a DOE SciDAC-2 project, and the DOE Program for Climate Model Diagnosis and Intercomparison (PCMDI). The goal of the project is to intercompare terrestrial biogeochemistry models running within the CCSM framework to determine the best set of processes to include in future versions of CCSM. As a part of the project, observational datasets are being collected and used to score the scientific performance of these models following a well-defined set of metrics. In addition, metadata standards for terrestrial biosphere models are being developed to support archival and distribution of the C-LAMP model output via the Earth System Grid (ESG). Progress toward completion of this project and preliminary results from the first set of experiments are reported.

Hoffman, Forrest M [ORNL; Covey, Curtis [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Fung, Inez [University of California, Berkeley; Randerson, Jim [University of California, Irvine; Thornton, Peter [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR); Lee, Jeff [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR); Rosenbloom, Nan [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR); Stockli, Reto [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Running, Steven [University of Montana, Missoula; Bernholdt, David E [ORNL; Williams, Dean [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

An energetic perspective on hydrological cycle changes in the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An energetic perspective on hydrological cycle changes in the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison-ocean general circulation models simulating experiment G1 of the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project perspective on hydrological cycle changes in the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project, J. Geophys. Res

Robock, Alan

237

Modeled climate change effects on distributions of Canadian butterfly species  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract: Climate change effects on biodiversity are being documented now frequently in the form of changes in phenology and distributional shifts. However, the form that these effects will take over a longer timespan is ...

Peterson, A. Townsend; Martí nez-Meyer, Enrique; Gonzá lez-Salazar, Constantino; Hall, Peter W.

2004-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

238

A Dynamic Simulation of the Indirect Land Use Implications of Recent Biofuel Production and Use in the United States.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The global indirect land use change (ILUC) implications of biofuel use in the United States of America (USA) from 2001 to 2010 are evaluated with a dynamic general equilibrium model. The effects of biofuels production on agricultural land area vary by year; from a net expansion of 0.17 ha per 1000 gallons produced (2002) to a net contraction of 0.13 ha per 1000 gallons (2018) in Case 1 of our simulation. In accordance with the general narrative about the implications of biofuel policy, agricultural land area increased in many regions of the world. However, oil-export dependent economies experienced agricultural land contraction because of reductions in their revenues. Reducing crude oil imports is a major goal of biofuel policy, but the land use change implications have received little attention in the literature. Simulations evaluating the effects of doubling supply elasticities for land and fossil resources show that these parameters can significantly influence the land use change estimates. Therefore, research that provides empirically-based and spatially-detailed agricultural land-supply curves and capability to project future fossil energy prices is critical for improving estimates of the effects of biofuel policy on land use.

Oladosu, Gbadebo A [ORNL] [ORNL; Kline, Keith L [ORNL] [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Modeling Impacts of Land-Use/Land-Cover Change and Variable Precipitation on Hydrology and Water Quality of a Coastal Watershed in Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

delivered total phosphorus load to Copano Bay from the Aransas River for the historical (Hist) baseline (1990-1999) and each scenario (2030-2039). b) Average monthly delivered total phosphorus load to Copano Bay from the Aransas River for the historical...

Castillo, Cesar Ricardo

2013-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

240

Using and losing land to feed a growing world It's taken a long time, but the issue of global climate change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, changing dietary preferences, rising energy prices and increasing needs for bioenergy sources are putting

Ellis, Erle C.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land change modeler" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Sequential Change--Point Detection in GARCH(p; q) Models \\Lambda  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sequential Change--Point Detection in GARCH(p; q) Models \\Lambda Istv'an Berkes y A. R 84322­3900, USA We suggest a sequential monitoring scheme to detect changes in the parameters of a GARCH. Unlike for linear regression models, the squared residuals of nonlinear time series models like GARCH do

Kokoszka, Piotr

242

Explicitly Accounting for Protected Lands within the GCAM 3.0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Global Change Assessment Model Version 3.0 defines three different levels of Protected Lands within the agricultural and landuse component. These three different scenarios effectively cordon off 3.5% (5.0 million km2) of the Earths terrestrial lands in the de minimus Protected Land Scenario, 5.0% (7.20 million km2) in the Core Protected Land Scenario, and 8.2% (11.8 million km2) in the Expanded Protected Land Scenario. None of these scenarios represents the right level of Protected Lands for the planet today or tomorrow. Rather, the goal is to create a range of scenarios that can be used in modeling human responses to climate change and the impact those would have on managed and unmanaged terrestrial lands. These scenarios harness the wealth of information in the United Nations Environment Programme World Conservation Monitoring Centres World Database on Protected Areas and its categories of explicit degrees of protection.

Dooley, James J.; Zhou, Yuyu

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Climate Change Impact Valuation Models Revisited | U.S. DOE Office...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Climate Change Impact Valuation Models Revisited Biological and Environmental Research (BER) BER Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Searchable Archive of BER...

244

Investigating the Nexus of Climate, Energy, Water, and Land at Decision-Relevant Scales: The Platform for Regional Integrated Modeling and Analysis (PRIMA)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Platform for Regional Integrated Modeling and Analysis (PRIMA) is an innovative modeling system developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to simulate interactions among natural and human systems at scales relevant to regional decision making. PRIMA brings together state-of-the-art models of regional climate, hydrology, agriculture, socioeconomics, and energy systems using a flexible coupling approach. The platform can be customized to inform a variety of complex questions and decisions, such as the integrated evaluation of mitigation and adaptation options across a range of sectors. Research into stakeholder decision support needs underpins the platform's application to regional issues, including uncertainty characterization. Ongoing numerical experiments are yielding new insights into the interactions among human and natural systems on regional scales with an initial focus on the energy-land-water nexus in the upper U.S. Midwest. This paper focuses on PRIMAs functional capabilities and describes some lessons learned to date about integrated regional modeling.

Kraucunas, Ian P.; Clarke, Leon E.; Dirks, James A.; Hathaway, John E.; Hejazi, Mohamad I.; Hibbard, Kathleen A.; Huang, Maoyi; Jin, Chunlian; Kintner-Meyer, Michael CW; Kleese van Dam, Kerstin; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Li, Hongyi; Moss, Richard H.; Peterson, Marty J.; Rice, Jennie S.; Scott, Michael J.; Thomson, Allison M.; Voisin, Nathalie; West, Tristram O.

2014-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

245

User Subjectivity in Change Modeling of Streaming Itemsets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

database and particularly for a data stream. Monitoring data streams is a challenging task because of a boiler may indicate malfunctioning in the process, while rate of change may indicate the severity

Bhatnagar, Vasudha

246

Climate change and uncertainty in ecological niche modeling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in California." Journal of Climate 8(3): 606- Elith, J. , C.vegetation model for use with climate models: concepts andthe suitability of spatial climate data sets." International

Alvarez, Otto

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Climate Change Policy: What Do the Models Tell Us?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Very little. A plethora of integrated assessment models (IAMs) have been constructed and used to estimate the social cost of carbon (SCC) and evaluate alternative abatement policies. These models have crucial flaws that ...

Pindyck, Robert S.

248

Climate change uncertainty evaluation, impacts modelling and resilience of farm scale dynamics in Scotland  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

evidence of how primary production components of agriculture in Scotland may change under a future climate. The work used a generic Integrated Modelling Framework to structure the following sequence of investigations: Evaluate a Regional Climate Model...

Rivington, Michael

2011-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

249

Recent Changes in Arctic Vegetation: Satellite Observations and Simulation Model Predictions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter 2 Recent Changes in Arctic Vegetation: Satellite Observations and Simulation Model with a combination of satellite observations (Fig. 2.1) and field mea- surements, as projected by simulation modeling

Bhatt, Uma

250

Changes in Temperature and Precipitation Extremes in the IPCC Ensemble of Global Coupled Model Simulations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Changes in Temperature and Precipitation Extremes in the IPCC Ensemble of Global Coupled Model September 2006) ABSTRACT Temperature and precipitation extremes and their potential future changes on Climate Change (IPCC) diagnostic exercise for the Fourth Assessment Report (AR4). Climate extremes

251

Microsoft Word - MSA - Theory of Change Logic Model (1).docx  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

* Video reflection and presentation 2xyr. * MSA days 2xyr. Instructional Coaching and PLC Support * Includes complete coaching cycles, video review, and modeling throughout...

252

Modeling Support Changes in Streaming Itemsets Vasudha Bhatnagar, Sarabjeet Kochhar  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

databases has captured attention of KDD community in the recent years. Stream databases are characterized process (dgp). In real life applications, where the database is continuously evolving (possibly fed temperature of a boiler may indicate malfunctioning in the process, while rate of change may indicate

Bhatnagar, Vasudha

253

IMPROVING PREDICTIONS OF CLIMATE CHANGE: OBSERVATIONAL AND MODELING REQUIREMENTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the atmosphere, largely because of emissions from fossil fuel combustion. An increase in atmospheric CO2 would, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton NY 11973 USA (ses@bnl.gov) Carbon dioxide (CO2) is building up is the extent of climate change that will result from future increases in atmospheric CO2. Confident knowledge

254

Mapping socio-economic scenarios of land cover change: A GIS method to enable ecosystem service modelling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, University of Dar es Salaam, P.O. Box 35049, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania h Environment Department, University

Vermont, University of

255

Land Cover Change Analysis in Tropical Forest Ecosystems Using GIS and Remote Sensing: The Kakum Conservation Area (KCA) of Ghana as a case  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Ghana, especially Mr. Alex of CCA and Police Officer Bosompem, I say God richly bless you all. #12;v in Environmental Change and Management, University of Oxford. SUBMISSION DATE: 2nd September, 2013. #12;ii ABSTRACT support in the practical GIS/Remote sensing work. My gratitude also goes to my MSc Environmental Change

Malhi, Yadvinder

256

The contribution of future agricultural trends in the US Midwest to global climate change mitigation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Land use change is a complex response to changing environmental and socioeconomic systems. Historical drivers of land use change include changes in the natural resource availability of a region, changes in economic conditions for production of certain products and changing policies. Most recently, introduction of policy incentives for biofuel production have influenced land use change in the US Midwest, leading to concerns that bioenergy production systems may compete with food production and land conservation. Here we explore how land use may be impacted by future climate mitigation measures by nesting a high resolution agricultural model (EPIC Environmental Policy Indicator Climate) for the US Midwest within a global integrated assessment model (GCAM Global Change Assessment Model). This approach is designed to provide greater spatial resolution and detailed agricultural practice information by focusing on the climate mitigation potential of agriculture and land use in a specific region, while retaining the global economic context necessary to understand the far ranging effects of climate mitigation targets. We find that until the simulated carbon prices are very high, the US Midwest has a comparative advantage in producing traditional food and feed crops over bioenergy crops. Overall, the model responds to multiple pressures by adopting a mix of future responses. We also find that the GCAM model is capable of simulations at multiple spatial scales and agricultural technology resolution, which provides the capability to examine regional response to global policy and economic conditions in the context of climate mitigation.

Thomson, Allison M.; Kyle, G. Page; Zhang, Xuesong; Bandaru, Varaprasad; West, Tristram O.; Wise, Marshall A.; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Calvin, Katherine V.

2014-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

257

Engineering change modelling using a function-behaviour-structure scheme  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

an FBS Linkage model is demonstrated. The methods potential benefits are discussed. Finally, the application of the method to two industrial case studies involving a diesel engine and a scanning electron microscope is presented. The method evaluation...

Hamraz, Bahram

2013-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

258

Terrestrial water mass load changes from Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of changes in continental water storage, Global Planet.system modeling studies, Water Resour. Res. , 35(2), 583 Time variations of land water storage from an inversion of 2

Seo, K.-W.; Wilson, C. R; Famiglietti, J. S; Chen, J. L; Rodell, M.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Population and Climate Change:Population and Climate Change: Coupling Population Models withCoupling Population Models with  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

carbon over the next 40 years as adopting low-carbon technologies Concluded: Family planning is cost / Capita Outputs: 1. Emissions CO2, Methane, etc 2. Waste Products Garbage, Toxics, etc 3. Surface Changes are needed to: · Stabilize population and · Stabilize industrial production per person · Adopt technologies

Kalnay, Eugenia

260

Multi-century Changes to Global Climate and Carbon Cycle: Results from a Coupled Climate and Carbon Cycle Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, we use a coupled climate and carbon cycle model to investigate the global climate and carbon cycle changes out to year 2300 that would occur if CO{sub 2} emissions from all the currently estimated fossil fuel resources were released to the atmosphere. By year 2300, the global climate warms by about 8 K and atmospheric CO{sub 2} reaches 1423 ppmv. The warming is higher than anticipated because the sensitivity to radiative forcing increases as the simulation progresses. In our simulation, the rate of emissions peak at over 30 PgC yr{sup -1} early in the 22nd century. Even at year 2300, nearly 50% of cumulative emissions remain in the atmosphere. In our simulations both soils and living biomass are net carbon sinks throughout the simulation. Despite having relatively low climate sensitivity and strong carbon uptake by the land biosphere, our model projections suggest severe long-term consequences for global climate if all the fossil-fuel carbon is ultimately released to the atmosphere.

Bala, G; Caldeira, K; Mirin, A; Wickett, M; Delire, C

2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land change modeler" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

A Model for Minimizing Active Processor Time Jessica Chang1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, the problem often becomes NP-complete.) We propose a simple model for measuring energy usage on a parallel consumes a fixed amount of energy per active timeslot, regardless of the number of jobs scheduled to finding a triangle-free 2-matching on a special graph. We extend the algorithm of Babenko et. al. [3

Khuller, Samir

262

A Model for Minimizing Active Processor Time Jessica Chang  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;We propose a simple model for measuring energy usage on a parallel machine. Rather than focusing consumes a fixed amount of energy per active timeslot, regardless of the number of jobs scheduled, the problem amounts to finding a triangle-free 2-matching on a special graph. We extend the algorithm

Khuller, Samir

263

Biomass Energy and Competition for Land  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We describe an approach for incorporating biomass energy production and competition for land into the MIT Emissions Prediction and Policy Analysis (EPPA) model, a computable general equilibrium model of the world economy, ...

Reilly, John

264

From "Stages" of Business Growth to a Dynamic States Model of Entrepreneurial Growth and Change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

From "Stages" of Business Growth to a Dynamic States Model of Entrepreneurial Growth and Change and Gumpert, 1985), and virtually all economic models of business creation follow firm birth with firm growth models of new business growth assume a limited number of distinct stages through #12;3 which businesses

Mottram, Nigel

265

Developing the PAGE2002 Model with Endogenous Technical Change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Furthermore, due to the very long term nature of global warming, even small differences in the AEEI and carbonisation levels of energy sources used can have significant effects on the overall outcome (Grubb & Khler 2000). Modelling ETC is seen... abatement costs for the 450ppm scenario 24 4.3. The cost of prevention and global warming impacts. 25 4.4. Cost of abatement over time for the 450 ppm scenario 27 4.5. Comparison of the 450, 500 and 550 ppm scenarios 28 Chapter 5. Discussion...

Alberth, Stephan; Hope, Chris

266

INVESTIGATIONS ON THE IMPACTS OF LAND-COVER CHANGES AND/OR INCREASED CO2 CONCENTRATIONS ON FOUR REGIONAL WATER CYCLES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

REGIONAL WATER CYCLES AND THEIR INTERACTIONS WITH THE GLOBAL WATER CYCLE By Zhao Li RECOMMENDED-COVER CHANGES AND/OR INCREASED CO2 CONCENTRATIONS ON FOUR REGIONAL WATER CYCLES AND THEIR INTERACTIONS WITH THE GLOBAL WATER CYCLE A THESIS Presented to the Faculty of the University of Alaska Fairbanks In Partial

Moelders, Nicole

267

Modeling Dynamic Receptive Field Changes in Primary Visual Cortex Using Inhibitory Learning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The position, size, and shape of the visual receptive field (RF) of some primary visual cortical neurons change dynamically, in response to artificial scotoma conditioning in cats (Pettet & Gilbert, 1992) and to retinal lesions in cats and monkeys (DarianSmith & Gilbert, 1995). The "EXIN" learning rules (Marshall, 1995) are used to model dynamic RF changes. The EXIN model is compared with an adaptation model (Xing & Gerstein, 1994) and the LISSOM model (Sirosh & Miikkulainen, 1994; Sirosh et al., 1996). To emphasize the role of the lateral inhibitory learning rules, the EXIN and the LISSOM simulations were done with only lateral inhibitory learning. During scotoma conditioning, the EXIN model without feedforward learning produces centrifugal expansion of RFs initially inside the scotoma region, accompanied by increased responsiveness, without changes in spontaneous activation. The EXIN model without feedforward learning is more consistent with the neurophysiological data than are the a...

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Precipitation, Recycling, and Land Memory: An Integrated Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A synthesis of several approaches to quantifying landatmosphere interactions is presented. These approaches use data from observations or atmospheric reanalyses applied to atmospheric tracer models and stand-alone land ...

Dirmeyer, Paul A.

269

Modeling a solar energy collector with an integrated phase-change material  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this thesis, a finite-element computer model was created to simulate a solar air heater with an integrated-phase change material. The commercially available finite element package ADINA-Fluid was used to generate the ...

Guerra, Alexander Adrian

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Conceptual understanding of climate change with a globally resolved energy balance model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Conceptual understanding of climate change with a globally resolved energy balance model Dietmar on the surface energy balance by very simple repre- sentations of solar and thermal radiation, the atmospheric and cold regions to warm more than other regions. Keywords Climate dynamics Á Climate change Á Climate

Dommenget, Dietmar

271

Using Dempster-Shafer Theory to model uncertainty in climate change and environmental impact  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using Dempster-Shafer Theory to model uncertainty in climate change and environmental impact]. The design wave overtopping in a context of changing climate cannot be deterministically predicted due defense structure due to (1) uncertain elevation of the mean water level and (2) uncertain level of storm

Boyer, Edmond

272

Chesapeake Forest Lands (Maryland)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Chesapeake Forest Lands are most of the former land holdings of the Chesapeake Forest Products Company, which now includes more than 66,000 acres in five lower Eastern Shore counties. These...

273

School Land Board (Texas)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The School Land Board oversees the use of land owned by the state or held in trust for use and benefit by the state or one of its departments, boards, or agencies. The Board is responsible for...

274

Agriculture and Climate Change in Global Scenarios: Why Don't the Models Agree  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Agriculture is unique among economic sectors in the nature of impacts from climate change. The production activity that transforms inputs into agricultural outputs makes direct use of weather inputs. Previous studies of the impacts of climate change on agriculture have reported substantial differences in outcomes of key variables such as prices, production, and trade. These divergent outcomes arise from differences in model inputs and model specification. The goal of this paper is to review climate change results and underlying determinants from a model comparison exercise with 10 of the leading global economic models that include significant representation of agriculture. By providing common productivity drivers that include climate change effects, differences in model outcomes are reduced. All models show higher prices in 2050 because of negative productivity shocks from climate change. The magnitude of the price increases, and the adaptation responses, differ significantly across the various models. Substantial differences exist in the structural parameters affecting demand, area, and yield, and should be a topic for future research.

Nelson, Gerald; van der Mensbrugghe, Dominique; Ahammad, Helal; Blanc, Elodie; Calvin, Katherine V.; Hasegawa, Tomoko; Havlik, Petr; Heyhoe, Edwina; Kyle, G. Page; Lotze-Campen, Hermann; von Lampe, Martin; Mason d'Croz, Daniel; van Meijl, Hans; Mueller, C.; Reilly, J. M.; Robertson, Richard; Sands, Ronald; Schmitz, Christoph; Tabeau, Andrzej; Takahashi, Kiyoshi; Valin, Hugo; Willenbockel, Dirk

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Moving from Status to Trends: Forest Inventory and Analysis Symposium 2012 46GTR-NRS-P-105 IMAGE-BASED CHANGE ESTIMATION FOR LAND COVER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Moving from Status to Trends: Forest Inventory and Analysis Symposium 2012 46GTR-NRS-P-105 IMAGE are core to applications including: carbon accounting, greenhouse gas emission reporting, biomass effects of natural disturbances and human activities. By extension, our ability to understand and model

276

A Design-for-Change Approach: Developing Distributed Applications from Enterprise Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Design-for-Change Approach: Developing Distributed Applications from Enterprise Models Remco M, The Netherlands Abstract This paper presents a novel approach to distributed applications design. The proposed and Application Designs We have used the Reference Model for Open Distributed Processing (RM-ODP) [9, 10, 11, 12

Pires, Luís Ferreira

277

Modeling the observed proton aurora and ionospheric convection responses to changes in the IMF clock angle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modeling the observed proton aurora and ionospheric convection responses to changes in the IMF clock angle: 1. Persistence of cusp proton aurora K. Throp, M. Lockwood,1 B. S. Lanchester, and S. K employ a numerical model of cusp ion precipitation and proton aurora emission to fit variations

Lockwood, Mike

278

A cognitive-consistency based model of population wide attitude change.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Attitudes play a significant role in determining how individuals process information and behave. In this paper we have developed a new computational model of population wide attitude change that captures the social level: how individuals interact and communicate information, and the cognitive level: how attitudes and concept interact with each other. The model captures the cognitive aspect by representing each individuals as a parallel constraint satisfaction network. The dynamics of this model are explored through a simple attitude change experiment where we vary the social network and distribution of attitudes in a population.

Lakkaraju, Kiran; Speed, Ann Elizabeth

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Climate Change Impacts for Conterminous USA: An Integrated Assessment Part 2. Models and Validation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As CO{sub 2} and other greenhouse gases accumulate in the atmosphere and contribute to rising global temperatures, it is important to examine how a changing climate may affect natural and managed ecosystems. In this series of papers, we study the impacts of climate change on agriculture, water resources and natural ecosystems in the conterminous United States using a suite of climate change predictions from General Circulation Models (GCMs) as described in Part 1. Here we describe the agriculture model EPIC and the HUMUS water model and validate them with historical crop yields and streamflow data. We compare EPIC simulated grain and forage crop yields with historical crop yields from the US Department of Agriculture and find an acceptable level of agreement for this study. The validation of HUMUS simulated streamflow with estimates of natural streamflow from the US Geological Survey shows that the model is able to reproduce significant relationships and capture major trends.

Thomson, Allison M.; Rosenberg, Norman J.; Izaurralde, R Cesar C.; Brown, Robert A.

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Shape Changing and Accelerating Solitons in the Integrable Variable Mass Sine-Gordon Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The sine-Gordon model with a variable mass (VMSG) appears in many physical systems, ranging from the current through a nonuniform Josephson junction to DNA-promoter dynamics. Such models are usually nonintegrable with solutions found numerically or perturbatively. We construct a class of VMSG models, integrable at both the classical and the quantum levels with exact soliton solutions, which can accelerate and change their shape, width, and amplitude simulating realistic inhomogeneous systems at certain limits.

Kundu, Anjan [Theory Group, Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, Calcutta (India)

2007-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land change modeler" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Land-Use History and Contemporary Management Inform an Ecological Reference Model for Longleaf Pine Woodland Understory Plant Communities.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ecological restoration is frequently guided by reference conditions describing a successfully restored ecosystem; however, the causes and magnitude of ecosystem degradation vary, making simple knowledge of reference conditions insufficient for prioritizing and guiding restoration. Ecological reference models provide further guidance by quantifying reference conditions, as well as conditions at degraded states that deviate from reference conditions. Many reference models remain qualitative, however, limiting their utility. We quantified and evaluated a reference model for southeastern U.S. longleaf pine woodland understory plant communities. We used regression trees to classify 232 longleaf pine woodland sites at three locations along the Atlantic coastal plain based on relationships between understory plant community composition, soils lol(which broadly structure these communities), and factors associated with understory degradation, including fire frequency, agricultural history, and tree basal area. To understand the spatial generality of this model, we classified all sites together. and for each of three study locations separately. Both the regional and location-specific models produced quantifiable degradation gradientsi.e., progressive deviation from conditions at 38 reference sites, based on understory species composition, diversity and total cover, litter depth, and other attributes. Regionally, fire suppression was the most important degrading factor, followed by agricultural history, but at individual locations, agricultural history or tree basal area was most important. At one location, the influence of a degrading factor depended on soil attributes. We suggest that our regional model can help prioritize longleaf pine woodland restoration across our study region; however, due to substantial landscape-to-landscape variation, local management decisions should take into account additional factors (e.g., soil attributes). Our study demonstrates the utility of quantifying degraded states and provides a series of hypotheses for future experimental restoration work. More broadly, our work provides a framework for developing and evaluating reference models that incorporate multiple, interactive anthropogenic drivers of ecosystem degradation.

Brudvig, Lars A. [Department of Plant Biology, Michigan State University; Orrock, John L. [Department of Zoology, University of Wisconsin; Damschen, Ellen I. [Department of Zoology, University of Wisconsin; et al, et al

2014-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

282

A Large-Scale, High-Resolution Hydrological Model Parameter Data Set for Climate Change Impact Assessment for the Conterminous US  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To extend geographical coverage, refine spatial resolution, and improve modeling efficiency, a computation- and data-intensive effort was conducted to organize a comprehensive hydrologic dataset with post-calibrated model parameters for hydro-climate impact assessment. Several key inputs for hydrologic simulation including meteorologic forcings, soil, land class, vegetation, and elevation were collected from multiple best-available data sources and organized for 2107 hydrologic subbasins (8-digit hydrologic units, HUC8s) in the conterminous United States at refined 1/24 (~4 km) spatial resolution. Using high-performance computing for intensive model calibration, a high-resolution parameter dataset was prepared for the macro-scale Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) hydrologic model. The VIC simulation was driven by DAYMET daily meteorological forcing and was calibrated against USGS WaterWatch monthly runoff observations for each HUC8. The results showed that this new parameter dataset may help reasonably simulate runoff at most US HUC8 subbasins. Based on this exhaustive calibration effort, it is now possible to accurately estimate the resources required for further model improvement across the entire conterminous United States. We anticipate that through this hydrologic parameter dataset, the repeated effort of fundamental data processing can be lessened, so that research efforts can emphasize the more challenging task of assessing climate change impacts. The pre-organized model parameter dataset will be provided to interested parties to support further hydro-climate impact assessment.

Oubeidillah, Abdoul A [ORNL] [ORNL; Kao, Shih-Chieh [ORNL] [ORNL; Ashfaq, Moetasim [ORNL] [ORNL; Naz, Bibi S [ORNL] [ORNL; Tootle, Glenn [University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa] [University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Effects of vegetation and soil moisture on the simulated land surface processes from the coupled WRF/Noah model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

simulations. Meso- scale models, which have been used not only for numerical weather prediction but also surface and atmosphere into numerical weather or climate prediction. This study describes coupled WRF [Chen et al., 1997; Pielke et al., 1997]. Numerical weather prediction with high spatial and tempo- ral

Small, Eric

284

Land Use and natUraL resoUrces  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Land Use and natUraL resoUrces summer 2012 Including: Climate Change and Local Planning Strategies Overview of Environmental Statistics Green Building Design Studio CONTINuING AND PrOFessIONAL eDuCATION #12Ndar........................................................................................................................4 laNd USe plaNNiNg Climate Change and Local Planning Strategies

California at Davis, University of

285

Modelling the economic and social consequences of drought under future projections of climate change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on agriculture (scenario one), seasonal drought effects on agriculture (scenario two), and sudden drought effects on agriculture (scenario three). .............................................................................. 140 Figure 6.2: Simulated change... in VA of Spains economy during the 1990-1995 drought modelled using SPI-12 for the three agricultural scenarios ................................................ 142 Figure 6.3: Simulated change in VA of Spains economy during the 1998-2002 drought...

Jenkins, Katie L.

2012-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

286

Analysis of permafrost thermal dynamics and response to climate change in the CMIP5 Earth System Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

coupled climate-carbon earth system models part i: PhysicalChangeintheCMIP5EarthSystemModels Koven, C.D. , W.J.output from a set of Earth System Models (ESMs) (Table 1)

Koven, C.D.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Final Report on Hierarchical Coupled Modeling and Prediction of Regional Climate Change in the Atlantic Sector  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the course of this project, we have accomplished the following: a) Carried out studies of climate changes in the past using a hierarchy of intermediate coupled models (Chang et al., 2008; Wan et al 2009; Wen et al., 2010a,b) b) Completed the development of a Coupled Regional Climate Model (CRCM; Patricola et al., 2011a,b) c) Carried out studies testing hypotheses testing the origin of systematic errors in the CRCM (Patricola et al., 2011a,b) d) Carried out studies of the impact of air-sea interaction on hurricanes, in the context of barrier layer interactions (Balaguru et al)

Saravanan, Ramalingam [Texas A& M University

2011-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

288

Potential influence of climate-induced vegetation shifts on future land use and associated land carbon fluxes in Northern Eurasia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Climate change will alter ecosystem metabolism and may lead to a redistribution of vegetation and changes in fire regimes in Northern Eurasia over the 21st century. Land management decisions will interact with these ...

Kicklighter, D W

289

Variation in Estimated Ozone-Related Health Impacts of Climate Change due to Modeling Choices and Assumptions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Future climate change may cause air quality degradation via climate-induced changes in meteorology, atmospheric chemistry, and emissions into the air. Few studies have explicitly modeled the potential relationships between climate change, air quality, and human health, and fewer still have investigated the sensitivity of estimates to the underlying modeling choices.

Post, Ellen S.; Grambsch, A.; Weaver, C. P.; Morefield, Philip; Huang, Jin; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Nolte, Christopher G.; Adams, P. J.; Liang, Xin-Zhong; Zhu, J.; Mahoney, Hardee

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Preliminary studies on physical and chemical processes in the subsurface system in the land reclaimed from the sea  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on the north-eastern shores of Penny's Bay. After reclamation the total groundwater head in the entire model: Land reclamation, coastal process, groundwater flow, physiochemical reactions 1) Introduction Most that reclamation may change the regional groundwater regime, including groundwater level, interface between

Jiao, Jiu Jimmy

291

Using Weather Data and Climate Model Output in Economic Analyses of Climate Change  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Economists are increasingly using weather data and climate model output in analyses of the economic impacts of climate change. This article introduces a set of weather data sets and climate models that are frequently used, discusses the most common mistakes economists make in using these products, and identifies ways to avoid these pitfalls. We first provide an introduction to weather data, including a summary of the types of datasets available, and then discuss five common pitfalls that empirical researchers should be aware of when using historical weather data as explanatory variables in econometric applications. We then provide a brief overview of climate models and discuss two common and significant errors often made by economists when climate model output is used to simulate the future impacts of climate change on an economic outcome of interest.

Auffhammer, Maximilian [University of California at Berkeley; Hsiang, Solomon M. [Princeton University; Schlenker, Wolfram [Columbia University; Sobel, Adam H. [Columbia University

2013-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

292

Progress Report 2008: A Scalable and Extensible Earth System Model for Climate Change Science  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project employs multi-disciplinary teams to accelerate development of the Community Climate System Model (CCSM), based at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR). A consortium of eight Department of Energy (DOE) National Laboratories collaborate with NCAR and the NASA Global Modeling and Assimilation Office (GMAO). The laboratories are Argonne (ANL), Brookhaven (BNL) Los Alamos (LANL), Lawrence Berkeley (LBNL), Lawrence Livermore (LLNL), Oak Ridge (ORNL), Pacific Northwest (PNNL) and Sandia (SNL). The work plan focuses on scalablity for petascale computation and extensibility to a more comprehensive earth system model. Our stated goal is to support the DOE mission in climate change research by helping ... To determine the range of possible climate changes over the 21st century and beyond through simulations using a more accurate climate system model that includes the full range of human and natural climate feedbacks with increased realism and spatial resolution.

Drake, John B [ORNL; Worley, Patrick H [ORNL; Hoffman, Forrest M [ORNL; Jones, Phil [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Journal of Environmental Management 84 (2007) 157172 Development and application of a GIS-based sediment budget model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-based sediment budget model Carlos E. Ramos-Scharro´ na,?, Lee H. MacDonaldb a Department of Geosciences Accelerated erosion and increased sediment yields resulting from changes in land use are a critical the changes in sediment production and delivery due to unpaved roads and other types of land disturbance

MacDonald, Lee

294

Conservation Practice Modeling Guide for SWAT and APEX  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

enhanced the ability of environmental managers, researchers, government officials, and urban planners to analyze current conditions and predict future impacts of land use changes on water quality. Despite the innovation of these technologies, modelers...

Waidler, D.; White, M.; Steglich, E.; Wang, S.; Williams, J.; Jones, C. A.; Srinivasan, R.

295

CHANGE OF STRUCTURE IN FINANCIAL TIME SERIES, LONG RANGE DEPENDENCE AND THE GARCH MODEL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CHANGE OF STRUCTURE IN FINANCIAL TIME SERIES, LONG RANGE DEPENDENCE AND THE GARCH MODEL THOMAS having as limit a Gaussian #12;eld. In the case of GARCH(p; q) processes a statistic closely related limit theorem for this statistic under the hypothesis of a GARCH(p; q) sequence with a #12;nite 4th

Mikosch, Thomas

296

An exploration of the stages of change model in a group treatment program for male batterers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The purpose of this study was to investigate the adequacy of the Stages of Change model in a group therapy treatment program for male batterers. The sample consisted of three groups with a total sample size of 22 participants. Data for this study...

Wells, Robert Davis

2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

297

Selected translated abstracts of Russian-language climate-change publications. 4: General circulation models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents English-translated abstracts of important Russian-language literature concerning general circulation models as they relate to climate change. Into addition to the bibliographic citations and abstracts translated into English, this report presents the original citations and abstracts in Russian. Author and title indexes are included to assist the reader in locating abstracts of particular interest.

Burtis, M.D. [comp.] [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center; Razuvaev, V.N.; Sivachok, S.G. [All-Russian Research Inst. of Hydrometeorological Information--World Data Center, Obninsk (Russian Federation)

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Net accumulation of the Greenland ice sheet: High resolution modeling of climate changes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: Kiilsholm, S., J. H. Christensen, K. Dethloff, and A. Rinke, Net accumulation of the Greenland ice sheetNet accumulation of the Greenland ice sheet: High resolution modeling of climate changes Sissi, Denmark Klaus Dethloff and Annette Rinke Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research

Born, Andreas

299

BEHAVIOR CHANGES IN SIS STD MODELS WITH SELECTIVE JAMES M. HYMAN + AND JIA LI #  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the epidemic threshold. Key words. STD models, selective mixing, balance constraint, behavior changes% of the population is infected by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and that in the Bronx in New York City 13 of Energy under contracts W7405ENG36 and DOE Applied Mathematical Sciences Program contract KC07

Hyman, James "Mac"

300

BEHAVIOR CHANGES IN SIS STD MODELS WITH SELECTIVE JAMES M. HYMAN AND JIA LI  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the epidemic threshold. Key words. STD models, selective mixing, balance constraint, behavior changes% of the population is infected by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and that in the Bronx in New York City 13 of Energy under contracts W-7405-ENG-36 and DOE Applied Mathematical Sciences Program contract KC-07

Hyman, James "Mac"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land change modeler" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Modeling and Simulation of Solar PV Arrays under Changing Illumination Conditions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the amount of electric power that may be generated from the solar panel at time of use. To be specificModeling and Simulation of Solar PV Arrays under Changing Illumination Conditions Dzung D Nguyen shadows (a passing cloud) on the output power of solar PV arrays. Each solar array is composed of a matrix

Lehman, Brad

302

Studying the Causes of Recent Climate Change Program for Climate Model Diagnosis and Intercomparison  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Studying the Causes of Recent Climate Change Ben Santer Program for Climate Model Diagnosis of evidence suggests a discernible human influence on global climate" "There is new and stronger evidence that most of the warming observed over the last 50 years is attributable to human activities" "Most

Kammen, Daniel M.

303

Comparison of problem model change mechanisms issued from CSP and TRIZ  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Comparison of problem model change mechanisms issued from CSP and TRIZ RRoollaanndd DDee GGuuiioo satisfaction problem (CSP), on the other hand. Keywords: over-constrained problems, dialectical methods issued from CSP and TRIZ 2 · a set of evaluation parameters, which represent the objective of the problem

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

304

Integrated Assessment of Hadley Centre (HadCM2) Climate Change Projections on Agricultural Productivity and Irrigation Water Supply in the Conterminous United States.I. Climate change scenarios and impacts on irrigation water supply simulated with the HUMUS model.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes methodology and results of a study by researchers at PNNL contributing to the water sector study of the U.S. National Assessment of Climate Change. The vulnerability of water resources in the conterminous U.S. to climate change in 10-y periods centered on 2030 and 2095--as projected by the HadCM2 general circulation model--was modeled with HUMUS (Hydrologic Unit Model of the U.S.). HUMUS consists of a GIS that provides data on soils, land use and climate to drive the hydrology model Soil Water Assessment Tool (SWAT). The modeling was done at the scale of the 2101 8-digit USGS hydrologic unit areas (HUA). Results are aggregated to the 4-digit and 2-digit (Major Water Resource Region, MWRR) scales for various purposes. Daily records of temperature and precipitation for 1961-1990 provided the baseline climate. Water yields (WY)--sum of surface and subsurface runoff--increases from the baseline period over most of the U.S. in 2030 and 2095. In 2030, WY increases in the western US and decreases in the central and southeast regions. Notably, WY increases by 139 mm from baseline in the Pacific NW. Decreased WY is projected for the Lower Mississippi and Texas Gulf basins, driven by higher temperatures and reduced precipitation. The HadCM2 2095 scenario projects a climate significantly wetter than baseline, resulting in WY increases of 38%. WY increases are projected throughout the eastern U.S. WY also increases in the western U.S. Climate change also affects the seasonality of the hydrologic cycle. Early snowmelt is induced in western basins, leading to dramatically increased WYs in late winter and early spring. The simulations were run at current (365 ppm) and elevated (560 ppm) atmospheric CO2 concentrations to account for the potential impacts of the CO2-fertilization effect. The effects of climate change scenario were considerably greater than those due to elevated CO2 but the latter, overall, decreased losses and augmented increases in water yield.

Rosenberg, Norman J.; Brown, Robert A.; Izaurralde, R Cesar C.; Thomson, Allison M.

2003-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

305

Modeling the response of plants and ecosystems to elevated CO sub 2 and climate change  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

While the exact effects of elevated CO{sub 2} on global climate are unknown, there is a growing consensus among climate modelers that global temperature and precipitation will increase, but that these changes will be non-uniform over the Earth's surface. In addition to these potential climatic changes, CO{sub 2} also directly affects plants via photosynthesis, respiration, and stomatal closure. Global climate change, in concert with these direct effects of CO{sub 2} on plants, could have a significant impact on both natural and agricultural ecosystems. Society's ability to prepare for, and respond to, such changes depends largely on the ability of climate and ecosystem researchers to provide predictions of regional level ecosystem responses with sufficient confidence and adequate lead time.

Reynolds, J.F.; Hilbert, D.W.; Chen, Jia-lin; Harley, P.C.; Kemp, P.R.; Leadley, P.W.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Modeling the response of plants and ecosystems to elevated CO{sub 2} and climate change  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

While the exact effects of elevated CO{sub 2} on global climate are unknown, there is a growing consensus among climate modelers that global temperature and precipitation will increase, but that these changes will be non-uniform over the Earth`s surface. In addition to these potential climatic changes, CO{sub 2} also directly affects plants via photosynthesis, respiration, and stomatal closure. Global climate change, in concert with these direct effects of CO{sub 2} on plants, could have a significant impact on both natural and agricultural ecosystems. Society`s ability to prepare for, and respond to, such changes depends largely on the ability of climate and ecosystem researchers to provide predictions of regional level ecosystem responses with sufficient confidence and adequate lead time.

Reynolds, J.F.; Hilbert, D.W.; Chen, Jia-lin; Harley, P.C.; Kemp, P.R.; Leadley, P.W.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Baseline for Climate Change: Modeling Watershed Aquatic Biodiversity Relative to Environmental and Anthropogenic Factors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Objectives of the two-year study were to (1) establish baselines for fish and macroinvertebrate community structures in two mid-Atlantic lower Piedmont watersheds (Quantico Creek, a pristine forest watershed; and Cameron Run, an urban watershed, Virginia) that can be used to monitor changes relative to the impacts related to climate change in the future; (2) create mathematical expressions to model fish species richness and diversity, and macroinvertebrate taxa and macroinvertebrate functional feeding group taxa richness and diversity that can serve as a baseline for future comparisons in these and other watersheds in the mid-Atlantic region; and (3) heighten peoples awareness, knowledge and understanding of climate change and impacts on watersheds in a laboratory experience and interactive exhibits, through internship opportunities for undergraduate and graduate students, a week-long teacher workshop, and a website about climate change and watersheds. Mathematical expressions modeled fish and macroinvertebrate richness and diversity accurately well during most of the six thermal seasons where sample sizes were robust. Additionally, hydrologic models provide the basis for estimating flows under varying meteorological conditions and landscape changes. Continuations of long-term studies are requisite for accurately teasing local human influences (e.g. urbanization and watershed alteration) from global anthropogenic impacts (e.g. climate change) on watersheds. Effective and skillful translations (e.g. annual potential exposure of 750,000 people to our inquiry-based laboratory activities and interactive exhibits in Virginia) of results of scientific investigations are valuable ways of communicating information to the general public to enhance their understanding of climate change and its effects in watersheds.

Maurakis, Eugene G

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Shaping Land Use along an Agricultural Frontier: A Dynamic Household Model for Early Small-Scale Settlers in the Brazilian Amazon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

titles on the Brazilian frontier. Journal of Law, Economics,Farmers in the Amazonian Frontier. In Deforestation and LandPatterns on an Agricultural Frontier in Brazil: Insights and

Witcover, Julie

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Assessing the impacts of climate change on natural resource systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This volume is a collection of papers addressing the theme of potential impacts of climatic change. Papers are entitled Integrated Assessments of the Impacts of Climatic Change on Natural Resources: An Introductory Editorial; Framework for Integrated Assessments of Global Warming Impacts; Modeling Land Use and Cover as Part of Global Environmental Change; Assessing Impacts of Climatic Change on Forests: The State of Biological Modeling; Integrating Climatic Change and Forests: Economic and Ecological Assessments; Environmental Change in Grasslands: Assessment using Models; Assessing the Socio-economic Impacts of Climatic Change on Grazinglands; Modeling the Effects of Climatic Change on Water Resources- A Review; Assessing the Socioeconomic Consequences of Climate Change on Water Resources; and Conclusions, Remaining Issues, and Next Steps.

Frederick, K.D.; Rosenberg, N.J. [eds.

1994-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

310

A tale of two roads: Land tenure, poverty, and politics on the Guatemalan frontier  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A tale of two roads: Land tenure, poverty, and politics on the Guatemalan frontier David Carr April 2003 Abstract Agricultural frontiers are hot spots for the most dramatic land cover change of literature explores the determinants of land cover change on the frontier, one issue that has been largely

Lopez-Carr, David

311

Farming: A Climate Change Culprit  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Farming: A Climate Change Culprit Farming: A Climate Change Culprit Simulations run at NERSC show impact of land-use change on African monsoon precipitation June 7, 2014 | Tags:...

312

Soil erosion from sugar beet in Central Europe in response to climate change induced seasonal precipitation variations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of adaptive land-use management for climate change response strategies in the agricultural sector. 2007; Conservation agriculture; Erosion modelling 1. Introduction Climate change of anthropogenic origin is widelySoil erosion from sugar beet in Central Europe in response to climate change induced seasonal

Quinton, John

313

Climate change projections using the IPSL-CM5 Earth System Model: from CMIP3 to CMIP5  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Climate change projections using the IPSL-CM5 Earth System Model: from CMIP3 to CMIP5 J relevant to the climate system, it may be referred to as an Earth System Model. However, the IPSL-CM5 model climate and Earth System Models, both developed in France and contributing to the 5th coupled model

Codron, Francis

314

Model study of shoreline changes due to a series of offshore breakwaters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MODEL STUDY OF SHORELINE CHANGES DUE TO A SERIES OF OFFSHORE BREAKHATERS A Thesis by DONALD ALAN CORDS Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... May 1986 Hajor Subject: Ocean Engineering NODEL STUDY OF SHORELINE CHANGES DUE TD A SERIES OF OFFSHORE BREAKHATERS A Thesis by DONALD ALAN CORDS Approved as to style and content by: ohn . er sc (Chairman) o ert . a a (Nember ) o er . ei...

Cords, Donald Alan

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

315

New Technologies to Reclaim Arid Lands User's Manual  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Approximately 70 percent of all U.S. military training lands are located in arid and semi-arid areas. Training activities in such areas frequently adversely affect vegetation, damaging plants and reducing the resilience of vegetation to recover once disturbed. Fugitive dust resulting from a loss of vegetation creates additional problems for human health, increasing accidents due to decreased visibility, and increasing maintenance costs for roads, vehicles, and equipment. Under conventional technologies to mitigate these impacts, it is estimated that up to 35 percent of revegetation projects in arid areas will fail due to unpredictable natural environmental conditions, such as drought, and reclamation techniques that were inadequate to restore vegetative cover in a timely and cost-effective manner. New reclamation and restoration techniques are needed in desert ranges to help mitigate the adverse effects of military training and other activities to arid-land environments. In 1999, a cooperative effort between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the US. Department of Defense (DoD), and selected university scientists was undertaken to focus on mitigating military impacts in arid lands. As arid lands are impacted due to DoD and DOE activities, biological and soil resources are gradually lost and the habitat is altered. A conceptual model of that change in habitat quality is described for varying levels of disturbance in the Mojave Desert. As the habitat quality degrades and more biological and physical resources are lost from training areas, greater costs are required to return the land to sustainable levels. The purpose of this manual is to assist land managers in recognizing thresholds associated with habitat degradation and provide reclamation planning and techniques that can reduce the costs of mitigation for these impacted lands to ensure sustainable use of these lands. The importance of reclamation planning is described in this manual with suggestions about establishing project objectives, scheduling, budgeting, and selecting cost-effective techniques. Reclamation techniques include sections describing: (1) erosion control (physical, chemical, and biological), (2) site preparation, (3) soil amendments, (4) seeding, (5) planting, (6) grazing and weed control, (7) mulching, (8) irrigation, and (9) site protection. Each section states the objectives of the technique, the principles, an in-depth look at the techniques, and any special considerations as it relates to DoD or DOE lands. The need for monitoring and remediation is described to guide users in monitoring reclamation efforts to evaluate their cost-effectiveness. Costs are provided for the proposed techniques for the major deserts of the southwestern U.S. showing the average and range of costs. A set of decision tools are provided in the form of a flow diagram and table to guide users in selecting effective reclamation techniques to achieve mitigation objectives. Recommendations are provided to help summarize key reclamation principles and to assist users in developing a successful program that contributes to sustainable uses of DoD and DOE lands. The users manual is helpful to managers in communicating to installation management the needs and consequences of training decisions and the costs required to achieve successful levels of sustainable use. This users manual focuses on the development of new reclamation techniques that have been implemented at the National Training Center at Fort Irwin, California, and are applicable to most arid land reclamation efforts.

W. K. Ostler

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

The Impact of Biofuel and Greenhouse Gas Policies on Land Management, Agricultural Production, and Environmental Quality  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and empirical modeling. First, a simple conceptual model of land allocation and management is used to illustrate how bioenergy policies and GHG mitigation incentives could influence market prices, shift the land supply between alternative uses, alter management...

Baker, Justin Scott

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

317

Multi-lane hybrid traffic flow model: a theory on the impacts of lane-changing maneuvers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is parsimonious; it requires only one more parameter than the simple kinematic wave model. The extra parameter flow models do not address lane-changing phenomena properly. Extensions to kinematic wave (KW) theory

Daganzo, Carlos F.

318

Agriculture, Land Use, Energy and Carbon Emission Impacts of Global Biofuel Mandates to Mid-Century  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Three potential future scenarios of expanded global biofuel production are presented here utilizing the GCAM integrated assessment model. These scenarios span a range that encompasses on the low end a continuation of existing biofuel production policies to two scenarios that would require an expansion of current targets as well as an extension of biofuels targets to other regions of the world. Conventional oil use is reduced by 4-8% in the expanded biofuel scenarios, which results in a decrease of in CO2 emissions on the order of 1-2 GtCO2/year by mid-century from the global transportation sector. The regional distribution of crop production is relatively unaffected, but the biofuels targets do result in a marked increase in the production of conventional crops used for energy. Producer prices of sugar and corn reach levels about 12% and 7% above year 2005 levels, while the increased competition for land causes the price of food crops such as wheat, although not used for bioenergy in this study, to increase by 1 to 2%. The amount of land devoted to growing all food crops and dedicated bioenergy crops is increased by about 10% by 2050 in the High biofuel case, with concurrent decreases in other uses of land such as forest and pasture. In both of the expanded biofuels cases studied, there is an increase in net cumulative carbon emissions for the first couple of decades due to these induced land use changes. However, the difference in net cumulative emissions from the biofuels expansion decline by about 2035 as the reductions in energy system emissions exceed further increases in emissions from land use change. Even in the absence of a policy that would limit emissions from land use change, the differences in net cumulative emissions from the biofuels scenarios reach zero by 2050, and are decreasing further over time in both cases.

Wise, Marshall A.; Dooley, James J.; Luckow, Patrick; Calvin, Katherine V.; Kyle, G. Page

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

The Role of Asia in Mitigating Climate Change: Results from the Asia Modeling Exercise  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 2010, Asia accounted for 60% of global population, 39% of Gross World Product, 44% of global energy consumption and nearly half of the worlds energy system CO2 emissions. Thus, Asia is an important region to consider in any discussion of climate change or climate change mitigation. This paper explores the role of Asia in mitigating climate change, by comparing the results of 23 energy-economy and integrated assessment models. We focus our analysis on seven key areas: base year data, future energy use and emissions absent climate policy, the effect of urban and rural development on future energy use and emissions, the role of technology in emissions mitigation, regional emissions mitigation, and national climate policies

Calvin, Katherine V.; Clarke, Leon E.; Krey, Volker; Blanford, Geoffrey J.; Jiang, Kejun; Kainuma, M.; Kriegler, Elmar; Luderer, Gunnar; Shukla, Priyadarshi R.

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Developing a change-point principal component predictive model for energy use in a supermarket  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the Thanksgiving Day. On these days , the store opens fewer than 18 hours. The store has a typical supermarket electrical consumption pattern (2). The estimated distribution of the peak demand of the electrical systems is: refrigeration cases and compressors... on heat recovery from the refrigeration system and, therefore, does not consume electricity; however the COP of the refrigeration system increases as the ambient temperature decreases. Hence, it is desirable to develop a more general change point model...

Chen, Lu

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land change modeler" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

MODIS Collection 5 global land cover: Algorithm refinements and characterization of new datasets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

information is required to parameterize land surface processes in regional-to-global scale Earth system models

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

322

Modelling downstream change in river flood power: a novel approach based on the UK Flood Estimation Handbook  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modelling downstream change in river flood power: a novel approach based on the UK Flood Estimation" (McEwen, 1994: 359). Lawler (1992) recognised that little was known about the downstream change. It is suggested that downstream change in discharge is best represented as a power function in terms of channel

Birmingham, University of

323

Collaborative Research: Towards Advanced Understanding and Predictive Capability of Climate Change in the Arctic Using a High-Resolution Regional Arctic Climate Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary research task completed for this project was the development of the Regional Arctic Climate Model (RACM). This involved coupling existing atmosphere, ocean, sea ice, and land models using the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Community Climate System Model (CCSM) coupler (CPL7). RACM is based on the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) atmospheric model, the Parallel Ocean Program (POP) ocean model, the CICE sea ice model, and the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) land model. A secondary research task for this project was testing and evaluation of WRF for climate-scale simulations on the large pan-Arctic model domain used in RACM. This involved identification of a preferred set of model physical parameterizations for use in our coupled RACM simulations and documenting any atmospheric biases present in RACM.

Cassano, John [Principal Investigator

2013-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

324

On the connection between continental-scale land surface processes and the tropical climate in a coupled ocean-atmosphere-land system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The impact of global tropical climate to perturbations in land surface processes (LSP) are evaluated using perturbations given by different LSP representations of continental-scale in a global climate model that includes atmosphere-ocean interactions. One representation is a simple land scheme, which specifies climatological albedos and soil moisture availability. The other representation is the more comprehensive Simplified Simple Biosphere Model, which allows for interactive soil moisture and vegetation biophysical processes. The results demonstrate that LSP processes such as interactive soil moisture and vegetation biophysical processes have strong impacts on the seasonal mean states and seasonal cycles of global precipitation, clouds, and surface air temperature. The impact is especially significant over the tropical Pacific. To explore the mechanisms for such impact, different LSP representations are confined to selected continental-scale regions where strong interactions of climate-vegetation biophysical processes are present. We find that the largest impact is mainly from LSP perturbations over the tropical African continent. The impact is through anomalous convective heating in tropical Africa due to changes in the surface heat fluxes, which in turn affect basinwide teleconnections in the Pacific through equatorial wave dynamics. The modifications in the equatorial Pacific climate are further enhanced by strong air-sea coupling between surface wind stress and upwelling, as well as effect of ocean memory. Our results further suggest that correct representations of land surface processes, land use change and the associated changes in the deep convection over tropical Africa are crucial to reducing the uncertainty when performing future climate projections under different climate change scenarios.

Ma, Hsi-Yen; Mechoso, C. R.; Xue, Yongkang; Xiao, Heng; Neelin, David; Ji, Xuan

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

325

Simulating Sustainability: Conjunctive Land and Water Management in the Upper  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Simulating Sustainability: Conjunctive Land and Water Management in the Upper Santa Cruz River Water Issue: Introduction and Context This research project addresses a chronic water management issue in Arizona: management and allocation of water supplies in areas undergoing rapid growth and land use changes

Fay, Noah

326

Survey of Critical Wetlands Bureau of Land Management Lands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Survey of Critical Wetlands Bureau of Land Management Lands South Park, Park County, Colorado 2003 Delivery Colorado State University #12;Survey of Critical Wetlands Bureau of Land Management Lands South place from unique wetlands to high quality grasslands to the bristlecone pine forests to its alpine

327

Recent Trends in Land Tenure in Texas.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and a live- stock program was instituted. Long term cash leases presented problems during this period of fluctuating commodity prices, One- year farm rental agreements, on the other hand, failed to provide the necessary inducements for the long... ............................................................................. 24 Effect of changes in land tenure on community institutions .................... 25 Landlord-tenant relations ........................................................................................ 26 Farm rental agreements...

Motheral, Joe

1944-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Modeling of Oceanic Gas Hydrate Instability and Methane Release in Response to Climate Change  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Paleooceanographic evidence has been used to postulate that methane from oceanic hydrates may have had a significant role in regulating global climate, implicating global oceanic deposits of methane gas hydrate as the main culprit in instances of rapid climate change that have occurred in the past. However, the behavior of contemporary oceanic methane hydrate deposits subjected to rapid temperature changes, like those predicted under future climate change scenarios, is poorly understood. To determine the fate of the carbon stored in these hydrates, we performed simulations of oceanic gas hydrate accumulations subjected to temperature changes at the seafloor and assessed the potential for methane release into the ocean. Our modeling analysis considered the properties of benthic sediments, the saturation and distribution of the hydrates, the ocean depth, the initial seafloor temperature, and for the first time, estimated the effect of benthic biogeochemical activity. The results show that shallow deposits--such as those found in arctic regions or in the Gulf of Mexico--can undergo rapid dissociation and produce significant methane fluxes of 2 to 13 mol/yr/m{sup 2} over a period of decades, and release up to 1,100 mol of methane per m{sup 2} of seafloor in a century. These fluxes may exceed the ability of the seafloor environment (via anaerobic oxidation of methane) to consume the released methane or sequester the carbon. These results will provide a source term to regional or global climate models in order to assess the coupling of gas hydrate deposits to changes in the global climate.

Reagan, Matthew; Reagan, Matthew T.; Moridis, George J.

2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

329

A nonstoichiometric structural model to characterize changes in the nickel hydroxide electrode during cycling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Experimental capacities and mass changes are recorded using an electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance during the first 9 charge and discharge cycles of nickel hydroxide thin films cycled in 3.0 weight percent (wt%) potassium hydroxide electrolyte. For the first time, the film capacities have been corrected for the oxygen evolution side reaction, and the data used as input into the point defect-containing structural model to track the changes that occur during short-term cycling. Variations in capacity and mass during formation and charge/discharge cycling are related to changes in the point defect parameters, thus providing a structural origin for the unique experimental variations observed here and often reported in the literature, but previously unexplained. Proton-, potassium-, and water-content vary in the active material during charge/discharge cycling. The observed capacity loss, or ''capacity fade'', is explained by incomplete incorporation of potassium ions in (or near) the nickel vacancy during charge, as additional protons are then allowed to occupy the vacant lattice site. The increase in water content during reduction parallels the expansion of the electrode that is well known during cycling. This result confirms the origin of the swelling phenomenon as being caused by water incorporation. The model and methodology developed in this paper can be used to correlate electrochemical signatures with material chemical structure.

Srinivasan, Venkat; Bahne, C. Cornilsen; Weidner, John W.

2003-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

330

A model for changes in coalbed permeability during primary and enhanced methane, recovery  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The natural fracture network of a dual-porosity coalbed reservoir is made up of two sets of orthogonal, and usually subvertically oriented, cleats. Coalbed permeability has been shown to vary exponentially with changes in the effective horizontal stress acting across the cleats through the cleat-volume compressibility, which is analogous to pore compressibility in porous rocks. A formulation for changes in the effective horizontal stress of coalbeds during primary methane recovery, which includes a Langmuir type curve shrinkage term, has been proposed previously. This paper presents a new version of the stress formulation by making a direct link between the volumetric matrix strain and the amount of gas desorbed. The resulting permeability model can be extended readily to account for adsorption-induced matrix swelling as well as matrix shrinkage during enhanced methane recovery involving the injection of an inert gas or gas mixture into the seams. The permeability model is validated against a recently published pressure-dependent permeability multiplier curve representative of the San Juan basin coalbeds at post-dewatering production stages. The extended permeability model is then applied successfully to history matching a micropilot test involving the injection of flue gas (consisting mainly of CO{sub 2} and N{sub 2}) at the Fenn Big Valley, Alberta, Canada.

Shi, J.Q.; Durucan, S. [University of London Imperial College of Science Technology & Medicine, London (United Kingdom). Dept. of Environmental Science & Technology

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Siting Renewable Energy: Land Use and Regulatory Context  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This article takes up the increasingly important land use question of siting for renewable energy. As concern over climate change grows, new policies are being crafted at all levels of government to support renewable energy as a way of reducing...

Outka, Uma

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Sensitivity of global tropical climate to land surface processes: Mean state and interannual variability  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study examines the sensitivity of global tropical climate to land surface processes (LSP) using an atmospheric general circulation model both uncoupled (with prescribed SSTs) and coupled to an oceanic general circulation model. The emphasis is on the interactive soil moisture and vegetation biophysical processes, which have first order influence on the surface energy and water budgets. The sensitivity to those processes is represented by the differences between model simulations, in which two land surface schemes are considered: 1) a simple land scheme that specifies surface albedo and soil moisture availability, and 2) the Simplified Simple Biosphere Model (SSiB), which allows for consideration of interactive soil moisture and vegetation biophysical process. Observational datasets are also employed to assess the reality of model-revealed sensitivity. The mean state sensitivity to different LSP is stronger in the coupled mode, especially in the tropical Pacific. Furthermore, seasonal cycle of SSTs in the equatorial Pacific, as well as ENSO frequency, amplitude, and locking to the seasonal cycle of SSTs are significantly modified and more realistic with SSiB. This outstanding sensitivity of the atmosphere-ocean system develops through changes in the intensity of equatorial Pacific trades modified by convection over land. Our results further demonstrate that the direct impact of land-atmosphere interactions on the tropical climate is modified by feedbacks associated with perturbed oceanic conditions ("indirect effect" of LSP). The magnitude of such indirect effect is strong enough to suggest that comprehensive studies on the importance of LSP on the global climate have to be made in a system that allows for atmosphere-ocean interactions.

Ma, Hsi-Yen; Xiao, Heng; Mechoso, C. R.; Xue, Yongkang

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Energy and land use  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report addresses the land use impacts of past and future energy development and summarizes the major federal and state legislation which influences the potential land use impacts of energy facilities and can thus influence the locations and timing of energy development. In addition, this report describes and presents the data which are used to measure, and in some cases, predict the potential conflicts between energy development and alternative uses of the nation's land resources. The topics section of this report is divided into three parts. The first part describes the myriad of federal, state and local legislation which have a direct or indirect impact upon the use of land for energy development. The second part addresses the potential land use impacts associated with the extraction, conversion and combustion of energy resources, as well as the disposal of wastes generated by these processes. The third part discusses the conflicts that might arise between agriculture and energy development as projected under a number of DOE mid-term (1990) energy supply and demand scenarios.

Not Available

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Land-use Leakage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Leakage occurs whenever actions to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions in one part of the world unleash countervailing forces elsewhere in the world so that reductions in global emissions are less than emissions mitigation in the mitigating region. While many researchers have examined the concept of industrial leakage, land-use policies can also result in leakage. We show that land-use leakage is potentially as large as or larger than industrial leakage. We identify two potential land-use leakage drivers, land-use policies and bioenergy. We distinguish between these two pathways and run numerical experiments for each. We also show that the land-use policy environment exerts a powerful influence on leakage and that under some policy designs leakage can be negative. International offsets are a potential mechanism to communicate emissions mitigation beyond the borders of emissions mitigating regions, but in a stabilization regime designed to limit radiative forcing to 3.7 2/m2, this also implies greater emissions mitigation commitments on the part of mitigating regions.

Calvin, Katherine V.; Edmonds, James A.; Clarke, Leon E.; Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; Kim, Son H.; Wise, Marshall A.; Thomson, Allison M.; Kyle, G. Page

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Addressing trend-related changes within cumulative effects studies in water resources planning  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Summarized herein are 28 case studies wherein trend-related causative physical, social, or institutional changes were connected to consequential changes in runoff, water quality, and riparian and aquatic ecological features. The reviewed cases were systematically evaluated relative to their identified environmental effects; usage of analytical frameworks, and appropriate models, methods, and technologies; and the attention given to mitigation and/or management of the resultant causative and consequential changes. These changes also represent important considerations in project design and operation, and in cumulative effects studies associated therewith. The cases were grouped into five categories: institutional changes associated with legislation and policies (seven cases); physical changes from land use changes in urbanizing watersheds (eight cases); physical changes from land use changes and development projects in watersheds (four cases); physical, institutional, and social changes from land use and related policy changes in river basins (three cases); and multiple changes within a comprehensive study of land use and policy changes in the Willamette River Basin in Oregon (six cases). A tabulation of 110 models, methods and technologies used in the studies is also presented. General observations from this review were that the features were unique for each case; the consequential changes were logically based on the causative changes; the analytical frameworks provided relevant structures for the studies, and the identified methods and technologies were pertinent for addressing both the causative and consequential changes. One key lesson was that the cases provide useful, real-world illustrations of the importance of addressing trend-related changes in cumulative effects studies within water resources planning. Accordingly, they could be used as an initial tool kit for addressing trend-related changes.

Canter, L.W., E-mail: envimptr@aol.com [University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma and President, Canter Associates, Inc., Horseshoe Bay, TX (United States); Chawla, M.K. [ERDC-CERL, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Champaign, IL (United States)] [ERDC-CERL, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Champaign, IL (United States); Swor, C.T. [Canter Associates, Inc., Frankewing, TN (United States)] [Canter Associates, Inc., Frankewing, TN (United States)

2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

336

Scenarios of Future Socio-Economics, Energy, Land Use, and Radiative Forcing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This chapter explores uncertainty in future scenarios of energy, land use, emissions and radiative forcing that span the range in the literature for radiative forcing, but also consider uncertainty in two other dimensions, challenges to mitigation and challenges to adaptation. We develop a set of six scenarios that we explore in detail including the underlying the context in which they are set, assumptions that drive the scenarios, the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM), used to produce quantified implications for those assumptions, and results for the global energy and land-use systems as well as emissions, concentrations and radiative forcing. We also describe the history of scenario development and the present state of development of this branch of climate change research. We discuss the implications of alternative social, economic, demographic, and technology development possibilities, as well as potential stabilization regimes for the supply of and demand for energy, the choice of energy technologies, and prices of energy and agricultural commodities. Land use and land cover will also be discussed with the emphasis on the interaction between the demand for bioenergy and crops, crop yields, crop prices, and policy settings to limit greenhouse gas emissions.

Eom, Jiyong; Moss, Richard H.; Edmonds, James A.; Calvin, Katherine V.; Clarke, Leon E.; Dooley, James J.; Kim, Son H.; Kopp, Roberrt; Kyle, G. Page; Luckow, Patrick W.; Patel, Pralit L.; Thomson, Allison M.; Wise, Marshall A.; Zhou, Yuyu

2013-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

337

Integrated dynamic landscape analysis and modeling system (IDLAMS) : installation manual.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Integrated Dynamic Landscape Analysis and Modeling System (IDLAMS) is a prototype, integrated land management technology developed through a joint effort between Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and the US Army Corps of Engineers Construction Engineering Research Laboratories (USACERL). Dr. Ronald C. Sundell, Ms. Pamela J. Sydelko, and Ms. Kimberly A. Majerus were the principal investigators (PIs) for this project. Dr. Zhian Li was the primary software developer. Dr. Jeffrey M. Keisler, Mr. Christopher M. Klaus, and Mr. Michael C. Vogt developed the decision analysis component of this project. It was developed with funding support from the Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP), a land/environmental stewardship research program with participation from the US Department of Defense (DoD), the US Department of Energy (DOE), and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). IDLAMS predicts land conditions (e.g., vegetation, wildlife habitats, and erosion status) by simulating changes in military land ecosystems for given training intensities and land management practices. It can be used by military land managers to help predict the future ecological condition for a given land use based on land management scenarios of various levels of training intensity. It also can be used as a tool to help land managers compare different land management practices and further determine a set of land management activities and prescriptions that best suit the needs of a specific military installation.

Li, Z.; Majerus, K. A.; Sundell, R. C.; Sydelko, P. J.; Vogt, M. C.

1999-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

338

Integrated dynamic landscape analysis and modeling system (IDLAMS) : programmer's manual.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Integrated Dynamic Landscape Analysis and Modeling System (IDLAMS) is a prototype, integrated land management technology developed through a joint effort between Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and the US Army Corps of Engineers Construction Engineering Research Laboratories (USACERL). Dr. Ronald C. Sundell, Ms. Pamela J. Sydelko, and Ms. Kimberly A. Majerus were the principal investigators (PIs) for this project. Dr. Zhian Li was the primary software developer. Dr. Jeffrey M. Keisler, Mr. Christopher M. Klaus, and Mr. Michael C. Vogt developed the decision analysis component of this project. It was developed with funding support from the Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP), a land/environmental stewardship research program with participation from the US Department of Defense (DoD), the US Department of Energy (DOE), and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). IDLAMS predicts land conditions (e.g., vegetation, wildlife habitats, and erosion status) by simulating changes in military land ecosystems for given training intensities and land management practices. It can be used by military land managers to help predict the future ecological condition for a given land use based on land management scenarios of various levels of training intensity. It also can be used as a tool to help land managers compare different land management practices and further determine a set of land management activities and prescriptions that best suit the needs of a specific military installation.

Klaus, C. M.; Li, Z.; Majerus, K. A.; Sundell, R. C.; Sydelko, P. J.; Vogt, M. C.

1999-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

339

Land Use and natUraL resoUrces  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in other areas. Students in our Green Building and Sustainable Design and Renewable Energy certificate1 Land Use and natUraL resoUrces Fall 2013 Including: Mitigation and Conservation Banking Climate making changes in our lives. We move to another city, change jobs or change our diet to be healthier. UC

California at Davis, University of

340

Measurement and Modeling of Sorption-Induced Strain and Permeability Changes in Coal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Strain caused by the adsorption of gases was measured in samples of subbituminous coal from the Powder River basin of Wyoming, U.S.A., and high-volatile bituminous coal from the Uinta-Piceance basin of Utah, U.S.A. using a newly developed strain measurement apparatus. The apparatus can be used to measure strain on multiple small coal samples based on the optical detection of the longitudinal strain. The swelling and shrinkage (strain) in the coal samples resulting from the adsorption of carbon dioxide, nitrogen, methane, helium, and a mixture of gases was measured. Sorption-induced strain processes were shown to be reversible and easily modeled with a Langmuir-type equation. Extended Langmuir theory was applied to satisfactorily model strain caused by the adsorption of gas mixtures using the pure gas Langmuir strain constants. The amount of time required to obtain accurate strain data was greatly reduced compared to other strain measurement methods. Sorption-induced changes in permeability were also measured as a function of pres-sure. Cleat compressibility was found to be variable, not constant. Calculated variable cleat-compressibility constants were found to correlate well with previously published data for other coals. During permeability tests, sorption-induced matrix shrinkage was clearly demonstrated by higher permeability values at lower pore pressures while holding overburden pressure constant. Measured permeability data were modeled using three dif-ferent permeability models from the open literature that take into account sorption-induced matrix strain. All three models poorly matched the measured permeability data because they overestimated the impact of measured sorption-induced strain on permeabil-ity. However, by applying an experimentally derived expression to the measured strain data that accounts for the confining overburden pressure, pore pressure, coal type, and gas type, the permeability models were significantly improved.

Eric P. Robertson

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land change modeler" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Center for Environmental Management of Military Lands (970) 491-2748 cemml@cemml.colostate.edu  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Symposia, Soil Erosion Modeling Workshops, and Sustainable Range Management Workshops. These workshops support environmental and sustainable land management programs to include communication, educationCenter for Environmental Management of Military Lands (970) 491-2748 · cemml

342

Global modeling of cancer gene expression signa-Cancer leads to permanent changes in cell's physiological state and various  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Global modeling of cancer gene expression signa- tures Cancer leads to permanent changes in cell cancer types. Less is known about the underlying biological processes, or relationships between different cancer types with respect to these changes. While each specific cancer type has a set of unique

Kaski, Samuel

343

Modeling hydrologic and water quality extremes in a changing climate: A statistical approach based on extreme value theory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modeling hydrologic and water quality extremes in a changing climate: A statistical approach based on extreme value theory Erin Towler,1,2 Balaji Rajagopalan,1,3 Eric Gilleland,2 R. Scott Summers,1 David makes quantifying changes to hydrologic extremes, as well as associated water quality effects

Katz, Richard

344

Title: Canada Land Inventory: Land Capability for Recreation Data Creator /  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Title: Canada Land Inventory: Land Capability for Recreation Data Creator / Copyright Owner: National Archives of Canada, Visual and Sound Archives Division Publisher: National Archives of Canada, Visual and Sound Archives Division; developed under the auspices of Environment Canada; distributed

345

Title: Canada Land Inventory: Land Capability for Ungulates Data Creator /  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Title: Canada Land Inventory: Land Capability for Ungulates Data Creator / Copyright Owner: National Archives of Canada, visual and Sound Archives Division Publisher: National Archives of Canada, Visual and Sound Archives Division; developed under the auspices of Environment Canada; distributed

346

Title: Canada Land Inventory: Land Capability for Agriculture Data Creator /  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Title: Canada Land Inventory: Land Capability for Agriculture Data Creator / Copyright Owner: National Archives of Canada, Visual and Sound Archives Division Publisher: National Archives of Canada, Visual and Sound Archives Division; developed under the auspices of Environment Canada; distributed

347

National Forest Land Scheme  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Community Right to Buy. Communities are encouraged to register an interest in the land they wish to buy Ministers to make a late registration of interest. When Forestry Commission Scotland decides to sell, a community organisation could consider the opportunities for working in partnership with Forestry Commission

348

Clearing Debris from Land  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

level. Burial ? Tree debris can be buried, but the cost is high. ? Use a chipping machine to eliminate smaller branches and reduce the amount of burial space needed. Landfill ? You can place tree debris in erosion gullies (where the land is not prac...

McFarland, Mark L.

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

349

Methods for modeling impact-induced reactivity changes in small reactors.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes techniques for determining impact deformation and the subsequent reactivity change for a space reactor impacting the ground following a potential launch accident or for large fuel bundles in a shipping container following an accident. This technique could be used to determine the margin of subcriticality for such potential accidents. Specifically, the approach couples a finite element continuum mechanics model (Pronto3D or Presto) with a neutronics code (MCNP). DAGMC, developed at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, is used to enable MCNP geometric queries to be performed using Pronto3D output. This paper summarizes what has been done historically for reactor launch analysis, describes the impact criticality analysis methodology, and presents preliminary results using representative reactor designs.

Tallman, Tyler N.; Radel, Tracy E.; Smith, Jeffrey A.; Villa, Daniel L.; Smith, Brandon M. (U. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI); Radel, Ross F.; Lipinski, Ronald J.; Wilson, Paul Philip Hood (U. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI)

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Hartle's model within the general theory of perturbative matchings: the change in mass  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hartle's model provides the most widely used analytic framework to describe isolated compact bodies rotating slowly in equilibrium up to second order in perturbations in the context of General Relativity. Apart from some explicit assumptions, there are some implicit, like the "continuity" of the functions in the perturbed metric across the surface of the body. In this work we sketch the basics for the analysis of the second order problem using the modern theory of perturbed matchings. In particular, the result we present is that when the energy density of the fluid in the static configuration does not vanish at the boundary, one of the functions of the second order perturbation in the setting of the original work by Hartle is not continuous. This discrepancy affects the calculation of the change in mass of the rotating star with respect to the static configuration needed to keep the central energy density unchanged.

Borja Reina; Ral Vera

2014-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

351

Integrated modeling of CO2 storage and leakage scenarios including transitions between super- and sub-critical conditions, and phase change between liquid and gaseous CO2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Storage of CO{sub 2} in saline aquifers is intended to be at supercritical pressure and temperature conditions, but CO{sub 2} leaking from a geologic storage reservoir and migrating toward the land surface (through faults, fractures, or improperly abandoned wells) would reach subcritical conditions at depths shallower than 500-750 m. At these and shallower depths, subcritical CO{sub 2} can form two-phase mixtures of liquid and gaseous CO{sub 2}, with significant latent heat effects during boiling and condensation. Additional strongly non-isothermal effects can arise from decompression of gas-like subcritical CO{sub 2}, the so-called Joule-Thomson effect. Integrated modeling of CO{sub 2} storage and leakage requires the ability to model non-isothermal flows of brine and CO{sub 2} at conditions that range from supercritical to subcritical, including three-phase flow of aqueous phase, and both liquid and gaseous CO{sub 2}. In this paper, we describe and demonstrate comprehensive simulation capabilities that can cope with all possible phase conditions in brine-CO{sub 2} systems. Our model formulation includes: (1) an accurate description of thermophysical properties of aqueous and CO{sub 2}-rich phases as functions of temperature, pressure, salinity and CO{sub 2} content, including the mutual dissolution of CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O; (2) transitions between super- and subcritical conditions, including phase change between liquid and gaseous CO{sub 2}; (3) one-, two-, and three-phase flow of brine-CO{sub 2} mixtures, including heat flow; (4) non-isothermal effects associated with phase change, mutual dissolution of CO{sub 2} and water, and (de-) compression effects; and (5) the effects of dissolved NaCl, and the possibility of precipitating solid halite, with associated porosity and permeability change. Applications to specific leakage scenarios demonstrate that the peculiar thermophysical properties of CO{sub 2} provide a potential for positive as well as negative feedbacks on leakage rates, with a combination of self-enhancing and self-limiting effects. Lower viscosity and density of CO{sub 2} as compared to aqueous fluids provides a potential for self-enhancing effects during leakage, while strong cooling effects from liquid CO{sub 2} boiling into gas, and from expansion of gas rising towards the land surface, act to self-limit discharges. Strong interference between fluid phases under three-phase conditions (aqueous - liquid CO{sub 2} - gaseous CO{sub 2}) also tends to reduce CO{sub 2} fluxes. Feedback on different space and time scales can induce non-monotonic behavior of CO{sub 2} flow rates.

Pruess, K.

2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

352

Stretched-Grid Model Intercomparison Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- Land-sea differences - Surface parameters Applications (besides regional climate variability and change, Russia #12;OUTLINE 1. INTRODUCTION: Exploring the variable- resolution stretched-grid approach (for grid- point models: Staniforth and Mitchell 1978, and for spectral models: Schmidt 1977) to regional climate

Gruner, Daniel S.

353

GCAM 3.0 Agriculture and Land Use: Data Sources and Methods  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the data processing methods used in the GCAM 3.0 agriculture and land use component, starting from all source data used, and detailing all calculations and assumptions made in generating the model inputs. The report starts with a brief introduction to modeling of agriculture and land use in GCAM 3.0, and then provides documentation of the data and methods used for generating the base-year dataset and future scenario parameters assumed in the model input files. Specifically, the report addresses primary commodity production, secondary (animal) commodity production, disposition of commodities, land allocation, land carbon contents, and land values.

Kyle, G. Page; Luckow, Patrick; Calvin, Katherine V.; Emanuel, William R.; Nathan, Mayda; Zhou, Yuyu

2011-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

354

Aggressive landing maneuvers for unmanned aerial vehicles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

VTOL (Vertical Take Off and Landing) vehicle landing is considered to be a critically difficult task for both land, marine, and urban operations. This thesis describes one possible control approach to enable landing of ...

Bayraktar, Selcuk

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Revisiting Hartle's model using perturbed matching theory to second order: amending the change in mass  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hartle's model describes the equilibrium configuration of a rotating isolated compact body in perturbation theory up to second order in General Relativity. The interior of the body is a perfect fluid with a barotropic equation of state, no convective motions and rigid rotation. That interior is matched across its surface to an asymptotically flat vacuum exterior. Perturbations are taken to second order around a static and spherically symmetric background configuration. Apart from the explicit assumptions, the perturbed configuration is constructed upon some implicit premises, in particular the continuity of the functions describing the perturbation in terms of some background radial coordinate. In this work we revisit the model within a modern general and consistent theory of perturbative matchings to second order, which is independent of the coordinates and gauges used to describe the two regions to be joined. We explore the matching conditions up to second order in full. The main particular result we present is that the radial function $m_0$ (in the setting of the original work) of the second order perturbation tensor, contrary to the original assumption, presents a jump at the surface of the star, which is proportional to the value of the energy density of the background configuration there. As a consequence, the change in mass needed by the perturbed configuration to keep the value of the central energy density unchanged must be amended. We also discuss some subtleties that arise when studying the deformation of the star.

Borja Reina; Ral Vera

2014-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

356

Improving parameter estimation and water table depth simulation in a land surface model using GRACE water storage and estimated base flow data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2007), Estimating ground water storage changes in thestorage (i.e. , all of the snow, ice, surface water, soil moisture, and ground-

Lo, Min-Hui; Famiglietti, James S; Yeh, P. J.-F.; Syed, T. H

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

ENVIRONMENTAL COMPLIANCE SERVICES CENTER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT OF MILITARY LANDS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

· Environmental Database Development and Management · Storm Water Modeling #12;ENVIRONMENTAL COMPLIANCE SERVICES CENTER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT OF MILITARY LANDS CEMML of environmental managers. The Center provides assistance to environmental managers in compliance areas such as air

358

FTT:Power : A global model of the power sector with induced technological change and natural resource depletion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This work introduces a model of Future Technology Transformations for the power sector (FTT:Power), a representation of global power systems based on market competition, induced technological change (ITC) and natural resource use and depletion. It is the first component of a family of sectoral bottom-up models of technology, designed for integration into the global macroeconometric model E3MG. ITC occurs as a result of technological learning produced by cumulative investment and leads to highly nonlinear, irreversible and path dependent technological transitions. The model uses a dynamic coupled set of logistic differential equations. As opposed to traditional bottom-up energy models based on systems optimisation, such differential equations offer an appropriate treatment of the times and structure of change involved in sectoral technology transformations, as well as a much reduced computational load. Resource use and depletion are represented by local cost-supply curves, which give rise to different regional...

Mercure, J -F

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Elsevier Editorial System(tm) for Land Use Policy Manuscript Draft  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: Deforestation Dynamics and Policy Changes in Bolivia's post-Neoliberal Era Article Type: Regular Paper Keywords: land reform; fire policy; land change; deforestation; Bolivia; Evo Morales Corresponding Author: Mr the Corredor Biocenico of southeastern Bolivia to determine if rates of agriculturally- driven forest

360

A georeferenced Agent-Based Model to analyze the climate change impacts on the Andorra winter tourism  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This study presents a georeferenced agent-based model to analyze the climate change impacts on the ski industry in Andorra and the effect of snowmaking as future adaptation strategy. The present study is the first attempt to analyze the ski industry in the Pyrenees region and will contribute to a better understanding of the vulnerability of Andorran ski resorts and the suitability of snowmaking as potential adaptation strategy to climate change. The resulting model can be used as a planning support tool to help local stakeholders understand the vulnerability and potential impacts of climate change. This model can be used in the decision-making process of designing and developing appropriate sustainable adaptation strategies to future climate variability.

Pons-Pons, M; Rosas-Casals, M; Sureda, B; Jover, E

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land change modeler" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Meanings, Measures, Maps, and Models: Understanding the Mechanisms of Continuous Change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

There is now considerable controversy concerning the role that incremental change plays in the process of organizational transformation. Some scholars assert that incremental change is the primary source of resistance to ...

Repenning, Nelson

362

Climate change and agriculture : global and regional effects using an economic model of international trade  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Empirical estimates of the economic welfare implications of the impact of climate change on global agricultural production are made. Agricultural yield changes resulting from climate scenarios associated with a doubling ...

Reilly, John M.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Coastal communities and climate change : a dynamic model of risk perception, storms, and adaptation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Climate change impacts, including sea-level rise and changes in tropical storm frequency and intensity, will pose signicant challenges to city planners and coastal zone managers trying to make wise investment and protection ...

Franck, Travis Read

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Mexican drought: an observational modeling and tree ring study of variability and climate change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

changes in Mexican agriculture over the last decade and a half are the combined result of severe climate-

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Increasing Understanding of Species Responses to Global Changes Through Modeling Plant Metapopulation Dynamics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mediterranean type ecosystem to the combined impacts of projected climate changeclimate change on geomorphology and desertification along a mediterranean-

Swab, Rebecca

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Modeling Potential Equilibrium States of Vegetation and Terrestrial Water Cycle of Mesoamerica under Climate Change Scenarios*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

precipitation, the impacts of climate change on vegetation and water cycle are predicted with relatively low under Climate Change Scenarios* PABLO IMBACH,1 LUIS MOLINA,1 BRUNO LOCATELLI,# OLIVIER ROUPSARD,1,@ GIL MAHE´ ,& RONALD NEILSON,**,&& LENIN CORRALES,11 MARKO SCHOLZE,## AND PHILIPPE CIAIS @@ 1 Climate Change

Boyer, Edmond

367

Temporal Land Cover Analysis for Net Ecosystem Improvement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We delineated 8 watersheds contributing to previously defined river reaches within the 1,468-km2 historical floodplain of the tidally influenced lower Columbia River and estuary. We assessed land-cover change at the watershed, reach, and restoration site scales by reclassifying remote-sensing data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Coastal Change Analysis Programs land cover/land change product into forest, wetland, and urban categories. The analysis showed a 198.3 km2 loss of forest cover during the first 6 years of the Columbia Estuary Ecosystem Restoration Program, 20012006. Total measured urbanization in the contributing watersheds of the estuary during the full 1996-2006 change analysis period was 48.4 km2. Trends in forest gain/loss and urbanization differed between watersheds. Wetland gains and losses were within the margin of error of the satellite imagery analysis. No significant land cover change was measured at restoration sites, although it was visible in aerial imagery, therefore, the 30-m land-cover product may not be appropriate for assessment of early-stage wetland restoration. These findings suggest that floodplain restoration sites in reaches downstream of watersheds with decreasing forest cover will be subject to increased sediment loads, and those downstream of urbanization will experience effects of increased impervious surfaces on hydrologic processes.

Ke, Yinghai; Coleman, Andre M.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.

2013-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

368

Evaluating land application effects  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Philadelphia, PA Water Department embarked on a land application program of its treated wastewater sludge in 1977. Initially, liquid sludge averaging from 1-5% solids was applied to approximately 400 acres of corn, soybeans, and sod at rates sufficient to supply crop nitrogen needs. During the 1978 through 1984 growing seasons, crops and soils were monitored for heavy metals (bioavailability of cadmium, copper, nickel, chromium, lead and zinc) and in 1984 for PCB accumulation. This report summarizes results of the monitoring program until 1984.

Sarkis, K. (Philadelphia Water Department, PA (USA))

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Proposed Conveyance of Land  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 - SeptemberMicroneedles for4-16HamadaBaO/Al2O3 leanProposalConveyance of Land at the

370

Climate Change and Extinctions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lectures presents: Climate Change and Extinctions Happening2013. He will present a climate change extinction model that

Sinervo, Barry

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Mapping Process to Pattern in the Landscape Change of the Amazonian Frontier  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mapping Process to Pattern in the Landscape Change of the Amazonian Frontier Robert Walker and agricultural frontiers. One goal of the present article is to address the land- use and land-cover decisions in the Amazon's colonization frontiers. Key Words: Amazon, deforestation, land use change. C hanges in land use

Walker, Robert T.

372

Absentee Landowners Near a Military Installation in Texas: Use, Motivation, and Emotional Tie to their Land  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.......................................................... 97 Family land. ........................................................................................................................... 98 Leasing land.... ......................................................................................................................... 117 Leasing land. ....................................................................................................................... 118 Hunting on land...

Dankert, Amber 1980-

2012-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

373

Land conversion in Amazonia and Northern South America : influences on regional hydrology and ecosystem response  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A numerical model of the terrestrial biosphere (Ecosystem Demography Model) is compbined with an atmospheric model (Brazilian Regional Atmospheric Modeling System) to investigate how land conversion in the Amazon and ...

Knox, Ryan Gary

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Superscaling and Charge-Changing Neutrino Scattering from Nuclei in the $\\boldsymbol ?$-Region beyond the Relativistic Fermi Gas Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The superscaling analysis using the scaling function obtained within the coherent density fluctuation model is extended to calculate charge-changing neutrino and antineutrino scattering on $^{12}$C at energies from 1 to 2 GeV not only in the quasielastic but also in the delta excitation region. The results are compared with those obtained using the scaling functions from the relativistic Fermi gas model and from the superscaling analysis of inclusive scattering of electrons from nuclei.

M. V. Ivanov; M. B. Barbaro; J. A. Caballero; A. N. Antonov; E. Moya de Guerra; M. K. Gaidarov

2008-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

375

Land Stewardship | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Improvements are implemented with consideration of adjacent land uses, owners, and political entities. Success is defined when measurable parameters are achieved. Scope The team...

376

CHANGING OUR WAYS SCOTLAND'S CLIMATE CHANGE PROGRAMME  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Introduction 15 Overview of emission trends at sector level 15 Energy sector 18 Transport sector 29 Agriculture, forestry and land use sector 37 Business sector 44 Residential sector 51 Public sector 56 Waste management in light of sound scientific evidence that Scotland's climate will change significantly over the coming

377

Bringing climate change down to earth : science and participation in Canadian and Australian climate change campaigns  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

while reducing air and water pollutants. Individualclimate change, rivers and water, forests, land health andand cooling, 11.1% from water heating, 7.5% from appliances,

Padolsky, Miriam Elana

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Title: Canada Land Inventory: Land Capability for Forestry Data Creator /  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Title: Canada Land Inventory: Land Capability for Forestry Data Creator / Copyright Owner: National Archives of Canada, Visual and Sound Archives Division; Publisher: National Archives of Canada, Visual and Sound Archives Division; developed under the auspices of Environment Canada; distributed by Natural

379

Title: Canada Land Inventory: 1966 Land Use Data Creator /  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Title: Canada Land Inventory: 1966 Land Use Data Creator / Copyright Owner: National Archives of Canada, Visual and Sound Archives Division Publisher: National Archives of Canada, Visual and Sound Archives Division; developed under the auspices of Environment Canada; distributed by Natural Resources

380

PDO-Related Heat and Temperature Budget Changes in a Model of the North Pacific JORDAN T. DAWE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the Pacific. The PDO index shows significant correlations with a wide variety of climate indices, including between a variety of Indian and Pacific tropical climate indices and the PDO. Since atmospheric signalsPDO-Related Heat and Temperature Budget Changes in a Model of the North Pacific JORDAN T. DAWE

Thompson, LuAnne

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land change modeler" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Verification and Validation of EnergyPlus Conduction Finite Difference and Phase Change Material Models for Opaque Wall Assemblies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Phase change materials (PCMs) represent a potential technology to reduce peak loads and HVAC energy consumption in buildings. There are few building energy simulation programs that have the capability to simulate PCM but their accuracy has not been completely tested. This report summarizes NREL efforts to develop diagnostic tests cases to obtain accurate energy simulations when PCMs are modeled in residential buildings.

Tabares-Velasco, P. C.; Christensen, C.; Bianchi, M.; Booten, C.

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Peatland carbon cycle responses to hydrological change at time scales from years to centuries: Impacts on model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Peatland carbon cycle responses to hydrological change at time scales from years to centuries: Impacts on model simulations and regional carbon budgets By Benjamin N. Sulman A dissertation submitted to the long-term storage of carbon in peat, these ecosystems contain a significant fraction of the global

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

383

Submission of manuscript to Energy and Buildings A thermal model for Phase Change Materials in a building roof for a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Submission of manuscript to Energy and Buildings A thermal model for Phase Change Materials: Stéphane GUICHARD Physics and Mathematical Engineering Laboratory for Energy and Environment (PIMENT in "Energy and Buildings 70 (2014) http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/ S0378778813007962" DOI

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

384

Industrial Conflict, Mass Demonstrations, and Economic and Political Change in Postwar France: An Econometric Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Business Cycle: An Econometric Analysis. Oxford, Blackwell,in Postwar France: An Econometric Model Monique Borrel I.to political vagaries. The econometric model presented here

Borrel, Monique J

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Industrial Conflict, Mass Demonstrations, and Economic and Political Change in Postwar France: An Econometric Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Business Cycle: An Econometric Analysis. Oxford, Blackwell,in Postwar France: An Econometric Model Monique Borrel I.to political vagaries. The econometric model presented here

Borrel, Monique J

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Land Use and Ecosystems Data from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC)  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

CDIAC products are indexed and searchable through a customized interface powered by ORNL's Mercury search engine. Products include numeric data packages, publications, trend data, atlases, models, etc. and can be searched for by subject area, keywords, authors, product numbers, time periods, collection sites, spatial references, etc. Some of the collections may also be included in the CDIAC publication titled Trends Online: A Compendium of Global Change Data. Most data sets, many with numerous data files, are free to download from CDIAC's ftp area. Land Use and Ecosystems information includes Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration Data Sets, data sets from Africa and Asia, the Worldwide Organic Soil Carbon and Nitrogen Dataset, and much more.

387

Modeling economic impacts of climate change on U.S. forests  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Climate change is expected to modify forest growth. As a result, the forestry sector of the United States could be affected. The primary objective of this study was to examine the economic impacts of climate change on the U.S. forestry sector...

Sousa, Claudio Ney Martins De

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Wetland model in an earth systems modeling framework for regional environmental policy analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The objective of this research is to investigate incorporating a wetland component into a land energy and water fluxes model, the Community Land Model (CLM). CLM is the land fluxes component of the Integrated Global Systems ...

Awadalla, Sirein Salah

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Modeling vertical beta-diversity in tropical butterfly communities Thomas R. Walla, Steinar Engen, Philip J. DeVries and Russell Lande  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modeling vertical beta-diversity in tropical butterfly communities Thomas R. Walla, Steinar Engen vertical beta- diversity in tropical butterfly communities. Á/ Oikos 107: 610Á/618. We present a novel of structure present. Beta-diversity (MacArthur

Devries, Philip J.

390

Does Model Sensitivity to Changes in CO2 Provide a Measure of Sensitivity to Other Forcings?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. In a more recent study (Forest et al. 2006), changes in solar constant, volcanic aerosol, and vegeta- tion forcings on the nature of the forcing has been a subject of a number of recent studies (e.g., Cook

391

Oil and Gas on Public Lands (Texas)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The School Land Board may choose to lease lands for the production of oil and natural gas, on the condition that oil and gas resources are leased together and separate from other minerals. Lands...

392

The influence of deer hunting leases on land values in Brazos County, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

landowners have changed from season leasing to day leasing. In conjunction with the increasing interest in deer hunting, there has been a simultaneous increase in the sale value of agricult, ur- al land. This speculative correlation justifies a detailed... leasing activities are capitalized into agricultural land values. 2. To estimate the portion of the sale value of agricultural land attributable to deer hunting leases and compare this value with the capitalized value of deer hunting leases...

Andrews, Francis Boyd

1965-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Regression Model Predicting Appraised Unit Value of Land in San Francisco County from Number of and Distance to Public Transit Stops using GIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The objective of this study is to develop a quantifying model that predicts the appraised unit value of parcels in San Francisco County based on number of LEED-NC Public Transportation Access (PTA) qualified bus, light rail and commuter rail stops...

Son, Kiyoung

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

394

Final Technical Report for "Collaborative Research: Regional climate-change projections through next-generation empirical and dynamical models"  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project was a continuation of previous work under DOE CCPP funding in which we developed a twin approach of non-homogeneous hidden Markov models (NHMMs) and coupled ocean-atmosphere (O-A) intermediate-complexity models (ICMs) to identify the potentially predictable modes of climate variability, and to investigate their impacts on the regional-scale. We have developed a family of latent-variable NHMMs to simulate historical records of daily rainfall, and used them to downscale seasonal predictions. We have also developed empirical mode reduction (EMR) models for gaining insight into the underlying dynamics in observational data and general circulation model (GCM) simulations. Using coupled O-A ICMs, we have identified a new mechanism of interdecadal climate variability, involving the midlatitude oceans mesoscale eddy field and nonlinear, persistent atmospheric response to the oceanic anomalies. A related decadal mode is also identified, associated with the oceans thermohaline circulation. The goal of the continuation was to build on these ICM results and NHMM/EMR model developments and software to strengthen two key pillars of support for the development and application of climate models for climate change projections on time scales of decades to centuries, namely: (a) dynamical and theoretical understanding of decadal-to-interdecadal oscillations and their predictability; and (b) an interface from climate models to applications, in order to inform societal adaptation strategies to climate change at the regional scale, including model calibration, correction, downscaling and, most importantly, assessment and interpretation of spread and uncertainties in multi-model ensembles. Our main results from the grant consist of extensive further development of the hidden Markov models for rainfall simulation and downscaling specifically within the non-stationary climate change context together with the development of parallelized software; application of NHMMs to downscaling of rainfall projections over India; identification and analysis of decadal climate signals in data and models; and, studies of climate variability in terms of the dynamics of atmospheric flow regimes. Each of these project components is elaborated on below, followed by a list of publications resulting from the grant.

Robertson, A.W.; Ghil, M.; Kravtsov, K.; Smyth, P.J.

2011-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

395

Final Technical Report for "Collaborative Research: Regional climate-change projections through next-generation empirical and dynamical models"  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project was a continuation of previous work under DOE CCPP funding in which we developed a twin approach of non-homogeneous hidden Markov models (NHMMs) and coupled ocean-atmosphere (O-A) intermediate-complexity models (ICMs) to identify the potentially predictable modes of climate variability, and to investigate their impacts on the regional-scale. We have developed a family of latent-variable NHMMs to simulate historical records of daily rainfall, and used them to downscale seasonal predictions. We have also developed empirical mode reduction (EMR) models for gaining insight into the underlying dynamics in observational data and general circulation model (GCM) simulations. Using coupled O-A ICMs, we have identified a new mechanism of interdecadal climate variability, involving the midlatitude oceans?? mesoscale eddy field and nonlinear, persistent atmospheric response to the oceanic anomalies. A related decadal mode is also identified, associated with the oceans?? thermohaline circulation. The goal of the continuation was to build on these ICM results and NHMM/EMR model developments and software to strengthen two key pillars of support for the development and application of climate models for climate change projections on time scales of decades to centuries, namely: (a) dynamical and theoretical understanding of decadal-to-interdecadal oscillations and their predictability; and (b) an interface from climate models to applications, in order to inform societal adaptation strategies to climate change at the regional scale, including model calibration, correction, downscaling and, most importantly, assessment and interpretation of spread and uncertainties in multi-model ensembles. Our main results from the grant consist of extensive further development of the hidden Markov models for rainfall simulation and downscaling specifically within the non-stationary climate change context together with the development of parallelized software; application of NHMMs to downscaling of rainfall projections over India; identification and analysis of decadal climate signals in data and models; and, studies of climate variability in terms of the dynamics of atmospheric flow regimes. Each of these project components is elaborated on below, followed by a list of publications resulting from the grant.

Kravtsov, S.; Robertson, A. W.; Ghil, M.; Smyth, P. J.

2011-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

396

Land application of sludge  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This book is the proceedings of a workshop held in Las Vegas, NV in 1985 entitled Effects of Sewage Sludge Quality and Soil Properties on Plant Uptake of Sludge-Applied Trace Constituents. The workshop was in response to the need to utilize the most current available information in the development of regulations and criteria to safely apply and manage the land application of municipal sewage sludge. The participants were undoubtedly the most knowledgeable of this subject matter, and were divided into five separate but related task groups. The groups addressed the following sludge-related topics: (1) role of soil properties on accumulation of trace element by crops; (2) role of sludge properties on accumulation of trace elements by crops; (3) influence of long-term application on accumulation of trace elements by crops; (4) transfer of trace elements to the food chain, and (5) effects of trace organics in agroecosystems and their risk assessment to humans. The text, therefore, parallels those of the results of the task groups. The five main chapters followed a similar format, i.e., having an introduction section, a comprehensive literature review, discussion of recent and current data, and synthesis of the most relevant information.

Page, A.L.; Logan, T.J.; Ryan, J.A. (eds.)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Tracking a medically important spider: climate change, ecological niche modeling, and the brown recluse (Loxosceles reclusa)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

associations, and aid in planning vector-control strate- gies. ENM is useful for studying the complex dynamics of environment and biota over time and estimating distributional changes to medically important species [this paper, 2832], pests [11,60...2 and B2 emission scenarios [85]. We used a liberal (a2a) and conservative (b2a) scenario of socio- economical and associated green house gas changes for three time slices: 2020, 2050, and 2080. The A2 and B2 storylines assume heterogeneous world...

Selden, Paul A.; Saupe, Erin E.; Pape?, Monica; Vetter, Richard S.

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Climate change and hydropower production in the Swiss Alps:potential impacts and modelling uncertainties Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 11(3), 11911205, 2007  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Climate change and hydropower production in the Swiss Alps:potential impacts and modelling/1191/2007 © Author(s) 2007. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons License. Climate change and hydropower Improvement Laboratory, CH-1015 Lausanne, Switzerland 2 Ouranos, Consortium on Regional Climate Change

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

399

2012 Changing Arctic Ocean 506E/497E -Lecture 17 -Woodgate Global models in the Arctic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

;2 2012 Changing Arctic Ocean 506E/497E - Lecture 17 - Woodgate Deep waters of the Atlantic from http://sam://iodp.tamu.edu/publications/PR/303PR/images/Fig01.jpg Dickson et al, refs Denmark Strait ~ 650m deep Iceland Scotland Ridge ~ 400

Washington at Seattle, University of

400

Essays on empirical time series modeling with causality and structural change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

change in the volatility of five Asian and U.S. stock markets is examined during the post-liberalization period (1990-2005) in the Asian financial markets, using the Sup LM test. Four Asian financial markets (Hong Kong, Japan, Korea, and Singapore...

Kim, Jin Woong

2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land change modeler" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Potential impacts of climate change on tropospheric ozone in California: a preliminary episodic modeling assessment of the Los Angeles basin and the Sacramento valley  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this preliminary and relatively short modeling effort, an initial assessment is made for the potential air quality implications of climate change in California. The focus is mainly on the effects of changes in temperature and related meteorological and emission factors on ozone formation. Photochemical modeling is performed for two areas in the state: the Los Angeles Basin and the Sacramento Valley.

Taha, Haider

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

An integral-balance nonlinear model to simulate changes in soil moisture, groundwater and surface runoff dynamics at the hillslope scale  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An integral-balance nonlinear model to simulate changes in soil moisture, groundwater and surface-state integral-balance model for soil moisture and groundwater dynamics. Development of the model was motivated. ? 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. 1. Introduction Recent studies on the modeling

Jay, Laurent O.

403

Modeling the response of subglacial drainage at Paakitsoq, West Greenland, to 21st century climate change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and into the future. Here, we apply a physically-based, subglacial hydrological model to the Paakitsoq region, west Greenland, and run it into the future to calculate patterns of daily subglacial water pressure fluctuations in response to climatic warming. The model...

Mayaud, Jerome R.; Banwell, Alison F.; Arnold, Neil S.; Willis, Ian C.

2015-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

404

LIKELIHOOD RATIO TESTS FOR THE STRUCTURAL CHANGE OF AN AR(P) MODEL TO A THRESHOLD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

or econo- metric model is stable to some possible events, such as the great depres- sion/expansion, oil price shocks and abrupt policy intervention. Due to the well need for model stability, a lot) and Quandt (1960). For the history and more early results, we refer to Horv´ath (1993, 1995) and Cs

Ling, Shiqing

405

Minerals on Public Lands (Texas)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Any tract of land that belongs to the state, including islands, salt and freshwater lakes, bays, inlets, marshes, and reefs owned by the state within tidewater limits, the part of the Gulf of...

406

Delaware Land Protection Act (Delaware)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Land Protection Act requires the Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control to work with the Delaware Open Space Council to develop standards and criteria for determining the...

407

Land and Facility Use Planning  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The Land and Facility Use Planning process provides a way to guide future site development and reuse based on the shared long-term goals and objectives of the Department, site and its stakeholders. Does not cancel other directives.

1996-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

408

How well do we know northern land cover? Comparison of four global vegetation and wetland products  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer data (GLCC.AVHRR), (2) the Global Land Cover Classification.AVHRR database underestimates evergreen needleleaf forest in favor of mixed forest; and (3) at high latitudes impacts of climate change on land- atmosphere exchanges of energy, water, carbon and green- house gases [e

Smith, Laurence C.

409

Lisa Shrestha Inclusive Land Policy and Human Security in Post-conflict Situation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of will power. The changing livelihood strategy of people with increase in size of landholding shows District Summary Land as a Source of Inequity, Power Struggle and Violent Conflict The findings of this study shows land can be one of the prominent sources for power truggle which propagates into violent

Richner, Heinz

410

Tuesday, March 14, 2006 SPECIAL SESSION: PHOENIX LANDING SITE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

polar cap have been characterized. This situation changed early in 2002 when large amounts of water ice. Regional melting and atmos- pheric exchange will affect all the soils. Science goal #1: Study the history of the Phoenix Mission Landing Site [#1910] The Phoenix mission will study the subsurface ice discovered in 2002

Rathbun, Julie A.

411

Electrochemical-thermal modeling and microscale phase change for passive internal thermal management of lithium ion batteries.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A fully coupled electrochemical and thermal model for lithium-ion batteries is developed to investigate the impact of different thermal management strategies on battery performance. In contrast to previous modeling efforts focused either exclusively on particle electrochemistry on the one hand or overall vehicle simulations on the other, the present work predicts local electrochemical reaction rates using temperature-dependent data on commercially available batteries designed for high rates (C/LiFePO{sub 4}) in a computationally efficient manner. Simulation results show that conventional external cooling systems for these batteries, which have a low composite thermal conductivity ({approx}1 W/m-K), cause either large temperature rises or internal temperature gradients. Thus, a novel, passive internal cooling system that uses heat removal through liquid-vapor phase change is developed. Although there have been prior investigations of phase change at the microscales, fluid flow at the conditions expected here is not well understood. A first-principles based cooling system performance model is developed and validated experimentally, and is integrated into the coupled electrochemical-thermal model for assessment of performance improvement relative to conventional thermal management strategies. The proposed cooling system passively removes heat almost isothermally with negligible thermal resistances between the heat source and cooling fluid. Thus, the minimization of peak temperatures and gradients within batteries allow increased power and energy densities unencumbered by thermal limitations.

Fuller, Thomas F. (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA); Bandhauer, Todd (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA); Garimella, Srinivas (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Manuscript prepared for Geosci. Model Dev. with version 3.0 of the LATEX class copernicus.cls.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

an interactive sea-ice and land component. SPEEDO is a global earth system model of intermediate complexity and predicting future changes. Global state-of-the-art earth system models are computationally expensive which. For these scientific purposes computationally efficient earth system models of intermediate complexity (EMICs) have

Haak, Hein

413

Modeling Changes in Connectivity at U.S. Airports: A Small Community Perspective  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

There currently exists no industry-standard model for measuring an airport's level of connectivity to the global air transportation network. This discussion paper introduces the Airport Connectivity Quality Index (ACQI)--a ...

Wittman, Michael D.

2013-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

414

Modeling Cerebral Blood Flow Control During Posture Change from Sitting to Standing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and syncope, which are major causes of morbidity and mortality in elderly people. In this paper, we focus our these effects we build upon our previous work which suggested (using a 3-element wind- kessel model) that both

415

Evaluation of short-term climate change prediction in multi-model CMIP5 decadal hindcasts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

events such as trop- ical cyclone activity. On decadal timescales, some aspects of internal climate skill of individual models have been analyzed separately for multi-year prediction horizons over

Webster, Peter J.

416

Advanced Technologies in Energy-Economy Models for Climate Change Assessment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Considerations regarding the roles of advanced technologies are crucial in energy-economic modeling, as these technologies, while usually not yet commercially viable, could substitute for fossil energy when relevant policies ...

Morris, J.F.

417

How will changes in global climate influence California?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Department of Land, Air and Water Resources, UC Davis.climate change impacts on water for agriculture and otherincreased flooding and reduced water availability, higher

Weare, B C

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Welcome to the University of Minnesota Land and Atmospheric Science Graduate Program!  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of land use change and Best Management Practices (agriculture, urbanization) on air or water quality practices and precision agriculture on crop yield and environmental quality. While research or coursework student ratio. Environmental Science topics constitute the majority of research conducted

Minnesota, University of

419

Modeling the Uncertain Future of a Threatened Habitat: Climate Change and Urban Growth in California Sage Scrub  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Under projected climate change, mediterranean-climate in theland use and climate change in mediterranean regions,TO PROJECTED CLIMATE CHANGE IN A THREATENED, MEDITERRANEAN-

Riordan, Erin Coulter

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Modeling Climate Change Policies in Canada and the U.S.: An Update  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In a report to the IETC in 2007, we described the set of CIMS models that would be used to simulate different climate policies in both the United States and Canada. This report will describe the various policies simulated in the two countries...

Roop, J. M.; Tubbs, W. J.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land change modeler" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

An Adaptive Change Detection Scheme for a Nonlinear Beam Model \\Lambda  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is persistently excited. Simulation studies are used to illustrate the applicability of the theoretical results approximation at several levels. The plant is modeled by a partial differential equation, which must be solved with a numerical example which illustrates its utility. The paper is organized as follows. In Section 2 we give

422

Original article A mathematical model to describe the change in moisture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for 200­300 s. During hydrothermal treatment of starchy foods, some physical and chemical processes take starch during hydrothermal treatment Ikbal Zarguili,1 Zoulikha Maache-Rezzoug,1 * Catherine Loisel2 on gravimetric data. The model proposes an exponential variation in the moisture content with processing time

Boyer, Edmond

423

A model study of the effects of climatic precipitation changes on ground temperatures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The cumulative effect of these processes governs the heat flux at the ground surface and couples surface air of a prairie region in the southern Great Plains of North America and force the model with meteorological data heat within the soil, vegetation, and air; chemical weathering; and biological processes

Smerdon, Jason E.

424

Regional climate effects of irrigation and urbanization in thewestern united states: a model intercomparison  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the western United States, more than 30,500 square miles has been converted to irrigated agriculture and urban areas. This study compares the climate responses of four regional climate models (RCMs) to these past land-use changes. The RCMs used two contrasting land cover distributions: potential natural vegetation, and modern land cover that includes agriculture and urban areas. Three of the RCMs represented irrigation by supplementing soil moisture, producing large decreases in August mean (-2.5 F to -5.6 F) and maximum (-5.2 F to -10.1 F) 2-meter temperatures where natural vegetation was converted to irrigated agriculture. Conversion to irrigated agriculture also resulted in large increases in relative humidity (9 percent 36 percent absolute change). Only one of the RCMs produced increases in summer minimum temperature. Converting natural vegetation to urban land cover produced modest but discernable climate effects in all models, with the magnitude of the effects dependent upon the preexisting vegetation type. Overall, the RCM results indicate that land use change impacts are most pronounced during the summer months, when surface heating is strongest and differences in surface moisture between irrigated land and natural vegetation are largest. The irrigation effect on summer maximum temperatures is comparable in magnitude (but opposite in sign) to predicted future temperature change due to increasing greenhouse gas concentrations.

Snyder, M.A.; Kueppers, L.M.; Sloan, L.C.; Cavan, D.C.; Jin, J.; Kanamaru, H.; Miller, N.L.; Tyree, M.; Du, H.; Weare, B.

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Trade-offs of different land and bioenergy policies on the path to achieving climate targets.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many papers have shown that bioenergy and land-use are potentially important elements in a strategy to limit anthropogenic climate change. But, significant expansion of bioenergy production can have a large terrestrial footprint. In this paper, we test the implications for land use, the global energy system, carbon cycle, and carbon prices of meeting a specific climate target, using a single fossil fuel and industrial sector policy instrumentthe carbon tax, but with five alternative bioenergy and land-use policy architectures. We find that the policies we examined have differing effects on the different segments of the economy. Comprehensive land policies can reduce land-use change emissions, increasing allowable emissions in the energy system, but have implications for the cost of food. Bioenergy taxes and constraints, on the other hand, have little effect on food prices, but can result in increased carbon and energy prices.

Calvin, Katherine V.; Wise, Marshall A.; Kyle, G. Page; Patel, Pralit L.; Clarke, Leon E.; Edmonds, James A.

2014-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

426

Exploration and Modeling of Structural changes in Waste Glass Under Corrosion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Vitrification is currently the world-wide treatment of choice for the disposition of high-level nuclear wastes. In glasses, radionuclides are atomistically bonded into the solid, resulting in a highly durable product, with borosilicate glasses exhibiting particularly excellent durability in water. Considering that waste glass is designed to retain the radionuclides within the waste form for long periods, it is important to understand the long-term stability of these materials when they react in the environment, especially in the presence of water. Based on a number of previous studies, there is general consensus regarding the mechanisms controlling the initial rate of nuclear waste glass dissolution. Agreement regarding the cause of the observed decrease in dissolution rate at extended times, however, has been elusive. Two general models have been proposed to explain this behavior, and it has been concluded that both concepts are valid and must be taken into account when considering the decrease in dissolution rate. Furthermore, other processes such as water diffusion, ion exchange, and precipitation of mineral phases onto the glass surface may occur in parallel with dissolution of the glass and can influence long-term performance. Our proposed research will address these issues through a combination of aqueous-phase dissolution/reaction experiments and probing of the resulting surface layers with state-of-the-art analytical methods. These methods include solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (SSNMR) and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS). The resulting datasets will then be coupled with computational chemistry and reaction-rate modeling to address the most persistent uncertainties in the understanding of glass corrosion, which indeed have limited the performance of the best corrosion models to date. With an improved understanding of corrosion mechanisms, models can be developed and improved that, while still conservative, take advantage of the inherent durability of the waste form to enable secure repositories to be engineered with a much higher density of waste disposition. We propose the synthesis, corrosion, and characterization of two sets of glass samples containing approximately 8 single-component oxides eachas models for corrosion studies of more complicated glass systems (which can contain in excess of 25 single-component ingredients). Powdered samples and millimeter- sized coupons of these simpler glasses will be corroded in solutions that begin at circumneutral pH, but are known to increase in alkalinity as corrosion proceeds and saturation in silica species is approached. Through carefully selected isotopic substitutions with nuclides that are readily detected with SSNMR and TOF-SIMS methods, we will be able to follow the diffusion of atoms into and out of the reacted surface layers of these glasses and provide new data for testing with existing reaction models. The models can then be further extended or updated to take our new data into account, allowing the existing long-term glass corrosion models to more accurately reflect the extraordinary durability of these systems. With improved models, a significant opportunity exists to better utilize the storage volume of any geologic repository.

Pantano, Carlos; Ryan, Joseph; Strachan, Denis

2013-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

427

The long-term change of El Nio Southern Oscillation in an ensemble reanalysis and climate coupled models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE LONG-TERM CHANGE OF EL NI?O SOUTHERN OSCILLATION IN AN ENSEMBLE REANALYSIS AND CLIMATE COUPLED MODELS A Dissertation by CHUNXUE YANG Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment...ESM1-M Norwegian Climate Centre 3 F19, L26 gx1v6L53 Bentsen et al. [2012] 20 CHAPTER III RESULTS Ensemble Reanalysis Ensemble Statistics El Ni?o/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) has significant impact on world economics, society...

Yang, Chunxue 1984-

2012-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

428

Comparison of Measurement And Modeling Of Current Profile Changes Due To Neutral Bean Ion Redistribution During TAE Avalanches in NSTX  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Brief "avalanches" of toroidal Alfven eigenmodes (TAEs) are observed in NSTX plasmas with several different n numbers simultaneously present. These affect the neutral beam ion distribution as evidenced by a concurrent drop in the neutron rate and, sometimes, beam ion loss. Guiding center orbit modeling has shown that the modes can transiently render portions of the beam ion phase space stochastic. The resulting redistribution of beam ions can also create a broader beam-driven current profile and produce other changes in the beam ion distribution function

Darrow, Douglas

2013-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

429

Subtask 2.4 - Integration and Synthesis in Climate Change Predictive Modeling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) completed a brief evaluation of the existing status of predictive modeling to assess options for integration of our previous paleohydrologic reconstructions and their synthesis with current global climate scenarios. Results of our research indicate that short-term data series available from modern instrumental records are not sufficient to reconstruct past hydrologic events or predict future ones. On the contrary, reconstruction of paleoclimate phenomena provided credible information on past climate cycles and confirmed their integration in the context of regional climate history is possible. Similarly to ice cores and other paleo proxies, acquired data represent an objective, credible tool for model calibration and validation of currently observed trends. It remains a subject of future research whether further refinement of our results and synthesis with regional and global climate observations could contribute to improvement and credibility of climate predictions on a regional and global scale.

Jaroslav Solc

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Hydrologic Response to Climate Variability, Climate Change, and Climate Extreme in the U.S.: Climate Model Evaluation and Projections  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Water resources are sensitive to climate variability and change; predictions of seasonal to interannual climate variations and projections of long-term climate trends can provide significant values in managing water resources. This study examines the control (19751995) and future (19952100) climate simulated by a global climate model (GCM) and a regional climate simulation driven by the GCM control simulation for the U.S. Comparison of the regional climate simulation with observations across 13 subregions showed that the simulation captured the seasonality and the distributions of precipitation rate quite well. The GCM control and climate change simulations showed that, as a result of a 1% increase in greenhouse gas concentrations per year, there will be a warming of 23C across the U.S. from 2000 to 2100. Although precipitation is not projected to change during this century, the warming trend will increase evapotranspiration to reduce annual basin mean runoff over five subregions along the coastal and south-central U.S.

Leung, Lai R.; Qian, Yun

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Modelling the stratospheric polar vortex and its changes for GHGs increase and ozone depletion.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

general circulation model (Manzini et al JGR 1997). Top: 0.01 hPa (80 km) Parameterization of a gravity boundary conditions, specified SSTs and ICE. 20 (or 30)-year simulations. The focus is on the Arctic. #12-HadGISS-HadGISS-HadSST & ICE 3.7 ppbv3.4 ppbv0.8 ppbvOrg. CL m. r. 372 ppmv353 ppmv317 ppmvCO2 m. r. 320 ppbv310 ppbv295 ppbvN2

Greatbatch, Richard

432

The impacts of climate, land use, and demography on fires during the 21st century simulated by CLM-CN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

model of wetland extent and peat accumulation: results forof carbon released from peat and forest fires in Indonesialosses in Alaskan forests and peat- lands, Nature Geosci. ,

Kloster, S.; Mahowald, N. M; Randerson, J. T; Lawrence, P. J

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Is the northern high latitude land-based CO2 sink weakening?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Studies indicate that, historically, terrestrial ecosystems of the northern high latitude region may have been responsible for up to 60% of the global net land-based sink for atmospheric CO2. However, these regions have recently experienced remarkable modification of the major driving forces of the carbon cycle, including surface air temperature warming that is significantly greater than the global average and associated increases in the frequency and severity of disturbances. Whether arctic tundra and boreal forest ecosystems will continue to sequester atmospheric CO2 in the face of these dramatic changes is unknown. Here we show the results of model simulations that estimate a 41 Tg C yr-1 sink in the boreal land regions from 1997 to 2006, which represents a 73% reduction in the strength of the sink estimated for previous decades in the late 20th Century. Our results suggest that CO2 uptake by the region in previous decades may not be as strong as previously estimated. The recent decline in sink strength is the combined result of 1) weakening sinks due to warming-induced increases in soil organic matter decomposition and 2) strengthening sources from pyrogenic CO2 emissions as a result of the substantial area of boreal forest burned in wildfires across the region in recent years. Such changes create positive feedbacks to the climate system that accelerate global warming, putting further pressure on emission reductions to achieve atmospheric stabilization targets.

Mcguire, David [University of Alaska; Kicklighter, David W. [Ecosystem Center, The; Gurney, Kevin R [Arizona State University; Burnside, Todd [University of Alaska, Fairbanks; Melillo, Jerry [Marine Biological Laboratory

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

A framework for benchmarking land models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Soil Carbon and Nitro- gen Data, NDP-018, Oak Ridge NationalLaboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee USA, 146, 1986.at: http://daac.ornl.gov/ from Oak Ridge National Laboratory

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

GCAM Bioenergy and Land Use Modeling  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeatMulti-Dimensional Subject: Guidance for natural gas as a feedstock forMEETINGS

436

Global Biofuels Modeling and Land Use  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeatMulti-Dimensional Subject: Guidance forGeospatialSession)

437

An integrated assessment modeling framework for uncertainty studies in global and regional climate change: the MIT IGSM-CAM (version 1.0)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper describes a computationally efficient framework for uncertainty studies in global and regional climate change. In this framework, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Integrated Global System Model ...

Monier, Erwan

438

Resolving discrepancies between hydraulic and chemical calibration data for seawater intrusion groundwater flow models by considering climate-driven sea level change.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Groundwater models of seawater intrusion environments can be calibrated using both hydraulic and chemical information. The possible impact of the long-term transient process of sea level change is difficult to identify, but important to accurate simulation of present conditions. The response times of the pressure and chemical fields to major fluctuations in sea level change are investigated

J. Chapman; A. Hassan; K. Pohlmann

2001-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

439

Multi-model Mean Nitrogen and Sulfur Deposition from the Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP): Evaluation of Historical and Projected Future Changes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present multi-model global datasets of nitrogen and sulfate deposition covering time periods from 1850 to 2100, calculated within the Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP). The computed deposition fluxes are compared to surface wet deposition and ice-core measurements. We use a new dataset of wet deposition for 2000-2002 based on critical assessment of the quality of existing regional network data. We show that for present-day (year 2000 ACCMIP time-slice), the ACCMIP results perform similarly to previously published multi-model assessments. The analysis of changes between 1980 and 2000 indicates significant differences between model and measurements over the United States, but less so over Europe. This difference points towards misrepresentation of 1980 NH3 emissions over North America. Based on ice-core records, the 1850 deposition fluxes agree well with Greenland ice cores but the change between 1850 and 2000 seems to be overestimated in the Northern Hemisphere for both nitrogen and sulfur species. Using the Representative Concentration Pathways to define the projected climate and atmospheric chemistry related emissions and concentrations, we find large regional nitrogen deposition increases in 2100 in Latin America, Africa and parts of Asia under some of the scenarios considered. Increases in South Asia are especially large, and are seen in all scenarios, with 2100 values more than double 2000 in some scenarios and reaching >1300 mgN/m2/yr averaged over regional to continental scale regions in RCP 2.6 and 8.5, ~30-50% larger than the values in any region currently (2000). Despite known issues, the new ACCMIP deposition dataset provides novel, consistent and evaluated global gridded deposition fields for use in a wide range of climate and ecological studies.

Lamarque, Jean-Francois; Dentener, Frank; McConnell, J.R.; Ro, C-U; Shaw, Mark; Vet, Robert; Bergmann, D.; Cameron-Smith, Philip; Dalsoren, S.; Doherty, R.; Faluvegi, G.; Ghan, Steven J.; Josse, B.; Lee, Y. H.; MacKenzie, I. A.; Plummer, David; Shindell, Drew; Skeie, R. B.; Stevenson, D. S.; Strode, S.; Zeng, G.; Curran, M.; Dahl-Jensen, D.; Das, S.; Fritzsche, D.; Nolan, M.

2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

440

Variable Infiltration Capacity model (VIC) is a macro-scale energy and water balance model with lake and wetland  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of surface storage in a low- gradient Arctic watershed, Water Resour. Res., 39(4), 1087, doi: 10.1029/2002WR (VIC) Cold Land Process Model Updates, Global and Planetary Change, 38, 151-159, 2003. Sathulur, K., L drainage, and expanding industrial and urban areas. The water table position usually acts as the dominant

Cherkauer, Keith

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land change modeler" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Design of a Gust-Attenuation Controller for Landing Operations of Unmanned Autonomous Helicopters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Design of a Gust-Attenuation Controller for Landing Operations of Unmanned Autonomous Helicopters landing operations of an Unmanned Autonomous Helicopter (UAH). A heave motion model of an UAH is constructed for the purpose of capturing dynamic variations of thrust due to horizontal wind gusts

Pota, Himanshu Roy

442

Hawaii Department of Land and Natural Resources Office of Conservation...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Office of Conservation and Coastal Lands Jump to: navigation, search Name: Hawaii Department of Land and Natural Resources Office of Conservation and Coastal Lands From Open Energy...

443

Sustainable bioenergy production from marginal lands in the US Midwest  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Long-term measurements of global warming impact coupled with spatially explicit modeling suggests that both climate benefits and the production potential of cellulosic crops grown on marginal lands of the US North Central region are substantial but will be insufficient to meet long-term biofuel needs.

Gelfand, Ilya; Sahajpal, Ritvik; Zhang, Xuesong; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Gross, Katherine L.; Robertson, G. P.

2013-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

444

Minerals on School and Public Lands  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Commissioner of School and Public Lands is authorized to lease the mineral interests of such lands for development. Section 5-7 of the SD Codified Laws describes provisions for the leasing of...

445

GEORGE LEA FOUNDER'S SCHOLARSHIP PUBLIC LANDS FOUNDATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 GEORGE LEA FOUNDER'S SCHOLARSHIP PUBLIC LANDS FOUNDATION P.O. Box 7226 Arlington, VA 22207 Scholarship Application Form This scholarship is being offered by the Public Lands Foundation, a national non

446

Sale of Water Resource Land (Maine)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This rule requires an eight month advance notice period whenever a consumer-owned water utility intends to transfer water resource land, defined as any land or real property owned by a water...

447

Marginal, Erodible Land Retirement Policy (Minnesota)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

It is state policy to encourage the retirement of marginal, highly erodible land, particularly land adjacent to public waters and drainage systems, from crop production and to reestablish a cover...

448

Coastal Public Lands Management Act (Texas)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The coastal public lands of the state are managed in accordance with the following principles: (a) The natural resources of the surface land, including their aesthetic value and their ability to...

449

United States Submission on Land-Use, Land-Use Change, and Forestry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to the objective and principles of the Convention and its Kyoto Protocol F. General U.S. views on narrowly 3.3 and 3.4 activities A. Monitoring and measuring GHGs B. Accounting for non-CO2 GHG emissions of greenhouse gases at safe levels, by taking into account the entire contribution ­ both positive and negative

450

Understanding and Mapping Land-Use and Land-Cover Change along Bolivia's Corredor Bioceancio  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Trigo (Association of Oilseed and Wheat Producers) AVHRR Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer CAF Corporaci?n Andina de Fomento (Andean Development Corporation) CAO C?mara Agropecuaria del Oriente (Agricultural Chamber of the East...

Redo, Daniel J.

2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

451

Moisture Flux Convergence in Regional and Global Climate Models: Implications for Droughts in the Southwestern United States Under Climate Change  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The water cycle of the southwestern United States (SW) is dominated by winter storms that maintain a positive annual net precipitation. Analysis of the control and future climate from four pairs of regional and global climate models (RCMs and GCMs) shows that the RCMs simulate a higher fraction of transient eddy moisture fluxes because the hydrodynamic instabilities associated with flow over complex terrain are better resolved. Under global warming, this enables the RCMs to capture the response of transient eddies to increased atmospheric stability that allows more moisture to converge on the windward side of the mountains by blocking. As a result, RCMs simulate enhanced transient eddy moisture convergence in the SW compared to GCMs, although both robustly simulate drying due to enhanced moisture divergence by the divergent mean flow in a warmer climate. This enhanced convergence leads to reduced susceptibility to hydrological change in the RCMs compared to GCMs.

Gao, Yanhong; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Salathe, E.; Dominguez, Francina; Nijssen, Bart; Lettenmaier, D. P.

2012-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

452

Altered Belowground Carbon Cycling Following Land-Use Change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois, USA; 2 Energy Bioscience Institute, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois, USA; 3 Department of Plant Biology, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois, USA; 4 Photosynthesis Research Unit, US Department of Agriculture, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois, USA; 5

DeLucia, Evan H.

453

Resource Assessment and Land Use Change | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department ofT ib l LPROJECTS IN RENEWABLE ENERGY FORPresentation fromResource Assessment

454

Land & Water Conservation Program Conservation Easements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Land & Water Conservation Program Conservation Easements: A Step by Step Guide PRELIMINARY STEPS: Step 1: Landowner expresses interest in land conservation. Step 2: Discuss the land with the landowner officially designated as prime. Source: municipal conservation commission or NH DES, Wetlands Bureau.* o Deer

New Hampshire, University of

455

LAND USE AND OWNERSHIP, WILLISTON BASIN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter WM LAND USE AND OWNERSHIP, WILLISTON BASIN By T.T. Taber and S.A. Kinney In U.S. Geological........................................WM-1 Map Information for the Williston Basin Land Use And Land Cover Map.........................................................WM-2 Map Information for the Williston Basin Subsurface Ownership map

456

Autonomous Landing of MAVs on an Arbitrarily Textured Landing Site using Onboard Monocular Vision  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Autonomous Landing of MAVs on an Arbitrarily Textured Landing Site using Onboard Monocular Vision a novel solution for micro aerial vehicles (MAVs) to autonomously search for and land on an arbitrary landing site using real- time monocular vision. The autonomous MAV is provided with only one single

Zell, Andreas

457

Paper presented at the 4th International Conference Working on Safety, Crete, Greece, 2008 Functional modeling for risk assessment of automation in a changing air  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Functional modeling for risk assessment of automation in a changing air traffic management environment R or to let automation act autonomously. The Functional Resonance Analysis Method (FRAM) provides a framework from ERASMUS automation. Various instantiations of a partial model resulting from the application

Zhao, Yuxiao

458

Collaborative Research: Towards Advanced Understanding and Predictive Capability of Climate Change in the Arctic using a High-Resolution Regional Arctic Climate System Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Primary activities are reported in these areas: climate system component studies via one-way coupling experiments; development of the Regional Arctic Climate System Model (RACM); and physical feedback studies focusing on changes in Arctic sea ice using the fully coupled model.

Lettenmaier, Dennis P

2013-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

459

Tropical Africa: Land use, biomass, and carbon estimates for 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document describes the contents of a digital database containing maximum potential aboveground biomass, land use, and estimated biomass and carbon data for 1980 and describes a methodology that may be used to extend this data set to 1990 and beyond based on population and land cover data. The biomass data and carbon estimates are for woody vegetation in Tropical Africa. These data were collected to reduce the uncertainty associated with the possible magnitude of historical releases of carbon from land use change. Tropical Africa is defined here as encompassing 22.7 x 10{sup 6} km{sup 2} of the earth`s land surface and includes those countries that for the most part are located in Tropical Africa. Countries bordering the Mediterranean Sea and in southern Africa (i.e., Egypt, Libya, Tunisia, Algeria, Morocco, South Africa, Lesotho, Swaziland, and Western Sahara) have maximum potential biomass and land cover information but do not have biomass or carbon estimate. The database was developed using the GRID module in the ARC/INFO{sup TM} geographic information system. Source data were obtained from the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), the U.S. National Geophysical Data Center, and a limited number of biomass-carbon density case studies. These data were used to derive the maximum potential and actual (ca. 1980) aboveground biomass-carbon values at regional and country levels. The land-use data provided were derived from a vegetation map originally produced for the FAO by the International Institute of Vegetation Mapping, Toulouse, France.

Brown, S. [Environmental Protection Agency, Corvallis, OR (United States). Western Ecology Division; Gaston, G. [Environmental Protection Agency, Corvallis, OR (United States). National Research Council; Daniels, R.C. [ed.] [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Land application and distribution and marketing of sewage sludge: technical support document  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document provides the technical background and justification for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) proposed regulation (40 CFR Part 503) covering the land application and distribution and marketing of sewage sludge. The document summarizes current practices in land application and presents data supporting the risk-assessment methodology used to derive human health and environmental risk-based limits for contaminants in land-applied sewage sludge. The underlying assumptions of the methodology, embodied in a series of computer models, are discussed, and the risk-based contaminant limits derived by the models are presented. The three management practices associated with land application are outlined, and the twelve different pathways by which contaminants reach most-exposed individuals through land application are discussed.

Not Available

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land change modeler" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Effect of Scale on the Modeling of Hydrologic Effects of Climate Change on the Niger River Basin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

infrastructural investments for irrigation and hydroelectricity development. Climate change is a potential threat

Mountziaris, T. J.

462

EVALUATION OF TEMPORAL VARIATIONS IN HYDRAULIC CAPTURE DUE TO CHANGING FLOW PATTERNS USING MAPPING AND MODELING TECHNIQUES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Robust performance evaluation represents one of the most challenging aspects of groundwater pump-and-treat (P&T) remedy implementation. In most cases, the primary goal of the P&T system is hydraulic containment, and ultimately recovery, of contaminants to protect downgradient receptors. Estimating the extent of hydraulic containment is particularly challenging under changing flow patterns due to variable pumping, boundaries and/or other conditions. We present a systematic approach to estimate hydraulic containment using multiple lines of evidence based on (a) water-level mapping and (b) groundwater modeling. Capture Frequency Maps (CFMs) are developed by particle tracking on water-level maps developed for each available water level data set using universal kriging. In a similar manner, Capture Efficiency Maps (CEMs) are developed by particle tracking on water-levels calculated using a transient groundwater flow model: tracking is undertaken independently for each stress period using a very low effective porosity, depicting the 'instantaneous' fate of each particle each stress period. Although conceptually similar, the two methods differ in their underlying assumptions and their limitations: their use together identifies areas where containment may be reliable (i.e., where the methods are in agreement) and where containment is uncertain (typically, where the methods disagree). A field-scale example is presented to illustrate these concepts.

SPILIOTOPOULOS AA; SWANSON LC; SHANNON R; TONKIN MJ

2011-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

463

A Cross-model Comparison of Global Long-term Technology Diffusion under a 2?C Climate Change Control Target  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigate the long-term global energy technology diffusion patterns required to reach a stringent climate change target with a maximum average atmospheric temperature increase of 2C. If the anthropogenic temperature increase is to be limited to 2C, total CO2 emissions have to be reduced massively, so as to reach substantial negative values during the second half of the century. Particularly power sector CO2 emissions should become negative from around 2050 onwards according to most models used for this analysis in order to compensate for GHG emissions in other sectors where abatement is more costly. The annual additional capacity deployment intensity (expressed in GW/yr) for solar and wind energy until 2030 needs to be around that recently observed for coal-based power plants, and will have to be several times higher in the period 20302050. Relatively high agreement exists across models in terms of the aggregated low-carbon energy system cost requirements on the supply side until 2050, which amount to about 50 trillion US$.

van der Zwaan, Bob; Rosler, Hilke; Kober, Tom; Aboumahboub, Tino; Calvin, Katherine V.; Gernaat, David; Marangoni, Giacomo; McCollum, David

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

IMAGE-BASED VISUAL SERVOING FOR VANISHING FEATURES AND GROUND LINES TRACKING: APPLICATION TO A UAV AUTOMATIC LANDING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IMAGE-BASED VISUAL SERVOING FOR VANISHING FEATURES AND GROUND LINES TRACKING: APPLICATION TO A UAV the feasibility of a vision-based guidance for a UAV model during survey missions and for automatic landing aerial vehicle (UAV), auto-landing, dynamic modeling, robust control Corresponding author. Email: Patrick

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

465

Macroscale water fluxes 3. Effects of land processes on variability of monthly  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, complemented by information from a global model of the ocean-atmosphere-land system. The first filter causes radiation, and air temperature. Superimposed upon this variation are random (chaotic) fluctuations at all

466

Comparison of avian species diversity and densities on non-mined and reclaimed surface-mined land in east-central Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Surface mining often changes the native landscape and vegetation of an area. Reclamation is used to counter this change, with the goal of restoring the land to its original pre-mined state. The process of reclamation creates early successional...

Wenzel, Dawn Nicole

2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

467

Role of the stratosphere in Northern winter climate change as simulated by the1 CMIP5 models2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Role of the stratosphere in Northern winter climate change as simulated by the1 CMIP5; 3 Abstract39 40 Stratospheric climate change and its potential for surface climate change Studies, NASA, New York, USA34 (20) Institute of Numerical Mathematics, Moscow, Russia35 (21) Japan

Gerber, Edwin

468

Wind Development on Tribal Lands  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Background: The Rosebud Sioux Tribe (RST) is located in south central South Dakota near the Nebraska border. The nearest community of size is Valentine, Nebraska. The RST is a recipient of several Department of Energy grants, written by Distributed Generation Systems, Inc. (Disgen), for the purposes of assessing the feasibility of its wind resource and subsequently to fund the development of the project. Disgen, as the contracting entity to the RST for this project, has completed all the pre-construction activities, with the exception of the power purchase agreement and interconnection agreement, to commence financing and construction of the project. The focus of this financing is to maximize the economic benefits to the RST while achieving commercially reasonable rates of return and fees for the other parties involved. Each of the development activities required and its status is discussed below. Land Resource: The Owl Feather War Bonnet 30 MW Wind Project is located on RST Tribal Trust Land of approximately 680 acres adjacent to the community of St. Francis, South Dakota. The RST Tribal Council has voted on several occasions for the development of this land for wind energy purposes, as has the District of St. Francis. Actual footprint of wind farm will be approx. 50 acres. Wind Resource Assessment: The wind data has been collected from the site since May 1, 2001 and continues to be collected and analyzed. The latest projections indicate a net capacity factor of 42% at a hub height of 80 meters. The data has been collected utilizing an NRG 9300 Data logger System with instrumentation installed at 30, 40 and 65 meters on an existing KINI radio tower. The long-term annual average wind speed at 65-meters above ground level is 18.2 mph (8.1 mps) and 18.7 mph (8.4 mps) at 80-meters agl. The wind resource is excellent and supports project financing.

Ken Haukaas; Dale Osborn; Belvin Pete

2008-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

469

Modeling the effect of climate change on U.S. state-level buildings energy demands in an integrated assessment framework  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As long-term socioeconomic transformation and energy service expansion show large spatial heterogeneity, advanced understanding of climate impact on building energy use at the sub-national level will offer useful insights into climate policy and regional energy system planning. In this study, we presented a detailed building energy model with a U.S. state-level representation, nested in the GCAM integrated assessment framework. We projected state-level building energy demand and its spatial pattern over the century, considering the impact of climate change based on the estimates of heating and cooling degree days derived from downscaled USGS CASCaDE temperature data. The result indicates that climate change has a large impact on heating and cooling building energy and fuel use at the state level, exhibiting large spatial heterogeneity across states (ranges from -10% to +10%). The sensitivity analysis reveals that the building energy demand is subject to multiple key factors, such as the magnitude of climate change, the choice of climate models, and the growth of population and GDP, and that their relative contributions vary greatly across the space. The scale impact in building energy use modeling highlights the importance of constructing a building energy model with the spatially-explicit representation of socioeconomics, energy system development, and climate change. These findings will help the climate-based policy decision and energy system, especially utility planning related to building sector at the U.S. state and regional level facing the potential climate change.

Zhou, Yuyu; Clarke, Leon E.; Eom, Jiyong; Kyle, G. Page; Patel, Pralit L.; Kim, Son H.; Dirks, James A.; Jensen, Erik A.; Liu, Ying; Rice, Jennie S.; Schmidt, Laurel C.; Seiple, Timothy E.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

North-South asymmetry in the modeled phytoplankton community response to climate change over the 21st century  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of com- plex Earth System Models uses widely differentacross the IPCC AR5 earth system models, manuscript in

Marinov, Irina; Doney, Scott C; Lima, Ivan D; Lindsay, K.; Moore, J. K; Mahowald, N.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Development of a Future Representative Concentration Pathway for Use in the IPCC 5th Assessment Earth System Model Simulations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The representative concentration pathway to be delivered is a scenario of atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases and other radiatively important atmospheric species, along with land-use changes, derived from the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM). The particular representative concentration pathway (RCP) that the Joint Global Change Research Institute (JGCRI) has been responsible for is a not-to-exceed pathway that stabilizes at a radiative forcing of 4.5Wm-2 in the year 2100.

None

2010-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

472

An Assessment of Land Availability and Price in the Coterminous United States for Conversion to Algal Biofuel Production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Realistic economic assessment of land-intensive alternative energy sources (e.g., solar, wind, and biofuels) requires information on land availability and price. Accordingly, we created a comprehensive, national-scale model of these parameters for the United States. For algae-based biofuel, a minimum of 1.04E+05 km2 of land is needed to meet the 2022 EISA target of 2.1E+10 gallons year-1. We locate and quantify land types best converted. A data-driven model calculates the incentive to sell and a fair compensation value (real estate and lost future income). 1.02E+6 km2 of low slope, non-protected land is relatively available including croplands, pasture/ grazing, and forests. Within this total there is 2.64E+5 km2 of shrub and barren land available. The Federal government has 7.68E+4 km2 available for lease. Targeting unproductive lands minimizes land costs and impacts to existing industries. However, shrub and barren lands are limited by resources (water) and logistics, so land conversion requires careful consideration.

Venteris, Erik R.; Skaggs, Richard; Coleman, Andre M.; Wigmosta, Mark S.

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Linking life history theory, environmental setting, and individual-based modeling to compare responses of different fish species to environmental change  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We link life history theory, environmental setting, and individual-based modeling to compare the responses of two fish species to environmental change. Life history theory provides the framework for selecting representative species, and in combination with information on important environmental characteristics, it provides the framework for predicting the results of model simulations. Individual-based modeling offers a promising tool for integrating and extrapolating our mechanistic understanding of reproduction, growth, and mortality at the individual level to population-level responses such as size-frequency distributions and indices of year-class strength. Based on the trade-offs between life history characteristics of striped bass Morone saxatilis and smallmouth bass Micropterus dolomieu and differences in their respective environments, we predicted that young-of-year smallmouth bass are likely to demonstrate a greater compensatory change in growth and mortality than young-of-year striped bass in response to changes in density of early life stages and turnover rates of zooplankton prey. We tested this prediction with a simulation experiment. The pattern of model results was consistent with our expectations: by the end of the first growing season, compensatory changes in length and abundance of juveniles were more pronounced for smallmouth bass than for striped bass. The results also highlighted the dependence of model predictions on the interplay between density of larvae and juveniles and characteristics of their zooplankton prey.

Van Winkle, W.; Rose, K.A.; Winemiller, K.O.; DeAngelis, D.L.; Christensen, S.W. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Otto, R.G. (R.G. Otto Associates, Vienna, MD (United States)); Shuter, B.J. (Ontario Ministry of Natural Resurces, Onatario (Canada))

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

programs in climate change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

existing programs in climate change science and infrastructure. The Laboratory has a 15- year history in climate change science. The Climate, Ocean and Sea Ice Modeling (COSIM) project develops and maintains advanced numerical models of the ocean, sea ice, and ice sheets for use in global climate change

475

MODELLING A COASTAL LAKE FOR FLOOD AND QUALITY E. Giusti, S. Marsili-Libelli*, A. Gualchieri  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

water shortage due to climate changes and by land subsidence. To cope with these adversities a project, when the water level falls below the sea level. This, in addition to representing a water shortage/quality model of the lake and its tributaries to be integrated in a Decision Support System to manage the water

476

The LandScan Global Population Distribution Project: Current State of the Art and Prospective Innovation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Advances in remote sensing, dasymetric mapping techniques, and the ever-increasing availability of spatial datasets have enhanced global human population distribution databases. These datasets demonstrate an enormous improvement over the conventional use of choropleth maps to represent population distribution and are vital for analysis and planning purposes including humanitarian response, disease mapping, risk analysis, and evacuation modeling. Dasymetric mapping techniques have been employed to address spatial mismatch, but also to develop finer resolution population distributions in areas of the world where subnational census data are coarse or non-existent. One such implementation is the LandScan Global model which provides a 30 arc-second global population distribution based on ancillary datasets such as land cover, slope, proximity to roads, and settlement locations. This work will review the current state of the LandScan model, future innovations aimed at increasing spatial and demographic resolution, and situate LandScan within the landscape of other global population distribution datasets.

Rose, Amy N [ORNL; Bright, Eddie A [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Predicting plant available nitrogen in land-applied biosolids  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The rate at which biosolids (municipal sewage sludge) may be applied to land is dependent on factors including concentrations of metals, pathogens, toxic organic compounds, and nutrients. Where other properties are not limiting, land application rates are often based on matching crop N needs with the plant available N (PAN). The objectives of this study were to quantify biosolids PAN under field conditions and to propose methods including computer simulation to estimate biosolids PAN in a land application program. Six biosolids were evaluated over a 2-yr period. Laboratory incubations were used to obtain decomposition kinetics. Field studies provided a relationship between inorganic fertilizer N rate and sorghum sudangrass [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench] tissue N concentration, which was used to determine biosolids PAN in a Captina silt loam soil. Biosolids PAN released during the field experiment was linearly related to biosolids C/N ratio, organic N, or total N. Computer model predictions of PAN in the field were also linearly related to field estimates of biosolids PAN. Decay series obtained using the computer model, average biosolids decomposition kinetics, and average application site weather were very similar to decay series obtained using the computer model, actual weather, and kinetic data. Either decay series and routine analytical data for biosolids are proposed to estimate PAN for a given situation. Use of the computer model and weather data makes the approach site-specific, while analytical data for a specific biosolids makes the approach biosolids-specific.

Gilmour, J.T.; Skinner, V.

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Marginal Lands: Concept, Assessment and Management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Marginal lands have received wide attention for their potential to improve food security and support bioenergy production. However, environmental, ecosystem service, and sustainability concerns have been widely raised over the use of marginal land. Knowledge of the extent, location, and quality of marginal lands as well as their assessment and management are limited and diverse. This paper provides a review of the historical development of marginal concept, its application and assessment. Limitations and priority research needs of marginal land assessment and management were discussed.

Kang, Shujiang [ORNL; Post, Wilfred M [ORNL; West, Tristram O. [Joint Global Change Research Institute, PNNL; Bandaru, Vara Prasad [ORNL; Izaurralde, Dr. R. Cesar [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Wang, Dali [ORNL; Nichols, Dr Jeff A [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Landholders, Residential Land Conversion, and Market Signals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

465 Margulis: Landholders, Residential Land Conversion, and1983. An Analysis of Residential Developer Location FactorsHow Regulation Affects New Residential Development. New

Margulis, Harry L.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Albeni Falls land acquisitions.indd  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Idaho The Bonneville Power Administration is working with the Idaho Department of Fish and Game to acquire and manage two parcels of land in northern Idaho to preserve,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land change modeler" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Chapter 37 Land Disposal Restrictions (Kentucky)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This administrative regulation establishes requirements for land disposal of hazardous waste. These include- surface impound exemptions, prohibitions on disposal and storage and treatment standards...

482

Sustainable Land Management in Northern Namibia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and low water holding capacity (Bolivia) #12;Perspective Similar soil (Kavango) #12;Increased Demand for Food + Energy Production Expansion onto Less Resilient Lands Reduced Production per Unit Area

483

The WAMME regional model intercomparison study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

has produced a multi-model climatology of land surface ?uxesThe Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP) combined

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

Title: Canada Land Inventory: Land Capability for Waterfowl Wildlife Data Creator /  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Title: Canada Land Inventory: Land Capability for Waterfowl Wildlife Data Creator / Copyright Owner: National Archives of Canada, Visual and Sound Archives Division Publisher: National Archives of Canada, Visual and Sound Archives Division; developed under the auspices of Environment Canada; distributed

485

7Be Solar Neutrino Measurement with KamLAND  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report a measurement of the neutrino-electron elastic scattering rate of 862 keV 7Be solar neutrinos based on a 165.4 kton-day exposure of KamLAND. The observed rate is 582 +/- 90 (kton-day)^-1, which corresponds to a 862 keV 7Be solar neutrino flux of (3.26 +/- 0.50) x 10^9 cm^-2s^-1, assuming a pure electron flavor flux. Comparing this flux with the standard solar model prediction and further assuming three flavor mixing, a nu_e survival probability of 0.66 +/- 0.14 is determined from the KamLAND data. Utilizing a global three flavor oscillation analysis, we obtain a total 7Be solar neutrino flux of (5.82 +/- 0.98) x 10^9 cm^-2s^-1, which is consistent with the standard solar model predictions.

A. Gando; Y. Gando; H. Hanakago; H. Ikeda; K. Inoue; K. Ishidoshiro; H. Ishikawa; Y. Kishimoto; M. Koga; R. Matsuda; S. Matsuda; T. Mitsui; D. Motoki; K. Nakajima; K. Nakamura; A. Obata; A. Oki; Y. Oki; M. Otani; I. Shimizu; J. Shirai; A. Suzuki; K. Tamae; K. Ueshima; H. Watanabe; B. D. Xu; S. Yamada; Y. Yamauchi; H. Yoshida; A. Kozlov; Y. Takemoto; S. Yoshida; C. Grant; G. Keefer; D. W. McKee; A. Piepke; T. I. Banks; T. Bloxham; S. J. Freedman; B. K. Fujikawa; K. Han; L. Hsu; K. Ichimura; H. Murayama; T. O'Donnell; H. M. Steiner; L. A. Winslow; D. Dwyer; C. Mauger; R. D. McKeown; C. Zhang; B. E. Berger; C. E. Lane; J. Maricic; T. Miletic; J. G. Learned; M. Sakai; G. A. Horton-Smith; A. Tang; K. E. Downum; K. Tolich; Y. Efremenko; Y. Kamyshkov; O. Perevozchikov; H. J. Karwowski; D. M. Markoff; W. Tornow; J. A. Detwiler; S. Enomoto; K. Heeger; M. P. Decowski

2014-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

486

Detection of CO sub 2 -induced climatic change  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The aims of the US Department of Energy's CO{sub 2} Climate Research Program are to improve assessments of greenhouse-gas-induced climatic change and to define and reduce uncertainties through selected research. We propose to continue earlier work in five areas: updating, improvement and analysis of our global (land and marine) temperature data set; the development and use of multivariate techniques for the detection of greenhouse-gas-induced climatic change; the further development and use of simple transient-response climate models in order to elucidate the responses of the climate system to external and internal forcing; validation of General Circulation Models using a variety of test statistics, and the use of regression methods to produce sub-grid-scale information from GCM output. The present project addresses all of these questions. This document contains information of the progress in each area. 25 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

Wigley, T.M.L.; Jones, P.D.

1990-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

487

Detection of CO sub 2 -induced climatic change  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In spite of the strong circumstantial evidence that the greenhouse effect has contributed significantly to the observed global warming, we are still unable to state unequivocally that the effect has been detected. Either we must eliminate all other possibilities, or we must identify one or more multivariate characteristics of the observed changes in climate that are unique signature of the greenhouse effect. We propose to continue earlier work in five areas: Updating, improvement and analysis of our global (land and marine) temperature data set, The development and use of multivariate techniques for the detection of greenhouse-gas-induced climatic change, The further development and use of simple transient-response climate models in order to elucidate the responses of the climate system to external and internal forcing, Validation of General Circulation Models using a variety of test statistics, and The use of regression methods to produce sub-grid-scale information from GCM output. 63 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

Wigley, T.M.L.

1990-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

488

A Stochastic Unit-Commitment Model to Estimate the Costs of Changing Power Plant Operation under High Amounts of Intermittent Wind Power  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) a market for district heating and process heat. Time series for the wind power production rely on timeA Stochastic Unit-Commitment Model to Estimate the Costs of Changing Power Plant Operation under High Amounts of Intermittent Wind Power Integration Meibom, P.1 , Brand, H.2 , Barth, R.2 and Weber, C

489

Abstract--A bi-objective optimization model of power and power changes generated by a wind turbine is discussed in this  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

operating a variable-speed wind turbine with pitch control to maximize power while minimizing the loads prediction, power ramp rate, data mining, wind turbine operation strategy, generator torque, blade pitch1 Abstract--A bi-objective optimization model of power and power changes generated by a wind

Kusiak, Andrew

490

Modeling Sea Ice-Ocean-Ecosystem Responses to Climate Changes in the Bering-Chukchi-Beaufort Seas with Data Assimilation of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Marine Science and Technology, Haoguo Hu - CILER, University of Michigan Overview This project will useModeling Sea Ice-Ocean-Ecosystem Responses to Climate Changes in the Bering-Chukchi-Beaufort Seas-Investigators: Leo Oey - Princeton University, Tel Ezer - Old Dominion University, K. Mizobata - Tokyo University

491

TEMPORAL MODELING OF SLIDE CHANGE IN PRESENTATION VIDEOS Quanfu Fan (1), Arnon Amir (2), Kobus Barnard (1), Ranjini Swaminathan (1) and Alon Efrat (1)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TEMPORAL MODELING OF SLIDE CHANGE IN PRESENTATION VIDEOS Quanfu Fan (1), Arnon Amir (2), Kobus develop a general framework to automatically match elec- tronic slides to the videos of corresponding video libraries. Our approach extends previous work that matches slides based on visual features alone

Barnard, Kobus

492

A Conceptual Model of H2O/CO2 Frost Sublimation and Condensation Caused Albedo Change in Crater Interiors, Martian Seasonal Polar Cap Regions H. Xie1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Conceptual Model of H2O/CO2 Frost Sublimation and Condensation Caused Albedo Change in Crater.Xie@utsa.edu; 2 School of Chemistry, Physics and Earth Sciences, Flinders University, Australia; 3 Research Center are a major element of the current Mars' climate and circulation. Understanding the sublimation

Texas at San Antonio, University of

493

Global MHD modeling of the impact of a solar wind pressure change Kristi A. Keller, Michael Hesse, Maria Kuznetsova, Lutz Rastatter, and Therese Moretto  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Global MHD modeling of the impact of a solar wind pressure change Kristi A. Keller, Michael Hesse of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA Received 26 February 2001; revised 21 December 2001; accepted 21 December 2001; published 23 July 2002. [1] A sudden increase in the solar wind dynamic pressure compresses

De Zeeuw, Darren L.

494

Detection of CO sub 2 -Induced climatic change  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We will assemble and analyse instrumental climate data and to develop simple climate models as a basis for (1) detecting greenhouse-gas-induced climatic change, and (2) validation of General Circulation Models. In addition to variations in greenhouse gas concentrations, climate responds to a number of other forcing factors, changes in ocean circulation, volcanic activity, solar irradiance, etc. To detect the greenhouse effect, its signal must be isolated from the noise'' of natural climatic variability, a significant part of which is due to these other factors. A high quality, spatially extensive data base is required to define the noise and its spatial characteristics. Available land and marine data bases will updated and expanded, and differences between different data sets will be reconciled where possible. The data will be analysed to determine the potential effects on climate of greenhouse gas concentration changes and other factors. Analyses will be guided by simple energy balance climate models. These analyses are oriented toward obtaining early evidence of greenhouse-gas-induced climatic change that would lead either to confirmation, rejection or modification of model projections, and toward the statistical validation of General Circulation Model control runs. 23 refs., 4 figs.

Wigley, T.M.L.; Jones, P.D.

1989-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

495

Distributive analysis of rural land size and price relationships  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

manuscript. :ABLE OF CONTENTS Chapter Page I. IN:RODUCTION The Problem Objectives of the Study 1 2 II. PREVIOUS RESEARCH U. S. Aggregate Studies Texas and Regional Studies 5 6 III. ECONOMIC THEORY AND LAND VALUES IV. HYPOTHESES AND METHODOLOGY... 12 Market Movements Frictional Adjustments Economies of Size 12 1". 13 Factors of Consideration Market Division Methodology Bases Percentages Blocks Groups Appreciation Market Distribution 15 17 18 19 20 20 23 24 The Models...

Rothe, Robert Joseph

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

496

Parcel-Level Land Architecture and Land Surface Temperature in the Phoenix Metropolitan Area  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Parcel-Level Land Architecture and Land Surface Temperature in the Phoenix Metropolitan Area Xiaoxiao Li1, Yun Ouyang1, Billie Turner II1,2, Sharon Harlan3, Anthony Brazel2 1 School of Sustainability system architecture--composition and configuration of different land-cover classes--on LST in the central

Hall, Sharon J.

497

Sensitivity of global wildfire occurrences to various factors in the context of global change1 and J. O. Kaplan3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

18 meteorology driven by 2000-2050 climate change are found to increase the global annual total191 Sensitivity of global wildfire occurrences to various factors in the context of global change1 Y of global change (including changes in climate,11 land use/land cover, and population density) on wildfire

Wu, Shiliang

498

Evaluation of whole-animal data using the ion parametric resonance model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Changes observed in the behavioral response of land snails from exposure to parallel ac and dc magnetic fields demonstrate limited agreement with the predictions of an interaction model proposed by Lednev and the predictions of a recently proposed ion parametric resonance (IPR) model. However, the inadequate number of reported data points, particularly in a critical exposure range, prevents unambiguous application of either the Lednev or the IPR model.

Blanchard, J.P. [Bechtel Corporation Research and Development Dept., San Francisco, CA (United States); House, D.E.; Blackman, C.F. [Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

499

E-Print Network 3.0 - anthropogenic habitat change Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the water cycle directly... these factors are widespread land cover change, urbanization, industrial activities, plus a host of ... Source: Slatton, Clint - Departments of Civil...

500

Three Essays on the Impact of Climate Change and Weather Extremes on the United States' Agriculture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Changes on California Agriculture, California ClimateProductivity Growth in U.S. Agriculture, Economic BriefClimate, Water, and Agriculture, Land Economics, Vol.79(3),

Le, Phu Viet

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z