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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lamps lighting efficiency" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Sulfur Lamps-The Next Generation of Efficient Light?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 5 Sulfur Lamps-The Next Generation of Efficient Light? The figure above is a schematic of the system installed at the National Air and Space Museum and the DOE headquarters in Washington, D.C., Light from the sulfur lamp is focused by a parabolic reflector so that it enters the light pipe within a small angular cone. Light travels down the pipe, reflecting off the prismatic film (A) that lines the outer acrylic tube. The prismatic film reflects the light through total internal reflection (C), an intrinsically efficient process. Some of the light striking the film (at A) is not reflected and "leaks out" of the pipe walls (B), giving the pipe a glowing appearance. A light ray that travels all the way down the pipe will strike the mirror at the end (D) and return back up the pipe.

2

High Efficiency LED Lamp for Solid-State Lighting  

SciTech Connect

This report contains a summary of technical achievements during a three-year project to demonstrate high efficiency, solid-state lamps based on gallium nitride/silicon carbide light-emitting diodes. Novel chip designs and fabrication processes are described for a new type of nitride light-emitting diode with the potential for very high efficiency. This work resulted in the demonstration of blue light-emitting diodes in the one watt class that achieved up to 495 mW of light output at 350 mA drive current, corresponding to quantum and wall plug efficiencies of 51% and 45%, respectively. When combined with a phosphor in Cree's 7090 XLamp package, these advanced blue-emitting devices resulted in white light-emitting diodes whose efficacy exceeded 85 lumens per watt. In addition, up to 1040 lumens at greater than 85 lumens per watt was achieved by combining multiple devices to make a compact white lamp module with high optical efficiency.

James Ibbetson

2006-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

3

A high-efficiency indirect lighting system utilizing the solar 1000 sulfur lamp  

SciTech Connect

High-lumen light sources represent unique challenges and opportunities for the design of practical and efficient interior lighting systems. High-output sources require a means of large-scale distribution and avoidance of high-luminance glare while providing efficient delivery. An indirect lighting system has been developed for use with a 1,000 Watt sulfur lamp that efficiently utilizes the high-output source to provide quality interior lighting. This paper briefly describes the design and initial testing of this new system.

Siminovitch, M.; Gould, C.; Page, E.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Energy efficiency lighting on board naval ships: Phase 2 (The T-8 lamp system)  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the development and performance of the T-8 fluorescent lamp-ballast system. Similar to the Phase I effort, the cooperation of the lamp and ballast companies (GTE, North American Philips Lighting, and IOTA Engineering) were required for the successful result. The above companies submitted prototype lamps and ballasts to the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Lighting Group to evaluate. The lamp designs were modified as required and the optimum system selected. Two-lamp designs and one ballast were chosen and tested to determine if they met the Navy specifications. The second section describes the lamp-ballast specifications. This section includes the measured thermal performance from an ambient of 10/degree/C to 60/degree/C. 1 ref., 8 figs., 11 tabs.

Verderber, R.R.

1987-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

5

Flash Lighting with Fluorescent Lamp.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A flash lighting circuit with the fluorescent lamp is designed to produce lighting flicker by means of controlling the operating frequency and the duty-ratio of… (more)

Hsieh, Horng

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Portable lamp with dynamically controlled lighting distribution  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A double lamp table or floor lamp lighting system has a pair of compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs) arranged vertically with a reflective septum in between. By selectively turning on one or both of the CFLs, down lighting, up lighting, or both up and down lighting is produced. The control system can also vary the light intensity from each CFL. The reflective septum insures that almost all the light produced by each lamp will be directed into the desired light distribution pattern which is selected and easily changed by the user. Planar compact fluorescent lamps, e.g. circular CFLs, particularly oriented horizontally, are preferable. CFLs provide energy efficiency. The lighting system may be designed for the home, hospitality, office or other environments.

Siminovitch, Michael J. (Pinole, CA); Page, Erik R. (Berkeley, CA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

L&E - high efficiency lighting for parking structure | The Better Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

structure structure Activities Technology Solutions Teams Lighting & Electrical Space Conditioning Plug & Process Loads Food Service Refrigeration Laboratories Energy Management & Information Systems Public Sector Teams Market Solutions Teams Adopt high-efficiency lighting for your parking structure Parking structures and garages are typically lighted by older HID lighting technology without any energy-saving controls. The latest high-efficiency alternatives with energy-saving controls-including light-emitting diode (LED), induction, and fluorescent technology options-can save building owners over 40% on their parking lot lighting bills while delivering additional benefits such as better-lighted spaces. The Lighting & Electrical team developed a performance specification that

8

L&E: Adopt high-efficiency lighting for your parking lot | The Better  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

lot lot Activities Technology Solutions Teams Lighting & Electrical Space Conditioning Plug & Process Loads Food Service Refrigeration Laboratories Energy Management & Information Systems Public Sector Teams Market Solutions Teams Adopt high-efficiency lighting for your parking lot Most parking lots are illuminated by older high-intensity discharge (HID) lighting technology without any energy-saving controls. New light-emitting diode (LED) technology can cut parking lot lighting energy bills by 40%, or much more with controls, while delivering additional benefits including long life, reduced maintenance costs, and improved lighting uniformity. The Lighting & Electrical team developed a performance specification to help building owners take advantage of these improved lighting

9

L&E: Participate in a field test for high-efficiency troffer lighting. |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lighting & Electrical » Participate Lighting & Electrical » Participate in a field test for high efficiency troffer lighting Activities Technology Solutions Teams Lighting & Electrical Space Conditioning Plug & Process Loads Food Service Refrigeration Laboratories Energy Management & Information Systems Public Sector Teams Market Solutions Teams Participate in a field test for high-efficiency troffer lighting 50% of all commercial fluorescent lighting fixtures are recessed troffers in 1'x4', 2'x2' and 2'x4' configurations, in operation for more than 10 hours a day on average and collectively consuming more than 87 TWh of electricity annually. The Lighting & Electrical team supported the market introduction of high-efficiency troffers by developing a specification that allows for

10

Lighting Group: Sources and Ballasts: LED Reflector Lamp  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LED Reflector Lamp LED Reflector Lamp LED Reflector Lamp Objective LED reflector lamp The goal of this project is to develop a revolutionary new reflector lamp which offers many advantages over current incandescent reflector lamps, including: three times greater efficiency ten times the rated life greater optical and performance properties use of light emitting diodes (LEDs) to generate the light. Although LEDs have been commercially available since the late 1960’s, recent dramatic improvements in LED technology have led to white light devices with efficiencies that meet or exceed those of a standard incandescent lamp. This project will build upon these improvements to develop a new type of source for focusing light. Contact Information For more information on this project, please contact:

11

Power control architectures for cold cathode fluorescent lamp and light emitting diode based light sources.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? In this dissertation, two different energy efficient power supply topologies are introduced for controlling cold cathode fluorescent lamp (CCFL) and high-brightness light emitting diode… (more)

Doshi, Montu V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Assessment of Electrical, Efficiency, and Photometric Performance of Advanced Lighting Sources: Dimmable Advanced Lighting Technolog ies -- Electronic (Hot and Cold Cathode) Compact Fluorescent Lamps and Ballasts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This EPRI Technical Update (EPRI report 1018477) is one of four in a series that addresses basic dimming performance of advanced lighting sourceselectronic (hot and cold cathode) compact fluorescent lamps and ballasts Chapter 1 discusses basic lighting control, the importance of considering power quality in lighting control, lighting control methods and parameters, and the advantages and future of lighting control. Chapter 2 addresses in more depth dimming methods used in advanced lighting sources and co...

2008-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

13

Assessment of Electrical, Efficiency, and Photometric Performance of Advanced Lighting Sources: Dimmable Advanced Lighting Technolog ies -- Electronic Light-Emitting Diode (LED) Fixtures, Lamps, and Drivers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This EPRI Technical Update addresses the dimming performance of light-emitting diode (LED) lighting. Chapter 1 provides a discussion of basic lighting control, the importance of considering power quality in lighting control, lighting control methods and parameters, and the advantages and future of lighting control. Chapter 2 addresses in more depth the dimming methods used in advanced lighting sources and controls for incandescent, fluorescent, high-intensity discharge (HID) and LED sources. Chapter 3 ad...

2008-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

14

Light Flicker in Compact Fluorescent Lamps Caused by Voltage Fluctuations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This power quality (PQ) case study presents tests performed at the EPRI Power Electronics Applications Center (PEAC) Power Quality Test Facility to characterize the light output of an incandescent lamp and compact fluorescent lamps during voltage fluctuations.

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

15

Stadiums and arenas use efficient, high wattage lamps - Today ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Other lighting types, such as light-emitting diode (LED), incandescent, and halogen lamps, are used in applications like signals, signage, ...

16

Novel Nanophosphors for High Efficiency Fluorescent Lamps  

SciTech Connect

This is the Final Report of the Novel Nanophosphors for High Efficiency Fluorescent Lamps, Department of Energy (DOE). The overall goal of this three-year program is to develop novel hybrid phosphors by coating commercially available lamp phosphors with highly stable wide band-gap nanocrystalline phosphors (NCP). The prime technical approach is the development of NCP quantum-splitting phosphor (QSP) and ultra-violet (UV) emitting phosphors with quantum efficiencies exceeding that of the conventional phosphors at 185 nm. The novel hybrid phosphors will increase the efficiency of the fluorescent lamps by up to 32%, enabling total energy savings of 0.26 quads, the reduction in the U.S. energy bill by $6.5 billion and the reduction of the annual carbon emission by 4.1 billion kilogram. Our work started by investigating through modeling calculations the requirement for the particle size of the NCP. Our work to develop suitable nanocrystalline phosphors started with the known oxide quantum splitting and UV emitting phosphors. We demonstrated several synthesis techniques for the production of high quality nanocrystalline materials that crystallizes in the desired phase and with the desired particle size. In collaboration with our subcontractor we demonstrated the feasibility for the manufacture of NC phosphors. We also demonstrated novel techniques of coating the NCP on the surface of micron sized phosphors. Our chief achievement pertains to the successful testing of the coated hybrid phosphor systems in linear fluorescent lamps. In linear fluorescent lamp tests, we have demonstrated up to 7% increase in the efficacy of hybrid phosphors over the conventional (uncoated) phosphors. We have also demonstrated the improvement in the lumen maintenance of the coated phosphors. A hybrid phosphor system based on the commercial red emitting phosphor, Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Eu{sup 3+} did not show the anticipated improvement in lamp efficacy. We explored the reasons for this observation, which are detailed in this report. Within the program we have carried out fundamental investigations into the physical processes that determine the quantum splitting behavior of the Pr{sup 3+} ion in solids. Specifically, we have investigated the quantum splitting luminescence of this ion in the LaPO{sub 4}, SrAl{sub 12}O{sub 19} and LiLaP{sub 4}O{sub 12} host lattices. In this final report we summarize the technical work completed under the Program, summarize our findings about the performance limits of the various technologies we investigated, and outline promising paths for future work.

Alok Srivatava

2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

17

Table lamp with dynamically controlled lighting distribution and uniformly illuminated luminous shade  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A double lamp table or floor lamp lighting system has a pair of compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs) or other lamps arranged vertically, i.e. one lamp above the other, with a reflective septum in between. By selectively turning on one or both of the CFLs, down lighting, up lighting, or both up and down lighting is produced. The control system can also vary the light intensity from each CFL. The reflective septum ensures that almost all the light produced by each lamp will be directed into the desired light distribution pattern which is selected and easily changed by the user. In a particular configuration, the reflective septum is bowl shaped, with the upper CFL sitting in the bowl, and a luminous shade hanging down from the bowl. The lower CFL provides both task lighting and uniform shade luminance. Planar compact fluorescent lamps, e.g. circular CFLs, particularly oriented horizontally, are preferable. CFLs provide energy efficiency. However, other types of lamps, including incandescent, halogen, and LEDs can also be used in the fixture. The lighting system may be designed for the home, hospitality, office or other environments.

Siminovitch, Michael J. (Pinole, CA); Page, Erik R. (Berkeley, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Efficient Driver for Dimmable White LED Lighting.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A high efficiency driver circuit is proposed for Light Emitting Diode (LED) lamps with dimming feature. The current regulation is accomplished by processing partial power… (more)

Yang, Wen-ching

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

New LED light sources and lamps for general illumination  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of light source compared to traditional light sources like incandescent bulbs and fluorescent tubes bulb. LEDs emit colored light with a narrow spectral band of 20-30 nm, colors covering the spectralNew LED light sources and lamps for general illumination Carsten Dam-Hansen, Birgitte Thestrup

20

A light diet for a giant appetite: An assessment of China's proposed fluorescent lamp standard  

SciTech Connect

Lighting has been one of the fastest growing electric end-uses in China over the last twenty years, with an average annual growth rate of 14%. Fluorescent lighting provides a significant portion of China's lighting need. In 1998, China produced 680 million fluorescent lamps, of which 420 million were linear fluorescent lamps of various diameters (T8 to T12). There are substantial variations both in energy efficiency and lighting performance among locally produced fluorescent lamps. Such variations present a perfect opportunity for policy intervention through efficiency standards to promote the adoption of more efficient fluorescent lamps in China. This paper analyzes China's proposed minimum efficiency standard for fluorescent lamps and presents an assessment of its likely impacts on China's lighting energy consumption and GHG emissions.

Lin, Jiang

2002-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lamps lighting efficiency" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Highly Efficient Small Form Factor LED Retrofit Lamp  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes work to develop a high efficiency LED-based MR16 lamp downlight at OSRAM SYLVANIA under US Department of Energy contract DE-EE0000611. A new multichip LED package, electronic driver, and reflector optic were developed for these lamps. At steady-state, the lamp luminous flux was 409 lumens (lm), luminous efficacy of 87 lumens per watt (LPW), CRI (Ra) of 87, and R9 of 85 at a correlated color temperature (CCT) of 3285K. The LED alone achieved 120 lumens per watt efficacy and 600 lumen flux output at 25 C. The driver had 90% electrical conversion efficiency while maintaining excellent power quality with power factor >0.90 at a power of only 5 watts. Compared to similar existing MR16 lamps using LED sources, these lamps had much higher efficacy and color quality. The objective of this work was to demonstrate a LED-based MR16 retrofit lamp for replacement of 35W halogen MR16 lamps having (1) luminous flux of 500 lumens, (2) luminous efficacy of 100 lumens per watt, (3) beam angle less than 40{sup o} and center beam candlepower of at least 1000 candelas, and (4) excellent color quality.

Steven Allen; Fred Palmer; Ming Li

2011-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

22

Over the past decade, lighting became more efficient across ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

"Other" includes light-emitting diode (LED) lamps as well as other lamps such as fiber optic lights, induction lamps, and lamps of unknown ...

23

Solid-State Lighting: LED Replacement Lamps: Current Performance and the  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LED Replacement Lamps: Current LED Replacement Lamps: Current Performance and the Latest on ENERGY STAR® to someone by E-mail Share Solid-State Lighting: LED Replacement Lamps: Current Performance and the Latest on ENERGY STAR® on Facebook Tweet about Solid-State Lighting: LED Replacement Lamps: Current Performance and the Latest on ENERGY STAR® on Twitter Bookmark Solid-State Lighting: LED Replacement Lamps: Current Performance and the Latest on ENERGY STAR® on Google Bookmark Solid-State Lighting: LED Replacement Lamps: Current Performance and the Latest on ENERGY STAR® on Delicious Rank Solid-State Lighting: LED Replacement Lamps: Current Performance and the Latest on ENERGY STAR® on Digg Find More places to share Solid-State Lighting: LED Replacement Lamps: Current Performance and the Latest on ENERGY STAR® on

24

Mercury Lamps Recycling Fluorescent light-tubes, compact fluorescent bulbs, mercury and sodium vapor lamps, ultraviolet and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mercury Lamps Recycling Fluorescent light-tubes, compact fluorescent bulbs, mercury and sodium light tubes are recycled. They are made from aluminum and metal. Aluminum is a silver-white metal and is very light in weight and strong. Because aluminum is ductile, it can be drawn into wires or pressed

Ungerleider, Leslie G.

25

Efficient Light Sources Today  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper reviews new lamp and lighting technology in terms of application and economic impact. Included are the latest advances in High Intensity Discharge systems, energy saving fluorescent lamps and ballasts, and the new state of the art high performance fluorescent systems. Cost analyses will show that typical owning and operating cost reductions of 15 to 65% can be achieved without sacrificing illumination levels when the right system is chosen and properly applied.

Hart, A. L.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Driver Circuit for White LED Lamps with TRIAC Dimming Control.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??An efficient Light Emitting Diode (LED) lamp driver circuit is proposed for retrofitting the conventionally used incandescent lamps with existing TRIAC dimmer. The dimming feature… (more)

Weng, Szu-Jung

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Energy-Efficient, High-Color-Rendering LED Lamps Using Oxyfluoride and Fluoride Phosphors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

LED lamps using phosphor downconversion can be designed to replace incandescent or halogen sources with a 'warm-white' correlated color temperature (CCT) of 2700-3200 K and a color rendering index (CRI) greater than 90. However, these lamps have efficacies of {approx}70% of standard 'cool-white' LED packages (CCT = 4500-6000 K; CRI = 75-80). In this report, we describe structural and luminescence properties of fluoride and oxyfluoride phosphors, specifically a (Sr,Ca){sub 3}(Al,Si)O{sub 4}(F,O):Ce{sup 3+} yellow-green phosphor and a K{sub 2}TiF{sub 6}:Mn{sup 4+} red phosphor, that can reduce this gap and therefore meet the spectral and efficiency requirements for high-efficacy LED lighting. LED lamps with a warm-white color temperature (3088 K), high CRI (90), and an efficacy of {approx}82 lm/W are demonstrated using these phosphors. This efficacy is {approx}85% of comparable cool-white lamps using typical Y{sub 3}Al{sub 5}O{sub 12}:Ce{sup 3+}-based phosphors, significantly reducing the efficacy gap between warm-white and cool-white LED lamps that use phosphor downconversion.

Setlur, A.; Radkov, E; Henderson, C; Her, J; Srivastava, A; Karkada, N; Kishore, M; Kumar, N; Aesram, D; et al.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

The Energy Efficiency of the U.S Fluorescent Lamp Ballast Industry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Energy Efficiency of the U.S Fluorescent Lamp Ballast Industry The Energy Efficiency of the U.S Fluorescent Lamp Ballast Industry Speaker(s): Francis Rubinstein Date: February 14, 2008 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Fluorescent lamp ballasts are subject to DOE appliance standards and rulemaking. But currently, only ballasts for older fluorescent lamp types, such as T-12 lamps are subject to minimum efficacy limits. The majority of fluorescent lamps now being shipped (T-8 and T-5 types) type are operated by ballasts that will not be subject to DOE rule until 2011. The metric used by DOE for characterizing the electrical efficiency of the fluorescent lamp-ballast system is called Ballast Efficacy Factor (BEF). Because BEF is not normalized, it is of limited utility for rulemaking and is useless for procurement. But by normalizing BEF to the total lamp power, I have

29

Compact Fluorescent Lamps  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electric lighting constitutes approximately 21-23 % of the electric grid load in the United States. The higher energy and maintenance costs of incandescent lamps, combined with the favorable economics of high-efficiency compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs), are making CFLs the increasingly popular choice for both residential and commercial lighting. Utility incentive and rebate programs to stimulate CFL use and the beginnings of a ban on incandescent lamps are enhancing CFL penetration levels in these enviro...

2009-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

30

Energy-efficient compact screw-in fluorescent lamp. Final report  

SciTech Connect

A compact fluorescent lamp has been designed and constructed which can replace an incandescent lamp. The lamp is slightly larger than a standard lamp (8 3/4 in. x 3 1/4 in.), but is designed to fit a majority of portable lamp applications. This version, with a core-coil ballast, results in a system efficacy of 54 lumens per watt, with a light output of more than 1800 lumens. This compares favorably with a 100-watt incandescent (17.5 lumens per watt and 1750 lumens light output). The color temperature of 3000/sup 0/K is compatible with an incandescent lamp (2800/sup 0/K). The color rendition index (CRI) is 84. With a solid-state ballast, the efficacy and light output could be increased by 20% (65 l/w, 2200 lumens) and could provide a direct replacement for a three-way, 150-watt incandescent lamp (15 l/w, 2200 lumens).

Morton, E.W.

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Performance of electronic ballasts and lighting controllers with 34-W fluorescent lamps: Final report  

SciTech Connect

This study has measured the performance of energy-saving 34-watt F40, T-12, rapid-start, lite white fluorescent lamps being operated by solid-state ballasts and lighting control equipment. The performances of these lamps are compared with those of 40-watt F40, T-12 rapid-start cool white fluorescent lamp systems studied in the prior phase of this project. With the 34-watt F40 lamps and various solid-state ballasts, system efficacy ranged from 67 to 84 lumens per watt and ballast factor from 0.756 to 0.908. Average system efficacy using the 34-watt lamps exceeded that of systems using 40-watt lamps and the same solid-state ballasts by only 1 percent even though the 34-watt lamps is about 6 percent more efficacious than the 40-watt lamp. This apparent discrepancy is due to increased ballast losses when operating the 34-watt lamps. However, the system efficacy of the 34-watt lamps used with a solid-state ballast exceeded that of a 34-watt, two-lamp system using the standard core-coil ballast by as much as 29 percent. A T-8 fluorescent lamp system with a smaller lamp diameter was also included in the study. Operating this lamp with a solid-state ballast produced a high system efficacy of 90 lumens per watt, a 39 percent improvement over the efficacy of a 40-watt F40 system using the standard core-coil ballast. The use of static controllers with 34-watt F40 lamps can result in excessive flickering (46 percent) and the generation of a second harmonic as high as 96 percent of the fundamental frequency. The dynamic controllers, when used to dim the 34-watt lamps generally cannot be dimmed as low as the 40-watt lamp system without flickering. In general, the 34-watt energy-saving lamps are appropriate as a retrofit to reduce illumination levels. However, for new construction, the 40-watt F40 argon filled lamps cost less, perform better, and provide a more reliable system. 5 refs., 27 figs., 9 tabs.

Verderber, R.R.

1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

A new optimized fluorescent lamp and ballast for low-energy general lighting applications  

SciTech Connect

A new fluorescent lamp and ballast system has been developed which minimizes system input power while maintaining light output close to values provided by conventional lamps and ballasts. The 28-WT-12 lamp designed for the new system utilizes a redesigned electrode structure which allows the lamp to be started in the rapid start manner but operated in an instant start mode to maximize the discharge efficacy (lumens/watt) while reducing lamp cathode power requirements. A matching two-lamp ballast incorporates a solid-state switching device to turn off the cathode heating circuit automatically once the lamps have started. Both lamps and ballasts are physically interchangeable with conventional equipment so that existing luminaires can be converted without luminaire, lampholder, and wiring modifications. This new lamp/ballast system can achieve efficacy values exceeding 80 lm/W--more than 25 percent better than the performance of conventional fluorescent systems of the early 1970's-along with the excellent life and reliability characteristics typical of electromagnetically ballasted systems. Economic analyses indicate that the new system is appropriate for many new commercial general lighting installations, although it is particularly suitable as a retrofit system for installations where power reductions are essential but where conversion costs must be minimized and illumination levels preserved.

Hammer, E.E.; McGowan, T.K.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Energy saving controller for fluorescent lamps.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Although fluorescent lamp is a very efficient lighting device in daily life, still the high harmonic distortion and low power factor cause unnecessary energy consumption.… (more)

Cheong, Zhi Xiong

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Potential Environmental Impacts from the Metals in Incandescent, Compact Fluorescent Lamp (CFL), and Light-Emitting Diode (LED)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

), and Light-Emitting Diode (LED) Bulbs Seong-Rin Lim, Daniel Kang, Oladele A. Ogunseitan,,§ and Julie M sources with compact fluorescent lamp (CFL) and light-emitting diode (LED) bulbs that use about 70% and 85 lighting systems are transitioning from incandes- cent to compact fluorescent lamp (CFL) and light

Short, Daniel

35

Electronic Compact Fluorescent Lamps  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This EPRI Technical Update addresses the fastest growing energy efficient light source the electronic compact fluorescent lamp (CFL). Business and technical market factors (Chapter 2) explain the past and future growth of the CFL market while emphasizing future technical improvements along with discussion of the importance of utility involvement in helping their customers make the switch from incandescent lamps to CFLs. The basic CFL technology is covered in Chapter 3 including test results for selected ...

2007-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

36

A light diet for a giant appetite: An assessment of China's proposed fluorescent lamp standard  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Green Lights Program to promote efficient lighting products through public education, consumer incentives, national product testing, and investments

Lin, Jiang

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

New and Underutilized Technology: Efficient High Bay Fluorescent Lighting |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Efficient High Bay Fluorescent Efficient High Bay Fluorescent Lighting New and Underutilized Technology: Efficient High Bay Fluorescent Lighting October 7, 2013 - 8:54am Addthis The following information outlines key deployment considerations for efficient high bay fluorescent lighting within the Federal sector. Benefits Efficient high bay fluorescent lighting can include either T5 or T8 fluorescent lighting systems for high-bay applications currently using metal halide fixtures. Fluorescent fixtures offer better light distribution, better light maintenance over the life of the lamp, improved color quality, and on-off control (re-strike time) with lower energy consumption. Application Efficient high bay fluorescent lighting is applicable for facilities containing high bay areas. Key Factors for Deployment

38

How Energy-Efficient Light Bulbs Compare with Traditional Incandescents |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy-Efficient Light Bulbs Compare with Traditional Energy-Efficient Light Bulbs Compare with Traditional Incandescents How Energy-Efficient Light Bulbs Compare with Traditional Incandescents July 29, 2012 - 6:25pm Addthis Energy-efficient light bulbs are available today and could save you about $50 per year in energy costs when you replace 15 traditional incandescent bulbs in your home. Energy-efficient light bulbs are available today and could save you about $50 per year in energy costs when you replace 15 traditional incandescent bulbs in your home. Compared to traditional incandescents, energy-efficient lightbulbs such as energy-saving incandescents, compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs), and light emitting diodes (LEDs) have the following advantages: Typically use about 25%-80% less energy, saving you money

39

Survey and Forecast of Marketplace Supply and Demand for Energy-Efficient Lighting Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Utility incentive programs have placed significant demands on the suppliers of certain types of energy-efficient lighting products--particularly compact fluorescent lamps and electronic ballasts. Two major federal programs may soon place even greater demands on the lighting industry. This report assesses the program-induced demand for efficient lighting products and their likely near-term supply.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Energy-efficient lighting system for television  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A light control system for a television camera which adjusts the power to lamps illuminating the camera viewing area to provide only sufficient artificial illumination necessary to keep the camera iris substantially open is described.

Cawthorne, D.C.

1986-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lamps lighting efficiency" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Arnold Schwarzenegger LIGHTING RESEARCH PROGRAM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fluorescent task lamp. The prototype used commercially available materials: 1watt light emitting diodes to the mounting board. Development of LightEmitting Diode Task Lamp using Advanced Technologies: Prototype 2 lightemitting diode task lamp. The problem of developing an energy efficient light emitting diode task lamp

42

Energy Efficient Lighting Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Road Vista, San Diego, CA [200823- 0] Light Laboratory, Inc ... GA. CSA Group, Alpharetta, GA [200732- 0] Cooper Lighting Photometric Laboratory ...

2013-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

43

New Lighting Fixtures: Combining Creativity and Style with Energy Efficiency  

SciTech Connect

This article for a building trade magazine describes a national design competition for energy efficient lighting sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, the American Lighting Association, and the Consortium for Energy Efficiency, with winners announced at ALA's Annual Conference May 14, 2004, in Tucson. The Lighting for Tomorrow competition was the first national lighting fixture design competition focusing on energy-efficient residential lighting. The competition invited fixture manufacturers and designers to come up with beautiful, functional lighting fixtures that also happen to be energy efficient. Fixtures were required to use a ''dedicated'' energy-efficient light source, such as a pin-based fluorescent lamp that cannot be replaced with a screw-in incandescent bulb. Fixtures also had to meet a minimum energy efficiency level that eliminated use of incandescent and halogen lamps, leaving the door open only to fluorescent sources and LEDs. More than 150 paper designs were submitted in the first phase of the competition, in 2003. Of those, 24 finalists were invited to submit working prototypes in 2004, and the winners were announced in May. The Grand Prize of $10,000 went to American Fluorescent of Waukegan, Illinois, for its ''Salem'' chandelier. Some winning fixtures are already available through Lowe's Home Improvement Centers.

Gordon, Kelly L.; Foster, Rebecca; McGowan, Terry

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Energy-efficient lighting system for television  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A light control system for a television camera comprises an artificial light control system which is cooperative with an iris control system. This artificial light control system adjusts the power to lamps illuminating the camera viewing area to provide only sufficient artificial illumination necessary to provide a sufficient video signal when the camera iris is substantially open.

Cawthorne, Duane C. (Amarillo, TX)

1987-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

45

LED lamp  

SciTech Connect

There is herein described a lamp for providing white light comprising a plurality of light sources positioned on a substrate. Each of said light sources comprises a blue light emitting diode (LED) and a dome that substantially covers said LED. A first portion of said blue light from said LEDs is transmitted through said domes and a second portion of said blue light is converted into a red light by a first phosphor contained in said domes. A cover is disposed over all of said light sources that transmits at least a portion of said red and blue light emitted by said light sources. The cover contains a second phosphor that emits a yellow light in response to said blue light. The red, blue and yellow light combining to form the white light and the white light having a color rendering index (CRI) of at least about 80.

Galvez, Miguel; Grossman, Kenneth; Betts, David

2013-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

46

Lighting Group: Sources and Ballasts: LED Task Light  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

light The goal of this project is to accelerate the use of energy efficient light emitting diode (LED) technology for general lighting applications by developing a task lamp...

47

Light pipe - design for efficiency  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The high cost and availability of materials which are clear enough to transmit light without absorption has limited the idea of piping large-scale quantities of light. The light pipe uses the principle of Total Internal Reflection, with the light guided by very accurate prisms. The transmission of light directed into the end of a Light Pipe at an angle of less than 27.6 degrees is theoretically 100% efficient. The author describes its uses and advantages for lighting offices, cold storage areas, difficult access and hazardous areas, and for solar lighting. Future directions will be to improve the economics and accuracy of the technology. 4 references, 2 figures.

Hockey, S.N.

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

NVLAP Energy Efficient Lighting Products LAP  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Energy Efficient Lighting Products LAP. ... In addition, NIST Handbook 150-1 contains specific requirements for energy efficient lighting laboratories. ...

2013-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

49

Aperture lamp  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A discharge lamp includes means for containing a light emitting fill, the fill being capable of absorbing light at one wavelength and re-emitting the light at a different wavelength, the light emitted from the fill having a first spectral power distribution in the absence of reflection of light back into the fill; means for exciting the fill to cause the fill to emit light; and means for reflecting some of the light emitted by the fill back into the fill while allowing some light to exit, the exiting light having a second spectral power distribution with proportionately more light in the visible region as compared to the first spectral power distribution, wherein the light re-emitted by the fill is shifted in wavelength with respect to the absorbed light and the magnitude of the shift is in relation to an effective optical path length. Another discharge lamp includes an envelope; a fill which emits light when excited disposed in the envelope; a source of excitation power coupled to the fill to excite the fill and cause the fill to emit light; and a reflective ceramic structure disposed around the envelope and defining an light emitting opening, wherein the structure comprises a sintered body built up directly on the envelope and made from a combination of alumina and silica.

MacLennan, Donald A. (Gaithersburg, MD); Turner, Brian P. (Damascus, MD)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Independence Power and Light - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Independence Power and Light - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Independence Power and Light - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Independence Power and Light - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Design & Remodeling Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Maximum Rebate $20,000, or 30% of the total project cost annually per organization Program Info State Missouri Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount High Performance T-8 Systems: $20-$30 Reduced-Wattage T-8 Systems: $20-$30 Standard T-8 Lamp: $2 Standard T-8 Electric Ballast: $10 400W HID Replacement (250W or less T8, T5, or T5HO Fluorescent): $75 Pulse Start Metal Halide Fixture: $50

51

Pupillary efficient lighting system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A lighting system having at least two independent lighting subsystems each with a different ratio of scotopic illumination to photopic illumination. The radiant energy in the visible region of the spectrum of the lighting subsystems can be adjusted relative to each other so that the total scotopic illumination of the combined system and the total photopic illumination of the combined system can be varied independently. The dilation or contraction of the pupil of an eye is controlled by the level of scotopic illumination and because the scotopic and photopic illumination can be separately controlled, the system allows the pupil size to be varied independently of the level of photopic illumination. Hence, the vision process can be improved for a given level of photopic illumination. 5 figs.

Berman, S.M.; Jewett, D.L.

1989-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

52

Pupillary efficient lighting system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A lighting system having at least two independent lighting subsystems each with a different ratio of scotopic illumination to photopic illumination. The radiant energy in the visible region of the spectrum of the lighting subsystems can be adjusted relative to each other so that the total scotopic illumination of the combined system and the total photopic illumination of the combined system can be varied independently. The dilation or contraction of the pupil of an eye is controlled by the level of scotopic illumination and because the scotopic and photopic illumination can be separately controlled, the system allows the pupil size to be varied independently of the level of photopic illumination. Hence, the vision process can be improved for a given level of photopic illumination.

Berman, Samuel M. (San Francisco, CA); Jewett, Don L. (Mill Valley, CA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

NIST Highlight about spectrally tunable lighting facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... white light produced by fluorescent lamps? Which spectral combination gives the best color quality and energy efficiency? ...

2012-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

54

DOE Opens Investigation into Alleged Lighting Efficiency Violations |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Opens Investigation into Alleged Lighting Efficiency Violations Opens Investigation into Alleged Lighting Efficiency Violations DOE Opens Investigation into Alleged Lighting Efficiency Violations March 24, 2010 - 4:36pm Addthis Today, the U.S. Department of Energy announced it had issued subpoenas to three companies who were identified as selling certain torchiere lamps that failed to meet federal energy efficiency standards. Under the subpoenas, Target Corporation, Adesso, Inc. and Habitex Corporation are required to submit detailed information about the design of these products and how the companies marketed and sold them in the U.S. These investigations are part of the ongoing efforts at the Department of Energy and across the Obama Administration to strengthen and enforce federal energy efficiency standards that will save money for consumers and

55

Cheyenne Light, Fuel and Power (Electric) - Commercial Energy Efficiency  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Electric) - Commercial Energy Electric) - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (Wyoming) Cheyenne Light, Fuel and Power (Electric) - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (Wyoming) < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Savings Category Other Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Manufacturing Maximum Rebate Custom: 50% of project cost Program Info Start Date 06/09/2011 State Wyoming Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount T8 Fixtures: $5 - $18 /system or $0.50 /lamp Fluorescents: $4 - $125 CFLs: $8 - $25 Indirect Lighting: $16 - $24 Pulse Start Metal Halide Fixtures: $25 - $65 Lighting Controls: $12 - $35 Variable Frequency Drive: $30 /hp Totally Enclosed Fan-Cooled: $10 - $600 Open Drip-Proof: $10 - $600 Custom: Buy down to 2 year pay back or 50% of cost, whichever is less

56

Department of Energy Opens Investigation into Alleged Lighting Efficiency  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Opens Investigation into Alleged Lighting Opens Investigation into Alleged Lighting Efficiency Violations Department of Energy Opens Investigation into Alleged Lighting Efficiency Violations March 24, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - Today, the U.S. Department of Energy announced it had issued subpoenas to three companies who were identified as selling certain torchiere lamps that failed to meet federal energy efficiency standards. Under the subpoenas, Target Corporation, Adesso, Inc. and Habitex Corporation are required to submit detailed information about the design of these products and how the companies marketed and sold them in the U.S. These investigations are part of the ongoing efforts at the Department of Energy and across the Obama Administration to strengthen and enforce federal energy efficiency standards that will save money for consumers and

57

Columbia Water & Light- HVAC and Lighting Efficiency Rebates  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Columbia Water & Light (CWL) offers rebates to its commercial and industrial customers for the purchase of high efficiency HVAC installations and efficient lighting. Incentives for certain...

58

Whole Product Performance for 2X High-Efficiency Incandescent Lamps  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

FirstEnergy (FE) approached EPRI’s Lighting Lab in 2011 to validate the performance of a newly developed “2X” incandescent lighting technology developed by a manufacturing company in their service territory. This manufacturer claimed that their product was identical in light output, but twice (2X) as efficient as traditional 100W incandescent bulbs. In collaboration with FE, EPRI conducted a series of tests to independently verify the energy and photometric performance of this ...

2012-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

59

Performance of electronic ballasts and other new lighting equipment: (Phase 2, The 34-watt F40 rapid start T-12 fluorescent lamp): Final report  

SciTech Connect

This study has measured the performance of energy-saving 34-watt F40, T-12, rapid-start, lite white fluorescent lamps being operated by solid-state ballasts and lighting control equipment. The performances of these lamp systems are compared with those of 40-watt F40, T-12 rapid-start cool white fluorescent lamp systems studied in the prior phase of this project. With the 34-watt F40 lamps and various solid-state ballasts, system efficacy ranged from 67 to 84 lumens per watt and ballast factor from 0.756 to 0.908. Average system efficacy using the 34-watt lamps exceeded that of systems using 40-watt lamps and the same solid-state ballasts by only 1 percent even though the 34-watt lamps is about 6 percent more efficacious than the 40-watt lamp. This apparent discrepancy is due to increased ballast losses when operating the 34-watt lamps. However, the systems efficacy of the 34-watt lamps used with a solid-state ballast exceeded that of a 34-watt, two-lamp system using the standard core-coil ballast by as much as 29 percent. A T-8 fluorescent lamp system with a smaller lamp diameter was also included in the study. Operating this lamp with a solid-state ballast produced a high system efficacy of 90 lumens per watt, a 39 percent improvement over the efficacy of a 40-watt F40 system using the standard core-coil ballast. The use of static controllers with 34-watt F40 lamps can result in excessive flickering (46 percent) and the generation of a second harmonic as high as 96 percent of the fundamental frequency. The dynamic controllers, when used to dim the 34-watt lamps generally cannot be dimmed as low as the 40-watt lamp system without flickering. In general, the 34-watt energy-saving lamps are appropriate as a retrofit to reduce illumination levels. However, for new construction, the 40-watt F40 argon filled lamps cost less, perform better, and provide a more reliable system. 5 refs., 27 figs., 9 tabs.

Verderber, R.R.; Morse, O.

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Buildings Energy Data Book: 7.7 Efficiency Standards for Lighting  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

Efficiency Standards for Lighting Efficiency Standards for Lighting March 2011 7.7.2 Efficiency Standards for General Service Fluorescent Lamps Effective for products manufactured before July 14, 2012 Minimum Nominal Lamp Average Lamp Lamp Type (1) Wattage (W) Minimum CRI Efficacy (lm/W) Effective Date 4-Foot Medium Bipin >35 69 75.0 November 1, 1995 4-Foot Medium Bipin 45 75.0 November 1, 1995 2-Foot U-Shaped >35 69 68.0 November 1, 1995 2-Foot U-Shaped 45 64.0 November 1, 1995 8-Foot Slimline >65 69 80.0 May 1, 1994 8-Foot Slimline 45 80.0 May 1, 1994 8-Foot High Output >100 69 80.0 May 1, 1994 8-Foot High Output 45 80.0 May 1, 1994 Effective for products manufactured on or after July 14, 2012 Minimum Correlated Color Average Lamp Lamp Type Temperature (K) Efficacy (lm/W) 4-Foot Medium Bipin 89 4-Foot Medium Bipin 88 2-Foot U-Shaped

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lamps lighting efficiency" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Cedarburg Light & Water Utility - Residential Energy Efficiency...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cedarburg Light & Water Utility - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Cedarburg Light & Water Utility - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Eligibility Low-Income...

62

Cedarburg Light & Water Utility - Commercial Energy Efficiency...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Cedarburg Light & Water Utility - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Local...

63

2X Incandescent Lamp Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The incandescent lamp was developed during the 1800s, largely reaching the design of the traditional incandescent lamp as we know it by the late 1800s. This lamp remained largely unchanged for years, providing most commercial and residential lighting demands into the 1950s and residential lighting into the 2000s. As new lighting technologies became available, the low efficacy, measured in lumens per watt, of the traditional incandescent lamp became an issue which many wanted to ...

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

A projective LED dental lamp design.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Halogen lamps are mostly applied as a light source to the traditional lamp for medical treatment due to its proper color temperature, but it has… (more)

Chung, Yu-Lin

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Advanced Lighting Technologies:Energy Efficiency and Power Quality of Lighting Sources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

his EPRI technical update is the third in a series of technical assessments of advanced lighting technologies. A total of seven lighting products were assessed in 2013: low cost screw based light-emitting diode (LED) lamps, retrofit LED ceiling fixtures, suspended LED fixtures, LED-based 2x4 troffers, LED high bay fixtures, innovative LED screw based lamps, and LED hospitality lighting. Prior to beginning an in-depth assessment, the EPRI Lighting Group evaluated each of the tested technologies to ...

2013-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

66

Electronic Radio-Frequency (Electrodeless) Induction Lamps: A Fluorescent Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This EPRI Technical Update addresses an expanding energy efficient light source electronic radio-frequency (electrodeless) induction lamps. Business and technical market factors (Chapter 2) use the past and future growth of the CFL market to illustrate the potential for the induction lighting market while emphasizing future technical improvements. Discussion of the importance of utility involvement in helping their customers consider induction lamps for high-efficiency fluorescent applications with long-...

2007-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

67

Columbia Water and Light - HVAC and Lighting Efficiency Rebates |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Columbia Water and Light - HVAC and Lighting Efficiency Rebates Columbia Water and Light - HVAC and Lighting Efficiency Rebates Columbia Water and Light - HVAC and Lighting Efficiency Rebates < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Maximum Rebate Lighting: 50% of invoiced cost up to $22,500 Program Info State Missouri Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount HVAC Replacements: $570 - $3,770 Lighting: $300/kW reduction or half of project cost Provider Columbia Water and Light Columbia Water and Light (CWL) offers rebates to its commercial and industrial customers for the purchase of high efficiency HVAC installations and efficient lighting. Incentives for certain measures are based upon the

68

Light Duty Efficient, Clean Combustion  

SciTech Connect

Cummins has successfully completed the Light Duty Efficient Clean Combustion (LDECC) cooperative program with DoE. This program was established in 2007 in support of the Department of Energy's Vehicles Technologies Advanced Combustion and Emissions Control initiative to remove critical barriers to the commercialization of advanced, high efficiency, emissions compliant internal combustion (IC) engines for light duty vehicles. Work in this area expanded the fundamental knowledge of engine combustion to new regimes and advanced the knowledge of fuel requirements for these diesel engines to realize their full potential. All of the following objectives were met with fuel efficiency improvement targets exceeded: (1) Improve light duty vehicle (5000 lb. test weight) fuel efficiency by 10.5% over today's state-of-the-art diesel engine on the FTP city drive cycle; (2) Develop and design an advanced combustion system plus aftertreatment system that synergistically meets Tier 2 Bin 5 NOx and PM emissions standards while demonstrating the efficiency improvements; (3) Maintain power density comparable to that of current conventional engines for the applicable vehicle class; and (4) Evaluate different fuel components and ensure combustion system compatibility with commercially available biofuels. Key accomplishments include: (1) A 25% improvement in fuel efficiency was achieved with the advanced LDECC engine equipped with a novel SCR aftertreatment system compared to the 10.5% target; (2) An 11% improvement in fuel efficiency was achieved with the advanced LDECC engine and no NOx aftertreamtent system; (3) Tier 2 Bin 5 and SFTP II emissions regulations were met with the advanced LDECC engine equipped with a novel SCR aftertreatment system; (4) Tier 2 Bin 5 emissions regulations were met with the advanced LDECC engine and no NOx aftertreatment, but SFTP II emissions regulations were not met for the US06 test cycle - Additional technical barriers exist for the no NOx aftertreatment engine; (5) Emissions and efficiency targets were reached with the use of biodiesel. A variety of biofuel feedstocks (soy, rapeseed, etc.) was investigated; (6) The advanced LDECC engine with low temperature combustion was compatible with commercially available biofuels as evaluated by engine performance testing and not durability testing; (7) The advanced LDECC engine equipped with a novel SCR aftertreatment system is the engine system architecture that is being further developed by the Cummins product development organization. Cost reduction and system robustness activities have been identified for future deployment; (8) The new engine and aftertreatment component technologies are being developed by the Cummins Component Business units (e.g. fuel system, turbomachinery, aftertreatment, electronics, etc.) to ensure commercial viability and deployment; (9) Cummins has demonstrated that the technologies developed for this program are scalable across the complete light duty engine product offerings (2.8L to 6.7L engines); and (10) Key subsystems developed include - sequential two stage turbo, combustions system for low temperature combustion, novel SCR aftertreatment system with feedback control, and high pressure common rail fuel system. An important element of the success of this project was leveraging Cummins engine component technologies. Innovation in component technology coupled with system integration is enabling Cummins to move forward with the development of high efficiency clean diesel products with a long term goal of reaching a 40% improvement in thermal efficiency for the engine plus aftertreatment system. The 40% improvement is in-line with the current light duty vehicle efficiency targets set by the 2010 DoE Vehicle Technologies MYPP and supported through co-operative projects such as the Cummins Advanced Technology Powertrains for Light-Duty Vehicles (ATP-LD) started in 2010.

Donald Stanton

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

69

Light Duty Efficient, Clean Combustion  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Cummins has successfully completed the Light Duty Efficient Clean Combustion (LDECC) cooperative program with DoE. This program was established in 2007 in support of the Department of Energy's Vehicles Technologies Advanced Combustion and Emissions Control initiative to remove critical barriers to the commercialization of advanced, high efficiency, emissions compliant internal combustion (IC) engines for light duty vehicles. Work in this area expanded the fundamental knowledge of engine combustion to new regimes and advanced the knowledge of fuel requirements for these diesel engines to realize their full potential. All of the following objectives were met with fuel efficiency improvement targets exceeded: (1) Improve light duty vehicle (5000 lb. test weight) fuel efficiency by 10.5% over today's state-of-the-art diesel engine on the FTP city drive cycle; (2) Develop and design an advanced combustion system plus aftertreatment system that synergistically meets Tier 2 Bin 5 NOx and PM emissions standards while demonstrating the efficiency improvements; (3) Maintain power density comparable to that of current conventional engines for the applicable vehicle class; and (4) Evaluate different fuel components and ensure combustion system compatibility with commercially available biofuels. Key accomplishments include: (1) A 25% improvement in fuel efficiency was achieved with the advanced LDECC engine equipped with a novel SCR aftertreatment system compared to the 10.5% target; (2) An 11% improvement in fuel efficiency was achieved with the advanced LDECC engine and no NOx aftertreamtent system; (3) Tier 2 Bin 5 and SFTP II emissions regulations were met with the advanced LDECC engine equipped with a novel SCR aftertreatment system; (4) Tier 2 Bin 5 emissions regulations were met with the advanced LDECC engine and no NOx aftertreatment, but SFTP II emissions regulations were not met for the US06 test cycle - Additional technical barriers exist for the no NOx aftertreatment engine; (5) Emissions and efficiency targets were reached with the use of biodiesel. A variety of biofuel feedstocks (soy, rapeseed, etc.) was investigated; (6) The advanced LDECC engine with low temperature combustion was compatible with commercially available biofuels as evaluated by engine performance testing and not durability testing; (7) The advanced LDECC engine equipped with a novel SCR aftertreatment system is the engine system architecture that is being further developed by the Cummins product development organization. Cost reduction and system robustness activities have been identified for future deployment; (8) The new engine and aftertreatment component technologies are being developed by the Cummins Component Business units (e.g. fuel system, turbomachinery, aftertreatment, electronics, etc.) to ensure commercial viability and deployment; (9) Cummins has demonstrated that the technologies developed for this program are scalable across the complete light duty engine product offerings (2.8L to 6.7L engines); and (10) Key subsystems developed include - sequential two stage turbo, combustions system for low temperature combustion, novel SCR aftertreatment system with feedback control, and high pressure common rail fuel system. An important element of the success of this project was leveraging Cummins engine component technologies. Innovation in component technology coupled with system integration is enabling Cummins to move forward with the development of high efficiency clean diesel products with a long term goal of reaching a 40% improvement in thermal efficiency for the engine plus aftertreatment system. The 40% improvement is in-line with the current light duty vehicle efficiency targets set by the 2010 DoE Vehicle Technologies MYPP and supported through co-operative projects such as the Cummins Advanced Technology Powertrains for Light-Duty Vehicles (ATP-LD) started in 2010.

Donald Stanton

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

70

Light Duty Efficient, Clean Combustion  

SciTech Connect

Cummins has successfully completed the Light Duty Efficient Clean Combustion (LDECC) cooperative program with DoE. This program was established in 2007 in support of the Department of Energy’s Vehicles Technologies Advanced Combustion and Emissions Control initiative to remove critical barriers to the commercialization of advanced, high efficiency, emissions compliant internal combustion (IC) engines for light duty vehicles. Work in this area expanded the fundamental knowledge of engine combustion to new regimes and advanced the knowledge of fuel requirements for these diesel engines to realize their full potential. All of the following objectives were met with fuel efficiency improvement targets exceeded: 1. Improve light duty vehicle (5000 lb. test weight) fuel efficiency by 10.5% over today’s state-ofthe- art diesel engine on the FTP city drive cycle 2. Develop & design an advanced combustion system plus aftertreatment system that synergistically meets Tier 2 Bin 5 NOx and PM emissions standards while demonstrating the efficiency improvements. 3. Maintain power density comparable to that of current conventional engines for the applicable vehicle class. 4. Evaluate different fuel components and ensure combustion system compatibility with commercially available biofuels. Key accomplishments include: ? A 25% improvement in fuel efficiency was achieved with the advanced LDECC engine equipped with a novel SCR aftertreatment system compared to the 10.5% target ? An 11% improvement in fuel efficiency was achieved with the advanced LDECC engine and no NOx aftertreamtent system ? Tier 2 Bin 5 and SFTP II emissions regulations were met with the advanced LDECC engine equipped with a novel SCR aftertreatment system ? Tier 2 Bin 5 emissions regulations were met with the advanced LDECC engine and no NOx aftertreatment, but SFTP II emissions regulations were not met for the US06 test cycle – Additional technical barriers exist for the no NOx aftertreatment engine ? Emissions and efficiency targets were reached with the use of biodiesel. A variety of biofuel feedstocks (soy, rapeseed, etc.) was investigated. ? The advanced LDECC engine with low temperature combustion was compatible with commercially available biofuels as evaluated by engine performance testing and not durability testing. ? The advanced LDECC engine equipped with a novel SCR aftertreatment system is the engine system architecture that is being further developed by the Cummins product development organization. Cost reduction and system robustness activities have been identified for future deployment. ? The new engine and aftertreatment component technologies are being developed by the Cummins Component Business units (e.g. fuel system, turbomachinery, aftertreatment, electronics, etc.) to ensure commercial viability and deployment ? Cummins has demonstrated that the technologies developed for this program are scalable across the complete light duty engine product offerings (2.8L to 6.7L engines) ? Key subsystems developed include – sequential two stage turbo, combustions system for low temperature combustion, novel SCR aftertreatment system with feedback control, and high pressure common rail fuel system An important element of the success of this project was leveraging Cummins engine component technologies. Innovation in component technology coupled with system integration is enabling Cummins to move forward with the development of high efficiency clean diesel products with a long term goal of reaching a 40% improvement in thermal efficiency for the engine plus aftertreatment system. The 40% improvement is in-line with the current light duty vehicle efficiency targets set by the 2010 DoE Vehicle Technologies MYPP and supported through co-operative projects such as the Cummins Advanced Technology Powertrains for Light- Duty Vehicles (ATP-LD) started in 2010.

Stanton, Donald W

2011-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

71

GLASS AND GLASS-DERIVATIVE SEALS FOR USE IN ENERGY-EFFICIENT FUEL CELLS AND LAMPS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As the project approaches the end of the first year, the materials screening components of the work are ahead of schedule, while all other tasks are on schedule. For solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC), a series of 16 sealing glasses have been prepared and characterized. Traditional melting was used to prepare all of the glasses, and the sol-gel approach has been used to prepare some of the glasses as well as other compositions that might be viable because of the low processing temperatures afforded by the sol-gel method. The glass characterization included measurements of the viscosity and thermal expansion of the glasses, as well as the thermal expansion of the partly crystalline glass ceramics. In addition, the wetting and sintering behavior of all glasses has been measured, as well as the crystallization behavior. The time and temperature at which crystalline phases form from the glasses has been determined for all of the glasses. Each glass ceramic contains at least two crystalline phases, and most of the crystalline phases have been positively identified. Room temperature leak testing has been completed for all sealants, and experiments are in progress to determine the DC electrochemical degradation and degradation in wet hydrogen. The second component of the work, focused on seals for higher-temperature discharge lighting, has focused on determining the phase relations in the yttria--alumina--silica system at various silica levels. Again, traditional melting and sol-gel synthesis have been employed, and the sol-gel method was successful for preparing new phases that were discovered during the work. High temperature diffraction and annealing studies have clarified the phase relations for the samples studies, although additional work remains. Four new phases have been identified and synthesized in pure form, from which full structure solutions were obtained as well as the anisotropic thermal expansion for each phase. Functional testing of lamps are on on-going and will be analyzed during year 2 of the contract.

Scott Misture; Arun Varshneya; Matthew Hall; Sylvia DeCarr; Steve Bancheri

2004-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

72

Guide to Energy Efficient Lighting  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Today's CFLs Today's CFLs Although CFLs have been available for residential use since the 1980s, they have made significant strides in quality and popularity in recent years. Today, CFLs are the most cost-effective, energy-efficient choice readily available on the market. A CFL produces the same amount of light as a comparable incan- descent, but uses 75% less energy, produces 75% less heat, and lasts up to 10 times longer than an incandescent bulb.

73

Energy-efficient lighting for the home  

SciTech Connect

This is a guide to energy efficient residential lighting systems. Topics include discussion of the types of bulbs available; lighting basics about how light is produced; light quality; flicker and buzz of lighting systems; how to arrange the lights and which one goes where; additional hints on using lighting.

Byrne, J.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Peninsula Light Company - Commercial Efficient Lighting Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Peninsula Light Company - Commercial Efficient Lighting Rebate Peninsula Light Company - Commercial Efficient Lighting Rebate Program Peninsula Light Company - Commercial Efficient Lighting Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Savings Category Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Program Info State District of Columbia Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount General: 30% - 70% of cost Provider Peninsula Light Company Peninsula Light Company (PLC) offers a rebate program for commercial customers who wish to upgrade to energy efficient lighting. Participating customers must be served by PLC commercial service. Customers who upgrade to highly efficient fixtures and systems are eligible to receive a rebate generally covering 30% - 70% of the project cost. These retrofits improve light quality and reduce energy costs in participating facilities. PLC

75

Glass and glass-derivative seals for use in energy-efficient fuel cells and lamps  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

For solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC), a series of 18 sealing glasses have been prepared and characterized. From the whole design space, several glasses were ''downselected'' and studied in detail to describe their behaviors in simulated fuel cell environments. One of the glasses was found to outperform all others, including the well-known G18 sealant developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The new glass composition showed lower bulk electrical conductivity, excellent sealing and wetting behavior when sealing under applied load, and qualitatively superior performance when exposed to wet hydrogen for 800 hours. Traditional melting was used to prepare all of the glasses that were studied in detail. The sol-gel approach was used to synthesize several compositions, but it was found that the glasses crystallized very rapidly during heating, precluding sealing. The glass characterization included measurements of the viscosity and thermal expansion of the glasses, as well as the thermal expansion of the partly crystalline glass ceramics. In addition, the wetting and sintering behavior of all glasses has been measured, as well as the crystallization behavior. The time and temperature at which crystalline phases form from the glasses has been determined for all of the glasses. Each glass ceramic contains at least two crystalline phases, and most of the crystalline phases have been positively identified. The body of fundamental data provides a platform for future developments for high temperature sealants, and the newly-developed glass compositions appear promising for large-scale testing. The second component of the work, focused on seals for higher-temperature discharge lighting, has focused on determining the phase relations in the yttria-alumina-silica system at various silica levels. Functional testing of one of the candidate sealants demonstrated that it performs well in current HID lighting applications. Further testing is required to evaluate its performance in next-generation lamps that operate at higher temperatures, but the baseline phase equilibria and crystallization behavior has been established for additional development. Again, traditional melting and sol-gel synthesis have been employed, and the sol-gel method was successful for preparing new phases that were discovered during the work. Four new phases have been identified and synthesized in pure form, from which full structure solutions were obtained as well as the anisotropic thermal expansion for each phase.

Scott Misture; Arun Varshineya; Matthew Hall; Sylvia DeCarr; Steve Bancheri

2005-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

76

Inductive tuners for microwave driven discharge lamps  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An RF powered electrodeless lamp utilizing an inductive tuner in the waveguide which couples the RF power to the lamp cavity, for reducing reflected RF power and causing the lamp to operate efficiently.

Simpson, James E. (Gaithersburg, MD)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Kansas City Power and Light - Commercial/Industrial Energy Efficiency...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

fixture Standard T8 LampsBallasts: 2 - 10unit Lighting Power Density: 1watt per square foot High Intensity Fluorescent: 50fixture Pulse Star Metal Halide: 50fixture...

78

Energy Efficiency Through Lighting Upgrades  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lighting upgrades including neon to LED, incandescent to CFL's and T-12 to T-8 and T-5's were completed through this grant. A total of 16 Chickasaw nation facilities decreased their carbon footprint because of these grant funds. Calculations used were based on comparing the energy usage from the previous year�¢����s average and the current energy usage. For facilities without a full year's set of energy bills, the month after installation was compared to the same month from the previous year. Overall, the effect the lighting change-outs had for the gaming centers and casinos far exceeded expectations. For the Madill Gaming Center; both an interior and exterior upgrade was performed which resulted in a 31% decrease in energy consumption. This same reduction was seen in every facility that participated in the grant. Just by simply changing out light bulbs to newer energy efficient equivalents, a decrease in energy usage can be achieved and this was validated by the return on investment seen at Chickasaw Nation facilities. Along with the technical project tasks were awareness sessions presented at Chickasaw Head Starts. The positive message of environmental stewardship was passed down to head start students and passed along to Chickasaw employees. Excitement was created in those that learned what they could do to help reduce their energy bills and many followed through and took the idea home. For a fairy low cost, the general public can also use this technique to lower their energy consumption both at home and at work. Although the idea behind the project was somewhat simple, true benefits have been gained through environmental awareness and reductions of energy costs.

Kara Berst; Maria Howeth

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Research on the Best Market Applications for LightLab Energy-Saving Lamps.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Nowadays, lighting represents 20% of the global electricity consumption. Light can be produced using different technologies but more than 100 years after its invention,… (more)

Vilalta Cea, Raul

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Energy Performance of Compact Fluorescent Lamps  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This power quality (PQ) case study presents the results of tests performed at the Worcester Polytechnic Institute, in contract with the EPRI Power Electronics Applications Center (PEAC), to determine the light output, power consumption, efficiency, and power factor of off-the-shelf electronic and magnetic compact fluorescent lamps.

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lamps lighting efficiency" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Flicker Performance of Modern Lighting Technologies including Impacts of Dimmers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The existing industry standards on flicker measurement and assessment are based on the response of general purpose incandescent lamps. However, worldwide these lamps are being replaced with more energy efficient lamps including Compact Fluorescent Lamps (CFLs) and Light emitting Diode (LED) lamps. In order to keep the flicker standards relevant, the industry standard bodies on the subject are in need of the evidence that compares the flicker performance of new lighting ...

2012-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

82

Solid-state semiconductors are better alternatives to arc-lamps for efficient and uniform illumination in minimal access surgery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of technical and ergonomic limitations. White light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are energy-efficient solid- state Illumination Á Light-emitting diode Á Minimal access surgery Á Solid-state semiconductor In the 1950s

Rosso, Lula

83

Analysis of federal policy options for improving US lighting energy efficiency: Commercial and residential buildings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) has recognized the opportunity to achieve energy, economic, and environmental benefits by promoting energy-efficient lighting through federal policies, including lighting standards, financial incentives, and information programs. To assist in this process, the Office of Conservation and Renewable Energy's Office of Codes and Standards invited Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory to assess prospective national impacts for a variety of policy options. Some progress has already been made in developing lighting policies at both the federal and state levels. The US DOE's Office of Building Technologies has evaluated lighting efficiency incentives as part of its analysis for the National Energy Strategy. Fluorescent and incandescent lamp standards are included in the national Energy Policy Act of 1992 (P.L. 102-486, October 24, 1992). A few states have analyzed or implemented lamp and luminaire standards. Many policy-related issues merit further investigation. For example, there is considerable debate over issues such as mandatory or voluntary standards versus component labeling and other education-oriented strategies. Several different technologies are involved that interact with each other-lamps (incandescent, compact fluorescent, and HID), ballasts (for fluorescent and HID lamps), and fixtures with reflectors and lenses. Control systems and operation patterns must also be considered (timers, automated dimming, or occupancy sensors). Lighting applications are diverse, ranging from offices, restaurants, hallways, hospital operating rooms, to exterior lights. Lighting energy use influences heating and cooling requirements in buildings. Successful lighting system design must also address interactions between architectural design elements and daylighting availability. Proper system installation and ongoing operation and maintenance are crucial. The economic aspects of the preceding points must also be considered for policy making.

Atkinson, B.A.; McMahon, J.E.; Mills, E.; Chan, P.; Chan, T.W.; Eto, J.H.; Jennings, J.D.; Koomey, J.G.; Lo, K.W.; Lecar, M.; Price, L.; Rubinstein, F.; Sezgen, O.; Wenzel, T.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Analysis of federal policy options for improving US lighting energy efficiency: Commercial and residential buildings  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (DOE) has recognized the opportunity to achieve energy, economic, and environmental benefits by promoting energy-efficient lighting through federal policies, including lighting standards, financial incentives, and information programs. To assist in this process, the Office of Conservation and Renewable Energy`s Office of Codes and Standards invited Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory to assess prospective national impacts for a variety of policy options. Some progress has already been made in developing lighting policies at both the federal and state levels. The US DOE`s Office of Building Technologies has evaluated lighting efficiency incentives as part of its analysis for the National Energy Strategy. Fluorescent and incandescent lamp standards are included in the national Energy Policy Act of 1992 (P.L. 102-486, October 24, 1992). A few states have analyzed or implemented lamp and luminaire standards. Many policy-related issues merit further investigation. For example, there is considerable debate over issues such as mandatory or voluntary standards versus component labeling and other education-oriented strategies. Several different technologies are involved that interact with each other-lamps (incandescent, compact fluorescent, and HID), ballasts (for fluorescent and HID lamps), and fixtures with reflectors and lenses. Control systems and operation patterns must also be considered (timers, automated dimming, or occupancy sensors). Lighting applications are diverse, ranging from offices, restaurants, hallways, hospital operating rooms, to exterior lights. Lighting energy use influences heating and cooling requirements in buildings. Successful lighting system design must also address interactions between architectural design elements and daylighting availability. Proper system installation and ongoing operation and maintenance are crucial. The economic aspects of the preceding points must also be considered for policy making.

Atkinson, B.A.; McMahon, J.E.; Mills, E.; Chan, P.; Chan, T.W.; Eto, J.H.; Jennings, J.D.; Koomey, J.G.; Lo, K.W.; Lecar, M.; Price, L.; Rubinstein, F.; Sezgen, O.; Wenzel, T.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Tungsten Lamps as an Affordable Light Source for Testing of Photovoltaic Cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An improved Tungsten light source system for photovoltaic cell testing made from low-cost, commercially available materials is presented as an alternative to standard expensive testing equipment. In this work, spectral correction of the Tungsten light ... Keywords: I-V measurement, Light source, Photovoltaic, Testing

Jeydmer Aristizabal; Badr Omrane; Clint Landrock; Sasan Vosoogh-Grayli; Yindar Chuo; Jasbir N. Patel; Bozena Kaminska; Carlo Menon

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Lighting Options for Homes.  

SciTech Connect

This report covers many aspects of various lighting options for homes. Types of light sources described include natural light, artificial light, incandescent lamps, fluorescent lamps, and high intensity discharge lamps. A light source selection guide gives the physical characteristics of these, design considerations, and common applications. Color, strategies for efficient lighting, and types of lighting are discussed. There is one section giving tips for various situations in specific rooms. Rooms and types of fixtures are shown on a matrix with watts saved by using the recommended type lighting for that room and room location. A major emphasis of this report is saving energy by utilizing the most suitable, recommended lighting option. (BN)

Baker, W.S.

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Avista Utilities - Commercial Lighting Energy Efficiency Program...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Avista Utilities - Commercial Lighting Energy Efficiency Program (Idaho) This is the approved revision of this page, as well...

88

Efficiency Maine Residential Lighting Program (Maine) | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Efficiency Maine Residential Lighting Program (Maine) This is the approved revision of this page, as well as being the most...

89

Westinghouse Pays $50,000 Civil Penalty to Resolve Light Bulb Efficiency  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Westinghouse Pays $50,000 Civil Penalty to Resolve Light Bulb Westinghouse Pays $50,000 Civil Penalty to Resolve Light Bulb Efficiency Violations Westinghouse Pays $50,000 Civil Penalty to Resolve Light Bulb Efficiency Violations December 13, 2010 - 2:12pm Addthis The Department of Energy has successfully resolved the enforcement case against Westinghouse Lighting Corporation for failure to certify its light bulbs as compliant with DOE's federal efficiency requirements and for the sale of at least 29,000 general service fluorescent and medium base compact fluorescent lamps that used more energy than permitted by law. This case reflects DOE's renewed commitment to enforce the federal efficiency requirements systematically and fairly to level the competitive playing field and to ensure that American consumers are buying products that

90

Side-by-Side Testing of Commercial Office Lighting Systems: Two-lamp Fluorescent Fixtures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lighting systems in commercial office buildings are primary determinants of building energy use. In warmer climates, lighting energy use has important implications for building cooling loads as well as those directly associated with illumination tasks. To research the comparative performance of conventional and advanced office lighting systems, Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC) set up the Lighting Flexible Test Facility (LFTF) which allows side-by-side comparison of lighting options in two otherwise identical 2.7 m x 3.7 m (9' x 12') south facing offices. The ceiling of the LFTF contains 0.61 m x 1.2 m (2' x 4') recessed fluorescent fixtures designed to be easily changed. Differing lighting systems were comparatively tested against each other over weeklong periods. Data on power consumption (watts), power quality (power factor), work-plane interior lighting levels (lux), bulb-wall, fixture and plenum temperatures were recorded every 15 minutes on a multi-channel data logger. This data allows realistic analysis of comparative lighting system performance including interactions with daylighting.

Parker, D. S.; Schrum, L.; Sonne, J. K.; Stedman, T. C.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Estimate of federal relighting potential and demand for efficient lighting products  

SciTech Connect

The increasing level of electric utility rebates for energy-efficient lighting retrofits has recently prompted concern over the adequacy of the market supply of energy-efficient lighting products (Energy User News 1991). In support of the U.S. Department of Energy`s Federal Energy Management Program, Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has developed an estimate of the total potential for energy-efficient lighting retrofits in federally owned buildings. This estimate can be used to address the issue of the impact of federal relighting projects on the supply of energy-efficient lighting products. The estimate was developed in 1992, using 1991 data. Any investments in energy-efficient lighting products that occurred in 1992 will reduce the potential estimated here. This analysis proceeds by estimating the existing stock of lighting fixtures in federally owned buildings. The lighting technology screening matrix is then used to determine the minimum life-cycle cost retrofit for each type of existing lighting fixture. Estimates of the existing stock are developed for (1) four types of fluorescent lighting fixtures (2-, 3-, and 4-lamp, F40 4-foot fixtures, and 2-lamp, F96 8-foot fixtures, all with standard magnetic ballasts); (2) one type of incandescent fixture (a 75-watt single bulb fixture); and (3) one type of exit sign (containing two 20-watt incandescent bulbs). Estimates of the existing stock of lighting fixtures in federally owned buildings, estimates of the total potential demand for energy-efficient lighting products if all cost-effective retrofits were undertaken immediately, and total potential annual energy savings (in MWh and dollars), the total investment required to obtain the energy savings and the present value of the efficiency investment, are presented.

Shankle, S.A.; Dirks, J.A.; Elliott, D.B.; Richman, E.E.; Grover, S.E.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Survivability of Electronic Compact Fluorescent Lamps  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This EPRI Technical Report addresses the fastest growing energy efficient light source8212the electronic compact fluorescent lamp (CFL). Because some of the failure modes for screw-in CFLs are different than those for plug-in CFLs, a cursory review of the difference between the two types of CFLs is provided in the first part of Chapter 2. A broad definition of shortened-life CFLs is also provided in Chapter 2 with an emphasis on revisiting mortality curves, the 10-minute lamp start, other relevant defini...

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

93

Max Tech and Beyond: High-Intensity Discharge Lamps  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High-intensity discharge (HID) lamps are most often found in industrial and commercial applications, and are the light source of choice in street and area lighting, and sports stadium illumination. HID lamps are produced in three types - mercury vapor (MV), high pressure sodium (HPS) and metal halide (MH). Of these, MV and MH are considered white-light sources (although the MV exhibits poor color rendering) and HPS produces a yellow-orange color light. A fourth lamp, low-pressure sodium (LPS), is not a HID lamp by definition, but it is used in similar applications and thus is often grouped with HID lamps. With the notable exception of MV which is comparatively inefficient and in decline in the US from both a sales and installed stock point of view; HPS, LPS and MH all have efficacies over 100 lumens per watt. The figure below presents the efficacy trends over time for commercially available HID lamps and LPS, starting with MV and LPS in 1930's followed by the development of HPS and MH in the 1960's. In HID lamps, light is generated by creating an electric arc between two electrodes in an arc tube. The particles in the arc are partially ionized, making them electrically conductive, and a light-emitting 'plasma' is created. This arc occurs within the arc tube, which for most HID lamps is enclosed within an evacuated outer bulb that thermally isolates and protects the hot arc tube from the surroundings. Unlike a fluorescent lamp that produces visible light through down-converting UV light with phosphors, the arc itself is the light source in an HID lamp, emitting visible radiation that is characteristic of the elements present in the plasma. Thus, the mixture of elements included in the arc tube is one critical factor determining the quality of the light emitted from the lamp, including its correlated color temperature (CCT) and color rendering index (CRI). Similar to fluorescent lamps, HID lamps require a ballast to start and maintain stable operating conditions, and this necessitates additional power beyond that used by the lamp itself. HID lamps offer important advantages compared to other lighting technologies, making them well suited for certain applications. HID lamps can be very efficient, have long operating lives, are relatively temperature-insensitive and produce a large quantity of light from a small package. For these reasons, HID lamps are often used when high levels of illumination are required over large areas and where operating and maintenance costs must be kept to a minimum. Furthermore, if the installation has a significant mounting height, high-power HID lamps can offer superior optical performance luminaires, reducing the number of lamps required to illuminate a given area. The indoor environments best suited to HID lamps are those with high ceilings, such as those commonly found in industrial spaces, warehouses, large retail spaces, sports halls and large public areas. Research into efficacy improvements for HID lighting technologies has generally followed market demand for these lamps, which is in decline for MV and LPS, has reached a plateau for HPS and is growing for MH. Several manufacturers interviewed for this study indicated that although solid-state lighting was now receiving the bulk of their company's R&D investment, there are still strong HID lamp research programs, which concentrate on MH technologies, with some limited amount of investment in HPS for specific niche applications (e.g., agricultural greenhouses). LPS and MV lamps are no longer being researched or improved in terms of efficacy or other performance attributes, although some consider MH HID lamps to be the next-generation MV lamp. Thus, the efficacy values of commercially available MV, LPS and HPS lamps are not expected to increase in the next 5 to 10 years. MH lamps, and more specifically, ceramic MH lamps are continuing to improve in efficacy as well as light quality, manufacturability and lamp life. Within an HID lamp, the light-producing plasma must be heated to sufficiently high temperatures to achieve high efficiencie

Scholand, Michael

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Lighting Energy Efficiency in Parking Campaign  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Lighting Energy Efficiency in Parking Lighting Energy Efficiency in Parking (LEEP) Campaign Linda Sandahl Pacific Northwest National Laboratory linda.sandahl@pnnl.gov (503) 417-7554 April 2, 2013 LEEP Campaign 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose & Objectives: Problem Statement While new lighting technologies such as LEDs have the potential for energy savings of 75%, or more when paired with controls, there are both technology and market-related challenges. Technology Challenges

95

Lighting Energy Efficiency in Parking Campaign  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lighting Energy Efficiency in Parking Lighting Energy Efficiency in Parking (LEEP) Campaign Linda Sandahl Pacific Northwest National Laboratory linda.sandahl@pnnl.gov (503) 417-7554 April 2, 2013 LEEP Campaign 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose & Objectives: Problem Statement While new lighting technologies such as LEDs have the potential for energy savings of 75%, or more when paired with controls, there are both technology and market-related challenges. Technology Challenges

96

Fluorescent lamp dimming adaptor kit  

SciTech Connect

An add-on fluorescent lamp dimming adaptor is described for connecting to a conventional nondimming ballast in a fluorescent lighting system, the system including a source of ac voltage. The ballast has terminals for connecting to a fluorescent lamp, the adaptor comprising: a switching module adapted to be coupled to the terminals for switching current from the lamp, the switching module being connected in parallel with the lamp to divert current from the lamp when the switching module conducts; and a level control coupled to the switching module, the level control controlling the conductive state of the switching module to vary the current in the lamp according to a dimming control signal supplied to the level control, the level control causing the switching module to switch at a frequency in the range of 300 hertz and higher during times that the lamp current is being varied.

Alley, R.P.

1987-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

97

Lighting energy efficiency opportunities at Cheyenne Mountain Air Station  

SciTech Connect

CMAS is an intensive user of electricity for lighting because of its size, lack of daylight, and 24-hour operating schedule. Argonne National Laboratory recently conducted a lighting energy conservation evaluation at CMAS. The evaluation included inspection and characterization of existing lighting systems, analysis of energy-efficient retrofit options, and investigation of the environmental effects that these lighting system retrofits could have when they are ready to be disposed of as waste. Argonne devised three retrofit options for the existing lighting systems at various buildings: (1) minimal retrofit--limited fixture replacement; (2) moderate retrofit--more extensive fixture replacement and limited application of motion detectors; and (3) advanced retrofit--fixture replacement, reduction in the number of lamps, expansion of task lighting, and more extensive application of motion detectors. Argonne used data on electricity consumption to analyze the economic and energy effects of these three retrofit options. It performed a cost analysis for each retrofit option in terms of payback. The analysis showed that lighting retrofits result in savings because they reduce electricity consumption, cooling load, and maintenance costs. The payback period for all retrofit options was found to be less than 2 years, with the payback period decreasing for more aggressive retrofits. These short payback periods derived largely from the intensive (24-hours-per-day) use of electric lighting at the facility. Maintenance savings accounted for more than half of the annual energy-related savings under the minimal and moderate retrofit options and slightly less than half of these savings under the advanced retrofit option. Even if maintenance savings were excluded, the payback periods would still be impressive: about 4.4 years for the minimal retrofit option and 2 years for the advanced option. The local and regional environmental impacts of the three retrofit options were minimal.

Molburg, J.C.; Rozo, A.J.; Sarles, J.K.; Haffenden, R.A.; Thimmapuram, P.R.; Cavallo, J.D.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Compact Fluorescent Lamps : Technologies : From the Lab to the...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

process. (Left) Compact Fluorescent Lamp; (Right) Cover of the 'Lighting Retrofit Workbook' (Left) Compact Fluorescent Lamp (CFL) (Right) Retrofitting national parks...

99

Selecting effective fluorescent lamp and ballast for retrofit in the continental United States. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Electrical lighting is a major contributor to daytime peak energy demand, accounting for about 30 percent of total electricity consumption in most Army facilities. Some of this energy may be wasted because many existing lighting systems at Army Installations use outmoded technologies. While recent technology has improved the energy efficiency of all lighting systems, fluorescent lighting-the most widely used interior building lighting-has shown the greatest efficiency gains. Retrofits using high-efficiency fluorescent lamps and ballasts can yield significant operating cost savings. High-efficiency fluorescent lighting systems are widely available, but current information on their performance characteristics is highly technical and not easily accessible to Army facility managers considering retrofit options. This report provides a single, accessible source that summarizes fluorescent lamp and ballast performance characteristics and outlines selection procedures. Fluorescent lamp, Retrofit, Ballast, Lighting. Energy conservation.

Taylor, W.R.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Monmouth Power & Light- Residential Energy Efficiency Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Monmouth Power & Light offers a wide range of energy efficiency rebates that encourage residential customers to save energy in their homes. To qualify for these incentives electricity must be...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lamps lighting efficiency" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Outlaw lighting  

SciTech Connect

Demand-side management programs by utilities and the federal government`s Green Lights program have made significant inroads in promoting energy-efficient lighting. But the Energy Policy Act now prohibits certain types of lighting. This article provides analysis to help architects determine new lamp performance compared with older lighting products.

Bryan, H.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Fixture conditions affect lamp performance  

SciTech Connect

This article discusses the major parameters that affect fluorescent lamp performance under fixture conditions. These parameters include fixture type, and HVAC integration, which directly determine the minimum lamp wall temperature (MLWT), and therefore, the resulting light output of the lamp/ballast system. Experimental data is presented showing that the lumen output of the lamp/ballast system can vary by as much as 20% and that the system efficacy can vary by 10% depending upon the type of fixture and HVAC system employed. 4 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

Siminovitch, M.J.; Rubinstein, F.M.; Verderber, R.R.

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Survey and forecast of marketplace supply and demand for energy- efficient lighting products  

SciTech Connect

The rapid growth in demand for energy-efficient lighting products has led to supply shortages for certain products. To understand the near-term (1- to 5-year) market for energy-efficient lighting products, a selected set of utilities and lighting product manufacturers were surveyed in early 1991. Two major U. S. government programs, EPA's Green Lights and DOE's Federal Relighting Initiative, were also examined to assess their effect on product demand. Lighting product manufacturers predicted significant growth through 1995. Lamp manufacturers indicated that compact fluorescent lamp shipments tripled between 1988 and 1991, and predicted that shipments would again triple, rising from 25 million units in 1991 to 72 million units in 1995. Ballast manufacturers predicted that demand for power-factorcorrected ballasts (both magnetic and electronic) would grow from 59.4 million units in 1991 to 71.1 million units in 1995. Electronic ballasts were predicted to grow from 11% of ballast demand in 1991 to 40% in 1995. Manufacturers projected that electronic ballast supply shortages would continue until late 1992. Lamp and ballast producers indicated that they had difficulty in determining what additional supply requirements might result due to demand created by utility programs. Using forecasts from 27 surveyed utilities and assumptions regarding the growth of U. S. utility lighting DSM programs, low, median, and high forecasts were developed for utility expenditures for lighting incentives through 1994. The projected median figure for 1992 was $316 million, while for 1994, the projected median figure was $547 million. The allocation of incentive dollars to various products and the number of units needed to meet utility-stimulated demand were also projected. To provide a better connection between future supply and demand, a common database is needed that captures detailed DSM program information including incentive dollars and unit-volume mix by product type.

Gough, A. (Lighting Research Inst., New York, NY (United States)); Blevins, R. (Plexus Research, Inc., Donegal, PA (United States))

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Max Tech and Beyond: Fluorescent Lamps  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fluorescent lamps are the most widely used artificial light source today, responsible for approximately 70% of the lumens delivered to our living spaces globally. The technology was originally commercialized in the 1930's, and manufacturers have been steadily improving the efficacy of these lamps over the years through modifications to the phosphors, cathodes, fill-gas, operating frequency, tube diameter and other design attributes. The most efficient commercially available fluorescent lamp is the 25 Watt T5 lamp. This lamp operates at 114-116 lumens per watt while also providing good color rendering and more than 20,000 hours of operating life. Industry experts interviewed indicated that while this lamp is the most efficient in the market today, there is still a further 10 to 14% of potential improvements that may be introduced to the market over the next 2 to 5 years. These improvements include further developments in phosphors, fill-gas, cathode coatings and ultraviolet (UV) reflective glass coatings. The commercialization of these technology improvements will combine to bring about efficacy improvements that will push the technology up to a maximum 125 to 130 lumens per watt. One critical issue raised by researchers that may present a barrier to the realization of these improvements is the fact that technology investment in fluorescent lamps is being reduced in order to prioritize research into light emitting diodes (LEDs) and ceramic metal halide high intensity discharge (HID) lamps. Thus, it is uncertain whether these potential efficacy improvements will be developed, patented and commercialized. The emphasis for premium efficacy will continue to focus on T5 lamps, which are expected to continue to be marketed along with the T8 lamp. Industry experts highlighted the fact that an advantage of the T5 lamp is the fact that it is 40% smaller and yet provides an equivalent lumen output to that of a T8 or T12 lamp. Due to its smaller form factor, the T5 lamp contains less material (i.e., glass, fill gas and phosphor), and has a higher luminance, enabling fixtures to take advantage of the smaller lamp size to improve the optics and provide more efficient overall system illuminance. In addition to offering the market a high-quality efficacious light source, another strong value proposition of fluorescent lighting is its long operating life. In today's market, one manufacturer is offering fluorescent lamps that have a rated life of 79,000 hours - which represents 18 years of service at 12 hours per day, 365 days per year. These lamps, operated using a long-life ballast specified by the manufacturer, take advantage of improvements in cathode coatings, fill gas chemistry and pressure to extend service life by a factor of four over conventional fluorescent lamps. It should be noted that this service life is also longer (approximately twice as long) as today's high-quality LED products. The fluorescent market is currently focused on the T5 and T8 lamp diameters, and it is not expected that other diameters would be introduced. Although T8 is a more optimal diameter from an efficacy perspective, the premium efficiency and optimization effort has been focused on T5 lamps because they are 40% smaller than T8, and are designed to operate at a higher temperature using high-frequency electronic ballasts. The T5 lamp offers savings in terms of materials, packaging and shipping, as well as smaller fixtures with improved optical performance. Manufacturers are actively researching improvements in four critical areas that are expected to yield additional efficacy improvements of approximately 10 to 14 percent over the next five years, ultimately achieving approximately 130 lumens per watt by 2015. The active areas of research where these improvements are anticipated include: (1) Improved phosphors which continue to be developed and patented, enabling higher efficacies as well as better color rendering and lumen maintenance; (2) Enhanced fill gas - adjusting proportions of argon, krypton, neon and xenon to optimize performance, while also m

Scholand, Michael

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Marblehead Municipal Light Department - Residential Energy Efficiency  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Marblehead Municipal Light Department - Residential Energy Marblehead Municipal Light Department - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Marblehead Municipal Light Department - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Appliances & Electronics Heat Pumps Maximum Rebate Insulation: $1,600 Program Info State Massachusetts Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Refrigerators: $100, plus $25 for disposal of old refrigerator Clothes Washers: $50 - $100 Dishwashers: $25 - $50 Room A/C Units: 50% of purchase price up to $50 Central A/C: $325 - $525, varies by efficiency and technology Heat Pumps: $325 - $675, varies by efficiency and technology Programmable Thermostat: up to 50% of the purchase price

106

Phase II report on energy efficient electronic ballasts for a two-40 watt fluorescent lamp system  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) has established a project aimed at accelerating the commercialization of electronic ballasts. During the Phase I portion of the project a small quantity of ballasts and other hardware were delivered for independent testing. Results verified the claims for energy savings and other unique and advantageous features of the electronic ballast. Phase II, a large scale field demonstration, is reported. The demonstration is being conducted by LBL and the Pacific Gas and Electric Company in the PG and E headquarters building in downtown San Fracisco. The test demonstration hardware is being procured. Included are two models of energy saving ballasts; two dimmer systems that show the potential for additional power savings; and, two models of Automatic Emergency Light Systems. Installation of ballasts and the beginning of actual test operations were originally scheduled for February 1978. However, slippages in hardware deliveries have caused a three-month delay. Testing at PG and E is now scheduled to begin in June 1978. Even though broad scale results from the Phase II demonstration at PG and E are not yet available, performance and versatility advantages of the electronic ballast have been demonstrated. They offer a clear incentive to the industry for development and production of reliable hardware that will be competitively saleable on a long term cost-of-lighting basis.

1978-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

New Light Sources for Tomorrow's Lighting Designs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The lighting industry is driven to provide light sources and lighting systems that, when properly applied, will produce a suitable luminous environment in which to perform a specified task. Tasks may include everything from office work, manufacturing and inspection to viewing priceless art objects, selecting the right chair for your living room, and deciding which produce item to select for tonight's dinner. While energy efficiency is a major consideration in any new lighting system design, the sacrifice of lighting quality may cost more in terms of lost productivity and user dissatisfaction than can ever be saved on that monthly energy bill. During the past several years, many new light sources have been developed and introduced. These product introductions have not been limited to anyone lamp type, but instead may be found in filament, fluorescent and high intensity discharge lamp families. Manufacturers of light sources have two basic goals for new product development. These goals are high efficiency lighting and improved color rendering properties. High efficiency lighting may take the form of either increasing lamp efficiency (lumens of light delivered per watt of power consumed) or decreasing lamp size, thus making a more easily controlled light source that places light where it is needed. The manufacturer's second goal is to produce lamps that render colors accurately while maintaining high efficiency. This paper will discuss new introductions in light sources and lighting systems and how they may impact the design of luminous environments of the future.

Krailo, D. A.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Demonstration Assessment of Light-Emitting Diode (LED) Retrofit Lamps at the Lobby of the Bonneville Power Administration, Portland, OR  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the process and results of a demonstration of solid-state lighting (SSL) technology in the lobby of the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) headquarters building in Portland, Oregon. The project involved a simple retrofit of 32 track lights used to illuminate historical black-and-white photos and printed color posters from the 1930s and 1940s. BPA is a federal power marketing agency in the Northwestern United States, and selected this prominent location to demonstrate energy efficient light-emitting diode (LED) retrofit options that not only can reduce the electric bill for their customers but also provide attractive alternatives to conventional products, in this case accent lighting for BPA's historical artwork.

Miller, Naomi

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Development of Efficient UV-LED Phosphor Coatings for Energy Saving Solid State Lighting  

SciTech Connect

The University of Georgia, in collaboration with GE Global Research, has investigated the relevant quenching mechanism of phosphor coatings used in white light devices based on UV LEDs. The final goal of the project was the design and fabrication of a high-efficacy white light UV-LED device through improved geometry and optimized phosphor coatings. At the end of the research period, which was extended to seamlessly carry over the research to a follow-up program, we have demonstrated a two-fold improvement in the conversion efficiency of a white light LED device, where the increase efficacy is due to both improved phosphor quantum efficiency and lamp geometry. Working prototypes have been displayed at DOE sponsored meetings and during the final presentation at the DOE Headquarters in Washington, DC. During the first phase of the project, a fundamental understanding of quenching processes in UV-LEDs was obtained, and the relationships that describe the performance of the phosphor as a function of photon flux, temperature, and phosphor composition were established. In the second phase of the project, these findings were then implemented to design the improved UV-LED lamp. In addition, our research provides a road map for the design of efficient white light LEDs, which will be an important asset during a follow-up project led by GE.

Uwe Happek

2006-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

110

NOTICE TO APPLICANTS FOR SOLID STATE LIGHTING, IES ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... _____ 22/P13b* IES LM-66:2000 Single-Ended Compact Fluorescent Lamps - Intensity Measurements ... NVLAP ENERGY EFFICIENT LIGHTING ...

2013-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

111

Fluorescent Lighting | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fluorescent Lighting Fluorescent Lighting Fluorescent Lighting October 17, 2013 - 5:44pm Addthis Fluorescent Lighting Fluorescent Lighting Fluorescent lamps use 25%-35% of the energy used by incandescent products to provide a similar amount of light. They also last about 10 times longer (7,000-24,000 hours). The two general types of fluorescent lamps are: Compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs) -- commonly found with integral ballasts and screw bases, these are popular lamps often used in household fixtures Fluorescent tube and circline lamps -- typically used for task lighting such as garages and under cabinet fixtures, and for lighting large areas in commercial buildings. CFLs CFLs combine the energy efficiency of fluorescent lighting with the convenience and popularity of incandescent fixtures. CFLs fit most fixtures

112

Carbon Power and Light - Residential and Commercial Energy Efficiency...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Carbon Power and Light - Residential and Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Carbon Power and Light - Residential and Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back...

113

City Water Light and Power - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Water Light and Power - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs City Water Light and Power - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs Eligibility Commercial Nonprofit...

114

How Energy-Efficient Light Bulbs Compare with Traditional Incandescent...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

How Energy-Efficient Light Bulbs Compare with Traditional Incandescents How Energy-Efficient Light Bulbs Compare with Traditional Incandescents July 29, 2012 - 6:25pm Addthis...

115

CoServ Electric Cooperative - Commercial Energy Efficient Lighting...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CoServ Electric Cooperative - Commercial Energy Efficient Lighting Rebate Program CoServ Electric Cooperative - Commercial Energy Efficient Lighting Rebate Program Eligibility...

116

Randolph EMC - Commercial and Industrial Efficient Lighting Rebate...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Randolph EMC - Commercial and Industrial Efficient Lighting Rebate Program (North Carolina) Randolph EMC - Commercial and Industrial Efficient Lighting Rebate Program (North...

117

Event:Technology Transfer in Energy and Efficient Lighting to...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

in Energy and Efficient Lighting to Combat Climate Change Jump to: navigation, search Calendar.png Technology Transfer in Energy and Efficient Lighting to Combat Climate Change: on...

118

How Do You Light Your Home Efficiently? | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

How Do You Light Your Home Efficiently? How Do You Light Your Home Efficiently? July 22, 2009 - 4:30pm Addthis An average household dedicates 11% of its energy budget to lighting....

119

Magical Mystery Devices or Not: How do LED Lamps and Luminaires Really Measure-Up?  

SciTech Connect

Solid-state lighting products for general lighting applications are now gaining a market presence, and more and more people are asking, “Which of these are ‘good’ products? Do they perform as claimed? How do they compare? Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs) differ from other light sources enough to require new procedures for measuring their performance and comparing to other lighting options, so both manufacturers and buyers are facing a learning curve. The energy-efficiency community has traditionally compared light sources based on system efficacy: rated lamp lumens divided by power into the system. This doesn’t work for LEDs because there are no standard LED “lamp” packages and no lamp ratings, and because LED performance depends heavily on thermal, electrical, and optical design of complete lighting unit or ‘luminaire’. Luminaire efficacy is the preferred metric for LEDs because it measures the net light output from the luminaire divided by power into the system.

Paget, Maria L.; McCullough, Jeffrey J.; Steward, Heidi E.

2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

120

High Efficiency, Illumination Quality OLEDs for Lighting  

SciTech Connect

The goal of the program was to demonstrate a 45 lumen per watt white light device based upon the use of multiple emission colors through the use of solution processing. This performance level is a dramatic extension of the team's previous 15 LPW large area illumination device. The fundamental material system was based upon commercial polymer materials. The team was largely able to achieve these goals, and was able to deliver to DOE a 90 lumen illumination source that had an average performance of 34 LPW a 1000 cd/m{sup 2} with peak performances near 40LPW. The average color temperature is 3200K and the calculated CRI 85. The device operated at a brightness of approximately 1000cd/m{sup 2}. The use of multiple emission colors particularly red and blue, provided additional degrees of design flexibility in achieving white light, but also required the use of a multilayered structure to separate the different recombination zones and prevent interconversion of blue emission to red emission. The use of commercial materials had the advantage that improvements by the chemical manufacturers in charge transport efficiency, operating life and material purity could be rapidly incorporated without the expenditure of additional effort. The program was designed to take maximum advantage of the known characteristics of these material and proceeded in seven steps. (1) Identify the most promising materials, (2) assemble them into multi-layer structures to control excitation and transport within the OLED, (3) identify materials development needs that would optimize performance within multilayer structures, (4) build a prototype that demonstrates the potential entitlement of the novel multilayer OLED architecture (5) integrate all of the developments to find the single best materials set to implement the novel multilayer architecture, (6) further optimize the best materials set, (7) make a large area high illumination quality white OLED. A photo of the final deliverable is shown. In 2003, a large area, OLED based illumination source was demonstrated that could provide light with a quality, quantity, and efficiency on par with what can be achieved with traditional light sources. The demonstration source was made by tiling together 16 separate 6-inch x 6-inch blue-emitting OLEDs. The efficiency, total lumen output, and lifetime of the OLED based illumination source were the same as what would be achieved with an 80 watt incandescent bulb. The devices had an average efficacy of 15 LPW and used solution-processed OLEDs. The individual 6-inch x 6-inch devices incorporated three technology strategies developed specifically for OLED lighting -- downconversion for white light generation, scattering for outcoupling efficiency enhancement, and a scalable monolithic series architecture to enable large area devices. The downconversion approach consists of optically coupling a blue-emitting OLED to a set of luminescent layers. The layers are chosen to absorb the blue OLED emission and then luminescence with high efficiency at longer wavelengths. The composition and number of layers are chosen so that the unabsorbed blue emission and the longer wavelength re-emission combine to make white light. A downconversion approach has the advantage of allowing a wide variety of colors to be made from a limited set of blue emitters. In addition, one does not have to carefully tune the emission wavelength of the individual electro-luminescent species within the OLED device in order to achieve white light. The downconversion architecture used to develop the 15LPW large area light source consisted of a polymer-based blue-emitting OLED and three downconversion layers. Two of the layers utilized perylene based dyes from BASF AG of Germany with high quantum efficiency (>98%) and one of the layers consisted of inorganic phosphor particles (Y(Gd)AG:Ce) with a quantum efficiency of {approx}85%. By independently varying the optical density of the downconversion layers, the overall emission spectrum could be adjusted to maximize performance for lighting (e.g. blackbody temp

Joseph Shiang; James Cella; Kelly Chichak; Anil Duggal; Kevin Janora; Chris Heller; Gautam Parthasarathy; Jeffery Youmans; Joseph Shiang

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lamps lighting efficiency" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Solid-State Lighting: L Prize(tm): The Race for Super Efficient Light Bulbs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

L Prize(tm): The Race for Super L Prize(tm): The Race for Super Efficient Light Bulbs to someone by E-mail Share Solid-State Lighting: L Prize(tm): The Race for Super Efficient Light Bulbs on Facebook Tweet about Solid-State Lighting: L Prize(tm): The Race for Super Efficient Light Bulbs on Twitter Bookmark Solid-State Lighting: L Prize(tm): The Race for Super Efficient Light Bulbs on Google Bookmark Solid-State Lighting: L Prize(tm): The Race for Super Efficient Light Bulbs on Delicious Rank Solid-State Lighting: L Prize(tm): The Race for Super Efficient Light Bulbs on Digg Find More places to share Solid-State Lighting: L Prize(tm): The Race for Super Efficient Light Bulbs on AddThis.com... Conferences & Meetings Presentations Publications Webcasts Videos Tools L Prize(tm): The Race for Super Efficient Light Bulbs

122

Lighting Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Purple LED lamp Purple LED lamp Lighting Systems Lighting research is aimed at improving the energy efficiency of lighting systems in buildings and homes across the nation. The goal is to reduce lighting energy consumption by 50% over twenty years by improving the efficiency of light sources, and controlling and delivering illumination so that it is available, where and when needed, and at the required intensity. Research falls into four main areas: Sources and Ballasts, Light Distribution Systems, Controls and Communications, and Human Factors. Contacts Francis Rubinstein FMRubinstein@lbl.gov (510) 486-4096 Links Lighting Research Group Batteries and Fuel Cells Buildings Energy Efficiency Applications Commercial Buildings Cool Roofs and Heat Islands Demand Response Energy Efficiency Program and Market Trends

123

Quality assurance assessment of new efficient lighting systems for Naval ships. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Ballasts and lamps, which have been selected to replace existing lamp/ballast systems based on improved performance, were tested to determine if they meet standard Naval MIL specifications. Fifty ballasts manufactured by Advance Transformer Corporation and Universal Manufacturing Corp., and 100 lamps manufactured by GTE were tested to determine their quality assurance and durability. These components met all of the MIL specifications that lamp/ballast systems in use must meet. In addition, these new systems have an improved system efficacy, 62 lumens per watt, and lower third harmonics, which will reduce the need for generating capacity for lighting on ships.

Verderber, R.

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Quality assurance assessment of new efficient lighting systems for naval ships. Final report. Revision  

SciTech Connect

Ballasts and lamps, which have been selected to replace existing lamp/ballast systems based on improved performance, were tested to determine if they meet standard Naval MIL specifications. Fifty ballasts manufactured by Advance Transformer Corporation and Universal Manufacturing Corporation and 100 lamps manufactured by GTE were tested to determine their quality assurance and durability. These components met all of the MIL specifications that lamp/ballast systems in use must meet. These new systems have an improved system efficacy, 62 lumens per watt, and lower third harmonics, which will reduce the need for generating capacity for lighting on ships. An addendum to the original study describes the assessment of the performance of the advanced ballast system with a new F-17 fluorescent lamp. The results indicate the system performs reliably and shows increased efficacy. This new lamp/ballast system reduces the harmonic content to within Navy limits, and improves the power factor, resulting in a 50% reduction in line current.

Verderber, R.R.; Morse, O.; Dumm, C.

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Garland Power and Light - Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Garland Power and Light - Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs Garland Power and Light - Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs Garland Power and Light - Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Design & Remodeling Windows, Doors, & Skylights Ventilation Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Maximum Rebate Weatherization: $500 per home Lighting: $20,000 Program Info State Texas Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Commercial Lighting: $100/kW reduced Small Commercial Central Air Conditioning: $400 - $600 per unit, depending on efficiency Central Heat Pump: $500 - $700 per unit, depending on efficiency

126

Economic Analysis of Ilumex, A Project to Promote Energy-Efficient Residential Lighting in Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CFL) offers a considerable increase in energy efficiencyCFL/(I-T&D loss) * Lamp hrs/day * 365 day sly ear d.Based on power plant efficiency

Sathaye, Jayant A.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

LED Provides Effective and Efficient Lighting in Freezer Storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

by example, saving energy and taxpayer dollars in federal facilities Spotlight on Design LED Provides Effective and Efficient Lighting in Freezer Storage Room New lighting...

128

Kansas City Power & Light - Commercial/Industrial Energy Efficiency...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Administration Other Agencies You are here Home Savings Kansas City Power & Light - CommercialIndustrial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Kansas City Power & Light -...

129

Monmouth Power and Light - Residential Energy Efficiency Program...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Provider Monmouth Power and Light Monmouth Power and Light offers a wide range of energy efficiency rebates that encourage residential customers to save energy in their homes. To...

130

Cedarburg Light & Water Utility- Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Cedarburg Light and Water Utility provides incentives for commercial, industrial and agricultural customers to increase the energy efficiency of eligible facilities. Upon request, Cedarburg Light...

131

A high-efficiency indirect lighting system utilizing the solar 1000 sulfur lamp  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Renewable Energy, Office of Building Technology, State andand Renewable Energy, Office of Building Technology, State and

Siminovitch, Michael; Gould, C.; Page, E.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Highly Efficient Silicon Light Emitting Diode  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we describe the fabrication, using standard silicon processing techniques, of silicon light-emitting diodes (LED) that efficiently emit photons with energy around the silicon bandgap. The improved efficiency had been explained by the spatial confinement of charge carriers due to a local strain field that is formed by dislocation loop arrays. The dependence of device electroluminescent properties on the annealing conditions is carefully examined as a high temperature process has profound influence on these dislocations. Increased luminescent intensity at higher device temperature, together with pure diffusion current conduction mechanism evidently shows the influence of the dislocation loops. The electrical properties of the diode are reasonable with low leakage reverse current.

Leminh Holleman Wallinga; P. Leminh; J. Holleman; H. Wallinga

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Lamp Divisions  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

--- --- /A;; i :' r%i;in~house ilEc;' i:Z3:~cra:ion Lamp Divisions , _.. (I +i. 0 :,,,rg. . I . . -= i?e p/q! qe)-' &se pw E.rcale?l iev, Je!sey 07m March 20, 1 gs? ::r . J. A. Jones I ti. 5. Muclear Regulatory Commission .> = ..- haterials Licensing Branch -s - ,.I, - - Division of Fuel Cycle and hateri al Safety LY. , $2 - _ . ' -' . 3 _- - Yeshington, C. C. 2@555 - :_ :--, =-- -- .-?J -.: y...., : :- 7 Dear Mr. Jones : y-- --, ? . *I 2=15 2 r; X -P The following is our final report of the decontamination efZor?s takz in our Bui Iding 7 basement and wi 11 also serve to update our report i& November 12, 1980. As stated in NRC' s report of December 22, 1983, two closeout inspect ions were conducted by your King of Prussia off i ce on November 21 and December 2,

134

Avista Utilities (Electric) - Commercial Lighting Energy Efficiency...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Applicable Sector Commercial Eligible Technologies Lighting, Lighting ControlsSensors, LED Lighting Active Incentive Yes Implementing Sector Utility Energy Category Energy...

135

Energy-efficient lighting for kitchens and bathrooms  

SciTech Connect

This booklet intended for the consumer explains ways to make kitchen and bathroom lighting more energy efficient.

Baker, W.S.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Dayton Power and Light - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Dayton Power and Light - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Dayton Power and Light - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Dayton Power and Light - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Program Info State Ohio Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Refrigerator Recycling: $25 Freezer Recycling: $25 HVAC Tune-Up: $25 credit CFL's: $1.40 average off of each bulb purchased at participating stores Air Conditioning: $100 - $300, varies by efficiency and equipment application Air Source Heat Pump: $200 - $600, varies by efficiency and equipment application Geothermal Heat Pump: $200 - $600, varies by efficiency and equipment

137

Assessment of Electrical, Efficiency, and Photometric Performance of Advanced Lighting Technologies: Dimmable Advanced Lighting Tech nologies -- Electronic Fluorescent, High-Intensity Discharge, and Light-Emitting Diode  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This EPRI Technical Report is a compilation of four technical updates that address the basic dimming performance of advanced lighting sources: EPRI report 1018476 for linear fluorescent ballasts, 1018477 for hot and cold cathode compact fluorescent lamps, 1018479 for electronic high-intensity discharge (HID) ballasts, and 1018480 for light-emitting diode (LED) lighting. Chapter 1 provides a discussion of basic lighting control, the importance of considering power quality in lighting control, lighting con...

2008-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

138

Duquesne Light Company - Residential Energy Efficiency Program...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Central Air conditioners, Clothes Washers, Dehumidifiers, Dishwasher, Furnaces, Heat pumps, Lighting, Lighting ControlsSensors, Pool Pumps, Programmable Thermostats,...

139

History and technical evolution of high frequency fluorescent lighting  

SciTech Connect

This work was performed to accelerate development and commercialization of solid-state, high frequency ballasts for fluorescent lighting systems. The history and development of fluorescent lamps, of ballasts for these fixtures, and of related circuits and equipment are reviewed. The higher lamp efficiency of high-frequency (300 to 3000 Hz) fluorescent lamps as compared with 60 Hz lamps, the development of frequency converter circuits for high-frequency lamps, and uses, electrical characteristics, and economics of these lighting systems are discussed. (LCL)

Campbell, J.H.

1977-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Analysis of Minimum Efficiency Performance Standards for Residential General Service Lighting in Chile  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Minimum Efficiency Performance Standards (MEPS) have been chosen as part of Chile's national energy efficiency action plan. As a first MEPS, the Ministry of Energy has decided to focus on a regulation for lighting that would ban the sale of inefficient bulbs, effectively phasing out the use of incandescent lamps. Following major economies such as the US (EISA, 2007) , the EU (Ecodesign, 2009) and Australia (AS/NZS, 2008) who planned a phase out based on minimum efficacy requirements, the Ministry of Energy has undertaken the impact analysis of a MEPS on the residential lighting sector. Fundacion Chile (FC) and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) collaborated with the Ministry of Energy and the National Energy Efficiency Program (Programa Pais de Eficiencia Energetica, or PPEE) in order to produce a techno-economic analysis of this future policy measure. LBNL has developed for CLASP (CLASP, 2007) a spreadsheet tool called the Policy Analysis Modeling System (PAMS) that allows for evaluation of costs and benefits at the consumer level but also a wide range of impacts at the national level, such as energy savings, net present value of savings, greenhouse gas (CO2) emission reductions and avoided capacity generation due to a specific policy. Because historically Chile has followed European schemes in energy efficiency programs (test procedures, labelling program definitions), we take the Ecodesign commission regulation No 244/2009 as a starting point when defining our phase out program, which means a tiered phase out based on minimum efficacy per lumen category. The following data were collected in order to perform the techno-economic analysis: (1) Retail prices, efficiency and wattage category in the current market, (2) Usage data (hours of lamp use per day), and (3) Stock data, penetration of efficient lamps in the market. Using these data, PAMS calculates the costs and benefits of efficiency standards from two distinct but related perspectives: (1) The Life-Cycle Cost (LCC) calculation examines costs and benefits from the perspective of the individual household; and (2) The National Perspective projects the total national costs and benefits including both financial benefits, and energy savings and environmental benefits. The national perspective calculations are called the National Energy Savings (NES) and the Net Present Value (NPV) calculations. PAMS also calculate total emission mitigation and avoided generation capacity. This paper describes the data and methodology used in PAMS and presents the results of the proposed phase out of incandescent bulbs in Chile.

Letschert, Virginie E.; McNeil, Michael A.; Leiva Ibanez, Francisco Humberto; Ruiz, Ana Maria; Pavon, Mariana; Hall, Stephen

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lamps lighting efficiency" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Buildings Energy Data Book: 7.6 Efficiency Standards for Lighting  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

2 2 Efficiency Standards for Incandescent Reflector Lamps (1) Effective for lamps manufactured after November 1, 1995 and before July 14, 2012 Minimum Nominal Average Lamp Lamp Wattage Efficacy (lm/W) 40-50 10.5 51-66 11.0 67-85 12.5 86-115 14.0 116-155 14.5 156-205 15.0 Effective for lamps manufactured on or after July 14, 2012 Minimum Rated Lamp Rated Average Lamp Lamp Wattage Lamp Spectrum Diameter (in) Voltage (V) Efficacy (lm/W) (2) 40-205 Standard Spectrum >2.5 ≥125 6.8*P^0.27 40-205 Standard Spectrum >2.5 <125 5.9*P^0.27 40-205 Standard Spectrum ≤2.5 ≥125 5.7*P^0.27 40-205 Standard Spectrum ≤2.5 <125 5.0*P^0.27 40-205 Modified Spectrum >2.5 ≥125 5.8*P^0.27 40-205 Modified Spectrum >2.5 <125 5.0*P^0.27 40-205 Modified Spectrum ≤2.5 ≥125 4.9*P^0.27

142

Cedarburg Light and Water Utility - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cedarburg Light and Water Utility - Commercial Energy Efficiency Cedarburg Light and Water Utility - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Cedarburg Light and Water Utility - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Local Government Nonprofit Schools State Government Savings Category Other Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Design & Remodeling Manufacturing Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Maximum Rebate Unspecified ($250,000 per bid cycle) Program Info State Wisconsin Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Varies by measure Provider Cedarburg Light and Water Utility Cedarburg Light and Water Utility provides incentives for commercial,

143

Laboratory Evaluation of LED T8 Replacement Lamp Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A report on a lab setting analysis involving LED lamps intended to directly replace T8 fluorescent lamps (4') showing light output, power, and economic comparisons with other fluorescent options.

Richman, Eric E.; Kinzey, Bruce R.; Miller, Naomi J.

2011-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

144

How Do You Light Your Home Efficiently? | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Light Your Home Efficiently? Light Your Home Efficiently? How Do You Light Your Home Efficiently? July 22, 2009 - 4:30pm Addthis An average household dedicates 11% of its energy budget to lighting. Installing efficient lighting technologies, using task lighting, flipping the switch, and taking advantage of natural daylight can all help you save on your lighting costs. How do you light your home efficiently? Each Thursday, you have the chance to share your thoughts on a question about energy efficiency or renewable energy for consumers. Please comment with your answers, and also feel free to respond to other comments. Addthis Related Articles How Do You Save Energy in Your Apartment or Rental? How Do You Save Water When Caring for Your Lawn? How Do You Encourage Your Family to Use Less Water

145

South River EMC - Business Energy Efficient Lighting Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

River EMC - Business Energy Efficient Lighting Rebate Program River EMC - Business Energy Efficient Lighting Rebate Program South River EMC - Business Energy Efficient Lighting Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Savings Category Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Program Info State North Carolina Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Complete Lighting Retrofit: $0.30/watt saved Incandescent to CFL or LED: $1/bulb Provider South River EMC South River EMC (SREMC) offers a rebate to eligible business customers who wish to upgrade the energy efficiency of lighting systems. The business must upgrade from an older, less efficient system to a high-efficiency system. An incentive of $0.30 per watt saved is available to eligible lighting projects. For commercial customers switching fron incandescent

146

EERE Roofus' Solar and Efficient Home: Lights  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

by buying energy-saving light bulbs. I use these light bulbs to save energy in my solar house Most people have incandescent (IN-CAN-DE-SENT) light bulbs in their house. If...

147

Advanced Light Sources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the generation of artificial light using electric lamps, photometric and color performance have been paramount in lamp design, manufacturing, measurement, lighting design, and visual perception. Many designers and researchers have strived to understand how light and color are generated, related, and to improve them. This has stemmed from the development of incandescent lamps, halogen lamps, linear fluorescent lamps, high-intensity discharge (HID) lamps, and compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs) among other...

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

148

Connecticut Light & Power - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebates...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Technologies Lighting, Lighting ControlsSensors, Heat pumps, Central Air conditioners, Energy Mgmt. SystemsBuilding Controls, Motors, HVAC Controls Active Incentive No...

149

Harnessing waste heat and reducing wasted lighting : three mechanical structures for efficient energy systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis presents three mechanical structures designed for efficient energy systems. In [3], Cooley presents a modification of a fluorescent lamp which allows it to detect nearby occupants and dim itself automatically. ...

Stronger, Brad A

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Evaluation of Lighting and Lighting Control Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Energy efficient lighting and lighting controls have been a means to significant energy savings for many facilities around the world. Advances in lighting sources often allow for the conservation of quality of light while providing more flexibility in the control of light. Additionally, advances in core technologies within the lighting marketplace regularly lead to the introduction of new lamps, fixtures and controls.  With the rapid introduction of new products and designs, it is important to ...

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

151

Seattle City Light - Multi-Family Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Seattle City Light - Multi-Family Residential Energy Efficiency Seattle City Light - Multi-Family Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Seattle City Light - Multi-Family Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Multi-Family Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Windows, Doors, & Skylights Program Info State District of Columbia Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Lighting: 85% discount on installation costs Insulation: 50% discount on installation costs Window Replacement: $3 - $5/sq. ft. Provider Seattle City Light Seattle City Light provides incentives for its multi-family housing customers to increase their energy efficiency. Rebates are offered for common area lighting and weatherization measures including the installation

152

Efficient Lighting Strategies: Wise Design Choices Can Meet Lighting Needs and Save Energy  

SciTech Connect

Fact sheet for homeowners and contractors on how to employ efficient lighting strategies in the home for comfort and safety.

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Reducing Barriers To The Use of High-Efficiency Lighting Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With funding from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the Lighting Research Center (LRC) at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute completed the four-year research project, Reducing Barriers to the Use of High-Efficiency Lighting Systems. The initial objectives were: (1) identifying barriers to widespread penetration of lighting controls in commercial/industrial (C/I) applications that employ fluorescent lamp technologies, and (2) making recommendations to overcome these barriers. The addition of a fourth year expanded the original project objectives to include an examination of the impact on fluorescent lamps from dimming utilizing different lamp electrode heating and dimming ratios. The scope of the project was narrowed to identify barriers to the penetration of lighting controls into commercial-industrial (C/I) applications that employ fluorescent lamp technologies, and to recommend means for overcoming these barriers. Working with lighting manufacturers, specifiers, and installers, the project identified technological and marketing barriers to the widespread use of lighting controls, specifically automatic-off controls, occupancy sensors, photosensors, dimming systems, communication protocols and load-shedding ballasts. The primary barriers identified include cost effectiveness of lighting controls to the building owner, lack of standard communication protocols to allow different part of the control system to communicate effectively, and installation and commissioning issues. Overcoming the identified barriers requires lighting control products on the market to achieve three main goals: (1) Achieve sufficient functionality to meet the key requirements of their main market. (2) Allow significant cost reduction compared to current market standard systems. Cost should consider: hardware capital cost including wiring, design time required by the specifier and the control system manufacturer, installation time required by the electrician, and commissioning time and remedial time required by the electrician and end user. (3) Minimize ongoing perceived overhead costs and inconvenience to the end user, or in other words, systems should be simple to understand and use. In addition, we believe that no lighting controls solution is effective or acceptable unless it contributes to, or does not compromise, the following goals: (1) Productivity--Planning, installation, commissioning, maintenance, and use of controls should not decrease business productivity; (2) Energy savings--Lighting controls should save significant amounts of energy and money in relation to the expense involved in using them (acceptable payback period); and/or (3) Reduced power demand--Society as a whole should benefit from the lowered demand for expensive power and for more natural resources. Discussions of technology barriers and developments are insufficient by themselves to achieve higher penetration of lighting controls in the market place. Technology transfer efforts must play a key role in gaining market acceptance. The LRC developed a technology transfer model to better understand what actions are required and by whom to move any technology toward full market acceptance.

Peter Morante

2005-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

154

NREL-Lessons Learned from Energy Efficiency Lighting Programs Webinar |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NREL-Lessons Learned from Energy Efficiency Lighting Programs Webinar NREL-Lessons Learned from Energy Efficiency Lighting Programs Webinar Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Lessons Learned from Energy Efficiency Lighting Programs Agency/Company /Organization: National Renewable Energy Laboratory Sector: Energy Focus Area: Energy Efficiency, Buildings Topics: Policies/deployment programs Resource Type: Webinar, Guide/manual, Training materials, Lessons learned/best practices Website: www.nrel.gov/applying_technologies/state_local_activities/webinar_2010 Lessons Learned from Energy Efficiency Lighting Programs Screenshot References: Lessons Learned from Energy Efficiency Lighting Programs[1] Logo: Lessons Learned from Energy Efficiency Lighting Programs Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Technical Assistance

155

Puget Sound Energy - Commercial Energy Efficient Equipment Rebate Programs  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Puget Sound Energy - Commercial Energy Efficient Equipment Rebate Puget Sound Energy - Commercial Energy Efficient Equipment Rebate Programs Puget Sound Energy - Commercial Energy Efficient Equipment Rebate Programs < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Institutional Nonprofit Schools Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Appliances & Electronics Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Manufacturing Program Info State District of Columbia Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount '''Lighting''' Small Business Lighting: $3 - $190 CFLs: $3 - $12 LEDs: $10 - $25 Ceramic Metal Halide Lamps: $25 LED Exit Signs: $50 LED Traffic Signals: $5 - $20 Lighting Controls: $40 - $80 T8 Lamp Upgrade: $1 per lamp '''HVAC''' HVAC Installations (New Construction): $30/ton HVAC Replacements: $100 - $550

156

Summer Loving-Energy-Efficient Outdoor Lighting! | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Summer Loving-Energy-Efficient Outdoor Lighting! Summer Loving-Energy-Efficient Outdoor Lighting! Summer Loving-Energy-Efficient Outdoor Lighting! June 20, 2013 - 9:47am Addthis Outdoor solar lights use solar cells, which convert sunlight into electricity, and are easy to install and virtually maintenance free. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/ndejan Outdoor solar lights use solar cells, which convert sunlight into electricity, and are easy to install and virtually maintenance free. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/ndejan Erin Connealy Communications Specialist, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy How can I participate? Check to see if energy-efficient or solar lighting can fit your outdoor lighting needs this summer. One of the best things about summer to me is all the time I get to spend

157

CoServ Electric Cooperative - Commercial Energy Efficient Lighting Rebate  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CoServ Electric Cooperative - Commercial Energy Efficient Lighting CoServ Electric Cooperative - Commercial Energy Efficient Lighting Rebate Program CoServ Electric Cooperative - Commercial Energy Efficient Lighting Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Savings Category Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Program Info Funding Source Via partnership with whole sale provider Brazos Electric Power, Inc. and escheat funds Start Date 09/01/2009 State Texas Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Custom Lighting Upgrade: 0.30/watt saved per fixture T8 Fluorescent Upgrade: 1.50 - 2.25/bulb per fixture Provider CoServ Electric Cooperative CoServ Electric Cooperative provides rebates for commercial and industrial customers who upgrade to high efficiency lighting for the workplace. A rebate of $0.30/watt saved is available on custom lighting upgrades and a

158

Free Energy Efficiency Kit includes CFL light bulbs,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Free Energy Efficiency Kit Kit includes CFL light bulbs, spray foam, low-flow shower head, and more i ci e n cy On Thursday, March 31st New River Light & Power will sponsor a seminar that is designed

Rose, Annkatrin

159

Kansas City Power and Light - Commercial/Industrial Energy Efficiency  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4,907-$35,142 by business 4,907-$35,142 by business class size and differs among Missouri and Kansas residents. Program Info State Kansas Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Energy Audit ( Energy Audit (> 25,000 sq ft): 50% of cost, up to $500 High Performance T8 Fixtures: $20 - $30/fixture Standard T8 Lamps/Ballasts: $2 - $10/unit Lighting Power Density: $1/watt per square foot High Intensity Fluorescent: $50/fixture Pulse Star Metal Halide: $50/fixture Lighting Controls: $20 - $50 per sensor Single Phase Package/Split System AC: $92/ton Three Phase Unitary/Split System AC: $92/ton Unitary/Split System AC: $73 - $79/ton Motors: $50 - $130/motor Custom (Retrofit): The lesser of a buydown to a two year payback, or 50% of the incremental cost Custom (New Construction): The lesser of a buydown to a two year payback,

160

Kansas City Power and Light - Commercial/Industrial Energy Efficiency  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7,299-$52,276 by business 7,299-$52,276 by business class, size, new construction, retrofit, and location. Program Info State Missouri Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Energy Audit ( Energy Audit (> 25,000 sq ft): 50% of cost, up to $500 High Performance T8 Fixtures: $20 - $30/fixture Standard T8 Lamps/Ballasts: $2 - $10/unit Lighting Power Density: $1/watt per square foot High Intensity Fluorescent: $50/fixture Pulse Star Metal Halide: $50/fixture Lighting Controls: $20 - $50 per sensor Single Phase Package/Split System AC: $92/ton Three Phase Unitary/Split System AC: $92/ton Unitary/Split System AC: $73 - $79/ton Motors: $50 - $130/motor Custom (Retrofit): The lesser of a buydown to a two year payback, or 50% of the incremental cost Custom (New Construction): The lesser of a buydown to a two year payback,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lamps lighting efficiency" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Memphis Light, Gas and Water (Electric) - Commercial Efficiency Advice and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Memphis Light, Gas and Water (Electric) - Commercial Efficiency Memphis Light, Gas and Water (Electric) - Commercial Efficiency Advice and Incentives Program Memphis Light, Gas and Water (Electric) - Commercial Efficiency Advice and Incentives Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Cooling Manufacturing Other Appliances & Electronics Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Commercial Weatherization Maximum Rebate 70% of project cost Program Info State Tennessee Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Commercial Dishwashers: $400 - $1500 Commercial Refrigerator: $60 - $100 Ice Machines: $100 - $400 Insulated Holding Cabinets: $250 - $600 Electric Steam Cookers: $400 Electric Convection Ovens: $200 Electric Griddles: $200 Electric Combination Ovens: $2,000

162

High Efficiency Organic Light Emitting Devices for Lighting  

SciTech Connect

Incorporate internal scattering layers and microlens arrays in high efficiency OLED to achieve up to 70% EQE.

So, Franky; Tansu, Nelson; Gilchrist, James

2013-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

163

Wellesley Municipal Light Plant - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wellesley Municipal Light Plant - Residential Energy Efficiency Wellesley Municipal Light Plant - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Wellesley Municipal Light Plant - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Appliances & Electronics Maximum Rebate Two equipment rebates per customer per calendar year Program Info State Massachusetts Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Refrigerator: $100 Clothes Washing Machine: $75 Central AC: $100 Room AC Unit: $50 Dishwasher: $75 Dehumidifier: $50 Provider Appliance Rebate Program Wellesley Municipal Light Plant (WMLP) offers a number of appliance rebates to residential customers who purchase and install energy efficient equipment. Rebates are available for refrigerators, dishwashers, clothes

164

CoServ Electric Cooperative - Commercial Energy Efficient Lighting...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

icon Twitter icon CoServ Electric Cooperative - Commercial Energy Efficient Lighting Rebate Program (Texas) This is the approved revision of this page, as well as being...

165

LIGHTING EFFICIENCY FEASIBILITY STUDY OF THREE OHIO UNIVERSITY BUILDINGS.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis aims to evaluate the lighting efficiency of three Ohio University campus buildings. The primary research question is: What are the short- versus long-term… (more)

Kariyeva, Jahan

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Carbon Power & Light- Residential and Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Carbon Power and Light, in collaboration with Tri-State Generation and Transmission Association, offers financial incentives for members to increase the energy efficiency of homes and facilities....

167

(ITO) Nanoparticles for Improvement of Light Extraction Efficiency  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For making the most enhancement of light extraction efficiency and applying into ... of Powder-based Metals via Current Activated Tip-Based Sintering (CATS).

168

Quantum Efficiency of Micron Scaled Organic Light Emitting Diodes ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jun 1, 2004 ... Quantum Efficiency of Micron Scaled Organic Light Emitting Diodes Using Atomic Force Electroluminescence Microscopy by L.S.C. Pingree ...

169

Reading Municipal Light Department - Business Energy Efficiency Rebate  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reading Municipal Light Department - Business Energy Efficiency Reading Municipal Light Department - Business Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Reading Municipal Light Department - Business Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Cooling Heat Pumps Manufacturing Appliances & Electronics Buying & Making Electricity Energy Sources Solar Wind Maximum Rebate $50,000 Program Info Expiration Date 04/30/2013 State Massachusetts Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Up to $50,000 Provider Incentive Programs Reading Municipal Light Department (RMLD) offers energy efficiency incentives to eligible commercial and industrial customers. Rebates of up to $50,000 are available to customers who wish to reduce energy consumption

170

Concord Municipal Light Plant- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Concord Municipal Light Plant (CMLP) offers its residential customers rebates on energy-efficient appliances through the Appliance Rebate Program. Rebates are available for Energy Star...

171

Demonstration Assessment of Light-Emitting Diode (LED) Retrofit Lamps at Intercontinental Hotel in San Francisco, CA  

SciTech Connect

This document is a report of observations and results obtained from a lighting demonstration project conducted under the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) GATEWAY Demonstration Program. The program supports demonstrations of high-performance solid-state lighting (SSL) products in order to develop empirical data and experience with in-the-field applications of this advanced lighting technology. The DOE GATEWAY Demonstration Program focuses on providing a source of independent, third-party data for use in decision-making by lighting users and professionals; this data should be considered in combination with other information relevant to the particular site and application under examination. Each GATEWAY Demonstration compares SSL products against the incumbent technologies used in that location. Depending on available information and circumstances, the SSL product may also be compared to alternate lighting technologies. Though products demonstrated in the GATEWAY program have been prescreened and tested to verify their actual performance, DOE does not endorse any commercial product or in any way guarantee that users will achieve the same results through use of these products.

Miller, Naomi J.; Curry, Ku'Uipo J.

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Duquesne Light Company - Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Duquesne Light Company - Commercial and Industrial Energy Duquesne Light Company - Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Program Duquesne Light Company - Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Institutional Local Government Schools State Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Commercial Weatherization Manufacturing Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Program Info State Pennsylvania Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Custom: Varies Lighting: Varies widely by type Controls and Sensors: $10-$75 VFD for Chilled Water Loop $150/hp VFD for HVAC Fans: $80/hp Packaged Terminal AC: $45-$75/ton Food Service Equipment: Varies widely by type Refrigeration Equipment: Varies widely by type

173

Chicopee Electric Light - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Chicopee Electric Light - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Chicopee Electric Light - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (Massachusetts) Chicopee Electric Light - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (Massachusetts) < Back Savings Category Other Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Maximum Rebate $25,000; 30% of total cost if project did not recieve financing from CEL, 20% of total cost if project did recieve financing from CEL Program Info State Massachusetts Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Custom: $0.17 per annual kWh saved Lighting: $0.17 per annual kWh saved New Construction: $0.17 per annual kWh saved Provider Program Administrator Chicopee Electric Light (CEL) offers a Pilot Energy Efficiency Program to encourage non-residential, commercial, and industrial facilities to pursue

174

Randolph EMC - Agricultural Efficient Lighting Rebate Program (North  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Randolph EMC - Agricultural Efficient Lighting Rebate Program Randolph EMC - Agricultural Efficient Lighting Rebate Program (North Carolina) Randolph EMC - Agricultural Efficient Lighting Rebate Program (North Carolina) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Savings Category Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Maximum Rebate Contact Randolph EMC Program Info State North Carolina Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount 25% of upgrade cost Provider Randolph Electric Membership Corporation Agricultural members of Randolph EMC (REMC) who upgrade to energy-efficient CFL bulbs in agricultural facilities are eligible for an incentive to help cover the initial cost of installation. The cooperative will cover 25% of the cost of the lighting upgrade. The program targets the adoption of CFL lighting technology specifically. Contact REMC for questions regarding

175

Visible Light Digital Camera --Up to 2.3MP resolution with LED lamps provides sharp images  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

regardless of lighting conditions · Fusion Picture in Picture (PIP) -- Displays thermal image super Marker Function · Auto Hot/Cold spot marker function shows a spot within the area that automatically finds the hottest or coldest spot within the box i-Series Features FLIR i60 -- Scalable Fusion picture

Short, Daniel

176

City Water Light and Power - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Water Light and Power - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Water Light and Power - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs City Water Light and Power - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs < Back Eligibility Commercial Nonprofit Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Maximum Rebate Insulation: $3,000 Retro-Commissioning: $50,000 Lighting: $15,000 Program Info State Illinois Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Air-Source Heat Pumps: $300/ton Geothermal Heat Pump: $500/ton Insulation: 30% Retro-Commissioning Study: $0.30 per sq. ft. of conditioned space Retro-Commissioning EMC: varies Lighting: $3 - $35/unit Lighting (Custom): $0.28/Watt reduced Water Loop Heat Pump: Contact CWLP

177

Cheyenne Light, Fuel and Power (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cheyenne Light, Fuel and Power (Electric) - Residential Energy Cheyenne Light, Fuel and Power (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Cheyenne Light, Fuel and Power (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Program Info State Wyoming Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Home Energy Audit: Contact Cheyenne Light, Fuel and Power CFL Bulbs: Up to 10 CFL bulbs at reduced cost Water Heater: $75 Refrigerator Recycling: $30 Cheyenne Light, Fuel and Power offers incentives to electric customers who wish to install energy efficient equipment in participating homes. Incentives are available for home energy audits, CFL light bulbs, tank water heaters and refrigerator recycling. Water heater purchases and

178

Wellesley Municipal Light Plant - Residential Energy Efficiency...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Refrigerator: 100 Clothes Washing Machine: 75 Central AC: 100 Room AC Unit: 50 Dishwasher: 75 Dehumidifier: 50 Wellesley Municipal Light Plant (WMLP) offers a number of...

179

Inland Power & Light Company - Residential Energy Efficiency...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pumps (Installed in homes with Electric Zonal Heating): 1,500 Window Replacement: 3 per square foot Inland Power & Light offers a variety of rebates through the Conservation...

180

Quantitative Modeling of Cerenkov Light Production Efficiency from Medical Radionuclides  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Quantitative Modeling of Cerenkov Light Production Efficiency from Medical Radionuclides Bradley J There has been recent and growing interest in applying Cerenkov radiation (CR) for biological applications) Quantitative Modeling of Cerenkov Light Production Efficiency from Medical Radionuclides. PLoS ONE 7(2): e31402

Hielscher, Andreas

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lamps lighting efficiency" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

City Water Light and Power - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

City Water Light and Power - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate City Water Light and Power - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs City Water Light and Power - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Maximum Rebate Refrigerator Recycling: 2 units Insulation: $1,000 Program Info State Illinois Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Clothes Washer: $150 Central Air Conditioner: $9 per kBTUh Air-Source Heat Pumps: $300/ton Geothermal Heat Pump: $500 Refrigerator Recycling: $50 per appliance Insulation: 30% Provider Energy Services Office City Water Light and Power (CWLP) offers rebates to Springfield residential

182

Waverly Light and Power - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebates |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Efficiency Rebates Energy Efficiency Rebates Waverly Light and Power - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebates < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Appliances & Electronics Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Design & Remodeling Heat Pumps Water Heating Maximum Rebate Appliance Recycling: $150 Program Info State Iowa Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Energy Star New Home: $1,300 Heat Pump Water Heater: $500 LED Lighting: 50% of cost, up to $200 Central AC: $150 Air-Source Heat Pump: $150 Geothermal Heat Pump: $450 Clothes Washer: $75 Refrigerator: $50 Appliance Recycling: $75 Provider Waverly Light and Power Waverly Light and Power (WL&P) offers rebates for the purchase and

183

Fluorescent Lighting Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fluorescent Lighting Basics Fluorescent Lighting Basics Fluorescent Lighting Basics October 17, 2013 - 5:39pm Addthis Light from a fluorescent lamp is first created by an electric current conducted through an inert gas producing ultraviolet light that is invisible to the human eye. The ultraviolet light in turn interacts with special blends of phosphors coating the interior surface of the fluorescent lamp tube that efficiently converts the invisible light into useful white light. Fluorescent lamps require a special power supply called a ballast that is needed to regulate lamp operating current and provide a compatible start-up voltage. Electronic ballasts perform the same function as a magnetic ballast but outperform the outdated magnetic products by operating at a very high frequency that eliminates flicker and noise while

184

Playing Around with Lighting Efficiency | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Playing Around with Lighting Efficiency Playing Around with Lighting Efficiency Playing Around with Lighting Efficiency June 28, 2010 - 6:03pm Addthis The city of Brea, California, had a problem: The lighting in its Brea Junior High Park was becoming obsolete. The park, one of the busiest maintained by this northern Orange County city, needed the lighting for nighttime use of its sports fields and courts. The existing system was not only extremely inefficient, but scheduled to be phased out of production. That meant the city would soon be unable to buy replacement bulbs. But due to the budget problems plaguing municipalities across California and the country, Brea had trouble finding the money to pay for a complete retrofit -- especially because the savings to the city from more efficient lights would not be large enough to repay the investment quickly.

185

Playing Around with Lighting Efficiency | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Playing Around with Lighting Efficiency Playing Around with Lighting Efficiency Playing Around with Lighting Efficiency June 28, 2010 - 6:03pm Addthis The city of Brea, California, had a problem: The lighting in its Brea Junior High Park was becoming obsolete. The park, one of the busiest maintained by this northern Orange County city, needed the lighting for nighttime use of its sports fields and courts. The existing system was not only extremely inefficient, but scheduled to be phased out of production. That meant the city would soon be unable to buy replacement bulbs. But due to the budget problems plaguing municipalities across California and the country, Brea had trouble finding the money to pay for a complete retrofit -- especially because the savings to the city from more efficient lights would not be large enough to repay the investment quickly.

186

North Branch Municipal Water and Light - Residential Energy Efficiency  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

North Branch Municipal Water and Light - Residential Energy North Branch Municipal Water and Light - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program North Branch Municipal Water and Light - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Appliances & Electronics Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Lighting: See program website Room A/C: $25, plus $25 for recycling an old, working unit Central A/C: $100 - $200, plus additional rebate for efficiency ratings above 14.5 SEER Air Source Heat Pump:$100 - $200, plus additional rebate for efficiency ratings above 14.5 SEER Geothermal Heat Pump:$200/ton, plus $25/ton for every 1 EER above minimum

187

March 10, 2011 Let There Be More Efficient Light  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

standards for light bulbs, which include a phasing out of incandescent bulbs in favor of more energy-efficient bulbs. The "government has no business telling an individual what kind of light bulb to buy," she during the 20th century. Today we can go to our hardware store and choose from hundreds of light bulbs

Colorado at Boulder, University of

188

Efficiency enhancement of microcavity organic light emitting diodes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report microcavity efficiency enhancement of organic electroluminescent devices based on the hole transporter bis(triphenyl) diamine and the electron transporter and light emitter tris(8?hydroxyquinoline) aluminum.Microcavityorganic light emitting diodes are described that emit four times the light measured in the forward direction (spectrally integrated)

R. H. Jordan; A. Dodabalapur; R. E. Slusher

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Independence Power and Light - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Independence Power and Light - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Independence Power and Light - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Independence Power and Light - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Program Info State Missouri Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Central A/C: $109 - $384 Heat Pumps: $259 - $701 Heat Pumps Water Heaters: $300 Provider Independence Power and Light Independence Power and Light (IPL) offers rebates to residential customers for purchasing new, energy efficient appliances. Rebates are available on central air conditioning systems, heat pumps, and water heaters. Rebates on equipment vary based upon size, capacity, and efficiency of the unit. See

190

Seattle City Light - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Seattle City Light - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs Seattle City Light - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs Seattle City Light - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Institutional Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Manufacturing Other Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Maximum Rebate 70% of cost Program Info State District of Columbia Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Lighting: $0.02 - $0.23/kWh saved or $3 - $86/fixture Lighting Controls: $0.20 - $0.26/kWh saved or $30 - $90/sensor HVAC Controls: $0.20 - $0.23 Chillers: $0.23-$0.34 per kWh saved Air Conditioners: $0.20 -$0.23 per kWh saved Heat Pumps $0.20-$0.27 per kWh saved

191

Alexandria Light and Power - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Alexandria Light and Power - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Alexandria Light and Power - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Alexandria Light and Power - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Manufacturing Other Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Home Weatherization Windows, Doors, & Skylights Maximum Rebate All Incentives: Limited to 75% of total project cost Custom Program: $100,000 per calendar year per customer Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Targeted Audit: Varies by building type and size Lighting (New Construction): Varies widely Lighting (Existing Buildings): Varies widely Custom Measures: $300 kW; $0.01/kWh; $0.40/Therm

192

Efficiency Maine Residential Lighting Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Lighting Program Lighting Program Efficiency Maine Residential Lighting Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Program Info Funding Source Maine's System Benefit Charge, Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative, Forward Capacity Market and Maine Power Reliability Program State Maine Program Type State Rebate Program Rebate Amount Typically $1.25/bulb Efficiency Maine's Residential Lighting Program works directly with retailers and manufacturers to encourage residential customers to purchase energy-efficient lighting. Rebate amounts average $1.25/bulb and are available at the point of sale at participating retailers. Participating retailers will deduct the rebate amount at the cash register. (See the program web site for a list of participating retailers and additional

193

Waverly Light & Power - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebates...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Rebate Program Rebate Amount Energy Star New Home: 1,300 Heat Pump Water Heater: 500 LED Lighting: 50% of cost, up to 200 Central AC: 150 Air-Source Heat Pump: 150...

194

Chicopee Electric Light - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Massachusetts Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Custom: 0.17 per annual kWh saved Lighting: 0.17 per annual kWh saved New Construction: 0.17 per annual kWh saved...

195

Types of Lighting in Commercial Buildings - Lighting Characteristics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Characteristics of Lighting Types Characteristics of Lighting Types Efficacy Efficacy is the amount of light produced per unit of energy consumed, expressed in lumens per watt (lm/W). Lamps with a higher efficacy value are more energy efficient. Average Rated Life The average rated life of a particular type of lamp is defined by the number of hours when 50 percent of a large sample of that type of lamp has failed. Color Rendering Index (CRI) The CRI is a measurement of a light source's accuracy in rendering different colors when compared to a reference light source. The highest attainable CRI is 100. Lamps with CRIs above 70 are typically used in office and living environments. Correlated Color Temperature (CCT) The CCT is an indicator of the "warmth" or "coolness" of the color

196

Lighting Research Group: Facilities: Power Analyzer  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Power Analyzer Power Analyzer Power Analyzer power analyzer Gonio-photometer | Integrating sphere | Power analyzer | Spectro-radiometer A power analyzer is a very necessary tool for lighting research. With the power analyzer we are able to monitor the input voltage to the lamp as well as the input power and current. The amount of power a lamp or a lamp-ballast combination uses is very important when determining its efficiency. It is also important to monitor the input voltage to make sure it doesn't vary. This can affect the light output of a lamp greatly. With the power analyzer we can also measure things like the power factor, harmonic distortion, and current crest factor of some lamps. These measurements tell us how well a lamp is working. For example, a high power

197

Advanced lighting guidelines, 1993: Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

The 1993 Advanced Lighting Guidelines document consists of twelve guidelines that provide an overview of specific lighting technologies and design application techniques utilizing energy-efficient lighting practice. Lighting Design Practice assesses energy-efficient lighting strategies, discusses lighting issues, and explains how to obtain quality lighting design and consulting services. Luminaires and Lighting Systems surveys luminaire equipment designed to take advantage of advanced technology lamp products and includes performance tables that allow for accurate estimation of luminaire light output and power input. The additional ten guidelines -- Computer-Aided Lighting Design, Energy-Efficient Fluorescent Ballasts, Full-Size Fluorescent Lamps, Compact Fluorescent Lamps, Tungsten- Halogen Lamps, Metal Halide and HPS Lamps, Daylighting and Lumen Maintenance, Occupant Sensors, Time Scheduling Systems, and Retrofit Control Technologies -- each provide a product technology overview, discuss current products on the lighting equipment market, and provide application techniques. This document is intended for use by electric utility personnel involved in lighting programs, lighting designers, electrical engineers, architects, lighting manufacturers' representatives, and other lighting professionals.

Eley, C.; Tolen, T.M. (Eley Associates, San Francisco, CA (United States)); Benya, J.R. (Luminae Souter Lighting Design, San Francisco, CA (United States)); Rubinstein, F.; Verderber, R. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States))

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Advanced lighting guidelines: 1993. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 1993 Advanced Lighting Guidelines document consists of twelve guidelines that provide an overview of specific lighting technologies and design application techniques utilizing energy-efficient lighting practice. Lighting Design Practice assesses energy-efficient lighting strategies, discusses lighting issues, and explains how to obtain quality lighting design and consulting services. Luminaires and Lighting Systems surveys luminaire equipment designed to take advantage of advanced technology lamp products and includes performance tables that allow for accurate estimation of luminaire light output and power input. The additional ten guidelines -- Computer-Aided Lighting Design, Energy-Efficient Fluorescent Ballasts, Full-Size Fluorescent Lamps, Compact Fluorescent Lamps, Tungsten-Halogen Lamps, Metal Halide and HPS Lamps, Daylighting and Lumen Maintenance, Occupant Sensors, Time Scheduling Systems, and Retrofit Control Technologies -- each provide a product technology overview, discuss current products on the lighting equipment market, and provide application techniques. This document is intended for use by electric utility personnel involved in lighting programs, lighting designers, electrical engineers, architects, lighting manufacturers` representatives, and other lighting professionals.

Eley, C.; Tolen, T.M. [Eley Associates, San Francisco, CA (United States); Benya, J.R. [Luminae Souter Lighting Design, San Francisco, CA (United States); Rubinstein, F.; Verderber, R. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

199

Advanced Lighting Technologies Application Guidelines: 1990  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced Lighting Technologies Application Guidelines document consists of eight guidelines that provide an overview of specific lighting technologies and design application techniques utilizing energy-efficient lighting products. Lighting Design Practice assesses energy-efficient lighting strategies and explains how to obtain quality lighting design and consulting services. Luminaries and Lighting Systems surveys advanced lighting fixture products designed to take advantage of current energy-efficient lamp technologies and includes luminaire tables to allow users to collect photometric performance characteristics for common commercial luminaires. Each of the remaining six guidelines -- Computer-Aided Lighting Design, Energy-efficient and Electronic Ballasts, Full-Size Fluorescent Lamps, Compact Fluorescent Lamps, Conventional Shape Tungsten-Halogen Lamps, and Compact Metal Halide and White High Pressure Sodium Lamps -- includes a technology overview section, a description of current products available on the market, and an applications section. The document is intended for use by electric utility personnel involved in lighting programs, lighting designers, electrical engineers, architects, lighting manufacturers' representatives, and other lighting professionals.

Eley, C. (Eley (Charles) Associates, San Francisco, CA (United States))

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

LED LAMP OR BULB WITH REMOTE PHOSPHOR AND DIFFUSER ...  

An LED lamp or bulb is disclosed that comprises a light source, a heat sink structure and an optical cavity. The optical cavity comprises a phosphor ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lamps lighting efficiency" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Heat transfer assembly for a fluorescent lamp and fixture  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a lighting fixture including a lamp and a housing, a heat transfer structure is disclosed for reducing the minimum lamp wall temperature of a fluorescent light bulb. The heat transfer structure, constructed of thermally conductive material, extends from inside the housing to outside the housing, transferring heat energy generated from a fluorescent light bulb to outside the housing where the heat energy is dissipated to the ambient air outside the housing. Also disclosed is a method for reducing minimum lamp wall temperatures. Further disclosed is an improved lighting fixture including a lamp, a housing and the aforementioned heat transfer structure. 11 figs.

Siminovitch, M.J.; Rubenstein, F.M.; Whitman, R.E.

1992-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

202

Heat transfer assembly for a fluorescent lamp and fixture  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a lighting fixture including a lamp and a housing, a heat transfer structure is disclosed for reducing the minimum lamp wall temperature of a fluorescent light bulb. The heat transfer structure, constructed of thermally conductive material, extends from inside the housing to outside the housing, transferring heat energy generated from a fluorescent light bulb to outside the housing where the heat energy is dissipated to the ambient air outside the housing. Also disclosed is a method for reducing minimum lamp wall temperatures. Further disclosed is an improved lighting fixture including a lamp, a housing and the aforementioned heat transfer structure.

Siminovitch, Michael J. (Richmond, CA); Rubenstein, Francis M. (Berkeley, CA); Whitman, Richard E. (Richmond, CA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

LED Holiday Lights: Festive, Safe, and Efficient! | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Holiday Lights: Festive, Safe, and Efficient! Holiday Lights: Festive, Safe, and Efficient! LED Holiday Lights: Festive, Safe, and Efficient! November 23, 2010 - 6:30am Addthis Allison Casey Senior Communicator, NREL This week brings a day that many people look forward to all year-and I'm not talking about Thanksgiving, or Black Friday. I'm talking about that magical day when it's finally okay to drag the dusty boxes from the basement or attic, to lovingly sort and display your decorations, to untangle your light strings and set up the stepladder, all in anticipation of one glorious moment: Dad's annual trip to the emergency room. I kid (and sincerely hope that's not your yearly ritual), but in addition to safety when hanging your lights this year, I hope you'll think about something else: efficiency.

204

Dayton Power and Light - Business and Government Energy Efficiency Rebate  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Dayton Power and Light - Business and Government Energy Efficiency Dayton Power and Light - Business and Government Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Dayton Power and Light - Business and Government Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Institutional Local Government Nonprofit Schools State Government Tribal Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Appliances & Electronics Manufacturing Other Construction Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Program Info State Ohio Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Custom Lighting: $0.05/kWh saved + $50/kW saved Custom Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning: $0.10/kWh saved + $100/kW saved Custom Other: $0.08/kWh saved + $100/kW saved New Construction Rebates: Custom

205

Concord Municipal Light Plant - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Concord Municipal Light Plant - Residential Energy Efficiency Concord Municipal Light Plant - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Concord Municipal Light Plant - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Appliances & Electronics Sealing Your Home Ventilation Commercial Lighting Lighting Maximum Rebate Electric Heat Weatherization: $1,000 Central Air Conditioners: $1,500 CFLs/LEDs/Exit Signs: 30 bulbs or signs Program Info State Massachusetts Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Electric Heat Weatherization: $1,000 Central Air Conditioners: $1,500 CFLs/LEDs/Exit Signs: 30 bulbs or signs Provider Customer Service Concord Municipal Light Plant (CMLP) offers its residential customers

206

Roseville Electric - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Roseville Electric - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Other Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Home Weatherization Insulation Design & Remodeling Windows, Doors, & Skylights Program Info Expiration Date 6/30/2013 State California Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Unitary AC/Heat Pump: $120/ton or $500/ton Package Terminal AC/Heat Pumps: $125/unit Variable Frequency Drive: $120/hp Variable Speed Motor: $75/hp Window Film: $4/sq ft Shade Tree: $30/tree Desktop Computer Network Controller: $10/computer Cold Cathode Lamps: $4/lamp Ceramic Metal Halide: $20/lamp

207

Plasma lighting, fiber optics, and daylight collectors: Toward the next revolution in high-efficiency illumination  

SciTech Connect

Combining three recently marketed innovations may provide the next revolution in illumination, making many other recent advances eventually obsolete. The first is plasma lighting, pioneered by Fusion Lighting Inc. of Rockville, Maryland, and first commercially applied by Hutchins International Ltd. of Mississauga, Ontario. This microwave-generated light source yields very high-quality light with efficacies at or beyond high intensity discharge (HID) lamps. The source uses no mercury, thus eliminating lamp disposal problems, and has no cathode, thereby providing very long lamp life. Using no phosphors, it also has very short start and re-strike periods, and is dimmable. The second innovation is in the distribution of light. Commercial developments in fiber optics and light guides now provide products that transfer light from a remote point and distribute it like standard light fixtures. Advances in fiber optic communications and applications to decorative lighting have supplied relatively economical systems for mounting and directing light from both electric light sources and the sun. The third advance is a result of efforts to harness daylight. Unlike architectural daylighting that directs sunlight into perimeter areas through glazing, daylight collectors are roof-mounted devices that supply light to interior and underground spaces through hollow columns and open chases. Aided by improvements and cost reductions in sun-tracking (i.e., heliostatic) controls that capture and concentrate sunlight, such collectors offer a source of free light to locations that might otherwise never receive it. When combined together, these three options could offer a centralized building lighting system that pipes lumens to distribution devices replacing many existing lamps and fixtures.

Audin, L. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

DOE Closes Investigation into Alleged Lighting Efficiency Violations |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Closes Investigation into Alleged Lighting Efficiency DOE Closes Investigation into Alleged Lighting Efficiency Violations DOE Closes Investigation into Alleged Lighting Efficiency Violations April 16, 2010 - 10:39am Addthis The U.S. Department of Energy has closed its investigation into the energy efficiency of lighting products manufactured by Habitex Corporation and sold under the Target and Adesso brand names based on test data provided by the companies. The Department requested information from the three companies last month in response to a complaint that these products did not meet the Department's energy efficiency standards for torchieres. Responding promptly to the Department's inquiry, the companies provided test data showing that these products did not meet the Energy Policy and Conservation Act's definition of torchiere and, as a result, did not

209

Green Light-Emitting Diode Makes Highly Efficient White Light; The Spectrum of Clean Energy Innovation (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

Fact sheet describing NREL's green light emitting diode that can lead to higher efficiency white light used in indoor lighting applications.

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Energy Basics: Fluorescent Lighting  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

& Cooling Water Heating Fluorescent Lighting Fluorescent lamps use 25%-35% of the energy used by incandescent lamps to provide the same amount of illumination (efficacy of...

211

Energy-efficient H. I. D. solid-state ballast: Phase II final report. [150 watt high pressure sodium lamp  

SciTech Connect

The following report presents the results of Phase II, Development of Solid State 150 watt High Pressure Sodium Ballasts. Basically, the objectives of the development program were accomplished, i.e., greater than 90% efficiency, greater than 90% power factor, regulation equivalent to ferro-magnetic ballasts, and energy savings sufficient to warrant the further development of the solid-state HPS ballast for commercial production and marketing. 8 figs., 5 tabs.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Commercialization of gallium nitride nanorod arrays on silicon for solid-state lighting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One important component in energy usage is lighting, which is currently dominated by incandescent and fluorescent lamps. However, due to potentially higher efficiencies and thus higher energy savings, solid-state lighting ...

Wee, Qixun

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Compact fluorescent lamp using horizontal and vertical insulating septums and convective venting geometry  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A novel design is described for a compact fluorescent lamp, including a lamp geometry which will increase light output and efficacy of the lamp in a base down operating position by providing horizontal and vertical insulating septums positioned in the ballast compartment of the lamp to provide a cooler coldspot. Selective convective venting provides additional cooling of the ballast compartment. 9 figs.

Siminovitch, M.

1998-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

214

Compact fluorescent lamp using horizontal and vertical insulating septums and convective venting geometry  

SciTech Connect

A novel design for a compact fluorescent lamp, including a lamp geometry which will increase light output and efficacy of the lamp in a base down operating position by providing horizontal and vertical insulating septums positioned in the ballast compartment of the lamp to provide a cooler coldspot. Selective convective venting provides additional cooling of the ballast compartment.

Siminovitch, Michael (El Sobrante, CA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Richland Energy Services - Energy Efficient Commercial Lighting Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Richland Energy Services - Energy Efficient Commercial Lighting Richland Energy Services - Energy Efficient Commercial Lighting Program Richland Energy Services - Energy Efficient Commercial Lighting Program < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Industrial Institutional Nonprofit Savings Category Other Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Maximum Rebate 70% of the total cost Program Info Expiration Date 9/30/2012 State District of Columbia Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount T5/T8 with Electric Ballasts: $10 - $65 Hardwired CFL's: $40 - $80 Screw In CFL's: $3 - $12 Cold Cathode: $3 - $15 Ceramic Metal Halide Fixture: $30 - $50 LED's: $15 - $50 Induction: $80 - $400 High-output T5/T8: $50 - $180 Metal Halide/High Pressure Sodium: $80 - $400 Stairwell/Garage Fluorescent Fixture: $50 Occupancy Sensor/Timer: $30 - $60

216

NREL: News Feature - Light Inspires Energy Efficient Building Design  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Light Inspires Energy Efficient Building Design Light Inspires Energy Efficient Building Design March 1, 2010 Photo of a man and a woman in a lab holding a window with tinted glass. Enlarge image NREL Researchers Dane Gillespie and Erin Whitney will get to see the windows they normally test in the lab used in a real world environment at the RSF. Credit: Pat Corkery Artists find inspiration in many ways. But for the artists (architects and researchers) working collaboratively to create the most energy efficient office space in the U.S., the inspiration was simply light. In fact, light and the access to light turned out to be a top factor when designing the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Research Support Facility (RSF) located on NREL's South Table Mountain Campus near Golden, Colo. "One of the most powerful drivers in the project is daylight," Philip

217

Duquesne Light Company - Residential Energy Efficiency Program | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Duquesne Light Company - Residential Energy Efficiency Program Duquesne Light Company - Residential Energy Efficiency Program Duquesne Light Company - Residential Energy Efficiency Program < Back Eligibility Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Appliances & Electronics Heating Commercial Lighting Lighting Heat Pumps Water Heating Program Info State Pennsylvania Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Energy Star Dehumidifier: $24 Energy Star Freezer: $10 Energy Star Refrigerator: $24 Energy Star Room A/C: $24 Energy Star Dishwasher with Electric Water Heater: $24 Energy Star Clothes Washer - (Electric Water Heating Only): $24 Electric Clothes Dryer with Moisture Sensor: $24 Swimming Pool Pump, Two-Speed or Variable Speed: $57

218

Florida Power and Light - Business Energy Efficiency Rebates | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Florida Power and Light - Business Energy Efficiency Rebates Florida Power and Light - Business Energy Efficiency Rebates Florida Power and Light - Business Energy Efficiency Rebates < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Institutional Local Government Nonprofit Schools State Government Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Manufacturing Other Construction Heat Pumps Heating Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Insulation Design & Remodeling Water Heating Windows, Doors, & Skylights Maximum Rebate Chillers: $99/kW reduced Thermal Energy Storage: $580/kW shifted DX AC: $165/kW reduced (Unitary); $495/kW reduced (Room Unit) Energy Recovery Ventilators: $415/kW reduced Demand Control Ventilation: $600/kW reduced ECM Motors for DX Systems: $100/kW reduced

219

Alexandria Light and Power - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Alexandria Light and Power - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Alexandria Light and Power - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Alexandria Light and Power - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Appliances & Electronics Construction Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Clothes Washer: $50 - $75 Refrigerator: $50, with recycling of old, working model Dishwasher: $25 Dehumidifier: $10 Room Air Conditioner: $15 Heat Pump Water Heater: $300 Central A/C: $200 Mini-Split Ductless A/C: $100 ECM in New Furnace/Air Handler/Fan Coil: $150 Air-Source Heat Pump: $250 - $350 Programmable Thermostat: $25 Geothermal Heat Pump: $200/ton

220

Solid-State Lighting: DOE and Northeast Energy Efficiency Partnerships...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE and Northeast Energy Efficiency Partnerships Host Two-Day Market Introduction Workshop in Boston to someone by E-mail Share Solid-State Lighting: DOE and Northeast Energy...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lamps lighting efficiency" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

McMinnville Water & Light- Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

McMinnville Water and Light Company offers a variety of rebates for commercial and industrial customers to make energy efficient improvements to eligible facilities. MW&L offers rebates in...

222

EnergyUnited - Commercial Energy Efficient Lighting Rebate Program...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Upgrades: 0.30watt saved Commercial and industrial members who upgrade to energy-efficient light bulbs which meet EnergyUnited's standards are eligible for a prescriptive,...

223

Highly efficient blue polyfluorene-based polymer light-emitting...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Physics Volume 42 Pagination 5 Abstract A highly efficient blue polymer light-emitting diode based on poly(9,9-di(2-(2-(2-methoxy-ethoxy)ethoxy)ethyl)fluorenyl-2,7-diyl)...

224

Buildings Energy Data Book: 7.6 Efficiency Standards for Lighting  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

1 1 Efficiency Standards for General Service Fluorescent Lamps Effective for products manufactured before July 14, 2012 Minimum Nominal Lamp Average Lamp Lamp Type (1) Wattage (W) Minimum CRI Efficacy (lm/W) Effective Date 4-Foot Medium Bipin >35 69 75.0 November 1, 1995 4-Foot Medium Bipin ≤35 45 75.0 November 1, 1995 2-Foot U-Shaped >35 69 68.0 November 1, 1995 2-Foot U-Shaped ≤35 45 64.0 November 1, 1995 8-Foot Slimline >65 69 80.0 May 1, 1994 8-Foot Slimline ≤65 45 80.0 May 1, 1994 8-Foot High Output >100 69 80.0 May 1, 1994 8-Foot High Output ≤100 45 80.0 May 1, 1994 Effective for products manufactured on or after July 14, 2012 Minimum Correlated Color Average Lamp Lamp Type Temperature (K) Efficacy (lm/W) 4-Foot Medium Bipin ≤4,500 89 4-Foot Medium Bipin >4,500 and ≤7,000 88

225

Virginia Tech Shines Light on Home Efficiency | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Virginia Tech Shines Light on Home Efficiency Virginia Tech Shines Light on Home Efficiency Virginia Tech Shines Light on Home Efficiency July 9, 2010 - 10:54am Addthis Virginia Tech's solar-powered Lumenhaus was designed for maximum efficiency as well as comfort. | Photo courtesy of Lumenhaus Virginia Tech's solar-powered Lumenhaus was designed for maximum efficiency as well as comfort. | Photo courtesy of Lumenhaus Collegiate teams from around the world came to Madrid this month to present their solar-powered houses in the first biennial Solar Decathlon Europe, a competition modeled after the Energy Department's Solar Decathlon in Washington, D.C. As one of just two teams representing the United States, Virginia Tech earned enough points with its Lumenhaus to win the overall competition. "We competed against high quality teams with significant support from their

226

Energy Engineering Analysis Program (EEAP), Fort Bliss headquarters building, lighting retrofit, Fort Bliss, El Paso, Texas  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study is to analyze the use of high efficiency fluorescent lighting with energy efficient lamps and electronic ballast for the Headquarters Building (Bldg. number 2) at Fort Bliss.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Development and characterization of a high CRI LED lamp.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The aim of this thesis is to realize a high CRI LED lamp using the color mixing technique. We start from a high efficiency white… (more)

Meneghesso , Matteo

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Cheyenne Light, Fuel and Power (Gas) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cheyenne Light, Fuel and Power (Gas) - Residential Energy Cheyenne Light, Fuel and Power (Gas) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (Wyoming) Cheyenne Light, Fuel and Power (Gas) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (Wyoming) < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Construction Design & Remodeling Sealing Your Home Ventilation Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Windows, Doors, & Skylights Maximum Rebate Insulation (Wall/Ceiling/Floor): $750 Insulation (Duct): $170 Infiltration Control: $200 Duct Sealing: $285 Program Info State Wyoming Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Home Energy Audit: Required for Infiltration Control, Insulation, Duct Sealing, and Window Rebates

229

High efficiency III-nitride light-emitting diodes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Tailored doping of barrier layers enables balancing of the radiative recombination among the multiple-quantum-wells in III-Nitride light-emitting diodes. This tailored doping enables more symmetric carrier transport and uniform carrier distribution which help to reduce electron leakage and thus reduce the efficiency droop in high-power III-Nitride LEDs. Mitigation of the efficiency droop in III-Nitride LEDs may enable the pervasive market penetration of solid-state-lighting technologies in high-power lighting and illumination.

Crawford, Mary; Koleske, Daniel; Cho, Jaehee; Zhu, Di; Noemaun, Ahmed; Schubert, Martin F; Schubert, E. Fred

2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

230

Chicopee Electric Light - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Chicopee Electric Light - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Chicopee Electric Light - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Chicopee Electric Light - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Appliances & Electronics Heat Pumps Water Heating Maximum Rebate Insulation: $300 maximum rebate Program Info State Massachusetts Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Clothes Washer: $50 Refrigerator: $50 Freezer: $50 Dishwasher: $25 Heat Pump Water Heater: $300 Central A/C: Up to $500 Ductless Mini-Split AC: Up to $500 Air Source Heat Pump: Up to $500 Insulation: 30% of installed cost Provider EFI Municipal Rebates Chicopee Electric Light (CEL) offers a variety of incentives for its

231

Orcas Power and Light - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Orcas Power and Light - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Orcas Power and Light - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Orcas Power and Light - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Appliances & Electronics Sealing Your Home Ventilation Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heat Pumps Water Heating Windows, Doors, & Skylights Program Info State District of Columbia Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Air Source Heat Pump: $300 - $1,900 Ductless Heat Pump: $1,500 Insulation: $0.05 - $0.85 per square foot Duct Sealing: $400 - $500 Window Replacement: $6 per square foot Clothes Washer: $20 - $70 Refrigerator/Freezer: $15 Water Heaters: $25 Provider Orcas Power and Light Cooperative

232

LED Holiday Lights: Festive, Safe, and Efficient! | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

LED Holiday Lights: Festive, Safe, and Efficient! LED Holiday Lights: Festive, Safe, and Efficient! LED Holiday Lights: Festive, Safe, and Efficient! December 2, 2010 - 4:34pm Addthis Andy Oare Andy Oare Former New Media Strategist, Office of Public Affairs Ed. Note cross posted from the Energy Savers Blog. Written by Allison Casey This week brings a day that many people look forward to all year -- and I'm not talking about Thanksgiving, or Black Friday. I'm talking about that magical day when it's finally okay to drag the dusty boxes from the basement or attic, to lovingly sort and display your decorations, to untangle your light strings and set up the stepladder, all in anticipation of one glorious moment: Dad's annual trip to the emergency room. I kid (and sincerely hope that's not your yearly ritual), but in addition

233

Amber LEDs for Solid-State Lighting: White light with unprecendented efficiencies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Amber LEDs for Solid-State Lighting: Amber LEDs for Solid-State Lighting: White light with unprecedented efficiencies Commercialization Webinar December 10, 2013 2 Agenda for Today's Webinar * Welcome/Logistics * Technology Overview * Commercialization Opportunity * Q&A 3 Presenters Yoriko Morita, PhD MBA licensing manager Kirstin Alberi, PhD inventor 4 Technology Overview * Background/Context * Limitations NREL's Technology Addresses o Substrate material o Efficiency o Manufacturing * Performance Testing Results * Summary of Benefits/Advantages NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. Amber LEDs for Solid-State Lighting: White light with unprecedented efficiencies

234

Discharge lamp with reflective jacket  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A discharge lamp includes an envelope, a fill which emits light when excited disposed in the envelope, a source of excitation power coupled to the fill to excite the fill and cause the fill to emit light, and a reflector disposed around the envelope and defining an opening, the reflector being configured to reflect some of the light emitted by the fill back into the fill while allowing some light to exit through the opening. The reflector may be made from a material having a similar thermal index of expansion as compared to the envelope and which is closely spaced to the envelope. The envelope material may be quartz and the reflector material may be either silica or alumina. The reflector may be formed as a jacket having a rigid structure which does not adhere to the envelope. The lamp may further include an optical clement spaced from the envelope and configured to reflect an unwanted component of light which exited the envelope back into the envelope through the opening in the reflector. Light which can be beneficially recaptured includes selected wavelength regions, a selected polarization, and selected angular components.

MacLennan, Donald A. (Gaithersburg, MD); Turner, Brian P. (Damascus, MD); Kipling, Kent (Gaithersburg, MD)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

IC-BASED CONTROLS FOR ENERGY-EFFICIENT LIGHTING  

SciTech Connect

A new approach for driving high frequency energy saving ballasts is developed and documented in this report. The developed approach utilizes an IC-based platform that provides the benefits of reduced system cost, reduced ballast size, and universal application to a wide range of lamp technologies, such as linear fluorescent lamps (LFL), compact fluorescent lamps (CFL) and high intensity discharge lamps (HID). The control IC chip set developed for the platform includes dual low voltage (LV) IC gate drive that provides gate drive for high and low side power switches in typical ballast circuits, and ballast controller IC that provides control functionalities optimal for different lamps and digital interface for future extension to more sophisticated control and communication.

Richard Zhang

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Inland Power and Light Company - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Inland Power and Light Company - Residential Energy Efficiency Inland Power and Light Company - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs Inland Power and Light Company - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Appliances & Electronics Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Sealing Your Home Ventilation Heat Pumps Water Heating Windows, Doors, & Skylights Program Info State District of Columbia Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Refrigerators/Freezers Recycling: $30 Electric Water Heaters: $25 Refrigerators/Freezers: $25 Clothes Washers: $20 - $50 Energy Star Site Built Home: $1,000 Northwest Energy Efficient Manufactured Home: $1,000 Air-source Heat Pumps (Installed in an All-Electric Home): $1,000

237

Florida Power and Light - Residential Energy Efficiency Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Florida Power and Light - Residential Energy Efficiency Program Florida Power and Light - Residential Energy Efficiency Program Florida Power and Light - Residential Energy Efficiency Program < Back Eligibility Installer/Contractor Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Sealing Your Home Ventilation Heat Pumps Insulation Design & Remodeling Program Info State Florida Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Residential Home Energy Survey: Free A/C and Heat Pump: $140 - $1930, depending on system size and efficiency rating Reflective Roof (Metal or Tile): $325 Duct Test: Discounted Single Family Duct System Repair: up to $154 Multi-family and Manufactured Home Duct System Repair: $60/account Ceiling and Roof Insulation: varies based upon existing insulation levels

238

Incandescent Lighting | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Incandescent Lighting Incandescent Lighting Incandescent Lighting October 17, 2013 - 6:15pm Addthis Incandescent lighting is the most common, and least energy efficient, type of lighting used in homes. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto/TokenPhoto. Incandescent lighting is the most common, and least energy efficient, type of lighting used in homes. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto/TokenPhoto. Incandescent lamps are often considered the least energy efficient type of electric lighting commonly found in residential buildings. Although inefficient, incandescent lamps possess a number of key advantages--they are inexpensive to buy, turn on instantly, are available in a huge array of sizes and shapes and provide a pleasant, warm light with excellent color rendition. However, because of their relative inefficiency and short life spans, they

239

Incandescent Lighting | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Incandescent Lighting Incandescent Lighting Incandescent Lighting October 17, 2013 - 6:15pm Addthis Incandescent lighting is the most common, and least energy efficient, type of lighting used in homes. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto/TokenPhoto. Incandescent lighting is the most common, and least energy efficient, type of lighting used in homes. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto/TokenPhoto. Incandescent lamps are often considered the least energy efficient type of electric lighting commonly found in residential buildings. Although inefficient, incandescent lamps possess a number of key advantages--they are inexpensive to buy, turn on instantly, are available in a huge array of sizes and shapes and provide a pleasant, warm light with excellent color rendition. However, because of their relative inefficiency and short life spans, they

240

Jacketed lamp bulb envelope  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A jacketed lamp bulb envelope includes a ceramic cup having an open end and a partially closed end, the partially closed end defining an aperture, a lamp bulb positioned inside the ceramic cup abutting the aperture, and a reflective ceramic material at least partially covering a portion of the bulb not abutting the aperture. The reflective ceramic material may substantially fill an interior volume of the ceramic cup not occupied by the bulb. The ceramic cup may include a structural feature for aiding in alignment of the jacketed lamp bulb envelope in a lamp. The ceramic cup may include an external flange about a periphery thereof. One example of a jacketed lamp bulb envelope includes a ceramic cup having an open end and a closed end, a ceramic washer covering the open end of the ceramic cup, the washer defining an aperture therethrough, a lamp bulb positioned inside the ceramic cup abutting the aperture, and a reflective ceramic material filling an interior volume of the ceramic cup not occupied by the bulb. A method of packing a jacketed lamp bulb envelope of the type comprising a ceramic cup with a lamp bulb disposed therein includes the steps of filling the ceramic cup with a flowable slurry of reflective material, and applying centrifugal force to the cup to pack the reflective material therein.

MacLennan, Donald A. (Gaithersburg, MD); Turner, Brian P. (Damascus, MD); Gitsevich, Aleksandr (Gaithersburg, MD); Bass, Gary K. (Mt. Airy, MD); Dolan, James T. (Frederick, MD); Kipling, Kent (Gaithersburg, MD); Kirkpatrick, Douglas A. (Great Falls, VA); Leng, Yongzhang (Damascus, MD); Levin, Izrail (Silver Spring, MD); Roy, Robert J. (Frederick, MD); Shanks, Bruce (Gaithersburg, MD); Smith, Malcolm (Alexandria, VA); Trimble, William C. (Columbia, MD); Tsai, Peter (Olney, MD)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lamps lighting efficiency" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Light trapping in a 30-nm organic photovoltaic cell for efficient carrier collection and light absorption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe surface patterning strategies that permit high photon-collection efficiency together with high carrier-collection efficiency in an ultra-thin planar heterojunction organic photovoltaic cell. Optimized designs reach up to 50% photon collection efficiency in a P3HT layer of only 30 nm, representing a 3- to 5-fold improvement over an unpatterned cell of the same thickness. We compare the enhancement of light confinement in the active layer with an ITO top layer for TE and TM polarized light, and demonstrate that the light absorption can increase by a factor of 2 due to a gap-plasmon mode in the active layer.

Tsai, Cheng-Chia; Banerjee, Ashish; Osgood, Richard M; Englund, Dirk

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Low-Pressure Sodium Lighting Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Low-Pressure Sodium Lighting Basics Low-Pressure Sodium Lighting Basics Low-Pressure Sodium Lighting Basics August 16, 2013 - 10:17am Addthis Low-pressure sodium lighting provides more energy-efficient outdoor lighting than high-intensity discharge lighting, but it has very poor color rendition. Typical applications include highway and security lighting, where color is not important. Low-pressure sodium lamps work somewhat like fluorescent lamps. Like high-intensity discharge lighting, low-pressure sodium lamps require up to 10 minutes to start and have to cool before they can restart. Therefore, they are most suitable for applications in which they stay on for hours at a time. They are not suitable for use with motion detectors. The chart below compares low-pressure sodium lamps and high-intensity

243

New Energy-Saving Fiber Optic Lighting System Lights Up Public Spaces  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Focus to develop a Energy Focus to develop a breakthrough lighting technology that delivers light comparable to conventional lamps while using significantly less energy per lumen, reducing watts per square foot without sacrificing light levels. As a result of DOE SBIR and other government funding, EFO (efficient fiber optics) Lighting Systems can deliver as much as 80% energy savings over halogen or

244

Environmental impacts of lighting technologies - Life cycle assessment and sensitivity analysis  

SciTech Connect

With two regulations, 244/2009 and 245/2009, the European Commission recently put into practice the EuP Directive in the area of lighting devices, aiming to improve energy efficiency in the domestic lighting sector. This article presents a comprehensive life cycle assessment comparison of four different lighting technologies: the tungsten lamp, the halogen lamp, the conventional fluorescent lamp and the compact fluorescent lamp. Taking advantage of the most up-to-date life cycle inventory database available (ecoinvent data version 2.01), all life cycle phases were assessed and the sensitivity of the results for varying assumptions analysed: different qualities of compact fluorescent lamps (production phase), different electricity mixes (use phase), and end-of-life scenarios for WEEE recycling versus municipal solid waste incineration (disposal phase). A functional unit of 'one hour of lighting' was defined and the environmental burdens for the whole life cycle for all four lamp types were calculated, showing a clearly lower impact for the two gas-discharge lamps, i.e. the fluorescent and the compact fluorescent lamp. Differences in the product quality of the compact fluorescent lamps reveal to have only a very small effect on the overall environmental performance of this lamp type; a decline of the actual life time of this lamp type doesn't result in a change of the rank order of the results of the here examined four lamp types. It was also shown that the environmental break-even point of the gas-discharge lamps is reached long before the end of their expected life-span. All in all, it can be concluded that a change from today's tungsten lamp technology to a low-energy-consuming technology such as the compact fluorescent lamp results in a substantial environmental benefit.

Welz, Tobias; Hischier, Roland, E-mail: Roland.Hischier@empa.ch; Hilty, Lorenz M.

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

245

Efficient semiconductor light-emitting device and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A semiconductor light-emitting device and method. The semiconductor light-emitting device is provided with at least one control layer or control region which includes an annular oxidized portion thereof to channel an injection current into the active region, and to provide a lateral refractive index profile for index guiding the light generated within the device. A periodic composition grading of at least one of the mirror stacks in the device provides a reduced operating voltage of the device. The semiconductor light-emitting device has a high efficiency for light generation, and may be formed either as a resonant-cavity light-emitting diode (RCLED) or as a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL).

Choquette, Kent D. (Albuquerque, NM); Lear, Kevin L. (Albuquerque, NM); Schneider, Jr., Richard P. (Albuquerque, NM)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Efficient semiconductor light-emitting device and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A semiconductor light-emitting device and method are disclosed. The semiconductor light-emitting device is provided with at least one control layer or control region which includes an annular oxidized portion thereof to channel an injection current into the active region, and to provide a lateral refractive index profile for index guiding the light generated within the device. A periodic composition grading of at least one of the mirror stacks in the device provides a reduced operating voltage of the device. The semiconductor light-emitting device has a high efficiency for light generation, and may be formed either as a resonant-cavity light-emitting diode (RCLED) or as a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL). 12 figs.

Choquette, K.D.; Lear, K.L.; Schneider, R.P. Jr.

1996-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

247

LIGHT-INDUCED EFFICIENCY AND PIGMENT ALTERATIONS IN RED ALGAE*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The low photosynthetic efficiency of chlorophyll in freshly collected red algae, can, in the case of Porphyra perforata, P. nereocystis, and Porpkyridium cruentum, be inercased by growing the algae for 10 days in red or blue light. Exposure to darkness or to green light maintains the algae in their originally low efficiency with respect to chlorophyll, while retaining the high efficiency of phycobilins. Red- or blue-adapted algae are rapidly reversed by exposure to green light, the chlorophyll efficiency dropping to low values again in a few hours. This is assumed to account for the action spectrum of freshly gathered plants. Some pigment changes were observed, but not in the direction of "chromatic adaptation; " and the carotenoid pigments were not activated, even by blue light, but remained as photosynthetically inactive shading filters. The higher red algae (Florideae) did not show activation of chlorophyll by red or blue light. Chlorophyll a of freshly collected marine red algae sensitizes photosynthesis with an efficiency of about 0.04 molecule oxygen liberated per absorbed quantum.

C. S. Yocum; L. R. Blinks

1957-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Lamp method and apparatus using multiple reflections  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method wherein the light in a sulfur or selenium lamp is reflected through the fill a multiplicity of times to convert ultraviolet radiation to visible is disclosed. A light emitting device comprised of an electrodeless envelope which bears a light reflecting covering around a first portion which does not crack due to differential thermal expansion and which has a second portion which comprises a light transmissive aperture. 20 figs.

MacLennan, D.A.; Turner, B.; Kipling, K.

1999-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

249

Lamp method and apparatus using multiple reflections  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method wherein the light in a sulfur or selenium lamp is reflected through the fill a multiplicity of times to convert ultraviolet radiation to visible. A light emitting device comprised of an electrodeless envelope which bears a light reflecting covering around a first portion which does not crack due to differential thermal expansion and which has a second portion which comprises a light transmissive aperture.

MacLennan, Donald A. (Butler, PA); Turner, Brian (Damascus, MD); Kipling, Kent (Gaithersburg, MD)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Carbon Power and Light - Residential and Commercial Energy Efficiency  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Carbon Power and Light - Residential and Commercial Energy Carbon Power and Light - Residential and Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Carbon Power and Light - Residential and Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heat Pumps Manufacturing Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Maximum Rebate Water Heater: $75 Program Info State Wyoming Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Water Heater: $1.50 - $3 /gallon, plus $50 Tri-State G&T incentive Resistive Heat: $8 /kW Electric Thermal Storage: $50 /unit or $12 /kW Air-Source Heat Pump: $125 - $150 /ton Geothermal Heat Pump: $150 /ton Terminal Unit: $85 Motors: $8 - $13 /hp (CPL and Tri-State Combined Rebate) Provider Carbon Power and Light, Inc.

251

Forest Grove Light and Power - Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Forest Grove Light and Power - Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs Forest Grove Light and Power - Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs Forest Grove Light and Power - Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Appliances & Electronics Sealing Your Home Ventilation Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heat Pumps Water Heating Windows, Doors, & Skylights Maximum Rebate Air Sealing: $400 Duct Sealing: $500 Program Info State Oregon Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Heat Pump with Central Ducts (Replacement): $300 - $1,000 Heat Pump with Central Ducts (Furnace Conversion): $1,400 - $1,900 Heat Pump with Ductless System: $1,500 Clothes Washer: $20 - $70 Refrigerator: $25 Freezer: $25 Electric Water Heater: $25

252

Cheyenne Light, Fuel and Power (Gas) - Commercial and Industrial Efficiency  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cheyenne Light, Fuel and Power (Gas) - Commercial and Industrial Cheyenne Light, Fuel and Power (Gas) - Commercial and Industrial Efficiency Rebate Program (Wyoming) Cheyenne Light, Fuel and Power (Gas) - Commercial and Industrial Efficiency Rebate Program (Wyoming) < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Other Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Maximum Rebate Custom: 50% of project cost Program Info Start Date 06/09/2011 State Wyoming Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Water Heater: $75 - $300 Furnaces: $250 - $400 Boilers: $150 - $400 Setback Thermostat: $25 - $50 Convection Oven: $100 High Efficiency Range/Oven: $500 Conveyor Oven: $500 Fryer: $500 Broiler: $100 Steam Cooker: $500 Vent Dampers for Boilers: $125 Custom: Two year buy down or 50% of project cost, whichever is less

253

Cape Light Compact - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cape Light Compact - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Cape Light Compact - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Cape Light Compact - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Cooling Construction Design & Remodeling Sealing Your Home Ventilation Heat Pumps Windows, Doors, & Skylights Solar Water Heating Maximum Rebate Home Energy Assessment/Weatherization: $2,000 Income Eligible Weatherization Measures: $2,000 - $3,000 Program Info State Massachusetts Program Type Local Rebate Program Rebate Amount Home Energy Assessment/Weatherization: 75% Single Family Energy Star Home: $750 - $8,000 Multi-Family Energy Star Home: $350 - $4,000/unit Income Eligible Weatherization Measures: 100% of cost

254

Efficiency Lighting & Maintenance Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Efficiency Lighting & Maintenance Inc Efficiency Lighting & Maintenance Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name Efficiency Lighting & Maintenance Inc Address 5a Del Mar Drive Place Brookfield, Connecticut Zip 06804 Sector Buildings Product Energy Service Company (ESCO) Website http://www.el-m.net/ Coordinates 41.453066°, -73.401583° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.453066,"lon":-73.401583,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

255

Peninsula Light Company - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Peninsula Light Company - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Peninsula Light Company - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Peninsula Light Company - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Ventilation Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Windows, Doors, & Skylights Maximum Rebate Windows: $1,000 Program Info State District of Columbia Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Windows: $6/sq. ft. Water Heaters: $50 Duct Sealing: Free Refrigerator/Freezer Recycling: $20 Ductless Heat Pumps: $1,500 Heat Pumps (Upgrade): $400 - $800 Heat Pumps (Conversion) $1,000 - $1,500 Simple Steps Smart Savings: Reduced prices on energy saving products at

256

Electrodeless lighting RF power source development. Final report  

SciTech Connect

An efficient, solid state RF power source has been developed on this NICE project for exciting low power electrodeless lamp bulbs. This project takes full advantage of concurrent advances in electrodeless lamp technology. Electrodeless lamp lighting systems utilizing the sulfur based bulb type developed by Fusion Lighting, Inc., is an emerging technology which is based on generating light in a confined plasma created and sustained by RF excitation. The bulb for such a lamp is filled with a particular element and inert gas at low pressure when cold. RF power from the RF source creates a plasma within the bulb which reaches temperatures approaching those of high pressure discharge lamp plasmas. At these temperatures the plasma radiates substantial visible light with a spectrum similar to sunlight.

NONE

1996-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

257

Economic Analysis of Ilumex, A Project to Promote Energy-Efficient Residential Lighting in Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Residential Energy Use in Mexico: Structure, EnvironmentalPromote Energy-Efficient Residential Lighting in Mexico J.Promote Energy-Efficient Residential Lighting in Mexico J.

Sathaye, Jayant A.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light (Electric)- Business Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Alliant Energy - Interstate Power and Light (IPL) offers rebates for high efficiency equipment for commercial customers. Rebates are available for high efficiency lighting equipment, occupancy...

259

Program on Technology Innovation: Advanced Light Source Research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Advanced Light Source (ALITE) research program is aimed at breakthrough basic research to achieve approximately 150 to 200 lumens per watt for fluorescent light sources, and to increase high intensity discharge light source efficiency by up to 50%. This report describes work on high intensity discharge (HID) lamps. These commercially available lamps currently have efficacies up to 120 lumens per watt (LPW), and radiate approximately 36% of their energy in the visible spectrum and 53% in the infrared ...

2006-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

260

FAQ of Overview of Solid-State Lighting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS 3 Leds FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS 3 Leds 1. What is solid-state lighting? 2. What is a semiconductor? 3. What is a semiconductor LED (light emitting diode)? 4. What is an organic LED (OLED)? 5. Where can I see LED lighting today? 6. How do you produce white light using LEDs? 7. How does solid-state lighting differ from conventional lighting? 8. What is the energy efficiency of solid-state lighting today? How does the energy efficiency compare with incandescent and fluorescent lamps? 9. What is the cost of solid-state lighting today? How does the cost compare with incandescent and fluorescent lamps? 10. What is the quality of the white light using solid-state lighting today? How does it compare with incandescent and fluorescent lamps?

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lamps lighting efficiency" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Nature of the effect of the ballast volumes of flash lamps on their emission  

SciTech Connect

The cause of the decrease in laser efficiency during pumping by flash lamps with increased ballast volumes is the unproductive loss of radiation, originating from the ballast volumes, and the associated change in the radiation brightness distribution along the length of the lamp. The increase radiation brightness at the electrodes of the light source is not the result of constriction of the discharge or the luminescence of the electrode plasma erosion, but is due to the slowing down of the plasma flows by the surface of the electrodes and to the slowing down of the ionized gas moving from the ballast volumes when it meets the denser plasma of the discharge zone. The profile of the current lines at the electrodes is established and the frequency of the axial oscillations of the plasma in the lamp is determined.

Basov, Yu.G.; Makarov, V.N.; Narkhova, G.I.

1975-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Synthesis and luminescence properties of rare earth activated phosphors for near UV-emitting LEDs for efficacious generation of white light  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

efficient, high-color-rendering LED lamps using oxyfluoridePhosphor selection for near UV LED solid state lighting,?and application for near UV LED solid state lighting,? ECS.

Han, Jinkyu

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Section 5.4.1 Linear Fluorescent Lighting: Greening Federal Facilities...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and color temperature. When specifying a lighting sys- tem, be sure that the lamp and ballast are electrically matched and the lamp and fixture optically matched. Fluorescent lamp...

264

Observed Minimum Illuminance Threshold for Night Market Vendors in Kenya who use LED Lamps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the economics of fuel-based and LED lighting technology fordata logger equipped rechargeable LED lamps, monitoring theadoption of the LED lamps, and a follow-up survey. 1 Figure

Johnstone, Peter

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Fluorescent lamp ballast  

SciTech Connect

An electronic ballast is described having at least a first and second terminal for engaging the filaments of at least one fluorescent lamp which requires a breakdown voltage to ignite the lamp and a maintaining voltage for maintaining ionization therewithin, the electronic ballast comprising: a direct current voltage source; a transistor; a transformer having a primary winding separated into a first winding, a second winding, a third winding, and a fourth winding; the first winding connected between the voltage source and the first terminal; the second winding connected between the two terminals; the third winding connected between the second terminal and to both the transistor and to ground; the fourth winding connected between ground and the transistor; the lamp being parallel to the second winding when the lamp filaments engages the ballast terminals.

Ureche, A.

1987-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

266

Lighting a building with a single bulb : toward a system for illumination in the 21st c.; or, A centralized illumination system for the efficient decoupling and recovery of lighting related heat  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Piping light represents the first tenable method for recovery and reutilization of lighting related heat. It can do this by preserving the energy generated at the lamp as radiative, departing from precedent and avoiding ...

Levens, Kurt Antony, 1961-

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Magnetic fluorescent lamp  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The radiant emission of a mercury-argon discharge in a fluorescent lamp assembly is enhanced by providing means for establishing a magnetic field with lines of force along the path of electron flow through the bulb of the lamp assembly, to provide Zeeman splitting of the ultraviolet spectral line. Optimum results are obtained when the magnetic field strength causes a Zeeman splitting of approximately 1.7 times the thermal line width.

Berman, S.M.; Richardson R.W.

1983-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

268

Blue light emitting diode internal and injection efficiency  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simple experimental method of light emitting diode(LED) injection efficiency (IE) determination was suggested. IE and internal quantum efficiency(IQE) calculation is an actual and difficult problem in LED science. In this paper IE and IQE of blue LEDs were determined separately. The method is based on electroluminescence data fitting by the modified rate equation model. Efficiency droop caused by Auger recombination and poor injection were taken into account. Only one reasonable assumption was accepted during the calculations: IE tends to 1 at low current densities.

Ilya E. Titkov; Denis A. Sannikov; Young-Min Park; Joong-Kon Son

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY CREE LIGHTING COMPANY, FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF DOMESTIC AND  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

20 2001 09:52 FR IPL DOE CH 630 252 2779 TO FGCP-HQ P.02/04 20 2001 09:52 FR IPL DOE CH 630 252 2779 TO FGCP-HQ P.02/04 * * STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY CREE LIGHTING COMPANY, FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN INVENTION RIGHTS UNDER DOE COOPERATIVE AGREEMENT NO. DE-FC26- 00NT40985 W(A)-01-002, CH-1055 The Petitioner, Cree Lighting Company, (Cree), was awarded this cooperative agreement for the performance of work entitled, "Energy Efficient Solid State Lamp". The purpose of the cooperative agreement is to develop high efficiency, high radiance light emitting diode (LED) chip and packaging technology that is expected to lead to novel solid state lamps capable of replacing less energy efficient incandescent and halogen reflector lamps. When compared with current incandescent reflector lamps, this revolutionary new lamp is expected to be three times more

270

Lamp bulb with integral reflector  

SciTech Connect

An improved electrodeless discharge lamp bulb includes an integral ceramic reflector as a portion of the bulb envelope. The bulb envelope further includes two pieces, a reflector portion or segment is cast quartz ceramic and a light transmissive portion is a clear fused silica. In one embodiment, the cast quartz ceramic segment includes heat sink fins or stubs providing an increased outside surface area to dissipate internal heat. In another embodiment, the quartz ceramic segment includes an outside surface fused to eliminate gas permeation by polishing.

Levin, Izrail (Silver Spring, MD); Shanks, Bruce (Gaithersburg, MD); Sumner, Thomas L. (Wheaton, MD)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Lighting in Residential and Commercial Buildings (1993 and 1995 Data)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Types > 1995 CBECS Lighting Equipment Types > 1995 CBECS Lighting Equipment 1995 CBECS Lighting Equipment Profile Lighting Equipment - Type and Characteristics of Equipment Emits Found In Incandescent Incandescent Light Bulb Produces light by electrically heating a tungsten filament Includes energy-efficient incandescent bulbs, such as Reflector or R-Lamps (accent and task lighting), Parabolic Aluminized Reflector (PAR) lamps (flood and spot lighting), and Ellipsoidal Reflector (ER) lamps (recessed lighting) Highly inefficient because much of the energy is lost as heat 14-18 Lumens Per Watt (LPW) 14% of Lit Commercial Floorspace Standard Fluorescent Lighting with Magnetic Ballast Standard Fluorescent with Magnetic Ballast Produces light by passing electricity through mercury vapor, causing the fluorescent coating to glow or fluoresce

272

Energy Department Announces New Investments to Drive Cost-Competitive Next Generation Efficient Lighting  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

American Innovation in New, More Efficient Lighting will Boost National Competitiveness in Manufacturing

273

High frequency inductive lamp and power oscillator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high frequency inductively coupled electrodeless lamp includes an excitation coil with an effective electrical length which is less than one half wavelength of a driving frequency applied thereto, preferably much less. The driving frequency may be greater than 100 MHz and is preferably as high as 915 MHz. Preferably, the excitation coil is configured as a non-helical, semi-cylindrical conductive surface having less than one turn, in the general shape of a wedding ring. At high frequencies, the current in the coil forms two loops which are spaced apart and parallel to each other. Configured appropriately, the coil approximates a Helmholtz configuration. The lamp preferably utilizes an bulb encased in a reflective ceramic cup with a pre-formed aperture defined therethrough. The ceramic cup may include structural features to aid in alignment and/or a flanged face to aid in thermal management. The lamp head is preferably an integrated lamp head comprising a metal matrix composite surrounding an insulating ceramic with the excitation integrally formed on the ceramic. A novel solid-state oscillator preferably provides RF power to the lamp. The oscillator is a single active element device capable of providing over 70 watts of power at over 70% efficiency. Various control circuits may be employed to match the driving frequency of the oscillator to a plurality of tuning states of the lamp.

MacLennan, Donald A. (Gaithersburg, MD); Turner, Brian P. (Damascus, MD); Dolan, James T. (Frederick, MD); Kirkpatrick, Douglas A. (Great Falls, VA); Leng, Yongzhang (Damascus, MD)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Economic Analysis of Ilumex, A Project to Promote Energy-Efficient Residential Lighting in Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy-Efficient Residential Lighting in Mexico J. Sathaye,Energy-Efficient Residential Lighting in Mexico J. Sathaye,of U.S. and Canadian lighting programs for the residential,

Sathaye, Jayant A.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

A Dual Supply Buck Converter with Improved Light Load Efficiency  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Power consumption is the primary concern in battery-operated portable applications. Buck converters have gained popularity in powering portable devices due to their compact size, good current delivery capability and high efficiency. However, portable devices are operating under light load condition for the most of the time. Conventional buck converters suffer from low light-load efficiency which severely limits battery lifetime. In this project, a novel technique for buck converter is proposed to reduce the switching loss by reducing the effective input supply voltage at light load. This is achieved by switching between two different input voltages (3.3V and 1.65V) depending on the output current value. Experimental results show that this technique improves the efficiency at light loads by 18.07%. The buck voltage possesses an output voltage of 0.9V and provides a maximum output current of 400mA. The buck converter operates at a switching frequency of 1MHz. The prototype was fabricated using 0.18µm CMOS technology, and occupies a total active area of 0.6039mm^2.

Chen, Hui

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

The effect of lighting system components on lighting quality, energy use, and life-cycle cost  

SciTech Connect

A computational method was developed to examine the effect of lamp, ballast, and fixture selection on the quality and quantity of illumination, energy consumption, and life-cycle cost of lighting systems. Applying this analysis to lighting layouts using different lamp/ballast/fixture combinations suggested that combinations with higher lumen outputs reduced the uniformity of the illuminance distribution at the workplace but did not reduce visibility levels. The use of higher lumen output lamp/ballast/fixture systems and higher efficiency components tended to reduce life-cycle costs as long as the premium cost of the components was not too high.

Rubinstein, F.; Clark, T.; Siminovitch, M.; Verderber, R.

1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Efficiency Improvement of Nitride-Based Solid State Light Emitting Materials -- CRADA Final Report  

SciTech Connect

The development of In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x} N/GaN thin film growth by Molecular Beam Epitaxy has opened a new route towards energy efficient solid-state lighting. Blue and green LED's became available that can be used to match the whole color spectrum of visible light with the potential to match the eye response curve. Moreover, the efficiency of such devices largely exceeds that of incandescent light sources (tungsten filaments) and even competes favorably with lighting by fluorescent lamps. It is, however, also seen in Figure 1 that it is essential to improve on the luminous performance of green LED's in order to mimic the eye response curve. This lack of sufficiently efficient green LED's relates to particularities of the In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N materials system. This ternary alloy system is polar and large strain is generated during a lattice mismatched thin film growth because of the significantly different lattice parameters between GaN and InN and common substrates such as sapphire. Moreover, it is challenging to incorporate indium into GaN at typical growth temperatures because a miscibility gap exists that can be modified by strain effects. As a result a large parameter space needs exploration to optimize the growth of In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N and to date it is unclear what the detailed physical processes are that affect device efficiencies. In particular, an inhomogeneous distribution indium in GaN modifies the device performance in an unpredictable manner. As a result technology is pushed forward on a trial and error basis in particular in Asian countries such as Japan and Korea, which dominate the market and it is desirable to strengthen the competitiveness of the US industry. This CRADA was initiated to help Lumileds Lighting/USA boosting the performance of their green LED's. The tasks address the distribution of the indium atoms in the active area of their blue and green LED's and its relation to internal and external quantum efficiencies. Procedures to measure the indium distribution with near atomic resolution were developed and applied to test samples and devices that were provided by Lumilids. Further, the optical performance of the device materials was probed by photoluminescence, electroluminescence and time resolved optical measurements. Overall, the programs objective is to provide a physical basis for the development of a simulation program that helps making predictions to improve the growth processes such that the device efficiency can be increased to about 20%. Our study addresses all proposed aspects successfully. Carrier localization, lifetime and recombination as well as the strain-induced generation of electric fields were characterized and modeled. Band gap parameters and their relation to the indium distribution were characterized and modeled. Electron microscopy was developed as a unique tool to measure the formation of indium clusters on a nanometer length scale and it was demonstrated that strain induced atom column displacements can reliably be determined in any materials system with a precision that approaches 2 pm. The relation between the local indium composition x and the strain induced lattice constant c(x) in fully strained In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N quantum wells was found to be: c(x) = 0.5185 + {alpha}x with {alpha} = 0.111 nm. It was concluded that the local indium concentration in the final product can be modulated by growth procedures in a predictable manner to favorably affect external quantum efficiencies that approached target values and that internal quantum efficiencies exceeded them.

Kisielowski, Christian; Weber, Eicke

2010-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

278

Thin Film Packaging Solutions for High Efficiency OLED Lighting Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of the 'Thin Film Packaging Solutions for High Efficiency OLED Lighting Products' project is to demonstrate thin film packaging solutions based on SiC hermetic coatings that, when applied to glass and plastic substrates, support OLED lighting devices by providing longer life with greater efficiency at lower cost than is currently available. Phase I Objective: Demonstrate thin film encapsulated working phosphorescent OLED devices on optical glass with lifetime of 1,000 hour life, CRI greater than 75, and 15 lm/W. Phase II Objective: Demonstrate thin film encapsulated working phosphorescent OLED devices on plastic or glass composite with 25 lm/W, 5,000 hours life, and CRI greater than 80. Phase III Objective: Demonstrate 2 x 2 ft{sup 2} thin film encapsulated working phosphorescent OLED with 40 lm/W, 10,000 hour life, and CRI greater than 85. This report details the efforts of Phase III (Budget Period Three), a fourteen month collaborative effort that focused on optimization of high-efficiency phosphorescent OLED devices and thin-film encapsulation of said devices. The report further details the conclusions and recommendations of the project team that have foundation in all three budget periods for the program. During the conduct of the Thin Film Packaging Solutions for High Efficiency OLED Lighting Products program, including budget period three, the project team completed and delivered the following achievements: (1) a three-year marketing effort that characterized the near-term and longer-term OLED market, identified customer and consumer lighting needs, and suggested prototype product concepts and niche OLED applications lighting that will give rise to broader market acceptance as a source for wide area illumination and energy conservation; (2) a thin film encapsulation technology with a lifetime of nearly 15,000 hours, tested by calcium coupons, while stored at 16 C and 40% relative humidity ('RH'). This encapsulation technology was characterized as having less than 10% change in transmission during the 15,000 hour test period; (3) demonstrated thin film encapsulation of a phosphorescent OLED device with 1,500 hours of lifetime at 60 C and 80% RH; (4) demonstrated that a thin film laminate encapsulation, in addition to the direct thin film deposition process, of a polymer OLED device was another feasible packaging strategy for OLED lighting. The thin film laminate strategy was developed to mitigate defects, demonstrate roll-to-roll process capability for high volume throughput (reduce costs) and to support a potential commercial pathway that is less dependent upon integrated manufacturing since the laminate could be sold as a rolled good; (5) demonstrated that low cost 'blue' glass substrates could be coated with a siloxane barrier layer for planarization and ion-protection and used in the fabrication of a polymer OLED lighting device. This study further demonstrated that the substrate cost has potential for huge cost reductions from the white borosilicate glass substrate currently used by the OLED lighting industry; (6) delivered four-square feet of white phosphorescent OLED technology, including novel high efficiency devices with 82 CRI, greater than 50 lm/W efficiency, and more than 1,000 hours lifetime in a product concept model shelf; (7) presented and or published more than twenty internal studies (for private use), three external presentations (OLED workshop-for public use), and five technology-related external presentations (industry conferences-for public use); and (8) issued five patent applications, which are in various maturity stages at time of publication. Delivery of thin film encapsulated white phosphorescent OLED lighting technology remains a challenging technical achievement, and it seems that commercial availability of thin, bright, white OLED light that meets market requirements will continue to require research and development effort. However, there will be glass encapsulated white OLED lighting products commercialized in niche markets during the 2008 calendar year. This commercializ

None

2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

279

Information on the Fate of Mercury From Fluorescent Lamps Disposed in Landfills  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mercury is contained in energy-efficient fluorescent, mercury-vapor, metal halide, and high-pressure sodium lamps. This report presents information on the potential for air and groundwater contamination when mercury lamps are disposed in municipal landfills.

1995-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

280

High-Efficiency Nitride-Base Photonic Crystal Light Sources  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The research activities performed in the framework of this project represent a major breakthrough in the demonstration of Photonic Crystals (PhC) as a competitive technology for LEDs with high light extraction efficiency. The goals of the project were to explore the viable approaches to manufacturability of PhC LEDS through proven standard industrial processes, establish the limits of light extraction by various concepts of PhC LEDs, and determine the possible advantages of PhC LEDs over current and forthcoming LED extraction concepts. We have developed three very different geometries for PhC light extraction in LEDs. In addition, we have demonstrated reliable methods for their in-depth analysis allowing the extraction of important parameters such as light extraction efficiency, modal extraction length, directionality, internal and external quantum efficiency. The information gained allows better understanding of the physical processes and the effect of the design parameters on the light directionality and extraction efficiency. As a result, we produced LEDs with controllable emission directionality and a state of the art extraction efficiency that goes up to 94%. Those devices are based on embedded air-gap PhC - a novel technology concept developed in the framework of this project. They rely on a simple and planar fabrication process that is very interesting for industrial implementation due to its robustness and scalability. In fact, besides the additional patterning and regrowth steps, the process is identical as that for standard industrially used p-side-up LEDs. The final devices exhibit the same good electrical characteristics and high process yield as a series of test standard LEDs obtained in comparable conditions. Finally, the technology of embedded air-gap patterns (PhC) has significant potential in other related fields such as: increasing the optical mode interaction with the active region in semiconductor lasers; increasing the coupling of the incident light into the active region of solar cells; increasing the efficiency of the phosphorous light conversion in white light LEDs etc. In addition to the technology of embedded PhC LEDs, we demonstrate a technique for improvement of the light extraction and emission directionality for existing flip-chip microcavity (thin) LEDs by introducing PhC grating into the top n-contact. Although, the performances of these devices in terms of increase of the extraction efficiency are not significantly superior compared to those obtained by other techniques like surface roughening, the use of PhC offers some significant advantages such as improved and controllable emission directionality and a process that is directly applicable to any material system. The PhC microcavity LEDs have also potential for industrial implementation as the fabrication process has only minor differences to that already used for flip-chip thin LEDs. Finally, we have demonstrated that achieving good electrical properties and high fabrication yield for these devices is straightforward.

James Speck; Evelyn Hu; Claude Weisbuch; Yong-Seok Choi; Kelly McGroddy; Gregor Koblmuller; Elison Matioli; Elizabeth Rangel; Fabian Rol; Dobri Simeonov

2010-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lamps lighting efficiency" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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281

Fluorescent lamp ballast  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes an electronic ballast unit for a fluorescent lamp comprising: a circuit assembly having a pair of voltage input terminal and a first inductor and a capacitor in series relationship with each other to form a series resonant circuit. The circuit is adapted to be coupled to a fluorescent lamp to provide a starting voltage for the lamp; and a second inductor connected in shunt relationship to the first inductor and connected to the other input terminal. There is a core on which the first inductor and the second inductor are mounted. The core inductively couples the inductors with each other and are shaped to reduce core losses to minimize the increase of temperature of the core; the core is of a generally H-shaped configuration, and means of opposite ends of the H-shaped core to complete the magnetic flux path for each inductor, respectively.

Boyd, G.D.

1987-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

282

Modern lighting sources and controls for energy efficient lighting and a smart control algorithm application  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Energy is an important measure of prosperity of a nation. Energy has been the life-blood for continual progress of human civilization. Since the beginning of industrial revolution around two centuries ago, the global energy consumption has increased ... Keywords: energy efficiency, energy saving, fuzzy logic, modern lighting, sensors, smart controls

?afak Sa?lam; Bülent Oral

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

State options in lighting: efficiency standards for existing public buildings  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses requirements and options for state lighting-efficiency standards for existing public buildings under the Energy Policy and Conservation Act. EPCA, as implemented under present regulations, is found to allow great flexibility to the states in what they adopt, so long as they do adopt some standard. A wide variety of substantive standards is described, and it is recommended that states adopt a standard based on a maximum-lighting power budget with cost-effectiveness criteria. Several options for adoption and enforcement of standards are discussed. It is recommended that states adopt a requirement that owners of all public buildings submit reports of lighting energy audits and estimates of energy savings from modifications to comply with substantive standards. It is further recommended that while filing of reports should be mandatory, substantive compliance, at least initially, need not be; if it turns out that voluntary compliance is not great enought to achieve a state's desired energy savings, compliance could then be made mandatory. It is recommended that exemptions from the standards be limited to small buildings and that variances under a mandatory standard be available only when an applicant can show insufficient capital to make required modifications, even though they would soon pay for themselves in reduced operating costs. It is suggested that a lighting standard of the kind recommended could substantially reduce wasted energy in lighting, be simple enough to be easily understood and applied, be technically and economically reasonable, and allow for needed exemptions without loopholes.

Meeker, F.

1979-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

High-Efficiency Nitride-Based Solid-State Lighting  

SciTech Connect

In this final technical progress report we summarize research accomplished during Department of Energy contract DE-FC26-01NT41203, entitled ''High-Efficiency Nitride-Based Solid-State Lighting''. Two teams, from the University of California at Santa Barbara (Principle Investigator: Dr. Shuji Nakamura) and the Lighting Research Center at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (led by Dr. N. Narendran), pursued the goals of this contract from thin film growth, characterization, and packaging/luminaire design standpoints. The UCSB team initially pursued the development of blue gallium nitride (GaN)-based vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers, as well as ultraviolet GaN-based light emitting diodes (LEDs). In Year 2, the emphasis shifted to resonant-cavity light emitting diodes, also known as micro-cavity LEDs when extremely thin device cavities are fabricated. These devices have very directional emission and higher light extraction efficiency than conventional LEDs. Via the optimization of thin-film growth and refinement of device processing, we decreased the total cavity thickness to less than 1 {micro}m, such that micro-cavity effects were clearly observed and a light extraction efficiency of over 10% was reached. We also began the development of photonic crystals for increased light extraction, in particular for so-called ''guided modes'' which would otherwise propagate laterally in the device and be re-absorbed. Finally, we pursued the growth of smooth, high-quality nonpolar a-plane and m-plane GaN films, as well as blue light emitting diodes on these novel films. Initial nonpolar LEDs showed the expected behavior of negligible peak wavelength shift with increasing drive current. M-plane LEDs in particular show promise, as unpackaged devices had unsaturated optical output power of {approx} 3 mW at 200 mA drive current. The LRC's tasks were aimed at developing the subcomponents necessary for packaging UCSB's light emitting diodes, and packaging them to produce a white light fixture. During the third and final year of the project, the LRC team investigated alternate packaging methods for the white LED device to achieve at least 25 percent more luminous efficacy than traditional white LEDs; conducted optical ray-tracing analyses and human factors studies to determine the best form factor for the white light source under development, in terms of high luminous efficacy and greater acceptance by subjects; and developed a new die encapsulant using silicone-epoxy resins that showed less yellowing and slower degradation. At the conclusion of this project, the LRC demonstrated a new packaging method, called scattered photon extraction (SPE), that produced an average luminous flux and corresponding average efficacy of 90.7 lm and 36.3 lm/W, respectively, compared with 56.5 lm and 22.6 lm/W for a similar commercial white LED package. At low currents, the SPE package emitted white light with an efficacy of over 80 lm/W and had chromaticity values very close to the blackbody locus. The SPE package showed an overall improvement of 61% for this particular comparison, exceeding the LRC's third-year goal of 25% improvement.

Paul T. Fini; Shuji Nakamura

2005-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

285

Inland Power and Light Company - Agricultural Energy Efficiency Rebate  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Agricultural Energy Efficiency Agricultural Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs Inland Power and Light Company - Agricultural Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs < Back Eligibility Agricultural Savings Category Other Manufacturing Maximum Rebate Custom: 70% or project cost Program Info State District of Columbia Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Flow controlling type nozzle for impact sprinklers: $4 Rebuilt or New Impact Sprinklers: $3.75 Nozzle for Impact Sprinkler: $1.50 Rotating Type Sprinklers: $4 Gasket: $2.75 Low-Pressure Regulators: $5 Low-Pressure Sprinklers: $4 Multiple Configuration Nozzles: $3 Multi-Trajectory Sprays: $4 Drains for Lines: $1 Hubs for Wheel-Lines: $14.50 "Goose Neck" Elbow for New Drop Tubes: $1.65 Drop Tubes: $3 Center Pivot Base Boot Gasket: $175

286

Thermal element for maintaining minimum lamp wall temperature in fluorescent fixtures  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a lighting fixture including a lamp and a housing, an improvement is disclosed for maintaining a lamp envelope area at a cooler, reduced temperature relative to the enclosed housing ambient. The improvement comprises a thermal element in thermal communication with the housing extending to and springably urging thermal communication with a predetermined area of the lamp envelope surface.

Siminovitch, Michael J. (Richmond, CA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Thermal element for maintaining minimum lamp wall temperature in fluorescent fixtures  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a lighting fixture including a lamp and a housing, an improvement is disclosed for maintaining a lamp envelope area at a cooler, reduced temperature relative to the enclosed housing ambient. The improvement comprises a thermal element in thermal communication with the housing extending to and springably urging thermal communication with a predetermined area of the lamp envelope surface. 12 figs.

Siminovitch, M.J.

1992-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

288

Incandescent Lighting | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Incandescent Lighting Incandescent Lighting August 16, 2013 - 10:00am Addthis Incandescent lighting is the most common type of lighting used in homes. Incandescent lamps operate...

289

One piece microwave container screens for electrodeless lamps  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A microwave powered electrodeless lamp includes an improved screen unit having mesh and solid sections with an internal reflector to reflect light into a light-transmitting chamber defined in the lamp microwave cavity by the reflector and the mesh section. A discharge envelope of a bulb is disposed in the light-transmitting chamber. Light emitted from the envelope is prevented by the reflector from entering the cavity portion bounded by the solid section of the screen. Replacing mesh material by solid metal material as part of the screen unit significantly reduces leakage of microwave energy from the lamp. The solid section has multiple compliant fingers defined therein for engaging the periphery of a flange on the waveguide unit so that a hose clamp can easily secure the screen to the assembly. Screen units of this type having different mesh section configurations can be interchanged in the lamp assembly to produce different respective illumination patterns.

Turner, Brian (Myersville, MD); Ury, Michael (Bethesda, MD)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

O&M First! Maintaining Effective and Efficient Lighting Can Help...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fact Sheet Maintaining Effective and Efficient Lighting Can Help Save Energy and Reduce Costs Over 20 percent of the nation's electricity is consumed by various lighting products...

291

Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light (Electric)- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (Minnesota)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Interstate Power and Light (Alliant Energy) offers a number of energy efficiency rebates for Minnesota residential customers which implement HVAC, lighting, appliance, window, insulation and water...

292

Green Light-Emitting Diode Makes Highly Efficient White Light, The Spectrum of Clean Energy Innovation (Fact Sheet)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Spectrum of Spectrum of Clean Energy Innovation innovati n Green Light-Emitting Diode Makes Highly Efficient White Light Scientists at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) have invented a deep green light-emitting diode (LED) that can lead to higher efficiency white light, which is of prime value in the indoor lighting world. LEDs are fundamentally solar cells operating in reverse-that is, when an electrical current is applied to a thin-film semiconductor, the result is the emission of light. These devices are a key technology for producing a new generation of efficient lighting, in which the amount of light generated far outweighs the amount of heat produced. But at the moment, LEDs that emit white light are produced using an inefficient process known as phosphor conversion. In this process, light from a blue- or ultraviolet-emitting LED energizes

293

High frequency inductive lamp and power oscillator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high frequency inductively coupled electrodeless lamp includes an excitation coil with an effective electrical length which is less than one half wavelength of a driving frequency applied thereto, preferably much less. The driving frequency may be greater than 100 MHz and is preferably as high as 915 MHz. Preferably, the excitation coil is configured as a non-helical, semi-cylindrical conductive surface having less than one turn, in the general shape of a wedding ring. At high frequencies, the current in the coil forms two loops which are spaced apart and parallel to each other. Configured appropriately, the coil approximates a Helmholtz configuration. The lamp preferably utilizes an bulb encased in a reflective ceramic cup with a pre-formed aperture defined therethrough. The ceramic cup may include structural features to aid in alignment and I or a flanged face to aid in thermal management. The lamp head is preferably an integrated lamp head comprising a metal matrix composite surrounding an insulating ceramic with the excitation integrally formed on the ceramic. A novel solid-state oscillator preferably provides RF power to the lamp. The oscillator is a single active element device capable of providing over 70 watts of power at over 70% efficiency. Various control circuits may be employed to adjust the driving frequency of the oscillator.

MacLennan, Donald A. (Gaithersburg, MD); Dymond, Jr., Lauren E. (North Potomac, MD); Gitsevich, Aleksandr (Montgomery Village, MD); Grimm, William G. (Silver Spring, MD); Kipling, Kent (Gaithersburg, MD); Kirkpatrick, Douglas A. (Great Falls, VA); Ola, Samuel A. (Silver Spring, MD); Simpson, James E. (Gaithersburg, MD); Trimble, William C. (Columbia, MD); Tsai, Peter (Olney, MD); Turner, Brian P. (Damascus, MD)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Stress Testing of the Philips 60W Replacement Lamp L Prize Entry  

SciTech Connect

The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, operated by Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy, worked with Intertek to develop a procedure for stress testing medium screw-base light sources. This procedure, composed of alternating stress cycles and performance evaluation, was used to qualitatively compare and contrast the durability and reliability of the Philips 60W replacement lamp L Prize entry with market-proven compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs) with comparable light output and functionality. The stress cycles applied simultaneous combinations of electrical, thermal, vibration, and humidity stresses of increasing magnitude. Performance evaluations measured relative illuminance, x chromaticity and y chromaticity shifts after each stress cycle. The Philips L Prize entry lamps appear to be appreciably more durable than the incumbent energy-efficient technology, as represented by the evaluated CFLs, and with respect to the applied stresses. Through the course of testing, all 15 CFL samples permanently ceased to function as a result of the applied stresses, while only 1 Philips L Prize entry lamp exhibited a failure, the nature of which was minor, non-destructive, and a consequence of a known (and resolved) subcontractor issue. Given that current CFL technology appears to be moderately mature and no Philips L Prize entry failures could be produced within the stress envelope causing 100 percent failure of the benchmark CFLs, it seems that, in this particular implementation, light-emitting diode (LED) technology would be much more durable in the field than current CFL technology. However, the Philips L Prize entry lamps used for testing were carefully designed and built for the competition, while the benchmark CFLs were mass produced for retail sale—a distinction that should be taken into consideration. Further reliability testing on final production samples would be necessary to judge the extent to which the results of this analysis apply to production versions of the Philips L Prize entry.

Poplawski, Michael E.; Ledbetter, Marc R.; Smith, Mark

2012-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

295

New Light on Improving Engine Efficiencies | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Crystal Structure of a Meta-stable Intermediate Particle in Virus The Crystal Structure of a Meta-stable Intermediate Particle in Virus Assembly Increasing Magnetic Response of Ferromagnetic Semiconductors under High Pressure Better Switching Through Chemistry in Thin Ferroelectrics First Molecular-Level Enzyme Images Could Improve Breast-Cancer Therapy Science Highlights Archives: 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 2001 | 2000 | 1998 | Subscribe to APS Science Highlights rss feed New Light on Improving Engine Efficiencies MARCH 3, 2009 Bookmark and Share The DOE, as part of its Clean Coal & Natural Gas Power Systems initiative, has a "Turbines of Tomorrow" program with the Program Performance Goal to: "By 2010, develop turbine technology that is capable of efficiently

296

Current injection efficiency induced efficiency-droop in InGaN quantum well light-emitting diodes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Current injection efficiency induced efficiency-droop in InGaN quantum well light-emitting diodes]. The detail of the model for current injection model for quantum well heterostructure is described in Ref. [18 Keywords: III-Nitride InGaN QWs Light-emitting diodes Efficiency-droop a b s t r a c t Current injection

Gilchrist, James F.

297

Lighting.  

SciTech Connect

Since lighting accounts for about one-third of the energy used in commercial buildings, there is opportunity to conserve. There are two ways to reduce lighting energy use: modify lighting systems so that they used less electricity and/or reduce the number of hours the lights are used. This booklet presents a number of ways to do both. Topics covered include: reassessing lighting levels, reducing lighting levels, increasing bulb & fixture efficiency, using controls to regulate lighting, and taking advantage of daylight.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Light-emitting diode spherical packages: an equation for the light transmission efficiency  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Virtually all light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are encapsulated with a transparent epoxy or silicone-gel. In this paper we analyze the optical efficiency of spherical encapsulants. We develop a quasi-radiometric equation for the light transmission efficiency, which incorporates some ideas of Monte-Carlo ray tracing into the context of radiometry. The approach includes the extended source nature of the LED chip, and the chip radiance distribution. The equation is an explicit function of the size and the refractive index of the package, and also of several chip parameters such as shape, size, radiance, and location inside the package. To illustrate the use of this equation, we analyze several packaging configurations of practical interest; for example, a hemispherical dome with multiple chips, a flat encapsulation as a special case of the spherical package, and approximate calculations of an encapsulant with a photonic crystal LED or with a photonic quasi crystal LED. These calculations are compared with Monte-Carl...

Moreno, Ivan; Avendano-Alejo, Maximino; 10.1364/AO.49.000012

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

McMinnville Water and Light - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

McMinnville Water and Light - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate McMinnville Water and Light - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs McMinnville Water and Light - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Savings Category Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Manufacturing Program Info State Oregon Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount McMinnville Water and Light Company Provider McMinnville Water and Light McMinnville Water and Light Company offers a variety of rebates for commercial and industrial customers to make energy efficient improvements to eligible facilities. MW&L offers rebates in three categories: Lighting retrofits, motor replacements, and process efficiency. Past lighting projects have included fluorescent lighting retrofits, mercury vapor

300

Avista Utilities (Electric)- Commercial Lighting Energy Efficiency Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Avista Utilities' Commercial Lighting Program provides incentives for lighting upgrades. New construction projects and proved energy saving lighting measures not listed on rebate form are...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lamps lighting efficiency" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Avista Utilities (Electric)- Commercial Lighting Energy Efficiency Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Avista Utilities' Commercial Lighting Program provides incentives for lighting upgrades. New construction projects and proved energy saving lighting measures not listed on rebate form are evaluated...

302

Reversible and efficient conversion between microwave and optical light  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Converting low-frequency electrical signals into much higher frequency optical signals has enabled modern communications networks to leverage both the strengths of microfabricated electrical circuits and optical fiber transmission, allowing information networks to grow in size and complexity. A microwave-to-optical converter in a quantum information network could provide similar gains by linking quantum processors via low-loss optical fibers and enabling a large-scale quantum network. However, no current technology can convert low-frequency microwave signals into high-frequency optical signals while preserving their fragile quantum state. For this demanding application, a converter must provide a near-unitary transformation between different frequencies; that is, the ideal transformation is reversible, coherent, and lossless. Here we demonstrate a converter that reversibly, coherently, and efficiently links the microwave and optical portions of the electromagnetic spectrum. We use our converter to transfer classical signals between microwave and optical light with conversion efficiencies of ~10%, and achieve performance sufficient to transfer quantum states if the device were further precooled from its current 4 kelvin operating temperature to below 40 millikelvin. The converter uses a mechanically compliant membrane to interface optical light with superconducting microwave circuitry, and this unique combination of technologies may provide a way to link distant nodes of a quantum information network.

R. W. Andrews; R. W. Peterson; T. P. Purdy; K. Cicak; R. W. Simmonds; C. A. Regal; K. W. Lehnert

2013-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

303

Compatibility testing of fluorescent lamp and ballast systems  

SciTech Connect

The rapid growth in the use of electronic ballasts for fluorescent lighting systems, and the corresponding increase in the number of new products and new manufacturers in the market, has raised a number of questions regarding the compatibility of the lamps and ballasts used in fluorescent systems. Because many of the new products start and operate lamps differently than previous products, the relevant American National Standards Institute requirements may no longer be adequate for addressing compatibility concerns. The impacts on system performance of the newer products of a parametric study designed to test key hypotheses regarding the impact of ballast parameters on fluorescent lamp life. In this study, samples of 4-ft T8 fluorescent lamps were operated on duty cycles of 5 min on and 5 min off, using seven different ballast types. The results of the study indicate which parameters seem to have the biggest effect on lamp life, and can be used in establishing new performance standards for fluorescent systems.

Ji, Y.; Davis, R.; O' Rourke, C.; Chui, E.W.M.

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Advanced Lighting Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report continues the technical assessment of advanced lighting technologies in the following product areasdimmable light-emitting diode (LED) screw-in replacement lamp, hybrid compact fluorescent lamp/halogen screw-in replacement lamp, replacement recessed can LED downlight, organic LED (OLED) disc, replacement mini high-intensity discharge (HID) lamp and ballast system, and solid-state plasma lighting (miniature HID technology) high-bay fixture. The research in this project helps to demonstrate how...

2011-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

305

Kansas City Power and Light - Commercial/Industrial Energy Efficiency...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Other Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Manufacturing Maximum Rebate Maximum custom incentive amount varies from...

306

New Lighting Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) technical update continues the technical assessment of advanced lighting technologies in the following product areas—linear LED T8 fluorescent replacements, Edison-based dimmable LED lamps, commercial replacement side-lit LED fixtures, Edison-based reduced-consumption halogen lamps designed to replace 100W incandescent lamps, high bay induction LED lamps, and architectural LED lamps. Many of the products in this year’s report are designed as ...

2012-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

307

Electronic High-Intensity Discharge Lighting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This EPRI Technical Update addresses the most promising controllable energy efficient light source electronic high-intensity discharge (HID) lighting. Business and technical market factors (Chapter 2) explain the upcoming growth of the HID lamp and electronic HID ballast market. Future technical improvements are emphasized along with discussion of the importance of utility involvement in helping their customers make the switch from magnetically-ballasted HID lighting to higher efficiency electronic HID l...

2007-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

308

Florida Public Utilities - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Public Utilities - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Public Utilities - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs Florida Public Utilities - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs < Back Eligibility Commercial Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Home Weatherization Windows, Doors, & Skylights Maximum Rebate Lamp Only Lighting Upgrade: $100 Window Film: $100 Program Info State Florida Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Ballast and Lamp Lighting Upgrade: $0.10/watt saved Lamp Only Lighting Upgrade: $0.025/watt saved AC/Heat Pump: $100 Window Film: $0.50/sq. ft. Chiller: Up to $100/kW Provider Florida Public Utilities Florida Public Utilities offers the Energy for Life Conservation program to

309

Event:Technology Transfer in Energy and Efficient Lighting to Combat  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

in Energy and Efficient Lighting to Combat in Energy and Efficient Lighting to Combat Climate Change Jump to: navigation, search Calendar.png Technology Transfer in Energy and Efficient Lighting to Combat Climate Change: on 2011/09/28 The objective of the workshop is to assess opportunities for transition to efficient lighting in the Middle East and North African region. In addition to detailed Country Lighting Assessments, UNEP will present a report on state of efficient lighting in the region by listing projects, activities and identifying obstacles and challenges facing the lighting sector. The workshop will further examine the economic and environmental benefits from shifting to efficient lighting. Space is limited so pre-registration is required. Please contact Abdul-Majeid Haddad, Regional Climate Change

310

LED Street and Area Lighting Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Light emitting diodes (LEDs) are being used for applications beyond just indicator lights. One of those applications, street and area lighting, is of considerable interest. This interest is generated by potential reductions that can be achieved in operating costs resulting from lower maintenance costs as well as potentially lower electricity costs that result from the higher efficiency of LED lamps in the systems, the capability to dim and control LED systems, and better light quality. This white paper l...

2008-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

311

HIGH-EFFICIENCY NITRIDE-BASED SOLID-STATE LIGHTING  

SciTech Connect

In this second annual report we summarize the progress in the second-year period of Department of Energy contract DE-FC26-01NT41203, entitled ''High- Efficiency Nitride-Based Solid-State Lighting''. The two teams, from the University of California at Santa Barbara (Principle Investigator: Dr. Shuji Nakamura) and Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (led by Dr. N. Narendran), are pursuing the goals of this contract from thin film growth, characterization, and packaging standpoints. The UCSB team has recently made significant progress in the development of light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with AlGaN active regions emitting in the ultraviolet (UV), resonant-cavity LEDs (RCLEDs), as well as lateral epitaxial overgrowth (LEO) techniques to obtain large-area non-polar GaN films with low average dislocation density. The Rensselaer team has benchmarked the performance of commercially available LED systems and has also conducted efforts to develop an optimized RCLED packaging scheme, including development of advanced epoxy encapsulant chemistries.

Paul T. Fini; Shuji Nakamura

2003-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

312

Kissimmee Utility Authority - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Kissimmee Utility Authority - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Sealing Your Home Ventilation Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Maximum Rebate One piece of equipment or measure per customer, per year Program Info State Florida Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Duct Leak Repair: $75 HVAC Maintenance: $50 HVAC Replacement: $225 Insulation: $100 CFL/LED Lamp: $15/lamp Provider Senior Energy Conservation Specialist Kissimmee Utility Authority (KUA) offers several rebates to residential customers for energy efficiency improvements. Residential customers can

313

Stalled on the Road to the Market: Analysis of Field Experience with a Project to Promote Lighting Efficiency in India  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1991. "Energy-Efficient Lighting in Brazil and India:on Energy-Efficient Lighting. Stockholm, Sweden. Katzev,with a Project to Promote Lighting Efficiency in India AJ.

Gadgil, A.J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

LBNL Lighting Research Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LED and ballast berkeley lamp workstation light switch Overview | What's New | Publications | Software | Facilities | People | Contact Us | Links Sources and Ballasts | Light...

315

Evolution in lighting  

SciTech Connect

Lights consume 20-25% of the nation's electricity, establishing strong incentives to develop more efficient lighting strategies. Attention is turning to where, when, and how we light our environment, and the potential savings add up to half the lighting load nationwide. Some types of lamp are more efficient than others, but characteristics other than energy consumption may dictate where they can be used. Current lighting strategies consider task requirements, light quality, and the potential for daylighting. Energy management systems that control the timing and intensity of light and new types of energy-efficient bulbs and fixtures are increasingly attractive to consumers. The effort will require continued research and the awareness of decision makers. 4 references, 8 figures.

Lihach, N.; Pertusiello, S.

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Energy and economic efficiency alternatives for electric lighting in commercial buildings  

SciTech Connect

This report investigates current efficient alternatives for replacing or supplementing electric lighting systems in commercial buildings. Criteria for establishing the economic attractiveness of various lighting alternatives are defined and the effect of future changes in building lighting on utility capacity. The report focuses on the energy savings potential, economic efficiency, and energy demand reduction of three categories of lighting alternatives: (1) use of a renewable resource (daylighting) to replace or supplement electric lighting; (2) use of task/ambient lighting in lieu of overhead task lighting; and (3) equipment changes to improve lighting energy efficiency. The results indicate that all three categories offer opportunities to reduce lighting energy use in commercial buildings. Further, reducing lighting energy causes a reduction in cooling energy use and cooling capacity while increasing heating energy use. It does not typically increase heating capacity because the use of lighting in the building does not offset the need for peak heating at night.

Robbins, C.L.; Hunter K.C.; Carlisle, N.

1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Over the past decade, lighting became more efficient across ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The Department of Energy (DOE) recently released a study of the 2010 lighting market, finding that lighting across all sectors became more energy ...

318

LED Provides Effective and Efficient Parking Area Lighting at...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New LED parking area lights at the NAVFAC Engineering Service Center at Port Hueneme provide high quality, evenly distributed light. Photo courtesy of PNNL because of its long...

319

Dayton Power and Light - Business and Government Energy Efficiency...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

conditioners, Chillers, Clothes Washers, Compressed air, CustomOthers pending approval, Energy Mgmt. SystemsBuilding Controls, Heat pumps, Lighting, Lighting ControlsSensors,...

320

DOE Science Showcase - Read about Energy-Efficient Lighting ...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Development Novel Smart Windows Based on Transparent Phosphorescent OLEDs Illuminating Solar Decathlon Homes: Exploring Next Generation Lighting Technology - Light Emitting Diodes...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lamps lighting efficiency" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Analysis of surface plasmon mediated light emitting diode efficiency enhancement.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The extraction of light from current light emitting diodes (LEDs) is very low due to the large index of refraction mismatch between the semiconductor… (more)

Holmstedt, Jason

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Lighting the Night: Technology, Urban Life and the Evolution of Street Lighting [Light in Place  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electrical 16. "Highway Lighting by So­ dium Vapor Lamps,"Possibilities of Street: Lighting Improve­ ments," TheLaunches Broad Street Lighting Promotion Campaign," The

Holden, Alfred

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Energy Basics: Fluorescent Lighting  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Fluorescent Lighting Fluorescent lamps use 25%-35% of the energy used by incandescent lamps to provide the same amount of illumination (efficacy of 30-110 lumens per watt). They...

324

Over the past decade, lighting became more efficient across all sectors |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Over the past decade, lighting became more efficient across all Over the past decade, lighting became more efficient across all sectors Over the past decade, lighting became more efficient across all sectors May 10, 2012 - 2:54pm Addthis Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, based on Department of Energy 2010 U.S. Lighting Market Characterization Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, based on Department of Energy 2010 U.S. Lighting Market Characterization Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, based on Department of Energy 2010 U.S. Lighting Market Characterization.

325

South Carolina Community Lights Up the Season with Energy-Efficient Holiday  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

South Carolina Community Lights Up the Season with Energy-Efficient South Carolina Community Lights Up the Season with Energy-Efficient Holiday Lights South Carolina Community Lights Up the Season with Energy-Efficient Holiday Lights December 20, 2011 - 1:12pm Addthis Carolers sing in front of Forest Acres, South Carolina's new LED holiday light display. | Photo courtesy of Richland County, S.C. Carolers sing in front of Forest Acres, South Carolina's new LED holiday light display. | Photo courtesy of Richland County, S.C. Eric Escudero Eric Escudero Senior Public Affairs Specialist & Contractor, Golden Field Office What does this mean for me? LED holiday lights reduce energy usage by 90 percent when compared to traditional incandescent lights. A South Carolina community is proving that energy efficiency can improve the holidays by reducing energy and maintenance costs, thanks to its new

326

South Carolina Community Lights Up the Season with Energy-Efficient Holiday  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

South Carolina Community Lights Up the Season with Energy-Efficient South Carolina Community Lights Up the Season with Energy-Efficient Holiday Lights South Carolina Community Lights Up the Season with Energy-Efficient Holiday Lights December 20, 2011 - 1:12pm Addthis Carolers sing in front of Forest Acres, South Carolina's new LED holiday light display. | Photo courtesy of Richland County, S.C. Carolers sing in front of Forest Acres, South Carolina's new LED holiday light display. | Photo courtesy of Richland County, S.C. Eric Escudero Eric Escudero Senior Public Affairs Specialist & Contractor, Golden Field Office What does this mean for me? LED holiday lights reduce energy usage by 90 percent when compared to traditional incandescent lights. A South Carolina community is proving that energy efficiency can improve the holidays by reducing energy and maintenance costs, thanks to its new

327

Replacement of Lighting Fixtures with LED Energy Efficient Lights at the Parking Facility, Milwaukee, Wisconsin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Forest County Potawatomi Community (FCPC or Tribe) owns a six-story parking facility adjacent to its Potawatomi Bingo Casino (the Casino) in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, as well as a valet parking facility under the Casino (collectively, the Parking Facility). The Parking Facility contained 205-watt metal halide-type lights that, for security reasons, operated 24 hours per day, 7 days per week. Starting on August 30, 2010, the Tribe replaced these fixtures with 1,760 state-of-the-art, energy efficient 55-Watt LED lights. This project resulted in an immediate average reduction in monthly peak demand of 238 kW over the fourth quarter of 2010. The average reduction in monthly peak demand from October 1 through December 31, 2010 translates into a forecast annual electrical energy reduction of approximately 1,995,000 kWh or 47.3% of the pre-project demand. This project was technically effective, economically feasible, and beneficial to the public not only in terms of long term energy efficiency and associated emissions reductions, but also in the short-term jobs provided for the S.E. Wisconsin region. The project was implemented, from approval by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to completion, in less than 6 months. The project utilized off-the-shelf proven technologies that were fabricated locally and installed by local trade contractors.

David Brien

2012-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

328

Energy-Efficient Lighting The typical American family spends more  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fluorescent light bulbs (CFLs) saves you money in the long run with lower energy bills. CFLs are significant Typical incandescent 75-watt light bulb Compact Fluorescent 18-watt light bulb Purchase cost $0.60 $ 5 that incandescent bulbs use becomes heat while only 10 percent becomes light. CFLs create less heat because more

329

Evaluation of energy-efficiency in lighting systems using sensor networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In modern energy aware buildings, lighting control systems are put in place so to maximise the energy-efficiency of the lighting system without effecting the comfort of the occupant. In many cases this involves utilising a set of presence sensors, with ... Keywords: building, decision, efficiency, energy, lighting, network, sensor, support

Declan T. Delaney; Gregory M. P. O'Hare; Antonio G. Ruzzelli

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Improvement of output coupling efficiency of organic light-emitting diodes by backside substrate modification  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Improvement of output coupling efficiency of organic light-emitting diodes by backside substrate in determining the power efficiency of organic light emitting diodes OLEDs is the coupling effi- ciency ( cp 1999; accepted for publication 1 February 2000 The emission intensity of an organic light-emitting

331

Loss of Quantum Efficiency in Green Light Emitting Diode Dies at Low Temperature  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Loss of Quantum Efficiency in Green Light Emitting Diode Dies at Low Temperature Yufeng Li1,2 , Wei, photoluminescence and cathodoluminescence of GaInN/GaN multiple quantum well light emitting diode dies are analyzed and efficient pure green light emitting diodes (LEDs) are of high economic value. However, when the emission

Wetzel, Christian M.

332

Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Energy Efficiency...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fluorescent Tube Lamps FEMP temporarily suspended its energy efficiency requirements for fluorescent tube lamps as it evaluates the market impact of the pending 2012 minimum...

333

Efficient estimation of energy transfer efficiency in light-harvesting complexes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The fundamental physical mechanisms of energy transfer in photosynthetic complexes is not yet fully understood. In particular, the degree of efficiency or sensitivity of these systems for energy transfer is not known given their non-perturbative and non-Markovian interactions with proteins backbone and surrounding photonic and phononic environments. One major problem in studying light-harvesting complexes has been the lack of an efficient method for simulation of their dynamics in biological environments. To this end, here we revisit the second-order time-convolution (TC2) master equation and examine its reliability beyond extreme Markovian and perturbative limits. In particular, we present a derivation of TC2 without making the usual weak system-bath coupling assumption. Using this equation, we explore the long time behaviour of exciton dynamics of Fenna-Matthews-Olson (FMO) protein complex. Moreover, we introduce a constructive error analysis to estimate the accuracy of TC2 equation in calculating energy transfer efficiency, exhibiting reliable performance for environments with weak and intermediate memory and strength. Furthermore, we numerically show that energy transfer efficiency is optimal and robust for the FMO protein complex of green sulphur bacteria with respect to variations in reorganization energy and bath correlation time-scales.

Alireza Shabani; Masoud Mohseni; Herschel Rabitz; Seth Lloyd

2011-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

334

ComEd - Business Instant Lighting Discounts Program (Illinois) | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ComEd - Business Instant Lighting Discounts Program (Illinois) ComEd - Business Instant Lighting Discounts Program (Illinois) ComEd - Business Instant Lighting Discounts Program (Illinois) < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Multi-Family Residential Savings Category Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Program Info Funding Source Illinois Energy Efficiency Portfolio Standard (EEPS) surcharge Start Date 06/01/2012 State Illinois Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Varies by technology ComEd offers the Business Instant Lighting Discounts program to businesses, multi-family properties and private schools. Incentives are available on a variety of reduced wattage lamps which can be installed as a direct replacement for standard lamps without having to rewire the fixture. Eligible lamps include screw-in CFLs, reduced wattage T8 and T5 linear

335

Covered Product Category: Compact Fluorescent Lamps | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Covered Product Category: Compact Fluorescent Lamps Covered Product Category: Compact Fluorescent Lamps Covered Product Category: Compact Fluorescent Lamps October 7, 2013 - 10:48am Addthis ENERGY STAR Qualified Products Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides acquisition guidance across a variety of product categories, including compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs), which are an ENERGY STAR-qualified product category. Federal laws and executive orders mandate that agencies meet these efficiency requirements in all procurement and acquisition actions that are not specifically exempted by law. Most manufacturers display the ENERGY STAR label on complying models. For a model not displaying this label, check the manufacturer's literature to determine if it meets the efficiency requirements outlined by ENERGY STAR.

336

Tunable surface plasmons in coupled metallo-dielectric multiple layers for light-emission efficiency enhancement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ul- timately the replacement of light bulbs for white lighting. Towards this goal, several techniquesTunable surface plasmons in coupled metallo-dielectric multiple layers for light films is a promising technique to increase the efficiency of light-emitting devices. Here we propose

Paiella, Roberto

337

Performance Evaluation of Energy-Efficient Lighting and Office Technologies in New York City  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lighting and office equipment are significant electricity end uses in commercial office buildings. Recent technology developments offer significant improvements in lighting quality along with potentially substantial reductions in lighting and office equipment electricity use. This project demonstrated successful application of energy-efficient lighting and office technologies in an office building in New York City.

1997-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

338

Abstract Photosynthetic efficiency is often quantified as the light-limited, maximum quantum yield in eco-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by an integrated red- blue light-emitting diode (LED) source (model 6400-02, Li-Cor, Inc.), and the CO2 mole TD (1995) Efficiency of photo- synthesis in continuous and pulsed light emitting diode irradi- ation

DeLucia, Evan H.

339

Solvothermal synthesis of designed nonstoichiometric strontium titanate for efficient visible-light photocatalysis  

SciTech Connect

SrTiO{sub 3} powders with various Sr/Ti atomic ratios were synthesized by microwave-assisted solvothermal reactions of SrCl{sub 2} and Ti(OC{sub 3}H{sub 7}){sub 4} in KOH aqueous solutions. The nanoparticles of perovskite type SrTiO{sub 3} structure with the particle size of 30-40 nm were synthesized. The photocatalytic activity was determined by deNO{sub x} ability using light emitting diode lamps of various wavelengths such as 627 nm (red), 530 nm (green), 445 nm (blue), and 390 nm (UV). The photocatalytic activity significantly changed depending on the Sr/Ti atomic ratio, i.e., the strontium rich sample (Sr/Ti atomic ratio>1) showed excellent visible light responsive photocatalytic activity for the oxidative destruction of NO.

Sulaeman, Uyi; Yin, Shu; Sato, Tsugio [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

2010-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

340

Dayton Power and Light - Business and Government Energy Efficiency...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

lighting: 1.50bulb (32 watts) Delamping: 1.20-1.50ln. ft. or 0.05rated fixture watt Relamping: 1 - 1.25 Lighting Sensors: 15-60sensor, 0.04connected watt for...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lamps lighting efficiency" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Concord Municipal Light Plant- Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Concord Municipal Light Plant (CMLP) offers rebates to commercial customers for a variety of appliances, ETS heating systems, general lighting upgrades, CFL bulbs, and exit sign retrofit kits. A...

342

Alexandria Light and Power - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Technologies Central Air conditioners, Clothes Washers, Dehumidifiers, Dishwasher, Energy Mgmt. SystemsBuilding Controls, Heat pumps, Lighting, Programmable Thermostats,...

343

Information Resources: LED Replacement Lamps: Current Performance...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

incandescent lamps (e.g., A-lamps), and provided an update on ENERGY STAR criteria for LED integral replacement lamps - currently in its second draft. Robert Lingard of Pacific...

344

Demonstration of LED Retrofit Lamps at the Smithsonian American Art Museum, Washington, DC  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents observations and results obtained from a lighting demonstration project conducted under the U.S. Department of Energy GATEWAY Solid-State Lighting (SSL) Technology Demonstration Program at the Smithsonain American Art Museum in Washington, DC. LED Lamp samples were tested in the museum workshop, temporarily installed in a gallery for feedback, and ultimately replaced all traditional incandescent lamps in one gallery of modernist art at the American Art Museum and partially replacing lamps in two galleries at the Musesum's Renwick Gallery. This report describes the selection and testing process, technology challenges, perceptions, economics, energy use, and mixed results of usign LED replacement lamps in art galleries housing national treasures.

Miller, Naomi J.; Rosenfeld, Scott M.

2012-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

345

Types of Lighting in Commercial Buildings - Lighting Types  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Lighting Types Lighting Types The following are the most widely used types of lighting equipment used in commercial buildings. Characteristics such as energy efficiency, light quality, and lifetime vary by lamp type. Standard Fluorescent A fluorescent lamp consists of a sealed gas-filled tube. The gas in the tube consists of a mixture of low pressure mercury vapor and an inert gas such as argon. The inner surface of the tube has a coating of phosphor powder. When an electrical current is applied to electrodes in the tube, the mercury vapor emits ultraviolet radiation which then causes the phosphor coating to emit visible light (the process is termed fluorescence). A ballast is required to regulate and control the current and voltage. Two types of ballasts are used, magnetic and electronic. Electronic ballasts

346

Lamp method and apparatus using multiple reflections  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrodeless microwave discharge lamp includes an envelope with a discharge forming fill disposed therein which emits light, the fill being capable of absorbing light at one wavelength and re-emitting the absorbed light at a different wavelength, the light emitted from the fill having a first spectral power distribution in the absence of reflection of light back into the fill, a source of microwave energy coupled to the fill to excite the fill and cause the fill to emit light, and a reflector disposed within the microwave cavity and configured to reflect at least some of the light emitted by the fill back into the fill while allowing some light to exit, the exiting light having a second spectral power distribution with proportionately more light in the visible region as compared to the first spectral power distribution, wherein the light re-emitted by the fill is shifted in wavelength with respect to the absorbed light and the magnitude of the shift is in relation to an effective optical path length.

MacLennan, Donald A. (Gaithersburg, MD); Turner, Brian P. (Damascus, MD)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light (Gas)- Residential Energy Efficiency Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Interstate Power and Light (Alliant Energy) offers residential energy efficiency rebates to Iowa customers for a variety of home upgrades. Rebates are available for certain heating, insulation,...

348

Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light (Electric)- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (Iowa)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Interstate Power and Light (Alliant Energy) offers residential energy efficiency rebates and incentives for Iowa customers for a variety of technologies. Rebates are available for certain HVAC...

349

Kansas City Power & Light- Commercial/Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Kansas City Power & Light (KCP&L) provides financial incentives for commercial and industrial customers to increase the energy efficiency of eligible facilities. Rebates are available for...

350

Energy-efficiency labels and standards: A guidebook for appliances, equipment and lighting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

D.C. Ginthum, M. 1995. Appliance. September. Greening, L. ,Projected Regional Impacts of Appliance Efficiency StandardsSpecial Issue Devoted to Appliance and Lighting Standards. ”

McMahon, James E.; Wiel, Stephen

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Barron Electric Cooperative- Energy Star Appliance & Energy Efficient Lighting Rebate Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Barron Electric Cooperative (BEC) offers rebates to any member receiving electrical service for the purchase of Energy Star appliances and energy efficient lighting. All appliance rebates are $25...

352

Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light (Gas)- Business Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs (Minnesota)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Alliant Energy - Interstate Power and Light (IPL) offers rebates for high efficiency equipment for commercial customers. Rebates are available for windows/sashes, programmable thermostats, water...

353

Information Resources: LED Replacements for Linear Fluorescent Lamps  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Replacements for Linear Fluorescent Lamps Webcast Replacements for Linear Fluorescent Lamps Webcast In this June 20, 2011 webcast on LED products marketed as replacements for linear fluorescent lamps, Jason Tuenge of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) discussed current Lighting Facts-listed products as well as products evaluated in the latest CALiPER reports. Eric Richman, also of PNNL, reported on a recently completed GATEWAY demonstration project, in which LED and fluorescent lamps were installed in a variety of recessed troffer luminaires for comparison in an office environment. The presentation concluded with a discussion of specifications listed in a newly updated technology fact sheet. View presentation slides View the text-alternative version View the webcast (WMV 16 MB) Download Windows Media Player

354

Performance of T12 and T8 Fluorescent Lamps and Troffers and LED Linear Replacement Lamps CALiPER Benchmark Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) Commercially Available LED Product Evaluation and Reporting (CALiPER) Program was established in 2006 to investigate the performance of light-emitting diode (LED) based luminaires and replacement lamps. To help users better compare LED products with conventional lighting technologies, CALiPER has also performed benchmark research and testing of traditional (i.e., non-LED) lamps and fixtures. This benchmark report addresses standard 4-foot fluorescent lamps (i.e., T12 and T8) and the 2-foot by 4-foot recessed troffers in which they are commonly used. This report also examines available LED replacements for T12 and T8 fluorescent lamps, and their application in fluorescent troffers. The construction and operation of linear fluorescent lamps and troffers are discussed, as well as fluorescent lamp and fixture performance, based on manufacturer data and CALiPER benchmark testing. In addition, the report describes LED replacements for linear fluorescent lamps, and compares their bare lamp and in situ performance with fluorescent benchmarks on a range of standard lighting measures, including power usage, light output and distribution, efficacy, correlated color temperature, and the color rendering index. Potential performance and application issues indicated by CALiPER testing results are also examined.

Myer, Michael; Paget, Maria L.; Lingard, Robert D.

2009-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

355

EXC-12-0005 - In the Matter of Halco Lighting Technologies | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5 - In the Matter of Halco Lighting Technologies 5 - In the Matter of Halco Lighting Technologies EXC-12-0005 - In the Matter of Halco Lighting Technologies On July 10, 2012, OHA issued a decision granting an Application for Exception filed by Halco Lighting Technologies (Halco) for relief from the provisions of 10 C.F.R. Part 430, Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards and Test Procedures for General Service Fluorescent Lamps and Incandescent Reflector Lamps (Lighting Efficiency Standards). In its exception request, Halco asserted that it will suffer a serious hardship, gross inequity and an unfair distribution of burdens if required to adhere to the new Lighting Efficiency Standards, effective July 14, 2012 (2009 Final Rule), with respect to its 700 series T8 General Service Fluorescent Lamps (GSFL). Specifically, Halco cited previous requests for

356

EXC-12-0014 - In the Matter of Topaz Lighting Corporation | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4 - In the Matter of Topaz Lighting Corporation 4 - In the Matter of Topaz Lighting Corporation EXC-12-0014 - In the Matter of Topaz Lighting Corporation On November 16, 2012, OHA issued a decision granting an Application for Exception filed by Topaz Lighting Corporation (Topaz) for relief from the provisions of 10 C.F.R. Part 430, Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards and Test Procedures for General Service Fluorescent Lamps and Incandescent Reflector Lamps (Lighting Efficiency Standards). In its exception request, Topaz asserted that it will suffer a serious hardship, gross inequity and an unfair distribution of burdens if required to adhere to the new Lighting Efficiency Standards, effective July 14, 2012 (2009 Final Rule), with respect to its 700 series T8 General Service Fluorescent Lamps (GSFL). Specifically, Topaz cited a previous OHA

357

EXC-12-0011 - In the Matter of Westinghouse Lighting Corporation |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 - In the Matter of Westinghouse Lighting Corporation 1 - In the Matter of Westinghouse Lighting Corporation EXC-12-0011 - In the Matter of Westinghouse Lighting Corporation On September 17, 2012, OHA issued a decision granting an Application for Exception filed by Westinghouse Lighting Corporation (Westinghouse) for relief from the provisions of 10 C.F.R. Part 430, Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards and Test Procedures for General Service Fluorescent Lamps and Incandescent Reflector Lamps (Lighting Efficiency Standards). In its exception request, Westinghouse asserted that it will suffer a serious hardship, gross inequity and an unfair distribution of burdens if required to adhere to the Lighting Efficiency Standards, which became effective July 14, 2012 (2009 Final Rule), with respect to its 700 series T8 General Service Fluorescent Lamps (GSFL).

358

Reading Municipal Light Department - Business Lighting Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reading Municipal Light Department - Business Lighting Rebate Reading Municipal Light Department - Business Lighting Rebate Program Reading Municipal Light Department - Business Lighting Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Institutional Local Government Nonprofit Schools State Government Savings Category Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Maximum Rebate Commercial Customers: $10,000 per calendar year Municipal Customers: $15,000 per calendar year Program Info State Massachusetts Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount T-8/T-5 Lamp with Electronic Ballasts: $11 - $35/fixture Interior High Output Lamp with Electronic Ballasts: $100/fixture De-lamping: $4 - $9/lamp Lighting Sensors: $20/sensor LED Exit Signs: $20/fixture Provider Incentive Programs

359

Efficiency Vermont - newLIGHT Incentive Program (Vermont) | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Incentive Programs Amount Lighting: 35-125 depending on the equipment installed LED Exit Sign: 35 Sensors: 40-200 depending on the equipment installed Expiration Date 12...

360

Seattle City Light- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Seattle City Light provides rebates to residential customers for purchasing and installing clothes washers, refrigerator, heat pump water heaters, and ductless heat pumps. [http://www...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lamps lighting efficiency" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Seattle City Light - Multi-Family Residential Energy Efficiency...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Lighting: 85% discount on installation costs Insulation: 50% discount on installation costs Window Replacement: 3 - 5sq. ft. Seattle City...

362

North Branch Municipal Water & Light - Residential Energy Efficiency...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

unit Central AC: 100 - 200, plus additional rebate for efficiency ratings above 14.5 SEER Air Source Heat Pump:100 - 200, plus additional rebate for efficiency ratings above...

363

Johnson County REMC - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (Indiana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Johnson County REMC - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Johnson County REMC - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (Indiana) Johnson County REMC - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (Indiana) < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Manufacturing Maximum Rebate Pre-approval required for payments greater than $1,000 Program Info State Indiana Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount T5/T8 Lamps with Electronic Ballasts: $8 - $18 T8 Lamps: $0.75/lamp High Bay Fluorescent Fixtures with Electronic Ballasts: $50 - $125 Hardwired/Modular CFL Fixtures: $8 - $25 Ceramic Metal Halide Accent/Directional Lighting: $20 - $50 Pulse Start Metal Halide Fixtures: $25 - $65

364

PNM - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PNM - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program PNM - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program PNM - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Design & Remodeling Other Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Windows, Doors, & Skylights Maximum Rebate 100% of incremental measure costs or 50% of total project costs Program Info State New Mexico Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount '''Interior Lighting''' Screw-In CFLs: $1 - $2 Hardwired CFLs: $5 - $40 Lamp Removal: $3 - $10 T5/T8/T12 Lamps and Electronic Ballast: $0.50 - $4 High Bay T5/T8 Fixtures and Electronic Ballast: $0.30/watt reduction LED Interior Lamps/Fixtures: $12 - $20

365

High efficiency light emitting diode with anisotropically etched GaN-sapphire interface  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High efficiency light emitting diode with anisotropically etched GaN- sapphire interface M. H. Lo and optimization of a light-emitting diode projection micro-stereolithography three-dimensional manufacturingGaN micro-light emitting diodes Appl. Phys. Lett. 101, 231110 (2012) A bright cadmium-free, hybrid organic

366

Lighting fundamentals handbook: Lighting fundamentals and principles for utility personnel  

SciTech Connect

Lighting accounts for approximately 30% of overall electricity use and demand in commercial buildings. This handbook for utility personnel provides a source of basic information on lighting principles, lighting equipment, and other considerations related to lighting design. The handbook is divided into three parts. Part One, Physics of Light, has chapters on light, vision, optics, and photometry. Part Two, Lighting Equipment and Technology, focuses on lamps, luminaires, and lighting controls. Part Three, Lighting Design Decisions, deals with the manner in which lighting design decisions are made and reviews relevant methods and issues. These include the quantity and quality of light needed for visual tasks, calculation methods for verifying that lighting needs are satisfied, lighting economics and methods for evaluating investments in efficient lighting systems, and miscellaneous design issues including energy codes, power quality, photobiology, and disposal of lighting equipment. The handbook contains a discussion of the role of the utility in promoting the use of energy-efficient lighting. The handbook also includes a lighting glossary and a list of references for additional information. This convenient and comprehensive handbook is designed to enable utility lighting personnel to assist their customers in developing high-quality, energy-efficient lighting systems. The handbook is not intended to be an up-to-date reference on lighting products and equipment.

Eley, C.; Tolen, T. (Eley (Charles) Associates, San Francisco, CA (United States)); Benya, J.R. (Luminae Souter Lighting Design, San Francisco, CA (United States))

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Buildings Energy Data Book: 7.6 Efficiency Standards for Lighting  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

4 4 Lighting Standards for General Service Incandescent Lamps Prescribed by EISA 2007 General Service Incandescent Effective Date Maximum Wattage Rated Lumen Range Minimum Life Modified Spectrum General Service Incandescent Effective Date Maximum Wattage Rated Lumen Range Minimum Life By 2020, the minimum efficacy for general service incandescent will be 45 lm/W unless the Secretary of Energy has implemented another standard which saves as much or more energy than a 45 lm/W standard. Source(s): U. S. Government, Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007, January 2007, Section 321. 2014 43 563-787 1000 hrs. 2015 29 232-563 1000 hrs. 2012 72 1,118-1,950 1000 hrs. 2013 53 788-1,117 1000 hrs. 2014 43 750-1,049 1000 hrs. 2015 29 310-749 1000 hrs. 2012 72 1,490-2,600 1000 hrs. 2013 53 1,050-1,498

368

Economic Analysis of Ilumex, A Project to Promote Energy-Efficient Residential Lighting in Mexico  

SciTech Connect

A higher penetration of compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs) for household lighting can reduce growth in peak electricity demand, reduce sales of subsidized electricity, and lessen environmental impacts. This paper describes an economic analysis of a project designed to promote high penetration rates of CFLs in two cities in Mexico. Our analysis indicates that the project will bring substantial net economic benefits to Mexico, the utility, and the average customer. In the absence of any subsidy to CFLs, most customers will see a payback period longer than two years. By sharing some of the anticipated net benefit, CFE, the utility company, can reduce the payback period to a maximum of two years for all customers. CFE's role is thus crucial to the successful implementation of the project. Expanding the Ilumex project to a Mexico-wide program would make a significant contribution towards meeting the planned addition of generation capacity by the year 2000.

Sathaye, Jayant A.; Friedmann, R.; Meyers, S.; de Buen, O.; Gadgil, A.J.; Vargas, E.; Saucedo, R.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Energy 101: Lighting Choices | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

101: Lighting Choices 101: Lighting Choices Energy 101: Lighting Choices August 13, 2013 - 2:38pm Addthis Learn about energy-efficient light bulbs that can light your home for less money. For many years, researchers have been working on new lighting options that produce the same light with less energy. Many of those designs are now on the market. This edition of Energy 101 features newer energy-saving light bulbs that provide the choices in colors and light levels you've come to expect, but with higher efficiencies-so they save you money. Upgrading 15 of the inefficient incandescent light bulbs in your home to energy-saving incandescent, compact fluorescent lamp (CFL), or light emitting diode (LED) bulbs could save you about $50 per year. For more information on lighting choices from the Office of Energy

370

Energy 101: Lighting Choices | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy 101: Lighting Choices Energy 101: Lighting Choices Energy 101: Lighting Choices August 13, 2013 - 2:38pm Addthis Learn about energy-efficient light bulbs that can light your home for less money. For many years, researchers have been working on new lighting options that produce the same light with less energy. Many of those designs are now on the market. This edition of Energy 101 features newer energy-saving light bulbs that provide the choices in colors and light levels you've come to expect, but with higher efficiencies-so they save you money. Upgrading 15 of the inefficient incandescent light bulbs in your home to energy-saving incandescent, compact fluorescent lamp (CFL), or light emitting diode (LED) bulbs could save you about $50 per year. For more information on lighting choices from the Office of Energy

371

Cheyenne Light, Fuel and Power (Gas) - Residential Energy Efficiency...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Implementing Sector Utility Energy Category Energy Efficiency Incentive Programs Amount Home Energy Audit: Required for Infiltration Control, Insulation, Duct Sealing, and Window...

372

Memphis Light, Gas and Water (Electric) - Commercial Efficiency...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

rebates on a range of energy efficient equipment and measures for commercial and smaller industrial customers. Eligible customers include commercial customers on General Power...

373

Efficient Lighting : Technologies : From the Lab to the Marketplace...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2005 would provide 15 billion in energy savings. Appliance efficiency standards have led to the widespread adoption of electronic ballasts. For a more recent estimate of...

374

Background Overview of Solid-State Lighting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

light sources Dramatic changes are unfolding in lighting technology. Semiconductor light-emitting diodes (LEDs), until recently used mainly as simple indicator lamps in...

375

EXC-12-0007 - In the Matter of Tailored Lighting, Inc. | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EXC-12-0007 - In the Matter of Tailored Lighting, Inc. EXC-12-0007 - In the Matter of Tailored Lighting, Inc. EXC-12-0007 - In the Matter of Tailored Lighting, Inc. On October 23, 2012, OHA issued a decision considering an Application for Exception filed by Tailored Lighting, Inc. (TLI) for relief from the provisions of 10 C.F.R. Part 430, Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards and Test Procedures for General Service Fluorescent Lamps and Incandescent Reflector Lamps (Lighting Efficiency Standards). In its exception request, TLI requests exception relief for its principal product, a PAR-shaped daylight incandescent reflector lamp known as the SoLux PAR. The company maintains that it has been unable to develop a more efficient alternative that offers the same utility as the SoLux PAR and, as

376

EXC-12-0007 - In the Matter of Tailored Lighting, Inc. | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

07 - In the Matter of Tailored Lighting, Inc. 07 - In the Matter of Tailored Lighting, Inc. EXC-12-0007 - In the Matter of Tailored Lighting, Inc. On October 23, 2012, OHA issued a decision considering an Application for Exception filed by Tailored Lighting, Inc. (TLI) for relief from the provisions of 10 C.F.R. Part 430, Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards and Test Procedures for General Service Fluorescent Lamps and Incandescent Reflector Lamps (Lighting Efficiency Standards). In its exception request, TLI requests exception relief for its principal product, a PAR-shaped daylight incandescent reflector lamp known as the SoLux PAR. The company maintains that it has been unable to develop a more efficient alternative that offers the same utility as the SoLux PAR and, as a result, will suffer serious hardship, gross inequity, and an unfair

377

Lighting Principles and Terms | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Principles and Terms Principles and Terms Lighting Principles and Terms July 29, 2012 - 5:20pm Addthis Light quantity, energy consumption, and light quality are the basic principles of lighting. | Photo courtesy of Tadson Bussey. Light quantity, energy consumption, and light quality are the basic principles of lighting. | Photo courtesy of Tadson Bussey. Learn More Find out how to shop for lights by lumens, not watts. To choose the best energy-efficient lighting options for your home, you should understand basic lighting principles and terms. Light Quantity Illumination The distribution of light on a horizontal surface. The purpose of all lighting is to produce illumination. Lumen A measurement of light emitted by a lamp. As reference, a 100-watt

378

The effects of supply harmonics on the performance of compact fluorescent lamps  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes a performance evaluation of ten compact fluorescent lighting systems operated with sinusoidal and distorted voltage waveform conditions. The lamps were either provided with an electronic ballast, a magnetic core ballast or a magnetic core ballast with a power factor correction circuit. The test results show that the electrical performance of the compact fluorescent lamps for both sinusoidal and distorted voltage waveform operation is related to the different types of ballast used. The cost of operation of these compact fluorescent lamps was calculated and compared to the cost of a conventional 60 W incandescent lamp.

Arseneau, R.; Ouellette, M.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Salazar, Chu to Flip Switch on Energy-Efficient LED Lights on National Mall  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

to Flip Switch on Energy-Efficient LED Lights on to Flip Switch on Energy-Efficient LED Lights on National Mall Salazar, Chu to Flip Switch on Energy-Efficient LED Lights on National Mall January 30, 2012 - 11:02am Addthis WASHINGTON, D.C.-Today, Secretary of the Interior Ken Salazar and Secretary of Energy Steven Chu will participate in a lighting ceremony featuring the newly-installed LED lights on the National Mall. Illuminating the Mall from 3rd to 15th Streets, the LED technology is expected to reduce lighting energy by up to 65 percent and provide a well-lit atmosphere to welcome the National Mall's 25 million annual visitors. "Achieving an economy built on American energy will require an all-of-the-above approach, one that includes safely and responsibly developing our domestic energy resources - and making the most of what we

380

600 New Lights Bulbs to Improve Energy Efficiency at DOE | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

600 New Lights Bulbs to Improve Energy Efficiency at DOE 600 New Lights Bulbs to Improve Energy Efficiency at DOE 600 New Lights Bulbs to Improve Energy Efficiency at DOE November 18, 2010 - 10:30am Addthis Ingrid Kolb Director of the Office of Management Starting in September, the Department of Energy has been steadily replacing all 600 light fixtures under our Washington, D.C., Forrestal North Building canopy with state of the art Light Emitting Diode (LED) fixtures. Every new bulb now uses just 23 watts instead of 205 watts. That translates into almost half a million kilowatts hours saved every year. and will cut annual energy consumption at the Department of Energy Headquarters by about 1%. The final new LED fixture under the canopy was installed on October 28, but these lights are just part of a full program to reduce energy consumption

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lamps lighting efficiency" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Thermoelectrically Pumped Light-Emitting Diodes Operating above Unity Efficiency  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A heated semiconductor light-emitting diode at low forward bias voltage V

Santhanam, Parthiban

382

DOE Science Showcase - Read about Energy-Efficient Lighting | OSTI, US  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

DOE Science Showcase - Read about Energy-Efficient Lighting DOE Science Showcase - Read about Energy-Efficient Lighting From the DOE Press Release: "These investments in cutting-edge lighting technologies will support American innovation, create new manufacturing jobs for U.S. workers, and help ensure that the United States leads the world in this rapidly evolving industry," said Secretary Chu. "These next-generation lighting technologies have the potential to transform the way we light our homes and businesses and generate enormous energy and cost savings for families and businesses across the country." From the Databases Energy Citations Database DOE Solid-State Lighting in Higher Ed Facilities Semiconductor Nanocrystals-Based White Light Emitting Diodes Walmart Experimental Store Performance Stories: Preprint

383

NV Energy (Southern Nevada) - SureBet Business Energy Efficiency Rebate  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Southern Nevada) - SureBet Business Energy Efficiency Southern Nevada) - SureBet Business Energy Efficiency Rebate Program NV Energy (Southern Nevada) - SureBet Business Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Local Government Nonprofit Schools State Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Design & Remodeling Other Heating Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Manufacturing Windows, Doors, & Skylights Program Info State Nevada Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount '''Existing Facilities''' T-8 Lamps: $2 - $7/lamp T-8/T-5 High Bay Replacement for HID: $0.30/watt reduced Delamping of T-12: $4 - $9

384

Dynamical systems in nanophotonics: From energy efficient modulators to light forces and optomechanics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We demonstrate novel device concepts based on rigorous design of the dynamics of resonant nanophotonic systems, such as dispersionless resonant switches and energy-efficient mo-dulator architectures, slow-light cells, and ...

Kaertner, Franz X.

385

Randolph EMC- Commercial and Industrial Efficient Lighting Rebate Program (North Carolina)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Commercial and industrial members who upgrade to energy-efficient light bulbs which meet Randolph EMC's standards are eligible for a prescriptive incentive payment. The cooperative will provide a...

386

Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light (Gas and Electric)- Low Interest Energy Efficiency Loan Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Alliant Energy (Interstate Power and Light - IP&L) offers low-interest financing program for the installation of energy efficient improvements. Businesses, Residences, farms or ag-related...

387

High Quality Down Lighting Luminaire with 73% Overall System Efficiency  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes work to develop a high flux, high efficiency LED-based downlight at OSRAM SYLVANIA under US Department of Energy contract DE-FC26-08NT01582. A new high power LED and electronic driver were developed for these downlights. The LED achieved 100 lumens per watt efficacy and 1700 lumen flux output at a correlated color temperature of 3500K. The driver had 90% electrical conversion efficiency while maintaining excellent power quality with power factor >0.99, and total harmonic distortion <10%. Two styles of downlights using the LED and driver were shown to exceed the project targets for steady-state luminous efficacy and flux of 70 lumens per watt and 1300 lumens, respectively. Compared to similar existing downlights using compact fluorescent or LED sources, these downlights had much higher efficacy at nearly the same luminous flux.

Robert Harrison; Steven C. Allen; Joseph Bernier; Robert Harrison

2010-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

388

High Quality Down Lighting Luminaire with 73% Overall System Efficiency  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes work to develop a high flux, high efficiency LED-based downlight at OSRAM SYLVANIA under US Department of Energy contract DE-FC26-08NT01582. A new high power LED and electronic driver were developed for these downlights. The LED achieved 100 lumens per watt efficacy and 1700 lumen flux output at a correlated color temperature of 3500K. The driver had 90% electrical conversion efficiency while maintaining excellent power quality with power factor >0.99, and total harmonic distortion LED and driver were shown to exceed the project targets for steady-state luminous efficacy and flux of 70 lumens per watt and 1300 lumens, respectively. Compared to similar existing downlights using compact fluorescent or LED sources, these downlights had much higher efficacy at nearly the same luminous flux.

Robert Harrison; Steven C. Allen; Joseph Bernier; Robert Harrison

2010-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

389

Effect of High Efficiency Lighting on Power Quality in Public Buildings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This power quality (PQ) case study investigates the effect of high efficiency lighting on PQ in public buildings. The buildings scheduled for lighting retrofits that were involved in this study include a graduate center, a hospital facility, and a social services building.

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

390

Efficient and Color-Tunable Oxyfluoride Solid Solution Phosphors for Solid-State White Lighting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A solid solution strategy helps increase the efficiency of Ce{sup 3+} oxyfluoride phosphors for solid-state white lighting. The use of a phosphor-capping architecture provides additional light extraction. The accompanying image displays electroluminescence spectra from a 434-nm InGaN LED phosphor that has been capped with the oxyfluoride phosphor.

Im, Won Bin; George, Nathan; Kurzman, Joshua; Brinkley, Stuart; Mikhailovsky, Alexander; Hu, Jerry; Chmelka, Bradley F.; DenBaars, Steven P.; Seshadri, Ram (UCSB)

2012-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

391

The Energy-Efficient Fixtures Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0 0 The Energy-Efficient Fixtures Laboratory Replacing the incandescent bulb with a more efficient light source is only the first step in developing an energy-efficient lighting system. Improved fixtures can raise the system's efficiency even further. At LBL's Energy-Efficient Fixtures Laboratory, researchers in the Lighting Systems Group study the optical and thermal efficiency of luminaires, and work closely with fixture manufacturers to develop more efficient products. "Fifty to seventy percent efficiencies are now typical of fixtures," says senior research associate Chin Zhang, "and we're trying to improve them to eighty to ninety percent." Oliver Morse adjusts a centralized light guide system consisting of a 250-watt metal halide lamp, a high-efficiency beam splitter and four hollow

392

Multi-Photon Phosphor Feasibility Research: Advanced Light Source Development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Efficiencies of commercial light sources have reached a plateau at about 33 percent of the maximum possible, but these efficiencies will have to be doubled to achieve the energy savings in lighting needed in the future. One possibility is to develop phosphor materials for application to fluorescent lamps that emit two visible photons for each absorbed ultraviolet photon. Scientists discussed the possibility of developing such phosphor materials at a workshop held May 8 through May 10, 2001 in Peabody, Ma...

2001-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

393

Issues, Models and Solutions for Triac Modulated Phase Dimming of LED Lamps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/a 30 lumens 0.1 Incandescent Bulb 15 W 225 lumens 15 Fluorescent Tube Lamp 10 W 500 lumens 50 White LED bulbs, and fluorescent lights, produce light that is radiated in all directions, LEDs produce a focused especially on the potential of white LED lights, which are an important and newly emerging lighting

Lehman, Brad

394

Vision 2020: Lighting Technology Roadmap | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Vision 2020: Lighting Technology Roadmap Vision 2020: Lighting Technology Roadmap Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Vision 2020: Lighting Technology Roadmap Agency/Company /Organization: United States Department of Energy, LBNL International Energy Studies, International Association of Lighting Designers, International Association of Lighting Management Companies Partner: NAED, NEMA, NEMRA, NECA, NAILD Sector: Energy Focus Area: Energy Efficiency Topics: Market analysis, Technology characterizations Resource Type: Guide/manual Website: www.nrel.gov/docs/fy00osti/27996.pdf References: Vision 2020: Lighting Technology Roadmap[1] Overview "Continued innovation in lamps and other system components, as well as in design practices, have made lighting progressively more effective,

395

Indoor Lighting Overview Page 5-1 2008 Nonresidential Compliance Manual August 2009  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

lighting system controls and photocells. · Install fixtures with metal halide lamps. Refer to the Advanced and Appliances 8 Space Planning 8 Heating, Cooling, and Ventilating Systems 9 Plumbing 10 Materials Use (see page 14). Energy efficiency yields benefits far beyond energy savings. Daylighting and efficient

396

Pacific Northwest Laboratory's Lighting Technology Screening Matrix: Let there be energy-efficient light  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest Laboratory has developed the Lighting Technology Screen Matrix (LTSM), a software tool to evaluate alternative lighting retrofit technologies according to life-cycle cost. The LTSM can be used to evaluate retrofits for most configurations of fluorescent, incandescent, high-intensity discharge, and exit lighting systems for any level of operation, electricity price, discount rate, and utility rebate. The tool was developed in support of the Federal Relighting Initiative as part of the US Department of Energy's Office of Federal Energy Management Program (DOE/FEMP) to assist federal government facilities in their efforts to comply with federal energy regulations. This article describes the LTSM and demonstrates its application in case studies at federal installations.

Stucky, D.; Shankle, S.; Schultz, R.; Richman, E.; Dirks, J. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States))

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Berkeley Lab Sheds Light on Improving Solar Cell Efficiency  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Typical manufacturing methods produce solar cells with an efficiency of 12-15%; and 14% efficiency is the bare minimum for achieving a profit. In work performed at the Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley, CA, 5 10-486-577 1)--a US Department of Energy national laboratory that conducts unclassified scientific research and is managed by the University of California--scientist Scott McHugo has obtained keen insights into the impaired performance of solar cells manufactured from polycrystalline silicon. The solar cell market is potentially vast, according to Berkeley Lab. Lightweight solar panels are highly beneficial for providing electrical power to remote locations in developing nations, since there is no need to build transmission lines or truck-in generator fuel. Moreover, industrial nations confronted with diminishing resources have active programs aimed at producing improved, less expensive solar cells. 'In a solar cell, there is a junction between p-type silicon and an n-type layer, such as diffused-in phosphorous', explained McHugo, who is now with Berkeley Lab's Accelerator and Fusion Research Division. 'When sunlight is absorbed, it frees electrons, which start migrating in a random-walk fashion toward that junction. If the electrons make it to the junction; they contribute to the cell's output of electric current. Often, however, before they reach the junction, they recombine at specific sites in the crystal' (and, therefore, cannot contribute to current output). McHugo scrutinized a map of a silicon wafer in which sites of high recombination appeared as dark regions. Previously, researchers had shown that such phenomena occurred not primarily at grain boundaries in the polycrystalline material, as might be expected, but more often at dislocations in the crystal. However, the dislocations themselves were not the problem. Using a unique heat treatment technique, McHugo performed electrical measurements to investigate the material at the dislocations. He was purportedly the first to show that they were 'decorated' with iron.

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

2007-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

398

Photometric assessment of energy efficient torchieres  

SciTech Connect

Extensive development of designs and prototyping of energy efficient torchiere systems using compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs) has led directly to the production of CFL torchieres by a major US manufacturer. This paper compares the electrical and photometric characteristics of one of the new CFL torchieres to standard tungsten halogen torchieres (halogen uplighters). Power assessments and gonio-photometric data indicate that the new CFL torchiere provides significant energy savings over the standard tungsten halogen torchiere while producing more luminous flux. The energy savings is jointly due to the high source efficacy of the CFLs and the poor performance . of the imported halogen lamps. The paper also presents results from a test site in the student dormitories at Stanford University where a torchiere "lamp swap" program was initiated in which students voluntarily traded their halogen torchieres for CFL torchieres. Out of the 500 torchieres involved in the lamp swap, a random sample of nearly 100 halogen lamps (seasoned in the field and considered to represent a typical population) were collected and photometrically and electrically characterized in the laboratory. These laboratory results indicate that the CFL torchieres use 65 watts to produce 25 percent more light than the 300 W tungsten halogen torchieres they are designed to replace. Additionally, the CFL torchieres have the benefit of a cooler lamp operating temperature, making them safer luminaires.

Page, Erik; Siminovitch, Michael

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Information Resources: L Prize(tm): The Race for Super Efficient Light Bulbs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

L Prize(tm): The Race for Super Efficient Light Bulbs L Prize(tm): The Race for Super Efficient Light Bulbs This September 23, 2008 webcast provided an overview of the Bright Tomorrow Lighting Prize (L Prize) technology competition. The L Prize calls for super-efficient SSL products to replace two of the most common light bulbs used today: the 60-watt incandescent and the PAR-38 halogen reflector. Kelly Gordon, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, kicked off the webcast with an overview of the competition requirements, evaluation process, and opportunities for promotion of the winning products. Mary Matteson Bryan, Pacific Gas & Electric, and Liesel Whitney-Schulte, Wisconsin Focus on Energy, followed with a look at the role of L Prize partners and plans for their organizations to support the winning products through demonstrations, education, promotions, and other collaborative efforts.

400

McMinnville Water and Light - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

McMinnville Water and Light - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate McMinnville Water and Light - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program McMinnville Water and Light - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Appliances & Electronics Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Water Heating Program Info State Oregon Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Energy Star Homes: up to $1,180 Energy Star Manufactured Homes: $850 Clothes Washer: $20 - $70 Refrigerator: $15 Freezer: $15 Refrigerator/Freezer Decommissioning: $100 Electric Water Heater: $25 - $50, varies by warranty Heat Pump PTCS Tune-up: contact utility Weatherization Measures: contact utility Provider McMinnville Water and Light

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lamps lighting efficiency" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

News From the D.C. Office: Monitored Savings from Energy-Efficient Lighting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 Aerial view of Washington D.C. 3 Aerial view of Washington D.C. News From the D.C. Office Monitored Savings from Energy-Efficient Lighting in D.C. Office More on the DC Office efficiency up-grade: Office Equipment: Part 1, Part 2 Figure 1: Lighting energy use profile for a typical exterior office. Berkeley Lab's office in Washington, D.C. is located a few blocks from DOE headquarters, in a five-year-old office building constructed mainly for lease to Federal agencies and their contractors. Despite its recent vintage, the building's standard lighting specifications were far from today's best, cost-effective practice. In designing the build-out plans for offices and meeting rooms in our 7,500-square-foot suite, we wanted to showcase some of the energy-efficient lighting and office equipment developed for DOE's Building Technologies

402

Arnold Schwarzenegger LIGHTING RESEARCH PROGRAM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Project Summaries ELEMENT 2: ADVANCE LIGHTING TECHNOLOGIES PROJECT 2.1 LIGHT EMITTING DIODE (LED light emitting diodes (LED) technology for general lighting applications by developing a task lamp

403

Efficiency enhancement in a light-emitting diode with a two-dimensional surface grating photonic crystal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Efficiency enhancement in a light-emitting diode with a two-dimensional surface grating photonic 21 November 2003 We demonstrate a light-emitting diode exhibiting 1.7­2.7-fold enhancement in light light emitting diode LED , the ef- ficiency is limited to several percents by a low light extrac- tion

Baba, Toshihiko

404

Phosphors for LED lamps  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A phosphor, a phosphor blend including the phosphor, a phosphor prepared by a process, and a lighting apparatus including the phosphor blend are disclosed. The phosphor has the formula (Ca.sub.1-p-qCe.sub.pK.sub.q).sub.xSc.sub.y(Si.sub.1-rGa.sub.r).sub.zO.su- b.12+.delta. or derived from a process followed using disclosed amounts of reactants. In the formula, (0

Murphy, James Edward; Manepalli, Satya Kishore; Kumar, Prasanth Nammalwar

2013-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

405

New Research Tool for Energy-Efficient Residential Fixtures  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 4 New Research Tool for Energy-Efficient Residential Fixtures Lighting Group researcher Erik Page stands next to the new goniophotometer, shown in a multiple-exposure photo that represents a complete sensor sweep around a table lamp. The lamp is seen reflected in a mirror mounted on a swing arm, aimed at a photocell used for data acquisition. The residential lighting sector represents a significant opportunity for energy conservation because it currently uses inefficient incandescent sources almost exclusively. Compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs) have the potential to transform this market by using one-fourth as much power as an incandescent to provide the same amount of light. While technical advances such as triphosphors and electronic ballasts have addressed issues of color

406

Progress Energy Carolinas - Commercial Energy Efficiency Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Efficiency Program Energy Efficiency Program Progress Energy Carolinas - Commercial Energy Efficiency Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Industrial Multi-Family Residential Nonprofit Schools Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Design & Remodeling Other Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Maximum Rebate Custom Projects: 75% of the incremental measure costs Technical Efficiency Studies: 50% of cost up to $10,000-$20,000 Design Incentive (New Construction): $50,000 Program Info Expiration Date 1/1/2013 State South Carolina Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Custom: $0.08 per kW hour saved annually CFL Lamps (Retrofit Only): $1.50

407

Efficient estimation of energy transfer efficiency in light-harvesting complexes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The fundamental physical mechanisms of energy transfer in photosynthetic complexes is not yet fully understood. In particular, the degree of efficiency or sensitivity of these systems for energy transfer is not known given ...

Mohseni, Masoud

408

Lighting Research Group: Facilities: Integrating Sphere  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Integrating Sphere Integrating Sphere integrating sphere Integrating Sphere Gonio-photometer | Integrating sphere | Power analyzer | Spectro-radiometer The integrating sphere is used to quickly measure the total light output of a lamp. The lamp being tested is placed in the center of the integrating sphere. At one side of the sphere is a light meter which measures the light output of the lamp. Between the lamp and the light meter there is a baffle to prevent the meter from seeing any direct light from the lamp. The inside of the sphere (including the baffle) is coated with a very white paint that reflects all wavelengths equally. This allows us to get very accurate measurements. The light from the lamp bounces around the sphere until it reaches the light meter. It is important that nothing else is in the sphere besides the lamp and the

409

Integrated starting and running amalgam assembly for an electrodeless fluorescent lamp  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An integrated starting and running amalgam assembly for an electrodeless SEF fluorescent lamp includes a wire mesh amalgam support constructed to jointly optimize positions of a starting amalgam and a running amalgam in the lamp, thereby optimizing mercury vapor pressure in the lamp during both starting and steady-state operation in order to rapidly achieve and maintain high light output. The wire mesh amalgam support is constructed to support the starting amalgam toward one end thereof and the running amalgam toward the other end thereof, and the wire mesh is rolled for friction-fitting within the exhaust tube of the lamp. The positions of the starting and running amalgams on the wire mesh are jointly optimized such that high light output is achieved quickly and maintained, while avoiding any significant reduction in light output between starting and running operation.

Borowiec, Joseph Christopher (Schenectady, NY); Cocoma, John Paul (Clifton Park, NY); Roberts, Victor David (Burnt Hills, NY)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

An Efficient LED System-in-Module for General Lighting Applications  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the project was to realize an LED-based lighting technology platform for general illumination, starting with LED chips, and integrating the necessary technologies to make compact, user-friendly, high-efficiency, energy-saving sources of controlled white (or variable-colored) light. The project is to build the system around the LEDs, and not to work on the LEDs themselves, in order that working products can be introduced soon after the LEDs reach suitable efficiency for mass-production of high-power light sources for general illumination. Because the light sources are intended for general illumination, color must be accurately maintained, requiring feedback control in the electronics. The project objective has been realized and screw base demonstrators, based on the technology developed in the project, have been built.

2008-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

411

Light Trapping for High Efficiency Heterojunction Crystalline Si Solar Cells: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Light trapping plays an important role to achieve high short circuit current density (Jsc) and high efficiency for amorphous/crystalline Si heterojunction solar cells. Si heterojunction uses hydrogenated amorphous Si for emitter and back contact. This structure of solar cell posses highest open circuit voltage of 0.747 V at one sun for c-Si based solar cells. It also suggests that over 25% record-high efficiency is possible with further improvement of Jsc. Light trapping has two important tasks. The first one is to reduce the surface reflectance of light to zero for the solar spectrum that Si has a response. The second one is to increase the effective absorption length to capture all the photon. For Si heterojunction solar cell, surface texturing, anti-reflectance indium tin oxides (ITO) layer at the front and back are the key area to improve the light trapping.

Wang, Q.; Xu, Y.; Iwaniczko, E.; Page, M.

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

How Energy Efficiency is "Lighting Up" the Streets of Philadelphia |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

How Energy Efficiency is "Lighting Up" the Streets of Philadelphia How Energy Efficiency is "Lighting Up" the Streets of Philadelphia How Energy Efficiency is "Lighting Up" the Streets of Philadelphia April 6, 2011 - 11:01am Addthis Andy Oare Andy Oare Former New Media Strategist, Office of Public Affairs What does this project do? Philadelphia Streets Department converting 58,000 yellow and green traffic signals to LED's. President Obama has made building a secure, prosperous energy future a top priority. Last week, he outlined a plan to strengthen energy security in a speech at Georgetown University. Then on Friday, he traveled to a UPS shipping facility in Landover, Maryland to announce a major milestone for the "National Clean Fleet Partnership": Five of the largest domestic shipping companies have made commitments to reduce gasoline use in their

413

How Energy Efficiency is "Lighting Up" the Streets of Philadelphia |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Efficiency is "Lighting Up" the Streets of Philadelphia Energy Efficiency is "Lighting Up" the Streets of Philadelphia How Energy Efficiency is "Lighting Up" the Streets of Philadelphia April 6, 2011 - 11:01am Addthis Andy Oare Andy Oare Former New Media Strategist, Office of Public Affairs What does this project do? Philadelphia Streets Department converting 58,000 yellow and green traffic signals to LED's. President Obama has made building a secure, prosperous energy future a top priority. Last week, he outlined a plan to strengthen energy security in a speech at Georgetown University. Then on Friday, he traveled to a UPS shipping facility in Landover, Maryland to announce a major milestone for the "National Clean Fleet Partnership": Five of the largest domestic shipping companies have made commitments to reduce gasoline use in their

414

OGE - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

OGE - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs OGE - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs OGE - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Savings Category Other Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Manufacturing Program Info State Arkansas Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount T5/T8 Lamps (T12 Replacements): $4 - $8/fixture Fluorescent Fixtures (HID Replacements): $52/watt (400 watt fixture replaced); $102 (750 watt fixture replaced) Hardwired CFLs (Incandescent Lamp Replacement): $8 - $11/fixture LED Exit Signs: $5 Lighting Sensors/Controls: $160/kW of reduced peak demand New Construction Lighting: $160/kW of reduced peak demand Geothermal Heat Pump: $375/ton Standard Offer (HVAC, Motors, Compressed Air, Performance Contracting):

415

Building Technologies Office: Solid-State Lighting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of two pages from the CALiPER Snapshot Report on A lamps. CALiPER Product Snapshot on LED Light Bulbs Report on the current state of the market for LED A lamp and omnidirectional...

416

Effect of carbazoleoxadiazole excited-state complexes on the efficiency of dye-doped light-emitting diodes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a profound effect on the external quantum efficiency of dye-doped organic light-emitting diodes employing Institute of Physics. DOI: 10.1063/1.1469692 I. INTRODUCTION Thin-film organic light-emitting diodes LEDsEffect of carbazole­oxadiazole excited-state complexes on the efficiency of dye-doped light-emitting

417

Testing of energy conservation of electronic ballasts for fluorescent lighting. Review of recent results and recommendations for design goals  

SciTech Connect

The performance of two 40-watt T-12 fluorescent lamps driven by both standard core-coil, and electronic ballasts has been measured over a range of temperatures and input voltages that simulate conditions they would experience in typical building installations. When using new energy-efficient lamps and electronic ballasts, an efficiency of 90 lumens/watt has been achieved, which represents an efficiency improvement of over 37% relative to standard lamps and core-coil ballasts. From these results, several design targets are suggested for ballast developers. Additional features of the electronic ballasts, (low noise, no flicker, and light level control), have potential to increase the use of efficient light sources (gas discharge types) as well as permit less costly luminaire construction. The dimming feature should also conserve energy whenever applied.

Verderber, R.R.; Cooper, D.; Ross, D.K.

1978-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Cornell University Electric Lighting Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electric Lighting Quality Electric Lighting Quality The CUSD lighting design team utilized energy efficient products that meshed well with our daylighting scheme. We chose to use fluorescent tubes or compact fluorescent bulbs with an energy consumption of between 15 and 30 Watts throughout the house. The ballasts for all lamps dim to a 1% light output, so the interior and exterior lights can be adjusted as the level of available daylight fluctuates. Light sensors have been placed in front of our two largest apertures, allowing us to control how much artificial light is supplied to each space. The control of our ballasts is intricate, but refined and tested to avoid dysfunctional dimming or switching. While automatic controls are included, manual user overrides are provided in case the occupant prefers

419

Clustered Geometries Exploiting Quantum Coherence Effects for Efficient Energy Transfer in Light Harvesting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Elucidating quantum coherence effects and geometrical factors for efficient energy transfer in photosynthesis has the potential to uncover non-classical design principles for advanced organic materials. We study energy transfer in a linear light-harvesting model to reveal that dimerized geometries with strong electronic coherences within donor and acceptor pairs exhibit significantly improved efficiency, which is in marked contrast to predictions of the classical F\\"orster theory. We reveal that energy tuning due to coherent delocalization of photoexcitations is mainly responsible for the efficiency optimization. This coherence-assisted energy-tuning mechanism also explains the energetics and chlorophyll arrangements in the widely-studied Fenna-Matthews-Olson complex. We argue that a clustered network with rapid energy relaxation among donors and resonant energy transfer from donor to acceptor states provides a basic formula for constructing efficient light-harvesting systems, and the general principles revea...

Ai, Qing; Jin, Bih-Yaw; Cheng, Yuan-Chung

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Energy Saving and Good Quality Lighting for Indoor Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Artificial Lighting in indoor applications is throughout Europe in a lot of cases 20 years or older. That means there are luminaries, lamps and gear in use that are inefficient and so contributing to environmental pollution due to high energy use. These installations one can find in public buildings, offices and industry halls. In offices 75% of the existing installations are old-fashioned and consumes too much energy. A tremendous high potential for energy savings is available. In the past years more and more efficient lighting solutions for these areas where developed. An increase in efficiency but at the same time also in quality of lighting took place. This increase of efficiency can be realized in different ways. In e.g. offices, new fluorescent lamps TL5 with extremely high lamp efficacies, silver-coated aluminum lamellae optics for high luminares efficiency, as well as highly efficient electronic gear take care that the energy consumption is decreasing up to 40%, while the light quality is improving. Latest developments in lighting controls, daylight regulation and presence detection, again reduces the energy bill by another up to 50%.

Lange, H.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lamps lighting efficiency" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

New Energy-Saving Fiber Optic Lighting System Lights Up Public Spaces  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Case study covering Energy Focus, Inc. and its lighting technology that delivers light comparable to conventional lamps while using significantly less energy per lumen.

422

Energy efficient alternatives to halogen torchieres  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A series of novel energy efficient torchiere systems have been developed using compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs). These systems were studied photometrically and compared with the performance of traditional commercially available tungsten halogen sources. Gonio-photometric data and power assessments indicate that significant lighting energy savings can be obtained by utilizing CFL sources instead of standard tungsten halogen sources. This energy savings is jointly due to the higher source efficacy of the CFLs and the surprisingly poor performance of the imported 300 Watt halogen lamps. Experimental data shows that a 50 to 60 Watt CFL will effectively lumen match a variety of 300 Watt tungsten halogen sources with 5 to 10 times the efficacy. CFL torchieres have additional benefits of higher power quality and cooler lamp operating temperature, making them safer fixtures.

Siminovitch, M.; Marr, L.; Mitchell, J.; Page, E.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

A Dual-Supply Buck Converter with Improved Light-Load Efficiency  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Power consumption and device size have been placed at the primary concerns for battery-operated portable applications. Switching converters gain popularity in powering portable devices due to their high efficiency, compact sizes and high current delivery capability. However portable devices usually operate at light loads most of the time and are only required to deliver high current in very short periods, while conventional buck converter suffers from low efficiency at light load due to the switching losses that do not scale with load current. In this research, a novel technique for buck converter is proposed to reduce the switching loss by reducing the effective voltage supply at light load. This buck converter, implemented in TSMC 0.18 micrometers CMOS technology, operates with a input voltage of 3.3V and generates an output voltage of 0.9V, delivers a load current from 1mA to 400mA, and achieves 54 percent ~ 91 percent power efficiency. It is designed to work with a constant switching frequency of 3MHz. Without sacrificing output frequency spectrum or output ripple, an efficiency improvement of up to 20 percent is obtained at light load.

Zhang, Chao

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Enhanced Efficiency of Light-Trapping Nanoantenna Arrays for Thin Film Solar Cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We suggest a novel concept of efficient light-trapping structures for thin-film solar cells based on arrays of planar nanoantennas operating far from plasmonic resonances. The operation principle of our structures relies on the excitation of chessboard-like collective modes of the nanoantenna arrays with the field localized between the neighboring metal elements. We demonstrated theoretically substantial enhancement of solar-cell short-circuit current by the designed light-trapping structure in the whole spectrum range of the solar-cell operation compared to conventional structures employing anti-reflecting coating. Our approach provides a general background for a design of different types of efficient broadband light-trapping structures for thin-film solar-cell technologically compatible with large-area thin-film fabrication techniques.

Simovski, Constantin R; Voroshilov, Pavel M; Guzhva, Michael E; Belov, Pavel A; Kivshar, Yuri S

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Advanced method for increasing the efficiency of white light quantum dot LEDs  

SciTech Connect

Covering a light-emitting diode (LED) with quantum dots (QDs) can produce a broad spectrum of white light. However, current techniques for applying QDs to LEDs suffer from a high density of defects and a non-uniform distribution of QDs, which, respectively, diminish the efficiency and quality of emitted light. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has the unique capability to thermally anneal QD structures at extremely high power densities for very short durations. This process, called pulse thermal processing (PTP), reduces the number of point defects while maintaining the size and shape of the original QD nanostructure. Therefore, the efficiency of the QD wavelength conversion layer is improved without altering the emission spectrum defined by the size distribution of theQD nanoparticles. The current research uses a thermal model to predict annealing temperatures during PTP and demonstrates up to a 300% increase in photoluminescence for QDs on passive substrates.

Duty, Chad E [ORNL; Bennett, Charlee J C [ORNL; Sabau, Adrian S [ORNL; Jellison Jr, Gerald Earle [ORNL; Boudreaux, Philip R [ORNL; Walker, Steven C [ORNL; Ott, Ronald D [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Clustered Geometries Exploiting Quantum Coherence Effects for Efficient Energy Transfer in Light Harvesting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Elucidating quantum coherence effects and geometrical factors for efficient energy transfer in photosynthesis has the potential to uncover non-classical design principles for advanced organic materials. We study energy transfer in a linear light-harvesting model to reveal that dimerized geometries with strong electronic coherences within donor and acceptor pairs exhibit significantly improved efficiency, which is in marked contrast to predictions of the classical F\\"orster theory. We reveal that energy tuning due to coherent delocalization of photoexcitations is mainly responsible for the efficiency optimization. This coherence-assisted energy-tuning mechanism also explains the energetics and chlorophyll arrangements in the widely-studied Fenna-Matthews-Olson complex. We argue that a clustered network with rapid energy relaxation among donors and resonant energy transfer from donor to acceptor states provides a basic formula for constructing efficient light-harvesting systems, and the general principles revealed here can be generalized to larger systems and benefit future innovation of efficient molecular light-harvesting materials.

Qing Ai; Tzu-Chi Yen; Bih-Yaw Jin; Yuan-Chung Cheng

2013-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

427

EXC-12-0006 - In the Matter of Premium Quality Lighting, Inc. | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6 - In the Matter of Premium Quality Lighting, Inc. 6 - In the Matter of Premium Quality Lighting, Inc. EXC-12-0006 - In the Matter of Premium Quality Lighting, Inc. On July 27, 2012, OHA issued a decision granting an Application for Exception filed by Premium Quality Lighting, Inc. (PQL) for relief from the provisions of 10 C.F.R. Part 430, Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards and Test Procedures for General Service Fluorescent Lamps and Incandescent Reflector Lamps (Lighting Efficiency Standards). In its exception request, PQL asserted that it will suffer a serious hardship, gross inequity and an unfair distribution of burdens if required to adhere to the new Lighting Efficiency Standards, effective July 14, 2012 (2009 Final Rule), with respect to its 700 series T8 General Service

428

Transportation Energy Futures Series: Potential for Energy Efficiency Improvement Beyond the Light-Duty-Vehicle Sector  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Considerable research has focused on energy efficiency and fuel substitution options for light-duty vehicles, while much less attention has been given to medium- and heavy-duty trucks, buses, aircraft, marine vessels, trains, pipeline, and off-road equipment. This report brings together the salient findings from an extensive review of literature on future energy efficiency options for these non-light-duty modes. Projected activity increases to 2050 are combined with forecasts of overall fuel efficiency improvement potential to estimate the future total petroleum and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions relative to current levels. This is one of a series of reports produced as a result of the Transportation Energy Futures (TEF) project, a Department of Energy-sponsored multi-agency project initiated to pinpoint underexplored strategies for abating GHGs and reducing petroleum dependence related to transportation.

Vyas, A. D.; Patel, D. M.; Bertram, K. M.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Transportation Energy Futures Series: Potential for Energy Efficiency Improvement Beyond the Light-Duty-Vehilce Sector  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

COMMERCIAL TRUCKS COMMERCIAL TRUCKS AVIATION MARINE MODES RAILROADS PIPELINES OFF-ROAD EQUIPMENT Potential for Energy Efficiency Improvement Beyond the Light-Duty-Vehicle Sector TRANSPORTATION ENERGY FUTURES SERIES: Potential for Energy Efficiency Improvement Beyond the Light-Duty-Vehicle Sector A Study Sponsored by U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy February 2013 Prepared by ARGONNE NATIONAL LABORATORY Argonne, IL 60439 managed by U Chicago Argonne, LLC for the U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY under contract DE-AC02-06CH11357 This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, expressed or implied, or assumes any legal liability or

430

Demonstration of LED Retrofit Lamps at the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art  

SciTech Connect

The Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art in Eugene, Oregon, houses a remarkable permanent collection of Asian art and antiquities, modern art, and sculpture, and also hosts traveling exhibitions. In the winter and spring of 2011, a series of digital photographs by artist Chris Jordan, titled "Running the Numbers," was exhibited in the Coeta and Donald Barker Special Exhibitions Gallery. These works graphically illustrate waste (energy, money, health, consumer objects, etc.) in contemporary culture. The Bonneville Power Administration and the Eugene Water and Electricity Board provided a set of Cree 12W light-emitting diode (LED) PAR38 replacement lamps (Cree LRP38) for the museum to test for accent lighting in lieu of their standard Sylvania 90W PAR38 130V Narrow Flood lamps (which draw 78.9W at 120V). At the same time, the museum tested LED replacement lamps from three other manufacturers, and chose the Cree lamp as the most versatile and most appropriate color product for this exhibit. The lamps were installed for the opening of the show in January 2011. This report describes the process for the demonstration, the energy and economic results, and results of a survey of the museum staff and gallery visitors on four similar clusters of art lighted separately by four PAR38 lamps.

Miller, Naomi J.

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

APS - Multifamily Energy Efficiency Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

APS - Multifamily Energy Efficiency Program APS - Multifamily Energy Efficiency Program APS - Multifamily Energy Efficiency Program < Back Eligibility Construction Multi-Family Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Other Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Program Info State Arizona Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount CFL Lighting in Dwellings: Free Energy Design Incentive: 50% of study cost, up to $5,000 Energy Assessments: Free T8 and T5 Fluorescents: $5-$12/unit Delamping: $5 - $10 LED Exit Signs/Traffic Signals: $25/unit LED Lamps: $10 - $15 LED Signage: $3/ln ft Refrigerated Case LED Lamps: $25 - $30 Occupancy Sensors: $0.12/connected watt Daylighting Controls: $0.30/connected watt

432

Product Efficiency Cases | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Product Efficiency Cases Product Efficiency Cases Product Efficiency Cases RSS November 6, 2013 EXC-13-0004 - In the Matter of Liebherr Canada Ltd. On November 6, 2013, OHA issued a decision granting an Application for Exception filed by Liebherr Canada Ltd. (Liebherr). In its Application, Liebherr sought relief from the provisions of 10 C.F.R. March 19, 2013 EXC-13-0003 - In the Matter of W.W. Grainger, Inc. On March 18, 2013, OHA issued a decision denying an Application for Exception filed by W. W. Grainger, Inc. (Grainger) for relief from the provisions of 10 C.F.R. Part 430, Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards and Test Procedures for General Service Fluorescent Lamps and Incandescent Reflector Lamps (Lighting Efficiency Standards). February 22, 2013 EXC-13-0002 - In the Matter of Technical Consumer Products, Inc.

433

NorthWestern Energy (Electric) - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NorthWestern Energy (Electric) - Commercial Energy Efficiency NorthWestern Energy (Electric) - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (Montana) NorthWestern Energy (Electric) - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (Montana) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Industrial Savings Category Other Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Construction Design & Remodeling Ventilation Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Manufacturing Water Heating Maximum Rebate Lighting: Rebates will not be provided for lamps or fixtures placed in stock in excess of 5% of installed equipment Program Info Funding Source Electric default supply rates for its default supply customers. State Montana Program Type

434

Pacific Power - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pacific Power - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs Pacific Power - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs Pacific Power - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs < Back Eligibility Construction Installer/Contractor Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Appliances & Electronics Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Design & Remodeling Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Program Info State California Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Clothes Washers: $50-$75 Refrigerators: $20 Refrigerator Recycling: $35 Dishwashers: $20 Water Heater: $40 CFL Lamps: Retailer discounts Lighting Fixtures: $20 Ceiling Fans: $20 Room Air Conditioner: $30 Evaporative Coolers: $50-$150 Central A/C Equipment: $100 (homeowner); $25 (contractor)

435

FirstEnergy (West Penn Power) - Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FirstEnergy (West Penn Power) - Commercial and Industrial Energy FirstEnergy (West Penn Power) - Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (Pennsylvania) FirstEnergy (West Penn Power) - Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (Pennsylvania) < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Local Government Schools State Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Other Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Maximum Rebate Contact Allegheny Power Program Info State Pennsylvania Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Custom Lighting Incentive: 0.05/kWh saved annually Screw-In CFL Lamp: $1 Hard-Wired CFL Lamp: $15 Lighting Controls: $35/sensor Street Lights (w/ Photocell Sensor): $140 - $800 Outdoor Area Lights (w/ Photocell Sensor): $65 - $100

436

Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Solid Lighting Core Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The overall objective of this project is to demonstrate an ultra-effective light extraction mechanism that can be universally applied to all top-emitting white OLEDs (TE-WOLEDs) and can be integrated with thin film encapsulation techniques. The scope of work proposed in this project includes four major areas: (1) optical modeling; (2) microlens and array fabrication; (3) fabrication, encapsulation, and characterization of TE-WOLEDs; and (4) full device integration and characterization. First, the light extraction efficiency in a top-emitting OLED with or without a microlens array are modeled using wave optics. Second, individual microlenses and microlens arrays are fabricated by inkjet printing of microdroplets of a liquid thiol-ene monomer with high refractive index followed by photopolymerization. Third, high efficiency top-emitting white OLEDs are fabricated, and fully characterized. Finally, optimized microlens arrays are fabricated on TE-WOLEDs with dielectric barrier layers. The overall light extraction efficiency of these devices, as well as its wavelength and angular dependencies, are measured by comparing the efficiencies of devices with and without microlens arrays. In conclusion, we have demonstrated the feasibility of applying inkjet printed microlens arrays to enhance the light extraction efficiency of top-emitting white OLEDs. We have shown that the geometry (contact angle) of the printed microlenses can be controlled by controlling the surface chemistry prior to printing the lenses. A 90% enhancement in the light extraction efficiency has been achieved with printed microlens array on a top-emitting white OLED, which can be further improved to 140% using a more close-packed microlens array fabricated from a molding process. Future work will focus on improvement of the microlens fabrication process to improve the array fill factor and the contact angle, as well as use transparent materials with a higher index of refraction. We will also further optimize the procedures for integrating the microlenses on the top-emitting white OLEDs and characterize the overall light extraction enhancement factor when the microlens array is attached.

Jiangeng Xue; Elliot Douglas

2011-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

437

Sustainable LED Fluorescent Light Replacement Technology  

SciTech Connect

Ilumisys and the National Center for Manufacturing Sciences (NCMS) partnered on a three-year project awarded by the United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE), to quantify the impacts of LED lamps, incandescent lamps and fluorescent benchmark lamps over a product lifecycle – i.e. to develop a sustainable design and manufacturing strategy that addresses product manufacturing, use, recycling and disposal scenarios for LED-based lighting. Based on the knowledge gained from extensive product tear-down studies of fluorescent and screw-in lighting products, lifecycle assessment tools, and accelerated lifecycle testing protocols, an interactive Sustainable LED Design Guide has been developed to aid architectural and lighting designers and engineers in making design decisions that consider three important environmental impacts (greenhouse gas emissions, energy use and mercury emission) across all phases of the life of an LED lighting product. Critical information developed for the lifecycle analysis and product feature comparisons is the useful life of the lighting product as well as its performance. The Design Guide is available at www.ncms.org, and was developed based on operational and durability testing of a variety of lighting products including power consumption, light output, and useful life of a lamp in order to allow a more realistic comparison of lamp designs. This report describes the main project tasks, results and innovative features of the lifecycle assessment (LCA)-based design tools, and the key considerations driving the sustainable design of LED lighting systems. The Design Guide incorporates the following three novel features for efficiently evaluating LED lighting features in value-chains: • Bill-of-Materials (BOM) Builder – Designers may import process data for each component and supply functional data for the product, including power, consumption, lumen output and expected useful life. • Environmental Impact Review – Designs are comparable across lifecycle phases, subsystems, and environmental impact category, and can be normalized to a userdefined functional unit. • Drill-down Review – These provide an indepth look at individual lamp designs with the ability to review across subsystem or lifecycle phase.

None

2011-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

438

Effect of strong electron correlation on the efficiency of photosynthetic light harvesting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Research into the efficiency of photosynthetic light harvesting has focused on two factors: (1) entanglement of chromophores, and (2) environmental noise. While chromophores are conjugated {pi}-bonding molecules with strongly correlated electrons, previous models have treated this correlation implicitly without a mathematical variable to gauge correlation-enhanced efficiency. Here we generalize the single-electron/exciton models to a multi-electron/exciton model that explicitly shows the effects of enhanced electron correlation within chromophores on the efficiency of energy transfer. The model provides more detailed insight into the interplay of electron correlation within chromophores and electron entanglement between chromophores. Exploiting this interplay is assisting in the design of new energy-efficient materials, which are just beginning to emerge.

Mazziotti, David A. [Department of Chemistry and James Franck Institute, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States)

2012-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

439

Efficiency of energy transfer in a light-harvesting system under quantum coherence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the role of quantum coherence in the efficiency of excitation transfer in a ring-hub arrangement of interacting two-level systems, mimicking a light-harvesting antenna connected to a reaction center as it is found in natural photosynthetic systems. By using a quantum jump approach, we demonstrate that in the presence of quantum coherent energy transfer and energetic disorder, the efficiency of excitation transfer from the antenna to the reaction center depends intimately on the quantum superposition properties of the initial state. In particular, we find that efficiency is sensitive to symmetric and asymmetric superposition of states in the basis of localized excitations, indicating that initial state properties can be used as a efficiency control parameter at low temperatures.

Alexandra Olaya-Castro; Chiu Fan Lee; Francesca Fassioli Olsen; Neil F. Johnson

2007-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

440

Lighting Research Group: Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facilities Facilities Lighting Research Facilities at LBNL gonio-photometer Gonio-photometer We use this device to measure the intensity and direction of the light from a lamp or fixture. integrating sphere Integrating sphere This instrument allows us to get a fast and accurate measurement of the total light output of a lamp. We are not able to determine the direction of the light, only the intensity. power analyzer Power analyzer We use our power analyzer with the lamps in the gonio-photometer to measure input power, harmonic distortion, power factor, and many other signals that tell us how well a lamp is performing. spectro-radiometer Spectro-radiometer This device measures not only the intensity of a light source but also the intensity of the light at each wavelength.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lamps lighting efficiency" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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441

Design of an efficient light-emitting diode with 10 GHz modulation bandwidth  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a high-speed light-emitting-diode (LED) design for efficient modulation at speeds higher than 10 GHz. It relies on a tensile-strain GaAsPquantum well coupled with surface plasmon polaritons on a silversurface. We present optical pumping experiments showing a tenfold reduction in carrier lifetime when the quantum well is located 40 nm above the silversurface. We believe this represents the first step toward an efficient LED compatible with 10 GHz modulation speed for use in short distance optical communication systems.

D. Fattal; M. Fiorentino; M. Tan; D. Houng; S. Y. Wang; Raymond G. Beausoleil

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Junction temperature, spectral shift, and efficiency in GaInN-based blue and green light emitting diodes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Keywords: GaInN/GaN Light emitting diode temperature Micro-Raman Photoluminescence Electroluminescence well light emitting diode (LED) dies is analyzed by micro-Raman, photoluminescence, cathodoluminescenceJunction temperature, spectral shift, and efficiency in GaInN-based blue and green light emitting

Wetzel, Christian M.

443

Vacuum-free lamination of low work function cathode for efficient solution-processed organic light-emitting diodes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-coated organic light-emitting diode is transferred from a soft polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) mold by lamination, or blade coating [1,2] for organic light emitting diode (OLED) as well as solar cell. The top electrodeVacuum-free lamination of low work function cathode for efficient solution-processed organic light-emitting

Meng, Hsin-Fei

444

Lighting for Tomorrow: Building on the results of the first national energy-efficient lighting fixture design competition in the United States  

SciTech Connect

Lighting for Tomorrow was the first residential lighting fixture design competition conducted in the United States to focus on energy-efficient light sources. Sponsored by the American Lighting Association, the Consortium for Energy Efficiency, and the U.S. Department of Energy, the competition was carried out in two phases between 2002 and 2004. Five winning fixture designs were selected from a field of 24 finalists. The paper describes the competition in detail, including its origins, sponsors, structure and rules, timeline, prizes, selection criteria, and judges. The paper describes the results of the competition, including industry response, promotion and publicity efforts, technical and design innovations demonstrated by the winners, and retail placements to date. Finally, the paper offers several lessons learned that are instructive for future efforts to promote high-efficiency lighting through the design competition approach.

Gordon, Kelly L.; Foster, Rebecca; McGowan, Terry

2005-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

445

Omaha Public Power District - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Omaha Public Power District - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Omaha Public Power District - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs Omaha Public Power District - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Maximum Rebate Lighting: $20,000 or up to 20% of cost Program Info State Nebraska Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Fluorescent Lighting: $5 - $32/fixture High Intensity Discharge Lighting: $5 - $75/unit Exit Sign: $5/unit LED Lighting: $6 - $55/unit Incandescent: $4 - $8 Lamp Upgrade: $1 - $1.50/unit Custom Lighting Measures: Contact Utility Heat Pump: $50/nominal ton Innovative Energy Efficiency Project: 50% of study cost and $400/kW of peak

446

DuraLamp USA: Order (2010-CE-0912)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

DOE ordered DuraLamp USA, Inc. to pay a $2,500 civil penalty after finding DuraLamp USA had failed to certify that model PAR 30, an incandescent reflector lamp, complies with the applicable energy conservation standards.

447

Solid-state lamp with integral occupancy sensor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Previous work demonstrated a retrofit proximity detector for fluorescent lamps using the lamp's own stray electric fields. This paper extends the retrofit sensor system to a solid-state (LED) lamp. The design and implementation ...

Cooley, John J.

448

Energy management seminar. [Seattle City Light's attempt to assist customers in energy efficiency  

SciTech Connect

This Energy Management Seminar was conducted by Seattle City Light to assist its customers in making the most efficient use of energy resources available in the area. Practical information to effect immediate savings of 30% or more on utility and fuel bills by improving energy-use efficiency in the Seattle area is given. In addition to those immediate savings, long-term objectives established in an Energy Management Program, often requiring significant technical and engineering changes, are broadly discussed. Seattle City Light has pioneered more-efficient housing standards for a number of years. In 1973 Seattle City Light began its Kilowatt Program, and more recently has engaged in a number of advanced projects, including a sophisticated heat-recovery system for its own office building and Project Weathervane, an experimental solar and wind-powered house. These programs have saved money for the citizens of Seattle in a number of ways, both on the individual bills and through long-term reductions in energy requirements necessitating major new energy sources. (MCW)

1977-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Highly efficient blue organic light emitting devices with indium-free transparent anode on flexible substrates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Indium-free transparent conducting oxides may provide a lower cost solution for the transparent anode in flexible displays and energy efficient solid state lighting. We report herein a near room temperature sputtering process for generating an indium-free transparent conductive oxide (TCO) coating on a flexible substrate. Specifically, we deposited gallium-doped zinc oxide (GZO) uniformly over a 12” diameter area at room temperature on polyethylene terephthalate (PET). During deposition, the system heats to about 60oC due to the energetic sputtering conditions, without any noticeable damage to the PET substrate. The GZO films exhibit excellent physical, optical and electrical properties: roughness ~7 nm, transmittance >85% and resistivity ~ 10-3 ohm• cm. Phosphorescent blue organic light-emitting devices (OLEDs) were fabricated on these substrates with comparable performance (16% external quantum efficiency and 33 lm/W power efficiency at 1mA/cm2) to that of devices fabricated on GZO (or ITO) deposited on glass substrates, suggesting flexible GZO/PET substrates may be used instead of high-cost and rigid ITO and glass for flexible displays and solid state lighting.

Wang, Liang; Swensen, James S.; Polikarpov, Evgueni; Matson, Dean W.; Bonham, Charles C.; Bennett, Wendy D.; Gaspar, Daniel J.; Padmaperuma, Asanga B.

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

450

Assessment of Electrical, Efficiency, and Photometric Performance of Advanced Lighting Sources: Dimmable Advanced Lighting Technolog ies -- Electronic Linear Fluorescent Ballasts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This EPRI Technical Update is one of four in a series that addresses the basic dimming performance of advanced lighting sources8212linear electronic fluorescent ballasts. Chapter 1 provides a discussion of basic lighting control, the importance of considering power quality in lighting control, lighting control methods and parameters, and the advantages and future of lighting control. Chapter 2 addresses in more depth dimming methods used in advanced lighting sources and controls for incandescent, fluores...

2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

451

ComEd - Business Instant Lighting Discounts Program (Illinois...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Industrial, Multi-Family Residential, Private Schools Eligible Technologies Lighting, LED Lighting, Reduced Wattage Metal Halide Lamps, LED Trim Kits, Screw-In CFL's Active...