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1

Chapter 2 Lake and reservoir water uses and abuses  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Publisher Summary Reservoirs are beneficial for human water needs, sometimes for one particular purpose, but frequently for multiple simultaneous purposes (multipurpose use). In contrast, lakes are natural waterbodies, often without designated human water uses. However, the use of their water is recently becoming more intensive and multipurpose, particularly for lakes in heavily-populated countries and intensively-utilized regions. This multipurpose and extensive use can often lead to abuse and conflicts, to a reduced ability to supply water of good quality, aesthetic and safe for human consumption. This chapter distinguishes twelve types of lake and reservoir functions. These include drinking water, irrigation, flood control, fish production and production of other useful organisms, mining, fire- and ice-ponds, and urban reservoirs. The deterioration of lakes and reservoirs is difficult to classify and two major groups are distinguished. One is based on their improper usage—abuses of the waterbodies, classified according to sources or reasons of the deterioration. The other is based on the agents and compounds causing the deterioration—pollution.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

The global abundance and size distribution of lakes, ponds, and ...  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

United States Geological Survey, National Research Program, Box 25046 MS 413, Denver, Colorado 80025 ..... Western Lakes Survey (U.S.A.). 20.78. 0.01. 752.

2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

3

Taste and Odor Problems in Clinton Lake Reservoir's Drinking Water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Taste and Odor Problems in Clinton Lake Reservoir's Drinking Water Diana L. Restrepo-Osorio (McNair Scholar) Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, INTRODUCTION Water is a requirement for human health and welfare; however..., an exceedingly large number of people around the world lack reliable sources of drinking water 1 . According to the World Health Organization, approximately 3.5 million people die every year, generally in developing countries, from diseases linked to poor...

Restrepo-Osorio, Dianna L.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Lake and Reservoir Management 21(1):24-29, 2005 Copyright by the North American Lake Management Society 2005  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

derived from erosion of the exposed shoreline (i.e., by rain and runoff), or wave-driven resuspension in flood control reservoirs expose those sedi- ments previously deposited in deeper areas to resuspension by waves and rain. Resuspension of sediment by wind has been documented in shallow lakes with constant lake

5

Analysis of microearthquake data at Cold Lake and its applications to reservoir monitoring  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-difference method, which highlights several tight event clusters. The deep cluster at a depth of 400 m, just above the oil reservoir, shows very high seismicity during the CSS processes.Asec- ond cluster is observed of the region. We analyzed a microearthquake data set from Cold Lake,Alberta, where heavy oil is extracted using

Snieder, Roel

6

Ancient lakes as evolutionary reservoirs: evidence from the thalassoid gastropods of Lake Tanganyika  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...lineages pre-date lake formation Combined seismic reflection readings and radiocarbon...as has been demonstrated for cichlid fishes (Ruber et al. 1999). The identification...others 535 of that observed in the cichlid fishes of the lake (Salzburger et al. 2002...

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Water-quality and sediment-chemistry data of drain water and evaporation ponds from Tulare Lake Drainage District, Kings County, California, March 1985 to March 1986  

SciTech Connect

Trace element and major ion concentrations were measured in water samples collected monthly between March 1985 and March 1986 at the MD-1 pumping station at the Tulare Lake Drainage District evaporation ponds, Kings County, California. Samples were analyzed for selected pesticides several times during the year. Salinity, as measured by specific conductance, ranged from 11,500 to 37,600 microsiemens/centimeter; total recoverable boron ranged from 4,000 to 16,000 micrg/L; and total recoverable molybdenum ranged from 630 to 2,600 microg/L. Median concentrations of total arsenic and total selenium were 97 and 2 microg/L. Atrazine, prometone, propazine, and simazine were the only pesticides detected in water samples collected at the MD-1 pumping station. Major ions, trace elements, and selected pesticides also were analyzed in water and bottom-sediment samples from five of the southern evaporation ponds at Tulare Lake Drainage District. The water samples increased in specific conductance and concentrations of total arsenic, total recoverable boron and total recoverable molybdenum going from pond 1 to pond 10, respectively. Median concentrations of total arsenic and total selenium in the bottom sediments were 4.0 and 0.9 microg/g, respectively. 6 refs., 2 figs., 12 tabs.

Fujii, R.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Farm Ponds  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Farm Ponds Farm Ponds Nature Bulletin No. 410-A March 13, 1971 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation FARM PONDS Since colonial times, farmers have been scooping out reservoirs or damming small watercourses to impound water for their livestock or satisfy a hankering for a private fishing hole. Such a pond was usually too shallow and was rarely fenced. In hot weather, cattle stood belly- deep in the water and hogs wallowed in the shallows. The shores were trampled bare of vegetation. It served as a swimming place for a flock of tame ducks and the youngsters of the family but, other than bullheads, a few fish could live in it. In most cases the dam was made of earth dug with a team and "slip scraper" to deepen the hole, without a proper spillway for the overflow during heavy rains. As a result, or because of holes tunneled through them by muskrats and crawfish, these dams eventually washed out. A number of them in our Palos preserves, built by early settlers, have been enlarged, provided with adequate spillways, and serve as harbors for fish and wildlife.

9

ENVIRONMENTAL PROBLEMS ASSOCIATED WITH DECOMMISSIONING THE CHERNOBYL NUCLEAR POWER PLANT COOLING POND  

SciTech Connect

Decommissioning of nuclear power plants and other nuclear fuel cycle facilities has been an imperative issue lately. There exist significant experience and generally accepted recommendations on remediation of lands with residual radioactive contamination; however, there are hardly any such recommendations on remediation of cooling ponds that, in most cases, are fairly large water reservoirs. The literature only describes remediation of minor reservoirs containing radioactive silt (a complete closure followed by preservation) or small water reservoirs resulting in reestablishing natural water flows. Problems associated with remediation of river reservoirs resulting in flooding of vast agricultural areas also have been described. In addition, the severity of environmental and economic problems related to the remedial activities is shown to exceed any potential benefits of these activities. One of the large, highly contaminated water reservoirs that require either remediation or closure is Karachay Lake near the MAYAK Production Association in the Chelyabinsk Region of Russia where liquid radioactive waste had been deep well injected for a long period of time. Backfilling of Karachay Lake is currently in progress. It should be noted that secondary environmental problems associated with its closure are considered to be of less importance since sustaining Karachay Lake would have presented a much higher radiological risk. Another well-known highly contaminated water reservoir is the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (ChNPP) Cooling Pond, decommissioning of which is planned for the near future. This study summarizes the environmental problems associated with the ChNPP Cooling Pond decommissioning.

Farfan, E.

2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

10

Environmental Problems Associated With Decommissioning The Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant Cooling Pond  

SciTech Connect

Decommissioning of nuclear power plants and other nuclear fuel cycle facilities has been an imperative issue lately. There exist significant experience and generally accepted recommendations on remediation of lands with residual radioactive contamination; however, there are hardly any such recommendations on remediation of cooling ponds that, in most cases, are fairly large water reservoirs. The literature only describes remediation of minor reservoirs containing radioactive silt (a complete closure followed by preservation) or small water reservoirs resulting in reestablishing natural water flows. Problems associated with remediation of river reservoirs resulting in flooding of vast agricultural areas also have been described. In addition, the severity of environmental and economic problems related to the remedial activities is shown to exceed any potential benefits of these activities. One of the large, highly contaminated water reservoirs that require either remediation or closure is Karachay Lake near the MAYAK Production Association in the Chelyabinsk Region of Russia where liquid radioactive waste had been deep well injected for a long period of time. Backfilling of Karachay Lake is currently in progress. It should be noted that secondary environmental problems associated with its closure are considered to be of less importance since sustaining Karachay Lake would have presented a much higher radiological risk. Another well-known highly contaminated water reservoir is the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (ChNPP) Cooling Pond, decommissioning of which is planned for the near future. This study summarizes the environmental problems associated with the ChNPP Cooling Pond decommissioning.

Farfan, E. B.; Jannik, G. T.; Marra, J. C.; Oskolkov, B. Ya.; Bondarkov, M. D.; Gaschak, S. P.; Maksymenko, A. M.; Maksymenko, V. M.; Martynenko, V. I.

2009-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

11

Analysis of reservoir performance and forecasting for the eastern area of the C-2 Reservoir, Lake Maracaibo, Venezuela  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This research developed a numerical simulation based on the latest reservoir description to evaluate the feasibility of new infill wells to maximize the recovery specifically in the eastern region of the reservoir operated by Petroleos de Venezuela...

Urdaneta Anez, Jackeline C

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

E-Print Network 3.0 - arrow lakes reservoir Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

water releases at Blue Marsh Lake following... an emergency declaration status for the project. The lake is located on the Tulpehocken Creek, a tributary Source: US Army Corps...

13

Pond Scum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DeWitt, assistant professor of ecological genetics with the Department of Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences, and his colleagues recently discovered these ponds and set out to make educational and experimental use of them through the creation... of Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences to evaluate and measure natural selection factors, predator behavior and morphology, experimental foodweb manipula- tions, habitat structure and use, ecology, and several additional proposed research studies...

Crawford, Amanda

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Catfish Ponds for Recreation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Catfish ponds can provide enjoyable outdoor recreation as well as excellent food fish. This publication explains pond preparation, stocking, feeding, water quality, off-flavor, harvesting, fish diseases, and controlling pond pests....

Masser, Michael P.; Steinbach, Don W.; Higginbotham, Billy

1999-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

15

Launois, L., Veslot, J., Irz, P., and Argillier, C. (2010) Selecting fish-based metrics responding to human pressures in French natural lakes and reservoirs:towards the development of a fish-based index (FBI) for French lakes, Ecology of Freshwater Fish 2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Launois, L., Veslot, J., Irz, P., and Argillier, C. (2010) Selecting fish-based metrics responding to human pressures in French natural lakes and reservoirs:towards the development of a fish-based index (FBI) for French lakes, Ecology of Freshwater Fish 2010. _ 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/ S. Accepted

Boyer, Edmond

16

Solar pond technology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Solar pond technology has made substantial progress in the last ... . This paper reviews the basic principles of solar ponds and the problems encountered in their ... which influence the technical and economic vi...

J Srinivasan

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Duck Valley Reservoirs Fish Stocking and Operation and Maintenance, 2005-2006 Annual Progress Report.  

SciTech Connect

The Duck Valley Reservoirs Fish Stocking and Operations and Maintenance (DV Fisheries) project is an ongoing resident fish program designed to enhance both subsistence fishing, educational opportunities for Tribal members of the Shoshone-Paiute Tribes, and recreational fishing facilities for non-Tribal members. In addition to stocking rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) in Mountain View, Lake Billy Shaw, and Sheep Creek Reservoirs, the program also intends to afford and maintain healthy aquatic conditions for fish growth and survival, to provide superior facilities with wilderness qualities to attract non-Tribal angler use, and to offer clear, consistent communication with the Tribal community about this project as well as outreach and education within the region and the local community. Tasks for this performance period are divided into operations and maintenance plus monitoring and evaluation. Operation and maintenance of the three reservoirs include fences, roads, dams and all reservoir structures, feeder canals, water troughs and stock ponds, educational signs, vehicles and equipment, and outhouses. Monitoring and evaluation activities included creel, gillnet, wildlife, and bird surveys, water quality and reservoir structures monitoring, native vegetation planting, photo point documentation, control of encroaching exotic vegetation, and community outreach and education. The three reservoirs are monitored in terms of water quality and fishery success. Sheep Creek Reservoir was the least productive as a result of high turbidity levels and constraining water quality parameters. Lake Billy Shaw trout were in poorer condition than in previous years potentially as a result of water quality or other factors. Mountain View Reservoir trout exhibit the best health of the three reservoirs and was the only reservoir to receive constant flows of water.

Sellman, Jake; Dykstra, Tim [Shoshone-Paiute Tribes

2009-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

18

Facies architecture of the Bluejacket Sandstone in the Eufaula Lake area, Oklahoma: Implications for the reservoir characterization of the Bartlesville Sandstone  

SciTech Connect

Outcrop studies of the Bluejacket Sandstone (Middle Pennsylvanian) provide significant insights to reservoir architecture of the subsurface equivalent Bartlesville Sandstone. Quarry walls and road cuts in the Lake Eufaula area offer excellent exposures for detailed facies architectural investigations using high-precision surveying, photo mosaics. Directional minipermeameter measurements are being conducted. Subsurface studies include conventional logs, borehole image log, and core data. Reservoir architectures are reconstructed in four hierarchical levels: multi-storey sandstone, i.e. discrete genetic intervals; individual discrete genetic interval; facies within a discrete genetic interval; and lateral accretion bar deposits. In both outcrop and subsurface, the Bluejacket (Bartlesville) Sandstone comprises two distinctive architectures: a lower braided fluvial and an upper meandering fluvial. Braided fluvial deposits are typically 30 to 80 ft thick, and are laterally persistent filling an incised valley wider than the largest producing fields. The lower contact is irregular with local relief of 50 ft. The braided-fluvial deposits consist of 100-400-ft wide, 5-15-ft thick channel-fill elements. Each channel-fill interval is limited laterally by an erosional contact or overbank deposits, and is separated vertically by discontinuous mudstones or highly concentrated mudstone interclast lag conglomerates. Low-angle parallel-stratified or trough cross-stratified medium- to coarse-grained sandstones volumetrically dominate. This section has a blocky well log profile. Meandering fluvial deposits are typically 100 to 150 ft thick and comprise multiple discrete genetic intervals.

Ye, Liangmiao; Yang, Kexian [Univ. of Tulsa, OK (United States)

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Remediation of a large contaminated reactor cooling reservoir: Resolving and environmental/regulatory paradox  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents a case study of a former reactor cooling water reservoir, PAR Pond, located Savannah River Site. PAR Pond, a 2640 acre, man-made reservoir was built in 1958 and until 1988, received cooling water from two DOE nuclear production reactors, P and R. The lake sediments were contaminated with low levels of radiocesium (CS-137) and transuranics in the late 1950s and early 1960s because of leaking fuel elements. Elevated levels of mercury accumulated in the sediments from pumping water from the Savannah River to maintain a full pool. PAR Ponds` stability, size, and nutrient content made a significant, unique, and highly studied ecological resource for fish and wildlife populations until it was partially drained in 1991 due to a depression in the downslope of the earthen dam. The drawdown, created 1340 acres of exposed, radioactively contaminated sediments along 33 miles of shoreline. This led US EPA to declare PAR Pond as a CERCLA operable unit subject to remediation. The drawdown also raised concerns for the populations of aquatic plants, fish, alligators, and endangered species and increased the potential for off-site migration of contaminated wildlife from contact with the exposed sediments. Applicable regulations, such as NEPA and CERCLA, require wetland loss evaluations, human health and ecological risk assessments, and remediation feasibility studies. DOE is committed to spending several million dollars to repair the dam for safety reasons, even though the lake will probably not be used for cooling purposes. At the same time, DOE must make decisions whether to refill and expend additional public funds to maintain a full pool to reduce the risks defined under CERCLA or spend hundreds of millions in remediation costs to reduce the risks of the exposed sediments.

Bowers, J.A.: Gladden, J.B.; Hickey, H.M.; Jones, M.P.; Mackey, H.E.; Mayer, J.J. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Doswell, A. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

The internal wave field in Sau reservoir  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The analysis of wind, temperature, and current data from Sau reservoir (Spain) shows that the ... of the total wind energy input into the lake (Wüest and Lorke.

2005-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lakes reservoirs ponds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Oakland Sub-Area Folsom Lake  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oakland Sub-Area 25 MW (C) 92 Lake Tahoe Folsom Lake Clear Lake Indian Valley Reservoir Nacimiento IONE CLAY IONE ENERGY TIGER CREEK WEST POINT PINE GROVE NEPCO ELECTRA 1& 2 Camanche Reservoir New Hogan EARLY INTAKE NEW MOCCASIN CR BEAR VALLEY INDIAN FLAT MARIPOSA Mariposa TULLOCH CHINESE CAMP SONORA

22

Duck Valley Reservoirs Fish Stocking and O&M, Annual Progress Report 2007-2008.  

SciTech Connect

The Duck Valley Reservoirs Fish Stocking and Operations and Maintenance Project (DV Fisheries) is an ongoing resident fish program that serves to partially mitigate the loss of anadromous fish that resulted from downstream construction of the federal hydropower system. The project's goals are to enhance subsistence fishing and educational opportunities for Tribal members of the Shoshone-Paiute Tribes and provide fishing opportunities for non-Tribal members. In addition to stocking rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) in Mountain View (MVR), Lake Billy Shaw (LBS), and Sheep Creek Reservoirs (SCR), the program is also designed to: maintain healthy aquatic conditions for fish growth and survival, provide superior facilities with wilderness qualities to attract non-Tribal angler use, and offer clear, consistent communication with the Tribal community about this project as well as outreach and education within the region and the local community. Tasks for this performance period fall into three categories: operations and maintenance, monitoring and evaluation, and public outreach. Operation and maintenance of the three reservoirs include maintaining fences, roads, dams and all reservoir structures, feeder canals, water troughs, stock ponds, educational signs, vehicles, equipment, and restroom facilities. Monitoring and evaluation activities include creel, gillnet, wildlife, and bird surveys, water quality and reservoir structures monitoring, native vegetation planting, photo point documentation, and control of encroaching exotic vegetation. Public outreach activities include providing environmental education to school children, providing fishing reports to local newspapers and vendors, updating the website, hosting community environmental events, and fielding numerous phone calls from anglers. The reservoir monitoring program focuses on water quality and fishery success. Sheep Creek Reservoir and Lake Billy Shaw had less than productive trout growth due to water quality issues including dissolved oxygen and/or turbidity. Regardless, angler fishing experience was the highest at Lake Billy Shaw. Trout in Mountain View Reservoir were in the best condition of the three reservoirs and anglers reported very good fishing there. Water quality (specifically dissolved oxygen and temperature) remain the main limiting factors in the fisheries, particularly in late August to early September.

Sellman, Jake; Perugini, Carol [Department of Fish, Wildlife, and Parks, Shoshone-Paiute Tribes

2009-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

23

Evaluation of solar pond performance  

SciTech Connect

The City of Miamisburg, Ohio, constructed during 1978 a large, salt-gradient solar pond as part of its community park development project. The thermal energy stored in the pond is being used to heat an outdoor swimming pool in the summer and an adjacent recreational building during part of the winter. This solar pond, which occupies an area of 2020 m/sup 2/ (22,000 sq. ft.), was designed from experience obtained at smaller research ponds located at Ohio State University, the University of New Mexico and similar ponds operated in Israel. During the summer of 1979, the initial heat (40,000 kWh, 136 million Btu) was withdrawn from the solar pond to heat the outdoor swimming pool. All of the data collection systems were installed and functioned as designed so that operational data were obtained. The observed performance of the pond was compared with several of the predicted models for this type of pond. (MHR)

Wittenberg, L.J.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Chironomids associated with common microhabitats in three ponds in Brazos County, Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

species of Chironomidae per ha- bitat, per season in TAMU Golf Course Pond, TAMU Research Park Pond and Bryan Municipal Lake. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 INTRODUCTION The family Chironomidae is an ecologically important group... of aquatic insects often occurring in high densities and diversities. The relatively short life cycles and the large total biomass of the numerous larvae confer ecological energetic significance on this taxon (as consumers and prey) and the partitioning...

Hernandez Oviedo, Alba Isbela

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

25

Solar Ponds - What Are They?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for Shallow Solar Ponds,"Jan. 8, 1978, 65p. Lawrence Livermore Lab. UCRL-52385 (2) Casamajor, A.B. "Application of Shallow Solar Ponds to Industrial Process Heat: Case Histories," October 16, 1978. 18 p. Lawrence Livermore Lab, UCRL 81764. (3... for Shallow Solar Ponds,"Jan. 8, 1978, 65p. Lawrence Livermore Lab. UCRL-52385 (2) Casamajor, A.B. "Application of Shallow Solar Ponds to Industrial Process Heat: Case Histories," October 16, 1978. 18 p. Lawrence Livermore Lab, UCRL 81764. (3...

Anderson, A. L.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

The Behavior of Lakes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Behavior of Lakes Behavior of Lakes Nature Bulletin No, 320-A November 9, 1968 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Richard B. Ogilvie, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation THE BEHAVIOR OF LAKES In many ways lakes are like living things -- especially a tree. A lake breathes and has a circulation; it is warmed and fed; it harbors many other living things; and in cold weather it goes into a winter sleep. If it were not for the special character of a body of standing water which we call a lake, the things that live in it would be radically different or, perhaps, not exist at all. Water is a very strange substance in many ways. For example, it is remarkable because it expands, becomes lighter and floats when it freezes into ice. If, like most substances, water shrank when it changed from a liquid to a solid, it would sink. Then, ponds and lakes would freeze from the bottom up and become solid blocks of ice. This would make life impossible for most kinds of aquatic plants and animals and indirectly affect all living things. Further, water is a poor conductor of heat -- otherwise lakes would freeze much deeper and, again most living things in it would perish.

27

ORNL Pond; Past, Present, and Future  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ORNL'S Pond: ORNL'S Pond: Past, Present, and Future Mike Ryon Summer 2008 All pictures: ORNL staff photos ORNL'S Pond: Past, Present, and Future * Pond was created in 1961. * Swans were added in 1964, as a result of campaign by physicist Frances Pleasonton. * First swans named Y and Not, lived more than 10 years, and sired more than 50 offspring. * Swans were viewed as "symbolic of Oak Ridge's tranquility and the natural beauty that surrounds the Laboratory." Transition of the Pond * Although a fixture on campus, ORNL Swan Pond was not integrated into the landscape. * As it was managed, pond invited use by large numbers of Canada geese. * Fish fauna of pond was dominated by non-native species. August 1965 Initially it looked like a farm pond. Transition of the Pond

28

Modeling of shallow stabilization ponds  

SciTech Connect

A two-dimensional hydrodynamic model is used to simulate shallow stabilization ponds. The model computes the flow field and the concentration distribution of a conservative tracer in the entire area of a pond. The location and the size of the dead zones, the bypassing, and the recirculating areas are also determined by the model. The numerical results are in good agreement with the experimental data obtained in the laboratory.

Babarutsi, S.; Marchand, P.; Safieddine, T.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Pond pH Control  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pond pH Control Pond pH Control Name: CLIFTON Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: We have just put in a pond in eastern Ky it is about 400 ft by 150ft the water level is about 6 ft on the low end and about 20ft on the dam end our problem is slate and shale rock the ph is around .That was the soil test before we started digging. What I would like to know is is there anyway to lower the ph and how? Also all the run off to the pond on two sides runs over slate and shale. We were told that if the water was a bright green there was to much acid,and there are a lot of crawdads in this bottom area. Replies: Dear Clifton, re. pH control of ponds, see: http://www.grassrootsnursery.com/answers/h20qual/queswq12.htm There are various pond care companies. Here's one: http://www.pondauthority.com/pondcare.htm

30

Across the Pond Newsletter Issue 8 | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

the Pond Newsletter Issue 8 More Documents & Publications Across the Pond Newsletter Issue 9 Heating Ventilation and Air Conditioning Efficiency Across the Pond Newsletter Issue 7...

31

Assessing Ecosystem Effects of Reservoir Operations Using Food Web–Energy Transfer and Water Quality Models  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We investigated the effects on the reservoir food web of a new temperature control device (TCD) on the dam at Shasta Lake, California. We followed a linked modeling approach that used a specialized reservoir wate...

Laurel Saito; Brett M. Johnson; John Bartholow; R. Blair Hanna

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

SINGH and BHATNAGAR Urban lakes and wetlands: opportunities and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, urban water bodies commonly become cesspools due to lack of sanitation facilities. Delhi is continually it is not unusual for some of them to be referred to as lakes. Ponds and tanks are small in size compared to lakes:50,000 scale, however, the mapping for Delhi was carried out at 1:25,000 scale under the National Wetland

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

33

216-B-3 expansion ponds closure plan  

SciTech Connect

This document describes the activities for clean closure under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) of the 216-B-3 Expansion Ponds. The 216-B-3 Expansion Ponds are operated by the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) and co-operated by Westinghouse Hanford Company (Westinghouse Hanford). The 216-B-3 Expansion Ponds consists of a series of three earthen, unlined, interconnected ponds that receive waste water from various 200 East Area operating facilities. The 3A, 3B, and 3C ponds are referred to as Expansion Ponds because they expanded the capability of the B Pond System. Waste water (primarily cooling water, steam condensate, and sanitary water) from various 200 East Area facilities is discharged to the Bypass pipe (Project X-009). Water discharged to the Bypass pipe flows directly into the 216-B-3C Pond. The ponds were operated in a cascade mode, where the Main Pond overflowed into the 3A Pond and the 3A Pond overflowed into the 3C Pond. The 3B Pond has not received waste water since May 1985; however, when in operation, the 3B Pond received overflow from the 3A Pond. In the past, waste water discharges to the Expansion Ponds had the potential to have contained mixed waste (radioactive waste and dangerous waste). The radioactive portion of mixed waste has been interpreted by the US Department of Energy (DOE) to be regulated under the Atomic Energy Act of 1954; the dangerous waste portion of mixed waste is regulated under RCRA.

Not Available

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

ELECTROKINETIC DENSIFICATION OF COAL FINES IN WASTE PONDS  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this research was to demonstrate that electrokinetics can be used to remove colloidal coal and mineral particles from coal-washing ponds and lakes without the addition of chemical additives such as salts and polymeric flocculants. The specific objectives were: Design and develop a scaleable electrophoresis apparatus to clarify suspensions of colloidal coal and clay particles; Demonstrate the separation process using polluted waste water from the coal-washing facilities at the coal-fired power plants in Centralia, WA; Develop a mathematical model of the process to predict the rate of clarification and the suspension electrical properties needed for scale up.

E. James Davis

1999-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

35

NSA-Beaver Pond Site  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Beaver Pond Site (NSA-BP) Beaver Pond Site (NSA-BP) The storage tent and gas collectors NSA-BP site looking to the east. Visible is the investigator hut on drier land to the west and the boardwalk leading out to the tower site in the right portion of the image with the mounded beaver lodge visible in the middle of the image. The bridge and the 3 meter flux tower The beaver lodge The bridge from the flux tower This is the floating bridge leading from the flux tower back to the shore. The large tent for holding equipment is clearly visible on the shore. The TGB gas collectors on the beaver pond Back to the BOREAS Photo Page Index Other Sites: NSA Photos ||NSA-BP Photos | NSA-Fen Photos | NSA-OA Photos | NSA-OBS Photos | NSA-OJP Photos | NSA-UBS Photos | NSA-YJP Photos | NSA-Ops Photos

36

Across the Pond Newsletters | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Across the Pond Newsletters Across the Pond Newsletters Across the Pond Newsletters April 10, 2013 Across the Pond Newsletter Issue 8 A Quarterly Update on Joint UK NDA/US DOE Activities and Initiatives Issue 8: Winter 2013. April 15, 2012 Across the Pond Newsletter Issue 7 A Quarterly Update on Joint UK NDA/US DOE Activities and Initiatives Issue 7: Spring 2012. April 1, 2011 Across the Pond Newsletter Issue 6 A Quarterly Update on Joint UK NDA/US DOE Activities and Initiatives Issue 6: Spring 2011. December 1, 2010 Across the Pond Newsletter Issue 5 A Quarterly Update on Joint UK NDA/US DOE Activities and Initiatives Issue 5: Winter 2010. July 1, 2010 Across the Pond Newsletter Issue 4 A Quarterly Update on Joint UK NDA/US DOE Activities and Initiatives Issue 4: Summer 2010. April 15, 2010

37

Par Pond Fish, Water, and Sediment Chemistry  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this report are to describe the Par Pond fish community and the impact of the drawdown and refill on the community, describe contaminant levels in Par Pond fish, sediments, and water and indicate how contaminant concentrations and distributions were affected by the drawdown and refill, and predict possible effects of future water level fluctuations in Par Pond.

Paller, M.H. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Wike, L.D.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Western Pond Turtle Recovery Columbia Gorge  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Western Pond Turtle Recovery in the Columbia Gorge Project ID 200102700 Submitted by: 4 March 2009 species of concern Western Pond Turtle Washington Status #12;Columbia Mainstem Goals · Maintain;Western Pond Turtle Recovery Current Efforts · Head Start · Population Reintroduction · Predator Control

39

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic lake sediments Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ALEXANDER P. WOLFE (awolfe@ualberta.ca) Summary: cover and low productivity is that sediment accumulation rates in non-glacial arctic lakes and ponds... from the sediment record....

40

The Life History of a Pond  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

History of a Pond History of a Pond Nature Bulletin No. 617 November 12, 1960 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Daniel Ryan, President Roberts Mann, Conservation Editor David H. Thompson, Senior Naturalist THE LIFE HISTORY OF A POND In the Palos division of the Forest Preserve District there is an extraordinary number of ponds and sloughs Many were created by damming the outlets from wet places; some were originally farm ponds that we have restored. The largest and probably oldest pond is located in Swallow Cliff Woods, west of the picnic area in a grove of white pines planted about 40 years ago. The pond is dying. Like most others, if undisturbed, after fifty years or so it will be forgotten because in its place there will be trees willows, cottonwoods, soft maples, and probably swamp white and bur oaks. Indeed, at one time it had already filled up until, after being drained by tile, corn was grown there.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lakes reservoirs ponds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Don Juan Pond, Antarctica: Near-surface CaCl2-brine feeding Earth's most saline  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Don Juan Pond, Antarctica: Near-surface CaCl2-brine feeding Earth's most saline lake for RSL formation, CaCl2 brines and chloride deposits in basins may provide clues to the origin of ancient,2,10­14 , the composition of the brine is unlike any other body of water in the world, as ,90% of the salt is CaCl2 1

Marchant, David R.

42

Submarine fan lobe models: Implications for reservoir properties  

SciTech Connect

A multitude of submarine fan lobe models, advocating widely different reservoir properties, has been introduced into the sedimentologic literature. Four of these models are compared to show their differences in reservoir properties. Braided suprafan lobes are characterized by stacked sand bodies with good lateral and vertical communication, and they constitute excellent reservoir facies. The unchanneled depositional lobes, composed of sheetlike sand bodies with good lateral and moderate vertical communication, exhibit properties of good reservoir facies. Fanlobes, which refer to meandering channels and associated levee facies of large mud-rich submarine fans such as the Mississippi Fan in the Gulf of Mexico, are characterized by offset stacked sand bodies with poor lateral and vertical communication. These lenticular sands have the potential to be moderately good reservoir facies. Ponded lobes, which represent mud-rich slump facies of slope environments, comprise poor reservoir facies because of poor sand content and poor sand-body connectivity caused by chaotic bedding. Furthermore, the presence of slumped mud layers in ponded lobes is expected to hinder fluid flow. Because different lobe models vary significantly from one another in terms of reservoir properties, caution must be exercised to apply the proper lobe model to ancient fan sequences in hydrocarbon exploration and production.

Shanmugam, G.; Moiola, R.J. (Mobil Research and Development Corp., Dallas, TX (USA))

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

ELECTROKINETIC DENSIFICATION OF COAL FINES IN WASTE PONDS  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this research is to demonstrate that electrokinetics can be used to remove colloidal coal and mineral particles from coal-washing ponds and lakes without the addition of chemical additives such as salts and polymeric flocculants. In this experimental and analytical study the authors elucidate the transport processes that control the rate of concentrated colloidal particle removal, demonstrate the process on a laboratory scale, and develop the scale-up laws needed to design commercial-scale processes. The authors are also addressing the fundamental problems associated with particle-particle interactions (electrical and hydrodynamic), the effects of particle concentration on the applied electric field, the electrochemical reactions that occur at the electrodes, and the prediction of power requirements.

E. James Davis

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Western Pond Turtle Head-starting and Reintroduction; 2003-2004 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

This report covers the results of the western pond turtle head-starting and reintroduction project for the period of October 2003-September 2004. Wild hatchling western pond turtles from the Columbia River Gorge were reared at the Woodland Park and Oregon Zoos in 2003 and 2004 as part of the recovery effort for this Washington State endangered species. The objective of the program is to reduce losses to introduced predators like bullfrogs and largemouth bass by raising the hatchlings to a size where they are too large to be eaten by most of these predators. Sixty-nine turtles were over-wintered at the Woodland Park Zoo and 69 at the Oregon Zoo. Of these, 136 head-started juvenile turtles were released at three sites in the Columbia Gorge in 2004. Two were held back to attain more growth in captivity. Thirty-four were released at the Klickitat ponds, 19 at the Klickitat lake, 21 at the Skamania site, and 62 at Pierce National Wildlife Refuge (NWR). This brought the total number of head-start turtles released since 1991 to 246 for the Klickitat ponds, 114 for the Klickitat lake, 167 for the Skamania pond complex, and 250 at Pierce NWR. In 2004, 32 females from the two Columbia Gorge populations were equipped with transmitters and monitored for nesting activity. Twenty-one of the females nested and produced 85 hatchlings. The hatchlings were collected in September and October and transported to the Woodland Park and Oregon zoos for rearing in the head-start program. Data collection for a four-year telemetry study of survival and habitat use by juvenile western pond turtles at Pierce NWR concluded in 2004. Radio transmitters on study animals were replaced as needed until all replacements were in service; afterward, the turtles were monitored until their transmitters failed. The corps of study turtles ranged from 39 in August 2003 to 2 turtles at the end of August 2004. These turtles showed the same seasonal pattern of movements between summer water and upland winter habitats observed in previous years. During the 2004 field season trapping effort, 345 western pond turtles were captured in the Columbia Gorge, including 297 previously head-started turtles. These recaptures, together with confirmed nesting by head-start females and visual resightings, indicate the program is succeeding in boosting juvenile recruitment to increase the populations. Records were also collected on 224 individual painted turtles captured in 2004 during trapping efforts at Pierce NWR, to gather baseline information on this native population. Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) funded approximately 60% of program activities in the Columbia River Gorge from October 2003 through September 2004.

Van Leuven, Susan; Allen, Harriet; Slavin, Kate (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Wildlife Management Program, Olympia, WA)

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Granger Lake Sedimentation and Watershed Conservation Implementation Assessment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

existing reservoir data and validate historic sedimentation rate estimates. To demonstrate application of this technology and value of its data derivatives, a multi-year, multi-frequency acoustic survey of Granger Lake, located in Williamson County, Texas...

McAlister, Jason

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

46

Easton Pond Business Center | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Easton Pond Business Center Easton Pond Business Center Jump to: navigation, search Name Easton Pond Business Center Facility Easton Pond Business Center Sector Wind energy Facility Type Small Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Location Middletown RI Coordinates 41.50220171984°, -71.28672659° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.50220171984,"lon":-71.28672659,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

47

Application of reservoir models to Cherokee Reservoir  

SciTech Connect

As a part of the Cherokee Reservoir Project hydrodynamic-temperature models and water quality models hav

Kim, B.R.; Bruggink, D.J.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

14 Diffusive CO2 Flux at the Air-Water Interface of the Robert-Bourassa Hydroelectric Reservoir in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

14 Diffusive CO2 Flux at the Air-Water Interface of the Robert-Bourassa Hydroelectric Reservoir Hydroelectric reservoirs and lakes in boreal Québec produce greenhouse gases (GHG) mainly in the form of CO2 of the interface. When applied to the Robert- Bourassa hydroelectric reservoir in boreal Québec, this model

Long, Bernard

49

Nekton Density Patterns in Tidal Ponds and Adjacent Wetlands Related to Pond Size and Salinity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

appeared to be structured by the responses of individual species to the estuarine salinity gradient shown that nekton abundance can be affected by salinity gradients in estuaries (Baltz et al. 1993, 1998Nekton Density Patterns in Tidal Ponds and Adjacent Wetlands Related to Pond Size and Salinity

50

Polybrominated Diphenyl Ethers in the Sediments of the Great Lakes.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

source of many pollutants, including PCBs and dioxins, to the Great Lakes. This has been particularly analysis demonstrated that the pattern of PBDEs in Lake Superior sediments differs from those in air from the point sources. Sediments are an important sink and reservoir of per- sistent pollutants

Rockne, Karl J.

51

Full Reviews: Reservoir Characterization  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Below are the project presentations and respective peer reviewer comments for Reservoir Characterization.

52

Western Pond Turtle Head-starting and Reintroduction, 2005-2006 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

This report covers the results of the western pond turtle head-starting and reintroduction project for the period of October 2005-September 2006. Wild hatchling western pond turtles from the Columbia River Gorge were reared at the Woodland Park and Oregon zoos in 2005 and 2006 as part of the recovery effort for this Washington State endangered species. The objective of the program is to reduce losses to introduced predators like bullfrogs and largemouth bass by raising the hatchlings to a size where they are too large to be eaten by most of these predators. Twenty-six turtles were placed at the Woodland Park Zoo and 62 at the Oregon Zoo in fall 2005. These turtles joined two that were held back from release in summer 2005 due to their small size. All 90 juvenile turtles were released at three sites in the Columbia Gorge in 2006. Twenty-eight juvenile turtles were released at the Klickitat ponds, 22 at the Klickitat lake, 21 at the Skamania site, and 19 at Pierce National Wildlife Refuge (NWR). This brought the total number of head-start turtles released since 1991 to 944; 285 for the Klickitat ponds, 158 for the Klickitat lake, 227 for the Skamania pond complex, and 274 at Pierce NWR. In 2006, 20 females from the Klickitat population were equipped with transmitters and monitored for nesting activity. Fifteen nests were located and protected; these produced 55 hatchlings. The hatchlings were collected in September and transported to the Oregon and Woodland Park zoos for rearing in the head-start program. One wild hatchling captured in spring 2006 was placed in the head-start program to attain more growth in captivity. During the 2006 field season trapping effort, 414 western pond turtles were captured in the Columbia Gorge, including 374 previously head-started turtles. These recaptures, together with confirmed nesting by head-start females and visual resightings, indicate the program is succeeding in boosting juvenile recruitment to increase the populations. Records were also collected on 179 individual painted turtles captured in 2006 during trapping efforts at Pierce NWR, to gather baseline information on this native population.

Van Leuven, Susan; Allen, Harriet; Slavens, Kate (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Wildlife Management Program, Olympia, WA)

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Western Pond Turtle Head-starting and Reintroduction; 2004-2005 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

This report covers the results of the western pond turtle head-starting and reintroduction project for the period of October 2004-September 2005. Wild hatchling western pond turtles from the Columbia River Gorge were reared at the Woodland Park and Oregon Zoos in 2004 and 2005 as part of the recovery effort for this Washington State endangered species. The objective of the program is to reduce losses to introduced predators like bullfrogs and largemouth bass by raising the hatchlings to a size where they are too large to be eaten by most of these predators. Thirty-five turtles were placed at the Woodland Park Zoo and 53 at the Oregon Zoo. Of these, 77 head-started juvenile turtles were released at three sites in the Columbia Gorge in 2005. Four were held back to attain more growth in captivity. Eleven were released at the Klickitat ponds, 22 at the Klickitat lake, 39 at the Skamania site, and 5 at Pierce National Wildlife Refuge (NWR). This brought the total number of head-start turtles released since 1991 to 257 for the Klickitat ponds, 136 for the Klickitat lake, 206 for the Skamania pond complex, and 255 at Pierce NWR. In 2005, 34 females from the two Columbia Gorge populations were equipped with transmitters and monitored for nesting activity. Twenty-four nests were located and protected; these produced 90 hatchlings. The hatchlings were collected in September and transported to the Oregon and Woodland Park zoos for rearing in the head-start program. During the 2005 field season trapping effort, 486 western pond turtles were captured in the Columbia Gorge, including 430 previously head-started turtles. These recaptures, together with confirmed nesting by head-start females and visual resightings, indicate the program is succeeding in boosting juvenile recruitment to increase the populations. Records were also collected on 216 individual painted turtles captured in 2005 during trapping efforts at Pierce NWR, to gather baseline information on this native population. Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) funded approximately 75% of program activities in the Columbia River Gorge from October 2004 through September 2005.

Van Leuven, Susan; Allen, Harriet; Slavin, Kate (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Wildlife Management Program, Olympia, WA)

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Heat extraction from a large solar pond  

SciTech Connect

The largest operational, salt-gradient solar pond in the United States, occupying 2000 m/sup 2/, was constructed during 1978 in Miamisburg, Ohio. The heat from this solar pond, nearly 1055 GJ/y (1000 million Btu/y) is used to heat an outdoor swimming pool in the summer and an adjacent recreation building during part of the winter. A new heat exchanger system has been installed externally to the pond and operated successfully to deliver 391 GJ (371 million Btu) of heat during May-June. Hot brine water is drawn through a diffuser by a self-priming pump fabricated from fiberglass reinforced plastic. The brine water passes through copper-10% nickel tubes of a tube-and-shell heat exchanger and is then returned to the bottom of the pond. Cooling water from the swimming pool circulates through the shell side of the heat exchanger. Several designs and flow velocities of the brine inlet and outlet diffusers into the pond have been tested in order to minimize the effect of turbulence upon the salt gradient zone.

Wittenberg, L.J.; Etter, D.E.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

VERTEBRATES OF FISH LAKE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

VERTEBRATES OF FISH LAKE CAUTION! FISH LAKE SCAVANGER HUNT RED HEADED is another majestic bird of Fish Lake. These birds can be seen perched at Fish Lake. CLUB-TAIL DRAGONFLY INSECTS OF FISH LAKE There are A LOT

Minnesota, University of

56

The Integration Of Shallow Solar-Pond and Swimming Pool  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A way of integration of shallow solar-pond into swimming pool is proposed for collecting, storage and utilizing ... solar-pond part can heat the water of swimming pool, share the heat loads of ventilation and...

Haijun Qiao; Diankui Gao

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Recreation land policies of Texas river authorities operating reservoirs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for future water in Texas by the Texas Department of Water Resources: Present use of lakes and reservoirs for water- oriented recreation demonstrates the need to include recreation as one of the many purposes of water 13 development projects... by the reservoir owner. 26 3. Another factor is that most reservoir owners do not let the1r land stand idle. Uses are found which either increase the benefits of the project' to the owner or public, or at least balance the costs of holding the land pending...

Ruesink, Lou Ellen

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Lake Roosevelt Fisheries and Limnological Research : 1996 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

The Lake Roosevelt Monitoring/Data Collection Program resulted from a merger between the Lake Roosevelt Monitoring Program and the Lake Roosevelt Data Collection Project. This project will model biological responses to reservoir operations, evaluate the effects of releasing hatchery origin kokanee salmon and rainbow trout on the fishery, and evaluate the success of various stocking strategies. In 1996, limnological, reservoir operation, zooplankton, and tagging data were collected. Mean reservoir elevation, storage volume and water retention time were reduced in 1996 relative to the last five years. In 1996, Lake Roosevelt reached a yearly low of 1,227 feet above mean sea level in April, a yearly high of 1,289 feet in July, and a mean yearly reservoir elevation of 1,271.4 feet. Mean monthly water retention times in Lake Roosevelt during 1996 ranged from 15.7 days in May to 49.2 days in October. Average zooplankton densities and biomass were lower in 1996 than 1995. Daphnia spp. and total zooplankton densities peaked during the summer, whereas minimum densities occurred during the spring. Approximately 300,000 kokanee salmon and 400,000 rainbow trout were released into Lake Roosevelt in 1996. The authors estimated 195,628 angler trips to Lake Roosevelt during 1996 with an economic value of $7,629,492.

Cichosz, Thomas A.; Underwood, Keith D.; Shields, John; Scholz, Allan; Tilson, Mary Beth

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Retrieval of Melt Pond Coverage from MODIS using Optimal Estimation   

E-Print Network (OSTI)

results showed an error in melt pond coverage estimation of 1.1%. The technique was then applied to Svalbard sea ice over the 2003 melt season to produce an estimate of melt pond coverage evolution. This melt pond evolution showed a similar general trend...

Dodd, Emma

2011-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

60

Post-Emergence Behavior of Hatchling Western Pond Turtles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Post-Emergence Behavior of Hatchling Western Pond Turtles www.oregonwildlife.org #12;2 Post-Emergence Behavior of Hatchling Western Pond Turtles Final Report August 2010 Daniel K. Rosenberg Oregon Wildlife: Rosenberg, D. K. and R. Swift. 2010. Post-emergence behavior of hatchling western pond turtles. Oregon

Rosenberg, Daniel K.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lakes reservoirs ponds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

High resolution reservoir geological modelling using outcrop information  

SciTech Connect

This is China`s first case study of high resolution reservoir geological modelling using outcrop information. The key of the modelling process is to build a prototype model and using the model as a geological knowledge bank. Outcrop information used in geological modelling including seven aspects: (1) Determining the reservoir framework pattern by sedimentary depositional system and facies analysis; (2) Horizontal correlation based on the lower and higher stand duration of the paleo-lake level; (3) Determining the model`s direction based on the paleocurrent statistics; (4) Estimating the sandbody communication by photomosaic and profiles; (6) Estimating reservoir properties distribution within sandbody by lithofacies analysis; and (7) Building the reservoir model in sandbody scale by architectural element analysis and 3-D sampling. A high resolution reservoir geological model of Youshashan oil field has been built by using this method.

Zhang Changmin; Lin Kexiang; Liu Huaibo [Jianghan Petroleum Institute, Hubei (China)] [and others

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Status of Cherokee Reservoir  

SciTech Connect

This is the first in a series of reports prepared by Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) for those interested in the conditions of TVA reservoirs. This overviews of Cherokee Reservoir summarizes reservoir and watershed characteristics, reservoir uses and use impairments, water quality and aquatic biological conditions, and activities of reservoir management agencies. This information was extracted from the most current reports, publications, and data available, and interviews with water resource professionals in various Federal, state, and local agencies and in public and private water supply and wastewater treatment facilities. 11 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

Not Available

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Hydrothermal Reservoirs | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hydrothermal Reservoirs Hydrothermal Reservoirs Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Hydrothermal Reservoirs Dictionary.png Hydrothermal Reservoir: Hydrothermal Reservoirs are underground zones of porous rock containing hot water and steam, and can be naturally occurring or human-made. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle Natural, shallow hydrothermal reservoirs naturally occurring hot water reservoirs, typically found at depths of less than 5 km below the Earth's surface where there is heat, water and a permeable material (permeability in rock formations results from fractures, joints, pores, etc.). Often, hydrothermal reservoirs have an overlying layer that bounds the reservoir and also serves as a thermal insulator, allowing greater heat retention. If hydrothermal reservoirs

64

Across the Pond Newsletter Issue 4  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Across The Pond Across The Pond 1 DOE-NDA discuss Spent Fuel Shipments Meeting with Dounreay Site Restoration Ltd. on Gap (non-US origin) Material Shipment: Environmental Management (EM) supported a National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) led team on a visit to the Dounreay Site, near Thurso, Scotland on July 14-15, 2010. The purpose of the visit was to meet with DSRL representatives on a potential Gap spent fuel (non U.S.- origin) shipment to the US at the Savannah River Site. The EM-HQ representatives included Yvette Collazo, Director for Technology Innovation and Development and Gary DeLeon, Director for Nuclear Materials Disposition. Gary said "This visit gave me the opportunity to see first hand the complexities involved with planning and logistics for shipping spent fuel back to

65

Nutrient Limitation across a salinity gradient of Martha's Vineyard Coastal Ponds Emily S Rogers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nutrient Limitation across a salinity gradient of Martha's Vineyard Coastal Ponds Emily S Rogers and their respective salinities were Long Cove Pond, 1ppt, Little Jobs Pond, 4ppt, Jobs Neck Pond, 9ppt, Chilmark Pond. There was a strong correlation between ammonium limitation and salinity. There was very little response

Vallino, Joseph J.

66

Across the Pond Newsletter Issue 2 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Across the Pond Newsletter Issue 2 Across the Pond Newsletter Issue 2 Across the Pond Newsletter Issue 2 A Quarterly Update on Joint UK NDA/US DOE Activities and Initiatives Issue 2: December 2009. In this issue: DOE - NDA relationship recognized at International Environmental Cleanup Conference NDA - DOE Standing Committee Meeting commends progress Topic Area Update: Significant Progress Being Made Information Exchange is one of "DOE's best business practices" Glass Chemistry - A Flagship of Progress Under the Statement of Intent US Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board visit UK Visit from Senior Sellafield Ltd staff to Hanford considered a 'Great Success' Across the Pond Newsletter Issue 2 More Documents & Publications Across the Pond Newsletter Issue 3 Across the Pond Newsletter Issue 6

67

Characterization of oil and gas reservoir heterogeneity  

SciTech Connect

Research described In this report addresses the internal architecture of two specific reservoir types: restricted-platform carbonates and fluvial-deltaic sandstones. Together, these two reservoir types contain more than two-thirds of the unrecovered mobile oil remaining ill Texas. The approach followed in this study was to develop a strong understanding of the styles of heterogeneity of these reservoir types based on a detailed outcrop description and a translation of these findings into optimized recovery strategies in select subsurface analogs. Research targeted Grayburg Formation restricted-platform carbonate outcrops along the Algerita Escarpment and In Stone Canyon In southeastern New Mexico and Ferron deltaic sandstones in central Utah as analogs for the North Foster (Grayburg) and Lake Creek (Wilcox) units, respectively. In both settings, sequence-stratigraphic style profoundly influenced between-well architectural fabric and permeability structure. It is concluded that reservoirs of different depositional origins can therefore be categorized Into a heterogeneity matrix'' based on varying intensity of vertical and lateral heterogeneity. The utility of the matrix is that it allows prediction of the nature and location of remaining mobile oil. Highly stratified reservoirs such as the Grayburg, for example, will contain a large proportion of vertically bypassed oil; thus, an appropriate recovery strategy will be waterflood optimization and profile modification. Laterally heterogeneous reservoirs such as deltaic distributary systems would benefit from targeted infill drilling (possibly with horizontal wells) and improved areal sweep efficiency. Potential for advanced recovery of remaining mobile oil through heterogeneity-based advanced secondary recovery strategies In Texas is projected to be an Incremental 16 Bbbl. In the Lower 48 States this target may be as much as 45 Bbbl at low to moderate oil prices over the near- to mid-term.

Tyler, N.; Barton, M.D.; Bebout, D.G.; Fisher, R.S.; Grigsby, J.D.; Guevara, E.; Holtz, M.; Kerans, C.; Nance, H.S.; Levey, R.A.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Classification and waterfowl use of ponds in south Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LITERATURE REVIEW STUDY AREA 10 pond Formation 12 METHODS RESULTS 13 26 Pond Suruey Pond Classification Water Quality Vegetation Classification System Estuarine/intertidal/unconsolidated shore Lacustrine/limnetic/aquatic bed Lacustrine/litton'al/unconsolidated... bottom Lacustrine/littoral/aquatic bed Lacustrine/littoral/unconsolidated shore Lacustrine/limnetic s littoral/ aquatic bed Lacustrine/limnetic a littoral/ unconsolidated shore a uncon- solidated bottom 26 33 33 38 41 46 46 49 49 50 51...

McAdams, Matthew Stephen

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

69

Winnemucca Dry Lake Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Winnemucca Dry Lake Geothermal Area Winnemucca Dry Lake Geothermal Area (Redirected from Winnemucca Dry Lake Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Winnemucca Dry Lake Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (1) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0

70

Walker Lake Valley Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Walker Lake Valley Geothermal Area Walker Lake Valley Geothermal Area (Redirected from Walker Lake Valley Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Walker Lake Valley Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (2) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0

71

5 - Reservoir Engineering  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Publisher Summary This chapter presents the basic fundamentals that are useful to practical petroleum engineers by including basic principles, definitions, and data related to the reservoir engineering. It introduces the topics at a level that can be understood by engineers and geologists who are not expert in the field of reservoir engineering. Various correlations are provided in the chapter to understand the functioning of reservoir engineering, and newer techniques for improving recovery are also discussed. Reservoir engineering covers a broad range of subjects including the occurrence of fluids in a gas or oil-bearing reservoir, movement of those or injected fluids, and evaluation of the factors governing the recovery of oil or gas. The objectives of a reservoir engineer are to maximize producing rates and to recover oil and gas from reservoirs in the most economical manner possible. The advent of programmable calculators and personal computers has changed the approach that the reservoir engineers use to solve problems. In the chapter, many of the charts and graphs that have been historically used are presented for completeness and for illustrative purposes. In addition, separate sections of the chapter are devoted to the use of equations in some of the more common programs suitable for programmable calculators and personal computers.

F. David Martin; Robert M. Colpitts

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Ising model for melt ponds on Arctic sea ice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The albedo of melting Arctic sea ice, a key parameter in climate modeling, is determined by pools of water on the ice surface. Recent observations show an onset of pond complexity at a critical area of about 100 square meters, attended by a transition in pond fractal dimension. To explain this behavior and provide a statistical physics approach to sea ice modeling, we introduce a two dimensional Ising model for pond evolution which incorporates ice-albedo feedback and the underlying thermodynamics. The binary magnetic spin variables in the Ising model correspond to the presence of melt water or ice on the sea ice surface. The model exhibits a second-order phase transition from isolated to clustered melt ponds, with the evolution of pond complexity in the clustered phase consistent with the observations.

Ma, Y -P; Golden, K M

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Lake Ecology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lake Ecology Lake Ecology Name: Jody Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: We have a partically natural/ partially man-dug lake in our back yard. It is approximately 3 acres in size. The fish in this tiny like are plentiful and HUGE :) Bass up to 20" s (so far) and blue gill up to 10"s (so far). My question is this... we appear to have a heavy goose population and I was wondering if they are the cause of the green slimmy stuff that is all over the top of the water as well as the lighter green slime on the plants growing under the water? Are the fish being harmed by waste from the geese and if so, what can I put in the water to ensure their health? Additionally, I noticed hundreds of frogs during the mating period yet I've yet to see even one tad pole and I am at the lake atleast 5 out of the 7 days in a week. Is there a reason for this. The frogs are two toned.. light green with patches of darker shades of green on the head and body. I've never seen frogs like these before but then again, I've never lived in wet lands prior. The frogs are also very agressive... tend to attack fishing line and even leap up to 4' in the air to attack a fishing rod. Thank heavens they don't have teeth! . We do not keep the fish we catch, we always release.

74

Fuel Pond Sludge - Lessons Learned from Initial De-sludging of Sellafield's Pile Fuel Storage Pond - 12066  

SciTech Connect

The Pile Fuel Storage Pond (PFSP) at Sellafield was built and commissioned between the late 1940's and early 1950's as a storage and cooling facility for irradiated fuel and isotopes from the two Windscale Pile reactors. The pond was linked via submerged water ducts to each reactor, where fuel and isotopes were discharged into skips for transfer along the duct to the pond. In the pond the fuel was cooled then de-canned underwater prior to export for reprocessing. The plant operated successfully until it was taken out of operation in 1962 when the First Magnox Fuel Storage Pond took over fuel storage and de-canning operations on the site. The pond was then used for storage of miscellaneous Intermediate Level Waste (ILW) and fuel from the UK's Nuclear Programme for which no defined disposal route was available. By the mid 1970's the import of waste ceased and the plant, with its inventory, was placed into a passive care and maintenance regime. By the mid 1990s, driven by the age of the facility and concern over the potential challenge to dispose of the various wastes and fuels being stored, the plant operator initiated a programme of work to remediate the facility. This programme is split into a number of key phases targeted at sustained reduction in the hazard associated with the pond, these include: - Pond Preparation: Before any remediation work could start the condition of the pond had to be transformed from a passive store to a plant capable of complex retrieval operations. This work included plant and equipment upgrades, removal of redundant structures and the provision of a effluent treatment plant for removing particulate and dissolved activity from the pond water. - Canned Fuel Retrieval: Removal of canned fuel, including oxide and carbide fuels, is the highest priority within the programme. Handling and export equipment required to remove the canned fuel from the pond has been provided and treatment routes developed utilising existing site facilities to allow the fuel to be reprocessed or conditioned for long term storage. - Sludge Retrieval: In excess of 300 m{sup 3} of sludge has accumulated in the pond over many years and is made up of debris arising from fuel and metallic corrosion, wind blown debris and bio-organic materials. The Sludge Retrieval Project has provided the equipment necessary to retrieve the sludge, including skip washer and tipper machines for clearing sludge from the pond skips, equipment for clearing sludge from the pond floor and bays, along with an 'in pond' corral for interim storage of retrieved sludge. Two further projects are providing new plant processing routes, which will initially store and eventually passivate the sludge. - Metal Fuel Retrieval: Metal Fuel from early Windscale Pile operations and various other sources is stored within the pond; the fuel varies considerably in both form and condition. A retrieval project is planned which will provide fuel handling, conditioning, sentencing and export equipment required to remove the metal fuel from the pond for export to on site facilities for interim storage and disposal. - Solid Waste Retrieval: A final retrieval project will provide methods for handling, retrieval, packaging and export of the remaining solid Intermediate Level Waste within the pond. This includes residual metal fuel pieces, fuel cladding (Magnox, aluminium and zircaloy), isotope cartridges, reactor furniture, and miscellaneous activated and contaminated items. Each of the waste streams requires conditioning to allow it to be and disposed of via one of the site treatment plants. - Pond Dewatering and Dismantling: Delivery of the above projects will allow operations to progressively remove the radiological inventory, thereby reducing the hazard/risk posed by the plant. This will then allow subsequent dewatering of the pond and dismantling of the structure. (authors)

Carlisle, Derek; Adamson, Kate [Sellafield Ltd, Sellafield, Cumbria (United Kingdom)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Why sequence metagenomics in freshwater lakes?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

metagenomics in freshwater lakes? metagenomics in freshwater lakes? Aquatic microbial communities represent one of the largest reservoirs of genetic and biochemical diversity on the planet, and metagenomic studies have led to the discovery of novel gene families and a deeper understanding of how microbial communities mediate the flow of carbon and energy. However, most of these studies have been based on a static 'snap shot' of genetic diversity found under a particular set of environmental conditions. This study involves a metagenomic time-series to better understand how microbial communities control carbon cycling in freshwater systems. Principal Investigators: Katherine McMahon, University of Wisconsin Program: CSP 2011 Home > Sequencing > Why sequence metagenomics in freshwater lakes

76

Seismicity and Reservoir Fracture Characterization  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Below are the project presentations and respective peer review results for Seismicity and Reservoir Fracture Characterization.

77

Chemistry, Reservoir, and Integrated Models  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Below are the project presentations and respective peer review results for Chemistry, Reservoir and Integrated Models.

78

Reservoir Protection (Oklahoma)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Oklahoma Water Resource Board has the authority to make rules for the control of sanitation on all property located within any reservoir or drainage basin. The Board works with the Department...

79

ANCIENT DELTAS IN A MARTIAN CRATE LAKE: FASSETT AND HEAD 1 Fluvial Sedimentary Deposits on Mars: Ancient Deltas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the Nili Fossae region of Mars reveal two valley networks (~80 and ~200 km long) that each formed in a crater lake. Water flowing in the valley networks entered the crater and deposited the fans, and ponded on the martian surface, primarily manifested in the form of valley networks [Carr, 1996], there have been

Head III, James William

80

Session: Reservoir Technology  

SciTech Connect

This session at the Geothermal Energy Program Review X: Geothermal Energy and the Utility Market consisted of five papers: ''Reservoir Technology'' by Joel L. Renner; ''LBL Research on the Geysers: Conceptual Models, Simulation and Monitoring Studies'' by Gudmundur S. Bodvarsson; ''Geothermal Geophysical Research in Electrical Methods at UURI'' by Philip E. Wannamaker; ''Optimizing Reinjection Strategy at Palinpinon, Philippines Based on Chloride Data'' by Roland N. Horne; ''TETRAD Reservoir Simulation'' by G. Michael Shook

Renner, Joel L.; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.; Wannamaker, Philip E.; Horne, Roland N.; Shook, G. Michael

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lakes reservoirs ponds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Across the Pond Newsletter Issue 1  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

OF OF ENERGY ACROSS THE POND Issue 1: Summer 2009 The US Department of Energy (DOE) / UK Nuclear Decommissioning Authority (NDA) Bilateral Agreement The US DOE (Department of Energy) and the UK NDA (Nuclear Decommissioning Authority) signed an agreement in March 2007 in which both parties agreed that there was mutual benefit in working together and sharing information in the development and application of technologies and approaches to pressing needs in a number of areas including environmental remediation, radioactive waste management and decommissioning & deactivation (D&D). Since then there have been a number of `Information Exchange' activities between the parties discussing a wide range of topics which have assisted both parties in their approach to

82

Groundwater impact assessment report for the 100-D Ponds  

SciTech Connect

The 183-D Water Treatment Facility (WTF) discharges effluent to the 120-0-1 Ponds (100-D Ponds) located north of the 100-D Area perimeter fence. This report satisfies one of the requirements of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) Milestone M-17-00B as agreed by the US Department of Energy, Washington State Department of Ecology, and the US Environmental Protection Agency. Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-17-00B includes a requirement to assess impacts to groundwater from disposal of the 183-D WTF effluent to the 100-D Ponds. In addition, the 100-D Ponds are a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 treatment, storage, and disposal facility covered by the 100-D Ponds Closure Plan (DOE-RL 1993a). There is evidence of groundwater contamination, primarily nitrate, tritium, and chromium, in the unconfined aquifer beneath the 100-D Area and 100 Areas in general. The contaminant plumes are area wide and are a result of past-practice reactor and disposal operations in the 100-D Area currently being investigated as part of the 100-DR-1 and 100-HR-3 Operable Units (DOE-RL 1992b, 1992a). Based on current effluent conditions, continued operation of the 100-D Ponds will not adversely affect the groundwater quality in the 100-D Area. Monitoring wells near the pond have slightly higher alkaline pH values than wells in the rest of the area. Concentrations of known contaminants in these wells are lower than ambient 100-D Area groundwater conditions and exhibit a localized dilution effect associated with discharges to the pond. Hydraulic impact to the local groundwater system from these discharges is minor. The groundwater monitoring well network for the 100-D Ponds is adequate.

Alexander, D.J.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Optimal Efficiency of a Solar Pond and a Rankine Cycle System  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The optimal efficiency of a solar pond — Rankine cycle system is found analytically. The optimum for...

M. H. Cobble; A. R. Shouman

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Arctic melt ponds and bifurcations in the climate system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Understanding how sea ice melts is critical to climate projections. In the Arctic, melt ponds that develop on the surface of sea ice floes during the late spring and summer largely determine their albedo $-$ a key parameter in climate modeling. Here we explore the possibility of a simple sea ice climate model passing through a bifurcation point $-$ an irreversible critical threshold as the system warms, by incorporating geometric information about melt pond evolution. This study is based on a nonlinear phase transition model for melt ponds, and bifurcation analysis of a simple climate model with ice - albedo feedback as the key mechanism driving the system to a potential bifurcation point.

Sudakov, Ivan; Golden, Kenneth M

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Winnemucca Dry Lake Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Winnemucca Dry Lake Geothermal Area Winnemucca Dry Lake Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Winnemucca Dry Lake Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (1) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed.

86

Walker Lake Valley Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Walker Lake Valley Geothermal Area Walker Lake Valley Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Walker Lake Valley Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (2) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed.

87

Across the Pond Newsletter Issue 1 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Across the Pond Newsletter Issue 1 Across the Pond Newsletter Issue 1 Across the Pond Newsletter Issue 1 A Quarterly Update on Joint UK NDA/US DOE Activities and Initiatives Issue 1: Summer 2009. In this issue: The US Department of Energy (DOE) / UK Nuclear Decommissioning Authority (NDA) Bilateral Agreement Initial Topic Areas for Discussion US DOE Represented at NDA-Sponsored Pu Workshop DOE - NDA Implementation Plan (4th Standing Committee Meeting held in Phoenix ) SRNL and NNL Collaborate on RadBall Trials NDA Provides Support to EM in Prioritization of D&D Technology Needs DOE and NRC Criticality Team visit Sellafield NDA Nucleargraduates Program Participant Seconded to DOE Across the Pond Newsletter Issue 1 More Documents & Publications RadBall Technology For Hot Cell Characterization

88

Across the Pond Newsletter Issue 7 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

in Research and Development Collaboration in Plutonium Management Moves to the Next Level Organizational Changes in NDA and DOE-EM Across the Pond Newsletter Issue 7 More Documents...

89

5 - Reservoir Engineering  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Publisher Summary This chapter presents the basic fundamentals useful to practical petroleum engineers. Topics are introduced at a level that can be understood by engineers and geologists who are not expert in this field. Various correlations are provided in the chapter where useful. Newer techniques for improving recovery are also discussed in the chapter. Reservoir engineering covers a broad range of subjects including the occurrence of fluids in a gas or oil-beating reservoir, movement of those fluids or injected fluids, and evaluation of the factors governing the recovery of oil or gas. The objectives of a reservoir engineer are to maximize production rates and to ultimately recover oil and gas from reservoirs in the most economical manner possible. The chapter includes many of the charts and graphs that have been historically used. While illustrating enhanced oil recovery methods, estimation of waterflood residual oil saturation, fluid movements, material balance with volumetric analysis, the chapter also discusses pressure transient testing, recovery of hydrocarbons, and decline curve analysis. Decline curve analysis estimates primary oil recovery for an individual reservoir. The conventional analysis of production decline curves for oil or gas production consists of plotting the log of flow rate versus time on semilog paper. In case of a decline in the rate of production, the data are extrapolated into the future to provide an estimate of expected production and reserves.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

An environmental simulation of a shrimp mariculture pond  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Zooplankton 30 33 EVALUATION OF MANAGEMENT STRATEGIES . . 46 Evaluation of Stocking Densities and Feeding Rates 46 SUMMARY . REFERENCES 59 60 VITA 67 vss LIST OF FIGURES Figure Page 1 Pond Model Biomass Flows 2 Dissolved Oxygen and Population... Submodels 3 Pond Model Biomass Curves Under Baseline Conditions, 80, 000 Animals per Hectare, Commercial Feed Rate 19 4 Reported Chlorophyll Levels from Rubright et al. , 1981 . 5 Detail of Figure 3 Showing Days 0 Through 35. . . . . . . . 20 21 6...

Whitson, John Lee

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

91

Low-temperature spray ponds: performance evaluation and prediction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LOW-TEMPERATURE SPRAY PONDS: PERFORMANCE EVALUATION AND PREDICTION A Thesis by PHILIP DWAN KERIG Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May... 1980 Major Subject: Chemical Engineering LOW-TEMPERATURE SPRAY PONDS: PERFORMANCE EVALUATION AND PREDICTION A Thesis by PHILIP DWAN KERIG Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committee) (Member) (Member) (Member) (Hea...

Kerig, Philip Dwan

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

92

Optoelectronic Reservoir Computing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reservoir computing is a recently introduced, highly efficient bio-inspired approach for processing time dependent data. The basic scheme of reservoir computing consists of a non linear recurrent dynamical system coupled to a single input layer and a single output layer. Within these constraints many implementations are possible. Here we report an opto-electronic implementation of reservoir computing based on a recently proposed architecture consisting of a single non linear node and a delay line. Our implementation is sufficiently fast for real time information processing. We illustrate its performance on tasks of practical importance such as nonlinear channel equalization and speech recognition, and obtain results comparable to state of the art digital implementations.

Yvan Paquot; François Duport; Anteo Smerieri; Joni Dambre; Benjamin Schrauwen; Marc Haelterman; Serge Massar

2011-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

93

2101-M pond closure plan. Volume 1, Revision 2  

SciTech Connect

This document describes activities for the closure of a surface impoundment (2101-M Pond) at the Hanford Site. The 2101-H Pond was initially constructed in 1953 to serve as a drainage collection area for the 2101-H Building. (Until the Basalt Waste Isolation Project (BWIP) Laboratory was constructed in the 2101-M Building in 1979--1981, the only source contributing discharge to the pond was condensate water from the 2101-H Building heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) system. The drains for the BWIP Laboratory rooms were plumbed into a 4-in., cast-iron, low-pressure drain pipe that carries waste water from the HVAC system to the pond. During the active life of the BWIP Laboratory, solutions of dissolved barium in groundwater samples were discharged to the 2101-M Pond via the laboratory drains. As a result of the discharges, a Part A permit application was initially submitted to the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) in August 1986 which designates the 2101-M Pond as a surface impoundment.

Not Available

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Lakes_Elec_You  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Lakes, Lakes, Electricity & You Why It's So Important That Lakes Are Used To Generate Electricity Why We Can Thank Our Lakes For Electricity Because lakes were made to generate electricity. Back in the mid-1940s, Congress recognized the need for better flood control and navigation. To pay for these services, Congress passed laws that started the building of federal hydroelectric dams, and sold the power from the dams under long-term contracts. Today these dams provide efficient, environmentally safe electricity for our cities and rural areas. And now these beautiful lakes are ours to enjoy. There are now 22 major man-made lakes all across the Southeast built under these federal programs and managed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers - lakes that help prevent flooding and harness the renewable power of water to generate electricity. Power produced at these lakes is marketed by the Elberton,

95

Reservoir geochemistry: A link between reservoir geology and engineering?  

SciTech Connect

Geochemistry provides a natural, but poorly exploited, link between reservoir geology and engineering. The authors summarize some current applications of geochemistry to reservoir description and stress that, because of their strong interactions with mineral surfaces and water, nitrogen and oxygen compounds in petroleum may exert an important influence on the pressure/volume/temperature (PVT) properties of petroleum, viscosity and wettability. The distribution of these compounds in reservoirs is heterogeneous on a submeter scale and is partly controlled by variations in reservoir quality. The implied variations in petroleum properties and wettability may account for some of the errors in reservoir simulations.

Larter, S.R.; Aplin, A.C.; Chen, M.; Taylor, P.N. [Univ. of Newcastle (Australia); Corbett, P.W.M.; Ementon, N. [Heriot-Watt Univ., Edinburgh (United Kingdom)

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Perch population assessment in lakes reclaimed using oil-sands derived material  

SciTech Connect

The mining and extraction of petroleum products from oil-sands involves large areas of land and produces enormous volumes of tailings. One possible land reclamation option is to incorporate fine-tailings material into the bottoms of constructed lakes capped with natural surface water. The wet landscape method represents potential risk to aquatic biota-naphthenic acids and PAHs elute from pore water contained in the fine-tailings substrate. In spring 1995 yellow perch were stocked into a large-scale (5ha) experimental pond that consisted of fine-tailings capped with natural water as well as into two other reclaimed ponds that were constructed with oil-sands overburden material. Prior to stocking of perch, ponds had colonized with cyprinids, macrophytes and benthic invertebrates over a two year period. Perch were sampled in fall 1995 for age, condition factor, liver size, gonad size, fecundity, stomach contents, liver mixed-function oxygenase activity (MFO), bile PAH metabolites and plasma steroid hormones. When compared to the source lake, perch in the DP did not show reduced reproductive potential. Perch in all of the reclaimed ponds demonstrated exposure to organic compounds as indicated by marginally induced MFO activity and increased liver size. Exposure to naphthenates and PAHs in water as well as ecological environmental factors will be discussed.

Heuvel, M.R. van den; Dixon, D.G. [Univ. of Waterloo, Ontario (Canada); Power, M. [Univ. of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada); Boerger, H.; MacKinnon, M.D.; Meer, T. van [Syncrude Canada, Fort McMurray, Alberta (Canada)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

97

Brine clarity maintenance in salinity-gradient solar ponds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Brine transparency is an important part of the maintenance of a salinity-gradient solar pond as it affects the amount of solar radiation reaching the storage zone and hence has an influence on the thermal performance. There is a wide range of factors that can hinder the transmission of light in a solar pond. Algal and microbial growths are the most common problems encountered in working solar ponds and control of their densities is essential to maintain transparency. Two different chemical treatment methods for algae growth prevention are described in this paper: chlorine and a novel chemical product – copper ethylamine complex. The latter method has never been implemented previously in a working pond. This paper discusses the theory of the algae control methods used and presents the experimental results of the chemical treatments. The results showed that Cupricide is more effective than chlorine and is therefore the recommended chemical for algae control in solar ponds; it improves the water transparency especially in the upper convective zone and lower convective zone with all measurement values less than 1 NTU. Chlorine was found to be more corrosive than Cupricide due to the acidic effect it has on the pH. The preliminary cost analysis showed that granular chlorine is the cheapest chemical. A more detailed financial analysis is nevertheless required to refine these costs.

Neus Gasulla; Yusli Yaakob; Jimmy Leblanc; Aliakbar Akbarzadeh; Jose Luis Cortina

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Toxicity of stormwater treatment pond sediments to Hyalella azteca (Amphipoda)  

SciTech Connect

Stormwater runoff from highways and commercial, industrial, and residential areas contains a wide spectrum of pollutants including heavy metals, petroleum hydrocarbons, pesticides, herbicides, sediment, and nutrients. Recent efforts to reduce the impacts of urbanization on natural wetlands and other receiving waters have included the construction of stormwater treatment ponds and wetlands. These systems provide flood control and improve water quality through settling, adsorption, and precipitation of pollutants removing up to 95% of metals, nutrients and sediment before discharged from the site. The design of stormwater ponds to provide habitat for aquatic wildlife has prompted concern over the potential exposure of aquatic organisms to these contaminants. Aquatic sediments concentrate a wide array of organic and inorganic pollutants. Although water quality criteria may not be exceeded, organisms living in or near the sediments may be adversely affected. The availability of chemicals in sediments depends strongly on the prevailing chemistry. Physical conditions of the sediment and water quality characteristics including pH, redox potential and hardness, also influence contaminant availability. Studies have shown that heavy metals and nutrients carried by runoff concentrate in the sediment of stormwater ponds. Although several investigations have assessed the toxicity of sediments in streams receiving urban runoff, there have been few studies of the toxicity of stormwater treatment pond sediments to aquatic organisms. This study was part of a large-scale assessment of the contaminant hazards of stormwater treatment ponds. The objective of this study was to evaluate the toxicity of sediments and water from stormwater ponds over a 10-d period to juvenile Hyalella azteca. Bioassay results were related to concentrations of acid volatile sulfides and metals of the tested sediments. 17 refs., 4 tabs.

Karouna-Renier, N.K. [Patuxent Wildlife Research Center, Laurel, MD (United States)] [Patuxent Wildlife Research Center, Laurel, MD (United States); [Univ. of Maryland, Baltimore, MD (United States); Sparling, D.W. [Patuxent Wildlife Research Center, Laurel, MD (United States)] [Patuxent Wildlife Research Center, Laurel, MD (United States)

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Performance testing of the Sandy Pond HVDC converter terminal  

SciTech Connect

Results of several performance tests for the 1,800 MW Sandy Pond HVDC converter terminal are presented and discussed. The work progressed during 1990 and 1991 and included tests for power line carrier interference, audible sound, ac and dc line faults and dc harmonic performance. The testing was conducted as part of the commissioning program for the first stage of the Quebec-New England Phase 2 multi-terminal system. In this stage, the Radisson (Quebec) and Sandy Pond (New England) terminals are operational.

Donahue, J.A.; Fisher, D.A.; Railing, B.D.; Tatro, P.J. (New England Power Service Co., Westborough, MA (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

An Internet survey of private pond owners and managers in Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

amphibians, frogs and salamanders, and reptiles, turtles, lizards, and snakes valuable habitat. Many types of mammals visit ponds for water, including deer, rabbits, and raccoons. Some, including beavers and muskrats, make ponds their homes. All provide... amphibians, frogs and salamanders, and reptiles, turtles, lizards, and snakes valuable habitat. Many types of mammals visit ponds for water, including deer, rabbits, and raccoons. Some, including beavers and muskrats, make ponds their homes. All provide...

Schonrock, April Elizabeth

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lakes reservoirs ponds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

National Science Foundation - Lake Hoare, Antarctica | Department...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Science Foundation - Lake Hoare, Antarctica National Science Foundation - Lake Hoare, Antarctica Photo of a Photovoltaic System Located at Lake Hoare, Antarctica Lake Hoare is a...

102

Lakes, Electricity and You | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Lakes, Electricity and You Lakes, Electricity and You Why It's So Important That Lakes Are Used To Generate Electricity Lakes, Electricity and You More Documents & Publications An...

103

Characterization of oil and gas reservoir heterogeneity. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Research described In this report addresses the internal architecture of two specific reservoir types: restricted-platform carbonates and fluvial-deltaic sandstones. Together, these two reservoir types contain more than two-thirds of the unrecovered mobile oil remaining ill Texas. The approach followed in this study was to develop a strong understanding of the styles of heterogeneity of these reservoir types based on a detailed outcrop description and a translation of these findings into optimized recovery strategies in select subsurface analogs. Research targeted Grayburg Formation restricted-platform carbonate outcrops along the Algerita Escarpment and In Stone Canyon In southeastern New Mexico and Ferron deltaic sandstones in central Utah as analogs for the North Foster (Grayburg) and Lake Creek (Wilcox) units, respectively. In both settings, sequence-stratigraphic style profoundly influenced between-well architectural fabric and permeability structure. It is concluded that reservoirs of different depositional origins can therefore be categorized Into a ``heterogeneity matrix`` based on varying intensity of vertical and lateral heterogeneity. The utility of the matrix is that it allows prediction of the nature and location of remaining mobile oil. Highly stratified reservoirs such as the Grayburg, for example, will contain a large proportion of vertically bypassed oil; thus, an appropriate recovery strategy will be waterflood optimization and profile modification. Laterally heterogeneous reservoirs such as deltaic distributary systems would benefit from targeted infill drilling (possibly with horizontal wells) and improved areal sweep efficiency. Potential for advanced recovery of remaining mobile oil through heterogeneity-based advanced secondary recovery strategies In Texas is projected to be an Incremental 16 Bbbl. In the Lower 48 States this target may be as much as 45 Bbbl at low to moderate oil prices over the near- to mid-term.

Tyler, N.; Barton, M.D.; Bebout, D.G.; Fisher, R.S.; Grigsby, J.D.; Guevara, E.; Holtz, M.; Kerans, C.; Nance, H.S.; Levey, R.A.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

RADIATION DOSE ASSESSMENT FOR THE BIOTA OF TERRESTRIAL ECOSYSTEMS IN THE SHORELINE ZONE OF THE CHERNOBYL NUCLEAR POWER PLANT COOLING POND  

SciTech Connect

Radiation exposure of the biota in the shoreline area of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant Cooling Pond was assessed to evaluate radiological consequences from the decommissioning of the Cooling Pond. The article addresses studies of radioactive contamination of the terrestrial faunal complex and radionuclide concentration ratios in bodies of small birds, small mammals, amphibians, and reptiles living in the area. The data were used to calculate doses to biota using the ERICA Tool software. Doses from {sup 90}Sr and {sup 137}Cs were calculated using the default parameters of the ERICA Tool and were shown to be consistent with biota doses calculated from the field data. However, the ERICA dose calculations for plutonium isotopes were much higher (2-5 times for small mammals and 10-14 times for birds) than the doses calculated using the experimental data. Currently, the total doses for the terrestrial biota do not exceed maximum recommended levels. However, if the Cooling Pond is allowed to drawdown naturally and the contaminants of the bottom sediments are exposed and enter the biological cycle, the calculated doses to biota may exceed the maximum recommended values. The study is important in establishing the current exposure conditions such that a baseline exists from which changes can be documented following the lowering of the reservoir water. Additionally, the study provided useful radioecological data on biota concentration ratios for some species that are poorly represented in the literature.

Farfan, E.; Jannik, T.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

The paleolimnology of Haynes Lake, and Teapot Lake, Ontario  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The paleolimnology of Haynes Lake, and Teapot Lake, Ontario: documenting anthropogenic disturbances in Teapot Lake and Haynes Lake were completed in 2006 with Tina Ziten and Paul Hamilton and, again, in 2007 student, who provided the pollen data and analysis thereof, for the Teapot Lake study. The Northwest

Patterson, Timothy

106

Surface reclamation of the Big Lake oil field  

SciTech Connect

Since the discovery of 1 Santa Rita in 1923, millions of barrels of salt water have been produced along with 135 million bbl of oil from the Big Lake oil field in Reagan County, Texas. Until the early 1960s, the accepted disposal method for the produced water was surface discharge to a large evaporation pond north of the field. Produced water was allowed to flow from wells to the pond via natural topographic drainage. This practice resulted in 2000 ac of eroded, barren landscape, characterized by highly saline soils incapable of supporting vegetation. In 1989, the University of Texas System, the U.S. Soil Conservation Service, and Marathon Oil Company, which acquired Big Lake field in 1962, initiated an experimental project to reclaim the affected land and restore rangeland productivity. An underground drainage system, consisting of 125,000 ft of buried drainage conduit and eight collection sumps, was installed over 205 ac of the affected area. Earthen terraces were constructed to capture and hold rain water to facilitate downward percolation and leaching of salts from the soil profile. Salts leached from the soil are captured by the drainage system and pumped to injection wells for disposal. The excellent revegetation that has occurred over the test area after three years of operations is encouraging and has shown the need for expanding and enhancing the existing system with supplemental water from fresh water wells, application of soil-amending agents, additional terracing, and selective planting with salt-tolerant species.

Weathers, M.L. (Univ. of Texas Lands, Midland, TX (United States)); Moore, K.R. (Univ. of Texas Lands, Big Lake, TX (United States)); Ford, D.L. (U.S.D.A. Soil Conservation Service, San Angelo, TX (United States)); Curlee, C.K. (Marathon Oil Company, Midland, TX (United States))

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Biomass and productivity of trematode parasites in pond ecosystems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biomass and productivity of trematode parasites in pond ecosystems Daniel L. Preston*, Sarah A often measure the biomass and productivity of organisms to understand the importance of populations and dissections of over 1600 aquatic invertebrate and amphib- ian hosts, we calculated the ecosystem-level biomass

Johnson, Pieter

108

Sediment management in sustainable urban drainage system ponds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sediment management in sustainable urban drainage system ponds K.V. Heal*, D.A. Hepburn** and R.lunn@strath.ac.uk) Abstract Since removal and disposal of sustainable urban drainage system (SUDS) sediment can incur high maintenance costs, assessments of sediment volumes, quality and frequency of removal are required. Sediment

Heal, Kate

109

Managing Florida Ponds for Fishing 1 Charles E. Cichra2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CIR802 Managing Florida Ponds for Fishing 1 Charles E. Cichra2 1. This document is CIR802, one-out and impounded waters, limerock pits, and sand or gravel pits, commonly called borrow pits. Fishing pressure in fishing as a source of recreation and food. Competition for public fishery resources, coupled

Watson, Craig A.

110

BIRD COMMUNITIES AT \\VASTEWATER PONDS IN SOUTHEASTERN IDAHO  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Third Annual Conference on Ecosystems Restoration and Creation. Hillsborough Community College, Tampa ground gleaners on plant food, aquatic ground gleaners, and divers. The most species-rich and diverse, Florida. #12;Dabblers and surface dippers were positively associated with pond surface area. Aquatic

111

Groundwater impact assessment report for the 284-WB Powerplant Ponds  

SciTech Connect

As required by the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-17-00A), this report assesses the impact of wastewater discharged to the 284-WB Powerplant Ponds on groundwater quality. The assessment reported herein expands upon the initial analysis conducted between 1989 and 1990 for the Liquid Effluent Study Final Project Plan.

Alexander, D.J.; Johnson, V.G.; Lindsey, K.A.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Saving an Underground Reservoir  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

significant part of the region?s agricultural economy. Though the area has few rivers and lakes, underneath it lies a supply of water that has provided groundwater for developing this economy. This underground water, the Ogallala Aquifer, is a finite.... ?We have already seen isolat- ed areas that have no irrigation water remaining and the economy has been crushed.? The region produces about 4 percent of the nation?s corn, 25 percent of the hard red winter wheat, 23 per- cent of the grain sorghum...

Wythe, Kathy

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Geological History of Lake Lahontan, a Quaternary Lake of Northwestern...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Geological History of Lake Lahontan, a Quaternary Lake of Northwestern Nevada Abstract Abstract...

114

Data requirements and acquisition for reservoir characterization  

SciTech Connect

This report outlines the types of data, data sources and measurement tools required for effective reservoir characterization, the data required for specific enhanced oil recovery (EOR) processes, and a discussion on the determination of the optimum data density for reservoir characterization and reservoir modeling. The two basic sources of data for reservoir characterization are data from the specific reservoir and data from analog reservoirs, outcrops, and modern environments. Reservoir data can be divided into three broad categories: (1) rock properties (the container) and (2) fluid properties (the contents) and (3)interaction between reservoir rock and fluid. Both static and dynamic measurements are required.

Jackson, S.; Chang, Ming Ming; Tham, Min.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Peer Reviewed: Experimenting with Hydroelectric Reservoirs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Peer Reviewed: Experimenting with Hydroelectric Reservoirs ... Researchers created reservoirs in Canada to explore the impacts of hydroelectric developments on greenhouse gas and methylmercury production. ...

R. A. Bodaly; Kenneth G. Beaty; Len H. Hendzel; Andrew R. Majewski; Michael J. Paterson; Kristofer R. Rolfhus; Alan F. Penn; Vincent L. St. Louis; Britt D. Hall; Cory J. D. Matthews; Katharine A. Cherewyk; Mariah Mailman; James P. Hurley; Sherry L. Schiff; Jason J. Venkiteswaran

2004-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

116

Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program, Part A; Fisheries Creel Survey and Population Status Analysis, 1998 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

The Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program is the result of a merger between two projects, the Lake Roosevelt Monitoring Program (BPA No. 8806300) and the Lake Roosevelt Data Collection Project (BPA No. 9404300). These projects were merged in 1996 to continue work historically completed under the separate projects, and is now referred to as the Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program. Creel and angler surveys estimated that anglers made 196,775 trips to Lake Roosevelt during 1998, with an economic value of $8.0 million dollars, based on the Consumer Price Index (CPI). In 1998 it was estimated that 9,980 kokanee salmon, 226,809 rainbow trout, 119,346 walleye, and over 14,000 smallmouth bass and other species were harvested. Creel data indicates that hatchery reared rainbow trout contribute substantially to the Lake Roosevelt fishery. The contribution of kokanee salmon to the creel has not met the expectations of fishery managers to date, and is limited by entrainment from the reservoir, predation, and possible fish culture obstacles. The 1998 Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Creel and Population Analysis Annual Report includes analyses of the relative abundance of fish species, and reservoir habitat relationships (1990-1998). Fisheries surveys (1990-1998) indicate that walleye and burbot populations appear to be increasing, while yellow perch, a preferred walleye prey species, and other prey species are decreasing in abundance. The long term decreasing abundance of yellow perch and other prey species are suspected to be the result of the lack of suitable multiple reservoir elevation spawning and rearing refugia for spring spawning reservoir prey species, resulting from seasonal spring-early summer reservoir elevation manipulations, and walleye predation. Reservoir water management is both directly, and indirectly influencing the success of mitigation hatchery production of kokanee salmon and rainbow trout. Tag return data suggested excessive entrainment occurred in 1997, with 97 percent of tag recoveries from rainbow trout coming from below Grand Coulee Dam. High water years appear to have substantial entrainment impacts on salmonids. The 1998 salmonid harvest has improved from the previous two years, due to the relatively water friendly year of 1998, from the harvest observed in the 1996-1997 high water years, which were particularly detrimental to the reservoir salmonid fisheries. Impacts from those water years are still evident in the reservoir fish populations. Analysis of historical relative species abundance, tagging data and hydroacoustical studies, indicate that hydro-operations have a substantial influence on the annual standing crop of reservoir salmonid populations due to entrainment losses, and limited prey species recruitment, due to reservoir elevation level fluctuation, and corresponding reproductive success.

Spotts, Jim; Shields, John; Underwood, Keith

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

FRACTURED PETROLEUM RESERVOIRS  

SciTech Connect

The four chapters that are described in this report cover a variety of subjects that not only give insight into the understanding of multiphase flow in fractured porous media, but they provide also major contribution towards the understanding of flow processes with in-situ phase formation. In the following, a summary of all the chapters will be provided. Chapter I addresses issues related to water injection in water-wet fractured porous media. There are two parts in this chapter. Part I covers extensive set of measurements for water injection in water-wet fractured porous media. Both single matrix block and multiple matrix blocks tests are covered. There are two major findings from these experiments: (1) co-current imbibition can be more efficient than counter-current imbibition due to lower residual oil saturation and higher oil mobility, and (2) tight fractured porous media can be more efficient than a permeable porous media when subjected to water injection. These findings are directly related to the type of tests one can perform in the laboratory and to decide on the fate of water injection in fractured reservoirs. Part II of Chapter I presents modeling of water injection in water-wet fractured media by modifying the Buckley-Leverett Theory. A major element of the new model is the multiplication of the transfer flux by the fractured saturation with a power of 1/2. This simple model can account for both co-current and counter-current imbibition and computationally it is very efficient. It can be orders of magnitude faster than a conventional dual-porosity model. Part II also presents the results of water injection tests in very tight rocks of some 0.01 md permeability. Oil recovery from water imbibition tests from such at tight rock can be as high as 25 percent. Chapter II discusses solution gas-drive for cold production from heavy-oil reservoirs. The impetus for this work is the study of new gas phase formation from in-situ process which can be significantly different from that of gas displacement processes. The work is of experimental nature and clarifies several misconceptions in the literature. Based on experimental results, it is established that the main reason for high efficiency of solution gas drive from heavy oil reservoirs is due to low gas mobility. Chapter III presents the concept of the alteration of porous media wettability from liquid-wetting to intermediate gas-wetting. The idea is novel and has not been introduced in the petroleum literature before. There are significant implications from such as proposal. The most direct application of intermediate gas wetting is wettability alteration around the wellbore. Such an alteration can significantly improve well deliverability in gas condensate reservoirs where gas well deliverability decreases below dewpoint pressure. Part I of Chapter III studies the effect of gravity, viscous forces, interfacial tension, and wettability on the critical condensate saturation and relative permeability of gas condensate systems. A simple phenomenological network model is used for this study, The theoretical results reveal that wettability significantly affects both the critical gas saturation and gas relative permeability. Gas relative permeability may increase ten times as contact angle is altered from 0{sup o} (strongly liquid wet) to 85{sup o} (intermediate gas-wetting). The results from the theoretical study motivated the experimental investigation described in Part II. In Part II we demonstrate that the wettability of porous media can be altered from liquid-wetting to gas-wetting. This part describes our attempt to find appropriate chemicals for wettability alteration of various substrates including rock matrix. Chapter IV provides a comprehensive treatment of molecular, pressure, and thermal diffusion and convection in porous media Basic theoretical analysis is presented using irreversible thermodynamics.

Abbas Firoozabadi

1999-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

118

TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY Reservoir Geophysics Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

includes applications to clastic reservoirs, heavy oil reservoirs, gas/oil shale, gas hydrates. Basic

119

Time-Domain Electromagnetics At Soda Lake Area (Combs 2006) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Time-Domain Electromagnetics At Soda Lake Area (Combs 2006) Time-Domain Electromagnetics At Soda Lake Area (Combs 2006) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Time-Domain Electromagnetics At Soda Lake Area (Combs 2006) Exploration Activity Details Location Soda Lake Area Exploration Technique Time-Domain Electromagnetics Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes "EM sounding, MT, CSAMT, dipole-dipole resistivity; reservoir model?" References Jim Combs (1 January 2006) Historical Exploration And Drilling Data From Geothermal Prospects And Power Generation Projects In The Western United States Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Time-Domain_Electromagnetics_At_Soda_Lake_Area_(Combs_2006)&oldid=388133" Category:

120

Analysis of real-time reservoir monitoring : reservoirs, strategies, & modeling.  

SciTech Connect

The project objective was to detail better ways to assess and exploit intelligent oil and gas field information through improved modeling, sensor technology, and process control to increase ultimate recovery of domestic hydrocarbons. To meet this objective we investigated the use of permanent downhole sensors systems (Smart Wells) whose data is fed real-time into computational reservoir models that are integrated with optimized production control systems. The project utilized a three-pronged approach (1) a value of information analysis to address the economic advantages, (2) reservoir simulation modeling and control optimization to prove the capability, and (3) evaluation of new generation sensor packaging to survive the borehole environment for long periods of time. The Value of Information (VOI) decision tree method was developed and used to assess the economic advantage of using the proposed technology; the VOI demonstrated the increased subsurface resolution through additional sensor data. Our findings show that the VOI studies are a practical means of ascertaining the value associated with a technology, in this case application of sensors to production. The procedure acknowledges the uncertainty in predictions but nevertheless assigns monetary value to the predictions. The best aspect of the procedure is that it builds consensus within interdisciplinary teams The reservoir simulation and modeling aspect of the project was developed to show the capability of exploiting sensor information both for reservoir characterization and to optimize control of the production system. Our findings indicate history matching is improved as more information is added to the objective function, clearly indicating that sensor information can help in reducing the uncertainty associated with reservoir characterization. Additional findings and approaches used are described in detail within the report. The next generation sensors aspect of the project evaluated sensors and packaging survivability issues. Our findings indicate that packaging represents the most significant technical challenge associated with application of sensors in the downhole environment for long periods (5+ years) of time. These issues are described in detail within the report. The impact of successful reservoir monitoring programs and coincident improved reservoir management is measured by the production of additional oil and gas volumes from existing reservoirs, revitalization of nearly depleted reservoirs, possible re-establishment of already abandoned reservoirs, and improved economics for all cases. Smart Well monitoring provides the means to understand how a reservoir process is developing and to provide active reservoir management. At the same time it also provides data for developing high-fidelity simulation models. This work has been a joint effort with Sandia National Laboratories and UT-Austin's Bureau of Economic Geology, Department of Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering, and the Institute of Computational and Engineering Mathematics.

Mani, Seethambal S.; van Bloemen Waanders, Bart Gustaaf; Cooper, Scott Patrick; Jakaboski, Blake Elaine; Normann, Randy Allen; Jennings, Jim (University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX); Gilbert, Bob (University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX); Lake, Larry W. (University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX); Weiss, Chester Joseph; Lorenz, John Clay; Elbring, Gregory Jay; Wheeler, Mary Fanett (University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX); Thomas, Sunil G. (University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX); Rightley, Michael J.; Rodriguez, Adolfo (University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX); Klie, Hector (University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX); Banchs, Rafael (University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX); Nunez, Emilio J. (University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX); Jablonowski, Chris (University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX)

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lakes reservoirs ponds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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121

Microsoft Word - Poorman Ponds_CX Memo_20120607.docx  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Poorman Ponds Property Funding Poorman Ponds Property Funding Fish and Wildlife Project No.: 2009-003-00 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.25 Transfer, lease, disposition, or acquisition of interests in land and associated buildings for cultural resources protection, habitat preservation, or fish and wildlife management provided that there would be no potential for release of substances at a level, or in a form, that could pose a threat to public health or the environment. Location: Twisp, Okanogan County, WA Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to fund the Methow Salmon Recovery Foundation (MSRF) to acquire approximately 22.1 acres of land and 1,455 feet of the Twisp

122

Across the Pond Newsletter Issue 5 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5 5 Across the Pond Newsletter Issue 5 A Quarterly Update on Joint UK NDA/US DOE Activities and Initiatives Issue 5: Winter 2010. In this issue: Introduction 7th Standing Committee Meeting between USDOE - UKNDA held in Sellafield. Topic Area Update Group From Sellafield Visits Idaho To Exchange Information On Hot Isostatic Pressing Glass Chemistry Collaboration Update International Partnership Workshop on DOE Used Nuclear Fuel & High Level Waste NWTRB Discusses Technical Lessons Gained From NDA HighLevel Nuclear Waste Disposal Efforts To Date Richard Abitz From SRNL Delivers Key Address At 2010 UK Decommissioning And Waste Management Conference In Penrith, Cumbria Upcoming Events: Waste Management Conference in Phoenix Across the Pond Newsletter - Issue 5 More Documents & Publications

123

Salinity gradient solar pond technology applied to potash solution mining  

SciTech Connect

A solution mining facility at the Eddy Potash Mine, Eddy County, New Mexico has been proposed that will utilize salinity gradient solar pond (SGSP) technology to supply industrial process thermal energy. The process will include underground dissolution of potassium chloride (KCl) from pillars and other reserves remaining after completion of primary room and pillar mining using recirculating solutions heated in the SGSP. Production of KCl will involve cold crystallization followed by a cooling pond stage, with the spent brine being recirculated in a closed loop back to the SGSP for reheating. This research uses SGSP as a renewable, clean energy source to optimize the entire mining process, minimize environmental wastes, provide a safe, more economical extraction process and reduce the need for conventional processing by crushing, grinding and flotation. The applications of SGSP technology will not only save energy in the extraction and beneficiation processes, but also will produce excess energy available for power generation, desalination, and auxiliary structure heating.

Martell, J.A.; Aimone-Martin, C.T.

2000-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

124

MHK Projects/Twin Pond | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Twin Pond Twin Pond < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":36.7971,"lon":-89.1361,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

125

Geological History of Lake Lahontan, a Quaternary Lake of Northwestern  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

History of Lake Lahontan, a Quaternary Lake of Northwestern History of Lake Lahontan, a Quaternary Lake of Northwestern Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Geological History of Lake Lahontan, a Quaternary Lake of Northwestern Nevada Abstract Abstract unavailable. Author Israel C. Russell Organization U.S. Geological Survey Published U.S. Government Printing Office, 1885 Report Number Monograph M11 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Geological History of Lake Lahontan, a Quaternary Lake of Northwestern Nevada Citation Israel C. Russell (U.S. Geological Survey). 1885. Geological History of Lake Lahontan, a Quaternary Lake of Northwestern Nevada. Washington, District of Columbia: U.S. Government Printing Office. Report No.:

126

The Western Pond Turtle; Habitat and History, 1993-1994 Final Report.  

SciTech Connect

The western pond turtle is known from many areas of Oregon. The majority of sightings and other records occur in the major drainages of the Klamath, Rogue, Umpqua, Willamette and Columbia River systems. A brief overview is presented of the evolution of the Willamette-Puget Sound hydrographic basin. A synopsis is also presented of the natural history of the western pond turtle, as well as, the status of this turtle in the Willamette drainage basin. The reproductive ecology and molecular genetics of the western pond turtle are discussed. Aquatic movements and overwintering of the western pond turtle are evaluated. The effect of introduced turtle species on the status of the western pond turtle was investigated in a central California Pond. Experiments were performed to determine if this turtle could be translocated as a mitigation strategy.

Holland, Dan C. (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Wildlife Diversity Program, Portland, OR)

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Chickamauga reservoir embayment study - 1990  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this report are three-fold: (1) assess physical, chemical, and biological conditions in the major embayments of Chickamauga Reservoir; (2) compare water quality and biological conditions of embayments with main river locations; and (3) identify any water quality concerns in the study embayments that may warrant further investigation and/or management actions. Embayments are important areas of reservoirs to be considered when assessments are made to support water quality management plans. In general, embayments, because of their smaller size (water surface areas usually less than 1000 acres), shallower morphometry (average depth usually less than 10 feet), and longer detention times (frequently a month or more), exhibit more extreme responses to pollutant loadings and changes in land use than the main river region of the reservoir. Consequently, embayments are often at greater risk of water quality impairments (e.g. nutrient enrichment, filling and siltation, excessive growths of aquatic plants, algal blooms, low dissolved oxygen concentrations, bacteriological contamination, etc.). Much of the secondary beneficial use of reservoirs occurs in embayments (viz. marinas, recreation areas, parks and beaches, residential development, etc.). Typically embayments comprise less than 20 percent of the surface area of a reservoir, but they often receive 50 percent or more of the water-oriented recreational use of the reservoir. This intensive recreational use creates a potential for adverse use impacts if poor water quality and aquatic conditions exist in an embayment.

Meinert, D.L.; Butkus, S.R.; McDonough, T.A.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Biological Factors in Treatment of Raw Sewage in Artificial Ponds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

be improved. Accordingly ... Various factors, such as loading, solar ..... example, follows changes in air temperature .... In these observations ice quality appeared ... of solar energy by aquatic organisms. Problems in. Lake Biology;. A.A.A.S..

1999-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

129

Reservoir characterization of Pennsylvanian Sandstone Reservoirs. Annual report  

SciTech Connect

This annual report describes the progress during the second year of a project on Reservoir Characterization of Pennsylvanian Sandstone Reservoirs. The report is divided into three sections: (i) reservoir description and scale-up procedures; (ii) outcrop investigation; (iii) in-fill drilling potential. The first section describes the methods by which a reservoir can be characterized, can be described in three dimensions, and can be scaled up with respect to its properties, appropriate for simulation purposes. The second section describes the progress on investigation of an outcrop. The outcrop is an analog of Bartlesville Sandstone. We have drilled ten wells behind the outcrop and collected extensive log and core data. The cores have been slabbed, photographed and the several plugs have been taken. In addition, minipermeameter is used to measure permeabilities on the core surface at six inch intervals. The plugs have been analyzed for the permeability and porosity values. The variations in property values will be tied to the geological descriptions as well as the subsurface data collected from the Glen Pool field. The third section discusses the application of geostatistical techniques to infer in-fill well locations. The geostatistical technique used is the simulated annealing technique because of its flexibility. One of the important reservoir data is the production data. Use of production data will allow us to define the reservoir continuities, which may in turn, determine the in-fill well locations. The proposed technique allows us to incorporate some of the production data as constraints in the reservoir descriptions. The technique has been validated by comparing the results with numerical simulations.

Kelkar, M.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

E-Print Network 3.0 - asian yellow pond Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chapter 19, verse 10), and ornamental fish... ponds appear in paintings from ancient Egypt. European aqua- culture began sometime in the Middle Ages... and transformed the "art"...

131

Distribution of Arsenic in Presque Isle, PA, Pond Sediments Jason Murnock, Master of Science Candidate,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Distribution of Arsenic in Presque Isle, PA, Pond Sediments Jason Murnock, Master of Science........................................................................................ 3 Arsenic in Soil & Sediments......................................................................................... 12 Sediment Digestion and Analysis

Short, Daniel

132

Enhancing harvestable algal biomass production in wastewater treatment high rate algal ponds by recycling.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??High Rate Algal Ponds (HRAPs) are an efficient and cost-effective system for wastewater treatment and produce algal biomass which could be converted to biofuels. However,… (more)

Park, Byung Kwan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

E-Print Network 3.0 - area process ponds Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ecology 7 Tracing anthropogenic nutrient inputs into coastal plain ponds on an urban-rural gradient: a study using stable Summary: Tracing anthropogenic nutrient inputs into...

134

THMC Modeling of EGS Reservoirs ? Continuum through Discontinuum Representations: Capturing Reservoir Stimulation, Evolution and Induced Seismicity  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

THMC Modeling of EGS Reservoirs ? Continuum through Discontinuum Representations: Capturing Reservoir Stimulation, Evolution and Induced Seismicity presentation at the April 2013 peer review meeting held in Denver, Colorado.

135

Lake Preservation (Indiana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The construction, reconstruction, recleaning, or repair of a dam, ditch, or other project is prohibited when the action is likely to lower the water level of a public freshwater lake, regulated or...

136

Honey Lake Geothermal Area  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Honey Lake geothermal area is located in Lassen County, California and Washoe County, Nevada. There are three geothermal projects actively producing electrical power. They are located at Wendel...

137

LAKE COLUSA SAN JOAQUIN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DORADO AMADOR SONOMA NAPA YOLO CALAVERAS SAN JOAQUIN TUOLUMNE MONO ALPINE MARIPOSA MERCED MADERA FRESNO LAKE COLUSA SUTTER YUBA NEVADA SIERRA PLACER EL DORADO AMADOR SONOMA NAPA YOLO CALAVERAS SAN JOAQUIN

138

Responses of phtyoplankton photosynthesis and phosphorus kinetics to resuspended sediments in copper sulfate-treated ponds  

SciTech Connect

Six farm ponds (dugouts) and one lake that differ in the history of copper sulfate (CuSO{sub 4}) treatment were selected for studies of effects of sediments resuspension on phytoplankton. All sites are located within 50 km of Peace River, Alberta, and are shallow, hardwater, and eutrophic. Effects of sediment resuspension on phytoplankton photosynthesis were assessed by changes in the photosynthesis-irradiance P-D curve parameters, Pmax and {alpha}, after addition of sediment at 2% v/v to lakewater samples; the effects on phytoplankton P-state were assessed by changes in {sup 32}PO{sub 4} turnover time. Copper concentrations in sediments of Gour No. 4, the dugout that had received the largest dosage of CuSO{sub 4}, were 60-times greater than untreated sites but were only 1.5 to 3-times greater at the other treated sites. Changes of Pmax and {alpha} were not correlated with Cu concentrations in the sediments. Instead, the prevailing P-state in lakewater could better explain the observed trends in Pmax after sediment addition. Pmax values decreased at sites where phytoplankton were P-limited ({sup 32} P-PO{sub 4} turnover time <63 min) and increased at more P-sufficient sites ({sup 32}P-PO{sub 4} turnover time >63 min). Stimulation of Pmax and increase in {sup 32}P-PO{sub 4} turnover time were positively correlated. With the exception of Gour No. 4, values of a increased in all treatments. Similar changes in Pmax and a in response to sediment addition occurred in laboratory experiments with P-sufficient cultures of Anabaena flos-aquae. We suggest that, with the exception of grossly Cu-polluted sediments, resuspension of sediments in waters previously treated with CuSO{sub 4} will enhance phytoplankton photosynthesis by increasing P availability, and possibly by supplying Cu at trace metal levels. 25 refs., 4 figs., 6 tabs.

Nalewajko, C. [Univ. of Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Prepas, E.E. [Univ. of Alberta, Edmonton (Canada)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

120-D-1 (100-D) ponds training plan  

SciTech Connect

This is the Environmental Restoration Contractor Team training plan for the 100-D Ponds treatment, storage, and disposal unit. This plan is intended to meet the requirements of WAC 173-303-330 and the Hanford Dangerous Waste Permit. The WAC 173-303-330(1)(d)(ii, v, vi) requires that personnel be familiar, where applicable, with waste feed cut-off systems, proper responses to groundwater contamination incidents, shutdown of operations, response to fire or explosion, and other process operation activities.

G. B. Mitchem

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

140

Texas' Natural Lake  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.? The Nature Conservancy?s Sustainable Waters program, designed to protect river ecosystems downstream of dams, has sponsored two workshops within the last year to determine the research needed to develop ecologically based environmental flow... recommendations for Caddo Lake. Environmental flows is the amount of water that needs to flow down the river to maintain the ecological system in the lake, river and flood plain. Dan Weber, the Conservancy?s northwest Louisiana program manager, said, ?We...

Wythe, Kathy

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lakes reservoirs ponds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Blackfoot Reservoir Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Blackfoot Reservoir Geothermal Area Blackfoot Reservoir Geothermal Area (Redirected from Blackfoot Reservoir Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Blackfoot Reservoir Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (3) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Idaho Exploration Region: Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0

142

Modeling of Geothermal Reservoirs: Fundamental Processes, Computer  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Modeling of Geothermal Reservoirs: Fundamental Processes, Computer Simulation and Field Applications Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Modeling of Geothermal Reservoirs: Fundamental Processes, Computer Simulation and Field Applications Abstract This article attempts to critically evaluate the present state of the art of geothermal reservoir simulation. Methodological aspects of geothermal reservoir modeling are briefly reviewed, with special emphasis on flow in fractured media. We then examine some applications of numerical simulation to studies of reservoir dynamics, well test design and analysis, and modeling of specific fields. Tangible impacts of reservoir simulation

143

The balance between deposition and subsidence (tectonics) in a rift basin playa and its effect on the climatic record of an area: Evidence from Bristol Dry Lake, California  

SciTech Connect

Two continuous core intervals drilled in Bristol Dry Lake, a large (150 km{sup 2}) playa in the central Mojave Desert of California, penetrated over 500 m of sediment and did not reach basement. The repetitious nature of the alternating shallow brine pond halite and siliciclastic and the consistency of the carbonate isotopic data from the surface and core indicate a relatively stable brine composition for most of the history of Bristol Dry Lake. All sedimentary structures and primary halite fabrics in the core indicate shallow-water, brine-pond halite alternated with halite-saturated siliciclastic muds in the basin center. A delicate balance of subsidence and mechanical and chemical deposition of evaporite and siliciclastic minerals was necessary to maintain the largely ephemeral lake environment of deposition through over 550 m of basin fill. The alternating brine pond/saline lake setting in Bristol Dry Lake is not directly related to climatic influences, and the sediments do not record major climatic events demonstrated in other closed-basin lakes. The reason for this insensitivity to climatic events is explained by the interior location of the basin, the low relief of the mountains surrounding the catchment, the large surface area of the catchment, and the low average sedimentation rates. All of the above criteria are at least partially controlled by the tectonics of the area, which, in turn, affect the sedimentation rate and supply water to the basin. Therefore, it is important to consider the influence of the above factors in determining global versus local, or regional, climate curves for a particular basin.

Rosen, M.R. (CSIRO, Floreat Park (Australia))

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Hydrogeophysical investigations of the former S-3 ponds contaminant plumes, Oak Ridge Integrated Field  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydrogeophysical investigations of the former S-3 ponds contaminant plumes, Oak Ridge Integrated. Hubbard4 , T. L. Mehlhorn5 , and D. B. Watson5 ABSTRACT At the Oak Ridge Integrated Field Research Challenge site, near Oak Ridge, Tennessee, contaminants from the former S-3 ponds have infiltrated

Hubbard, Susan

145

Algae/Bacteria Ratio in High-Rate Ponds Used for Waste Treatment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...ALGAE/BACTERIAL RATIO IN HIGH-RATE PONDS 573 1140 1120...ALGAE/BACTERIAL RATIO IN HIGH-RATE PONDS 575 and N is the...favorable operating conditions with high algal productivity, the algae...utilization in converted oil- fired boiler. Resource Recov. Conserv...

Gideon Oron; Gedaliah Shelef; Anna Levi; Arie Meydan; Yossef Azov

1979-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

PROC. S.D. ACAD. SCI., VOL. 69 (1990) 109 EVALUATION OF AN EVAPORATION POND  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in concert with production of electricity. However, we had no data on the extent of winterkill that would Dakota 57007 ABSTRACT The evaporation pond (85 hectares) at the Big Stone Power Plant, Milbank, SD at the Big Stone Power Plant, Milbank, South Dakota (reviewed by Berry 1988). The evaporation pond (85

147

Fertilization of Fresh Water Fish Ponds 1 Craig Watson and Charles E. Cichra2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FA17 Fertilization of Fresh Water Fish Ponds 1 Craig Watson and Charles E. Cichra2 1. This document. If a fish species which consumes small natural foods is grown, such as the bluegill or golden shiner, then pond fertilization can increase the production of these fish. Fertilizers provide nutrients

Watson, Craig A.

148

Constructed Wetlands and Waste Stabilization Ponds for municipal wastewater treatment in France: comparison of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

13 Constructed Wetlands and Waste Stabilization Ponds for municipal wastewater treatment in France In France, vertical flow constructed wetlands and waste stabilisation ponds are both extensive treatment processes well adapted to small rural communities mainly because they are easy to operate

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

149

A model of the threedimensional evolution of Arctic melt ponds on firstyear and multiyear sea ice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ice. In the summer the upper layers of sea ice and snow melts producing meltwater that accumulatesA model of the threedimensional evolution of Arctic melt ponds on firstyear and multiyear sea ice F in Arctic melt ponds on the surface of sea ice. An accurate estimate of the fraction of the sea ice surface

Feltham, Daniel

150

Aerial radiological surveys of Steed Pond, Savannah River Site: Dates of surveys, 1984--1989  

SciTech Connect

From June 1984 to August 1985, three aerial radiological surveys were conducted over Steed Pond at the Savannah River Site in South Carolina. In addition, Steed Pond was included in larger-area surveys of the Savannah River Site in subsequent years. The surveys were conducted by the Remote Sensing Laboratory of EG&G Energy Measurements, Inc., Las Vegas, Nevada, for the US Department of Energy. Airborne measurements were obtained for both natural and man-made gamma radiation over Steed Pond and surrounding areas. The first survey was conducted when the pond was filled to normal capacity for the time of the year. On September 1, 1984, the Steed Pond dam spillway failed causing the pond to drain. The four subsequent surveys were conducted with the pond drained. The second survey and the third were conducted to study silt deposits exposed by the drop in water level after the spillway`s opening. Steed Pond data from the February 1987 and April 1989 Savannah River Site surveys have been included to bring this study up to date.

Fritzsche, A.E.; Jobst, J.E.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Survival of the western pond turtle (Emys marmorata) in an urban California environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Survival of the western pond turtle (Emys marmorata) in an urban California environment Phillip Q, 2320 Storer Hall, University of California, Davis, CA 95616, USA b Turtle Bay Museum and Arboretum; accepted 9 November 2002 Abstract The western pond turtle Emys (formerly Clemmys) marmorata is declining

Grether, Gregory

152

Sediment resuspension in the Lake Taihu, China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In order to examine the intensity of surficial sediment resuspension in Lake Taihu, a large shallow lake...0 mm.

Chunhua Hu; Weiping Hu; Fabing Zhang; Zhixin Hu; Xianghua Li…

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Seismic modeling of complex stratified reservoirs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for such complex reservoirs is crucial and necessary to reduce exploration risk. A fast and accurate approach generating synthetic seismograms for such reservoir models combines wavefront construction ray tracing with composite reflection coefficients in a hybrid...

Lai, Hung-Liang

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

154

Simplified methods of modeling multilayer reservoirs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to develop simplified methods to model multilayer reservoirs. We examined the method to model well responses of multilayer reservoirs with equivalent single layer solutions during transient flow period which Bennett...

Ryou, Sangsoo

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

the contiguous U.S., low stream, reservoir, and stock pond levels, and depleted soil moisture combined  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Louisiana, and Mississippi having the driest year on record. The United States had a below-average wildfire.S. dollars)--the costliest fire in Colorado's history. Across the United States, 2010 was an above-aver- age

156

Comparative Evaluation of Generalized River/Reservoir System Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report reviews user-oriented generalized reservoir/river system models. The terms reservoir/river system, reservoir system, reservoir operation, or river basin management "model" or "modeling system" are used synonymously to refer to computer...

Wurbs, Ralph A.

157

NAME: Molokai Fish Pond & Fringing Reef Restoration LOCATION: Kaunakakai, Island of Molokai (Maui County), Hawai'i  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NAME: Molokai Fish Pond & Fringing Reef Restoration LOCATION: Kaunakakai, Island of Molokai (Maui fish ponds on the fringing reef of the Hawaiian island of Molokai. Mangroves were planted in 1902 conditions and threaten to take over the reef flats and fish ponds. EXPECTED BENEFITS: Fine sediment flushed

US Army Corps of Engineers

158

Sediments in marsh ponds of the Gulf Coast Chenier Plain: effects of structural marsh management and salinity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sediments in marsh ponds of the Gulf Coast Chenier Plain: effects of structural marsh management: impoundments, marsh sediments, ponds, salinity Abstract Physical characteristics of sediments in coastal marsh compositions of waterbird communities. Sediments in marsh ponds of the Gulf Coast Chenier Plain potentially

Afton, Alan D.

159

Design, construction, and initial operation of the Los Alamos National Laboratory salt-gradient solar pond  

SciTech Connect

A 232 m/sup 2/ solar pond was constructed at Los Alamos National Laboratory for the purpose of studying pond hydrodynamics on a large scale and to complement the flow visualization and one-dimensional pond simulator experiments that are ongoing at the Laboratory. Design methods and construction techniques, some of which are unique to this pond, are described in detail. The pond was excavated from a soft volcanic rock known as tuff; such rock forms a large fraction of the Los Alamos area surface geology. Because tuff has a small thermal conductivity, little insulation was required to reduce perimeter energy losses. In addition, the strength of tuff permitted the pond to be built with vertical side walls; this design eliminated local side wall convection in the gradient zone that is possible with sloping side walls. Instrumentation in the pond consists of traversing and fixed rakes of thermometers and salinity probes, an underwater pyranometer, and a weather station. The traversing rake is a wheeled trolley driven vertically on a rectangular rail. Installed on the trolley are coplanar platinum RTDs, a point conductivity probe, and an induction salinometer. The stationary rake supports 28 thermocouples and 28 sample-fluid withdrawal taps located every 10 cm. About 127 T of sodium chloride has been introduced and is nearly dissolved. A 120-cm-thick salinity gradient was established and the pond is heating. Preliminary results indicate a lower-convective-zone heating rate of 1.2/sup 0/C/day during the pond's first month of operation. Recommendations on pond design, construction, and instrumentation are presented.

Jones, G.F.; Meyer, K.A.; Hedstrom, J.C.; Dreicer, J.S.; Grimmer, D.P.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program : Limnological and Fisheries Monitoring Annual Report 1999.  

SciTech Connect

The Grand Coulee Dam was constructed in 1939 without a fish ladder, which eliminated steelhead (Onchorhynchus mykiss), chinook salmon (O. twshwastica), coho salmon (O. kisutch) and sockeye salmon (O. nerka) from returning to approximately 1,835 km (1,140 miles) of natal streams and tributaries found in the upper Columbia River Drainage in the United States and Canada. The Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980 gave the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), the authority and responsibility to use its legal and financial resources, 'to protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife to the extent affected by the development and operation of any hydroelectric project of the Columbia River and its tributaries. This is to be done in a manner consistent with the program adopted by the Northwest Power Planning Council (NWPPC), and the purposes of the Act' (NWPPC, 1987). With the phrase 'protect, mitigate and enhance', Congress signaled its intent that the NWPPC's fish and wildlife program should do more than avoid future hydroelectric damage to the basin's fish and wildlife. The program must also counter past damage, work toward rebuilding those fish and wildlife populations that have been harmed by the hydropower system, protect the Columbia Basin's fish and wildlife resources, and mitigate for harm caused by decades of hydroelectric development and operations. By law, this program is limited to measures that deal with impacts created by the development, operation and management of hydroelectric facilities on the Columbia River and its tributaries. However, off-site enhancement projects are used to address the effects of the hydropower system on fish and wildlife (NWPPC 1987). Resident game fish populations have been established in Franklin D. Roosevelt Lake, the reservoir behind Grand Coulee Dam, since the extirpation of anadromous fish species. The resident game fish populations are now responsible for attracting a large percentage of the recreational visits to the region. An increase in popularity has placed Lake Roosevelt fifth amongst the most visited State and Federal parks in Washington. Increased use of the reservoir prompted amplified efforts to enhance the Native American subsistence fishery and the resident sport fishery in 1984 with hatchery supplementation of rainbow trout (O. mykiss) and kokanee salmon (O. nerka). This was followed by the formation of the Spokane Tribal Lake Roosevelt Monitoring Project (LRMP) in 1988 and later by formation of the Lake Roosevelt Data Collection Project in 1991. The Lake Roosevelt Data Collection Project began in July 1991 as part of the BPA, Bureau of Reclamation, and U.S. Army Corps of Engineers System Operation Review process. This process sought to develop an operational scenario for the federal Columbia River hydropower system to maximize the in-reservoir fisheries with minimal impacts to all other stakeholders in the management of the Columbia River. The Lake Roosevelt Monitoring/Data Collection Program (LRMP) is the result of a merger between the Lake Roosevelt Monitoring Program (BPA No. 8806300) and the Lake Roosevelt Data Collection Project (BPA No. 9404300). These projects were merged in 1996 forming the Lake Roosevelt Monitoring Program (LRMP), which continues the work historically completed under the separate projects. The LRMP has two main goals. The first is to develop a biological model for Lake Roosevelt that will predict in-reservoir biological responses to a range of water management operational scenarios, and to develop fisheries and reservoir management strategies accordingly. The model will allow identification of lake operations that minimize impacts on lake biota while addressing the needs of other interests (e.g. flood control, hydropower generation, irrigation, and downstream resident and anadromous fisheries). Major components of the model will include: (1) quantification of entrainment and other impacts to phytoplankton, zooplankton and fish caused by reservoir drawdowns and low water retention times; (2) quantification

McLellan, Holly; Lee, Chuck; Scofield, Ben; Pavlik, Deanne

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lakes reservoirs ponds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Reservoir compaction loads on casings and liners  

SciTech Connect

Pressure drawdown due to production from a reservoir causes compaction of the reservoir formation which induces axial and radial loads on the wellbore. Reservoir compaction loads increase during the production life of a well, and are greater for deviated wells. Presented here are casing and liner loads at initial and final pressure drawdowns for a particular reservoir and at well deviation angles of 0 to 45 degrees.

Wooley, G.R.; Prachner, W.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Optimization Online - Managing Hydroelectric Reservoirs over an ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Jul 7, 2013 ... Managing Hydroelectric Reservoirs over an Extended Planning Horizon using a Benders Decomposition Algorithm Exploiting a Memory Loss ...

Pierre-Luc Carpentier

2013-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

163

A preliminary analysis of comparable cooling-thermal loading-reservoir ownership as a factor in annual recreation attendance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the reservoir sought alternatives to private or personal investment and opted for a grant or long term lease of their holdings to the Texas Parks and Wildlife system. In the case of Fairfield reservoir, the 25 Texas Utility Generating Company granted 1200... tion of primary data vev'aIeu lnformat'on concer ning the following factors: (1) access (2) contig- uous surrounding lands (3) grazing leases (4) lake frrnt leases (5) water quality (6) recreation facilities (7) recreation opportunities and (8) law...

Darga, Thomas Jerome

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Effects of a reduction of blue tilapia Oreochromis aureus on the ichthyofauna of a power-plant reservoir  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Administration 1986). Thus, the number of thermally altered habitats is substantial and increasing. This will mean more suitable habitat will be created for exotic species such as the blue tilapia Oreochromis (= ~T'I i = S tb d ) ~ . 7i1 pt b-t p' 4 fishes.... Mean depth of the reservoir is 6. 5 m. A 586 ha lease to the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department (TPWD) resulted in the establishment of Fairfield Lake State Recreation Area, located at the south end of' the reservoir. Data were obtained at seven...

Starling, Scott Michael

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

An inventory of the original vegetation of the Palmetto Bend Reservoir site in Jackson County, Texas with respect to potential eutrophication  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

left on the bottom of the reservoir (1) (2). Leentvaar reported on a study of Lake Brokopondo in Surinam, South America (3). Within 3 to 4 weeks after filling, dissolved oxygen con- centrations were zero below 4 meters and large scale H S production...

Crocker, Benjamin Rush

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

166

Tenth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: proceedings  

SciTech Connect

The workshop contains presentations in the following areas: (1) reservoir engineering research; (2) field development; (3) vapor-dominated systems; (4) the Geysers thermal area; (5) well test analysis; (6) production engineering; (7) reservoir evaluation; (8) geochemistry and injection; (9) numerical simulation; and (10) reservoir physics. (ACR)

Not Available

1985-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

167

STIMULATION AND RESERVOIR ENGINEERING OF GEOTHERMAL RESOURCES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

STIMULATION AND RESERVOIR ENGINEERING OF GEOTHERMAL RESOURCES Paul Kruger and Henry J . Ramey, Jr . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 THE GEOTHERMAL CHIMNEY MODEL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Current Design of t h e . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67 Geothermal Reservoir Phy.Sica1 PIodels . . . . . . . . . . . . 73 RAD3N I N GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS

Stanford University

168

Hydroelectric Reservoirs -the Carbon Dioxide and Methane  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydroelectric Reservoirs - the Carbon Dioxide and Methane Emissions of a "Carbon Free" Energy an overview on the greenhouse gas production of hydroelectric reservoirs. The goals are to point out the main how big the greenhouse gas emissions from hydroelectric reservoirs are compared to thermo-power plants

Fischlin, Andreas

169

Increasing Waterflooding Reservoirs in the Wilmington Oil Field through Improved Reservoir Characterization and Reservoir Management, Class III  

SciTech Connect

This project was intended to increase recoverable waterflood reserves in slope and basin reservoirs through improved reservoir characterization and reservoir management. The particular application of this project is in portions of Fault Blocks IV and V of the Wilmington Oil Field, in Long Beach, California, but the approach is widely applicable in slope and basin reservoirs, transferring technology so that it can be applied in other sections of the Wilmington field and by operators in other slope and basin reservoirs is a primary component of the project.

Koerner, Roy; Clarke, Don; Walker, Scott; Phillips, Chris; Nguyen, John; Moos, Dan; Tagbor, Kwasi

2001-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

170

The role of reservoir characterization in the reservoir management process (as reflected in the Department of Energy`s reservoir management demonstration program)  

SciTech Connect

Optimum reservoir recovery and profitability result from guidance of reservoir practices provided by an effective reservoir management plan. Success in developing the best, most appropriate reservoir management plan requires knowledge and consideration of (1) the reservoir system including rocks, and rock-fluid interactions (i.e., a characterization of the reservoir) as well as wellbores and associated equipment and surface facilities; (2) the technologies available to describe, analyze, and exploit the reservoir; and (3) the business environment under which the plan will be developed and implemented. Reservoir characterization is the essential to gain needed knowledge of the reservoir for reservoir management plan building. Reservoir characterization efforts can be appropriately scaled by considering the reservoir management context under which the plan is being built. Reservoir management plans de-optimize with time as technology and the business environment change or as new reservoir information indicates the reservoir characterization models on which the current plan is based are inadequate. BDM-Oklahoma and the Department of Energy have implemented a program of reservoir management demonstrations to encourage operators with limited resources and experience to learn, implement, and disperse sound reservoir management techniques through cooperative research and development projects whose objectives are to develop reservoir management plans. In each of the three projects currently underway, careful attention to reservoir management context assures a reservoir characterization approach that is sufficient, but not in excess of what is necessary, to devise and implement an effective reservoir management plan.

Fowler, M.L. [BDM-Petroleum Technologies, Bartlesville, OK (United States); Young, M.A.; Madden, M.P. [BDM-Oklahoma, Bartlesville, OK (United States)] [and others

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Distribution and Diversity of Archaea Corresponding to the Limnological Cycle of a Hypersaline Stratified Lake (Solar Lake, Sinai, Egypt)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Stratified Lake (Solar Lake, Sinai, Egypt) Eddie Cytryn Dror Minz Ronald S. Oremland...monomictic lake, Solar Lake, Sinai, Egypt, during the limnological development of...stratified lake (Solar lake, Sinai, Egypt). | The vertical and seasonal distribution...

Eddie Cytryn; Dror Minz; Ronald S. Oremland; Yehuda Cohen

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Study on fine geological modelling of the fluvial sandstone reservoir in Daqing oilfield  

SciTech Connect

These paper aims at developing a method for fine reservoir description in maturing oilfields by using close spaced well logging data. The main productive reservoirs in Daqing oilfield is a set of large fluvial-deltaic deposits in the Songliao Lake Basin, characterized by multi-layers and serious heterogeneities. Various fluvial channel sandstone reservoirs cover a fairly important proportion of reserves. After a long period of water flooding, most of them have turned into high water cut layers, but there are considerable residual reserves within them, which are difficult to find and tap. Making fine reservoir description and developing sound a geological model is essential for tapping residual oil and enhancing oil recovery. The principal reason for relative lower precision of predicting model developed by using geostatistics is incomplete recognition of complex distribution of fluvial reservoirs and their internal architecture`s. Tasking advantage of limited outcrop data from other regions (suppose no outcrop data available in oilfield) can only provide the knowledge of subtle changing of reservoir parameters and internal architecture. For the specific geometry distribution and internal architecture of subsurface reservoirs (such as in produced regions) can be gained only from continuous infilling logging well data available from studied areas. For developing a geological model, we think the first important thing is to characterize sandbodies geometries and their general architecture`s, which are the framework of models, and then the slight changing of interwell parameters and internal architecture`s, which are the contents and cells of the model. An excellent model should possess both of them, but the geometry is the key to model, because it controls the contents and cells distribution within a model.

Zhoa Han-Qing [Daqing Research Institute, Helongjiang (China)

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Blackfoot Reservoir Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Blackfoot Reservoir Geothermal Area Blackfoot Reservoir Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Blackfoot Reservoir Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (3) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Idaho Exploration Region: Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed.

174

4. International reservoir characterization technical conference  

SciTech Connect

This volume contains the Proceedings of the Fourth International Reservoir Characterization Technical Conference held March 2-4, 1997 in Houston, Texas. The theme for the conference was Advances in Reservoir Characterization for Effective Reservoir Management. On March 2, 1997, the DOE Class Workshop kicked off with tutorials by Dr. Steve Begg (BP Exploration) and Dr. Ganesh Thakur (Chevron). Tutorial presentations are not included in these Proceedings but may be available from the authors. The conference consisted of the following topics: data acquisition; reservoir modeling; scaling reservoir properties; and managing uncertainty. Selected papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology database.

NONE

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Lake Improvement District Law and County Lake Improvement Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Lake Improvement District Law and County Lake Improvement Program Lake Improvement District Law and County Lake Improvement Program (Minnesota) Lake Improvement District Law and County Lake Improvement Program (Minnesota) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Siting and Permitting Lake Improvement Districts may be established by county boards in order to

176

THERMAL PERFORMANCE MEASUREMENTS ON ULTIMATE HEAT SINKS - COOLING PONDS  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

THERMAL PERFORMANCE MEASUREMENTS THERMAL PERFORMANCE MEASUREMENTS ON ULTIMATE HEAT SINKS - COOLING PONDS R. K. Hadlock 0 . B. Abbey Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratories Prepared for U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission b + NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. Neither the United States nor the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission, nor any of their employees, nor any of their contractors, subcontractors, or their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, nor assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness or usefulness of any information, apparatus, pro- duct or process disclosed, nor represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. F Available from National Technical Information Service

177

Soil washing results for mixed waste pond soils at Hanford  

SciTech Connect

Soil washing technology was assessed as a means for remediating soil contaminated with mixed wastes primarily composed of heavy metals and radionuclides. The soils at the US Department of Energy's Hanford Site are considered suitable for soil washing because of their relatively low quantities of silt and clay. However, in a limited number of soil washing experiments using soils from different locations in the north pond of the 300 Area, the degree of decontamination achieved for the coarse fraction of the soil varied considerably. Part of this variation appears to be due to the presence of a discrete layer of contaminated sediment found in some of the samples. 7 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

Gerber, M.A.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Factors affecting water quality in Cherokee Reservoir  

SciTech Connect

The purpose was to: (1) define reservoir problems related to water quality conditions; (2) identify the probable causes of these problems; and (3) recommend procedures for achieving needed reservoir water quality improvements. This report presents the project findings to date and suggests steps for upgrading the quality of Cherokee Reservoir. Section II presents background information on the characteristics of the basin, the reservoir, and the beneficial uses of the reservoir. Section III identifies the impacts of existing reservoir water quality on uses of the reservoir for water supply, fishery resources, recreation, and waste assimilation. Section IV presents an assessment of cause-effect relationships. The factors affecting water quality addressed in Section IV are: (1) reservoir thermal stratification and hydrodynamics; (2) dissolved oxygen depletion; (3) eutrophication; (4) toxic substances; and (5) reservoir fisheries. Section V presents a preliminary evaluation of alternatives for improving the quality of Cherokee Reservoir. Section VI presents preliminary conclusions and recommendations for developing and implementing a reservoir water quality management plan. 7 references, 22 figures, 21 tables.

Iwanski, M.L.; Higgins, J.M.; Kim, B.R.; Young, R.C.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

MERCURY CYCLING IN LAKE GORDON AND LAKE PEDDER, TASMANIA (AUSTRALIA). I: IN-LAKE PROCESSES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MERCURY CYCLING IN LAKE GORDON AND LAKE PEDDER, TASMANIA (AUSTRALIA). I: IN-LAKE PROCESSES KARL C; accepted 2 December 2002) Abstract. The processes affecting the concentrations of total mercury (total Hg- vestigated. Surface concentrations of total mercury (total Hg) were temporally and spatially uniform in both

Canberra, University of

180

Predicting production performance of CBM reservoirs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Prediction of gas production from the coalbed methane (CBM) reservoirs is challenging due to the complex interaction of storage and transport mechanisms. The vast majority of the gas in CBM reservoirs is stored by adsorption in the coal matrix which practically has no permeability. The flow to production wells however takes place through the cleats or the natural fracture system which store relatively small amounts of gas. These unique coal characteristics have resulted in classification of CBM as an “unconventional” gas resource. Gas production from CBM reservoirs is governed by gas diffusion through coal matrix followed by gas desorption into the cleat system through which the gas flows to the wellbore generally under two-phase conditions. As a result, the production profile of the CBM reservoirs greatly differs from conventional gas reservoirs. This precludes the use of common techniques such as decline curves to forecast the recovery, future revenues, and well performance. Numerical reservoir models (simulators) that incorporate the unique flow and storage characteristics of CBM reservoirs are by far the best tools for predicting the gas production from the CBM reservoirs. It is however cumbersome, time consuming, and expensive to use a complex reservoir simulator for evaluating CBM prospects when the required reservoir parameters are not available. Therefore, there is a need for a quick yet reliable tool for predicting production performance of CBM reservoirs. This paper presents a set of production type curves that can be used for predicting gas and water the production from CBM prospects. The type curves are particularly useful for parametric studies when the key characteristics are not well established. A numerical reservoir model that incorporated the unique flow and storage characteristics of CBM reservoirs was employed to develop the type curves. The impact of various reservoir parameters on the type curves was investigated to confirm the uniqueness of the type curves. The application and limitation of the type curves have been also discussed.

K. Aminian; S. Ameri

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lakes reservoirs ponds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Groundwater Monitoring Plan for the Hanford Site 216-B-3 Pond RCRA Facility  

SciTech Connect

The 216-B-3 Pond system was a series of ponds used for disposal of liquid effluent from past Hanford production facilities. In operation from 1945 to 1997, the B Pond System has been a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) facility since 1986, with RCRA interim-status groundwater monitoring in place since 1988. In 1994 the expansion ponds of the facility were clean closed, leaving only the main pond and a portion of the 216-B-3-3 ditch as the currently regulated facility. In 2001, the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) issued a letter providing guidance for a two-year, trial evaluation of an alternate, intrawell statistical approach to contaminant detection monitoring at the B Pond system. This temporary variance was allowed because the standard indicator-parameters evaluation (pH, specific conductance, total organic carbon, and total organic halides) and accompanying interim status statistical approach is ineffective for detecting potential B-Pond-derived contaminants in groundwater, primarily because this method fails to account for variability in the background data and because B Pond leachate is not expected to affect the indicator parameters. In July 2003, the final samples were collected for the two-year variance period. An evaluation of the results of the alternate statistical approach is currently in progress. While Ecology evaluates the efficacy of the alternate approach (and/or until B Pond is incorporated into the Hanford Facility RCRA Permit), the B Pond system will return to contamination-indicator detection monitoring. Total organic carbon and total organic halides were added to the constituent list beginning with the January 2004 samples. Under this plan, the following wells will be monitored for B Pond: 699-42-42B, 699-43-44, 699-43-45, and 699-44-39B. The wells will be sampled semi-annually for the contamination indicator parameters (pH, specific conductance, total organic carbon, and total organic halides) and annually for water quality parameters (chloride, iron, manganese, phenols, sodium, and sulfate). This plan will remain in effect until superseded by another plan or until B Pond is incorporated into the Hanford Facility RCRA Permit.

Barnett, D BRENT.; Smith, Ronald M.; Chou, Charissa J.; McDonald, John P.

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Great Lakes RESTORATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

these focus areas over a five-year period (FY 2010-2014). NOAA Climate Projects Contact Information Heather, and education in the Great Lakes. NOAA's Climate Projects use a three-pronged approach to research climate decisions made as a result. - Monitoring and modeling climate variables to project future climate trends

183

Man-Made Lakes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... of these lakes demands that the fullest use be made of them. In addition to hydroelectric power, for which most of the dams are primarily constructed, their creation provides innumerable ... bottom waters become barren of fish and other life, and strongly sulphurated waters affect the turbines. How long these situations will persist depends on the shape, size and position of ...

ROSEMARY L. MCCONNELL; E. B. WORTHINGTON

1965-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

184

GREAT LAKES ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

or product does not constitute an endorsement by NOANERL. Use for publicity or advertising purposes & Global Change in Large Lakes ................" ... 7 Pollutant Effects and effects of pollutants, the cycling and through-put of nutrients and energy within the food chain, water

185

Texas AgriLife Research with General Atomics Pilots Microalgae Ponds in Pecos BIOENERGY PROGRAM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Texas AgriLife Research with General Atomics Pilots Microalgae Ponds in Pecos BIOENERGY PROGRAM on the tank bottom will be opened. The Continued on back #12;http://AgBioenergy.tamu.edu concentrated algae

186

Is degradation of the herbicide atrazine enhanced in turfgrass pond sediments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To further understand the fate of atrazine, a herbicide of public concern in the environment, this study was undertaken to determine if atrazine degradation potential is increased in turfgrass ponds having a history of repeated exposure...

Shourds, Shalyn Wayne

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Salt Gradient Solar Pond for Solar Heat Collection and Lang Term Storage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Work is described concerning the instrumentation, thermal modelling and laboratory tests on a salt gradient solar pond to be used for heat collection and storage. A densitameter capable of measuring the salinity....

V. Phillips; P. J. Unsworth; N. A. Al-Saleh

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

An innovative approach to heat extraction from a salinity gradient solar pond to enhance overall efficiency.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A solar pond is a simple and low-cost solar collector with long-term thermal storage. It utilizes a large body of salinity gradient water to absorb… (more)

Yaakob, Y

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

The effect of heterocope predation on zooplankton communities in arctic ponds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The influence of Heterocope septentrionalis, a predacious calanoid copepod, on five species of artic pond zooplankton is investigated. Prey species coexisting with Heterocope are relatively invulnerable to predation, but ...

O'Brien, W. John; Luecke, C.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Reclamation of Abandoned Shrimp Pond Soils in Southern Thailand for Cultivation of Mauritius Grass (Brachiaria mutica)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A study on soil reclamation for cultivation of Mauritius grass was conducted on soils obtained from abandoned shrimp ponds at Ranote District, Songkhla Province, southern Thailand. A glass house experiment on ...

P. Towatana; C. Voradej; N. Leeraphante

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

40 CFR 265 interim-status ground-water monitoring plan for the 2101-M pond  

SciTech Connect

This report outlines a ground-water monitoring plan for the 2101-M pond, located in the southwestern part of the 200-East Area on the Hanford Site in south-central Washington State. It has been determined that hazardous materials may have been discharged to the pond. Installation of an interim-status ground-water monitoring system is required under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act to determine if hazardous chemicals are moving out of the pond. This plan describes the location of new wells for the monitoring system, how the wells are to be completed, the data to be collected, and how those data can be used to determine the source and extent of any ground-water contamination from the 2101-M pond. Four new wells are planned, one upgradient and three downgradient. 35 refs., 12 figs., 9 tabs.

Chamness, M.A.; Luttrell, S.P.; Dudziak, S.

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Tomorrow`s energy today for cities and counties -- Alternative wastewater treatment: Advanced Integrated Pond systems  

SciTech Connect

This report provides a discussion of the design, construction, operation, and maintenance of the Advanced Integrated Pond System as an alternative for other more costly municipal waste water treatment plants.

Not Available

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Impact of population and latrines on fecal contamination of ponds in rural Bangladesh  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Due to poor sanitation, ponds receive fecal contaminatio-based methods and E. coli, Bacteroidales and adenovirus using quantitative PCR. Population and sanitation focused on safe drinking water, as well as improved sanitation and hygiene (Esrey, 1996; Pruss et al

van Geen, Alexander

194

Reservoir monitoring: 1990 summary of vital signs and use impairment monitoring on Tennessee Valley Reservoirs  

SciTech Connect

The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) initiated a Reservoir Monitoring Program on 12 TVA reservoirs (the nine main stream Tennessee river reservoirs -- Kentucky through Fort Loudoun and three major tributary storage reservoirs -- Cherokee, Douglas, and Norris) in autumn 1989. The objective of the Reservoir Monitoring Program is to provide basic information on the ``health`` or integrity of the aquatic ecosystem in each TVA reservoir (``Vital Signs``) and to provide screening level information for describing how well each reservoir meets the swimmable and fishable goals of the Clean Water Act (Use Impairments). This is the first time in the history of the agency that a commitment to a long-term, systematic sampling of major TVA reservoirs has been made. The basis of the Vital Signs Monitoring is examination of appropriate physical, chemical, and biological indicators in three areas of each reservoir. These three areas are the forebay immediately upstream of the dam; the transition zone (the mid-reservoir region where the water changes from free flowing to more quiescent, impounded water); and the inflow or headwater region of the reservoir. The Use Impairments monitoring provides screening level information on the suitability of selected areas within TVA reservoirs for water contact activities (swimmable) and suitability of fish from TVA reservoirs for human consumption (fishable).

Dycus, D.L.; Meinert, D.L.

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Reservoir monitoring: 1990 summary of vital signs and use impairment monitoring on Tennessee Valley Reservoirs  

SciTech Connect

The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) initiated a Reservoir Monitoring Program on 12 TVA reservoirs (the nine main stream Tennessee river reservoirs -- Kentucky through Fort Loudoun and three major tributary storage reservoirs -- Cherokee, Douglas, and Norris) in autumn 1989. The objective of the Reservoir Monitoring Program is to provide basic information on the health'' or integrity of the aquatic ecosystem in each TVA reservoir ( Vital Signs'') and to provide screening level information for describing how well each reservoir meets the swimmable and fishable goals of the Clean Water Act (Use Impairments). This is the first time in the history of the agency that a commitment to a long-term, systematic sampling of major TVA reservoirs has been made. The basis of the Vital Signs Monitoring is examination of appropriate physical, chemical, and biological indicators in three areas of each reservoir. These three areas are the forebay immediately upstream of the dam; the transition zone (the mid-reservoir region where the water changes from free flowing to more quiescent, impounded water); and the inflow or headwater region of the reservoir. The Use Impairments monitoring provides screening level information on the suitability of selected areas within TVA reservoirs for water contact activities (swimmable) and suitability of fish from TVA reservoirs for human consumption (fishable).

Dycus, D.L.; Meinert, D.L.

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Comparative growth of six strains of largemouth bass in Texas ponds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COMPARATIVE GROWTH OF SIX STRAINS OF LARGEMOUTH BASS IN TEXAS PONDS A Thesis by ALAN EUGENE RUDD Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May... 1985 Major Subject: Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences COMPARATIVE GROWTH OF SIX STRAINS OF LARGEMOUTH BASS IN TEXAS PONDS A Thesis by ALAN EUGENE RUDD Approved as to style and content by: Richard L. Noble (Chairman) William H. Neill (Member) J...

Rudd, Alan Eugene

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program, Part B; Limnology, Primary Production, and Zooplankton in Lake Roosevelt, Washington, 1998 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

The Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program is the result of a merger between two projects, the Lake Roosevelt Monitoring Program (BPA No. 8806300) and the Lake Roosevelt Data Collection Project (BPA No. 9404300). These projects were merged in 1996 to continue work historically completed under the separate projects, and is now referred to as the Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program. The 1998 Annual Report, Part B. Limnology, Primary Production, and Zooplankton in Lake Roosevelt, Washington examined the limnology, primary production, and zooplankton at eleven locations throughout the reservoir. The 1998 research protocol required a continuation of the more complete examination of limnological parameters in Lake Roosevelt that began in 1997. Phytoplankton and periphyton speciation, phytoplankton and periphyton chlorophyll a analysis, complete zooplankton biomass analysis by taxonomic group, and an increased number of limnologic parameters (TDG, TDS, etc.) were examined and compared with 1997 results. Total dissolved gas levels were greatly reduced in 1998, compared with 1997, likely resulting from the relatively normal water year experienced in 1998. Mean water temperatures were similar to what was observed in past years, with a maximum of 22.7 C and a minimum of 2.6 C. Oxygen concentrations were also relatively normal, with a maximum of 16.6 mg/L, and a minimum of 0.9 mg/L. Phytoplankton in Lake Roosevelt was primarily composed of microplankton (29.6%), Cryptophyceae (21.7%), and Bacillriophyceae (17.0 %). Mean total phytoplankton chlorophyll a maximum concentration occurred in May (3.53 mg/m{sup 3}), and the minimum in January (0.39 mg/m{sup 3}). Phytoplankton chlorophyll a concentrations appear to be influenced by hydro-operations and temperature. Trophic status as indicated by phytoplankton chlorophyll a concentrations place Lake Roosevelt in the oligomesotrophic range. Periphyton colonization rates and biovolume were significantly greater at a depth of 1.5 m (5 ft) when compared with a 4.6 m (15 ft) depth, and during the shorter incubation periods (two and four weeks). Mean zooplankton densities were greatest for Copepoda (88 %), then Daphnia spp. (10%) and other Cladocera (2.1%), while the zooplankton biomass assessment indicated Daphnia spp. had the greatest biomass (53.6%), then Copepoda (44.0%) and other Cladocera (2.5%). Mean overall zooplankton densities were the lowest observed since 1991. The cause was unclear, but may have been an artifact of human error. It seems unlikely that hydro-operations played a significant part in the reduction of zooplankton in light of the relatively friendly water year of 1998.

Shields, John; Spotts, Jim; Underwood, Keith

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Hydraulic fracturing in a naturally fractured reservoir  

SciTech Connect

Hydraulic fracturing of wells in naturally fractured reservoirs can differ dramatically from fracturing wells in conventional isotropic reservoirs. Fluid leakoff is the primary difference. In conventional reservoirs, fluid leakoff is controlled by reservoir matrix and fracture fluid parameters. The fluid leakoff rate in naturally fractured reservoirs is typically excessive and completely dominated by the natural fractures. This paper presents several field examples of a fracture stimulation program performed on the naturally fractured Devonia carbonate of West Texas. Qualitative pressure decline analysis and net treating pressure interpretation techniques were utilized to evaluate the existence of natural fractures in the Devonian Formation. Quantitative techniques were utilized to assess the importance of the natural fractures to the fracturing process. This paper demonstrates that bottomhole pressure monitoring of fracture stimulations has benefits over conducting minifrac treatments in naturally fractured reservoirs. Finally, the results of this evaluation were used to redesign fracture treatments to ensure maximum productivity and minimize costs.

Britt, L.K.; Hager, C.J.; Thompson, J.W.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

199

Solar energy storage by salinity gradient solar pond: Pilot plant construction and gradient control  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An experimental solar pond pilot plant was constructed in Solvay-Martorell, facilities, Catalonia (NE part of the Iberian Peninsula) to capture and store solar energy. The body of the pond is a cylindrical reinforced concrete tank, 3 m height, 8 m diameter and total area of 50 m2. Salinity and thermal gradient were properly established by using the salinity distribution methodology. The gradient in the pond was maintained by feeding salt (NaCl) through a cylindrical salt charger to the bottom at a height of 80 cm from the pond floor. Continuous surface washing using tap water supply maintained the salinity of the top convective layer at a low level and compensate loses by evaporation. An acidification method by addition of \\{HCl\\} at different heights was used to control the clarity of the pond. The salinity gradient was fully established on 30 September 2009 and has been maintained until the date. After winter time (February 2010), the pond warms up and the temperature increased continuously until it reached its maximum (55 °C) in August 2010. The salinity gradient observed great stability after one year of continuous control and maintenance and under different weather conditions.

César Valderrama; Oriol Gibert; Jordina Arcal; Pau Solano; Aliakbar Akbarzadeh; Enric Larrotcha; José Luis Cortina

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Transient hydrodynamic, heat and mass transfer in a salinity gradient solar pond: A numerical study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The impoverishment of our planet in non-renewable energies has incited researchers to design salinity gradient solar ponds to collect and store solar energy at a lower cost. It is in this context that the present research work lies to focus on the numerical study of the transient hydrodynamic, heat and mass transfer in a salinity gradient solar pond. The problem is tackled using the dimensionless governing equations of Navier–Stokes, thermal energy and mass transfer, which are solved numerically by finite-volume method to provide the temperature, concentration and velocity fields in transient regime. The pond is filled with salty water of various salinities to form three zones of salty water: Upper Convective Zone (UCZ), Non-Convective Zone (NCZ) and Lower Convective Zone (LCZ). To prevent convective movements induced by the internal heating of salty water due to solar radiation absorption, a salinity gradient is used in the solar pond. Representative results illustrating the influence of internal Rayleigh number on the thermal performance of the pond and the effect of the aspect ratio on the distribution of temperature and velocity fields in the salinity gradient solar pond (SGSP) are discussed. In addition, results for the transient average temperature of UCZ and LCZ are presented and discussed for various parametric conditions.

Ridha Boudhiaf; Mounir Baccar

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lakes reservoirs ponds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

216-U-10 Pond and 216-Z-19 Ditch characterization studies  

SciTech Connect

The chemical, reprocessing of spent nuclear fuels at the US Department of Energy`s Hanford Site has generated large volumes of radioactive liquid effluents. The majority of these effluents have been used strictly for cooling or other supportive functions and have been discharged to ditches and ponds. The 216-U-10 Pond and 216-Z-19 Ditch are two such disposal facilities. These facilities are components of an integrated system of ditches, ponds, and overflow facilities collectively referred to as the U-Pond disposal system. The U-Pond system has been used since 1943 and has received a large variety of radioisotopes from several sources. This study covered tho major aspects of the environment, including wind resuspension, biological uptake and transport, geologic distribution in surface and subsurface sediments, and ground-water impacts. The long-term use of U-Pond and the Z-19 Ditch has resulted in the localized accumulation of transuranic and fission product inventories as a result of sorption and filtration of particulates onto the uppermost sediments.

Last, G.V.; Duncan, D.W.; Graham, M.J.; Hall, M.D.; Hall, V.W.; Landeen, D.S.; Leitz, J.G.; Mitchell, R.M.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Pressure maintenance in a volatile oil reservoir  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

reservoir. Historically, produced and makeup gas was injected to maintain pressure. In today's economy. gas has an increasing market value compared to the price of oil. Therefore, it becomes increasingly difficult to justify economically the injection... of produced gas and the purchase of additional make up gas to maintain reservoir pressure. Accordingly, water injection to maintain pressure becomes more favorable economically. This research investigated water injection into a volatile oil reservoir...

Schuster, Bruce Alan

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

203

Integrated reservoir study of the 8 reservoir of the Green Canyon 18 field  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The move into deeper waters in the Gulf of Mexico has produced new opportunities for petroleum production, but it also has produced new challenges as different reservoir problems are encountered. This integrated reservoir characterization effort has...

Aniekwena, Anthony Udegbunam

2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

204

Plutonium in Lake Ontario  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The presence of West Valley-delivered radionuclides in the western basin of Lake Ontario is demonstrated through an analysis of plutoniums and associated radionuclides in a 210Pb-dated sediment core. It is observed that the radionuclide profiles are consistent with the 1970 West Valley peak discharge and not the 1963 fallout peak activity. The drainage basin soils are estimated to annually release only about 0.006% of their fallout 239,240Pu inventory to the receiving waters. Taken together, on a lakewide basis, both releases have made very little contribution to the overall levels of plutoniums in the open waters though surges in West Valley emissions were obviously a significant contributor to western Lake Ontario waters. It appears nuclear reactor operations contribute very little plutonium to the open waters. Their influence on the nearshore zone must await the availability of relevant release and monitoring data.

S.R. Joshi

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

salt lake city.cdr  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Locations of the Salt Lake City Processing and Disposal Sites Locations of the Salt Lake City Processing and Disposal Sites This fact sheet provides information about the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 Title I processing site and disposal site at Salt Lake City, Utah. These sites are managed by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. Salt Lake City, Utah, Processing and Disposal Sites Site Descriptions and History Regulatory Setting The former Salt Lake City processing site is located about 4 miles south-southwest of the center of Salt Lake City, Utah, at 3300 South and Interstate 15. The Vitro Chemical Company processed uranium and vanadium ore at the site from 1951 until 1968. Milling operations conducted at the processing site created radioactive tailings, a predominantly sandy material.

206

Natural CO2 Reservoirs on the Colorado Plateau … Candidates for CO2 Sequestration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CO CO 2 Reservoirs on the Colorado Plateau and Southern Rocky Mountains: Candidates for CO 2 Sequestration. R. Allis (nrugs.rallis@state.ut.us; 801-537-3301) T. Chidsey (nrugs.tchidsey@state.ut.us; 801-537-3364) W. Gwynn (nrugs.wgwynn@state.ut.us; 801-537-3366) C. Morgan (nrugs.cmorgan@state.ut.us; 801-537-3370) Utah Geological Survey P.O. Box 146100 Salt Lake City, UT 84114 S. White (s.white@irl.cri.nz; 64-4-569-0000) Industrial Research Ltd. P.O. Box 31-310 Lower Hutt, New Zealand M. Adams (madams@egi.utah.edu; 801-585-7784) J. Moore (jmoore@egi.utah.edu; 801-585-6931) Energy and Geoscience Institute, 427 Wakara Way, Suite 300 Salt Lake City, UT84107 Abstract Numerous natural accumulations of CO 2 -dominant gases have been discovered as a result of

207

Radioactive Marker Measurements in Heterogeneous Reservoirs ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

quence of subsurface fluid water, gas, oil production e.g., Gam- ...... reservoirs.'' J. Pet. Technol., 25, 734–744. Gonzalez-Moran, T., Rodriguez, R., and Cortes, ...

2004-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

208

The internal wave field in Sau reservoir  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The analysis of wind, temperature, and current data from Sau reservoir (Spain) shows that the third vertical mode ..... However, increased computing power.

2005-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

209

Storage capacity in hot dry rock reservoirs  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of extracting thermal energy, in a cyclic manner, from geologic strata which may be termed hot dry rock. A reservoir comprised of hot fractured rock is established and water or other liquid is passed through the reservoir. The water is heated by the hot rock, recovered from the reservoir, cooled by extraction of heat by means of heat exchange apparatus on the surface, and then re-injected into the reservoir to be heated again. Water is added to the reservoir by means of an injection well and recovered from the reservoir by means of a production well. Water is continuously provided to the reservoir and continuously withdrawn from the reservoir at two different flow rates, a base rate and a peak rate. Increasing water flow from the base rate to the peak rate is accomplished by rapidly decreasing backpressure at the outlet of the production well in order to meet periodic needs for amounts of thermal energy greater than a baseload amount, such as to generate additional electric power to meet peak demands. The rate of flow of water provided to the hot dry rock reservoir is maintained at a value effective to prevent depletion of the liquid

Brown, Donald W. (Los Alamos, NM)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

International reservoir operations agreement helps NW fish &...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

or 503-230-5131 International reservoir operations agreement helps Northwest fish and power Portland, Ore. - The Bonneville Power Administration and the British Columbia...

211

Evaluation Of Chemical Geothermometers For Calculating Reservoir...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermometers For Calculating Reservoir Temperatures At Nevada Geothermal Power Plants Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper:...

212

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Reservoir Pressure Management  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Reservoir Pressure Management Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us | Admin Log On HomeBasic Search About Publications Advanced Search New Hot...

213

Analysis of Geothermal Reservoir Stimulation Using Geomechanics...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

System (EGS) Reservoir; 2010 Geothermal Technology Program Peer Review Report Seismic Fracture Characterization Methods for Enhanced Geothermal Systems; 2010 Geothermal Technology...

214

Mapping Diffuse Seismicity for Geothermal Reservoir Management...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Templeton David B. Harris Lawrence Livermore Natl. Lab. Seismicity and Reservoir Fracture Characterization May 18, 2010 This presentation does not contain any proprietary...

215

Safety of Dams and Reservoirs Act (Nebraska)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This act regulates dams and associated reservoirs to protect health and public safety and minimize adverse consequences associated with potential dam failure. The act describes the responsibilities...

216

Characterization and interwell connectivity evaluation of Green Rver reservoirs, Wells Draw study area, Uinta Basin, Utah  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and seal rocks of the Green River petroleum system. Datum is Mahoganey oil shale bed (1). 49 27 Fig. 11?Cross-section of thermal maturity of oil accumulations in the Green River petroleum system. 49 28 Fig. 12? Lake Uinta depositional... This petroleum system has produced more than 450 MMBO mainly from two formations, the Green River and Colton Formations. 7 The Green River Formation contains the source rock and most of the reservoir and seal rocks (Fig. 10). 49 Most of the kerogen-rich oil...

Abiazie, Joseph Uchechukwu

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

217

ORISE Research Team Experiences: Joe Lake  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Joe Lake One-Time Student Intern has 'Second Life' as ORNL Mentor Joe Lake Joe Lake, a full-time software engineer for Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Computational Science and...

218

Measurement of sound transmission through mud at Dodge Pond, Connecticut.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Questions important to the sonic detection of buried ordinance are whether the sound dispersion and attenuation of muddy bottoms can be predicted and verified. Wood and Weston [Acustica (1964)] measured compressional speeds in harbor mud 3% less than that of water with attenuation considerably less than those of sandy/silty sediments. A recent theoretical treatment [Pierce and Carey POMA 7001 (2009)] making use of the Mallock–Wood equation and of a card?house theory of the structure of mud estimates the slow sound speed to depend on porosity as 1?(0.35)(1??). Present measurements at frequencies between 1 and 10 kHz with a buried array in the depositional mud at the bottom of Dodge Pond which contains considerable gas microbubbles yield speeds of the order of 60% of the sound speed in water. The initial measurements on the disturbed sediment were found to be strongly influenced by scattering from larger bubbles whereas the results after a period of 10 months showed the effect of a smaller size distribution of bubbles. Estimates based on the Dodge Pondmeasurements and on the card?house theory of the propagation characteristics and of the effect of micro?bubbles are discussed. [Sponsored by SERDP?NSWC?PCD.

William M. Carey; Allan D. Pierce

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Measurement of sound transmission through mud at Dodge Pond, Connecticut  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Depositional muddy sediments are slow bottoms and pose a problem for the sonic detection of buried ordnance. This paper addresses the question: can the frequency dependent dispersion be predicted and verified by measurements in areas where buried object detection is required? Wood and Weston (Acustica V14 1964) have indicated that muddy sediments in the kHz range have a compressional speed 3% less than water with a frequency dependent attenuation (less than that of sand). A theoretical treatment of "muddy sediments" the Card House Theory (Pierce and Carey POMA (5) 7001 2009) estimates the slow sound speed and frequency dispersion proportional to mud porosity. Preliminary Dodge Pond results obtained with a buried array (1 to 10 kHz) are presented and illustrate the importance of micro-bubbles on the dispersion characteristic. The initial measurements on the disturbed sediment were found strongly influenced by scattering from larger bubbles whereas the results after a period of 10 months showed the effect of a smaller size distribution of bubbles. Estimates of the dispersion characteristic of mud and the effect of micro-bubbles are discussed. Finally the application of an impedance tube to the characterization of mud is discussed.

William M. Carey; Allan D. Pierce

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

From Greenland to green lakes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

From Greenland to green lakes: Cultural eutrophication and the loss of benthic pathways in .... Kahlert 2001), the importance of attached algae as an energy.

2003-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lakes reservoirs ponds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

NAWS-China Lake Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presentation covers the NAWS-China Lake Project at the Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting, held on November 18-19, 2009.

222

Lake Whitney Comprehensive Water Quality Assessment, Phase 1B- Physical and Biological Assessment (USDOE)  

SciTech Connect

Baylor University Center for Reservoir and Aquatic Systems Research (CRASR) has conducted a phased, comprehensive evaluation of Lake Whitney to determine its suitability for use as a regional water supply reservoir. The area along the Interstate 35 corridor between Dallas / Fort Worth Metroplex and the Waco / Temple Centroplex represents one of the fastest growth areas in the State of Texas and reliable water supplies are critical to sustainable growth. Lake Whitney is situated midway between these two metropolitan areas. Currently, the City of Whitney as well as all of Bosque and Hill counties obtain their potable water from the Trinity Sands aquifer. Additionally, parts of the adjoining McLennan and Burleson counties utilize the Trinity sands aquifer system as a supplement to their surface water supplies. Population growth coupled with increasing demands on this aquifer system in both the Metroplex and Centroplex have resulted in a rapid depletion of groundwater in these rural areas. The Lake Whitney reservoir represents both a potentially local and regional solution for an area experiencing high levels of growth. Because of the large scope of this project as well as the local, regional and national implications, we have designed a multifaceted approach that will lead to the solution of numerous issues related to the feasibility of using Lake Whitney as a water resource to the region. Phase IA (USEPA, QAPP Study Elements 1-4) of this research focused on the physical limnology of the reservoir (bathymetry and fine scale salinity determination) and develops hydrodynamic watershed and reservoir models to evaluate how salinity would be expected to change with varying hydrologic and climatic factors. To this end, we implemented a basic water quality modeling program in collaboration with the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department and the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality to add to the developing long-term database on Lake Whitney. Finally, we conducted an initial assessment of knowledge of watershed and water quality related issues by local residents and stakeholders of Lake Whitney and design an intervention educational program to address any deficiencies discovered. Phase IA was funded primarily from EPA Cooperative Agreement X7-9769 8901-0. Phase IC (USEPA, QAPP Study Element 5) of this research focused on the ambient toxicity of the reservoir with respect to periodic blooms of golden algae. Phase IC was funded primarily from Cooperative Agreement EM-96638001. Phase 1B (USDOE, Study Elements 6-11) complemented work being done via EPA funding on study elements 1-5 and added five new study elements: 6) Salinity Transport in the Brazos Watershed to Lake Whitney; 7) Bacterial Assessment; 8) Organic Contaminant Analysis on Lake Whitney; 9) Plankton Photosynthesis; 10) Lake Whitney Resident Knowledge Assessment; and 11) Engineering Scoping Perspective: Recommendations for Use.

Doyle, Robert D; Byars, Bruce W

2009-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

223

Reservoir characterization using experimental design and response surface methodology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This research combines a statistical tool called experimental design/response surface methodology with reservoir modeling and flow simulation for the purpose of reservoir characterization. Very often, it requires large number of reservoir simulation...

Parikh, Harshal

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

224

Electromagnetic Heating Methods for Heavy Oil Reservoirs  

SciTech Connect

The most widely used method of thermal oil recovery is by injecting steam into the reservoir. A well-designed steam injection project is very efficient in recovering oil, however its applicability is limited in many situations. Simulation studies and field experience has shown that for low injectivity reservoirs, small thickness of the oil-bearing zone, and reservoir heterogeneity limits the performance of steam injection. This paper discusses alternative methods of transferring heat to heavy oil reservoirs, based on electromagnetic energy. They present a detailed analysis of low frequency electric resistive (ohmic) heating and higher frequency electromagnetic heating (radio and microwave frequency). They show the applicability of electromagnetic heating in two example reservoirs. The first reservoir model has thin sand zones separated by impermeable shale layers, and very viscous oil. They model preheating the reservoir with low frequency current using two horizontal electrodes, before injecting steam. The second reservoir model has very low permeability and moderately viscous oil. In this case they use a high frequency microwave antenna located near the producing well as the heat source. Simulation results presented in this paper show that in some cases, electromagnetic heating may be a good alternative to steam injection or maybe used in combination with steam to improve heavy oil production. They identify the parameters which are critical in electromagnetic heating. They also discuss past field applications of electromagnetic heating including technical challenges and limitations.

Sahni, A.; Kumar, M.; Knapp, R.B.

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Water quality management plan for Cherokee Reservoir  

SciTech Connect

The management plan provides an assessment of Cherokee Reservoir's current water quality, identifies those factors which affect reservoir water quality, and develops recommendations aimed at restoring or maintaining water quality at levels sufficient to support diverse beneficial uses. 20 references, 8 figures, 15 tables. (ACR)

Not Available

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

REVIEW PLAN PINE CREEK LAKE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;REVIEW PLAN PINE CREEK LAKE McCurtain County, Oklahoma DAM SAFETY MODIFICATION STUDY TULSA LEFT BLANK #12;REVIEW PLAN Pine Creek Lake, Oklahoma Dam Safety Modification Study TABLE OF CONTENTS and Costs 17 13. Public Participation 19 14. Review Plan Approval and Updates 19 15. Review Plan Points

US Army Corps of Engineers

227

Colorado Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million Barrels) Colorado Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

228

INJECTION AND THERMAL BREAKTHROUGH IN FRACTURED GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

geothermal reservoirs (except those in the Imperial Valley)Geothermal resource and reservoir investigation of U.S. Bureau of Reclamation Leaseholds at East Mesa, Imperial Valley,

Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Reservoir Operation by Ant Colony Optimization Algorithms M. R. ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reservoir Operation by Ant Colony Optimization Algorithms. 1. Reservoir Operation by Ant Colony Optimization Algorithms. M. R. Jalali1; A. Afshar2; and M. A. ...

Jalali

2000-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

230

Louisiana State Offshore Crude Oil + Lease Condensate New Reservoir...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Million Barrels) Louisiana State Offshore Crude Oil + Lease Condensate New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Million Barrels) Decade...

231

Texas--State Offshore Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million Barrels) Texas--State Offshore Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

232

ORIGINAL PAPER Photomineralization in a boreal hydroelectric reservoir  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ORIGINAL PAPER Photomineralization in a boreal hydroelectric reservoir: a comparison with natural dioxide Á Dissolved organic matter Á Boreal hydroelectric reservoir Á Greenhouse gas production

Long, Bernard

233

Predicting Reservoir System Quality and Performance | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Predicting Reservoir System Quality and Performance Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Book Section: Predicting Reservoir System Quality and...

234

The Optimization of Well Spacing in a Coalbed Methane Reservoir.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Numerical reservoir simulation has been used to describe mechanism of methane gas desorption process, diffusion process, and fluid flow in a coalbed methane reservoir. The… (more)

Sinurat, Pahala Dominicus

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Oklahoma Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves New Reservoir Discoveries...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Oklahoma Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0...

236

Wyoming Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves New Reservoir Discoveries...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0...

237

Utah Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves New Reservoir Discoveries...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1...

238

An Updated Conceptual Model Of The Los Humeros Geothermal Reservoir...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Humeros Geothermal Reservoir (Mexico) Abstract An analysis of production and reservoir engineering data of 42 wells from the Los Humeros geothermal field (Mexico) allowed...

239

Use Of Electrical Surveys For Geothermal Reservoir Characterization...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Of Electrical Surveys For Geothermal Reservoir Characterization- Beowawe Geothermal Field Abstract The STAR geothermal reservoir simulator was used to model the natural state of...

240

Modeling wettability alteration in naturally fractured carbonate reservoirs.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The demand for energy and new oil reservoirs around the world has increased rapidly while oil recovery from depleted reservoirs has become more difficult. Oil… (more)

Goudarzi, Ali

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lakes reservoirs ponds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Why Sequence Great Salt Lake?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Great Salt Lake? Great Salt Lake? On average, the Great Salt Lake is four times saltier than the ocean and also has heavy metals, high concentrations of sulfur and petroleum seeps. In spite of all this, the lake is the saltiest body of water to support life. The lake hosts brine shrimp, algae and a diverse array of microbes, not to mention the roughly 5 million birds that migrate there annually. The secret to these microbes' ability to survive under such harsh conditions might be revealed in their genes. Researchers expect the genetic data will provide insight into how the microorganisms tolerate pollutants such as sulfur and detoxify pollutants such as sulfur and heavy metals like mercury. The information could then be used to develop bioremediation techniques. Researchers also expect that sequencing microorganisms sampled

242

Quantum reservoirs with ion chains  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ion chains are promising platforms for studying and simulating quantum reservoirs. One interesting feature is that their vibrational modes can mediate entanglement between two objects which are coupled through the vibrational modes of the chain. In this work we analyse entanglement between the transverse vibrations of two heavy impurity defects embedded in an ion chain, which is generated by the coupling with the chain vibrations. We verify general scaling properties of the defects dynamics and demonstrate that entanglement between the defects can be a stationary feature of these dynamics. We then analyse entanglement in chains composed of tens of ions and propose a measurement scheme which allows one to verify the existence of the predicted entangled state.

B. G. Taketani; T. Fogarty; E. Kajari; Th. Busch; Giovanna Morigi

2014-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

243

East Pond West Pond South Pond South Pond Southwest Pond  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

06-0500 06-0500 14.4 06-0501 14.53 15-M03S 14.97 18-0500 14.34 18-0502 14.23 18-0521 14.18 18-0525 14.31 18-0526 13.79 20-M025 14.26 20-M035 14.4 21-0502 12.66 21-0503 12.34 21-0504 13.12 21-0505 13.23 18-0524 14.24 12-0539 12.86 18-RW02 14.09 18-RW03 14.16 12-0523 14.43 12-0525 13.7 12-S29C 14.25 12-S32B 14.4 12-S35B 14.18 12-S37B 14.59 15-0530 14.13 15-M14S 14.68 12-0509 14.52 12-0513 13.64 12-0517 14.08 12-0521 14.35 12-0526 12.88 12-RW01 14.55 12-S31B 14.25 12-S36B 13.99 12-TE03 13.95 15-0507 13.45 15-0510 14.1 15-0515 14.24 15-0516 13.95 15-0520 13.52 15-M27S 13.84 15-M32S 14.61 18-0504 14.4 20-M003 14.54 20-M012 14.96 20-M024 14.55 20-M40S 14.45 12-S67C 13.92 12-S67B 13.85 12-S68B 13.62 12-S68C 13.47 12-S69B 12.96 12-S69C 12.95 12-S70B 13.37 12-S70C 13.4 12-S71C 13.39 12-S72B 13.11 12-S72C 12.99 12-S73B 12.95 12-S73C 12.87 15-0568 14.05 15-0571 14.4 18-RW0501 14.2 20-RW01

244

East Pond West Pond South Pond South Pond Southwest Pond  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

12-S30B 713.6 12-S30B 713.6 12-S33C 1863 12-S35B 38320 15-0534 ND 20-M003 ND 20-M005 ND 20-M054 3.9 12-S68D 164.7 12-S69C ND 12-S70B 30 12-S70C 70 12-S71C 77 12-S72C 3.8 12-S73B ND 12-S73C 11.9 12-S67B 349.9 12-S67C 197.2 12-S67D 56.7 15-0566 101 12-0527 ND 12-S69D ND 12-S70D 43.2 12-S71D 28.2 12-S72D ND 12-S71B ND 12-S69B ND 20-M028 ND 20-M011 ND 20-M019 ND 20-0503 4.1 20-M024 ND 20-M025 ND 20-M035 2.9 20-M036 ND 20-M38D ND 20-M40S ND 20-M023 ND 20-M41D ND 15-0569 5.6 20-MWL3 996.1 20-M049 5.6 20-M22D 4.2 15-0559 ND 15-M32S ND 15-M32D ND 06-0500 ND 12-0526 8.5 12-0509 ND 12-0514 46.2 12-0524 1214 12-0513 ND 12-0525 1.4 12-0515 ND 12-0516 ND 12-0517 ND 12-0550-3 ND 21-0502 2.1 21-0503 ND 21-0504 ND 21-0505 ND 15-0535 17.6 15-0537 750 15-M16D ND 15-M16S ND 12-0518 1.5 12-S68C 35 12-S73D ND 20-M012 ND 20-0502 32 20-M40D ND 15-M27D ND

245

J. Great Lakes Res. 29(4):681704 Internat. Assoc. Great Lakes Res., 2003  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, lake level rise. Schematic reconstructions illustrate changing paleogeography and a Holocene lake level Postglacial Lake Level History Based on New Detailed Bathymetry Troy L. Holcombe1,*, Lisa A. Taylor1, David F. Holocene lake level history and paleogeography of Lake Erie are re-interpreted with the aid of new

246

GREAT LAKES UNIVERSITY OF KISUMU INTRODUCTION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

agriculture, green valleys and hills, and occasional thick forest and mountains. It is situated on Lake

Petriu, Emil M.

247

Vitrification demonstration with surrogate Oak Ridge Reservation K-25 B and C pond sludge  

SciTech Connect

Surrogate Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) K-25 B&C Pond sludge was vitrified in a pilot-scale EnVit Co melter operated by Clemson University at the DOE/Industrial Center for Vitrification Research Center. This demonstration was performed for the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) in support of a Department of Energy (DOE) - Office of Technology Development (OTD) Technical Task Plan. The intent of the demonstration was to determine the feasibility of vitrifying actual K-25 B&C Pond sludge in an EnVitCo type melter. B&C Pond sludge is a mixed waste consisting primarily of various amounts of Ca, Fe, and Si, with Ni and U as the principal hazardous and radioactive components. The demonstration was successfully completed and homogeneous, durable glass was produced. Characterization of the glass product, as well as details of the demonstration, will be discussed.

Cicero, C.A. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Overcamp, T.J.; Erich, D.L. [Clemson Univ., Anderson, SC (United States)

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Utilization of SRS pond ash in controlled low strength material. Technical report  

SciTech Connect

Design mixes for Controlled Low Strength Material (CLSM) were developed which incorporate pond ashes (fly ashes) from the A-Area Ash Pile, the old F-Area Ash Basin and the D-Area Ash Basin. CLSM is a pumpable, flowable, excavatable backfill used in a variety of construction applications at SRS. Results indicate that CLSM which meets all of the SRS design specifications for backfill, can be made with the A-, D-, and F-Area pond ashes. Formulations for the design mixes are provided in this report. Use of the pond ashes may result in a cost savings for CLSM used at SRS and will utilize a by-product waste material, thereby decreasing the amount of material requiring disposal.

Langton, C.A.; Rajendran, N.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

The role of zooplankton in the ecological succession of plankton and benthic algae across a salinity gradient in the Shark Bay solar salt ponds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The relatively low biodiversity and simple hydrodynamics make solar salt ponds ideal sites for ecological studies. We have studied the ecological gradient of the primary ponds at the Shark ... representative of t...

Louise C. Bruce; Jörg Imberger

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Simulation of Radon Transport in Geothermal Reservoirs  

SciTech Connect

Numerical simulation of radon transport is a useful adjunct in the study of radon as an in situ tracer of hydrodynamic and thermodynamic numerical model has been developed to assist in the interpretation of field experiments. The model simulates transient response of radon concentration in wellhead geofluid as a function of prevailing reservoir conditions. The radon simulation model has been used to simulate radon concentration response during production drawdown and two flowrate transient tests in vapor-dominated systems. Comparison of model simulation with experimental data from field tests provides insight in the analysis of reservoir phenomena such as propagation of boiling fronts, and estimates of reservoir properties of porosity and permeability thickness.

Semprini, Lewis; Kruger, Paul

1983-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

251

Dispersivity as an oil reservoir rock characteristic  

SciTech Connect

The main objective of this research project is to establish dispersivity, {alpha}{sub d}, as an oil reservoir rock characteristic and to use this reservoir rock property to enhance crude oil recovery. A second objective is to compare the dispersion coefficient and the dispersivity of various reservoir rocks with other rock characteristics such as: porosity, permeability, capillary pressure, and relative permeability. The dispersivity of a rock was identified by measuring the physical mixing of two miscible fluids, one displacing the other in a porous medium. 119 refs., 27 figs., 12 tabs.

Menzie, D.E.; Dutta, S.

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Atmospheric Mercury Concentrations Near Salmon Falls Creek Reservoir - Phase 1  

SciTech Connect

Elemental and reactive gaseous mercury (EGM/RGM) were measured in ambient air concentrations over a two-week period in July/August 2005 near Salmon Falls Creek Reservoir, a popular fishery located 50 km southwest of Twin Falls, Idaho. A fish consumption advisory for mercury was posted at the reservoir in 2002 by the Idaho Department of Health and Welfare. The air measurements were part of a multi-media (water, sediment, precipitation, air) study initiated by the Idaho Department of Environmental Quality and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Region 10 to identify potential sources of mercury contamination to the reservoir. The sampling site is located about 150 km northeast of large gold mining operations in Nevada, which are known to emit large amounts of mercury to the atmosphere (est. 2,200 kg/y from EPA 2003 Toxic Release Inventory). The work was co-funded by the Idaho National Laboratory’s Community Assistance Program and has a secondary objective to better understand mercury inputs to the environment near the INL, which lies approximately 230 km to the northeast. Sampling results showed that both EGM and RGM concentrations were significantly elevated (~ 30 – 70%, P<0.05) compared to known regional background concentrations. Elevated short-term RGM concentrations (the primary form that deposits) were likely due to atmospheric oxidation of high EGM concentrations, which suggests that EGM loading from upwind sources could increase Hg deposition in the area. Back-trajectory analyses indicated that elevated EGM and RGM occurred when air parcels came out of north-central and northeastern Nevada. One EGM peak occurred when the air parcels came out of northwestern Utah. Background concentrations occurred when the air was from upwind locations in Idaho (both northwest and northeast). Based on 2003 EPA Toxic Release Inventory data, it is likely that most of the observed peaks were from Nevada gold mine sources. Emissions from known large natural mercury sources in that area cannot account for the observed EGM peaks due to their diffuse source geometry and the large (170 km) transport distance involved. The EGM peak originating from northwestern Utah air may be from three known mercury sources west of Salt Lake City (Kennecott, US Magnesium, Clean Harbors Aragonite) and/or the 1600 MW coal-fired Intermountain Power plant near Delta. However, the relative importance of these short-term peaks for long-term watershed mercury loading (critical factor affecting fish concentrations) is not known, and there is a need to better quantify the annual frequency and magnitude of these different inputs over a longer period of time.

M. L. Abbott

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Warming shifts top-down and bottom-up control of pond food web structure and function  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...top-down and bottom-up control of pond food web structure and function Jonathan B. Shurin...structuring experimental freshwater pond food webs in western Canada over 16 months. Experimental...temperatures produced top-heavy food webs with lower biomass of benthic and pelagic...

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Effect of wind speed on the growth of the upper convective zone in a solar pond  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

[2]. The distance which the wind has to act on the surface of a pond is commonly called fetch, or fetch length. The purpose of the nets or other devices used in wind suppression is to reduce the fetch and transmit some of the energy in the waves... to the sides of the pond. Wind mixing of the upper convective zone can be thought of as converting some of the kinetic energy in the wind to potential energy in the fluid by a process called entrainment. Entrainment is defined in detail in Chapter V...

McMinn, Steven Lee

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

255

The effects of cattle on shoreline vegetation of ponds and tanks in south Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OF SCIENCE December I97S Hajor Subject: Wildlife and. Fisheries Sciences THE EFFECTS OF CATTLE ON SHORELINE VEGETATION OF PONDS AND TANKS IN SOUTH TEXAS A Thesis by RICHARD JOHN WHITE Approved as to content and style by: Chairmen of Committee Head... of Department M ber ber December 1978 ABSTRACT Ti e Effe ts of Cattle on Shoreline Vegetation of Ponds a", !d Tanks in "outh Texas. (December i978) Richard John Nhytc, B, Nat ~ Res. , University of New England Chairman of Mvisory Committee: Dr. N ~ J...

Whyte, Richard John

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Estimated Costs and Returns for Catfish Farms with Recirculating Ponds Along the Upper Texas Coast.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

_TDOC ' Z TA24S.7 8873 NO.1704 - . , ., TEXAS A&M UNIVERSHY LIBRARY for Catfish Farms ' with Recirculating Ponds Along ? . . the Upper Texas Coast ~7'!K~fi~~~ation ? J. Charles Lee: Interim Director? The Texas A&M University System ? C...~J1ege Station, Texas :,. .,: (Blank Page in OrigiBal BuBetiol ' 1iJ. ~ ; :; . : . . / I Estimated Costs and Returns for Catfish Farms with Recirculating Ponds Along the Upper Texas Coast J.A.D. Lambregts, Marketing Manager for Niaid...

Lambregts, J.A.D.; Griffin, W.L.; Lacewell R.D.; Davis, J.T.; Clary, G.M.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Gradient zone-boundary control in salt-gradient solar ponds  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for suppressing zone boundary migration in a salt gradient solar pond includes extending perforated membranes across the pond at the boundaries, between the convective and non-convective zones, the perforations being small enough in size to prevent individual turbulence disturbances from penetrating the hole, but being large enough to allow easy molecular diffusion of salt thereby preventing the formation of convective zones in the gradient layer. The total area of the perforations is a sizeable fraction of the membrane area to allow sufficient salt diffusion while preventing turbulent entrainment into the gradient zone.

Hull, J.R.

1982-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

258

Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Monitoring Program; 1990 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

As partial mitigation for the loss of anadromous salmon and steelhead incurred by construction of Grand Coulee Dam, the Northwest Power Planning Council directed Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to construct two kokanee salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) hatcheries on Lake Roosevelt (NPPC 1987 [Section 903 (g)(l)(C)]). The hatcheries are to produce 8 million kokanee salmon fry or 3.2 million adults for outplanting into Lake Roosevelt as well as 500,000 rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) for the Lake Roosevelt net-pen programs. In section 903 (g)(l)(E), the Council also directed BPA to fund a monitoring program to evaluate the effectiveness of the kokanee hatcheries. The monitoring program included the following components: (1) conduction of a year-round creel census survey to determine angler pressure, catch rates and composition, growth and condition of fish caught by anglers, and economic value of the fishery. Comparisons will be made before and after hatcheries are on-line to determine hatchery effectiveness; (2) conduct an assessment of kokanee, rainbow trout, and walleye feeding habits, growth rates, and densities of their preferred prey at different locations in the reservoir and how reservoir operations affect population dynamics of preferred prey organisms. This information will be used to determine kokanee and rainbow trout stocking locations, stocking densities and stocking times; (3) conduct a mark-recapture study designed to assess effectiveness of various release times and locations for hatchery-raised kokanee and net-pen raised rainbow so fish-loss over Grand Coulee Dam will be minimized, homing to egg collection sites will be improved and angler harvest will be increased. The above measures were adopted by the Council based on a management plan developed by Upper Columbia United Tribes Fisheries Center, Spokane Indian Tribe, Colville Confederated Tribes, Washington Department of Wildlife, and the National Park Service. This plan examined the feasibility of restoring and enhancing Lake Roosevelt fisheries (Scholz et al. 1986). In July 1988, BPA entered into a contract with the Spokane Indian Tribe to initiate the monitoring program and continue research through 1995. This report contains the results of the monitoring program from January to December 1990.

Griffith, Janelle R.; Scholz, Allan T. (Eastern Washington University, Upper Columbia United Tribes Fisheries Research Center, Cheney, WA)

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Assessment Of Bacterial Sources Impacting Lake Waco And Belton Lake  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

time for sample delivery to the laboratory and initiation of analysis was maintained. Following incubation and enumeration using USEPA Method 1603, the Assessment of Bacterial Sources Impacting Lake Waco & Belton Lake Executive Summary J:\\742... of Contents J:\\742\\742880_TX_Farm_Bureau\\Reports\\Final_Report_2-2006\\TXFB_ReportFinal_020806.doc i February 2006 TABLE OF CONTENTS EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ........................................................................................ ES-1 SECTION 1...

Giovanni, G.

260

Heat deliverability of homogeneous geothermal reservoirs  

SciTech Connect

For the last two decades, the petroleum industry has been successfully using simple inflow performance relationships (IPR's) to predict oil deliverability. In contrast, the geothermal industry lacked a simple and reliable method to estimate geothermal wells' heat deliverability. To address this gap in the standard geothermal-reservoir-assessment arsenal, we developed generalized dimensionless geothermal inflow performance relationships (GIPR's). These ''reference curves'' may be regarded as an approximate general solution of the equations describing the practically important case of radial 2-phase inflow. Based on this approximate solution, we outline a straightforward approach to estimate the reservoir contribution to geothermal wells heat and mass deliverability for 2-phase reservoirs. This approach is far less costly and in most cases as reliable as numerically modeling the reservoir, which is the alternative for 2-phase inflow.

Iglesias, Eduardo R.; Moya, Sara L.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lakes reservoirs ponds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Fifteenth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings  

SciTech Connect

The Fifteenth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering was held at Stanford University on January 23--25, 1990. Major topics included: DOE's geothermal research and development program, well testing, field studies, geosciences, geysers, reinjection, tracers, geochemistry, and modeling.

Not Available

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Study of induced seismicity for reservoir characterization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The main goal of the thesis is to characterize the attributes of conventional and unconventional reservoirs through passive seismicity. The dissertation is comprised of the development and applications of three new methods, ...

Li, Junlun, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Sediment resuspension in a monomictic eutrophic reservoir  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

During the mixing period sediment traps were placed at 9 different levels of the water column in La Concepción reservoir (Málaga-Spain). During the exposure time a benthic nepheloid layer with high suspended matt...

J. A. Gálvez; F. X. Niell

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Sediment resuspension in a monomictic eutrophic reservoir  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

During the mixing period sediment traps were placed at 9 different levels of the water column in La Concepción reservoir (Málaga-Spain). During the exposure time a benthic nepheloid layer with high suspended matt...

J. A. Gálvez; F. X. Niell

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Geothermal Reservoir Evaluation Considering Fluid Adsorption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SGP-"R- 68 Geothermal Reservoir Evaluation Considering Fluid Adsorption and Composition Michael J. Economides September, 1983 Financial support was provided through the Stanford Geothermal Program Contract No Geothermal Program Interdisciplinary Research in Engineering and Earth Sciences STANFORD UNIVERSITY Stanford

Stanford University

266

Chelated Indium Activable Tracers for Geothermal Reservoirs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SGP-TR-99 Chelated Indium Activable Tracers for Geothermal Reservoirs Constantinos V. Chrysikopoulos Paul Kruger June 1986 Financial support was provided through the Stanford Geothermal Program under University Stanford Geothermal Program Interdisciplinary Research in Engineering and Earth Sciences STANFORD

Stanford University

267

ANNOTATED RESEARCH BIBLIOGRAPHY FOR GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modeling f o r Geothermal Reservoirs and Power- plants. I'Fumaroles Hunt, 1970 Geothermal power James, 1978 FusionGood a lated perfo : Geothermal Power Systems Compared. 'I

Sudo!, G.A

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Modelling the GHG emission from hydroelectric reservoirs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A mechanistic model has been constructed to compute the fluxes of CO2 and CH4 emitted from the surface of hydroelectric reservoirs. The structure of the model has been designed to be adaptable to hydroelectric re...

Normand Thérien; Ken Morrison

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Reservoir fracture characterizations from seismic scattered waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The measurements of fracture parameters, such as fracture orientation, fracture density and fracture compliance, in a reservoir is very important for field development and exploration. Traditional seismic methods for ...

Fang, Xinding

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Reservoir Data 6-30-09.xls  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Injection MSL - Mean Sea Level Wl - Water Injection Muddy 2,829 (307) 261-5000 (888) 599-2200 Reservoir Data -- Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC) -- NPR-3Teapot Dome...

271

Using Snow Fences to Augument Fresh Water Supplies in Shallow Arctic Lakes  

SciTech Connect

This project was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to address environmental research questions specifically related to Alaska?s oil and gas natural resources development. The focus of this project was on the environmental issues associated with allocation of water resources for construction of ice roads and ice pads. Earlier NETL projects showed that oil and gas exploration activities in the U.S. Arctic require large amounts of water for ice road and ice pad construction. Traditionally, lakes have been the source of freshwater for this purpose. The distinctive hydrological regime of northern lakes, caused by the presence of ice cover and permafrost, exerts influence on lake water availability in winter. Lakes are covered with ice from October to June, and there is often no water recharge of lakes until snowmelt in early June. After snowmelt, water volumes in the lakes decrease throughout the summer, when water loss due to evaporation is considerably greater than water gained from rainfall. This balance switches in August, when air temperature drops, evaporation decreases, and rain (or snow) is more likely to occur. Some of the summer surface storage deficit in the active layer and surface water bodies (lakes, ponds, wetlands) is recharged during this time. However, if the surface storage deficit is not replenished (for example, precipitation in the fall is low and near?surface soils are dry), lake recharge is directly affected, and water availability for the following winter is reduced. In this study, we used snow fences to augment fresh water supplies in shallow arctic lakes despite unfavorable natural conditions. We implemented snow?control practices to enhance snowdrift accumulation (greater snow water equivalent), which led to increased meltwater production and an extended melting season that resulted in lake recharge despite low precipitation during the years of the experiment. For three years (2009, 2010, and 2011), we selected and monitored two lakes with similar hydrological regimes. Both lakes are located 30 miles south of Prudhoe Bay, Alaska, near Franklin Bluffs. One is an experimental lake, where we installed a snow fence; the other is a control lake, where the natural regime was preserved. The general approach was to compare the hydrologic response of the lake to the snowdrift during the summers of 2010 and 2011 against the ?baseline? conditions in 2009. Highlights of the project included new data on snow transport rates on the Alaska North Slope, an evaluation of the experimental lake?s hydrological response to snowdrift melt, and cost assessment of snowdrift?generated water. High snow transport rates (0.49 kg/s/m) ensured that the snowdrift reached its equilibrium profile by winter's end. Generally, natural snowpack disappeared by the beginning of June in this area. In contrast, snow in the drift lasted through early July, supplying the experimental lake with snowmelt when water in other tundra lakes was decreasing. The experimental lake retained elevated water levels during the entire open?water season. Comparison of lake water volumes during the experiment against the baseline year showed that, by the end of summer, the drift generated by the snow fence had increased lake water volume by at least 21?29%. We estimated water cost at 1.9 cents per gallon during the first year and 0.8 cents per gallon during the second year. This estimate depends on the cost of snow fence construction in remote arctic locations, which we assumed to be at $7.66 per square foot of snow fence frontal area. The snow fence technique was effective in augmenting the supply of lake water during summers 2010 and 2011 despite low rainfall during both summers. Snow fences are a simple, yet an effective, way to replenish tundra lakes with freshwater and increase water availability in winter. This research project was synergetic with the NETL project, "North Slope Decision Support System (NSDSS) for Water Resources Planning and Management." The results

Stuefer, Svetlana

2013-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

272

Understanding the reservoir important to successful stimulation  

SciTech Connect

In anisotropic Bakken shale reservoirs, fracture treatments serve to extend the well bore radius past a disturbed zone and vertically connect discrete intervals. Natural fractures in the near-well bore area strongly control the well deliverability rate. The Bakken is one of the few shale formations in the world with commercial oil production. This article covers the Bakken reservoir properties that influence production and stimulation treatments. The concluding part will discuss the design and effectiveness of the treatments.

Cramer, D.D. (BJ Services Co., Denver, CO (US))

1991-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

273

Modeling well performance in compartmentalized gas reservoirs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

index in estimating reservoir performance. • The optimization routine is done with VBA using Excel solver. Model Assumptions • The reservoir is in stabilized flow under pseudo-steady state conditions at constant pressure with no aquifer influx... is matched with a type curve to predict field performance. Fetkovich Decline Type Curves 11 is based on analytical solutions to flow equations for production at constant BHP and include both transient and boundary dominated flow periods. These log...

Yusuf, Nurudeen

2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

274

Modeling well performance in compartmentalized gas reservoirs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

index in estimating reservoir performance. ? The optimization routine is done with VBA using Excel solver. Model Assumptions ? The reservoir is in stabilized flow under pseudo-steady state conditions at constant pressure with no aquifer influx... is matched with a type curve to predict field performance. Fetkovich Decline Type Curves 11 is based on analytical solutions to flow equations for production at constant BHP and include both transient and boundary dominated flow periods. These log...

Yusuf, Nurudeen

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

275

Oil reservoir properties estimation using neural networks  

SciTech Connect

This paper investigates the applicability as well as the accuracy of artificial neural networks for estimating specific parameters that describe reservoir properties based on seismic data. This approach relies on JPL`s adjoint operators general purpose neural network code to determine the best suited architecture. The authors believe that results presented in this work demonstrate that artificial neural networks produce surprisingly accurate estimates of the reservoir parameters.

Toomarian, N.B. [California Inst. of Tech., Pasadena, CA (United States); Barhen, J.; Glover, C.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Center for Engineering Systems Advanced Research; Aminzadeh, F. [UNOCAL Corp., Sugarland, TX (United States)

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Sources and reservoirs of anthropogenic iodine-129 in western New York  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Large quantities of iodine-129 have been released during nuclear weapons testing, and from nuclear power and fuel reprocessing plants. The distribution of this isotope was investigated in 110 surface water and soil samples from western New York (where several potential point sources are located) and other areas of North America, to evaluate its sources, transport pathways, and reservoirs. Elevated 129I concentrations associated with a former reprocessing facility at West Valley, NY, can be tracked to Lakes Erie and Ontario via site drainage, and for over 200 km via atmospheric transport, while only a negligible signal is associated with active power plants in the area. The results point to local reprocessing as the major source of 129I in western New York, while bomb fallout constitutes less than 0.5% of the signal. Surface soil is the dominant reservoir for anthropogenic 129I in this region. Across North America, 129I concentrations are lower than in western New York, although still significantly higher than expected weapons fallout. Reprocessing releases are currently seen to be the major source for elevated 129I concentrations on a global scale, in contrast to previous suggestions that most anthropogenic 129I was still derived from weapons fallout. Concentrations of 129I and iodine in surface reservoirs are generally found to be uncorrelated, implying that natural iodine and anthropogenic 129I are not yet in equilibrium. The results suggest that anthropogenic 129I is cycled between the atmosphere-soil-vegetation systems more rapidly than natural, pre-anthropogenic iodine.

Usha Rao; Udo Fehn

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Lake Ontario Maritime Cultural Landscape  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(Watertown). I also benefited from interactions with several organizations, including Jefferson County Historical Society, Maritime Museum of the Great Lakes, 1000 Islands Land Trust, New York Office of Parks, Recreation, and Historic Preservation, Ontario... (Watertown). I also benefited from interactions with several organizations, including Jefferson County Historical Society, Maritime Museum of the Great Lakes, 1000 Islands Land Trust, New York Office of Parks, Recreation, and Historic Preservation, Ontario...

Ford, Benjamin L.

2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

278

Southwest region solar pond study for three sites: Tularosa Basin, Malaga Bend, and Canadian River  

SciTech Connect

In the study, the Bureau of Reclamation investigated the technical and economic feasibility of using solar salt-gradient ponds to generate power and to produce freshwater in Bureau projects at three sites--the Canadian River at Logan, New Mexico; Malaga Bend on the Pecos River near Carlsbad, New Mexico; and the Tularosa Basin in the vicinity of Alamogordo, New Mexico. The ponds would be used to generate electric power that could be integrated with the Bureau's power grid or used in combination with thermal energy from the ponds to power commercially available desalination systems to produce freshwater. Results of the economic analysis, which concentrated primarily on the Tularosa Basin site, showed that solar-pond-generated intermediate load power would cost between 62 and 90 mills/kWh and between 52 and 83 mills/kWh for baseload power. This results in benefit-cost ratios of approximately 2.0 and 1.3 for intermediate and baseload, respectively, when compared to similar facilities powered by fossil fuels. The cost savings are even more pronounced when comparing the two (solar versus fossil fuel) as a source of power for conventional distillation and membrane-type desalination systems.

Boegli, W.J.; Dahl, M.M.; Remmers, H.E.

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Detention basins, also known as dry ponds, or dry detention basins, are  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

permanent standing pools of water. The pur- pose is to provide basic flood protec- tion and potentially Rutgers websites: water conservation, turf, Environ- mental Stewards, water chestnut 5 Rain barrels measures that detain water for a period of time but unlike wet ponds are not de- signed to have large

Goodman, Robert M.

280

A continuum model of melt pond evolution on Arctic sea ice Daniela Flocco1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the atmosphere and ocean. In particular, sea ice affects the polar climate by insulating the ocean fromA continuum model of melt pond evolution on Arctic sea ice Daniela Flocco1 and Daniel L. Feltham1 the Northern Hemisphere summer, absorbed solar radiation melts snow and the upper surface of Arctic sea ice

Feltham, Daniel

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lakes reservoirs ponds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

2013 Radiological Monitoring Results Associated with the Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes radiological monitoring performed of the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste wastewater prior to discharge into the Cold Waste Pond and of specific groundwater monitoring wells associated with the Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (#LA-000161-01, Modification B). All radiological monitoring is performed to fulfill Department of Energy requirements under the Atomic Energy Act.

Mike Lewis

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Ponding Test Results Seepage and Total Losses Main Canal B Hidalgo County Irrigation District No. 16  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TR-325 2008 Ponding Test Results Seepage and Total Losses Main Canal B Hidalgo County Irrigation District No. 16 Eric Leigh Texas AgriLife Extension Associate, Biological and Agricultural Engineering... MAIN CANAL B HIDALGO COUNTY IRRIGATION DISTRICT NO. 16 Report Prepared by: Eric Leigh and Guy Fipps,1 P.E. February 17, 2004 IRRIGATION TECHNOLOGY CENTER Texas Cooperative Extension - Texas Agricultural...

Leigh, E.; Fipps, G.

283

Evaluation of remedial alternatives for the Solar Ponds Plume, Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the process used to select a remedial alternative for handling contaminated groundwater emanating from the Solar Evaporation Ponds (Solar Ponds) at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) and prevent it from reaching the nearest surface water body, North Walnut Creek. Preliminary results of field investigations conducted to provide additional information for the alternatives analysis are also presented. The contaminated groundwater is referred to as the Solar Ponds Plume (SPP). The primary contaminants in the SPP are nitrate and uranium; however, some metals exceed the site action levels at several locations and volatile organic compounds, originating from other sources, also have been detected. Currently the SPP, local surface water runoff, and infiltrated precipitation are collected by a trench system located downgradient of the Solar Ponds and pumped to three storage tanks. The water (two to three million gallons annually) is then pumped to an on-site treatment plant for evaporation at an approximate cost of $7.57 per liter.

Hranac, K.C. [Morrison Knudsen Corp., Golden, CO (United States). Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site; Chromec, F.W.; Fiehweg, R. [Rocky Mountain Remediation Services, Golden, CO (United States). Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site; Hopkins, J. [Rocky Mountain Remediation Services, Los Alamos, NM (United States)

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Pond thermal stratification and turnover -A 1 Year Experiment Last updated on 9 Dec 2008  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. We recorded the temperatures once every 50 sec continuously. The voltage output of a solar cell is also recorded. The solar cell shows sunrise and sunset and the passing of clouds. The pond is located fruitful discussions and the loan of equipment. James D. Brownridge (9 Dec 08) jdbjdb@binghamton.edu. #12;

Suzuki, Masatsugu

285

Tracing anthropogenic nutrient inputs to coastal plain ponds using stable Wayne Daniel1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is to determine if invasive species Phragmites australis is dependent on sewage derived nitrogen using stable tissues in Duck Pond expressed elevated del 15 N values. Del 15 N of and Phragmites australis suggested colonization. Phragmites australis is know in North America as the common reed, but has a genetic lineage

Vallino, Joseph J.

286

Steel Creek primary producers: Periphyton and seston, L-Lake/Steel Creek Biological Monitoring Program, January 1986--December 1991  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River Site (SRS) encompasses 300 sq mi of the Atlantic Coastal Plain in west-central South Carolina. Five major tributaries of the Savannah River -- Upper Three Runs Creek, Four Mile Creek, Pen Branch, Steel Creek, and Lower Three Runs Creek -- drain the site. In 1985, L Lake, a 400-hectare cooling reservoir, was built on the upper reaches of Steel Creek to receive effluent from the restart of L-Reactor and to protect the lower reaches from thermal impacts. The Steel Creek Biological Monitoring Program was designed to assess various components of the system and identify and changes due to the operation of L-Reactor or discharge from L Lake. An intensive ecological assessment program prior to the construction of the lake provided baseline data with which to compare data accumulated after the lake was filled and began discharging into the creek. The Department of Energy must demonstrate that the operation of L-Reactor will not significantly alter the established aquatic ecosystems. This report summarizes the results of six years` data from Steel Creek under the L-Lake/Steel Creek Monitoring Program. L Lake is discussed separately from Steel Creek in Volumes NAI-SR-138 through NAI-SR-143.

Bowers, J.A. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Toole, M.A.; van Duyn, Y. [Normandeau Associates Inc., New Ellenton, SC (United States)

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

HYDROPOWER RESERVOIR FOR FLOOD CONTROL: A CASE STUDY ON RINGLET RESERVOIR, CAMERON  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HYDROPOWER RESERVOIR FOR FLOOD CONTROL: A CASE STUDY ON RINGLET RESERVOIR, CAMERON HIGHLANDS, Malaysia 4 Professor, Department of Civil Engineering, Colorado State University, USA ABSTRACT: Hydropower as possible for daily hydropower generation as well as to prevent any spillage at dam. However

Julien, Pierre Y.

288

Solar pond technology for large-scale heat processing in a Chilean mine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Coppermining is the largest industrial activity in Northern Chile a region that relies mostly on imported energy resources thus making the mining sector vulnerable to the rising cost of fuel oil and electricity. The extraction of copper is mostly accomplished by hydrometallurgy a three-step low energy process consisting of heap leaching concentration by solvent extraction and metal recovery by electro-winning. Since the content of copper in its ore tends to degrade as the mining operation proceeds higher leaching temperatures would be needed along with increasing energy requirements. In order to address this demand and considering that the region has one of the highest levels of solar radiation and clear skies the authors assessed the solar pond technology for rising the temperature of the leaching stream. The working principle of such technology is presented as well as its mathematical formulation restrictions and assumptions aiming to simulate the performance of a solar pond and to size a suitable setup. The results indicate that this technology can provide sufficient heat to raise the temperature to a range of 50 to 70?°C throughout the year with an annual gross thermal supply of 626?GWh. In order to minimize the loss of water and salt from the pond a closed salt cycle is suggested. Savings of up to 59 000 tons of diesel oil per year and the avoidance of 164 000 tons of CO2 per year could be achieved with a solar pond effective area of 1.43 km2 reaching an average efficiency of 19.4%. Thus solar pond technology is suitable for attaining the goal of increasing the leaching temperature while diminishing fuel costs and greenhouse emissions.

F. Garrido; R. Soto; J. Vergara; M. Walczak; P. Kanehl; R. Nel; J. García

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Reservoir Characterization, Production Characteristics, and Research Needs for Fluvial/Alluvial Reservoirs in the United States  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy's (DOE's) Oil Recovery Field Demonstration Program was initiated in 1992 to maximize the economically and environmentally sound recovery of oil from known domestic reservoirs and to preserve access to this resource. Cost-shared field demonstration projects are being initiated in geology defined reservoir classes which have been prioritized by their potential for incremental recovery and their risk of abandonment. This document defines the characteristics of the fifth geological reservoir class in the series, fluvial/alluvial reservoirs. The reservoirs of Class 5 include deposits of alluvial fans, braided streams, and meandering streams. Deposit morphologies vary as a complex function of climate and tectonics and are characterized by a high degree of heterogeneity to fluid flow as a result of extreme variations in water energy as the deposits formed.

Cole, E.L.; Fowler, M.L.; Jackson, S.R.; Madden, M.P.; Raw-Schatzinger, V.; Salamy, S.P.; Sarathi, P.; Young, M.A.

1999-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

290

An Updated Conceptual Model Of The Los Humeros Geothermal Reservoir  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Humeros Geothermal Reservoir Humeros Geothermal Reservoir (Mexico) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: An Updated Conceptual Model Of The Los Humeros Geothermal Reservoir (Mexico) Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: An analysis of production and reservoir engineering data of 42 wells from the Los Humeros geothermal field (Mexico) allowed obtaining the pressure and temperature profiles for the unperturbed reservoir fluids and developing 1-D and 2-D models for the reservoir. Results showed the existence of at least two reservoirs in the system: a relatively shallow liquid-dominant reservoir located between 1025 and 1600 m above sea level (a.s.l.) the pressure profile of which corresponds to a 300-330°C boiling water column and a deeper low-liquid-saturation reservoir located between

291

Evidence from lake sediments, marine sediments, and ice cores  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Evidence from lake sediments, marine sediments, and ice cores #12;Outline · Archives · Proxies and glaciers #12;Archive: Lake sediments #12;Lake sediments - sampling #12;Lake sediments - proxies Lake sediments: age Wohlfarth et al. Geology 2008 #12;Lake sediments - proxies Wohlfarth et al. Geology 2008 #12

Sengun, Mehmet Haluk

292

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced reservoir characterization Sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

<< < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY Reservoir Geophysics Program Summary: and fracture analysis, multi-component seismic reservoir characterization, quantitative reservoir...

293

Surfactant-enhanced spontaneous imbibition process in highly fractured carbonate reservoirs.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Highly fractured carbonate reservoirs are a class of reservoirs characterized by high conductivity fractures surrounding low permeability matrix blocks. In these reservoirs, wettability alteration is… (more)

Chen, Peila

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Integral cesium reservoir: Design and transient operation  

SciTech Connect

An electrically heated thermionic converter has been designed built and successfully tested in air (Homer et.al., 1995). One of the unique features of this converter was an integral cesium reservoir thermally coupled to the emitter. The reservoir consisted of fifteen cesiated graphite pins located in pockets situated in the emitter lead with thermal coupling to the emitter, collector and the emitter terminal; there were no auxiliary electric heaters on the reservoir. Test results are described for conditions in which the input thermal power to the converter was ramped up and down between 50% and 100% of full power in times as short as 50 sec, with data acquisition occurring every 12 sec. During the ramps the emitter and collector temperature profiles. the reservoir temperature and the electric output into a fixed load resistor are reported. The converter responded promptly to the power ramps without excessive overshoot and with no tendency to develop instabilities. This is the rust demonstration of the performance of a cesium-graphite integral reservoir in a fast transient

Smith, J.N. Jr.; Horner, M.H.; Begg, L.L. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Wrobleski, W.J. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., West Mifflin, PA (United States). Bettis Atomic Power Lab.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Category:Salt Lake City, UT | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

UT UT Jump to: navigation, search Go Back to PV Economics By Location Media in category "Salt Lake City, UT" The following 16 files are in this category, out of 16 total. SVFullServiceRestaurant Salt Lake City UT Moon Lake Electric Assn Inc (Utah).png SVFullServiceRestauran... 57 KB SVHospital Salt Lake City UT Moon Lake Electric Assn Inc (Utah).png SVHospital Salt Lake C... 57 KB SVLargeHotel Salt Lake City UT Moon Lake Electric Assn Inc (Utah).png SVLargeHotel Salt Lake... 55 KB SVLargeOffice Salt Lake City UT Moon Lake Electric Assn Inc (Utah).png SVLargeOffice Salt Lak... 57 KB SVMediumOffice Salt Lake City UT Moon Lake Electric Assn Inc (Utah).png SVMediumOffice Salt La... 62 KB SVMidriseApartment Salt Lake City UT Moon Lake Electric Assn Inc (Utah).png

296

Resuspension in a shallow eutrophic lake  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The frequency and the importance of wind-induced resuspension were studied in the shallow, eutrophic Lake...2, mean depth 3 m). During storm events in autumn 1988 lake water samples were collected every 2–8 hours...

Peter Kristensen; Martin Søndergaard; Erik Jeppesen

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Morphological abnormalities in chironomidae in relation to sediment metals concentrations in Empire Lake, Cherokee County, Kansas  

SciTech Connect

Morphological abnormalities of headcapsule structures of chironomid larvae were quantified in relation to concentrations of heavy metals in sediments of Empire Lake. This reservoir is situated in a catchment downstream of a US EPA Superfund Site in the Tri-State Mining District of southeast Kansas, and receives discharges from several streams that flow through the abandoned mining areas. Sediments have elevated concentrations of Zinc, Lead, and Cadmium in varying concentrations. Chironomini had the highest incidence of morphological abnormalities, followed by Procladius. Although deformities of the mentum, premandibles, and antennae were found in several taxa, no clear trends were seen for increasing concentrations of any of the metals individually or collectively. From this study it appears as if the incidence of morphological abnormalities is not a linear function of metals concentrations in sediments of this reservoir.

Ferringington, L.C. Jr. [Univ. of Kansas, Lawrence, KS (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

298

Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Monitoring Program; 1988-1989 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

In the Northwest Power Planning Council's 1987 Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (NPPC 1987), the Council directed the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to construct two kokanee salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) hatcheries as partial mitigation for the loss of anadromous salmon and steelhead incurred by construction of Grand Coulee Dam [Section 903 (g)(l)(C)]. The hatcheries will produce kokanee salmon for outplanting into Lake Roosevelt as well as rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) for the Lake Roosevelt net-pen program. In section 903 (g)(l)(E), the Council also directed BPA to fund a monitoring program to evaluate the effectiveness of the kokanee hatcheries. The monitoring program included the following components: (1) a year-round, reservoir-wide, creel survey to determine angler use, catch rates and composition, and growth and condition of fish; (2) assessment of kokanee, rainbow, and walleye (Stizostedion vitreum) feeding habits and densities of their preferred prey, and; (3) a mark and recapture study designed to assess the effectiveness of different locations where hatchery-raised kokanee and net pen reared rainbow trout are released. The above measures were adopted by the Council based on a management plan, developed by the Upper Columbia United Tribes Fisheries Center, Spokane Indian Tribe, Colville Confederated Tribes, Washington Department of Wildlife, and National Park Service, that examined the feasibility of restoring and enhancing Lake Roosevelt fisheries (Scholz et al. 1986). In July 1988, BPA entered into a contract with the Spokane Indian Tribe to initiate the monitoring program. The projected duration of the monitoring program is through 1995. This report contains the results of the monitoring program from August 1988 to December 1989.

Peone, Tim L.; Scholz, Allan T.; Griffith, James R.

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Shale Reservoir Characterization | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oil & Gas » Shale Gas » Shale Reservoir Oil & Gas » Shale Gas » Shale Reservoir Characterization Shale Reservoir Characterization Geologist examining the base of the Marcellus Shale at an outcrop near Bedford, PA. Geologist examining the base of the Marcellus Shale at an outcrop near Bedford, PA. Gas-producing shales are predominantly composed of consolidated clay-sized particles with a high organic content. High subsurface pressures and temperatures convert the organic matter to oil and gas, which may migrate to conventional petroleum traps and also remains within the shale. However, the clay content severely limits gas and fluid flow within the shales. It is, therefore, necessary to understand the mineral and organic content, occurrence of natural fractures, thermal maturity, shale volumes, porosity

300

Magic Reservoir Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Magic Reservoir Geothermal Area Magic Reservoir Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Magic Reservoir Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.32833333,"lon":-114.3983333,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lakes reservoirs ponds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

New method for evaluating composite reservoir systems  

SciTech Connect

A simple new technique has been developed for evaluating interference test data in radially symmetric composite reservoirs. The technique is based on the realization that systematic variations in the apparent storage coefficient (calculated from semi-log analysis of the late-time data are indicative of a two-mobility (k/..mu..) reservoir. By analyzing variations in the apparent storage coefficient, both the mobility and size of the inner region can be calculated. The technique is particularly useful for evaluating heterogeneous geothermal systems where the intersection of several faults, or hydrothermal alteration has created a high permeability region in the center of the geothermal field. The technique is applied to an extensive interference test in the geothermal reservoir at Klamath Falls, Oregon. 7 refs., 7 figs.

Benson, S.M.; Lai, C.H.

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Water salinity of the First Eocene reservoir: Its unique behaviour and influence on reservoir engineering calculations  

SciTech Connect

The salinity of the produced water from First Eocene reservoir of Wafra field was studied through its past history. The change in the salinity of the initially produced water (from about 500 to 20,000 ppm NaCl) was attributed to the meteoric water which might have entered the reservoir through its outcrops to the west of the field. The correct value of the connate water salinity (23,000 ppm) that should be used in estimating the original oil in place by the volumetric method was determined by three different approaches. In addition, a technique to be followed in calculating the volumetric original oil in place for the First Eocene reservoir is outlined to overcome the complex behaviour of aquifer salinity. The change in the produced water salinity of the First Eocene reservoir with time was studied and proved that water is dumping from an upper water bearing zone into First Eocene reservoir. Upper water dumping, which apparently has supported the reservoir pressure, was confirmed to occur behind casing in many deeper wells penetrating the First Eocene reservoir by the analysis of their temperature and noise logs.

Ghoniem, S.A.A.; Al-Zanki, F.H.

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Water salinity of First Eocene reservoir: Unique behavior and influence on reservoir engineering calculations  

SciTech Connect

The salinity of the produced water from the First Eocene reservoir of the Wafra field was studied through its history. The change in the salinity of the initially produced water (from about 500 to 20,000 ppm NaCl) was attributed to meteoric water that might have entered the reservoir through outcrops west of the field. The correct value of the interstitial water salinity (23,000ppm) that should be used in estimating the original oil in place (OOIP) by the volumetric method was determined by three different approaches. In addition, a technique to overcome the complex behavior of aquifer salinity in calculating the volumetric OOIP for the First Eocene reservoir is outlined. A study of the change in the produced water salinity of the First Eocene reservoir with time proved that water is dumping from an upper water-bearing zone into the reservoir. Analysis of temperature and noise logs confirmed that this upper water dumping, which apparently has supported the reservoir pressure, occurred behind casing in many deeper wells penetrating the First Eocene reservoir.

Ghoniem, S.A.; Al-Zanki, F.H.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Experimental and numerical investigations of mixing in raceway ponds for algae cultivation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The current high interest in the algae sector is leading to the development of several demo/commercial scale projects, either for the food market or bioenergy production. Raceway Ponds (RWPs) are a widely used technology for algae mass cultivation. \\{RWPs\\} were developed long time ago, and thus capital and operating costs are well assessed. Nevertheless, room still exists to further reduce operational costs. A possible route towards energy optimization and therefore operational cost reduction can be identified through a better understanding of the mixing phenomena. The focus of the present work is that vertical mixing, defined as the cyclical movement of the algal cells between surface and bottom layers of the culture, cannot be completely determined by considering only turbulence, and therefore it is not represented by the Re number. A 3D Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) analysis of a conventional RWP was carried out based on a multi-phase “Volume of Fluid” model, in order to investigate the flow field of the culture in the pond. The CFD results were compared with experimental measures on a 20 m2 pilot RWP. Once agreement among CFD and experimental results was shown, a statistical evaluation of the trajectories calculated for algae particles in the flow was carried out. The aim of this statistical evaluation was to define the level of vertical mixing in different sections of the pond. The model proposed was then used to scale-up the results to a demo/pre-commercial size RWP (500 m2). The standard deviation of the actual trajectory was calculated with respect to the undisturbed trajectory for each section modeled. The results of the simulation showed that a limited mixing is to be expected in RWPs. In the long straight parts of the pond vertical mixing is poor and algae tend to settle to the bottom. Only in the bends the vortexes produced by flow separation move part of the culture from the bottom to the top and vice-versa. This result does not fit with the practice, typically observed in large scale ponds, of reducing vortexes around the bends by placing baffles. The method described can be applied to different pond designs operated at different culture velocities.

Matteo Prussi; Marco Buffi; David Casini; David Chiaramonti; Francesco Martelli; Mauro Carnevale; Mario R. Tredici; Liliana Rodolfi

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Lake Charles Urbanized Area MTP 2034  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

................................................................................................................................ 2-9 National Highway System ........................................................................................................................... 2-10 City of Lake Charles Transit System Routes... transportation. The Lake Charles Urbanized Area is located wholly within Calcasieu Parish and includes the cities of Lake Charles, Sulphur, and Westlake, as well as the unincorporated areas known as Moss Bluff, and Carlyss (see map on following page...

Lake Charles Urbanized Area Metropolitan Planning Organization

2009-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

306

Fallout Plutonium in an Alkaline, Saline Lake  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Mono Lake, a natural closed-basin (3) alkaline, saline lake...3 pCi/m3), and New York Bight (-0.7 pCi/m3) are much...volcanic debris that fills the basin to a depth of 1000 m. Mono...Water is lost from a closed basin lake only by evaporation and...

H. J. SIMPSON; R. M. TRIER; C. R. OLSEN; D. E. HAMMOND; A. EGE; L. MILLER; J. M. MELACK

1980-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

307

Biosecurity for Aquaculture Rend Lake Workshop  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

's The Right Thing To Do Makes You More Profitable Protects Your Investment Regulatory Rend Lake Biosecurity Protect economic investmentProtect economic investment Reputation Protect against new diseases Viral regulations Rend Lake Biosecurity Workshop #12;Regulatory International Federal StateState Local Rend Lake

308

RECIPIENT:Lake County, FL  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Lake County, FL Lake County, FL u.s. DEPARTIIIEN T OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CEN T ER NEPA DETERlIJJNATION PROJECf TITLE: Lake County, FL EECBG SOW (S) Page lof2 STATE: FL Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procurement Instrument Number NEPA Control Numbcr CID Numbtr OE·FOA-OOOOO13 DE·EE00Q0786.001 0 Based on my review of the information concerning the proposed adion, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized undtr DOE Order 451.IA), I have made the following determination: ex. EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: 65.1 Actions to conserve energy, demonstrate potential energy conserva tion, and promote energy-efficiency that do not increase the indoor concentrations of potentially harmful substances. These actions may involve financial and technical

309

Prediction of Kizildere reservoir behavior under exploitation  

SciTech Connect

Kizildere geothermal reservoir is under exploitation since 1984. During the four years of operation, electricity production showed a decline from the initially designed power output of 20.4 MW{sub e}. The scaling in wells necessitates periodic mechanical cleaning. However decline in well flow rates even after cleaning, indicate either decrease in productivity index due to scaling in fractures or due to rapid decline in reservoir pressure due to insufficient recharge and strong interference between wells. In this paper the results of a lumped parameter model prepared for Kizildere will be presented with the analysis of natural state of the field.

Okandan, Ender

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Pesticide use in Kentucky reservoir watershed  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes information on the types, uses, and amounts of pesticides applied to Kentucky Reservoir and its immediate watershed. Estimates for the quantities and types of the various pesticides used are based primarily on the land uses in the watershed. A listing of commonly used pesticides is included describing their uses, mode of action, and potential toxicological effects. This report will inform the the public and the Kentucky Reservoir Water Resources Task Force of the general extent of pesticide usage and is not an assessment of pesticide impacts. 10 refs., 5 figs., 9 tabs.

Butkus, S.R.

1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Geothermal reservoir engineering code: comparison and validation  

SciTech Connect

INTERCOMP has simulated six geothermal reservoir problems. INTERCOMP's geothermal reservoir model was used for all problems. No modifications were made to this model except to provide tabular output of the simulation results in the units used in RFP No. DE-RP03-80SF-10844. No difficulty was encountered in performing the problems described herein, although setting up the boundary and grid conditions exactly as specified were sometimes awkward, and minor modifications to the grid system were necessitated. The results of each problem are presented in tabular and (for many) graphical form.

Not Available

1981-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

312

Improved characterization of reservoir behavior by integration of reservoir performances data and rock type distributions  

SciTech Connect

An integrated geological/petrophysical and reservoir engineering study was performed for a large, mature waterflood project (>250 wells, {approximately}80% water cut) at the North Robertson (Clear Fork) Unit, Gaines County, Texas. The primary goal of the study was to develop an integrated reservoir description for {open_quotes}targeted{close_quotes} (economic) 10-acre (4-hectare) infill drilling and future recovery operations in a low permeability, carbonate (dolomite) reservoir. Integration of the results from geological/petrophysical studies and reservoir performance analyses provide a rapid and effective method for developing a comprehensive reservoir description. This reservoir description can be used for reservoir flow simulation, performance prediction, infill targeting, waterflood management, and for optimizing well developments (patterns, completions, and stimulations). The following analyses were performed as part of this study: (1) Geological/petrophysical analyses: (core and well log data) - {open_quotes}Rock typing{close_quotes} based on qualitative and quantitative visualization of pore-scale features. Reservoir layering based on {open_quotes}rock typing {close_quotes} and hydraulic flow units. Development of a {open_quotes}core-log{close_quotes} model to estimate permeability using porosity and other properties derived from well logs. The core-log model is based on {open_quotes}rock types.{close_quotes} (2) Engineering analyses: (production and injection history, well tests) Material balance decline type curve analyses to estimate total reservoir volume, formation flow characteristics (flow capacity, skin factor, and fracture half-length), and indications of well/boundary interference. Estimated ultimate recovery analyses to yield movable oil (or injectable water) volumes, as well as indications of well and boundary interference.

Davies, D.K.; Vessell, R.K. [David K. Davies & Associates, Kingwood, TX (United States); Doublet, L.E. [Texas A& M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)] [and others

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

INCREASING WATERFLOOD RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH IMPROVED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND RESERVOIR MANAGEMENT  

SciTech Connect

This project increased recoverable waterflood reserves in slope and basin reservoirs through improved reservoir characterization and reservoir management. The particular application of this project is in portions of Fault Blocks IV and V of the Wilmington Oil Field, in Long Beach, California, but the approach is widely applicable in slope and basin reservoirs. Transferring technology so that it can be applied in other sections of the Wilmington Field and by operators in other slope and basin reservoirs is a primary component of the project. This project used advanced reservoir characterization tools, including the pulsed acoustic cased-hole logging tool, geologic three-dimensional (3-D) modeling software, and commercially available reservoir management software to identify sands with remaining high oil saturation following waterflood. Production from the identified high oil saturated sands was stimulated by recompleting existing production and injection wells in these sands using conventional means as well as a short radius redrill candidate. Although these reservoirs have been waterflooded over 40 years, researchers have found areas of remaining oil saturation. Areas such as the top sand in the Upper Terminal Zone Fault Block V, the western fault slivers of Upper Terminal Zone Fault Block V, the bottom sands of the Tar Zone Fault Block V, and the eastern edge of Fault Block IV in both the Upper Terminal and Lower Terminal Zones all show significant remaining oil saturation. Each area of interest was uncovered emphasizing a different type of reservoir characterization technique or practice. This was not the original strategy but was necessitated by the different levels of progress in each of the project activities.

Scott Walker; Chris Phillips; Roy Koerner; Don Clarke; Dan Moos; Kwasi Tagbor

2002-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

314

Sediment accumulation and carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus deposition in the large tropical reservoir Lake Kariba  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. In addition, mass balance calculations revealed that approximately 70% and 90% of incoming total N and P

Gilli, Adrian

315

Radon emanation and electric potential variations associated with transient deformation near reservoir lakes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... Two of the most often cited earthquake precursors are radon emanation and electric potential variations, but these few reported examples have generally been deemed ... few reported examples have generally been deemed questionable. If a mechanism relating crustal deformation to radon emanation or electrical signals does indeed exist, it is thought to involve fluids. Some ...

M. Trique; P. Richon; F. Perrier; J. P. Avouac; J. C. Sabroux

1999-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

316

GISbased modeling approach to estimate nitrogen loading and load reduction in lakes/ reservoirs with  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, crop cultivation areas, livestock populations, and atmospheric deposition. Nitrogen sources in Texas led to increases in energy and food production, use of fertilizer and animal manure, atmospheric

Yang, Zong-Liang

317

Trophic structure and avian communities across a salinity gradient in evaporation ponds of the San Francisco Bay estuary  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Commercial salt evaporation ponds comprise a large proportion of baylands adjacent to the San Francisco Bay, a highly urbanized estuary. In the past two centuries, more than 79% of the historic tidal wetlands ...

J. Y. Takekawa; A. K. Miles; D. H. Schoellhamer; N. D. Athearn…

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Trophic structure and avian communities across a salinity gradient in evaporation ponds of the San Francisco Bay estuary  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Commercial salt evaporation ponds comprise a large proportion of baylands adjacent to the San Francisco Bay, a highly urbanized estuary. In the past two centuries, more than 79% of the historic tidal wetlands ...

J. Y. Takekawa; A. K. Miles; D. H. Schoellhamer…

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Environmental assessment of coal ash ponds of thermal power plants in the south of the Russian Far East  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The results of environmental assessment of ash ponds of thermal power plants in Vladivostok and Khabarovsk are given. High radioactivity of coal in the Russian Far East is responsible ... accumulation of radionuc...

V. P. Zvereva; L. T. Krupskaya

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

The absorption chiller in large scale solar pond cooling design with condenser heat rejection in the upper convecting zone  

SciTech Connect

The possibility of using solar ponds as low-cost solar collectors combined with commercial absorption chillers in large scale solar cooling design is investigated. The analysis is based on the combination of a steady-state solar pond mathematical model with the operational characteristics of a commercial absorption chiller, assuming condenser heat rejection in the upper convecting zone (U.C.Z.). The numerical solution of the nonlinear equations involved leads to results which relate the chiller capacity with pond design and environmental parameters, which are also employed for the investigation of the optimum pond size for a minimum capital cost. The derived cost per cooling kW for a 350 kW chiller ranges from about 300 to 500 $/kW cooling. This is almost an order of magnitude lower than using a solar collector field of evacuated tube type.

Tsilingiris, P.T. (Commercial Bank of Greece, Athens (Greece))

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lakes reservoirs ponds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Long-term changes in nitrogen loads of a stream in the vicinity of an earthen waste storage pond  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It is not sufficiently known for how long earthen waste storage ponds that are no more in use continue to affect surface water quality. In 2006, we carried out an investigation on the water quality and hydrolo...

T. Kato; H. Kuroda; H. Nakasone

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

The redox and iron-sulfide geochemistry of Salt Pond and the thermodynamic constraints on native magnetotactic bacteria  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Salt pond is a meromictic system with an outlet to the sea allowing denser seawater to occupy the monimolimnion while the mixolimnion has relatively low salinity and is the site of greater mixing and microbial activity. ...

Canovas, Peter A

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Salt Lake Community College | .EDUconnections  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SLCC Partners with DOE's Rocky Mountain Solar Training Program This program is a joint partnership between DOE's Solar Energy Technogies Program, Salt Lake Community College, Solar Energy International, and the Utah Solar Energy Association that works to accelerate use of solar electric technologies, training and facilities at community and technical college solar training programs within a 15 western United States region. DOE Solar Instructor Training Network Salt Lake City, Utah DOE Applauds SLCC's Science and Technical Programs Architectural Technology Biology Biotechnology Biomanufacturing Chemistry Computer Science Electric Sector Training Energy Management Engineering Geographic Information Sciences Geosciences InnovaBio Manufacturing & Mechanical Engineering Technology

324

E-Print Network 3.0 - arsenic-rich soda lakes Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Clean Lakes DiagnosticFeasibility Study... For Clear Lake, California prepared for: Lake County Flood Control and Water Conservation District... Engineer Lake County Flood Control...

325

Colorado Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Colorado Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

326

Feasibility of waterflooding Soku E7000 gas-condensate reservoir  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We performed a simple 3D compositional reservoir simulation study to examine the possibility of waterflooding the Soku E7 gas-condensate reservoir. This study shows that water injection results in higher condensate recovery than natural depletion...

Ajayi, Arashi

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

327

Evaluating human fecal contamination sources in Kranji Reservoir Catchment, Singapore  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Singapore government through its Public Utilities Board is interested in opening Kranji Reservoir to recreational use. However, water courses within the Kranji Reservoir catchment contain human fecal indicator bacteria ...

Nshimyimana, Jean Pierre

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

U.S. Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves New Reservoir Discoveries...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) U.S. Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1...

329

Petroleum reservoir porosity versus depth: Influence of geological age  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...in late Carboniferous sandstone reservoirs, Bothamsall oilfield, E. Midlands: Journal of the Geological Society of...carbonate reservoir quality: Examples from Abu Dhabi and the Amu Darya Basin: Marine and Petroleum Geology, v.-15, p...

S. N. Ehrenberg; P. H. Nadeau; Ø. Steen

330

Optimal Hydropower Reservoir Operation with Environmental Requirements MARCELO ALBERTO OLIVARES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Optimal Hydropower Reservoir Operation with Environmental Requirements By MARCELO ALBERTO OLIVARES Engineering Optimal Hydropower Reservoir Operation with Environmental Requirements Abstract Engineering solutions to the environmental impacts of hydropower operations on downstream aquatic ecosystem are studied

Lund, Jay R.

331

FMI Borehole Geology, Geomechanics and 3D Reservoir Modeling...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geomechanics and 3D Reservoir Modeling Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: FMI Borehole Geology, Geomechanics and 3D Reservoir Modeling...

332

Reducing temperature uncertainties by stochastic geothermal reservoir modelling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......economically successful geothermal reservoirs. To this...An increased use of geothermal energy requires reliable estimates...exploration and development of geothermal reservoirs. Suitable...risk of failure and cost may be reduced and estimated......

C. Vogt; D. Mottaghy; A. Wolf; V. Rath; R. Pechnig; C. Clauser

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Optimizing Development Strategies to Increase Reserves in Unconventional Gas Reservoirs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

spacing in highly uncertain and risky unconventional gas reservoirs. To achieve the research objectives, an integrated reservoir and decision modeling tool that fully incorporates uncertainty was developed. Monte Carlo simulation was used with a fast...

Turkarslan, Gulcan

2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

334

Monitoring and Modeling Fluid Flow in a Developing EGS Reservoir  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Project objectives: Better understand and model fluid injection into a tight reservoir on the edges of a hydrothermal field. Use seismic data to constrain geomechanical/hydrologic/thermal model of reservoir.

335

Lake Tai: The limnology of a shallow lake in China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Lake Tai (Tai Hu) is located in the S part of the Yangtze River delta, has a surface area of 2,425 km2, a mean depth of 2.12 m, and a volume of 5.15 km3. The climate of the region is characterised by an average a...

Cheng-xi Shi; Rui-ju Liang

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

DOE/EA-1075 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT PROPOSED CASEY'S POND IMPROVEMENT PROJECT  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

75 75 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT PROPOSED CASEY'S POND IMPROVEMENT PROJECT MAY 1995 DISTRIBUTION OF THIS DOCUMENT I S UNLMlTED DOE /EA4075 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT PROPOSED CASEY'S POND IMPROVEMENT PROJECT DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied. or assumes any legal liability or respnsi- bility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Refer- ence herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark,

337

Miamisburg salt-gradient solar pond: mid-1980 status report. [For swimming pool heating  

SciTech Connect

The largest salt-gradient solar pond in the US was constructed by the City of Miamisburg, Ohio to provide heat for an outdoor swimming pool in the summer and an adjacent recreational building from October to December. The pond which occupies an area of 2020 m/sup 2/ was installed for $35/m/sup 2/ and is conservatively estimated to provide 1012 GJ/year (960 million Btu) at a cost of $6.80/GJ ($7.20/MBtu). During July to September 1979, 143.5 GJ (136 million Btu) of heat was utilized. Several unpredicted operational concerns have been noted related to corrosion of the metallic heat exchanger and the failure of selected seams in the plastic liner. Based upon two years of experience, suggestions are made to prevent or minimize these difficulties.

Wittenberg, L.J.; Harris, M.J.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Techniques of High Performance Reservoir Simulation for Unconventional Challenges  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

48 offshore Alaska 2010 5 high performance computing, execution of compositional simulation in parallel seems to be the apparently feasible way to tackle its computational demand. Although running reservoir simulation in parallel sounds extremely... attractive, developing an efficient parallel reservoir simulator is far more challenging than developing the underlying serial reservoir simulator. For decades there have remained many open problems associated with high performance computing and reservoir...

Wang, Yuhe

2013-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

339

State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA) Environmental Checklist Form 216-B-3 Expansion Ponds Closure Plan. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

The 216-B-3 Expansion Ponds Closure Plan (Revision 1) consists of a Part A Dangerous Waste Permit Application and a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Closure Plan. An explanation of the Part A submitted with this document is provided at the beginning of the Part A Section. The closure plan consists of nine chapters and five appendices. The 216-B-3 Pond System consists of a series of four earthen, unlined, interconnected ponds and the 216-B-3-3 Ditch that receive waste water from various 200 East Area operating facilities. These four ponds, collectively. Waste water (primarily cooling water, steam condensate, and sanitary water) from various 200 East Area facilities is discharged to the 216-B-3-3 Ditch. Water discharged to the 216-8-3-3 Ditch flows directly into the 216-B-3 Pond. In the past, waste water discharges to B Pond and the 216-B-3-3 Ditch contained mixed waste (radioactive waste and dangerous waste). The radioactive portion of mixed waste has been interpreted by the US Department of Energy (DOE) to be regulated under the Atomic Energy Act of 1954; the nonradioactive dangerous portion of mixed waste is regulated under RCRA. Mixed waste also may be considered a hazardous substance under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) when considering remediation of waste sites.

Not Available

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

K-Area and Par Pond Sewage Sludge Application Sites groundwater monitoring report, Third quarter 1992  

SciTech Connect

During third quarter 1992, the three wells at the K-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site (KSS wells) and the three wells at the Par Pond Sewage Sludge Application Site (PSS wells) were sampled for analyses required each quarter or annually by South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control Construction Permit 13,173 and for base-neutral/acid semivolatile constituents. None of the analytical results exceeded standards.

Thompson, C.Y.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lakes reservoirs ponds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Numerical-Model Investigation of the Hydrothermal Regime of a Straight-Through Shallow Cooling Pond  

SciTech Connect

A mathematic model based on solution of hydrodynamics and heat-transfer equations by the finite-element method is constructed to predict the hydrothermal regime of a straight-through shallow cooling pond, which provides cooling circulating water to a repository of spent nuclear fuel. Numerical experiments made it possible to evaluate the influence exerted by wind conditions and flow rate of water in the river on the temperature of the circulating water.

Sokolov, A. S. [JSC 'VNIIG im. B. E. Vedeneeva' (Russian Federation)] [JSC 'VNIIG im. B. E. Vedeneeva' (Russian Federation)

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

342

Semi-analytical solutions for multilayer reservoirs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, we develop, validate, and present five new approximate solutions for the case of a multilayer reservoir system - these solutions are: [ Solution p[wDj(tD)] Description 1 a[j] Constant p[wDj(tD)] Case 2 a[j tD] Linear p[wDj(tD)] Zero...

Lolon, Elyezer Pabibak

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

343

STIMULATION AND RESERVOIR ENGINEERING OF GEOTHERMAL RESOURCXS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

STIMULATION AND RESERVOIR ENGINEERING OF GEOTHERMAL RESOURCXS Henry J. Ramey, Jr., and A. Louis. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67 Stanford Geothermal Project Reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69 Papers Presented a t the Second United Nations Symposium on t h e Development and Use of Geothermal Resources, May 19-29, 1975, San

Stanford University

344

Fourteenth workshop geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings  

SciTech Connect

The Fourteenth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering was held at Stanford University on January 24--26, 1989. Major areas of discussion include: (1) well testing; (2) various field results; (3) geoscience; (4) geochemistry; (5) reinjection; (6) hot dry rock; and (7) numerical modelling. For these workshop proceedings, individual papers are processed separately for the Energy Data Base.

Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.; Horne, R.N.; Miller, F.G.; Brigham, W.E.; Cook, J.W.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Fourteenth workshop geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings  

SciTech Connect

The Fourteenth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering was held at Stanford University on January 24--26, 1989. Major areas of discussion include: (1) well testing; (2) various field results; (3) geoscience; (4) geochemistry; (5) reinjection; (6) hot dry rock; and (7) numerical modelling. For these workshop proceedings, individual papers are processed separately for the Energy Data Base.

Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.; Horne, R.N.; Miller, F.G.; Brigham, W.E.; Cook, J.W.

1989-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

346

Underground natural gas storage reservoir management  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this study is to research technologies and methodologies that will reduce the costs associated with the operation and maintenance of underground natural gas storage. This effort will include a survey of public information to determine the amount of natural gas lost from underground storage fields, determine the causes of this lost gas, and develop strategies and remedial designs to reduce or stop the gas loss from selected fields. Phase I includes a detailed survey of US natural gas storage reservoirs to determine the actual amount of natural gas annually lost from underground storage fields. These reservoirs will be ranked, the resultant will include the amount of gas and revenue annually lost. The results will be analyzed in conjunction with the type (geologic) of storage reservoirs to determine the significance and impact of the gas loss. A report of the work accomplished will be prepared. The report will include: (1) a summary list by geologic type of US gas storage reservoirs and their annual underground gas storage losses in ft{sup 3}; (2) a rank by geologic classifications as to the amount of gas lost and the resultant lost revenue; and (3) show the level of significance and impact of the losses by geologic type. Concurrently, the amount of storage activity has increased in conjunction with the net increase of natural gas imports as shown on Figure No. 3. Storage is playing an ever increasing importance in supplying the domestic energy requirements.

Ortiz, I.; Anthony, R.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Type curve analysis for naturally fractured reservoirs (infinite-acting reservoir case): a new approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

analysis methods are sometimes inconclusive for pressure transient analysis of wells completed in naturally fractured reservoirs. This is due to wellbore storage effects which mask the early time "straight-line" that is expected on the semilog plot...

Angel Restrepo, Juan Alejandro

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

348

Reservoir Simulation for Improving Water Flooding Performance in Low-Permeability Reservoirs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We studied the YSL oil field in Daqing, China with reservoir permeability 10-3 ?m2 that has been developed by water flooding. From the results of a preliminary estimate ... we have used as the basis for numerical...

Huiying Zhong; Hongjun Yin

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Maximizing output from oil reservoirs without water breakthrough  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Maximizing output from oil reservoirs without water breakthrough S.K. Lucas School of Mathematics, revised May 2003, published 45(3), 2004, 401­422 Abstract Often in oil reservoirs a layer of water lies, for example, Muskat [8], Bear [1]). When oil is removed from the reservoir by an oil well, it will generate

Lucas, Stephen

350

Parallel Finite Element Simulation of Tracer Injection in Oil Reservoirs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Parallel Finite Element Simulation of Tracer Injection in Oil Reservoirs Alvaro L.G.A. Coutinho In this work, parallel finite element techniques for the simulation of tracer injection in oil reservoirs. Supercomputers have made it possible to consider global reservoir effects which can not be represented using

Coutinho, Alvaro L. G. A.

351

Genesis field, Gulf of Mexico: Recognizing reservoir compartments on geologic and production time scales in deep-water reservoirs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Factors for the Pleistocene Reservoirs of Genesis Field Reservoir EOD Reserves (MMBOE) Recovery Factor () Drive Mechanism Completions...49-63 Weak water drive 5 All completions are fracture packed. EOD environment of deposition. Table 2 Cumulative Production and...

Michael L. Sweet; Larry T. Sumpter

352

K-Area and Par Pond Sewage Sludge Application Sites groundwater monitoring report: Second quarter 1993  

SciTech Connect

During second quarter 1993, samples from the three monitoring wells at the K-Area site (KSS series) and the three monitoring wells at the Par Pond site (PSS series) were analyzed for constituents required by South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control Construction Permit 13,173 and for other constituents as part of the Savannah River Site (SRS) Groundwater Monitoring Program. This report describes monitoring results that exceeded the final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) or the SRS flagging criteria. During second quarter 1993, no constituents exceeded the final PDWS or any other flagging criteria at the K-Area and Par Pond Sewage Sludge Application Sites. During first quarter 1993, aluminum and iron exceeded the SRS Flag 2 criteria in one or more of the KSS and the PSS wells. These constituents were not analyzed second quarter 1993. In the KSS well series, the field measurement for alkalinity ranged as high as 35 mg/L in well KSS 1D. Alkalinity measurements were zero in the PSS wells, except for a single measurement of 1 mg/L in well PSS 1D. Historical and current water-level elevations at the K-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site indicate that the groundwater flow direction is south to southwest (SRS grid coordinates). The groundwater flow direction at the Par Pond Sewage Sludge Application Site could not be determined second quarter 1993.

Not Available

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Characterization and reservoir evaluation of a hydraulically fractured, shaly gas reservoir  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Shaly Gas Reservoir. ( December 1991 ) Cesar Alfonso Santiago Molina, Ingeniero de Petroleos, Universidad Nacional de Colombia; Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Steven W. Poston Shale content in reservoir rocks affect their petrophysical properties... for their support. The author also wishes to express his deepest appreciation to Dr. H. Chen for all the help and suggestions he made in this study. The author expresses his gratitude to every one in Empresa Colombiana de Petroleos, Ecopetrol, who made possible...

Santiago Molina, Cesar Alfonso

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Solar Lakes and Solar Energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... It is worth estimating the magnitude of the energy that can be extracted from the stable layer of such a lake. Por presented ... the depth of 125 cm as the top of that layer. Now the fraction of solar radiation which penetrates unabsorbed below a water layer 125 cm thick2 is about 30 per ...

J. NEUMANN

1968-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

355

GREAT LAKES ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH LABORATORY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by the NOAA Environmental Research Laboratories, in any advertising or sales promotion which would indicate or indirectly the advertised product to be used or purchased because of this NOAA Environmental Research and dispersion of pollutants; surface waves and oscillation5-critical to lake transportation, boating

356

GREAT LAKES ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH LABORATORY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- cation furnished by the NOAA Environmental Re- search Laboratories, in any advertising or sales promo as its purpose an intent to cause directly or indirectly the advertised product to be used or purchased~sand an understanding of the transport and dispers~onof pollutants; surface waves and oscillations-critical to lake

357

GREAT LAKES ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH LABORATORY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by the NOAA Environmental Research Laboratories, in any advertising or sales promotion which would indicate directly or indirectly the advertised product to be used or purchased because of this NOAA Environmental of the transport and dispersion of pollutants; surface waves and oscillations-critical to lake transportation

358

Impact assessment of nuclear and thermal power plants on zooplankton in cooling ponds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The current state of assessment of nuclear and thermal power plant toxic effects on zooplankton entrained in ... particular emphasis is given to specific features of cooling reservoirs and their ecosystems. Compl...

N. V. Kartasheva; D. V. Fomin; A. V. Popov…

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Geotechnical studies of geothermal reservoirs | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geotechnical studies of geothermal reservoirs Geotechnical studies of geothermal reservoirs Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Geotechnical studies of geothermal reservoirs Details Activities (7) Areas (7) Regions (0) Abstract: It is proposed to delineate the important factors in the geothermal environment that will affect drilling. The geologic environment of the particular areas of interest are described, including rock types, geologic structure, and other important parameters that help describe the reservoir and overlying cap rock. The geologic environment and reservoir characteristics of several geothermal areas were studied, and drill bits were obtained from most of the areas. The geothermal areas studied are: (1) Geysers, California, (2) Imperial Valley, California, (3) Roosevelt Hot

360

Heavy oil reservoirs recoverable by thermal technology. Annual report  

SciTech Connect

This volume contains reservoir, production, and project data for target reservoirs which contain heavy oil in the 8 to 25/sup 0/ API gravity range and are susceptible to recovery by in situ combustion and steam drive. The reservoirs for steam recovery are less than 2500 feet deep to comply with state-of-the-art technology. In cases where one reservoir would be a target for in situ combustion or steam drive, that reservoir is reported in both sections. Data were collectd from three source types: hands-on (A), once-removed (B), and twice-removed (C). In all cases, data were sought depicting and characterizing individual reservoirs as opposed to data covering an entire field with more than one producing interval or reservoir. The data sources are listed at the end of each case. This volume also contains a complete listing of operators and projects, as well as a bibliography of source material.

Kujawa, P.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lakes reservoirs ponds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Multicomponent 3-D characterization of a coalbed methane reservoir  

SciTech Connect

Methane is produced from fractured coalbed reservoirs at Cedar Hill Field in the San Juan Basin. Fracturing and local stress are critical to production because of the absence of matrix permeability in the coals. Knowledge of the direction of open fractures, the degree of fracturing, reservoir pressure, and compartmentalization is required to understand the flow of fluids through the reservoir. A multicomponent 3-D seismic survey was acquired to aid in coalbed methane reservoir characterization. Coalbed reservoir heterogeneities, including isolated pressure cells, zones of increased fracture density, and variable fracture directions, have been interpreted through the analysis of the multicomponent data and integration with petrophysical and reservoir engineering studies. Strike-slip faults, which compartmentalize the reservoir, have been identified by structural interpretation of the 3-D P-wave seismic data. These faults form boundaries for pressure cells that have been identified by P-wave reflection amplitude anomalies.

Shuck, E.L. [Advance Geophysical Corp., Englewood, CO (United States)] [Advance Geophysical Corp., Englewood, CO (United States); Davis, T.L.; Benson, R.D. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States). Geophysics Dept.] [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States). Geophysics Dept.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Advanced reservoir characterization for improved oil recovery in a New Mexico Delaware basin project  

SciTech Connect

The Nash Draw Brushy Canyon Pool in Eddy County, New Mexico is a field demonstration site in the Department of Energy Class III program. The basic problem at the Nash Draw Pool is the low recovery typically observed in similar Delaware fields. By comparing a control area using standard infill drilling techniques to a pilot area developed using advanced reservoir characterization methods, the goal of the project is to demonstrate that advanced technology can significantly improve oil recovery. During the first year of the project, four new producing wells were drilled, serving as data acquisition wells. Vertical seismic profiles and a 3-D seismic survey were acquired to assist in interwell correlations and facies prediction. Limited surface access at the Nash Draw Pool, caused by proximity of underground potash mining and surface playa lakes, limits development with conventional drilling. Combinations of vertical and horizontal wells combined with selective completions are being evaluated to optimize production performance. Based on the production response of similar Delaware fields, pressure maintenance is a likely requirement at the Nash Draw Pool. A detailed reservoir model of pilot area was developed, and enhanced recovery options, including waterflooding, lean gas, and carbon dioxide injection, are being evaluated.

Martin, F.D.; Kendall, R.P.; Whitney, E.M. [Dave Martin and Associates, Inc., Socorro, NM (United States)] [and others

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Algal growth potentials and heavy-metal concentrations of the primary streams to upper Beaver Lake. Technical completion report  

SciTech Connect

Algal-growth potential was inhibited by heavy metals in upper Beaver Lake, Arkansas. Upper Beaver Lake receives water from three tributaries. One contains a small reservoir and the combined streams receive sewage input. Collections were made approximately monthly at eight sites for the Algal Assay Bottle Test (AABT) and heavy-metal analysis. In general, AABT results indicated that the collections above the sewage input were phosphorus-limited while those below were nitrogen- or combined nitrogen- and phosphorus-limited. Growth inhibition occurred during summer and early fall at various sites with greater inhibition at the confluence of the streams. No inhibitions occurred at the site below the sewage input. Heavy-metal concentrations had an overall tendency to increase downstream. Values within the small reservoir were 50-100% higher than in the feeder stream. Highest values of Pb were observed below the reservoir. SO/sub 4/, Cl, Mg, Ca, Na and K had high values during low flow in August-October. Mn, Pb, and Fe exceeded EPA-recommended standards for drinking water.

Meyer, R.L.; Green, W.R.; Steele, K.F.; Wickliff, D.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Development of reservoir simulator for hydraulically fractured gas wells in noncontinuous lenticular reservoirs  

SciTech Connect

A mathematical model is presented which forms the basis for a reservoir simulator that can be used to assist in the interpretation and prediction of the performance of hydraulically fractured gas wells completed in the western tight sands area. The model represents a first step in developing a reservoir simulator that can be used as an exploration tool and to analyze proposed gas well tests and future production trends in noncontinuous sand lense formations which are representative of the tight gas sands located in the Rocky Mountain gas provinces. The model developed consists of the necessary mathematical equations to simulate both reservoir and well performance under a variety of operating conditions. The equations developed are general in that they consider the following effects: (1) three-dimensional flow in the reservoir and one-dimensional flow in the fracture; (2) non-Darcy flow in the reservoir and fracture; (3) wellbore and fracture storage; (4) formation damage on the fracture face; (5) frictional pressure drop in the production string; (6) noncontinuous sand lenses; and (7) Klinkenberg effect. As a start toward the development of the final version of the desired reservoir simulator, a two-dimensional simulator was secured, placed on the computer, and debugged, and some test cases were run to ensure its validity. Using this simulator as a starting point, changes to reflect the effects of items 3 and 6 were made since it was believed these were the more important effects to consider at this stage of development. The development of an operational two-dimensional gas reservoir simulator was completed. Further work will be required to extend the simulator to three dimensions and incorporate all the changes reflected in items 1 to 6.

Evans, R.D.; Carroll, H.B. Jr.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Brackish water pond culture of fishes and their use as biological monitors of the water quality of thermal effluent from a power station  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

designed temperature change (bT) in the cooling water is 11. 1 C. Ponds Adjacent to the discharge canal are 25 ponds (Fig. 2); 16 ponds were used in this study. Each pond had 0. 1 ha suxface area and was 82. 3 m long, 12. 2 m wide, 1. 5 m deep... FIANT CEGAR RAVOU TRINITY BAY ~ 0 . . 000 ?' 8 OGLl II 0 Kll 0 'll El 9'll . 0 LI 0 GALVESTON BAY ll 'll ' I E RA 5 90 MAF AREA GULF OF MEXICO 9 SG Figure 1. --Map showing location of power plant and research facilities. DRAINAGE...

Kaehler, Todd

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Quantification of Libby Reservoir Levels Needed to Maintain or Enhance Reservoir Fisheries, 1983-1987 Methods and Data Summary.  

SciTech Connect

Libby Reservoir was created under an International Columbia River Treaty between the United States and Canada for cooperative water development of the Columbia River Basin. The authorized purpose of the dam is to provide power, flood control, and navigation and other benefits. Research began in May 1983 to determine how operations of Libby dam impact the reservoir fishery and to suggest ways to lessen these impacts. This study is unique in that it was designed to accomplish its goal through detailed information gathering on every trophic level in the reservoir system and integration of this information into a quantitative computer model. The specific study objectives are to: quantify available reservoir habitat, determine abundance, growth and distribution of fish within the reservoir and potential recruitment of salmonids from Libby Reservoir tributaries within the United States, determine abundance and availability of food organisms for fish in the reservoir, quantify fish use of available food items, develop relationships between reservoir drawdown and reservoir habitat for fish and fish food organisms, and estimate impacts of reservoir operation on the reservoir fishery. 115 refs., 22 figs., 51 tabs.

Chisholm, Ian

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Enhancing Reservoir Management in the Appalach  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reservoir Management in the Appalachian Basin by Identifying Technical Reservoir Management in the Appalachian Basin by Identifying Technical Barrier and Preferred Practices Final Report Reporting Period Start Date: September 1, 2001 Reporting Period End Date: September 15, 2003 Principal Author(s): Ronald R. McDowell Khashayar Aminian Katharine L. Avary John M. Bocan Michael Ed. Hohn Douglas G. Patchen September 2003 DE-FC26-01BC15273 West Virginia University Research Corporation West Virginia Geological and Economic Survey (subcontractor) ii DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus,

368

Chapter 5 - Coal Composition and Reservoir Characterization  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Coal consists of organic and mineral matter. Fixed carbon from organic matter measures the energy output of coal during combustion. Mineral matter determines how coal responds to combustion and affects reservoir porosity and permeability. Minerals infill pores, cleats, or fractures and replace the organic composition of coal. Organic composition is grouped into maceral association as microlithotypes and macrolithotypes, the latter for megascopic field descriptions (e.g. coal cores and mine face). Coal composition controls reservoir properties such as gas adsorption capacity, gas content, porosity, and permeability. Permeability is important to gas transport from coal matrix pores to the production well. Coal permeability is a function of the width, length, and height of cleats or fractures as well as the aperture, spacing, frequency or density, and connectivity of cleats or fractures. Coal cleats or fractures formed during burial, compaction, and coalification (endogenetic) and after coalification during deformation, uplift, and erosion of the basin of deposition.

Romeo M. Flores

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Salinity routing in reservoir system modeling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.......................39 Figure 3.6 Sulfate concentration at Seymour gauge observed by USGS..........................39 Figure 3.7 TDS concentration at Richmond gauge observed by USGS............................40 Figure 3.8 Chloride concentration at Richmond... and three major upper reservoirs in the Brazos River Basin.......36 Figure 3.4 TDS concentration at Seymour gauge observed by USGS..............................38 Figure 3.5 Chloride concentration at Seymour gauge observed by USGS...

Ha, Mi Ae

2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

370

Lake Winds | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Winds Winds Jump to: navigation, search Name Lake Winds Facility Lake Winds Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Consumers Energy Developer Consumers Energy Energy Purchaser Consumers Energy Location Ludington MI Coordinates 43.83972728°, -86.38154984° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.83972728,"lon":-86.38154984,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

371

NAWS-China Lake Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

g g y g y S S C C NAWS NAWS - - China Lake China Lake Working with the Local Utility Working with the Local Utility Mark Shvartzman Mark Shvartzman Project Manager, Southern California Edison Project Manager, Southern California Edison Presented at the November FUPWG Meeting Presented at the November FUPWG Meeting November 18, 2009 November 18, 2009 1 1 g E t bli h d i 1998 d Ad i Fili 1358 E History of SCE's UESC Program History of SCE's UESC Program History of SCE s UESC Program History of SCE s UESC Program * Background - Edison developed Energy Related Services (ERS) to assist Federal customers in identifying and implementing energy efficiency and renewable energy projects at government owned and/or managed facilities within Southern California Edison service territory - Established in 1998 under Advice Filing 1358-E

372

NORTHWESTERN LAKES OF THE UNITED STATES: BIO-LOGICAL AND CHEMICAL STUDIES WITH REFERENCE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

102 102 103 103 Lakes in western Washington-Continued. Lake Stevens, Wash . Swan Lake, Wash . Lake '" . Lakes in California and Oregon . Crater Lake, Oreg .. Temperatures .. Net plankton '" . Fallen Leaf LakeNORTHWESTERN LAKES OF THE UNITED STATES: BIO- LOGICAL AND CHEMICAL STUDIES WITH REFERENCE

373

Spirit Lake Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Spirit Lake Wind Farm Spirit Lake Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Spirit Lake Wind Farm Facility Spirit Lake Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Spirit Lake School Developer Minnesota Windpower Energy Purchaser Alliant/IES Utilities Location Spirit Lake IA Coordinates 43.411381°, -95.10075° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.411381,"lon":-95.10075,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

374

Lake Region State College | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

College College Jump to: navigation, search Name Lake Region State College Facility Lake Region State College Sector Wind energy Facility Type Community Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Lake Region State College Developer Lake Region State College Energy Purchaser Lake Region State College Location Devils Lake ND Coordinates 48.166071°, -98.864529° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":48.166071,"lon":-98.864529,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

375

ORIGINAL ARTICLE The paleolimnology of Haynes Lake, Oak Ridges Moraine,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ORIGINAL ARTICLE The paleolimnology of Haynes Lake, Oak Ridges Moraine, Ontario, Canada-Verlag 2012 Abstract Haynes Lake is a small kettle lake located on the Oak Ridges Moraine, and is within

Patterson, Timothy

376

FAYETTEVILLE GREEN LAKE, NEW YORK. V. STUDIES OF ...  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Green Lake, N.Y., was estimated to be 290 g C/m', .... chemical data for Fayetteville Green Lake .... Green Lake, Spectrum of light energy reaching the chemo-.

2000-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

377

Stratification and horizontal exchange in Lake Victoria, East ... - ASLO  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

energy budgets derived from local meteorological stations and two reanalysis products, address whether ... surface energy budget and wind drive the hydrodynamics of Lake Victoria ...... Laurentian Great Lakes region: Implementation of a lake.

2014-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

378

2011 Annual Industrial Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site's Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond  

SciTech Connect

This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (LA 000161 01, Modification B), for the wastewater land application site at the Idaho National Laboratory Site's Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond from November 1, 2010 through October 31, 2011. The report contains the following information: Facility and system description Permit required effluent monitoring data and loading rates Groundwater monitoring data Status of compliance activities Noncompliance and other issues Discussion of the facility's environmental impacts During the 2011 permit year, approximately 166 million gallons of wastewater were discharged to the Cold Waste Pond. This is well below the maximum annual permit limit of 375 million gallons. As shown by the groundwater sampling data, sulfate and total dissolved solids concentrations are highest near the Cold Waste Pond and decrease rapidly as the distance from the Cold Waste Pond increases. Although concentrations of sulfate and total dissolved solids are elevated near the Cold Waste Pond, both parameters were below the Ground Water Quality Rule Secondary Constituent Standards in the down gradient monitoring wells.

Mike Lewis

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Disparities in Salt Lake County and Salt Lake City Mortgage Outcomes and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

who applied for Salt Lake County properties selected West Valley. · As the overall application volume). · Over 54 percent of all Salt Lake County mortgage applications from 2006 to 2011 were for homes in West Valley, unincorporated areas, West Jordan, and Salt Lake City. For Hispanic/Latino applicants

Feschotte, Cedric

380

Development of the Great Lakes Ice-circulation Model (GLIM): Application to Lake Erie in 20032004  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

due to strong cooling and wind mixing. Prediction of the lake's ice extent (i.e., ice coverDevelopment of the Great Lakes Ice-circulation Model (GLIM): Application to Lake Erie in 2003: Received 4 May 2009 Accepted 30 November 2009 Communicated by Dr. Ram Yerubandi Index words: Coupled Ice

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lakes reservoirs ponds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Water Quality, Lake Sensitivity Ratings, and Septic Seepage Surveys of Six Lakes in the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;Water Quality, Lake Sensitivity Ratings, and Septic Seepage Surveys of Six Lakes in the Bridge 224 West Esplanade North Vancouver, B.C. V7M 3H7 #12;i TABLE OF CONTENTS TABLE OF CONTENTS)..................................................... 9 3.2 Bridge Lake

382

Advanced oil recovery technologies for improved recovery from slope basin clastic reservoirs, Nash Draw Brushy Canyon Pool, Eddy County, New Mexico. Annual report, September 25, 1995--September 24, 1996  

SciTech Connect

The basic driver for this project is the low recovery observed in Delaware reservoirs, such as the Nash Draw Pool (NDP). This low recovery is caused by low reservoir energy, less than optimum permeabilities and porosities, and inadequate reservoir characterization and reservoir management strategies which are typical of projects operated by independent producers. Rapid oil decline rates and high gas/oil ratios are typically observed in the first year of primary production. Based on the production characteristics that have been observed in similar Delaware fields, pressure maintenance is a likely requirement at the Nash Pool. Three basic constraints to producing the Nash Draw Brushy Canyon Reservoir are: (1) limited areal and interwell geologic knowledge, (2) lack of an engineering tool to evaluate the various producing strategies, and (3) limited surface access prohibiting development with conventional drilling. The limited surface access is caused by the proximity of underground potash mining and surface playa lakes. The objectives of this project are: (1) to demonstrate that a development drilling program and pressure maintenance program, based on advanced reservoir management methods, can significantly improve oil recovery compared with existing technology applications and (2) to transfer these advanced methodologies to oil and gas producers, especially in the Permian Basin.

Murphy, M.B.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Advanced Oil Recovery Technologies for Improved Recovery from Slope Basin Clastic Reservoirs, Nash Draw Brushy Canyon Pool, Eddy County, NM  

SciTech Connect

The Nash Draw Brushy Canyon Pool in Eddy County New Mexico was a cost-shared field demonstration project in the U.S. Department of Energy Class III Program. A major goal of the Class III Program was to stimulate the use of advanced technologies to increase ultimate recovery from slope-basin clastic reservoirs. Advanced characterization techniques were used at the Nash Draw Pool (NDP) project to develop reservoir management strategies for optimizing oil recovery from this Delaware reservoir. The objective of the project was to demonstrate that a development program, which was based on advanced reservoir management methods, could significantly improve oil recovery at the NDP. Initial goals were (1) to demonstrate that an advanced development drilling and pressure maintenance program can significantly improve oil recovery compared to existing technology applications and (2) to transfer these advanced methodologies to other oil and gas producers. Analysis, interpretation, and integration of recently acquired geological, geophysical, and engineering data revealed that the initial reservoir characterization was too simplistic to capture the critical features of this complex formation. Contrary to the initial characterization, a new reservoir description evolved that provided sufficient detail regarding the complexity of the Brushy Canyon interval at Nash Draw. This new reservoir description was used as a risk reduction tool to identify 'sweet spots' for a development drilling program as well as to evaluate pressure maintenance strategies. The reservoir characterization, geological modeling, 3-D seismic interpretation, and simulation studies have provided a detailed model of the Brushy Canyon zones. This model was used to predict the success of different reservoir management scenarios and to aid in determining the most favorable combination of targeted drilling, pressure maintenance, well stimulation, and well spacing to improve recovery from this reservoir. An Advanced Log Analysis technique developed from the NDP project has proven useful in defining additional productive zones and refining completion techniques. This program proved to be especially helpful in locating and evaluating potential recompletion intervals, which has resulted in low development costs with only small incremental increases in lifting costs. To develop additional reserves at lower costs, zones behind pipe in existing wells were evaluated using techniques developed for the Brushy Canyon interval. These techniques were used to complete uphole zones in thirteen of the NDP wells. A total of 14 recompletions were done: four during 1999, four during 2000, two during 2001, and four during 2002-2003. These workovers added reserves of 332,304 barrels of oil (BO) and 640,363 MCFG (thousand cubic feet of gas) at an overall weighted average development cost of $1.87 per BOE (barrel of oil equivalent). A pressure maintenance pilot project in a developed area of the field was not conducted because the pilot area was pressure depleted, and the reservoir in that area was found to be compartmentalized and discontinuous. Economic analyses and simulation studies indicated that immiscible injection of lean hydrocarbon gas for pressure maintenance was not warranted at the NDP and would need to be considered for implementation in similar fields very soon after production has started. Simulation studies suggested that the injection of miscible carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) could recover significant quantities of oil at the NDP, but a source of low-cost CO{sub 2} was not available in the area. Results from the project indicated that further development will be under playa lakes and potash areas that were beyond the regions covered by well control and are not accessible with vertical wells. These areas, covered by 3-D seismic surveys that were obtained as part of the project, were accessed with combinations of deviated/horizontal wells. Three directional/horizontal wells have been drilled and completed to develop reserves under surface-restricted areas and potash mines. The third

Mark B. Murphy

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

384

Why sequence Bacteria from Lake Washington?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

bacteria from Lake Washington? bacteria from Lake Washington? Previous collaborations between the University of Washington team and the DOE JGI involving both single genome and metagenomic sequencing have greatly enhanced the community's ability to explore the diversity of bacteria functionally active in metabolism of single carbon compounds, known as methylotrophs, isolated from Lake Washington (Seattle, Washington) sediment. Sequencing genomes of 50 methylotroph isolates from the Lake Washington will further enhance the methylotroph community knowledge database providing a much higher level of resolution of global (meta)transcriptomic and (meta)proteomic analyses, as well as species interaction studies, informing a better understanding of biogeochemical cycling of carbon and nitrogen.

385

Postglacial (Holocene) ostracodes from Lake Erie  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THE UNIVERSITY OF KANSAS PALEONTOLOGICAL CONTRIBUTIONS ABSTRACT Ten cores, collected by personnel on C. M. S. Porte Dauphine from the central and eastern basins of Lake Erie, were examined for ostracodes at the University of Kansas. The cores varied in length... OF STUDY AREA Lake Erie, one of the five Great Lakes, is approxi- mately 250 miles long and has a maximum width of nearly 60 miles. The major part of the lake is less than 30 meters in depth, but its maximum depth in the eastern basin is about 64 meters...

Benson, R. H.; MacDonald, H. C.

1963-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

A case study from Lake Matano, Indonesia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

local winds could generate sufficient energy to mix the water in the deep basins of Lake Matano. Methods. Sampling and storage—Sampling was conducted at a.

2007-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

387

SEISMIC DETERMINATION OF RESERVOIR HETEROGENEITY: APPLICATION TO THE CHARACTERIZATION OF HEAVY OIL RESERVOIRS  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the project was to examine how seismic and geologic data can be used to improve characterization of small-scale heterogeneity and their parameterization in reservoir models. The study focused on West Coalinga Field in California. The project initially attempted to build reservoir models based on different geologic and geophysical data independently using different tools, then to compare the results, and ultimately to integrate them all. We learned, however, that this strategy was impractical. The different data and tools need to be integrated from the beginning because they are all interrelated. This report describes a new approach to geostatistical modeling and presents an integration of geology and geophysics to explain the formation of the complex Coalinga reservoir.

Matthias G. Imhof; James W. Castle

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Novel Adsorbent-Reactants for Treatment of Ash and Scrubber Pond Effluents  

SciTech Connect

The overall goal of this project was to evaluate the ability of novel adsorbent/reactants to remove specific toxic target chemicals from ash and scrubber pond effluents while producing stable residuals for ultimate disposal. The target chemicals studied were arsenic (As(III) and As(V)), mercury (Hg(II)) and selenium (Se(IV) and Se(VI)). The adsorbent/reactants that were evaluated are iron sulfide (FeS) and pyrite (FeS{sub 2}). Procedures for measuring concentrations of target compounds and characterizing the surfaces of adsorbent-reactants were developed. Effects of contact time, pH (7, 8, 9, 10) and sulfate concentration (0, 1, 10 mM) on removal of all target compounds on both adsorbent-reactants were determined. Stability tests were conducted to evaluate the extent to which target compounds were released from the adsorbent-reactants when pH changed. Surface characterization was conducted with x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to identify reactions occurring on the surface between the target compounds and surface iron and sulfur. Results indicated that target compounds could be removed by FeS{sub 2} and FeS and that removal was affected by time, pH and surface reactions. Stability of residuals was generally good and appeared to be affected by the extent of surface reactions. Synthesized pyrite and mackinawite appear to have the required characteristics for removing the target compounds from wastewaters from ash ponds and scrubber ponds and producing stable residuals.

Bill Batchelor; Dong Suk Han; Eun Jung Kim

2010-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

389

Lake Charles, LA Natural Gas LNG Imports from Equatorial Guinea...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Lake Charles, LA Natural Gas LNG Imports from Equatorial Guinea (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Lake Charles, LA Natural Gas LNG Imports from Equatorial Guinea (Dollars per...

390

Ancient lakes: Their cultural and biological diversity (Hiroya ...  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

cichlid fishes in the East African Rift Valley lakes). In fact, ancient lakes contain the ... pods—Geary et al., Michel, Nishino, and Watanabe, West and. Michel; and

2001-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

391

Hyperspectral Imaging At Fish Lake Valley Area (Littlefield ...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fish Lake Valley Area (Littlefield & Calvin, 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Hyperspectral Imaging At Fish Lake Valley Area...

392

Pressure Temperature Log At Fish Lake Valley Area (DOE GTP) ...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fish Lake Valley Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Pressure Temperature Log At Fish Lake Valley Area (DOE GTP)...

393

Geothermometry At Fish Lake Valley Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fish Lake Valley Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermometry At Fish Lake Valley Area (DOE GTP) Exploration...

394

Thermochronometry At Fish Lake Valley Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fish Lake Valley Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermochronometry At Fish Lake Valley Area (DOE GTP) Exploration...

395

Obama Administration and Great Lakes States Announce Agreement...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

and Great Lakes States Announce Agreement to Spur Development of Offshore Wind Projects Obama Administration and Great Lakes States Announce Agreement to Spur Development of...

396

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- West Lake Landfill - MO...  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Lake Landfill - MO 05 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: West Lake Landfill (MO.05) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location: Evaluation Year: Site Operations: Site Disposition:...

397

Stepout-Deepening Wells At Medicine Lake Area (Warpinski, Et...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Home Exploration Activity: Stepout-Deepening Wells At Medicine Lake Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Medicine Lake Area Exploration Technique...

398

VALUE DISTRIBUTION ASSESSMENT OF GEOTHERMAL DEVELOPMENT IN LAKE COUNTY, CA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Eleven: Lake County Geothermal Energy Resource. . . .of Susanville, Susanville Geothermal Energy Project Workshopparts of the state. Geothermal energy is only one of Lake

Churchman, C.W.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Ambrosia Lake Mill Site...  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Surveillance Plan (LTSP) for the Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico Site. FACT SHEET Office of Legacy Management Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico, Disposal Site This fact sheet provides...

400

Cherokee Reservoir: supplement to factors affecting water quality in Cherokee Reservoir  

SciTech Connect

Several rates and/or measurements were assumed in preparation of the Factors Affecting Water Quality in Cherokee Reservoir report prepared by Iwanski, et al. (1980). The following discussions and data were generated to support future modeling efforts of Cherokee Reservoir water quality. These discussions are not wholly intended to define conclusions or new findings, but rather lend support to assumed parameters in the modeling effort. The data include: (1) long-term BOD analyses; (2) limiting nutrient studies algal assays; (3) phytoplankton biomass; (4) primary productivity; and (5) solids transport. 10 references, 3 figures, 5 tables. (ACR)

Poppe, W.L.

1981-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lakes reservoirs ponds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Steel Creek fish, L-Lake/Steel Creek Biological Monitoring Program, January 1986--December 1991  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River Site (SRS) encompasses 300 sq mi of the Atlantic Coastal plain in west-central South Carolina. The Savannah River forms the western boundary of the site. Five major tributaries of the Savannah River -- Upper Three Runs Creek, Four Mile Creek, Pen Branch, Steel Creek, and Lower Three Runs Creek -- drain the site. All but Upper Three Runs Creek receive, or in the past received, thermal effluents from nuclear production reactors. In 1985, L Lake, a 400-hectare cooling reservoir, was built on the upper reaches of Steel Creek to receive effluent from the restart of L-Reactor, and protect the lower reaches from thermal impacts. The lake has an average width of approximately 600 m and extends along the Steel Creek valley approximately 7000 m from the dam to the headwaters. Water level is maintained at a normal pool elevation of 58 m above mean sea level by overflow into a vertical intake tower that has multilevel discharge gates. The intake tower is connected to a horizontal conduit that passes through the dam and releases water into Steel Creek. The Steel Creek Biological Monitoring Program was designed to meet environmental regulatory requirements associated with the restart of L-Reactor and complements the Biological Monitoring Program for L Lake. This extensive program was implemented to address portions of Section 316(a) of the Clean Water Act. The Department of Energy (DOE) must demonstrate that the operation of L-Reactor will not significantly alter the established aquatic ecosystems.

Sayers, R.E. Jr.; Mealing, H.G. III [Normandeau Associates, Inc., New Ellenton, SC (United States)

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

FLUID STRATIGRAPHY OF THE COSO GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

FLUID STRATIGRAPHY OF THE COSO GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR FLUID STRATIGRAPHY OF THE COSO GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: FLUID STRATIGRAPHY OF THE COSO GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: A fluid model for the Coso geothermal reservoir is developed from Fluid Inclusion Stratigraphy (FIS) analyses. Fluid inclusion gas chemistry in well cuttings collected at 20 ft intervals is analyzed and plotted on well log diagrams. The working hypothesis is that select gaseous species and species ratios indicate areas of groundwater and reservoir fluid flow, fluid processes and reservoir seals. Boiling and condensate zones are distinguished. Models are created using cross-sections and fence diagrams. A thick condensate and boiling zone is indicated across the western portion

403

Fluid Stratigraphy and Permeable Zones of the Coso Geothermal Reservoir |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Stratigraphy and Permeable Zones of the Coso Geothermal Reservoir Stratigraphy and Permeable Zones of the Coso Geothermal Reservoir Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Fluid Stratigraphy and Permeable Zones of the Coso Geothermal Reservoir Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: A fence-diagram for the Coso geothermal reservoir is developed from Fluid Inclusion Stratigraphy (FIS) analyses. Fluid inclusion gas chemistry in well cuttings collected at 20 ft intervals is analyzed and plotted on well log diagrams. The working hypothesis is that select gaseous species and species ratios indicate areas of groundwater and reservoir fluid flow, fluid processes and reservoir seals. Boiling and condensate zones are distinguished. Permeable zones are indicated by a large change in

404

Borehole geophysics evaluation of the Raft River geothermal reservoir |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

reservoir reservoir Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Book: Borehole geophysics evaluation of the Raft River geothermal reservoir Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Borehole geophysics techniques were used in evaluating the Raft River geothermal reservoir to establish a viable model for the system. The assumed model for the hot water (145/sup 0/C) reservoir was a zone of higher conductivity, increased porosity, decreased density, and lower sonic velocity. It was believed that the long term contact with the hot water would cause alteration producing these effects. With this model in mind, cross-plots of the above parameters were made to attempt to delineate the reservoir. It appears that the most meaningful data include smoothed and

405

Using precision gravity data in geothermal reservoir engineering modeling studies  

SciTech Connect

Precision gravity measurements taken at various times over a geothermal field can be used to derive information about influx into the reservoir. Output from a reservoir simulation program can be used to compute surface gravity fields and time histories. Comparison of such computer results with field-measured gravity data can add confidence to simulation models, and provide insight into reservoir processes. Such a comparison is made for the Bulalo field in the Philippines.

Atkinson, Paul G.; Pederseen, Jens R.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Geothermal Reservoir Technology Research Program: Abstracts of selected research projects  

SciTech Connect

Research projects are described in the following areas: geothermal exploration, mapping reservoir properties and reservoir monitoring, and well testing, simulation, and predicting reservoir performance. The objectives, technical approach, and project status of each project are presented. The background, research results, and future plans for each project are discussed. The names, addresses, and telephone and telefax numbers are given for the DOE program manager and the principal investigators. (MHR)

Reed, M.J. (ed.)

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Oxygenation cost estimates for Cherokee, Douglas, and Norris reservoirs  

SciTech Connect

The capital and annual costs associated with reoxygenation of the turbine releases at Cherokee, Douglas and Norris Reservoirs using the small bubble injection technique developed for Ft. Patrick Henry Dam were computed. The weekly average dissolved oxygen (DO) deficits were computed for each reservoir for an average year (based on 16 years of records). The total annual cost of an oxygen supply and injection system for each reservoir is presented. 5 refs., 6 figs., 5 tabs.

Fain, T.G.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Analysis of a geopressured gas reservoir using solution plot method  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

dependent formation compressibility and water influx require extensive study of the reservoir core samples and aquifer characteristics that are not commonly conducted. Poston and Chen solved this problem by re-arranging the material balance equation... of water compressibility (c~) and formation compressibility (c/ ). Studies of geopressured gas reservoirs have shown such reservoirs to be generally associated with either interbedded shales and or an aquifer. Each of these conditions can provide...

Hussain, Syed Muqeedul

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Harvesting Ornamental Fish From Ponds1 Tina C. Crosby, Jeffrey E. Hill, Carlos V. Martinez, Craig A. Watson, Deborah B. Pouder, and Roy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FA-117 Harvesting Ornamental Fish From Ponds1 Tina C. Crosby, Jeffrey E. Hill, Carlos V. Martinez, ornamental fish are predominantly farmed in earthen ponds. Once fish reach marketable size and are ready and physical damage during harvesting (see UF IFAS Circular 919 Stress-Its Role in Fish Disease). Overall, col

Watson, Craig A.

410

Large Pond stocked with Bass Fenced in Swimming Pool and Hot Tub University of Tennessee Alumni RECONNECT Fun Day at New Caney, Texas May 4, 2013  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Large Pond stocked with Bass Fenced in Swimming Pool and Hot Tub University of Tennessee Alumni RECONNECT Family Fun Day!! AT THE ALLISONKREWE RANCH DISC GOLF, VOLLEYBALL, BASKETBALL SWIMMING POOL, FISHING POND HORSESHOES, POOL TABLE, AIR HOCKEY LADDER BALL, BAG TOSS, YARD DARTS MODEL ROCKETRY, OR JUST

Wang, Xiaorui "Ray"

411

Selecting a Method for Sealing Ponds in Florida1 Dorota Z. Haman, Allen G. Smajstrla, Fedro S. Zazueta, and Gary A. Clark2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

257) or, as some retention ponds in south Florida, created by building a dike around a water storage in South Florida are required on all new agricultural developments for runoff control, water quality control and a recharge of the shallow aquifer. In some cases, water from these ponds is also reused

Watson, Craig A.

412

The microbial flora of pond-reared shrimp (Penaeus stylirostris, P. setiferus, P. vannamei, and Macrobrachium rosenbergii)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) in the pond waters. Samples of P. setiferus and Macr btachdcm ~reenb 11 mere obtained f o pr feet lo- cations on the Pecos and. Rio Grande Rivers. Aerobic plate counts of fresh shrimp ranged from 1. 5 X 10 ? 2. 9 X 10 per gram. Coryneform bacteria... stored on ice for 1V eight days ranged from 5. 1-9. 4 X 10 . The microbial flora 2 of stored shrimp was dominated by coryneform bacteria, Pseudomonas, and Nicrococcus species. The aerobic plate counts of pond waters ranged from 6. 1 X 10 ? 2. 2 X 10...

Christopher, Frank Mitchell

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

413

OUTDOOR RECREATION DEMAND AND EXPENDITURES: LOWER SNAKE RIVER RESERVOIRS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

i OUTDOOR RECREATION DEMAND AND EXPENDITURES: LOWER SNAKE RIVER RESERVOIRS John R. Mc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . v SECTION ONE - OUTDOOR RECREATION DEMAND . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Recreation Demand Methods

O'Laughlin, Jay

414

5641_FrozenReservoirs | netl.doe.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

parallel to the structure. These fractures could play a major role in enhancing vertical permeability and vertical connectivity in a reservoir that is otherwise highly...

415

Field Algae Measurements Using Empirical Correlations at Deer Creek Reservoir.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Deer Creek Reservoir in Utah has a history of high algae concentrations. Despite recent nutrient reduction efforts, seasonal algae continue to present problems. Cost effective,… (more)

Stephens, Ryan A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Carbonation Mechanism of Reservoir Rock by Supercritical Carbon...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

the carbonation reaction mechanisms between supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) and reservoir rocks consisting of different mineralogical compositions in aqueous and...

417

Texas State Offshore Crude Oil + Lease Condensate New Reservoir...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 4102014 Next Release Date: 4302015 Referring Pages: Crude Oil plus Lease Condensate New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields...

418

California State Offshore Crude Oil + Lease Condensate New Reservoir...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 4102014 Next Release Date: 4302015 Referring Pages: Crude Oil plus Lease Condensate New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields...

419

,"New York Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New York Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million Barrels)",1,"Annual",2013...

420

,"Texas--State Offshore Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas--State Offshore Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million Barrels)",1,"Annual",2013...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lakes reservoirs ponds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Evaluation of testing and reservoir parameters in geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

testing and reservoir parameters in geothermal wells at Raft River and Boise, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Proceedings:...

422

Hydraulics and Well Testing of Engineered Geothermal Reservoirs...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hydraulics and Well Testing of Engineered Geothermal Reservoirs Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Hydraulics and Well Testing of...

423

Lower Watts Bar Reservoir Clinch River/Poplar Creek  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This document explains the cleanup activities and any use limitations for the land surrounding the Lower Watts Bar Reservoir Clinch River/Poplar Creek.

424

Three-dimensional Modeling of Fracture Clusters in Geeothermal Reservoirs  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Three-dimensional Modeling of Fracture Clusters in Geeothermal Reservoirs presentation at the April 2013 peer review meeting held in Denver, Colorado.

425

Reservoir-Scale Fracture Permeability in the Dixie Valley, Nevada...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Reservoir-Scale Fracture Permeability in the Dixie Valley, Nevada, Geothermal Field Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper:...

426

Monitoring and Modeling Fluid Flow in a Developing EGS Reservoir...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

More Documents & Publications Imaging, Characterizing, and Modeling of Fracture Networks and Fluid Flow in EGS Reservoirs Detection and Characterization of Natural...

427

Application of thermal depletion model to geothermal reservoirs...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

of thermal depletion model to geothermal reservoirs with fracture and pore permeability Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Proceedings:...

428

Fracture Evolution Following a Hydraulic Stimulation within an EGS Reservoir  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Fracture Evolution Following a Hydraulic Stimulation within an EGS Reservoir presentation at the April 2013 peer review meeting held in Denver, Colorado.

429

Dispersed Fluid Flow in Fractured Reservoirs- an Analysis of...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

correlations. Downhole measurements of the tracer response exiting from discrete fracture zones permit further characterization of reservoir fluid flow behavior. Tracer...

430

FLUID INCLUSION STRATIGRAPHY: NEW METHOD FOR GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

RESERVOIR ASSESSMENT PRELIMINARY RESULTS Abstract Fluid Inclusion Stratigraphy (FIS) is a new technique developed for the oil industry in order to map borehole fluids....

431

Methodologies for Reservoir Characterization Using Fluid Inclusion Gas Chemistry  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Methodologies for Reservoir Characterization Using Fluid Inclusion Gas Chemistry presentation at the April 2013 peer review meeting held in Denver, Colorado.

432

Prediction of coalbed methane reservoir performance with type curves.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Coalbed methane is an unconventional gas resource that consists of methane production from the coal seams. CBM reservoirs are dual-porosity systems that are characterized by… (more)

Bhavsar, Amol Bhaskar.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

WATERJETTING: A NEW DRILLING TECHNIQUE IN COALBED METHANE RESERVOIRS.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??WATERJETTING: A NEW DRILLING TECHNIQUE IN COALBED METHANE RESERVOIRS Applications of waterjeting to drill horizontal wells for the purpose of degassing coalbeds prior to mining… (more)

Funmilayo, Gbenga M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

,"U.S. Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves New Reservoir Discoveries...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic...

435

Impact of Langmuir isotherm on production behavior of CBM reservoirs.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Coalbed Methane is an unconventional gas resource that consists of methane production from the coal seams. CBM reservoir performance is also influenced by the interrelationship… (more)

Arrey, Efundem Ndipanquang.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

THMC Modeling of EGS Reservoirs ?Continuum through Discontinuum...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Evolution and Induced Seismicity Derek Elsworth Pennsylvania State University Chemistry, Reservoir and Integrated Models May 19, 2010 This presentation does not contain any...

437

Variations in dissolved gas compositions of reservoir fluids...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

A. E.; Copp, J. F. . 111991. Variations in dissolved gas compositions of reservoir fluids from the Coso geothermal field. Proceedings of () ; () : Sixteenth workshop on...

438

APPLICATION OF RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND ADVANCED TECHNOLOGY TO IMPROVE RECOVERY AND ECONOMICS IN A LOWER QUALITY SHALLOW SHELF SANANDRES RESERVOIR  

SciTech Connect

The Class 2 Project at West Welch was designed to demonstrate the use of advanced technologies to enhance the economics of improved oil recovery (IOR) projects in lower quality Shallow Shelf Carbonate (SSC) reservoirs, resulting in recovery of additional oil that would otherwise be left in the reservoir at project abandonment. Accurate reservoir description is critical to the effective evaluation and efficient design of IOR projects in the heterogeneous SSC reservoirs. Therefore, the majority of Budget Period 1 was devoted to reservoir characterization. Technologies being demonstrated include: (1) Advanced petrophysics; (2) Three-dimensional (3-D) seismic; (3) Crosswell bore tomography; (4) Advanced reservoir simulation; (5) Carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) stimulation treatments; (6) Hydraulic fracturing design and monitoring; (7) Mobility control agents.

Unknown

2003-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

439

Shear-slip analysis in multiphase fluid-flow reservoir engineering ap plications using TOUGH-FLAC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

IN MULTIPHASE FLUID-FLOW RESERVOIR ENGINEERING APPLICATIONSin multiphase fluid-flow reservoir-engineering applications.in multiphase fluid-flow reservoir engineering applications.

Rutqvist, Jonny; Birkholzer, Jens; Cappa, Frederic; Oldenburg, Curt; Tsang, Chin-Fu

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

CO2 gas/oil ratio prediction in a multi-component reservoir by combined seismic and electromagnetic imaging  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CO 2 flooding of an oil reservoir are inverted to producein a complex reservoir containing oil, water, hydrocarbonincluding oil, water and gas) and reservoir pressure. The

Hoversten, G.M.; Gritto, Roland; Washbourne, John; Daley, Tom

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lakes reservoirs ponds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

ARTHUR LAKES LIBRARY FACILITIES USE POLICY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

;Reservations for Meeting Space The Library makes selected meeting facilities available at no charge to CSM are currently maintained on a Trailhead calendar, called Library Space, accessible to Library staff. PoliciesARTHUR LAKES LIBRARY FACILITIES USE POLICY The Arthur Lakes Library's meeting areas are designed

442

Technical and economical aspects of solar desalination with particular emphasis on solar pond powered distillation plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Desalination remains an important and interesting application for the use of solar radiation as a source of undepletable energy. After almost a decade of research and development including the installation and testing of various smaller pilot systems, our solar desalination technology - among others - is now becoming available on a commercial level. The paper discusses the evolution of the technology both of the desalination and the collector-subsystems as a result of the technical and economical constraints associated with the utilization of solar energy, a highly fluctuating energy source of low surface density. Performance data is presented in particular for the coupling of a selfregulating MSF unit with a solar pond energy collection and storage system, both inhouse developments. The performance and layout data was obtained both from computer simulation and experimental results with a small sized solar pond and desalination subsystem in Switzerland. The economy assessment, which is presented for Middle East climate conditions, clearly demonstrates that solar desalination already becomes competitive for medium sized installation at remote locations. Potential further cost reductions also through upscaling may lead to the use of desalinated water for agricultural applications one day.

M. Posnansky

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Assessment of halite-cemented reservoir zones  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the techniques used to identify the presence and distribution of halite-cemented layers in a sandstone oil reservoir. The distribution of these layers in the wells was found by matching the core data with two independent halite identifiers from the well logs. Numerical well models were used to assess the dimensions and spatial distribution of the halite-cemented layers. Multiple simulation runs in which the spatial distribution, the dimensions, and the vertical permeability were varied resulted in a stochastic model that best matched the production history. Gas and water coning are retarded by the halite-cemented layers if the perforations are properly located.

Huurdeman, A.J.M.; Floris, F.J.T.; Lutgert, J.E. (TNO Inst. of Applied Geoscience (NL)); Breunese, J.N. (Geological Survey of the Netherlands (NL)); Al-Asbahl, A.M.S. (Ministry of Oil and Mineral Resources (YE))

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

PROCEEDINGS, Tenth Workshop on Geothe-1 Reservoir Engineering  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

utility company, gov- n 1 Proposed PGRF S l t e 2 Yellhead 3 Separator 4 C d Y S t i C Tanks 5 Power Plant 6 H p S Abatement 7 Cooling Tower 8 Detention Pond 9 S e t t l i n g...

445

The Lake Charles CCS Project  

SciTech Connect

The Lake Charles CCS Project is a large-scale industrial carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) project which will demonstrate advanced technologies that capture and sequester carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions from industrial sources into underground formations. Specifically the Lake Charles CCS Project will accelerate commercialization of large-scale CO{sub 2} storage from industrial sources by leveraging synergy between a proposed petroleum coke to chemicals plant (the LCC Gasification Project) and the largest integrated anthropogenic CO{sub 2} capture, transport, and monitored sequestration program in the U.S. Gulf Coast Region. The Lake Charles CCS Project will promote the expansion of EOR in Texas and Louisiana and supply greater energy security by expanding domestic energy supplies. The capture, compression, pipeline, injection, and monitoring infrastructure will continue to sequester CO{sub 2} for many years after the completion of the term of the DOE agreement. The objectives of this project are expected to be fulfilled by working through two distinct phases. The overall objective of Phase 1 was to develop a fully definitive project basis for a competitive Renewal Application process to proceed into Phase 2 - Design, Construction and Operations. Phase 1 includes the studies attached hereto that will establish: the engineering design basis for the capture, compression and transportation of CO{sub 2} from the LCC Gasification Project, and the criteria and specifications for a monitoring, verification and accounting (MVA) plan at the Hastings oil field in Texas. The overall objective of Phase 2, provided a successful competitive down-selection, is to execute design, construction and operations of three capital projects: (1) the CO{sub 2} capture and compression equipment, (2) a Connector Pipeline from the LLC Gasification Project to the Green Pipeline owned by Denbury and an affiliate of Denbury, and (3) a comprehensive MVA system at the Hastings oil field.

Doug Cathro

2010-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

446

A better understanding of a Uinta Basin channelized analog reservoir through geostatistics and reservoir simulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the behavior of channelized oil and gas reservoirs. Results show that the number of channels in the model can have a significant effect on performance. The rock properties in these channels and the channel paths are also important factors that determine...

Robbana, Enis

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

447

A petrophysics and reservoir performance-based reservoir characterization of Womack Hill (Upper Smackover) Field (Alabama)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as well as to optimize the operating practices in the field. We used a non-parametric regression algorithm (ACE) to develop correlations between the core and well log data. These correlations allow us to estimate reservoir permeability at the "flow unit...

Avila Urbaneja, Juan Carlos

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

448

Why sequence novel haloarchaea from Deep Lake?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

novel haloarchaea from Deep Lake? novel haloarchaea from Deep Lake? Antarctica's Deep Lake was isolated from the ocean by glaciers long ago, creating a salt water lake with a unique ecosystem for studying the evolution of marine microorganisms in harsh extremes. Among these microorganisms are haloarchaea, members of the halophile community which need high salt concentrations in order to grow. Haloarchaea are a distinct evolutionary branch of the Archaea, and are considered extremophiles. The haloarchaea from Deep Lake are naturally adapted to cold, nutrient-limited and high saline level conditions that would kill almost any other life. The enzymes in these naturally adapted microorganisms can provide insight into bioprospecting and bioengineering cold active and salt-adapted enzymes. Understanding how haloarchaea

449

Bingham Lake Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lake Wind Farm Lake Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Bingham Lake Wind Farm Facility Bingham Lake Wind Farm Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Edison Mission Group owns majority Developer Edison Mission Group Energy Purchaser Alliant Energy Location Bingham Lake MN Coordinates 43.909°, -95.0464° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.909,"lon":-95.0464,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

450

Search for ancient microorganisms in Lake Baikal  

SciTech Connect

Lake Baikal in Russia, the world's oldest and deepest continental lake lies in south central Siberia, near the border to Mongolia. The lake is 1,643 m deep and has an area of about 46,000 km2. It holds one-fifth of all the terrestrial fresh water on Earth. Lake Baikal occupies the deepest portion of the Baikal Rift Zone. It was formed some 30-45 million years ago. The isolated Lake Baikal ecosystem represents a unique niche in nature based on its historical formation. The microbial diversity present in this environment has not yet been fully harvested or examined for products and processes of commercial interest and value. Thus, the collection of water, soil, and sub-bottom sediment samples was decided to characterize the microbial diversity of the isolated strains and to screen the isolates for their biotechnological value.

Hunter-Cevera, Jennie C.; Repin, Vladimir E.; Torok, Tamas

2000-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

451

Application of integrated reservoir management and reservoir characterization to optimize infill drilling. Annual report, June 13, 1994--June 12, 1995  

SciTech Connect

This project has used a multi-disciplinary approach employing geology, geophysics, and engineering to conduct advanced reservoir characterization and management activities to design and implement an optimized infill drilling program at the North Robertson (Clearfork) Unit in Gaines County, Texas. The activities during the first Budget Period have consisted of developing an integrated reservoir description from geological, engineering, and geostatistical studies, and using this description for reservoir flow simulation. Specific reservoir management activities are being identified and tested. The geologically targeted infill drilling program will be implemented using the results of this work. A significant contribution of this project is to demonstrate the use of cost-effective reservoir characterization and management tools that will be helpful to both independent and major operators for the optimal development of heterogeneous, low permeability shallow-shelf carbonate (SSC) reservoirs. The techniques that are outlined for the formulation of an integrated reservoir description apply to all oil and gas reservoirs, but are specifically tailored for use in the heterogeneous, low permeability carbonate reservoirs of West Texas.

Pande, P.K.

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Twentieth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings  

SciTech Connect

PREFACE The Twentieth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering, dedicated to the memory of Professor Hank Ramey, was held at Stanford University on January 24-26, 1995. There were ninety-five registered participants. Participants came from six foreign countries: Japan, Mexico, England, Italy, New Zealand and Iceland. The performance of many geothermal reservoirs outside the United States was described in several of the papers. Professor Roland N. Horne opened the meeting and welcomed visitors to the campus. The key note speaker was Marshall Reed, who gave a brief overview of the Department of Energy's current plan. Thirty-two papers were presented in the technical sessions of the workshop. Technical papers were organized into eleven sessions concerning: field development, modeling, well tesubore, injection, geoscience, geochemistry and field operations. Session chairmen were major contributors to the workshop, and we thank: Ben Barker, Bob Fournier, Mark Walters, John Counsil, Marcelo Lippmann, Keshav Goyal, Joel Renner and Mike Shook. In addition to the technical sessions, a panel discussion was held on ''What have we learned in 20 years?'' Panel speakers included Patrick Muffler, George Frye, Alfred Truesdell and John Pritchett. The subject was further discussed by Subir Sanyal, who gave the post-dinner speech at the banquet. The Workshop was organized by the Stanford Geothermal Program faculty, staff, and graduate students. We wish to thank our students who operated the audiovisual equipment. Shaun D. Fitzgerald Program Manager

None

1995-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

453

Rabi multi-sector reservoir simulation model  

SciTech Connect

To ensure optimum ultimate recovery of the 46 meter thick oil rim of the Rabi Field in Gabon, a full field simulation model was required. Due to it`s size and complexity, with local cusping, coning and geological circumstances dominating individual well behavior, a single full field model would be too large for existing hardware. A method was developed to simulate the full field with 5 separate sector models, whilst allowing the development in one sector model to have an effect on the boundary conditions of another sector. In this manner, the 13 x 4.5 km field could be simulated with a horizontal well spacing down to 175 meter. This paper focuses on the method used to attach single 3-phase tank cells to a sector simulation grid in order to represent non-simulated parts of the field. It also describes the history matching methodology and how to run a multisector model in forecasting mode. This method can be used for any reservoir, where size and complexity require large reservoir simulation models that normally could not be modeled within the constraints of available computer facilities. Detailed studies can be conducted on specific parts of a field, whilst allowing for dynamic flow and pressure effects caused by the rest of the field.

Bruijnzeels, C.; O`Halloran, C.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

454

Reservoir permeability from seismic attribute analysis  

SciTech Connect

In case of porous fluid-saturated medium the Biot's poroelasticity theory predicts a movement of the pore fluid relative to the skeleton on seismic wave propagation through the medium. This phenomenon opens an opportunity for investigation of the flow properties of the hydrocarbon-saturated reservoirs. It is well known that relative fluid movement becomes negligible at seismic frequencies if porous material is homogeneous and well cemented. In this case the theory predicts an underestimated seismic wave velocity dispersion and attenuation. Based on Biot's theory, Helle et al. (2003) have numerically demonstrated the substantial effects on both velocity and attenuation by heterogeneous permeability and saturation in the rocks. Besides fluid flow effect, the effects of scattering (Gurevich, et al., 1997) play very important role in case of finely layered porous rocks and heterogeneous fluid saturation. We have used both fluid flow and scattering effects to derive a frequency-dependent seismic attribute which is proportional to fluid mobility and applied it for analysis of reservoir permeability.

Silin, Dmitriy; Goloshubin, G.; Silin, D.; Vingalov, V.; Takkand, G.; Latfullin, M.

2008-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

455

Sixth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings  

SciTech Connect

INTRODUCTION TO THE PROCEEDINGS OF THE SIXTH GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING WORKSHOP, STANFORD GEOTHERMAL PROGRAM Henry J. Ramey, Jr., and Paul Kruger Co-Principal Investigators Ian G. Donaldson Program Manager Stanford Geothermal Program The Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering convened at Stanford University on December 16, 1980. As with previous Workshops the attendance was around 100 with a significant participation from countries other than the United States (18 attendees from 6 countries). In addition, there were a number of papers from foreign contributors not able to attend. Because of the success of all the earlier workshops there was only one format change, a new scheduling of Tuesday to Thursday rather than the earlier Wednesday through Friday. This change was in general considered for the better and will be retained for the Seventh Workshop. Papers were presented on two and a half of the three days, the panel session, this year on the numerical modeling intercomparison study sponsored by the Department of Energy, being held on the second afternoon. This panel discussion is described in a separate Stanford Geothermal Program Report (SGP-TR42). This year there was a shift in subject of the papers. There was a reduction in the number of papers offered on pressure transients and well testing and an introduction of several new subjects. After overviews by Bob Gray of the Department of Energy and Jack Howard of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, we had papers on field development, geopressured systems, production engineering, well testing, modeling, reservoir physics, reservoir chemistry, and risk analysis. A total of 51 papers were contributed and are printed in these Proceedings. It was, however, necessary to restrict the presentations and not all papers printed were presented. Although the content of the Workshop has changed over the years, the format to date has proved to be satisfactory. The objectives of the Workshop, the bringing together of researchers, engineers and managers involved in geothermal reservoir study and development and the provision of a forum for the prompt and open reporting of progress and for the exchange of ideas, continue to be met . Active discussion by the majority of the participants is apparent both in and outside the workshop arena. The Workshop Proceedings now contain some of the most highly cited geothermal literature. Unfortunately, the popularity of the Workshop for the presentation and exchange of ideas does have some less welcome side effects. The major one is the developing necessity for a limitation of the number of papers that are actually presented. We will continue to include all offered papers in the Summaries and Proceedings. As in the recent past, this sixth Workshop was supported by a grant from the Department of Energy. This grant is now made directly to Stanford as part of the support for the Stanford Geothermal Program (Contract No. DE-AT03-80SF11459). We are certain that all participants join us in our appreciation of this continuing support. Thanks are also due to all those individuals who helped in so many ways: The members of the program committee who had to work so hard to keep the program to a manageable size - George Frye (Aminoil USA), Paul G. Atkinson (Union Oil Company). Michael L. Sorey (U.S.G.S.), Frank G. Miller (Stanford Geothermal Program), and Roland N. Horne (Stanford Geothermal Program). The session chairmen who contributed so much to the organization and operation of the technical sessions - George Frye (Aminoil USA), Phillip H. Messer (Union Oil Company), Leland L. Mink (Department of Energy), Manuel Nathenson (U.S.G.S.), Gunnar Bodvarsson (Oregon State University), Mohindar S. Gulati (Union Oil Company), George F. Pinder (Princeton University), Paul A. Witherspoon (Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory), Frank G. Miller (Stanford Geothermal Program) and Michael J. O'Sullivan (Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory). The many people who assisted behind the scenes, making sure that everything was prepared and organized - in particular we would like to t

Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P. (eds.)

1980-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

456

Methods and systems using encapsulated tracers and chemicals for reservoir interrogation and manipulation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus, method, and system of reservoir interrogation. A tracer is encapsulating in a receptacle. The receptacle containing the tracer is injected into the reservoir. The tracer is analyzed for reservoir interrogation.

Roberts, Jeffery; Aines, Roger D; Duoss, Eric B; Spadaccini, Christopher M

2014-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

457

Integrated Hydraulic Fracture Placement and Design Optimization in Unconventional Gas Reservoirs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Unconventional reservoir such as tight and shale gas reservoirs has the potential of becoming the main source of cleaner energy in the 21th century. Production from these reservoirs is mainly accomplished through engineered hydraulic fracturing...

Ma, Xiaodan

2013-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

458

A Hierarchical Multiscale Approach to History Matching and Optimization for Reservoir Management in Mature Fields  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reservoir management typically focuses on maximizing oil and gas recovery from a reservoir based on facts and information while minimizing capital and operating investments. Modern reservoir management uses history-matched simulation model...

Park, Han-Young

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

459

Fracture Modeling and Flow Behavior in Shale Gas Reservoirs Using Discrete Fracture Networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fluid flow process in fractured reservoirs is controlled primarily by the connectivity of fractures. The presence of fractures in these reservoirs significantly affects the mechanism of fluid flow. They have led to problems in the reservoir which...

Ogbechie, Joachim Nwabunwanne

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

460

Thermo-Poroelastic Modeling of Reservoir Stimulation and Microseismicity Using Finite Element Method with Damage Mechanics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Stress and permeability variations around a wellbore and in the reservoir are of much interest in petroleum and geothermal reservoir development. Water injection causes significant changes in pore pressure, temperature, and stress in hot reservoirs...

Lee, Sang Hoon

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lakes reservoirs ponds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Flood Operation Rules for a Single Reservoir Licheng Dong  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, University of California - Davis 2012-12-12 Abstract This paper examines the theoretical behavior ecosystems. 2. Simple Inflow Hydrographs Three main factors affect the reservoir's inflow flood volume and peak outflow (Ergish, 2010): 1) inflow hydrograph volume and shape; 2) controllable reservoir storage

Lund, Jay R.

462

General inflow performance relationship for solution-gas reservoir wells  

SciTech Connect

Two equations are developed to describe the inflow performance relationship (IPR) of wells producing from solution-gas drive reservoirs. These are general equations (extensions of the currently available IPR's) that apply to wells with any drainage-area shape at any state of completion flow efficiency and any stage of reservoir depletion. 7 refs.

Dias-Couto, L.E.; Golan, M.

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

WestVirginiaUniversity SPE 65675 Reservoir Characterization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to measure effective porosity (MPHI) and irreducible water saturation (MBVI) in the reservoir rock to accurately characterize effective porosity, fluid saturation and permeability. WestVirginiaUniversity #12WestVirginiaUniversity SPE 65675 SPE 65675 Reservoir Characterization Through Synthetic Logs Shahab

Mohaghegh, Shahab

464

Resolution of reservoir scale electrical anisotropy from marine CSEM data  

SciTech Connect

A combination of 1D and 3D forward and inverse solutions is used to quantify the sensitivity and resolution of conventional controlled source electromagnetic (CSEM) data collected using a horizontal electric dipole source to transverse electrical anisotropy located in a deep-water exploration reservoir target. Since strongly anisotropic shale layers have a vertical resistivity that can be comparable to many reservoirs, we examine how CSEM can discriminate confounding shale layers through their characteristically lower horizontal resistivity. Forward modeling demonstrates that the sensitivity to reservoir level anisotropy is very low compared to the sensitivity to isotropic reservoirs, especially when the reservoir is deeper than about 2 km below the seabed. However, for 1D models where the number of inversion parameters can be fixed to be only a few layers, both vertical and horizontal resistivity of the reservoir can be well resolved using a stochastic inversion. We find that the resolution of horizontal resistivity increases as the horizontal resistivity decreases. We show that this effect is explained by the presence of strong horizontal current density in anisotropic layers with low horizontal resistivity. Conversely, when the reservoir has a vertical to horizontal resistivity ratio of about 10 or less, the current density is vertically polarized and hence has little sensitivity to the horizontal resistivity. Resistivity anisotropy estimates from 3D inversion for 3D targets suggest that resolution of reservoir level anisotropy for 3D targets will require good a priori knowledge of the background sediment conductivity and structural boundaries.

Brown, V.; Hoversten, G.M.; Key, K.; Chen, J.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Evidence for an Ancient Osmium Isotopic Reservoir in Earth  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...ophiolites in the Klamath mountains have extremely...ancient platinum group element reservoir...Oregon Josephine Creek Klamath Mountains mass spectra...platinum platinum group plutonic rocks...ophiolites in the Klamath mountains have extremely...ancient platinum group element reservoir...

Anders Meibom; Robert Frei

2002-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

466

SEDIMENTATION OF THE PANAMA CANAL RESERVOIR: COSMOGENIC NUCLIDE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SEDIMENTATION OF THE PANAMA CANAL RESERVOIR: COSMOGENIC NUCLIDE ESTIMATES OF BACKGROUND SEDIMENT, Livermore, CA 94550 The Panama Canal is an engineering marvel. Vital to the operation of the canal, the reservoir to the Panama Canal. In addition to water, the headwater basins supply sediment that reduces

Nichols, Kyle K.

467

Gradient-based Methods for Production Optimization of Oil Reservoirs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gradient-based Methods for Production Optimization of Oil Reservoirs Eka Suwartadi Doctoral Thesis oil reservoirs. Gradient- based optimization, which utilizes adjoint-based gradient computation optimization for water flooding in the secondary phase of oil recovery is the main topic in this thesis

Foss, Bjarne A.

468

Halite depositional facies in a solar salt pond: A key to interpreting physical energy and water depth in ancient deposits  

SciTech Connect

Subaqueous deposits of aragonite, gypsum, and halite are accumulating in shallow solar salt ponds constructed in the Pekelmeer, a sea-level salina on Bonaire, Netherlands Antilles. Several halite facies are deposited in the crystallizer ponds in response to difference in water depth and wave energy. Cumulate halite, which originates as floating rafts, is present only along the protected, upwind margins of ponds where low-energy conditions foster their formation and preservation. Cornet crystals with peculiar mushroom- and mortarboard-shaped caps precipitate in centimetre-deep brine sheets within a couple of metres of the upwind or low-energy margins. Downwind from these margins, cornet and chevron halite precipitate on the pond floors in water depths ranging from a few centimetres to {approximately} 60 cm. Halite pisoids with radial-concentric structure are precipitated in the swash zone along downwind high-energy shorelines where they form pebbly beaches. This study suggests that primary halite facies are energy and/or depth dependent and that some primary features, if preserved in ancient halite deposits, can be used to infer physical energy conditions, subenvironments such as low- to high-energy shorelines, and extremely shallow water depths in ancient evaporite basins.

Handford, C.R. (ARCO Oil and Gas Co., Plano, TX (USA))

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Using mathematical modelling to inform on the ability of stormwater ponds to improve the water quality of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, a retention pond's permanent pool of water provides the sort of conditions that allows pollutants to degrade that is achieved by the mixing of the inflow with the water in the permanent pool; and (b) how sensitive) that is based on the following equation that describes the conservation of volume of water: dV dt ¼ Qi 2 Qo ð1�

Heal, Kate

470

Category:Houghton-Lake, MI | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Houghton-Lake, MI Houghton-Lake, MI Jump to: navigation, search Go Back to PV Economics By Location Media in category "Houghton-Lake, MI" The following 16 files are in this category, out of 16 total. SVFullServiceRestaurant Houghton-Lake MI Detroit Edison Co.png SVFullServiceRestauran... 64 KB SVHospital Houghton-Lake MI Detroit Edison Co.png SVHospital Houghton-La... 64 KB SVLargeHotel Houghton-Lake MI Detroit Edison Co.png SVLargeHotel Houghton-... 61 KB SVLargeOffice Houghton-Lake MI Detroit Edison Co.png SVLargeOffice Houghton... 64 KB SVMediumOffice Houghton-Lake MI Detroit Edison Co.png SVMediumOffice Houghto... 61 KB SVMidriseApartment Houghton-Lake MI Detroit Edison Co.png SVMidriseApartment Hou... 65 KB SVOutPatient Houghton-Lake MI Detroit Edison Co.png SVOutPatient Houghton-...

471

Physical model of a fractured reservoir | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

model of a fractured reservoir model of a fractured reservoir Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Physical model of a fractured reservoir Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The objectives of the physical modeling effort are to: (1) evaluate injection-backflow testing for fractured reservoirs under conditions of known reservoir parameters (porosity, fracture width, etc.); (2) study the mechanisms controlling solute transport in fracture systems; and (3) provide data for validation of numerical models that explicitly simulate solute migration in fracture systems. The fracture network is 0.57-m wide, 1.7-m long, and consists of two sets of fractures at right angles to one another with a fracture spacing of 10.2 cm. A series of

472

Characterization of geothermal reservoir crack patterns using shear-wave  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

geothermal reservoir crack patterns using shear-wave geothermal reservoir crack patterns using shear-wave splitting Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Characterization of geothermal reservoir crack patterns using shear-wave splitting Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Microearthquakes recorded by a downhole, three-component seismic network deployed around the Coso, California, geothermal reservoir since 1992 display distinctive shear-wave splitting and clear polarization directions. From the polarizations the authors estimated three predominant subsurface fracture directions, and from the time delays of the split waves they determined tomographically the 3-D fracture density distribution in the reservoir. Author(s): Lou, M.; Rial, J.A. Published: Geophysics, 3/1/1997

473

Tectonic setting of the Coso geothermal reservoir | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tectonic setting of the Coso geothermal reservoir Tectonic setting of the Coso geothermal reservoir Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Tectonic setting of the Coso geothermal reservoir Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Coso geothermal reservoir is being developed in Sierran-type crystalline bedrock of the Coso Mountains, a small desert mountain range just to the east of the Sierra Nevada and Rose Valley, which is the southern extension of the Owens Valley of eastern California Optimum development of this reservoir requires an understanding of the fracture hydrology of the Coso Mountains crystalline terrain and its hydrologic connection to regional groundwater and thermal sources. An interpreted, conceptually balanced regional cross section that extends from the Sierra

474

Dams and Reservoirs Safety Act (South Carolina) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Dams and Reservoirs Safety Act (South Carolina) Dams and Reservoirs Safety Act (South Carolina) Dams and Reservoirs Safety Act (South Carolina) < Back Eligibility Utility Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Institutional Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State South Carolina Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control The Dams and Reservoirs Safety Act provides for the certification and inspection of dams in South Carolina and confers regulatory authority on the Department of Health and Environmental Control. Owners of dams and reservoirs are responsible for maintaining the safety of the structures,

475

Integrated Seismic Studies At The Rye Patch Geothermal Reservoir, Nevada |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Seismic Studies At The Rye Patch Geothermal Reservoir, Nevada Seismic Studies At The Rye Patch Geothermal Reservoir, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Book: Integrated Seismic Studies At The Rye Patch Geothermal Reservoir, Nevada Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: A 3-D surface seismic reflection survey, covering an area of over 3 square miles, was conducted at the Rye Patch geothermal reservoir (Nevada) to explore the structural features that may control geothermal production in the area. In addition to the surface sources and receivers, a high-temperature three-component seismometer was deployed in a borehole at a depth of 3900 ft within the basement below the reservoir, which recorded the waves generated by all surface sources. A total of 1959 first-arrival travel times were determined out of 2134 possible traces. Two-dimensional

476

Geothermal Reservoir Assessment Case Study, Northern Basin and Range  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Reservoir Assessment Case Study, Northern Basin and Range Reservoir Assessment Case Study, Northern Basin and Range Province, Northern Dixie Valley, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Geothermal Reservoir Assessment Case Study, Northern Basin and Range Province, Northern Dixie Valley, Nevada Abstract N/A Authors Elaine J. Bell, Lawrence T. Larson and Russell W. Juncal Published U.S. Department of Energy, 1980 Report Number GLO2386 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Geothermal Reservoir Assessment Case Study, Northern Basin and Range Province, Northern Dixie Valley, Nevada Citation Elaine J. Bell,Lawrence T. Larson,Russell W. Juncal. 1980. Geothermal Reservoir Assessment Case Study, Northern Basin and Range Province,

477

Opportunities to improve oil productivity in unstructured deltaic reservoirs  

SciTech Connect

This report contains presentations presented at a technical symposium on oil production. Chapter 1 contains summaries of the presentations given at the Department of Energy (DOE)-sponsored symposium and key points of the discussions that followed. Chapter 2 characterizes the light oil resource from fluvial-dominated deltaic reservoirs in the Tertiary Oil Recovery Information System (TORIS). An analysis of enhanced oil recovery (EOR) and advanced secondary recovery (ASR) potential for fluvial-dominated deltaic reservoirs based on recovery performance and economic modeling as well as the potential resource loss due to well abandonments is presented. Chapter 3 provides a summary of the general reservoir characteristics and properties within deltaic deposits. It is not exhaustive treatise, rather it is intended to provide some basic information about geologic, reservoir, and production characteristics of deltaic reservoirs, and the resulting recovery problems.

Not Available

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Energy transport between two pure-dephasing reservoirs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A pure-dephasing reservoir acting on an individual quantum system induces loss of coherence without energy exchange. When acting on composite quantum systems, dephasing reservoirs can lead to a radically different behavior. Transport of energy between two pure-dephasing markovian reservoirs is predicted in this work. They are connected through a chain of coupled sites. The baths are kept in thermal equilibrium at distinct temperatures. Quantum coherence between sites is generated in the steady-state regime and results in the underlying mechanism sustaining the effect. A quantum model for the reservoirs is a necessary condition for the existence of stationary energy transport. A microscopic derivation of the non-unitary system-bath interaction is employed, valid in the ultrastrong inter-site coupling regime. The model assumes that each site-reservoir coupling is local.

T. Werlang; D. Valente

2014-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

479

Property:AvgReservoirDepth | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AvgReservoirDepth AvgReservoirDepth Jump to: navigation, search Property Name AvgReservoirDepth Property Type Quantity Description Average depth to reservoir Use this type to express a quantity of length. The default unit is the meter (m). Acceptable units (and their conversions) are: Meters - 1 m, meter, meters Meter, Meters, METER, METERS Kilometers - 0.001 km, kilometer, kilometers, Kilometer, Kilometers, KILOMETERS, KILOMETERS Miles - 0.000621371 mi, mile, miles, Mile, Miles, MILE, MILES Feet - 3.28084 ft, foot, feet, Foot, Feet, FOOT, FEET Yards - 1.09361 yd, yard, yards, Yard, Yards, YARD, YARDS Pages using the property "AvgReservoirDepth" Showing 24 pages using this property. A Amedee Geothermal Area + 213 m0.213 km 0.132 mi 698.819 ft 232.939 yd + B Beowawe Hot Springs Geothermal Area + 850 m0.85 km

480

Lithology and alteration mineralogy of reservoir rocks at Coso Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lithology and alteration mineralogy of reservoir rocks at Coso Geothermal Lithology and alteration mineralogy of reservoir rocks at Coso Geothermal Area, California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Lithology and alteration mineralogy of reservoir rocks at Coso Geothermal Area, California Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Coso is one of several high-temperature geothermal systems associated with recent volcanic activity in the Basin and Range province. Chemical and fluid inclusion data demonstrate that production is from a narrow, asymmetric plume of thermal water that originates from a deep reservoir to the south and then flows laterally to the north. Geologic controls on the geometry of the upwelling plume were investigated using petrographic and analytical analyses of reservoir rock and vein material.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lakes reservoirs ponds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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481

Reviving Abandoned Reservoirs with High-Pressure Air Injection: Application in a Fractured and Karsted Dolomite Reservoir  

SciTech Connect

Despite declining production rates, existing reservoirs in the United States contain vast volumes of remaining oil that is not being effectively recovered. This oil resource constitutes a huge target for the development and application of modern, cost-effective technologies for producing oil. Chief among the barriers to the recovery of this oil are the high costs of designing and implementing conventional advanced recovery technologies in these mature, in many cases pressure-depleted, reservoirs. An additional, increasingly significant barrier is the lack of vital technical expertise necessary for the application of these technologies. This lack of expertise is especially notable among the small operators and independents that operate many of these mature, yet oil-rich, reservoirs. We addressed these barriers to more effective oil recovery by developing, testing, applying, and documenting an innovative technology that can be used by even the smallest operator to significantly increase the flow of oil from mature U.S. reservoirs. The Bureau of Economic Geology and Goldrus Producing Company assembled a multidisciplinary team of geoscientists and engineers to evaluate the applicability of high-pressure air injection (HPAI) in revitalizing a nearly abandoned carbonate reservoir in the Permian Basin of West Texas. The Permian Basin, the largest oil-bearing basin in North America, contains more than 70 billion barrels of remaining oil in place and is an ideal venue to validate this technology. We have demonstrated the potential of HPAI for oil-recovery improvement in preliminary laboratory tests and a reservoir pilot project. To more completely test the technology, this project emphasized detailed characterization of reservoir properties, which were integrated to access the effectiveness and economics of HPAI. The characterization phase of the project utilized geoscientists and petroleum engineers from the Bureau of Economic Geology and the Department of Petroleum Engineering (both at The University of Texas at Austin) to define the controls on fluid flow in the reservoir as a basis for developing a reservoir model. The successful development of HPAI technology has tremendous potential for increasing the flow of oil from deep carbonate reservoirs in the Permian Basin, a target resource that can be conservatively estimated at more than 1.5 billion barrels. Successful implementation in the field chosen for demonstration, for example, could result in the recovery of more than 34 million barrels of oil that will not otherwise be produced. Geological and petrophysical analysis of available data at Barnhart field reveals the following important observations: (1) the Barnhart Ellenburger reservoir is similar to most other Ellenburger reservoirs in terms of depositional facies, diagenesis, and petrophysical attributes; (2) the reservoir is characterized by low to moderate matrix porosity much like most other Ellenburger reservoirs in the Permian Basin; (3) karst processes (cave formation, infill, and collapse) have substantially altered stratigraphic architecture and reservoir properties; (4) porosity and permeability increase with depth and may be associated with the degree of karst-related diagenesis; (5) tectonic fractures overprint the reservoir, improving overall connectivity; (6) oil-saturation profiles show that the oil-water contact (OWC) is as much as 125 ft lower than previous estimations; (7) production history and trends suggest that this reservoir is very similar to other solution-gas-drive reservoirs in the Permian Basin; and (8) reservoir simulation study showed that the Barnhart reservoir is a good candidate for HPAI and that application of horizontal-well technology can improve ultimate resource recovery from the reservoir.

Robert Loucks; Stephen C. Ruppel; Dembla Dhiraj; Julia Gale; Jon Holder; Jeff Kane; Jon Olson; John A. Jackson; Katherine G. Jackson

2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

482

Simulation study to investigate development options for a super-heavy oil reservoir.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A reservoir simulation study was performed on a heavy oil reservoir with the main objective of evaluating possible development options beyond the existing cold production… (more)

Diaz Franco, Jose Manuel

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Sizing of a hot dry rock reservoir from a hydraulic fracturing experiment  

SciTech Connect

Hot dry rock (HDR) reservoirs do not lend themselves to the standard methods of reservoir sizing developed in the petroleum industry such as the buildup/drawdown test. In a HDR reservoir the reservoir is created by the injection of fluid. This process of hydraulic fracturing of the reservoir rock usually involves injection of a large volume (5 million gallons) at high rates (40BPM). A methodology is presented for sizing the HDR reservoir created during the hydraulic fracturing process. The reservoir created during a recent fracturing experiment is sized using the techniques presented. This reservoir is then investigated for commercial potential by simulation of long term power production. 5 refs., 7 figs.

Zyvoloski, G.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

U.S. Federal Offshore Crude Oil + Lease Condensate New Reservoir...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Million Barrels) U.S. Federal Offshore Crude Oil + Lease Condensate New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0...

485

U.S. Federal Offshore Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million Barrels) U.S. Federal Offshore Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

486

E-Print Network 3.0 - ardross reservoir gridblock Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

sections. Reservoir Reservoir gridblock Idealized gridblockSingle matrix block Fracture Matrix 12;SPE... gridblocks is applied for ... Source: Arbogast, Todd - Center for...

487

Sensitivity analysis of modeling parameters that affect the dual peaking behaviour in coalbed methane reservoirs.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Coalbed methane reservoir (CBM) performance is controlled by a complex set of reservoir, geologic, completion and operational parameters and the inter-relationships between those parameters. Therefore… (more)

Okeke, Amarachukwu Ngozi

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

EVALUATION OF PERFORMANCE OF CYCLIC STEAM INJECTION IN NATURALLY FRACTURED RESERVOIRS – AN ARTIFICIAL NEURAL NETWORK APPLICATION.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??With increasing demand on oil, it is important to improve the recovery factor of oil reservoirs. Naturally fractured reservoirs constitute a major portion of world’s… (more)

Chintalapati, Santosh Phani Bhushan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

GEOTHERMAL EXPLORATION ASSESSMENT AND INTERPRETATION, KLAMATH BASIN, OREGON-SWAN LAKE AND KLAMATH HILLS AREA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

survey of the Swan Lake Valley area, Oregon: Geonornicssurvey of the Swan Lake Valley Area, Oregon: GeonomicsKLAMATH BASIN, OREGON SWAN LAKE AND KLAMATH HILLS AREA M.

Stark, M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

GEOTHERMAL EXPLORATION ASSESSMENT AND INTERPRETATION, KLAMATH BASIN, OREGON-SWAN LAKE AND KLAMATH HILLS AREA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

KLAMATH BASIN, OREGON SWAN LAKE AND KLAMATH HILLS AREA M.survey of the Swan Lake Valley area, Oregon: Geonornicssurvey of the Swan Lake Valley Area, Oregon: Geonomics

Stark, M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

E-Print Network 3.0 - alkaline saline lakes Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Chemical and physical properties of some saline lakes in Alberta and Saskatchewan Jeff S Bowman* and Julian... and ephemeral athalassohaline lakes. These lakes...

492

The physics of the warming of Lake Tanganyika by climate change  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... increased the density stratification and stability of Lake Tanganyika, a deep rift valley lake. ... Lakes warm through increased incoming long-wave radiation.

493

GHG Emissions from Hydropower Reservoirs The role of hydropower reservoirs in contributing to greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions is poorly  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GHG Emissions from Hydropower Reservoirs The role of hydropower reservoirs in contributing to greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions is poorly understood, but recent studies have indicated that GHG emissions; and over 5 weeks in August--September, the peak GHG emission period, during 2012. (Pacific Northwest

494

Lake-effect snowfall in Western New York and surface temperatures of Lakes Erie and Ontario  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

during the 1976-77 winter (Alverson, 1977). Through an examination of weather records, Dewey (1977) points out that numerous paralyzing lake-effect storms have struck the Buffalo area over the years. The occurrence of such storms is far from unusual... LAKE-EFPECT SNOWFALL IN WESTERN NFW YORK AND SURFACE TEMPERATURF. S OF LAKES ERIE AND ONTARIO A Thesis by WILLIAM AGRELLA Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree...

Agrella, William

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

495

Post-Closure RCRA Groundwater Monitoring Plan for the 216-S-10 Pond and Ditch  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this plan is to provide a post-closure groundwater monitoring program for the 216-S-10 Pond and Ditch (S-10) treatment, storage, and/or disposal (TSD) unit. The plan incorporates the sum of knowledge about the potential for groundwater contamination to originate from the S-10, including groundwater monitoring results, hydrogeology, and operational history. The S-10 has not received liquid waste since October 1991. The closure of S-10 has been coordinated with the 200-CS-1 source operable unit in accordance with the Tri-Party Agreement interim milestones M-20-39 and M-15-39C. The S-10 is closely situated among other waste sites of very similar operational histories. The proximity of the S-10 to the other facilities (216-S-17 pond, 216-S-11 Pond, 216-S-5,6 cribs, 216-S-16 ditch and pond, and 216-U-9 ditch) indicate that at least some observed groundwater contamination beneath and downgradient of S-10 could have originated from waste sites other than S-10. Hence, it may not be feasible to strictly discriminate between the contributions of each waste site to groundwater contamination beneath the S-10. A post-closure groundwater monitoring network is proposed that will include the drilling of three new wells to replace wells that have gone dry. When completed, the revised network will meet the intent for groundwater monitoring network under WAC 173-303-645, and enable an improved understanding of groundwater contamination at the S-10. Site-specific sampling constituents are based on the dangerous waste constituents of concern relating to RCRA TSD unit operations (TSD unit constituents) identified in the Part A Permit Application. Thus, a constituent is selected for monitoring if it is: A dangerous waste constituent identified in the Part A Permit Application, or A mobile decomposition product (i.e., nitrate from nitrite) of a Part A constituent, or A reliable indicator of the site-specific contaminants (i.e., specific conductance). Using these criteria, the following constituent list and sampling schedule is proposed: Constituent; Sampling Frequency Site-Specific Parameters; Hexavalent chromium (a); Semiannual Chloride; Semiannual Fluoride; Semiannual Nitrate; Semiannual Nitrite; Semiannual Specific conductance (field)(a); Semiannual Ancillary Parameters; Anions; Annual Alkalinity Annual Metals, (in addition to chromium); Annual pH (field) Semiannual Temperature (field); Semiannual Turbidity (field) Semiannual (a). These constituents will be subject to statistical tests after background is established. It will be necessary to install new monitoring wells and accumulate background data on the groundwater from those wells before statistical comparisons can be made. Until then, the constituents listed above will be evaluated by tracking and trending concentrations in all wells and comparing these results with the corresponding DWS or Hanford Site background concentration for each constituent. If a comparison value (background or DWS) for a constituent is exceeded, DOE will notify Ecology per WAC 173-303-645 (9) (g) requirements (within seven days or a time agreed to between DOE and Ecology).

Barnett, D BRENT.; Williams, Bruce A.; Chou, Charissa J.; Hartman, Mary J.

2006-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

496

The culture of some marine fishes in ponds receiving heated discharge water from a power plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and sampled to determine survival, growth, condition, and for saltmarsh species reproduction: bay anchovy, Anchoa 'tch'lll (Valenc' nnes); h epshead m'n ow, ~Cr' r t Led:*oc'tfth, Gb ff'1(a'Md Gt d); a'lf' molly, P '1'a~tt' 'n (L ); lfd wats 'Iv 'd, M 'd...' beryl)'n (C p ); Pl 'da p p, P ht t 1 (Lf );Atl t' k, ~Mt d lt (L' 1; bl kd om, P~ac 's (Id eos); reddr, ~dc' n* o ll t (L' ): t 'p d list, ~Mtt ~ht 11 LITERATURE REVIEW Pond culture of fish has been going on for centuries virtually throughout...

Luebke, Richard William

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

497

Ground water impact assessment report for the 216-B-3 Pond system  

SciTech Connect

Ground water impact assessments were required for a number of liquid effluent receiving sites according to the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order Milestones M-17-00A and M-17-00B, as agreed upon by the US Department of Energy. This report is one of the last three assessments required and addresses the impact of continued discharge of uncontaminated wastewater to the 216-B-3C expansion lobe of the B Pond system in the 200 East Area until June 1997. Evaluation of past and projected effluent volumes and composition, geohydrology of the receiving site, and contaminant plume distribution patterns, combined with ground water modeling, were used to assess both changes in ground water flow regime and contaminant-related impacts.

Johnson, V.G.; Law, A.G.; Reidel, S.P.; Evelo, S.D.; Barnett, D.B.; Sweeney, M.D.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

498

Inventory of Ponds in the Brazos and Colorado River (Texas) Drainages, from NASA Color Infrared Photography.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, we decided to carry out the stepwise regression on the densi ty of each of the different size 7 '0 c o :; u cu -LL 1.5 A. All Ponds 1.2 6. 0.9 ? ? 6. ?????? 6. ??? ? ?? ? eI ?? .. , .. ., ..... O... FRMX FRMX POPD POPD FRMX FRMX R2 0.125 0.206 0.262 0.296 0.313 0.321 0.324 0.352 0.372 PROB) F 0.0026 0.0004 0.0002 0.0001 0.0002 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 * Underlined variables were significant at ex = 20.05. Doubly underlined variables...

Clark, William J.; Springer, Timothy A.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

499

Naturally fractured tight gas reservoir detection optimization  

SciTech Connect

The goal of the work this quarter has been to partition and high-grade the Greater Green River basin for exploration efforts in the Upper Cretaceous tight gas play and to initiate resource assessment of the basin. The work plan for the quarter of July 1-September 30, 1998 comprised three tasks: (1) Refining the exploration process for deep, naturally fractured gas reservoirs; (2) Partitioning of the basin based on structure and areas of overpressure; (3) Examination of the Kinney and Canyon Creek fields with respect to the Cretaceous tight gas play and initiation of the resource assessment of the Vermilion sub-basin partition (which contains these two fields); and (4) Initiation analysis of the Deep Green River Partition with respect to the Stratos well and assessment of the resource in the partition.

NONE

1998-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

500

Naturally fractured tight gas reservoir detection optimization  

SciTech Connect

Building upon the partitioning of the Greater Green River Basin (GGRB) that was conducted last quarter, the goal of the work this quarter has been to conclude evaluation of the Stratos well and the prototypical Green River Deep partition, and perform the fill resource evaluation of the Upper Cretaceous tight gas play, with the goal of defining target areas of enhanced natural fracturing. The work plan for the quarter of November 1-December 31, 1998 comprised four tasks: (1) Evaluation of the Green River Deep partition and the Stratos well and examination of potential opportunity for expanding the use of E and P technology to low permeability, naturally fractured gas reservoirs, (2) Gas field studies, and (3) Resource analysis of the balance of the partitions.

NONE

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z