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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land application sites" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

2002 Wastewater Land Application Site Performance Reports for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The 2002 Wastewater Land Application site Performance Reports for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory describe site conditions for the facilities with State of Idaho Wastewater Land Application Permits. Permit-required monitoring data are summarized, and permit exceedences or environmental impacts relating to the operation of the facilities during the 2002 permit year are discussed.

Meachum, T.R.; Lewis, M.G.

2003-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

2

2001 Wastewater Land Application Site Performance Reports for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The 2001 Wastewater Land Application Site Performance Reports for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory describe site conditions for the facilities with State of Idaho Wastewater Land Application Permits. Permit-required monitoring data are summarized, and any permit exceedences or environmental impacts relating to the operation of any of the facilities during the 2001 permit year are discussed. Additionally, any special studies performed at the facilities, which related to the operation of the facility or application of the wastewater, are discussed.

Meachum, Teresa Ray; Lewis, Michael George

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

2001 Wastewater Land Application Site Performance Reports for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The 2001 Wastewater Land Application Site Performance Reports for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory describe site conditions for the facilities with State of Idaho Wastewater Land Application Permits. Permit-required monitoring data are summarized, and any permit exceedences or environmental impacts relating to the operation of any of the facilities during the 2001 permit year are discussed. Additionally, any special studies performed at the facilities, which related to the operation of the facility or application of the wastewater, are discussed.

Meachum, T.R.; Lewis, M.G.

2002-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

4

2003 Wastewater Land Application Site Performance Reports for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The 2003 Wastewater Land Application Site Performance Reports for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory describe the conditions for the facilities with State of Idaho Wastewater Land Application Permits. Permit-required monitoring data are summarized, and permit exceedences or environmental impacts relating to the operations of the facilities during the 2003 permit year are discussed.

Teresa R. Meachum

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Land Validation web site  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

web site A web site is now available for the Land Validation project. It was created with the purpose of facilitating communication among MODIS Land Validation Principal...

6

2002 Wastewater Land Application Site Performance Reports for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory and Associated Documentation  

SciTech Connect

The 2002 Wastewater Land Application site Performance Reports for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory describe site conditions for the facilities with State of Idaho Wastewater Land Application Permits. Permit-required monitoring data are summarized, and permit exceedences or environmental impacts relating to the operation of the facilities during the 2002 permit year are discussed.

Meachum, Teresa Ray; Michael G. Lewis

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

HANFORD SITE CLEANUP OBJECTIVES INCONSISTENTWITH PROJECTED LAND...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

HANFORD SITE CLEANUP OBJECTIVES INCONSISTENTWITH PROJECTED LAND USES, IG-0446 HANFORD SITE CLEANUP OBJECTIVES INCONSISTENTWITH PROJECTED LAND USES, IG-0446 The cleanup of the...

8

Land Validation web site  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

graphs and more worldwide NPP datasets graphs and more worldwide NPP datasets Graphs of biomass dyanmics and climate data for grassland sites have been added to the global terrestrial Net Primary Production (NPP) reference database at the ORNL DAAC. The NPP database has been compiled by Dick Olson and Jonathan Scurlock under the auspices of the International Geosphere-Biosphere Programme and funding from the Terrestrial Ecology Program of NASA's Office of Earth Science. Browsing through the graphs will help users to select data of interest, and to see relationships between grassland biomass changes and driving climate variables such as rainfall. Graphs are presently available for 14 of the 31 grassland sites. In addition, two more well-known worldwide datasets are available for browsing and downloading from the ORNL DAAC's NPP Web pages. The Osnabruck

9

Land Use Baseline Report Savannah River Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document is to serve as a resource for Savannah River Site managers, planners, and SRS stakeholders by providing a general description of the site and land-use factors important to future use decisions and plans. The intent of this document is to be comprehensive in its review of SRS and the surrounding area.

Noah, J.C.

1995-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

10

Drilling Waste Management Fact Sheet: Land Application  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Land Application Land Application Fact Sheet - Land Application The objective of applying drilling wastes to the land is to allow the soil's naturally occurring microbial population to metabolize, transform, and assimilate waste constituents in place. Land application is a form of bioremediation, and is important enough to be described in its own fact sheet; other forms of bioremediation are described in a separate fact sheet. Several terms are used to describe this waste management approach, which can be considered both treatment and disposal. In general, land farming refers to the repeated application of wastes to the soil surface, whereas land spreading and land treatment are often used interchangeably to describe the one-time application of wastes to the soil surface. Some practitioners do not follow the same terminology convention, and may interchange all three terms. Readers should focus on the technologies rather than on the specific names given to each process.

11

EA-1332: Leasing Land for the Siting, Construction and Operation...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2: Leasing Land for the Siting, Construction and Operation of a Commercial AM Radio Antenna at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico EA-1332: Leasing Land for the...

12

Land use siting considerations for hydrothermal energy facilities  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydrothermal resources are described and discussion is focused on some of the land use and social considerations involved in siting hydrothermal power plants. (MHR)

Oakes, K.M.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Final Land Configuration for the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site  

SciTech Connect

Closure of the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) has been completed. The future land use of the site is designated as a National Wildlife Refuge. A joint effort between Kaiser-Hill, Department of Energy, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Environmental Protection Agency, State of Colorado, and other stakeholders was initiated to provide direction for developing the final land configuration. Through early identification of issues and developing mutually agreeable solutions, the final land configuration of the site was successfully completed. (authors)

Stegen, R. L.; Kapinos, J. M.; Wehner, J. P.; Snyder, B. [Parsons, 1700 Broadway, Suite 900, Denver, Colorado 80290 (United States); Davis, R. W. [Kaiser-Hill Company, LLC, 9193 S. Jamaica, Englewood, Colorado 80112 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Land application systems for municipal sludge  

SciTech Connect

The production of treated municipal sludge requiring disposal or recycling has increased substantially in the last 10 years as a result of more stringent waste-water treatment requirements. In 1974, for example, there were 3.2 million dry tons of sludge requiring disposal. By 1982 that number had more than doubled to 6.5 million dry tons/year. Land application of municipal sludge is widely practiced in the United States as a method of handling these increasing tonnages. For wastewater treatment plants with less than 10 mgd capacity, 39 percent of the sludge produced is managed by land application. Currently, for all size treatment plants, about 25 percent of the nation's sludge is land applied. The experience with land application has shown it to be a safe and effective sludge management practice. In particular, research and studies of the practice over the past 10 years have produced new knowledge which allows the benefits of land application to be realized with minimal adverse impact. 11 references.

Crites, R.W.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

EA-1779: Proposed Changes to the Sanitary Biosolids Land Application...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

79: Proposed Changes to the Sanitary Biosolids Land Application Program on the Oak Ridge Reservation, Oak Ridge, Tennessee EA-1779: Proposed Changes to the Sanitary Biosolids Land...

16

Application for State Land Use Lease: Surface Lease (SL) - Coastal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

for State Land Use Lease: Surface Lease (SL) - Coastal Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Reference Material: Application for State Land Use Lease:...

17

An interactive land use VRML application (ILUVA) with servlet assist  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We summarize progress achieved on an interactive land use VRML application (ILUVA) with servlet assist. The purpose of this application is to enable one to take a virtual land area and add buildings, roadways, landscaping and other features. The application ...

Lee A. Belfore, II; Suresh Chitithoti

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Savannah River Site Land Use Plan - May, 2013 i SRNS-RP-2013-00162  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Savannah River Site Land Use Plan - May, 2013 i Savannah River Site Land Use Plan - May, 2013 i SRNS-RP-2013-00162 Savannah River Site Land Use Plan - May, 2013 i Table of Contents 1.0 - Purpose p1 2.0 - Executive Summary p1 3.0 - SRS Land Use Overview p5 Assumptions Current Land Use Leases, Transfers and Other Land Use Actions Future Land Use Land Use Issues 4.0 - Land Use Planning and Control for Existing Missions p13 Cleanup, Production and Support Missions Natural and Cultural Resource Management 5.0 - Process for Future Land Use Changes p15 Introduction Process Overview Process Description 6.0 - Summary p19 7.0 - References p20 8.0 - Acronyms p21 Savannah River Site Land Use Plan - May, 2013 i

19

Land use suitability screening for power plant sites in Maryland  

SciTech Connect

Since 1974 Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been engaged in developing an automated procedure for land use suitability screening. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission has funded the project to aid in the selection of power plant sites in Maryland. Its purpose is to identify candidate areas from which specific candidate sites can be chosen for detailed analyses. The ORNL approach assures that certain key variables are examined empirically for every cell in the study region before candidate sites are selected. Each variable is assigned an importance weight and compatibility score based upon its effect on the economic, social, or ecologic costs associated with construction in a given cell. The weighted scores for each variable are aggregated and output as a suitability score for each cell. (auth)

Dobson, J.E.

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

EA-1042: Proposed Changes to the Sanitary Sludge Land Application Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

042: Proposed Changes to the Sanitary Sludge Land Application 042: Proposed Changes to the Sanitary Sludge Land Application Program on the Oak Ridge Reservation, Oak Ridge, Tennesee EA-1042: Proposed Changes to the Sanitary Sludge Land Application Program on the Oak Ridge Reservation, Oak Ridge, Tennesee SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposal to raise the sludge land application loading limits from the current, self-imposed conservative 48 metric tons/ha lifetime loading to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency-approved and Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation-permitted level of 110 metric tons/ha. The U.S. Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory also proposes to add its K-25 Site pretreated sewage sludge to the existing sewage sludge land application program on the Oak Ridge Reservation in Oak Ridge, Tennessee.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land application sites" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Hanford Site air operating permit application  

SciTech Connect

The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990, which amended the Federal Clean Air Act of 1977, required that the US Environmental Protection Agency develop a national Air Operating Permit Program, which in turn would require each state to develop an Air Operating Permit Program to identify all sources of ``regulated`` pollutants. Regulated pollutants include ``criteria`` pollutants (oxides of nitrogen, sulfur oxides, total suspended particulates, carbon monoxide, particulate matter greater than 10 micron, lead) plus 189 other ``Hazardous`` Air Pollutants. The Hanford Site, owned by the US Government and operated by the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office, is located in southcentral Washington State and covers 560 square miles of semi-arid shrub and grasslands located just north of the confluence of the Snake and Yakima Rivers with the Columbia River. This land, with restricted public access, provides a buffer for the smaller areas historically used for the production of nuclear materials, waste storage, and waste disposal. About 6 percent of the land area has been disturbed and is actively used. The Hanford Site Air Operating Permit Application consists of more than 1,100 sources and in excess of 300 emission points. Before January 1995, the maintenance and operations contractor and the environmental restoration contractor for the US Department of Energy completed an air emission inventory on the Hanford Site. The inventory has been entered into a database so that the sources and emission points can be tracked and updated information readily can be retrieved. The Hanford Site Air Operating Permit Application contains information current as of April 19, 1995.

NONE

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Application for State Land Use Lease: Miscellaneous Easement...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Reference Material: Application for State Land Use Lease: Miscellaneous EasementROW Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions...

23

Application for State Land Use Lease: Commercial/Multi-Family...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Reference Material: Application for State Land Use Lease: CommercialMulti-Family Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0)...

24

EA-1606: Proposed Use of Savannah River Site Lands for Military...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Environmental Assessment Proposed Use of Savannah River Site Lands for Military Training, SC September 7, 2011 EA-1606: Draft Environmental Assessment Proposed Use of Savannah...

25

Land surface cleanup of plutonium at the Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect

The Nevada Test Site (NTS) covers approximately 3300 km{sup 2} of high desert and is located approximately 100 km northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Soil contaminated by plutonium exists on the NTS and surrounding areas from safety tests conducted in the 1950s and 1960s. About 150 curies of contamination have been measured over 1200 hectares of land surface. Most contamination is found in the top 5 cm of soil but may be found deep as 25 cm. The cost of conventional removal and disposal of the full soil volume has been estimated at over $500,000,000. This study is directed toward minimizing the volume of waste which must be further processed and disposed of by precisely controlling soil removal depth. The following soil removal machines were demonstrated at the NTS: (1) a CMI Corporation Model PR-500FL pavement profiler, (2) a CMI Corporation Model Tr-225B trimmer reclaimer, (3) a Caterpillar Model 623 elevating scraper equipped with laser depth control, (4) a Caterpillar Model 14G motor grader equipped with laser depth control, (5) a Caterpillar Model 637 auger scraper, and (6) a XCR Series Guzzler vacuum truck. 5 refs., 5 figs.

Ebeling, L.L.; Evans, R.B.; Walsh, E.J.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

EA-1332: Leasing Land for the Siting, Construction and Operation of a  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

32: Leasing Land for the Siting, Construction and Operation of 32: Leasing Land for the Siting, Construction and Operation of a Commercial AM Radio Antenna at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico EA-1332: Leasing Land for the Siting, Construction and Operation of a Commercial AM Radio Antenna at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts for the proposal to lease approximately 3 acres of land at the U.S. Department of Energy's Los Alamos National Laboratory on the southeast tip of Technical Area 54 for the siting, construction and operation of an AM radio broadcasting antenna. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD February 16, 2000 EA-1332: Finding of No Significant Impact Leasing Land for the Siting, Construction and Operation of a Commercial AM

27

Land Application of Coal Combustion By-Products: Use in Agriculture and Land Reclamation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Land application of coal combustion by-products (CCBP) can prove beneficial for a number of reasons. The data presented in this survey provide a basis for optimizing the rates and timing of CCBP applications, selecting proper target soils and crops, and minimizing adverse effects on soil properties, plant responses, and groundwater quality.

1997-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

28

EA-1779: Proposed Changes to the Sanitary Biosolids Land Application  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

79: Proposed Changes to the Sanitary Biosolids Land 79: Proposed Changes to the Sanitary Biosolids Land Application Program on the Oak Ridge Reservation, Oak Ridge, Tennessee EA-1779: Proposed Changes to the Sanitary Biosolids Land Application Program on the Oak Ridge Reservation, Oak Ridge, Tennessee Summary This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal to amend (e.g., by changing setback requirements from surface water features and potential channels to groundwater) the Sanitary Biosolids Land Application Program at the Oak Ridge Reservation in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Base on the analyses in the EA, DOE determined that the proposed action is not a major federal action that would significantly affect the quality of the human environment within the context of NEPA, and that preparation of an environmental impact statement is not required.

29

Siting Guide: Site Selection and Evaluation Criteria for an Early Site Permit Application  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of the Early Site Permit (ESP) Demonstration Program, the "Siting Guide: Site Selection and Evaluation Criteria for an Early Site Permit Application" was initially published in March 1993. It served as a roadmap and tool for applicant use in developing detailed siting plans to support an ESP application. This revision has been prepared to update the site selection process and criteria to reflect current regulatory requirements. The updated Guide also addresses the impact of significant changes in...

2002-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

30

Final Hanford Comprehensive Land-Use Plan Environmental Impact Statement, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington  

SciTech Connect

This Final ''Hanford Comprehensive Land-Use Plan Environmental Impact Statement'' (HCP EIS) is being used by the Department of Energy (DOE) and its nine cooperating and consulting agencies to develop a comprehensive land-use plan (CLUP) for the Hanford Site. The DOE will use the Final HCP EIS as a basis for a Record of Decision (ROD) on a CLUP for the Hanford Site. While development of the CLUP will be complete with release of the HCP EIS ROD, full implementation of the CLUP is expected to take at least 50 years. Implementation of the CLUP would begin a more detailed planning process for land-use and facility-use decisions at the Hanford Site. The DOE would use the CLUP to screen proposals. Eventually, management of Hanford Site areas would move toward the CLUP land-use goals. This CLUP process could take more than 50 years to fully achieve the land-use goals.

N /A

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

THE DEVELOPMENT OF SYNTHETIC SOIL MATERIALS FOR THE SUCCESSFUL RECLAMATION OF ABANDONED MINED LAND SITES  

SciTech Connect

Abandoned mine sites associated with coal and metal mining across the western United States have been left as unproductive wastelands. The availability of soil materials or other materials to support the restoration of the vegetative cover and enhance the recovery of such areas is limited. The restoration of these areas often requires the use of available amendments such as organic waste products or to help stabilize the soil. Many of the organic waste products, including sewage sludge, clarifier sludge, fly ash sludge, and other by-products from the agricultural industries such as compost can be employed for beneficial uses. This study looked at the feasibility of applying organic waste products to a mine soil in Montana to increase soil fertility and enhance plant productivity. Waste rock samples were tested for acid forming potential via acid base accounting. Samples cores were constructed and leached with simulated rainwater to determine amendment affect on metal leaching. A greenhouse study was completed to determine the most suitable amendment(s) for the field mine land site. Results from the acid base accounting indicate that acid formed from the waste rock would be neutralized with the alkalinity in the system. Results also show that metals in solution are easily held by organics from the amendments and not allowed to leach in to the surrounding water system. Data from the greenhouse study indicated that the amendment of sewage sludge was most promising. Application of 2% sewage sludge along with 1% sewage sludge plus 1% clarifier sludge, 2% compost, and no treatment were used for mine land application. Initial results were encouraging and it appears that sewage sludge may be a good reclamation option for mine lands.

Song Jin

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

MEETING NOTES Shallow Land Disposal Area (SLDA) FUSRAP Site  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1900s, the Upper Freeport Coal seam was deep mined beneath the majority of the site. Coal was later feet. The Upper Freeport coal was strip mined from the majority of the lower trench area strip mined from the western end of the site. Nuclear Materials and Equipment Corporation (NUMEC) owned

US Army Corps of Engineers

33

EA-1606: Proposed Use of Savannah River Site Lands for Military Training,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

06: Proposed Use of Savannah River Site Lands for Military 06: Proposed Use of Savannah River Site Lands for Military Training, South Carolina EA-1606: Proposed Use of Savannah River Site Lands for Military Training, South Carolina Summary This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal for the Department of Defense and Department of Homeland Security to use the Savannah River Site, near Aiken, South Carolina, for military training purposes. For more information, contact: Mr. Andrew R. Grainger NEPA Compliance Officer U. S. Department of Energy Savannah River Operations Office Building 730-1B, Room 3150 Aiken, SC 29808 Telephone: 803-952-8001 Fax/telephone: 1-800-881-7292 Electronic mail: nepa@srs.gov Public Comment Opportunities No public comment opportunities available at this time. Documents Available for Download

34

1996 Hanford site report on land disposal restrictions for mixed waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report was submitted to meet the requirements of Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order milestone M-26-OIF. This milestone requires the preparation of an annual report that covers characterization, treatment, storage, minimization, and other aspects of land disposal-restricted mixed waste management at the Hanford Site.

Black, D.G.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Regulatory Review of Early Site Permit Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has received and is reviewing three applications for early site permits (ESPs). The ESP process allows early resolution of site-related issues affecting possible construction and operation of a new nuclear power plant. The nuclear industry views a successful and predictable ESP process as an important step in assessing whether to seek authorization to construct and operate a new generation of nuclear power reactors in the United States. Because consideration of ESP applications is a first-of-a-kind activity, a number of issues have emerged prior to and during the reviews of the first three applications. Issues have included the need for design information at the ESP stage, accident analyses, quality assurance, and seismic analyses. The NRC has been working to resolve identified issues to support a Commission decision on whether to issue an ESP approximately 33-37 months after receipt of each ESP application. (authors)

Scott, Michael L. [Senior Project Manager, Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC 20555 (United States)

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

1997 Hanford site report on land disposal restrictions for mixed waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The baseline land disposal restrictions (LDR) plan was prepared in 1990 in accordance with the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (commonly referred to as the Tn-Party Agreement) Milestone M-26-00 (Ecology et al, 1989). The text of this milestone is below. ''LDR requirements include limitations on storage of specified hazardous wastes (including mixed wastes). In accordance with approved plans and schedules, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) shall develop and implement technologies necessary to achieve full compliance with LDR requirements for mixed wastes at the Hanford Site. LDR plans and schedules shall be developed with consideration of other action plan milestones and will not become effective until approved by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) (or Washington State Department of Ecology [Ecology]) upon authorization to administer LDRs pursuant to Section 3006 of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA). Disposal of LDR wastes at any time is prohibited except in accordance with applicable LDR requirements for nonradioactive wastes at all times. The plan will include, but not be limited to, the following: Waste characterization plan; Storage report; Treatment report; Treatment plan; Waste minimization plan; A schedule depicting the events necessary to achieve full compliance with LDR requirements; and A process for establishing interim milestones.

Black, D.G.

1997-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

37

Artificial Neural Network estimation of soil erosion and nutrient concentrations in runoff from land application areas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The transport of sediment and nutrients from land application areas is an environmental concern. New methods are needed for estimating soil and nutrient concentrations of runoff from cropland areas on which manure is applied. Artificial Neural Networks ... Keywords: Artificial Neural Network (ANN), Land application, Manure runoff, Nitrogen, Nutrient losses, Phosphorus, Soil erosion, Water quality

Minyoung Kim; John E. Gilley

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Siting industrial waste land disposal facilities in Thailand: A risk based approach  

SciTech Connect

The Thailand Industrial Works Department (IWD) has established a toxic industrial waste Central Treatment and Stabilization Center (CTSC) for textile dyeing and electroplating industries located in the Thonburi region of the Bangkok metropolitan area. Industrial waste is treated, stabilized, and stored at the CTSC. Although the IWD plans to ship the stabilized sludge to the Ratchaburi Province in western Thailand for burial, the location for the land disposal site has not been selected. Assessing the relative health risks from exposure to toxic chemicals released from an industrial waste land disposal site is a complicated, data-intensive process that requires a multidisciplinary approach. This process is further complicated by the unique physical and cultural characteristics exhibited by the rapidly industrializing Thai economy. The purpose of this paper is to describe the research approach taken and to detail the constraints to health risk assessments in Thailand. issues discussed include data availability and quality, effectiveness of control or mitigation methods, cultural differences, and the basic assumptions inherent in many of the risk assessment components.

Fingleton, D.J.; Habegger, L.; Peters, R.; Tomasko, D.; Liengcharernsit, W.; Hastings, P.; Boonraksa, C.; Phantumvanit, D.; Smith, K.; Carpenter, R. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA); Thailand Development Research Inst., Bangkok (Thailand). Natural Resources and Environment Program; Environment and Policy Inst., Honolulu, HI (USA))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

1995 Report on Hanford site land disposal restrictions for mixed waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report was submitted to meet the requirements of Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order Milestone M-26-01E. This milestone requires the preparation of an annual report that covers characterization, treatment, storage, minimization, and other aspects of land disposal restricted mixed waste at the Hanford Site. The U.S. Department of Energy, its predecessors, and contractors at the Hanford Site were involved in the production and purification of nuclear defense materials from the early 1940s to the late 1980s. These production activities have generated large quantities of liquid and solid radioactive mixed waste. This waste is subject to regulation under authority of both the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 and Atomic Energy Act of 1954. This report covers mixed waste only. The Washington State Department of Ecology, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and U.S. Department of Energy have entered into an agreement, the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (commonly referred to as the Tri-Party Agreement) to bring the Hanford Site operations into compliance with dangerous waste regulations. The Tri-Party Agreement required development of the original land disposal restrictions (LDRs) plan and its annual updates to comply with LDR requirements for radioactive mixed waste. This report is the fifth update of the plan first issued in 1990. Tri-Party Agreement negotiations completed in 1993 and approved in January 1994 changed and added many new milestones. Most of the changes were related to the Tank Waste Remediation System and these changes are incorporated into this report.

Black, D.G.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

THE ROLE OF LAND USE IN ENVIRONMENTAL DECISION MAKING AT THREE DOE MEGA-CLEANUP SITES FERNALD & ROCKY FLATS & MOUND  

SciTech Connect

This paper explores the role that future land use decisions have played in the establishment of cost-effective cleanup objectives and the setting of environmental media cleanup levels for the three major U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites for which cleanup has now been successfully completed: the Rocky Flats, Mound, and Fernald Closure Sites. At each site, there are distinct consensus-building histories throughout the following four phases: (1) the facility shut-down and site investigation phase, which took place at the completion of their Cold War nuclear-material production missions; (2) the decision-making phase, whereby stakeholder and regulatory-agency consensus was achieved for the future land-use-based environmental decisions confronting the sites; (3) the remedy selection phase, whereby appropriate remedial actions were identified to achieve the future land-use-based decisions; and (4) the implementation phase, whereby the selected remedial actions for these high-profile sites were implemented and successfully closed out. At each of the three projects, there were strained relationships and distrust between the local community and the DOE as a result of site contamination and potential health effects to the workers and local residents. To engage citizens and interested stakeholder groups - particularly in the role of final land use in the decision-making process, the site management teams at each respective site developed new public-participation strategies to open stakeholder communication channels with site leadership, technical staff, and the regulatory agencies. This action proved invaluable to the success of the projects and reaching consensus on appropriate levels of cleanup. With the implementation of the cleanup remedies now complete, each of the three DOE sites have become models for future environmental-remediation projects and associated decision making.

JEWETT MA

2011-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land application sites" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Development of a Land Surface Model. Part I: Application in a Mesoscale Meteorological Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Parameterization of land surface processes and consideration of surface inhomogeneities are very important to mesoscale meteorological modeling applications, especially those that provide information for air quality modeling. To provide crucial, ...

Aijun Xiu; Jonathan E. Pleim

2001-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

1993 report on Hanford Site land disposal restrictions for mixed wastes  

SciTech Connect

Since the early 1940s, the contractors at the Hanford Site have been involved in the production and purification of nuclear defense materials. These production activities have resulted in the generation of large quantities of liquid and solid radioactive mixed waste (RMW). This waste is subject to regulation under authority of both the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976{sup 2}(RCRA) and Atomic Energy Act{sup 3}. This report covers mixed waste only. Hazardous waste that is not contaminated with radionuclides is not addressed in this report. The Washington State Department of Ecology, US Environmental Protection Agency, and US Department of Energy have entered into an agreement, the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order{sup 1} (commonly referred to as the Tri-Party Agreement) to bring the Hanford Site operations into compliance with dangerous waste regulations. The Tri-Party Agreement required development of the original land disposal restrictions (LDR) plan and its annual updates to comply with LDR requirements for RMW. This report is the third update of the plan first issued in 1990. The Tri-Party Agreement requires, and the baseline plan and annual update reports provide, the information that follows: Waste characterization information; storage data; treatment information; waste reduction information; schedule; and progress.

Black, D.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Corrective measures technology for shallow land burial at arid sites: field studies of biointrusion barriers and erosion control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The field research program involving corrective measures technologies for arid shallow land burial (SLB) sites is described. Results of field testing of a biointrusion barrier installed at a close-out waste disposal site (Area B) at Los Alamos are presented. Soil erosion and infiltration of water into a simulated trench cap with various surface treatments were measured, and the interaction between erosion control and subsurface water dynamics is discussed relative to waste management.

Nyhan, J.W.; Hakonson, T.E.; Lopez, E.A.

1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Predictive Fallout Composition Modeling: Improvements and Applications of the Defense Land Fallout Interpretive Code  

SciTech Connect

This paper outlines several improvements to the Particle Activity Module of the Defense Land Fallout Interpretive Code (DELFIC). The modeling of each phase of the fallout process is discussed within DELFIC to demonstrate the capabilities and limitations with the code for modeling and simulation. Expansion of the DELFIC isotopic library to include actinides and light elements is shown. Several key features of the new library are demonstrated, including compliance with ENDF/B-VII standards, augmentation of hardwired activated soil and actinide decay calculations with exact Bateman calculations, and full physical and chemical fractionation of all material inventories. Improvements to the radionuclide source term are demonstrated, including the ability to specify heterogeneous fission types and the ability to import source terms from irradiation calculations using the Oak Ridge Isotope Generation (ORIGEN) code. Additionally, the dose, kerma, and effective dose conversion factors are revised. Finally, the application of DELFIC for consequence management planning and forensic analysis is presented. For consequence management, DELFIC is shown to provide disaster recovery teams with simulations of real-time events, including the location, composition, time of arrival, activity rates, and dose rates of fallout, accounting for site-specific atmospheric effects. The results from DELFIC are also demonstrated for use by nuclear forensics teams to plan collection routes (including the determination of optimal collection locations), estimate dose rates to collectors, and anticipate the composition of material at collection sites. These capabilities give mission planners the ability to maximize their effectiveness in the field while minimizing risk to their collectors.

Hooper, David A [ORNL; Jodoin, Vincent J [ORNL; Lee, Ronald W [ORNL; Monterial, Mateusz [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Technology application analyses at five Department of Energy Sites  

SciTech Connect

The Hazardous Waste Remedial Actions Program (HAZWRAP), a division of Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc., managing contractor for the Department of Energy (DOE) facilities in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, was tasked by the United States Air Force (USAF) through an Interagency Agreement between DOE and the USAF, to provide five Technology Application Analysis Reports to the USAF. These reports were to provide information about DOE sites that have volatile organic compounds contaminating soil or ground water and how the sites have been remediated. The sites were using either a pump-and-treat technology or an alternative to pump-and-treat. The USAF was looking at the DOE sites for lessons learned that could be applied to Department of Defense (DoD) problems in an effort to communicate throughout the government system. The five reports were part of a larger project undertaken by the USAF to look at over 30 sites. Many of the sites were DoD sites, but some were in the private sector. The five DOE projects selected to be reviewed came from three sites: the Savannah River Site (SRS), the Kansas City Site, and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). SRS and LLNL provided two projects each. Both provided a standard pump-and-treat application as well as an innovative technology that is an alternative to pump-and-treat. The five reports on these sites have previously been published separately. This volume combines them to give the reader an overview of the whole project.

NONE

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Feasibility Study of Anaerobic Digestion of Food Waste in St. Bernard, Louisiana. A Study Prepared in Partnership with the Environmental Protection Agency for the RE-Powering America's Land Initiative: Siting Renewable Energy on Potentially Contaminated Land and Mine Sites  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) developed the RE-Powering America's Land initiative to re-use contaminated sites for renewable energy generation when aligned with the community's vision for the site. The former Kaiser Aluminum Landfill in St. Bernard Parish, Louisiana, was selected for a feasibility study under the program. Preliminary work focused on selecting a biomass feedstock. Discussions with area experts, universities, and the project team identified food wastes as the feedstock and anaerobic digestion (AD) as the technology.

Moriarty, K.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Feasibility Study of Biopower in East Helena, Montana. A Study Prepared in Partnership with the Environmental Protection Agency for the RE-Powering America's Land Initiative: Siting Renewable Energy on Potentially Contaminated Land and Mine Sites  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) developed the RE-Powering America's Land initiative to reuse contaminated sites for renewable energy generation when aligned with the community's vision for the site. The former American Smelting and Refining Company (Asarco) smelter in East Helena, Montana, was selected for a feasibility study under the initiative. Biomass was chosen as the renewable energy resource based on the wood products industry in the area. Biopower was selected as the technology based on Montana's renewable portfolio standard (RPS) requiring utilities to purchase renewable power.

Moriarty, K.

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Application of neural networks to waste site screening  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Waste site screening requires knowledge of the actual concentrations of hazardous materials and rates of flow around and below the site with time. The present approach consists primarily of drilling boreholes near contaminated sites and chemically analyzing the extracted physical samples and processing the data. This is expensive and time consuming. The feasibility of using neural network techniques to reduce the cost of waste site screening was investigated. Two neural network techniques, gradient descent back propagation and fully recurrent back propagation were utilized. The networks were trained with data received from Westinghouse Hanford Corporation. The results indicate that the network trained with the fully recurrent technique shows satisfactory generalization capability. The predicted results are close to the results obtained from a mathematical flow prediction model. It is possible to develop a new tool to predict the waste plume, thus substantially reducing the number of the bore sites and samplings. There are a variety of applications for this technique in environmental site screening and remediation. One of the obvious applications would be for optimum well siting. A neural network trained from the existing sampling data could be utilized to decide where would be the best position for the next bore site. Other applications are discussed in the report.

Dabiri, A.E.; Garrett, M.; Kraft, T.; Hilton, J.; VanHammersveld, M.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Land Application Uses for Dry Flue Gas Desulfurization By-Products: Phase 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The utility industry currently generates about 20 million tons of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) by-products annually, and the quantity is expected to increase as utilities institute further controls to comply with Clean Air Act requirements. This report presents the results of the second phase of a large-scale study of beneficial land-use applications of these by-products.

1998-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

50

Noah-GEM and Land Data Assimilation System (LDAS) based downscaling of global reanalysis surface fields: Evaluations using observations from a CarboEurope agricultural site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study provides the first assessment of the Noah and Noah-GEM (photosynthesis-based Gas exchange Evapotranspiration Model) land surface model using observations from the Avignon, France CarboEurope agricultural site during 2006 and 2007. Noah and ... Keywords: CarboEurope, Fluxnet, Land Data Assimilation System, Latent heat flux, Noah, Noah-GEM

Umarporn Charusombat; Dev Niyogi; SéBastien Garrigues; Albert Olioso; Olivier Marloie; Michael Barlage; Fei Chen; Michael Ek; Xuemei Wang; Zhiyong Wu

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

1999 Report on Hanford Site land disposal restriction for mixed waste  

SciTech Connect

This report was submitted to meet the requirements of Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) Milestone M-26-011. This milestone requires the preparation of an annual report that covers characterization, treatment, storage, minimization, and other aspects of managing land-disposal-restricted mixed waste at the Hanford Facility.

BLACK, D.G.

1999-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

52

Siting guidelines for utility application of wind turbines. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Utility-oriented guidelines are described for identifying viable sites for wind turbines. Topics and procedures are also discussed that are important in carrying out a wind turbine siting program. These topics include: a description of the Department of Energy wind resource atlases; procedures for predicting wind turbine performance at potential sites; methods for analyzing wind turbine economics; procedures for estimating installation and maintenance costs; methods for anlayzing the distribution of wind resources over an area; and instrumentation for documenting wind behavior at potential sites. The procedure described is applicable to small and large utilities. Although the procedure was developed as a site-selection tool, it can also be used by a utility who wishes to estimate the potential for wind turbine penetration into its future generation mix.

Pennell, W.T.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Feasibility Study of Economics and Performance of Biomass Power Generation at the Former Farmland Industries Site in Lawrence, Kansas. A Study Prepared in Partnership with the Environmental Protection Agency for the RE-Powering America's Land Initiative: Siting Renewable Energy on Potentially Contaminated Land and Mine Sites  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Under the RE-Powering America's Land initiative, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) provided funding to the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to support a feasibility study of biomass renewable energy generation at the former Farmland Industries site in Lawrence, Kansas. Feasibility assessment team members conducted a site assessment to gather information integral to this feasibility study. Information such as biomass resources, transmission availability, on-site uses for heat and power, community acceptance, and ground conditions were considered.

Tomberlin, G.; Mosey, G.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

MODIS Land Products Subsets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Shaaf, and the FLUXNET validation communities to choose sites and to identify the land products needed for validation. We also worked with MODAPS on subsetting the Land...

55

Land Application Uses for Dry Flue Gas Desulfurization By-Products: Phase 3  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The utility industry currently generates about 25 million tons of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) by-products annually in the United States -- a quantity that is expected to increase as utilities apply new controls to comply with Clean Air Act Amendments. This report presents results of the third and final phase of a large-scale study of beneficial land-use applications for these by-products.

1999-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

56

A Review of Agricultural and Other Land Application Uses of Flue Gas Desulfurization Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The production of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) products, especially FGD gypsum, is expected to increase substantially over the next ten to twenty years in response to clean air initiatives. There are a large number of agricultural and other land application uses of FGD products that have received previous research and development attention, but only in specific locations of the United States and under limited conditions of crops, climate and soil types. This report discusses current and potential futur...

2006-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

57

Feasibility Study of Economics and Performance of Solar Photovoltaics at the Former Chicago, Milwaukee, and St. Paul Rail Yard Company Site in Perry, Iowa. A Study Prepared in Partnership with the Environmental Protection Agency for the RE-Powering America's Land Initiative: Siting Renewable Energy on Potentially Contaminated Land and Mine Sites  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in accordance with the RE-Powering America's Land initiative, selected the Former Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Rail Yard Company site in Perry, Iowa, for a feasibility study of renewable energy production. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) provided technical assistance for this project. The purpose of this report is to assess the site for a photovoltaic (PV) system installation and estimate the cost, performance, and site impacts of different PV options. In addition, the report recommends financing options that could assist in the implementation of a PV system at the site. This study did not assess environmental conditions at the site.

Salasovich, J.; Geiger, J.; Healey, V.; Mosey, G.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Feasibility Study of Economics and Performance of Solar Photovoltaics at the Tower Road Site in Aurora, Colorado. A Study Prepared in Partnership with the Environmental Protection Agency for the RE-Powering America's Land Initiative: Siting Renewable Energy on Potentially Contaminated Land and Mine Sites  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in accordance with the RE-Powering America's Land initiative, selected the Tower Road site in Aurora, Colorado, for a feasibility study of renewable energy production. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) provided technical assistance for this project. The purpose of this report is to assess the site for a possible photovoltaic (PV) system installation and estimate the cost, performance, and site impacts of different PV options. In addition, the report recommends financing options that could assist in the implementation of a PV system at the site. This study did not assess environmental conditions at the site.

Van Geet, O.; Mosey, G.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Feasibility Study of Economics and Performance of Solar Photovoltaics at the Price Landfill Site in Pleasantville, New Jersey. A Study Prepared in Partnership with the Environmental Protection Agency for the RE-Powering America's Land Initiative: Siting Renewable Energy on Potentially Contaminated Land and Mine Sites  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in accordance with the RE-Powering America's Land initiative, selected the Price Landfill site in Pleasantville, New Jersey, for a feasibility study of renewable energy production. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) provided technical assistance for this project. The purpose of this report is to assess the site for a possible photovoltaic (PV) system installation and estimate the cost, performance, and site impacts of different PV options. In addition, the report recommends financing options that could assist in the implementation of a PV system at the site. This study did not assess environmental conditions at the site.

Salasovich, J.; Geiger, J.; Mosey, G.; Healey, V.

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

1998 report on Hanford Site land disposal restrictions for mixed waste  

SciTech Connect

This report was submitted to meet the requirements of Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) Milestone M-26-01H. This milestone requires the preparation of an annual report that covers characterization, treatment, storage, minimization, and other aspects of managing land-disposal-restricted mixed waste at the Hanford Facility. The US Department of Energy, its predecessors, and contractors on the Hanford Facility were involved in the production and purification of nuclear defense materials from the early 1940s to the late 1980s. These production activities have generated large quantities of liquid and solid mixed waste. This waste is regulated under authority of both the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of l976 and the Atomic Energy Act of 1954. This report covers only mixed waste. The Washington State Department of Ecology, US Environmental Protection Agency, and US Department of Energy have entered into the Tri-Party Agreement to bring the Hanford Facility operations into compliance with dangerous waste regulations. The Tri-Party Agreement required development of the original land disposal restrictions (LDR) plan and its annual updates to comply with LDR requirements for mixed waste. This report is the eighth update of the plan first issued in 1990. The Tri-Party Agreement requires and the baseline plan and annual update reports provide the following information: (1) Waste Characterization Information -- Provides information about characterizing each LDR mixed waste stream. The sampling and analysis methods and protocols, past characterization results, and, where available, a schedule for providing the characterization information are discussed. (2) Storage Data -- Identifies and describes the mixed waste on the Hanford Facility. Storage data include the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 dangerous waste codes, generator process knowledge needed to identify the waste and to make LDR determinations, quantities stored, generation rates, location and method of storage, an assessment of storage-unit compliance status, storage capacity, and the bases and assumptions used in making the estimates.

Black, D.G.

1998-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land application sites" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Meteorological Observations for Renewable Energy Applications at Site 300  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In early October 2010, two Laser and Detection Ranging (LIDAR) units (LIDAR-96 and LIDAR-97), a 3 m tall flux tower, and a 3 m tall meteorological tower were installed in the northern section of Site 300 (Figure 1) as a first step in development of a renewable energy testbed facility. This section of the SMS project is aimed at supporting that effort with continuous maintenance of atmospheric monitoring instruments capable of measuring vertical profiles of wind speed and wind direction at heights encountered by future wind power turbines. In addition, fluxes of energy are monitored to estimate atmospheric mixing and its effects on wind flow properties at turbine rotor disk heights. Together, these measurements are critical for providing an accurate wind resource characterization and for validating LLNL atmospheric prediction codes for future renewable energy projects at Site 300. Accurate, high-resolution meteorological measurements of wind flow in the planetary boundary layer (PBL) and surface-atmosphere energy exchange are required for understanding the properties and quality of available wind power at Site 300. Wind speeds at heights found in a typical wind turbine rotor disk ({approx} 40-140 m) are driven by the synergistic impacts of atmospheric stability, orography, and land-surface characteristics on the mean wind flow in the PBL and related turbulence structures. This section of the report details the maintenance and labor required in FY11 to optimize the meteorological instruments and ensure high accuracy of their measurements. A detailed look at the observations from FY11 is also presented. This portion of the project met the following milestones: Milestone 1: successful maintenance and data collection of LIDAR and flux tower instruments; Milestone 2: successful installation of solar power for the LIDAR units; and Milestone 3: successful implementation of remote data transmission for the LIDAR units.

Wharton, S; Alai, M; Myers, K

2011-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

62

Feasibility Study of Economics and Performance of Geothermal Power Generation at the Lakeview Uranium Mill Site in Lakeview, Oregon. A Study Prepared in Partnership with the Environmental Protection Agency for the RE-Powering America's Land Initiative: Siting Renewable Energy on Potentially Contaminated Land and Mine Sites  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in accordance with the RE-Powering America's Land initiative, selected the Lakeview Uranium Mill site in Lakeview, Oregon, for a feasibility study of renewable energy production. The EPA contracted with the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to provide technical assistance for the project. The purpose of this report is to describe an assessment of the site for possible development of a geothermal power generation facility and to estimate the cost, performance, and site impacts for the facility. In addition, the report recommends development pathways that could assist in the implementation of a geothermal power system at the site.

Hillesheim, M.; Mosey, G.

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Feasibility Study of Economics and Performance of Solar Photovoltaics at the Crazy Horse Landfill Site in Salinas, California. A Study Prepared in Partnership with the Environmental Protection Agency for the RE-Powering America's Land Initiative: Siting Renewable Energy on Potentially Contaminated Land and Mine Sites  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in accordance with the RE-Powering America's Land initiative, selected the Crazy Horse Landfill site in Salinas, California, for a feasibility study of renewable energy production. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) was contacted to provide technical assistance for this project. The purpose of this report is to assess the site for a possible photovoltaic (PV) system installation and estimate the cost, performance, operation and maintenance requirements, and site impacts of different PV options. In addition, the report recommends financing options that could assist in the implementation of a PV system at the site.

Stoltenberg, B.; Konz, C.; Mosey, G.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Feasibility Study of Economics and Performance of Solar Photovoltaics at the Sky Park Landfill Site in Eau Claire, Wisconsin. A Study Prepared in Partnership with the Environmental Protection Agency for the RE-Powering America's Land Initiative: Siting Renewable Energy on Potentially Contaminated Land and Mine Sites  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in accordance with the RE-Powering America's Land initiative, selected the Sky Park Landfill site in Eau Claire, Wisconsin, for a feasibility study of renewable energy production. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) provided technical assistance for this project. The purpose of this report is to assess the site for a possible photovoltaic (PV) system installation and estimate the cost, performance, and site impacts of different PV options. In addition, the report recommends financing options that could assist in the implementation of a PV system at the site.

Simon, J.; Mosey, G.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Feasibility Study of Economics and Performance of Solar Photovoltaics at the Kerr McGee Site in Columbus, Mississippi. A Study Prepared in Partnership with the Environmental Protection Agency for the RE-Powering America's Land Initiative: Siting Renewable Energy on Potentially Contaminated Land and Mine Sites  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in accordance with the RE-Powering America's Land initiative, selected the Kerr McGee site in Columbus, Mississippi, for a feasibility study of renewable energy production. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) provided technical assistance for this project. The purpose of this report is to assess the site for a possible photovoltaic (PV) system installation and estimate the cost, performance, and site impacts of different PV options. In addition, the report recommends financing options that could assist in the implementation of a PV system at the site.

Simon, J.; Mosey, G.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Feasibility Study of Economics and Performance of Solar Photovoltaics at the Snohomish County Cathcart Landfill Site in Snohomish County, Washington. A Study Prepared in Partnership with the Environmental Protection Agency for the RE-Powering America's Land Initiative: Siting Renewable Energy on Potentially Contaminated Land and Mine Sites  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in accordance with the RE-Powering America's Land initiative, selected the Snohomish County Cathcart Landfill Site in Snohomish County, Washington, for a feasibility study of renewable energy production. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) provided technical assistance for this project. The purpose of this report is to assess the site for a photovoltaic (PV) system installation and estimate the cost, performance, and site impacts of different PV options. In addition, the report recommends financing options that could assist in the implementation of a PV system at the site.

Olis, D.; Salasovich, J.; Mosey, G.; Healey, V.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Feasibility Study of Economics and Performance of Solar Photovoltaics at the Former Bethlehem Steel Plant Brownfield Site in Lackawanna, New York. A Study Prepared in Partnership with the Environmental Protection Agency for the RE-Powering America's Land Initiative: Siting Renewable Energy on Potentially Contaminated Land and Mine Sites  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in accordance with the RE-Powering America's Land initiative, selected the Former Bethlehem Steel Plant site in Lackawanna, New York, for a feasibility study of renewable energy production. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) provided technical assistance for this project. The purpose of this report is to assess the site for a possible photovoltaic (PV) system installation and estimate the cost, performance, and site impacts of different PV options. In addition, the report recommends financing options that could assist in the implementation of a PV system at the site.

Salasovich, J.; Geiger, J.; Mosey, G.; Healey, V.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Feasibility Study of Economics and Performance of Solar Photovoltaics at the Brisbane Baylands Brownfield Site in Brisbane, California. A Study Prepared in Partnership with the Environmental Protection Agency for the RE-Powering America's Land Initiative: Siting Renewable Energy on Potentially Contaminated Land and Mine Sites  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in accordance with the RE-Powering America's Land initiative, selected the Brisbane Baylands site in Brisbane, California, for a feasibility study of renewable energy production. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) provided technical assistance for this project. The purpose of this report is to assess the site for a possible photovoltaic (PV) system installation and estimate the cost, performance, and site impacts of different PV options. In addition, the report recommends financing options that could assist in the implementation of a PV system at the site.

Salasovich, J.; Geiger, J.; Healey, V.; Mosey, G.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Feasibility Study of Economics and Performance of Solar Photovoltaics at the Standard Chlorine of Delaware Superfund Site in Delaware City, Delaware. A Study Prepared in Partnership with the Environmental Protection Agency for the RE-Powering America's Land Initiative: Siting Renewable Energy on Potentially Contaminated Land and Mine Sites  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in accordance with the RE-Powering America's Land initiative, selected the Standard Chlorine of Delaware site in Delaware City, Delaware, for a feasibility study of renewable energy production. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) provided technical assistance for this project. The purpose of this report is to assess the site for a possible photovoltaic (PV) system installation and estimate the cost, performance, and site impacts of different PV options. In addition, the report recommends financing options that could assist in the implementation of a PV system at the site.

Salasovich, J.; Geiger, J.; Mosey, G.; Healey, V.

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Feasibility Study of Economics and Performance of Solar Photovoltaics at the Former Fort Ord Army Base Site in Marina, California. A Study Prepared in Partnership with the Environmental Protection Agency for the RE-Powering America's Land Initiative: Siting Renewable Energy on Potentially Contaminated Land and Mine Sites  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in accordance with the RE-Powering America's Land initiative, selected the Former Fort Ord Army Base (FOAB) site in Marina, California, for a feasibility study of renewable energy production. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) provided technical assistance for this project. The purpose of this report is to assess the site for a possible photovoltaic (PV) system installation and estimate the cost, performance, and site impacts of different PV options. In addition, the report recommends financing options that could assist in the implementation of a PV system at the site.

Stoltenberg, B.; Konz, C.; Mosey, G.

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Feasibility Study of Economics and Performance of Solar Photovoltaics at the VAG Mine Site in Eden and Lowell, Vermont. A Study Prepared in Partnership with the Environmental Protection Agency for the RE-Powering America's Land Initiative: Siting Renewable Energy on Potentially Contaminated Land and Mine Sites  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in accordance with the RE-Powering America's Land initiative, selected the Vermont Asbestos Group (VAG) Mine site in Eden, Vermont, and Lowell, Vermont, for a feasibility study of renewable energy production. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) provided technical assistance for this project. The purpose of this report is to assess the site for a possible photovoltaic (PV) system installation and estimate the cost, performance, and site impacts of different PV options. In addition, the report recommends financing options that could assist in the implementation of a PV system at the site.

Simon, J.; Mosey, G.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Mobile Land Information System (MLIS): a GIS-based e-government application  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Storing land data using current methods results in several issues: (a) inaccurate design of land use districts on land registry and cadastre maps, (b) difficulty of discovering non-granted lands, (c) need to physically visit offices to obtain legal land ...

Waleed Alsabhan; Oualid Ben Ali

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

US EPA Converting Limbo Lands to Energy-Generating Stations: Renewable Energy Technologies on Underused, Formerly Contaminated Sites October 2007  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

R-08/023 R-08/023 October 2007 Converting Limbo Lands to Energy-Generating Stations: Renewable Energy Technologies on Underused, Formerly Contaminated Sites By: Gail Mosey, Donna Heimiller, Douglas Dahle, Laura Vimmerstedt, and Liz Brady-Sabeff National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Blvd. Golden, CO 80401 Under Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 Through EPA IAG NO. DW89930254010 NREL/TP-640-41522 For: George Huffman, EPA Project Manager Sustainable Technology Division National Risk Management Research Laboratory U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Cincinnati, Ohio 45268 National Risk Management Research Laboratory Office of Research and Development U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Cincinnati, Ohio 45268 Notice The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency through its Office of Research and Development

74

Long-Term Performance of Transuranic Waste Inadvertently Disposed in a Shallow Land Burial Trench at the Nevada Test Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 1986, 21 m3 of transuranic (TRU) waste was inadvertently disposed in a shallow land burial trench at the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site on the Nevada Test Site. U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) TRU waste must be disposed in accordance with Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 191, Environmental Radiation Protection Standard for Management and Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel, High-Level, and Transuranic Radioactive Wastes. The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant is the only facility meeting these requirements. The National Research Council, however, has found that exhumation of buried TRU waste for disposal in a deep geologic repository may not be warranted when the effort, exposures, and expense of retrieval are not commensurate with the risk reduction achieved. The long-term risks of leaving the TRU waste in-place are evaluated in two probabilistic performance assessments. A composite analysis, assessing the dose from all disposed waste and interacting sources of residual contamination, estimates an annual total effective dose equivalent (TEDE) of 0.01 mSv, or 3 percent of the dose constraint. A 40 CFR 191 performance assessment also indicates there is reasonable assurance of meeting all requirements. The 40 CFR 191.15 annual mean TEDE for a member of the public is estimated to reach a maximum of 0.055 mSv at 10,000 years, or approximately 37 percent of the 0.15 mSv individual protection requirement. In both assessments greater than 99 percent of the dose is from co-disposed low-level waste. The simulated probability of the 40 CFR 191.13 cumulative release exceeding 1 and 10 times the release limit is estimated to be 0.0093 and less than 0.0001, respectively. Site characterization data and hydrologic process modeling support a conclusion of no groundwater pathway within 10,000 years. Monte Carlo uncertainty analysis indicates that there is reasonable assurance of meeting all regulatory requirements. Sensitivity analysis indicates that the results are insensitive to TRU waste-related parameters. Limited quantities of TRU waste in a shallow land burial trench can meet DOE performance objectives for disposal of TRU waste and contribute negligibly to disposal site risk. Leaving limited quantities of buried TRU waste in-place may be preferred over retrieval for disposal in a deep geologic repository.

Gregory J. Shott; Vefa Yucel

2009-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

75

Best Practices for Siting Solar Photovoltaics on Municipal Solid Waste Landfills. A Study Prepared in Partnership with the Environmental Protection Agency for the RE-Powering America's Land Initiative: Siting Renewable Energy on Potentially Contaminated Land and Mine Sites  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Environmental Protection Agency and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory developed this best practices document to address common technical challenges for siting solar photovoltaics (PV) on municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills. The purpose of this document is to promote the use of MSW landfills for solar energy systems. Closed landfills and portions of active landfills with closed cells represent thousands of acres of property that may be suitable for siting solar photovoltaics (PV). These closed landfills may be suitable for near-term construction, making these sites strong candidate to take advantage of the 30% Federal Business Energy Investment Tax Credit. It was prepared in response to the increasing interest in siting renewable energy on landfills from solar developers; landfill owners; and federal, state, and local governments. It contains examples of solar PV projects on landfills and technical considerations and best practices that were gathered from examining the implementation of several of these projects.

Kiatreungwattana, K.; Mosey, G.; Jones-Johnson, S.; Dufficy, C.; Bourg, J.; Conroy, A.; Keenan, M.; Michaud, W.; Brown, K.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Temporal Variations of Land Surface Microwave Emissivities over the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Southern Great Plains Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Land surface microwave emissivities are important geophysical parameters for atmospheric, hydrological, and biospheric studies. This study estimates land surface microwave emissivity using an atmospheric microwave radiative transfer model and a ...

Bing Lin; Patrick Minnis

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Environmental Assessment for Leasing Land for the Siting, Construction and Operation of a Commercial AM Radio Antenna at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to lease approximately 3 acres of land at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) on the southeast tip of Technical Area (TA) 54 for the siting, construction and operation of an AM radio broadcasting antenna. This Environmental Assessment (EA) has been developed in order to assess the environmental effects of the Proposed Action and No Action alternative. The Proposed Action includes the lease of land for the siting, construction and operation of an AM radio broadcasting antenna in TA-54, just north of Pajarito Road and State Highway 4. The No Action Alternative was also considered. Under the No Action Alternative, DOE would not lease land on LANL property for the siting and operation of an AM radio broadcasting antenna; the DOE would not have a local station for emergency response use; and the land would continue to be covered in native vegetation and serve as a health and safety buffer zone for TA-54 waste management activities. Other potential sites on LANL property were evaluated but dismissed for reasons such as interference with sensitive laboratory experiments. Potential visual, health, and environmental effects are anticipated to be minimal for the Proposed Action. The radio broadcasting antenna would be visible against the skyline from some public areas, but would be consistent with other man-made objects in the vicinity that partially obstruct viewsheds (e.g. meteorological tower, power lines). Therefore, the net result would be a modest change of the existing view. Electromagnetic field (EMF) emissions from the antenna would be orders or magnitude less than permissible limits. The proposed antenna construction would not affect known cultural sites, but is located in close proximity to two archaeological sites. Construction would be monitored to ensure that the associated road and utility corridor would avoid cultural sites.

N /A

2000-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

78

Land Application Uses for Dry Flue Gas Desulfurization By-Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

New sulfur dioxide removal technologies produce a dry, solid by-product material consisting of excess sorbent, reaction products that contain sulfates and sulfites, and coal fly ash. The scarcity of landfill disposal sites for such flue gas desulfurization (FGD) by-products has led to a long-term study on possible large-volume beneficial applications. To date, FGD by-products have been successfully used in agriculture, construction, and strip mine reclamation.

1995-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

79

The Role of an Advanced Land Model in Seasonal Dynamical Downscaling for Crop Model Application  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An advanced land model [the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Community Land Model, version 2 (CLM2)] is coupled to the Florida State University (FSU) regional spectral model to improve seasonal surface climate outlooks at very high ...

D. W. Shin; J. G. Bellow; T. E. LaRow; S. Cocke; James J. O'Brien

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Predicting the Unit Appraisal Value of the Unimproved and Private Land in the City of Houston by LEED Sustainable Site Credits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The primary objectives of this research are to identify the relation between Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) criteria regarding sustainable site credits and the appraised value of land parcels in the City of Houston, and additionally to analyze the effects of detail components which leverage the sustainable credits regarding the Public Transportation Access (PTA) in terms of economic issues. To accomplish these objectives, the approach to estimate sustainable ratings of specific parcels using Geographic Information Systems (GIS) was established. Green construction must be one of the most powerful trends in the construction industry. One of the main concepts to underlie the basis of this green construction is sustainability. This sustainability has to be considered in the process of the site selection prior to the actual activities to construct a building. Recently, the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC) has suggested the modified guideline with "LEED 2009 for New Construction and Major Renovations". According to this metric, it is clear that this principle endeavors to block environmental abuses related to land development or restoration projects. On the other hand, it is not easy to check the serviceability of these rules to guarantee continuous economic merit through sustainable land development or restoration encouraged by these criteria. The criteria regarding the sustainable site selection in this LEED metric are Sustainable Site Credit (SSC) #1: Site Selection, SSC #3: Brownfield, and SSC #4.1: Public Transportation Access. Linear regression methods were used for predictive analysis. In this model, the unit appraisal value of the land was used as the dependent variable to reflect the economic values of the land, and LEED-sustainable-site criteria were used as the categorical independent variables. According to statistical results, the models to predict the appraisal parcel value using sustainable site components have relatively low R-square. Moreover, SSC #1 and SSC #3 were not significant factors affecting the unit value of land. This outcome means that there are no statistically significant effects of SSC #1 and SSC #3 on parcel value. On the other hand, SSC #4.1 was highly significant. Furthermore, the detail components of SSC #4.1 regarding the bus stops and railroad stations were also significant. These results can lead to improved environmental preservation by avoiding development which is far from the PTA as well as increasing economic value while enhancing the development density near the PTA corridors. Finally, GIS was used to determine the LEED ratings of individual parcels. The methods established to do this can be applied to other projects for the other regions, or the same region at different times.

Park, Young Jun

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land application sites" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Fly Ash Design Manual for Road and Site Applications: Volumes 1 and 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This two-volume design manual describes the use of fly ash as a construction material in high-volume applications like structural fills, highway embankments, grouting, roller-compacted concrete, and land reclamation. The engineering data and construction procedures presented should help coal ash managers and power plant managers incorporate such applications in by-product management plans.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Fly Ash Design Manual for Road and Site Applications: Volumes 1 and 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This two-volume design manual describes the use of fly ash as a construction material in high-volume applications like structural fills, highway embankments, grouting, roller-compacted concrete, and land reclamation. The engineering data and construction procedures presented should help coal ash managers and power plant managers incorporate such applications in by-product management plans.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Texas National Estuarine Research Reserve Site Nomination and Application  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 #12;FIRST DRAFT 14 March 2003 Page v LIST OF ACRONYMS ANWR Aransas National Wildlife Refuge CBBF Bend Land Trust), Superintendent Charles Holbrook (Aransas National Wildlife Refuge, ANWR), Mr. Tom Stehn (ANWR), Mr. Ray Allen (CBBEP), Mr. Ron Massey (CCC), and Mr. Carter Smith (TNC). We would also

Villareal, Tracy

84

DOE/EA-1660: Combined Community Communications Facility and Infrastructure Cleanup on the Fitzner/Eberhardt Arid Land's Ecology Reserve, Hanford Site, Richland, WA (07/20/09)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

July 2009 July 2009 DOE/EA-1660F Environmental Assessment Combined Community Communications Facility and Infrastructure Cleanup on the Fitzner/Eberhardt Arid Lands Ecology Reserve, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington U.S. Department of Energy Richland Operations Office Richland, Washington 99352 Final Environmental Assessment July 2009 Sum-1 Summary Introduction. This Environmental Assessment (EA) provides information and analyses of proposed U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) activities associated with consolidating existing communications operations and removing excess facilities and infrastructure within the Fitzner/Eberhardt Arid Lands Ecology Reserve (ALE) at the Hanford Site near the City of Richland, Washington. Purpose and Need. To meet long-term federal agency missions, DOE needs to reduce indirect costs and

85

Land application uses of dry FGD by-products. [Quarterly report, January 1, 1994--March 31, 1994  

SciTech Connect

This report contains three separate monthly reports on the progress to use flue gas desulfurization by-products for the land reclamation of an abandoned mine site in Ohio. Data are included on the chemical composition of the residues, the cost of the project, as well as scheduling difficulties and efforts to allay the fears of public officials as to the safety of the project. The use of by-products to repair a landslide on State Route 541 is briefly discussed.

Dick, W.A.; Beeghly, J.H.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Feasibility Study of Economics and Performance of Solar Photovoltaics at the Tronox Facility in Savannah, Georgia. A Study Prepared in Partnership with the Environmental Protection Agency for the RE-Powering America's Land Initiative: Siting Renewable Energy on Potentially Contaminated Land and Mine Sites  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in accordance with the RE-Powering America's Land initiative, selected the Tronox Facility site in Savannah, Georgia, for a feasibility study of renewable energy production. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) provided technical assistance for this project. The purpose of this report is to assess the site for a possible photovoltaic (PV) system installation and estimate the cost, performance, and site impacts of different PV options. In addition, the report recommends financing options that could assist in the implementation of a PV system at the site.

Kiatreungwattana, K.; Geiger, J.; Healey, V.; Mosey, G.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Feasibility Study of Economics and Performance of Solar Photovoltaics at the Peru Mill Industrial Park in the City of Deming, New Mexico. A Study Prepared in Partnership with the Environmental Protection Agency for the RE-Powering America's Land Initiative: Siting Renewable Energy on Potentially Contaminated Land and Mine Sites  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in accordance with the RE-Powering America's Land initiative, selected the Peru Mill Industrial Park site in the City of Deming, New Mexico, for a feasibility study of renewable energy production. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) provided technical assistance for this project. The purpose of this report is to assess the site for a possible photovoltaic (PV) system installation and estimate the cost, performance, and site impacts of different PV options. In addition, the report recommends financing options that could assist in the implementation of a PV system at the site.

Kiatreungwattana, K.; Geiger, J.; Healey, V.; Mosey, G.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Feasibility Study of Economics and Performance of Solar Photovoltaics at the Kolthoff Landfill in Cleveland, Ohio. A Study Prepared in Partnership with the Environmental Protection Agency for the RE-Powering America's Land Initiative: Siting Renewable Energy on Potentially Contaminated Land and Mine Sites  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Region 5, in accordance with the RE-Powering America's Land initiative, selected the Kolthoff Landfill site in Cleveland, Ohio, for a feasibility study of renewable energy production. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) provided technical assistance for this project. The purpose of this report is to assess the site for a possible photovoltaic (PV) system installation and estimate the cost, performance, and site impacts of different PV options. In addition, the report recommends financing options that could assist in the implementation of a PV system at the site.

Salasovich, J.; Geiger, J.; Mosey, G.; Healey, V.

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Feasibility Study of Economics and Performance of Solar Photovoltaics at the Chino Mine in Silver City, New Mexico. A Study Prepared in Partnership with the Environmental Protection Agency for the RE-Powering America's Land Initiative: Siting Renewable Energy on Potentially Contaminated Land and Mine Sites  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in accordance with the RE-Powering America's Land initiative, selected the Chino Mine site in Silver City, New Mexico, for a feasibility study of renewable energy production. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) provided technical assistance for this project. The purpose of this report is to assess the site for a possible photovoltaic (PV) system installation and estimate the cost, performance, and site impacts of different PV options. In addition, the report recommends financing options that could assist in the implementation of a PV system at the site.

Kiatreungwattana, K.; Geiger, J.; Healey, V.; Mosey, G.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Advanced ceramics for land-based gas turbine applications. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In order to increase the efficiency of land-based gas turbines, inlet gas temperatures have to be increased, and the amount of air which cools the turbine vanes has to be reduced, to the maximum extent possible. Presently, thermal barrier coatings (TBC`s) are the state of the art in achieving these goals. However, since TBC`s are very thin (typically 100 {mu}m), they have clearly limitations. Since all-ceramic turbine vanes would be a very large and risky development step, Westinghouse is considering to protect the leading edges of turbine vanes with high-performance ceramics. This might be done by either replacing the leading edge with a suitably shaped ceramic part, or by modifying the vanes such that they can accommodate ceramic inserts. Among the most important criteria for the success of ceramics in such applications are (a) thermodynamic compatibility with the turbine vane alloy, (b) sufficient thermal shock resistance to survive the thermal cycling during operation and in particular during emergency shut-down, and a design considering the thermal expansion mismatch of the metallic and ceramic components. This paper presents results of work performed on SiC, SiN, and aluminas.

Schneibel, J.H.; Ludeman, E.; Sabol, S.M.

1997-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

91

What Kind of Mobile Sites or Applications Would Help with Your Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Kind of Mobile Sites or Applications Would Help with Your Kind of Mobile Sites or Applications Would Help with Your Energy Savings? What Kind of Mobile Sites or Applications Would Help with Your Energy Savings? December 17, 2009 - 7:30am Addthis This week, you read about an application that helps you find E85 fueling stations using popular GPS navigation units. GPS units and mobile computing in general continue to grow in popularity. EERE has a few sites available especially for mobile devices, and we are working to make as much of our content ready for use on mobile devices as possible. We want to make our mobile sites and apps useful for you, so we'd like to know: What kind of mobile sites or applications would help with your energy savings? Each Thursday, you have the chance to share your thoughts on a question

92

What Kind of Mobile Sites or Applications Would Help with Your Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Kind of Mobile Sites or Applications Would Help with Your Kind of Mobile Sites or Applications Would Help with Your Energy Savings? What Kind of Mobile Sites or Applications Would Help with Your Energy Savings? December 17, 2009 - 7:30am Addthis This week, you read about an application that helps you find E85 fueling stations using popular GPS navigation units. GPS units and mobile computing in general continue to grow in popularity. EERE has a few sites available especially for mobile devices, and we are working to make as much of our content ready for use on mobile devices as possible. We want to make our mobile sites and apps useful for you, so we'd like to know: What kind of mobile sites or applications would help with your energy savings? Each Thursday, you have the chance to share your thoughts on a question

93

Feasibility Study of Economics and Performance of Biopower at the Chanute Air Force Base in Rantoul, Illinois. A Study Prepared in Partnership with the Environmental Protection Agency for the RE-Powering America's Land Initiative: Siting Renewable Energy on Potentially Contaminated Land and Mine Sites  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in accordance with the RE-Powering America's Land initiative, selected the Former Chanute Air Force Base site in Rantoul, Illinois, for a feasibility study of renewable energy production. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) was contacted to provide technical assistance for this project. The purpose of this study was to assess the site for a possible biopower system installation and estimate the cost, performance, and impacts of different biopower options.

Scarlata, C.; Mosey, G.

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Feasibility Study of Economics and Performance of a Hydroelectric Installation at the Jeddo Mine Drainage Tunnel. A Study Prepared in Partnership with the Environmental Protection Agency for the RE-Powering America's Land Initiative: Siting Renewable Energy on Potentially Contaminated Land and Mine Sites  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in accordance with the RE-Powering America's Land initiative, selected the Jeddo Tunnel discharge site for a feasibility study of renewable energy potential. The purpose of this report is to assess technical and economic viability of the site for hydroelectric and geothermal energy production. In addition, the report outlines financing options that could assist in the implementation of a system.

Roberts, J. O.; Mosey, G.

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Multi-Criteria Spatial Decision Support System DECERNS: Application to Land Use Planning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Land-use planning and environmental management often requires an implementation of both geoyspatial information analysis and value-driven criteria within the decision-making process. DECERNS Decision Evaluation in Complex Risk Network Systems is a web-based ... Keywords: DECERNS, GIS, Housing Development, Land-Use Planning, MCDA, Multi-Criteria Decision Analysis, Spatial Decision Support System, WebSDSS

B. Yatsalo; V. Didenko; A. Tkachuk; G. Gritsyuk; O. Mirzeabasov; V. Slipenkaya; A. Babutski; I. Pichugina; T. Sullivan; I. Linkov

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

V-230: IBM TRIRIGA Application Platform Multiple Cross-Site Scripting  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0: IBM TRIRIGA Application Platform Multiple Cross-Site 0: IBM TRIRIGA Application Platform Multiple Cross-Site Scripting Vulnerabilities V-230: IBM TRIRIGA Application Platform Multiple Cross-Site Scripting Vulnerabilities August 29, 2013 - 4:10am Addthis PROBLEM: Multiple vulnerabilities have been reported in IBM TRIRIGA Application Platform, which can be exploited by malicious people to conduct cross-site scripting attacks. PLATFORM: IBM TRIRIGA Application Platform 2.x ABSTRACT: The vulnerabilities are reported in versions 2.1, 2.5, 2.6, and 2.7. REFERENCE LINKS: Secunia Advisory SA54641 CVE-2013-4003 IBM Security Bulletin IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Low DISCUSSION: Multiple vulnerabilities have been reported in IBM TRIRIGA Application Platform, which can be exploited by malicious people to conduct cross-site scripting attacks.

97

LAND AND WATER USE CHARACTERISTICS AND HUMAN HEALTH INPUT PARAMETERS FOR USE IN ENVIRONMENTAL DOSIMETRY AND RISK ASSESSMENTS AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE  

SciTech Connect

Operations at the Savannah River Site (SRS) result in releases of small amounts of radioactive materials to the atmosphere and to the Savannah River. For regulatory compliance purposes, potential offsite radiological doses are estimated annually using computer models that follow U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Regulatory Guides. Within the regulatory guides, default values are provided for many of the dose model parameters but the use of site-specific values by the applicant is encouraged. A detailed survey of land and water use parameters was conducted in 1991 and is being updated here. These parameters include local characteristics of meat, milk and vegetable production; river recreational activities; and meat, milk and vegetable consumption rates as well as other human usage parameters required in the SRS dosimetry models. In addition, the preferred elemental bioaccumulation factors and transfer factors to be used in human health exposure calculations at SRS are documented. Based on comparisons to the 2009 SRS environmental compliance doses, the following effects are expected in future SRS compliance dose calculations: (1) Aquatic all-pathway maximally exposed individual doses may go up about 10 percent due to changes in the aquatic bioaccumulation factors; (2) Aquatic all-pathway collective doses may go up about 5 percent due to changes in the aquatic bioaccumulation factors that offset the reduction in average individual water consumption rates; (3) Irrigation pathway doses to the maximally exposed individual may go up about 40 percent due to increases in the element-specific transfer factors; (4) Irrigation pathway collective doses may go down about 50 percent due to changes in food productivity and production within the 50-mile radius of SRS; (5) Air pathway doses to the maximally exposed individual may go down about 10 percent due to the changes in food productivity in the SRS area and to the changes in element-specific transfer factors; and (6) Air pathway collective doses may go down about 30 percent mainly due to the decrease in the inhalation rate assumed for the average individual.

Jannik, T.; Karapatakis, D.; Lee, P.; Farfan, E.

2010-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

98

F- and H-area Sewage Sludge Application Sites: Groundwater monitoring report. Second quarter 1993  

SciTech Connect

Samples from the four wells at the F-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site (FSS wells) and the three wells at the H-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site (HSS wells) are analyzed quarterly for constituents as required by South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control Construction Permit 12,076 and, as requested, for other constituents as part of the Savannah River Site Groundwater Monitoring Program. Annual analyses for other constituents, primarily metals, also are required by the permit. Currently, no permit-required analytes exceed standards at the F- and H-Area Sewage Sludge Application Sites. Tritium and aluminum have been the primary nonpermit constituents exceeding standards at the F-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site. These constituents were not analyzed second quarter 1993. Other constituents also have exceeded standards at this site, but only sporadically, and none of those were analyzed second quarter 1993.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

F- and H-Area Sewage Sludge Application Sites groundwater monitoring report  

SciTech Connect

Samples from the four wells at the F-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site (FSS wells) and the three wells at the H-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site (HSS wells) are analyzed quarterly for constituents as required by South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control Construction Permit 12,076 and, as requested, for other constituents as part of the Savannah River Site Groundwater Monitoring Program. Annual analyses for other constituents, primarily metals, also are required by the permit. Historically and currently, no permit-required analytes exceed standards at the F- and H-Area Sewage Sludge Application Sites except iron, lead, and manganese, which occur in elevated concentrations frequently in FSS wells and occasionally in HSS wells. Tritium and aluminum are the primary nonpermit constituents that exceed standards at the F-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site. Other constituents also exceed standards at this site but only sporadically.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

MODIS Land Products Subsets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ORNL DAAC MODIS Land Product Subsets MODIS Collection 5 Global Subsetting and Visualization Tool Create subset for user selected site, area, product, and time period. Data for...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land application sites" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

A Prescribed Fire Emission Factors Database for Land Management and Air Quality Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Clean Air Act, its amendments, and air quality regulations require that prescribed fire managers estimate the quantity of emissions that a prescribed fire will produce. Information on emissions is available for these calculations; however, it is often incomplete or difficult to find. Tables and computer models can also provide some of this information, but the quality and applicability of the data to a specific site are unknown. In conjunction with three research projects developing new emissions data and meteorological tools to assist prescribed fire managers, the Resource Conservation and Climate Change Program Area of the Department of Defense's Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program is supporting development of a database that contains emissions information related to prescribed burning. Ultimately the vetted database will be available on the Internet and will contain emissions information that has been developed from laboratory and field-scale measurements and has been published.

Lincoln, Emily; Hao, WeiMin; Baker, S.; Yokelson, Robert J.; Burling, Ian R.; Urbanski, Shawn; Miller, J. Wayne; Weise, David; Johnson, Timothy J.

2010-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

102

Feasibility Study of Economics and Performance of Solar Photovoltaics at the Vincent Mullins Landfill in Tucson, Arizona. A Study Prepared in Partnership with the Environmental Protection Agency for the RE-Powering America's Land Initiative: Siting Renewable Energy on Potentially Contaminated Land and Mine Sites  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in accordance with the RE-Powering America's Land initiative, selected the Vincent Mullins Landfill in Tucson, Arizona, for a feasibility study of renewable energy production. Under the RE-Powering America's Land initiative, the EPA provided funding to the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to support the study. NREL provided technical assistance for this project but did not assess environmental conditions at the site beyond those related to the performance of a photovoltaic (PV) system. The purpose of this report is to assess the site for a possible PV installation and estimate the cost and performance of different PV configurations, as well as to recommend financing options that could assist in the implementation of a PV system. In addition to the Vincent Mullins site, four similar landfills in Tucson are included as part of this study.

Steen, M.; Lisell, L.; Mosey, G.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Baselines For Land-Use Change In The Tropics: Application To Avoided Deforestation Projects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the area of the pilot carbon sequestration projects in theseLUCS = Land Use and Carbon Sequestration model, and GEOMOD =in Mexico: making carbon sequestration a by-product of

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Feasibility Study of Economics and Performance of Solar Photovoltaics at the Ft. Hood Military Base Outside Killeen, Texas. A Study Prepared in Partnership with the Environmental Protection Agency for the RE-Powering America's Land Initiative: Siting Renewable Energy on Potentially Contaminated Land and Mine Sites  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in accordance with the RE-Powering America's Land initiative through the Region 6 contract, selected Ft. Hood Army Base in Killeen, Texas, for a feasibility study of renewable energy production. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) provided technical assistance for this project. The purpose of this study is to assess the site for possible photovoltaic (PV) system installations and estimate the cost, performance, and site impacts of different PV options. In addition, the report recommends financing options that could assist in the implementation of a PV system at the site.

Geiger, J.; Lisell, L.; Mosey, G.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Application of UAVs at the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect

Small, unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) equipped with sensors for physical, chemical, and radiochemical measurements of remote environments have been tested at the Savannah River Site (SRS). A miniature helicopter was used as an aerial platform for testing a variety of sensors with outputs integrated with the flight control system for real-time data acquisition and evaluation. The sensors included a precision magnetometer, two broad band infra-red radiometers, a 1-inch by 1-inch Nal(TI) scintillation detector, and an on-board color video camera. Included in the avionics package was an ultrasonic altimeter, a precision barometer, and a portable Global Positioning System. Two separate demonstration locations at SRS were flown that had been previously characterized by careful sampling and analyses and by aerial surveys at high altitudes. The Steed Pond demonstration site contains elevated levels of uranium in the soil and pond silt due to runoff from one of the site`s uranium fuel and target production areas. The soil at the other site is contaminated with oil bearing materials and contains some buried objects. The results and limitations of the UAV surveys are presented and improvements for future measurements are discussed.

Hofstetter, K.J.; Pendergast, M.M.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

F- and H-Area Sewage Sludge Application Sites groundwater monitoring report, fourth quarter 1991  

SciTech Connect

Eleven sewage sludge application sites at the Savannah River Site (SRS) were originally the subject of a research program, begun in 1980, using domestic sewage sludge to reclaim borrow pits and to enhance forest productivity at SRS. Currently, the F- and H-Area Sewage Sludge Application Sites are the only remaining active sludge application sites. During fourth quarter 1991, samples from the four monitoring wells at the F-Area site (FSS series) and three monitoring wells at the H-Area site (HSS series) were analyzed for specific conductance, pH, and certain pesticides, herbicides, toxic metals, water quality indicators, and radionuclides. This report describes monitoring results that exceeded the US Environmental Protection Agency primary drinking water standards (PDWS) and the SRS flagging criteria.

Thompson, C.Y.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

MODIS Land Product Subsets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Validation > MODIS Land Subsets Validation > MODIS Land Subsets MODIS Land Product Subsets Overview Earth, Western Hemisphere The goal of the MODIS Land Product Subsets project is to provide summaries of selected MODIS Land Products for the community to use for validation of models and remote-sensing products and to characterize field sites. Output files contain pixel values of MODIS land products in text format and in GeoTIFF format. In addition, data visualizations (time series plots and grids showing single composite periods) are available. MODIS Land Product Subsets Resources The following MODIS Land Product Subsets resources are maintained by the ORNL DAAC: MODIS Land Products Offered Background Citation Policy Methods and formats MODIS Sinusoidal Grid - Google Earth KMZ Classroom Exercises

108

Naval Station Newport Wind Resource Assessment. A Study Prepared in Partnership with the Environmental Protection Agency for the RE-Powering America's Land Initiative: Siting Renewable Energy on Potentially Contaminated Land and Mine Sites, and The Naval Facilities Engineering Service Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Naval Station Newport Naval Station Newport Wind Resource Assessment A Study Prepared in Partnership with the Environmental Protection Agency for the RE-Powering America's Land Initiative: Siting Renewable Energy on Potentially Contaminated Land and Mine Sites, and The Naval Facilities Engineering Service Center Robi Robichaud, Jason Fields, and Joseph Owen Roberts Technical Report NREL/TP-6A20-52801 February 2012 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Naval Station Newport

109

Supporting efficient execution of MPI applications across multiple sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the main goals of the CrossGrid Project [1] is to provide explicit support to parallel and interactive compute- and data- intensive applications. The CrossBroker job manager provides services as part of the CrossGrid middleware and allows execution ...

Enol Fernández; Elisa Heymann; Miquel Ŕngel Senar

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

F- and H-Area Sewage Sludge Application Sites groundwater monitoring report  

SciTech Connect

During second quarter 1992, the four wells at the F-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site (FSS wells) and the three wells at the H-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site (HSS wells) of Savannah River Plant were sampled and analyzed for constituents required quarterly by South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control Construction Permit 12,076. None of these analytes exceeded the US Environmental Protection Agency Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) or the Savannah River Site (SRS) Flag 2 criteria at either sewage sludge site. The F-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site wells also were analyzed for a number of other constituents not required by the permit. Of these constituents, tritium exceeded the PDWS in wells FSS 2D and 3D. Lead exceeded the PDWS in well FSS 3D. Iron exceeded the Flag 2 criterion in well FSS 4D, and manganese exceeded the SRS Flag 2 criterion in wells FSS 2D and 3D.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

F- and H-Area Sewage Sludge Application Sites Groundwater Monitoring Report: Third quarter 1993  

SciTech Connect

Samples from the four wells at the F-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site (FSS wells) and the three wells at the H-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site (HSS wells) are analyzed quarterly for constituents as required by South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control Construction Permit 12,076 and, as requested, for other constituents as part of the Savannah River Site Groundwater Monitoring Program. Annual analyses for other constituents, primarily metals, also are required by the permit. Currently, iron, lead, and manganese are the only permit-required analytes that exceed standards at the F- and H-Area Sewage Sludge Application Sites. Tritium and aluminum are the nonpermit constituents exceeding standards. Other constituents have exceeded standards at this site previously, but only sporadically.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

F- and H-Area Sewage Sludge Application Sites groundwater monitoring report. Second quarter 1992  

SciTech Connect

During second quarter 1992, the four wells at the F-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site (FSS wells) and the three wells at the H-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site (HSS wells) of Savannah River Plant were sampled and analyzed for constituents required quarterly by South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control Construction Permit 12,076. None of these analytes exceeded the US Environmental Protection Agency Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) or the Savannah River Site (SRS) Flag 2 criteria at either sewage sludge site. The F-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site wells also were analyzed for a number of other constituents not required by the permit. Of these constituents, tritium exceeded the PDWS in wells FSS 2D and 3D. Lead exceeded the PDWS in well FSS 3D. Iron exceeded the Flag 2 criterion in well FSS 4D, and manganese exceeded the SRS Flag 2 criterion in wells FSS 2D and 3D.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Position paper on the applicability of supplemental standards to the uppermost aquifer at the Uranium Mill Tailings Vitro Processing Site, Salt Lake City, Utah  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the results of the evaluation of the potential applicability of supplemental standards to the uppermost aquifer underlying the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project, Vitro Processing Site, Salt Lake City, Utah. There are two goals for this evaluation: provide the landowner with information to make an early qualitative decision on the possible use of the Vitro property, and evaluate the proposed application of supplemental standards as the ground water compliance strategy at the site. Justification of supplemental standards is based on the contention that the uppermost aquifer is of limited use due to wide-spread ambient contamination not related to the previous site processing activities. In support of the above, this report discusses the site conceptual model for the uppermost aquifer and related hydrogeological systems and establishes regional and local background water quality. This information is used to determine the extent of site-related and ambient contamination. A risk-based evaluation of the contaminants` effects on current and projected land uses is also provided. Reports of regional and local studies and U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) site investigations provided the basis for the conceptual model and established background ground water quality. In addition, a limited field effort (4 through 28 March 1996) was conducted to supplement existing data, particularly addressing the extent of contamination in the northwestern portion of the Vitro site and site background ground water quality. Results of the field investigation were particularly useful in refining the conceptual site model. This was important in light of the varied ground water quality within the uppermost aquifer. Finally, this report provides a critical evaluation, along with the related uncertainties, of the applicability of supplemental standards to the uppermost aquifer at the Salt Lake City Vitro processing site.

NONE

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Application of Dense Non-Aqueous Phase Liquid Containment Barriers at Manufactured Gas Plant Sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the status and use of containment technologies at former manufactured gas plant (MGP) sites and provides a framework for a rigorous evaluation of containment technologies and applicability. It identifies the performance parameters that, through additional bench- or field-scale research, would promote increased understanding of the use and limitations of containment technologies at MGP sites.

2007-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

115

Application for a Permit to Operate a Class III Solid Waste Disposal Site at the Nevada Test Site Area 5 Asbestiform Low-Level Solid Waste Disposal Site  

SciTech Connect

The NTS solid waste disposal sites must be permitted by the state of Nevada Solid Waste Management Authority (SWMA). The SWMA for the NTS is the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection, Bureau of Federal Facilities (NDEP/BFF). The U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) as land manager (owner), and National Security Technologies (NSTec), as operator, will store, collect, process, and dispose all solid waste by means that do not create a health hazard, a public nuisance, or cause impairment of the environment. NTS disposal sites will not be included in the Nye County Solid Waste Management Plan. The NTS is located approximately 105 kilometers (km) (65 miles [mi]) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada (Figure 1). The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is the federal lands management authority for the NTS, and NSTec is the Management and Operations contractor. Access on and off the NTS is tightly controlled, restricted, and guarded on a 24-hour basis. The NTS has signs posted along its entire perimeter. NSTec is the operator of all solid waste disposal sites on the NTS. The Area 5 RWMS is the location of the permitted facility for the Solid Waste Disposal Site (SWDS). The Area 5 RWMS is located near the eastern edge of the NTS (Figure 2), approximately 26 km (16 mi) north of Mercury, Nevada. The Area 5 RWMS is used for the disposal of low-level waste (LLW) and mixed low-level waste. Many areas surrounding the RWMS have been used in conducting nuclear tests. A Notice of Intent to operate the disposal site as a Class III site was submitted to the state of Nevada on January 28, 1994, and was acknowledged as being received in a letter to the NNSA/NSO on August 30, 1994. Interim approval to operate a Class III SWDS for regulated asbestiform low-level waste (ALLW) was authorized on August 12, 1996 (in letter from Paul Liebendorfer to Runore Wycoff), with operations to be conducted in accordance with the ''Management Plan for the Disposal of Low-Level Waste with Regulated Asbestos Waste.'' A requirement of the authorization was that on or before October 9, 1999, a permit was required to be issued. Because of NDEP and NNSA/NSO review cycles, the final permit was issued on April 5, 2000, for the operation of the Area 5 Low-Level Waste Disposal Site, utilizing Pit 7 (P07) as the designated disposal cell. The original permit applied only to Pit 7, with a total design capacity of 5,831 cubic yards (yd{sup 3}) (157,437 cubic feet [ft{sup 3}]). NNSA/NSO is expanding the SWDS to include the adjacent Upper Cell of Pit 6 (P06), with an additional capacity of 28,037 yd{sup 3} (756,999 ft{sup 3}) (Figure 3). The proposed total capacity of ALLW in Pit 7 and P06 will be approximately 33,870 yd{sup 3} (0.9 million ft{sup 3}). The site will be used for the disposal of regulated ALLW, small quantities of low-level radioactive hydrocarbon-burdened (LLHB) media and debris, LLW, LLW that contains PCB Bulk Product Waste greater than 50 ppm that leaches at a rate of less than 10 micrograms of PCB per liter of water, and small quantities of LLHB demolition and construction waste (hereafter called permissible waste). Waste containing free liquids, or waste that is regulated as hazardous waste under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) or state-of-generation hazardous waste regulations, will not be accepted for disposal at the site. The only waste regulated under the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) that will be accepted at the disposal site is regulated asbestos-containing materials (RACM). The term asbestiform is used throughout this document to describe this waste. Other TSCA waste (i.e., polychlorinated biphenyls [PCBs]) will not be accepted for disposal at the SWDS. The disposal site will be used as a depository of permissible waste generated both on site and off site. All generators designated by NNSA/NSO will be eligible to dispose regulated ALLW at the Asbestiform Low-Level Waste Disposal Site in accordance with the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) 325

NSTec Environmental Programs

2010-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

116

Site-specific solar resource measurements for industrial solar applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The solar industry can borrow solar radiation measuring equipment from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) as part of NREL`s Solar Industrial Program. This program provides assistance to qualified parties in quantifying the solar radiation resource at prospective sites to reduce the risks of deploying industrial solar energy systems. Up-to-date solar radiation measurements permit comparisons of fresh data with existing data to verify established data bases and also provide data based on actual measurements instead of on less accurate models. This report outlines the responsibilities and obligations of NREL and the solar industry participant. It also describes the equipment for measuring solar radiation, the data quality assessment procedures, and the format of the data provided.

Marion, W.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

land | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

land land Dataset Summary Description This dataset is part of a larger internal dataset at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) that explores various characteristics of large solar electric (both PV and CSP) facilities around the United States. This dataset focuses on the land use characteristics for solar facilities that are either under construction or currently in operation. Source Land-Use Requirements for Solar Power Plants in the United States Date Released June 25th, 2013 (5 months ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords acres area average concentrating solar power csp Density electric hectares km2 land land requirements land use land-use mean photovoltaic photovoltaics PV solar statistics Data application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.spreadsheetml.sheet icon Master Solar Land Use Spreadsheet (xlsx, 1.5 MiB)

118

National Geo-Database for Biofuel Simulations and Regional Analysis of Biorefinery Siting Based on Cellulosic Feedstock Grown on Marginal Lands  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of this project undertaken by GLBRC (Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center) Area 4 (Sustainability) modelers is to develop a national capability to model feedstock supply, ethanol production, and biogeochemical impacts of cellulosic biofuels. The results of this project contribute to sustainability goals of the GLBRC; i.e. to contribute to developing a sustainable bioenergy economy: one that is profitable to farmers and refiners, acceptable to society, and environmentally sound. A sustainable bioenergy economy will also contribute, in a fundamental way, to meeting national objectives on energy security and climate mitigation. The specific objectives of this study are to: (1) develop a spatially explicit national geodatabase for conducting biofuel simulation studies and (4) locate possible sites for the establishment of cellulosic ethanol biorefineries. To address the first objective, we developed SENGBEM (Spatially Explicit National Geodatabase for Biofuel and Environmental Modeling), a 60-m resolution geodatabase of the conterminous USA containing data on: (1) climate, (2) soils, (3) topography, (4) hydrography, (5) land cover/ land use (LCLU), and (6) ancillary data (e.g., road networks, federal and state lands, national and state parks, etc.). A unique feature of SENGBEM is its 2008-2010 crop rotation data, a crucially important component for simulating productivity and biogeochemical cycles as well as land-use changes associated with biofuel cropping. ARRA support for this project and to the PNNL Joint Global Change Research Institute enabled us to create an advanced computing infrastructure to execute millions of simulations, conduct post-processing calculations, store input and output data, and visualize results. These computing resources included two components installed at the Research Data Center of the University of Maryland. The first resource was 'deltac': an 8-core Linux server, dedicated to county-level and state-level simulations and PostgreSQL database hosting. The second resource was the DOE-JGCRI 'Evergreen' cluster, capable of executing millions of simulations in relatively short periods. ARRA funding also supported a PhD student from UMD who worked on creating the geodatabases and executing some of the simulations in this study. Using a physically based classification of marginal lands, we simulated production of cellulosic feedstocks from perennial mixtures grown on these lands in the US Midwest. Marginal lands in the western states of the US Midwest appear to have significant potential to supply feedstocks to a cellulosic biofuel industry. Similar results were obtained with simulations of N-fertilized perennial mixtures. A detailed spatial analysis allowed for the identification of possible locations for the establishment of 34 cellulosic ethanol biorefineries with an annual production capacity of 5.6 billion gallons. In summary, we have reported on the development of a spatially explicit national geodatabase to conduct biofuel simulation studies and provided simulation results on the potential of perennial cropping systems to serve as feedstocks for the production of cellulosic ethanol. To accomplish this, we have employed sophisticated spatial analysis methods in combination with the process-based biogeochemical model EPIC. The results of this study will be submitted to the USDOE Bioenergy Knowledge Discovery Framework as a way to contribute to the development of a sustainable bioenergy industry. This work provided the opportunity to test the hypothesis that marginal lands can serve as sources of cellulosic feedstocks and thus contribute to avoid potential conflicts between bioenergy and food production systems. This work, we believe, opens the door for further analysis on the characteristics of cellulosic feedstocks as major contributors to the development of a sustainable bioenergy economy.

Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Zhang, Xuesong; Sahajpal, Ritvik; Manowitz, David H.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

National Geo-Database for Biofuel Simulations and Regional Analysis of Biorefinery Siting Based on Cellulosic Feedstock Grown on Marginal Lands  

SciTech Connect

The goal of this project undertaken by GLBRC (Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center) Area 4 (Sustainability) modelers is to develop a national capability to model feedstock supply, ethanol production, and biogeochemical impacts of cellulosic biofuels. The results of this project contribute to sustainability goals of the GLBRC; i.e. to contribute to developing a sustainable bioenergy economy: one that is profitable to farmers and refiners, acceptable to society, and environmentally sound. A sustainable bioenergy economy will also contribute, in a fundamental way, to meeting national objectives on energy security and climate mitigation. The specific objectives of this study are to: (1) develop a spatially explicit national geodatabase for conducting biofuel simulation studies and (4) locate possible sites for the establishment of cellulosic ethanol biorefineries. To address the first objective, we developed SENGBEM (Spatially Explicit National Geodatabase for Biofuel and Environmental Modeling), a 60-m resolution geodatabase of the conterminous USA containing data on: (1) climate, (2) soils, (3) topography, (4) hydrography, (5) land cover/ land use (LCLU), and (6) ancillary data (e.g., road networks, federal and state lands, national and state parks, etc.). A unique feature of SENGBEM is its 2008-2010 crop rotation data, a crucially important component for simulating productivity and biogeochemical cycles as well as land-use changes associated with biofuel cropping. ARRA support for this project and to the PNNL Joint Global Change Research Institute enabled us to create an advanced computing infrastructure to execute millions of simulations, conduct post-processing calculations, store input and output data, and visualize results. These computing resources included two components installed at the Research Data Center of the University of Maryland. The first resource was 'deltac': an 8-core Linux server, dedicated to county-level and state-level simulations and PostgreSQL database hosting. The second resource was the DOE-JGCRI 'Evergreen' cluster, capable of executing millions of simulations in relatively short periods. ARRA funding also supported a PhD student from UMD who worked on creating the geodatabases and executing some of the simulations in this study. Using a physically based classification of marginal lands, we simulated production of cellulosic feedstocks from perennial mixtures grown on these lands in the US Midwest. Marginal lands in the western states of the US Midwest appear to have significant potential to supply feedstocks to a cellulosic biofuel industry. Similar results were obtained with simulations of N-fertilized perennial mixtures. A detailed spatial analysis allowed for the identification of possible locations for the establishment of 34 cellulosic ethanol biorefineries with an annual production capacity of 5.6 billion gallons. In summary, we have reported on the development of a spatially explicit national geodatabase to conduct biofuel simulation studies and provided simulation results on the potential of perennial cropping systems to serve as feedstocks for the production of cellulosic ethanol. To accomplish this, we have employed sophisticated spatial analysis methods in combination with the process-based biogeochemical model EPIC. The results of this study will be submitted to the USDOE Bioenergy Knowledge Discovery Framework as a way to contribute to the development of a sustainable bioenergy industry. This work provided the opportunity to test the hypothesis that marginal lands can serve as sources of cellulosic feedstocks and thus contribute to avoid potential conflicts between bioenergy and food production systems. This work, we believe, opens the door for further analysis on the characteristics of cellulosic feedstocks as major contributors to the development of a sustainable bioenergy economy.

Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Zhang, Xuesong; Sahajpal, Ritvik; Manowitz, David H.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Naval Station Newport Wind Resource Assessment. A Study Prepared in Partnership with the Environmental Protection Agency for the RE-Powering America's Land Initiative: Siting Renewable Energy on Potentially Contaminated Land and Mine Sites, and The Naval Facilities Engineering Service Center  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) launched the RE-Powering America's Land initiative to encourage development of renewable energy (RE) on potentially contaminated land and mine sites. EPA is collaborating with the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to evaluate RE options at Naval Station (NAVSTA) Newport in Newport, Rhode Island where multiple contaminated areas pose a threat to human health and the environment. Designated a superfund site on the National Priorities List in 1989, the base is committed to working toward reducing the its dependency on fossil fuels, decreasing its carbon footprint, and implementing RE projects where feasible. The Naval Facilities Engineering Service Center (NFESC) partnered with NREL in February 2009 to investigate the potential for wind energy generation at a number of Naval and Marine bases on the East Coast. NAVSTA Newport was one of several bases chosen for a detailed, site-specific wind resource investigation. NAVSTA Newport, in conjunction with NREL and NFESC, has been actively engaged in assessing the wind resource through several ongoing efforts. This report focuses on the wind resource assessment, the estimated energy production of wind turbines, and a survey of potential wind turbine options based upon the site-specific wind resource.

Robichaud, R.; Fields, J.; Roberts, J. O.

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land application sites" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

F- and H-Area Sewage Sludge Application Sites groundwater monitoring report  

SciTech Connect

Samples from the four wells at the F-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site (FSS wells) and the three wells at the H-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site (HSS wells) are analyzed quarterly for constituents as required by South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control Construction Permit 12,076 and, as requested, for other constituents as part of the Savannah River Site Groundwater Monitoring Program. Annual analyses for other constituents, primarily metals, also are required by the permit. During fourth quarter 1992, the FSS wells also were analyzed for a number of other constituents not required by the permit. Historically and currently, no permit-required analytes exceed standards at the F- and H-Area Sewage Sludge Application Sites except iron, lead, and manganese, which occur in elevated concentrations frequently in FSS wells. Lead concentrations exceeded the final Primary Drinking Water Standards during fourth quarter 1992, an event that is concurrent with a change in sampling procedures. Tritium is the primary nonpermit constituent that exceeds standards at the F-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site. Other constituents also exceed standards at this site but only sporadically.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

K-Area and Par Pond Sewage Sludge Application Sites groundwater monitoring report: Second quarter 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During second quarter 1993, samples from the three monitoring wells at the K-Area site (KSS series) and the three monitoring wells at the Par Pond site (PSS series) were analyzed for constituents required by South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control Construction Permit 13,173 and for other constituents as part of the Savannah River Site (SRS) Groundwater Monitoring Program. This report describes monitoring results that exceeded the final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) or the SRS flagging criteria. During second quarter 1993, no constituents exceeded the final PDWS or any other flagging criteria at the K-Area and Par Pond Sewage Sludge Application Sites. During first quarter 1993, aluminum and iron exceeded the SRS Flag 2 criteria in one or more of the KSS and the PSS wells. These constituents were not analyzed second quarter 1993. In the KSS well series, the field measurement for alkalinity ranged as high as 35 mg/L in well KSS 1D. Alkalinity measurements were zero in the PSS wells, except for a single measurement of 1 mg/L in well PSS 1D. Historical and current water-level elevations at the K-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site indicate that the groundwater flow direction is south to southwest (SRS grid coordinates). The groundwater flow direction at the Par Pond Sewage Sludge Application Site could not be determined second quarter 1993.

Not Available

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Greenhouse gases emissions accounting for typical sewage sludge digestion with energy utilization and residue land application in China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer GHGs emissions from sludge digestion + residue land use in China were calculated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The AD unit contributes more than 97% of total biogenic GHGs emissions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer AD with methane recovery is attractive for sludge GHGs emissions reduction. - Abstract: About 20 million tonnes of sludge (with 80% moisture content) is discharged by the sewage treatment plants per year in China, which, if not treated properly, can be a significant source of greenhouse gases (GHGs) emissions. Anaerobic digestion is a conventional sewage sludge treatment method and will continue to be one of the main technologies in the following years. This research has taken into consideration GHGs emissions from typical processes of sludge thickening + anaerobic digestion + dewatering + residue land application in China. Fossil CO{sub 2}, biogenic CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4,} and avoided CO{sub 2} as the main objects is discussed respectively. The results show that the total CO{sub 2}-eq is about 1133 kg/t DM (including the biogenic CO{sub 2}), while the net CO{sub 2}-eq is about 372 kg/t DM (excluding the biogenic CO{sub 2}). An anaerobic digestion unit as the main GHGs emission source occupies more than 91% CO{sub 2}-eq of the whole process. The use of biogas is important for achieving carbon dioxide emission reductions, which could reach about 24% of the total CO{sub 2}-eq reduction.

Niu Dongjie, E-mail: niudongjie@tongji.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Yangtze Aquatic Environment, Ministry of Education, College of Environmental Science and Engineering of Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China); UNEP-Tongji Institute of Environment for Sustainable Development, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China); Huang Hui [Key Laboratory of Yangtze Aquatic Environment, Ministry of Education, College of Environmental Science and Engineering of Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China); Dai Xiaohu [Key Laboratory of Yangtze Aquatic Environment, Ministry of Education, College of Environmental Science and Engineering of Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China); National Engineering Research Center for Urban Pollution Control, Shanghai 200092 (China); Zhao Youcai [Key Laboratory of Yangtze Aquatic Environment, Ministry of Education, College of Environmental Science and Engineering of Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China)

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

124

Environmental Assessment Proposed Changes to the Sanitary Biosolids Land Application Program on the Oak Ridge Reservation Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

56 56 Environmental Assessment Proposed Changes to the Sanitary Biosolids Land Application Program on the Oak Ridge Reservation Oak Ridge, Tennessee February 2003 U.S. Department of Energy Oak Ridge Operations i ACRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONS ac acres ALARA as low as reasonably achievable AMSA American Metropolitan Sewer Association CEQ Council on Environmental Quality CSF cancer slope factor DOE U.S. Department of Energy EA environmental assessment EFPC East Fork Poplar Creek EPA U.S. Environmental Protection Agency EPS Effluent Polishing System (West End Treatment Facility) FONSI Finding of No Significant Impact g gram ha hectares HEAST Health Effects Assessment Summary Tables HI hazard index HQ hazard quotient IDP Industrial Discharge Permit IRIS Integrated Risk Information System kg kilogram

125

Fly Ash Construction Manual for Road and Site Applications, Volumes 1 and 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This two-volume construction manual details the use of fly ash in high-volume road construction and site development, covering all project elements from ash procurement to finishing. It addresses the use of fly ash in fills, embankments, backfills, subgrade stabilization, pavement base course, and slurried backfills, as well as its application as a soil amendment.

1988-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

126

H-Area, K-Area, and Par Pond Sewage Sludge Application Sites Groundwater Monitoring Report. Second quarter 1995  

SciTech Connect

During second quarter 1995, samples from monitoring wells at the K-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site (KSS wells) and Par Pond Sewage Sludge Application Site (PSS wells) were analyzed for constituents required by SCDHEC Construction Permit 13,173. H-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site (HSS wells) samples were analyzed for constituents required by SCDHEC Construction Permit 12,076. All samples are also analyzed as requested for other constituents as part of the Savannah River Site (SRS) Groundwater Monitoring Program. Annual analyses for other constituents, primarily metals, also are required by the permits. There were no constituents which exceeded the SCDHEC final Primary Drinking Water Standard in any well from the H-Area, K-Area, and Par Pond Sewage Sludge Application Sites. There were also no constituents which were above the SRS Flag 2 criteria in any well at the three sites during second quarter 1995.

Chase, J.A.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Session: Development and application of guidelines for siting, constructing, operating and monitoring wind turbines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This session at the Wind Energy and Birds/Bats workshop consisted of two presentations followed by a discussion/question and answer period. The two papers were: 'Development and Application of USFWS Guidance for Site Evaluation, Siting, Construction, Operation and Monitoring of Wind Turbines' by Albert Manville and 'Wind Power in Washington State' by Greg Hueckel. The session provided a comparison of wind project guidelines developed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) in May 2003 and the Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife in August 2003. Questions addressed included: is there a need or desire for uniform national or state criteria; can other states learn from Washington State's example, or from the USFWS voluntary guidelines; should there be uniform requirements/guidelines/check-lists for the siting, operation, monitoring, and mitigation to prevent or minimize avian, bat, and other wildlife impacts.

Manville, Albert; Hueckel, Greg

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Fly Ash Carbon Burn-Out at TVA's Colbert and Shawnee Stations: Site Specific Application Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fly ash beneficiation using Carbon Burn-Out (CBO) technology offers the opportunity to market fly ash that was previously landfilled. This site application study of beneficiating pulverized coal boiler fly ash at Tennessee Valley Authority's Colbert and Shawnee Stations indicates this process is a cost effective solution for decreasing solid waste disposal, increasing landfill life, improving boiler heat rate, and generating a positive revenue stream.

1996-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

129

F- and H-Area Sewage Sludge Application Sites groundwater monitoring report, third quarter 1992  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During third quarter 1992, the four wells at the F-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site (FSS wells) and the three wells at the H-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site (HSS wells) were sampled and analyzed for constituents required quarterly by South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control Construction Permit 12,076. The F-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site wells also were analyzed for a number of other constituents not required by the permit. Mercury exceeded the Primary Drinking Water Standard (PDWS) in one analysis from well FSS 2D, and tritium exceeded the PDWS in wells FSS 2D and 3D. The mercury result above PDWS is considered suspect because it was not supported by a reanalysis from the same sample or by historical data. Iron exceeded the SRS Flag 2 criterion in wells FSS 3D, lead exceeded its criterion in wells FSS 3D and HSS 3D, and manganese exceeded its Flag 2 criterion in wells FSS 2D and 3D.

Not Available

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Land application uses for dry FGD by-products, Phase 1 report  

SciTech Connect

The 1990 amendments to the Clean Air Act have spurred the development of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) processes, several of which produce a dry, solid by-product material consisting of excess sorbent, reaction products containing sulfates and sulfites, and coal fly ash. FGD by-product materials are treated as solid wastes and must be landfilled. It is highly desirable to find beneficial reuses for these materials provided the environmental impacts are minimal and socially acceptable. Phase 1 results of a 4 and 1/2 year study to demonstrate large volume beneficial uses of FGD by-products are reported. The purpose of the Phase 1 portion of the project was to characterize the chemical, physical, mineralogical and engineering properties of the FGD by-product materials obtained from various FGD technologies being developed in the state of Ohio. Phase 1 also involved the collection of baseline economic data related to the beneficial reuse of these FGD materials. A total of 58 samples were collected and analyzed. The results indicated the chemical composition of the FGD by-product materials were dominated by Ca, S, Al, and Si. Many of the elements regulated by the US Environmental Protection Agency reside primarily in the fly ash. Phase 1 results revealed that FGD by-product materials are essentially coal fly ash materials diluted with unreacted sorbent and reaction products. High volume beneficial reuses will depend on the economics of their substituting for existing materials for various types of applications (e.g. as an agricultural liming material, soil borrow for highway embankment construction, and reclamation of active and abandoned surface coal mines). Environmental constraints to the beneficial reuse of dry FGD by-product materials, based on laboratory and leachate studies, seem to be less than for coal fly ash.

Bigham, J.; Dick, W.; Forster, L.; Hitzhusen, F.; McCoy, E.; Stehouwer, R.; Traina, S.; Wolfe, W.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

CROWTM PROCESS APPLICATION FOR SITES CONTAMINATED WITH LIGHT NON-AQUEOUS PHASE LIQUIDS AND CHLORINATED HYDROCARBONS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Western Research Institute (WRI) has successfully applied the CROWTM (Contained Recovery of Oily Wastes) process at two former manufactured gas plants (MGPs), and a large wood treatment site. The three CROW process applications have all occurred at sites contaminated with coal tars or fuel oil and pentachlorophenol (PCP) mixtures, which are generally denser than water and are classified as dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs). While these types of sites are abundant, there are also many sites contaminated with gasoline, diesel fuel, or fuel oil, which are lighter than water and lie on top of an aquifer. A third site type occurs where chlorinated hydrocarbons have contaminated the aquifer. Unlike the DNAPLs found at MGP and wood treatment sites, chlorinated hydrocarbons are approximately one and a half times more dense than water and have fairly low viscosities. These contaminants tend to accumulate very rapidly at the bottom of an aquifer. Trichloroethylene (TCE) and perchloroethylene, or tetrachloroethylene (PCE), are the major industrial chlorinated solvents that have been found contaminating soils and aquifers. The objective of this program was to demonstrate the effectiveness of applying the CROW process to sites contaminated with light non-aqueous phase liquids (LNAPLs) and chlorinated hydrocarbons. Individual objectives were to determine a range of operating conditions necessary to optimize LNAPL and chlorinated hydrocarbon recovery, to conduct numerical simulations to match the laboratory experiments and determine field-scale recoveries, and determine if chemical addition will increase the process efficiency for LNAPLs. The testing consisted of twelve TCE tests; eight tests with PCE, diesel, and wood treatment waste; and four tests with a fuel oil-diesel blend. Testing was conducted with both vertical and horizontal orientations and with ambient to 211 F (99 C) water or steam. Residual saturations for the horizontal tests ranged from 23.6% PV to 0.3% PV. Also conducted was screening of 13 chemicals to determine their relative effectiveness and the selection of three chemicals for further testing.

L.A. Johnson, Jr.

2003-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

132

IDRISI Land Change Modeler | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

IDRISI Land Change Modeler IDRISI Land Change Modeler Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: IDRISI Land Change Modeler Agency/Company /Organization: Clark Labs Sector: Land Focus Area: Agriculture, Forestry Topics: Co-benefits assessment, - Environmental and Biodiversity, Resource assessment Resource Type: Maps, Software/modeling tools User Interface: Desktop Application Website: www.clarklabs.org/ Cost: Paid IDRISI Land Change Modeler Screenshot References: IDRISI Land Change Modeler[1] Overview "The Land Change Modeler is revolutionary land cover change analysis and prediction software with tools to analyze, measure and project the impacts of such change on habitat and biodiversity." References ↑ "IDRISI Land Change Modeler" Retrieved from

133

Coordination of Federal Transmission Permitting on Federal Lands (216(h)) |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Coordination of Federal Transmission Permitting on Federal Lands (216(h)) Coordination of Federal Transmission Permitting on Federal Lands (216(h)) Coordination of Federal Transmission Permitting on Federal Lands (216(h)) On October 23, 2009, the Department of Energy and eight other Federal agencies entered into a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) to improve coordination among project applicants, federal agencies, states and tribes involved in the siting and permitting process for electric transmission facilities on Federal land. The MOU will improve uniformity, consistency, and transparency by describing each entity's role and responsibilities when project applicants wish to build electric transmission facilities. Additionally, the MOU designates a "Lead Agency" serving as the single point-of-contact for coordinating all federal environmental reviews

134

ORNL DAAC, Land Validation Data in Mercury, June 4, 2002  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

collected at field sites for comparison with satellite-derived products. A total of 51 land validation data sets are currently registered in Mercury. The data include land...

135

NREL: Energy Analysis - Renewable Energy on Contaminated Lands  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Renewable Energy on Contaminated Lands Map of U.S. Map of Potential Limbo Land Sites for Consideration for Renewable Energy Technology Development. Enlarge image NREL's...

136

A Multiscale Ensemble Filtering System for Hydrologic Data Assimilation. Part II: Application to Land Surface Modeling with Satellite Rainfall Forcing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Part I of this series of studies developed procedures to implement the multiscale filtering algorithm for land surface hydrology and performed assimilation experiments with rainfall ensembles from a climate model. However, a most important ...

Ming Pan; Eric F. Wood

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Time Scales of Terrestrial Carbon Response Related to Land-Use Application: Implications for Initializing an Earth System Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The dynamic vegetation and carbon cycling component, LM3V, of the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL) prototype Earth system model (ESM2.1), has been designed to simulate the effects of land use on terrestrial carbon pools, including ...

Lori T. Sentman; Elena Shevliakova; Ronald J. Stouffer; Sergey Malyshev

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Regional Parameter Estimation of the VIC Land Surface Model: Methodology and Application to River Basins in China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a methodology for regional parameter estimation of the three-layer Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC-3L) land surface model with the goal of improving the streamflow simulation for river basins in China. This methodology is ...

Zhenghui Xie; Fei Yuan; Qingyun Duan; Jing Zheng; Miaoling Liang; Feng Chen

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Land Stewardship | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Land Stewardship Land Stewardship Land Stewardship Mission The team advocates improved ecosystem health on LM properties in accordance with DOE Order 430.1B, Real Property Asset Management; federal regulations, such as the Endangered Species Act, the Noxious Weed Act, and the Wetlands and Floodplains Act; and in consideration of LM agreements with regulatory agencies and tribes. The team advocates identifying and proposing land management improvements on LM sites that are beneficial to ecosystems and improve remedy sustainability. Improvements are implemented with consideration of adjacent land uses, owners, and political entities. Success is defined when measurable parameters are achieved. Scope The team identifies and evaluates proposals to enhance ecosystem health at

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land application sites" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


142

F- and H-Area Sewage Sludge Application Sites groundwater monitoring report. Fourth quarter 1993 and 1993 summary  

SciTech Connect

Samples from the four wells at the F-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site (FSS wells) and the three wells at the H-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site (HSS wells) are analyzed quarterly for constituents as required by South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control Construction Permit 12,076 and, as requested, for other constituents as part of the Savannah River Site (SRS) Groundwater Monitoring Program. Annual analyses for other constituents, primarily metals, also are required by the permit. No constituent exceeded either the final Primary Drinking Water Standards or the SRS Flag 2 criteria during fourth quarter 1993. Iron, lead, and manganese were the only permit- required analytes that exceeded standards at the F- and H-Area Sewage Sludge Application Sites in 1993. Tritium, aluminum, and other constituents not included in the permit have exceeded standards at this site previously, but only sporadically. These constituents were not analyzed fourth quarter 1993.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

H-Area, K-Area, and Par Pond Sewage Sludge Application sites groundwater monitoring report. First quarter 1995  

SciTech Connect

During first quarter 1995, samples from monitoring wells at the K-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site (KSS wells) and Par Pond Sewage Sludge Application Site (PSS wells) were analyzed for constituents required by SCDHEC Construction Permit 13,173. H-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site (HSS wells) samples were analyzed for constituents required by SCDHEC Construction Permit 12,076. All samples are also analyzed as requested for other constituents as part of the Savannah River Site (SRS) Groundwater Monitoring Program. Annual analyses for other constituents, primarily metals, also are required by the permits. The only constituent that exceeded the SCDHEC final Primary Drinking Water Standard in any well was lead which was found in wells HSS 3D and PSS 3D. Aluminum and iron were above Flag 2 criteria in one or more wells in the three sites during first quarter 1995.

Chase, J.A.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Application of Spatial Data Modeling and Geographical Information Systems (GIS) for Identification of Potential Siting Options for Various Electrical Generation Sources  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) initiated an internal National Electric Generation Siting Study, which is an ongoing multiphase study addressing several key questions related to our national electrical energy supply. This effort has led to the development of a tool, OR-SAGE (Oak Ridge Siting Analysis for power Generation Expansion), to support siting evaluations. The objective in developing OR-SAGE was to use industry-accepted approaches and/or develop appropriate criteria for screening sites and employ an array of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) data sources at ORNL to identify candidate areas for a power generation technology application. The initial phase of the study examined nuclear power generation. These early nuclear phase results were shared with staff from the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), which formed the genesis and support for an expansion of the work to several other power generation forms, including advanced coal with carbon capture and storage (CCS), solar, and compressed air energy storage (CAES). Wind generation was not included in this scope of work for EPRI. The OR-SAGE tool is essentially a dynamic visualization database. The results shown in this report represent a single static set of results using a specific set of input parameters. In this case, the GIS input parameters were optimized to support an economic study conducted by EPRI. A single set of individual results should not be construed as an ultimate energy solution, since US energy policy is very complex. However, the strength of the OR-SAGE tool is that numerous alternative scenarios can be quickly generated to provide additional insight into electrical generation or other GIS-based applications. The screening process divides the contiguous United States into 100 x 100 m (1-hectare) squares (cells), applying successive power generation-appropriate site selection and evaluation criteria (SSEC) to each cell. There are just under 700 million cells representing the contiguous United States. If a cell meets the requirements of each criterion, the cell is deemed a candidate area for siting a specific power generation form relative to a reference plant for that power type. Some SSEC parameters preclude siting a power plant because of an environmental, regulatory, or land-use constraint. Other SSEC assist in identifying less favorable areas, such as proximity to hazardous operations. All of the selected SSEC tend to recommend against sites. The focus of the ORNL electrical generation source siting study is on identifying candidate areas from which potential sites might be selected, stopping short of performing any detailed site evaluations or comparisons. This approach is designed to quickly screen for and characterize candidate areas. Critical assumptions supporting this work include the supply of cooling water to thermoelectric power generation; a methodology to provide an adequate siting footprint for typical power plant applications; a methodology to estimate thermoelectric plant capacity while accounting for available cooling water; and a methodology to account for future ({approx}2035) siting limitations as population increases and demands on freshwater sources change. OR-SAGE algorithms were built to account for these critical assumptions. Stream flow is the primary thermoelectric plant cooling source evaluated in this study. All cooling was assumed to be provided by a closed-cycle cooling (CCC) system requiring makeup water to account for evaporation and blowdown. Limited evaluations of shoreline cooling and the use of municipal processed water (gray) cooling were performed. Using a representative set of SSEC as input to the OR-SAGE tool and employing the accompanying critical assumptions, independent results for the various power generation sources studied were calculated.

Mays, Gary T [ORNL; Belles, Randy [ORNL; Blevins, Brandon R [ORNL; Hadley, Stanton W [ORNL; Harrison, Thomas J [ORNL; Jochem, Warren C [ORNL; Neish, Bradley S [ORNL; Omitaomu, Olufemi A [ORNL; Rose, Amy N [ORNL

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Effects of land markets and land management on ecosystem function: A framework for modelling exurban land-change  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents the conceptual design and application of a new land-change modelling framework that represents geographical, sociological, economic, and ecological aspects of a land system. The framework provides an overarching design that can be ... Keywords: Agent-based modelling, Carbon storage and flux, Exurban development, Land-use and land-cover change, Policy

Derek T. Robinson, Shipeng Sun, Meghan Hutchins, Rick L. Riolo, Daniel G. Brown, Dawn C. Parker, Tatiana Filatova, William S. Currie, Sarah Kiger

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Electric Transmission Line Siting Compact  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Electric Transmission Line Siting Compact Electric Transmission Line Siting Compact 1 ______________________________________________________________________________ 2 ARTICLE I 3 PURPOSE 4 5 Siting electric transmission lines across state borders and federal lands is an issue for states, the 6 federal government, transmission utilities, consumers, environmentalists, and other stakeholders. 7 The current, multi-year application review process by separate and equal jurisdictions constitutes 8 a sometimes inefficient and redundant process for transmission companies and complicates the 9 efforts of state and federal policy-makers and other stakeholders to develop more robust 10 economic opportunities, increase grid reliability and security, and ensure the consumers have the 11 lowest cost electricity possible. 12

147

Applicability of petroleum horizontal drilling technology to hazardous waste site characterization and remediation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Horizontal wells have the potential to become an important tool for use in characterization, remediation and monitoring operations at hazardous waste disposal, chemical manufacturing, refining and other sites where subsurface pollution may develop from operations or spills. Subsurface pollution of groundwater aquifers can occur at these sites by leakage of surface disposal ponds, surface storage tanks, underground storage tanks (UST), subsurface pipelines or leakage from surface operations. Characterization and remediation of aquifers at or near these sites requires drilling operations that are typically shallow, less than 500-feet in depth. Due to the shallow nature of polluted aquifers, waste site subsurface geologic formations frequently consist of unconsolidated materials. Fractured, jointed and/or layered high compressive strength formations or compacted caliche type formations can also be encountered. Some formations are unsaturated and have pore spaces that are only partially filled with water. Completely saturated underpressured aquifers may be encountered in areas where the static ground water levels are well below the ground surface. Each of these subsurface conditions can complicate the drilling and completion of wells needed for monitoring, characterization and remediation activities. This report describes some of the equipment that is available from petroleum drilling operations that has direct application to groundwater characterization and remediation activities. A brief discussion of petroleum directional and horizontal well drilling methodologies is given to allow the reader to gain an understanding of the equipment needed to drill and complete horizontal wells. Equipment used in river crossing drilling technology is also discussed. The final portion of this report is a description of the drilling equipment available and how it can be applied to groundwater characterization and remediation activities.

Goranson, C.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Future land use plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy`s (DOE) changing mission, coupled with the need to apply appropriate cleanup standards for current and future environmental restoration, prompted the need for a process to determine preferred Future Land Uses for DOE-owned sites. DOE began the ``Future Land Use`` initiative in 1994 to ensure that its cleanup efforts reflect the surrounding communities` interests in future land use. This plan presents the results of a study of stakeholder-preferred future land uses for the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), located in central Long Island, New York. The plan gives the Laboratory`s view of its future development over the next 20 years, as well as land uses preferred by the community were BNL ever to cease operations as a national laboratory (the post-BNL scenario). The plan provides an overview of the physical features of the site including its history, topography, geology/hydrogeology, biological inventory, floodplains, wetlands, climate, and atmosphere. Utility systems and current environmental operations are described including waste management, waste water treatment, hazardous waste management, refuse disposal and ground water management. To complement the physical descriptions of the site, demographics are discussed, including overviews of the surrounding areas, laboratory population, and economic and non-economic impacts.

NONE

1995-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

149

Compact Neutron Generators for Medical Home Land Security and Planetary Exploration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GENERATORS FOR MEDICAL, HOME LAND SECURITY AND PLANETARYdetection schemes, from home-land security applications[4-6

Reijonen, J.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Health Equity in a New Urbanist Environment: Land Use Planning and Community Capacity Building in Fresno, CA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on the links between land use, air pollution and health inlinks between land use and air pollution were simultaneouslyof land- use siting and cumulative air pollution impacts. ”

ZUK, MIRIAM ZOFITH

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

MODIS Land Products Subsets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Data for Selected Field Sites (n=1147) Data for Selected Field Sites (n=1147) Obtain MODIS data for areas centered on selected field sites or flux towers from around the world. The goal of the MODIS Subsets for Selected Field Sites is to prepare summaries of selected MODIS Land Products for the community to use for validation of models and remote sensing products and to characterize field sites. Search for data: By Site from a Map Server from Google Earth (Install Google Earth) From FTP site (ASCII) Methods Data products were first subsetted from one or more 1200x1200-km MODIS tiles to 25 x 25-km arrays by the MODIS Science Data Support Team (MODAPS). These products were further subsetted (7x7) and reformatted from their native HDF-EOS to ASCII using version 2.2 of the MODIS Reprojection Tool (MRT) in combination with code developed at the ORNL DAAC.

152

Spectroelectrochemical Sensor for Pertechnetate Applicable to Hanford and Other DOE Sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the period of this grant several significant milestones have been passed pursuant to designing a fluorescence sensor for pertechnetate (TcO4-). They are as follows: Fluorescence spectroelectrochemistry and less than picomolar limit of detection for a model non-radioactive analyte have been demonstrated. The spectroelectrochemical sensor and associated instrumentation for fluorescence mode of operation have been made, are portable, and easily transported to and used at DOE sites. The sensor has sufficient selectivity for its application to complex samples, even including tank waste, that exist at DOE sites such as the Hanford Site. Pertechnetate has been preconcentrated in sensor films and electrochemically reduced. This is the first critical step in operation of a spectroelectrochemical sensor for TcO4-. New Tc complexes have been made that fluoresce and these complexes have been preconcentrated and electrochemically modulated in a sensor film leading to fluorescence modulation, which is the second critical step in operation of the spectroelectrochemical sensor for TcO4-. We have determined that fluorescence offers a means of dramatically improving the limit of detection. Based on measurements on our new fluorescent complexes of Tc, we estimate the limit of detection for the sensor to be 5 x 10-12M. In related work, we have shown that the sensitivity of the spectroelectrochemical sensor for some metal cations can be improved by forming a metal complex with better optical and electrochemical properties. In addition, some heavy metals can be detected with the spectroelectrochemical sensor by depositing them directly as metals on the sensor surface.

Heineman, William R.; Seliskar, Carl J.; Bryan, Samuel A.; Hubler, Timothy L.

2009-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

153

The Great DOE Land Rush?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

area manager. co, 1800 ha-about 15% of the lab's land- (NERP), at the Savannah River site in South But some DOE officials argue that could be transferred as early as 2001 to the...

154

H-Area, K-Area, and Par Pond Sewage Sludge Application Sites groundwater monitoring report. Second quarter 1994  

SciTech Connect

Groundwater samples from the three wells at the H-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site (HSS wells) are analyzed quarterly for constituents as required by South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) Construction Permit 12,076. Samples from the three wells at the K-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site (KSS wells) and the three wells at the Par Pond Sewage Sludge Application Site (PSS wells) are analyzed quarterly for constituents required by SCDHEC Construction Permit 13,173. All samples are also analyzed as requested for other constituents as part of the Savannah River Site (SRS) Groundwater Monitoring Program. Annual analyses for other constituents, primarily metals, also are required by the permits. No constituents exceeded the SCDHEC final Primary Drinking Water Standard in any well from the H-Area, K-Area, and Par Pond Sewage Sludge Application Sites. Aluminum, iron, lead, and manganese, which were above standards and Flag 2 criteria in one or more wells in the three sites during first quarter 1994, were not analyzed this quarter. Second quarter results are similar to results for fourth quarter 1993.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

F- and H-Area Sewage Sludge Application Sites groundwater monitoring report. Fourth quarter 1992 and 1992 summary  

SciTech Connect

Samples from the four wells at the F-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site (FSS wells) and the three wells at the H-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site (HSS wells) are analyzed quarterly for constituents as required by South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control Construction Permit 12,076 and, as requested, for other constituents as part of the Savannah River Site Groundwater Monitoring Program. Annual analyses for other constituents, primarily metals, also are required by the permit. During fourth quarter 1992, the FSS wells also were analyzed for a number of other constituents not required by the permit. Historically and currently, no permit-required analytes exceed standards at the F- and H-Area Sewage Sludge Application Sites except iron, lead, and manganese, which occur in elevated concentrations frequently in FSS wells. Lead concentrations exceeded the final Primary Drinking Water Standards during fourth quarter 1992, an event that is concurrent with a change in sampling procedures. Tritium is the primary nonpermit constituent that exceeds standards at the F-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site. Other constituents also exceed standards at this site but only sporadically.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

H-Area, K-Area, and Par Pond Sewage Sludge Application Sites groundwater monitoring report. First quarter 1994  

SciTech Connect

Samples from the three wells at the H-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site (HSS wells) are analyzed quarterly for constituents as required by South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) Construction Permit 12,076. Samples from the three Wells at the K-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site (KSS wells) and the three wells at the Par Pond Sewage Sludge Application Site (PSS wells) are analyzed quarterly for constituents required by SCDHEC Construction Permit 13,173. All samples are also analyzed as requested for other constituents as part of the Savannah River Site (SRS) Groundwater Monitoring Program. Annual analyses for other constituents, primarily metals, also are required by the permits. Lead presently exceeds the SCDHEC final Primary Drinking Water Standard in two wells from the three sites. As in third quarter 1993, aluminum, iron, and lead were reported in excess of the SRS Flag 2 criteria during first quarter 1994. An elevated concentration of manganese was found in one well at the K-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site during first quarter.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Case studies of the application of the Certification Framework to two geologic carbon sequestration sites  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from geologic carbon sequestration sites: unsaturated zoneverification of geologic carbon sequestration, Geophys. Res.to two geologic carbon sequestration sites Curtis M.

Oldenburg, Curtis M.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

solar land use | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

solar land use solar land use Home Rosborne318's picture Submitted by Rosborne318(5) Member 2 December, 2013 - 11:06 Request for Information Renewable Energy Generation/Production Shreveport Airport Authority - Response Deadline 2 January 2014 pv land use Solar solar land use Solar Power The Shreveport Airport Authority intends to issue a Request for Proposal (RFP) at some future time for renewable energy generation opportunities on Shreveport Airport property. Files: application/pdf icon solar_rfi_complete.pdf Sfomail's picture Submitted by Sfomail(48) Member 25 June, 2013 - 12:10 Solar Land Use Data on OpenEI acres csp land use how much land land requirements pv land use solar land use square miles I'm happy to announce that a new report on Solar+Land+Use was just released by the National+Renewable+Energy+Laboratory. You can find a brief summary

159

pv land use | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

pv land use pv land use Home Rosborne318's picture Submitted by Rosborne318(5) Member 2 December, 2013 - 11:06 Request for Information Renewable Energy Generation/Production Shreveport Airport Authority - Response Deadline 2 January 2014 pv land use Solar solar land use Solar Power The Shreveport Airport Authority intends to issue a Request for Proposal (RFP) at some future time for renewable energy generation opportunities on Shreveport Airport property. Files: application/pdf icon solar_rfi_complete.pdf Sfomail's picture Submitted by Sfomail(48) Member 25 June, 2013 - 12:10 Solar Land Use Data on OpenEI acres csp land use how much land land requirements pv land use solar land use square miles I'm happy to announce that a new report on Solar+Land+Use was just released by the National+Renewable+Energy+Laboratory. You can find a brief summary

160

land requirements | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

requirements requirements Dataset Summary Description This dataset is part of a larger internal dataset at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) that explores various characteristics of large solar electric (both PV and CSP) facilities around the United States. This dataset focuses on the land use characteristics for solar facilities that are either under construction or currently in operation. Source Land-Use Requirements for Solar Power Plants in the United States Date Released June 25th, 2013 (5 months ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords acres area average concentrating solar power csp Density electric hectares km2 land land requirements land use land-use mean photovoltaic photovoltaics PV solar statistics Data application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.spreadsheetml.sheet icon Master Solar Land Use Spreadsheet (xlsx, 1.5 MiB)

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land application sites" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

land use | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

use use Dataset Summary Description This dataset is part of a larger internal dataset at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) that explores various characteristics of large solar electric (both PV and CSP) facilities around the United States. This dataset focuses on the land use characteristics for solar facilities that are either under construction or currently in operation. Source Land-Use Requirements for Solar Power Plants in the United States Date Released June 25th, 2013 (5 months ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords acres area average concentrating solar power csp Density electric hectares km2 land land requirements land use land-use mean photovoltaic photovoltaics PV solar statistics Data application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.spreadsheetml.sheet icon Master Solar Land Use Spreadsheet (xlsx, 1.5 MiB)

162

Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 9   Applications of various polymers...bins 767 aircraft acoustical tile 767 and other Boeing aircraft brackets Airbus A320 bulk cargo floor sandwich structural panels Airbus A330-340 lower wing fairings A3XX main stair case (developmental) Beluga heavy-duty entrance floor panels Dornier 328 landing flap ribs Dornier 328 ice protection...

163

MODIS Land Products Subsets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

methods methods This section describes methods used to generate MODIS Land Subsets for Collection 4 and Collection 5 data products. Methods for Selected Sites (Collections 4 and 5) Methods for North America Tool (Collection 4) Methods for the Global Tool (Collection 5) Methods for Selected Sites (Collection 4 and 5) Source for Selected Site Data: Full MODIS scenes (1200-km x 1200-km) are initially subset to 11-km x 31-km (Collection 4) or 25-km x 25-km (Collection 5) by the MODAPS; these initial subsets contain the field site or flux tower. Reformatting and additional subsetting to 7-km x 7-km containing the field site or flux tower are done by the ORNL DAAC. Tools Used: The ORNL DAAC uses the MODIS Reprojection Tool (MRT) to reformat the MODIS data from HDF-EOS to binary format. A tool developed at ORNL is then used to convert the binary format to ASCII. The MRT is available from the Land Processes DAAC. Whereas the MRT can also be used to reproject data from its native projection to other projections, ORNL chose to forgo the resampling associated with reprojection to minimize data manipulation and distortion. The MOD12Q1 Land Cover Collection 3 data are in I-Sin projection, and the Collection 4 and Collection 5 data are in Sinusoidal projection.

164

EOS Land Validation Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

EOS Land Validation The EOS Land Validation Project Overview EOS Land Validation Logo The objective of the EOS Land Validation Project is to achieve consistency, completeness,...

165

MODIS Land Products Subsets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Global Subsetting and Visualization Tool Global Subsetting and Visualization Tool The Global Subsetting and Visualization Tool provides customized subsets of MODIS Land products in ASCII format on demand for any location on Earth. Users select a site (either from a picklist or by entering the site's geographic coordinates) and the area surrounding that site, from one pixel up to 201 x 201 km. The tool is expected to take up to 60 minutes to complete the processing, and the tool will send you an email message containing the URL where you can access the output. The tool provides time series plots of the measurement, an ASCII file of the pixel values for the selected product along with quality information, average and standard deviations for the area selected, and a file that can be imported directly into GIS software. In addition we provide a land cover grid (IGBP classification) of the area, along with an estimate of heterogeneity (Shannon richness and evenness).

166

Environment Canada research on land treatment of petroleum wastes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of the studies presented in this book is to identify wastes which can be applied to land in an environmentally acceptable manner and to provide information on which to base guidelines for the proper application of such wastes to land. The information which has been collected to date has focused on the persistence and fate of oil and toxic constituents of petroleum wastes when applied to soil, potential environmental impacts and risk to human health associated with application to land, and site managements techniques which enhance treatment of organic constituents of wastes while protecting environmental quality. The potential for contamination of groundwater, the accumulation of hazardous substances in soil and effects on plant growth have undergone the most intensive investigation to date. Impingement on air quality has received limited study.

Bulman, T.L.; Scroggins, R.P. (Wastewater Technolgy Centre, Burlington, Ontario (CA))

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

MODIS Land Products Subsets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Presentations Presentations Web and Web Services based tool that provides Subsets and Visualization of MODIS land products to facilitate land validation and field site characterization. S.K. Santhana Vannan; R. B. Cook; B. E. Wilson. AGU Fall Meeting, San Francisco, CA, December 14-18 2009 MODIS Land Product Subsets,S.K. Santhana Vannan; R. B. Cook. November, 2009 MODIS Web Service, S.K. Santhana Vannan. ORNL DAAC UWG Meeting, May 2009 Subsetting Tools for MODIS Land Products: Time-series data for field sites, R. B. Cook, S. M. Margle, S. K. Santhana Vannan, S. K. Holladay, and T. W. Beaty. Global Vegetation Workshop, Missoula MT, August 8-10, 2006 MODIS ASCII Subsets, R. B. Cook. May 2006 Subsets of Remote Sensing Products for AmeriFlux Sites: MODIS ASCII Subsets, AmeriFlux Annual Meeting, R. B. Cook, S. M. Margle, S. K. Holladay, F. A. Heinsch, and C. B. Schaaf. October 5-7, 2004, Boulder, Colorado

168

MODIS Land Products Subsets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Introduction Introduction The goal of the MODIS Land Product Subsets project is to provide summaries of selected MODIS Land Products for the community to use for validation of models and remote-sensing products, and to characterize field sites. The MODIS Land Product Subsets are derived from MODIS products that were generated with Collection 4 or later algorithms. Please be advised that these products are subject to continual review and revision. The MODIS land product subsets are provided in ASCII and GeoTIFF format. The subsets are stored as individual text(ASCII) files, each file represents one field site and one MODIS product.The ASCII data covers 7x7 km of the field site. These ASCII files contain comma-delimited rows of parameter values (image bands) for each pixel in the selected area. Each row in the file will contain data from one 8-day, 16-day, or annual period (depending on the temporal frequency of the data product represented).

169

Application for a Permit to Operate a Class III Solid Waste Disposal Site at the Nevada National Security Site Area 5 Asbestiform Low-Level Solid Waste Disposal Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) is located approximately 105 km (65 mi) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. The U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) is the federal lands management authority for the NNSS and National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec) is the Management and Operations contractor. Access on and off the NNSS is tightly controlled, restricted, and guarded on a 24-hour basis. The NNSS is posted with signs along its entire perimeter. NSTec is the operator of all solid waste disposal sites on the NNSS. The Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) is the location of the permitted facility for the Solid Waste Disposal Site (SWDS). The Area 5 RWMS is located near the eastern edge of the NNSS (Figure 1), approximately 26 km (16 mi) north of Mercury, Nevada. The Area 5 RWMS is used for the disposal of low-level waste (LLW) and mixed low-level waste. Many areas surrounding the RWMS have been used in conducting nuclear tests. The site will be used for the disposal of regulated Asbestiform Low-Level Waste (ALLW), small quantities of low-level radioactive hydrocarbon-burdened (LLHB) media and debris, LLW, LLW that contains Polychlorinated Biphenyl (PCB) Bulk Product Waste greater than 50 ppm that leaches at a rate of less than 10 micrograms of PCB per liter of water, and small quantities of LLHB demolition and construction waste (hereafter called permissible waste). Waste containing free liquids, or waste that is regulated as hazardous waste under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) or state-of-generation hazardous waste regulations, will not be accepted for disposal at the site. Waste regulated under the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) that will be accepted at the disposal site is regulated asbestos-containing materials (RACM) and PCB Bulk Product Waste greater than 50 ppm that leaches at a rate of less than 10 micrograms of PCB per liter of water. The term asbestiform is used throughout this document to describe RACM. The disposal site will be used as a depository of permissible waste generated both on site and off site. All generators designated by NNSA/NSO will be eligible to dispose regulated ALLW at the Asbestiform Low-Level Waste Disposal Site in accordance with the DOE/NV-325, Nevada National Security Site Waste Acceptance Criteria (NNSSWAC, current revision). Approval will be given by NNSA/NSO to generators that have successfully demonstrated through process knowledge (PK) and/or sampling and analysis that the waste is low-level, contains asbestiform material, or contains PCB Bulk Product Waste greater than 50 ppm that leaches at a rate of less than 10 micrograms of PCB per liter of water, or small quantities of LLHB demolition and construction waste and does not contain prohibited waste materials. Each waste stream will be approved through the Radioactive Waste Acceptance Program (RWAP), which ensures that the waste meets acceptance requirements outlined in the NNSSWAC.

NSTec Environmental Programs

2010-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

170

2011 Annual Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant  

SciTech Connect

This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Wastewater Reuse Permit (LA-000141-03), for the wastewater land application site at Idaho National Laboratory Site's Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant from November 1, 2010, through October 31, 2011. The report contains the following information: (1) Site description; (2) Facility and system description; (3) Permit required monitoring data and loading rates; (4) Status of special compliance conditions and activities; and (5) Discussion of the facility's environmental impacts. During the 2011 permit year, approximately 1.22 million gallons of treated wastewater was land-applied to the irrigation area at Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment plant.

Michael G. Lewis

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

H-Area, K-Area, and Par Pond Sewage Sludge Application Sites groundwater monitoring report. Third quarter 1994  

SciTech Connect

Groundwater samples from the three wells at the H-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site (HSS wells) are analyzed quarterly for constituents as required by South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) Construction Permit 12,076. Samples from the three wells at the K-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site (KSS wells) and the three wells at the quired by SCDHEC Construction Permit 13,173. All samples are also analyzed as requested for other constituents as part of the Savannah River Site (SRS) Groundwater Monitoring Program. Annual analyses for other constituents, primarily metals, also are required by the permits. No constituents exceeded the SCDHEC final Primary Drinking Water Standard in any well from the H-Area, K-Area, and Par Pond Sewage Sludge Application Sites. Aluminum and iron were above Flag 2 criteria in one or more wells in the three sites during third quarter 1994. These constituents were not analyzed during the previous quarter. Third quarter results are similar to results for first quarter 1994.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

MODIS Land Products Subsets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Geography of the MODIS Land Subsets for selected Field Sites Geography of the MODIS Land Subsets for selected Field Sites The 7- x 7-km grid containing the field or tower site is provided to enable comparison of pixel values of MODIS products with field data collected at a site. The values are intended to be examined over time either as a collection of individual values or combined (e.g., the average and range) within a 3- x 3-km grid or a 5- x 5-km grid around the site. Examples of analyses using the ASCII subset data can be found in presentations. If users would like to examine the MODIS data spatially in a map, we suggest that they obtain the GeoTIFF subsets or MODIS products from the LP DAAC. Please note that the grid and pixel sizes are not exact multiples of 1 km, but are only approximations. For instance, the grid and pixel size for the 1 km Sinusoidal grid is approximately 926 m. For additional information, please view the MODIS Web site.

173

Evaluating, Migrating, and Consolidating Databases and Applications for Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Activities at the Rocky Flats Site  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM) is assuming responsibilities for long-term surveillance and maintenance (LTS and M) activities at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) during fiscal year 2006. During the transition, LM is consolidating databases and applications that support these various functions into a few applications which will streamline future management and retrieval of data. This paper discussed the process of evaluating, migrating, and consolidating these databases and applications for LTS and M activities and provides lessons learned that will benefit future transitions. (authors)

Surovchak, S. [U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Legacy Management, Broomfield, Colorado (United States); Marutzky, S.; Thompson, B.; Miller, K.; Labonte, E. [S.M. Stoller Corporation, Grand Junction, Colorado (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Preliminary Analysis of Grande Ronde Basalt Formation Flow Top Transmissivity as it Relates to Assessment and Site Selection Applications for Fluid/Energy Storage and Sequestration Projects  

SciTech Connect

Preliminary Analysis of Grande Ronde Basalt Formation Flow Top Transmissivity as it Relates to Assessment and Site Selection Applications for Fluid/Energy Storage and Sequestration Projects

Spane, Frank A.

2013-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

175

Land-Use Requirements for Solar Power Plants in the United States  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report provides data and analysis of the land use associated with utility-scale ground-mounted solar facilities, defined as installations greater than 1 MW. We begin by discussing standard land-use metrics as established in the life-cycle assessment literature and then discuss their applicability to solar power plants. We present total and direct land-use results for various solar technologies and system configurations, on both a capacity and an electricity-generation basis. The total area corresponds to all land enclosed by the site boundary. The direct area comprises land directly occupied by solar arrays, access roads, substations, service buildings, and other infrastructure. As of the third quarter of 2012, the solar projects we analyze represent 72% of installed and under-construction utility-scale PV and CSP capacity in the United States.

Ong, S.; Campbell, C.; Denholm, P.; Margolis, R.; Heath, G.

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Factors Controlling the Vertical Extent of Fair-Weather Shallow Cumulus Clouds over Land: Investigation of Diurnal-Cycle Observations Collected at the ARM Southern Great Plains Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Summertime observations for 13 yr at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Southern Great Plains site are used to study fair-weather shallow cumuli (ShCu). To roughly separate forced from active ShCu, days are categorized into “thin-” or “thick-” ...

Yunyan Zhang; Stephen A. Klein

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Multi-Site Application of the Geomechanical Approach for Natural Fracture Exploration  

SciTech Connect

In order to predict the nature and distribution of natural fracturing, Advanced Resources Inc. (ARI) incorporated concepts of rock mechanics, geologic history, and local geology into a geomechanical approach for natural fracture prediction within mildly deformed, tight (low-permeability) gas reservoirs. Under the auspices of this project, ARI utilized and refined this approach in tight gas reservoir characterization and exploratory activities in three basins: the Piceance, Wind River and the Anadarko. The primary focus of this report is the knowledge gained on natural fractural prediction along with practical applications for enhancing gas recovery and commerciality. Of importance to tight formation gas production are two broad categories of natural fractures: (1) shear related natural fractures and (2) extensional (opening mode) natural fractures. While arising from different origins this natural fracture type differentiation based on morphology is sometimes inter related. Predicting fracture distribution successfully is largely a function of collecting and understanding the available relevant data in conjunction with a methodology appropriate to the fracture origin. Initially ARI envisioned the geomechanical approach to natural fracture prediction as the use of elastic rock mechanics methods to project the nature and distribution of natural fracturing within mildly deformed, tight (low permeability) gas reservoirs. Technical issues and inconsistencies during the project prompted re-evaluation of these initial assumptions. ARI's philosophy for the geomechanical tools was one of heuristic development through field site testing and iterative enhancements to make it a better tool. The technology and underlying concepts were refined considerably during the course of the project. As with any new tool, there was a substantial learning curve. Through a heuristic approach, addressing these discoveries with additional software and concepts resulted in a stronger set of geomechanical tools. Thus, the outcome of this project is a set of predictive tools with broad applicability across low permeability gas basins where natural fractures play an important role in reservoir permeability. Potential uses for these learnings and tools range from rank exploration to field-development portfolio management. Early incorporation of the permeability development concepts presented here can improve basin assessment and direct focus to the high potential areas within basins. Insight into production variability inherent in tight naturally fractured reservoirs leads to improved wellbore evaluation and reduces the incidence of premature exits from high potential plays. A significant conclusion of this project is that natural fractures, while often an important, overlooked aspect of reservoir geology, represent only one aspect of the overall reservoir fabric. A balanced perspective encompassing all aspects of reservoir geology will have the greatest impact on exploration and development in the low permeability gas setting.

R. L. Billingsley; V. Kuuskraa

2006-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

178

Wind Opportunities for Idaho State Lands  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

and Local Initiatives Group and Local Initiatives Group National Renewable Energy Laboratory Terri Walters Carol Tombari 303-275-3005 303-275-3821 terri_walters@nrel.gov carol_tombari@nrel.gov Wind Opportunities For Idaho State Lands March 3, 2004 Wind Overview Wind Overview * Technology * Resources * Markets and Drivers * Economic Development Opportunities * Wind Powering America U.S. Electricity Fuel Mix U.S. Electricity Fuel Mix Coal 51.8% Nuclear 19.8% Hydro 7.2% Petroleum 2.9% Gas 16.1% Other/Renewables 2.2% Sizes and Applications Sizes and Applications Small (≤10 kW) * Homes * Farms * Remote Applications (e.g. water pumping, telecom sites, icemaking) Intermediate (10-100 kW) * Village Power * Hybrid Systems * Distributed Power Large (660 kW - 2+MW) * Central Station Wind Farms * Distributed Power Growth of Wind Energy Capacity Growth of Wind Energy Capacity

179

Application of microseismic technology to hydraulic fracture diagnostics: GRI/DOE Field Fracturing Multi-Sites Project  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the Field Fracturing Multi-Sites Project (M-Site) is to conduct field experiments and analyze data that will result in definitive determinations of hydraulic fracture dimensions using remote well and treatment well diagnostic techniques. In addition, experiments will be conducted to provide data that will resolve significant unknowns with regard to hydraulic fracture modeling, fracture fluid rheology and fracture treatment design. These experiments will be supported by a well-characterized subsurface environment as well as surface facilities and equipment conducive to acquiring high-quality data. It is anticipated that the project`s research advancements will provide a foundation for a fracture diagnostic service industry and hydraulic fracture optimization based on measured fracture response. The M-Site Project is jointly sponsored by the Gas Research Institute (GRI) and the US Department of Energy (DOE). The site developed for M-Site hydraulic fracture experimentation is the former DOE Multiwell Experiment (MWX) site located near Rifle, Colorado. The MWX project drilled three closely-spaced wells (MWX-1, MWX-2 and MWX-3) which were the basis for extensive reservoir analyses and tight gas sand characterizations in the blanket and lenticular sandstone bodies of the Mesaverde Group. The research results and background knowledge gained from the MWX project are directly applicable to research in the current M-Site Project.

Wilmer, R. [CER Corp., Las Vegas, NV (United States); Warpinski, N.R. [Sandia National Laboratories (United States); Wright, T.B. [Resources Engineering Systems (United States); Branagan, P.T. [Branagan & Associates (United States); Fix, J.E. [Fix & Associates (United States)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Evaluation of Technical Impracticability Determinations and Their Applicability to Former Manufactured Gas Plant Sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Investigation and remediation of former manufactured gas plant (MGP) sites often present many challenges due to the presence of dense nonaqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs), the age of releases, complex geology, persistent compounds, and site ownership by third parties. As a result, it is often difficult or impossible to remediate former MGP sites to pre-release conditions or regulatory-established default soil and groundwater quality criteria. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) and many states ...

2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land application sites" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Optimal selection of on-site generation with combined heat and power applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the burning of natural gas for on-site power generation andnatural gas absorption chiller GenL i , m , t , h , u Generated power by distributed generation

Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Marnay, Chris; Bailey, Owen; Hamachi LaCommare, Kristina

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

K-Area and Par Pond Sewage Sludge Application Sites Groundwater Monitoring Report. Fourth quarter 1992 and 1992 summary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During fourth quarter 1992, samples from the three monitoring wells at the K-Area site (KSS series) and the three monitoring wells at the Par Pond site (PSS series) were analyzed for constituents required by South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control Construction Permit 13, 173 and for other constituents as part of the Savannah River Site (SRS) Groundwater Monitoring Program. This report describes monitoring results that exceeded the final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) or the SRS flagging criteria. During fourth quarter 1992, no constituents analyzed exceeded the PDWS or the SRS Flag 2 criteria at the K-Area and Par Pond Sewage Sludge Application Sites. In the KSS well series, the field measurement for alkalinity ranged as high as 26 mg/L in well KSS 1D. Alkalinity measurements were zero in the PSS wells. Historical and current water-level elevations at the K-Area and Par Pond Sewage Sludge Application Site indicate that the groundwater flow directions are south to southwest (SRS grid coordinates).

Thompson, C.Y.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

land-use | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

land-use land-use Dataset Summary Description This dataset is part of a larger internal dataset at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) that explores various characteristics of large solar electric (both PV and CSP) facilities around the United States. This dataset focuses on the land use characteristics for solar facilities that are either under construction or currently in operation. Source Land-Use Requirements for Solar Power Plants in the United States Date Released June 25th, 2013 (5 months ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords acres area average concentrating solar power csp Density electric hectares km2 land land requirements land use land-use mean photovoltaic photovoltaics PV solar statistics Data application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.spreadsheetml.sheet icon Master Solar Land Use Spreadsheet (xlsx, 1.5 MiB)

184

Land Division: Uniform Environmental Covenants Program (Alabama) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Land Division: Uniform Environmental Covenants Program (Alabama) Land Division: Uniform Environmental Covenants Program (Alabama) Land Division: Uniform Environmental Covenants Program (Alabama) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Industrial Local Government Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Alabama Program Type Environmental Regulations These regulations apply to environmental covenants arising from environmental response projects conducted under any of the following Alabama Department of Environmental Management programs: Scrap tire remediation sites, Soil and groundwater remediation sites, Leaking storage tank remediation sites, Solid waste disposal sites, Hazardous waste

185

Hanford Federal Facility state of Washington leased land  

SciTech Connect

This report was prepared to provide information concerning past solid and hazardous waste management practices for all leased land at the US DOE Hanford Reservation. This report contains sections including land description; land usage; ground water, air and soil monitoring data; and land uses after 1963. Numerous appendices are included which provide documentation of lease agreements and amendments, environmental assessments, and site surveys.

Not Available

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Solar Land Use | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Land Use Land Use Jump to: navigation, search (The following text is derived from a National Renewable Energy Laboratory report on solar land use in the United States.)[1] One concern regarding large-scale deployment of solar energy is its potentially significant land use. This article summarizes data and analysis of the land use associated with U.S. utility-scale ground-mounted photovoltaic (PV) and concentrating solar power (CSP) facilities. This article presents total and direct land-use results for various solar technologies and system configurations, on both a capacity and an electricity-generation basis. The total area corresponds to all land enclosed by the site boundary. The direct area comprises land directly occupied by solar arrays, access roads, substations, service buildings, and

187

Optimal selection of on-site generation with combined heat and power applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

0.85. The test site load profiles described in this report3.1: Electric-Only Sample Load Profile A.S. Siddiqui et al.Space Heating Sample Load Profile Figure 3.3: Sample Cooling

Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Marnay, Chris; Bailey, Owen; Hamachi LaCommare, Kristina

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

MODIS Land Products Subsets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Introduction Introduction Collection 5 The MODIS data from the Terra and Aqua satellites are being reprocessed using revised algorithms beginning in September 2006. This new set of MODIS Products is called Collection 5. To view the product changes that took place in going from Collection 4 to Collection 5, please visit the following Web site: http://landweb.nascom.nasa.gov/cgi-bin/QA_WWW/newPage.cgi?fileName=MODLAND_C005_changes The ORNL DAAC provides subsets of the Collection 5 MODIS Land Products. Investigators from around the world have shown a great deal of interest in this activity, asking that over 1000 field and flux tower sites be included in Collection 5 subsetting (up from 280 sites for Collection 4 MODIS subsetting). Availability of the Collection 5 Data Products

190

Predicting plant available nitrogen in land-applied biosolids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The rate at which biosolids (municipal sewage sludge) may be applied to land is dependent on factors including concentrations of metals, pathogens, toxic organic compounds, and nutrients. Where other properties are not limiting, land application rates are often based on matching crop N needs with the plant available N (PAN). The objectives of this study were to quantify biosolids PAN under field conditions and to propose methods including computer simulation to estimate biosolids PAN in a land application program. Six biosolids were evaluated over a 2-yr period. Laboratory incubations were used to obtain decomposition kinetics. Field studies provided a relationship between inorganic fertilizer N rate and sorghum sudangrass [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench] tissue N concentration, which was used to determine biosolids PAN in a Captina silt loam soil. Biosolids PAN released during the field experiment was linearly related to biosolids C/N ratio, organic N, or total N. Computer model predictions of PAN in the field were also linearly related to field estimates of biosolids PAN. Decay series obtained using the computer model, average biosolids decomposition kinetics, and average application site weather were very similar to decay series obtained using the computer model, actual weather, and kinetic data. Either decay series and routine analytical data for biosolids are proposed to estimate PAN for a given situation. Use of the computer model and weather data makes the approach site-specific, while analytical data for a specific biosolids makes the approach biosolids-specific.

Gilmour, J.T.; Skinner, V.

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Solar feasibility study for site-specific industrial-process-heat applications. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study addresses the technical feasibility of solar energy in industrial process heat (IPH) applications in Mid-America. The study was one of two contracted efforts covering the MASEC 12-state region comprised of: Illinois, Michigan, North Dakota, Indiana, Minnesota, Ohio, Iowa, Missouri, South Dakota, Kansas, Nebraska, Wisconsin. The results of our study are encouraging to the potential future role of solar energy in supplying process heat to a varied range of industries and applications. We identified and developed Case Study documentation of twenty feasible solar IPH applications covering eight major SIC groups within the Mid-American region. The geographical distribution of these applications for the existing range of solar insolation levels are shown and the characteristics of the applications are summarized. The results of the study include process identification, analysis of process heat requirements, selection of preliminary solar system characteristics, and estimation of system performance and cost. These are included in each of the 20 Case Studies. The body of the report is divided into two primary discussion sections dealing with the Study Methodology employed in the effort and the Follow-On Potential of the identified applications with regard to possible demonstration projects. The 20 applications are rated with respect to their relative overall viability and procedures are discussed for possible demonstration project embarkment. Also, a possible extension of this present feasibility study for late-comer industrial firms expressing interest appears worthy of consideration.

Murray, O.L.

1980-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

192

Application of cycle-based simulation to estimate loss of logistics productivity on construction sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Logistics management is a critical factor that determines the successful delivery of a construction project. The logistics activities have close connection with other logistics/construction activities, often producing hazards on site. Moreover, the policies ... Keywords: cycle-based simulation, hazard prevention, hazardous interaction, logistics productivity loss, safety

Feng Xu; Yuanbin Song; Hao Hu

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Applications of RESRAD family of computer codes to sites contaminated with radioactive residues.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The RESIL4D family of computer codes was developed to provide a scientifically defensible answer to the question ''How clean is clean?'' and to provide useful tools for evaluating human health risk at sites contaminated with radioactive residues. The RESRAD codes include (1) RESRAD for soil contaminated with radionuclides; (2) RESRAD-BUILD for buildings contaminated with radionuclides; (3) RESRAD-CHEM for soil contaminated with hazardous chemicals; (4) RESRAD-BASELINE for baseline risk assessment with measured media concentrations of both radionuclides and chemicals; (5) RESRAD-ECORISK for ecological risk assessment; (6) RESRAD-RECYCLE for recycle and reuse of radiologically contaminated metals and equipment; and (7) RESRAD-OFFSITE for off-site receptor radiological dose assessment. Four of these seven codes (RESRAD, RESRAD-BUILD, RESRAD-RECYCLE, and RESRAD-OFFSITE) also have uncertainty analysis capabilities that allow the user to input distributions of parameters. RESRAD has been widely used in the United States and abroad and approved by many federal and state agencies. Experience has shown that the RESRAD codes are useful tools for evaluating sites contaminated with radioactive residues. The use of RESRAD codes has resulted in significant savings in cleanup cost. Analysis of 19 site-specific uranium guidelines is discussed in the paper.

Yu, C.; Kamboj, S.; Cheng, J.-J.; LePoire, D.; Gnanapragasam, E.; Zielen, A.; Williams, W. A.; Wallo, A.; Peterson, H.

1999-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

194

What Kind of Mobile Sites or Applications Would Help with Your...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

17, 2009 - 7:30am Addthis This week, you read about an application that helps you find E85 fueling stations using popular GPS navigation units. GPS units and mobile computing in...

195

Optimal selection of on-site generation with combined heat andpower applications  

SciTech Connect

While demand for electricity continues to grow, expansion of the traditional electricity supply system, or macrogrid, is constrained and is unlikely to keep pace with the growing thirst western economies have for electricity. Furthermore, no compelling case has been made that perpetual improvement in the overall power quality and reliability (PQR)delivered is technically possible or economically desirable. An alternative path to providing high PQR for sensitive loads would generate close to them in microgrids, such as the Consortium for Electricity Reliability Technology Solutions (CERTS) Microgrid. Distributed generation would alleviate the pressure for endless improvement in macrogrid PQR and might allow the establishment of a sounder economically based level of universal grid service. Energy conversion from available fuels to electricity close to loads can also provide combined heat and power (CHP) opportunities that can significantly improve the economics of small-scale on-site power generation, especially in hot climates when the waste heat serves absorption cycle cooling equipment that displaces expensive on-peak electricity. An optimization model, the Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model (DER-CAM), developed at Berkeley Lab identifies the energy bill minimizing combination of on-site generation and heat recovery equipment for sites, given their electricity and heat requirements, the tariffs they face, and a menu of available equipment. DER-CAM is used to conduct a systemic energy analysis of a southern California naval base building and demonstrates atypical current economic on-site power opportunity. Results achieve cost reductions of about 15 percent with DER, depending on the tariff.Furthermore, almost all of the energy is provided on-site, indicating that modest cost savings can be achieved when the microgrid is free to select distributed generation and heat recovery equipment in order to minimize its over all costs.

Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Marnay, Chris; Bailey, Owen; HamachiLaCommare, Kristina

2004-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

196

Land Turtles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Turtles Turtles Nature Bulletin No. 157 May 29, 1948 Forest Preserve District of Cook County William N. Erickson, President Roberts Mann, Supt. of Conservation LAND TURTLES Turtles are four-legged reptiles that originated before the dinosaurs appeared, some 175 million years ago. The distinguishing feature of the turtle is its shell, varying in shape and markings with the different species: an arched upper shell grown fast to the backbone, and a flat lower shell grown fast to the breastbone, the two connected on either side by a bony bridge. In some species, like the box turtles, the lower shell is hinged, enabling the animal to completely conceal its head, tail and limbs by closing the two shells together. Most turtles live in water all or part of the time, but all of them lay their eggs on land, and neither the nest nor the young is attended by the parents. Each species has its own method of nest construction, using the hind legs to dig a hole in the ground, but the eggs are covered and left to be hatched by the heat of the sun. The eggs are relished by many animals such as skunks and squirrels; the young, before their armor hardens, are devoured by birds, mammals, fishes and other turtles.

197

Whole Genome Analysis of Functional Protein Binding Sites and DNA Methylation: Application to p53 and Low Dose Ionizing Radiation.  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Whole Genome Analysis of Functional Protein Binding Sites and DNA Methylation: Whole Genome Analysis of Functional Protein Binding Sites and DNA Methylation: Application to p53 and Low Dose Ionizing Radiation. Krassimira Botcheva, John J. Dunn and Carl W. Anderson Biology Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973, USA The effects of exposure to low doses of ionizing radiation on humans results largely from changes in gene expression mediated by the activation of sequence-specific DNA binding proteins (transcription factors) as well as changes to other chromosomal proteins and perhaps to DNA. To develop a molecular understanding of the consequences of exposures to low doses of ionizing radiation, it will be necessary to understanding where radiation-activated transcription factors bind in whole genomes and how

198

Application of accident progression event tree technology to the Savannah River Site Defense Waste Processing Facility SAR analysis  

SciTech Connect

The Accident Analysis in the Safety Analysis Report (SAR) for the Savannah River Site (SRS) Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) has recently undergone an upgrade. Non-reactor SARs at SRS (and other Department of Energy (DOE) sites) use probabilistic techniques to assess the frequency of accidents at their facilities. This paper describes the application of an extension of the Accident Progression Event Tree (APET) approach to accidents at the SRS DWPF. The APET technique allows an integrated model of the facility risk to be developed, where previous probabilistic accident analyses have been limited to the quantification of the frequency and consequences of individual accident scenarios treated independently. Use of an APET allows a more structured approach, incorporating both the treatment of initiators that are common to more than one accident, and of accident progression at the facility.

Brandyberry, M.D.; Baker, W.H.; Wittman, R.S. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Amos, C.N. [Science Applications International Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

199

Nuclear Maintenance Applications Center: Foreign Material Exclusion Site Coordinator Training—Student Handbook  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The main purpose of this report is to provide newly appointed foreign material exclusion (FME) coordinators with vital FME program information so they can quickly perform their responsibilities at a high level to ensure that site FME practices do not adversely affect equipment and plant performance. FME coordinators who wish or need to improve station FME program performance would also benefit by attending this training. This report provides a comprehensive overview of technical considerations required t...

2010-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

200

Simple economic evaluation and applications experiments for photovoltaic systems for remote sites  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A simple evaluation of the cost effectiveness of photovoltaic systems is presented. The evaluation is based on a calculation of breakeven costs of photovoltaics (PV) arrays with the levelized costs of two alternative energy sources (1) extension of the utility grid and (2) diesel generators. A selected number of PV applications experiments that are in progress in remote areas of the US are summarized. These applications experiments range from a 23 watt insect survey trap to a 100 kW PV system for a national park complex. It is concluded that PV systems for remote areas are now cost effective in remote small applications with commercially available technology and will be cost competitive for intermediate scale systems (approx. 10 kW) in the 1980s if the DOE 1986 Commercial Readiness Goals are achieved.

Rios, M. Jr.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land application sites" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

2010 Annual Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site's Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant  

SciTech Connect

This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Wastewater Reuse Permit (#LA-000141-03), for the wastewater land application site at Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant from November 1, 2009, through October 31, 2010. The report contains the following information: • Site description • Facility and system description • Permit required monitoring data and loading rates • Status of special compliance conditions • Discussion of the facility’s environmental impacts. During the 2010 permit year, approximately 2.2 million gallons of treated wastewater was land-applied to the irrigation area at Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment plant.

Mike lewis

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

2012 Annual Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site's Central facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant  

SciTech Connect

This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Wastewater Reuse Permit (#LA-000141-03), for the wastewater land application site at Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant from November 1, 2011, through October 31, 2012. The report contains the following information: • Site description • Facility and system description • Permit required monitoring data and loading rates • Status of compliance conditions and activities • Discussion of the facility’s environmental impacts. During the 2012 permit year, no wastewater was land-applied to the irrigation area of the Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant.

Mike Lewis

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Business Models for Monetizing Internet Applications and Web Sites: Experience, Theory, and Predictions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Almost all attempts to date to monetize Internet applications targeted at individuals have focused on natural extensions of traditional media or traditional retailing. Most are either some form of consumer-focused advertising or of consumer-focused e-commerce. ... Keywords: Business Models For The Internet, Future Of Online Advertising, Monetizing The Internet, Strategic Information Systems

Eric Clemons

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

High Performance, Low-Dose Radiography Systems for Space and Remote Site Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Medical imaging applications using X- and gamma-rays have reached outstanding levels of complexity and performance, thanks to technology achievements in the fields of radiography, tomography and high resolution synchrotron devices. The operability of ... Keywords: Digital radiography, Semiconductor detectors, Space radiology, X-ray instrumentation

Lorenzo Natalucci; Pietro Ubertini; Angela Bazzano; Ezio Caroli; Memmo Federici; Egidio Quadrini; Roberto Vittori

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Feasibility Study of Economics and Performance of Solar Photovoltaics at Massachusetts Military Reservation. A Study Prepared in Partnership with the Environmental Protection Agency for the RE-Powering America's Land Initiative: Siting Renewable Energy on Potentially Contaminated Land and Mine Sites  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents the results of an assessment of the technical and economic feasibility of deploying photovoltaics (PV) systems on a superfund site located within the Massachusetts Military Reservation (MMR). The site was assessed for possible PV installations. The cost, performance, and site impacts of different PV options were estimated. The economics of the potential systems were analyzed using an electric rate of $0.17/kWh and incentives offered in the State of Massachusetts, such as the solar renewable energy credits. According to calculations, MMR can place 8 MW of ballast-weighted, ground-mounted PV systems on the crowns of the three landfill caps and the borrow pit with the PV modules tilted at 30 degrees.

Stafford, B.; Robichaud, R.; Mosey, G.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

MODIS Land Products Subsets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MODIS ASCII Subset Products - FTP Access MODIS ASCII Subset Products - FTP Access All of the MODIS ASCII Subsets are available from the ORNL DAAC's ftp site. The directory structure of the ftp site is based on the abbreviated names for the MODIS Products. Terra MODIS products are abbreviated "MOD", Aqua MODIS products are abbreviated "MYD" and combined Terra and Aqua MODIS products are abbreviated "MCD". The abbreviated names also include the version number (also known as collection). For specific products, please refer to the following table: Product Acronym Spatial Resolution Temporal Frequency Terra V005 SIN Aqua V005 SIN Terra/Aqua Combined V005 SIN Surface Reflectance SREF 500 m 8 day composites MOD09A1 MYD09A1 ---------- Land Surface Temperature and Emissivity TEMP 1 km 8 day composites MOD11A2 MYD11A2 ----------

207

Geothermal investment analysis with site-specific applications to Roosevelt Hot Springs and Cove Fort-Sulphurdale, Utah  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The analysis and modeling of investment behavior in the development of hydrothermal electric power facilities are reported. This investment behavior reflects a degree of sensitivity to public policy alternatives concerning taxation and regulation of the resource and its related energy conversion facilities. The objective of the current research is to provide a realistic and theoretically sound means for estimating the impacts of such public policy alternatives. A stochastic simulation model was developed which offers an efficient means for site-specific investment analysis of private sector firms and investors. The results of the first year of work are discussed including the identification, analysis, quantification and modeling of: a decision tree reflecting the sequence of procedures, timing and stochastic elements of hydrothermal resource development projects; investment requirements, expenses and revenues incurred in the exploration, development and utilization of hydrothermal resources for electric power generation; and multiattribute investment decision criteria of the several types of firms in the geothermal industry. An application of the investment model to specific resource sites in the state of Utah is also described. Site specific data for the Known Geothermal Resource Areas of Roosevelt Hot Springs and Cove Fort-Sulphurdale are given together with hypothesized generation capacity growth rates.

Cassel, T.A.V.; Edelstein, R.H.; Blair, P.D.

1978-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Analysis of concentrating PV-T systems for the commercial/industrial sector. Volume II. PV-T state-of-the-art survey and site/application pair selection and analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As part of a project to develop feasibility assessments, design procedures, and reference designs for total energy systems that could use actively cooled concentrating photovoltaic collectors, a survey was conducted to provide an overview of available photovoltaic-thermal (PV-T) technology. General issues associated with the design and installation of a PV-T system are identified. Electrical and thermal efficiencies for the line-focus Fresnel, the linear parabolic trough, and the point-focus Fresnel collectors are specified as a function of operating temperature, ambient temperature, and insolation. For current PV-T technologies, the line-focus Fresnel collector proved to have the highest thermal and electrical efficiencies, lowest array cost, and lowest land area requirement. But a separate feasibility analysis involving 11 site/application pairs showed that for most applications, the cost of the photovoltaic portion of a PV-T system is not recovered through the displacement of an electrical load, and use of a thermal-only system to displace the thermal load would be a more economical alternative. PV-T systems are not feasible for applications that have a small thermal load, a large steam requirement, or a high load return temperature. SAND82-7157/3 identifies the technical issues involved in designing a photovoltaic-thermal system and provides guidance for resolving such issues. Detailed PV-T system designs for three selected applications and the results of a trade-off study for these applications are presented in SAND82-7157/4. A summary of the major results of this entire study and conclusions concerning PV-T systems and applications is presented in SAND82-7157/1.

Schwinkendorf, W.E.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

The application of borehole logging to characterize the hydrogeology of the Faultless site, Central Nevada Test Area  

SciTech Connect

The Central Nevada Test Area was the site of the Faultless underground nuclear test that could be a source of radionuclide contamination to aquifers in Hot Creek Valley, Nevada. Field studies in 1992 and 1993 have used hydrologic logging and water sampling to determine the adequacy of the current groundwater monitoring network and the status of water-level recovery to pre-shot levels in the nuclear chimney. The field studies have determined that there is a possibility for contaminant migration away from the Faultless event though the pre-event water level has not been attained, while new data raise questions about the ability of the current monitoring network to detect migration. Hydrologic logs from the postshot hole (drilled into the chimney created by the nuclear detonation) reveal inflow around 485 m below land surface. The physical and chemical characteristics of the inflow water indicate that its source is much deeper in the chimney, perhaps driven upward in a convection cell generated by heat near the nuclear cavity. Logging and sampling at monitoring wells HTH-1 and HTH-2 revealed that the completion of HTH-1 may be responsible for its elevated water level (as compared to pre-nuclear test levels) and may have also created a local mound in the water table in the alluvium that accounts for higher post-test water levels at HTH-2. This mound would serve to divert flow around the monitoring wells, so that only migration of contaminants through the underlying, higher pressure, volcanic units is currently monitored. A hydraulic high found in an abandoned hole located between the nuclear chimney and the monitoring wells further reduces the likelihood of HTH-1 or HTH-2 intercepting contaminant migration.

Chapman, J.B.; Mihevc, T.M.; Lyles, B.F.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Analysis of superconducting magnetic energy storage applications at a proposed wind farm site near Browning, Montana  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A computer program was developed to analyze the viability of integrating superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) with proposed wind farm scenarios at a site near Browning, Montana. The program simulated an hour-by-hour account of the charge/discharge history of a SMES unit for a representative wind-speed year. Effects of power output, storage capacity, and power conditioning capability on SMES performance characteristics were analyzed on a seasonal, diurnal, and hourly basis. The SMES unit was assumed to be charged during periods when power output of the wind resource exceeded its average value. Energy was discharged from the SMES unit into the grid during periods of low wind speed to compensate for below-average output of the wind resource. The option of using SMES to provide power continuity for a wind farm supplemented by combustion turbines was also investigated. Levelizing the annual output of large wind energy systems operating in the Blackfeet area of Montana was found to require a storage capacity too large to be economically viable. However, it appears that intermediate-sized SMES economically levelize the wind energy output on a seasonal basis.

Gaustad, K.L.; De Steese, J.G.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Compound hybrid geothermal-fossil power plants: thermodynamic analyses and site-specific applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The analysis of hybrid fossil-geothermal power plants is extended to compound hybrid systems which combine the features of previously analyzed systems: the geothermal-preheat and the fossil-superheat systems. Compound systems of the one- and two-stage type are considered. A compilation of working formulae from earlier studies is included for completeness. Results are given for parametric analyses of compound hybrid plants. System performance was determined for wellhead conditions of 150, 200, and 250/sup 0/C, and for steam fractions of 10, 20, 30, and 40%. For two-stage systems an additional cycle variable, the hot water flash fraction, was varied from 0 to 100% in increments of 25%. From the viewpoint of thermodynamics, compound hybrid plants are superior to individual all-geothermal and all-fossil plants, and are shown to have certain advantages over basic geothermal-preheat and fossil-superheat hybrid plants. The flexibility of compound hybrid systems is illustrated by showing how such plants might be used at six geothermal sites in the western United States. The question of the optimum match between the energy resources and the power plant is addressed, and an analysis given for a hypothetical geothermal resource.

DiPippo, R.; Avelar, E.M.

1979-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Africa Land Use (1980)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Africa Land Use (1980) image Brown, S., and G. Gaston. 1996. Tropical Africa: Land Use, Biomass, and Carbon Estimates For 1980. ORNLCDIAC-92, NDP-055. Carbon Dioxide Information...

213

H-Area, K-Area, and Par Pond Sewage Sludge Application Sites Groundwater Monitoring Report. Fourth quarter 1994 and 1994 summary  

SciTech Connect

Groundwater samples from the three wells at the H-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site (HSS wells) are analyzed quarterly for constituents as required by South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control Construction Permit 12,076. Samples from the three wells at the K-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site (KSS wells) and the three wells at the Par Pond Sewage Sludge Application Site (PSS wells) are analyzed quarterly for constituents required by SCDHEC Construction Permit 13,173. All samples are also analyzed as requested for other constituents as part of the Savannah River Site Groundwater Monitoring Program. Annual analyses for other constituents, primarily metals. also are required by the permits.

Chase, J.A.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Nuclear Operations Application to Environmental Restoration at Corrective Action Unit 547, Miscellaneous Contaminated Waste Sites, at the Nevada National Security Site  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office has responsibility for environmental restoration at the Nevada National Security Site (formerly the Nevada Test Site). This includes remediation at locations where past testing activities have resulted in the release of plutonium to the environment. One of the current remediation efforts involves a site where an underground subcritical nuclear safety test was conducted in 1964. The underground test was vented through a steel pipe to the surface in a closed system where gas samples were obtained. The piping downstream of the gas-sampling apparatus was routed belowground to a location where it was allowed to vent into an existing radioactively contaminated borehole. The length of the pipe above the ground surface is approximately 200 meters. This pipe remained in place until remediation efforts began in 2007, at which time internal plutonium contamination was discovered. Following this discovery, an assessment was conducted to determine the quantity of plutonium present in the pipe. This site has been identified as Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 547, Miscellaneous Contaminated Waste Sites. The quantity of plutonium identified at CAU 547 exceeded the Hazard Category 3 threshold but was below the Hazard Category 2 threshold specified in DOE Standard DOE-STD-1027-92. This CAU, therefore, was initially categorized as a Hazard Category 3 environmental restoration site. A contaminated facility or site that is initially categorized as Hazard Category 3, however, may be downgraded to below Hazard Category 3 if it can be demonstrated through further analysis that the form of the material and the energy available for release support reducing the hazard category. This is an important consideration when performing hazard categorization of environmental restoration sites because energy sources available for release of material are generally fewer at an environmental restoration site than at an operating facility and environmental restoration activities may result in the complete removal of source material.

Kevin Cabble (NSO), Mark Krauss and Patrick Matthews (N-I)

2011-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

215

HANFORD SITE ASSETS AND ATTRIBUTES  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

HANFORD SITE ASSETS AND ATTRIBUTES HANFORD SITE ASSETS AND ATTRIBUTES The Hanford Site provides the opportunity for long-term sustainable energy and industry development. The area boasts a specialized workforce that is highly educated and well-established; is rich in resources including land, infrastructure, low-cost energy, and available workforce; more scientists and engineers per capita than any other area in the Pacific Northwest; and is an optimum location for the development of sustainable energy solutions. Land The Hanford Site is one of the largest remaining land mega-sites available in the United States. * The 586-square-mile Hanford Site includes 39,000 acres designated for industrial use (9,000 acres for R&D). * The Comprehensive Land-Use Plan Environmental Impact Statement allows for a planning process

216

Remote Sensing and Geospatial Technological Applications for Site-specific Management of Fruit and Nut Crops: A Review  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: Site-specific crop management (SSCM) is one facet of precision agriculture which is helping increase production with minimal input. It has enhanced the cost-benefit scenario in crop production. Even though the SSCM is very widely used in row crop agriculture like corn, wheat, rice, soybean, etc. it has very little application in cash crops like fruit and nut. The main goal of this review paper was to conduct a comprehensive review of advanced technologies, including geospatial technologies, used in site-specific management of fruit and nut crops. The review explores various remote sensing data from different platforms like satellite, LIDAR, aerial, and field imaging. The study analyzes the use of satellite sensors, such as Quickbird, Landsat, SPOT, and IRS imagery as well as hyperspectral narrow-band remote sensing data in study of fruit and nut crops in blueberry, citrus, peach, apple, etc. The study also explores other geospatial technologies such as GPS, GIS spatial modeling, advanced image processing techniques, and information technology for suitability study, orchard delineation, and classification accuracy assessment. The study also provides an example of a geospatial model developed in ArcGIS ModelBuilder to automate the blueberry production suitability analysis. The GIS

Sudhanshu Sekhar P; Gerrit Hoogenboom; Joel O. Paz

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Spectroelectrochemical Sensor for Pertechnetate Applicable to Hanford and Other DOE Sites  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

New film materials for pertechnetate: A new film material comprised of quaternized poly(4-vinylpyridine) cross-linked with 1,10-diiododecane has been developed for use in the spectroelectrochemical sensor. Films were prepared in a one-pot synthesis by stirring poly(4-vinylpyridine), cross-linker and methyl iodide in 1-butanol for 1 h, after which the solution was spin-coating onto ITO-glass. Film thickness was varied either by changing the spin rate or by dilution of the original precursor solution. The thinnest film prepared was 30 nm; the thickest 930 nm. Spectroscopic ellipsometry was used to study the dynamics of film changes on soaking in aqueous salt solution and on preconcentrating model analyte ferrocyanide. The results document that, on hydration, films expanded by almost 90% in 0.1 M KNO3, then contracted slightly when ferrocyanide solution was introduced probably due to electrostatic cross-linking. IR spectroscopy was used to determine the extent of quaternization of the film. For a polymer solution stirred for 1 h, films were about 20% quaternized. This can be increased to {approx}30% by adding more solvent to the precursor solution and stirring for an additional hour. Solubility of the partially cross-linked material was a factor that limited the quaternization process. Use of a more appropriate solvent may enable greater quaternization. A more quaternized film should preconcentrate more pertechnetate by virtue of having a higher density of charged binding sites. Film ruggedness is critical. To investigate this, films on ITO-glass were soaked in methanol and butanol overnight, in 0.1M KNO3, and in 0.1M KNO3 adjusted to pH 12 and pH 2 for 30 days. Each film was then tested as a spectroelectrochemical sensor for model analyte ferrocyanide. The results showed only the pH 2 conditioned sensor behaved abnormally. The film soaked in pH 2 electrolyte delaminated but did not dissolve. Delamination was most likely due to the acid digestion of the ITO layer of the sensor and not to any film-based process. We have also shown that it is possible to regenerate the film by flushing with 1M KNO3 solution. Response curves were prepared from a single sensor by injecting different concentrations of ferrocyanide, monitoring the uptake, then regenerating the film and injecting the next concentration. To check reproducibility, a film was regenerated 10 times with almost no change in response. Film selectivity was demonstrated by adding a model cationic species, Ru(bipy)32+ to the ferrocyanide sample. Even at 10 times the ferrocyanide concentration, only a very small electrochemical signal and no optical signal due to the cation were observed. Additionally a competitive anion Ru(CN)64- could be distinguished from Fe(CN)64- based on the redox potential and absorbance spectrum differences between the two anions. Both species were preconcentrated into the film, and both could be electrochemically modulated simultaneously or individually. The films exhibited a linear absorbance response to ferrocyanide over the range 0.008-0.2mM. From 0.1mM ferrocyanide solution, the analyte was concentrated in a 320 nm thick film by a factor of {approx}6,000. The films have recently been used at PNNL to repeat cyclic voltammetry experiments with pertechnetate (TcO4) as previously performed with other candidate films. The results showed that the new films performed very well and better than films previously used, and showed reversible waves in the voltammogram with the film present where none appeared when a bare ITO-glass substrate was used. Our results clearly show that cross-linked quaternized poly(4-vinylpyridine) films made this way are superior materials for preconcentrating pertechnetate.

Heineman, William R.

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Site-specific analysis of radiological and physical parameters for cobbly soils at the Gunnison, Colorado, processing site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The remedial action at the Gunnison, Colorado, processing site is being performed under the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) of 1978 [Public Law (PL) 95-6041]. Under UMTRCA, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is charged with the responsibility of developing appropriate and applicable standards for the cleanup of radiologically contaminated land and buildings at 24 designated sites, including the Gunnison, Colorado, inactive processing site. The remedial action at the processing site will be conducted to remove the tailings and contaminated materials to meet the EPA bulk soil cleanup standards for surface and subsurface soils. The site areas disturbed by remedial action excavation will be either contoured or backfilled with radiologically uncontaminated soil and contoured to restore the site. The final contours will produce a final surface grade that will create positive drainage from the site.

Not Available

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Marginal Lands: Concept, Assessment and Management  

SciTech Connect

Marginal lands have received wide attention for their potential to improve food security and support bioenergy production. However, environmental, ecosystem service, and sustainability concerns have been widely raised over the use of marginal land. Knowledge of the extent, location, and quality of marginal lands as well as their assessment and management are limited and diverse. This paper provides a review of the historical development of marginal concept, its application and assessment. Limitations and priority research needs of marginal land assessment and management were discussed.

Kang, Shujiang [ORNL; Post, Wilfred M [ORNL; West, Tristram O. [Joint Global Change Research Institute, PNNL; Bandaru, Vara Prasad [ORNL; Izaurralde, Dr. R. Cesar [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Wang, Dali [ORNL; Nichols, Dr Jeff A [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Since 1995, under its Land Legacy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

program, The Conservation Fund has helped protect 272,751 acres and raised $15 million for land protection. The Conservation Fund has launched the final phase of its American Land Legacy initiative to protect 200 sites around the country by 2001. The effort focuses on acquisition of threatened landscapes, critical wildlife habitat, watershed areas, prime outdoor recreational opportunities, key historical sites and community greenways. Since starting the project in 1995, the Fund and its partners have protected 1,300 acres per week. As part of the Land Legacy initiative, the Fund is working to triple the size of its revolving fund, which is used solely to finance land protection, to $30 million. “With our new resources, the Fund will be able to move more effectively to save valuable land under threat of development, ” said John Turner, the Fund’s president and chief executive officer. “As we move into a new century, this effort will provide us with new tools to address the growing needs of the conservation community.” The third component of the Land Legacy program involves the expansion of educational opportunities to bolster the leadership skills of conservation professionals. Land legacy sites: The Fund’s Legacy initiative has helped preserve 85 natural, cultural and managed landscapes covering 272,751 acres valued at $222 million and acquired at a cost of $86 million. Continued on page 6

unknown authors

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land application sites" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Analysis of Markets for Coal Combustion By-Products Use in Agriculture and Land Reclamation: Summary Report of Four Regional Marketi ng Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sites for the disposal of coal combustion by-products (CCBP) are becoming more difficult to acquire, license, and develop. Since CCBP production may increase in the foreseeable future, reducing the reliance on disposal makes economic and environmental sense. This report summarizes the findings of four regional marketing studies, which examined barriers--both economic and regulatory-- to the land application of CCBP.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Clean Cities: Land of Enchantment Clean Cities (New Mexico) coalition  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

and renewable energy applications and market development. Burcham has a Master of Science in Systems Management from the University of Southern California. Land of Enchantment...

223

Agriculture and Land Use National Greenhouse Gas Inventory Software | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Agriculture and Land Use National Greenhouse Gas Inventory Software Agriculture and Land Use National Greenhouse Gas Inventory Software Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Agriculture and Land Use National Greenhouse Gas Inventory Software Agency/Company /Organization: Colorado State University Partner: United States Agency for International Development, United States Forest Service, United States Environmental Protection Agency Sector: Land Focus Area: Forestry, Agriculture Topics: GHG inventory Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Desktop Application Website: www.nrel.colostate.edu/projects/ghgtool/index.php Cost: Free Agriculture and Land Use National Greenhouse Gas Inventory Software Screenshot References: Agriculture and Land Use National Greenhouse Gas Inventory Software[1]

224

Chesapeake Forest Lands (Maryland) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Chesapeake Forest Lands (Maryland) Chesapeake Forest Lands (Maryland) Chesapeake Forest Lands (Maryland) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info Start Date 1999 State Maryland Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Maryland Department of Natural Resources The Chesapeake Forest Lands are most of the former land holdings of the

225

Site-specific analysis of radiological and physical parameters for cobbly soils at the Gunnison, Colorado, processing site. Revision 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The remedial action at the Gunnison, Colorado, processing site is being performed under the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) of 1978. Under UMTRCA, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is charged with the responsibility of developing appropriate and applicable standards for the cleanup of radiologically contaminated land and buildings at 24 designated sites, including the Gunnison, Colorado, inactive processing site. Section 108 of Public Law 95-604 states that the US Department of Energy (DOE) shall ``select and perform remedial actions at the designated processing sites and disposal sites in accordance with the general standards`` prescribed by the EPA. Regulations governing the required remedial action at inactive uranium processing sites were promulgated by the EPA in 1983 and are contained in 40 CFR Part 192 (1993), Health and Environmental Protection Standards for Uranium and Thorium Mill Tailings. This document describes the radiological and physical parameters for the remedial action of the soil.

Not Available

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

ARM - Evaluation Product - Critical soil quantities for describing land  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ProductsCritical soil quantities for describing land ProductsCritical soil quantities for describing land properties Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Evaluation Product : Critical soil quantities for describing land properties 1994.01.01 - 2012.12.31 Site(s) SGP General Description The ARMBELAND is a subset of the ARM Best Estimate (ARMBE) products for supporting community land-atmospheric research and land model developments. It contains several critical soil quantities that ARM has been measuring for many years for describing land properties. The quantities in ARMBE-Land are averaged over one hour time interval, consistent with other ARMBE datasets. It is recommended to use with other ARMBE data products such as ARMBECLDRAD (cloud and radiative fluxes) and ARMBEATM (surface

227

Land and Facility Use Policy | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Land and Facility Use Policy Land and Facility Use Policy Land and Facility Use Policy It is Department of Energy policy to manage all of its land and facilities as valuable national resources. Our stewardship will be based on the principles of ecosystem management and sustainable development. We will integrate mission, economic. ecologic, social and cultural factors in a comprehensive plan for each site that will guide land and facility use decisions. Each comprehensive plan will consider the site's larger regional context and be developed with stakeholder participation. This policy will result in land and facility uses which support the Department's critical missions. stimulate the economy, and protect the environment. Land and Facility Use Policy More Documents & Publications

228

THE APPLICATION OF ELECTROCHEMICAL NOISE BASED CORROSION MONITORING TO NUCLEAR WASTE TANK VAPOR SPACE ENVIRONMENTS AT THE HANFORD SITE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Vapor space corrosion data collected by electrochemical noise (EN) based corrosion probes installed in double shell tanks (DSTs) at the Department of Energy's Hanford Site in Richland, Washington have historically been characterized by surprisingly high levels in current. In late 2003, a program was established to assess the significance of archived Hanford DST vapor space EN data. This program showed that the high vapor space current levels are likely the result of crevice corrosion on the vapor space electrodes. The design of DST vapor space electrodes provides tight metal-to-metal and gaskeito-metal interfaces necessary for this type of localized corrosion to occur. In-tank activities (splashing, etc.), or more likely condensation of water vapor in the vapor space, provide the necessary moisture. Because crevice corrosion appears to be active on the vapor space EN electronics, data collected from these electrodes are not likely to be applicable to the large flat metal surfaces that make up the bulk of the DST domes and upper walls. The data do, however, indicate that conditions in the DST vapor spaces are conducive to accelerated crevice corrosion at creviced areas in the tank vapor space (overlapping joints, riser interfaces, equipment penetrations, etc.) under high humidity conditions.

EDGEMON, G.L.

2005-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

229

Critical review of siting characteristics of small scale solar thermal energy systems  

SciTech Connect

An analysis was made of unique technical issues to be considered in siting solar-thermal energy systems in small communities. Four systems are described: central receiver, parabolic trough, parabolic dish, hemispherical bowl. The difference between central receiver systems and distributed receiver systems are indicated with reference to current applications. Finally, a technical siting comparison is made of the four systems defined, including overall efficiency, end use, land requirements, failure rates, safety considerations, energy backup systems and capital costs.

Sokolow, B.B.; Lobnitz, M.M.; Baruch, S.B.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Land Conservation (Virginia) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Land Conservation (Virginia) Land Conservation (Virginia) Land Conservation (Virginia) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Virginia Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation The Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation has developed the

231

Acquisition Of Land (Tennessee) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Acquisition Of Land (Tennessee) Acquisition Of Land (Tennessee) Acquisition Of Land (Tennessee) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Tennessee Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Tennessee Regulatory Authority Every corporation organized under the laws of any state of the United

232

New Technologies to Reclaim Arid Lands User's Manual  

SciTech Connect

Approximately 70 percent of all U.S. military training lands are located in arid and semi-arid areas. Training activities in such areas frequently adversely affect vegetation, damaging plants and reducing the resilience of vegetation to recover once disturbed. Fugitive dust resulting from a loss of vegetation creates additional problems for human health, increasing accidents due to decreased visibility, and increasing maintenance costs for roads, vehicles, and equipment. Under conventional technologies to mitigate these impacts, it is estimated that up to 35 percent of revegetation projects in arid areas will fail due to unpredictable natural environmental conditions, such as drought, and reclamation techniques that were inadequate to restore vegetative cover in a timely and cost-effective manner. New reclamation and restoration techniques are needed in desert ranges to help mitigate the adverse effects of military training and other activities to arid-land environments. In 1999, a cooperative effort between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the US. Department of Defense (DoD), and selected university scientists was undertaken to focus on mitigating military impacts in arid lands. As arid lands are impacted due to DoD and DOE activities, biological and soil resources are gradually lost and the habitat is altered. A conceptual model of that change in habitat quality is described for varying levels of disturbance in the Mojave Desert. As the habitat quality degrades and more biological and physical resources are lost from training areas, greater costs are required to return the land to sustainable levels. The purpose of this manual is to assist land managers in recognizing thresholds associated with habitat degradation and provide reclamation planning and techniques that can reduce the costs of mitigation for these impacted lands to ensure sustainable use of these lands. The importance of reclamation planning is described in this manual with suggestions about establishing project objectives, scheduling, budgeting, and selecting cost-effective techniques. Reclamation techniques include sections describing: (1) erosion control (physical, chemical, and biological), (2) site preparation, (3) soil amendments, (4) seeding, (5) planting, (6) grazing and weed control, (7) mulching, (8) irrigation, and (9) site protection. Each section states the objectives of the technique, the principles, an in-depth look at the techniques, and any special considerations as it relates to DoD or DOE lands. The need for monitoring and remediation is described to guide users in monitoring reclamation efforts to evaluate their cost-effectiveness. Costs are provided for the proposed techniques for the major deserts of the southwestern U.S. showing the average and range of costs. A set of decision tools are provided in the form of a flow diagram and table to guide users in selecting effective reclamation techniques to achieve mitigation objectives. Recommendations are provided to help summarize key reclamation principles and to assist users in developing a successful program that contributes to sustainable uses of DoD and DOE lands. The users manual is helpful to managers in communicating to installation management the needs and consequences of training decisions and the costs required to achieve successful levels of sustainable use. This users manual focuses on the development of new reclamation techniques that have been implemented at the National Training Center at Fort Irwin, California, and are applicable to most arid land reclamation efforts.

W. K. Ostler

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Land animal sizes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Land animal sizes Name: tamar c Status: NA Age: NA Location: NA Country: NA Date: Around 1993 Question: Why are today's land mammals so much smaller than prehistoric mammals?...

234

The Common Land Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Common Land Model (CLM) was developed for community use by a grassroots collaboration of scientists who have an interest in making a general land model available for public use and further development. The major model characteristics include ...

Yongjiu Dai; Xubin Zeng; Robert E. Dickinson; Ian Baker; Gordon B. Bonan; Michael G. Bosilovich; A. Scott Denning; Paul A. Dirmeyer; Paul R. Houser; Guoyue Niu; Keith W. Oleson; C. Adam Schlosser; Zong-Liang Yang

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

School Land Board (Texas)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The School Land Board oversees the use of land owned by the state or held in trust for use and benefit by the state or one of its departments, boards, or agencies. The Board is responsible for...

236

LBA Land Use and Land Cover Data Set Released  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Land Use and Land Cover Data Set Released The ORNL DAAC announces the release of an image data set from the Land Use and Land Cover science theme, a component of the LBA-ECO Large...

237

Bioremediation of Petroleum and Radiological Contaminated Soils at the Savannah River Site: Laboratory to Field Scale Applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In the process of Savannah River Site (SRS) operations limited amounts of waste are generated containing petroleum, and radiological contaminated soils. Currently, this combination of radiological and petroleum contaminated waste does not have an immediate disposal route and is being stored in low activity vaults. SRS developed and implemented a successful plan for clean up of the petroleum portion of the soils in situ using simple, inexpensive, bioreactor technology. Treatment in a bioreactor removes the petroleum contamination from the soil without spreading radiological contamination to the environment. This bioreactor uses the bioventing process and bioaugmentation or the addition of the select hydrocarbon degrading bacteria. Oxygen is usually the initial rate-limiting factor in the biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons. Using the bioventing process allowed control of the supply of nutrients and moisture based on petroleum contamination concentrations and soil type. The results of this work have proven to be a safe and cost-effective means of cleaning up low level radiological and petroleum-contaminated soil. Many of the other elements of the bioreactor design were developed or enhanced during the demonstration of a ''biopile'' to treat the soils beneath a Polish oil refinery's waste disposal lagoons. Aerobic microorganisms were isolated from the aged refinery's acidic sludge contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Twelve hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria were isolated from the sludge. The predominant PAH degraders were tentatively identified as Achromobacter, Pseudomonas Burkholderia, and Sphingomonas spp. Several Ralstonia spp were also isolated that produce biosurfactants. Biosurfactants can enhance bioremediation by increasing the bioavailability of hydrophobic contaminants including hydrocarbons. The results indicated that the diversity of acid-tolerant PAH-degrading microorganisms in acidic oil wastes may be much greater than previously demonstrated and they have numerous applications to environmental restoration. Twelve of the isolates were subsequently added to the bioreactor to enhance bioremediation. In this study we showed that a bioreactor could be bioaugmented with select bacteria to enhance bioremediation of petroleum-contaminated soils under radiological conditions.

BRIGMON, ROBINL.

2004-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

238

Idaho National Laboratory Comprehensive Land Use and Environmental Stewardship Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Land and facility use planning and decisions at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Site are guided by a comprehensive site planning process in accordance with Department of Energy Policy 430.1, 'Land and Facility Use Policy,' that integrates mission, economic, ecologic, social, and cultural factors. The INL Ten-Year Site Plan, prepared in accordance with Department of Energy Order 430.1B, 'Real Property Asset Management,' outlines the vision and strategy to transform INL to deliver world-leading capabilities that will enable the Department of Energy to accomplish its mission. Land use planning is the overarching function within real property asset management that integrates the other functions of acquisition, recapitalization, maintenance, disposition, real property utilization, and long-term stewardship into a coordinated effort to ensure current and future mission needs are met. All land and facility use projects planned at the INL Site are considered through a formal planning process that supports the Ten-Year Site Plan. This Comprehensive Land Use and Environmental Stewardship Report describes that process. The land use planning process identifies the current condition of existing land and facility assets and the scope of constraints across INL and in the surrounding region. Current land use conditions are included in the Comprehensive Land Use and Environmental Stewardship Report and facility assets and scope of constraints are discussed in the Ten-Year Site Plan. This report also presents the past, present, and future uses of land at the INL Site that are considered during the planning process, as well as outlining the future of the INL Site for the 10, 30, and 100-year timeframes.

No name listed on publication

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Hanford Site National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Characterization. Revision 5  

SciTech Connect

This fifth revision of the Hanford Site National Environmental Policy (NEPA) Characterization presents current environmental data regarding the Hanford Site and its immediate environs. This information is intended for use in preparing Site-related NEPA documentation. Information is presented on climate and meteorology, geology and hydrology, ecology, history and archaeology, socioeconomics, land use, and noise levels, prepared by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) staff. Models are described that are to be used in simulating realized or potential impacts from nuclear materials at the Hanford Site. Included are models of radionuclide transport in groundwater and atmospheric pathways, and of radiation dose to populations via all known pathways from known initial conditions. Federal and state regulations, DOE orders and permits, and environmental standards directly applicable for the NEPA documents at the Hanford Site, are provided.

Cushing, C.E. [ed.] [ed.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Hanford Site National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Characterization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This fifth revision of the Hanford Site National Environmental Policy (NEPA) Characterization presents current environmental data regarding the Hanford Site and its immediate environs. This information is intended for use in preparing Site-related NEPA documentation. Information is presented on climate and meteorology, geology and hydrology, ecology, history and archaeology, socioeconomics, land use, and noise levels, prepared by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) staff. Models are described that are to be used in simulating realized or potential impacts from nuclear materials at the Hanford Site. Included are models of radionuclide transport in groundwater and atmospheric pathways, and of radiation dose to populations via all known pathways from known initial conditions. Federal and state regulations, DOE orders and permits, and environmental standards directly applicable for the NEPA documents at the Hanford Site, are provided.

Cushing, C.E. (ed.) [ed.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land application sites" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

A Bivariate Mixed Distribution with a Heavy-tailed Component and its Application to Single-site Daily Rainfall Simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents an improved brivariate mixed distribution, which is capable of modeling the dependence of daily rainfall from two distinct sources (e.g., rainfall from two stations, two consecutive days, or two instruments such as satellite and rain gauge). The distribution couples an existing framework for building a bivariate mixed distribution, the theory of copulae and a hybrid marginal distribution. Contributions of the improved distribution are twofold. One is the appropriate selection of the bivariate dependence structure from a wider admissible choice (10 candidate copula families). The other is the introduction of a marginal distribution capable of better representing low to moderate values as well as extremes of daily rainfall. Among several applications of the improved distribution, particularly presented here is its utility for single-site daily rainfall simulation. Rather than simulating rainfall occurrences and amounts separately, the developed generator unifies the two processes by generalizing daily rainfall as a Markov process with autocorrelation described by the improved bivariate mixed distribution. The generator is first tested on a sample station in Texas. Results reveal that the simulated and observed sequences are in good agreement with respect to essential characteristics. Then, extensive simulation experiments are carried out to compare the developed generator with three other alternative models: the conventional two-state Markov chain generator, the transition probability matrix model and the semi-parametric Markov chain model with kernel density estimation for rainfall amounts. Analyses establish that overall the developed generator is capable of reproducing characteristics of historical extreme rainfall events and is apt at extrapolating rare values beyond the upper range of available observed data. Moreover, it automatically captures the persistence of rainfall amounts on consecutive wet days in a relatively natural and easy way. Another interesting observation is that the recognized ‘overdispersion’ problem in daily rainfall simulation ascribes more to the loss of rainfall extremes than the under-representation of first-order persistence. The developed generator appears to be a sound option for daily rainfall simulation, especially in particular hydrologic planning situations when rare rainfall events are of great importance.

Li, Chao .; Singh, Vijay P.; Mishra, Ashok K.

2013-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

242

EOS Land Validation Presentations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

EOS Land Validation Presentations EOS Land Validation Presentations Meeting: Land Cover Validation Workshop Date: February 2, 2004 Place: Boston, MA Title: Validation Data Support Activities at the ORNL DAAC (Power Point) Presenter: Bob Cook Meeting: Fall 2003 American Geophysical Union (AGU) Meeting Date: December 9, 2003 Place: San Francisco, CA Title: Ground-Based Data Supporting the Validation of MODIS Land Products (Power Point) Presenter: Larry Voorhees Meeting: Terra and Aqua Products Review Date: March 2003 Place: NASA HQ Title: Supporting the Validation of MODIS Land Products (Power Point) Presenter: Larry Voorhees Meeting: Terra and Aqua Products Review Date: March 2003 Place: NASA HQ Title: MODIS Land Summary (Power Point) Presenter: Chris Justice, University of Maryland Meeting: Spring 2002 American Geophysical Union (AGU) Meeting

243

Lidar-based Hazard Avoidance for Safe Landing on Mars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hazard avoidance is a key technology for landing large payloads safely on the surface of Mars. During hazard avoidance a lander uses onboard sensors to detect hazards in the landing zone, autonomously selects a safe landing site, and then maneuvers to the new site. Design of a system for hazard avoidance is facilitated by simulation where trades involving sensor and mission requirements can be explored. This paper describes the algorithms and models that comprise a scanning lidarbased hazard avoidance simulation including a terrain generator, a lidar model, hazard avoidance algorithms and powered landing guidance algorithms. Preliminary simulation results show that the proposed hazard avoidance algorithms are effective at detecting hazards and guiding the lander to a safe landing site. 1

Andrew Johnson; James Collier; Aron Wolf

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Evaluation of Site Investigation/Closure Requirements and Their Applicability to Residuals from Former Manufactured Gas Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Free product is defined as the concentration of non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL) that is present in concentrations greater than the residual saturation point of the site media at a contaminated location. Identifying free product is important for the management of former Manufactured Gas Plant (MGP) sites because the free product is mobile and has the potential to migrate off site. The report provides a review of the regulatory programs for six states in the mid-west and northeast with regard to closure re...

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

245

Oil and Gas on Public Lands (Texas) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

on Public Lands (Texas) on Public Lands (Texas) Oil and Gas on Public Lands (Texas) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Investor-Owned Utility Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Program Info State Texas Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Texas General Land Office The School Land Board may choose to lease lands for the production of oil and natural gas, on the condition that oil and gas resources are leased together and separate from other minerals. Lands that may be leased include: (1) islands, saltwater lakes, bays, inlets, marshes, and reefs owned by the state within tidewater limits; (2) the portion of the Gulf of Mexico within the jurisdiction of the state; (3) all unsold surveyed and

246

Minerals on Public Lands (Texas) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Minerals on Public Lands (Texas) Minerals on Public Lands (Texas) Minerals on Public Lands (Texas) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Investor-Owned Utility Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Program Info State Texas Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Texas General Land Office Any tract of land that belongs to the state, including islands, salt and freshwater lakes, bays, inlets, marshes, and reefs owned by the state within tidewater limits, the part of the Gulf of Mexico within the state's jurisdiction, unsold surveyed public school land, rivers and channels that belong to the state, and land sold with a reservation of minerals to the state are subject to prospect by any person for those minerals which are

247

File:03-TX-f - Lease of Land Trade Lands.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

f - Lease of Land Trade Lands.pdf f - Lease of Land Trade Lands.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Metadata File:03-TX-f - Lease of Land Trade Lands.pdf Size of this preview: 463 × 599 pixels. Other resolution: 464 × 600 pixels. Full resolution ‎(1,275 × 1,650 pixels, file size: 42 KB, MIME type: application/pdf) File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 13:54, 26 July 2013 Thumbnail for version as of 13:54, 26 July 2013 1,275 × 1,650 (42 KB) Apalazzo (Talk | contribs) You cannot overwrite this file. Edit this file using an external application (See the setup instructions for more information) File usage The following page links to this file: GRR/Section 3-TX-f - Lease of Land Trade Lands

248

MODIS Land Products Subsets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Citation When using subsets of MODIS Land Products from the ORNL DAAC, please use the citation: Oak Ridge National Laboratory Distributed Active Archive Center (ORNL DAAC). 2011....

249

National Land Cover Data  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

products was done by the Multi-Resolution Land Characterization Consortium and EROS Data Center (U.S. Geological Survey). The Consortium includes the Environmental Monitoring and...

250

Sugar Land, TX -  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Petroleum Engineering Alumnus Recognized by Secretary of Energy for Work at National Lab Sugar Land, TX - The National Energy Technology Laboratory is proud to announce that...

251

Hierarchical Marginal Land Assessment for Land Use Planning  

SciTech Connect

Marginal land provides an alternative potential for food and bioenergy production in the face of limited land resources; however, effective assessment of marginal lands is not well addressed. Concerns over environmental risks, ecosystem services and sustainability for marginal land have been widely raised. The objective of this study was to develop a hierarchical marginal land assessment framework for land use planning and management. We first identified major land functions linking production, environment, ecosystem services and economics, and then classified land resources into four categories of marginal land using suitability and limitations associated with major management goals, including physically marginal land, biologically marginal land, environmental-ecological marginal land, and economically marginal land. We tested this assessment framework in south-western Michigan, USA. Our results indicated that this marginal land assessment framework can be potentially feasible on land use planning for food and bioenergy production, and balancing multiple goals of land use management. We also compared our results with marginal land assessment from the Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) and land capability classes (LCC) that are used in the US. The hierarchical assessment framework has advantages of quantitatively reflecting land functions and multiple concerns. This provides a foundation upon which focused studies can be identified in order to improve the assessment framework by quantifying high-resolution land functions associated with environment and ecosystem services as well as their criteria are needed to improve the assessment framework.

Kang, Shujiang [ORNL; Post, Wilfred M [ORNL; Wang, Dali [ORNL; Nichols, Dr Jeff A [ORNL; Bandaru, Vara Prasad [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Mound Site  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ohio Mound, Ohio, Site A CERCLA andor RCRA Site MoundMap DOE has completed all remediation activities at the Mound site in accordance with applicable Comprehensive Environmental...

253

Short communication: A generic framework for land-use modelling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we present the generic modelling system SITE (SImulation of Terrestrial Environments), a software package to develop and apply models simulating regional land-use dynamics. The modelling system includes (i) a framework managing the model ... Keywords: Cellular automata, Genetic algorithm, Integrated framework, Land-use model, Map comparison

Christian Schweitzer; Joerg A. Priess; Subhashree Das

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

The DOD Siting Clearinghouse  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The DoD Siting Clearinghouse The DoD Siting Clearinghouse Dave Belote Director, Siting Clearinghouse Office of the Secretary of Defense The Nexus of National Security & Renewable Energy * Unintended Consequences - Rapid development of renewable technologies - Rapidly changing military technology research & development * Existing Policy and Processes - Not up to date with changing technologies - Land use decision-making authorities fragmented across all levels of government 2 From Nellis to Shepherds Flat: Congressional Push for Action 3 Congressional Response - FY2011 NDAA, Section 358 * Section 358 "Study Of Effects Of New Construction Of Obstructions On Military Installations And Operations" - Integrated review process - 180-day backlog assessment

255

EVS launches new Solar Energy Program Web site for the Bureau...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

launches new Solar Energy Program Web site for the Bureau of Land Management August 22, 2013 EVS designed and recently released a new Web site for the Bureau of Land Management...

256

Class B monitoring program handbook for southeastern sites with data based on INIT2 software (applicable to heating season)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document provides reference information on eight residences located in the southern part of the US which are being monitored under the Class B Passive Solar Monitoring Program. This handbook provides reference information on the sites and basic test conditions for the 1982-1983 winter heating season using software which is identified as INIT2. The manual is intended for use in data analysis work but is limited to this period of time because of basic differences in the control software and the related instrumentation system. This document is separated into individual sections for each site. The following information is provided for each site: (a) Site summary providing information on the structure, the passive solar features, the auxiliary heating system, and other related data; (b) Floor layouts with the sensor locations, etc.; (c) The One Time Value Log which records the results of field tests and calculations to determine the thermal characteristics, air infiltration rate, and other reference data; (d) The Analog/Digital Channel Log which provides calibration data; (e) The Status Channel Log which defines various event sensors; and (f) Program listings as used during the specified time periods during the heating season. Appendix A provides a summary of photographs which have been provided separately as part of the site documentation.

Gustashaw, D. H.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Water, Land and People  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Water, Land and People Water, Land and People Nature Bulletin No. 251 January 8, 1983 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation WATER, LAND AND PEOPLE "Water, Land and People" is the title of a book which, like "Road to Survival", should be read by every American. Water, and its uses or control, has become a vital national problem. Some places, some years, we have too much of it and suffer disastrous floods. Elsewhere we have too little. In cities like New York and Los Angeles -- even in many inland towns -- and in the western lands which depend upon irrigation, the demand far exceeds the supply. Our Congress is beseeched for huge appropriations to provide flood control, navigation, electric power and irrigation.

258

csp land use | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

csp land use Home Sfomail's picture Submitted by Sfomail(48) Member 25 June, 2013 - 12:10 Solar Land Use Data on OpenEI acres csp land use how much land land requirements pv land...

259

how much land | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

by Sfomail(48) Member 25 June, 2013 - 12:10 Solar Land Use Data on OpenEI acres csp land use how much land land requirements pv land use solar land use square miles I'm...

260

land requirements | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

by Sfomail(48) Member 25 June, 2013 - 12:10 Solar Land Use Data on OpenEI acres csp land use how much land land requirements pv land use solar land use square miles I'm...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land application sites" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Management and Use of Public Lands (Virginia) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Management and Use of Public Lands (Virginia) Management and Use of Public Lands (Virginia) Management and Use of Public Lands (Virginia) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Developer Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Systems Integrator Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Virginia Program Type Leasing Program Siting and Permitting Provider Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation The Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation may elect to lease its lands for the development of mineral interests (defined herein as petroleum, natural gas, coal, ore, rock and any other solid chemical

262

Land-Use and Ecosystems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Land-Use and Ecosystems Terrestrial Carbon Management Data Sets and Analyses National Land Cover Data 1992 (2005), and 2001 (2008) Carbon Flux to the Atmosphere from Land-Use...

263

land.PDF  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 2 AUDIT REPORT SALE OF LAND AT OAK RIDGE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL OFFICE OF AUDIT SERVICES May 2001 DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Washington, DC 20585 May 7, 2001 MEMORANDUM FOR THE SECRETARY FROM: Gregory H. Friedman (Signed) Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Audit Report on the "Sale of Land at Oak Ridge" BACKGROUND Under the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, the U.S. Department of Energy (Department) may sell land in the performance of identified programmatic functions. The functions specified in the Atomic Energy Act include encouraging scientific and industrial progress, controlling special nuclear

264

2. Annual Quantities of Land Clearing Debris Generated and Used (1) Sectors that generate Land Clearing Debris:  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Land clearing debris is defined as growing stock and other timber sources cut or otherwise destroyed in the process of converting forest land to non-forest uses. 1 Growing stock that is removed in silvicultural operations such as pre-commercial thinning is also included in this definition. Land clearing debris is typically in the form of tree tops and branches, trees cut or knocked down and left on site, and stumps. In non-forested areas, such as grasslands and desert, land clearing debris may include soil, rocks, and shrubs, although fuel is primarily derived from previously forested areas.

unknown authors

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Approaches used for Clearance of Lands from Nuclear Facilities among  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Approaches used for Clearance of Lands from Nuclear Facilities Approaches used for Clearance of Lands from Nuclear Facilities among Several Countries: Evaluation for Regulatory Input Approaches used for Clearance of Lands from Nuclear Facilities among Several Countries: Evaluation for Regulatory Input The study entitled, "Approaches used for Clearance of Lands from Nuclear Facilities among Several Countries: Evaluation for Regulatory Input," focuses on the issue of showing compliance with given clearance levels for site release (also called derived concentration guideline levels, DCGL:s). The Swedish Radiation Safety Authority (SSM) intends to continue working on establishing such clearance levels in Sweden. As a starting point, SSM foresees that levels applied will depend on the features of the specific site and on the expected future use of the land, for example

266

NASA Land Validation Campaign Data  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Products > Validation NASA Land Validation Campaign Data Land Validation Campaigns The goal of the EOS Validation Program is the comprehensive assessment of all EOS science data...

267

Nuclear Maintenance Applications Center: Guide for the Performance of OnSite and Vendor Shop Inspections of Electric Motors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The power industry is experiencing a loss of expertise as its workforce ages. Compounding the problem is that many plants find that there is limited time to train new workers. Periodically, station and corporate motor specialists are asked to perform inspections of on-site motors to maintain a level of equipment reliability or to perform inspections for customers at vendor motor shops. This report should prove valuable during visual inspections of electric motors.

2008-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

268

Subsetting Tools Available for New MODIS Land Products (Collection 5)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Subsetting Tools Available for New MODIS Land Products (Collection 5) Subsetting Tools Available for New MODIS Land Products (Collection 5) The ORNL DAAC announces two tools for subsetting land products from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensors onboard the Terra and Aqua satellites. The first tool allows users to obtain MODIS land products for 1,052 selected sites worldwide in ASCII format (7 x 7 km) and in GeoTIFF format (25 x 25 km). To access this tool see http://daac.ornl.gov/modisfixedsite. The global subsetting tool creates MODIS land product subsets for user-selected areas worldwide from one pixel up to 201 x 201 km area and for a user-selected time period during the MODIS record. To access this tool, please see http://daac.ornl.gov/modisglobal. Both tools subset the following MODIS Land Products:

269

Pennsylvania Farmland and Forest Land Assessment Act of 1974 - Utilization  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pennsylvania Farmland and Forest Land Assessment Act of 1974 - Pennsylvania Farmland and Forest Land Assessment Act of 1974 - Utilization of Land or Conveyance of Rights for Exploration or Extraction of Gas, Oil or Coal Bed Methane Pennsylvania Farmland and Forest Land Assessment Act of 1974 - Utilization of Land or Conveyance of Rights for Exploration or Extraction of Gas, Oil or Coal Bed Methane < Back Eligibility Utility Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Rural Electric Cooperative Transportation Program Info Start Date 2011 State Pennsylvania Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection This act prescribes the procedure utilization of land or conveyance of rights for exploration or extraction of gas, oil or coal bed methane in

270

Coastal Public Lands Management Act (Texas) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Coastal Public Lands Management Act (Texas) Coastal Public Lands Management Act (Texas) Coastal Public Lands Management Act (Texas) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Texas Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Texas General Land Office The coastal public lands of the state are managed in accordance with the following principles: (a) The natural resources of the surface land, including their aesthetic value and their ability to support and nurture all types of marine life and wildlife, shall be preserved. (b) Preference

271

Ecological perspectives of land use history: The Arid Lands Ecology (ALE) Reserve  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this study was to gather information on the land use history of the Arid Land Ecology (ALE) Reserve so that current ecological research could be placed within a historical perspective. The data were gathered in the early 1980s by interviewing former users of the land and from previously published research (where available). Interviews with former land users of the ALE Reserve in Benton County, Washington, revealed that major land uses from 1880 to 1940 were homesteading, grazing, oil/gas production, and road building. Land use practices associated with grazing and homesteading have left the greatest impact on the landscape. Disturbed sites where succession is characterized by non-native species, plots where sagebrush was railed away, and sheep trails are major indications today of past land uses. Recent estimates of annual bunchgrass production do ALE do not support the widespread belief that bunchgrass were more productive during the homesteading era, though the invasion of cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum), Jim Hill mustard (Sisymbrium altissium), and other European alien plant species has altered pre-settlement succession patterns. 15 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

Hinds, N R; Rogers, L E

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

National Land Cover Data  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

National Land Cover Data National Land Cover Data Metadata also available as Metadata: q Identification_Information q Data_Quality_Information q Spatial_Data_Organization_Information q Spatial_Reference_Information q Entity_and_Attribute_Information q Distribution_Information q Metadata_Reference_Information Identification_Information: Citation: Citation_Information: Originator: United States Geological Survey Publication_Date: Unpublished Material Title: National Land Cover Data Edition: 01 Geospatial_Data_Presentation_Form: raster digital data Other_Citation_Details: Classification and processing of the orginal remote sensing products was done by the Multi-Resolution Land Characterization Consortium and EROS Data Center (U.S. Geological Survey). The Consortium includes the

273

Sugar Land, TX -  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Alumnus Recognized by Secretary of Energy for Work at National Lab Sugar Land, TX - The National Energy Technology Laboratory is proud to announce that U.S. Air Force Academy...

274

MODIS Land Products Subsets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(Meter) MCD12Q1 LC MODISTerra+Aqua Lan Cover ( LC ) Type Yearly L3 Global 500m SIN Grid annual 500 MCD12Q2 LCD MODISTerra+Aqua Land Cover Dynamics ( LCD ) Yearly L3 Global...

275

OpenEI - land  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

en.openei.orgdatasetstaxonomyterm4150 en Land use requirements for ground-mounted solar power facilities. http:en.openei.orgdatasetsnode454

This dataset is part of...

276

Hanford Site Air Operating Permit Application Supplemental Information [Sec 1 Thru 5] Vol 1 Thru 3 Appendices A Thru C  

SciTech Connect

This report documents radionuclide air emissions from the Hanford Site in 1998 and the resulting effective dose equivalent to the maximally exposed individual (MEI) member of the public. The report has been prepared in accordance with the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40, Protection of the Environment, Part 61, National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (40 CFR 61), Subpart H: ''National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other than Radon from Department of Energy Facilities,'' and with the Washington Administrative Code Chapter 246247, Radiation Protection - Air Emissions. The federal regulations in 40 CFR 61, Subpart H, require the measurement and reporting of radionuclides emitted from Department of Energy facilities and the resulting offsite dose from those emissions. A standard of 10 mrem/yr effective dose equivalent (EDE) is imposed on them. The EDE to the MEI due to routine emissions in 1998 from Hanford Site point sources was 1.3 E-02 mrem (1.3 E-04 mSv). which is 0.13 percent of the federal standard. Chapter 246-247 of the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) requires the reporting of radionuclide emissions from all Department of Energy Hanford Site sources. The state has adopted into these regulations the 40 CFR 61 standard of 10 mrem/yr EDE. The EDE to the MEI attributable to diffuse and fugitive radionuclide air emissions from the Hanford Site in 1998 was 2.5 E-02 mrem (2.S E-04 mSv). This dose added to the dose from point sources gives a total for all sources of 3.8 E-02 mrem/yr (3.8 E-04 mSv) EDE. which is 0.38 percent of the 10 mrem/yr standard. An unplanned release on August 26, 1998, in the 300 Area of the Hanford Site resulted in a potential dose of 4.1 E-02 mrem to a hypothetical individual at the nearest point of public access to that area. This hypothetical individual was not the MEI since the wind direction on the day of the release was away from the MEI residence. The potential dose from the unplanned event was similar in magnitude to that from routine releases during 1998. Were the release from this unplanned event combined with routine releases, the total dose would be less than 1 percent of the 10 mrem/yr standard.

CURN, B.L.

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Preliminary design of a solar central receiver for site-specific repowering application (Saguaro Power Plant). Volume II. Preliminary design. Final report, October 1982-September 1983  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The solar central receiver technology, site, and specific unit for repowering were selected in prior analyses and studies. The objectives of this preliminary design study were to: develop a solar central receiver repowering design for Saguaro that (1) has potential to be economically competitive with fossil fueled plants in near and long term applications, (2) has the greatest chance for completion without further government funding, (3) will further define technical and economic feasibility of a 66 MWe gross size plant that is adequate to meet the requirements for utility and industrial process heat applications, (4) can potentially be constructed and operated within the next five years, and (5) incorporates solar central receiver technology and represents state-of-the-art development. This volume on the preliminary design includes the following sections: executive summary; introduction; changes from advanced conceptual design; preliminary design; system characteristics; economic analysis; and development plan.

Weber, E.R.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

A comparison of geospatially modeled fire behavior and potential application to fire and fuels management for the Savannah River Site.  

SciTech Connect

This study evaluates modeled fire behavior for the Savannah River Site in the Atlantic Coastal Plain of the southeastern U.S. using three data sources: FCCS, LANDFIRE, and SWRA. The Fuel Characteristic Classification System (FCCS) was used to build fuelbeds from intensive field sampling of 629 plots. Custom fire behavior fuel models were derived from these fuelbeds. LANDFIRE developed surface fire behavior fuel models and canopy attributes for the U.S. using satellite imagery informed by field data. The Southern Wildfire Risk Assessment (SWRA) developed surface fire behavior fuel models and canopy cover for the southeastern U.S. using satellite imagery.

Kurth, Laurie; Hollingsworth, LaWen; Shea, Dan

2011-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

279

Environmental effects of growing short-rotation woody crops on former agricultural lands  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Field-scale studies in the Southeast have been addressing the environmental effects of converting agricultural lands to biomass crop production since 1994. Erosion, surface water quality and quantity and subsurface movement of water and nutrients from woody crops, switchgrass and agricultural crops are being compared. Nutrient cycling, soil physical changes and crop productivity are also being monitored at the three sites. Maximum sediment losses occurred in the spring and fall. Losses were greater from sweetgum planted without a cover crop than with a cover crop. Nutrient losses of N and P in runoff and subsurface water occurred primarily after spring fertilizer application.

Tolbert, V.R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Thornton, F.C.; Joslin, J.D. [Tennessee Valley Authority, Muscle Shoals, AL (United States). Atmospheric Sciences Div.] [and others

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Wind Development on Tribal Lands  

SciTech Connect

Background: The Rosebud Sioux Tribe (RST) is located in south central South Dakota near the Nebraska border. The nearest community of size is Valentine, Nebraska. The RST is a recipient of several Department of Energy grants, written by Distributed Generation Systems, Inc. (Disgen), for the purposes of assessing the feasibility of its wind resource and subsequently to fund the development of the project. Disgen, as the contracting entity to the RST for this project, has completed all the pre-construction activities, with the exception of the power purchase agreement and interconnection agreement, to commence financing and construction of the project. The focus of this financing is to maximize the economic benefits to the RST while achieving commercially reasonable rates of return and fees for the other parties involved. Each of the development activities required and its status is discussed below. Land Resource: The Owl Feather War Bonnet 30 MW Wind Project is located on RST Tribal Trust Land of approximately 680 acres adjacent to the community of St. Francis, South Dakota. The RST Tribal Council has voted on several occasions for the development of this land for wind energy purposes, as has the District of St. Francis. Actual footprint of wind farm will be approx. 50 acres. Wind Resource Assessment: The wind data has been collected from the site since May 1, 2001 and continues to be collected and analyzed. The latest projections indicate a net capacity factor of 42% at a hub height of 80 meters. The data has been collected utilizing an NRG 9300 Data logger System with instrumentation installed at 30, 40 and 65 meters on an existing KINI radio tower. The long-term annual average wind speed at 65-meters above ground level is 18.2 mph (8.1 mps) and 18.7 mph (8.4 mps) at 80-meters agl. The wind resource is excellent and supports project financing.

Ken Haukaas; Dale Osborn; Belvin Pete

2008-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land application sites" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

NUREG/CR-6695 PNNL-13375 Hydrologic Uncertainty Assessment for Decommissioning Sites: Hypothetical Test Case Applications Prepared by  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report uses hypothetical decommissioning test cases to illustrate an uncertainty assessment methodology for dose assessments conducted as part of decommissioning analyses for NRC-licensed facilities. This methodology was presented previously in NUREG/CR-6656. The hypothetical test case source term and scenarios are based on an actual decommissioning case and the physical setting is based on the site of a field experiment carried out for the NRC in Arizona. The emphasis in the test case was on parameter uncertainty. The analysis is limited to the hydrologic aspects of the exposure pathway involving infiltration of water at the ground surface, leaching of contaminants, and transport of contaminants through the groundwater to a point of exposure. The methodology uses generic parameter distributions based on national or regional databases for estimating

P. D. Meyer; R. Y. Taira

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Energy and land use  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report addresses the land use impacts of past and future energy development and summarizes the major federal and state legislation which influences the potential land use impacts of energy facilities and can thus influence the locations and timing of energy development. In addition, this report describes and presents the data which are used to measure, and in some cases, predict the potential conflicts between energy development and alternative uses of the nation's land resources. The topics section of this report is divided into three parts. The first part describes the myriad of federal, state and local legislation which have a direct or indirect impact upon the use of land for energy development. The second part addresses the potential land use impacts associated with the extraction, conversion and combustion of energy resources, as well as the disposal of wastes generated by these processes. The third part discusses the conflicts that might arise between agriculture and energy development as projected under a number of DOE mid-term (1990) energy supply and demand scenarios.

Not Available

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Hanford Site National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) characterization. Revision 7  

SciTech Connect

This seventh revision of the Hanford Site National Environmental Policy (NEPA) Characterization presents current environmental data regarding the Hanford Site and its immediate environs. This information is intended for use in preparing Site-related NEPA documentation. Chapter 4.0 summarizes up-to-date information on climate and meteorology, geology, hydrology, environmental monitoring, ecology, history and archaeology, socioeconomics, land use, and noise levels prepared by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) staff. More detailed data are available from reference sources cited or from the authors. Chapter 5.0 was not updated from the sixth revision (1994). It describes models, including their principal underlying assumptions, that are to be used in simulating realized or potential impacts from nuclear materials at the Hanford Site. Included are models of radionuclide transport in groundwater and atmospheric pathways, and of radiation dose to populations via all known pathways from known initial conditions. The updated Chapter 6.0 provides the preparer with the federal and state regulations, DOE Orders and permits, and environmental standards directly applicable to the NEPA documents on the Hanford Site, following the structure of Chapter 4.0. No conclusions or recommendations are given in this report. Rather, it is a compilation of information on the Hanford Site environment that can be used directly by Site contractors. This information can also be used by any interested individual seeking baseline data on the Hanford Site and its past activities by which to evaluate projected activities and their impacts.

Cushing, C.E. [ed.] ed.; Baker, D.A.; Chamness, M.A. [and others] and others

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Hanford Site National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) characterization. Revision 6  

SciTech Connect

This sixth revision of the Hanford Site National Environmental Policy (NEPA) Characterization presents current environmental data regarding the Hanford Site and its immediate environs. This information is intended for use in preparing Site-related NEPA documentation. Chapter 4.0 summarizes up-to-date information on climate and meteorology, geology and hydrology, ecology, history and archaeology, socioeconomics, land use, and noise levels prepared by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) staff. More detailed data are available from reference sources cited or from the authors; Chapter 5.0 has been significantly updated from the fifth revision. It describes models, including their principal underlying assumptions, that are to be used in simulating realized or potential impacts from nuclear materials at the Hanford Site. Included are models of radionuclide transport in groundwater and atmospheric pathways, and of radiation dose to populations via all known pathways from known initial conditions; The updated Chapter 6.0 provides the preparer with the federal and state regulations, DOE orders and permits, and environmental standards directly applicable to the NEPA documents on the Hanford Site, following the structure of Chapter 4.0. No conclusions or recommendations are given in this report. Rather, it is a compilation of information on the Hanford Site environment that can be utilized directly by Site contractors. This information can also be used by any interested individual seeking baseline data on the Hanford Site and its past activities by which to evaluate projected activities and their impacts.

Cushing, C.E. [ed.; Baker, D.A.; Chamness, M.A. [and others

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Land Use and natUraL resoUrces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Land Use and natUraL resoUrces CONTINUING AND PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION SPRING 2013 Including.m. Sacramento: Sutter Square Galleria, 2901 K St. $575 ($625 if postmarked after 03/28/2013). Enroll in section and site designs, create and prepare site plans, and analyze and develop planning staff reports. Emphasis

California at Davis, University of

286

Land Use History  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study focuses on the cultural-historical environment of the 88,900-acre (35,560-ha) Valles Caldera National Preserve (VCNP) over the past four centuries of Spanish, Mexican, and U.S. governance. It includes a review and synthesis of available published and unpublished historical, ethnohistorical, and ethnographic literature about the human occupation of the area now contained within the VCNP. Documents include historical maps, texts, letters, diaries, business records, photographs, land and mineral patents, and court testimony. This study presents a cultural-historical framework of VCNP land use that will be useful to land managers and researchers in assessing the historical ecology of the property. It provides VCNP administrators and agents the cultural-historical background needed to develop management plans that acknowledge traditional associations with the Preserve, and offers managers additional background for structuring and acting on consultations with affiliated communities.

United States; Forest Service; Kurt F. Anschuetz

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Global Modeling of Land Water and Energy Balances. Part I: The Land Dynamics (LaD) Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simple model of large-scale land (continental) water and energy balances is presented. The model is an extension of an earlier scheme with a record of successful application in climate modeling. The most important changes from the original ...

P. C. D. Milly; A. B. Shmakin

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Land use and energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides estimates of the amount of land required by past and future energy development in the United States and examines major federal legislation that regulates the impact of energy facilities on land use. An example of one land use issue associated with energy development - the potential conflict between surface mining and agriculture - is illustrated by describing the actual and projected changes in land use caused by coal mining in western Indiana. Energy activities addressed in the report include extraction of coal, oil, natural gas, uranium, oil shale, and geothermal steam; uranium processing; preparation of synfuels from coal; oil refineries; fossil-fuel, nuclear, and hydro-electric power plants; biomass energy farms; and disposal of solid wastes generated during combustion of fossil fuels. Approximately 1.1 to 3.3 x 10/sup 6/ acres were devoted to these activities in the United States in 1975. As much as 1.8 to 2.0 x 10/sup 6/ additional acres could be required by 1990 for new, nonbiomass energy development. The production of grain for fuel ethanol could require an additional 16.9 to 55.7 x 10/sup 6/ acres by 1990. Federal laws that directly or indirectly regulate the land-use impacts of energy facilities include the National Environmental Protection Act, Clean Air Act, Federal Water Pollution Control Act, Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act, and Coastal Zone Management Act. The major provisions of these acts, other relevant federal regulations, and similar state and local regulatons are described in this report. Federal legislation relating to air quality, water quality, and the management of public lands has the greatest potential to influence the location and timing of future energy development in the United States.

Robeck, K.E.; Ballou, S.W.; South, D.W.; Davis, M.J.; Chiu, S.Y.; Baker, J.E.; Dauzvardis, P.A.; Garvey, D.B.; Torpy, M.F.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Land Cover Differences in Soil Carbon and Nitrogen at Fort Benning, Georgia  

SciTech Connect

Land cover characterization might help land managers assess the impacts of management practices and land cover change on attributes linked to the maintenance and/or recovery of soil quality. However, connections between land cover and measures of soil quality are not well established. The objective of this limited investigation was to examine differences in soil carbon and nitrogen among various land cover types at Fort Benning, Georgia. Forty-one sampling sites were classified into five major land cover types: deciduous forest, mixed forest, evergreen forest or plantation, transitional herbaceous vegetation, and barren land. Key measures of soil quality (including mineral soil density, nitrogen availability, soil carbon and nitrogen stocks, as well as properties and chemistry of the O-horizon) were significantly different among the five land covers. In general, barren land had the poorest soil quality. Barren land, created through disturbance by tracked vehicles and/or erosion, had significantly greater soil density and a substantial loss of carbon and nitrogen relative to soils at less disturbed sites. We estimate that recovery of soil carbon under barren land at Fort Benning to current day levels under transitional vegetation or forests would require about 60 years following reestablishment of vegetation. Maps of soil carbon and nitrogen were produced for Fort Benning based on a 1999 land cover map and field measurements of soil carbon and nitrogen stocks under different land cover categories.

Garten Jr., C.T.

2004-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

290

Sale of Water Resource Land (Maine) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sale of Water Resource Land (Maine) Sale of Water Resource Land (Maine) Sale of Water Resource Land (Maine) < Back Eligibility Municipal/Public Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Maine Program Type Siting and Permitting This rule requires an eight month advance notice period whenever a consumer-owned water utility intends to transfer water resource land, defined as any land or real property owned by a water utility for the purposes of providing a source of supply, storing water or protecting sources of supply or water storage, including reservoirs, lakes, ponds, rivers or streams, wetlands and watershed areas. The rule also provides an assignable right of first refusal to the municipality or municipalities

291

Renewable Energy Potential on Tribal Lands Webinar | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Potential on Tribal Lands Webinar Potential on Tribal Lands Webinar Renewable Energy Potential on Tribal Lands Webinar February 27, 2013 11:00AM MST Webinar The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Tribal Energy Program, and Western Area Power Administration are pleased to continue their sponsorship of the Tribal Renewable Energy Webinar Series. American Indian land comprises 2% of U.S. land but contains an estimated 5% of all renewable energy resources. Attend this webinar for an introduction to the recently released National Renewable Energy Laboratory on tribal renewable energy resources. Learn about location, siting, and transmission issues and opportunities for feasible renewable energy development on

292

Energy Corridors on Federal Lands | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Corridors on Federal Lands Energy Corridors on Federal Lands Energy Corridors on Federal Lands In many areas of the United States, the infrastructure required to deliver energy has not always kept pace with growth in demand. To improve energy delivery and enhance the electric transmission grid for the future, several government agencies currently are working together to establish a coordinated network of Federal energy corridors on Federal lands throughout the United States. Energy corridors would help address growing energy demand by facilitating future siting of oil, gas, and hydrogen pipelines and electricity transmission and distribution facilities, while also protecting the environment. As the agency-preferred siting locations, the energy transport corridors will provide industry and the public with

293

Land use requirements for ground-mounted solar power facilities. | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Land use requirements for ground-mounted solar power facilities. Land use requirements for ground-mounted solar power facilities. Dataset Summary Description This dataset is part of a larger internal dataset at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) that explores various characteristics of large solar electric (both PV and CSP) facilities around the United States. This dataset focuses on the land use characteristics for solar facilities that are either under construction or currently in operation. Source Land-Use Requirements for Solar Power Plants in the United States Date Released June 25th, 2013 (5 months ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords acres area average concentrating solar power csp Density electric hectares km2 land land requirements land use land-use mean photovoltaic photovoltaics PV solar statistics Data application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.spreadsheetml.sheet icon Master Solar Land Use Spreadsheet (xlsx, 1.5 MiB)

294

Combined Estimation of Hydrogeologic Conceptual Model, Parameter, and Scenario Uncertainty with Application to Uranium Transport at the Hanford Site 300 Area  

SciTech Connect

This report to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) describes the development and application of a methodology to systematically and quantitatively assess predictive uncertainty in groundwater flow and transport modeling that considers the combined impact of hydrogeologic uncertainties associated with the conceptual-mathematical basis of a model, model parameters, and the scenario to which the model is applied. The methodology is based on a n extension of a Maximum Likelihood implementation of Bayesian Model Averaging. Model uncertainty is represented by postulating a discrete set of alternative conceptual models for a site with associated prior model probabilities that reflect a belief about the relative plausibility of each model based on its apparent consistency with available knowledge and data. Posterior model probabilities are computed and parameter uncertainty is estimated by calibrating each model to observed system behavior; prior parameter estimates are optionally included. Scenario uncertainty is represented as a discrete set of alternative future conditions affecting boundary conditions, source/sink terms, or other aspects of the models, with associated prior scenario probabilities. A joint assessment of uncertainty results from combining model predictions computed under each scenario using as weight the posterior model and prior scenario probabilities. The uncertainty methodology was applied to modeling of groundwater flow and uranium transport at the Hanford Site 300 Area. Eight alternative models representing uncertainty in the hydrogeologic and geochemical properties as well as the temporal variability were considered. Two scenarios represent alternative future behavior of the Columbia River adjacent to the site were considered. The scenario alternatives were implemented in the models through the boundary conditions. Results demonstrate the feasibility of applying a comprehensive uncertainty assessment to large-scale, detailed groundwater flow and transport modeling and illustrate the benefits of the methodology I providing better estimates of predictive uncertiay8, quantitative results for use in assessing risk, and an improved understanding of the system behavior and the limitations of the models.

Meyer, Philip D.; Ye, Ming; Rockhold, Mark L.; Neuman, Shlomo P.; Cantrell, Kirk J.

2007-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

295

File:03CAAStateLandLeasingProcessAndLandAccessROWs.pdf | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CAAStateLandLeasingProcessAndLandAccessROWs.pdf CAAStateLandLeasingProcessAndLandAccessROWs.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage File:03CAAStateLandLeasingProcessAndLandAccessROWs.pdf Size of this preview: 463 × 599 pixels. Other resolution: 464 × 600 pixels. Full resolution ‎(1,275 × 1,650 pixels, file size: 75 KB, MIME type: application/pdf) File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 16:03, 29 November 2012 Thumbnail for version as of 16:03, 29 November 2012 1,275 × 1,650 (75 KB) Jnorris (Talk | contribs) 12:06, 12 September 2012 Thumbnail for version as of 12:06, 12 September 2012 1,275 × 1,650 (82 KB) Djenne (Talk | contribs) 15:45, 26 June 2012 Thumbnail for version as of 15:45, 26 June 2012 1,275 × 1,650 (75 KB) Jnorris (Talk | contribs) June 26th version

296

Environmental Land Use Restriction (Connecticut) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Environmental Land Use Restriction (Connecticut) Environmental Land Use Restriction (Connecticut) Environmental Land Use Restriction (Connecticut) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Connecticut Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Energy and Environmental Protection

297

Florida Environmental Land and Water Management Act (Florida) | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Florida Environmental Land and Water Management Act (Florida) Florida Environmental Land and Water Management Act (Florida) Florida Environmental Land and Water Management Act (Florida) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Florida Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Florida Department of Economic Opportunity

298

Protection of Public Parks and Recreational Lands (Texas) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Protection of Public Parks and Recreational Lands (Texas) Protection of Public Parks and Recreational Lands (Texas) Protection of Public Parks and Recreational Lands (Texas) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Texas Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Texas Parks and Wildlife Department

299

Regulations for Land Disturbing Activities (North Carolina) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Regulations for Land Disturbing Activities (North Carolina) Regulations for Land Disturbing Activities (North Carolina) Regulations for Land Disturbing Activities (North Carolina) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State North Carolina Program Type Siting and Permitting The law requires installation and maintenance of sufficient erosion control

300

Land and Water Developments (Newfoundland and Labrador) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Land and Water Developments (Newfoundland and Labrador) Land and Water Developments (Newfoundland and Labrador) Land and Water Developments (Newfoundland and Labrador) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Developer Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Home Weatherization Program Info State Newfoundland and Labrador Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Newfoundland and Labrador Department of Environment and Conservation This policy applies to public water supply areas designated by the province of Newfoundland and Labrador. The policy limits development in public water supply areas unless they meet specific conditions, and have the approval of the Minister of the Department of Environment and Conservation.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land application sites" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Pantex Site  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pantex Site Pantex Site The primary mission of the Pantex Plant is the assembly, disassembly, testing, and evaluation of nuclear wespons in support of the NNSA stockpile...

302

County Land Preservation and Use Commissions (Iowa)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This ordinance creates Land Preservation and Use Commissions in each county to provide for the orderly use and development of land, to protect agricultural land from nonagricultural development,...

303

Siting the International Linear Collider at Hanford  

SciTech Connect

Review of the proposed International Linear Collider, applications in high energy physics, and evaluation of the Hanford Site as a possible location for siting the facilityl.

Kouzes, Richard T.; Asner, David M.; Brodzinski, Ronald L.; Fast, James E.; Miley, Harry S.

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

304

Siting the International Linear Collider at Hanford  

SciTech Connect

Review of the proposed International Linear Collider, applications in high energy physics, and evaluation of the Hanford Site as a possible location for siting the facility.

Kouzes, Richard T.; Asner, David M.; Brodzinski, Ronald L.; Fast, James E.; Miley, Harry S.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

In Situ Remediation Integrated Program. In situ physical/chemical treatment technologies for remediation of contaminated sites: Applicability, developing status, and research needs  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) In Situ Remediation Integrated Program (ISR IP) was established in June 1991 to facilitate the development and implementation of in situ remediation technologies for environmental restoration within the DOE complex. Within the ISR IP, four subareas of research have been identified: (1) in situ containment, (2) in situ physical/chemical treatment (ISPCT), (3) in situ bioremediation, and (4) subsurface manipulation/electrokinetics. Although set out as individual focus areas, these four are interrelated, and successful developments in one will often necessitate successful developments in another. In situ remediation technologies are increasingly being sought for environmental restoration due to the potential advantages that in situ technologies can offer as opposed to more traditional ex situ technologies. These advantages include limited site disruption, lower cost, reduced worker exposure, and treatment at depth under structures. While in situ remediation technologies can offer great advantages, many technology gaps exist in their application. This document presents an overview of ISPCT technologies and describes their applicability to DOE-complex needs, their development status, and relevant ongoing research. It also highlights research needs that the ISR IP should consider when making funding decisions.

Siegrist, R.L.; Gates, D.D.; West, O.R.; Liang, L.; Donaldson, T.L.; Webb, O.F.; Corder, S.L.; Dickerson, K.S.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 6   Typical applications of duplex stainless steels...salt evaporation equipment, desalination plants, geothermal

307

Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 3   Wear-, erosion-, and corrosion-resistance applications of CVD...against neutron radiation

308

EIS-0222: Hanford Comprehensive Land-Use Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

22: Hanford Comprehensive Land-Use Plan 22: Hanford Comprehensive Land-Use Plan EIS-0222: Hanford Comprehensive Land-Use Plan SUMMARY DOE has prepared the EIS to evaluate the potential environmental impacts associated with implementing a comprehensive land-use plan (CLUP) for the Hanford Site for at least the next 50 years. DOE is expected to use this land-use plan in its decision-making process to establish what is the "highest and best use" of the land (41 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] 101-47, "Federal Property Management Regulations"). The final selection of a land-use map, land-use policies, and implementing procedures would create the working CLUP when they are adopted through the ROD for the EIS. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD

309

Arid Lands Ecology Facility management plan  

SciTech Connect

The Arid Lands Ecology (ALE) facility is a 312-sq-km tract of land that lies on the western side of the Hanford Site in southcentral Washington. The US Atomic Energy Commission officially set aside this land area in 1967 to preserve shrub-steppe habitat and vegetation. The ALE facility is managed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the US Department of Energy (DOE) for ecological research and education purposes. In 1971, the ALE facility was designated the Rattlesnake Hills Research Natural Area (RNA) as a result of an interagency federal cooperative agreement, and remains the largest RNA in Washington. it is also one of the few remaining large tracts of shrub-steppe vegetation in the state retaining a predominant preeuropean settlement character. This management plan provides policy and implementation methods for management of the ALE facilities consistent with both US Department of Energy Headquarters and the Richland Field Office decision (US Congress 1977) to designate and manage ALE lands as an RNA and as a component of the DOE National Environmental Research Park System.

None

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Other Surface Impoundments and Land Applications (Oklahoma)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

A water quality permit is required from the Department of Environmental Quality to construct, install, operate or close any industrial surface impoundment, industrial septic tank or treatment...

311

Shallow land burial of low-level radioactive wastes. A selected, annotated bibliography  

SciTech Connect

The data file was built to provide information support to DOE researchers in the field of low-level radioactive waste disposal and management. The scope of the data base emphasizes studies which deal with the ''old'' Manhattan sites, commercial disposal sites, and the specific parameters which affect the soil and geologic migration of radionuclides. Specialized data fields have been incorporated into the data base to improve the ease and accuracy of locating pertinent references. Specific radionuclides for which data are presented are listed in the ''Measured Radionuclides'' field, and specific parameters which affect the migration of these radionuclides are presented in the ''Measured Parameters'' field. The 504 references are rated indicating applicability to shallow land burial technology and whether interpretation is required. Indexes are provided for author, geographic location, title, measured parameters, measured radionuclides, keywords, subject categories, and publication description. (DLC)

Fore, C.S.; Vaughan, N.D.; Tappen, J. (comps.)

1978-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Chapter 37 Land Disposal Restrictions (Kentucky) | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7 Land Disposal Restrictions (Kentucky) Chapter 37 Land Disposal Restrictions (Kentucky) Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor...

313

Spatial decision support system for land assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Keywords: GIS, agriculture planning, artificial intelligence, decision support system, expert system, geoinformatics, geoinformation system, land evaluation, land use planning

Cláudio Chauke Nehme; Margareth Simőes

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

File:03NVBStateLandAccess.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

3NVBStateLandAccess.pdf 3NVBStateLandAccess.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage File:03NVBStateLandAccess.pdf Size of this preview: 463 × 599 pixels. Other resolution: 464 × 600 pixels. Full resolution ‎(1,275 × 1,650 pixels, file size: 11 KB, MIME type: application/pdf) File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 12:11, 15 October 2012 Thumbnail for version as of 12:11, 15 October 2012 1,275 × 1,650 (11 KB) Dklein2012 (Talk | contribs) You cannot overwrite this file. Edit this file using an external application (See the setup instructions for more information) File usage The following 2 pages link to this file: GRR/Flowcharts GRR/Section 3-NV-b - State Land Access Retrieved from

315

Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 8   Major markets for ABS products...Market category Applications ABS grades Major appliances Refrigerator door and food liners; crisper pans;

316

Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 5   Selected applications for wrought aluminum alloys...vehicles, trucks and trailers 3105 Residential siding, mobile homes, rain-carrying goods,

317

Alabama Land Recycling And Economic Redevelopment Act (Alabama) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Land Recycling And Economic Redevelopment Act (Alabama) Land Recycling And Economic Redevelopment Act (Alabama) Alabama Land Recycling And Economic Redevelopment Act (Alabama) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Developer Industrial Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Alabama Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Department of Environmental Management This article establishes a program, to be implemented, maintained, and administered by the Alabama Department of Environmental Management, to encourage the voluntary cleanup and the reuse and redevelopment of environmentally contaminated properties. The article states criteria for applicant participation and property qualification in the voluntary cleanup

318

LBA Land Use and Land Cover Data Set Released  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LBA Land Use and Land Cover Data Sets Released LBA Land Use and Land Cover Data Sets Released The ORNL DAAC announces the release of two image data sets from the Land Use and Land Cover science theme (LC-15 team), a component of the LBA-ECO Large Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia (LBA). LBA-ECO LC-15 SRTM30 Digital Elevation Model Data, Amazon Basin: 2000 . Data set prepared by S. Saatchi. This data set provides a subset of the SRTM30 Digital Elevation Model (DEM) elevation and standard deviation data (STD of the data points used in the averaging) for the Amazon Basin. SRTM30 is a near-global digital elevation model (DEM) comprising a combination of data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), flown in February, 2000, and the earlier U.S. Geological Survey's GTOPO30 data set.

319

Argonne Terrestrial Carbon Cycle Data from Batvia Prairie and Agricultural Sites  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

Carbon dioxide fluxes and stocks in terrestrial ecosystems are key measurements needed to constrain quantification of regional carbon sinks and sources and the mechanisms controlling them. This information is required to produce a sound carbon budget for North America. This project examines CO2 and energy fluxes from agricultural land and from restored tallgrass prairie to compare their carbon sequestration potentials. The study integrates eddy covariance measurements with biometric measurements of plant and soil carbon stocks for two systems in northeastern Illinois: 1) long-term cultivated land in corn-soybean rotation with conventional tillage, and 2) a 15 year-old restored prairie that represents a long-term application of CRP conversion of cultivated land to native vegetation. The study contributes to the North American Carbon Program (NACP) by providing information on the magnitude and distribution of carbon stocks and the processes that control carbon dynamics in cultivated and CRP-restored land in the Midwest. The prairie site has been functioning since October 2004 and the agricultural site since July 2005. (From http://www.atmos.anl.gov/ FERMI/index.html)

Matamala, Roser [ANL; Jastrow, Julie D.; Lesht, Barry [ANL; Cook, David [ANL; Pekour, Mikhail [ANL; Gonzalez-Meler, Miquel A. [University of Illinois at Chicago

320

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- LASL Land Parcels A B C E K LN PL - NM  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Land Parcels A B C E K LN PL - Land Parcels A B C E K LN PL - NM 07 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: LASL LAND PARCELS A, B, C, E, K, LN, PL (NM.07 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Los Alamos County , New Mexico NM.07-2 Evaluation Year: 1986 NM.07-1 Site Operations: No specific operations identified for these tracts of land. NM.07-1 NM.07-2 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Radiation levels below criteria. Declared as surplus real property and offered for public sale in 1972. NM.07-1 NM.07-2 Radioactive Materials Handled: None Specifically Indicated NM.07-1 NM.07-2 Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: None Specifically Indicated Radiological Survey(s): Yes NM.07-2 Site Status: Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land application sites" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Groundwater modeling: Application of a multiphase fluid flow model as a decision-making tool for assessing and remediating installation restoration program sites. Master's thesis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This research examined a two-dimensional numerical model, VALOR, which can simulate multiphase fluid flow in soils and groundwater, and evaluated the applicability of the model as a decision-making tool for assessing and remediating IRP sites. Model sensitivity analyses were conducted to study the influence of grid sizes, soil types, and organic release rates on the simulated migration of both light and dense non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs). The VALOR model was applied to a case study of a JP-4 release at Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio. The finer grid sizes provide the most accurate definition of NAPL distribution. The soil type and release rate sensitivity analyses demonstrate that NAPL migrates quicker through coarse sands than fine sand and clay. The light NAPL ponds at the water table and spreads laterally. The dense NAPL migrates through the subsurface and ponds at the aquifer bottom. The fast organic release simulations predict wider vertical pathways of migration. The slow organic release simulations predict higher light NAPL saturation at the water table. The case study indicates that within limits, VALOR may be useful for assessing NAPL distribution, estimating contaminated soil volumes, and evaluating remediation alternatives.... Groundwater modeling, Non-aqueous Phase Liquids: NAPL, Multiphase fluid flow model, Installation Restoration Program, IRP.

Scott, D.J.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Application of a modified denitrifying bacteria method for analyzing groundwater and vadose zone pore water nitrate at the Hanford Site, WA, USA.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

zone pore water nitrate at the Hanford Site, WA, USA. Woods,and Conrad, Mark The Hanford Site in southern WashingtonL have been reported for Hanford groundwaters, where nitrate

Woods, Katharine N.; Singleton, Michael J.; Conrad, Mark

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Temporal Land Cover Analysis for Net Ecosystem Improvement  

SciTech Connect

We delineated 8 watersheds contributing to previously defined river reaches within the 1,468-km2 historical floodplain of the tidally influenced lower Columbia River and estuary. We assessed land-cover change at the watershed, reach, and restoration site scales by reclassifying remote-sensing data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Coastal Change Analysis Program’s land cover/land change product into forest, wetland, and urban categories. The analysis showed a 198.3 km2 loss of forest cover during the first 6 years of the Columbia Estuary Ecosystem Restoration Program, 2001–2006. Total measured urbanization in the contributing watersheds of the estuary during the full 1996-2006 change analysis period was 48.4 km2. Trends in forest gain/loss and urbanization differed between watersheds. Wetland gains and losses were within the margin of error of the satellite imagery analysis. No significant land cover change was measured at restoration sites, although it was visible in aerial imagery, therefore, the 30-m land-cover product may not be appropriate for assessment of early-stage wetland restoration. These findings suggest that floodplain restoration sites in reaches downstream of watersheds with decreasing forest cover will be subject to increased sediment loads, and those downstream of urbanization will experience effects of increased impervious surfaces on hydrologic processes.

Ke, Yinghai; Coleman, Andre M.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.

2013-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

324

Commission decision on the Department of Water Resources' Application for Certification for the Bottle Rock Geothermal Project  

SciTech Connect

The Application for Certification for the construction of a 55 MW geothermal power plant and related facilities in Lake County was approved subject to terms identified in the Final Decision. The following are covered: findings on compliance with statutory site-certification requirements; final environmental impact report; procedural steps; evidentiary bases; need, environmental resources; public health and safety; plant and site safety and reliability; socioeconomic, land use, and cultural concerns, and transmission tap line. (MHR)

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Commission decision on the Department of Water Resources' Application for Certification for the Bottle Rock Geothermal Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Application for Certification for the construction of a 55 MW geothermal power plant and related facilities in Lake County was approved subject to terms identified in the Final Decision. The following are covered: findings on compliance with statutory site-certification requirements; final environmental impact report; procedural steps; evidentiary bases; need, environmental resources; public health and safety; plant and site safety and reliability; socioeconomic, land use, and cultural concerns, and transmission tap line. (MHR)

Not Available

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Marine Habitats and Land Use (Virginia) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Marine Habitats and Land Use (Virginia) Marine Habitats and Land Use (Virginia) Marine Habitats and Land Use (Virginia) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Developer Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Systems Integrator Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Virginia Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Virginia Marine Resources Commission The Virginia Marine Resources Commission has jurisdiction over submerged lands off the state's coast and in inland rivers and streams, wetlands and tidal wetlands, coastal sand dunes and beaches, and other shores. A permit from the Commission is required to dredge, fill, or otherwise disturb these

327

Natural Streambed and Land Preservation Act of 1975 (Montana) | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Natural Streambed and Land Preservation Act of 1975 (Montana) Natural Streambed and Land Preservation Act of 1975 (Montana) Natural Streambed and Land Preservation Act of 1975 (Montana) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Institutional Multi-Family Residential Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Wind Solar Program Info Start Date 1975 State Montana Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Montana Association of Conservation Districts (MACD) The Natural Streambed and Land Preservation Act of 1975 aims to prevent the

328

Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach: Resources for Public Lands  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Resources Public Power Regional Activities State Activities State Lands Siting Resources for Public Lands This page lists wind-related resources and tools such as publications, Web resources, and news about public lands. Search the Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach initiative's Database Choose a Type of Information All News Publications Web Resource Videos Choose # of Records per Page Default (10 per page) 5 25 50 To search the titles, enter a word or phrase. Start Search Clear Contents Total of 24 records found. Page 1 of 5, Sorted by descending date Filtered by: Public Lands 1 2 3 4 5 Next Page >> Date sort by ascending date sort by descending date State sort by ascending state sort by descending state Type of Information Program Area Title sort by ascending title sort by descending title

329

AshtabulaSite.cdr  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Ashtabula, Ohio, Site comprises 42.5 acres of Ashtabula, Ohio, Site comprises 42.5 acres of privately owned land adjacent to the city of Ashtabula, about 55 miles east of Cleveland. From 1962 to 1988 Reactive Metals Inc. (RMI) operated a facility on the property that manufactured metallic uranium tubes and rods and experimental quantities of thorium metal for use in the Hanford, Washington; and Savannah River, Georgia, weapons program reactors. The facility operated under contract to the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission and its successor agency the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). RMI also extruded depleted uranium under a U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) license and extruded nonradioactive materials, primarily copper-based, for the private sector. RMI once operated a small wastewater evaporation pond near the northern boundary of the plant area for

330

CARBON SEQUESTRATION ON SURFACE MINE LANDS  

SciTech Connect

An area planted in 2004 on Bent Mountain in Pike County was shifted to the Department of Energy project to centralize an area to become a demonstration site. An additional 98.3 acres were planted on Peabody lands in western Kentucky and Bent Mountain to bring the total area under study by this project to 556.5 acres as indicated in Table 2. Major efforts this quarter include the implementation of new plots that will examine the influence of differing geologic material on tree growth and survival, water quality and quantity and carbon sequestration. Normal monitoring and maintenance was conducted and additional instrumentation was installed to monitor the new areas planted.

Donald H. Graves; Christopher Barton; Richard Sweigard; Richard Warner

2005-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

331

Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 6 Selected applications for aluminum casting alloys...gears; jet engine compressor cases 356.0 Sand: flywheel castings; automotive transmission cases; oil pans; pump bodies. Permanent: machine tool parts;

332

Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 2   Applications for titanium and titanium alloys...for FGD units, nuclear waste disposal Geothermal energy Heat exchangers, evaporators, condensers, tubes Marine engineering Shipbuilding Heat exchangers, condensers, piping

333

Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 1   Application of sintered stainless steels...316L Photographic equipment 316L Cam cleats 304L Dishwasher components 304L Can opener gears 410L...

334

Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 2   Examples of applications and parts made with vacuum infusion...small aircraft Industrial Fan blades, part for fish counting unit, toilet bowl, oil

335

Applications:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Applications: Applications: â—Ź Telecommunications: cell / smartphone; multi-party secure phone calls; videoconferencing; Voice over IP (VoIP) â—Ź Banking and financial transactions: ATM, debit / credit card and e-Commerce â—Ź e-Business; e-gaming; e-books; e-music; e-movies; e-gambling â—Ź Wireless internet â—Ź Electronic voting â—Ź Facility and vehicle access â—Ź Information exchange for government/defense

336

Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach: Wind Power on Public Lands  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Resources Public Power Regional Activities State Activities State Lands Siting Wind Power on Public Lands Through its programs at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and partners, Wind Powering America is assisting with the evaluation of wind energy development on public lands. The cover of the publication. Federal Wind Energy Assistance through NREL The National Renewable Energy Laboratory assists with wind resource assessment and development activities initiated by federal agencies to facilitate distributed renewable energy projects at federal agency sites. This brief outlines the process for requesting National Renewable Energy Laboratory assistance with federal wind energy projects. Army National Guard NREL provided the Army National Guard at Fort Carson, Colorado, with a 50-m

337

Evaluating runoff simulations from the Community Land Model 4.0 using observations from flux towers and a mountainous watershed  

SciTech Connect

Previous studies using the Community Land Model (CLM) focused on simulating landatmosphere interactions and water balance at continental to global scales, with limited attention paid to its capability for hydrologic simulations at watershed or regional scales. This study evaluates the performance of CLM 4.0 (CLM4) for hydrologic simulations, and explores possible directions of improvement. Specifically, it is found that CLM4 tends to produce unrealistically large temporal variation of runoff for applications at a mountainous catchment in the Northwest United States where subsurface runoff is dominant, as well as at a few flux tower sites. We show that runoff simulations from CLM4 can be improved by: (1) increasing spatial resolution of the land surface representations; (2) calibrating parameter values; (3) replacing the subsurface formulation with a more general nonlinear function; (4) implementing the runoff generation schemes from the Variability Infiltration Capacity (VIC) model. This study also highlights the importance of evaluating both the energy and water fluxes application of land surface models across multiple scales.

Li, Hongyi; Huang, Maoyi; Wigmosta, Mark S.; Ke, Yinghai; Coleman, Andre M.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Wang, Aihui; Ricciuto, Daniel M.

2011-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

338

NSA-Beaver Pond Site  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Beaver Pond Site (NSA-BP) Beaver Pond Site (NSA-BP) The storage tent and gas collectors NSA-BP site looking to the east. Visible is the investigator hut on drier land to the west and the boardwalk leading out to the tower site in the right portion of the image with the mounded beaver lodge visible in the middle of the image. The bridge and the 3 meter flux tower The beaver lodge The bridge from the flux tower This is the floating bridge leading from the flux tower back to the shore. The large tent for holding equipment is clearly visible on the shore. The TGB gas collectors on the beaver pond Back to the BOREAS Photo Page Index Other Sites: NSA Photos ||NSA-BP Photos | NSA-Fen Photos | NSA-OA Photos | NSA-OBS Photos | NSA-OJP Photos | NSA-UBS Photos | NSA-YJP Photos | NSA-Ops Photos

339

Evaluating the JULES Land Surface Model Energy Fluxes Using FLUXNET Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Surface energy flux measurements from a sample of 10 flux network (FLUXNET) sites selected to represent a range of climate conditions and biome types were used to assess the performance of the Hadley Centre land surface model (Joint U.K. Land ...

Eleanor Blyth; John Gash; Amanda Lloyd; Matthew Pryor; Graham P. Weedon; Jim Shuttleworth

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

LandUse/Land Cover Map of the CF of ARM in the SGP Site Using...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the effects and interactions of sunlight, radiant energy, and clouds on temperatures, weather, and climate. (http:www.arm.govdocsabout.html) This energy balance is affected by...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land application sites" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Site characterization report for the basalt waste isolation project. Volume II  

SciTech Connect

The reference location for a repository in basalt for the terminal storage of nuclear wastes on the Hanford Site and the candidate horizons within this reference repository location have been identified and the preliminary characterization work in support of the site screening process has been completed. Fifteen technical questions regarding the qualification of the site were identified to be addressed during the detailed site characterization phase of the US Department of Energy-National Waste Terminal Storage Program site selection process. Resolution of these questions will be provided in the final site characterization progress report, currently planned to be issued in 1987, and in the safety analysis report to be submitted with the License Application. The additional information needed to resolve these questions and the plans for obtaining the information have been identified. This Site Characterization Report documents the results of the site screening process, the preliminary site characterization data, the technical issues that need to be addressed, and the plans for resolving these issues. Volume 2 contains chapters 6 through 12: geochemistry; surface hydrology; climatology, meteorology, and air quality; environmental, land-use, and socioeconomic characteristics; repository design; waste package; and performance assessment.

None

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Hanford Site National Evnironmental Policy Act (NEPA) characterization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This fourth revision of the Hanford Site National Environmental Policy (NEPA) Characterization presents current environmental data regarding the Hanford Site and its immediate environs. This information is intended for use in preparing Site-related NEPA documentation. In Chapter 4.0 are presented summations of up-to-date information about climate and meteorology, geology and hydrology, ecology, history and archaeology, socioeconomics, land use, and noise levels. Chapter 5.0 describes models, including their principal assumptions, that are to be used in simulating realized or potential impacts from nuclear materials at the Hanford Site. Included are models of radionuclides transport in groundwater and atmospheric pathways, and of radiation dose to populations via all known pathways from known initial conditions. Chapter 6.0 provides the preparer with the federal and state regulations, DOE orders and permits, and environmental standards directly applicable for environmental impact statements for the Hanford Site, following the structure Chapter 4.0. NO conclusions or recommendations are given in this report.

Cushing, C.E. (ed.) [ed.

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Hanford Site National Evnironmental Policy Act (NEPA) characterization. Revision 4  

SciTech Connect

This fourth revision of the Hanford Site National Environmental Policy (NEPA) Characterization presents current environmental data regarding the Hanford Site and its immediate environs. This information is intended for use in preparing Site-related NEPA documentation. In Chapter 4.0 are presented summations of up-to-date information about climate and meteorology, geology and hydrology, ecology, history and archaeology, socioeconomics, land use, and noise levels. Chapter 5.0 describes models, including their principal assumptions, that are to be used in simulating realized or potential impacts from nuclear materials at the Hanford Site. Included are models of radionuclides transport in groundwater and atmospheric pathways, and of radiation dose to populations via all known pathways from known initial conditions. Chapter 6.0 provides the preparer with the federal and state regulations, DOE orders and permits, and environmental standards directly applicable for environmental impact statements for the Hanford Site, following the structure Chapter 4.0. NO conclusions or recommendations are given in this report.

Cushing, C.E. [ed.

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Site decommissioning management plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff has identified 48 sites contaminated with radioactive material that require special attention to ensure timely decommissioning. While none of these sites represent an immediate threat to public health and safety they have contamination that exceeds existing NRC criteria for unrestricted use. All of these sites require some degree of remediation, and several involve regulatory issues that must be addressed by the Commission before they can be released for unrestricted use and the applicable licenses terminated. This report contains the NRC staff`s strategy for addressing the technical, legal, and policy issues affecting the timely decommissioning of the 48 sites and describes the status of decommissioning activities at the sites.

Fauver, D.N.; Austin, J.H.; Johnson, T.C.; Weber, M.F.; Cardile, F.P.; Martin, D.E.; Caniano, R.J.; Kinneman, J.D.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Land reclamation beautifies coal mines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The article explains how the Mississippi Agricultural and Forestry Experiments station, MAFES, has helped prepare land exploited by strip mining at North American Coal Corporation's Red Hills Mine. The 5,800 acre lignite mine is over 200 ft deep and uncovers six layers of coal. About 100 acres of land a year is mined and reclaimed, mostly as pine plantations. 5 photos.

Coblentz, B. [MSU Ag Communications (United States)

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

346

Evaluation and Transferability of the Noah Land Surface Model in Semiarid Environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper investigates the performance of the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Noah land surface model at two semiarid sites in southern Arizona. The goal is to evaluate the transferability of calibrated parameters (i.e., ...

Terri S. Hogue; Luis Bastidas; Hoshin Gupta; Soroosh Sorooshian; Ken Mitchell; William Emmerich

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 3   Major application areas of porous P/M materials...refining Semiconductor Particle removal process gas Bulk gas delivery systems Purifier media retainers Analysis instruments Gas/liquid chromatography Gas sampling Sensor protection Chemical processing Catalyst recovery Process gases and liquids Fluid-bed reactor products Mineral processing Coal,...

348

Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 1   Commercial applications of refractory metals and alloys by industry...Rhenium, W-Re Process industries Heating and cooling coils Tantalum, Ta-Nb Shell and tube heat exchangers Tantalum Condensers Tantalum Tantalum-clad steel vessels Tantalum Distillation towers Tantalum Valves for hot sulfuric acid service Molybdenum, tantalum, Ta-Nb Expansion joints (bellows) Tantalum...

349

Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 3   Some applications of investment casting...Electrical equipment Electronics, radar Guns and small armaments Hand tools Jewelry Machine tools Materials handling equipment Metal working equipment Oil well drilling and auxiliary equipment Optical equipment Packaging equipment Pneumatic and hydraulic systems Prosthetic appliances Pumps Sports gear...

350

Data Sets Released from Two LBA Land Use-Land Change Teams  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Two land Use-Land Change Teams The ORNL DAAC and the LBA DIS announce the release of two data sets from the Land Use-Land Change teams, a component of the LBA-ECO Large Scale...

351

Extra-Territorial Siting of Nuclear Installations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Arrangements might be created for siting nuclear installations on land ceded by a host State for administration by an international or multinational organization. Such arrangements might prove useful in terms of resolving suspicions of proliferation in troubled areas of the world, or as a means to introduce nuclear activities into areas where political, financial or technical capabilities might otherwise make such activities unsound, or as a means to enable global solutions to be instituted for major nuclear concerns (e.g., spent fuel management). The paper examines practical matters associated with the legal and programmatic aspects of siting nuclear installations, including diplomatic/political frameworks, engaging competent industrial bodies, protection against seizure, regulation to ensure safety and security, waste management, and conditions related to the dissolution of the extra-territorial provisions as may be agreed as the host State(s) achieve the capabilities to own and operate the installations. The paper considers the potential for using such a mechanism across the spectrum of nuclear power activities, from mining to geological repositories for nuclear waste. The paper considers the non-proliferation dimensions associated with such arrangements, and the pros and cons affecting potential host States, technology vendor States, regional neighbors and the international community. It considers in brief potential applications in several locations today.

Shea, Thomas E.; Morris, Frederic A.

2009-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

352

Descriptions of representative contaminated sites and facilities within the DOE complex  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has initiated efforts to prepare a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) that will analyze the existing environmental restoration and waste management program and evaluate alternatives for an integrated program. The alternatives being evaluated include (1) a {open_quotes}No Action{close_quotes} alternative as required by the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), (2) an Applicable, Relevant, and Appropriate Requirements (ARAR)-driven alternative, (3) a land-use-driven alternative, (4) a health-risk-driven alternative, and (5) a combination land-use and health-risk-driven alternative. The analytical approach being taken to evaluate each of these alternatives is to perform a remedial engineering analysis and human health and ecosystem effects analyses on every contaminated site and facility in the DOE complex. One of Pacific Northwest Laboratory`s (PNL) roles in this approach has been to compile the source term and environmental setting data needed to drive each of these analyses. To date, over 10,000 individual contaminated sites and facilities located throughout the DOE complex of installations have been identified and at least some minimal data compiled on each. The PEIS analyses have been appreciably simplified by categorizing all of these contaminated sites and facilities into six broad categories: (1) contaminated buildings, (2) contaminated soils, (3) solid waste sites (e.g., burial grounds), (4) liquid containment structures (e.g., tanks), (5) surface water sites, and (6) contaminated groundwater sites. A report containing a complete description of each of these thousands of contaminated sites and facilities would be tremendously large and unwildy, as would separate reports describing the application of the analytical methodologies to each.

Short, S.M.; Buck, J.W.; Clark, L.L.; Fletcher, J.F.; Glantz, C.S.; Holdren, G.R.; Huesties, L.R.; Williams, M.D. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Oates, L. [ICF, Richland, WA (United States)] [and others

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

New England Wind Forum: Siting Considerations  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Siting Considerations Siting Considerations Choosing a proper site for a wind turbine or farm is critical to a successful project. While the most important factors may vary from site to site, in any given instance a single factor can undermine success of an otherwise superlative project. On the other hand, sometimes a site may be weak in one area but so strong in another area that it is viable, such as a site with very strong winds that is farther than normal from a transmission line. A viable wind energy site generally includes the following key factors: Attractive Wind Resource Landowner and Community Support Feasible Permitting Compatible Land Use Nearby Access to an Appropriate Electrical Interconnect Point Appropriate Site Conditions for Access During Construction and Operations

354

US Fish and Wildlife Service lands biomonitoring operations manual  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is Volume 1 of an operations manual designed to facilitate the development of biomonitoring strategies for U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Lands. It is one component of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Lands Biomonitoring Operations Manual. The Volume contains the Introduction to the Manual, background information on monitoring, and procedures for developing a biomonitoring strategy for Service lands. The purpose of the Biomonitoring Operations Manual is to provide an approach to develop and implement biomonitoring activities to assess the status and trends of U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service trust resources. It also provides field sampline methods and documentation protocols for contaminant monitoring activities. The strategy described in the Manual has been designed as a stand alone process to characterize the presence of contaminants on lands managed by the Service. This process can be sued to develop a monitoring program for any tract of real estate with potential threats from on- or off-site contaminants. Because the process was designed to address concerns for Service lands that span the United States from Alaska to the Tropical Islands, it has a generic format that can be used in al types of ecosystems, however, significant site specific informtion is required to complete the Workbook and make the process work successfully.

Rope, R.C.; Breckenridge, R.P.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Biofuels, land and water : a systems approach to sustainability.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

There is a strong societal need to evaluate and understand the sustainability of biofuels, especially because of the significant increases in production mandated by many countries, including the United States. Sustainability will be a strong factor in the regulatory environment and investments in biofuels. Biomass feedstock production is an important contributor to environmental, social, and economic impacts from biofuels. This study presents a systems approach where the agricultural, energy, and environmental sectors are considered as components of a single system, and environmental liabilities are used as recoverable resources for biomass feedstock production. We focus on efficient use of land and water resources. We conducted a spatial analysis evaluating marginal land and degraded water resources to improve feedstock productivity with concomitant environmental restoration for the state of Nebraska. Results indicate that utilizing marginal land resources such as riparian and roadway buffer strips, brownfield sites, and marginal agricultural land could produce enough feedstocks to meet a maximum of 22% of the energy requirements of the state compared to the current supply of 2%. Degraded water resources such as nitrate-contaminated groundwater and wastewater were evaluated as sources of nutrients and water to improve feedstock productivity. Spatial overlap between degraded water and marginal land resources was found to be as high as 96% and could maintain sustainable feedstock production on marginal lands. Other benefits of implementing this strategy include feedstock intensification to decrease biomass transportation costs, restoration of contaminated water resources, and mitigation of greenhouse gas emissions.

Gopalakrishnan, G.; Negri, M. C.; Wang, M.; Wu, M.; Snyder, S. W.; LaFreniere, L.

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Montana State Land Board | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Land Board Jump to: navigation, search Name Montana State Land Board Place Helena, Montana Website http:dnrc.mt.govLandBoardS References Webpage1 This article is a stub. You...

357

POLLUTION AND LAND USE: OPTIMUM AND DECENTRALIZATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with land and labor inputs and pollution emissions as a by-isolating the role of land use in pollution control we: i)land and the composite good, and disutility from the pollution

Hochman, Oded; Rausser, Gordon C.; Arnott, Richard J

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Analytical Land–Atmosphere Radiometer Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Conversion of radiometric land surface temperature (?r) to an equivalent isothermal (aerodynamic) surface temperature (?i) is important in balancing the land surface energy budget with satellite-based ?r measurements. An analytical land–...

Ayman Suleiman; Richard Crago

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Land Record System PIA, Bonneville Power Administration | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Land Record System PIA, Bonneville Power Administration Land Record System PIA, Bonneville Power Administration Land Record System PIA, Bonneville Power Administration Land Record...

360

EA-365 Centre Land Trading Limited | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5 Centre Land Trading Limited EA-365 Centre Land Trading Limited Order Authorizing Centre Land Trading Limited to export electric energy to Canada EA-365 Centre Land Trading...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land application sites" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

PIA - Land Record System (SWPA) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Land Record System (SWPA) PIA - Land Record System (SWPA) PIA - Land Record System (SWPA) PIA - Land Record System (SWPA) More Documents & Publications Thursday, February 14, 2008...

362

SGP Cloud and Land Surface Interaction Campaign (CLASIC): Measurement Platforms  

SciTech Connect

The Cloud and Land Surface Interaction Campaign (CLASIC) will be conducted from June 8 to June 30, 2007, at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility (ACRF) Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. Data will be collected using eight aircraft equipped with a variety of specialized sensors, four specially instrumented surface sites, and two prototype surface radar systems. The architecture of CLASIC includes a high-altitude surveillance aircraft and enhanced vertical thermodynamic and wind profile measurements that will characterize the synoptic scale structure of the clouds and the land surface within the ACRF SGP site. Mesoscale and microscale structures will be sampled with a variety of aircraft, surface, and radar observations. An overview of the measurement platforms that will be used during the CLASIC are described in this report. The coordination of measurements, especially as it relates to aircraft flight plans, will be discussed in the CLASIC Implementation Plan.

MA Miller; R Avissar; LK Berg; SA Edgerton; ML Fischer; TJ Jackson; B. Kustas; PJ Lamb; G McFarquhar; Q Min; B Schmid; MS Torn; DD Tuner

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

A new user-friendly experiment visual database system application to the gas migration test (GMT) at the Grimsel test site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: Long-term integrated field investigations combine information from different groups (laboratory, modeling, experimental) often working in different locations and on different time scales. The results of these different groups are evaluated and integrated for decision making during the experiment execution, but at the end of the experiment a huge database exists, which may be difficult to use at a later stage - for example, for further modeling, benchmarking etc. How can one preserve the information obtained and present it in a transparent and user-friendly manner? A new visual database system developed is presented and its application to the 'Gas Migration in-situ Test (GMT)' is described. The GMT project has been conducted to assess the gas migration (for example from TRU waste) through the engineered barrier system and the adjacent geosphere. The experiment was initiated in 1997 under the auspices of RWMC and with primary funding by the Japanese Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. The project consists of a large-scale in-situ test, laboratory tests and numerical modeling. The in-situ test has been performed at the Grimsel Test Site (GTS) in Switzerland operated by NAGRA (National cooperative for the disposal of radioactive waste, Switzerland). Laboratory tests have been performed in facilities in Japan, Germany, Spain and Switzerland. Finally, the modeling activities, performed within the modeling group, have included teams from the US, Spain, France, Japan, Germany and Switzerland with support from organizations BGR, ENRESA, ANDRA, and RWMC. More than 250 reports document the various data and analyses. The database developed uses a three layered framework. The first (or bottom) layer is the data storage which contains all reports, publications as well as the raw data; the second layer is a data flow diagram - from material data, generation of input data to the model and output to the end user; the third layer is the interface with external users to facilitate optimal use of the database for their needs - it includes search through key words, publication year, data type etc. (authors)

Shimura, Tomoyuki; Asano, Hidekazu [RWMC, N0.15 Mori Bldg., 2-8-10, Toranomon, Minato-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Ando, Kenichi; Okuma, Fumiko; Yamamoto, Shuichi [Obayashi Corporation, SHinagawa InterCity B, 2-15-2, Konan, Minatoku, Tokyo, 108-8502 (Japan); Vomvoris, Stratis [NAGRA, Wettingen (Switzerland)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

GRR/Section 3-TX-f - Lease of Land Trade Lands | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 3-TX-f - Lease of Land Trade Lands GRR/Section 3-TX-f - Lease of Land Trade Lands < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 3-TX-f - Lease of Land Trade Lands 03-TX-f - Lease of Land Trade Lands.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 03-TX-f - Lease of Land Trade Lands.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative This flowchart illustrates the process of leasing Land Trade Lands in Texas. The Texas General Land Office (GLO) administers leases on Land Trade Lands through Title 31 of the Texas Administrative Code Section 155.42.

365

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Shallow Land Disposal Area - PA 45  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Shallow Land Disposal Area - PA 45 Shallow Land Disposal Area - PA 45 FUSRAP Considered Sites Shallow Land Disposal Area, PA Alternate Name(s): Parks Township Shallow Land Disposal Area Nuclear Materials and Equipment Corporation (NUMEC) Babcox and Wilcox Parks Facilities PA.45-1 PA.45-5 PA.45-6 Location: PA Route 66 and Kissimere Road, Parks Township, Apollo, Pennsylvania PA.45-1 Historical Operations: Fabricated nulcear fuel under an NRC license as an extension of NUMEC Apollo production facilities. PA.45-1 PA.45-5 Eligibility Determination: Eligible PA.45-6 Radiological Survey(s): None Site Status: Cleanup in progress by U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. PA.45-6 USACE Website Long-term Care Requirements: To be determined upon completion. Also see Documents Related to Shallow Land Disposal Area, PA

366

LANDS WITH WILDERNESS CHARACTERISTICS, RESOURCE MANAGEMENT PLAN CONSTRAINTS, AND LAND EXCHANGES: CROSS-JURISDICTIONAL MANAGEMENT AND IMPACTS ON UNCONVENTIONAL FUEL DEVELOPMENT IN UTAH’S UINTA BASIN  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Utah is rich in oil shale and oil sands resources. Chief among the challenges facing prospective unconventional fuel developers is the ability to access these resources. Access is heavily dependent upon land ownership and applicable management requirements. Understanding constraints on resource access and the prospect of consolidating resource holdings across a fragmented management landscape is critical to understanding the role Utah’s unconventional fuel resources may play in our nation’s energy policy. This Topical Report explains the historic roots of the “crazy quilt” of western land ownership, how current controversies over management of federal public land with wilderness character could impact access to unconventional fuels resources, and how land exchanges could improve management efficiency. Upon admission to the Union, the State of Utah received the right to title to more than one-ninth of all land within the newly formed state. This land is held in trust to support public schools and institutions, and is managed to generate revenue for trust beneficiaries. State trust lands are scattered across the state in mostly discontinuous 640-acre parcels, many of which are surrounded by federal land and too small to develop on their own. Where state trust lands are developable but surrounded by federal land, federal land management objectives can complicate state trust land development. The difficulty generating revenue from state trust lands can frustrate state and local government officials as well as citizens advocating for economic development. Likewise, the prospect of industrial development of inholdings within prized conservation landscapes creates management challenges for federal agencies. One major tension involves whether certain federal public lands possess wilderness character, and if so, whether management of those lands should emphasize wilderness values over other uses. On December 22, 2010, Secretary of the Interior Ken Salazar issued Secretarial Order 3310, Protecting Wilderness Characteristics on Lands Managed by the Bureau of Land Management. Supporters argue that the Order merely provides guidance regarding implementation of existing legal obligations without creating new rights or duties. Opponents describe Order 3310 as subverting congressional authority to designate Wilderness Areas and as closing millions of acres of public lands to energy development and commodity production. While opponents succeeded in temporarily defunding the Order’s implementation and forcing the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) to adopt a more collaborative approach, the fundamental questions remain: Which federal public lands possess wilderness characteristics and how should those lands be managed? The closely related question is: How might management of such resources impact unconventional fuel development within Utah? These questions remain pressing independent of the Order because the BLM, which manages the majority of federal land in Utah, is statutorily obligated to maintain an up-to-date inventory of federal public lands and the resources they contain, including lands with wilderness characteristics. The BLM is also legally obligated to develop and periodically update land use plans, relying on information obtained in its public lands inventory. The BLM cannot sidestep these hard choices, and failure to consider wilderness characteristics during the planning process will derail the planning effort. Based on an analysis of the most recent inventory data, lands with wilderness characteristics — whether already subject to mandatory protection under the Wilderness Act, subject to discretionary protections as part of BLM Resource Management Plan revisions, or potentially subject to new protections under Order 3310 — are unlikely to profoundly impact oil shale development within Utah’s Uinta Basin. Lands with wilderness characteristics are likely to v have a greater impact on oil sands resources, particularly those resources found in the southern part of the state. Management requirements independent of l

Keiter, Robert; Ruple, John; Holt, Rebecca; Tanana, Heather; McNeally, Phoebe; Tribby, Clavin

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

State Waste Discharge Permit application: 400 Area Septic System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order negotiations, the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office, the US Environmental Protection Agency, and the Washington State Department of Ecology agreed that liquid effluent discharges to the ground on the Hanford Site which affects groundwater or has the potential to affect groundwater would be subject to permitting under the structure of Chapter 173-216 (or 173-218 where applicable) of the Washington Administrative Code, the State Waste Discharge Permit Program. This document constitutes the State Waste Discharge Permit application for the 400 Area Septic System. The influent to the system is domestic waste water. Although the 400 Area Septic System is not a Public Owned Treatment Works, the Public Owned Treatment Works application is more applicable than the application for industrial waste water. Therefore, the State Waste Discharge Permit application for Public Owned Treatment Works Discharges to Land was used.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Medical Sites  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Medical Sites Name: Jenielle Location: NA Country: NA Date: NA Question: I started itching Aug. 1999. Diagnosed with ITP Oct.1999. I am in remission With a platelet count in...

369

Hanford Site  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites

Around the Site Current HMS Observations Daily HMS Extremes in Met Data Met and Climate Data Summary Products Contacts Hours Current NWS Forecast for the Tri-Cities NWS...

370

An Act to Reform Land Use Planning in the Unorganized Territory (Maine) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

An Act to Reform Land Use Planning in the Unorganized Territory An Act to Reform Land Use Planning in the Unorganized Territory (Maine) An Act to Reform Land Use Planning in the Unorganized Territory (Maine) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Rural Electric Cooperative Schools Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Wind Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State Maine Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Conservation An Act to Reform Land Use Planning in the Unorganized Territory alters the makeup and responsibilities of Maine's Land Use Regulation Commission (LURC). It took effect on August 29, 2012 and changed the Commission's name to the Land Use Planning Commission. Under the Act, permitting review for significant projects, such as

371

GRR/Section 13 - Land Use Assessment Process | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

- Land Use Assessment Process - Land Use Assessment Process < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 13 - Land Use Assessment Process 13 - LandUseAssessmentProcess.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 13 - LandUseAssessmentProcess.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative Preexisting land uses at and surrounding the site are critical considerations in the early planning stages of the project. Federal and state law may prohibit interference with certain preexisting uses. For instance, developers should consider impact on farmland, livestock, nearby

372

Uni Land | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Land Land Jump to: navigation, search Name Uni Land Place Bologna, Italy Zip 40063 Sector Solar Product Italian property company, which buys land without permits and develops it for residential and commerical use before selling it on. The firm is involved with solar project development. Coordinates 44.50483°, 11.345169° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.50483,"lon":11.345169,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

373

Riparian Rights: State Land (Indiana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The state reserves the power to sell, transfer, and convey, as provided by law, rights-of-way in public land for several purposes, including pipelines, gas pipelines, water pipelines, sewer lines,...

374

OpenEI - land requirements  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

en.openei.orgdatasetstaxonomyterm4180 en Land use requirements for ground-mounted solar power facilities. http:en.openei.orgdatasetsnode454

This dataset is part of...

375

OpenEI - land use  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

en.openei.orgdatasetstaxonomyterm4160 en Land use requirements for ground-mounted solar power facilities. http:en.openei.orgdatasetsnode454

This dataset is part of...

376

Site Map  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Efficiency Applications Commercial Buildings Cool Roofs and Heat Islands Demand Response Energy Efficiency Program and Market Trends High Technology and Industrial Systems...

377

Site Manager Enclosure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This radiological release survey for the west property at the Canonsburg UMTRCA Title I disposal site is a precursor for selling the approximately 2.5 acres of land that lie west and outside of the disposal cell fence line. The basic design philosophy underlying this plan was agreed to a conference call with your office in July. We are planning to conduct the survey in late October or early November to allow effective use of a GPS unit after the leaves have fallen in the wooded area of the property. It is requested that you review the attached document and provide your concurrence, or comments, within time for us to meet this schedule. If you have any questions, please contact me at (412) 386-4754 or email me at

Mr. Paul Michalak; Cc W/o Enclosure; R. Ransbottom

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Continuous Monitoring of Nearest Neighbors on Land Surface Songhua Xing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As geo-realistic rendering of land surfaces is becoming commonplace in geographical information systems- tree suffers from intrinsic defects: it is fat and short, and hence does not improve the query, a realistic, accurate and detailed rendering of Earth surfaces is becoming feasible in many applications

Shahabi, Cyrus

379

The Need for Open Lands  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Need for Open Lands Need for Open Lands Nature Bulletin No. 742 February 8, 1964 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Seymour .Simon, President Roberts Mann, Conservation Editor THE NEED FOR OPEN LANDS There is an old saying: The proof of the pudding is the eating . In other words, if it's good, people enjoy it and beg for more. The proof of the need for open lands -- publicly owned areas for recreational uses and open spaces undisturbed -- is the tremendous and ever-increasing use of those we have. We need more now. Year after year we will need more and more. It is imperative that areas desirable for future use be acquired now or as soon as possible, regardless of cost and even though they may stand idle ' -- vacant and undeveloped -- until more funds become available. Otherwise they may be gone, or the asking price may be a hundred times greater. Open spaces such as farm lands and prairies may have been occupied by residential, commercial or industrial developments. Woodlands may have been cut, stream channels dredged and wetlands drained, destroying all but a memory of their beauty and recreational values. There are compelling reasons for our need of open lands and why we should waste no time in providing more. Those reasons have been confirmed and emphasized by exhaustive studies and statistical analyses nationwide in scope.

380

Solid Waste Management and Land Protection (North Dakota) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Land Protection (North Dakota) and Land Protection (North Dakota) Solid Waste Management and Land Protection (North Dakota) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Program Info State North Dakota Program Type Siting and Permitting The policy of the State of North Dakota is to encourage and provide for environmentally acceptable and economical solid waste management practices, and the Department of Health may promulgate regulations related to waste

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land application sites" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Navajo-Hopi Land Commission Renewable Energy Development Project (NREP)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Navajo Hopi Land Commission Office (NHLCO), a Navajo Nation executive branch agency has conducted activities to determine capacity-building, institution-building, outreach and management activities to initiate the development of large-scale renewable energy - 100 megawatt (MW) or larger - generating projects on land in Northwestern New Mexico in the first year of a multi-year program. The Navajo Hopi Land Commission Renewable Energy Development Project (NREP) is a one year program that will develop and market a strategic business plan; form multi-agency and public-private project partnerships; compile site-specific solar, wind and infrastructure data; and develop and use project communication and marketing tools to support outreach efforts targeting the public, vendors, investors and government audiences.

Thomas Benally, Deputy Director,

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

382

Hanford Site Transuranic (TRU) Waste Certification Plan  

SciTech Connect

As a generator of transuranic (TRU) and TRU mixed waste destined for disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), the Hanford Site must ensure that its TRU waste meets the requirements of US. Department of Energy (DOE) 0 435.1, ''Radioactive Waste Management,'' and the Contact-Handled (CH) Transuranic Waste Acceptance Criteria for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP-WAC). WIPP-WAC requirements are derived from the WIPP Technical Safety Requirements, WIPP Safety Analysis Report, TRUPACT-II SARP, WIPP Land Withdrawal Act, WIPP Hazardous Waste Facility Permit, and Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 191/194 Compliance Certification Decision. The WIPP-WAC establishes the specific physical, chemical, radiological, and packaging criteria for acceptance of defense TRU waste shipments at WIPP. The WPP-WAC also requires that participating DOE TRU waste generator/treatment/storage sites produce site-specific documents, including a certification plan, that describe their program for managing TRU waste and TRU waste shipments before transferring waste to WIPP. Waste characterization activities provide much of the data upon which certification decisions are based. Waste characterization requirements for TRU waste and TRU mixed waste that contains constituents regulated under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) are established in the WIPP Hazardous Waste Facility Permit Waste Analysis Plan (WAP). The Hanford Site Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPjP) (HNF-2599) implements the applicable requirements in the WAP and includes the qualitative and quantitative criteria for making hazardous waste determinations. The Hanford Site must also ensure that its TRU waste destined for disposal at WPP meets requirements for transport in the Transuranic Package Transporter-11 (TRUPACT-11). The US. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) establishes the TRUPACT-11 requirements in the Safety Analysis Report for the TRUPACT-II Shipping Package (TRUPACT-11 SARP). In addition, a TRU waste is eligible for disposal at WIPP only if it has been generated in whole or in part by one or more of the activities listed in Section 10101(3) of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act. DOE sites must determine that each waste stream to be disposed of at WIPP is ''defense'' TRU waste. (See also the definition of ''defense'' TRU waste.). Only CH TRU wastes meeting the requirements of the QAPjP, WIPP-WAP, WPP-WAC, and other requirements documents described above will be accepted for transportation and disposal at WIPP.

GREAGER, T.M.

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Hanford Site Transuranic (TRU) Waste Certification Plan  

SciTech Connect

As a generator of transuranic (TRU) and TRU mixed waste destined for disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), the Hanford Site must ensure that its TRU waste meets the requirements of US. Department of Energy (DOE) 0 435.1, ''Radioactive Waste Management,'' and the Contact-Handled (CH) Transuranic Waste Acceptance Criteria for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP-WAC). WIPP-WAC requirements are derived from the WIPP Technical Safety Requirements, WIPP Safety Analysis Report, TRUPACT-II SARP, WIPP Land Withdrawal Act, WIPP Hazardous Waste Facility Permit, and Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 191/194 Compliance Certification Decision. The WIPP-WAC establishes the specific physical, chemical, radiological, and packaging criteria for acceptance of defense TRU waste shipments at WIPP. The WPP-WAC also requires that participating DOE TRU waste generator/treatment/storage sites produce site-specific documents, including a certification plan, that describe their program for managing TRU waste and TRU waste shipments before transferring waste to WIPP. Waste characterization activities provide much of the data upon which certification decisions are based. Waste characterization requirements for TRU waste and TRU mixed waste that contains constituents regulated under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) are established in the WIPP Hazardous Waste Facility Permit Waste Analysis Plan (WAP). The Hanford Site Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPjP) (HNF-2599) implements the applicable requirements in the WAP and includes the qualitative and quantitative criteria for making hazardous waste determinations. The Hanford Site must also ensure that its TRU waste destined for disposal at WPP meets requirements for transport in the Transuranic Package Transporter-11 (TRUPACT-11). The US. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) establishes the TRUPACT-11 requirements in the Safety Analysis Report for the TRUPACT-II Shipping Package (TRUPACT-11 SARP). In addition, a TRU waste is eligible for disposal at WIPP only if it has been generated in whole or in part by one or more of the activities listed in Section 10101(3) of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act. DOE sites must determine that each waste stream to be disposed of at WIPP is ''defense'' TRU waste. (See also the definition of ''defense'' TRU waste.). Only CH TRU wastes meeting the requirements of the QAPjP, WIPP-WAP, WPP-WAC, and other requirements documents described above will be accepted for transportation and disposal at WIPP.

GREAGER, T.M.

2000-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

384

Refinery siting workbook: appendices A and B  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this effort is to develop and provide basic refinery-related information for use by state and local government officials as a basis for establishing responsible refinery siting requirements and policies consistent with the federal clean air and water standards and socio-economic concerns. The report will be organized into two volumes. The main text comprises the basic topics of physical concerns, regulatory requirements, and permitting activities, while the second volume includes the detailed appendix materials such as the applicable laws, and the necessary permits, as available and a glossary of pertinent terms. As a means to this objective, three refinery sizes, 200,000, 100,000 and 30,000 barrels per day crude charge will be discussed in technical terms. Process unit configuration will be presented which will maximize either gasoline or heating oil production with either sweet or sour crude oil feedstocks. The major issues affecting the socio-economic impact of siting the refinery in a given locale will be presented. These data will review the factors affecting the human environment and the issues that must be addressed to assess the impact that a refinery will have on a community. The key federal registrations which impact upon a refinery siting decision shall be reviewed. Summaries of these regulations and a simplified decision diagram for the air and water acts shall be presented to assist both government and refinery officials in understanding the scope of regulatory impact. All pertinent procedures required for refinery permitting shall be reviewed under the generalized headings of air, water, health and safety, land use, and miscellaneous permits. This categorization at the federal, state and local levels of government shall be used as a basis for establishing degrees of emphasis.

Not Available

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Sludge application and monitoring program on the Oak Ridge Reservation, 1986--1993  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Municipal sewage sludge has been applied to forests and pastures on the Oak Ridge Reservation since 1983 as a method of both disposal and beneficial reuse. Application was carried out under Tennessee permits issued to the city of Oak Ridge for land disposal of sewage sludge. In conjunction with these applications, information has been collected concerning sludge quantity and characteristics, soil parameters, soil water constituents, groundwater quality, surface runoff water quality, and various chemical constituents in vegetation on application sites. This information provides (1) a record of sludge application on the DOE reservations and (2) documentation of changes in soil parameters following sludge application. The information also provides a basis for evaluating the implications of the land application of municipal sewage sludge for soil and water quality and for evaluating the fate of sludge constituents when sludge is either sprayed or injected on pasture sites or surface applied in forested sites. This report covers in detail sludge applications conducted from 1986 through 1993, with some data from the period between 1983 and 1986. Anaerobically digested liquid sludge (2% to 4% solids) from the city of Oak Ridge had a relatively high nitrogen content (8% dry weight) and average to low concentrations of potentially problematic metals, compared with typical municipal sludges. Few potentially hazardous organic chemicals were detected in the sludge, and when found, these were at very low concentrations. Oak Ridge sludge is somewhat unique in that it contains radionuclides ({sup 137}Cs, {sup 60}Co, {sup 131}I, uranium isotopes, {sup 90}Sr, and occasionally {sup 99}Tc) at concentrations much higher than typical municipal sludges. Land application of sewage sludge can dilute or destroy problematic sludge constituents while improving soil fertility. Correct management has made these sludge applications a model of environmentally responsible waste management.

Gunderson, C.A.; Larsen, I.L.; Boston, H.L.; Bradburn, D.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Van Miegroet, H. [Utah State Univ., Logan, UT (United States). Dept. of Forest Resources; Morris, J.L. [Jaycor, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Walzer, A.E. [Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Central Environmental Compliance; Adler, T.C. [Bechtel National, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Huq, M. [Oak Ridge Associated Universities, TN (United States)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Site Map  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home » Site Map Home » Site Map Site Map Home About Overview NERSC Mission Contact us Staff Center Leadership Sudip Dosanjh Select Publications Jeff Broughton Katie Antypas John Shalf Francesca Verdier Center Administration James Craw Norma Early Jeff Grounds Betsy MacGowan Zaida McCunney Lynn Rippe Suzanne Stevenson David Tooker Center Communications Jon Bashor Linda Vu Margie Wylie Kathy Kincade Advanced Technologies Group Nicholas Wright Brian Austin Research Projects Matthew Cordery Christopher Daley Analytics Group Peter Nugent David Camp Hank Childs Harinarayan Krishnan Burlen Loring Joerg Meyer Prabhat Oliver Ruebel Daniela Ushizima Gunther Weber Yushu Yao Computational Systems Group Jay Srinivasan James Botts Scott Burrow Tina Butler Nick Cardo Tina Declerck Ilya Malinov David Paul Larry Pezzaglia Iwona Sakrejda

387

Options for passive energy conservation in site design  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

At a time of concern for energy supplies and costs it is essential to examine the energy-conserving potential of once again using natural energy systems and patterns that exist on any site on which a building is to be or has been placed. This state-of-the-art study examines existing research and applications of land planning and design for energy-conservation purposes. It is organized around the basic principles of natural heating and cooling factors and the impact of site elements on human comfort, regional adaptation of these principles, steps in the site planning and design process, and energy-conservation options available in each of the steps. This is supplemented by an appendix and a bibliography of additional references. The principles of site planning and design for energy conservation deal with the impact of the sun and wind on natural elements and, conversely, ways in which landforms, water, and vegetation affect the impact of the sun and wind on limited sections of the earth. For instance, the sun is able to naturally warm certain slopes more than others, certain surface materials naturally accentuate the warmth of the sun, while certain naturally occurring elements, such as vegetation, block and control the sun. The wind moving over the earth's surface has certain natural directions, patterns, and characteristics. By recognizing these and by introducing or removing impediments it is possible to modify these patterns to provide natural ventilation and to conserve energy. Four commonly accepted regional divisions were utilized to illustrate the differing applications of these principles in the temperate, hot-humid, hot-arid, and cool regions of the continental U.S. The typical site planning or design process was superimposed over each region to illustrate the various energy conservation options possible, depending upon the precise decision made in each step in each region. 300 references.

Not Available

1978-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

LBA Land Use and Land Cover Change Data Sets Released  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

four data sets from the Carbon four data sets from the Carbon Dynamics and Nutrient Dynamics science themes, components of the LBA-ECO Large Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia (LBA). LBA-ECO CD-36 South American Land Data Assimilation System Atmospheric Forcing Data . Data set prepared by L.G.G. de Goncalves, W.J. Shuttleworth, D. Vila, E. Larroza, M.J. Bottino, D.L. Herdies, J.A. Aravequia, J.G. de Mattos, D.L. Toll, M. Rodell and P. Houser. This data set provides South American Land Data Assimilation System (SALDAS) atmospheric forcing data necessary for land surface modeling for South America. The data were derived by combining modeled and observation based sources.The forcing data cover the entire continent of South America at 0.125 degree resolution and are built around the model-calculated values of

389

Executive Order 13007 Indian Sacred Sites (1996) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

07 Indian Sacred Sites (1996) 07 Indian Sacred Sites (1996) Executive Order 13007 Indian Sacred Sites (1996) Executive Order 13007 Indian Sacred Sites (1996). Designed to protect and preserve Indian religious practices, this EO directs each federal agency that manages federal lands to "(1) accommodate access to and ceremonial use of Indian sacred sites by Indian religious practitioners and (2) avoid adversely affecting the physical integrity of such sacred sites." This EO also directs each federal agency to report to the President on "procedures implemented or proposed to facilitate with appropriate Indian tribes and religious leaders." Several EM sites and facilities are located on Tribal aboriginal and treaty lands. Staff at these facilities work with the Tribes to allow Tribal members safe access to DOE sites for

390

Advanced Rain/No-Rain Classification Methods for Microwave Radiometer Observations over Land  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Seto et al. developed rain/no-rain classification (RNC) methods over land for the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Microwave Imager (TMI). In this study, the methods are modified for application to other microwave radiometers. The ...

Shinta Seto; Takuji Kubota; Nobuhiro Takahashi; Toshio Iguchi; Taikan Oki

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Assessing the Performance of the Ensemble Kalman Filter for Land Surface Data Assimilation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ensemble Kalman filter provides an easy-to-use, flexible, and efficient option for data assimilation problems. One of its attractive features in land surface applications is its ability to provide distributional information about variables, ...

Yuhua Zhou; Dennis McLaughlin; Dara Entekhabi

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Using the Special Sensor Microwave/Imager to Monitor Land Surface Temperatures, Wetness, and Snow Cover  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The worldwide network of in situ land surface temperatures archived in near-real time at the National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) has limited applications, since many areas are poorly represented or provide no observations. Satellite measurements ...

Alan Basist; Norman C. Grody; Thomas C. Peterson; Claude N. Williams

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Use of NDVI and Land Surface Temperature for Drought Assessment: Merits and Limitations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A large number of water- and climate-related applications, such as drought monitoring, are based on spaceborne-derived relationships between land surface temperature (LST) and the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI). The majority of ...

Arnon Karnieli; Nurit Agam; Rachel T. Pinker; Martha Anderson; Marc L. Imhoff; Garik G. Gutman; Natalya Panov; Alexander Goldberg

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Multi-sensor large scale land surface data assimilation using ensemble approaches  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One of the ensemble Kalman filter's (EnKF) attractive features in land surface applications is its ability to provide distributional information. The EnKF relies on normality approximations that improve its efficiency but ...

Zhou, Yuhua, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Evaluation of MERRA Land Surface Estimates in Preparation for the Soil Moisture Active Passive Mission  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors evaluated several land surface variables from the Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) product that are important for global ecological and hydrological studies, including daily maximum (Tmax) and ...

Yonghong Yi; John S. Kimball; Lucas A. Jones; Rolf H. Reichle; Kyle C. McDonald

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

GRR/Section 3-MT-b - State Land Access | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

b - State Land Access b - State Land Access < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 3-MT-b - State Land Access 03MTBStateLandAccess (1).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Montana Department of Natural Resources & Conservation Montana State Land Board Regulations & Policies Montana Code 77-4-101 et seq Geothermal Resources Natural Resources and Conservation Rules Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 03MTBStateLandAccess (1).pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative 3-MT-b.1 - Application for Lease, Right-of-Way, or Easement

397

Application of the SELECS methodology to evaluate socioeconomic and environmental impacts of commercial-scale coal liquefaction plants at six potential sites in Kentucky. Final report from the study on development of environmental guidelines for the selection of sites for fossil energy conversion facilities  

SciTech Connect

Environmental and socioeconomic impacts likely to occur during the operational phase of two coal liquefaction processes have been evaluated with SELECS (Site Evaluation for Energy Conversion Systems) for each of six potential sites in Kentucky for commercial scale facilities capable of processing about 26,000 tons of coal per stream day. The processes considered in this evaluation are SRC-I, a direct liquefaction route with solid boiler fuel as the principal product, and Coal-to-Methanol-to-Gasoline, an indirect liquefaction route with transportation fuel as the primary product. For comparative purposes, the impacts of a 2-gigawatt coal-fired steam-electric power plant (with coal requirements comparable to the liquefaction facilities) and an automobile parts manufacturing plant (with employment requirements of 849, comparable to the liquefaction facilities) have also been evaluated at each site. At each site, impacts have been evaluated for one or two nearby cities or towns and four to six counties where significant impacts might be expected. The SELECS methodology affords a well-organized and efficient approach to collecting and assessing a large volume of data needed to comprehensively determine the potential socioeconomic and environmental impacts resulting from the implementation of commercial scale synfuel and other energy conversion facilities. This study has also shown that SELECS is equally applicable to determine the impacts of other facilities, such as automobile parts manufacturing. In brief, the SELECS methodology serves the purpose of objectively screening sites in order to choose one at which adverse impacts will be least, and/or to determine what aspect of a proposed facility might be modified to lessen impacts at a specific site.

Northrop, G.M.; D' Ambra, C.A.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

COOPERATIVE LAND REUSE PROGRAM  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this study was to determine what financial return, if any, DOE would realize if they invest solely in removal of the asbestos from these three Hanford steam plants and the associated large bore distribution piping at the site. Once the asbestos was removed the strategy was to bring in companies that specialize in salvage and material re-use and have them remove, at no cost to DOE, the plants and the associated large bore piping. The salvage companies we contacted had said that if they didn't have to remove asbestos, they may be able to realize enough value from these plants to offset their demolition and/or dismantling cost. The results were not what we expected but they do offer DOE some favorable financial alternatives to their present approach. The study concluded that there was very little salvage and/or re-use value remaining in the steam plant material that could be used to offset the demolition and/or dismantling cost. The notable exception to this is the removal of the 24 inch steam piping that runs from 200E to 200W areas (see IDM executive summary under Dismantling cost). It is estimated that the re-use value of the 24-inch piping would more than pay for the dismantling cost of this piping. On a more favorable note, it does appear as though the cost of conventional demolition can be reduced by a factor of 3 to 5 if the asbestos is removed first and the demolition is performed using competitive and commercial practices. Both estimates in this study are similar except that IDM did not include floor slab removal nor remove the same quantity of piping. This is why we are using a range of 3 to 5 as a reduction factor. The IDM estimate (using union labor) for demolition after removal of asbestos was approximately $1.5M versus $10.0M for accomplishing the work using Hanford practices and rates.

Unknown

1999-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

399

Site C  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

' ' u. s. A r my Corps or Engineers Kurfal.. Ilisfr ifl om« 1776 N1 . ~lI rll Sfred , lIu fflll" , New v ur k. 14207 Site C loseout Report for th e Ashland I (Includlng Seaway Arca D), Ashland 2 and Rattlesnake Creek FUS RAP Sites To nawanda . New Yor k F ina l - Octo ber 2006 Formerl y Ut ilized Sites Remedi al Actiun Program Dt:CLAlUlfiO lO OF RF ~ I'O""" A <:n o .. ('oMnLflOI'O '" 1 S-~1 1 A "n· nvnn: S Ill: C'lO'iU 'U l RtrUlIT f OR A SlIu x u l (I "ICLU I ING S t:A" ·,H A RU D j, AS H I .A ~O 2 A."n RAnU:M'AKf eRU" ~ rn~ I!d'on at A.hland 1 (Ind udonl Seaway Area DJ. Ashland 2 and kan~snak c Creek is Wi,...... 1c in acwr.hnu willi ~ Rcconl or Oecisim (ROD) . igned 00> April 20. 1998 and l'.1pbIWlOII <;If

400

Development and application of new methods to retrieve vertical structure of precipitation above the ARM CART sites from MMCR measurementsĂ?Âť  

SciTech Connect

The main objective of this project was to develop, validate and apply remote sensing methods to retrieve vertical profiles of precipitation over the DOE ARM CART sites using currently available remote sensors. While the ARM Program invested very heavily into developments of remote sensing methods and instruments for water vapor and non-precipitating cloud parameter retrievals, precipitation retrievals and studies lagged behind. Precipitation, however, is a crucial part of the water cycle, and without detailed information on rainfall and snowfall, significant improvements in the atmospheric models of different scales (i.e., one of the ARM Program's main goals) is difficult to achieve. Characterization of the vertical atmospheric column above the CART sites is also incomplete without detailed precipitation information, so developments of remote sensing methods for retrievals of parameters in precipitating cloud condition was essential. Providing modelers with retrieval results was also one of the key objectives of this research project.

Dr. Sergey Matrosov

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "land application sites" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

GRR/Section 3-CA-a - State Land Leasing Process and Land Access...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

3-CA-a - State Land Leasing Process and Land Access (ROWs) < GRR Jump to: navigation, search Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleGRRSection3-CA-a-StateLand...

402

Comparison of Water-Related Land Cover Types in Six 1-km Global Land Cover Datasets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Land cover classification is a fundamental and vital activity that is helpful for understanding natural dynamics and the human impacts of land surface processes. Available multiple 1-km global land cover datasets have been compared to identify ...

Tosiyuki Nakaegawa

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Geothermal/Land Use | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal/Land Use Geothermal/Land Use < Geothermal(Redirected from Land Use) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Land Use Leasing Exploration Well Field Power Plant Transmission Environment Water Use Print PDF Geothermal Land Use Planning General Regulatory Roadmap The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and the USDA Forest Service (FS) have prepared a joint Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) to analyze and expedite the leasing of BLM-and FS-administered lands with high potential for renewable geothermal resources in 11 Western states and Alaska. Geothermal Land Use Planning is ... Example Land Use Plans References Information for Publication Standards for EA/EIS/Planning Documents IM 2004-110.pdf Fluid Mineral Leasing and Related Planning and National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Processes April 11, 2004 and

404

Remaining Sites Verification Package for 100-F-38 Stained Soil Site, Waste Site Reclassification Form 2004-093  

SciTech Connect

The 100-F-38 Stained Soil site was an area of yellow stained soil that was discoverd while excavating a trench for the placement of electrical conduit. The 100-F-38 Stained Soil site meets the remedial action objectives specified in the Remaining Sites ROD. The results of verification sampling show demonstrate that residual contaminant concentrations support future unrestricted land uses that can be represented by a rural-residential scenario. The results also show that residual contaminant concentrations do not preclude any future uses and allow for unrestricted use of shallow zone soils and the contaminant concentrations remaining in the soil are protective of groundwater and the Columbia River.

R. A. Carlson

2006-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

405

The IAGL Land Surface Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A model that computes the fluxes of energy and momentum between the land surface and the atmosphere is presented. It is designed to serve as a lower boundary in a mesoscale atmospheric model and is intended to be used to study the influence of ...

Koen De Ridder; Guy Schayes

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Extreme Maximum Land Surface Temperatures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There are numerous reports in the literature of observations of land surface temperatures. Some of these, almost all made in situ, reveal maximum values in the 50°–70°C range, with a few, made in desert regions, near 80°C. Consideration of a ...

J. R. Garratt

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Land use and land cover, 1978 Hot Springs, South Dakota, Nebraska  

SciTech Connect

Land use and land cover of the area surrounding Hot Springs, South Dakota in 1978 is presented in map form. (ACR)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Land-use implications of wind-energy-conversion systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An estimated 20 utilities in the United States are now investigating potential wind machine sites in their areas. Identifying sites for wind machine clusters (wind farms) involves more than just finding a location with a suitable wind resource. Consideration must also be given to the proximity of sites to existing transmission lines, environmental impacts, aesthetics, and legal concerns as well as the availability of and alternative uses for the land. These issues have made it increasingly difficult for utilities to bring conventional power plants on-line quickly. Utilities are now required, however, to give careful consideration to specific legal, social, and environmental questions raised by the siting of wind energy conversion systems (WECS).

Noun, R.J.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Resource Management Services: Land Use, Part 501: Use of Flood Control  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Services: Land Use, Part 501: Use of Flood Services: Land Use, Part 501: Use of Flood Control Lands (New York) Resource Management Services: Land Use, Part 501: Use of Flood Control Lands (New York) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State New York Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider

410

NASA Cold Land Processes Experiment (CLPX 2002/03): Field Measurements of Snowpack Properties and Soil Moisture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A field measurement program was undertaken as part NASA’s Cold Land Processes Experiment (CLPX). Extensive snowpack and soil measurements were taken at field sites in Colorado over four study periods during the two study years (2002 and 2003). ...

Kelly Elder; Don Cline; Glen E. Liston; Richard Armstrong

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Executive Order 13007 Indian Sacred Sites (1996)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6771 6771 Federal Register / Vol. 61, No. 104 / Wednesday, May 29, 1996 / Presidential Documents Executive Order 13007 of May 24, 1996 Indian Sacred Sites By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution and the laws of the United States, in furtherance of Federal treaties, and in order to protect and preserve Indian religious practices, it is hereby ordered: Section 1. Accommodation of Sacred Sites. (a) In managing Federal lands, each executive branch agency with statutory or administrative responsibility for the management of Federal lands shall, to the extent practicable, permitted by law, and not clearly inconsistent with essential agency functions, (1) accommodate access to and ceremonial use of Indian sacred sites by Indian religious practitioners and (2) avoid adversely affecting the physical integrity

412

Criteria for greater confinement of radioactive wastes at arid western sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document provides a set of criteria and standards for greater confinement disposal (CCD) of low-level waste as an alternative to shallow land burial or deep geologic disposal for certain types of waste. The criteria and standards are discussed relative to seven major areas: radiation exposure protection, characterization of waste, transportation and handling, site selection, engineering, general facility requirements, and administration. The document addresses the objectives or goals of burial at intermediate depths to provide greater confinement, and its advantages and disadvantages compared to shallow land burial. Additionally, the document describes a generic greater confinement disposal facility (GCDF), and discusses as well as evaluates the various interrelating factors which must be considered in the selection of a viable site and in the development of GCDF design and performance criteria. Methods are developed for evaluating and ranking the importance of the factors based on health and safety, their potential impact on cost, and the uncertainty and/or difficulty in measurement and control of the factors. It also provides the methodology and analysis used to determine the various site-specific waste concentration acceptance standards (in the form of area disposal concentration limits) as well as design and engineering standards. It also illustrates the methodology used to determine the optimal or preferred depth of disposal under expected arid site conditions and alternative wet or irrigated site conditions. In addition, an example calculation demonstrates the application of the waste area concentration limits at an arid or humid GDF in determining the allowable waste inventory capacity of a particular site and the loading capacity of a waste disposal cell.

Card, D.H.; Hunter, P.H.; Adam, J.A.; White, R.B.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Land Mine Detection at TJNAF | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Land Mine Detection at TJNAF Land Mine Detection at TJNAF Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Spinoff Applications Spinoff Archives SBIR/STTR Applications of Nuclear Science and Technology Funding Opportunities Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) News & Resources Contact Information Nuclear Physics U.S. Department of Energy SC-26/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3613 F: (301) 903-3833 E: sc.np@science.doe.gov More Information » Spinoff Archives Land Mine Detection at TJNAF Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Application/instrumentation: Land Mine detection and security imaging using THz radiation Developed at: Thomas Jefferson National Laboratory Developed in: 1998 - 2007 Result of NP research:

414

Land disposal of San Luis drain sediments: Progress Report October 1998 through November 2000  

SciTech Connect

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), in collaboration with the US Bureau of Reclamation and the Panoche Water District, is conducting a pilot-scale test of the viability of land application of selenium (Se)-enriched San Luis Drain (SLD) sediments. Local land disposal is an attractive option due to its low cost and the proximity of large areas of available land. Two modes of disposal are being tested: (1) the application to a nearby SLD embankment, and (2) the application to and incorporation with nearby farm soils. The study of these options considers the key problems which may potentially arise from this approach. These include disturbance of SLD sediments during dredging, resulting in increased downstream Se concentrations; movement of the land-applied Se to the groundwater; increased exposure to the biota; and reduced productivity of farm crops. This report describes field and laboratory activities carried out from 1998 through November 2000, as well as the results of these investigations.

Zawislanski, P.T.; Benson, S.M.; TerBerg, R.; Borglin, S.E.

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Characterization ReportOperational Closure Covers for the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site at the Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect

Bechtel Nevada (BN) manages two low-level Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMSs) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO). The Area 3 RWMS is located in south-central Yucca Flat and the Area 5 RWMS is located about 15 miles south, in north-central Frenchman Flat. Though located in two separate topographically closed basins, they are similar in climate and hydrogeologic setting. The Area 5 RWMS uses engineered shallow-land burial cells to dispose of packaged waste, while the Area 3 RWMS uses subsidence craters formed from underground testing of nuclear weapons for the disposal of packaged and unpackaged bulk waste. Over the next several decades, most waste disposal units at both the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMSs are anticipated to be closed. Closure of the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMSs will proceed through three phases: operational closure, final closure, and institutional control. Many waste disposal units at the Area 5RWMS are operationally closed and final closure has been placed on one unit at the Area 3 RWMS (U-3ax/bl). Because of the similarities between the two sites (e.g., type of wastes, environmental factors, operational closure cover designs, etc.), many characterization studies and data collected at the Area 3 RWMS are relevant and applicable to the Area 5 RWMS. For this reason, data and closure strategies from the Area 3 RWMS are referred to as applicable. This document is an interim Characterization Report – Operational Closure Covers, for the Area 5 RWMS. The report briefly describes the Area 5 RWMS and the physical environment where it is located, identifies the regulatory requirements, reviews the approach and schedule for closing, summarizes the monitoring programs, summarizes characterization studies and results, and then presents conclusions and recommendations.

Bechtel Nevada Geotechnical Sciences

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Land Use Requirements of Modern Wind Power Plants in the United States  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report provides data and analysis of the land use associated with modern, large wind power plants (defined as greater than 20 megawatts (MW) and constructed after 2000). The analysis discusses standard land-use metrics as established in the life-cycle assessment literature, and then discusses their applicability to wind power plants. The report identifies two major 'classes' of wind plant land use: 1) direct impact (i.e., disturbed land due to physical infrastructure development), and 2) total area (i.e., land associated with the complete wind plant project). The analysis also provides data for each of these classes, derived from project applications, environmental impact statements, and other sources. It attempts to identify relationships among land use, wind plant configuration, and geography. The analysts evaluated 172 existing or proposed projects, which represents more than 26 GW of capacity. In addition to providing land-use data and summary statistics, they identify several limitations to the existing wind project area data sets, and suggest additional analysis that could aid in evaluating actual land use and impacts associated with deployment of wind energy.

Denholm, P.; Hand, M.; Jackson, M.; Ong, S.

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

PETSc: Applications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Applications and Publications Applications and Publications Home Download Features Documentation Applications/Publications Prizes Industrial/DOE sites DOE CSGF users Miscellaneous External Software Developers Site These are publications on application simulations developed by PETSc users. Please send us information about your publications, petsc-maint@mcs.anl.gov. How to cite PETSc in your publications. See Acknowledgments for software packages that PETSc uses. PETSc has been used for modeling in all of these areas: Acoustics, Aerodynamics, Air Pollution, Arterial Flow, Bone Fractures, Brain Surgery, Cancer Surgery, Cancer Treatment, Carbon Sequestration, Cardiology, Cells, CFD, Combustion, Concrete, Corrosion, Data Mining, Dentistry, Earth Quakes, Economics, Fission, Fusion, Glaciers, Ground Water Flow, Linguistics,

418

Novel Technique of Sizing the Stand-Alone Photovoltaic Systems Using the Radial Basis Function Neural Networks: Application in Isolated Sites  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The objective of this work is to investigate the Radial Basis Function Neural Networks (RBFN) to identifying and modeling the optimal sizing couples of stand-alone photovoltaic (PV) system using a minimum of input data, These optimal couples allow to the users of stand-alone PV systems to determine the number of solar panel modules and storage batteries necessary to satisfy a given consumption. The advantage of this model is to estimate of the sizing PV system in any site in Algeria particularly in isolated sites, where the global solar radiation data is not always available. A RBFN has been trained by using 200 known sizing couples data corresponding to 200 locations. In this way, it was trained to accept and even handle a number of unusual case, known sizing couples were subsequently used to investigate the accuracy of prediction the training of the RBFN model was performed with adequate accuracy. Subsequently, the unknown validation sizing couples set produced very set accurate predictions with the correlation coefficient between the actual and the RBFN model identified data of 98% was obtained. This result indicates that the proposed method can be successfully used for estimating of optimal sizing couples of PV systems for any locations in Algeria, but the methodology can be generalized using different locations in the world.

Mellit, A.; Benghanme, M.; Arab, A. H.; Guessoum, A.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Long-term land use future scenarios for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

In order to facilitate decision regarding environmental restoration activities at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), the United States Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID) conducted analyses to project reasonable future land use scenarios at the INEL for the next 100 years. The methodology for generating these scenarios included: review of existing DOE plans, policy statements, and mission statements pertaining to the INEL; review of surrounding land use characteristics and county developments policies; solicitation of input from local, county, state and federal planners, policy specialists, environmental professionals, and elected officials; and review of environmental and development constraints at the INEL site that could influence future land use.

NONE

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Assessment of a Transportable 200-kW Fuel Cell in Rural Applications: Site 1: Central Georgia EMC/Oglethorpe Power Corporation, Jack son, Georgia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dispersed generation is particularly attractive to electric cooperatives in rural areas due to low customer densities and sometimes rapid load growth at the end of long lines. EPRI and the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association (NRECA) are cosponsoring a project to demonstrate the use of transportable 200 kW phosphoric acid fuel cell power plants in rural dispersed generation applications. This interim report details the project and describes the first year of operation of a transportable fuel c...

1997-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

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421

OpenEI Community - solar land use  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

90 en Solar Land Use Data on OpenEI http:en.openei.orgcommunityblogsolar-land-use-data-openei

 

 

422

Minerals on School and Public Lands  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Commissioner of School and Public Lands is authorized to lease the mineral interests of such lands for development. Section 5-7 of the SD Codified Laws describes provisions for the leasing of...

423

Time Scales of Land Surface Hydrology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper intends to investigate the time scales of land surface hydrology and enhance the understanding of the hydrological cycle between the atmosphere, vegetation, and soil. A three-layer model for land surface hydrology is developed to study ...

Aihui Wang; Xubin Zeng; Samuel S. P. Shen; Qing-Cun Zeng; Robert E. Dickinson

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

The Global Land Data Assimilation System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Global Land Data Assimilation System (GLDAS) has been developed. Its purpose is to ingest satellite- and ground-based observational data products, using advanced land surface modeling and data assimilation techniques, in order to generate ...

M. Rodell; P. R. Houser; U. Jambor; J. Gottschalck; K. Mitchell; C-J. Meng; K. Arsenault; B. Cosgrove; J. Radakovich; M. Bosilovich; J. K. Entin*J. P. Walker; D. Lohmann; D. Toll

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

A land-use systems approach to represent land-use dynamics at continental and global scales  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Most of the current global land cover datasets and global scale land-use models use a classification of land cover based on the dominant land cover type within a distinct region or pixel. Such a classification disregards the diversity and intensity of ... Keywords: Global, IMAGE, Land-use change, Land-use intensification, Land-use systems

Aurélien Letourneau; Peter H. Verburg; Elke Stehfest

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Oregon Department of State Lands | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Oregon Department of State Lands Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Oregon Department of State Lands Name Oregon Department of State Lands Address 775 Summer Street, Suite 100 Place...

427

Hawaii Department of Land and Natural Resources Office of Conservation...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Office of Conservation and Coastal Lands Jump to: navigation, search Name Hawaii Department of Land and Natural Resources Office of Conservation and Coastal Lands From Open Energy...

428

Facilitating Oil Industry Access to Federal Lands through Interagency Data Sharing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Much of the environmental and technical data useful to the oil and gas industry and regulatory agencies is now contained in disparate state and federal databases. Delays in coordinating permit approvals between federal and state agencies translate into increased operational costs and stresses for the oil and gas industry. Making federal lease stipulation and area restriction data available on state agency Web sites will streamline a potential lessors review of available leases, encourage more active bidding on unleased federal lands, and give third-party operators independent access to data who otherwise may not have access to lease restrictions and other environmental data. As a requirement of the Energy Policy Conservation Act (EPCA), the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) is in the process of inventorying oil and natural gas resources beneath onshore federal lands and the extent and nature of any stipulation, restrictions, or impediments to the development of these resources. The EPCA Phase 1 Inventory resulted in a collection of GIS coverage files organized according to numerous lease stipulation reference codes. Meanwhile, state agencies also collect millions of data elements concerning oil and gas operations. Much of the oil and gas data nationwide is catalogued in the Ground Water Protection Council's (GWPC's) successfully completed Risk Based Data Management System (RBDMS). The GWPC and the states of Colorado, New Mexico, Utah, and Montana are implementing a pilot project where BLM lease stipulation data and RBDMS data will be displayed in a GIS format on the Internet. This increased access to data will increase bid activity, help expedite permitting, and encourage exploration on federal lands. Linking environmental, lease stipulation and resource inventory assessment data and making a GIS interface for the data available to industry and other agencies via the internet represents an important step in the GWPC strategy for all oil and gas regulatory e-commerce. The next step beyond mere data sharing for facilitating the permitting process is to make it possible for industry to file those permit applications electronically. This process will involve the use of common XML schemas.

Paul Jehn; Ben Grunewald

2007-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

429

Nevada Test Site Resource Management Plan  

SciTech Connect

The Nevada Test Site (NTS) Resource Management Plan (RMP) describes the NTS Stewardship Mission and how its accomplishment will preserve the resources of the ecoregion while accomplishing the objectives of the mission. The NTS Stewardship Mission is to manage the land and facilities at the NTS as a unique and valuable national resource. The RMP has defined goals for twelve resource areas based on the principles of ecosystem management. These goals were established using an interdisciplinary team of DOE/NV resource specialists with input from surrounding land managers, private parties, and representatives of Native American governments. The overall goal of the RMP is to facilitate improved NTS land use management decisions within the Great Basin and Mojave Desert ecoregions.

NONE

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Hanford land disposal restrictions plan for mixed wastes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since the early 1940s, the Hanford Site has been involved in the production and purification of nuclear defense materials. These production activities have resulted in the generation of large quantities of liquid and solid radioactive mixed waste. This waste is subject to regulation under authority of both the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) and the Atomic Energy Act. The State of Washington Department of Ecology (Ecology), the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the US Department of Energy (DOE) have entered into an agreement, the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) to bring Hanford Site Operations into compliance with dangerous waste regulations. The Tri-Party Agreement was amended to require development of the Hanford Land Disposal Restrictions Plan for Mixed Wastes (this plan) to comply with land disposal restrictions requirements for radioactive mixed waste. The Tri-Party Agreement requires, and the this plan provides, the following sections: Waste Characterization Plan, Storage Report, Treatment Report, Treatment Plan, Waste Minimization Plan, a schedule, depicting the events necessary to achieve full compliance with land disposal restriction requirements, and a process for establishing interim milestones. 34 refs., 28 figs., 35 tabs.

Not Available

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Water and land availability for energy farming. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The physical and economic availability of land and water resources for energy farming were determined. Ten water subbasins possessing favorable land and water availabilities were ranked according to their overall potential for biomass production. The study results clearly identify the Southeast as a favorable area for biomass farming. The Northwest and North-Central United States should also be considered on the basis of their highly favorable environmental characteristics. Both high and low estimates of water availability for 1985 and 2000 in each of 99 subbasins were prepared. Subbasins in which surface water consumption was more than 50% of surface water supply were eliminated from the land availability analysis, leaving 71 subbasins to be examined. The amount of acreage potentially available for biomass production in these subbasins was determined through a comparison of estimated average annual net returns developed for conventional agriculture and forestry with net returns for several biomass production options. In addition to a computerized method of ranking subbasins according to their overall potential for biomass production, a methodology for evaluating future energy farm locations was developed. This methodology included a general area selection procedure as well as specific site analysis recommendations. Thirty-five general factors and a five-step site-specific analysis procedure are described.

Schooley, F.A.; Mara, S.J.; Mendel, D.A.; Meagher, P.C.; So, E.C.

1979-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT SITE SPECIFIC ADVISORY BOARD  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT SITE-SPECIFIC ADVISORY BOARD (EM SSAB) Savannah River Site Application No. (Please leave blank) ______________ MEMBERSHIP APPLICATION ________________________________________________________________________________________________ The EM SSAB provides meaningful opportunity for collaborative dialogue among the diverse communities at the Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Management (EM) clean-up sites. At the request of the Assistant Secretary or the Site Manager/Assistant Manager for Environmental Management, the Board provides advice and recommendations concerning the following EM site-specific issues: clean-up standards and environmental restoration; waste management and disposition; stabilization and disposition of non-stockpile nuclear materials;

433

Division Site  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Dioxide Reduction Catalysts Carbon Dioxide Reduction Catalysts Our research program is directed toward developing and understanding metal complexes that catalyze reactions relevant to renewable energy, particularly those that reduce carbon dioxide to fuels or fuel precursors. Carbon dioxide reduction catalysts are important targets because they could enable "recycling" of hydrocarbon fuels, thus lowering their carbon footprint. Our research addresses two key challenges in this area. First, we aim to improve the lifetimes, activity, and selectivity of homogeneous catalysts by incorporating them into porous heterogeneous frameworks derived from structurally persistent organic polymers. These frameworks allow isolation of the catalytic centers, which inhibits reaction pathways that lead to catalyst decomposition, and enable the spatially controlled deployment of ancillary functional groups that bind and concentrate substrate near the active site and/or assist with its activation. Second, we are developing homogeneous dual-catalyst systems and assemblies that couple CO2 reduction catalysis to a parallel catalytic reaction that provides the reducing equivalents. We are especially interested in proton-coupled electron-transfer reactions involving activation of H2 and of organic dehydrogenation substrates, wherein the proton pathway also participates in the conversion of CO2 to CO. In both of these research thrusts we are studying catalysts that may be activated under thermal, electrochemical, or photochemical conditions.

434

Fueling area site assessment  

SciTech Connect

This report provides results of a Site Assessment performed at the Fuel Storage Area at Buckley ANG Base in Aurora, Colorado. Buckley ANG Base occupies 3,328 acres of land within the City of Aurora in Arapahoe County, Colorado. The Fuel Storage Area (also known as the Fueling Area) is located on the west side of the Base at the intersection of South Powderhorn Street and East Breckenridge Avenue. The Fueling Area consists of above ground storage tanks in a bermed area, pumps, piping, valves, an unloading stand and a fill stand. Jet fuel from the Fueling Area is used to support aircraft operations at the Base. Jet fuel is stored in two 200,000 gallon above ground storage tanks. Fuel is received in tanker trucks at the unloading stand located south and east of the storage tanks. Fuel required for aircraft fueling and other use is transferred into tanker trucks at the fill stand and transported to various points on the Base. The Fuel Storage Area has been in operation for over 20 years and handles approximately 7 million gallons of jet fuel annually.

1996-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

435

Preliminary design of a solar central receiver for a site-specific repowering application (Saguaro Power Plant). Volume 1. Executive summary. Final report, October 1982-September 1983  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The preliminary design of a solar central receiver repowered gas/oil fired steam-Rankine cycle electric power generation plant was completed. The design is based on a central receiver technology using molten salt (60% NaNO/sub 3/, 40% KNO/sub 3/, by weight) for the heat transport and thermal storage fluid. Unit One of APS's Saguaro power plant located 43 km (27 mi) northwest of Tucson, AZ, is to be repowered. The selection of both the site and the molten salt central receiver promotes a near-term feasibility demonstration and cost-effective power production from an advanced solar thermal technology. The recommended system concept is to repower the existing electric power generating system at the minimum useful level (66 MW/sub e/ gross) using a field of 4850 Martin Marietta second-generation (58.5 m/sup 2/) heliostats and a storage capacity of 4.0 hours. The storage capacity will be used to optimize dispatch of power to the utility system. The preliminary design was based on the use of the systems approach to design where the overall project was divided into systems, each of which is clearly bounded, and performs specific functions. The total project construction cost was estimated to be 213 million in 1983 dollars. The plant will be capable of displacing fossil energy equivalent to 2.4 million barrels of No. 6 oil in its first 10 years of operation.

Weber, E.R.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.