Sample records for lamont-doherty earth observatory

  1. LamontDoherty Earth Observatory The Earth Institute at Columbia UniversityThe Earth Institute at Columbia Univ

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    12 12 Lamont­Doherty Earth Observatory The Earth Institute at Columbia UniversityThe Earth-DOHERTYEARTHOBSERVATORYTHEEARTHINSTITUTEATCOLUMBIAUNIVERSITYBIENNIALREPORT2000­2002 #12;Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory is renowned in the internationLamont-Doherty Earth suc- cess and innovation in advancing understanding of Earth, for itcess and innovation in advancing

  2. Sophia E. Brumer Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sophia E. Brumer Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University Ocean and Climate Physics Graduate Research Fellow, Columbia University Department of Earth and Environmental Science (DEES. Gordon, A. Sobel Columbia University, Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory 2010--2011 J. Hirshi, A. Megann

  3. PROFESSOR WILLIAM MENKE, F-AGU LAMONT-DOHERTY EARTH OBSERVATORY OF COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Menke, William

    PROFESSOR WILLIAM MENKE, F-AGU LAMONT-DOHERTY EARTH OBSERVATORY OF COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY CONTACT Prof PREPARATION Ph.D. 1982, Department of Geological Sciences, Columbia University, Geological Sciences, Thesis of Geological Sciences, Columbia University. MS, BS 1976, Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences

  4. Ocean pC02 Data from the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University, 1994 - 2009

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Takahashi, T.

    The Earth Institute of Columbia University has, as an overarching goal, to help achieve sustainable development primarily by expanding the world's understanding of Earth as one integrated system. The Earth Institute encompasses centers of excellence with an established reputation for groundbreaking research, including the renowned Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory (LDEO), home to more than 200 researchers who study Earth and its systems. The Carbon Dioxide Research Group, led by Dr. Taro Takahashi, studies pCO2 in seawater, carbon sequestration models related to deep aquifers, and air-sea CO2 flux. Datasets from ocean cruises in the years 1994 to the present are made available from this website, along with a list of publications, and cruise maps.

  5. The Earth Institute, Columbia University8 annual donor report 2010 9 the ice sheets of antarctica are not

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Earth Institute, Columbia University8 annual donor report 2010 9 the ice sheets of antarctica research scientist at the Lamont- Doherty Earth Observatory. In order to model the fate of polar ice sheets cheaply. Secrets Beneath the Ice Experts at the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, including senior

  6. NETL F 451.1/1-1, Categorical Exclusion Designation Form

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory SCNGO FY14-17 1012013 - 09302017 John Terneus Palisades, NY Mechanisms for Methane Transport and Hydrate Accumulation in Coarse-Grained...

  7. Geochemical Evidence for Slab Melting in theTrans-MexicanVolcanic Belt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Langmuir, Charles H.

    and heavy rare earth concentrations and Nb/Ta ratios with increasing SiO2 contents in theVBZ rocks is best OF EARTH AND PLANETARY SCIENCES, HARVARD UNIVERSITY, CAMBRIDGE, MA 02138, USA 3 LAMONT^DOHERTY EARTH OBSERVATORY AND DEPARTMENT OF EARTH AND ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES, COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY, 61 RT. 9W, PALISADES, NY

  8. Towards explaining the Nd paradox using reversible scavenging in an ocean general circulation model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khatiwala, Samar

    of the rare earth element neodymium (Nd) has the potential to serve as water-mass tracer, because a,b , Sidney Hemming a,b , Robert F. Anderson a,b a Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University, 61 Route 9W, Palisades, NY 10964, USA b Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Columbia

  9. This article appeared in a journal published by Elsevier. The attached copy is furnished to the author for internal non-commercial research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siddall, Mark

    of the rare earth element neodymium (Nd) has the potential to serve as water-mass tracer, because. Goldstein a,b , Sidney Hemming a,b , Robert F. Anderson a,b a Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University, 61 Route 9W, Palisades, NY 10964, USA b Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Columbia

  10. Uniform basin growth over the last 500 ka, North Anatolian Fault, Marmara Sea, Turkey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shillington, Donna J.

    Uniform basin growth over the last 500 ka, North Anatolian Fault, Marmara Sea, Turkey Christopher C, Dokuz Eylül University, Izmir, Turkey c Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, Columbia University, Palisades, NY, USA d Department of Geophysics, Istanbul Technical University, Turkey e Department of Earth

  11. JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. 99, NO. C4, PAGES 8015-8031, APRIL 15, 1994 Interactive Kalman filtering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kalman filtering Gerd Btirger and Mark A. Cane Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory,Palisades,New York Abstract. Data assimilationvia the extended Kalman filter can become problematic when the assimilatingmodel Kalman filter a seriesof numericalexperimentsis performed usingthe double-well systemand the well

  12. High wind evaluation in the Southern Ocean Xiaojun Yuan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khatiwala, Samar

    1 High wind evaluation in the Southern Ocean Xiaojun Yuan Lamont-Doherty of Earth Observatory based scatterometer instruments provide crucial surface wind measurements with high resolution over winds at high wind bands because these regions host the strongest wind fields at the ocean surface

  13. Impact of Friction and Scale-Dependent Initial Stress on Radiated Energy-Moment Scaling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaw, Bruce E.

    . Shaw Lamont­Doherty Earth Observatory, Columbia University, New York, USA The radiated energy coming271 Impact of Friction and Scale-Dependent Initial Stress on Radiated Energy-Moment Scaling Bruce E of elucidat- ing their radiated energy-moment scaling. We find, contrary to expectations, that apparent stress

  14. Five centuries of climate change in Australia: the view from underground

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Shaopeng

    * SHAOPENG HUANG1 and JASON E. SMERDON2 1 Department of Geological Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA 2 Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, Columbia University, Palisades, New York, USA of speleothems, corals and ice; the distribution and composition of pollen; thickness and composition

  15. Volcanoes and ENSO over the Past Millennium JULIEN EMILE-GEAY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Emile-Geay, Julien

    , Atlanta, Georgia RICHARD SEAGER, MARK A. CANE, AND EDWARD R. COOK Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory solar activity during the well-documented Medieval Climate Anomaly. Compiling paleoclimate data from is documented. The authors propose, in particular, that the event briefly interrupted a solar

  16. PAGES news Vol 21 No 2 August 2013 ScienceHighlights:ENSO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ummenhofer, Caroline C.

    , C. UmmenhofeR3 , n.n. Kyaw4 anD P. KRUsiC5 1 Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory (LDEO), Palisades, USA but where even instrumental climate records and related studies of monsoon climate dynamics are rare. Much Figure1:MapofMyanmarandadjacentsouthernmonsoonAsia.PinkdotisMaingthaForestReserve

  17. Geophysical study of the East African margin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matthias, Paul Kulman

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    file in the Lamont- Doherty System Directory. 14 22 29 CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION Plate tectonic theory has described the fitting together of various continents to varying degrees of accuracy. These fits have been based primarily on matching... and Somali Basin (fig. 8) is fairly extensive. The cruise tracks are those of Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute, Lamont-Doherty Geological Observatory, Naval Oceanographic Office (NAVOCEANO), Scripps Institute of Oceanography, and the British Admiralty...

  18. sea level, understanding the linkages between ice sheet processes and subglacial geology is key. Bell,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the current climate system will function in the future. 4:30 p.m. COCKTAIL RECEPTION 1:00 ­ 2:30 p.m. LUNCH at Lamont-Doherty. Did the Rise of the Himalayan Mountains Cause Global Cooling? Pratigya J. Polissar, Lamont Assistant Research Professor, Biogeochemistry The earth cooled from a hothouse climate 60 million

  19. Deglacial radiocarbon history of tropical Atlantic thermocline waters: absence of CO2 reservoir purging signal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    deMenocal, Peter B.

    purging signal Caroline Cléroux a,*, Peter deMenocal a , Thomas Guilderson b,c a Lamont-Doherty Earth of the atmospheric CO2 increase during the Glacial to Holocene climate transition requires the outgassing of a deep production changes alone (Hughen et al., 2006). These two steps in atmospheric CO2 and radiocarbon anomalies

  20. Noble gases and radiocarbon in natural gas hydrates Gisela Winckler

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aeschbach-Hertig, Werner

    Noble gases and radiocarbon in natural gas hydrates Gisela Winckler Lamont-Doherty Earth 2001; published 24 May 2002. [1] In samples of pure natural gas hydrates from Hydrate Ridge, Cascadia ones preferentially incorporated into the gas hydrate structure. The hydrate methane is devoid of 14 C

  1. Precovery of near-Earth asteroids by a citizen-science project of the Spanish Virtual Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Solano, E; Pulido, R; Carry, B

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This article describes a citizen-science project conducted by the Spanish Virtual Observatory (SVO) to improve the orbits of near-Earth asteroids (NEAs) using data from astronomical archives. The list of NEAs maintained at the Minor Planet Center (MPC) is checked daily to identify new objects or changes in the orbital parameters of already catalogued objects. Using NEODyS we compute the position and magnitude of these objects at the observing epochs of the 938 046 images comprising the Eigth Data Release of the Sloan Digitised Sky Survey (SDSS). If the object lies within the image boundaries and the magnitude is brighter than the limiting magnitude, then the associated image is visually inspected by the project's collaborators (the citizens) to confirm or discard the presence of the NEA. If confirmed, accurate coordinates and, sometimes, magnitudes are submitted to the MPC. Using this methodology, 3,226 registered users have made during the first fifteen months of the project more than 167,000 measurements wh...

  2. Earth

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Enthusiastic employees: sustaining the Earth January 30, 2014 Green Teams work hard to make sustainable choices at home, at work The Lab has made many energy sustainable...

  3. Integration Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bogart, Richard S.

    Hill, Stephen Wampler National Solar Observatory Piet Martens, Alisdair Davey Montana State University Joseph B. Gurman, George Dimitoglou Solar Data Analysis Center #12; VSO Overview 1 Perspective + From documents. ê Independent of platform and programming language + Three major components â Data encapsulation

  4. Earth

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisitingContract ManagementDiscoveringESnet Update WinterEXPLANATIONScienceEarth

  5. Science Potential of a Deep Ocean Antineutrino Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steve Dye

    2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents science potential of a deep ocean antineutrino observatory under development at Hawaii. The observatory design allows for relocation from one site to another. Positioning the observatory some 60 km distant from a nuclear reactor complex enables precision measurement of neutrino mixing parameters, leading to a determination of neutrino mass hierarchy. At a mid-Pacific location the observatory measures the flux and ratio of uranium and thorium decay neutrinos from earth's mantle and performs a sensitive search for a hypothetical natural fission reactor in earth's core. A subsequent deployment at another mid-ocean location would test lateral heterogeneity of uranium and thorium in earth's mantle.

  6. In-Situ Sampling and Characterization of Naturally Occuring Marine Methane Hydrate Using the D/V JOIDES Resolution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frank Rack; Gilles Guerin; David Goldberg; ODP Leg 204 Shipboard Scientific Party

    2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary accomplishments of the JOI Cooperative Agreement with DOE/NETL in this quarter were that: (1) Leg 204 scientific party members presented preliminary results and operational outcomes of ODP Leg 204 at the American Geophysical Union Fall meeting, which was held in San Francisco, CA; and, (2) a report was prepared by Dr. Gilles Guerin and David Goldberg from Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University on their postcruise evaluation of the data, tools and measurement systems that were used for vertical seismic profiling (VSP) experiments during ODP Leg 204. The VSP report is provided herein. Intermediate in scale and resolution between the borehole data and the 3-D seismic surveys, the Vertical Seismic Profiles (VSP) carried during Leg 204 were aimed at defining the gas hydrate distribution on hydrate ridge, and refining the signature of gas hydrate in the seismic data. VSP surveys were attempted at five sites, following completion of the conventional logging operations. Bad hole conditions and operational difficulties did not allow to record any data in hole 1245E, but vertical and constant offset VSP were successful in holes 1244E, 1247B and 1250F, and walk-away VSP were successfully completed in holes 1244E, 1250F and 1251H. Three different tools were used for these surveys. The vertical VSP provided the opportunity to calculate interval velocity that could be compared and validated with the sonic logs in the same wells. The interval velocity profiles in Holes 1244E and 1247B are in very good agreement with the sonic logs. Information about the Leg 204 presentations at the AGU meeting are included in a separate Topical Report, which has been provided to DOE/NETL in addition to this Quarterly Report. Work continued on analyzing data collected during ODP Leg 204 and preparing reports on the outcomes of Phase 1 projects as well as developing plans for Phase 2.

  7. Sensors for Environmental Observatories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamilton, Michael P.

    Sensors for Environmental Observatories Report of the NSF-Sponsored Workshop December 2004 #12 States of America. 2005. #12;Sensors for Environmental Observatories Report of the NSF Sponsored Workshop Evaluation Center (WTEC), Inc. 4800 Roland Avenue Baltimore, Maryland 21210 #12;In recent years

  8. Alexey Kuznetsov Armagh Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    by the high-energy electrons that are the key factor in development of the flares. Therefore, radio Observatory 8 Radiometers / radiopolarimeters Full-disk observations * + " + , ' - & . $ / $ 0 $ $ 0 $ $ 1 2 3

  9. 2010 RAL Space Solar Impacts on Earth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    © 2010 RAL Space Solar Impacts on Earth: Revealed by NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory & STEREO minimum for a century: · Why? What happened? · What does that mean for the Earth? · Will the next build up cycle begins... The Events of 1-4 August 2010: A Close Shave for the Earth! 1 August 2010 ­ The day

  10. Progress on the 1.6-meter New Solar Telescope at Big Bear Solar Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Progress on the 1.6-meter New Solar Telescope at Big Bear Solar Observatory C. Denkera, P. R, Newark, NJ 07102, U.S.A. bBig Bear Solar Observatory, 40386 North Shore Lane, Big Bear City, CA 92314, U.S.A. cSeoul National University, School of Earth and Environmental Science, Seoul, 151-742 Republic

  11. Sommers-Bausch Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stowell, Michael

    Sommers-Bausch Observatory Handbook Ninth Edition, Fall 2013 DEPARTMENT OF ASTROPHYSICAL of the early years of SBO. Thanks also to the Denver Library for information and photos of Elmer Sommers, Ed here at Sommers-Bausch: Kelsey Johnson, Cori Krauss, John Weiss, James Roberts, Quyen Hart, Colin

  12. Sommers-Bausch Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stowell, Michael

    The Sommers-Bausch Observatory Handbook Eighth Edition, Fall 2012 DEPARTMENT OF ASTROPHYSICAL to the Denver Library for information and photos of Elmer Sommers, Ed Kosmicki of Summit Magazine for the 16 the educational mission here at Sommers-Bausch: Kelsey Johnson, Cori Krauss, John Weiss, James Roberts, Quyen Hart

  13. The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hime, A.

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A report is given on the status of the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory, presently under construction in the Creighton nickel mine near Sudbury, Ontario in Canada. Focus is upon the technical factors involving a measurement of the charged-current and neutral-current interactions of solar neutrinos on deuterium.

  14. NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY Green Bank, West Virginia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groppi, Christopher

    NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY Green Bank, West Virginia ELECTRONICS DIVISION INTERNAL REPORT the earth's axis and perpendic- ular to the Greenwich Meridian, call it the east-west plane. A telescope's rectangular cordinate components (x,y,z) are X = 882880.0208m Distance from the east-west plane, Greenwich

  15. The Green Computing Observatory: from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lefèvre, Laurent

    The Green Computing Observatory: from instrumentation to ontology Cécile Germain-Renaud1, Fredéric a gateway Files in XML format Available from the Grid Observatory portal GreenDays@LyonThe Green Computing) n GreenDays@LyonThe Green Computing Observatory #12;The GRIF-LAL computing room Green

  16. Microbial and Chemical Enhancement of In-Situ Carbon Mineralization in Geological Formation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matter, J.; Chandran, K.

    2013-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Predictions of global energy usage suggest a continued increase in carbon emissions and rising concentrations of CO{sub 2} in the atmosphere unless major changes are made to the way energy is produced and used. Various carbon capture and storage (CCS) technologies are currently being developed, but unfortunately little is known regarding the fundamental characteristics of CO{sub 2}-mineral reactions to allow a viable in-situ carbon mineralization that would provide the most permanent and safe storage of geologically-injected CO{sub 2}. The ultimate goal of this research project was to develop a microbial and chemical enhancement scheme for in-situ carbon mineralization in geologic formations in order to achieve long-term stability of injected CO{sub 2}. Thermodynamic and kinetic studies of CO{sub 2}-mineral-brine systems were systematically performed to develop the in-situ mineral carbonation process that utilizes organic acids produced by a microbial reactor. The major participants in the project are three faculty members and their graduate and undergraduate students at the School of Engineering and Applied Science and at the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory at Columbia University: Alissa Park in Earth and Environmental Engineering & Chemical Engineering (PI), Juerg Matter in Earth and Environmental Science (Co-PI), and Kartik Chandran in Earth and Environmental Engineering (Co-PI). Two graduate students, Huangjing Zhao and Edris Taher, were trained as a part of this project as well as a number of graduate students and undergraduate students who participated part-time. Edris Taher received his MS degree in 2012 and Huangjing Zhao will defend his PhD on Jan. 15th, 2014. The interdisciplinary training provided by this project was valuable to those students who are entering into the workforce in the United States. Furthermore, the findings from this study were and will be published in referred journals to disseminate the results. The list of the papers is given at the end of the report for reference.

  17. Earth Sciences Environmental Earth Sciences,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brierley, Andrew

    94 Earth Sciences­ Environmental Earth Sciences, Geology Degree options MGeol (Single Honours Degrees) Earth Sciences BSc (Single Honours Degrees) Environmental Earth Sciences Geology BSc (Joint placement. * The Geology and Environmental Earth Sciences degrees are accredited by the Geological Society

  18. Looking for matter enhanced neutrino oscillations via day v. night asymmetries in the NCD phase of the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ott, Richard Anthony, III

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To measure the regeneration of electron neutrinos during passage through the Earth via the MSW effect, the difference in electron neutrino flux between day and night is measured at the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO). ...

  19. The Enriched Xenon Observatory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dolinski, M. J. [Stanford University Physics Department, 382 Via Pueblo Mall, Stanford, CA 94305-4060 (United States)

    2009-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The Enriched Xenon Observatory (EXO) experiment will search for neutrinoless double beta decay of {sup 136}Xe. The EXO Collaboration is actively pursuing both liquid-phase and gas-phase Xe detector technologies with scalability to the ton-scale. The search for neutrinoless double beta decay of {sup 136}Xe is especially attractive because of the possibility of tagging the resulting Ba daughter ion, eliminating all sources of background other than the two neutrino decay mode. EXO-200, the first phase of the project, is a liquid Xe time projection chamber with 200 kg of Xe enriched to 80% in {sup 136}Xe. EXO-200, which does not include Ba-tagging, will begin taking data in 2009, with two-year sensitivity to the half-life for neutrinoless double beta decay of 6.4x10{sup 25} years. This corresponds to an effective Majorana neutrino mass of 0.13 to 0.19 eV.

  20. Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During the R/V Knorr Cruises in the North Atlantic Ocean on WOCE Sections AR24 (November 2-December 5, 1996) and A24, A20, and A22 (May 30-September 3, 1997)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, K.M.

    2003-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This documentation describes the procedures and methods used to measure total carbon dioxide (TCO{sub 2}) total alkalinity (TALK), and partial pressure of CO{sub 2} (pCO{sub 2}) at hydrographic stations on the North Atlantic Ocean sections AR24, A24, A20, and A22 during the R/V Knorr Cruises 147-2, 151-2, 151-3, and 151-4 in 1996 and 1997. Conducted as part of the World Ocean Circulation Experiment (WOCE), the expeditions began at Woods Hole, Massachusetts, on October 24, 1996, and ended at Woods Hole on September 3, 1997. Instructions for accessing the data are provided. A total of 5,614 water samples were analyzed for discrete TCO{sub 2} using two single-operator multiparameter metabolic analyzers (SOMMAs) coupled to a coulometer for extracting and detecting CO{sub 2}. The overall accuracy of the TCO{sub 2} determination was {+-} 1.59 {micro}mol/kg. The TALK was determined in a total of 6,088 discrete samples on all sections by potentiometric titration using an automated titration system developed at the University of Miami. The accuracy of the TALK determination was {+-} 3 {micro}mol/kg. A total of 2,465 discrete water samples were collected for determination of pCO{sub 2} in seawater on sections A24, A20, and A22. The pCO{sub 2} was measured by means of an equilibrator-IR system by scientists from Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory. The precision of the measurements was estimated to be about {+-} 0.15%, based on the reproducibility of the replicate equilibrations on a single hydrographic station. The North Atlantic data set is available as a numeric data package (NDP) from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center. The NDP consists of 12 ASCII data files, one Ocean Data View-formatted data file, a NDP-082 ASCII text file, a NDP-082 PDF file, and this printed documentation, which describes the contents and format of all files, as well as the procedures and methods used to obtain the data.

  1. Radio Wavelength Observatories within the Exploration Architecture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Lazio; R. J. Macdowall; J. Burns; L. Demaio; D. L. Jones; K. W. Weiler

    2007-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Observations at radio wavelengths address key problems in astrophysics, astrobiology, and lunar structure including the first light in the Universe (the Epoch of Reionization), the presence of magnetic fields around extrasolar planets, particle acceleration mechanisms, and the structure of the lunar ionosphere. Moreover, achieving the performance needed to address these scientific questions demands observations at wavelengths longer than those that penetrate the Earth's ionosphere, observations in extremely "radio quiet" locations such as the Moon's far side, or both. We describe a series of lunar-based radio wavelength interferometers of increasing capability. The Radio Observatory for Lunar Sortie Science (ROLSS) is an array designed to be deployed during the first lunar sorties (or even before via robotic rovers) and addressing particle acceleration and the lunar ionosphere. Future arrays would be larger, more capable, and deployed as experience is gained in working on the lunar surface.

  2. Earth's Three

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hacker, Randi

    2010-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Broadcast Transcript: From Mongolia, land of fermented mare's milk, comes this beguiling morsel of nomadic oral tradition. It's called yertonciin gorav or Earth's Three. Earth's three what? Well, Earth's three top things in a number of categories...

  3. Earth Sciences Environmental Earth Sciences,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brierley, Andrew

    84 Earth Sciences­ Environmental Earth Sciences, Geology MGeol (Single Honours Degrees) Earth Sciences BSc (Single Honours Degrees) Environmental Earth Sciences Geology BSc (Joint Honours Degrees) and among the most research-intensive in Europe. Features * The Department of Earth and Environmental

  4. Early Science Results from SOFIA, the World's Largest Airborne Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Buizer, James M

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Stratospheric Observatory For Infrared Astronomy, or SOFIA, is the largest flying observatory ever built,consisting of a 2.7-meter diameter telescope embedded in a modified Boeing 747-SP aircraft. SOFIA is a joint project between NASA and the German Aerospace Center Deutsches Zentrum fur Luft und-Raumfahrt (DLR). By flying at altitudes up to 45000 feet, the observatory gets above 99.9 percent of the infrared-absorbing water vapor in the Earth's atmosphere. This opens up an almost uninterrupted wavelength range from 0.3-1600 microns that is in large part obscured from ground based observatories. Since its 'Initial Science Flight' in December 2010, SOFIA has flown several dozen science flights, and has observed a wide array of objects from Solar System bodies, to stellar nurseries, to distant galaxies. This paper reviews a few of the exciting new science results from these first flights which were made by three instruments: the mid-infrared camera FORCAST, the far-infrared heterodyne spectrometer GREAT, and...

  5. The Large Aperture GRB Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allard, D; Asorey, H; Barros, H; Bertou, X; Castillo, M; Chirinos, J M; De Castro, A; Flores, S; González, J; Berisso, M Gomez; Grajales, J; Guada, C; Day, W R Guevara; Ishitsuka, J; López, J A; Martínez, O; Melfo, A; Meza, E; Loza, P Miranda; Barbosa, E Moreno; Murrugarra, C; Núñez, L A; Ormachea, L J Otiniano; Pérez, G; Perez, Y; Ponce, E; Quispe, J; Quintero, C; Rivera, H; Rosales, M; Rovero, A C; Saavedra, O; Salazar, H; Tello, J C; Peralda, R Ticona; Varela, E; Velarde, A; Villaseñor, L; Wahl, D; Zamalloa, M A

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Large Aperture GRB Observatory (LAGO) is aiming at the detection of the high energy (around 100 GeV) component of Gamma Ray Bursts, using the single particle technique in arrays of Water Cherenkov Detectors (WCD) in high mountain sites (Chacaltaya, Bolivia, 5300 m a.s.l., Pico Espejo, Venezuela, 4750 m a.s.l., Sierra Negra, Mexico, 4650 m a.s.l). WCD at high altitude offer a unique possibility of detecting low gamma fluxes in the 10 GeV - 1 TeV range. The status of the Observatory and data collected from 2007 to date will be presented.

  6. Observatory, 125, 319322, 2005 EARTH IN THE COSMIC SHOOTING GALLERY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    University, Chelyabinsk, 454080, Russia 3Cardiff Centre for Astrobiology, Cardiff University, Cardiff CF10 3

  7. US earthquake observatories: recommendations for a new national network

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is the first attempt by the seismological community to rationalize and optimize the distribution of earthquake observatories across the United States. The main aim is to increase significantly our knowledge of earthquakes and the earth's dynamics by providing access to scientifically more valuable data. Other objectives are to provide a more efficient and cost-effective system of recording and distributing earthquake data and to make as uniform as possible the recording of earthquakes in all states. The central recommendation of the Panel is that the guiding concept be established of a rationalized and integrated seismograph system consisting of regional seismograph networks run for crucial regional research and monitoring purposes in tandem with a carefully designed, but sparser, nationwide network of technologically advanced observatories. Such a national system must be thought of not only in terms of instrumentation but equally in terms of data storage, computer processing, and record availability.

  8. Boscovich and the Brera Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Antonello, E

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the mid 18th century both theoretical and practical astronomy were cultivated in Milan by Barnabites and Jesuits. In 1763 R.G. Boscovich was appointed to the chair of mathematics of the University of Pavia in the Duchy of Milan, and the following year he designed an observatory for the Jesuit Collegium of Brera. The Specola was built in 1765 and it became quickly one of the main European observatories. We discuss the relation between Boscovich and Brera in the framework of a short biography. An account is given of the initial research activity in the Specola, of the departure of Boscovich from Milan in 1773 and his coming back just before his death.

  9. National Astronomical Observatory of Japan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iye, Masanori

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    National Astronomical Observatory is an inter-university institute serving as the national center for ground based astronomy offering observational facilities covering the optical, infrared, radio wavelength domain. NAOJ also has solar physics and geo-lunar science groups collaborating with JAXA for space missions and a theoretical group with computer simulation facilities. The outline of NAOJ, its various unique facilities, and some highlights of recent science achievements are reviewed.

  10. Science with Virtual Observatory Tools

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Padovani

    2004-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The Virtual Observatory is now mature enough to produce cutting-edge science results. The exploitation of astronomical data beyond classical identification limits with interoperable tools for statistical identification of sources has become a reality. I present the discovery of 68 optically faint, obscured (i.e., type 2) active galactic nuclei (AGN) candidates in the two GOODS fields using the Astrophysical Virtual Observatory (AVO) prototype. Thirty-one of these sources have high estimated X-ray powers (>10^44 erg/s) and therefore qualify as optically obscured quasars, the so-called QSO 2. The number of these objects in the GOODS fields is now 40, an improvement of a factor > 4 when compared to the only 9 such sources previously known. By going ~ 3 magnitudes fainter than previously known type 2 AGN in the GOODS fields the AVO is sampling a region of redshift -- power space much harder to reach with classical methods. I also discuss the AVO move to our next phase, the EURO-VO, and our short-term plans to continue doing science with the Virtual Observatory.

  11. 146 Earth Science 147 Earth Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    146 Earth Science 147 Earth Science ESCI 101 The Earth or ESCI 102 Evolution of the Earth or ESCI 107 Oceans and Global Change or ESCI 108 Crises of the Earth ESCI 105 Introductory Lab for Earth Geophysics I ESCI 444 Exploration Geophysics II or ESCI 446 Solid Earth Geophysics Math and Other Sciences

  12. IATP | Trade Observatory | Headlines q What's new

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    IATP | Trade Observatory | Headlines q Home q What's new q Geneva Update q Headlines q Library q Treaty Database q Related sites q About Trade Observatory Select a category to display: Archives August Industries Unite to Seek Free and Fair Trade Canada NewsWire July 8, 2003 Email this pageCanada News

  13. MT STROMLO OBSERVATORY VISITOR GUIDE & WALK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Botea, Adi

    to the Observatory and construction of a new Advanced Instrumentation and Technology Centre was begun. You can watch, the University of NSW, and the Faulkes Telescope Project. Mt Stromlo began operation as the Commonwealth Solar Optical Munitions Factory. After the war, the Observatory changed from solar to stellar astronomy

  14. The International Axion Observatory (IAXO)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. G. Irastorza; F. T. Avignone; G. Cantatore; S. Caspi; J. M. Carmona; T. Dafni; M. Davenport; A. Dudarev; G. Fanourakis; E. Ferrer-Ribas; J. Galan; J. A. Garcia; T. Geralis; I. Giomataris; S. Gninenko; H. Gomez; D. H. H. Hoffmann; F. J. Iguaz; K. Jakovcic; M. Krcmar; B. Lakic; G. Luzon; A. Lindner; M. Pivovaroff; T. Papaevangelou; G. Raffelt; J. Redondo; A. Rodr?guez; S. Russenschuck; J. Ruz; I. Shilon; H. Ten Kate; A. Tomas; S. Troitsky; K. van Bibber; J. A. Villar; J. Vogel; L. Walckiers; K. Zioutas

    2012-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The International Axion Observatory (IAXO) is a new generation axion helioscope aiming at a sensitivity to the axion-photon coupling of a few 10$^{12}$ GeV$^{-1}$, i.e. 1 - 1.5 orders of magnitude beyond the one currently achieved by CAST. The project relies on improvements in magnetic field volume together with extensive use of x-ray focusing optics and low background detectors, innovations already successfully tested in CAST. Additional physics cases of IAXO could include the detection of electron-coupled axions invoked to solve the white dwarfs anomaly, relic axions, and a large variety of more generic axion-like particles (ALPs) and other novel excitations at the low-energy frontier of elementary particle physics. This contribution is a summary of our paper [1] to which we refer for further details.

  15. NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY GREEN BANK, WEST VIRGINIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groppi, Christopher

    NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY GREEN BANK, WEST VIRGINIA ELECTRONICS DIVISION TECHNICAL NOTE R. Lacasse #12;NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY Green Bank, West Virginia 140-ft CASSEGRAIN BAa

  16. astrophysical observatory letter: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Observatory Network (AMON). AMON will link multiple current and future high-energy, multimessenger, and follow-up observatories together into a single network, enabling...

  17. astrophysical observatory cambridge: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Observatory Network (AMON). AMON will link multiple current and future high-energy, multimessenger, and follow-up observatories together into a single network, enabling...

  18. Earth materials and earth dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bennett, K; Shankland, T. [and others

    2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the project ''Earth Materials and Earth Dynamics'' we linked fundamental and exploratory, experimental, theoretical, and computational research programs to shed light on the current and past states of the dynamic Earth. Our objective was to combine different geological, geochemical, geophysical, and materials science analyses with numerical techniques to illuminate active processes in the Earth. These processes include fluid-rock interactions that form and modify the lithosphere, non-linear wave attenuations in rocks that drive plate tectonics and perturb the earth's surface, dynamic recrystallization of olivine that deforms the upper mantle, development of texture in high-pressure olivine polymorphs that create anisotropic velocity regions in the convecting upper mantle and transition zone, and the intense chemical reactions between the mantle and core. We measured physical properties such as texture and nonlinear elasticity, equation of states at simultaneous pressures and temperatures, magnetic spins and bonding, chemical permeability, and thermal-chemical feedback to better characterize earth materials. We artificially generated seismic waves, numerically modeled fluid flow and transport in rock systems and modified polycrystal plasticity theory to interpret measured physical properties and integrate them into our understanding of the Earth. This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL).

  19. THE SAAO ASTRONOMICAL MUSEUM OBSERVATORY, CAPE TOWN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glass, Ian S.

    power came from the battery house next door. The batteries were charged by a steam-powered generator Observatory 1 #12;THE BUILDING The building which houses the museum is usually called the McClean, after its

  20. Recent results from the Pierre Auger Observatory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gascón, Alberto [Dpto. Física Teórica y del Cosmos and CAFPE, Universidad de Granada (Spain); Collaboration: Pierre Auger Collaboration

    2014-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pierre Auger Observatory has been designed to investigate the origin and nature of Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays (UHECR) using a hybrid detection technique. In this contribution we present some of the most recent results of the observatory, namely the upper-end of the spectrum of cosmic rays, state-of-the-art analyses on mass composition, the measurements of the proton-air cross-section, and the number of muons at ground.

  1. Synoptic Observing Programs at Big Bear Solar Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Solar Observatory in China, and will explore collaboration with observatories in Canary Island to extendSynoptic Observing Programs at Big Bear Solar Observatory Haimin Wang and Philip R. Goode Big Bear Solar Observatory, New Jersey Institute of Technology, Newark, NJ 07102, USA Abstract. New Jersey

  2. CHAPTER 3.4 Observatory mathematics in the nineteenth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aubin, David

    of science was in fact inaugurated by a debate about Tycho Brahe's observatory (Hannaway 1986; Shackelford

  3. Earth's Magnetosphere

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField Campaign:INEA :Work4/11Computational Earth Science SHARE EarthMysterious

  4. Breaking Earth Poems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hernandez, Scott Mcnaul

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CALIFORNIA RIVERSIDE Breaking Earth Poems A Thesis submittedFestival……………………………………………………………………..…..14 Earth Against Mylittle else in their hands. Earth Against My Back I lay in

  5. 3D Spectroscopy and the Virtual Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bryan W. Miller

    2007-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Integral field, or 3D, spectroscopy is the technique of obtaining spectral information over a two-dimensional, hopefully contiguous, field of view. While there is some form of astronomical 3D spectroscopy at all wavelengths, there has been a rapid increase in interest in optical and near-infrared 3D spectroscopy. This has resulted in the deployment of a large variety of integral-field spectrographs on most of the large optical/infrared telescopes. The amount of IFU data available in observatory archives is large and growing rapidly. The complications of treating IFU data as both imaging and spectroscopy make it a special challenge for the virtual observatory. This article describes the various techniques of optical and near-infrared spectroscopy and some of the general needs and issues related to the handling of 3D data by the virtual observatory.

  6. Status of the Milagro $\\gamma$ Ray Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atkins, R; Berley, D; Chen, M L; Coyne, D G; Delay, R S; Dingus, B L; Dorfan, D E; Ellsworth, R W; Evans, D; Falcone, A D; Fleysher, L; Fleysher, R; Gisler, G; Goodman, J A; Haines, T J; Hoffman, C M; Hugenberger, S; Kelley, L A; Leonor, I; Macri, J R; McConnell, M; McCullough, J F; McEnery, J E; Miller, R S; Mincer, A I; Morales, M F; Némethy, P; Ryan, J M; Schneider, M; Shen, B; Shoup, A L; Sinnis, G; Smith, A J; Sullivan, G W; Thompson, T N; Tümer, T O; Wang, K; Wascko, M O; Westerhoff, S; Williams, D A; Yang, T; Yodh, G B

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Milagro Gamma Ray Observatory is the world's first large-area water Cherenkov detector capable of continuously monitoring the sky at TeV energies. Located in northern New Mexico, Milagro will perform an all sky survey of the Northern Hemisphere at energies between ~250 GeV and 50 TeV. With a high duty cycle, large detector area (~5000 square meters), and a wide field-of-view (~1 sr), Milagro is uniquely capable of searching for transient and DC sources of high-energy gamma-ray emission. Milagro has been operating since February, 1999. The current status of the Milagro Observatory and initial results will be discussed.

  7. Status of the Milagro Gamma Ray Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Atkins; W. Benbow; D. Berley; M. -L. Chen; D. G. Coyne; R. S. Delay; B. L. Dingus; D. E. Dorfan; R. W. Ellsworth; D. Evans; A. Falcone; L. Fleysher; R. Fleysher; G. Gisler; J. A. Goodman; T. J. Haines; C. M. Hoffman; S. Hugenberger; L. A. Kelley; I. Leonor; J. Macri; M. McConnell; J. F. McCullough; J. E. McEnery; R. S. Miller; A. I. Mincer; M. F. Morales; P. Nemethy; J. M. Ryan; M. Schneider; B. Shen; A. Shoup; G. Sinnis; A. J. Smith; G. W. Sullivan; T. N. Thompson; O. T. Tumer; K. Wang; M. O. Wascko; S. Westerhoff; D. A. Williams; T. Yang; G. B. Yodh

    1999-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The Milagro Gamma Ray Observatory is the world's first large-area water Cherenkov detector capable of continuously monitoring the sky at TeV energies. Located in northern New Mexico, Milagro will perform an all sky survey of the Northern Hemisphere at energies between ~250 GeV and 50 TeV. With a high duty cycle, large detector area (~5000 square meters), and a wide field-of-view (~1 sr), Milagro is uniquely capable of searching for transient and DC sources of high-energy gamma-ray emission. Milagro has been operating since February, 1999. The current status of the Milagro Observatory and initial results will be discussed.

  8. Solar Dynamics Observatory/ Extreme Ultraviolet Variability Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mojzsis, Stephen J.

    Solar Dynamics Observatory/ EVE Extreme Ultraviolet Variability Experiment Frequently Asked and model solar extreme ultraviolet irradiance variations due to solar flares, solar rotation, and solar and structure of the Sun. What is solar variability? Solar radiation varies on all time scales ranging from

  9. UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SANTA CRUZ UC OBSERVATORIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SANTA CRUZ UC OBSERVATORIES POSTDOCTORAL SCHOLAR ­ EMPLOYEE The Inter Stellar+Galactic Medium Program of Studies (IMPS) at the University of California, Santa Cruz invites of funding. START DATE: October 2013 TO APPLY: Applicants should send curriculum vitae with list

  10. Neutrino Observations from the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. W. P. Poon; for the SNO Collaboration

    2001-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) is a water imaging Cherenkov detector. Its usage of 1000 metric tons of D$_{2}$O as target allows the SNO detector to make a solar-model independent test of the neutrino oscillation hypothesis by simultaneously measuring the solar $\

  11. The endless mantra : innovation at the Keck Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bobra, Monica Godha

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A study of historical, current, and future developments at the Keck Observatory revealed a thriving philosophy of innovation. Intended to defy obsoletion and keep the observatory competitive over long time scales, this ...

  12. "Towards Optics-Based Measurements in Ocean Observatories"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boss, Emmanuel S.

    /JPSS ­ UAV ­ Ocean optics, Biological ­ Laser penetration New opportunity · Insitu Sensors ­ (Gliders"Towards Optics-Based Measurements in Ocean Observatories" "Ocean Observatories Contributions to Ocean Models and Data Assimilation For Ecosystems" Ocean Optics 2012 Glasgow Scotland Robert Arnone

  13. Operations of and Future Plans for the Pierre Auger Observatory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abraham, : J.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Aguirre, C.; Ahn, E.J.; Allard, D.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Alvarez-Muniz, J.; Ambrosio, M.; Anchordoqui, L.

    2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    These are presentations to be presented at the 31st International Cosmic Ray Conference, in Lodz, Poland during July 2009. It consists of the following presentations: (1) Performance and operation of the Surface Detectors of the Pierre Auger Observatory; (2) Extension of the Pierre Auger Observatory using high-elevation fluorescence telescopes (HEAT); (3) AMIGA - Auger Muons and Infill for the Ground Array of the Pierre Auger Observatory; (4) Radio detection of Cosmic Rays at the southern Auger Observatory; (5) Hardware Developments for the AMIGA enhancement at the Pierre Auger Observatory; (6) A simulation of the fluorescence detectors of the Pierre Auger Observatory using GEANT 4; (7) Education and Public Outreach at the Pierre Auger Observatory; (8) BATATA: A device to characterize the punch-through observed in underground muon detectors and to operate as a prototype for AMIGA; and (9) Progress with the Northern Part of the Pierre Auger Observatory.

  14. GOOGLE EARTH QUICK GUIDE (1)Google Earth Features

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith-Konter, Bridget

    GOOGLE EARTH QUICK GUIDE (1)Google Earth Features The Google Earth of the Google Earth window. Often when opening up the Google Earth program, the view screen will be a view of the entire Earth from space. Navigation bar

  15. Updated Multichannel Infrared Solar Spectrograph at Purple Mountain Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Hui

    Updated Multichannel Infrared Solar Spectrograph at Purple Mountain Observatory LI Hui( û), YOU Jianqi( � ), WU Qindi( ¸Ð) and YU Xingfeng(åÐ ) Purple Mountain Observatory, CAS, Nanjing 210008, China National Astronomical Observatories, CAS, Beijing 100012, China Email: lihui@mail.pmo.ac.cn Tel: 025

  16. Knowledge Discovery Framework for the Virtual Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Brian; Huang, Zenping; Teuben, Peter

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe a framework that allows a scientist-user to easily query for information across all Virtual Observatory (VO) repositories and pull it back for analysis. This framework hides the gory details of meta-data remediation and data formatting from the user, allowing them to get on with search, retrieval and analysis of VO data as if they were drawn from a single source using a science based terminology rather than a data-centric one.

  17. The Final Results from the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) was a water Cherenkov detector dedicated to investigate elementary particles called neutrinos. It successfully took data between 1999 and 2006. The detector was unique in its use of heavy water as a detection medium, permitting it to make a solar model-independent test of solar neutrino mixing. In fact, SNO conclusively showed that solar neutrinos oscillate on their way from the core of the Sun to the Earth. This groundbreaking observation was made during three independent phases of the experiment. Even if data taking ended, SNO is still in a mode of precise determination of the solar neutrino oscillation parameters because all along SNO had developed several methods to tell charged-current events apart from neutral-current events. This ability is crucial for the final and ultimate data analysis of all the phases. The physics reach of a combined three-phase solar analysis will be reviewed together with results and subtleties about solar neutrino physics.

  18. Protecting Life on Earth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Byron P.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Review: Protecting Life on Earth: An Introduction to thePeter B. Protecting Life on Earth: An Introduction to theof Protecting Life on Earth is “to explain to an intelligent

  19. Probing low-x QCD with cosmic neutrinos at the Pierre Auger Observatory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anchordoqui, Luis A.; /Northeastern U. /Wisconsin U., Milwaukee; Cooper-Sarkar, Amanda M.; /Oxford U.; Hooper, Dan; /Fermilab; Sarkar, Subir; /Oxford U.

    2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The sources of the observed ultra-high energy cosmic rays must also generate ultra-high energy neutrinos. Deep inelastic scattering of these neutrinos with nucleons on Earth probe center-of-mass energies {radical}s {approx} 100 TeV, well beyond those attainable at terrestrial colliders. By comparing the rates for two classes of observable events, any departure from the benchmark (unscreened perturbative QCD) neutrino-nucleon cross-section can be constrained. Using the projected sensitivity of the Pierre Auger Observatory to quasi-horizontal showers and Earth-skimming tau neutrinos, we show that a ''Super-Auger'' detector can thus provide an unique probe of strong interaction dynamics.

  20. Earth Structure Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Earth Structure Introduction Earth Structure (2nd Edition), 2004 W.W. Norton & Co, New York Slide show by Ben van der Pluijm © WW Norton, unless noted otherwise #12;© EarthStructure (2nd ed) 210/4/2010 Aerial views #12;© EarthStructure (2nd ed) 310/4/2010 http://www.globalchange.umich.edu/Ben/ES/ #12

  1. Earth's Mineral Evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Downs, Robert T.

    Earth's Mineral Evolution :: Astrobiology Magazine - earth science - evol...rth science evolution Extreme Life Mars Life Outer Planets Earth's Mineral Evolution Summary (Nov 14, 2008): New research. Display Options: Earth's Mineral Evolution Based on a CIW news release Mineral Kingdom Has Co

  2. The Virtual Observatory and Grid in Spain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. D. Santander-Vela

    2008-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The Virtual Observatory (VO) is nearing maturity, and in Spain the Spanish VO (SVO) exists since June 2004. There have also been numerous attempts at providing more or less encompassing grid initiatives at the national level, and finally Spain has an official National Grid Initiative (NGI). In this article we will show the VO and Grid development status of nationally funded initiatives in Spain, and we will hint at potential joint VO-Grid use-cases to be developed in Spain in the near future.

  3. auger observatory status: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Pierre Auger Observatory is presently under construction in Malargue, Mendoza, Argentina. It combines two complementary air shower observation techniques; the detection of...

  4. auger observatory closes: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Pierre Auger Observatory (PAO), currently under construction in Province of Mendoza, Argentina, and with another site planned in the Northern hemisphere, is a major international...

  5. auger observatory celebrates: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Pierre Auger Observatory (PAO), currently under construction in Province of Mendoza, Argentina, and with another site planned in the Northern hemisphere, is a major international...

  6. auger observatory estudo: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Pierre Auger Observatory (PAO), currently under construction in Province of Mendoza, Argentina, and with another site planned in the Northern hemisphere, is a major international...

  7. auger observatory surface: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The southern site of the Auger Observatory, now approaching completion in Mendoza, Argentina, features an array of 1600 water-Cherenkov surface detector stations covering 3000...

  8. auger observatory progress: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    part of the Auger Observatory, now under construction in the Province of Mendoza, Argentina, is well over half finished. Active detectors have been recording events for one and...

  9. auger observatory project: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Pierre Auger Observatory (PAO), currently under construction in Province of Mendoza, Argentina, and with another site planned in the Northern hemisphere, is a major international...

  10. Science in China Series D: Earth Sciences 2008 SCIENCE IN CHINA PRESS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Science in China Series D: Earth Sciences © 2008 SCIENCE IN CHINA PRESS Springer Sci China Ser D, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100029, China; 2 China Meteorological Administration Training Centre, Beijing 100081, China; 3 Heilongjiang Meteorological Observatory, Harbin 150030, China Using correlation

  11. Updated Multichannel Infrared Solar Spectrograph at Purple Mountain Observatory #

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Hui

    in solar flare [12] , which is # Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC, NoUpdated Multichannel Infrared Solar Spectrograph at Purple Mountain Observatory # LI Hui(©¿), YOU Jianqi(Æ?OÅ ), WU Qindi(Ã?,l) and YU Xingfeng(â?¢lb) Purple Mountain Observatory, CAS, Nanjing 210008, China

  12. Towards a Taxonomy for Web Observatories Web Science Institute

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Towards a Taxonomy for Web Observatories Ian Brown Web Science Institute University of Southampton University of Southampton Southampton, SO17 1BJ, UK +44 (0)23 8059 5000 wh@soton.ac.uk Lisa Harris Web.j.harris@soton.ac.uk ABSTRACT In this paper, we propose an initial structure to support a taxonomy for Web Observatories (WO

  13. NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY GREEN BANK, WEST VIRGINIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groppi, Christopher

    NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY GREEN BANK, WEST VIRGINIA ELECTRONICS DIVISION INTERNAL REPORT and Ionospheric Center, Arecibo, Puerto Rico by the National Radio Astronomy Observatory at Green Bank, West Virginia. The general design concept was taken from previous receivers assembled at NRAO. S. Weinreb and N

  14. NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY Green, Bank, West Virginia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groppi, Christopher

    NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY Green, Bank, West Virginia Electronics Division Internal Rep preformed by the Standard Receiver Section of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory at Green Bank, West Virginia. The following breakdown was used to divide the costs into various categories: (1) Emckajs.c1 . 1

  15. The Green Computing Observatory: status of acquisition and analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lefèvre, Laurent

    The Green Computing Observatory: status of acquisition and analysis Cécile Germain-Renaud1, Julien, CNRS, INRIA 2: Laboratoire de l'Accélérateur Linéaire, CNRS-IN2P3 #12; Previous GreenDays talks o GreenDays@Paris The Green Computing Observatory: plans and scientific challenges o GreenDays@Lyon The Green Computing

  16. Oceanography Vol.22, No.2128 Distributed Ocean Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    together for intensive multi-institutional experiments. RU COOL is now a core component of the National Partnership Program (NOPP), which transformed our predominantly academic endeavors of the early 1990s observatory and the international ocean observatory movement (Glenn et al., 2000a,b, 2004; Schofield et al

  17. Constraining the gravitational wave energy density of the Universe using Earth's ring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coughlin, Michael

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The search for gravitational waves is one of today's major scientific endeavors. A gravitational wave can interact with matter by exciting vibrations of elastic bodies. Earth itself is a large elastic body whose so-called normal-mode oscillations ring up when a gravitational wave passes. Therefore, precise measurement of vibration amplitudes can be used to search for the elusive gravitational-wave signals. Earth's free oscillations that can be observed after high-magnitude earthquakes have been studied extensively with gravimeters and low-frequency seismometers over many decades leading to invaluable insight into Earth's structure. Making use of our detailed understanding of Earth's normal modes, numerical models are employed for the first time to accurately calculate Earth's gravitational-wave response, and thereby turn a network of sensors that so far has served to improve our understanding of Earth, into an astrophysical observatory exploring our Universe. In this article, we constrain the energy density o...

  18. STRONG RARE EARTH COBALT QUADRUPOLES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Halbach, K.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ^3 LBL-8906 STRONG RARE EARTH COBALT QUADRUPOLES tfl Klausowned righu. STRONG RARE EARTH COBALT QUADRUPOLES Klausof i new family of strong Rare Earth Cobalt quadrupoles are

  19. About Rare Earth Metals | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    About Rare Earth Metals What Are Rare Earths? Ames Laboratory's Materials Preparation Center The Ames Process for Purification of Rare Earths USGS Rare Earth Information Rare Earth...

  20. Argonne's Earth Day 2011

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Argonne celebrated Earth Day on April 21, 2011 with an event that featured green activities and information booths.

  1. Earth Systems Science Earth Systems Science at UNH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pringle, James "Jamie"

    Earth Systems Science Earth Systems Science at UNH THE UNH Institute for the Study of Earth, Oceans, and Space (EOS) Earth Systems Research Center is dedicated to understanding the Earth as an integrative scientists and students study the Earth's ecosystems, atmosphere, water, and ice using field measurements

  2. VOL. 84, NO. B7 JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH JULY 10, 1979 An Analysisof Isostasyin theWorld's Oceans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watts, A. B. "Tony"

    MassachusettsInstituteof Technology,Cambridge,Massachusetts02139 A. B. WATTS Lamont-DohertyGeologicalObservatoryandDepartmentof GeologicalSciencesof ColumbiaUniversity Palisades, New York 10964 Cross-spectraltechniqueshave beenusedto [Wilson, 1963; Morgan, 1971]. Deep Sea Drilling Project (DSDP) resultsfrom aseismic

  3. The sensitivity of the ICAL detector at India-based Neutrino Observatory to neutrino oscillation parameters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaur, Daljeet; Kumar, Sanjeev

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The India-based Neutrino Observatory (INO) will host a 50 kt magnetized iron calorimeter (ICAL) detector that will be able to detect muon tracks and hadron showers produced by Charged-Current muon neutrino interactions in the detector. The ICAL experiment will be able to determine the precision of atmospheric neutrino mixing parameters and neutrino mass hierarchy using atmospheric muon neutrinos through earth matter effect. In this paper, we report on the sensitivity for the atmospheric neutrino mixing parameters ($\\sin^{2}\\theta_{23}$ and $|\\Delta m^{2}_{32}|$) for the ICAL detector using the reconstructed neutrino energy and muon direction as observables. We apply realistic resolutions and efficiencies obtained by the ICAL collaboration with a GEANT4-based simulation to reconstruct neutrino energy and muon direction. Our study shows that using neutrino energy and muon direction as observables for a $\\chi^{2}$ analysis, ICAL detector can measure $\\sin^{2}\\theta_{23}$ and $|\\Delta m^{2}_{32}|$ with 13% and 4%...

  4. Search for Very High Energy Emission from Satellite-triggered GRBs with the Milagro Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parkinson, P M S; Atkins, R; Benbow, W; Berley, D; Blaufuss, E; Coyne, D G; De Young, T R; Dingus, B L; Dorfan, D E; Ellsworth, R W; Fleysher, L; Gisler, G; González, M M; Goodman, J A; Haines, T J; Hays, E; Hoffman, C M; Kelley, L A; Lansdell, C P; Linnemann, J T; McEnery, J E; Miller, R S; Mincer, A I; Morales, M F; Némethy, P; Noyes, D; Ryan, J M; Samuelson, F W; Saz-Parkinson, P M; Shoup, A; Sinnis, G; Smith, A J; Sullivan, G W; Williams, D A; Wilson, M E; Xu, X W; Yodh, G B

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Milagro gamma-ray observatory employs a water Cherenkov detector to observe extensive air showers produced by high energy particles interacting in the Earth's atmosphere. Milagro has a wide field of view (2 sr) and high duty cycle (> 90%) making it an ideal all-sky monitor of the northern hemisphere in the 100 GeV to 100 TeV energy range. More than 45 satellite-triggered gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) have occurred in the field of view of Milagro since January 2000, with the rate of bursts increasing significantly with the launch of Swift. We discuss the most recent results of a search for very high energy (VHE) emission from these GRBs.

  5. Low Energy Investigations at Kamioka Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sekiya, Hiroyuki

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At Kamioka Observatory many activities for low energy rare event search are ongoing. Super-Kamiokande(SK), the largest water Cherenkov neutrino detector, currently continues data taking as the fourth phase of the experiment (SK-IV). In SK-IV, we have upgraded the water purification system and tuned water flow in the SK tank. Consequently the background level was lowered significantly. This allowed SK-IV to derive solar neutrino results down to 3.5MeV energy region. With these data, neutrino oscillation parameters are updated from global fit; $\\Delta m^2_{12}=7.44^{+0.2}_{-0.19}\\times10^{-5} {\\rm eV}^2$, $\\sin^2\\theta_{12}=0.304\\pm0.013$, $\\sin^2\\theta_{13}=0.030^{+0.017}_{-0.015}$. NEWAGE, the directional sensitive dark matter search experiment, is currently operated as "NEWAGE-0.3a" which is a $0.20\\times0.25\\times0.31$ m$^3$ micro-TPC filled with CF4 gas at 152 Torr. Recently we have developed "NEWAGE-0.3b". It was succeeded to lower the operation pressure down to 76 Torr and the threshold down to 50 keV (F...

  6. Rare Earth ? See Rare Earth, by Ward and Brownlee

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, Frederick M.

    Rare Earth ? See Rare Earth, by Ward and Brownlee #12;N to date N = N* fs fGHZfp nH fl fi fc L/T ·N Earth is "Just Right" Yes, life on Earth has adapted to Earth, but ... Earth has just the right mass to be ·Tectonically-active ·Retain an atmosphere Earth has had a stable climate The Sun is particularly inactive

  7. Low-multiplicity Burst Search at the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Min

    Results are reported from a search for low-multiplicity neutrino bursts in the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory. Such bursts could indicate the detection of a nearby core-collapse supernova explosion. The data were taken from ...

  8. apache point observatory: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    sky observatory's largest telescope is the versatile ARC 3.5-m, which Telescope, Dan LongAPO APOLLO and 3.5-m Observations One synoptic study is the APOLLO (Apache PointApache...

  9. auger southern observatory: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Auger Collaboration intends to extend the energy range of its southern observatory in Argentina for high quality data from 0.1 to 3 EeV. The extensions, described in accompanying...

  10. NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY Green Bank, West Virginia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groppi, Christopher

    NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY Green Bank, West Virginia Elec-xonics Division Internal Report 140 MV The battery voltage as a function of temperature was also measured. The voltage was extremely

  11. NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY Green Bank, West Virginia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groppi, Christopher

    NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY Green Bank, West Virginia Electronics Division Internal Report with the calculator. It is constructed from CMOS logic for lowest power consumption and has a NiCad battery back

  12. NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY Green Bank, West Virginia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groppi, Christopher

    NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY Green Bank, West Virginia Electronics Division Internal Report an opposition battery, a DC Null Voltmeter and a recorder. With this set-up a variation in temperature of .02 °C

  13. Full simulation of the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory proportional counters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beltran, B.

    The third phase of the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) experiment added an array of [superscript 3]He proportional counters to the detector. The purpose of this neutral-current detection (NCD) array was to observe ...

  14. Rare earth thermoelectrics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahan, G.D.

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A review is presented of the thermoelectric properties of rare earth compounds: A discussion is presented of the prospects for future improvements in the figure of merit.

  15. Evolution of Life on Earth EVOLUTION OF LIFE ON EARTH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shirley, Yancy

    Evolution of Life on Earth #12;EVOLUTION OF LIFE ON EARTH #12;Earth ~4.5 billion years ago A bad day .... #12;Old (Archean) Rocks #12;4.4 Billion year old Zircon Earth was temperate and had water 4.4 billion years ago! #12;#12;EVOLUTION OF LIFE ON EARTH #12;Making Organic Molecules : Miller & Urey Famous

  16. The Sun-Earth Connection The Temperature of the Earth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, Frederick M.

    AST248 The Sun-Earth Connection #12;The Temperature of the Earth The Earth is in equilibrium ­ the heat absorbed from the Sun with ­ the heat radiated by the Earth. Heat in = heat out #12;Heat constant) ­ L is the solar luminosity ­ d is the distance from the Earth to the Sun, 1AU ­ The solar

  17. carleton.ca Earth Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dawson, Jeff W.

    carleton.ca Earth Sciences #12;Earth is our home. It is a dynamic planet, integrating and recording spectrometers or electron microprobes--earth scientists investigate Earth's evolution to help understand future today and for the future is enhanced by the expertise of economic geologists. Knowledge of the Earth

  18. Earth Day 2010: Earth Day 40th Anniversary Poster

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nowacka, Izabela

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EGJ Issue 30 Earth Day 2010 ISSN 1076-7975 In celebration of 40 Earth Day the Electronic GreenEconomics, Poznan, Poland. Earth image used from www.sxc.hu.

  19. Cool Earth Solar

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Lamkin, Rob; McIlroy, Andy; Swalwell, Eric; Rajan, Kish

    2014-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    In a public-private partnership that takes full advantage of the Livermore Valley Open Campus (LVOC) for the first time, Sandia National Laboratories and Cool Earth Solar have signed an agreement that could make solar energy more affordable and accessible. In this piece, representatives from Sandia, Cool Earth Solar, and leaders in California government all discuss the unique partnership and its expected impact.

  20. Cool Earth Solar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lamkin, Rob; McIlroy, Andy; Swalwell, Eric; Rajan, Kish

    2013-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    In a public-private partnership that takes full advantage of the Livermore Valley Open Campus (LVOC) for the first time, Sandia National Laboratories and Cool Earth Solar have signed an agreement that could make solar energy more affordable and accessible. In this piece, representatives from Sandia, Cool Earth Solar, and leaders in California government all discuss the unique partnership and its expected impact.

  1. Earth Sciences | More Science | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    fully coupled, and intermodel comparison are underway. Moving forward, Earth system models that imbed a stochastic representation of variable Earth system behavior such...

  2. Star Formation in the Era of the Three Great Observatories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott J. Wolk; Norbert Schulz; John Stauffer; Nancy Evans; Leisa Townsley; Tom Megeath; Dave Huenemoerder; Claus Leitherer; Ray Jayawardana

    2006-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper summarizes contributions and suggestions as presented at the Chandra Workshop Star Formation in the Era of Three Great Observatories conducted in July 2005. One of the declared goals of the workshop was to raise recognition within the star formation research community about the sensible future utilization of the space observatories Spitzer, Hubble, and Chandra in their remaining years of operation to tackle imminent questions of our understanding of stellar formation and the early evolution of stars. A white paper was generated to support the continuous and simultaneous usage of observatory time for star formation research. The contents of this paper have been presented and discussed at several other meetings during the course of 2005 and January 2006.

  3. Physical Earth Science Is Physical Earth Science right for me?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harman, Neal.A.

    Physical Earth Science Is Physical Earth Science right for me? If you are interested in learning a Physical Earth Science degree. The skills you will gain are wide-ranging and will provide a good basis for employment in almost any sector. Are all Physical Earth Science degrees the same? Universities do not have

  4. Alexandria Digital Earth ProtoType The Alexandria Digital Earth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Janée, Greg

    Alexandria Digital Earth ProtoType The Alexandria Digital Earth Prototype System Terence Smith Greg Janée James Frew Anita Coleman #12;Alexandria Digital Earth ProtoType 2Smith et al. / JCDL 2001 / 2x Earth ProtoType 3Smith et al. / JCDL 2001 / 2x-Jun-2001 Core System (inherited from ADL) Components

  5. Capturing near-Earth asteroids around Earth Zaki Hasnain n

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ross, Shane

    metals and semiconducting elements on Earth may be supplemented or even replaced by the reserves floating twice the tonnage of such metals already harvested on Earth. There are $ 1000 NEAs with a diameter propellant to transport spacecraft between space habitats, Earth, the Moon, the asteroids, and beyond. Rare-Earth

  6. RARE EARTHS--2003 60.1 RARE EARTHS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . U.S. imports of cerium compounds and rare-earth metals and alloys decreased (table 5). YttriumRARE EARTHS--2003 60.1 RARE EARTHS By James B. Hedrick Domestic survey data and tables were, geographic information specialist. The rare earths are a moderately abundant group of 17 elements comprising

  7. RARE EARTHS--2002 61.1 RARE EARTHS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of rare earths are iron gray to silvery lustrous metals that are typically soft, malleable, ductile decreased as imports of rare-earth alloys, compounds, and metals declined. Production of bastnäsiteRARE EARTHS--2002 61.1 RARE EARTHS By James B. Hedrick Domestic survey data and tables were

  8. Earth System History Announcements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mojzsis, Stephen J.

    Earth System History GEOL 1020 [35] Announcements The demise of the Paleozoic (extinction, Nova Scotia. #12;The Carboniferous was marked by the progressive formation of the supercontinent Pangea, there is evidence of significant cooling and drying in the sedimentologi

  9. LANL Studies Earth's Magnetosphere

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Daughton, Bill

    2014-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A new 3-D supercomputer model presents a new theory of how magnetic reconnection works in high-temperature plasmas. This Los Alamos National Laboratory research supports an upcoming NASA mission to study Earth's magnetosphere in greater detail than ever.

  10. Rammered Earth Wall 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2011-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

    FIELD MEASUREMENT OF LATERAL EARTH PRESSURES ON RETAINING WALLS A Thesis by Michael Riggins Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1974... Major Subject: Civil Engineering FIELD MEASUREMENT OF LATERAL EARTH PRESSURES ON RETAINING WALLS A Thesis by Michael Riggins Approved as to style and content by: Cha rman of Committee Memb r Head of Departm t P Etc Member August 1974 ABSTRACT...

  11. Earth Day 2014 | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Day 2014 Earth Day 2014 Earth Day 2014 This year, we're celebrating Earth Day all week long. It's Earth Week on Energy.gov We're focusing on climate change, highlighting Earth Day...

  12. UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SANTA CRUZ DEPARTMENT OF UC OBSERVATORIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SANTA CRUZ DEPARTMENT OF UC OBSERVATORIES Postdoctoral Scholar The Inter) and the University of California, Santa Cruz (UCSC) invites applications for the position of Postdoctoral Scholar: Postdoctoral Scholar - Employee SALARY: $51,776 ­ $55,128, commensurate with qualifications and experience

  13. Jose Groh (Geneva Observatory, Switzerland) Luminous Blue Variables

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crowther, Paul

    Jose Groh (Geneva Observatory, Switzerland) Luminous Blue Variables: massive stars extremely close Groh - Luminous BlueVariables: massive stars extremely close to the Eddington limit JD2:Very massive Jose Groh - Luminous BlueVariables: massive stars extremely close to the Eddington limit JD2:Very

  14. NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY Green Bank, West Virginia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groppi, Christopher

    NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY Green Bank, West Virginia Electronics Division Internal Report which has been used on all systems mounted in the past at the 300-foot telescope. The East and West 14 are so made to allow the East and West 1410 MHz feeds to be positioned 2. 63, 5.24, 7.88 and 10. 52

  15. NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY Green Bank, West Virginia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groppi, Christopher

    NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY Green Bank, West Virginia Electronics Division Internal Report (Polarization) Focus Declination Beam East on Sky (Feed West of Center) Beam North to West on Sky (Feed North to West on Sky) Feed moves down toward surface Beam South on Sky Position Read- out Sign 300-FOOT

  16. NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY GREEN BANK ) WEST VIRGINIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groppi, Christopher

    NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY GREEN BANK ) WEST VIRGINIA ELECTRONICS DIVISION INTERNAL REPORT No. 159 INTERFERENCE POTENTIAL FOR RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATIONS AT GREEN BANK, WEST VIRGINIA CRAIG ASTRONOMY OBSERVATIONS AT GREEN BANK, WEST VIRGINIA Craig R. Moore and James L. Dolan Introduction

  17. INDIA-BASED NEUTRINO OBSERVATORY INO/2005/01

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Udgaonkar, Jayant B.

    important developments have occurred recently in neutrino physics and neutrino astronomy. OscillationsINDIA-BASED NEUTRINO OBSERVATORY INO/2005/01 Interim Project Report Volume I I N O #12;#12;The INO of neutrinos and the inferred discovery that neutrinos have mass are likely to have far-reaching consequences

  18. Results from the Milagro Gamma-Ray Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    V energies, and a search for transient emission above 100 GeV from gamma-ray bursts. 1 Introduction remnants and gamma-ray bursts (GRB). Gamma rays are also produced when high-energy cosmic rays interactResults from the Milagro Gamma-Ray Observatory E. Blaufuss for the Milagro Collaboration a,1 , a

  19. BIG BEAR SOLAR OBSERVATORY CENTER FOR SOLAR-TERRESTRIAL RESEARCH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BIG BEAR SOLAR OBSERVATORY CENTER FOR SOLAR-TERRESTRIAL RESEARCH Faculty Position in Solar Physics, New Jersey Institute of Technology A tenure track faculty position in solar physics is available of NJIT's program in solar physics, visit http://solar.njit.edu. Applicants are required to have a Ph

  20. 11Chandra 'Sees' a Distant Planet Evaporating NASA's Chandra Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    energy. A simple model of this planet's interior suggests that its atmosphere might account for as much11Chandra 'Sees' a Distant Planet Evaporating NASA's Chandra Observatory has discovered that the star CoRot-2a is a powerful X-ray source. This is unfortunate because it is also known that a planet

  1. NGEE Arctic Webcam Photographs, Barrow Environmental Observatory, Barrow, Alaska

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Bob Busey; Larry Hinzman

    The NGEE Arctic Webcam (PTZ Camera) captures two views of seasonal transitions from its generally south-facing position on a tower located at the Barrow Environmental Observatory near Barrow, Alaska. Images are captured every 30 minutes. Historical images are available for download. The camera is operated by the U.S. DOE sponsored Next Generation Ecosystem Experiments - Arctic (NGEE Arctic) project.

  2. Supporting a Social Media Observatory with Customizable Index Structures --Architecture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    research activity in analysis of social media and micro- blogging data in recent years suggests media data. To support these "social media observatories" effectively, a storage platform must satisfy special requirements for loading and storage of multi-terabyte datasets, as well as efficient evaluation

  3. FIRST RESULTS FROM SUPER-KAMIOKANDE Kamioka Observatory,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tokyo, University of

    FIRST RESULTS FROM SUPER-KAMIOKANDE Y. TOTSUKA Kamioka Observatory, Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, Higashimozumi, Kamioka, Gifu, 506-12 Japan (for the Super-Kamiokande Collaboration) A 50,000ton water Cerenkov detector, Super-Kamiokande, has been operational since April 1996

  4. Part I: Instrumentation The Chandra X-ray Observatory and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -ray Observatory showing the HRMA, four sci- entific instruments (two types of gratings, HRC, and ACIS) and major://asc.harvard.edu. 2.2 Scientific Instruments 2.2.1 HRMA At energies above 10 eV, photons scatter at incident angles and (usually) prohibitively expensive endeavor. The High Resolution Mirror Assembly (HRMA) gives Chandra

  5. Part I: Instrumentation The Chandra Xray Observatory and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the Chandra X­ray Observatory showing the HRMA, four sci­ entific instruments (two types of gratings, HRC://asc.harvard.edu. 2.2 Scientific Instruments 2.2.1 HRMA At energies above ¸10 eV, photons scatter at incident angles and (usually) prohibitively expensive endeavor. The High Resolution Mirror Assembly (HRMA) gives Chandra

  6. The HAWC Gamma-Ray Observatory: Design, Calibration, and Operation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abeysekara, A U; Alvarez, C; Álvarez, J D; Arceo, R; Arteaga-Velázquez, J C; Solares, H A Ayala; Barber, A S; Baughman, B M; Bautista-Elivar, N; Belmont, E; BenZvi, S Y; Berley, D; Rosales, M Bonilla; Braun, J; Caballero-Lopez, R A; Caballero-Mora, K S; Carramiñana, A; Castillo, M; Cotti, U; Cotzomi, J; de la Fuente, E; De León, C; DeYoung, T; Hernandez, R Diaz; Díaz-Vélez, J C; Dingus, B L; DuVernois, M A; Ellsworth, R W; Fernandez, A; Fiorino, D W; Fraija, N; Galindo, A; Garfias, F; González, L X; González, M M; Goodman, J A; Grabski, V; Gussert, M; Hampel-Arias, Z; Hui, C M; Hüntemeyer, P; Imran, A; Iriarte, A; Karn, P; Kieda, D; Kunde, G J; Lara, A; Lauer, R J; Lee, W H; Lennarz, D; Vargas, H León; Linares, E C; Linnemann, J T; Longo, M; Luna-GarcIa, R; Marinelli, A; Martinez, H; Martinez, O; Martínez-Castro, J; Matthews, J A J; Miranda-Romagnoli, P; Moreno, E; Mostafá, M; Nava, J; Nellen, L; Newbold, M; Noriega-Papaqui, R; Oceguera-Becerra, T; Patricelli, B; Pelayo, R; Pérez-Pérez, E G; Pretz, J; Rivière, C; Rosa-González, D; Salazar, H; Salesa, F; Sanchez, F E; Sandoval, A; Santos, E; Schneider, M; Silich, S; Sinnis, G; Smith, A J; Sparks, K; Springer, R W; Taboada, I; Toale, P A; Tollefson, K; Torres, I; Ukwatta, T N; Villaseñor, L; Weisgarber, T; Westerhoff, S; Wisher, I G; Wood, J; Yodh, G B; Younk, P W; Zaborov, D; Zepeda, A; Zhou, H

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The High-Altitude Water Cherenkov Gamma Ray Observatory (HAWC) is under construction 4100 meters above sea level at Sierra Negra, Mexico. We describe the design and cabling of the detector, the characterization of the photomultipliers, and the timing calibration system. We also outline a next-generation detector based on the water Cherenkov technique.

  7. NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY Green Bank, West Virginia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groppi, Christopher

    NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY Green Bank, West Virginia Electronics Division Internal Report line. A 12 V stor- e battery may be attached to the battery connector with pin 1 ground and pin 2 +12 V DC nominal. When the primary power fails, the battery will supply power to the clock. About 1 1/2 amp

  8. NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY GREEN BANK, WEST VIRGINIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groppi, Christopher

    NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY GREEN BANK, WEST VIRGINIA ELECTRONICS DIVISION TECHNICAL NOTE .:41; CLOCK INFORMATION FOR AST 286 COMPUTERS Ronald B. Weimer The battery backed clock is only read (which does not set the battery clock) the AST keeps time from a second crystal oscillator. A rough block

  9. NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY Green Bank, West Virginia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groppi, Christopher

    NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY Green Bank, West Virginia Electronics Division Internal Report No. 109 BATTERY PACK FOR HEWLETT-PACKARD 5065A RUBIDIUM FREQUENCY STANDARD Michael Balister OCTOBER 1971 NUMBER OF COPIES: 150 #12;BATTERY PACK FOR HEWLETT-PACKARD 5065A RUBIDIUM FREQUENCY STANDARD

  10. NGEE Arctic Webcam Photographs, Barrow Environmental Observatory, Barrow, Alaska

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bob Busey; Larry Hinzman

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The NGEE Arctic Webcam (PTZ Camera) captures two views of seasonal transitions from its generally south-facing position on a tower located at the Barrow Environmental Observatory near Barrow, Alaska. Images are captured every 30 minutes. Historical images are available for download. The camera is operated by the U.S. DOE sponsored Next Generation Ecosystem Experiments - Arctic (NGEE Arctic) project.

  11. NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY GREEN BANK, WEST VIRGINIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groppi, Christopher

    not attempted to measure the electrical loss of the samples, nor have we tried plating the EDM'ed surfacesNATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY GREEN BANK, WEST VIRGINIA ELECTRONICS DIVISION TECHNICAL NOTE FOR SMALL WAVEGUIDE FABRICATION A. R. Kerr, J. W. Lamb, N. J. Bailey, M. Crawford, and N. Horner Electric

  12. Modeling the earth system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ojima, D. [ed.

    1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The 1990 Global Change Institute (GCI) on Earth System Modeling is the third of a series organized by the Office for Interdisciplinary Earth Studies to look in depth at particular issues critical to developing a better understanding of the earth system. The 1990 GCI on Earth System Modeling was organized around three themes: defining critical gaps in the knowledge of the earth system, developing simplified working models, and validating comprehensive system models. This book is divided into three sections that reflect these themes. Each section begins with a set of background papers offering a brief tutorial on the subject, followed by working group reports developed during the institute. These reports summarize the joint ideas and recommendations of the participants and bring to bear the interdisciplinary perspective that imbued the institute. Since the conclusion of the 1990 Global Change Institute, research programs, nationally and internationally, have moved forward to implement a number of the recommendations made at the institute, and many of the participants have maintained collegial interactions to develop research projects addressing the needs identified during the two weeks in Snowmass.

  13. Great Salt Lake Basin Hydrologic Observatory Prospectus Submitted to CUAHSI for consideration as a CUAHSI Hydrologic Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tarboton, David

    1 Great Salt Lake Basin Hydrologic Observatory Prospectus Submitted to CUAHSI for consideration.S., the Great Salt Lake Basin provides the opportunity to observe climate and human-induced land-surface changes relationship between people and water across the globe and make the Great Salt Lake Basin a microcosm

  14. Better Than Earth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heller, René

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Do We Inhabit The Best O All Possible Worlds? German mathematician Gottfried Leibniz thought so, writing in 1710 that our planet, warts and all, must be the most optimal one imaginable. Leibniz's idea was roundly scorned as unscientific wishful thinking, most notably by French author Voltaire in his magnum opus, Candide. Yet Leibniz might find sympathy from at least one group of scientists - the astronomers who have for decades treated Earth as a golden standard as they search for worlds beyond our own solar system. Because earthlings still know of just one living world - our own - it makes some sense to use Earth as a template in the search for life elsewhere, such as in the most Earth-like regions of Mars or Jupiter's watery moon Europa. Now, however, discoveries of potentially habitable planets orbiting stars other than our sun - exoplanets, that is - are challenging that geocentric approach.

  15. Identifying clouds over the Pierre Auger Observatory using infrared satellite data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abreu, Pedro; et al.,

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe a new method of identifying night-time clouds over the Pierre Auger Observatory using infrared data from the Imager instruments on the GOES-12 and GOES-13 satellites. We compare cloud identifications resulting from our method to those obtained by the Central Laser Facility of the Auger Observatory. Using our new method we can now develop cloud probability maps for the 3000 km^2 of the Pierre Auger Observatory twice per hour with a spatial resolution of ~2.4 km by ~5.5 km. Our method could also be applied to monitor cloud cover for other ground-based observatories and for space-based observatories.

  16. Constraining the gravitational wave energy density of the Universe using Earth's ring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael Coughlin; Jan Harms

    2014-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The search for gravitational waves is one of today's major scientific endeavors. A gravitational wave can interact with matter by exciting vibrations of elastic bodies. Earth itself is a large elastic body whose so-called normal-mode oscillations ring up when a gravitational wave passes. Therefore, precise measurement of vibration amplitudes can be used to search for the elusive gravitational-wave signals. Earth's free oscillations that can be observed after high-magnitude earthquakes have been studied extensively with gravimeters and low-frequency seismometers over many decades leading to invaluable insight into Earth's structure. Making use of our detailed understanding of Earth's normal modes, numerical models are employed for the first time to accurately calculate Earth's gravitational-wave response, and thereby turn a network of sensors that so far has served to improve our understanding of Earth, into an astrophysical observatory exploring our Universe. In this article, we constrain the energy density of gravitational waves to values in the range 0.035 - 0.15 normalized by the critical energy density of the Universe at frequencies between 0.3mHz and 5mHz, using 10 years of data from the gravimeter network of the Global Geodynamics Project that continuously monitors Earth's oscillations. This work is the first step towards a systematic investigation of the sensitivity of gravimeter networks to gravitational waves. Further advance in gravimeter technology could improve sensitivity of these networks and possibly lead to gravitational-wave detection.

  17. Earth Sciences Safety Handbook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    Report of Earth Sciences Departmental Safety Committee 2011 - 12 5 Chemical Safety 21 - 22 Chemical Waste Assessment Hire Vehicle Checklist Department Driving Protocol: Bullard vehicles 38 - 48 Electrical Safety 24 and outside adjacent to areas which present a particular fire hazard. Persons wishing to smoke are asked to do

  18. Earth Sciences Safety Handbook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    Report of Earth Sciences Departmental Safety Committee 2012 - 13 5 Chemical Safety 21 - 22 Chemical Waste Assessment Hire Vehicle Checklist Department Driving Protocol: Bullard vehicles 38 - 48 Electrical Safety 24 and outside adjacent to areas which present a particular fire hazard. Persons wishing to smoke are asked to do

  19. Earth Democracy: Justice, Sustainability, and Peace

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Byron

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Review: Earth Democracy: Justice, Sustainability, and PeaceUniversity, USA Vandana Shiva. Earth Democracy: Justice,Acid-free, recycled paper. Earth Democracy is a movement

  20. EARTH SCIENCES DIVISION. ANNUAL REPORT 1977.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Witherspoon, P.A.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    8erkeley Laboratory (LBL), the Earth Sciences Division, wasactivation analysis: rare earth element distribution (D)can be used to generate earth- quake records for use in

  1. EMP: Earth Microbiome Project | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Data-Intensive Science Applied Mathematics Science & Engineering Applications EMP: Earth Microbiome Project EMP: Earth Microbiome Project The Earth Microbiome Project is a...

  2. Mixed Conduction in Rare-Earth Phosphates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ray, Hannah Leung

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Conduction  in  Rare-­Earth  Phosphates   by   Hannah  Conduction  in  Rare-­?Earth  Phosphates   by   Hannah  conduction  in  rare  earth  phosphates.  Specifically,  

  3. Measurement of Aerosols at the Pierre Auger Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Y. BenZvi; F. Arqueros; R. Cester; M. Chiosso; B. M. Connolly; B. Fick; A. Filipcic; B. García; A. Grillo; F. Guarino; M. Horvat; M. Iarlori; C. Macolino; M. Malek; J. Matthews; J. A. J. Matthews; D. Melo; R. Meyhandan; M. Micheletti; M. Monasor; M. Mostafá; R. Mussa; J. Pallotta; S. Petrera; M. Prouza; V. Rizi; M. Roberts; J. R. Rodriguez Rojo; D. Rodríguez-Frías; F. Salamida; M. Santander; G. Sequeiros; P. Sommers; A. Tonachini; L. Valore; D. Verberic; E. Visbal; S. Westerhoff; L. Wiencke; D. Zavrtanik; M. Zavrtanik; for the Pierre Auger Collaboration

    2007-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The air fluorescence detectors (FDs) of the Pierre Auger Observatory are vital for the determination of the air shower energy scale. To compensate for variations in atmospheric conditions that affect the energy measurement, the Observatory operates an array of monitoring instruments to record hourly atmospheric conditions across the detector site, an area exceeding 3,000 square km. This paper presents results from four instruments used to characterize the aerosol component of the atmosphere: the Central Laser Facility (CLF), which provides the FDs with calibrated laser shots; the scanning backscatter lidars, which operate at three FD sites; the Aerosol Phase Function monitors (APFs), which measure the aerosol scattering cross section at two FD locations; and the Horizontal Attenuation Monitor (HAM), which measures the wavelength dependence of aerosol attenuation.

  4. Managing Distributed Software Development in the Virtual Astronomical Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Janet D; Bonaventura, Nina; Busko, Ivo; Cresitello-Dittmar, Mark; D'Abrusco, Raffaele; Doe, Stephen; Ebert, Rick; Laurino, Omar; Pevunova, Olga; Refsdal, Brian; Thomas, Brian

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Virtual Astronomical Observatory (VAO) is a product-driven organization that provides new scientific research capabilities to the astronomical community. Software development for the VAO follows a lightweight framework that guides development of science applications and infrastructure. Challenges to be overcome include distributed development teams, part-time efforts, and highly constrained schedules. We describe the process we followed to conquer these challenges while developing Iris, the VAO application for analysis of 1-D astronomical spectral energy distributions (SEDs). Iris was successfully built and released in less than a year with a team distributed across four institutions. The project followed existing International Virtual Observatory Alliance inter-operability standards for spectral data and contributed a SED library as a by-product of the project. We emphasize lessons learned that will be folded into future development efforts. In our experience, a well-defined process that provides gu...

  5. Studies of Cosmic Ray Composition and Air Shower Structure with the Pierre Auger Observatory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abraham, : J.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Aguirre, C.; Ahn, E.J.; Allard, D.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Alvarez-Muniz, J.; Ambrosio, M.; Anchordoqui, L.

    2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    These are presentations to be presented at the 31st International Cosmic Ray Conference, in Lodz, Poland during July 2009. It consists of the following presentations: (1) Measurement of the average depth of shower maximum and its fluctuations with the Pierre Auger Observatory; (2) Study of the nuclear mass composition of UHECR with the surface detectors of the Pierre Auger Observatory; (3) Comparison of data from the Pierre Auger Observatory with predictions from air shower simulations: testing models of hadronic interactions; (4) A Monte Carlo exploration of methods to determine the UHECR composition with the Pierre Auger Observatory; (5) The delay of the start-time measured with the Pierre Auger Observatory for inclined showers and a comparison of its variance with models; (6) UHE neutrino signatures in the surface detector of the Pierre Auger Observatory; and (7) The electromagnetic component of inclined air showers at the Pierre Auger Observatory.

  6. Life Before Earth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexei A. Sharov; Richard Gordon

    2013-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    An extrapolation of the genetic complexity of organisms to earlier times suggests that life began before the Earth was formed. Life may have started from systems with single heritable elements that are functionally equivalent to a nucleotide. The genetic complexity, roughly measured by the number of non-redundant functional nucleotides, is expected to have grown exponentially due to several positive feedback factors: gene cooperation, duplication of genes with their subsequent specialization, and emergence of novel functional niches associated with existing genes. Linear regression of genetic complexity on a log scale extrapolated back to just one base pair suggests the time of the origin of life 9.7 billion years ago. This cosmic time scale for the evolution of life has important consequences: life took ca. 5 billion years to reach the complexity of bacteria; the environments in which life originated and evolved to the prokaryote stage may have been quite different from those envisaged on Earth; there was no intelligent life in our universe prior to the origin of Earth, thus Earth could not have been deliberately seeded with life by intelligent aliens; Earth was seeded by panspermia; experimental replication of the origin of life from scratch may have to emulate many cumulative rare events; and the Drake equation for guesstimating the number of civilizations in the universe is likely wrong, as intelligent life has just begun appearing in our universe. Evolution of advanced organisms has accelerated via development of additional information-processing systems: epigenetic memory, primitive mind, multicellular brain, language, books, computers, and Internet. As a result the doubling time of complexity has reached ca. 20 years. Finally, we discuss the issue of the predicted technological singularity and give a biosemiotics perspective on the increase of complexity.

  7. Technology development for a neutrino astrophysical observatory. Letter of intent

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chaloupka, V.; Cole, T.; Crawford, H.J. [and others

    1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors propose a set of technology developments relevant to the design of an optimized Cerenkov detector for the study of neutrino interactions of astrophysical interest. Emphasis is placed on signal processing innovations that enhance significantly the quality of primary data. These technical advances, combined with field experience from a follow-on test deployment, are intended to provide a basis for the engineering design for a kilometer-scale Neutrino Astrophysical Observatory.

  8. Technology Development for a Neutrino AstrophysicalObservatory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chaloupka, V.; Cole, T.; Crawford, H.J.; He, Y.D.; Jackson, S.; Kleinfelder, S.; Lai, K.W.; Learned, J.; Ling, J.; Liu, D.; Lowder, D.; Moorhead, M.; Morookian, J.M.; Nygren, D.R.; Price, P.B.; Richards, A.; Shapiro, G.; Shen, B.; Smoot, George F.; Stokstad, R.G.; VanDalen, G.; Wilkes, J.; Wright, F.; Young, K.

    1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a set of technology developments relevant to the design of an optimized Cerenkov detector for the study of neutrino interactions of astrophysical interest. Emphasis is placed on signal processing innovations that enhance significantly the quality of primary data. These technical advances, combined with field experience from a follow-on test deployment, are intended to provide a basis for the engineering design for a kilometer-scale Neutrino Astrophysical Observatory.

  9. A 100-micron polarimeter for the Kuiper Airborne Observatory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Novak, G.; Gonatas, D.P.; Hildebrand, R.H.; Platt, S.R.

    1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Consideration is given to the design and performance of the 100-micron polarimeter proposed for use on the NASA Kuiper Airborne Observatory. The polarimeter specifications are listed. The polarimeter design and data reduction techniques are based on the work of Hildebrand et al. (1984) and Dragovan (1986). The polarimeter has an improved signal-to-noise ratio and systematic measurement errors below 0.2 percent. 20 refs.

  10. High-energy Astrophysics and the Virtual Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Padovani

    2005-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The Virtual Observatory (VO) will revolutionise the way we do Astronomy by allowing easy access to all astronomical data and by making the handling and analysis of datasets at various locations across the globe much simpler and faster. I report here on the need for the VO and its status in Europe, concentrating on the recently started EURO-VO project, and then give two specific applications of VO tools to high-energy astrophysics.

  11. A SURVEY OF EGRET SOURCES USING THE MILAGRO OBSERVATORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    V. The third EGRET catalog contained 271 new gamma-ray sources with energies above 100 MeV. The 271 sources OBSERVATORY By Chuan Chen Very high energy gamma-rays can be used to understand some of the most pow- erful detected gamma-ray emission from 30 keV to 30 GeV. EGRET covered an energy range between 20 MeV and 30 Ge

  12. The HAWC Gamma-Ray Observatory: Observations of Cosmic Rays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abeysekara, A U; Alvarez, C; Álvarez, J D; Arceo, R; Arteaga-Velázquez, J C; Solares, H A Ayala; Barber, A S; Baughman, B M; Bautista-Elivar, N; Belmont, E; BenZvi, S Y; Berley, D; Rosales, M Bonilla; Braun, J; Caballero-Lopez, R A; Caballero-Mora, K S; Carramiñana, A; Castillo, M; Cotti, U; Cotzomi, J; de la Fuente, E; De León, C; DeYoung, T; Hernandez, R Diaz; Díaz-Vélez, J C; Dingus, B L; DuVernois, M A; Ellsworth, R W; Fernandez, A; Fiorino, D W; Fraija, N; Galindo, A; Garfias, F; González, L X; González, M M; Goodman, J A; Grabski, V; Gussert, M; Hampel-Arias, Z; Hui, C M; Hüntemeyer, P; Imran, A; Iriarte, A; Karn, P; Kieda, D; Kunde, G J; Lara, A; Lauer, R J; Lee, W H; Lennarz, D; Vargas, H León; Linares, E C; Linnemann, J T; Longo, M; Luna-GarcIa, R; Marinelli, A; Martinez, H; Martinez, O; Martínez-Castro, J; Matthews, J A J; Miranda-Romagnoli, P; Moreno, E; Mostafá, M; Nava, J; Nellen, L; Newbold, M; Noriega-Papaqui, R; Oceguera-Becerra, T; Patricelli, B; Pelayo, R; Pérez-Pérez, E G; Pretz, J; Rivière, C; Rosa-González, D; Salazar, H; Salesa, F; Sanchez, F E; Sandoval, A; Santos, E; Schneider, M; Silich, S; Sinnis, G; Smith, A J; Sparks, K; Springer, R W; Taboada, I; Toale, P A; Tollefson, K; Torres, I; Ukwatta, T N; Villaseñor, L; Weisgarber, T; Westerhoff, S; Wisher, I G; Wood, J; Yodh, G B; Younk, P W; Zaborov, D; Zepeda, A; Zhou, H

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe measurements of GeV and TeV cosmic rays with the High-Altitude Water Cherenkov Gamma-Ray Observatory, or HAWC. The measurements include the observation of the shadow of the moon; the observation of small-scale and large-scale angular clustering of the TeV cosmic rays; the prospects for measurement of transient solar events with HAWC; and the observation of Forbush decreases with the HAWC engineering array and HAWC-30.

  13. Physics Potential of the ICAL detector at the India-based Neutrino Observatory (INO)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The ICAL Collaboration; Shakeel Ahmed; M. Sajjad Athar; Rashid Hasan; Mohammad Salim; S. K. Singh; S. S. R. Inbanathan; Venktesh Singh; V. S. Subrahmanyam; Shiba Prasad Behera; Vinay B. Chandratre; Nitali Dash; Vivek M. Datar; V. K. S. Kashyap; Ajit K. Mohanty; Lalit M. Pant; Animesh Chatterjee; Sandhya Choubey; Raj Gandhi; Anushree Ghosh; Deepak Tiwari; Ali Ajmi; S. Uma Sankar; Prafulla Behera; Aleena Chacko; Sadiq Jafer; James Libby; K. Raveendrababu; K. R. Rebin; D. Indumathi; K. Meghna; S. M. Lakshmi; M. V. N. Murthy; Sumanta Pal; G. Rajasekaran; Nita Sinha; Sanjib Kumar Agarwalla; Amina Khatun; Poonam Mehta; Vipin Bhatnagar; R. Kanishka; A. Kumar; J. S. Shahi; J. B. Singh; Monojit Ghosh; Pomita Ghoshal; Srubabati Goswami; Chandan Gupta; Sushant Raut; Sudeb Bhattacharya; Suvendu Bose; Ambar Ghosal; Abhik Jash; Kamalesh Kar; Debasish Majumdar; Nayana Majumdar; Supratik Mukhopadhyay; Satyajit Saha; B. S. Acharya; Sudeshna Banerjee; Kolahal Bhattacharya; Sudeshna Dasgupta; Moon Moon Devi; Amol Dighe; Gobinda Majumder; Naba K. Mondal; Asmita Redij; Deepak Samuel; B. Satyanarayana; Tarak Thakore; C. D. Ravikumar; A. M. Vinodkumar; Gautam Gangopadhyay; Amitava Raychaudhuri; Brajesh C. Choudhary; Ankit Gaur; Daljeet Kaur; Ashok Kumar; Sanjeev Kumar; Md. Naimuddin; Waseem Bari; Manzoor A. Malik; Jyotsna Singh; S. Krishnaveni; H. B. Ravikumar; C. Ranganathaiah; Swapna Mahapatra; Saikat Biswas; Subhasis Chattopadhyay; Rajesh Ganai; Tapasi Ghosh; Y. P. Viyogi

    2015-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The upcoming 50 kt magnetized iron calorimeter (ICAL) detector at the India-based Neutrino Observatory (INO) is designed to study the atmospheric neutrinos and antineutrinos separately over a wide range of energies and path lengths. The primary focus of this experiment is to explore the Earth matter effects by observing the energy and zenith angle dependence of the atmospheric neutrinos in the multi-GeV range. This study will be crucial to address some of the outstanding issues in neutrino oscillation physics, including the fundamental issue of neutrino mass hierarchy. In this document, we present the physics potential of the detector as obtained from realistic detector simulations. We describe the simulation framework, the neutrino interactions in the detector, and the expected response of the detector to particles traversing it. The ICAL detector can determine the energy and direction of the muons to a high precision, and in addition, its sensitivity to multi-GeV hadrons increases its physics reach substantially. Its charge identification capability, and hence its ability to distinguish neutrinos from antineutrinos, makes it an efficient detector for determining the neutrino mass hierarchy. In this report, we outline the analyses carried out for the determination of neutrino mass hierarchy and precision measurements of atmospheric neutrino mixing parameters at ICAL, and give the expected physics reach of the detector with 10 years of runtime. We also explore the potential of ICAL for probing new physics scenarios like CPT violation and the presence of magnetic monopoles.

  14. EARLY SCIENCE WITH SOFIA, THE STRATOSPHERIC OBSERVATORY FOR INFRARED ASTRONOMY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Young, E. T.; Becklin, E. E.; De Buizer, J. M.; Andersson, B.-G.; Casey, S. C.; Helton, L. A. [SOFIA Science Center, Universities Space Research Association, NASA Ames Research Center, MS 232, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Marcum, P. M.; Roellig, T. L.; Temi, P. [NASA Ames Research Center, MS 232, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Herter, T. L. [Astronomy Department, 202 Space Sciences Building, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853-6801 (United States); Guesten, R. [Max-Planck Institut fuer Radioastronomie, Auf dem Huegel 69, Bonn (Germany); Dunham, E. W. [Lowell Observatory, 1400 W. Mars Hill Rd., Flagstaff AZ 86001 (United States); Backman, D.; Burgdorf, M. [SOFIA Science Center, NASA Ames Research Center, MS 211-1, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Caroff, L. J.; Erickson, E. F. [NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Davidson, J. A. [School of Physics, The University of Western Australia (M013), 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley WA 6009 (Australia); Gehrz, R. D. [Minnesota Institute for Astrophysics, School of Physics and Astronomy, 116 Church Street, S. E., University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Harper, D. A. [Yerkes Observatory, University of Chicago, 373 W. Geneva St., Williams Bay, WI (United States); Harvey, P. M. [Astronomy Department, University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station C1400, Austin, TX 78712-0259 (United States); and others

    2012-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The Stratospheric Observatory For Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) is an airborne observatory consisting of a specially modified Boeing 747SP with a 2.7 m telescope, flying at altitudes as high as 13.7 km (45,000 ft). Designed to observe at wavelengths from 0.3 {mu}m to 1.6 mm, SOFIA operates above 99.8% of the water vapor that obscures much of the infrared and submillimeter. SOFIA has seven science instruments under development, including an occultation photometer, near-, mid-, and far-infrared cameras, infrared spectrometers, and heterodyne receivers. SOFIA, a joint project between NASA and the German Aerospace Center Deutsches Zentrum fuer Luft und-Raumfahrt, began initial science flights in 2010 December, and has conducted 30 science flights in the subsequent year. During this early science period three instruments have flown: the mid-infrared camera FORCAST, the heterodyne spectrometer GREAT, and the occultation photometer HIPO. This Letter provides an overview of the observatory and its early performance.

  15. Chapter 32: Beyond the earth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hart, Gus

    1 Chapter 32: Beyond the earth Did you read chapter 32 before coming to class? A. Yes B the planets. We began our study of the history of the solar system by studying the history of the earth decreased. How about the rest of the solar system? Some stats on the Sun Time for light to reach Earth · 8

  16. Ames Lab 101: Rare Earths

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Gschneidner, Karl

    2012-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    "Mr. Rare Earth," Ames Laboratory scientist Karl Gschneidner Jr., explains the importance of rare-earth materials in many of the technologies we use today -- ranging from computers to hybrid cars to wind turbines. Gschneidner is a world renowned rare-earths expert at the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory.

  17. Ames Lab 101: Rare Earths

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gschneidner, Karl

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    "Mr. Rare Earth," Ames Laboratory scientist Karl Gschneidner Jr., explains the importance of rare-earth materials in many of the technologies we use today -- ranging from computers to hybrid cars to wind turbines. Gschneidner is a world renowned rare-earths expert at the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory.

  18. 2014 Earth Day | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Earth Day 2014 Argonne Earth Day event 1 of 43 2014 Argonne Earth Day event As part of the lab's April 22, 2014 Earth Day celebration, children from Argonne's Child Development...

  19. Earth's Decelerating Tectonic Plates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forte, A M; Moucha, R; Rowley, D B; Quere, S; Mitrovica, J X; Simmons, N A; Grand, S P

    2008-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Space geodetic and oceanic magnetic anomaly constraints on tectonic plate motions are employed to determine a new global map of present-day rates of change of plate velocities. This map shows that Earth's largest plate, the Pacific, is presently decelerating along with several other plates in the Pacific and Indo-Atlantic hemispheres. These plate decelerations contribute to an overall, globally averaged slowdown in tectonic plate speeds. The map of plate decelerations provides new and unique constraints on the dynamics of time-dependent convection in Earth's mantle. We employ a recently developed convection model constrained by seismic, geodynamic and mineral physics data to show that time-dependent changes in mantle buoyancy forces can explain the deceleration of the major plates in the Pacific and Indo-Atlantic hemispheres.

  20. Superhydrophobic diatomaceous earth

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Simpson, John T. (Clinton, TN); D'Urso, Brian R. (Clinton, TN)

    2012-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A superhydrophobic powder is prepared by coating diatomaceous earth (DE) with a hydrophobic coating on the particle surface such that the coating conforms to the topography of the DE particles. The hydrophobic coating can be a self assembly monolayer of a perfluorinated silane coupling agent. The DE is preferably natural-grade DE where organic impurities have been removed. The superhydrophobic powder can be applied as a suspension in a binder solution to a substrate to produce a superhydrophobic surface on the substrate.

  1. Aperture calculation of the Pierre Auger Observatory surface detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allard, D.; Allekotte, I.; Armengaud, E.; Aublin, J.; Bertou, Xavier; Chou, A.; Ghia, P.L.; Gomez Berisso, M.; Hamilton, J.C.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; Medina, C.; Navarra, G.; Parizot, E.; Tripathi, A.

    2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We determine the instantaneous aperture and integrated exposure of the surface detector of the Pierre Auger Observatory, taking into account the trigger efficiency as a function of the energy, arrival direction (with zenith angle lower than 60 degrees) and nature of the primary cosmic-ray. We make use of the so-called Lateral Trigger Probability function (or LTP) associated with an extensive air shower, which summarizes all the relevant information about the physics of the shower, the water tank Cherenkov detector, and the triggers.

  2. The Astrophysical Virtual Observatory to EURO-VO Transition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Padovani

    2005-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The Astrophysical Virtual Observatory (AVO) initiative, jointly funded by the European Commission and six European organisations, had the task of creating the foundations of a regional scale infrastructure by conducting a research and demonstration programme on the VO scientific requirements and necessary technologies. The AVO project is now formally concluded. I highlight AVO's main achievements and then describe its successor, the EURO-VO project. With its three new interlinked structures, the Data Centre Alliance, the Facility Centre, and the Technology Centre, the EURO-VO is the logical next step for the deployment of an operational VO in Europe.

  3. The Torino Observatory Parallax Program: White Dwarf Candidates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. L. Smart; M. G. Lattanzi; B. Bucciarelli; G. Massone; R. Casalegno; G. Chiumiento; R. Drimmel; L. Lanteri; F. Marocco; A. Spagna

    2003-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We present parallax determinations for six white dwarf candidates in the Torino Observatory Parallax Program. The absolute parallaxes are found with precisions at the 2-3 milliarcsecond level. For WD 1126+185 we find a distance incompatible with being a white dwarf, implying an incorrect classification. For WD 2216+484 we find our distance is consistent with a simple DA white dwarf rather than a composite system as previously proposed in the literature. In general it is found that the published photometric distance is an overestimate of the distance found here.

  4. Performance of the Pierre Auger Observatory Surface Detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tiina Suomijarvi for the Pierre Auger Collaboration

    2007-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The Surface Detector of the Pierre Auger Observatory will consist of 1600 water Cherenkov tanks sampling ground particles of air showers produced by energetic cosmic rays. The arrival times are obtained from GPS and power is provided by solar panels. The construction of the array is nearly completed and a large number of detectors has been operational for more than three years. In this paper the performance of different components of the detectors are discussed. The accuracy of the signal measurement and the trigger stability are presented. The performance of the solar power system and other hardware, as well as the water purity and its long-term stability are discussed.

  5. Characterizing the Habitable Zones of Exoplanetary Systems with a Large Ultraviolet/Visible/Near-IR Space Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    France, Kevin; Linsky, Jeffrey; Roberge, Aki; Ayres, Thomas; Barman, Travis; Brown, Alexander; Davenport, James; Desert, Jean-Michel; Domagal-Goldman, Shawn; Fleming, Brian; Fontenla, Juan; Fossati, Luca; Froning, Cynthia; Hallinan, Gregg; Hawley, Suzanne; Hu, Renyu; Kaltenegger, Lisa; Kasting, James; Kowlaski, Adam; Loyd, Parke; Mauas, Pablo; Miguel, Yamila; Osten, Rachel; Redfield, Seth; Rugheimer, Sarah; Schneider, Christian; Segura, Antigona; Stocke, John; Tian, Feng; Tumlinson, Jason; Vieytes, Mariela; Walkowicz, Lucianne; Wood, Brian; Youngblood, Allison

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Understanding the surface and atmospheric conditions of Earth-size, rocky planets in the habitable zones (HZs) of low-mass stars is currently one of the greatest astronomical endeavors. Knowledge of the planetary effective surface temperature alone is insufficient to accurately interpret biosignature gases when they are observed in the coming decades. The UV stellar spectrum drives and regulates the upper atmospheric heating and chemistry on Earth-like planets, is critical to the definition and interpretation of biosignature gases, and may even produce false-positives in our search for biologic activity. This white paper briefly describes the scientific motivation for panchromatic observations of exoplanetary systems as a whole (star and planet), argues that a future NASA UV/Vis/near-IR space observatory is well-suited to carry out this work, and describes technology development goals that can be achieved in the next decade to support the development of a UV/Vis/near-IR flagship mission in the 2020s.

  6. Earth's extensive entropy bound

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. M. Lisewski

    2012-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The possibility of planetary mass black hole production by crossing entropy limits is addressed. Such a possibility is given by pointing out that two geophysical quantities have comparable values: first, Earth's total negative entropy flux integrated over geological time and, second, its extensive entropy bound, which follows as a tighter bound to the Bekenstein limit when entropy is an extensive function. The similarity between both numbers suggests that the formation of black holes from planets may be possible through a strong fluctuation toward thermodynamic equilibrium which results in gravothermal instability and final collapse. Briefly discussed are implications for the astronomical observation of low mass black holes and for Fermi's paradox.

  7. A Star on Earth

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Prager, Stewart; Zwicker, Andrew; Hammet, Greg; Tresemer, Kelsey; Diallo, Ahmed

    2014-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

    At the Energy Department's Princeton Plasma Physics Lab, scientists are trying to accomplish what was once considered the realm of science fiction: create a star on Earth. The National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) is a magnetic fusion device that is used to study the physics principles of spherically shaped plasmas -- hot ionized gases in which, under the right conditions, nuclear fusion will occur. Fusion is the energy source of the sun and all of the stars. Not just limited to theoretical work, the NSTX is enabling cutting-edge research to develop fusion as a future energy source.

  8. A Star on Earth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prager, Stewart; Zwicker, Andrew; Hammet, Greg; Tresemer, Kelsey; Diallo, Ahmed

    2014-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    At the Energy Department's Princeton Plasma Physics Lab, scientists are trying to accomplish what was once considered the realm of science fiction: create a star on Earth. The National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) is a magnetic fusion device that is used to study the physics principles of spherically shaped plasmas -- hot ionized gases in which, under the right conditions, nuclear fusion will occur. Fusion is the energy source of the sun and all of the stars. Not just limited to theoretical work, the NSTX is enabling cutting-edge research to develop fusion as a future energy source.

  9. Earth-sheltered apartments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Germer, J.

    1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Earth-sheltered apartments for students at St. Johns University, Collegeville, MN are described. The intent was to provide energy-efficient, low maintenance housing in a neighborhood environment for the students. Students would learn about energy-conscious architecture from living in the buildings. The buildings have had few problems, but energy performance has not been up to expectations. The consumption of electricity exceeded predictions by 49%. The most likely answer to the problem is deviation from design. Several items of energy-efficient design were specified but deleted in order to cut costs.

  10. Earth, Space Sciences

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy,ARMFormsGasRelease Date:research community -- hosted byColdNewsEarlyEarth,

  11. Earth & Environmental Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField Campaign:INEA :Work4/11 ENVIROISSUESEVALUATINGG7.0EXPOHomeII)Earth

  12. Earth and Environmental Sciences

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisitingContract ManagementDiscoveringESnet UpdateEarth Week event all about energyEES

  13. Astrophysical Sources of Cosmic Rays and Related Measurements with the Pierre Auger Observatory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abraham, : J.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Aguirre, C.; Ahn, E.J.; Allard, D.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Alvarez-Muniz, J.; Ambrosio, M.; Anchordoqui, L.

    2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    These are presentations to be presented at the 31st International Cosmic Ray Conference, in Lodz, Poland during July 2009. It consists of the following presentations: (1) Correlation of the highest energy cosmic rays with nearby extragalactic objects in Pierre Auger Observatory data; (2) Discriminating potential astrophysical sources of the highest energy cosmic rays with the Pierre Auger Observatory; (3) Intrinsic anisotropy of the UHECR from the Pierre Auger Observatory; (4) Ultra-high energy photon studies with the Pierre Auger Observatory; (5) Limits on the flux of diffuse ultra high energy neutrinos set using the Pierre Auger Observatory; (6) Search for sidereal modulation of the arrival directions of events recorded at the Pierre Auger Observatory; (7) Cosmic Ray Solar Modulation Studies in the Pierre Auger Observatory; (8) Investigation of the Displacement Angle of the Highest Energy Cosmic Rays Caused by the Galactic Magnetic Field; (9) Search for coincidences with astrophysical transients in Pierre Auger Observatory data; and (10) An alternative method for determining the energy of hybrid events at the Pierre Auger Observatory.

  14. The Cosmic Ray Energy Spectrum and Related Measurements with the Pierre Auger Observatory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abraham, : J.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Aguirre, C.; Ahn, E.J.; Allard, D.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Alvarez-Muniz, J.; Ambrosio, M.; Anchordoqui, L.

    2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    These are presentations to be presented at the 31st International Cosmic Ray Conference, in Lodz, Poland during July 2009. It consists of the following presentations: (1) Measurement of the cosmic ray energy spectrum above 10{sup 18} eV with the Pierre Auger Observatory; (2) The cosmic ray flux observed at zenith angles larger than 60 degrees with the Pierre Auger Observatory; (3) Energy calibration of data recorded with the surface detectors of the Pierre Auger Observatory; (4) Exposure of the Hybrid Detector of The Pierre Auger Observatory; and (5) Energy scale derived from Fluorescence Telescopes using Cherenkov Light and Shower Universality.

  15. Digital Elevation Model, 0.5-m, Barrow Environmental Observatory, Alaska, 2012

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Gangodagamage, Chandana; Wilson, Cathy; Rowland, Joel

    The dataset is a digital elevation model, DEM, of a 2km by 7km region in the vicinity of the Barrow Environmental Observatory near Barrow, Ak.

  16. Digital Elevation Model, 0.5-m, Barrow Environmental Observatory, Alaska, 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gangodagamage, Chandana; Wilson, Cathy; Rowland, Joel

    2013-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The dataset is a digital elevation model, DEM, of a 2km by 7km region in the vicinity of the Barrow Environmental Observatory near Barrow, Ak.

  17. LAGOVirtual: A Collaborative Environment for the Large Aperture GRB Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Camacho; R. Chacon; G. Diaz; C. Guada; V. Hamar; H. Hoeger; A. Melfo; L. A. Nunez; Y. Perez; C. Quintero; M. Rosales; R. Torrens; the LAGO Collaboration

    2009-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the LAGOVirtual Project: an ongoing project to develop platform to collaborate in the Large Aperture GRB Observatory (LAGO). This continental-wide observatory is devised to detect high energy (around 100 GeV) component of Gamma Ray Bursts, by using the single particle technique in arrays of Water Cherenkov Detectors (WCD) at high mountain sites (Chacaltaya, Bolivia, 5300 m a.s.l., Pico Espejo, Venezuela, 4750 m a.s.l., Sierra Negra, Mexico, 4650 m a.s.l). This platform will allow LAGO collaboration to share data, and computer resources through its different sites. This environment has the possibility to generate synthetic data by simulating the showers through AIRES application and to store/preserve distributed data files collected by the WCD at the LAGO sites. The present article concerns the implementation of a prototype of LAGO-DR adapting DSpace, with a hierarchical structure (i.e. country, institution, followed by collections that contain the metadata and data files), for the captured/simulated data. This structure was generated by using the community, sub-community, collection, item model; available at the DSpace software. Each member institution-country of the project has the appropriate permissions on the system to publish information (descriptive metadata and associated data files). The platform can also associate multiple files to each item of data (data from the instruments, graphics, postprocessed-data, etc.).

  18. LAGOVirtual: A Collaborative Environment for the Large Aperture GRB Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Camacho, R; Diaz, G; Guada, C; Hamar, V; Hoeger, H; Melfo, A; Nunez, L A; Perez, Y; Quintero, C; Rosales, M; Torrens, R

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the LAGOVirtual Project: an ongoing project to develop platform to collaborate in the Large Aperture GRB Observatory (LAGO). This continental-wide observatory is devised to detect high energy (around 100 GeV) component of Gamma Ray Bursts, by using the single particle technique in arrays of Water Cherenkov Detectors (WCD) at high mountain sites (Chacaltaya, Bolivia, 5300 m a.s.l., Pico Espejo, Venezuela, 4750 m a.s.l., Sierra Negra, Mexico, 4650 m a.s.l). This platform will allow LAGO collaboration to share data, and computer resources through its different sites. This environment has the possibility to generate synthetic data by simulating the showers through AIRES application and to store/preserve distributed data files collected by the WCD at the LAGO sites. The present article concerns the implementation of a prototype of LAGO-DR adapting DSpace, with a hierarchical structure (i.e. country, institution, followed by collections that contain the metadata and data files), for the captured/simulate...

  19. Creating a Star on Earth

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    At the Energy Department's Princeton Plasma Physics Lab, scientists are trying to accomplish what was once considered the realm of science fiction: creating a star on Earth.

  20. Earth Day 2014 Photo Contest

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Earth Day 2014 Photo Contest CALLING ALL PHOTOGRAPHERS Professionals, amateurs, and the camera sharp shooter We invite all DOE employees and DOE contractors to share images of...

  1. Earth Sciences Take on the world

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waikato, University of

    Earth Sciences Take on the world Career paths Earth Sciences graduate Gerard Bird. Careers Coastal engineer Environmental consultant Earth scientist Engineering geologist Environmental Email: science@waikato.ac.nz Visit: www.earth.waikato.ac.nz earth sCienCes Surrounded by diverse

  2. Earth and Sustainability 1. General Information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utrecht, Universiteit

    Earth and Sustainability 1. General Information Deans: Prof. dr. G.J. van der Zwaan (Faculty of Geosciences) Prof. dr. ir. A. Bliek (Faculty of Science) Constituting faculty focus areas: Solid Earth (Dept. Earth Sciences), Earth Surface Analysis (Depts. Earth Sciences, Physical Geography), Climate and Global

  3. Geoengineering the Earth's Climate

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Google Tech Talks

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Emergency preparedness is generally considered to be a good thing, yet there is no plan regarding what we might do should we be faced with a climate emergency. Such an emergency could take the form of a rapid shift in precipitation patterns, a collapse of the great ice sheets, the imminent triggering of strong climate system feedbacks, or perhaps the loss of valuable ecosystems. Over the past decade, we have used climate models to investigate the potential to reverse some of the effects of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere by deflecting some incoming sunlight back to space. This would probably be most cost-effectively achieved with the placement of small particles in or above the stratosphere. Our model simulations indicate that such geoengineering approaches could potentially bring our climate closer to the state is was in prior to the introduction of greenhouse gases. This talk will present much of what is known about such geoengineering approaches, and raise a range of issues likely to stimulate lively discussion. Speaker: Ken Caldeira Ken Caldeira is a scientist at the Carnegie Institution Department of Global Ecology and a Professor (by courtesy) at the Stanford University Department of Environmental and Earth System Sciences. Previously, he worked for 12 years in the Energy and Environment Directorate at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (Department of Energy). His research interests include the numerical simulation of Earth's climate, carbon, and biogeochemistry; ocean acidification; climate emergency response systems; evaluating approaches to supplying environmentally-friendly energy services; ocean carbon sequestration; long-term evolution of climate and geochemical cycles; and marine biogeochemical cycles. Caldeira has a B.A. in Philosophy from Rutgers College and an M.S. and Ph.D. in Atmospheric Sciences from New York University.

  4. 2006 Minerals Yearbook RARE EARTHS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    bastnäsite. Rare earths were not mined in the United States in 2006; however, the mine and plant at Mountain-earth ores were primarily mined in China, with lesser amounts coming from Brazil, India, and Russia. Domestic, cerium, praseodymium, neodymium, promethium, samarium, europium, gadolinium, terbium, dysprosium, holmium

  5. Temperature, Temperature, Earth, geotherm for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Treiman, Allan H.

    Temperature, Temperature, Earth, geotherm for total global heat flow Venus, geotherm for total global heat flow, 500 Ma #12;Temperature, Temperature, #12;Earth's modern regional continental geotherms Venusian Geotherms, 500 Ma Temperature, Temperature, After Blatt, Tracy, and Owens Petrology #12;Ca2Mg5Si8

  6. Effort on Developing Cabled Ocean Observatories Research Assitant, Institute of Mechatronics Control Engineering, Zhejiang University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frandsen, Jannette B.

    of Mechatronics Control Engineering, Zhejiang University Post-doctoral Research Fellow, Department of Ocean and Resources Engineering, University of Hawaii Abstract Cabled ocean observatory that enables abundant powerEffort on Developing Cabled Ocean Observatories in China Yanhu Chen Research Assitant, Institute

  7. Engineering in the service of science; construction of a cabled ocean observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frandsen, Jannette B.

    Engineering in the service of science; construction of a cabled ocean observatory Mr. Peter Phibbs for maintenance can quickly make a system uneconomic. Peter Phibbs was project manager for the $75M construction ocean observatory, and went into operation fifteen months ago. The infrastructure demonstrates not only

  8. Thompson March 2003 -1STEREO -Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory Mission STEREO GS PR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson ­ March 2003 - 1STEREO - Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory Mission STEREO GS PR STEREO Science Center (SSC) William T. Thompson STEREO Science Center Code 682, NASA-Goddard (William.T.Thompson@gsfc.nasa.gov 301-286-2040) #12;Thompson ­ March 2003 - 2STEREO - Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory Mission

  9. The Telescope Control System of the New Solar Telescope at Big Bear Solar Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    mirror (M1) and its alignment with the secondary mirror (M2) will be actively controlled. HighThe Telescope Control System of the New Solar Telescope at Big Bear Solar Observatory G. Yang*a, J of Technology, 323 Martin Luther King Blvd., Newark, NJ 07104; bBig Bear Solar Observatory, 40386 North Shore

  10. GOALS: The Great Observatories All-Sky LIRG Survey J. M. MAZZARELLA,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spoon, Henrik

    GOALS: The Great Observatories All-Sky LIRG Survey L. ARMUS,1 J. M. MAZZARELLA,2 A. S. EVANS,3,4 J. The Great Observatories All-Sky LIRG Survey (GOALS20 ) combines data from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope 200 low-redshift (z Luminous Infrared Galaxies (LIRGs). The LIRGs are a complete subset

  11. Phase stable rare earth garnets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kuntz, Joshua D.; Cherepy, Nerine J.; Roberts, Jeffery J.; Payne, Stephen A.

    2013-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A transparent ceramic according to one embodiment includes a rare earth garnet comprising A.sub.hB.sub.iC.sub.jO.sub.12, where h is 3.+-.10%, i is 2.+-.10%, and j is 3.+-.10%. A includes a rare earth element or a mixture of rare earth elements, B includes at least one of aluminum, gallium and scandium, and C includes at least one of aluminum, gallium and scandium, where A is at a dodecahedral site of the garnet, B is at an octahedral site of the garnet, and C is at a tetrahedral site of the garnet. In one embodiment, the rare earth garment has scintillation properties. A radiation detector in one embodiment includes a transparent ceramic as described above and a photo detector optically coupled to the rare earth garnet.

  12. X-Ray Emission from Jupiter, Saturn, and Earth: A Short Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anil Bhardwaj

    2006-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Jupiter, Saturn, and Earth - the three planets having dense atmosphere and a well developed magnetosphere - are known to emit X-rays. Recently, Chandra X-ray Observatory has observed X-rays from these planets, and XMM-Newton has observed them from Jupiter and Saturn. These observations have provided improved morphological, temporal, and spectral characteristics of X-rays from these planets. Both auroral and non-auroral (low-latitude) 'disk' X-ray emissions have been observed on Earth and Jupiter. X-rays have been detected from Saturn's disk, but no convincing evidence for X-ray aurora on Saturn has been observed. The non-auroral disk X-ray emissions from Jupiter, Saturn, and Earth, are mostly produced due to scattering of solar X-rays. X-ray aurora on Earth is mainly generated via bremsstrahlung from precipitating electrons and on Jupiter via charge exchange of highlyionized energetic heavy ions precipitating into the polar atmosphere. Recent unpublished work suggests that at higher (>2 keV) energies electron bremsstrahlung also plays a role in Jupiter's X-ray aurora. This paper summarizes the recent results of X-ray observations on Jupiter, Saturn, and Earth mainly in the soft energy (~0.1-2.0 keV) band and provides a comparative overview.

  13. AVOCADO: A Virtual Observatory Census to Address Dwarfs Origins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sánchez-Janssen, Rubén

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dwarf galaxies are by far the most abundant of all galaxy types, yet their properties are still poorly understood -especially due to the observational challenge that their intrinsic faintness represents. AVOCADO aims at establishing firm conclusions on their formation and evolution by constructing a homogeneous, multiwavelength dataset for a statistically significant sample of several thousand nearby dwarfs (-18 < Mi < -14). Using public data and Virtual Observatory tools, we have built GALEX+SDSS+2MASS spectral energy distributions that are fitted by a library of single stellar population models. Star formation rates, stellar masses, ages and metallicities are further complemented with structural parameters that can be used to classify them morphologically. This unique dataset, coupled with a detailed characterization of each dwar's environment, allows for a fully comprehensive investigation of their origins and to track the (potential) evolutionary paths between the different dwarf types.

  14. The Theoretical Astrophysical Observatory: Cloud-Based Mock Galaxy Catalogues

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernyk, Maksym; Tonini, Chiara; Hodkinson, Luke; Hassan, Amr H; Garel, Thibault; Duffy, Alan R; Mutch, Simon J; Poole, Gregory B

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce the Theoretical Astrophysical Observatory (TAO), an online virtual laboratory that houses mock observations of galaxy survey data. Such mocks have become an integral part of the modern analysis pipeline. However, building them requires an expert knowledge of galaxy modelling and simulation techniques, significant investment in software development, and access to high performance computing. These requirements make it difficult for a small research team or individual to quickly build a mock catalogue suited to their needs. To address this TAO offers access to multiple cosmological simulations and semi-analytic galaxy formation models from an intuitive and clean web interface. Results can be funnelled through science modules and sent to a dedicated supercomputer for further processing and manipulation. These modules include the ability to (1) construct custom observer light-cones from the simulation data cubes; (2) generate the stellar emission from star formation histories, apply dust extinction, a...

  15. Optical calibration hardware for the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. A. Moffat; R. J. Ford; F. A. Duncan; K. Graham; A. L. Hallin; C. A. W. Hearns; J. Maneira; P. Skensved; D. R. Grant

    2005-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The optical properties of the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) heavy water Cherenkov neutrino detector are measured in situ using a light diffusing sphere ("laserball"). This diffuser is connected to a pulsed nitrogen/dye laser via specially developed underwater optical fibre umbilical cables. The umbilical cables are designed to have a small bending radius, and can be easily adapted for a variety of calibration sources in SNO. The laserball is remotely manipulated to many positions in the D2O and H2O volumes, where data at six different wavelengths are acquired. These data are analysed to determine the absorption and scattering of light in the heavy water and light water, and the angular dependence of the response of the detector's photomultiplier tubes. This paper gives details of the physical properties, construction, and optical characteristics of the laserball and its associated hardware.

  16. Single Ion Trapping for the Enriched Xenon Observatory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waldman, Samuel J.; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SLAC; ,

    2006-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    In the last decade, a variety of neutrino oscillation experiments have established that there is a mass difference between neutrino flavors, without determining the absolute neutrino mass scale. The Enriched Xenon Observatory for neutrinoless double beta decay (EXO) will search for the rare decays of xenon to determine the absolute value of the neutrino mass. The experiment uses a novel technique to minimize backgrounds, identifying the decay daughter product in real time using single ion spectroscopy. Here, we describe single ion trapping and spectroscopy compatible with the EXO detector. We extend the technique of single ion trapping in ultrahigh vacuum to trapping in xenon gas. With this technique, EXO will achieve a neutrino mass sensitivity of {approx_equal} .010 eV.

  17. VAMOS: a Pathfinder for the HAWC Gamma-Ray Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abeysekara, A U; Alvarez, C; Álvarez, J D; Ángeles, F; Arceo, R; Arteaga-Velázquez, J C; Avila-Aroche, A; Solares, H A Ayala; Badillo, C; Barber, A S; Baughman, B M; Bautista-Elivar, N; Gonzalez, J Becerra; Belmont, E; Benítez, E; BenZvi, S Y; Berley, D; Bernal, A; Rosales, M Bonilla; Braun, J; Caballero-Lopez, R A; Caballero-Mora, K S; Cabrera, I; Carramiñana, A; Castañeda-Martínez, L; Castillo, M; Cotti, U; Cotzomi, J; de la Fuente, E; De León, C; DeYoung, T; Diaz-Azuara, A; Diaz-Cruz, L; Hernandez, R Diaz; Díaz-Vélez, J C; Dingus, B L; Dultzin, D; DuVernois, M A; Ellsworth, R W; Fernandez, A; Fiorino, D W; Fraija, N; Galindo, A; García-Torales, G; Garfias, F; González, A; González, L X; González, M M; Goodman, J A; Grabski, V; Gussert, M; Guzmán-Cerón, C; Hampel-Arias, Z; Harding, J P; Hernández-Cervantes, L; Hui, C M; Hüntemeyer, P; Imran, A; Iriarte, A; Karn, P; Kieda, D; Kunde, G J; Langarica, R; Lara, A; Lara, G; Lauer, R J; Lee, W H; Lennarz, D; Vargas, H León; Linares, E C; Linnemann, J T; Longo, M; Luna-Garcia, R; Marinelli, A; Martínez, L A; Martínez, H; Martínez, O; Martínez-Castro, J; Martos, M; Matthews, J A J; McEnery, J; Torres, E Mendoza; Miranda-Romagnoli, P; Moreno, E; Mostafá, M; Nava, J; Nellen, L; Newbold, M; Noriega-Papaqui, R; Oceguera-Becerra, T; Page, D P; Patricelli, B; Pelayo, R; Pérez-Pérez, E G; Pretz, J; Ramírez, I; Renter, A; Rivière, C; Rosa-González, D; Ruiz-Sala, F; Ruiz-Velasco, E L; Ryan, J; Sacahui, J R; Salazar, H; Salesa, F; Sandoval, A; Santos, E; Schneider, M; Silich, S; Sinnis, G; Smith, A J; Woodle, K Sparks; Springer, R W; Suarez, F; Taboada, I; Tepe, A; Toale, P A; Tollefson, K; Torres, I; Tinoco, S; Ukwatta, T N; Galicia, J F Valdés; Vanegas, P; Vázquez, A; Villaseñor, L; Wall, W; Weisgarber, T; Westerhoff, S; Wisher, I G; Wood, J; Yodh, G B; Younk, P W; Zaborov, D; Zepeda, A; Zhou, H

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    VAMOS was a prototype detector built in 2011 at an altitude of 4100m a.s.l. in the state of Puebla, Mexico. The aim of VAMOS was to finalize the design, construction techniques and data acquisition system of the HAWC observatory. HAWC is an air-shower array currently under construction at the same site of VAMOS with the purpose to study the TeV sky. The VAMOS setup included six water Cherenkov detectors and two different data acquisition systems. It was in operation between October 2011 and May 2012 with an average live time of 30%. Besides the scientific verification purposes, the eight months of data were used to obtain the results presented in this paper: the detector response to the Forbush decrease of March 2012, and the analysis of possible emission, at energies above 30 GeV, for long gamma-ray bursts GRB111016B and GRB120328B.

  18. Earth analysis methods, subsurface feature detection methods, earth analysis devices, and articles of manufacture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    West, Phillip B. (Idaho Falls, ID); Novascone, Stephen R. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wright, Jerry P. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2012-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Earth analysis methods, subsurface feature detection methods, earth analysis devices, and articles of manufacture are described. According to one embodiment, an earth analysis method includes engaging a device with the earth, analyzing the earth in a single substantially lineal direction using the device during the engaging, and providing information regarding a subsurface feature of the earth using the analysis.

  19. Earth analysis methods, subsurface feature detection methods, earth analysis devices, and articles of manufacture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    West, Phillip B. (Idaho Falls, ID); Novascone, Stephen R. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wright, Jerry P. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2011-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Earth analysis methods, subsurface feature detection methods, earth analysis devices, and articles of manufacture are described. According to one embodiment, an earth analysis method includes engaging a device with the earth, analyzing the earth in a single substantially lineal direction using the device during the engaging, and providing information regarding a subsurface feature of the earth using the analysis.

  20. Heterogeneity and Flow in the Deep Earth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cottaar, Sanne

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The age of the inner core. Earth Planet. Sc. Lett. 190 (3-1995. The composition of the Earth 1. Chem. Geol. 120 (3-4),thermal evolution of the Earths core. J. Geophys. Res 101,

  1. EARTH SCIENCES DIVISION ANNUAL REPORT 1978

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of electrolytes: IX, rare earth chlorides, nitrates, andU E OF AQUIFER RESPONSE TO EARTH TIDES AS A MEANS O F SLawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Earth Sciences Division, 1977.

  2. Celebrate Earth Day! | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Earth Day Celebrate Earth Day April 20, 2010 - 10:25am Addthis Chris Stewart Senior Communicator at DOE's National Renewable Energy Laboratory Earth Day is a great time to commit...

  3. Introduction: Observatory Techniques in Nineteenth-Century Science and Society David Aubin, Charlotte Bigg, and H. Otto Sibum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aubin, David

    >David Aubin, Charlotte Bigg, and H. Otto Sibum Observatories--Temples of the most sublime of the sciences

  4. Search for: "earth modeling" | DOE PAGES

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    earth modeling" Find + Advanced Search Advanced Search All Fields: "earth modeling" Title: Full Text: Bibliographic Data: Creator Author: Name Name ORCID Search Authors Type:...

  5. Sandia National Laboratories: Earth Sciences Research Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Earth Sciences Research Center Officials Turn to Sandia National Labs for Help on Huge Sinkhole On October 15, 2012, in Capabilities, Earth Sciences Research Center, Modeling &...

  6. Planning Near Earth Asteroid Observations on a 1m Class Telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ovidiu Vaduvescu; Mirel Birlan

    2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The number of known Near Earth Asteroids (NEAs) and Potentially Hazardous Asteroids (PHAs) has continued to grow in the last decade. Follow-up and recovery of newly discovered objects, as well as new astrometry at second or third oppositions are necessary to improve their orbits and predict any potential collision with the Earth in the future. A project to follow-up and recovery PHAs and NEAs is proposed, using 1m class telescopes in the next two years. Two incoming runs will take place first at Pic du Midi Observatory (France) and SAAO (South Africa), both to use 1m telescopes. Other observing runs are sought in the future. Collaborators to extend this project are welcomed.

  7. Earth and Moon orbital anomalies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ll. Bel

    2014-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A time-dependent gravitational constant or mass would correctly describe the suspected increasing of both: the Astronomical unit and the eccentricity of the Lunar orbit around the Earth.

  8. Introduction Flattening the Earth Continuation procedure Flat Earth Numerical simulations Continuation from a flat to a round Earth model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Introduction Flattening the Earth Continuation procedure Flat Earth Numerical simulations Continuation from a flat to a round Earth model in the coplanar orbit transfer problem M. Cerf1, T. Haberkorn, SADCO 2011, March 2nd M. Cerf, T. Haberkorn, E. Tr´elat Continuation from a flat to a round Earth model

  9. Through-the-earth radio

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reagor, David; Vasquez-Dominguez, Jose

    2006-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A through-the-earth communication system that includes a digital signal input device; a transmitter operating at a predetermined frequency sufficiently low to effectively penetrate useful distances through-the earth; a data compression circuit that is connected to an encoding processor; an amplifier that receives encoded output from the encoding processor for amplifying the output and transmitting the data to an antenna; and a receiver with an antenna, a band pass filter, a decoding processor, and a data decompressor.

  10. 106 | Triennial Scientific Report EC-EARTH: goals, developments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stoffelen, Ad

    Earth'sglobalclimatesystemisstrongly affectedbytheinteractionsbetweenitsvarioussubsys- tems1) .Asaresult,attentionhasshiftedtothedevelop- mentofEarthSystemModels

  11. Earth: 15 Million Years Ago

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masataka Mizushima

    2008-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    In Einstein's general relativity theory the metric component gxx in the direction of motion (x-direction) of the sun deviates from unity due to a tensor potential caused by the black hole existing around the center of the galaxy. Because the solar system is orbiting around the galactic center at 200 km/s, the theory shows that the Newtonian gravitational potential due to the sun is not quite radial. At the present time, the ecliptic plane is almost perpendicular to the galactic plane, consistent with this modification of the Newtonian gravitational force. The ecliptic plane is assumed to maintain this orientation in the galactic space as it orbits around the galactic center, but the rotational angular momentum of the earth around its own axis can be assumed to be conserved. The earth is between the sun and the galactic center at the summer solstice all the time. As a consequence, the rotational axis of the earth would be parallel to the axis of the orbital rotation of the earth 15 million years ago, if the solar system has been orbiting around the galactic center at 200 km/s. The present theory concludes that the earth did not have seasons 15 million years ago. Therefore, the water on the earth was accumulated near the poles as ice and the sea level was very low. Geological evidence exists that confirms this effect. The resulting global ice-melting started 15 million years ago and is ending now.

  12. Day-night asymmetry of high and low energy solar neutrino events in Super-Kamiokande and in the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. L. Fogli; E. Lisi; D. Montanino; A. Palazzo

    2000-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

    In the context of solar neutrino oscillations among active states, we briefly discuss the current likelihood of Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein (MSW) solutions to the solar neutrino problem, which appear to be currently favored at large mixing, where small Earth regeneration effects might still be observable in Super-Kamiokande (SK) and in the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO). We point out that, since such effects are larger at high (low) solar neutrino energies for high (low) values of the mass square difference \\delta m^2, it may be useful to split the night-day rate asymmetry in two separate energy ranges. We show that the difference \\Delta of the night-day asymmetry at high and low energy may help to discriminate the two large-mixing solutions at low and high \\delta m^2 through a sign test, both in SK and in SNO, provided that the sensitivity to \\Delta can reach the (sub)percent level.

  13. Expanding Earth Sciences Research with Layerscape

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jakubowski, Mariusz H.

    Expanding Earth Sciences Research with Layerscape In Brief Websites: layerscape Earth in three-dimensional space and time. Oceanographers and earth scientists are using this free set of serious illness in the hospital was pneumonia." The Earth is a vast, complicated system comprised

  14. Earth: The Early Years We discuss ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Earth: The Early Years We discuss ... · What happened to the Earth during the first few billion)? · What is the relationship to (early) life? #12;Age of Earth James Ussher (17th C) biblical account: 6: 20-40 m.y. (million years!) Charles Darwin evolution >300 m.y. Lord Kelvin (1880's) cooling Earth: 50

  15. MIDDLE EARTH MOVE OUT INFORMATION 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrett, Jeffrey A.

    MIDDLE EARTH MOVE OUT INFORMATION 2013 Start thinking about the move-out process now. If you to you by your RA, sent to you by e-mail, and updated on the Middle Earth website (http://www.housing.uci.edu/housingOptions/Middle_Earth noon on June 15th must submit a written request to the Middle Earth Housing Office at middleearth

  16. CoastWatch Data in Google Earth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CoastWatch Data in Google Earth: A How-to Guide Peter Hollemans, Terrenus Earth Sciences Consultant for NOAA/NESDIS CoastWatch Operations Managers Meeting, June, 2007 #12;Peter Hollemans, Terrenus Earth Sciences Consultant for NOAA/NESDISJune, 2007 Talk Outline · About Google Earth · Preparing Data

  17. The Inner Solar System Characteristics of Earth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, Frederick M.

    The Inner Solar System #12;The Earth #12;Characteristics of Earth A terrestrial, rocky planet floats on mantle · Crust is created and destroyed #12;Characteristics of Earth Today Surface: · 70% water · 30% land Atmosphere: ·77% N2 ·21% O2 ·0.1% H2O ·+Ar, CO2, Ne #12;The Dynamic Earth Molten Core

  18. Whole Earth Structure and Plate Tectonics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whole Earth Structure and Plate Tectonics Earth Structure (2nd Edition), 2004 W.W. Norton & Co, New York Slide show by Ben van der Pluijm © WW Norton; unless noted otherwise #12;© EarthStructure (2nd ed evolution of Earth: from continental drift (early 1900's) to sea-floor spreading (early 1960's) to plate

  19. Earth and Space Sciences Geochemistry 111

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henkel, Werner

    Earth and Space Sciences #12;Geochemistry 111 5 Earth and Space Sciences Research in the realm of Earth and Space Sci- ences focusses on the observation and qualitative and quantitative description of natural phenom- ena on Earth and in the Universe, on the detailed study and experimental and computational

  20. Was Lepenski Vir an ancient Sun or Pleiades observatory?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pankovic, Vladan; Krmar, Miodrag

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work we consider some old hypotheses according to which remarkable mesolithic village Lepenski Vir (9500 -- 5500 BC) at the right (nearly west) Danube riverside in the Iron gate in Serbia was an ancient (one of the oldest) Sun observatory. We use method recently suggested by A. C. Sparavigna, concretely we use "freely available software" or local Sun radiation direction simulation computer programs. In this way we obtain and discuss pictures of the sunrise in the Lepenski Vir during winter and summer solstice and spring and autumn equinox in relation to position of the mountains, especially Treskavac (Trescovat) and Kukuvija at left (nearly east) Danube riverside (in Romania). While mountain Kukuvija represents really the marker for the Sun in date of the winter solstice, mountain Treskavac, in despite to usual opinions, does not represent a real marker for the Sun in date of the summer solstice. Sun rises behind Treskavac, roughly speaking, between 22.April and 1. May. It corresponds to year period w...

  1. The Large Observatory For x-ray Timing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feroci, M; Bozzo, E; Barret, D; Brandt, S; Hernanz, M; van der Klis, M; Pohl, M; Santangelo, A; Stella, L; Watts, A; Wilms, J; Zane, S; Ahangarianabhari, M; Albertus, C; Alford, M; Alpar, A; Altamirano, D; Alvarez, L; Amati, L; Amoros, C; Andersson, N; Antonelli, A; Argan, A; Artigue, R; Artigues, B; Atteia, J -L; Azzarello, P; Bakala, P; Baldazzi, G; Balman, S; Barbera, M; van Baren, C; Bhattacharyya, S; Baykal, A; Belloni, T; Bernardini, F; Bertuccio, G; Bianchi, S; Bianchini, A; Binko, P; Blay, P; Bocchino, F; Bodin, P; Bombaci, I; Bidaud, J -M Bonnet; Boutloukos, S; Bradley, L; Braga, J; Brown, E; Bucciantini, N; Burderi, L; Burgay, M; Bursa, M; Budtz-Jørgensen, C; Cackett, E; Cadoux, F R; Cais, P; Caliandro, G A; Campana, R; Campana, S; Capitanio, F; Casares, J; Casella, P; Castro-Tirado, A J; Cavazzuti, E; Cerda-Duran, P; Chakrabarty, D; Château, F; Chenevez, J; Coker, J; Cole, R; Collura, A; Cornelisse, R; Courvoisier, T; Cros, A; Cumming, A; Cusumano, G; D'Aì, A; D'Elia, V; Del Monte, E; De Luca, A; De Martino, D; Dercksen, J P C; De Pasquale, M; De Rosa, A; Del Santo, M; Di Cosimo, S; Diebold, S; Di Salvo, T; 1), I Donnarumma; (32), A Drago; (33), M Durant; (107), D Emmanoulopoulos; (135), M H Erkut; (85), P Esposito; (1, Y Evangelista; 1b),; (24), A Fabian; (34), M Falanga; (25), Y Favre; (35), C Feldman; (128), V Ferrari; (3), C Ferrigno; (133), M Finger; (36), M H Finger; (35, G W Fraser; +),; (2), M Frericks; (7), F Fuschino; (125), M Gabler; (37), D K Galloway; (6), J L Galvez Sanchez; (6), E Garcia-Berro; (10), B Gendre; (62), S Gezari; (39), A B Giles; (40), M Gilfanov; (10), P Giommi; (102), G Giovannini; (102), M Giroletti; (4), E Gogus; (105), A Goldwurm; (86), K Goluchová; (16), D Götz; (16), C Gouiffes; (56), M Grassi; (42), P Groot; (17), M Gschwender; (128), L Gualtieri; (32), C Guidorzi; (3), L Guy; (2), D Haas; (50), P Haensel; (29), M Hailey; (19), F Hansen; (42), D H Hartmann; (43), C A Haswell; (88), K Hebeler; (37), A Heger; (2), W Hermsen; (28), J Homan; (19), A Hornstrup; (23, R Hudec; 72),; (45), J Huovelin; (5), A Ingram; (2), J J M in't Zand; (27), G Israel; (20), K Iwasawa; (47), L Izzo; (2), H M Jacobs; (17), F Jetter; (118, T Johannsen; 127),; (2), H M Jacobs; (2), P Jonker; (126), J Josè; (49), P Kaaret; (123), G Kanbach; (23), V Karas; (6), D Karelin; (29), D Kataria; (49), L Keek; (29), T Kennedy; (17), D Klochkov; (50), W Kluzniak; (17), K Kokkotas; (45), S Korpela; (51), C Kouveliotou; (87), I Kreykenbohm; (2), L M Kuiper; (19), I Kuvvetli; (7), C Labanti; (52), D Lai; (53), F K Lamb; (2), P P Laubert; (105), F Lebrun; (8), D Lin; (29), D Linder; (54), G Lodato; (55), F Longo; (19), N Lund; (131), T J Maccarone; (14), D Macera; (8), S Maestre; (62), S Mahmoodifar; (17), D Maier; (56), P Malcovati; (120), I Mandel; (144), V Mangano; (50), A Manousakis; (7), M Marisaldi; (109), A Markowitz; (35), A Martindale; (59), G Matt; (107), I M McHardy; (60), A Melatos; (61), M Mendez; (85), S Mereghetti; (68), M Michalska; (20), S Migliari; (85, R Mignani; 108),; (62), M C Miller; (49), J M Miller; (57), T Mineo; (112), G Miniutti; (64), S Morsink; (65), C Motch; (13), S Motta; (66), M Mouchet; (8), G Mouret; (19), J Mula?ová; (1, F Muleri; 1b),; (140), T Muñoz-Darias; (95), I Negueruela; (28), J Neilsen; (43), A J Norton; (28), M Nowak; (35), P O'Brien; (19), P E H Olsen; (102), M Orienti; (99, M Orio; 110),; (7), M Orlandini; (68), P Orleanski; (35), J P Osborne; (69), R Osten; (70), F Ozel; (1, L Pacciani; 1b),; (119), M Paolillo; (6), A Papitto; (20), J M Paredes; (83, A Patruno; 141),; (71), B Paul; (17), E Perinati; (115), A Pellizzoni; (47), A V Penacchioni; (136), M A Perez; (72), V Petracek; (10), C Pittori; (95), J Pons; (6), J Portell; (115), A Possenti; (73), J Poutanen; (122), M Prakash; (16), P Le Provost; (70), D Psaltis; (8), D Rambaud; (8), P Ramon; (76), G Ramsay; (1, M Rapisarda; 1b),; (77), A Rachevski; (77), I Rashevskaya; (78), P S Ray; (6), N Rea; (80), S Reddy; (113, P Reig; 81),; (63), M Reina Aranda; (28), R Remillard; (62), C Reynolds; (124), L Rezzolla; (20), M Ribo; (2), R de la Rie; (115), A Riggio; (138), A Rios; (82, P Rodríguez- Gil; 104),; (16), J Rodriguez; (3), R Rohlfs; (57), P Romano; (83), E M R Rossi; (50), A Rozanska; (29), A Rousseau; (84), F Ryde; (63), L Sabau-Graziati; (6), G Sala; (85), R Salvaterra; (61), A Sanna; (134), J Sandberg; (130), S Scaringi; (16), S Schanne; (86), J Schee; (87), C Schmid; (117), S Shore; (27), R Schneider; (88), A Schwenk; (89), A D Schwope; (114), J -Y Seyler; (90), A Shearer; (29), A Smith; (58), D M Smith; (29), P J Smith; (23), V Sochora; (1), P Soffitta; (61), P Soleri; (29), A Spencer

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Large Observatory For x-ray Timing (LOFT) was studied within ESA M3 Cosmic Vision framework and participated in the final down-selection for a launch slot in 2022-2024. Thanks to the unprecedented combination of effective area and spectral resolution of its main instrument, LOFT will study the behaviour of matter under extreme conditions, such as the strong gravitational field in the innermost regions of accretion flows close to black holes and neutron stars, and the supra-nuclear densities in the interior of neutron stars. The science payload is based on a Large Area Detector (LAD, 10 m 2 effective area, 2-30 keV, 240 eV spectral resolution, 1 deg collimated field of view) and a WideField Monitor (WFM, 2-50 keV, 4 steradian field of view, 1 arcmin source location accuracy, 300 eV spectral resolution). The WFM is equipped with an on-board system for bright events (e.g. GRB) localization. The trigger time and position of these events are broadcast to the ground within 30 s from discovery. In this paper we ...

  2. The 16N Calibration Source for the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. R. Dragowsky; A. Hamer; Y. D. Chan; R. Deal; E. D. Earle; W. Frati; E. Gaudette; A. Hallin; C. Hearns; J. Hewett; G. Jonkmans; Y. Kajiyama; A. B. McDonald; B. A. Moffat; E. B. Norman; B. Sur; N. Tagg

    2001-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A calibration source using gamma-rays from 16N (t_1/2 = 7.13 s) beta-decay has been developed for the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) for the purpose of energy and other calibrations. The 16N is produced via the (n,p) reaction on 16O in the form of CO2 gas using 14-MeV neutrons from a commercially available Deuterium-Tritium (DT) generator. The 16N is produced in a shielding pit in a utility room near the SNO cavity and transferred to the water volumes (D2O or H2O) in a CO2 gas stream via small diameter capillary tubing. The bulk of the activity decays in a decay/trigger chamber designed to block the energetic beta-particles yet permit the primary branch 6.13 MeV gamma-rays to exit. Detection of the coincident beta-particles with plastic scintillator lining the walls of the decay chamber volume provides a tag for the SNO electronics. This paper gives details of the production, transfer, and triggering systems for this source along with a discussion of the source gamma-ray output and performance.

  3. Milagro - A TeV Observatory for Gamma Ray Bursts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dingus, B.L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (United States)

    2004-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Milagro is a large field of view ({approx} 2 sr), high duty cycle ({approx}90%), ground-based observatory sensitive to gamma-rays above {approx}100 GeV. This unique detector is ideal for observing the highest energy gamma-rays from gamma-ray bursts. The highest energy gamma rays supply very strong constraints on the nature of gamma-ray burst sources as well as fundamental physics. Because the highest energy gamma-rays are attenuated by pair production with the extragalactic infrared background light, Milagro's sensitivity decreases rapidly for bursts with redshift > 0.5. While only 10 % of bursts have been measured to be within z=0.5, these bursts are very well studied at all wavelengths resulting in the most complete understanding of GRB phenomena. Milagro has sufficient sensitivity in units of E2 dN/dE to detect VHE luminosities lower than the observed luminosities at {approx} 100 keV for these nearby bursts. Therefore, the launch of SWIFT and its ability to localize and measure redshifts of many bursts points to great future possibilities.

  4. Japanese Virtual Observatory (JVO) as an advanced astronomical research enviroment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y. Shirasaki; M. Tanaka; S. Kawanomoto; S. Honda; M. Ohishi; Y. Mizumoto; N. Yasuda; Y. Masunaga; Y. Ishihara; J. Tsutsumi; H. Nakamoto; Y. Kobayashi; M. Sakamoto

    2006-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the design and implementation of the Japanese Virtual Observatory (JVO) system. JVO is a portal site to various kinds of astronomical resources distributed all over the world. We have developed five components for constructing the portal: (1) registry, (2) data service, (3) workflow system, (4) data analysis service (5) portal GUI. Registry services are used for publishing and searching data services in the VO, and they are constructed using an OAI-PMH metadata harvesting protocol and a SOAP web service protocol so that VO standard architecture is applied. Data services are developed based on the Astronomical Data Query Language (ADQL) which is an international VO standard and an extension of the standard SQL. The toolkit for building the ADQL-based service is released to the public on the JVO web site. The toolkit also provides the protocol translation from a Simple Image Access Protocol (SIAP) to ADQL protocol, so that both the VO standard service can be constructed using our toolkit. In order to federate the distributed databases and analysis services, we have designed a workflow language which is described in XML and developed execution system of the workflow. We have succeeded to connect to a hundred of data resources of the world as of April 2006. We have applied this system to the study of QSO environment by federating a QSO database, a Subaru Suprim-Cam database, and some analysis services such a SExtractor and HyperZ web services. These experiences are described is this paper.

  5. Performance of the Pierre Auger Observatory Surface Array

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Pierre Auger Collaboration

    2005-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The surface detector of the Pierre Auger Observatory is a 1600 water Cherenkov tank array on a triangular 1.5 km grid. The signals from each tank are read out using three 9'' photomultipliers and processed at a sampling frequency of 40 MHz, from which a local digital trigger efficiently selects shower candidates. GPS signals are used for time synchronization and a wireless communication system connects all tanks to the central data acquisition system. Power is provided by a stand-alone solar panel system. With large ambient temperature variations, that can reach over 20 degrees in 24 hours, high salinity, dusty air, high humidity inside the tank, and remoteness of access, the performance and reliability of the array is a challenge. Several key parameters are constantly monitored to ensure consistent operation. The Surface Array has currently over 750 detectors and has been in reliable operation since January 2004. Good uniformity in the response of different detectors and good long term stability is observed.

  6. Conceptual Design of the International Axion Observatory (IAXO)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Armengaud, E; Betz, M; Brax, P; Brun, P; Cantatore, G; Carmona, J M; Carosi, G P; Caspers, F; Caspi, S; Cetin, S A; Chelouche, D; Christensen, F E; Dael, A; Dafni, T; Davenport, M; Derbin, A V; Desch, K; Diago, A; Döbrich, B; Dratchnev, I; Dudarev, A; Eleftheriadis, C; Fanourakis, G; Ferrer-Ribas, E; Galán, J; García, J A; Garza, J G; Geralis, T; Gimeno, B; Giomataris, I; Gninenko, S; Gómez, H; González-Díaz, D; Guendelman, E; Hailey, C J; Hiramatsu, T; Hoffmann, D H H; Horns, D; Iguaz, F J; Irastorza, I G; Isern, J; Imai, K; Jakobsen, A C; Jaeckel, J; Jakov?i?, K; Kaminski, J; Kawasaki, M; Karuza, M; Kr?mar, M; Kousouris, K; Krieger, C; Laki?, B; Limousin, O; Lindner, A; Liolios, A; Luzón, G; Matsuki, S; Muratova, V N; Nones, C; Ortega, I; Papaevangelou, T; Pivovaroff, M J; Raffelt, G; Redondo, J; Ringwald, A; Russenschuck, S; Ruz, J; Saikawa, K; Savvidis, I; Sekiguchi, T; Semertzidis, Y K; Shilon, I; Sikivie, P; Silva, H; Kate, H ten; Tomas, A; Troitsky, S; Vafeiadis, T; Bibber, K van; Vedrine, P; Villar, J A; Vogel, J K; Walckiers, L; Weltman, A; Wester, W; Yildiz, S C; Zioutas, K

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The International Axion Observatory (IAXO) will be a forth generation axion helioscope. As its primary physics goal, IAXO will look for axions or axion-like particles (ALPs) originating in the Sun via the Primakoff conversion of the solar plasma photons. In terms of signal-to-noise ratio, IAXO will be about 4-5 orders of magnitude more sensitive than CAST, currently the most powerful axion helioscope, reaching sensitivity to axion-photon couplings down to a few $\\times 10^{-12}$ GeV$^{-1}$ and thus probing a large fraction of the currently unexplored axion and ALP parameter space. IAXO will also be sensitive to solar axions produced by mechanisms mediated by the axion-electron coupling $g_{ae}$ with sensitivity $-$for the first time$-$ to values of $g_{ae}$ not previously excluded by astrophysics. With several other possible physics cases, IAXO has the potential to serve as a multi-purpose facility for generic axion and ALP research in the next decade. In this paper we present the conceptual design of IAXO, w...

  7. Preliminary systems engineering evaluations for the National Ecological Observatory Network.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robertson, Perry J.; Kottenstette, Richard Joseph; Crouch, Shannon M.; Brocato, Robert Wesley; Zak, Bernard Daniel; Osborn, Thor D.; Ivey, Mark D.; Gass, Karl Leslie; Heller, Edwin J.; Dishman, James Larry; Schubert, William Kent; Zirzow, Jeffrey A.

    2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) is an ambitious National Science Foundation sponsored project intended to accumulate and disseminate ecologically informative sensor data from sites among 20 distinct biomes found within the United States and Puerto Rico over a period of at least 30 years. These data are expected to provide valuable insights into the ecological impacts of climate change, land-use change, and invasive species in these various biomes, and thereby provide a scientific foundation for the decisions of future national, regional, and local policy makers. NEON's objectives are of substantial national and international importance, yet they must be achieved with limited resources. Sandia National Laboratories was therefore contracted to examine four areas of significant systems engineering concern; specifically, alternatives to commercial electrical utility power for remote operations, approaches to data acquisition and local data handling, protocols for secure long-distance data transmission, and processes and procedures for the introduction of new instruments and continuous improvement of the sensor network. The results of these preliminary systems engineering evaluations are presented, with a series of recommendations intended to optimize the efficiency and probability of long-term success for the NEON enterprise.

  8. SNO Data: Results from Experiments at the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) was built 6800 feet under ground, in INCO's Creighton mine near Sudbury, Ontario. SNO is a heavy-water Cherenkov detector that is designed to detect neutrinos produced by fusion reactions in the sun. It uses 1000 tonnes of heavy water, on loan from Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL), contained in a 12 meter diameter acrylic vessel. Neutrinos react with the heavy water (D2O) to produce flashes of light called Cherenkov radiation. This light is then detected by an array of 9600 photomultiplier tubes mounted on a geodesic support structure surrounding the heavy water vessel. The detector is immersed in light (normal) water within a 30 meter barrel-shaped cavity (the size of a 10 story building!) excavated from Norite rock. Located in the deepest part of the mine, the overburden of rock shields the detector from cosmic rays. The detector laboratory is extremely clean to reduce background signals from radioactive elements present in the mine dust which would otherwise hide the very weak signal from neutrinos. (From http://www.sno.phy.queensu.ca/]

    The SNO website provides access to various datasets. See also the SNO Image Catalog at http://www.sno.phy.queensu.ca/sno/images/ and computer-generated images of SNO events at http://www.sno.phy.queensu.ca/sno/events/ and the list of published papers.

  9. An improved limit to the diffuse flux of ultra-high energy neutrinos from the Pierre Auger Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aab, Alexander; Aglietta, Marco; Ahn, Eun-Joo; Samarai, Imen Al; Albuquerque, Ivone; Allekotte, Ingomar; Allison, Patrick; Almela, Alejandro; Castillo, Jesus Alvarez; Alvarez-Muñiz, Jaime; Batista, Rafael Alves; Ambrosio, Michelangelo; Aminaei, Amin; Anchordoqui, Luis; Andringa, Sofia; Aramo, Carla; Aranda, Victor Manuel; Arqueros, Fernando; Arsene, Nicusor; Asorey, Hernán Gonzalo; Assis, Pedro; Aublin, Julien; Ave, Maximo; Avenier, Michel; Avila, Gualberto; Awal, Nafiun; Badescu, Alina Mihaela; Barber, Kerri B; Bäuml, Julia; Baus, Colin; Beatty, Jim; Becker, Karl Heinz; Bellido, Jose A; Berat, Corinne; Bertaina, Mario Edoardo; Bertou, Xavier; Biermann, Peter; Billoir, Pierre; Blaess, Simon G; Blanco, Alberto; Blanco, Miguel; Bleve, Carla; Blümer, Hans; Bohá?ová, Martina; Boncioli, Denise; Bonifazi, Carla; Borodai, Nataliia; Brack, Jeffrey; Brancus, Iliana; Bridgeman, Ariel; Brogueira, Pedro; Brown, William C; Buchholz, Peter; Bueno, Antonio; Buitink, Stijn; Buscemi, Mario; Caballero-Mora, Karen S; Caccianiga, Barbara; Caccianiga, Lorenzo; Candusso, Marina; Caramete, Laurentiu; Caruso, Rossella; Castellina, Antonella; Cataldi, Gabriella; Cazon, Lorenzo; Cester, Rosanna; Chavez, Alan G; Chiavassa, Andrea; Chinellato, Jose Augusto; Chudoba, Jiri; Cilmo, Marco; Clay, Roger W; Cocciolo, Giuseppe; Colalillo, Roberta; Coleman, Alan; Collica, Laura; Coluccia, Maria Rita; Conceição, Ruben; Contreras, Fernando; Cooper, Mathew J; Cordier, Alain; Coutu, Stephane; Covault, Corbin; Cronin, James; Dallier, Richard; Daniel, Bruno; Dasso, Sergio; Daumiller, Kai; Dawson, Bruce R; de Almeida, Rogerio M; de Jong, Sijbrand J; De Mauro, Giuseppe; Neto, Joao de Mello; De Mitri, Ivan; de Oliveira, Jaime; de Souza, Vitor; del Peral, Luis; Deligny, Olivier; Dembinski, Hans; Dhital, Niraj; Di Giulio, Claudio; Di Matteo, Armando; Diaz, Johana Chirinos; Castro, Mary Lucia Díaz; Diogo, Francisco; Dobrigkeit, Carola; Docters, Wendy; D'Olivo, Juan Carlos; Dorofeev, Alexei; Hasankiadeh, Qader Dorosti; Dova, Maria Teresa; Ebr, Jan; Engel, Ralph; Erdmann, Martin; Erfani, Mona; Escobar, Carlos O; Espadanal, Joao; Etchegoyen, Alberto; Falcke, Heino; Fang, Ke; Farrar, Glennys; Fauth, Anderson; Fazzini, Norberto; Ferguson, Andrew P; Fernandes, Mateus; Fick, Brian; Figueira, Juan Manuel; Filevich, Alberto; Filip?i?, Andrej; Fox, Brendan; Fratu, Octavian; Freire, Martín Miguel; Fuchs, Benjamin; Fujii, Toshihiro; García, Beatriz; Garcia-Pinto, Diego; Gate, Florian; Gemmeke, Hartmut; Gherghel-Lascu, Alexandru; Ghia, Piera Luisa; Giaccari, Ugo; Giammarchi, Marco; Giller, Maria; G?as, Dariusz; Glaser, Christian; Glass, Henry; Golup, Geraldina; Berisso, Mariano Gómez; Vitale, Primo F Gómez; González, Nicolás; Gookin, Ben; Gordon, Jacob; Gorgi, Alessio; Gorham, Peter; Gouffon, Philippe; Griffith, Nathan; Grillo, Aurelio; Grubb, Trent D; Guardincerri, Yann; Guarino, Fausto; Guedes, Germano; Hampel, Matías Rolf; Hansen, Patricia; Harari, Diego; Harrison, Thomas A; Hartmann, Sebastian; Harton, John; Haungs, Andreas; Hebbeker, Thomas; Heck, Dieter; Heimann, Philipp; Herve, Alexander E; Hill, Gary C; Hojvat, Carlos; Hollon, Nicholas; Holt, Ewa; Homola, Piotr; Hörandel, Jörg; Horvath, Pavel; Hrabovský, Miroslav; Huber, Daniel; Huege, Tim; Insolia, Antonio; Isar, Paula Gina; Jandt, Ingolf; Jansen, Stefan; Jarne, Cecilia; Johnsen, Jeffrey A; Josebachuili, Mariela; Kääpä, Alex; Kambeitz, Olga; Kampert, Karl Heinz; Kasper, Peter; Katkov, Igor; Kégl, Balazs; Keilhauer, Bianca; Keivani, Azadeh; Kemp, Ernesto; Kieckhafer, Roger; Klages, Hans; Kleifges, Matthias; Kleinfeller, Jonny; Krause, Raphael; Krohm, Nicole; Krömer, Oliver; Kuempel, Daniel; Kunka, Norbert; LaHurd, Danielle; Latronico, Luca; Lauer, Robert; Lauscher, Markus; Lautridou, Pascal; Coz, Sandra Le; Lebrun, Didier; Lebrun, Paul; de Oliveira, Marcelo Augusto Leigui; Letessier-Selvon, Antoine; Lhenry-Yvon, Isabelle; Link, Katrin; Lopes, Luis; López, Rebeca; Casado, Aida López; Louedec, Karim; Lu, Lu; Lucero, Agustin; Malacari, Max; Maldera, Simone; Mallamaci, Manuela; Maller, Jennifer; Mandat, Dusan; Mantsch, Paul; Mariazzi, Analisa; Marin, Vincent; Mari?, Ioana; Marsella, Giovanni; Martello, Daniele; Martin, Lilian; Martinez, Humberto; Bravo, Oscar Martínez; Martraire, Diane; Meza, Jimmy Masías; Mathes, Hermann-Josef; Mathys, Sebastian; Matthews, James; Matthews, John; Matthiae, Giorgio; Maurel, Detlef; Maurizio, Daniela; Mayotte, Eric; Mazur, Peter; Medina, Carlos; Medina-Tanco, Gustavo; Meissner, Rebecca; Mello, Victor; Melo, Diego; Menshikov, Alexander; Messina, Stefano

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutrinos in the cosmic ray flux with energies near 1 EeV and above are detectable with the Surface Detector array of the Pierre Auger Observatory. We report here on searches through Auger data from 1 January 2004 until 20 June 2013. No neutrino candidates were found, yielding a limit to the diffuse flux of ultra-high energy neutrinos that challenges the Waxman-Bahcall bound predictions. Neutrino identification is attempted using the broad time-structure of the signals expected in the SD stations, and is efficiently done for neutrinos of all flavors interacting in the atmosphere at large zenith angles, as well as for "Earth-skimming" neutrino interactions in the case of tau neutrinos. In this paper the searches for downward-going neutrinos in the zenith angle bins $60^\\circ-75^\\circ$ and $75^\\circ-90^\\circ$ as well as for upward-going neutrinos, are combined to give a single limit. The $90\\%$ C.L. single-flavor limit to the diffuse flux of ultra-high energy neutrinos with an $E^{-2}$ spectrum in the energy ra...

  10. RARE-EARTH METALS--1997 61.1 RARE-EARTH METALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    RARE-EARTH METALS--1997 61.1 RARE-EARTH METALS By James B. Hedrick The rare earths are a relatively million, to thulium and lutetium, the least abundant rare-earth elements at about 0.5 parts per million. Scandium, atomic number 21, is the lightest rare-earth element. It is the 31st most abundant element

  11. The fate of Earth's ocean Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 5(4), 569575 (2001) EGS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    The fate of Earth's ocean 569 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 5(4), 569­575 (2001) © EGS The fate of Earth's ocean Christine Bounama, Siegfried Franck and Werner von Bloh Potsdam Institute@pik-potsdam.de Abstract Questions of how water arrived on the Earth's surface, how much water is contained in the Earth

  12. MEASUREMENT OF THE 8 B SOLAR NEUTRINO ENERGY SPECTRUM AT THE SUDBURY NEUTRINO OBSERVATORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waltham, Chris

    MEASUREMENT OF THE 8 B SOLAR NEUTRINO ENERGY SPECTRUM AT THE SUDBURY NEUTRINO OBSERVATORY Monica me everything from the fine details of signal extraction, iii #12; Fortran and C++ to bird watching

  13. Combined analysis of all three phases of solar neutrino data from the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Formaggio, Joseph A.

    We report results from a combined analysis of solar neutrino data from all phases of the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO). By exploiting particle identification information obtained from the proportional counters installed ...

  14. A measurement of the atmospheric neutrino flux and oscillation parameters at the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sonley, Thomas John

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Through-going muon events are analyzed as a function of their direction of travel through the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory. Based on simulations and previous measurements, muons with a zenith angle of 1 < cos([theta]zenith) ...

  15. A Reusable Process Control System Framework for the Orbiting Carbon Observatory and NPP Sounder PEATE missions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mattmann, Chris

    PEATE missions Chris A. Mattmann, Dana Freeborn, Dan Crichton, Brian Foster, Andrew Hart, David Woollard missions: the Orbiting Carbon Observatory (OCO), and NPP Sounder PEATE projects. 1 Introduction Data volume

  16. Earth's Heat Source - The Sun

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliver K. Manuel

    2009-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The Sun encompasses planet Earth, supplies the heat that warms it, and even shakes it. The United Nation Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) assumed that solar influence on our climate is limited to changes in solar irradiance and adopted the consensus opinion of a Hydrogen-filled Sun, the Standard Solar Model (SSM). They did not consider the alternative solar model and instead adopted another consensus opinion: Anthropogenic greenhouse gases play a dominant role in climate change. The SSM fails to explain the solar wind, solar cycles, and the empirical link of solar surface activity with Earth changing climate. The alternative solar model, that was molded from an embarrassingly large number of unexpected observations revealed by space-age measurements since 1959, explains not only these puzzles but also how closely linked interactions between the Sun and its planets and other celestial bodies induce turbulent cycles of secondary solar characteristics that significantly affect Earth climate.

  17. Earth's Heat Source - The Sun

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manuel, Oliver K

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Sun encompasses planet Earth, supplies the heat that warms it, and even shakes it. The United Nation Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) assumed that solar influence on our climate is limited to changes in solar irradiance and adopted the consensus opinion of a Hydrogen-filled Sun, the Standard Solar Model (SSM). They did not consider the alternative solar model and instead adopted another consensus opinion: Anthropogenic greenhouse gases play a dominant role in climate change. The SSM fails to explain the solar wind, solar cycles, and the empirical link of solar surface activity with Earth changing climate. The alternative solar model, that was molded from an embarrassingly large number of unexpected observations revealed by space-age measurements since 1959, explains not only these puzzles but also how closely linked interactions between the Sun and its planets and other celestial bodies induce turbulent cycles of secondary solar characteristics that significantly affect Earth climate.

  18. Earth Sciences | More Science | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField Campaign:INEA :Work4/11Computational Earth Science SHARE Earth Sciences

  19. Earth Sciences | ornl.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField Campaign:INEA :Work4/11Computational Earth Science SHARE Earth Sciences

  20. Earth Week 2008 | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField Campaign:INEA :Work4/11Computational Earth Science SHARE Earth Sciences

  1. Observations of Near-Earth Asteroids Impact Hazard to Earth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Throop, Henry

    #12;Chelyabinsk, Russia 15 Feb 2013, 9h20 #12;Where did Chelyabinsk meteor come from? Path can be traced precisely using security videos and cell phone images! #12;What Do We Know About the Chelyabinsk-recorded meteor impact on Earth ! 50-100 meters, several times larger than Chelyabinsk #12;· #12;+Chelyabinsk

  2. RARE EARTHS--2001 61.1 RARE EARTHS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    mined in Brazil, India, Russia, and the United States. Demand decreased for rare earths used), neodymium (Nd), promethium (Pm), samarium (Sm), europium (Eu), gadolinium (Gd), terbium (Tb), dysprosium (Dy of the group at 60 ppm, followed, in decreasing order, by yttrium at 33 ppm, lanthanum at 30 ppm, and neodymium

  3. RARE EARTHS--2000 62.1 RARE EARTHS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in the 1880s with the mining in Sweden and Norway of the rare-earth thorium-phosphate mineral monazite requiring only the oxides of thorium and cerium. The mantles also used small amounts of neodymium was recorded in 1893 in North Carolina; however, a small tonnage of monazite was reportedly mined as early

  4. Supernova Neutrinos Detection On Earth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xin-Heng Guo; Ming-Yang Huang; Bing-Lin Young

    2009-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we first discuss the detection of supernova neutrino on Earth. Then we propose a possible method to acquire information about $\\theta_{13}$ smaller than $1.5^\\circ$ by detecting the ratio of the event numbers of different flavor supernova neutrinos. Such an sensitivity cannot yet be achieved by the Daya Bay reactor neutrino experiment.

  5. Natural Sciences Tripos EARTH SCIENCES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    . The majority of Cambridge graduates remain within geology. Exploration and production of oil and gas still Find out more by visiting www.esc.cam.ac.uk/undergraduate-admissions What is Geology? Geology and Geological Sciences. A Dynamic Planet The tectonic plates that form the Earth's surface are continually

  6. The Nitrogen Budget of Earth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Ben

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We comprehensively compile and review N content in geologic materials to calculate a new N budget for Earth. Using analyses of rocks and minerals in conjunction with N-Ar geochemistry demonstrates that the Bulk Silicate Earth (BSE) contains \\sim7\\pm4 times present atmospheric N (4\\times10^18 kg N, PAN), with 27\\pm16\\times10^18 kg N. Comparison to chondritic composition, after subtracting N sequestered into the core, yields a consistent result, with BSE N between 17\\pm13\\times10^18 kg to 31\\pm24\\times10^18 kg N. In the chondritic comparison we calculate a N mass in Earth's core (180\\pm110 to 300\\pm180\\times10^18 kg) and discuss the Moon as a proxy for the early mantle. Significantly, we find the majority of the planetary budget of N is in the solid Earth. The N estimate herein precludes the need for a "missing N" reservoir. Nitrogen-Ar systematics in mantle rocks and basalts identify two mantle reservoirs: MORB-source like (MSL) and high-N. High-N mantle is composed of young, N-rich material subducted from the...

  7. Earth and Terrestrial Planet Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacobson, Seth A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The growth and composition of Earth is a direct consequence of planet formation throughout the Solar System. We discuss the known history of the Solar System, the proposed stages of growth and how the early stages of planet formation may be dominated by pebble growth processes. Pebbles are small bodies whose strong interactions with the nebula gas lead to remarkable new accretion mechanisms for the formation of planetesimals and the growth of planetary embryos. Many of the popular models for the later stages of planet formation are presented. The classical models with the giant planets on fixed orbits are not consistent with the known history of the Solar System, fail to create a high Earth/Mars mass ratio, and, in many cases, are also internally inconsistent. The successful Grand Tack model creates a small Mars, a wet Earth, a realistic asteroid belt and the mass-orbit structure of the terrestrial planets. In the Grand Tack scenario, growth curves for Earth most closely match a Weibull model. The feeding zon...

  8. Earth Insights By Phil Rawlings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Earth Insights By Phil Rawlings If you have a question about geothermal installation, design some portion of the water elsewhere) rates are typically 10-30% and may reduce depth per nominal ton is shallow, pipe returning to the heat pump is deep. Mr. Rawlings has over twenty-five years experience

  9. Earth Sciences Division Research Summaries 2006-2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DePaolo, Donald

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the commencement of the Earth Sciences Division 30 yearstelling. Happy Anniversary! Earth Sciences Division ears YTritium in Engineered and Earth Materials Stefan Finsterle,

  10. Exploring the geophysical signatures of microbial processes in the earth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slater, L.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Arctic Natural Sciences, Antarctic Earth Sciences, Antarcticof Microbial Processes in the Earth Lee Slater 1 , Estellaa rapidly evolving Earth science discipline that integrates

  11. Sandia National Laboratories: Earth Science: Facilities and Equipment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ManagementEarth ScienceEarth Science: Facilities and Equipment Earth Science: Facilities and Equipment Geoscience Facilities and Equipment High-pressure thermalmechanical...

  12. Exploring the Earth matter effect with atmospheric neutrinos in ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanjib Kumar Agarwalla; Tracey Li; Olga Mena; Sergio Palomares-Ruiz

    2012-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the possibility to perform neutrino oscillation tomography and to determine the neutrino mass hierarchy in kilometer-scale ice Cerenkov detectors by means of the theta13-driven matter effects which occur during the propagation of atmospheric neutrinos deep through the Earth. We consider the ongoing IceCube/DeepCore neutrino observatory and future planned extensions, such as the PINGU detector, which has a lower energy threshold. Our simulations include the impact of marginalization over the neutrino oscillation parameters and a fully correlated systematic uncertainty on the total number of events. For the current best-fit value of the mixing angle theta13, the DeepCore detector, due to its relatively high-energy threshold, could only be sensitive to fluctuations on the normalization of the Earth's density of \\Delta\\rho \\simeq \\pm 10% at ~ 1.6 sigma CL after 10 years in the case of a true normal hierarchy. For the two PINGU configurations we consider, overall density fluctuations of \\Delta\\rho \\simeq \\pm 3% (\\pm 2%) could be measured at the 2 sigma CL after 10 years, also in the case of a normal mass hierarchy. We also compare the prospects to determine the neutrino mass hierarchy in these three configurations and find that this could be achieved at the 5 sigma CL, for both hierarchies, after 5 years in DeepCore and about 1 year in PINGU. This clearly shows the importance of lowering the energy threshold below 10 GeV so that detectors are fully sensitive to the resonant matter effects.

  13. Sandia National Laboratories: Cool Earth Solar

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cool Earth Solar Cool Earth Solar and Sandia Team Up in First-Ever Public-Private Partnership on Livermore Valley Open Campus On February 26, 2013, in Concentrating Solar Power,...

  14. Earth & Aquatic Sciences | Clean Energy | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Earth and Aquatic Sciences SHARE Earth and Aquatic Sciences Create and apply new knowledge across multiple scales to aid decision makers on the stewardship of air, water and land...

  15. Production method for making rare earth compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McCallum, R. William (Ames, IA); Ellis, Timothy W. (Ames, IA); Dennis, Kevin W. (Ames, IA); Hofer, Robert J. (Ames, IA); Branagan, Daniel J. (Ames, IA)

    1997-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of making a rare earth compound, such as a earth-transition metal permanent magnet compound, without the need for producing rare earth metal as a process step, comprises carbothermically reacting a rare earth oxide to form a rare earth carbide and heating the rare earth carbide, a compound-forming reactant (e.g. a transition metal and optional boron), and a carbide-forming element (e.g. a refractory metal) that forms a carbide that is more thermodynamically favorable than the rare earth carbide whereby the rare earth compound (e.g. Nd.sub.2 Fe.sub.14 B or LaNi.sub.5) and a carbide of the carbide-forming element are formed.

  16. Ecology & Earth Systems Dynamics for Educators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amin, S. Massoud

    Ecology & Earth Systems Dynamics for Educators July 21-25, 2014 CI 5540-003 (86282) 3 Credits Science and Earth Science curricula in Minnesota public schools. It is designed primarily for middle

  17. Production method for making rare earth compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McCallum, R.W.; Ellis, T.W.; Dennis, K.W.; Hofer, R.J.; Branagan, D.J.

    1997-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of making a rare earth compound, such as a earth-transition metal permanent magnet compound, without the need for producing rare earth metal as a process step, comprises carbothermically reacting a rare earth oxide to form a rare earth carbide and heating the rare earth carbide, a compound-forming reactant (e.g., a transition metal and optional boron), and a carbide-forming element (e.g., a refractory metal) that forms a carbide that is more thermodynamically favorable than the rare earth carbide whereby the rare earth compound (e.g., Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B or LaNi{sub 5}) and a carbide of the carbide-forming element are formed.

  18. Modeling the Earth System, volume 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ojima, D.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The topics covered fall under the following headings: critical gaps in the Earth system conceptual framework; development needs for simplified models; and validating Earth system models and their subcomponents.

  19. WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY and NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY APPLICATION FOR RARECATS PROGRAM Deadline for postmark of this application and supporting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groppi, Christopher

    WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY and NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY APPLICATION FOR RARECATS PROGRAM 604 Allen Hall, PO Box 6122 West Virginia University Morgantown, WV 26506-6122 #12;

  20. s Earth and environment s Living resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    4 s Earth and environment s Living resources s Societies and health s Expertise and consulting of this trend is the acquisition, on a joint proposal from the Earth and Environment department and the Living phenomena so as to improve forecasting of the attendant hazards. The earth's crust: processes and natural

  1. Journey to the mantle of the Earth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demouchy, Sylvie

    COMMENT Journey to the mantle of the Earth On the 50th anniversary of the first attempt to drill into Earth's mantle, Damon Teagle and Benoît Ildefonse say that what was once science fiction is now possible, or `Moho' for short. This boundary marks the start of the bulk of Earth's interior, which extends from

  2. Marketing Earth Science Education Roel Snieder(1)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Snieder, Roel

    CWP-000 Marketing Earth Science Education Roel Snieder(1) and Chris Spiers(2) (1) Dept@mines.edu (2) Dept. of Earth Sciences, Utrecht University, P.O. Box 80.021, 3508 TA Utrecht, The Netherlands In the 1990s, Utrecht University's Department of Earth Sciences struggled with a declining influx of students

  3. JAXA's Earth Observation Program Osamu Ochiai

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    JAXA's Earth Observation Program Osamu Ochiai Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency #12;1 Disasters Health Energy Climate Water 1 Japanese Main Activities of Earth Observation Weather MTSAT (JMA) Eco Earth Observation Targets (JFY) 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018

  4. Earth Minerals Did you read chapter 29

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hart, Gus

    1 Chapter 29 Earth Minerals Did you read chapter 29 before coming to class? A. Yes B. No Lets play that begins in Hawaii Other "Hot Spots" around the world The interior structure of Earth has been determined outer core #12;2 What is different on earth (as opposed to other planets)? Continents Why does

  5. Rare Earth Element Mines, Deposits, and Occurrences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torgersen, Christian

    Rare Earth Element Mines, Deposits, and Occurrences by Greta J. Orris1 and Richard I. Grauch2 Open Table 1. Rare earth mineral codes and associated mineral names.......................................................................................6 Table 2. Non-rare earth mineral codes and associated mineral names

  6. EARTH SCIENCES Lower-Division Requirements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Constable, Steve

    2012-2013 EARTH SCIENCES Lower-Division Requirements Math 20A_____ 20B_____ 20C_____ 20D (BILD 3) _____ SIO 50* _____ Group A: Earth Science Upper-Division Core Requirements (all courses _____ Introduction to Geophysics SIO 104 _____ Paleobiology and History of Life* Group B: Upper-Division Earth

  7. Mass Transportation on the Earth Ludovic Rifford

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rifford, Ludovic

    Mass Transportation on the Earth Ludovic Rifford Universit´e Nice - Sophia Antipolis & Institut Mass Transportation on the Earth #12;The framework Let M be a smooth connected compact surface in Rn of the lengths of the curves (drawn on M) joining x to y. Ludovic Rifford Mass Transportation on the Earth #12

  8. Mass Transportation on the Earth Ludovic Rifford

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rifford, Ludovic

    Mass Transportation on the Earth Ludovic Rifford Universit´e de Nice - Sophia Antipolis & Institut Universitaire de France UPV/EHU Ludovic Rifford Mass Transportation on the Earth #12;The framework Let M Rifford Mass Transportation on the Earth #12;Transport maps Let µ0 and µ1 be probability measures on M. We

  9. Imestigation ol" Maenons in Rare Earth Metals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Imestigation ol" Maenons in Rare Earth Metals b\\ Inelastic Neutron Scattering tL Bjerrum Moiler #12;BLANK PAGE #12;Riso Report No. 178 Investigation of Magnons in Rare Earth Metals by Inelastic NeutronN LANGF h. a. dec. #12;Contents Page PREFACE 7 I. INTRODUCTION *> 1. Magnetism of Rare Earth Metals 10 2

  10. A toolkit for building earth system models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foster, I.

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An earth system model is a computer code designed to simulate the interrelated processes that determine the earth`s weather and climate, such as atmospheric circulation, atmospheric physics, atmospheric chemistry, oceanic circulation, and biosphere. I propose a toolkit that would support a modular, or object-oriented, approach to the implementation of such models.

  11. 4, 71397166, 2004 The Modular Earth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    , the typical approach towards Earth System Modeling has been to couple existing models of different domains computer modeling is to pursue Earth System models. The aim is to capture feedback mechanisms between philosophy to pursue an interactively coupled Earth System model ap- proach is partly based

  12. Development and application of earth system models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Development and application of earth system models Ronald G. Prinn *Reprinted from Proceedings, 2011) The global environment is a complex and dynamic system. Earth system modeling is needed to help: globalchange@mit.edu Website: http://globalchange.mit.edu/ #12;Development and application of earth system

  13. 5, 28432931, 2012 The Norwegian Earth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drange, Helge

    GMDD 5, 2843­2931, 2012 The Norwegian Earth System Model, NorESM1-M M. Bentsen et al. Title Page to the corresponding final paper in GMD if available. The Norwegian Earth System Model, NorESM1-M ­ Part 1: Description The Norwegian Earth System Model, NorESM1-M M. Bentsen et al. Title Page Abstract Introduction Conclusions

  14. NRC Earth Science Decadal Survey-Mission Concept Earth Sciences from the Astronomer's Perspective, a Deep

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christian, Eric

    NRC Earth Science Decadal Survey-Mission Concept Earth Sciences from the Astronomer's Perspective Irina Melnikova #12;1 Earth Sciences from the Astronomer's Perspective 1.0 Mission Concept and Purpose Earth observations from satellites located in deep space offer the exciting opportunity to look

  15. Adding STARFire Analysis Layers to Google Earth through a KML Network Link 1) Launch Google Earth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adding STARFire Analysis Layers to Google Earth through a KML Network Link 1) Launch Google Earth 2) The network link will be added in the Places control within Google Earth. Select the node level in the tree layers for viewing within Google Earth. Double clicking on a layer will zoom you to the extent

  16. The Earth Institute, Columbia University6 scott barrett, the Lenfest-Earth Institute

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Earth Institute, Columbia University6 scott barrett, the Lenfest-Earth Institute Professor faculty members whose positions have been endowed in the Earth Institute by Gerry and Marguerite Lenfest of the Earth Institute. As a Lenfest professor, Barrett studies the interactions between economic and natural

  17. Earth Syst. Dynam., 4, 187198, 2013 www.earth-syst-dynam.net/4/187/2013/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zuyev, Sergei

    Planck Research School for Earth System Modelling, Hamburg, Germany 2Max Planck Institute for Meteorology

  18. Rare Earth Phosphate Glass and Glass-Ceramic Proton Conductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Jonghe, Lutgard C.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    300-500°C. Doping rare earth phosphate glasses with Ce, andRare Earth Phosphate Glass and Glass-Ceramic Protonconductivity of alkaline-earth doped rare earth phosphate

  19. The Virtual Astronomical Observatory: Re-engineering Access to Astronomical Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hanisch, R J; Lazio, T J W; Bunn, S Emery; Evans, J; McGlynn, T A; Plante, R

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Virtual Astronomical Observatory was a software infrastructure and development project designed both to begin the establishment of an operational Virtual Observatory (VO) and to provide the U.S. coordination with the international VO effort. The concept of the VO is to provide the means by which an astronomer is able to discover, access, and process data seamlessly, regardless of its physical location. This paper describes the origins of the VAO, including the predecessor efforts within the U.S. National Virtual Observatory, and summarizes its main accomplishments. These accomplishments include the development of both scripting toolkits that allow scientists to incorporate VO data directly into their reduction and analysis environments and high-level science applications for data discovery, integration, analysis, and catalog cross-comparison. Working with the international community, and based on the experience from the software development, the VAO was a major contributor to international standards ...

  20. GLOBAL MAPPING OF EARTH-LIKE EXOPLANETS FROM SCATTERED LIGHT CURVES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kawahara, Hajime [Department of Physics, Tokyo Metropolitan University, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-0397 (Japan); Fujii, Yuka, E-mail: kawa_h@tmu.ac.j [Department of Physics, University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)

    2010-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Scattered lights from terrestrial exoplanets provide valuable information about their planetary surface. Applying the surface reconstruction method proposed by Fujii et al. to both diurnal and annual variations of scattered light, we develop a reconstruction method of land distribution with both longitudinal and latitudinal resolutions. We find that one can recover a global map of an idealized Earth-like planet on the following assumptions: (1) cloudlessness, (2) a face-on circular orbit, (3) known surface types and their reflectance spectra, (4) lack of atmospheric absorption, (5) known rotation rate, (6) a static map, and (7) the absence of a moon. Using the dependence of light curves on planetary obliquity, we also show that the obliquity can be measured by adopting the {chi}{sup 2} minimization or the extended information criterion. We demonstrate the feasibility of our methodology by applying it to a multi-band photometry of a cloudless model Earth with future space missions such as the occulting ozone observatory (O3). We conclude that future space missions can estimate both the surface distribution and the obliquity at least for cloudless Earth-like planets within 5 pc.

  1. Studying the Earth with Geoneutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Livia Ludhova; Sandra Zavatarelli

    2014-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Geo-neutrinos, electron antineutrinos from natural radioactive decays inside the Earth, bring to the surface unique information about our planet. The new techniques in neutrino detection opened a door into a completely new inter-disciplinary field of Neutrino Geoscience. We give here a broad geological introduction highlighting the points where the geo-neutrino measurements can give substantial new insights. The status-of-art of this field is overviewed, including a description of the latest experimental results from KamLAND and Borexino experiments and their first geological implications. We performed a new combined Borexino and KamLAND analysis in terms of the extraction of the mantle geo-neutrino signal and the limits on the Earth's radiogenic heat power. The perspectives and the future projects having geo-neutrinos among their scientific goals are also discussed.

  2. Slide 1 Fig 7-1, p.154 Planet Earth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wardle, Mark

    Slide 1 Fig 7-1, p.154 Planet Earth #12;Slide 2 The New Solar System ch9 #12;Slide 3 Fig 7-2, p.155 Interior Structure of the Earth #12;Slide 4 Fig 7-4, p.156 Earth!s Magnetosphere #12;Slide 5 The New Solar System ch9 #12;Slide 6 Fig 7-3, p.155 Earth!s Crust #12;Slide 7 Fig 7-6, p.157 Earth!s Continental Plates

  3. Argonne's 2012 Earth Day Event

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Argonne's 2012 Earth Day event drew crowds from across the laboratory. Argonne and U.S. Department of Energy employees toured booths and interactive displays set up by Argonne programs and clubs. Several of Argonne's partners participated, including U.S. Department of Energy, University of Chicago, Abri Credit Union, DuPage County Forest Preserve, DuPage Water Commission, PACE and Morton Arboretum. Argonne scientists and engineers also participated in a poster session, discussing their clean energy research.

  4. Argonne's 2012 Earth Day Event

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Argonne's 2012 Earth Day event drew crowds from across the laboratory. Argonne and U.S. Department of Energy employees toured booths and interactive displays set up by Argonne programs and clubs. Several of Argonne's partners participated, including U.S. Department of Energy, University of Chicago, Abri Credit Union, DuPage County Forest Preserve, DuPage Water Commission, PACE and Morton Arboretum. Argonne scientists and engineers also participated in a poster session, discussing their clean energy research.

  5. Description of Atmospheric Conditions at the Pierre Auger Observatory using the Global Data Assimilation System (GDAS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abreu, P.; /Lisbon, IST; Aglietta, M.; /Turin U. /INFN, Turin; Ahlers, M.; /Wisconsin U., Madison; Ahn, E.J.; /Fermilab; Albuquerque, I.F.M.; /Sao Paulo U.; Allard, D.; /APC, Paris; Allekotte, I.; /Buenos Aires, CONICET; Allen, J.; /New York U.; Allison, P.; /Ohio State U.; Almela, A.; /Natl. Tech. U., San Nicolas /Buenos Aires, CONICET; Alvarez Castillo, J.; /Mexico U., ICN /Santiago de Compostela U.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Atmospheric conditions at the site of a cosmic ray observatory must be known for reconstructing observed extensive air showers. The Global Data Assimilation System (GDAS) is a global atmospheric model predicated on meteorological measurements and numerical weather predictions. GDAS provides altitude-dependent profiles of the main state variables of the atmosphere like temperature, pressure, and humidity. The original data and their application to the air shower reconstruction of the Pierre Auger Observatory are described. By comparisons with radiosonde and weather station measurements obtained on-site in Malargue and averaged monthly models, the utility of the GDAS data is shown.

  6. The Apache Point Observatory Lunar Laser-ranging Operation: Instrument Description and First Detections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murphy, TW; Adelberger, Eric G.; Battat, J.; Carey, LN; Hoyle, Charles D.; LeBlanc, P.; Michelsen, EL; Nordtvedt, K.; Orin, AE; Strasburg, Jana D.; Stubbs, CW; Swanson, HE; Williams, E.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A next-generation lunar laser ranging apparatus using the 3.5 m telescope at the Apache Point Observatory in southern New Mexico has begun science operation. APOLLO (the Apache Point Observatory Lunar Laser-ranging Operation) has achieved one-millimeter range precision to the moon which should lead to aproximately one-orderof-magnitude improvements in the precision of several tests of fundamental properties of gravity. We briefly motivate the scientific goals, and then give a detailed discussion of the APOLLO instrumentation.

  7. APOLLO: the Apache Point Observatory Lunar Laser-ranging Operation: Instrument Description and First Detections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. W. Murphy, Jr.; E. G. Adelberger; J. B. R. Battat; L. N. Carey; C. D. Hoyle; P. LeBlanc; E. L. Michelsen; K. Nordtvedt; A. E. Orin; J. D. Strasburg; C. W. Stubbs; H. E. Swanson; E. Williams

    2007-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A next-generation lunar laser ranging apparatus using the 3.5 m telescope at the Apache Point Observatory in southern New Mexico has begun science operation. APOLLO (the Apache Point Observatory Lunar Laser-ranging Operation) has achieved one-millimeter range precision to the moon which should lead to approximately one-order-of-magnitude improvements in the precision of several tests of fundamental properties of gravity. We briefly motivate the scientific goals, and then give a detailed discussion of the APOLLO instrumentation.

  8. CoolEarth formerly Cool Earth Solar | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, clickInformationNew| Exploration Technique:Illinois: EnergyRoofCoolEarth

  9. AN INFRARED SPACE OBSERVATORY ATLAS OF BRIGHT SPIRAL GALAXIES1 George J. Bendo,2,3,4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joseph, Robert D.

    AN INFRARED SPACE OBSERVATORY ATLAS OF BRIGHT SPIRAL GALAXIES1 George J. Bendo,2,3,4 Robert D in a series we present an atlas of infrared images and photometry from 1.2 to 180 lm for a sample of bright galaxies. Using the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO), we have obtained 12 lm images and photometry at 60

  10. Earth

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField Campaign:INEA :Work4/11 ENVIROISSUESEVALUATINGG7.0EXPOHomeII)

  11. SOLID EARTH OPTION FOR EARTH SCIENCE (GYA/GYS) MAJORS The main goals of the Solid Earth option are to give you an understanding of how our lively

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Paul

    SOLID EARTH OPTION FOR EARTH SCIENCE (GYA/GYS) MAJORS The main goals of the Solid Earth option tools we use to unravel its complex history. Solid Earth science is the study of the materials, architecture, and processes of the dynamic solid Earth. It deals with rock-forming minerals and processes

  12. The Astrophysical Multimessenger Observatory Network (AMON) M.W.E. Smith a,b,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Babu, G. Jogesh

    Gravitational radiation Neutrinos Cosmic rays Gamma-ray bursts Supernovae a b s t r a c t We summarize including the Swift [6] and Fermi [7] satellites, the HESS [8], VERITAS [9], and MAGIC [10] TeV gamma-ray telescopes, and the HAWC [11] TeV gamma-ray observatory. Collectively, these facilities promise the first

  13. SEARCH FOR NEUTRON ANTI-NEUTRON OSCILLATION AT THE SUDBURY NEUTRINO OBSERVATORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waltham, Chris

    SEARCH FOR NEUTRON ANTI-NEUTRON OSCILLATION AT THE SUDBURY NEUTRINO OBSERVATORY A Thesis Presented to explain the baryon asymmetry of the universe. In this thesis, a limit on the neutron anti-neutron (nnbar is sampled from the three phases of the SNO experiment to construct a three-phase blind analysis. The profile

  14. Prospects for and Status of CUORE ? The Cryogenic Underground Observatory for Rare Events

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Norman, E B

    2009-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    CUORE (Cryogenic Underground Observatory for Rare Events) is a next generation experiment designed to search for the neutrinoless DBD of {sup 130}Te using a bolometric technique. The present status of the CUORE is presented along with the latest results from its prototype, CUORICINO.

  15. Directions to the National Radio Astronomy Observatory Green Bank, West Virginia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groppi, Christopher

    Directions to the National Radio Astronomy Observatory Green Bank, West Virginia From Charleston Roanoke, VA: Via I-64 West, exit at White Sulphur Springs (Exit 181) and take Rt. 92 North to Green Bank, then take Rt. 92 South to Green Bank. From Washington DC: Via I-66 West to I-81 South. Option 1: Take I-81

  16. Size distributions of ionic aerosols measured at Waliguan Observatory: Implication for nitrate gas-to-particle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacobson, Mark

    Size distributions of ionic aerosols measured at Waliguan Observatory: Implication for nitrate gas Plateau. Size-resolved ionic aerosols (NH4 + , Na+ , K+ , Ca2+ , Mg2+ , SO4 2À , ClÀ , NO3 À CO3 2À , formate, acetate and oxalate), organic aerosols, black carbon and gaseous HNO3 and SO2 were measured

  17. MilagroA TeV Observatory for Gamma Ray Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    Milagro­A TeV Observatory for Gamma Ray Bursts B.L. Dingus and the Milagro Collaboration Los energy gamma-rays from gamma-ray bursts. The highest energy gamma rays supply very strong constraints on the nature of gamma-ray burst sources as well as fundamental physics. Because the highest energy gamma-rays

  18. PRELIMINARY PARALLAXES OF 40 L AND T DWARFS FROM THE US NAVAL OBSERVATORY INFRARED ASTROMETRY PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golimowski, David A.

    Observatory, Flagstaff Station, P.O. Box 1149, Flagstaff, AZ 86002; fjv@nofs.navy.mil, aah@nofs.navy.mil, cbl@nofs.navy.mil, guetter@nofs.navy.mil, jam@nofs.navy.mil, blaise@nofs.navy.mil A. J. Burgasser2 Division of Astronomy

  19. Proceedings of ICRC 2001: 1 c Copernicus Gesellschaft 2001 Status of the Milagro Gamma Ray Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    , active galactic nuclei (AGN), and gamma ray bursts (GRB). In addition, more exotic sources like Gamma Ray Observatory, located at an altitude of 8,600 feet in the Jemez Mountains of New Mexico for sources of TeV gamma rays. It is uniquely capable of search- ing for transient sources of VHE gamma rays

  20. Results from the Milagro Gamma-Ray Observatory E. Blaufuss a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    V emission from the galactic plane, and a search for transient emission above 100 GeV from gamma ray bursts- clei (AGN), supernova remnants and gamma-ray bursts (GRB). Gamma rays are also produced when high1 Results from the Milagro Gamma-Ray Observatory E. Blaufuss a for the Milagro Collaboration

  1. Soil CO2 production and surface flux at four climate observatories in eastern Canada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soil CO2 production and surface flux at four climate observatories in eastern Canada David Risk the climatic controls on soil respiration. We use subsurface CO2 concentrations, surface CO2 flux and detailed physical monitoring of the subsurface regime to examine physical controls on soil CO2 production. Results

  2. The Thermal Control of the New Solar Telescope at Big Bear Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Thermal Control of the New Solar Telescope at Big Bear Observatory Angelo P. Verdonia and Carsten Denkera aNew Jersey Institute of Technology, Center for Solar-Terrestrial Research, 323 Martin Luther King Blvd, Newark, NJ 07102, US ABSTRACT We present the basic design of the THermal Control System

  3. A remote sensing observatory for hydrologic sciences: A genesis for scaling to continental hydrology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katul, Gabriel

    A remote sensing observatory for hydrologic sciences: A genesis for scaling to continental hydrology Witold F. Krajewski,1 Martha C. Anderson,2 William E. Eichinger,1 Dara Entekhabi,3 Brian K arise primarily from an inadequate understanding of the hydrological cycle: on land, in oceans

  4. Nasmyth focus instrumentation of the New Solar Telescope at Big Bear Solar Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    field stop and heat reflector (heat-stop), elliptical secondary mirror (SM) and diagonal flats. Figure 1Nasmyth focus instrumentation of the New Solar Telescope at Big Bear Solar Observatory Wenda Caoab Coulterb, and Philip R. Goodeab aCenter for Solar-Terrestrial Research, New Jersey Institute of Technology

  5. 30th International Cosmic Ray Conference Hybrid Performance of the Pierre Auger Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    present the results for the hybrid performance of the Observatory, including trigger efficiency, energy 5005, Australia 2 Observatorio Pierre Auger, Av. San Mart´in Norte 304, (5613) Malarg¨ue, Mendoza design, in which ultra high energy cosmic rays are detected simultaneously by fluorescence telescopes

  6. Oceans. Europe2005 An Acoustically-Linked Deep-Ocean Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    to communications power efficiency and cost of the acoustic and satellite telemetry systems. The efficiency ship servicing. Solarcells on the buoy provide enough power for many hours of Iridium terminalHole Oceano a hicKnstitution A6slmei - A buoy-based observatory that uses acoustic communication to retrieve

  7. NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY TITLE: A REVISED VAX FARANT SPLOT ROUTINE AND RELATED APPLE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groppi, Christopher

    NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY TITLE: A REVISED VAX FARANT SPLOT ROUTINE AND RELATED APPLE #12;A REVISED VAX FARANT SPLOT ROUTINE AND RELATED APPLE II PLOTTING PROGRAM. The purpose of this report is to describe some upgrades made to the VAX 1 SPLOT" routine and the related Apple plotting

  8. Tycho Brahe made observations of the motions of the planets from his great observatory on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tycho Brahe made observations of the motions of the planets from his great observatory,and understood the importance of random and systematic errors in his observations. In 1600Tycho Brahe employed such a diligent observer inTycho Brahe that his observations convicted this Ptolemaic calculation of an error of 8

  9. Double beta decays and solar neutrinos with 100 MOON(Mo Observatory Of Neutrinos)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    nuclear laboratory for spectroscopic studies of neutrinos Neutrinos are key particles for new frontiers) are sensitive and realistic experiments for studying the Majorana nature of the neutrino and the absolute massDouble beta decays and solar neutrinos with 100 Mo ­MOON(Mo Observatory Of Neutrinos)­ May 24, 2005

  10. Infrared Imaging Solar Spectrograph at Purple Mountain Observatory Hui Li , Zhongyu Fan and Jianqi You

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Hui

    Infrared Imaging Solar Spectrograph at Purple Mountain Observatory Hui Li , Zhongyu Fan and Jianqi, Chinese Academy of Sciences Abstract. Since 1986, we have made some improvements to the multichannel solar to it a multichannel infrared imaging solar spectrograph. The original spectrograph can be used to observe

  11. Arizona Radio Observatory (ARO) The SMT is the most accurate submillimeter astronomical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ziurys, Lucy M.

    Arizona Radio Observatory (ARO) The SMT is the most accurate submillimeter astronomical telescope-183 GHz range (2 and 3 mm windows), and the SMT supports 200-490 GHz receivers. Future instrumentation.I.T. Haystack. SMT Structure Geometry Main reflector: paraboloid D=10 m F/D=0.35. Subreflector: hyperboloid d=0

  12. FIRST MEASUREMENT OF THE FLUX OF SOLAR NEUTRINOS FROM THE SUN AT THE SUDBURY NEUTRINO OBSERVATORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waltham, Chris

    FIRST MEASUREMENT OF THE FLUX OF SOLAR NEUTRINOS FROM THE SUN AT THE SUDBURY NEUTRINO OBSERVATORY for approaching problems that I found to be more generally useful. Godwin Mayers, Chuck Alexander, Jim Cook and with me. v #12; ABSTRACT FIRST MEASUREMENT OF THE FLUX OF SOLAR NEUTRINOS FROM THE SUN AT THE SUDBURY

  13. Earth Sciences annual report, 1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Younker, L.W.; Donohue, M.L.; Peterson, S.J. (eds.)

    1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Earth Sciences Department at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory conducts work in support of the Laboratory's energy, defense, and research programs. The Department is organized into ten groups. Five of these -- Nuclear Waste Management, Fossil Energy, Containment, Verification, and Research -- represent major programmatic activities within the Department. Five others -- Experimental Geophysics, Geomechanics, Geology/Geological Engineering, Geochemistry, and Seismology/Applied Geophysics -- are major disciplinary areas that support these and other laboratory programs. This report summarizes work carried out in 1987 by each group and contains a bibliography of their 1987 publications.

  14. Are Earths Rare? Perhaps Not

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWP TWPAlumni AlumniFederal FacilityAprilAre Earths Rare? Perhaps Not Are

  15. Trellis Earth | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown of Ladoga, Indiana (Utility Company)LibraryDatasetsElectric Coop,Trellis Earth

  16. Through-the-earth radio

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reagor, David (Los Alamos, NM); Vasquez-Dominguez, Jose (Los Alamos, NM)

    2006-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for effective through-the-earth communication involves a signal input device connected to a transmitter operating at a predetermined frequency sufficiently low to effectively penetrate useful distances through-the earth, and having an analog to digital converter receiving the signal input and passing the signal input to a data compression circuit that is connected to an encoding processor, the encoding processor output being provided to a digital to analog converter. An amplifier receives the analog output from the digital to analog converter for amplifying said analog output and outputting said analog output to an antenna. A receiver having an antenna receives the analog output passes the analog signal to a band pass filter whose output is connected to an analog to digital converter that provides a digital signal to a decoding processor whose output is connected to an data decompressor, the data decompressor providing a decompressed digital signal to a digital to analog converter. An audio output device receives the analog output form the digital to analog converter for producing audible output.

  17. Earth oscillations induced by Hurricane Katrina

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peters, R D

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Seismograph records show that Katrina was responsible for many motions of the Earth in addition to the well known microseismic `noise' that is known to accompany oceanic disturbances.

  18. Rapporteur's Report - workshop on rare earth elements

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Trans-Atlantic Workshop on Rare Earth Elements and Other Critical Materials for a Clean Energy Future Hosted by the MIT Energy Initiative, cambridge, Massachusetts december 3, 2010...

  19. 2014 Earth Day Photo Contest Winners

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    2014 Earth Day Photo Contest Winners COMMUNITY: "Edison Home" by Gary Hartman SUSTAINABILITY: "Oak Alley" by Wade Sickinger ALTERNATIVE ENERGY: "Windmill Ablaze at Sunset" by Leroy...

  20. Improved method for preparing rare earth sesquichalcogenides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Takeshita, T.; Beaudry, B.J.; Gschneidner, K.A. Jr.

    1982-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved method for the preparation of high purity rare earth sesquichalcogenides is described. The rare earth, as one or more pieces of the metal, is sealed under a vacuum with a stoichiometric amount of sulfur or selenium and a small amount of iodine into a quartz reaction vessel. The sealed vessel is then heated to above the vaporization temperature of the chalcogen and below the melting temperature of the rare earth metal and maintained until the product has been formed. The iodine is then vaporized off leaving a pure product. The rare earth sulfides and selenides thus formed are useful as semiconductors and as thermoelectric generators. 3 tables.

  1. Exploring the Earth’s subsurface with virtual seismic sources and receivers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicolson, Heather Johan

    2011-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Traditional methods of imaging the Earth’s subsurface using seismic waves require an identifiable, impulsive source of seismic energy, for example an earthquake or explosive source. Naturally occurring, ambient seismic waves form an ever...

  2. RARE EARTHS1 (Data in metric tons of rare-earth oxide (REO) content, unless noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Imports:3 Thorium ore (monazite) -- -- -- -- 22 Rare-earth metals, alloys 271 352 235 284 406 Cerium Exports:3 Thorium ore, monazite -- -- 3 27 -- Rare-earth metals, alloys 71 44 194 329 456 Cerium compounds. Rare-earth metals, whether or not intermixed or interalloyed 2805.30.0000 5.0% ad val. 31.3% ad val

  3. Earth SciEncES attheUniversityofNewHampshire.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pringle, James "Jamie"

    Earth SciEncES attheUniversityofNewHampshire. DiscoverEarthSciences Department of Earth Sciences University of New Hampshire James Hall 56 College Road Durham, NH 03824 603 862-1718 earth.sciences@unh.edu In January 2010, the University of New Hampshire Earth Sciences Department moved into its newly renovated

  4. Earth Science The Wiess School of Natural Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    143 Earth Science The Wiess School of Natural Sciences CHAIR Alan Levander PROFESSORS John B Physics I and II with lab ESCI 321 Earth System Evolution and Cycles ESCI 322 Earth Chemistry and Materials ESCI 323 Earth Structure and Deformation with lab ESCI 324 Earth's Interior ESCI Degrees Offered

  5. Prospects for Rare Earth Elements From Marine Minerals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prospects for Rare Earth Elements From Marine Minerals Rare earth elements (REEs) compose in the earth's crust. However, because of their geochemical proper es, rare earth elements are typically. Briefing Paper 02/12 Jim Hein | May 2012 www.isa.org.jm Table 1: Rare Earth Elements This paper

  6. Ames Lab 101: Rare-Earth Recycling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryan Ott

    2012-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Recycling keeps paper, plastics, and even jeans out of landfills. Could recycling rare-earth magnets do the same? Perhaps, if the recycling process can be improved. Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory are working to more effectively remove the neodymium, a rare earth, from the mix of other materials in a magnet.

  7. Ames Lab 101: Rare-Earth Recycling

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Ryan Ott

    2013-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Recycling keeps paper, plastics, and even jeans out of landfills. Could recycling rare-earth magnets do the same? Perhaps, if the recycling process can be improved. Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory are working to more effectively remove the neodymium, a rare earth, from the mix of other materials in a magnet.

  8. Mass Transportation on the Earth Ludovic Rifford

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rifford, Ludovic

    Mass Transportation on the Earth Ludovic Rifford Universit´e de Nice - Sophia Antipolis Ludovic Rifford Mass Transportation on the Earth #12;The framework Let M be a smooth connected compact surface), as the minimum of the lengths of the curves (drawn on M) joining x to y. Ludovic Rifford Mass Transportation

  9. Undergraduate Degrees 2014 School of Earth & Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Undergraduate Degrees 2014 School of Earth & Environment FACULTY OF ENVIRONMENT #12;UNIVERSITYOFLEEDS 03 Contents Welcome to the School of Earth & Environment 4 Choosing the right degree 6 Three, MGeol, MGeophys) The MSc Track Fieldwork 8 Why study the environment? 10 Environment and Business 12

  10. A toolkit for building earth system models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foster, I.

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An earth system model is a computer code designed to simulate the interrelated processes that determine the earth's weather and climate, such as atmospheric circulation, atmospheric physics, atmospheric chemistry, oceanic circulation, and biosphere. I propose a toolkit that would support a modular, or object-oriented, approach to the implementation of such models.

  11. Physical Limitations on Mining Natural Earth Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patzek, Tadeusz W.

    Physical Limitations on Mining Natural Earth Systems A view of the Himalayas from Lhasa Tad Patzek of fossil fuels ("resources") left all over the Earth The resource size (current balance of a banking flow-based solutions (wind turbines, photovoltaics, and biofuels) will require most radical changes

  12. Earth System Models especially those of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shepherd, John

    Dioxide Deep Ocean Carbon Dioxide Freshwater Outgasing Deep water Slide courtesy ofSlide courtesy of P.Valdes (Genie)P.Valdes (Genie) What is an Earth System Model ?What is an Earth System Model ? #12;Components-A Coupled Modes? Decadal Modes? ~1 Sea-ice variability #12;Existing EMICS Information from M. Claussen (PIK

  13. Mode-locked Lasers Applied to Deflecting a Near Earth Object on Collision Course with Earth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fork, Richard; Burgess, Luke; Bergstue, Grant

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider synchronized trains of sub-picosecond pulses generated by mode-locked lasers applied to deflection of near Earth objects (NEO) on collision course with Earth. Our method is designed to avoid a predicted collision of the NEO with Earth by at least the diameter of Earth. We estimate deflecting a 10,000 MT NEO, such as the asteroid which struck Earth near Chelyabinsk, Russia to be feasible within several months using average power in the ten kilowatt range. We see this deflection method as scalable to larger NEO to a degree not possible using continuous laser systems.

  14. Exploring the Texture of Ocean-Atmosphere Redox Evolution on the Early Earth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reinhard, Christopher Thomas

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    northeastern Baltic Shield. Earth Sci Rev 36:205- 241. B81.Earth.DC, Claire MW (2005) How Earth’s atmosphere evolved to an

  15. Spectrometry of the Earth using Neutrino Oscillations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rott, Carsten; Bose, Debanjan

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The unknown constituents of the interior of our home planet have provoked the human imagination and driven scientific exploration. We herein demonstrate that large neutrino detectors could be used in the near future to significantly improve our understanding of the Earth's inner chemical composition. Neutrinos, which are naturally produced in the atmosphere, traverse the Earth and undergo oscillations that depend on the Earth's electron density. The Earth's chemical composition can be determined by combining observations from large neutrino detectors with seismic measurements of the Earth's matter density. We present a method that will allow us to perform a measurement that can distinguish between composition models of the outer core. We show that the next-generation large-volume neutrino detectors can provide sufficient sensitivity to reject outer core models with large hydrogen content and thereby demonstrate the potential of this novel method. In the future, dedicated instruments could be capable of distin...

  16. Measurement of the cosmic ray energy spectrum using hybrid events of the Pierre Auger Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mariangela Settimo; for the Pierre Auger Collaboration

    2012-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The energy spectrum of ultra-high energy cosmic rays above 10$^{18}$ eV is measured using the hybrid events collected by the Pierre Auger Observatory between November 2005 and September 2010. The large exposure of the Observatory allows the measurement of the main features of the energy spectrum with high statistics. Full Monte Carlo simulations of the extensive air showers (based on the CORSIKA code) and of the hybrid detector response are adopted here as an independent cross check of the standard analysis (Phys. Lett. B 685, 239 (2010)). The dependence on mass composition and other systematic uncertainties are discussed in detail and, in the full Monte Carlo approach, a region of confidence for flux measurements is defined when all the uncertainties are taken into account. An update is also reported of the energy spectrum obtained by combining the hybrid spectrum and that measured using the surface detector array.

  17. Reconstruction of inclined air showers detected with the Pierre Auger Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Pierre Auger Collaboration; A. Aab; P. Abreu; M. Aglietta; M. Ahlers; E. J. Ahn; I. Al Samarai; I. F. M. Albuquerque; I. Allekotte; J. Allen; P. Allison; A. Almela; J. Alvarez Castillo; J. Alvarez-Muñiz; R. Alves Batista; M. Ambrosio; A. Aminaei; L. Anchordoqui; S. Andringa; C. Aramo; F. Arqueros; H. Asorey; P. Assis; J. Aublin; M. Ave; M. Avenier; G. Avila; A. M. Badescu; K. B. Barber; J. Bäuml; C. Baus; J. J. Beatty; K. H. Becker; J. A. Bellido; C. Berat; X. Bertou; P. L. Biermann; P. Billoir; F. Blanco; M. Blanco; C. Bleve; H. Blümer; M. Bohá?ová; D. Boncioli; C. Bonifazi; R. Bonino; N. Borodai; J. Brack; I. Brancus; P. Brogueira; W. C. Brown; P. Buchholz; A. Bueno; M. Buscemi; K. S. Caballero-Mora; B. Caccianiga; L. Caccianiga; M. Candusso; L. Caramete; R. Caruso; A. Castellina; G. Cataldi; L. Cazon; R. Cester; A. G. Chavez; S. H. Cheng; A. Chiavassa; J. A. Chinellato; J. Chudoba; M. Cilmo; R. W. Clay; G. Cocciolo; R. Colalillo; L. Collica; M. R. Coluccia; R. Conceição; F. Contreras; M. J. Cooper; S. Coutu; C. E. Covault; A. Criss; J. Cronin; A. Curutiu; R. Dallier; B. Daniel; S. Dasso; K. Daumiller; B. R. Dawson; R. M. de Almeida; M. De Domenico; S. J. de Jong; J. R. T. de Mello Neto; I. De Mitri; J. de Oliveira; V. de Souza; L. del Peral; O. Deligny; H. Dembinski; N. Dhital; C. Di Giulio; A. Di Matteo; J. C. Diaz; M. L. D\\'\\iaz Castro; P. N. Diep; F. Diogo; C. Dobrigkeit; W. Docters; J. C. D'Olivo; P. N. Dong; A. Dorofeev; Q. Dorosti Hasankiadeh; M. T. Dova; J. Ebr; R. Engel; M. Erdmann; M. Erfani; C. O. Escobar; J. Espadanal; A. Etchegoyen; P. Facal San Luis; H. Falcke; K. Fang; G. Farrar; A. C. Fauth; N. Fazzini; A. P. Ferguson; M. Fernandes; B. Fick; J. M. Figueira; A. Filevich; A. Filip?i?; B. D. Fox; O. Fratu; U. Fröhlich; B. Fuchs; T. Fuji; R. Gaior; B. Garc\\'\\ia; S. T. Garcia Roca; D. Garcia-Gamez; D. Garcia-Pinto; G. Garilli; A. Gascon Bravo; F. Gate; H. Gemmeke; P. L. Ghia; U. Giaccari; M. Giammarchi; M. Giller; C. Glaser; H. Glass; F. Gomez Albarracin; M. Gómez Berisso; P. F. Gómez Vitale; P. Gonçalves; J. G. Gonzalez; B. Gookin; A. Gorgi; P. Gorham; P. Gouffon; S. Grebe; N. Griffith; A. F. Grillo; T. D. Grubb; Y. Guardincerri; F. Guarino; G. P. Guedes; P. Hansen; D. Harari; T. A. Harrison; J. L. Harton; A. Haungs; T. Hebbeker; D. Heck; P. Heimann; A. E. Herve; G. C. Hill; C. Hojvat; N. Hollon; E. Holt; P. Homola; J. R. Hörandel; P. Horvath; M. Hrabovský; D. Huber; T. Huege; A. Insolia; P. G. Isar; K. Islo; I. Jandt; S. Jansen; C. Jarne; M. Josebachuili; A. Kääpä; O. Kambeitz; K. H. Kampert; P. Kasper; I. Katkov; B. Kégl; B. Keilhauer; A. Keivani; E. Kemp; R. M. Kieckhafer; H. O. Klages; M. Kleifges; J. Kleinfeller; R. Krause; N. Krohm; O. Krömer; D. Kruppke-Hansen; D. Kuempel; N. Kunka; G. La Rosa; D. LaHurd; L. Latronico; R. Lauer; M. Lauscher; P. Lautridou; S. Le Coz; M. S. A. B. Leão; D. Lebrun; P. Lebrun; M. A. Leigui de Oliveira; A. Letessier-Selvon; I. Lhenry-Yvon; K. Link; R. López; A. Lopez Agëra; K. Louedec; J. Lozano Bahilo; L. Lu; A. Lucero; M. Ludwig; H. Lyberis; M. C. Maccarone; M. Malacari; S. Maldera; J. Maller; D. Mandat; P. Mantsch; A. G. Mariazzi; V. Marin; I. C. Mari?; G. Marsella; D. Martello; L. Martin; H. Martinez; O. Mart\\'\\inez Bravo; D. Martraire; J. J. Mas\\'\\ias Meza; H. J. Mathes; S. Mathys; A. J. Matthews; J. Matthews; G. Matthiae; D. Maurel; D. Maurizio; E. Mayotte; P. O. Mazur; C. Medina; G. Medina-Tanco; M. Melissas; D. Melo; E. Menichetti; A. Menshikov; S. Messina; R. Meyhandan; S. Mi?anovi?; M. I. Micheletti; L. Middendorf; I. A. Minaya; L. Miramonti; B. Mitrica; L. Molina-Bueno; S. Mollerach; M. Monasor; D. Monnier Ragaigne; F. Montanet; C. Morello; J. C. Moreno; M. Mostafá; C. A. Moura; M. A. Muller; G. Müller; M. Münchmeyer; R. Mussa; G. Navarra; S. Navas; P. Necesal; L. Nellen; A. Nelles; J. Neuser; D. Newton; M. Niechciol; L. Niemietz; T. Niggemann; D. Nitz; D. Nosek; V. Novotny; L. Nožka; L. Ochilo; A. Olinto; M. Oliveira; V. M. Olmos-Gilbaja; M. Ortiz; N. Pacheco; D. Pakk Selmi-Dei; M. Palatka; J. Pallotta; N. Palmieri; P. Papenbreer; G. Parente; A. Parra; S. Pastor; T. Paul; M. Pech; J. P?kala; R. Pelayo; I. M. Pepe; L. Perrone; R. Pesce; E. Petermann; C. Peters; S. Petrera; A. Petrolini; Y. Petrov; R. Piegaia; T. Pierog; P. Pieroni; M. Pimenta; V. Pirronello; M. Platino; M. Plum; A. Porcelli; C. Porowski; P. Privitera; M. Prouza; V. Purrello; E. J. Quel; S. Querchfeld; S. Quinn; J. Rautenberg; O. Ravel; D. Ravignani; B. Revenu; J. Ridky; S. Riggi; M. Risse; P. Ristori; V. Rizi; J. Roberts; W. Rodrigues de Carvalho; I. Rodriguez Cabo; G. Rodriguez Fernandez; J. Rodriguez Rojo; M. D. Rodr\\'\\iguez-Fr\\'\\ias; G. Ros; J. Rosado; T. Rossler; M. Roth; E. Roulet; A. C. Rovero; C. Rühle; S. J. Saffi; A. Saftoiu; F. Salamida; H. Salazar; F. Salesa Greus

    2014-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe the method devised to reconstruct inclined cosmic-ray air showers with zenith angles greater than $60^\\circ$ detected with the surface array of the Pierre Auger Observatory. The measured signals at the ground level are fitted to muon density distributions predicted with atmospheric cascade models to obtain the relative shower size as an overall normalization parameter. The method is evaluated using simulated showers to test its performance. The energy of the cosmic rays is calibrated using a sub-sample of events reconstructed with both the fluorescence and surface array techniques. The reconstruction method described here provides the basis of complementary analyses including an independent measurement of the energy spectrum of ultra-high energy cosmic rays using very inclined events collected by the Pierre Auger Observatory.

  18. Upper limit on the primary photon fraction from the Pierre Auger Observatory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Risse, Markus; /Karlsruhe, Forschungszentrum

    2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Based on observations of the depth of shower maximum performed with the hybrid detector of the Auger Observatory, an upper limit on the cosmic-ray photon fraction of 26% (at 95% confidence level) is derived for primary energies above 10{sup 19} eV. Additional observables recorded with the surface detector array, available for a sub-set of the data sample, support the conclusion that a photon origin of the observed events is not favoured.

  19. The Canadian Automated Meteor Observatory (CAMO): System overview R.J. Weryk a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiegert, Paul

    The Canadian Automated Meteor Observatory (CAMO): System overview R.J. Weryk a, , M.D. Campbell-Brown a,b , P.A. Wiegert a,b , P.G. Brown a,b , Z. Krzeminski a , R. Musci a a Dept. of Physics and Brown, 2012, 2013) using the Canadian Meteor Orbit Radar (CMOR) and a number of Gen-III image

  20. A Search for Astrophysical Burst Signals at the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Aharmim; S. N. Ahmed; A. E. Anthony; N. Barros; E. W. Beier; A. Bellerive; B. Beltran; M. Bergevin; S. D. Biller; K. Boudjemline; M. G. Boulay; B. Cai; Y. D. Chan; D. Chauhan; M. Chen; B. T. Cleveland; G. A. Cox; X. Dai; H. Deng; J. A. Detwiler; M. DiMarco; M. D. Diamond; P. J. Doe; G. Doucas; P. -L. Drouin; F. A. Duncan; M. Dunford; E. D. Earle; S. R. Elliott; H. C. Evans; G. T. Ewan; J. Farine; H. Fergani; F. Fleurot; R. J. Ford; J. A. Formaggio; N. Gagnon; J. TM. Goon; K. Graham; E. Guillian; S. Habib; R. L. Hahn; A. L. Hallin; E. D. Hallman; P. J. Harvey; R. Hazama; W. J. Heintzelman; J. Heise; R. L. Helmer; A. Hime; C. Howard; M. Huang; P. Jagam; B. Jamieson; N. A. Jelley; M. Jerkins; K. J. Keeter; J. R. Klein; L. L. Kormos; M. Kos; C. Kraus; C. B. Krauss; A. Krueger; T. Kutter; C. C. M. Kyba; R. Lange; J. Law; I. T. Lawson; K. T. Lesko; J. R. Leslie; I. Levine; J. C. Loach; R. MacLellan; S. Majerus; H. B. Mak; J. Maneira; R. Martin; N. McCauley; A. B. McDonald; S. R. McGee; M. L. Miller; B. Monreal; J. Monroe; B. G. Nickel; A. J. Noble; H. M. O'Keeffe; N. S. Oblath; R. W. Ollerhead; G. D. Orebi Gann; S. M. Oser; R. A. Ott; S. J. M. Peeters; A. W. P. Poon; G. Prior; S. D. Reitzner; K. Rielage; B. C. Robertson; R. G. H. Robertson; M. H. Schwendener; J. A. Secrest; S. R. Seibert; O. Simard; J. J. Simpson; D. Sinclair; P. Skensved; T. J. Sonley; L. C. Stonehill; G. Tesic; N. Tolich; T. Tsui; R. Van Berg; B. A. VanDevender; C. J. Virtue; B. L. Wall; D. Waller; H. Wan Chan Tseung; D. L. Wark; P. J. S. Watson; J. Wendland; N. West; J. F. Wilkerson; J. R. Wilson; J. M. Wouters; A. Wright; M. Yeh; F. Zhang; K. Zuber

    2013-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) has confirmed the standard solar model and neutrino oscillations through the observation of neutrinos from the solar core. In this paper we present a search for neutrinos associated with sources other than the solar core, such as gamma-ray bursters and solar flares. We present a new method for looking for temporal coincidences between neutrino events and astrophysical bursts of widely varying intensity. No correlations were found between neutrinos detected in SNO and such astrophysical sources.

  1. Detection of Inclined and Horizontal Showers in the Pierre Auger Observatory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elewyck, V. van [Observatorio Pierre Auger, Av. San Martin Norte 304 (5613) Malarguee (Argentina)

    2006-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pierre Auger Observatory can detect with high efficiency the air showers induced by ultra-high energy cosmic rays incident at large zenith angles {theta} > 60 deg. We describe here the specific characteristics of inclined and horizontal showers, as well as the characteristics of their signal in the surface detector. We point out their relevance both to extend the potential of the detector, and in the context of the detection of high-energy cosmic neutrinos.

  2. Radial Velocity Jitter in Stars from the California and Carnegie Planet Search at Keck Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. T. Wright

    2005-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    I present an empirical model for predicting a star's radial velocity jitter from its B-V color, activity level, and absolute magnitude. This model is based on observations of 450 well- observed stars from Keck Observatory for the California and Carnegie Planet Search Program. The model includes noise from both astrophysical sources and systematic errors, and describes jitter as generally increasing with a star's activity and height above the main sequence.

  3. CollegeofEarth,Ocean, andAtmosphericSciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurapov, Alexander

    Chemistry for Environmental Sciences 490 Environmental Conservation & Sustainability 577 Environmental, and Atmospheric Sciences Environmental Sciences Earth Sciences Geology Option Geography Option Earth Systems Sciences or Environmental Sciences** The new College of Earth Ocean and Atmospheric Sciences (CEOAS) has

  4. Efficient Bulk Data Replication for the Earth System Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sim, Alex

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bulk Data Replication for the Earth System Grid Alex Sim 1 ,CA 94720, USA Abstract The Earth System Grid (ESG) communityNetLogger 1. Introduction The Earth System Grid (ESG) [1

  5. Efficient Bulk Data Replication for the Earth System Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sim, Alex

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for the Earth System Grid Alex Sim 1 , Dan Gunter 1 , VijayaUSA Abstract The Earth System Grid (ESG) community faces theIntroduction The Earth System Grid (ESG) [1] community faces

  6. The Ability of MM5 to Simulate Ice Clouds: Systematic Comparison between Simulated and Measured Fluxes and Lidar/Radar Profiles at SIRTA Atmospheric Observatory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chiriaco, M.; Vautard, R.; Chepfer, H.; Haeffelin, M.; Wanherdrick, Y.; Morille, Y.; Protat, A.; Dudhia, J.

    2005-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Ice clouds play a major role in the radiative energy budget of the Earth-atmosphere system (Liou 1986). Their radiative effect is governed primarily by the equilibrium between their albedo and greenhouse effects. Both macrophysical and microphysical properties of ice clouds regulate this equilibrium. For quantifying the effect of these clouds onto climate and weather systems, they must be properly characterized in atmospheric models. In this paper we use remote-sensing measurements from the SIRTA ground based atmospheric observatory (Site Instrumental de Recherche par Teledetection Atmospherique, http://sirta.lmd.polytechnique.fr). Lidar and radar observations taken over 18 months are used, in order to gain statistical confidence in the model evaluation. Along this period of time, 62 days are selected for study because they contain parts of ice clouds. We use the ''model to observations'' approach by simulating lidar and radar signals from MM5 outputs. Other more classical variables such as shortwave and longwave radiative fluxes are also used. Four microphysical schemes, among which that proposed by Reisner et al. (1998) with original or modified parameterizations of particle terminal fall velocities (Zurovac-Jevtic and Zhang 2003, Heymsfield and Donner 1990), and the simplified Dudhia (1989) scheme are evaluated in this study.

  7. Atlantis 11-32 Report Page 1 Update on Experiments Associated with CORK Subseafloor Observatories installed during IODP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Andrew

    ) replacement of data loggers at Holes 1026B, 1301A, and 1301B and installation of a supplemental battery associated with other CORK observatories, microbiological sampling, and in-situ analysis

  8. Low-energy-threshold analysis of the Phase I and Phase II data sets of the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monroe, Jocelyn

    Results are reported from a joint analysis of Phase I and Phase II data from the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory. The effective electron kinetic energy threshold used is Teff=3.5 MeV, the lowest analysis threshold yet achieved ...

  9. Proceedings of ICRC 2001: 773 c Copernicus Gesellschaft 2001 Implementation of the first level trigger for the auger observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (Suomij¨arvi, 2001) powered by solar panels. The station electronics communicates with the observatory delivery schedule, power consump- tion, functionality, and cost goals. This paper discusses the trigger

  10. Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 10, 715729, 2006 www.hydrol-earth-syst-sci.net/10/715/2006/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 10, 715­729, 2006 www.hydrol-earth-syst-sci.net/10/715/2006/ © Author in Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci. Discuss.: 16 May 2006 Revised: 2 August 2006 ­ Accepted: 25 September 2006

  11. Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 15, 37013713, 2011 www.hydrol-earth-syst-sci.net/15/3701/2011/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vrugt, Jasper A.

    Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 15, 3701­3713, 2011 www.hydrol-earth-syst-sci.net/15/3701/2011/ doi:10, Wageningen, The Netherlands Received: 19 April 2011 ­ Published in Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci. Discuss.: 26

  12. Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 17, 43794388, 2013 www.hydrol-earth-syst-sci.net/17/4379/2013/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Jason

    Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 17, 4379­4388, 2013 www.hydrol-earth-syst-sci.net/17/4379/2013/ doi:10 May 2013 ­ Published in Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci. Discuss.: 25 June 2013 Revised: 12 September 2013

  13. Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 10, 609618, 2006 www.hydrol-earth-syst-sci.net/10/609/2006/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 10, 609­618, 2006 www.hydrol-earth-syst-sci.net/10/609/2006/ © Author in Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci. Discuss.: 22 May 2006 Revised: 21 August 2006 ­ Accepted: 6 September 2006

  14. Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 11, 14691480, 2007 www.hydrol-earth-syst-sci.net/11/1469/2007/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 11, 1469­1480, 2007 www.hydrol-earth-syst-sci.net/11/1469/2007/ © Author 7, 2611 AX Delft, The Netherlands Received: 18 December 2006 ­ Published in Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci

  15. Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 12, 825839, 2008 www.hydrol-earth-syst-sci.net/12/825/2008/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 12, 825­839, 2008 www.hydrol-earth-syst-sci.net/12/825/2008/ © Author, Slovakia Received: 10 July 2007 ­ Published in Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci. Discuss.: 24 July 2007 Revised: 21

  16. Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 12, 267275, 2008 www.hydrol-earth-syst-sci.net/12/267/2008/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 12, 267­275, 2008 www.hydrol-earth-syst-sci.net/12/267/2008/ © Author Received: 11 June 2007 ­ Published in Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci. Discuss.: 31 July 2007 Revised: 10 December

  17. Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 10, 889902, 2006 www.hydrol-earth-syst-sci.net/10/889/2006/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 10, 889­902, 2006 www.hydrol-earth-syst-sci.net/10/889/2006/ © Author of Agricultural Sciences, P.O. Box 50, 8830 Tjele, Denmark Received: 4 April 2006 ­ Published in Hydrol. Earth

  18. Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 12, 393403, 2008 www.hydrol-earth-syst-sci.net/12/393/2008/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 12, 393­403, 2008 www.hydrol-earth-syst-sci.net/12/393/2008/ © Author, Norway Received: 27 November 2006 ­ Published in Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci. Discuss.: 11 September 2007

  19. Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 11, 753768, 2007 www.hydrol-earth-syst-sci.net/11/753/2007/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 11, 753­768, 2007 www.hydrol-earth-syst-sci.net/11/753/2007/ © Author December 2005 ­ Published in Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci. Discuss.: 19 July 2006 Revised: 3 November 2006

  20. Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 10, 663677, 2006 www.hydrol-earth-syst-sci.net/10/663/2006/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 10, 663­677, 2006 www.hydrol-earth-syst-sci.net/10/663/2006/ © Author in Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci. Discuss.: 6 April 2006 Revised: 5 July 2006 ­ Accepted: 21 September 2006

  1. Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 10, 645662, 2006 www.hydrol-earth-syst-sci.net/10/645/2006/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 10, 645­662, 2006 www.hydrol-earth-syst-sci.net/10/645/2006/ © Author. of Technology, Karlsplatz 13, 1040 Vienna, Austria Received: 29 March 2006 ­ Published in Hydrol. Earth Syst

  2. Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 10, 181195, 2006 www.hydrol-earth-syst-sci.net/10/181/2006/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 10, 181­195, 2006 www.hydrol-earth-syst-sci.net/10/181/2006/ © Author, Singapore Received: 4 October 2005 ­ Published in Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci. Discuss.: 9 November 2005 Revised

  3. Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 11, 725737, 2007 www.hydrol-earth-syst-sci.net/11/725/2007/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 11, 725­737, 2007 www.hydrol-earth-syst-sci.net/11/725/2007/ © Author´et´eorologique de Belgique, Brussels, Belgium Received: 21 February 2006 ­ Published in Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci

  4. Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 18, 463477, 2014 www.hydrol-earth-syst-sci.net/18/463/2014/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 18, 463­477, 2014 www.hydrol-earth-syst-sci.net/18/463/2014/ doi:10 2013 ­ Published in Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci. Discuss.: 12 July 2013 Revised: 18 December 2013

  5. Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 10, 743754, 2006 www.hydrol-earth-syst-sci.net/10/743/2006/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 10, 743­754, 2006 www.hydrol-earth-syst-sci.net/10/743/2006/ © Author, The Netherlands Received: 6 December 2005 ­ Published in Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci. Discuss.: 13 April 2006 Revised

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    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

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    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

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    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 15, 519­532, 2011 www.hydrol-earth-syst-sci.net/15/519/2011/ doi:10, CP220, 69366 Lyon Cedex 09, France Received: 30 July 2010 ­ Published in Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci

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  10. Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 11, 951963, 2007 www.hydrol-earth-syst-sci.net/11/951/2007/

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    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

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    Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 11, 851­862, 2007 www.hydrol-earth-syst-sci.net/11/851/2007/ © Author Received: 15 May 2006 ­ Published in Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci. Discuss.: 14 July 2006 Revised: 1 December

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  1. Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 15, 437451, 2011 www.hydrol-earth-syst-sci.net/15/437/2011/

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    Stoffelen, Ad

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    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

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  5. Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 10, 233243, 2006 www.hydrol-earth-syst-sci.net/10/233/2006/

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    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 10, 233­243, 2006 www.hydrol-earth-syst-sci.net/10/233/2006/ © Author in Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci. Discuss.: 1 September 2005 Revised: 22 November 2005 ­ Accepted: 22 February

  6. Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 14, 17311744, 2010 www.hydrol-earth-syst-sci.net/14/1731/2010/

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    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 14, 1731­1744, 2010 www.hydrol-earth-syst-sci.net/14/1731/2010/ doi:10 2010 ­ Published in Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci. Discuss.: 22 June 2010 Revised: 26 August 2010 ­ Accepted

  7. Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 11, 891906, 2007 www.hydrol-earth-syst-sci.net/11/891/2007/

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    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

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    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 11, 1481­1500, 2007 www.hydrol-earth-syst-sci.net/11/1481/2007/ © Author April 2006 ­ Published in Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci. Discuss.: 28 August 2006 Revised: 23 May 2007

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    Boyer, Edmond

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    Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 11, 1581­1592, 2007 www.hydrol-earth-syst-sci.net/11/1581/2007/ © Author, France Received: 10 April 2007 ­ Published in Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci. Discuss.: 30 May 2007 Revised: 10

  13. Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 11, 15511561, 2007 www.hydrol-earth-syst-sci.net/11/1551/2007/

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    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 11, 1551­1561, 2007 www.hydrol-earth-syst-sci.net/11/1551/2007/ © Author ­ Published in Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci. Discuss.: 31 August 2006 Revised: 29 November 2006 ­ Accepted: 7

  14. Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 10, 339352, 2006 www.hydrol-earth-syst-sci.net/10/339/2006/

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    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 10, 339­352, 2006 www.hydrol-earth-syst-sci.net/10/339/2006/ © Author 2600 GB, Delft, The Netherlands Received: 16 September 2005 ­ Published in Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci

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    Boyer, Edmond

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    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 10, 507­518, 2006 www.hydrol-earth-syst-sci.net/10/507/2006/ © Author Bilt, The Netherlands Received: 21 June 2005 ­ Published in Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci. Discuss.: 16

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    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 11, 1405­1416, 2007 www.hydrol-earth-syst-sci.net/11/1405/2007/ © Author: 11 October 2006 ­ Published in Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci. Discuss.: 26 October 2006 Revised: 15 May

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    Arumugam, Sankar

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    Vrugt, Jasper A.

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  1. Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 18, 727746, 2014 www.hydrol-earth-syst-sci.net/18/727/2014/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 18, 727­746, 2014 www.hydrol-earth-syst-sci.net/18/727/2014/ doi:10 to: L. Coron (laurent.coron@irstea.fr) Received: 22 August 2013 ­ Published in Hydrol. Earth Syst

  2. Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 10, 263276, 2006 www.hydrol-earth-syst-sci.net/10/263/2006/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 10, 263­276, 2006 www.hydrol-earth-syst-sci.net/10/263/2006/ © Author: 1 July 2005 ­ Published in Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci. Discuss.: 22 August 2005 Revised: 6 December

  3. Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 11, 711720, 2007 www.hydrol-earth-syst-sci.net/11/711/2007/

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    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 11, 711­720, 2007 www.hydrol-earth-syst-sci.net/11/711/2007/ © Author in Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci. Discuss.: 4 September 2006 Revised: 7 December 2006 ­ Accepted: 11 December 2006

  4. Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 16, 201216, 2012 www.hydrol-earth-syst-sci.net/16/201/2012/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 16, 201­216, 2012 www.hydrol-earth-syst-sci.net/16/201/2012/ doi:10 to: S. Singla (stephanie.singla@hotmail.fr) Received: 28 July 2011 ­ Published in Hydrol. Earth Syst

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    Boyer, Edmond

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  6. Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 14, 15271536, 2010 www.hydrol-earth-syst-sci.net/14/1527/2010/

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    Boyer, Edmond

    Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 14, 1527­1536, 2010 www.hydrol-earth-syst-sci.net/14/1527/2010/ doi:10, 34060 Montpellier, France Received: 23 December 2009 ­ Published in Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci. Discuss.: 1

  7. Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 12, 123139, 2008 www.hydrol-earth-syst-sci.net/12/123/2008/

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    Boyer, Edmond

    Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 12, 123­139, 2008 www.hydrol-earth-syst-sci.net/12/123/2008/ © Author in Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci. Discuss.: 6 June 2007 Revised: 15 October 2007 ­ Accepted: 20 December 2007

  8. Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 12, 257265, 2008 www.hydrol-earth-syst-sci.net/12/257/2008/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 12, 257­265, 2008 www.hydrol-earth-syst-sci.net/12/257/2008/ © Author in Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci. Discuss.: 5 July 2007 Revised: 20 December 2007 ­ Accepted: 13 January 2008

  9. Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 16, 29953010, 2012 www.hydrol-earth-syst-sci.net/16/2995/2012/

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    Boyer, Edmond

    Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 16, 2995­3010, 2012 www.hydrol-earth-syst-sci.net/16/2995/2012/ doi:10. Delogu (emilie.delogu@cesbio.cnes.fr) Received: 12 January 2012 ­ Published in Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci

  10. Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 13, 23152327, 2009 www.hydrol-earth-syst-sci.net/13/2315/2009/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 13, 2315­2327, 2009 www.hydrol-earth-syst-sci.net/13/2315/2009/ © Author June 2009 ­ Published in Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci. Discuss.: 6 August 2009 Revised: 29 October 2009

  11. Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 16, 25852603, 2012 www.hydrol-earth-syst-sci.net/16/2585/2012/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Jason

    Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 16, 2585­2603, 2012 www.hydrol-earth-syst-sci.net/16/2585/2012/ doi:10 April 2012 ­ Published in Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci. Discuss.: 16 April 2012 Revised: 13 July 2012

  12. Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 11, 665676, 2007 www.hydrol-earth-syst-sci.net/11/665/2007/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 11, 665­676, 2007 www.hydrol-earth-syst-sci.net/11/665/2007/ © Author in Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci. Discuss.: 25 July 2006 Revised: 1 December 2006 ­ Accepted: 1 December 2006

  13. Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 15, 34113430, 2011 www.hydrol-earth-syst-sci.net/15/3411/2011/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Troch, Peter

    Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 15, 3411­3430, 2011 www.hydrol-earth-syst-sci.net/15/3411/2011/ doi:10Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA, USA Received: 30 March 2011 ­ Published in Hydrol. Earth

  14. Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 15, 25192530, 2011 www.hydrol-earth-syst-sci.net/15/2519/2011/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Zhi "Luke"

    Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 15, 2519­2530, 2011 www.hydrol-earth-syst-sci.net/15/2519/2011/ doi:10, California State University, Fresno, CA 93740, USA Received: 7 December 2010 ­ Published in Hydrol. Earth

  15. Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 12, 363370, 2008 www.hydrol-earth-syst-sci.net/12/363/2008/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 12, 363­370, 2008 www.hydrol-earth-syst-sci.net/12/363/2008/ © Author ­ Published in Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci. Discuss.: 11 September 2007 Revised: 28 November 2007 ­ Accepted: 5

  16. Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 12, 715726, 2008 www.hydrol-earth-syst-sci.net/12/715/2008/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 12, 715­726, 2008 www.hydrol-earth-syst-sci.net/12/715/2008/ © Author, Germany Received: 16 May 2007 ­ Published in Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci. Discuss.: 12 June 2007 Revised: 30

  17. Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 10, 197208, 2006 www.hydrol-earth-syst-sci.net/10/197/2006/

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    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 10, 197­208, 2006 www.hydrol-earth-syst-sci.net/10/197/2006/ © Author Received: 10 August 2005 ­ Published in Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci. Discuss.: 8 September 2005 Revised: 29

  18. Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 13, 13491360, 2009 www.hydrol-earth-syst-sci.net/13/1349/2009/

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    Boyer, Edmond

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  19. Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 12, 5574, 2008 www.hydrol-earth-syst-sci.net/12/55/2008/

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    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

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  20. Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 10, 395412, 2006 www.hydrol-earth-syst-sci.net/10/395/2006/

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    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

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