Sample records for lakes reservoirs ponds

  1. Sealing Ponds and Lakes with Bentonite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of 1 pound per square foot will require two bags of 50 pounds each in each square (each square contains 100 square feet). Large ponds or lakes may require the bentonite to be delivered to the site in bulk quantities. Spread the bentonite even- ly over... of Bentonite to Use The amount of bentonite required to effectively reduce seepage losses from a pond or lake varies from 1 to 2 pounds per square foot of soil surface. One-half pound of bentonite per square foot of soil is usually satisfactory when the bottom...

  2. Fish Grubs in Freshwater Ponds and Lakes.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Sterling K.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    rooc Z TA245.7 8873 N0.1380 r--- u ----!i -- B-1380 Fish Grubs in Freshwater Ponds and Lakes Sterling K. Johnson* Fish grubs are the immature forms of parasitic worms that invade the flesh of fishes. Grubs appear as round or bead...

  3. Quality control summary report for the RFI/RI assessment of the submerged sediment core samples taken at Par Pond, Pond C, and L-Lake

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koch, J. II

    1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents a summary of the sediment characterization performed under the direction of the Westinghouse Savannah River Company`s (WSRC) Environmental Protection Department/Environmental Monitoring Section (EPD/EMS) in support of Par Pond, Pond C, and L- Lake. This characterization will be a screening study and will enable the Environmental Sciences Section (ESS) to develop a defensible contaminants of concern list for more extensive characterization of the Par Pond, Pond C, and L-Lake.

  4. Environmental assessment for the natural fluctuation of water level in Par Pond and reduced water flow in Steel Creek below L-Lake at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Savannah River Operations Office Strategic Plan directs Savannah River Site (SRS) to find ways to reduce operating costs, and to determine what site infrastructure must be maintained and what infrastructure is surplus. Because of the mission change, L-Lake, Par Pond, and the river water system are no longer needed to support current missions and therefore provide an opportunity for operating cost reduction. If SRS determines that L-Lake, Par Pond, and the river water system are no longer needed to support future missions and are considered surplus, appropriate NEPA documentation will be prepared. The purpose of the proposed action in this Environmental Assessment is to begin an examination of the need for the Site`s river water system by (1) developing data needed to evaluate the potential environmental impacts of further reducing or eliminating the flow demands from the Site`s river water system and; (2) evaluating the potential of reducing operating costs by allowing the water level in Par Pond to fluctuate naturally through reduced pumping. This action also includes reducing the current flow rates from L-Lake to Steel Creek to natural stream flows while maintaining full pool. The recently approved Par Pond CERCLA Interim Action Proposed Plan (IAPP) committed to evaluate in a NEPA document the environmental consequences of this proposed action. This document evaluated the remediation of human health and ecological risks associated with the three year drawdown of Par Pond. Should any of the parameters sampled in the reservoir and streams (e.g., water quality, biota, etc.) exceed established threshold levels during the implementation of the proposed action, water would again be pumped into the reservoir to minimize any impacts by bringing the water level back to an appropriate level about 58.2 m (195 ft).

  5. Lake and Reservoir Management 24:381-391, 2008 Copyright by the North American Lake Management Society 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boss, Emmanuel S.

    381 Lake and Reservoir Management 24:381-391, 2008 © Copyright by the North American Lake Management Society 2008 Assessing contribution of DOC from sediments to a drinking-water reservoir using.G. Evans and E. Boss. 2008. Estimating source-specific contributions of DOC into a drinking-water reservoir

  6. Lake and Reservoir Management, 25:364376, 2009 C Copyright by the North American Lake Management Society 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    García-Berthou, Emili

    Lake and Reservoir Management, 25:364­376, 2009 C Copyright by the North American Lake Management Quality (EQ) of the reservoirs was assessed by integrating values of total chlorophyll a, cyanophyta classification of a set of Mediterranean reservoirs applying the EU Water Framework Directive: A reasonable

  7. Accepted, subject to re-review, Journal of Hydraulic Engineering, ASCE, version of January 2006 Role of Ponded Turbidity Currents in Reservoir Trap Efficiency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parker, Gary

    , because some of this sediment may pass out of the reservoir without settling out. Here a model of trap. The dam causes a sustained turbidity current to reflect and form a muddy pond bounded upstream by a hydraulic jump. If the interface of this muddy pond rises above any vent or overflow point at the dam

  8. Measurement of Lake Roosevelt Biota in Relation to Reservoir Operations : Final Report 1993.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Voeller, Amy C.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study was to collect biological data from Lake Roosevelt to be used in the design of a computer model that will predict biological responses to reservoir operations as part of the System Operation Review Program. This study worked in conjunction with Lake Roosevelt Monitoring Project which investigated the effectiveness of two kokanee salmon hatcheries. This report summarized the data collected from Lake Roosevelt from 1993 and includes limnological, reservoir operation, zooplankton, benthic macroinvertebrate, experimental trawling, and net-pen rainbow trout tagging data. Major components of the Lake Roosevelt model include quantification of impacts to zooplankton, benthic macroinvertebrates, and fish caused by reservoir drawdowns and low water retention times.

  9. Lake and Reservoir Management 21(1):24-29, 2005 Copyright by the North American Lake Management Society 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    derived from erosion of the exposed shoreline (i.e., by rain and runoff), or wave-driven resuspension in flood control reservoirs expose those sedi- ments previously deposited in deeper areas to resuspension by waves and rain. Resuspension of sediment by wind has been documented in shallow lakes with constant lake

  10. Use of uranium^thorium dating to determine C reservoir eects in lakes: examples from Antarctica

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henderson, Gideon

    Use of uranium^thorium dating to determine past 14 C reservoir e¡ects in lakes: examples from of dissolved `dead' carbon or to slow air^water exchange. Here we use the TIMS uranium^thorium disequilibrium

  11. Aquatic plants growing in ponds and lakes are beneficial for fish and wildlife. They provide food,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    cover, preventing predation, and leading to stunted (small-sized) sportfish populations. Water Weed in your pond. Constructing ponds with steep slopes that drop quickly into deep water can prevent weeds such as contour plowing, no-till farming, strip cropping, protecting shelter belts, and excluding livestock from

  12. PACIFIC NORTHWEST NUTRIA PROGRAM SUMMARY 2013 In 2007 the Center for Lakes and Reservoirs and Aquatic Bioinvasions Research and Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in numerous management activities. The Center for Lakes and Reservoirs-Aquatic Bioinvasions Research at several integrated pest management education workshops and helped launch a citizen bounty program in Polk1 PACIFIC NORTHWEST NUTRIA PROGRAM SUMMARY 2013 In 2007 the Center for Lakes and Reservoirs

  13. Measurement of Lake Roosevelt Biota in Relation to Reservoir Operations; 1992 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griffith, Janelle R.; McDowell, Amy C.

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this research project is to collect data to model resident fish requirements for Lake Roosevelt as part of the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), Bureau of Reclamation (BoR), and U.S. Army Corps of Engineer`s (ACE) System Operation Review. The System Operation Review (SOR) is a tri-agency team functioning to review the use and partitioning of Columbia Basin waters. User groups of the Columbia have been defined as power, irrigation, flood control, anadromous fish, resident fish, wildlife, recreation, water quality, navigation, and cultural resources. Once completed the model will predict biological responses to different reservoir operation strategies. The model being developed for resident fish is based on Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife, and Parks model for resident fish requirements within Hungry Horse and Libby Reservoirs. While the Montana model predicts fish growth based on the impacts of reservoir operation and flow conditions on primary and secondary production levels, the Lake Roosevelt model will also factor in the affects of water retention time on zooplankton production levels and fish entrainment. Major components of the Lake Roosevelt model include: (1) quantification of impacts to zooplankton, benthic invertebrates, and fish caused by reservoir drawdowns and low water retention times; (2) quantification of number, distribution, and use of fish food organisms in the reservoir by season; (3) determination of seasonal growth of fish species as related to reservoir operations, prey abundance and utilization; and (4) quantification of entrainment levels of fish as related to reservoir operations and water retention times. This report contains the results of the resident fish system operation review program for Lake Roosevelt from January through December 1992.

  14. Physical Controls on Methane Ebullition from Reservoirs and Lakes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Cari

    Department of Geology and Geophysics, 135 South 1460 East, Room 719, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT the potential to cause blowouts during drilling operations as well as decreasing the geotechnical stability

  15. Taste and Odor Problems in Clinton Lake Reservoir's Drinking Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Restrepo-Osorio, Dianna L.

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of geosmin and the costs of dredging the reservoir as it fills with sediment from erosion 8 4 1 1 4 1 4 . The actual situation is often undetected due to inadequate methodologies used at the time of sampling. Weather conditions are often disregarded... to hu9ans and pets fro9 a variety of blue-green algae species bloo9ing in the reservoir, lethality to water dwelling organis9s such as fish due because of decreased dissolved oxygen, higher water treat9ent costs to di9inish the effects 59...

  16. Solar-induced thermal activity and stratification in pond water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brownridge, James D

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ponds are universally used to store water for a large number of uses. With the increasing demand for more fresh water, ponds, lakes and reservoirs are likely to be constructed on a larger scale. We must understand the effects of environmental changes on fresh water if we are to most efficiently utilize this resource. This study undertakes to increase our understanding of the rate of thermal response of ponds and other bodies of water to every-day environmental changes. The central research agenda is to investigate how the temperature of pond water from top to bottom responds to the day/night cycle, changes in air temperature just above the surface, cloud conditions, and other sudden environmental changes. Data collection for this study spanned October 2007 to June 2011 and had a continuous time resolution of 50 seconds.

  17. Arrow Lakes Reservoir Fertilization Experiment; Years 4 and 5, Technical Report 2002-2003.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schindler, E.

    2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the fourth and fifth year (2002 and 2003, respectively) of a five-year fertilization experiment on the Arrow Lakes Reservoir. The goal of the experiment was to increase kokanee populations impacted from hydroelectric development on the Arrow Lakes Reservoir. The impacts resulted in declining stocks of kokanee, a native land-locked sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka), a key species of the ecosystem. Arrow Lakes Reservoir, located in southeastern British Columbia, has undergone experimental fertilization since 1999. It is modeled after the successful Kootenay Lake fertilization experiment. The amount of fertilizer added in 2002 and 2003 was similar to the previous three years. Phosphorus loading from fertilizer was 52.8 metric tons and nitrogen loading from fertilizer was 268 metric tons. As in previous years, fertilizer additions occurred between the end of April and the beginning of September. Surface temperatures were generally warmer in 2003 than in 2002 in the Arrow Lakes Reservoir from May to September. Local tributary flows to Arrow Lakes Reservoir in 2002 and 2003 were generally less than average, however not as low as had occurred in 2001. Water chemistry parameters in select rivers and streams were similar to previous years results, except for dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) concentrations which were significantly less in 2001, 2002 and 2003. The reduced snow pack in 2001 and 2003 would explain the lower concentrations of DIN. The natural load of DIN to the Arrow system ranged from 7200 tonnes in 1997 to 4500 tonnes in 2003; these results coincide with the decrease in DIN measurements from water samples taken in the reservoir during this period. Water chemistry parameters in the reservoir were similar to previous years of study except for a few exceptions. Seasonal averages of total phosphorus ranged from 2.11 to 7.42 {micro}g/L from 1997 through 2003 in the entire reservoir which were indicative of oligo-mesotrophic conditions. Dissolved inorganic nitrogen concentrations have decreased in 2002 and 2003 compared to previous years. These results indicate that the surface waters in Arrow Lakes Reservoir were approaching nitrogen limitation. Results from the 2003 discrete profile series indicate nitrate concentrations decreased significantly below 25 {micro}g/L (which is the concentration where nitrate is considered limiting to phytoplankton) between June and July at stations in Upper Arrow and Lower Arrow. Nitrogen to phosphorus ratios (weight:weight) were also low during these months indicating that the surface waters were nitrogen deficient. These results indicated that the nitrogen to phosphorus blends of fertilizer added to the reservoir need to be fine tuned and closely monitored on a weekly basis in future years of nutrient addition. Phytoplankton results shifted during 2002 and 2003 compared to previous years. During 2002, there was a co-dominance of potentially 'inedible' diatoms (Fragilaria spp. and Diatoma) and 'greens' (Ulothrix). Large diatom populations occurred in 2003 and these results indicate it may be necessary to alter the frequency and amounts of weekly loads of nitrogen and phosphorus in future years to prevent the growth of inedible diatoms. Zooplankton density in 2002 and 2003, as in previous years, indicated higher densities in Lower Arrow than in Upper Arrow. Copepods and other Cladocera (mainly tiny specimens such as Bosmina sp.) had distinct peaks, higher than in previous years, while Daphnia was not present in higher numbers particularly in Upper Arrow. This density shift in favor to smaller cladocerans was mirrored in a weak biomass increase. In Upper Arrow, total zooplankton biomass decreased from 1999 to 2002, and in 2003 increased slightly, while in Lower Arrow the biomass decreased from 2000-2002. In Lower Arrow the majority of biomass was comprised of Daphnia throughout the study period except in 2002, while in Upper Arrow the total biomass was comprised of copepods from 2000-2003.

  18. Environmental Problems Associated With Decommissioning The Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant Cooling Pond

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farfan, E. B.; Jannik, G. T.; Marra, J. C.; Oskolkov, B. Ya.; Bondarkov, M. D.; Gaschak, S. P.; Maksymenko, A. M.; Maksymenko, V. M.; Martynenko, V. I.

    2009-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Decommissioning of nuclear power plants and other nuclear fuel cycle facilities has been an imperative issue lately. There exist significant experience and generally accepted recommendations on remediation of lands with residual radioactive contamination; however, there are hardly any such recommendations on remediation of cooling ponds that, in most cases, are fairly large water reservoirs. The literature only describes remediation of minor reservoirs containing radioactive silt (a complete closure followed by preservation) or small water reservoirs resulting in reestablishing natural water flows. Problems associated with remediation of river reservoirs resulting in flooding of vast agricultural areas also have been described. In addition, the severity of environmental and economic problems related to the remedial activities is shown to exceed any potential benefits of these activities. One of the large, highly contaminated water reservoirs that require either remediation or closure is Karachay Lake near the MAYAK Production Association in the Chelyabinsk Region of Russia where liquid radioactive waste had been deep well injected for a long period of time. Backfilling of Karachay Lake is currently in progress. It should be noted that secondary environmental problems associated with its closure are considered to be of less importance since sustaining Karachay Lake would have presented a much higher radiological risk. Another well-known highly contaminated water reservoir is the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (ChNPP) Cooling Pond, decommissioning of which is planned for the near future. This study summarizes the environmental problems associated with the ChNPP Cooling Pond decommissioning.

  19. ENVIRONMENTAL PROBLEMS ASSOCIATED WITH DECOMMISSIONING THE CHERNOBYL NUCLEAR POWER PLANT COOLING POND

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farfan, E.

    2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Decommissioning of nuclear power plants and other nuclear fuel cycle facilities has been an imperative issue lately. There exist significant experience and generally accepted recommendations on remediation of lands with residual radioactive contamination; however, there are hardly any such recommendations on remediation of cooling ponds that, in most cases, are fairly large water reservoirs. The literature only describes remediation of minor reservoirs containing radioactive silt (a complete closure followed by preservation) or small water reservoirs resulting in reestablishing natural water flows. Problems associated with remediation of river reservoirs resulting in flooding of vast agricultural areas also have been described. In addition, the severity of environmental and economic problems related to the remedial activities is shown to exceed any potential benefits of these activities. One of the large, highly contaminated water reservoirs that require either remediation or closure is Karachay Lake near the MAYAK Production Association in the Chelyabinsk Region of Russia where liquid radioactive waste had been deep well injected for a long period of time. Backfilling of Karachay Lake is currently in progress. It should be noted that secondary environmental problems associated with its closure are considered to be of less importance since sustaining Karachay Lake would have presented a much higher radiological risk. Another well-known highly contaminated water reservoir is the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (ChNPP) Cooling Pond, decommissioning of which is planned for the near future. This study summarizes the environmental problems associated with the ChNPP Cooling Pond decommissioning.

  20. North Sabine Lake field: complex deposition and reservoir morphology of lower Hackberry (Oligocene), southwest Louisiana

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eubanks, L.G.

    1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas and condensate production at the North Sabine Lake field is from sands of the Hackberry wedge of the Oligocene Frio Formation. These lower Hackberry sands were deposited in a preexisting submarine canyon. Multiple sand bodies are present, and five patterns of sand deposition are recognized from SP logs: (1) incised channel fill, (2) braided fan channel, (3) intermediate suprafan, (4) proximal suprafan, and (5) overbank. Although three faults surround the field, the primary trapping mechanism is stratigraphic. The development and production history of the field indicate that many small sand lenses have coalesced to form a single large reservoir; however, differences in permeability have caused variations in water influx and in the levels of gas-water contacts. Sand lenses that are not connected to the larger reservoir are of limited size and have produced small amounts of hydrocarbon. Development of the field has been complicated by casing damage probably caused by reservoir compaction. 11 figures, 2 tables.

  1. Analysis of reservoir performance and forecasting for the eastern area of the C-2 Reservoir, Lake Maracaibo, Venezuela

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Urdaneta Anez, Jackeline C

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This research developed a numerical simulation based on the latest reservoir description to evaluate the feasibility of new infill wells to maximize the recovery specifically in the eastern region of the reservoir operated by Petroleos de Venezuela...

  2. LAKE AND RESERVOIR MANAGEMENT, 1990 6(2): 175-180 C 1990 North American Lake Management Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in both lakes. Prior Lake contained a fish community in which the largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoicks at Prior Lake was 2,200 uS/cm. The most abundant fish species in this lake were largemouth bass, bluegill carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella) is a her- bivorous fish that can control nuisance aquatic vegetation

  3. Sedimentology and diagenesis of misoa C-2 reservoir, VLE-305/326 area, block V, Lamar Field, Maracaibe Lake, Venezuela

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cabrera de Casas, L.; Chacartegui, F. (Maraven S.A., Caracas (Venezuela))

    1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The main purpose of this study was to characterize the Upper Eocene C-2 reservoir using sedimentological, petrophysical and biostratigraphic parameters. The reservoir quality was evaluated by defining its physical attributes, geometry, areal distribution and orientation, from facies analysis of sedimentary units identified in core samples. In evaluating the sedimentary features of the Misoa C-2 reservoir in VLE 305/326 area, Block V, Lamar Field, Maracaibo Lake, 2,000' of cores from five wells (named VLe-339, VLE-720, VLE -723, VLe-754, LPG-1211) were analyzed. The sedimentary sequence studied represents upper-middle deltaic plain deposits with no marine influence. These deposits were identified as interdistributary channels, crevasse splays and interdistributary bays deposited in a northward prograding system. Seven sedimentary facies were defined from the physical, chemical and biological features observed in all cores. These facies were petrophysically and petrographically characterized then grouped in six sedimentary units which were then correlated over the entire area. One hundred well logs were correlated using sedimentological criteria. Finally, four flow units were identified in the reservoir using the sedimentological parameters, petrophysical data and production behavior. A surface trend analysis program utilizing thickness values resulted in contours, trends, residuals and isometry maps of each unit with a generalized southwest-northeast trend orientation. It was determined that facies distribution in the units controls the reservoir quality. These results are the main input into reservoir simulation. An accurate reservoir modeling is needed to prepare for optimizing secondary oil recovery.

  4. Reproducing human decisions in reservoir management: the case of lake Lugano

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corani, Giorgio

    local linear regression. We setup a daily predictor, which achieves good accuracy, with a mean absolute irrigation of agricultural fields, to drinking water sup- ply, hydroelectric power production, and even reservoir systems often im- poses that different reservoirs have different types of regulation: a major

  5. A polluted pond

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A polluted pond. Consider a pond that has an initial volume of 10,000 cubic meters. Suppose that at time t = 0, the water in the pond is clean and that the pond ...

  6. Sediment accumulation and carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus deposition in the large tropical reservoir Lake Kariba

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilli, Adrian

    Kariba, the largest hydropower reservoir in the Zambezi River Basin (ZRB). Sediment characteristics large dams are constructed to provide socio- economic benefits in the form of hydropower, water storage regions of the world have considerable untapped hydropower potential [Bartle, 2002; Hydropower and Dams

  7. AN ANALYSIS OF COORDINATED OPERATION OF LAKES POWELL & MEAD UNDER LOWER RESERVOIR CONDITIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of documents dating as early as 1922. The hydrology of the Colorado River is highly variable and water managers the Upper and Lower Basin vulnerability to shortage and unprotected power pools. This thesis explores and reservoir-based recreation), Lower Basin and Mexico shortage frequency and magnitude and basin

  8. Fluid flow near reservoir lakes inferred from the spatial and temporal analysis of the electric potential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adolphs, Ralph

    , 2002. 1. Introduction [2] Detecting subsurface groundwater circulation using geophysical methods to result from the electrokinetic coupling associated with a vertical groundwater flow connecting a constant pore pressure source to the bottom of the lakes. Numerical modeling indicates that the spatial

  9. A reservoir engineering characterization of the north study area of the C2/VLE-305 reservoir, Lamar Field, Lake Maracaibo, Venezuela 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Padron Cabral, Ricardo Javier

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Reservoir charactefimtion is the key to successful oil field development programs. The recovery efficiency of any reservoir is influenced by its heterogeneities, particularly the distributions of porosity and permeability. ...

  10. Swan Lake Dusaf Pond Main Ring Lake Casey's Pond

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening a solid ...SuccessSurprising ControlSustainability GridS I T E

  11. Launois, L., Veslot, J., Irz, P., and Argillier, C. (2010) Selecting fish-based metrics responding to human pressures in French natural lakes and reservoirs:towards the development of a fish-based index (FBI) for French lakes, Ecology of Freshwater Fish 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Launois, L., Veslot, J., Irz, P., and Argillier, C. (2010) Selecting fish-based metrics responding to human pressures in French natural lakes and reservoirs:towards the development of a fish-based index (FBI) for French lakes, Ecology of Freshwater Fish 2010. _ 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/ S. Accepted

  12. Duck Valley Reservoirs Fish Stocking and Operation and Maintenance, 2005-2006 Annual Progress Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sellman, Jake; Dykstra, Tim [Shoshone-Paiute Tribes

    2009-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The Duck Valley Reservoirs Fish Stocking and Operations and Maintenance (DV Fisheries) project is an ongoing resident fish program designed to enhance both subsistence fishing, educational opportunities for Tribal members of the Shoshone-Paiute Tribes, and recreational fishing facilities for non-Tribal members. In addition to stocking rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) in Mountain View, Lake Billy Shaw, and Sheep Creek Reservoirs, the program also intends to afford and maintain healthy aquatic conditions for fish growth and survival, to provide superior facilities with wilderness qualities to attract non-Tribal angler use, and to offer clear, consistent communication with the Tribal community about this project as well as outreach and education within the region and the local community. Tasks for this performance period are divided into operations and maintenance plus monitoring and evaluation. Operation and maintenance of the three reservoirs include fences, roads, dams and all reservoir structures, feeder canals, water troughs and stock ponds, educational signs, vehicles and equipment, and outhouses. Monitoring and evaluation activities included creel, gillnet, wildlife, and bird surveys, water quality and reservoir structures monitoring, native vegetation planting, photo point documentation, control of encroaching exotic vegetation, and community outreach and education. The three reservoirs are monitored in terms of water quality and fishery success. Sheep Creek Reservoir was the least productive as a result of high turbidity levels and constraining water quality parameters. Lake Billy Shaw trout were in poorer condition than in previous years potentially as a result of water quality or other factors. Mountain View Reservoir trout exhibit the best health of the three reservoirs and was the only reservoir to receive constant flows of water.

  13. Alabama's Hatter's Pond called a classic field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCaslin, J.C.

    1981-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Delineation of the combination (structural-stratigraphic) hydrocarbon traps in southern Alabama's Hatter's Pond field demands a thorough understanding of the facies distribution, diagenesis, and structural relations of the area. The field's trapping mechanism is highly complex. In addition to the salt movement associated with normal faulting, the porosity distribution - and hence reservoir development - is facies-selective and is significantly altered by the field's diagenetic changes. Hatter's Pond is one of the most important fields in the Smackover and Norphlet producing areas. The Jurassic section of southwest Alabama probably holds most of that state's oil and gas.

  14. Comparative physical limnology of farm ponds in Southcentral Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyers, Dewey Gregory

    1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . More recently Bennett (1971) also examined pond thermal dynamics. Most of his discussion, however, dealt with lakes in the northern latitudes. Much of the literature available tends to be biologically oriented. Schultz (1952) sampled one Ohio farm... than two inches in early June caused a sharp drop in temperature st all depths. However, the bottom temperatures of one pond intensively studied by Schultz (1952) in Ohio remained unchanged after a summer rainfall. Only the surface waters were...

  15. Facies architecture of the Bluejacket Sandstone in the Eufaula Lake area, Oklahoma: Implications for the reservoir characterization of the Bartlesville Sandstone

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ye, Liangmiao; Yang, Kexian [Univ. of Tulsa, OK (United States)

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Outcrop studies of the Bluejacket Sandstone (Middle Pennsylvanian) provide significant insights to reservoir architecture of the subsurface equivalent Bartlesville Sandstone. Quarry walls and road cuts in the Lake Eufaula area offer excellent exposures for detailed facies architectural investigations using high-precision surveying, photo mosaics. Directional minipermeameter measurements are being conducted. Subsurface studies include conventional logs, borehole image log, and core data. Reservoir architectures are reconstructed in four hierarchical levels: multi-storey sandstone, i.e. discrete genetic intervals; individual discrete genetic interval; facies within a discrete genetic interval; and lateral accretion bar deposits. In both outcrop and subsurface, the Bluejacket (Bartlesville) Sandstone comprises two distinctive architectures: a lower braided fluvial and an upper meandering fluvial. Braided fluvial deposits are typically 30 to 80 ft thick, and are laterally persistent filling an incised valley wider than the largest producing fields. The lower contact is irregular with local relief of 50 ft. The braided-fluvial deposits consist of 100-400-ft wide, 5-15-ft thick channel-fill elements. Each channel-fill interval is limited laterally by an erosional contact or overbank deposits, and is separated vertically by discontinuous mudstones or highly concentrated mudstone interclast lag conglomerates. Low-angle parallel-stratified or trough cross-stratified medium- to coarse-grained sandstones volumetrically dominate. This section has a blocky well log profile. Meandering fluvial deposits are typically 100 to 150 ft thick and comprise multiple discrete genetic intervals.

  16. Duck Valley Reservoirs Fish Stocking and Operation and Maintenance, 2006-2007 Annual Progress Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sellman, Jake; Dykstra, Tim [Shoshone-Paiute Tribes

    2009-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The Duck Valley Reservoirs Fish Stocking and Operations and Maintenance (DV Fisheries) project is an ongoing resident fish program that serves to partially mitigate the loss of anadromous fish that resulted from downstream construction of the hydropower system. The project's goals are to enhance subsistence fishing and educational opportunities for Tribal members of the Shoshone-Paiute Tribes and provide resident fishing opportunities for non-Tribal members. In addition to stocking rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) in Mountain View, Lake Billy Shaw, and Sheep Creek Reservoirs, the program is also designed to maintain healthy aquatic conditions for fish growth and survival, to provide superior facilities with wilderness qualities to attract non-Tribal angler use, and to offer clear, consistent communication with the Tribal community about this project as well as outreach and education within the region and the local community. Tasks for this performance period are divided into operations and maintenance plus monitoring and evaluation. Operation and maintenance of the three reservoirs include fences, roads, dams and all reservoir structures, feeder canals, water troughs and stock ponds, educational signs, vehicles and equipment, and outhouses. Monitoring and evaluation activities included creel, gillnet, wildlife, and bird surveys, water quality and reservoir structures monitoring, native vegetation planting, photo point documentation, control of encroaching exotic vegetation, and community outreach and education. The three reservoirs are monitored in terms of water quality and fishery success. Sheep Creek Reservoir was very unproductive this year as a fishery. Fish morphometric and water quality data indicate that the turbidity is severely impacting trout survival. Lake Billy Shaw was very productive as a fishery and received good ratings from anglers. Mountain View was also productive and anglers reported a high number of quality sized fish. Water quality (specifically dissolved oxygen and temperature) is the main limiting factor in our fisheries.

  17. Lake Granbury and Lake Whitney Assessment Initiative Final Scientific/Technical Report Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harris, B.L.; Roelke, Daniel; Brooks, Bryan; Grover, James

    2010-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A team of Texas AgriLife Research, Baylor University and University of Texas at Arlington researchers studied the biology and ecology of Prymnesium parvum (golden algae) in Texas lakes using a three-fold approach that involved system-wide monitoring, experimentation at the microcosm and mesocosm scales, and mathematical modeling. The following are conclusions, to date, regarding this organismâ??s ecology and potential strategies for mitigation of blooms by this organism. In-lake monitoring revealed that golden algae are present throughout the year, even in lakes where blooms do not occur. Compilation of our field monitoring data with data collected by Texas Parks and Wildlife and Brazos River Authority (a period spanning a decade) revealed that inflow and salinity variables affect bloom formations. Thresholds for algae populations vary per lake, likely due to adaptations to local conditions, and also to variations in lake-basin morphometry, especially the presence of coves that may serve as hydraulic storage zones for P. parvum populations. More specifically, our in-lake monitoring showed that the highly toxic bloom that occurred in Lake Granbury in the winter of 2006/2007 was eliminated by increased river inflow events. The bloom was flushed from the system. The lower salinities that resulted contributed to golden algae not blooming in the following years. However, flushing is not an absolute requirement for bloom termination. Laboratory experiments have shown that growth of golden algae can occur at salinities ~1-2 psu but only when temperatures are also low. This helps to explain why blooms are possible during winter months in Texas lakes. Our in-lake experiments in Lake Whitney and Lake Waco, as well as our laboratory experiments, revealed that cyanobacteria, or some other bacteria capable of producing algicides, were able to prevent golden algae from blooming. Identification of this organism is a high priority as it may be a key to managing golden algae blooms. Our numerical modeling results support the idea that cyanobacteria, through allelopathy, control the timing of golden algae blooms in Lake Granbury. The in-lake experiments in Lake Whitney and Lake Waco also revealed that as golden algae blooms develop, there are natural enemies (a species of rotifer, and a virus) that help slow the population growth. Again, better characterization of these organisms is a high priority as it may be key to managing golden algae blooms. Our laboratory and in-lake experiments and field monitoring have shown that nutrient additions will remove toxicity and prevent golden algae from blooming. In fact, other algae displace the golden algae after nutrient additions. Additions of ammonia are particularly effective, even at low doses (much lower than what is employed in fish hatchery ponds). Application of ammonia in limited areas of lakes, such as in coves, should be explored as a management option. The laboratory experiments and field monitoring also show that the potency of toxins produced by P. parvum is greatly reduced when water pH is lower, closer to neutral levels. Application of mild acid to limited areas of lakes (but not to a level where acidic conditions are created), such as in coves, should be explored as a management option. Finally, our field monitoring and mathematical modeling revealed that flushing/dilution at high enough levels could prevent P. parvum from forming blooms and/or terminate existing blooms. This technique could work using deeper waters within a lake to flush the surface waters of limited areas of the same lakes, such as in coves and should be explored as a management option. In this way, water releases from upstream reservoirs would not be necessary and there would be no addition of nutrients in the lake.

  18. Nacimiento Reservoir San Antonio Reservoir Searles Lake

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PERMANENTE COTTONWOOD LUCERNE PLUESS BLACK MOUNTAIN SOUTHCAP SOUTHDOWN RANCHO SAVAGE APPLE VALLEY HESPERIA

  19. Duck Valley Reservoirs Fish Stocking and O&M, Annual Progress Report 2007-2008.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sellman, Jake; Perugini, Carol [Department of Fish, Wildlife, and Parks, Shoshone-Paiute Tribes

    2009-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The Duck Valley Reservoirs Fish Stocking and Operations and Maintenance Project (DV Fisheries) is an ongoing resident fish program that serves to partially mitigate the loss of anadromous fish that resulted from downstream construction of the federal hydropower system. The project's goals are to enhance subsistence fishing and educational opportunities for Tribal members of the Shoshone-Paiute Tribes and provide fishing opportunities for non-Tribal members. In addition to stocking rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) in Mountain View (MVR), Lake Billy Shaw (LBS), and Sheep Creek Reservoirs (SCR), the program is also designed to: maintain healthy aquatic conditions for fish growth and survival, provide superior facilities with wilderness qualities to attract non-Tribal angler use, and offer clear, consistent communication with the Tribal community about this project as well as outreach and education within the region and the local community. Tasks for this performance period fall into three categories: operations and maintenance, monitoring and evaluation, and public outreach. Operation and maintenance of the three reservoirs include maintaining fences, roads, dams and all reservoir structures, feeder canals, water troughs, stock ponds, educational signs, vehicles, equipment, and restroom facilities. Monitoring and evaluation activities include creel, gillnet, wildlife, and bird surveys, water quality and reservoir structures monitoring, native vegetation planting, photo point documentation, and control of encroaching exotic vegetation. Public outreach activities include providing environmental education to school children, providing fishing reports to local newspapers and vendors, updating the website, hosting community environmental events, and fielding numerous phone calls from anglers. The reservoir monitoring program focuses on water quality and fishery success. Sheep Creek Reservoir and Lake Billy Shaw had less than productive trout growth due to water quality issues including dissolved oxygen and/or turbidity. Regardless, angler fishing experience was the highest at Lake Billy Shaw. Trout in Mountain View Reservoir were in the best condition of the three reservoirs and anglers reported very good fishing there. Water quality (specifically dissolved oxygen and temperature) remain the main limiting factors in the fisheries, particularly in late August to early September.

  20. Detrimental Effects Associated with Trace Element Uptake in Lake Chubsuckers (Erimyzon sucetta) Exposed to Polluted Sediments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hopkins, William A.

    February 2000 Abstract. Lake chubsuckers (Erimyzon sucetta) were exposed to coal ash­polluted sediments were eliminated from Belews Lake, NC, after coal fly ash pond effluent was discharged problems induced by pollutant disposal practices, the power plant ceased discharge of ash pond effluent

  1. Awakening Seed Pond Water ChemistryAwakening Seed Pond Water Chemistry Our Question: Is our pond polluted?Our Question: Is our pond polluted?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Sharon J.

    Awakening Seed Pond Water ChemistryAwakening Seed Pond Water Chemistry Our Question: Is our pond polluted?Our Question: Is our pond polluted? Our InvestigationOur Investigation We discussed what kinds of pollutants we should look for. We narrowed down the aspects of pond chemistry that we would investigate

  2. Great Lakes Spatially Distributed Watershed Model of Water and Materials Runoff Thomas E. Croley II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the service life of reservoirs and lakes, and increase flooding and costs for dredging harbors and treating

  3. Pond Construction: Some Practical Considerations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    condemnation or structural failure of the dam. Farm ponds are constructed for many purposes. Those designed is normally held liable for downstream flooding and related damages caused by dam failure. www was shown for con struction safety in building farm pond dams. Now, however, many states are routinely

  4. Solar Ponds - What Are They?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, A. L.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Solar ponds can provide low cost solar energy collection as well as low temperature heat storage. Currently there are two types of solar ponds in an advanced state of development in the U.S. Each system uses a different collection and energy storage...

  5. Solar Ponds - What Are They? 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, A. L.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Solar ponds can provide low cost solar energy collection as well as low temperature heat storage. Currently there are two types of solar ponds in an advanced state of development in the U.S. Each system uses a different collection and energy storage...

  6. INTRODUCTION Chlorophyll concentration within individual lakes varies spa-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    often have been implemented (George & Lakes & Reservoirs: Research and Management 2001 6: 279 increase turbulence to such an extent that macro-scale spatial distributions are dis- integrated

  7. Don Juan Pond, Antarctica: Near-surface CaCl2-brine feeding Earth's most saline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marchant, David R.

    Don Juan Pond, Antarctica: Near-surface CaCl2-brine feeding Earth's most saline lake lineae (RSL), thought to represent seasonal brines, has sparked interest in analogous environments watershed and show that this, together with small amounts of meltwater, are capable of generating brines

  8. -Reservoir Technology -Geothermal Reservoir Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    SGP-TR-91 - Reservoir Technology - Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Research at Stanford Principal in Engineering and Earth Sciences STANFORD UNIVERSITY Stanford, California #12;TABLE OF CONTENTS Page ...PREFACE................................................................................ 20 3.4 Thermal Stress Effects on Thermal Conductivity .................................... 27 #12

  9. 216-B-3 expansion ponds closure plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes the activities for clean closure under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) of the 216-B-3 Expansion Ponds. The 216-B-3 Expansion Ponds are operated by the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) and co-operated by Westinghouse Hanford Company (Westinghouse Hanford). The 216-B-3 Expansion Ponds consists of a series of three earthen, unlined, interconnected ponds that receive waste water from various 200 East Area operating facilities. The 3A, 3B, and 3C ponds are referred to as Expansion Ponds because they expanded the capability of the B Pond System. Waste water (primarily cooling water, steam condensate, and sanitary water) from various 200 East Area facilities is discharged to the Bypass pipe (Project X-009). Water discharged to the Bypass pipe flows directly into the 216-B-3C Pond. The ponds were operated in a cascade mode, where the Main Pond overflowed into the 3A Pond and the 3A Pond overflowed into the 3C Pond. The 3B Pond has not received waste water since May 1985; however, when in operation, the 3B Pond received overflow from the 3A Pond. In the past, waste water discharges to the Expansion Ponds had the potential to have contained mixed waste (radioactive waste and dangerous waste). The radioactive portion of mixed waste has been interpreted by the US Department of Energy (DOE) to be regulated under the Atomic Energy Act of 1954; the dangerous waste portion of mixed waste is regulated under RCRA.

  10. Par Pond Fish, Water, and Sediment Chemistry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paller, M.H. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Wike, L.D.

    1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of this report are to describe the Par Pond fish community and the impact of the drawdown and refill on the community, describe contaminant levels in Par Pond fish, sediments, and water and indicate how contaminant concentrations and distributions were affected by the drawdown and refill, and predict possible effects of future water level fluctuations in Par Pond.

  11. The Mystery of Dos Bocas Reservoir, Puerto Rico: Explaining Extreme Spatial Heterogeneity in Largemouth Bass Distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cope, W. Gregory

    The Mystery of Dos Bocas Reservoir, Puerto Rico: Explaining Extreme Spatial Heterogeneity.--Dos Bocas Reservoir, Puerto Rico, has pronounced in-lake variability in fish distributions, especially composition between the two basins of Dos Bocas Reservoir, Puerto Rico; characterized by the absence of top

  12. Age, growth and condition of bluegill sunfish, Lepomis macrochirus Rafinesque, in four heated reservoirs in Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Serns, Steven Leo

    1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . S. , Texas A&M University Directed by: Dr. Kirk Strawn Bluegill collected in four heated reservoirs in Texas (Lake Bastrop, Lake Nasworthy, North Lake and Lake Colorado City) were aged by scale-reading. Back-calculated length frequency... in the heated strata than the non-heated strata. Annuli could not be discerned on the scales of bluegill confined to the heated discharge-canal at Lake Colorado City. There was an inverse relationship between both age of the reservoir and megawatts per...

  13. Pond Management Update Register by: October 16!!!

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    Pond Management Update Register by: October 16!!! Tri-County Extension Programming October 18, 2012 Bradford County FFA Farm 3165 N.W. 196th St. Starke, FL 32091 4:00 PM Registration 4:30 Hot Dog Dinner 5:00 Calculating Pond Dimensions Dr. Mike Davis, CED, Baker County 5:25 Water Quality Basil Bactawar, CED, Union

  14. 100-D Ponds closure plan. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petersen, S.W.

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 100-D Ponds is a Treatment, Storage, and Disposal (TSD) unit on the Hanford Facility that received both dangerous and nonregulated waste. This Closure Plan (Rev. 1) for the 100-D Ponds TSD unit consists of a RCRA Part A Dangerous Waste Permit Application (Rev. 3), a RCRA Closure Plan, and supporting information contained in the appendices to the plan. The closure plan consists of eight chapters containing facility description, process information, waste characteristics, and groundwater monitoring data. There are also chapters containing the closure strategy and performance standards. The strategy for the closure of the 100-D Ponds TSD unit is clean closure. Appendices A and B of the closure plan demonstrate that soil and groundwater beneath 100-D Ponds are below cleanup limits. All dangerous wastes or dangerous waste constituents or residues associated with the operation of the ponds have been removed, therefore, human health and the environment are protected. Discharges to the 100-D Ponds, which are located in the 100-DR-1 operable unit, were discontinued in June 1994. Contaminated sediment was removed from the ponds in August 1996. Subsequent sampling and analysis demonstrated that there is no contamination remaining in the ponds, therefore, this closure plan is a demonstration of clean closure.

  15. The study of the accumulation of hydrocarbons in VLE 196, Block V, Lamar field, Lake Maracaibo, Venezuela 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leveque, Soazig

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Lake Maracaibo basin is a prolific basin. Its study is not straightforward due to complex tectonic history. At this time, most of the reservoirs have been found and our aim is to better understand the reservoirs and ...

  16. ELECTROKINETIC DENSIFICATION OF COAL FINES IN WASTE PONDS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    E. James Davis

    1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this research is to demonstrate that electrokinetics can be used to remove colloidal coal and mineral particles from coal-washing ponds and lakes without the addition of chemical additives such as salts and polymeric flocculants. In this experimental and analytical study the authors elucidate the transport processes that control the rate of concentrated colloidal particle removal, demonstrate the process on a laboratory scale, and develop the scale-up laws needed to design commercial-scale processes. The authors are also addressing the fundamental problems associated with particle-particle interactions (electrical and hydrodynamic), the effects of particle concentration on the applied electric field, the electrochemical reactions that occur at the electrodes, and the prediction of power requirements.

  17. Equilibrium composition between liquid and clathrate reservoirs on Titan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mousis, Olivier; Lunine, Jonathan I; Sotin, Christophe

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hundreds of lakes and a few seas of liquid hydrocarbons have been observed by the Cassini spacecraft to cover the polar regions of Titan. A significant fraction of these lakes or seas could possibly be interconnected with subsurface liquid reservoirs of alkanes. In this paper, we investigate the interplay that would happen between a reservoir of liquid hydrocarbons located in Titan's subsurface and a hypothetical clathrate reservoir that progressively forms if the liquid mixture diffuses throughout a preexisting porous icy layer. To do so, we use a statistical-thermodynamic model in order to compute the composition of the clathrate reservoir that forms as a result of the progressive entrapping of the liquid mixture. This study shows that clathrate formation strongly fractionates the molecules between the liquid and the solid phases. Depending on whether the structure I or structure II clathrate forms, the present model predicts that the liquid reservoirs would be mainly composed of either propane or ethane, r...

  18. Western Pond Turtle Head-starting and Reintroduction; 2003-2004 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Leuven, Susan; Allen, Harriet; Slavin, Kate (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Wildlife Management Program, Olympia, WA)

    2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report covers the results of the western pond turtle head-starting and reintroduction project for the period of October 2003-September 2004. Wild hatchling western pond turtles from the Columbia River Gorge were reared at the Woodland Park and Oregon Zoos in 2003 and 2004 as part of the recovery effort for this Washington State endangered species. The objective of the program is to reduce losses to introduced predators like bullfrogs and largemouth bass by raising the hatchlings to a size where they are too large to be eaten by most of these predators. Sixty-nine turtles were over-wintered at the Woodland Park Zoo and 69 at the Oregon Zoo. Of these, 136 head-started juvenile turtles were released at three sites in the Columbia Gorge in 2004. Two were held back to attain more growth in captivity. Thirty-four were released at the Klickitat ponds, 19 at the Klickitat lake, 21 at the Skamania site, and 62 at Pierce National Wildlife Refuge (NWR). This brought the total number of head-start turtles released since 1991 to 246 for the Klickitat ponds, 114 for the Klickitat lake, 167 for the Skamania pond complex, and 250 at Pierce NWR. In 2004, 32 females from the two Columbia Gorge populations were equipped with transmitters and monitored for nesting activity. Twenty-one of the females nested and produced 85 hatchlings. The hatchlings were collected in September and October and transported to the Woodland Park and Oregon zoos for rearing in the head-start program. Data collection for a four-year telemetry study of survival and habitat use by juvenile western pond turtles at Pierce NWR concluded in 2004. Radio transmitters on study animals were replaced as needed until all replacements were in service; afterward, the turtles were monitored until their transmitters failed. The corps of study turtles ranged from 39 in August 2003 to 2 turtles at the end of August 2004. These turtles showed the same seasonal pattern of movements between summer water and upland winter habitats observed in previous years. During the 2004 field season trapping effort, 345 western pond turtles were captured in the Columbia Gorge, including 297 previously head-started turtles. These recaptures, together with confirmed nesting by head-start females and visual resightings, indicate the program is succeeding in boosting juvenile recruitment to increase the populations. Records were also collected on 224 individual painted turtles captured in 2004 during trapping efforts at Pierce NWR, to gather baseline information on this native population. Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) funded approximately 60% of program activities in the Columbia River Gorge from October 2003 through September 2004.

  19. SINGH and BHATNAGAR Urban lakes and wetlands: opportunities and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    , urban water bodies commonly become cesspools due to lack of sanitation facilities. Delhi is continually urbanizing at a rapid pace that has affected the condition of water bodies. To identify water resource to map all the water bodies including groundwater recharge sites ­ 44 lakes and 355 village ponds. Hauz

  20. Stocking and Management Recommendations for Texas Farm Ponds.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anonymous,

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . For example, what size pond is to be stocked? Generally, ponds less than one acre receive different recommendations than larger ponds. The extent of water surface fluctuations, degree of expected fishing pressure and the muddiness of the water are a few... balance between bass and forage. Spawning devices may be installed to encourage reproduction of catfish. Expect most or all of the reproduction to be removed by bass, particularly in clear ponds. In muddy or turbid ponds, more catfish will avoid bass...

  1. Maintenance of Stormwater Wetlands and Wet Ponds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hunt, William F.

    constructed across North Carolina. OVERVIEW As its name implies, a stormwater wetland is a wetland system of stormwater wetlands and wet ponds is performed to achieve four goals: efficient hydraulic flow and pollutant

  2. Western Pond Turtle Head-starting and Reintroduction, 2005-2006 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Leuven, Susan; Allen, Harriet; Slavens, Kate (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Wildlife Management Program, Olympia, WA)

    2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report covers the results of the western pond turtle head-starting and reintroduction project for the period of October 2005-September 2006. Wild hatchling western pond turtles from the Columbia River Gorge were reared at the Woodland Park and Oregon zoos in 2005 and 2006 as part of the recovery effort for this Washington State endangered species. The objective of the program is to reduce losses to introduced predators like bullfrogs and largemouth bass by raising the hatchlings to a size where they are too large to be eaten by most of these predators. Twenty-six turtles were placed at the Woodland Park Zoo and 62 at the Oregon Zoo in fall 2005. These turtles joined two that were held back from release in summer 2005 due to their small size. All 90 juvenile turtles were released at three sites in the Columbia Gorge in 2006. Twenty-eight juvenile turtles were released at the Klickitat ponds, 22 at the Klickitat lake, 21 at the Skamania site, and 19 at Pierce National Wildlife Refuge (NWR). This brought the total number of head-start turtles released since 1991 to 944; 285 for the Klickitat ponds, 158 for the Klickitat lake, 227 for the Skamania pond complex, and 274 at Pierce NWR. In 2006, 20 females from the Klickitat population were equipped with transmitters and monitored for nesting activity. Fifteen nests were located and protected; these produced 55 hatchlings. The hatchlings were collected in September and transported to the Oregon and Woodland Park zoos for rearing in the head-start program. One wild hatchling captured in spring 2006 was placed in the head-start program to attain more growth in captivity. During the 2006 field season trapping effort, 414 western pond turtles were captured in the Columbia Gorge, including 374 previously head-started turtles. These recaptures, together with confirmed nesting by head-start females and visual resightings, indicate the program is succeeding in boosting juvenile recruitment to increase the populations. Records were also collected on 179 individual painted turtles captured in 2006 during trapping efforts at Pierce NWR, to gather baseline information on this native population.

  3. Western Pond Turtle Head-starting and Reintroduction; 2004-2005 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Leuven, Susan; Allen, Harriet; Slavin, Kate (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Wildlife Management Program, Olympia, WA)

    2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report covers the results of the western pond turtle head-starting and reintroduction project for the period of October 2004-September 2005. Wild hatchling western pond turtles from the Columbia River Gorge were reared at the Woodland Park and Oregon Zoos in 2004 and 2005 as part of the recovery effort for this Washington State endangered species. The objective of the program is to reduce losses to introduced predators like bullfrogs and largemouth bass by raising the hatchlings to a size where they are too large to be eaten by most of these predators. Thirty-five turtles were placed at the Woodland Park Zoo and 53 at the Oregon Zoo. Of these, 77 head-started juvenile turtles were released at three sites in the Columbia Gorge in 2005. Four were held back to attain more growth in captivity. Eleven were released at the Klickitat ponds, 22 at the Klickitat lake, 39 at the Skamania site, and 5 at Pierce National Wildlife Refuge (NWR). This brought the total number of head-start turtles released since 1991 to 257 for the Klickitat ponds, 136 for the Klickitat lake, 206 for the Skamania pond complex, and 255 at Pierce NWR. In 2005, 34 females from the two Columbia Gorge populations were equipped with transmitters and monitored for nesting activity. Twenty-four nests were located and protected; these produced 90 hatchlings. The hatchlings were collected in September and transported to the Oregon and Woodland Park zoos for rearing in the head-start program. During the 2005 field season trapping effort, 486 western pond turtles were captured in the Columbia Gorge, including 430 previously head-started turtles. These recaptures, together with confirmed nesting by head-start females and visual resightings, indicate the program is succeeding in boosting juvenile recruitment to increase the populations. Records were also collected on 216 individual painted turtles captured in 2005 during trapping efforts at Pierce NWR, to gather baseline information on this native population. Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) funded approximately 75% of program activities in the Columbia River Gorge from October 2004 through September 2005.

  4. SOLPOND: a simulation program for salinity gradient solar ponds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henderson, J.; Leboeuf, C.M.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A computer simulation design tool was developed to simulate dynamic thermal performance for salinity gradient solar ponds. Dynamic programming techniques allow the user significant flexibility in analyzing pond performance under realistic load and weather conditions. Finite element techniques describe conduction heat transfer through the pond, earth, and edges. Results illustrate typical thermal performance of salinity gradient ponds. Sensitivity studies of salty pond thermal performance with respect to geometry, load, and optical transmission are included. Experimental validation of the program with an operating pond is also presented.

  5. Depositional environments, lithofacies types, and reservoir development of the Permian Khuff Formation in Eastern Saudi Arabia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Al-Jallal, I.A. (Saudi Aramco, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia))

    1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Later Permian carbonates and evaporites of the Khuff Formation contain considerable amounts of gas in Ghawar field, eastern Saudi Arabia. Sedimentary structures, textures, and grain types were used to interpret the depositional environments and to define the different lithofacies types which determine the original reservoir face is distribution within this 1,500-ft-thick formation. There are three major depositional environments: subtidal, intertidal, and sabkha. Locally, these include shoals, belts, bars, bays, lagoons, ponds, tidal channels, sabkha. Locally, these include shoals, belts, bars, bays, lagoons, ponds, tidal channels, sabkha islands, and sabkha pans. Tidal flooding and storms are represented. These environments represent four major transgressive-regressive cycles, which conform to four Khuff units: Khuff A, B, C and D (from youngest to oldest). Transgressive phases (subtidal), with lithofacies of grainstones and horizontally burrowed mudstones usually comprise the reservoir facies. The regressive phases (intertidal and sabkha) with lithofacies of anhydritic mudstones and anhydrites, usually seal the Khuff reservoirs. Later disappearance of reservoir facies are due to deposition or diagenesis. Depositionally, the lateral change in facies may occur, for example, from a non-reservoir anhydrite and mudstone facies to a reservoir grainstone facies, or from a non-reservoir anhydritic mudstones to a reservoir burrowed-mudstone facies. Diagenetically, ooid grainstones may be greatly cemented by anhydrite. A combination of dolomitization and leaching may create intercrystalline porosity in mudstone. Leaching creates poorly connected moldic porosity in grainstones because the resulting calcite cement plugs the interparticle porosity.

  6. Experimental nursery pond cultivation of the seagrass Halodule beaudettei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosen, David J.

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experiments were conducted from April through July of hics. l 998 to assess the cultivation of Halodule beaudettei (den Hartog) den Hartog (shoal-grass) in experimental nursery ponds. The effects of pond flow-regime, water turbidity, culture media...

  7. Lake Roosevelt Fisheries and Limnological Research : 1996 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cichosz, Thomas A.; Underwood, Keith D.; Shields, John; Scholz, Allan; Tilson, Mary Beth

    1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Lake Roosevelt Monitoring/Data Collection Program resulted from a merger between the Lake Roosevelt Monitoring Program and the Lake Roosevelt Data Collection Project. This project will model biological responses to reservoir operations, evaluate the effects of releasing hatchery origin kokanee salmon and rainbow trout on the fishery, and evaluate the success of various stocking strategies. In 1996, limnological, reservoir operation, zooplankton, and tagging data were collected. Mean reservoir elevation, storage volume and water retention time were reduced in 1996 relative to the last five years. In 1996, Lake Roosevelt reached a yearly low of 1,227 feet above mean sea level in April, a yearly high of 1,289 feet in July, and a mean yearly reservoir elevation of 1,271.4 feet. Mean monthly water retention times in Lake Roosevelt during 1996 ranged from 15.7 days in May to 49.2 days in October. Average zooplankton densities and biomass were lower in 1996 than 1995. Daphnia spp. and total zooplankton densities peaked during the summer, whereas minimum densities occurred during the spring. Approximately 300,000 kokanee salmon and 400,000 rainbow trout were released into Lake Roosevelt in 1996. The authors estimated 195,628 angler trips to Lake Roosevelt during 1996 with an economic value of $7,629,492.

  8. Low-temperature spray ponds: performance evaluation and prediction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kerig, Philip Dwan

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    pond. These figures were used along with the dry-bulb temperatures measured at the pond to estimate the wet-bulb temperature at the spray pond. A second problem encountered during very cold weather was that the manometer lines would often freeze...LOW-TEMPERATURE SPRAY PONDS: PERFORMANCE EVALUATION AND PREDICTION A Thesis by PHILIP DWAN KERIG Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May...

  9. High resolution reservoir geological modelling using outcrop information

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang Changmin; Lin Kexiang; Liu Huaibo [Jianghan Petroleum Institute, Hubei (China)] [and others

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is China`s first case study of high resolution reservoir geological modelling using outcrop information. The key of the modelling process is to build a prototype model and using the model as a geological knowledge bank. Outcrop information used in geological modelling including seven aspects: (1) Determining the reservoir framework pattern by sedimentary depositional system and facies analysis; (2) Horizontal correlation based on the lower and higher stand duration of the paleo-lake level; (3) Determining the model`s direction based on the paleocurrent statistics; (4) Estimating the sandbody communication by photomosaic and profiles; (6) Estimating reservoir properties distribution within sandbody by lithofacies analysis; and (7) Building the reservoir model in sandbody scale by architectural element analysis and 3-D sampling. A high resolution reservoir geological model of Youshashan oil field has been built by using this method.

  10. Reservoir Characterization Research Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    Reservoir Characterization Research Laboratory for Carbonate Studies Executive Summary for 2014 Outcrop and Subsurface Characterization of Carbonate Reservoirs for Improved Recovery of Remaining/Al 0.00 0.02 0.04 Eagle Ford Fm #12;#12; Reservoir Characterization Research Laboratory Research Plans

  11. A comparison of Nannochloropsis salina growth performance in two outdoor pond designs: conventional raceways versus the ARID pond with superior temperature management

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Crowe, Braden [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; Attalah, Said [University of Arizona; Agrawal, Shweta [University of Arizona; Waller, Peter [University of Arizona; Ryan, Randy [University of Arizona.edu; Van Wagenen, Jon [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; Chavis, Aaron [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; Kyndt, John [University of Arizona; Kacira, Murat [University of Arizona; Ogden, Kim L. [University of Arizona; Huesemann, Michael [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A comparison of Nannochloropsis salina growth performance in two outdoor pond designs: conventional raceways versus the ARID pond with superior temperature management

  12. Bachaquero-01 reservoir, Venezuela-increasing oil production by switching from cyclic steam injection to steamflooding using horizontal wells 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodriguez, Manuel Gregorio

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Bachaquero-01 reservoir of the Lagunillas field is located in the eastern part of the Maracaibo Lake, Venezuela. The field is operated by the national oil company of Venezuela, PDVSA (Petroleos de Venezuela, S.A.). The ...

  13. Geosynthetics in a salinity-gradient solar pond environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lichwardt, M.A.; Comer, A.I.

    1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the latest in salinity-gradient solar pond lining systems. The high-temperature, high-salinity environment unique to a salinity-gradient solar pond resulted in failure of the geomembrane liner at the El Paso Solar Pond Test Facility after only eight years of operation. Research involved in pond reconstruction led to the selection of a lining system consisting of a flexible polypropylene (PP) geomembrane for the sidewalls and a specially formulated geosynthetic clay liner (GCL) on the bottom of the pond. The two liners have been installed and a comprehensive test program is being conducted to measure their performance. The environment encountered in a salinity-gradient solar pond will be discussed as well as material selection criteria and the design of the two liners. Preliminary results of the GCL performance monitoring will also be presented.

  14. area process ponds: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sciences Websites Summary: ). Pond: the OceanStore Prototype Sean Rhea, Patrick Eaton, Dennis Geels, Hakim Weatherspoon, Ben Zhao.berkeley.edu Abstract OceanStore is an...

  15. aerated treatment pond: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    nitratenitrite can be reduced with influent BOD. The key feature Nerenberg, Robert 50 Treatment of saltwater crocodile Pond wastewater using constructed Wetland system;. Open...

  16. Characterization of oil and gas reservoir heterogeneity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tyler, N.; Barton, M.D.; Bebout, D.G.; Fisher, R.S.; Grigsby, J.D.; Guevara, E.; Holtz, M.; Kerans, C.; Nance, H.S.; Levey, R.A.

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Research described In this report addresses the internal architecture of two specific reservoir types: restricted-platform carbonates and fluvial-deltaic sandstones. Together, these two reservoir types contain more than two-thirds of the unrecovered mobile oil remaining ill Texas. The approach followed in this study was to develop a strong understanding of the styles of heterogeneity of these reservoir types based on a detailed outcrop description and a translation of these findings into optimized recovery strategies in select subsurface analogs. Research targeted Grayburg Formation restricted-platform carbonate outcrops along the Algerita Escarpment and In Stone Canyon In southeastern New Mexico and Ferron deltaic sandstones in central Utah as analogs for the North Foster (Grayburg) and Lake Creek (Wilcox) units, respectively. In both settings, sequence-stratigraphic style profoundly influenced between-well architectural fabric and permeability structure. It is concluded that reservoirs of different depositional origins can therefore be categorized Into a heterogeneity matrix'' based on varying intensity of vertical and lateral heterogeneity. The utility of the matrix is that it allows prediction of the nature and location of remaining mobile oil. Highly stratified reservoirs such as the Grayburg, for example, will contain a large proportion of vertically bypassed oil; thus, an appropriate recovery strategy will be waterflood optimization and profile modification. Laterally heterogeneous reservoirs such as deltaic distributary systems would benefit from targeted infill drilling (possibly with horizontal wells) and improved areal sweep efficiency. Potential for advanced recovery of remaining mobile oil through heterogeneity-based advanced secondary recovery strategies In Texas is projected to be an Incremental 16 Bbbl. In the Lower 48 States this target may be as much as 45 Bbbl at low to moderate oil prices over the near- to mid-term.

  17. Overspill avalanching in a dense reservoir network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mamede, G L; Schneider, C M; de Araújo, J C; Herrmann, H J

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sustainability of communities, agriculture, and industry is strongly dependent on an effective storage and supply of water resources. In some regions the economic growth has led to a level of water demand which can only be accomplished through efficient reservoir networks. Such infrastructures are not always planned at larger scale but rather made by farmers according to their local needs of irrigation during droughts. Based on extensive data from the upper Jaguaribe basin, one of the world's largest system of reservoirs, located in the Brazilian semiarid northeast, we reveal that surprisingly it self-organizes into a scale-free network exhibiting also a power-law in the distribution of the lakes and avalanches of discharges. With a new self-organized-criticality-type model we manage to explain the novel critical exponents. Implementing a flow model we are able to reproduce the measured overspill evolution providing a tool for catastrophe mitigation and future planning.

  18. 14 Diffusive CO2 Flux at the Air-Water Interface of the Robert-Bourassa Hydroelectric Reservoir in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, Bernard

    Hydroelectric reservoirs and lakes in boreal Québec produce greenhouse gases (GHG) mainly in the form of CO214 Diffusive CO2 Flux at the Air-Water Interface of the Robert-Bourassa Hydroelectric Reservoir. No method exists, however, which can directly measure the flux of CO2 across the air-water interface

  19. A SIMULATION MODEL FOR THE PERFORMANCE ANALYSIS OF ROOF POND SYSTEMS FOR HEATING AND COOLING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tavana, Medhi

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on Heating Performance of Roof Pond XSL803-6664 Fig. 4.on Heating Performance of Roof Pond Phoenix, Arizona Auguston Cooling Performance of Roof Pond HOur of the doy (solar

  20. Constructed Wetlands and Waste Stabilization Ponds for municipal wastewater treatment in France: comparison of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    13 Constructed Wetlands and Waste Stabilization Ponds for municipal wastewater treatment in France In France, vertical flow constructed wetlands and waste stabilisation ponds are both extensive treatment Vertical Flow Constructed Wetlands, Waste Stabilization Ponds, operation and maintenance, sludge management

  1. Analysis and evaluation of round hay bale breakwaters at Lake Sharpe, South Dakota 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grundy, Thomas Paxson

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lake Sharpe in central South Dakota is one of three reservoirs constructed along the Missouri River by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers in the 50's and 60's. The Lake is underlain by Cretaceous Pierre shale and various Quaternary glacial deposits...

  2. Landscape influences on climate-related lake shrinkage at high latitudes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ickert-Bond, Steffi

    reservoirs of carbon. Here, using a population of ca. 2300 lakes with statistically significant increasing-related declines in lake area have been identified across circumpolar regions and have been characterized-reaching ecosystem services along migratory routes. Net declining trends have also been characterized by spatial

  3. Reservoir CharacterizationReservoir Characterization Research LaboratoryResearch Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    Reservoir CharacterizationReservoir Characterization Research LaboratoryResearch Laboratory at Austin Austin, Texas 78713Austin, Texas 78713--89248924 #12;Reservoir Characterization Research Laboratory for Carbonate Studies Research Plans for 2012 Outcrop and Subsurface Characterization of Carbonate

  4. Sediment pass-through, an alternative to reservoir dredging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harrison, L.L.; Lee, W.H. [Pacific Gas and Electric Co., San Francisco, CA (United States); Tu, S. [Pacific and Gas Electric Co., San Ramon, CA (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E) is studying an alternative {open_quotes}Sediment Management Plan{close_quotes} (SMP) to control sediments at Rock Creek Reservoir and the downstream Cresta Reservoir on the North Fork Feather River in Plumas County. The reservoirs are part of the 182,000 kW Rock Creek-Cresta Project hydroelectric development. Approximately 5.4 million cubic meters of sediments, deposited in the two reservoirs since they were placed in service in 1949 and 1950, partially obstruct the dams` low level outlets and pipe inlets supplying water for spillway gate operations. The sediments jeopardize the reliable and efficient operation of the dams and powerhouses. The SMP includes retrofitting Rock Creek and Cresta Dams with additional low-level gated outlets and modification of trash racks at the existing low level outlet pipes at each dam to improve sediment pass-through (SPT) capacity during high flows. Also, to enable construction of the dam modifications and to facilitate the initiation of SPT operation, dredging of approximately 46,000 cubic meters at Rock Creek Reservoir and 57,000 cubic meters at Cresta Reservoir can be accomplished using a new slurry pump dredging technology to minimize turbidity and re-suspension of solids during dredging. It is proposed to deposit the sediment on the reservoir bottoms, upstream of the areas to be dredged. The dredged sediments subsequently would be flushed from the reservoirs during SPT operations to ultimately be deposited in the dead storage volume of a large downstream reservoir, Lake Oroville. The SPT management plan supersedes more costly plans for major dredging, and may preclude the need for future maintenance dredging at the reservoirs.

  5. Variation of mercury in fish from Massachusetts lakes based on ecoregion and lake trophic status

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rose, J.; Hutcheson, M.; West, C.R. [Massachusetts Dept. of Environmental Protection, Boston, MA (United States). Office of Research and Standards] [and others

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Twenty-four of the state`s least-impacted waterbodies were sampled for sediment, water, physical characteristics and 3 species of fish to determine the extent of, and patterns of variation in, mercury contamination. Sampling effort was apportioned among three different ecological subregions of the state, as defined by EPA, and among lakes of differing trophic status. The authors sought to partition the variance to discover if these broadly defined concepts are suitable predictors of mercury levels in fish. Mean fish mercury was 0.14 ppm wet weight in samples of 168 of the bottom feeding brown bullheads (Ameriurus nebulosus) (range = 0.01--0.79 ppm); 0.3 ppm in 199 of the omnivorous yellow perch (Perca flavescens) (range = 0.01--0.75 ppm); and 0.4 ppm in samples of 152 of the predaceous largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) (range = 0.05--1.1 ppm). Multivariate statistics are employed to determine how mercury concentrations in fish correlate with sediment chemistry, water chemistry, fish trophic status, fish size and age, lake and watershed size, the presence and extent of wetlands in the watershed, and physical characteristics of the lake. The survey design complements ongoing efforts begun in 1983 to test fish in a variety of waters, from which emanated fish advisories for impacted rivers and lakes. The study defines a baseline for fish contamination in Massachusetts lakes and ponds that serves as a template for public health decisions regarding fish consumption.

  6. Reservoir management using streamline simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choudhary, Manoj Kumar

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of information and sparsity of data. Quantifying this uncertainty in terms of reservoir performance forecast poses a major reservoir management challenge. One solution to this problem is flow simulation of a large number of these plausible reservoir descriptions...

  7. HIGH TEMPERATURE GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schroeder, R.C.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    upon the available reservoir data. If the latter data a r eThe use of measured data in reservoir engineering simulationdata on the condition of the well and the static reservoir

  8. 2101-M Pond hydrogeologic characterization report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chamness, M.A.; Luttrell, S.P.; Bates, D.J.; Martin, W.J.

    1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents information collected by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory {sup (a)} at the request of Westinghouse Hanford Company. Presented in this report is the interpretation of the hydrogeologic environment at the 2101-M Pond, located in the 200-East Area of the Hanford Site. This information and its accompanying interpretation were derived from sampling and testing activities associated with the installation of four ground-water monitoring wells, in addition to data gathered from several previously existing wells. The new monitoring wells were installed as part of a groundwater monitoring program initiated in 1988. The four new monitoring wells were installed around the 2101-M Pond between May 23 and August 27, 1988. Geologic sampling, aquifer testing, and initial ground-water sampling were performed during the installation of these wells. Laboratory analyses of the sediment samples for particle size, calcium carbonate content, and selected natural and contaminant constituents were performed. A full year of quarterly ground-water sampling and the first statistical analysis of background and downgradient data have also been performed. 112 refs., 49 figs., 18 tabs.

  9. Fuel Pond Sludge - Lessons Learned from Initial De-sludging of Sellafield's Pile Fuel Storage Pond - 12066

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlisle, Derek; Adamson, Kate [Sellafield Ltd, Sellafield, Cumbria (United Kingdom)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pile Fuel Storage Pond (PFSP) at Sellafield was built and commissioned between the late 1940's and early 1950's as a storage and cooling facility for irradiated fuel and isotopes from the two Windscale Pile reactors. The pond was linked via submerged water ducts to each reactor, where fuel and isotopes were discharged into skips for transfer along the duct to the pond. In the pond the fuel was cooled then de-canned underwater prior to export for reprocessing. The plant operated successfully until it was taken out of operation in 1962 when the First Magnox Fuel Storage Pond took over fuel storage and de-canning operations on the site. The pond was then used for storage of miscellaneous Intermediate Level Waste (ILW) and fuel from the UK's Nuclear Programme for which no defined disposal route was available. By the mid 1970's the import of waste ceased and the plant, with its inventory, was placed into a passive care and maintenance regime. By the mid 1990s, driven by the age of the facility and concern over the potential challenge to dispose of the various wastes and fuels being stored, the plant operator initiated a programme of work to remediate the facility. This programme is split into a number of key phases targeted at sustained reduction in the hazard associated with the pond, these include: - Pond Preparation: Before any remediation work could start the condition of the pond had to be transformed from a passive store to a plant capable of complex retrieval operations. This work included plant and equipment upgrades, removal of redundant structures and the provision of a effluent treatment plant for removing particulate and dissolved activity from the pond water. - Canned Fuel Retrieval: Removal of canned fuel, including oxide and carbide fuels, is the highest priority within the programme. Handling and export equipment required to remove the canned fuel from the pond has been provided and treatment routes developed utilising existing site facilities to allow the fuel to be reprocessed or conditioned for long term storage. - Sludge Retrieval: In excess of 300 m{sup 3} of sludge has accumulated in the pond over many years and is made up of debris arising from fuel and metallic corrosion, wind blown debris and bio-organic materials. The Sludge Retrieval Project has provided the equipment necessary to retrieve the sludge, including skip washer and tipper machines for clearing sludge from the pond skips, equipment for clearing sludge from the pond floor and bays, along with an 'in pond' corral for interim storage of retrieved sludge. Two further projects are providing new plant processing routes, which will initially store and eventually passivate the sludge. - Metal Fuel Retrieval: Metal Fuel from early Windscale Pile operations and various other sources is stored within the pond; the fuel varies considerably in both form and condition. A retrieval project is planned which will provide fuel handling, conditioning, sentencing and export equipment required to remove the metal fuel from the pond for export to on site facilities for interim storage and disposal. - Solid Waste Retrieval: A final retrieval project will provide methods for handling, retrieval, packaging and export of the remaining solid Intermediate Level Waste within the pond. This includes residual metal fuel pieces, fuel cladding (Magnox, aluminium and zircaloy), isotope cartridges, reactor furniture, and miscellaneous activated and contaminated items. Each of the waste streams requires conditioning to allow it to be and disposed of via one of the site treatment plants. - Pond Dewatering and Dismantling: Delivery of the above projects will allow operations to progressively remove the radiological inventory, thereby reducing the hazard/risk posed by the plant. This will then allow subsequent dewatering of the pond and dismantling of the structure. (authors)

  10. Spatial and temporal trends of mercury in water, sediments and biota in a mainstream Canadian reservoir

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, G.P.; Munteanu, N. [G3 Consulting Ltd., Richmond, British Columbia (Canada)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Mercury (Hg) concentrations within several environmental matrices were examined, during high and low water periods of a 1,778.7 kM{sup 2} northern Canada drawdown reservoir, as part of an Environmental Effects Monitoring (EEM) program. Mercury, and 20 other metals, were analyzed in liver tissues of two benthic foraging fish species, Largescale Sucker (Catastomus macrocheilus) and Lake Whitefish (Coregonus clupeaformis). Previous work on the reservoir demonstrated a positive correlation between mercury in muscle tissue and Lake Whitefish weight, Results from the current investigation were compared to historical data from the reservoir and several mercuriferous lakes in the region. Research dating from 1970 indicated elevated Hg concentrations in reservoir water (0.026 to 0.09 ppb) and in Lake Whitefish, with no significant decline noted to date. Hg levels in Whitefish muscle tissue averaged 0.20 ppm and were comparable to post-impoundment concentrations observed in Alberta reservoirs. Sediment and water samples and in situ water profiles were examined at 34 stations throughout the system. Sediments and water underwent a variety of organic and inorganic analyses, including mercury. Spatial and temporal analytical concentration profiles were determined for a variety of specific environmental matrices.

  11. Identifying high-quality pond habitats for Odonata in lowland England: implications for agri-environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Merckx, Thomas

    of ponds) and pollution and eutrophication (e.g. increased use of agrochemicals). Furthermore, the paucity

  12. Description of work for 216-U-Pond test pits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelty, G.G.

    1993-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This description of work (DOW) details the field activities associated with the test pit excavation and soil sampling at the 216- U-10 Pond (U-10 Pond) in the 200 West Area and will serve as a field guide for those performing the work. It will be used in conjunction with the 200-UP-2 Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) Facility Investigation/Corrective Measures Study (DOE-RL 1993a, [LFI]) and Site Characterization Manual (WHC 1988a). Test pits will be constructed to characterize the vertical extent of contaminants in sediments within and beneath the former U-10 pond.

  13. Reservoir Protection (Oklahoma)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Oklahoma Water Resource Board has the authority to make rules for the control of sanitation on all property located within any reservoir or drainage basin. The Board works with the Department...

  14. Reservoir Operation in Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wurbs, Ralph A.

    management of the surface water resources of the various river basins of the state. The operation of these essential water control facilities is examined in this report. Reservoir operation is viewed here from the perspective of deciding how much water...

  15. To Brunswick Folsom Lake

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MASONITE UPPER LAKE LUCERNE WILLIAMS MERIDAN CORTINA PEASE BARRY BOGUE OLIVEHURST HARTER Marysville Yuba

  16. Microsoft Word - Poorman Ponds_CX Memo_20120607.docx

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Poorman Ponds Property Funding Fish and Wildlife Project No.: 2009-003-00 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.25 Transfer, lease, disposition,...

  17. Sandia National Laboratories: Sandian Todd Lane's "Pond Crash...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    October 11th as one of the key EERE-OBP funded activities on algal pond stabilityproductivity. This is a great recognition of the efforts of Todd and his team, as well as a very...

  18. GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR SIMULATIONS WITH SHAFT79

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pruess, Karsten

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    that well blocks must geothermal reservoir s·tudies, paperof Califomia. LBL-10066 GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR SIMULATIONSbe presented at the Fifth Geothermal Reservoir Engineering

  19. ANNOTATED RESEARCH BIBLIOGRAPHY FOR GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sudo!, G.A

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    o f Energy from Fractured Geothermal Reservoirs. Dal las:well behavior, fractured matrix reservoir behavior, wellEnergy from Fractured Geothermal Reservoirs." Society of ~

  20. ANALYSIS OF PRODUCTION DECLINE IN GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zais, E.J.; Bodvarsson, G.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Garg, 1978, Reservoir Engineering Data: Wai.akei Geothermalof the reservoir engineer because production data are alwaysGeothermal Reservoirs IV. DATA PROCESSING • • • . • Data

  1. 2101-M pond closure plan. Volume 1, Revision 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Izatt, R. D.; Lerch, R. E.

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes activities for the closure of a surface impoundment (2101-M Pond) at the Hanford Site. The 2101-H Pond was initially constructed in 1953 to serve as a drainage collection area for the 2101-H Building. (Until the Basalt Waste Isolation Project (BWIP) Laboratory was constructed in the 2101-M Building in 1979--1981, the only source contributing discharge to the pond was condensate water from the 2101-H Building heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) system. The drains for the BWIP Laboratory rooms were plumbed into a 4-in., cast-iron, low-pressure drain pipe that carries waste water from the HVAC system to the pond. During the active life of the BWIP Laboratory, solutions of dissolved barium in groundwater samples were discharged to the 2101-M Pond via the laboratory drains. As a result of the discharges, a Part A permit application was initially submitted to the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) in August 1986 which designates the 2101-M Pond as a surface impoundment.

  2. A reservoir management strategy for multilayered reservoirs in eastern Venezuela

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Espinel Diaz, Arnaldo Leopoldo

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A reservoir management strategy has been developed for a field located in eastern Venezuela. The field contains deep, high pressure, multilayer reservoirs. A thorough formation evaluation was accomplished using the log data, core data, PVT data...

  3. Easton Pond Business Center | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualPropertyd8c-a9ae-f8521cbb8489 No revision| Open Jump to:(RES-AEI)CoastSoda Lake

  4. Diagenesis and fluid evolution of deeply buried Permian (Rotliegende) gas reservoirs, Northwest Germany

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gaupp, R. (Johannes Gutenberg Universitaet, Mainz (Germany)); Matter, A.; Ramseyer, K.; Platt, J. (Geologisches Institute der Universitaet, Bern (Switzerland)); Walzebuck, J. (NAM Nederlands Aardolie Maatschappij, Assen (Netherlands))

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Depositional environment and tectonic setting were important in the diagenesis and evolution of reservoir properties in the Rotliegende sequence of the North German Basin. Facies belts paralleling the edge of a central saline lake controlled the distribution of early and shallow burial cements. Lake shoreline sands with radial chlorite cement show the best reservoir properties in the study area. Juxtaposition of Rotliegende deposits against either Carboniferous Coal Measures or Late Permian (Zechstein) evaporites by faulting resulted in cross-formational fluid exchange. The introduction of fluids from Carboniferous Coal Measures into Rotliegende reservoirs produced intense clay cementation, significantly reducing rock permeabilities. Influx of Zechstein fluids favored precipitation of late carbonate and anhydrite cements. Cross-formational and fault-related fluid flow was enhanced during periods of fault activity. 50 refs., 15 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Reinjection into geothermal reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bodvarsson, G.S.; Stefansson, V.

    1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Reinjection of geothermal wastewater is practiced as a means of disposal and for reservoir pressure support. Various aspects of reinjection are discussed, both in terms of theoretical studies as well as specific field examples. The discussion focuses on the major effects of reinjection, including pressure maintenance and chemical and thermal effects. (ACR)

  6. Applying reservoir characterization technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lake, L.W.

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    While reservoir characterization is an old discipline, only within the last 10 years have engineers and scientists been able to make quantitative descriptions, due mostly to improvements in high-resolution computational power, sophisticated graphics, and geostatistics. This paper summarizes what has been learned during the past decade by using these technologies.

  7. LAKE COLUSA SAN JOAQUIN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DEL NORTE SISKIYOU MODOC LASSEN BUTTE PLUMAS GLENN LAKE COLUSA SUTTER YUBA NEVADA SIERRA PLACER EL ¡¢ 1 0 1 "!9 6 Lake Tahoe HUMBOLDT TEHAMA MENDOCINO DEL NORTE SISKIYOU MODOC LASSEN BUTTE PLUMAS GLENN

  8. An Internet survey of private pond owners and managers in Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schonrock, April Elizabeth

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    pond owners got the information they used to deal with pond management problems. A secondary emphasis of the project was to examine the potential presented by the Internet for use in this type of information gathering and distribution for Texas...

  9. National Science Foundation, Lake Hoare, Antarctica | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    National Science Foundation, Lake Hoare, Antarctica National Science Foundation, Lake Hoare, Antarctica Photo of a Photovoltaic System Located at Lake Hoare, Antarctica Lake Hoare...

  10. Performance testing of the Sandy Pond HVDC converter terminal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donahue, J.A.; Fisher, D.A.; Railing, B.D.; Tatro, P.J. (New England Power Service Co., Westborough, MA (United States))

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Results of several performance tests for the 1,800 MW Sandy Pond HVDC converter terminal are presented and discussed. The work progressed during 1990 and 1991 and included tests for power line carrier interference, audible sound, ac and dc line faults and dc harmonic performance. The testing was conducted as part of the commissioning program for the first stage of the Quebec-New England Phase 2 multi-terminal system. In this stage, the Radisson (Quebec) and Sandy Pond (New England) terminals are operational.

  11. Reservoir Outflow (RESOUT) Model 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Purvis, Stuart Travis

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    rating tables for a comprehensive range of outlet structure types and configurations, simulating a dam breach, routing a hydrograph through the reservoir, and performing drawdown analyses. The thesis describes the basic equations and computational... of Rating Curves Rating Curves for Uncontrolled Ogee Spillways Rating Curves for Uncontrolled Broad-crested Spillways Rating Curves for Spillway Gates Rating Curves for Drop Inlet Spillways Rating Curves for Outlet Works Breach Simulation Storage...

  12. Characterization of oil and gas reservoir heterogeneity. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tyler, N.; Barton, M.D.; Bebout, D.G.; Fisher, R.S.; Grigsby, J.D.; Guevara, E.; Holtz, M.; Kerans, C.; Nance, H.S.; Levey, R.A.

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Research described In this report addresses the internal architecture of two specific reservoir types: restricted-platform carbonates and fluvial-deltaic sandstones. Together, these two reservoir types contain more than two-thirds of the unrecovered mobile oil remaining ill Texas. The approach followed in this study was to develop a strong understanding of the styles of heterogeneity of these reservoir types based on a detailed outcrop description and a translation of these findings into optimized recovery strategies in select subsurface analogs. Research targeted Grayburg Formation restricted-platform carbonate outcrops along the Algerita Escarpment and In Stone Canyon In southeastern New Mexico and Ferron deltaic sandstones in central Utah as analogs for the North Foster (Grayburg) and Lake Creek (Wilcox) units, respectively. In both settings, sequence-stratigraphic style profoundly influenced between-well architectural fabric and permeability structure. It is concluded that reservoirs of different depositional origins can therefore be categorized Into a ``heterogeneity matrix`` based on varying intensity of vertical and lateral heterogeneity. The utility of the matrix is that it allows prediction of the nature and location of remaining mobile oil. Highly stratified reservoirs such as the Grayburg, for example, will contain a large proportion of vertically bypassed oil; thus, an appropriate recovery strategy will be waterflood optimization and profile modification. Laterally heterogeneous reservoirs such as deltaic distributary systems would benefit from targeted infill drilling (possibly with horizontal wells) and improved areal sweep efficiency. Potential for advanced recovery of remaining mobile oil through heterogeneity-based advanced secondary recovery strategies In Texas is projected to be an Incremental 16 Bbbl. In the Lower 48 States this target may be as much as 45 Bbbl at low to moderate oil prices over the near- to mid-term.

  13. Groundwater impact assessment report for the 284-WB Powerplant Ponds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alexander, D.J.; Johnson, V.G.; Lindsey, K.A.

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As required by the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-17-00A), this report assesses the impact of wastewater discharged to the 284-WB Powerplant Ponds on groundwater quality. The assessment reported herein expands upon the initial analysis conducted between 1989 and 1990 for the Liquid Effluent Study Final Project Plan.

  14. Managing Florida Ponds for Fishing 1 Charles E. Cichra2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    CIR802 Managing Florida Ponds for Fishing 1 Charles E. Cichra2 1. This document is CIR802, one-out and impounded waters, limerock pits, and sand or gravel pits, commonly called borrow pits. Fishing pressure in fishing as a source of recreation and food. Competition for public fishery resources, coupled

  15. Network Modeling of Arctic Melt Ponds Meenakshi Barjatiaa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golden, Kenneth M.

    . In late spring and summer, the albedo of the ice pack is determined primarily by melt ponds that form­albedo feedback [7], and has played a significant role in the decline of the summer Arctic ice pack [8]. Sea ice precipitous losses of summer Arctic sea ice have outpaced the pro- jections of most climate models. Efforts

  16. Biomass and productivity of trematode parasites in pond ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Pieter

    Biomass and productivity of trematode parasites in pond ecosystems Daniel L. Preston*, Sarah A often measure the biomass and productivity of organisms to understand the importance of populations and dissections of over 1600 aquatic invertebrate and amphib- ian hosts, we calculated the ecosystem-level biomass

  17. X] THEPROPAGATIONOF BLACK BASS IN PONDS. BY WILLIAM F. PAGE,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    X¯] THEPROPAGATIONOF BLACK BASS IN PONDS. BY WILLIAM F. PAGE, Superintendent U.S. Fish Commission to add to the fish supply by broadening the habitat of the black bass. But while fish-culturists were States, engaged in fish-culture were annually, at the period of the bass spawning, devoting every energy

  18. Water Management: Clearing Cloudy and Muddy Water in Ponds and Lakes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , including bass, to see and capture prey. Muddy waters may impart a bad flavor to fish. Such waters also can- tion for game fish and other aquatic animals. Cloudy water interferes with the ability of certain fish-feeding fish such as carp and bullheads also can affect water clarity. These animals root and stir up

  19. Lake Granbury and Lake Whitney Assessment Initiative

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris, B.L.; Roelke, Daniel; Grover, James; Brooks, Bryan

    bloom level, occurred when 7-day accumulated inflows were <10 x 106 m3 for Lake Possum Kingdom, <20 x 106 m3 for Lake Granbury and conservatively <40 x 106 m3 for Lake Whitney. These bloom inflow-thresholds corresponded to system flushing rates of 0...-24 h at -20? C. Extracts were filtered (0.2 ?m) and injected (300 ul) into an HPLC system equipped with reverse-phase C18 columns in series (Rainin Microsorb-MV, 0.46 x 10 cm, 3mm, Vydac 201TP, 0.46 x 25cm, 5mm). A nonlinear binary gradient...

  20. Sedimentation and the economics of selecting an optimum reservoir size

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miltz, D.; White, D.C.

    1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An easily reproducible methodology is presented for the economic selection of an optimal reservoir size given an annual sedimentation rate. The optimal capacity is that at which the marginal cost of constructing additional storage capacity is equal to the dredging costs avoided by having that additional capacity available to store sediment. The cost implications of misestimating dredging costs, construction costs, and sediment delivery rates are investigated. In general, it is shown that oversizing is a rational response to uncertainty in the estimation of parameters. The sensitivity of the results to alternative discount rates is also discussed. The theoretical discussion is illustrated with a case study drawn from Highland Silver Lake in southwestern Illinois.

  1. Five synthetic rubber pond liners protect against leakage and weather

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weinreich, G.; Hofsess, R.; Toy, D.A.

    1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    More than 137 million cu ft of pipeline quality gas is produced daily at the Great Plains Coal Gasification Project in Beulah, ND. The facility is the only commercial plant in the US which produces gaseous and liquid fuels from low-grade coal. The plant needs to recycle and reuse 100% of the organic process wastewater, requiring a complicated treatment system of cooling towers, evaporators, a liquid waste incinerator and other units, each of which has its own surge pond. In total, the plant has five surge ponds which hold near 80 million gallons. To prevent the seepage of wastewater from the surge ponds into the ground water, a liner material was needed that would fulfill several design criteria. The liner had to be resistant to degradation caused by a very wide range of temperatures and it had to have a low coefficient of expansion. Resistance to both organic and inorganic chemical substances was another key requirement. Finally, the liner material needed to be easy to seam during field installation. An elastomeric membrane liner using the synthetic rubber and reinforcing polyester scrim best met the plant's requirements. One of the primary reasons for selecting synthetic rubber was its low coefficient of expansion. Extreme seasonal weather conditions, with temperatures ranging from below zero in the winter to over 100/sup 0/F in the summer, are common in North Dakota. And because the level of wastewater in the ponds constantly varies, a liner is frequently exposed to the elements. Overall, the synthetic rubber pond liners have performed through extreme weather conditions and have proven to be a cost-effective solution to wastewater storage at the gasification project.

  2. Estimating lake susceptibility to acidification due to acid deposition. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nichols, D.S.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    National Forest System lands contain a wide variety of surface waters ranging from small, sensitive, remote wilderness lakes to large, heavily used recreational reservoirs. The USDA Forest Service is responsible for the management and protection of these diverse water resources. Considerations of impacts on water quantity and quality are an integral part of most land-use decisions made by Forest Service land managers. The paper describes a graphical method of using lake chemistry data and rates of sulfur (and nitrogen) deposition to estimate the likelihood of lakes becoming acidified if subjected to increased levels of deposition.

  3. Lake Improvement District Law and County Lake Improvement Program (Minnesota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Lake Improvement Districts may be established by county boards in order to “improve the quality of water in lakes; provide for reasonable assurance of water quantity in lakes, where feasible and...

  4. Fluid Flow Simulation in Fractured Reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sarkar, Sudipta

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study is to analyze fluid flow in fractured reservoirs. In most petroleum reservoirs, particularly carbonate reservoirs and some tight sands, natural fractures play a critical role in controlling fluid ...

  5. ANNOTATED RESEARCH BIBLIOGRAPHY FOR GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sudo!, G.A

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    results w i t h other reservoir data. Ramey [1974] definesone-dimen- sional data on reservoir drainage which has beenC. R. , Goodwill D. Data t o Reservoir Engine H. Application

  6. Reservoir permeability from seismic attribute analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goloshubin, G.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the reservoir permeability based on seismic and log data.seismic reservoir response based on well and 3D seismic datadata analysis we suggest seismic imaging of the reservoir

  7. Saving an Underground Reservoir 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    significant part of the region?s agricultural economy. Though the area has few rivers and lakes, underneath it lies a supply of water that has provided groundwater for developing this economy. This underground water, the Ogallala Aquifer, is a finite... resource. The amount of water seeping back into the aquifer is much less than the water taken out, especially in the southern half of the aquifer, which spreads out from western Kansas to the High Plains of Texas. ?Water levels are declining 2 to 4...

  8. Texas' Natural Lake

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in Texas A&M?s Department of Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences, said the summary report synthesizes the ?state of knowl- edge? about the geography, hydrology, ecology and environmental impacts affecting Caddo Lake and Big Cypress Creek. At the second...; and heavy metals, including mercury found in the lignite coal used to power electricity-generating plants, are accumulating in fish tissues. Texas? Natural Lake tx H2O | pg. 2 Research to help restore environmental flows to Caddo Lake Scientists...

  9. Bachaquero-01 reservoir, Venezuela-increasing oil production by switching from cyclic steam injection to steamflooding using horizontal wells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodriguez, Manuel Gregorio

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Bachaquero-01 reservoir of the Lagunillas field is located in the eastern part of the Maracaibo Lake, Venezuela. The field is operated by the national oil company of Venezuela, PDVSA (Petroleos de Venezuela, S.A.). The Bachaquero-01 heavy oil...

  10. Lake Ontario Maritime Cultural Landscape

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ford, Benjamin L.

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    ........................................................................................... 64 Ice ................................................................................................... 66 Storms............................................................................................. 67 Lake Fauna and Ecology............................................................................... 342 Introduction .................................................................................... 342 Ephemeral Landscapes and Ice Roads ........................................... 342 Boundaries and the Pan-Lake Identity...

  11. Characterization of geothermal reservoir crack patterns using...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    reservoir crack patterns using shear-wave splitting Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Characterization of geothermal reservoir...

  12. Hydrological and Geochemical Investigations of Selenium Behavior at Kesterson Reservoir

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zawislanski, P.T.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ecological Characterization of Kesterson Reservoir. AnnualEcological Characterization of Kesterson Reservoir. Annual

  13. TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY Reservoir Geophysics Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    includes applications to clastic reservoirs, heavy oil reservoirs, gas/oil shale, gas hydrates. Basic

  14. An environmental simulation of a shrimp mariculture pond

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whitson, John Lee

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . 39 19 Zooplankton Response to Changes in ZMORT . . 20 Detritus Pool Response to Changes in ZMORT . 42 43 vln Figure Pa. ge 21 Shrimp Biomass Response to Changes in ZMORT . . 22 Shrimp Individual Body Weight Response to Changes in ZMORT... . Zooplankton 30 33 EVALUATION OF MANAGEMENT STRATEGIES . . 46 Evaluation of Stocking Densities and Feeding Rates 46 SUMMARY . REFERENCES 59 60 VITA 67 vss LIST OF FIGURES Figure Page 1 Pond Model Biomass Flows 2 Dissolved Oxygen and Population...

  15. An environmental simulation of a shrimp mariculture pond 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whitson, John Lee

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . 39 19 Zooplankton Response to Changes in ZMORT . . 20 Detritus Pool Response to Changes in ZMORT . 42 43 vln Figure Pa. ge 21 Shrimp Biomass Response to Changes in ZMORT . . 22 Shrimp Individual Body Weight Response to Changes in ZMORT... . Zooplankton 30 33 EVALUATION OF MANAGEMENT STRATEGIES . . 46 Evaluation of Stocking Densities and Feeding Rates 46 SUMMARY . REFERENCES 59 60 VITA 67 vss LIST OF FIGURES Figure Page 1 Pond Model Biomass Flows 2 Dissolved Oxygen and Population...

  16. Analysis of real-time reservoir monitoring : reservoirs, strategies, & modeling.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mani, Seethambal S.; van Bloemen Waanders, Bart Gustaaf; Cooper, Scott Patrick; Jakaboski, Blake Elaine; Normann, Randy Allen; Jennings, Jim (University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX); Gilbert, Bob (University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX); Lake, Larry W. (University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX); Weiss, Chester Joseph; Lorenz, John Clay; Elbring, Gregory Jay; Wheeler, Mary Fanett (University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX); Thomas, Sunil G. (University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX); Rightley, Michael J.; Rodriguez, Adolfo (University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX); Klie, Hector (University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX); Banchs, Rafael (University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX); Nunez, Emilio J. (University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX); Jablonowski, Chris (University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX)

    2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The project objective was to detail better ways to assess and exploit intelligent oil and gas field information through improved modeling, sensor technology, and process control to increase ultimate recovery of domestic hydrocarbons. To meet this objective we investigated the use of permanent downhole sensors systems (Smart Wells) whose data is fed real-time into computational reservoir models that are integrated with optimized production control systems. The project utilized a three-pronged approach (1) a value of information analysis to address the economic advantages, (2) reservoir simulation modeling and control optimization to prove the capability, and (3) evaluation of new generation sensor packaging to survive the borehole environment for long periods of time. The Value of Information (VOI) decision tree method was developed and used to assess the economic advantage of using the proposed technology; the VOI demonstrated the increased subsurface resolution through additional sensor data. Our findings show that the VOI studies are a practical means of ascertaining the value associated with a technology, in this case application of sensors to production. The procedure acknowledges the uncertainty in predictions but nevertheless assigns monetary value to the predictions. The best aspect of the procedure is that it builds consensus within interdisciplinary teams The reservoir simulation and modeling aspect of the project was developed to show the capability of exploiting sensor information both for reservoir characterization and to optimize control of the production system. Our findings indicate history matching is improved as more information is added to the objective function, clearly indicating that sensor information can help in reducing the uncertainty associated with reservoir characterization. Additional findings and approaches used are described in detail within the report. The next generation sensors aspect of the project evaluated sensors and packaging survivability issues. Our findings indicate that packaging represents the most significant technical challenge associated with application of sensors in the downhole environment for long periods (5+ years) of time. These issues are described in detail within the report. The impact of successful reservoir monitoring programs and coincident improved reservoir management is measured by the production of additional oil and gas volumes from existing reservoirs, revitalization of nearly depleted reservoirs, possible re-establishment of already abandoned reservoirs, and improved economics for all cases. Smart Well monitoring provides the means to understand how a reservoir process is developing and to provide active reservoir management. At the same time it also provides data for developing high-fidelity simulation models. This work has been a joint effort with Sandia National Laboratories and UT-Austin's Bureau of Economic Geology, Department of Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering, and the Institute of Computational and Engineering Mathematics.

  17. TRITIUM RESERVOIR STRUCTURAL PERFORMANCE PREDICTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lam, P.S.; Morgan, M.J

    2005-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The burst test is used to assess the material performance of tritium reservoirs in the surveillance program in which reservoirs have been in service for extended periods of time. A materials system model and finite element procedure were developed under a Savannah River Site Plant-Directed Research and Development (PDRD) program to predict the structural response under a full range of loading and aged material conditions of the reservoir. The results show that the predicted burst pressure and volume ductility are in good agreement with the actual burst test results for the unexposed units. The material tensile properties used in the calculations were obtained from a curved tensile specimen harvested from a companion reservoir by Electric Discharge Machining (EDM). In the absence of exposed and aged material tensile data, literature data were used for demonstrating the methodology in terms of the helium-3 concentration in the metal and the depth of penetration in the reservoir sidewall. It can be shown that the volume ductility decreases significantly with the presence of tritium and its decay product, helium-3, in the metal, as was observed in the laboratory-controlled burst tests. The model and analytical procedure provides a predictive tool for reservoir structural integrity under aging conditions. It is recommended that benchmark tests and analysis for aged materials be performed. The methodology can be augmented to predict performance for reservoir with flaws.

  18. Rock Physics Based Determination of Reservoir Microstructure for Reservoir Characterization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adesokan, Hamid 1976-

    2013-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the most important, but often ignored, factors affecting the transport and the seismic properties of hydrocarbon reservoir is pore shape. Transport properties depend on the dimensions, geometry, and distribution of pores and cracks. Knowledge...

  19. ANNOTATED RESEARCH BIBLIOGRAPHY FOR GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sudo!, G.A

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    reservoir engineering research program a t the University of Colorado is described. Physical characterization

  20. Damage and plastic deformation of reservoir rocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ze'ev, Reches

    Damage and plastic deformation of reservoir rocks: Part 1. Damage fracturing Seth Busetti, Kyran mechanics, fluid flow in fractured reservoirs, and geomechanics in nonconventional reservoirs. Kyran Mish finite deformation of reservoir rocks. We present an at- tempt to eliminate the main limitations

  1. TopTop--Down Intelligent ReservoirDown Intelligent Reservoir Modeling (TDIRM)Modeling (TDIRM)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    Reservoir ModelingModeling · In top-down modeling we start from production data and try to deduce a pictureTopTop--Down Intelligent ReservoirDown Intelligent Reservoir Modeling (TDIRM)Modeling (TDIRM) A NEW APPROACH IN RESERVOIR MODELING BY INTEGRATING CLASSIC RESERVOIR ENGINEERING WITH ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE

  2. Growth, survival, distribution, and population estimates of penaeid shrimp in fertilized and unfertilized brackish water ponds receiving thermal effluents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Furness, Gary Neal

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    aquariums 3 and 4. Study began at 1000 hours on August 12 . 90 Growth and food conversion ratios (FCR) of white shrimp in fertilized (F) ponds 2, 4, and 6 which received weekly applications of 45-0-0 fertilizer and in unfertilized ponds (UF) 3 and 5 zx...; UF designates ponds receiving no fertilizer. Ponds 2 and 3 were stocked with 7, 500 shrimp; ponds 4-6 were stocked with 5, 000 shrimp Heavy metal concentrations of tail meat of samples from fertilized (F) ponds 2, 4, and 6, and unfertilized (UF...

  3. Reservoir characterization using wavelet transforms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rivera Vega, Nestor

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Automated detection of geological boundaries and determination of cyclic events controlling deposition can facilitate stratigraphic analysis and reservoir characterization. This study applies the wavelet transformation, a recent advance in signal...

  4. Responses of phtyoplankton photosynthesis and phosphorus kinetics to resuspended sediments in copper sulfate-treated ponds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nalewajko, C. [Univ. of Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Prepas, E.E. [Univ. of Alberta, Edmonton (Canada)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Six farm ponds (dugouts) and one lake that differ in the history of copper sulfate (CuSO{sub 4}) treatment were selected for studies of effects of sediments resuspension on phytoplankton. All sites are located within 50 km of Peace River, Alberta, and are shallow, hardwater, and eutrophic. Effects of sediment resuspension on phytoplankton photosynthesis were assessed by changes in the photosynthesis-irradiance P-D curve parameters, Pmax and {alpha}, after addition of sediment at 2% v/v to lakewater samples; the effects on phytoplankton P-state were assessed by changes in {sup 32}PO{sub 4} turnover time. Copper concentrations in sediments of Gour No. 4, the dugout that had received the largest dosage of CuSO{sub 4}, were 60-times greater than untreated sites but were only 1.5 to 3-times greater at the other treated sites. Changes of Pmax and {alpha} were not correlated with Cu concentrations in the sediments. Instead, the prevailing P-state in lakewater could better explain the observed trends in Pmax after sediment addition. Pmax values decreased at sites where phytoplankton were P-limited ({sup 32} P-PO{sub 4} turnover time <63 min) and increased at more P-sufficient sites ({sup 32}P-PO{sub 4} turnover time >63 min). Stimulation of Pmax and increase in {sup 32}P-PO{sub 4} turnover time were positively correlated. With the exception of Gour No. 4, values of a increased in all treatments. Similar changes in Pmax and a in response to sediment addition occurred in laboratory experiments with P-sufficient cultures of Anabaena flos-aquae. We suggest that, with the exception of grossly Cu-polluted sediments, resuspension of sediments in waters previously treated with CuSO{sub 4} will enhance phytoplankton photosynthesis by increasing P availability, and possibly by supplying Cu at trace metal levels. 25 refs., 4 figs., 6 tabs.

  5. Lake Preservation (Indiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The construction, reconstruction, recleaning, or repair of a dam, ditch, or other project is prohibited when the action is likely to lower the water level of a public freshwater lake, regulated or...

  6. MHK Projects/Twin Pond | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRose Bend < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation,Thames isTurnbullPond

  7. City of Pond Creek, Oklahoma (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, clickInformation Smyrna Beach, FloridaCity of Pender, NebraskaPeru,CityPond

  8. STATUS OF GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING MANAGEMENT PROGRAM ("GREMP") -DECEMBER, 1979

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howard, J. H.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the characteristics of a geothermal reservoir: Items 2, 6,new data important to geothermal reservoir engineering prac-forecast performance of the geothermal reservoir and bore

  9. GMINC - A MESH GENERATOR FOR FLOW SIMULATIONS IN FRACTURED RESERVOIRS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pruess, K.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Flow in Naturally Fractured Reservoirs, Society of Petroleumfor Naturally Fractured Reservoirs, paper SPE-11688,Determining Naturally Fractured Reservoir Properties by Well

  10. Analysis of flow behavior in fractured lithophysal reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Jianchun; Bodvarsson, G.S.; Wu, Yu-Shu

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    R. , 1980. Naturally Fractured Reservoirs, Petroleum, Tulsa,bounded naturally fractured reservoirs. Soc. Pet. Eng. J.test in a naturally fractured reservoir. J. Pet. Tech. 1295–

  11. Tracer Testing for Estimating Heat Transfer Area in Fractured Reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pruess, Karsten; van Heel, Ton; Shan, Chao

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Heat Flow in Fractured Reservoirs, SPE Advanced TechnologyTransfer Area in Fractured Reservoirs Karsten Pruess 1 , Tonbehavior arises in fractured reservoirs. As cold injected

  12. STATUS OF GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING MANAGEMENT PROGRAM ("GREMP") -DECEMBER, 1979

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howard, J. H.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Summary of reservoir engineering data: Wairakei Geothermaland new data important to geothermal reservoir engineeringdata and other information related to geothermal reservoir

  13. SUMMARY OF RESERVOIR ENGINEERING DATA: WAIRAKEI GEOTHERMAL FIELD, NEW ZEALAND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pritchett, J.W.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    W. , L. F. Rice "Reservoir Engineering Data: thermal Field,Summary of Reservoir Engineering Data: Wairakei GeothermalSUMMARY OF RESERVOIR ENGINEERING DATA: WAIRAKEI GEOTHERMAL

  14. Hydrological and Geochemical Investigations of Selenium Behavior at Kesterson Reservoir

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zawislanski, P.T.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Kesterson Reservoir, and supplements data provided in1991). The Reservoir-wide sampling data has been reviewed toinventory at Kesterson Reservoir. The data presented herein

  15. SUMMARY OF RESERVOIR ENGINEERING DATA: WAIRAKEI GEOTHERMAL FIELD, NEW ZEALAND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pritchett, J.W.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    W. , L. F. Rice "Reservoir Engineering Data: thermal Field,Summary of Reservoir Engineering Data: Wairakei GeothermalSUMMARY OF RESERVOIR ENGINEERING DATA: WAIRAKEI GEOTHERMAL

  16. GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING MANGEMENT PROGRAM PLAN (GREMP PLAN)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bloomster, C.H.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in data interpretation, and reservoir performance as relatedgeothermal reservoir, the acquisition of data on the v i s cfield data and for modeling reservoir performance. such

  17. A STOCHASTIC METHOD FOR MODELING FLUID DISPLACEMENT IN PETROLEUM RESERVOIRS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, C.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    FLUID DISPLACEMENT IN PETROLEUM RESERVOIRS C. Anderson andFLUID DISPLACEMENT IN PETROLEUM RESERVOIRS C. Anderson andachieve optimal recovery of petroleum from a reservoir, it

  18. Application of Integrated Reservoir Management and Reservoir Characterization to Optimize Infill Drilling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    P. K. Pande

    1998-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Initial drilling of wells on a uniform spacing, without regard to reservoir performance and characterization, must become a process of the past. Such efforts do not optimize reservoir development as they fail to account for the complex nature of reservoir heterogeneities present in many low permeability reservoirs, and carbonate reservoirs in particular. These reservoirs are typically characterized by: o Large, discontinuous pay intervals o Vertical and lateral changes in reservoir properties o Low reservoir energy o High residual oil saturation o Low recovery efficiency

  19. QUAD RESIDENCE POND ROAD/SENTINEL ROAD LOT CONSTRUCTION August 21, 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    entry/exit for the combined lot, the existing Pond Road lot entrance is being expanded to provide an additional entry/exit laneway and to further remove vehicle queuing from Pond Road. All spaces within the Parking Services office at 4167365335. 2) Entrance/Exit Construction and Changes Work to expand

  20. Fertilization of Fresh Water Fish Ponds 1 Craig Watson and Charles E. Cichra2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    FA17 Fertilization of Fresh Water Fish Ponds 1 Craig Watson and Charles E. Cichra2 1. This document. If a fish species which consumes small natural foods is grown, such as the bluegill or golden shiner, then pond fertilization can increase the production of these fish. Fertilizers provide nutrients

  1. SUDS Ponds in Scotland Performance Outcomes to Date Institute of Ecology & Resource Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heal, Kate

    been widely constructed in Scotland because the wet climate and low hydraulic conductivity of soils limit infiltration options at many sites. Furthermore, the construction of SUDS ponds has not involved1 SUDS Ponds in Scotland ­ Performance Outcomes to Date KATE HEAL Institute of Ecology & Resource

  2. Proper pond management practices should always start with an assessment and inspection of the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Elizabeth W.

    1 Proper pond management practices should always start with an assessment and inspection that collects surface runoff from the surrounding land. College of Agricultural Sciences · Cooperative Extension source, it is a good idea to establish a buffer strip of vegetation around the pond to trap sediment

  3. Whether for aesthetics or for fishing pleasure, most pond owners are interested in stocking and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Elizabeth W.

    combination of fishes in Pennsylvania ponds. Either smallmouth or largemouth bass are suitable although ponds. Bass offer excellent sport fishing opportunities, while bluegills provide a food base for bass and good fishing for youngsters. When stocking these fish together, bass should be one year older than

  4. Response of Salt Marsh Ponds to Eutropication Austin N. Ritter1,3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vallino, Joseph J.

    Response of Salt Marsh Ponds to Eutropication Austin N. Ritter1,3 , David Dodge1 , Linda A. Deegan2 examined the response of New England salt marsh ponds to nutrient loading via flooding tidal water as part of nutrient (70 uM nitrate and 4uM phosphate). Our results indicate that gross nitrate processing in salt

  5. A model of melt pond evolution on sea ice P. D. Taylor and D. L. Feltham

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feltham, Daniel

    short-wave radiation. The difference in solar energy ab- sorption between pond-covered and bare sea ice Observation and Modelling, Department of Space and Climate Physics, University College London, London, UK ponds influence the summertime energy and mass balance through the albedo-feedback mechanism [Ebert

  6. Investigation of the suitability of a geosynthetic clay liner system for the El Paso Solar Pond

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robbins, M.C.; Lu, H.; Swift, A.H.P. Jr. [Univ. of Texas, El Paso, TX (United States). Mechanical and Industrial Engineering Dept.

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The El Paso Solar Pond Project experienced a complete failure of its XR-5 8130 (SP) membrane liner. This paper will summarize the XR-5 8130 (SP) liner failure analysis, and provide design and installation procedures of its replacement: a geosynthetic clay liner (GCL). This application represents the first use of a GCL in a solar pond. Geosynthetic clay liners offer major advantages over membrane liners. Unlike membrane liners, clay liners are puncture-proof, have predictable permeability, and are self-healing. Furthermore, the cost of clay liners is less than that of membrane liners. However, disagreement exists as to the efficacy of clay liners in solar ponds. The high temperatures and salinity of the pond are factors which cause the most concern. Most information available for clay liners is in conjunction with municipal waste disposal facilities, although compacted clay liners have been used in Israel and Mexico for solar ponds.

  7. Daily results of the initial operation of the Los Alamos salt-gradient solar pond

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hedstrom, J.C.; Jones, G.F.; Meyer, K.A.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of analysis of the initial data obtained on the Los Alamos National Laboratory salt-gradient solar pond, a 232 m/sup 2/ pond constructed for the primary purpose of studying pond hydrodynamics, are presented. The pond and the data-acquisition system were complete and in full operation by August 14, 1982. By September 21, 1982, the lower convecting zone had reached a temperature of 56/sup 0/C. An energy balance was performed over this period and is presented. Soil conductivity determinations have been made from the data, and the method is discussed. As a result of a leak discovered in the pond in September, a method of determining the leak rate was developed, and the results are included.

  8. Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program : Limnological and Fisheries Monitoring Annual Report 1999.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McLellan, Holly; Lee, Chuck; Scofield, Ben; Pavlik, Deanne

    1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Grand Coulee Dam was constructed in 1939 without a fish ladder, which eliminated steelhead (Onchorhynchus mykiss), chinook salmon (O. twshwastica), coho salmon (O. kisutch) and sockeye salmon (O. nerka) from returning to approximately 1,835 km (1,140 miles) of natal streams and tributaries found in the upper Columbia River Drainage in the United States and Canada. The Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980 gave the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), the authority and responsibility to use its legal and financial resources, 'to protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife to the extent affected by the development and operation of any hydroelectric project of the Columbia River and its tributaries. This is to be done in a manner consistent with the program adopted by the Northwest Power Planning Council (NWPPC), and the purposes of the Act' (NWPPC, 1987). With the phrase 'protect, mitigate and enhance', Congress signaled its intent that the NWPPC's fish and wildlife program should do more than avoid future hydroelectric damage to the basin's fish and wildlife. The program must also counter past damage, work toward rebuilding those fish and wildlife populations that have been harmed by the hydropower system, protect the Columbia Basin's fish and wildlife resources, and mitigate for harm caused by decades of hydroelectric development and operations. By law, this program is limited to measures that deal with impacts created by the development, operation and management of hydroelectric facilities on the Columbia River and its tributaries. However, off-site enhancement projects are used to address the effects of the hydropower system on fish and wildlife (NWPPC 1987). Resident game fish populations have been established in Franklin D. Roosevelt Lake, the reservoir behind Grand Coulee Dam, since the extirpation of anadromous fish species. The resident game fish populations are now responsible for attracting a large percentage of the recreational visits to the region. An increase in popularity has placed Lake Roosevelt fifth amongst the most visited State and Federal parks in Washington. Increased use of the reservoir prompted amplified efforts to enhance the Native American subsistence fishery and the resident sport fishery in 1984 with hatchery supplementation of rainbow trout (O. mykiss) and kokanee salmon (O. nerka). This was followed by the formation of the Spokane Tribal Lake Roosevelt Monitoring Project (LRMP) in 1988 and later by formation of the Lake Roosevelt Data Collection Project in 1991. The Lake Roosevelt Data Collection Project began in July 1991 as part of the BPA, Bureau of Reclamation, and U.S. Army Corps of Engineers System Operation Review process. This process sought to develop an operational scenario for the federal Columbia River hydropower system to maximize the in-reservoir fisheries with minimal impacts to all other stakeholders in the management of the Columbia River. The Lake Roosevelt Monitoring/Data Collection Program (LRMP) is the result of a merger between the Lake Roosevelt Monitoring Program (BPA No. 8806300) and the Lake Roosevelt Data Collection Project (BPA No. 9404300). These projects were merged in 1996 forming the Lake Roosevelt Monitoring Program (LRMP), which continues the work historically completed under the separate projects. The LRMP has two main goals. The first is to develop a biological model for Lake Roosevelt that will predict in-reservoir biological responses to a range of water management operational scenarios, and to develop fisheries and reservoir management strategies accordingly. The model will allow identification of lake operations that minimize impacts on lake biota while addressing the needs of other interests (e.g. flood control, hydropower generation, irrigation, and downstream resident and anadromous fisheries). Major components of the model will include: (1) quantification of entrainment and other impacts to phytoplankton, zooplankton and fish caused by reservoir drawdowns and low water retention times; (2) quantification

  9. Lake Ontario Maritime Cultural Landscape 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ford, Benjamin L.

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of the Lake Ontario Maritime Cultural Landscape project was to investigate the nature and distribution of archaeological sites along the northeast shoreline of Lake Ontario while examining the environmental, ...

  10. Comparative Evaluation of Generalized River/Reservoir System Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wurbs, Ralph A.

    This report reviews user-oriented generalized reservoir/river system models. The terms reservoir/river system, reservoir system, reservoir operation, or river basin management "model" or "modeling system" are used synonymously to refer to computer...

  11. INJECTION AND THERMAL BREAKTHROUGH IN FRACTURED GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    injection into a fractured reservoir system. A reservoirIn the case of fractured reservoirs, Equations (25) and (26)c ww q a >> For fractured reservoirs, the former expression

  12. The Carpenteria reservoir redevelopment project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kendall, R.P.; Whitney, E.M.; Krogh, K.E. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Coombs, S. [Pacific Operators Offshore, Inc., Carpinteria, CA (United States); Paul, R.G. [Dept. of the Interior (United States); Voskanian, M.M. [California State Lands Commission, Sacramento, CA (United States); Ershaghi, I. [University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The objective of this project was to develop a simulation-based reservoir management system that could be used to guide the redevelopment of the Carpenteria Offshore Field, which is located just seven miles from Santa Barbara. The system supports geostatistical and geological modeling and reservoir forecasting. Moreover, it is also a shared resource between the field operator, Pacific Operators Offshore, and the mineral owners, the U.S. Department of the Interior and the State of California.

  13. A preliminary analysis of comparable cooling-thermal loading-reservoir ownership as a factor in annual recreation attendance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Darga, Thomas Jerome

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    LAKE FRONT LEASE: AVAILABLE INDEF INI I E ZONED RECREATION FACILITIES: PRIVATE S I'ATE COUNTY-CITY WATER DIST RICT YES NO To aid in understanding how ownership patterns may in reality affect annual attendance, the comparison ot the two... CONTROLLED BUT NOT OWNED LAKE FRONT LEASE: A VAILABLE INDEFINITE ZONED RECREATIO/I FACII ITIES: PRIVATE STATE COUNTY-CITY iJATER DISTRICT X X X X X X X X X X X Braunig reservoir policy does not provide for private access, thus dif Fering...

  14. Optimizing injected solvent fraction in stratified reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moon, Gary Michael

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Waterflooding has become standard practice for extending the productive life of many solution gas drive reservoirs, but has the disadvantage of leaving a substantial residual oil volume in the reservoir. Solvent flooding has been offered as a...

  15. Modeling well performance in compartmentalized gas reservoirs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yusuf, Nurudeen

    2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    for consolidated reservoir cases while synthetic data (generated by the model using known parameters) was used for unconsolidated reservoir cases. In both cases, the Compartmentalized Depletion Model was used to analyze data, and estimate the OGIP and Jg of each...

  16. Modeling well performance in compartmentalized gas reservoirs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yusuf, Nurudeen

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    for consolidated reservoir cases while synthetic data (generated by the model using known parameters) was used for unconsolidated reservoir cases. In both cases, the Compartmentalized Depletion Model was used to analyze data, and estimate the OGIP and Jg of each...

  17. Modeling well performance in compartmentalized gas reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yusuf, Nurudeen

    2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Predicting the performance of wells in compartmentalized reservoirs can be quite challenging to most conventional reservoir engineering tools. The purpose of this research is to develop a Compartmentalized Gas Depletion Model that applies not only...

  18. Modeling well performance in compartmentalized gas reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yusuf, Nurudeen

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Predicting the performance of wells in compartmentalized reservoirs can be quite challenging to most conventional reservoir engineering tools. The purpose of this research is to develop a Compartmentalized Gas Depletion Model that applies not only...

  19. THMC Modeling of EGS Reservoirs ? Continuum through Discontinuum...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Continuum through Discontinuum Representations: Capturing Reservoir Stimulation, Evolution and Induced Seismicity THMC Modeling of EGS Reservoirs Continuum through...

  20. Optimization Online - Managing Hydroelectric Reservoirs over an ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pierre-Luc Carpentier

    2013-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Jul 7, 2013 ... Managing Hydroelectric Reservoirs over an Extended Planning Horizon using a Benders Decomposition Algorithm Exploiting a Memory Loss ...

  1. Naturally fractured reservoirs contain a significant amount of the world oil reserves. A number of these reservoirs contain several

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arbogast, Todd

    Summary Naturally fractured reservoirs contain a significant amount of the world oil reserves simulation of naturally fractured reservoirs is one of the most important, challenging, and computationally intensive problems in reservoir engineering. Parallel reservoir simulators developed for naturally fractured

  2. Lake restoration by dredging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gorini, R.F.

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper is a summary overview of the $17 million Vancouver Lake Restoration Project, the largest project of its type ever undertaken through the Federal Clean Lakes Program. It was funded jointly by the US Environmental Protection Agency, the Washington State Department of Ecology, and the Port of Vancouver. Although the project was conceived in 1965, a nationwide program to help fund such projects did not exist until 1976. Then, final approval was not received until 1981, after many volumes of studies and reviews. Construction was completed in June 1983, after 30 months--6 months ahead of schedule and underbudget. A great deal of time, money, and energy was expended to demonstrate to Federal and state environmental agencies that dredging was a key tool in effecting this lake's restoration.

  3. A LIMNOLOGICAL STUDY OF THE FINGER LAKES OF NEW YORK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 569 Heat supply of the smaller lakes

  4. Study on fine geological modelling of the fluvial sandstone reservoir in Daqing oilfield

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhoa Han-Qing [Daqing Research Institute, Helongjiang (China)

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    These paper aims at developing a method for fine reservoir description in maturing oilfields by using close spaced well logging data. The main productive reservoirs in Daqing oilfield is a set of large fluvial-deltaic deposits in the Songliao Lake Basin, characterized by multi-layers and serious heterogeneities. Various fluvial channel sandstone reservoirs cover a fairly important proportion of reserves. After a long period of water flooding, most of them have turned into high water cut layers, but there are considerable residual reserves within them, which are difficult to find and tap. Making fine reservoir description and developing sound a geological model is essential for tapping residual oil and enhancing oil recovery. The principal reason for relative lower precision of predicting model developed by using geostatistics is incomplete recognition of complex distribution of fluvial reservoirs and their internal architecture`s. Tasking advantage of limited outcrop data from other regions (suppose no outcrop data available in oilfield) can only provide the knowledge of subtle changing of reservoir parameters and internal architecture. For the specific geometry distribution and internal architecture of subsurface reservoirs (such as in produced regions) can be gained only from continuous infilling logging well data available from studied areas. For developing a geological model, we think the first important thing is to characterize sandbodies geometries and their general architecture`s, which are the framework of models, and then the slight changing of interwell parameters and internal architecture`s, which are the contents and cells of the model. An excellent model should possess both of them, but the geometry is the key to model, because it controls the contents and cells distribution within a model.

  5. RATE DECLINE ANALYSIS FOR NATURALLY FRACTURED RESERVOIRS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    RATE DECLINE ANALYSIS FOR NATURALLY FRACTURED RESERVOIRS A REPORT SUBMITTED TO THE DEPARTMENT analylsiis for constant pressure production in a naturally fractured reservoir is presented. The solution, the Warren and Root model which assumes fracturing is perfectly unifom, provides an upper bound of reservoir

  6. STIMULATION AND RESERVOIR ENGINEERING OF GEOTHERMAL RESOURCES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    STIMULATION AND RESERVOIR ENGINEERING OF GEOTHERMAL RESOURCES Paul Kruger and Henry J . Ramey, Jr . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61 Mass Transfer i n Porous and Fractured Media . . . . . . . . . 61 Heat Transfer i n Fractun3d Rock . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67 Geothermal Reservoir Phy.Sica1 PIodels . . . . . . . . . . . . 73 RAD3N I N GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS

  7. Tenth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The workshop contains presentations in the following areas: (1) reservoir engineering research; (2) field development; (3) vapor-dominated systems; (4) the Geysers thermal area; (5) well test analysis; (6) production engineering; (7) reservoir evaluation; (8) geochemistry and injection; (9) numerical simulation; and (10) reservoir physics. (ACR)

  8. Reservoir Characterization Using Intelligent Seismic Inversion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    reservoir performance. Field Development #12;- Issues about the data and problems regarding data analysis characterization studies. - Inverse modeling of reservoir properties from the seismic data is known as seismic inversion. SEISMIC LOGS #12;1. Does a relationship exist between seismic data and reservoir characteristics

  9. Hydrological and geochemical investigations of selenium behavior at Kesterson Reservoir. Progress report, October 1, 1994--September 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zawislanski, P.; Tokunaga, T.; Benson, S.M. [and others

    1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes research relevant to selenium (Se) speciation, fractionation, physical redistribution, reduction and oxidation, and spatial distribution as related to Kesterson Reservoir. The work was carried out by scientists and engineers from the Earth Sciences Division of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory over a two year period from October 1994 to September 1996. Much of the focus of this research was on long-term, Reservoir-wide changes in Se concentrations and distribution; estimation and prediction of the physical extent ephemeral pools; and the quantification and prediction of Se levels in ephemeral pools waters and underlying sediments. Chapter 2 contains descriptions of field monitoring of soil processes. In Section 2.1, elevated Se concentrations observed in groundwater in the northern part of Pond 9 are investigated. The past removal of the original surface soil in the northern Pond 9 area resulted in the enhancement of Se transport into the shallow groundwater in this area. Removal of the most organic-rich surface soil horizon left the remaining profile with a lower capacity to generate and sustain reducing conditions needed to immobilize Se. Furthermore, removal of the lower permeability surface soil left the remaining profile more hydraulically conductive since sands are encountered at fairly shallow depths. These conditions result in Se remaining oxidized down to the 2.00 m depth throughout the year.

  10. Increasing Waterflooding Reservoirs in the Wilmington Oil Field through Improved Reservoir Characterization and Reservoir Management, Class III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koerner, Roy; Clarke, Don; Walker, Scott; Phillips, Chris; Nguyen, John; Moos, Dan; Tagbor, Kwasi

    2001-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This project was intended to increase recoverable waterflood reserves in slope and basin reservoirs through improved reservoir characterization and reservoir management. The particular application of this project is in portions of Fault Blocks IV and V of the Wilmington Oil Field, in Long Beach, California, but the approach is widely applicable in slope and basin reservoirs, transferring technology so that it can be applied in other sections of the Wilmington field and by operators in other slope and basin reservoirs is a primary component of the project.

  11. Lakes_Elec_You

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(FactDepartment ofLetter Report:40PM toLEDControl Concept | DepartmentLakeLakes,

  12. HIGH TEMPERATURE GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schroeder, R.C.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on the Cerro P r i e t o Geothermal F i e l d , Mexicali,e C e r r o P r i e t o Geothermal F i e l d , Baja C a l i1979 HIGH TEMPERATURE GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING R.

  13. -Injection Technology -Geothermal Reservoir Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    For the Period October 1, 1985 through September 30, 1986 DE-ASO7-84ID12529 Stanford Geothermal Program was initiated in fiscal year 1981. The report covers the period from October 1, 1985 through September 30, 1986SGP-TR-107 - Injection Technology - Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Research at Stanford Principal

  14. Prevention of Reservoir Interior Discoloration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arnold, K.F.

    2001-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Contamination is anathema in reservoir production. Some of the contamination is a result of welding and some appears after welding but existed before. Oxygen was documented to be a major contributor to discoloration in welding. This study demonstrates that it can be controlled and that some of the informal cleaning processes contribute to contamination.

  15. The role of reservoir characterization in the reservoir management process (as reflected in the Department of Energy`s reservoir management demonstration program)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fowler, M.L. [BDM-Petroleum Technologies, Bartlesville, OK (United States); Young, M.A.; Madden, M.P. [BDM-Oklahoma, Bartlesville, OK (United States)] [and others

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Optimum reservoir recovery and profitability result from guidance of reservoir practices provided by an effective reservoir management plan. Success in developing the best, most appropriate reservoir management plan requires knowledge and consideration of (1) the reservoir system including rocks, and rock-fluid interactions (i.e., a characterization of the reservoir) as well as wellbores and associated equipment and surface facilities; (2) the technologies available to describe, analyze, and exploit the reservoir; and (3) the business environment under which the plan will be developed and implemented. Reservoir characterization is the essential to gain needed knowledge of the reservoir for reservoir management plan building. Reservoir characterization efforts can be appropriately scaled by considering the reservoir management context under which the plan is being built. Reservoir management plans de-optimize with time as technology and the business environment change or as new reservoir information indicates the reservoir characterization models on which the current plan is based are inadequate. BDM-Oklahoma and the Department of Energy have implemented a program of reservoir management demonstrations to encourage operators with limited resources and experience to learn, implement, and disperse sound reservoir management techniques through cooperative research and development projects whose objectives are to develop reservoir management plans. In each of the three projects currently underway, careful attention to reservoir management context assures a reservoir characterization approach that is sufficient, but not in excess of what is necessary, to devise and implement an effective reservoir management plan.

  16. The growth of Tilapia aurea in ponds receiving laying hen wastes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burns, Robert Paul

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    be seen in Figure 8. The most significant feature of this figure is the trace amounts of nitrates present in the pond receiving the wastes from 200 laying hens (A-10) during the month of August. Higher phyto- plankton densities in that pond (Figure 7...THE GROWTH OF TILAPIA AUREA IN PONDS RECEIVING LAYING HEN WASTES A Thesis by ROBERT PAUL BURNS Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of. MASTER OF SCIENCE December...

  17. Superfund record of decision (EPA Region 3): Saltville Waste Disposal Ponds 5 and 6, operable unit 2, VA, September 29, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Record of Decision (`ROD`) presents the final remedial action selected for Operable Unit 2 (Pond 5 and Pond 6) of the Saltville Waste Disposal Ponds Superfund Site (`Site`), located in Saltville, Virginia. The selected remedy for the Pond 5 area consists of the following major components: Installation of a multi-layered cap over the entire Pond 5 area; Ground water interceptor system; Revision of the effluent discharge limit for the existing Pond 5 Treatment Facility to achieve the current Virginia surface water standard for mercury and any modification of the Pond 5 treatment Facility necessary to achieve the revised discharge limit; The selected remedy for Pond 6 and consists of the following components: A permeable soil cover over the entire Pond 6 area, approximately 40 to 45 arcres, including the demolition debris burial area; and A pH adjustment system to neutralize the discharge from the Pond 6 decant structure.

  18. 4. International reservoir characterization technical conference

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume contains the Proceedings of the Fourth International Reservoir Characterization Technical Conference held March 2-4, 1997 in Houston, Texas. The theme for the conference was Advances in Reservoir Characterization for Effective Reservoir Management. On March 2, 1997, the DOE Class Workshop kicked off with tutorials by Dr. Steve Begg (BP Exploration) and Dr. Ganesh Thakur (Chevron). Tutorial presentations are not included in these Proceedings but may be available from the authors. The conference consisted of the following topics: data acquisition; reservoir modeling; scaling reservoir properties; and managing uncertainty. Selected papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology database.

  19. Pressure maintenance in a volatile oil reservoir

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schuster, Bruce Alan

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . . 40 Cumulative Gas Produced vs. Time - Variable Well Spacing and Injection Pattern 75 76 INTRODUCTION In a typical basin, most shallow oil field can be classified as black oil reservoirs. Phase changes which occur in black oil reservoirs can... of the reservoir fluid. Black oil reservoirs produce oil at low to moderate gas oil ratios generally less than 2, 000 SCF/STB, with stock-tank oil gravities less than 45' API. These reservoirs are also identifled by having formation volume factors less than 2...

  20. Thermal ecology of Naegleria fowleri from a power plant cooling reservoir

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huizinga, H.W. (Illinois State Univ., Normal (USA)); McLaughlin, G.L. (Univ. of Illinois, Urbana (USA))

    1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The pathogenic, free-living amoeba Naegleria fowleri is the causative agent of human primary amebic meningoencephalitis. N. fowleri has been isolated from thermally elevated aquatic environments worldwide, but temperature factors associated with occurrence of the amoeba remain undefined. In this study, a newly created cooling reservoir (Clinton Lake, Illinois) was surveyed for Naegleria spp. before and after thermal additions from a nuclear power plant. Water and sediment samples were collected from heated and unheated arms of the reservoir and analyzed for the presence of thermophilic Naegleria spp. and pathogenic N. fowleri. Amoebae were identified by morphology, in vitro cultivation, temperature tolerance, mouse pathogenicity assay, and DNA restriction fragment length analysis. N. fowleri was isolated from the thermally elevated arm but not from the ambient-temperature arm of the reservoir. The probability of isolating thermophilic Naegleria and pathogenic N. fowleri increased significantly with temperature. Repetitive DNA restriction fragment profiles of the N. fowleri Clinton Lake isolates and a known N. fowleri strain of human origin were homogeneous.

  1. A comparison of Nannochloropsis salina growth performance in two outdoor pond designs: conventional raceways versus the ARID pond with superior temperature management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crowe, Braden J.; Attalah, Said; Agrawal, Shweta; Waller, Peter; Ryan, Randy; Van Wagenen, Jonathan M.; Chavis, Aaron R.; Kyndt, John; Kacira, Murat; Ogden, Kimberly L.; Huesemann, Michael H.

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present study examines how climatic conditions and pond design affect the growth performance of microalgae. From January to April of 2011, outdoor batch cultures of Nannochloropsis salina were grown in three replicate 780 L conventional raceways, as well as in an experimental 7500 L ARID (Algae Raceway Integrated Design) pond. The ARID culture system utilizes a series of 8 to 20 cm deep basins and a 1.5 m deep canal to enhance light exposure and mitigate temperature variations and extremes. The ARID culture reached the stationary phase 27 days earlier than the conventional raceways, which can be attributed to its superior temperature management and shallower basins. On a night when the air temperature dropped to -9 °C, the water temperature was 18 °C higher in the ARID pond than in the conventional raceways. Lipid and fatty acid content ranged from 16 - 25 % and 5 - 15 %, respectively, as a percentage of AFDW. Palmitic, palmitoleic, and eicosapentaenoic acid comprised the majority of fatty acids. While the ARID culture system achieved nearly double the volumetric productivity relative to the conventional raceways (0.023 vs 0.013 g L-1day-1), areal biomass productivities were of similar magnitude in both pond systems (3.34 vs. 3.47 g m-2day-1), suggesting that the ARID pond design has to be further optimized, most likely by increasing the culture depth or operating at higher cell densities while maintaining adequate mixing.

  2. Lake Survey DETROIT, MICH.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . DEPARTMENT OF' COMMERCE National Ouanic and Atmospheric Admlnl,trltion National OeUII SUI"II, Great Lakes Ice ................. .... ............. . $l'.iUllary ice charts ..............·.......·................. Area ice charts - winter 1971-72 ......... . ,, Table Tabl e l.--Ice 2.--Key to ice chart sy

  3. Stratigraphy and sedimentation of the Unayzah reservoir, central Saudi Arabia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Senalp, M.; Abdulaziz, A. [Saudi Aramco, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia)

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Significant reserves of Arabian super light oil, condensate, and associated gas occur in the various genetically different sandstone bodies of the upper Permian Unayzah and Khuff Formations in Central Saudi Arabia. The Unayzah Formation which rests unconformably on the older formations is composed of red colored, poorly sorted conglomerate, sandstone, siltstone, mudstone, caliche and nodular anhydrite. Facies changes occur due to the presence of various subenvironments and possible faulting and structural growth in the basin during deposition. However, the entire Unayzah Formation shows an overall fining and thinning-upward sequence. It was deposited as coalescing alluvial fans dominated by braided streams which graded into meandering stream and playa lakes under and to semi-arid conditions. Eolian processes were also inferred. A marked unconformity which is indicated by the occurrence of thick caliche and soil horizons separate the Unayzah and the overlying Khuff Formation. The Khuff Formation consists primarily of marine shale, marl, and fine- to very coarse-grained sandstones in the lower parts; shale, limestone, dolomite, and amhydrite in the upper parts. The sandstones were deposited as incised channel fills and their associated low stand deltaic sediments as a result of fluctuating sea level during the deposition of the Khuff Formation. The base of the incised channels represent a sequence boundary. Red colored and rooted paleosols were formed on the underlying marine sediments. During relative sea level rise, good quality reservoir sands were deposited by aggradation within the incised channels. Sand deposition within the channels terminated at the same time, and the area was covered by shallow marine limestones, shales and marls during maximum sea level highstand. Although the Unayzah reservoir occurs in both the Unayzah and the Khuff Formations because of their different geometry, continuity, and reservoir quality, they have been studied separately.

  4. A landscape approach to reserving farm ponds for wintering bird refuges in Taoyuan, Taiwan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fang, Wei-Ta

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    regression with error back-propagation into the paradigm of artificial neural networks (ANN). The model considers pond shape, size, neighboring farmlands, and developed areas in calculating parameters pertaining to their respective and interactive influences...

  5. Oxygen, carbon, and sulfur cycling in the sediments of hyper-eutrophic mesocosms (shrimp mariculture ponds)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ellis, Matthew Stewart

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for the individual incubations in season 1 was 167. 86 ml Op m ~ hr ' in pond 5 on sand on August 1 (trip 5) and the low was 35. 24 mi Op m ~ hr ' in pond 6 on sand on July 3 (trip 3) In season 2 the highest rate observed was 236. 13 ml 02 m ~ hr ' in pond 6... to 124. 35 ml Op m. ~ hr. t on trip four and then fell to 112. 04 ml Os m ~ hr. 1 on trip five. During season two, SOD was much more variable, starting at 88. 87 ml Op m-~ hr-1 and reaching a maximum of 145. 49 ml Os m-s hr-1 on Sept. 25. In pond five...

  6. Factors influencing algal biomass in hydrologically dynamic salt ponds in a subtropical salt marsh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Carrie J.

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    by channels and shallow ponds that are subject to flooding by winds, tides, and storm surges. Coastal salt marshes are widely regarded as zones of high macrophyte productivity. However, microalgae may contribute more to salt marsh productivity than previously...

  7. Development of the Great Lakes Ice-circulation Model (GLIM): Application to Lake Erie in 20032004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Development of the Great Lakes Ice-circulation Model (GLIM): Application to Lake Erie in 2003: Received 4 May 2009 Accepted 30 November 2009 Communicated by Dr. Ram Yerubandi Index words: Coupled Ice-Ocean Model Ice modeling Lake ice cover Ice thickness Ice speed Lake surface temperature Great Lakes Lake Erie

  8. SEISMIC ATTENUATION FOR RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joel Walls; M.T. Taner; Naum Derzhi; Gary Mavko; Jack Dvorkin

    2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have developed and tested technology for a new type of direct hydrocarbon detection. The method uses inelastic rock properties to greatly enhance the sensitivity of surface seismic methods to the presence of oil and gas saturation. These methods include use of energy absorption, dispersion, and attenuation (Q) along with traditional seismic attributes like velocity, impedance, and AVO. Our approach is to combine three elements: (1) a synthesis of the latest rock physics understanding of how rock inelasticity is related to rock type, pore fluid types, and pore microstructure, (2) synthetic seismic modeling that will help identify the relative contributions of scattering and intrinsic inelasticity to apparent Q attributes, and (3) robust algorithms that extract relative wave attenuation attributes from seismic data. This project provides: (1) Additional petrophysical insight from acquired data; (2) Increased understanding of rock and fluid properties; (3) New techniques to measure reservoir properties that are not currently available; and (4) Provide tools to more accurately describe the reservoir and predict oil location and volumes. These methodologies will improve the industry's ability to predict and quantify oil and gas saturation distribution, and to apply this information through geologic models to enhance reservoir simulation. We have applied for two separate patents relating to work that was completed as part of this project.

  9. Storage capacity in hot dry rock reservoirs

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brown, D.W.

    1997-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is described for extracting thermal energy, in a cyclic manner, from geologic strata which may be termed hot dry rock. A reservoir comprised of hot fractured rock is established and water or other liquid is passed through the reservoir. The water is heated by the hot rock, recovered from the reservoir, cooled by extraction of heat by means of heat exchange apparatus on the surface, and then re-injected into the reservoir to be heated again. Water is added to the reservoir by means of an injection well and recovered from the reservoir by means of a production well. Water is continuously provided to the reservoir and continuously withdrawn from the reservoir at two different flow rates, a base rate and a peak rate. Increasing water flow from the base rate to the peak rate is accomplished by rapidly decreasing backpressure at the outlet of the production well in order to meet periodic needs for amounts of thermal energy greater than a baseload amount, such as to generate additional electric power to meet peak demands. The rate of flow of water provided to the hot dry rock reservoir is maintained at a value effective to prevent depletion of the liquid inventory of the reservoir. 4 figs.

  10. 216-U-10 Pond and 216-Z-19 Ditch characterization studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Last, G.V.; Duncan, D.W.; Graham, M.J.; Hall, M.D.; Hall, V.W.; Landeen, D.S.; Leitz, J.G.; Mitchell, R.M.

    1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The chemical, reprocessing of spent nuclear fuels at the US Department of Energy`s Hanford Site has generated large volumes of radioactive liquid effluents. The majority of these effluents have been used strictly for cooling or other supportive functions and have been discharged to ditches and ponds. The 216-U-10 Pond and 216-Z-19 Ditch are two such disposal facilities. These facilities are components of an integrated system of ditches, ponds, and overflow facilities collectively referred to as the U-Pond disposal system. The U-Pond system has been used since 1943 and has received a large variety of radioisotopes from several sources. This study covered tho major aspects of the environment, including wind resuspension, biological uptake and transport, geologic distribution in surface and subsurface sediments, and ground-water impacts. The long-term use of U-Pond and the Z-19 Ditch has resulted in the localized accumulation of transuranic and fission product inventories as a result of sorption and filtration of particulates onto the uppermost sediments.

  11. Lake Whitney Comprehensive Water Quality Assessment, Phase 1B- Physical and Biological Assessment (USDOE)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doyle, Robert D; Byars, Bruce W

    2009-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Baylor University Center for Reservoir and Aquatic Systems Research (CRASR) has conducted a phased, comprehensive evaluation of Lake Whitney to determine its suitability for use as a regional water supply reservoir. The area along the Interstate 35 corridor between Dallas / Fort Worth Metroplex and the Waco / Temple Centroplex represents one of the fastest growth areas in the State of Texas and reliable water supplies are critical to sustainable growth. Lake Whitney is situated midway between these two metropolitan areas. Currently, the City of Whitney as well as all of Bosque and Hill counties obtain their potable water from the Trinity Sands aquifer. Additionally, parts of the adjoining McLennan and Burleson counties utilize the Trinity sands aquifer system as a supplement to their surface water supplies. Population growth coupled with increasing demands on this aquifer system in both the Metroplex and Centroplex have resulted in a rapid depletion of groundwater in these rural areas. The Lake Whitney reservoir represents both a potentially local and regional solution for an area experiencing high levels of growth. Because of the large scope of this project as well as the local, regional and national implications, we have designed a multifaceted approach that will lead to the solution of numerous issues related to the feasibility of using Lake Whitney as a water resource to the region. Phase IA (USEPA, QAPP Study Elements 1-4) of this research focused on the physical limnology of the reservoir (bathymetry and fine scale salinity determination) and develops hydrodynamic watershed and reservoir models to evaluate how salinity would be expected to change with varying hydrologic and climatic factors. To this end, we implemented a basic water quality modeling program in collaboration with the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department and the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality to add to the developing long-term database on Lake Whitney. Finally, we conducted an initial assessment of knowledge of watershed and water quality related issues by local residents and stakeholders of Lake Whitney and design an intervention educational program to address any deficiencies discovered. Phase IA was funded primarily from EPA Cooperative Agreement X7-9769 8901-0. Phase IC (USEPA, QAPP Study Element 5) of this research focused on the ambient toxicity of the reservoir with respect to periodic blooms of golden algae. Phase IC was funded primarily from Cooperative Agreement EM-96638001. Phase 1B (USDOE, Study Elements 6-11) complemented work being done via EPA funding on study elements 1-5 and added five new study elements: 6) Salinity Transport in the Brazos Watershed to Lake Whitney; 7) Bacterial Assessment; 8) Organic Contaminant Analysis on Lake Whitney; 9) Plankton Photosynthesis; 10) Lake Whitney Resident Knowledge Assessment; and 11) Engineering Scoping Perspective: Recommendations for Use.

  12. Bottle Habitat Region: Great Lakes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to each bottle to minimize sand displacement. In each bottle, root three ten-centimeter elodea stalks period, have the students research pond ecology and the organisms involved in the project. 11. At the end you think would happen if the fish population doubled? Quadrupled?" or "What impact does temperature

  13. Characterization and interwell connectivity evaluation of Green Rver reservoirs, Wells Draw study area, Uinta Basin, Utah

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abiazie, Joseph Uchechukwu

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    and seal rocks of the Green River petroleum system. Datum is Mahoganey oil shale bed (1). 49 27 Fig. 11?Cross-section of thermal maturity of oil accumulations in the Green River petroleum system. 49 28 Fig. 12? Lake Uinta depositional... This petroleum system has produced more than 450 MMBO mainly from two formations, the Green River and Colton Formations. 7 The Green River Formation contains the source rock and most of the reservoir and seal rocks (Fig. 10). 49 Most of the kerogen-rich oil...

  14. NAWS-China Lake Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation covers the NAWS-China Lake Project at the Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting, held on November 18-19, 2009.

  15. Integrated reservoir study of the 8 reservoir of the Green Canyon 18 field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aniekwena, Anthony Udegbunam

    2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The move into deeper waters in the Gulf of Mexico has produced new opportunities for petroleum production, but it also has produced new challenges as different reservoir problems are encountered. This integrated reservoir characterization effort has...

  16. RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION OF THE LOWER GREEN RIVER FORMATION, SOUTHWEST UINTA BASIN, UTAH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. Robert Bereskin

    2003-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Anastamosing, low gradient distributary channels produce {approx}30 gravity, paraffinic oils from the Middle Member of the lacustrine Eocene Green River Formation in the south-central portion of the Uinta Basin. This localized depocenter was situated along the fluctuating southern shoreline of Lake Uinta, where complex deposits of marginal-lacustrine to lower delta plain accumulations are especially characteristic. The Middle Member contains several fining-upward parasequences that can be recognized in outcrop, core, and downhole logs. Each parasequence is about 60 to 120 feet thick and consists of strata deposited during multiple lake level fluctuations that approach 30 to 35 feet in individual thickness. Such parasequences represent 300,000-year cycles based on limited absolute age dating. The subaerial to subaqueous channels commonly possess an erosional base and exhibit a fining upward character. Accordingly, bedding features commonly range from large-scale trough and planar cross bedding or lamination at the base, to a nonreservoir, climbing ripple assemblage near the uppermost reservoir boundary. The best reservoir quality occurs within the laminated to cross-stratified portions, and the climbing ripple phase usually possesses more deleterious micas and/or detrital clays. Diagenesis also exerts a major control on reservoir quality. Certain sandstones were cemented by an early, iron-poor calcite cement, which can be subsequently leached. Secondary intergranular porosity (up to 20%) is largely responsible for the 10 -100 millidarcy rock, which represents petrophysical objectives for both primary and secondary production. Otherwise, intense compaction, silicic and iron-rich carbonate cements, and authigenic clays serve to reduce reservoir quality to marginal economic levels.

  17. ProClim-Flash | No 57, June 201318 Figure 1: Swiss CH4 fluxes from (a) anthropogenic (agriculture, energy, waste) and (b) natural contributors (wetlands, lakes and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , energy, waste) and (b) natural contributors (wetlands, lakes and reservoirs, wild animals, forest uptake. company Meteotest for the year 2007. This inven- tory has now been updated for 2011 and extended with new hydroelectric res- ervoirs are included. The agricultural sector with its emissions from ruminants and manure

  18. Improved energy recovery from geothermal reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bodvarsson, G.S.; Pruess, K.; Lippmann, M.J.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The behavior of a liquid-dominated geothermal reservoir in response to production from different horizons is studied using numerical simulation methods. The Olkaria geothermal field in Kenya is used as an example where a two-phase vapor-dominated zone overlies the main liquid-dominated reservoir. The possibility of improving energy recovery from vapor-dominated reservoirs by tapping deeper horizons is considered.

  19. A virtual company concept for reservoir management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, F.D. [Dave Martin and Associates, Inc. (United States); Kendall, R.P.; Whitney, E.M. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes how reservoir management problems were pursued with a virtual company concept via the Internet and World Wide Web. The focus of the paper is on the implementation of virtual asset management teams that were assembled with small independent oil companies. The paper highlights the mechanics of how the virtual team transferred data and interpretations, evaluated geological models of complex reservoirs, and used results of simulation studies to analyze various reservoir management strategies.

  20. Quantum discord dynamics in structured reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Z. -K. Su; S. -J. Jiang

    2011-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The non-Markovian master equations are derived to study quantum discord dynamics of two qubits coupled to a common reservoir and two independent reservoirs, respectively. We compare the dynamics under different parameters, such as reservoir spectra and resonant parameters, at high temperature and at zero temperature. The results indicate that the dynamics at these two extreme temperatures share similar characters, as well as differences.

  1. WRP Technical Note FW-SW-4. 1 ~-May 1994

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and is a common resident at Corps of Engineers reservoir projects. BACKGROUND: Since wood ducks are cavity nesters populations. Such settings include reservoir backwater areas, tributary streams, tailwater areas, subimpoundments, abandoned sand or gravel pits, oxbow lakes, and beaver ponds. Nest box programs have been

  2. White Bear Lake Conservation District (Minnesota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This statute establishes the White Bear Lake Conservation District, which has the authority to set water and land use regulations for the area around White Bear Lake.

  3. ANNOTATED RESEARCH BIBLIOGRAPHY FOR GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sudo!, G.A

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on Geothermal Resource Assessment and Reservoir EngineeriWorkshop on Geothermal Resources Assessment and ReserooirWorkshop on Geothermal Resources Assessment an ervoi r Engi

  4. GEOMECHANICS IN RESERVOIR SIMULATION: OVERVIEW OF ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. LONGUEMARE

    2002-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    dans le réservoir et de faciliter le calage des historiques de production. Abstract — Geomechanics in Reservoir Simulation: Overview of Coupling Methods and ...

  5. Analysis of Geothermal Reservoir Stimulation using Geomechanics...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    using Geomechanics-Based Stochastic Analysis of Injection-Induced Seismicity Analysis of Geothermal Reservoir Stimulation using Geomechanics-Based Stochastic Analysis of...

  6. Modeling of Geothermal Reservoirs: Fundamental Processes, Computer...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Reservoirs: Fundamental Processes, Computer Simulation and Field Applications Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Modeling of...

  7. Safety of Dams and Reservoirs Act (Nebraska)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This act regulates dams and associated reservoirs to protect health and public safety and minimize adverse consequences associated with potential dam failure. The act describes the responsibilities...

  8. International reservoir operations agreement helps NW fish &...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    or 503-230-5131 International reservoir operations agreement helps Northwest fish and power Portland, Ore. - The Bonneville Power Administration and the British Columbia...

  9. Evaluation Of Chemical Geothermometers For Calculating Reservoir...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    For Calculating Reservoir Temperatures At Nevada Geothermal Power Plants Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Evaluation Of Chemical...

  10. Analysis of Geothermal Reservoir Stimulation using Geomechanics...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Seismicity This project will develop a model for seismicity-based reservoir characterization (SBRC) by combining rock mechanics; finite element modeling;...

  11. Storage capacity in hot dry rock reservoirs

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brown, Donald W. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of extracting thermal energy, in a cyclic manner, from geologic strata which may be termed hot dry rock. A reservoir comprised of hot fractured rock is established and water or other liquid is passed through the reservoir. The water is heated by the hot rock, recovered from the reservoir, cooled by extraction of heat by means of heat exchange apparatus on the surface, and then re-injected into the reservoir to be heated again. Water is added to the reservoir by means of an injection well and recovered from the reservoir by means of a production well. Water is continuously provided to the reservoir and continuously withdrawn from the reservoir at two different flow rates, a base rate and a peak rate. Increasing water flow from the base rate to the peak rate is accomplished by rapidly decreasing backpressure at the outlet of the production well in order to meet periodic needs for amounts of thermal energy greater than a baseload amount, such as to generate additional electric power to meet peak demands. The rate of flow of water provided to the hot dry rock reservoir is maintained at a value effective to prevent depletion of the liquid

  12. Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Methodologies for Reservoir...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Methodologies for Reservoir Characterization Using Fluid Inclusion Gas Chemistry Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us HomeBasic Search About...

  13. ANNOTATED RESEARCH BIBLIOGRAPHY FOR GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sudo!, G.A

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    i s maintain reservoir pressu found t o be f a i r l yPrieto. , Correlation of pressu temperature trends w i t h

  14. The verification of a semi-analytical reservoir simulator using a finite difference reservoir simulator 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dube, Hans Gerhardt

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Cases Fundamental Difference Between the Reservoir Simulators. Data Sets. . General Process of Verification. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 24 25 25 26 29 32 36 SINGLE LAYER, RADIAL FLOW DRAWDOWN CASES. . 38 viii Page Infinite Cylindrical... Drawdown Problems. . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 41 43 45 49 50 52 MULTIPLE LAYER RESERVOIR, RADIAL FLOW DRAWDOWN CASES. 63 Simulation of Multiple Layer Reservoirs. . . . . . Simulation Parameters. Constant Rate Drawdown Tests in an Infinite...

  15. New Insight into Integrated Reservoir Management using Top-Down, Intelligent Reservoir Modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    ;Introduction · Can be used as an alternative to traditional reservoir simulation ­ Cost ­ Man Power · May · Time and resources required : Only a small fraction performing a conventional reservoir simulation is basis for estimation of initial and remaining hydrocarbons volumes in the reservoir. · Results obtained

  16. Reservoir Engineering for Unconventional Gas Reservoirs: What Do We Have to Consider?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clarkson, Christopher R [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The reservoir engineer involved in the development of unconventional gas reservoirs (UGRs) is required to integrate a vast amount of data from disparate sources, and to be familiar with the data collection and assessment. There has been a rapid evolution of technology used to characterize UGR reservoir and hydraulic fracture properties, and there currently are few standardized procedures to be used as guidance. Therefore, more than ever, the reservoir engineer is required to question data sources and have an intimate knowledge of evaluation procedures. We propose a workflow for the optimization of UGR field development to guide discussion of the reservoir engineer's role in the process. Critical issues related to reservoir sample and log analysis, rate-transient and production data analysis, hydraulic and reservoir modeling and economic analysis are raised. Further, we have provided illustrations of each step of the workflow using tight gas examples. Our intent is to provide some guidance for best practices. In addition to reviewing existing methods for reservoir characterization, we introduce new methods for measuring pore size distribution (small-angle neutron scattering), evaluating core-scale heterogeneity, log-core calibration, evaluating core/log data trends to assist with scale-up of core data, and modeling flow-back of reservoir fluids immediately after well stimulation. Our focus in this manuscript is on tight and shale gas reservoirs; reservoir characterization methods for coalbed methane reservoirs have recently been discussed.

  17. A synthesis of the "Ecological Effects of Reservoir Operations at Blue Mesa Reservoir" Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A synthesis of the "Ecological Effects of Reservoir Operations at Blue Mesa Reservoir" Project June 2005 #12;2 RECLAMATION A synthesis of the "Ecological Effects of Reservoir Operations at Blue Mesa), happy angler with a nice catch of kokanee (B. Johnson), CSU students doing vertical gill net survey (B

  18. Report on the culture of brown shrimp, Penaeus aztecus, in ponds receiving thermal effluent from a power plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quarberg, Donald Martin

    1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . (December 1974) Donald Martin Quarberg, B. S. , University of Wisconsin--Stevens Point Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. David V. Aldrich During 1973 brown shrimp, Penaeus aztecus, were cultured in 0. 1 ha ponds designed to receive a constant supply... pond study in early August and the other was terminated in mid- September. Survival was under 0. 5%, growth less than 0. 6 mm/day, and production only 0. 53 and 1. 59 kg/ha. In September two ponds were each stocked with 50, two ponds with 500...

  19. Using historical aerial photography and softcopy photogrammetry for waste unit mapping in L Lake.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christel, L.M.

    1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    L Lake was developed as a cooling water reservoir for the L Reactor at the Savannah River Site. The construction of the lake, which began in the fall of 1984, altered the structure and function of Steel Creek. Completed in the fall of 1985, L Lake has a capacity of 31 million cubic meters and a normal pool of 58 meters. When L Reactor operations ceased in 1988, the water level in the lake still had to be maintained. Site managers are currently trying to determine the feasibility of draining or drawing down the lake in order to save tax dollars. In order to understand the full repercussions of such an undertaking, it was necessary to compile a comprehensive inventory of what the lake bottom looked like prior to filling. Aerial photographs, acquired nine days before the filling of the lake began, were scanned and used for softcopy photogrammetry processing. A one-meter digital elevation model was generated and a digital orthophoto mosaic was created as the base map for the project. Seven categories of features, including the large waste units used to contain the contaminated soil removed from the dam site, were screen digitized and used to generate accurate maps. Other map features include vegetation waste piles, where contaminated vegetation from the flood plain was contained, and ash piles, which are sites where vegetation debris was burned and then covered with clean soil. For all seven categories, the area of disturbance totaled just over 63 hectares. When the screen digitizing was completed, the elevation at the centroid of each disturbance was determined. When the information is used in the Savannah River Site Geographical Information System, it can be used to visualize the various L Lake draw-down scenarios suggested by site managers and hopefully, to support evaluations of the cost effectiveness for each proposed activity.

  20. Waterfowl use of a northcentral Texas reservoir

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoy, Michael Dennis

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of human recreational activities at Aquilla Lake, northcentral Texas. . . 59 Percent frequency of human induced waterfowl disturbances at Aquilla Lake, northcentral Texas. 61 12 Percent time spent in activities in undisturbed and disturbed emergent..., time-activity budgets, and effects of recreational disturbance were studied for postbreeding waterfowl at Aquilla Lake, northcentral Texas, from August through March, 1984-85 and 1985-86. Peak waterfowl use of the study area occurred during fall...

  1. The growth and survival of brown shrimp (Penaeus aztecus) and blue crabs (Callinectes sapidus) in ponds receiving heated bay water from an electric power plant 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gould, Robert Andrew

    1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . In the 6 month experiment survival was 3-27/G, growth was 15. 8-18. 5 mm per month, yields were 7. 8-80. 5 kg per ha (6. 9-71. 0 pounds per acre), and food conversion rates were 32. 1-328. 0 g of feed per gram increase of crab. Eleven 0. 1-ha ponds were... 14 Arrangement of ponds at research facility 15 Hydrological data for pond 22 31 Hydrological data, pond 23, with power plant intake and di charge water temperature . 32 Hydrological data for pond 8 Hydrological data for pond 9 Hydrological...

  2. SEISMIC ATTENUATION FOR RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joel Walls; M.T. Taner; Gary Mavko; Jack Dvorkin

    2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wave-induced variations of pore pressure in a partially-saturated reservoir result in oscillatory liquid flow. The viscous losses during this flow are responsible for wave attenuation. The same viscous effects determine the changes in the dynamic bulk modulus of the system versus frequency. These changes are necessarily linked to attenuation via the causality condition. We analytically quantify the frequency dependence of the bulk modulus of a partially saturated rock by assuming that saturation is patchy and then link these changes to the inverse quality factor. As a result, the P-wave attenuation is quantitatively linked to saturation and thus can serve as a saturation indicator.

  3. Analysis of Geothermal Reservoir Stimulation Using Geomechanics...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Systems; 2010 Geothermal Technology Program Peer Review Report Microseismic Study with LBNL - Monitoring the Effect of Injection of Fluids from the Lake County Pipeline on...

  4. Monitoring EGS Stimulation and Reservoir Dynamics with InSAR...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Monitoring EGS Stimulation and Reservoir Dynamics with InSAR and MEQ Monitoring EGS Stimulation and Reservoir Dynamics with InSAR and MEQ Monitoring EGS Stimulation and Reservoir...

  5. Integrated reservoir characterization for the Mazari oil field, Pakistan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ashraf, Ejaz

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    evaluated reservoir performance potential using the production history, well tests and cased-hole well log surveys. Suggestions for reservoir management activities in conjunction with the evaluation of the reservoir performance are discussed in detail...

  6. Reservoir Characterization Research Laboratory Research Plans for 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    and Subsurface Characterization of Carbonate Reservoirs for Improved Recovery of Remaining Hydrocarbons Charles#12; Reservoir Characterization Research Laboratory Research Plans for 2013 Outcrop for heavy oil deposits within the Canadian Grosmont Formation. #12;iii Reservoir Characterization Research

  7. Optimal Reservoir Management and Well Placement Under Geologic Uncertainty 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taware, Satyajit Vijay

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Reservoir management, sometimes referred to as asset management in the context of petroleum reservoirs, has become recognized as an important facet of petroleum reservoir development and production operations. In the ...

  8. PYRAMID LAKE RENEWEABLE ENERGY PLAN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HIGH DESERT GEOCULTURE, LLC

    2009-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pyramid Lake Renewable Energy Plan covers these areas: energy potential (primarily focusing on geothermal resource potential, but also more generally addressing wind energy potential); renewable energy market potential; transmission system development; geothermal direct use potential; and business structures to accomplish the development objectives of the Pyramid Lake Paiute Tribe.

  9. An urban lake remediation experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Castelli, S.E.; Gardner, K.H.; Jennings, A.A.

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Circumstances provided the opportunity to study a small urban lake as the surrounding municipalities attempted to improve its aesthetic quality by dredging. This manuscript focuses primarily on the sediments in the system: accumulation rates, the expected dynamics of the lake bed drying process, and the influence of the sediments on water quality.

  10. Development of Reservoir Characterization Techniques and Production Models for Exploiting Naturally Fractured Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiggins, Michael L.; Brown, Raymon L.; Civan, Faruk; Hughes, Richard G.

    2003-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This research was directed toward developing a systematic reservoir characterization methodology which can be used by the petroleum industry to implement infill drilling programs and/or enhanced oil recovery projects in naturally fractured reservoir systems in an environmentally safe and cost effective manner. It was anticipated that the results of this research program will provide geoscientists and engineers with a systematic procedure for properly characterizing a fractured reservoir system and a reservoir/horizontal wellbore simulator model which can be used to select well locations and an effective EOR process to optimize the recovery of the oil and gas reserves from such complex reservoir systems.

  11. Increasing Waterflood Reserves in the Wilmington Oil Field Through Reservoir Characterization and Reservoir Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chris Phillips; Dan Moos; Don Clarke; John Nguyen; Kwasi Tagbor; Roy Koerner; Scott Walker

    1997-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This project is intended to increase recoverable waterflood reserves in slope and basin reservoirs through improved reservoir characterization and reservoir management. The particular application of this project is in portions of Fault Blocks IV and V of the Wilmington Oil Field, in Long Beach, California, but the approach is widely applicable in slope and basin reservoirs. Transferring technology so that it can be applied in other sections of the Wilmington Field and by operators in other slope and basin reservoirs is a primary component of the project.

  12. Economics of Developing Hot Stratigraphic Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greg Mines; Hillary Hanson; Rick Allis; Joseph Moore

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Stratigraphic geothermal reservoirs at 3 – 4 km depth in high heat-flow basins are capable of sustaining 100 MW-scale power plants at about 10 c/kWh. This paper examines the impacts on the levelized cost of electricity (LCOE) of reservoir depth and temperature, reservoir productivity, and drillhole/casing options. For a reservoir at 3 km depth with a moderate productivity index by hydrothermal reservoir standards (about 50 L/s/MPa, 5.6 gpm/psi), an LCOE of 10c/kWh requires the reservoir to be at about 200°C. This is the upper temperature limit for pumps. The calculations assume standard hydrothermal drilling costs, with the production interval completed with a 7 inch liner in an 8.5 inch hole. If a reservoir at 4 km depth has excellent permeability characteristics with a productivity index of 100 L/s/MPa (11.3 gpm/psi), then the LCOE is about 11 c/kWh assuming the temperature decline rate with development is not excessive (< 1%/y, with first thermal breakthrough delayed by about 10 years). Completing wells with modest horizontal legs (e.g. several hundred meters) may be important for improving well productivity because of the naturally high, sub-horizontal permeability in this type of reservoir. Reducing the injector/producer well ratio may also be cost-effective if the injectors are drilled as larger holes.

  13. GEOMECHANICAL MODELING AS A RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION TOOL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GEOMECHANICAL MODELING AS A RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION TOOL AT RULISON FIELD, PICEANCE BASIN _______________ ____________________ Dr. Terence K. Young Department Head Department of Geophysics ii #12;ABSTRACT Geomechanics is a powerful reservoir characterization tool. Geomechanical modeling is used here to understand how the in

  14. Geothermal Reservoir Evaluation Considering Fluid Adsorption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    SGP-"R- 68 Geothermal Reservoir Evaluation Considering Fluid Adsorption and Composition Michael J, California #12;GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR EVALUATION CONSIDERING FLUID ADSORPTION AND COMPOSITION A DISSERTATIONFtion phenomena is described. Then, t h e implications of adsorption on material balance calculations and on vel1

  15. Damage and plastic deformation of reservoir rocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ze'ev, Reches

    Damage and plastic deformation of reservoir rocks: Part 2. Propagation of a hydraulic fracture Seth fracture and fault mechanics, fluid flow in fractured reservoirs, and geome- chanics in nonconventional the development of complex hydraulic fractures (HFs) that are commonly ob- served in the field and in experiments

  16. STIMULATION AND RESERVOIR ENGINEERING OF GEOTHERMAL RESOURCXS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    STIMULATION AND RESERVOIR ENGINEERING OF GEOTHERMAL RESOURCXS Henry J. Ramey, Jr., and A. Louis C a p i l l a r i t y . . . . . . . . . . 28 RADON I N GEOTHEENAL RESERVOIRS . . . . . . . 33 HEAT AND MASS TRANSPORT I N FRACTURED ROCKS . . . . . . . . . . . . .35 Mathematical Models

  17. EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Salt Cavern Storage Reservoir...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Salt Cavern Underground Natural Gas Storage Reservoir Configuration Salt Cavern Underground Natural Gas Storage Reservoir Configuration Source: PB Energy Storage Services Inc....

  18. Two-dimensional simulation of the Raft River geothermal reservoir...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of the Raft River geothermal reservoir and wells. (SINDA-3G program) Abstract Computer models describing both the transient reservoir pressure behavior and the time...

  19. Modeling CO2 Sequestration in a Saline Reservoir and Depleted...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Modeling CO 2 Sequestration in a Saline Reservoir and Depleted Oil Reservoir to Evaluate The Regional CO 2 Sequestration Potential of The Ozark Plateau Aquifer System,...

  20. Sustainability of Shear-Induced Permeability for EGS Reservoirs...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Sustainability of Shear-Induced Permeability for EGS Reservoirs A Laboratory Study Sustainability of Shear-Induced Permeability for EGS Reservoirs A Laboratory Study...

  1. Extreme Methane Emissions from a Swiss Hydropower Reservoir

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wehrli, Bernhard

    Extreme Methane Emissions from a Swiss Hydropower Reservoir: Contribution from Bubbling Sediments and their importance were quantified during a yearlong survey of a temperate hydropower reservoir. Measurements using

  2. A STOCHASTIC METHOD FOR MODELING FLUID DISPLACEMENT IN PETROLEUM RESERVOIRS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, C.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Paper SPE 7681, Soc. Petrol. Eng. Fifth Symp. on ReservoirPaper SPE 7679, Soc. Petrol. Eng. Fifth Symp. on Reservoir

  3. Monitoring and Modeling Fluid Flow in a Developing EGS Reservoir...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    model fluid injection into a tight reservoir on the edges of a hydrothermal field. Use seismic data to constrain geomechanicalhydrologicthermal model of reservoir....

  4. Monitoring and Modeling Fluid Flow in a Developing EGS Reservoir

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    fluid injection into a tight reservoir on the edges of a hydrothermal field * Use seismic data to constrain geomechanicalhydrologicthermal model of reservoir * Model for...

  5. Resolution of reservoir scale electrical anisotropy from marine CSEM data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, V.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the field data to accurately model potential reservoirs andreservoir scale electrical anisotropy from marine CSEM datathe reservoir target can be determined from seismic data or

  6. Aligned vertical fractures, HTI reservoir symmetry, and Thomsen seismic anisotropy parameters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berryman, James G.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    seismic parameters for fractured reservoirs when the crackin a naturally fractured gas reservoir, The Leading Edge,

  7. BYU Salt Lake Center Financial Aid Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martinez, Tony R.

    BYU Salt Lake Center Financial Aid Program 2011 A financial aid program of the Brigham Young University Division of Continuing Education BYU Salt Lake Center 345 West North Temple Street 3 Triad Center Salt Lake City, UT 84180 Fax: (801) 933­9456 Email: slc@byu.edu #12;BYU Salt Lake Center Financial Aid

  8. BYU Salt Lake Center Financial Aid Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olsen Jr., Dan R.

    BYU Salt Lake Center Financial Aid Program 2013 A financial aid program of the Brigham Young University Division of Continuing Education BYU Salt Lake Center 345 West North Temple Street 3 Triad Center Salt Lake City, UT 84180 Fax: (801) 933­9456 Email: slc@byu.edu #12;BYU Salt Lake Center Financial Aid

  9. BYU Salt Lake Center Financial Aid Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hart, Gus

    BYU Salt Lake Center Financial Aid Program 2014 A financial aid program of the Brigham Young University Division of Continuing Education BYU Salt Lake Center 345 West North Temple Street 3 Triad Center Salt Lake City, UT 84180 Fax: (801) 933­9456 Email: slc@byu.edu #12;BYU Salt Lake Center Financial Aid

  10. BYU Salt Lake Center Financial Aid Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hart, Gus

    BYU Salt Lake Center Financial Aid Program 2012 A financial aid program of the Brigham Young University Division of Continuing Education BYU Salt Lake Center 345 West North Temple Street 3 Triad Center Salt Lake City, UT 84180 Fax: (801) 933­9456 Email: slc@byu.edu #12;BYU Salt Lake Center Financial Aid

  11. Oakland Sub-Area Folsom Lake

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UPPER LAKE LUCERNE WILLIAMS MERIDAN CORTINA PEASE BARRY BOGUE OLIVEHURST HARTER Marysville Yuba City

  12. Some practical aspects of reservoir management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fowler, M.L.; Young, M.A.; Cole, E.L.; Madden, M.P. [BDM-Oklahoma, Bartlesville, OK (United States)

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The practical essence of reservoir management is the optimal application of available resources-people, equipment, technology, and money to maximize profitability and recovery. Success must include knowledge and consideration of (1) the reservoir system, (2) the technologies available, and (3) the reservoir management business environment. Two Reservoir Management Demonstration projects (one in a small, newly-discovered field and one in a large, mature water-flood) implemented by the Department of Energy through BDM-Oklahoma illustrate the diversity of situations suited for reservoir management efforts. Project teams made up of experienced engineers, geoscientists, and other professionals arrived at an overall reservoir management strategy for each field. in 1993, Belden & Blake Corporation discovered a regionally significant oil reservoir (East Randolph Field) in the Cambrian Rose Run formation in Portage County, Ohio. Project objectives are to improve field operational economics and optimize oil recovery. The team focused on characterizing the reservoir geology and analyzing primary production and reservoir data to develop simulation models. Historical performance was simulated and predictions were made to assess infill drilling, water flooding, and gas repressurization. The Citronelle Field, discovered in 1955 in Mobile County, Alabama, has produced 160 million barrels from fluvial sandstones of the Cretaceous Rodessa formation. Project objectives are to address improving recovery through waterflood optimization and problems related to drilling, recompletions, production operations, and regulatory and environmental issues. Initial efforts focused on defining specific problems and on defining a geographic area within the field where solutions might best be pursued. Geologic and reservoir models were used to evaluate past performance and to investigate improved recovery operations.

  13. Effects of reservoir drawdown and refill on mercury levels in fish and other biota

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jagoe, C.H.; Salice, C.; Yabnochko, G.; Grasman, B.T.; Youngblood, T. [Savannah River Ecology Lab., Aiken, SC (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Mercury bioavailability from contaminated sediments is controlled by methylation, related to bacterial activity and degradable organic material. These variables may be affected by large changes in water level and chemistry in a reservoir. At Par Pond, a 1,200 ha impoundment on the USDOE Savannah River Site, South Carolina, potential failure of an earthen dam prompted lowering the reservoir by 3 meters over a two month period in 1991, decreasing water volume about 70%. The reservoir was refilled over a two month period in 1995. Largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) were sampled at quarterly intervals before, during and after the drawdown. Length and weight were determined, and liver and muscle analyzed for total Hg. Hg was also measured in top level predators (alligators), forage fish, macrophytes and invertebrates. From Fall 1991 Winter 1994--5, Hg ranged from 0.05 to 2.0 ug/g wet mass in bass muscle, and was strongly related to fish size, based on about 400 fish. Condition factor rose soon after drawdown, then declined as forage populations collapsed. Using fish size as covariate, bass muscle Hg was greater in spring 1992 than all other sampling dates. However, after 3 years of drawdown, there was no overall trend in bass Hg. Forage species differed in Hg, with highest concentrations in brook silversides (0.13 {micro}g Hg/g wet mass in 2 g fish). Alligators contained up to 20 {micro}g Hg/g dry mass in liver. Refill caused inundation of terrestrial plants on exposed sediments, and microbial action associated with the decay of these may enhance Hg methylation. Experiments with caged fish are underway to measure uptake rates.

  14. East Pond West Pond South Pond South Pond Southwest Pond

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7111AWell: GasEPA-600/4-82-061?a/71 2.z=' 1.

  15. East Pond West Pond South Pond South Pond Southwest Pond

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7111AWell: GasEPA-600/4-82-061?a/71 2.z=' 1.West

  16. East Pond West Pond South Pond South Pond Southwest Pond

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7111AWell: GasEPA-600/4-82-061?a/71 2.z='

  17. Levels of nonpolar organic compounds in the Columbia Generating Station cooling pond. Technical completion report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andren, A.W.; Erickson, R.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1970, plans to build a coal-fired generating station near Portage, Wisconsin and an interest by involved utilities in carrying out a preconstruction analysis of potential environmental changes created a unique opportunity for broadly based research on the impacts of coal-fired steam plants. Of particular concern to aquatic scientists are the potential problems associated with the 192-ha manmade cooling pond. The research presented in this report describes a survey of the types and levels of nonpolar xenobiotic organic compounds in sediments and fish from the cooling pond. Sediment and fish samples were analyzed for PCBs, Sigma DDT, and hexachlorobenzene using techniques developed at the Water Chemistry Laboratory, University of Wisconsin-Madison. It was hypothesized that polyaromatic hydrocarbons and chlorinated hydrocarbons would accumulate; however, results indicate that the microcontaminants do not concentrate in the cooling pond. Reasons for why there is no microcontaminant problem are presented.

  18. The Use of Lime in Fish Ponds1 Andy M. Lazur, Charles E. Cichra and Craig Watson2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    small fish are being reared. Calcite and dolomite increase the total hardness, total alkalinity, and p desirable for most freshwater fish. Water in ponds reflects the quality of the soils in which they are located. In acid soils, ponds typically have low total alkalinity, total hardness, and pH. Total hardness

  19. Ponding Test Results Seepage and Total Losses, Secondary Canals 13, 16, and 29 Donna Irrigation District Hidalgo County No. 1 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leigh, E.; Fipps, G.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    TR-323 2008 Ponding Test Results Seepage and Total Losses, Secondary Canals 13, 16, and 29 Donna Irrigation District Hidalgo County No. 1 Eric Leigh Texas AgriLife Extension Associate, Biological... and Agricultural Engineering, College Station Guy Fipps Texas AgriLife Extension Professor and Extension Agricultural Engineer, Biological and Agricultural Engineering, College Station March 30, 2004 PONDING TEST RESULTS SEEPAGE...

  20. Ponding Test Results Seepage and Total Losses, North Alamo Main Canal Hidalgo County Irrigation District No. 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leigh, E.; Fipps, G.

    TR-324 2008 Ponding Test Results Seepage and Total Losses, North Alamo Main Canal Hidalgo County Irrigation District No. 2 Eric Leigh Texas AgriLife Extension Associate, Biological and Agricultural... Engineering, College Station Guy Fipps Texas AgriLife Extension Professor and Extension Agricultural Engineer, Biological and Agricultural Engineering, College Station February 4, 2004 PONDING TEST RESULTS SEEPAGE AND TOTAL...

  1. Ponding Test Results Seepage and Total Losses, Secondary Canals 13, 16, and 29 Donna Irrigation District Hidalgo County No. 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leigh, E.; Fipps, G.

    TR-323 2008 Ponding Test Results Seepage and Total Losses, Secondary Canals 13, 16, and 29 Donna Irrigation District Hidalgo County No. 1 Eric Leigh Texas AgriLife Extension Associate, Biological... and Agricultural Engineering, College Station Guy Fipps Texas AgriLife Extension Professor and Extension Agricultural Engineer, Biological and Agricultural Engineering, College Station March 30, 2004 PONDING TEST RESULTS SEEPAGE...

  2. Fottea 8(2): 133146, 2008 133 Epipelic cyanobacteria and algae: a case study from Czech ponds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fottea 8(2): 133­146, 2008 133 Epipelic cyanobacteria and algae: a case study from Czech ponds Petr and algae (particularly desmids). Altogether 45 sediment samples were taken at ponds covering a p and various protozoa, feeding on epipelic algae (Amoeba, Urceolus cyclostomus). Key words: epipelon

  3. Estimated Costs and Returns for Catfish Farms with Recirculating Ponds Along the Upper Texas Coast.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lambregts, J.A.D.; Griffin, W.L.; Lacewell R.D.; Davis, J.T.; Clary, G.M.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Hypothetical farms using the modified recirculating system are studied. Three farm sizes are cost engi neered and evaluated, a small farm with 66 (163) total land ha (ac), a medium farm with 132 (323), and a large farm with 264 (643). The farms are analyzed... with a farm-level simulation program (CATSIM) to determine costs, returns, and economies of scale of catfish farm ing. Production of the catfish ponds is set at 11,227 kg per ha (10,000 lb per ac) when the ponds are in full production, with an annual...

  4. Effect of wind speed on the growth of the upper convective zone in a solar pond

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McMinn, Steven Lee

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    [2]. The distance which the wind has to act on the surface of a pond is commonly called fetch, or fetch length. The purpose of the nets or other devices used in wind suppression is to reduce the fetch and transmit some of the energy in the waves... to the sides of the pond. Wind mixing of the upper convective zone can be thought of as converting some of the kinetic energy in the wind to potential energy in the fluid by a process called entrainment. Entrainment is defined in detail in Chapter V...

  5. Effect of wind speed on the growth of the upper convective zone in a solar pond 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McMinn, Steven Lee

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    [2]. The distance which the wind has to act on the surface of a pond is commonly called fetch, or fetch length. The purpose of the nets or other devices used in wind suppression is to reduce the fetch and transmit some of the energy in the waves... to the sides of the pond. Wind mixing of the upper convective zone can be thought of as converting some of the kinetic energy in the wind to potential energy in the fluid by a process called entrainment. Entrainment is defined in detail in Chapter V...

  6. Gradient zone-boundary control in salt-gradient solar ponds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hull, J.R.

    1982-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for suppressing zone boundary migration in a salt gradient solar pond includes extending perforated membranes across the pond at the boundaries, between the convective and non-convective zones, the perforations being small enough in size to prevent individual turbulence disturbances from penetrating the hole, but being large enough to allow easy molecular diffusion of salt thereby preventing the formation of convective zones in the gradient layer. The total area of the perforations is a sizeable fraction of the membrane area to allow sufficient salt diffusion while preventing turbulent entrainment into the gradient zone.

  7. Using Snow Fences to Augument Fresh Water Supplies in Shallow Arctic Lakes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stuefer, Svetlana

    2013-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This project was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to address environmental research questions specifically related to Alaska?s oil and gas natural resources development. The focus of this project was on the environmental issues associated with allocation of water resources for construction of ice roads and ice pads. Earlier NETL projects showed that oil and gas exploration activities in the U.S. Arctic require large amounts of water for ice road and ice pad construction. Traditionally, lakes have been the source of freshwater for this purpose. The distinctive hydrological regime of northern lakes, caused by the presence of ice cover and permafrost, exerts influence on lake water availability in winter. Lakes are covered with ice from October to June, and there is often no water recharge of lakes until snowmelt in early June. After snowmelt, water volumes in the lakes decrease throughout the summer, when water loss due to evaporation is considerably greater than water gained from rainfall. This balance switches in August, when air temperature drops, evaporation decreases, and rain (or snow) is more likely to occur. Some of the summer surface storage deficit in the active layer and surface water bodies (lakes, ponds, wetlands) is recharged during this time. However, if the surface storage deficit is not replenished (for example, precipitation in the fall is low and near?surface soils are dry), lake recharge is directly affected, and water availability for the following winter is reduced. In this study, we used snow fences to augment fresh water supplies in shallow arctic lakes despite unfavorable natural conditions. We implemented snow?control practices to enhance snowdrift accumulation (greater snow water equivalent), which led to increased meltwater production and an extended melting season that resulted in lake recharge despite low precipitation during the years of the experiment. For three years (2009, 2010, and 2011), we selected and monitored two lakes with similar hydrological regimes. Both lakes are located 30 miles south of Prudhoe Bay, Alaska, near Franklin Bluffs. One is an experimental lake, where we installed a snow fence; the other is a control lake, where the natural regime was preserved. The general approach was to compare the hydrologic response of the lake to the snowdrift during the summers of 2010 and 2011 against the ?baseline? conditions in 2009. Highlights of the project included new data on snow transport rates on the Alaska North Slope, an evaluation of the experimental lake?s hydrological response to snowdrift melt, and cost assessment of snowdrift?generated water. High snow transport rates (0.49 kg/s/m) ensured that the snowdrift reached its equilibrium profile by winter's end. Generally, natural snowpack disappeared by the beginning of June in this area. In contrast, snow in the drift lasted through early July, supplying the experimental lake with snowmelt when water in other tundra lakes was decreasing. The experimental lake retained elevated water levels during the entire open?water season. Comparison of lake water volumes during the experiment against the baseline year showed that, by the end of summer, the drift generated by the snow fence had increased lake water volume by at least 21?29%. We estimated water cost at 1.9 cents per gallon during the first year and 0.8 cents per gallon during the second year. This estimate depends on the cost of snow fence construction in remote arctic locations, which we assumed to be at $7.66 per square foot of snow fence frontal area. The snow fence technique was effective in augmenting the supply of lake water during summers 2010 and 2011 despite low rainfall during both summers. Snow fences are a simple, yet an effective, way to replenish tundra lakes with freshwater and increase water availability in winter. This research project was synergetic with the NETL project, "North Slope Decision Support System (NSDSS) for Water Resources Planning and Management." The results

  8. Atmospheric Mercury Concentrations Near Salmon Falls Creek Reservoir - Phase 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. L. Abbott

    2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Elemental and reactive gaseous mercury (EGM/RGM) were measured in ambient air concentrations over a two-week period in July/August 2005 near Salmon Falls Creek Reservoir, a popular fishery located 50 km southwest of Twin Falls, Idaho. A fish consumption advisory for mercury was posted at the reservoir in 2002 by the Idaho Department of Health and Welfare. The air measurements were part of a multi-media (water, sediment, precipitation, air) study initiated by the Idaho Department of Environmental Quality and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Region 10 to identify potential sources of mercury contamination to the reservoir. The sampling site is located about 150 km northeast of large gold mining operations in Nevada, which are known to emit large amounts of mercury to the atmosphere (est. 2,200 kg/y from EPA 2003 Toxic Release Inventory). The work was co-funded by the Idaho National Laboratory’s Community Assistance Program and has a secondary objective to better understand mercury inputs to the environment near the INL, which lies approximately 230 km to the northeast. Sampling results showed that both EGM and RGM concentrations were significantly elevated (~ 30 – 70%, P<0.05) compared to known regional background concentrations. Elevated short-term RGM concentrations (the primary form that deposits) were likely due to atmospheric oxidation of high EGM concentrations, which suggests that EGM loading from upwind sources could increase Hg deposition in the area. Back-trajectory analyses indicated that elevated EGM and RGM occurred when air parcels came out of north-central and northeastern Nevada. One EGM peak occurred when the air parcels came out of northwestern Utah. Background concentrations occurred when the air was from upwind locations in Idaho (both northwest and northeast). Based on 2003 EPA Toxic Release Inventory data, it is likely that most of the observed peaks were from Nevada gold mine sources. Emissions from known large natural mercury sources in that area cannot account for the observed EGM peaks due to their diffuse source geometry and the large (170 km) transport distance involved. The EGM peak originating from northwestern Utah air may be from three known mercury sources west of Salt Lake City (Kennecott, US Magnesium, Clean Harbors Aragonite) and/or the 1600 MW coal-fired Intermountain Power plant near Delta. However, the relative importance of these short-term peaks for long-term watershed mercury loading (critical factor affecting fish concentrations) is not known, and there is a need to better quantify the annual frequency and magnitude of these different inputs over a longer period of time.

  9. An inventory of the original vegetation of the Palmetto Bend Reservoir site in Jackson County, Texas with respect to potential eutrophication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crocker, Benjamin Rush

    1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    left on the bottom of the reservoir (1) (2). Leentvaar reported on a study of Lake Brokopondo in Surinam, South America (3). Within 3 to 4 weeks after filling, dissolved oxygen con- centrations were zero below 4 meters and large scale H S production... boundaries. They were ran- domly distributed throughout the vegetative population. With this method, all of the plants inside the boundaries of the quadrat were catalogued and measured, a time-consuming process usually requiring a great deal of equipment...

  10. Adsorption of water vapor on reservoir rocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Progress is reported on: adsorption of water vapor on reservoir rocks; theoretical investigation of adsorption; estimation of adsorption parameters from transient experiments; transient adsorption experiment -- salinity and noncondensible gas effects; the physics of injection of water into, transport and storage of fluids within, and production of vapor from geothermal reservoirs; injection optimization at the Geysers Geothermal Field; a model to test multiwell data interpretation for heterogeneous reservoirs; earth tide effects on downhole pressure measurements; and a finite-difference model for free surface gravity drainage well test analysis.

  11. MARSH LAKE, APPLETON, MINNESOTA ECOSYSTEM RESTORATION PROJECT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    a dike to restore connectivity to an abandoned fish rearing pond adjacent to the dam. · Installing gated recreation features, including shoreline fishing access, picnic facilities, canoe access and a pedestrian

  12. Global Change and Mountain Lakes: Establishing Nutrient Criteria and Critical Loads for Sierra Nevada Lakes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heard, ANDREA Michelle

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the summer and fall of 2011 at Emerald Lake (EML) and Marblethe summer and fall of 2011 at Emerald Lake (EML) and Marble

  13. Volume 4: Characterization of representative reservoirs -- Gulf of Mexico field, U-8 reservoir

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koperna, G.J. Jr.; Johnson, H.R. [BDM Federal, Inc., McLean, VA (United States); Salamy, S.P.; Reeves, T.K. [BDM-Oklahoma, Inc., Bartlesville, OK (United States); Sawyer, W.K. [Mathematical and Computer Services, Inc., Danville, VA (United States); Kimbrell, W.C.; Schenewerk, P.A. [Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States). Dept. of Petroleum Engineering

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A reservoir study was performed using a publicly available black oil simulator to history match and predict the performance of a Gulf of Mexico reservoir. The first objective of this simulation study was to validate the Black Oil Applied Simulation Tool version three for personal computers (BOAST3-PC) model to ensure the integrity of the simulation runs. Once validation was completed, a field history match for the Gulf of Mexico U-8 oil reservoir was attempted. A verbal agreement was reached with the operator of this reservoir to blindcode the name and location of the reservoir. In return, the operator supplied data and assistance in regards to the technical aspects of the research. On the basis of the best history match, different secondary recovery techniques were simulated as a predictive study for enhancing the reservoir productivity.

  14. The verification of a semi-analytical reservoir simulator using a finite difference reservoir simulator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dube, Hans Gerhardt

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    reduction in CPU time and computer memory, when compared to using finite difference reservoir simulators and mainframe computers, to solve the same problem. Development of Computers The advances that have been made in computing power and the improved...THE VERIFICATION OF A SEMI-ANALYTICAL RESERVOIR SIMULATOR USING A FINITE DIFFERENCE RESERVOIR SIMULATOR A Thesis by HANS GERHARDT DUBE Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements...

  15. Installation of a Devonian Shale Reservoir Testing Facility and acquisition of reservoir property measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Locke, C.D.; Salamy, S.P.

    1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In October, a contract was awarded for the Installation of a Devonian Shale Reservoir Testing Facility and Acquisition of Reservoir Property measurements from wells in the Michigan, Illinois, and Appalachian Basins. Geologic and engineering data collected through this project will provide a better understanding of the mechanisms and conditions controlling shale gas production. This report summarizes the results obtained from the various testing procedures used at each wellsite and the activities conducted at the Reservoir Testing Facility.

  16. Installation of a Devonian Shale Reservoir Testing Facility and acquisition of reservoir property measurements. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Locke, C.D.; Salamy, S.P.

    1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In October, a contract was awarded for the Installation of a Devonian Shale Reservoir Testing Facility and Acquisition of Reservoir Property measurements from wells in the Michigan, Illinois, and Appalachian Basins. Geologic and engineering data collected through this project will provide a better understanding of the mechanisms and conditions controlling shale gas production. This report summarizes the results obtained from the various testing procedures used at each wellsite and the activities conducted at the Reservoir Testing Facility.

  17. Characterization and reservoir evaluation of a hydraulically fractured, shaly gas reservoir

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santiago Molina, Cesar Alfonso

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the possibility of replacing average reservoir pressures for short-term pressure data to evaluate gas reserves. Petrophysical properties derived from logs (shale content and porosity) were found to correlate very well. A correlation between average porosity..., Shaly Gas Reservoir. ( December 1991 ) Cesar Alfonso Santiago Molina, Ingeniero de Petroleos, Universidad Nacional de Colombia; Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Steven W. Poston Shale content in reservoir rocks affect their petrophysical properties...

  18. Steel Creek primary producers: Periphyton and seston, L-Lake/Steel Creek Biological Monitoring Program, January 1986--December 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bowers, J.A. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Toole, M.A.; van Duyn, Y. [Normandeau Associates Inc., New Ellenton, SC (United States)

    1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) encompasses 300 sq mi of the Atlantic Coastal Plain in west-central South Carolina. Five major tributaries of the Savannah River -- Upper Three Runs Creek, Four Mile Creek, Pen Branch, Steel Creek, and Lower Three Runs Creek -- drain the site. In 1985, L Lake, a 400-hectare cooling reservoir, was built on the upper reaches of Steel Creek to receive effluent from the restart of L-Reactor and to protect the lower reaches from thermal impacts. The Steel Creek Biological Monitoring Program was designed to assess various components of the system and identify and changes due to the operation of L-Reactor or discharge from L Lake. An intensive ecological assessment program prior to the construction of the lake provided baseline data with which to compare data accumulated after the lake was filled and began discharging into the creek. The Department of Energy must demonstrate that the operation of L-Reactor will not significantly alter the established aquatic ecosystems. This report summarizes the results of six years` data from Steel Creek under the L-Lake/Steel Creek Monitoring Program. L Lake is discussed separately from Steel Creek in Volumes NAI-SR-138 through NAI-SR-143.

  19. Application of integrated reservoir management and reservoir characterization to optimize infill drilling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project has used a multi-disciplinary approach employing geology, geophysics, and engineering to conduct advanced reservoir characterization and management activities to design and implement an optimized infill drilling program at the North Robertson (Clearfork) Unit in Gaines County, Texas. The activities during the first Budget Period consisted of developing an integrated reservoir description from geological, engineering, and geostatistical studies, and using this description for reservoir flow simulation. Specific reservoir management activities were identified and tested. The geologically targeted infill drilling program currently being implemented is a result of this work. A significant contribution of this project is to demonstrate the use of cost-effective reservoir characterization and management tools that will be helpful to both independent and major operators for the optimal development of heterogeneous, low permeability shallow-shelf carbonate (SSC) reservoirs. The techniques that are outlined for the formulation of an integrated reservoir description apply to all oil and gas reservoirs, but are specifically tailored for use in the heterogeneous, low permeability carbonate reservoirs of West Texas.

  20. Great Lakes Water Level Statistics Primary Investigator: Cynthia Sellinger

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Great Lakes Water Level Statistics Primary Investigator: Cynthia Sellinger Overview Extreme Great disruption throughout the Great Lakes system. Reliable lake level frequency distributions are a critical of monthly lake levels reflect secular changes in connecting channel hydraulics, watershed hydrologic

  1. Dams and Reservoirs Safety Act (South Carolina)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Dams and Reservoirs Safety Act provides for the certification and inspection of dams in South Carolina and confers regulatory authority on the Department of Health and Environmental Control....

  2. Study of induced seismicity for reservoir characterization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Junlun, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The main goal of the thesis is to characterize the attributes of conventional and unconventional reservoirs through passive seismicity. The dissertation is comprised of the development and applications of three new methods, ...

  3. Fifteenth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Fifteenth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering was held at Stanford University on January 23--25, 1990. Major topics included: DOE's geothermal research and development program, well testing, field studies, geosciences, geysers, reinjection, tracers, geochemistry, and modeling.

  4. Reservoir fracture characterizations from seismic scattered waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fang, Xinding

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The measurements of fracture parameters, such as fracture orientation, fracture density and fracture compliance, in a reservoir is very important for field development and exploration. Traditional seismic methods for ...

  5. Salinity routing in reservoir system modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ha, Mi Ae

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    in several major river basins in Texas and neighboring states. WRAP is the river/reservoir system simulation model incorporated in the Water Availability Modeling (WAM) System applied by agencies and consulting firms in Texas in planning and water right...

  6. New multilateral well architecture in heterogeneous reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jia, Hongqiao

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    . The performance of new multilateral well in heterogeneous reservoirs is studied, and that is compared with vertical well architecture also. In order to study the productivity of new multilateral wells, we use a numerical simulation method to set up heterogeneous...

  7. Estimating uncertainties in integrated reservoir studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Guohong

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    To make sound investment decisions, decision makers need accurate estimates of the uncertainties present in forecasts of reservoir performance. In this work I propose a method, the integrated mismatch method, that incorporates the misfit...

  8. Determination of mechanical properties of reservoir rock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barnett, Ashley

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatus, experimental procedure, and methodology have been developed to determine the mechanical response of reservoir rock. The apparatus is capable of subjecting cylindrical core specimens to triaxial stress states and temperatures...

  9. Continuous variable entanglement dynamics in structured reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Vasile; S. Olivares; M. G. A. Paris; S. Maniscalco

    2009-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We address the evolution of entanglement in bimodal continuous variable quantum systems interacting with two independent structured reservoirs. We derive an analytic expression for the entanglement of formation without performing the Markov and the secular approximations and study in details the entanglement dynamics for various types of structured reservoirs and for different reservoir temperatures, assuming the two modes initially excited in a twin-beam state. Our analytic solution allows us to identify three dynamical regimes characterized by different behaviors of the entanglement: the entanglement sudden death, the non-Markovian revival and the non-secular revival regimes. Remarkably, we find that, contrarily to the Markovian case, the short-time system-reservoir correlations in some cases destroy quickly the initial entanglement even at zero temperature.

  10. Coarse scale simulation of tight gas reservoirs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    El-Ahmady, Mohamed Hamed

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    It is common for field models of tight gas reservoirs to include several wells with hydraulic fractures. These hydraulic fractures can be very long, extending for more than a thousand feet. A hydraulic fracture width is ...

  11. GHG Emissions from Hydropower Reservoirs The role of hydropower reservoirs in contributing to greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions is poorly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GHG Emissions from Hydropower Reservoirs The role of hydropower reservoirs in contributing from tropical and boreal reservoirs are significant. In light of hydropower's potential role as a green to characterize carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) emissions from hydropower reservoirs in the US Southeast

  12. Sampling and Hydrogeology of the Vadose Zone Beneath the 300 Area Process Ponds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bjornstad, Bruce N.

    2004-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Four open pits were dug with a backhoe into the vadose zone beneath the former 300 Area Process Ponds in April 2003. Samples were collected about every 2 feet for physical, chemical, and/or microbiological characterization. This reports presents a stratigraphic and geohydrologic summary of the four excavations.

  13. 2012 Radiological Monitoring Results Associated with the Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mike Lewis

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes radiological monitoring performed of the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste wastewater prior to discharge into the Cold Waste Pond and of specific groundwater monitoring wells associated with the Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (#LA-000161-01, Modification B). All radiological monitoring is performed to fulfill Department of Energy requirements under the Atomic Energy Act.

  14. 2013 Radiological Monitoring Results Associated with the Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mike Lewis

    2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes radiological monitoring performed of the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste wastewater prior to discharge into the Cold Waste Pond and of specific groundwater monitoring wells associated with the Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (#LA-000161-01, Modification B). All radiological monitoring is performed to fulfill Department of Energy requirements under the Atomic Energy Act.

  15. 2010 Radiological Monitoring Results Associated with the Advance Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    mike lewis

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes radiological monitoring performed of the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste wastewater prior to discharge into the Cold Waste Pond and of specific groundwater monitoring wells associated with the Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (#LA-000161-01, Modification B). All radiological monitoring is performed to fulfill Department of Energy requirements under the Atomic Energy Act.

  16. 2011 Radiological Monitoring Results Associated with the Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mike Lewis

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes radiological monitoring performed of the Idaho National Laboratory Site's Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste wastewater prior to discharge into the Cold Waste Pond and of specific groundwater monitoring wells associated with the Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (LA-000161-01, Modification B). All radiological monitoring is performed to fulfill Department of Energy requirements under the Atomic Energy Act.

  17. Fishing is an important use of private ponds throughout Pennsylvania. In fact, a recent survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Elizabeth W.

    largemouth bass and sunfish, prefer water temperatures above 80°F in the summer while cold-water fish, like are cool-water fish, like smallmouth bass, that are adapted to both conditions. Proper stocking-water fish like largemouth bass (Figure 1) and bluegill. This combination is generally successful in ponds

  18. Hydrogen isotopic variability in leaf waxes among terrestrial and aquatic plants around Blood Pond, Massachusetts (USA)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Hydrogen isotopic variability in leaf waxes among terrestrial and aquatic plants around Blood Pond interpretation of the hydrogen isotope ratios of plant leaf waxes extracted from sediments requires a thor- ough at a single site to determine how leaf wax hydro- gen isotope (D/H) ratios differ in different plant types

  19. Mercury in the Atmosphere, Snow and Melt Water Ponds in the North

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacob, Daniel J.

    . Introduction Compared to most heavy metals, mercury behaves excepMercury in the Atmosphere, Snow and Melt Water Ponds in the North Atlantic Ocean during Arctic dominant species, with a northern hemispheric back- ground concentration of 1.7 ng/m3 (3). Under these same

  20. Reconstruction and operation of the El Paso Solar Pond with a geosynthetic clay liner system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, H.; Swift, A.H.P. [Univ. of Texas, El Paso, TX (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    After the original XR-5 membrane liner failed in 1992, the El Paso Solar Pond was reconstructed and operated with a geosynthetic clay liner (GCL) system. The solar pond is approximately 3,000 m{sup 2} in surface area, and 3.2 meters deep with a 15{degree} side-wall slope. A new heat extraction system includes 15-cm (6-inch) rubber hoses and two redesigned polypropylene diffusers. A new automated instrumentation system was developed for monitoring pond status. It uses a newly developed scanner combined with a computer for both position control and data logging. The salinity gradient was established using a new scanning method, as opposed to the previously used fixed point method. Fresh water was injected into brine through a newly designed PVC bar shaped diffuser, which scans automatically within preset regions. After two months, the pond bottom reached 80 C and heat extraction began. The performance of the GCL system, characterized by its hydraulic conductivity, has been monitored, and generates the first full scale, elevated temperature data for a GCL system. Preliminary hydraulic conductivity data indicate values comparable with other clay liner systems.

  1. Pond thermal stratification and turnover -A 1 Year Experiment Last updated on 9 Dec 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suzuki, Masatsugu

    . We recorded the temperatures once every 50 sec continuously. The voltage output of a solar cell is also recorded. The solar cell shows sunrise and sunset and the passing of clouds. The pond is located temperature vs. time will be updated from time to time as more data is collected. If you have comments

  2. Texas AgriLife Research with General Atomics Pilots Microalgae Ponds in Pecos BIOENERGY PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas AgriLife Research with General Atomics Pilots Microalgae Ponds in Pecos BIOENERGY PROGRAM systems for microalgae capable of producing biofuels. Diesel and jet fuels are critical to our nation from renewable sources by 2020. Energy and financial analysts acknowledge that the world has entered

  3. Reservoir cross-over in entanglement dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Mazzola; S. Maniscalco; K. -A. Suominen; B. M. Garraway

    2009-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the effects of spontaneous emission on the entanglement dynamics of two qubits interacting with a common Lorentzian structured reservoir. We assume that the qubits are initially prepared in a Bell-like state. We focus on the strong coupling regime and study the entanglement dynamics for different regions of the spontaneous emission decay parameter. This investigation allows us to explore the cross-over between common and independent reservoirs in entanglement dynamics.

  4. Finite temperature reservoir engineering and entanglement dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Fedortchenko; A. Keller; T. Coudreau; P. Milman

    2014-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose experimental methods to engineer reservoirs at arbitrary temperature which are feasible with current technology. Our results generalize to mixed states the possibility of quantum state engineering through controlled decoherence. Finite temperature engineered reservoirs can lead to the experimental observation of thermal entanglement --the appearance and increase of entanglement with temperature-- to the study of the dependence of finite time disentanglement and revival with temperature, quantum thermodynamical effects, among many other applications, enlarging the comprehension of temperature dependent entanglement properties.

  5. Numerical simulation of sandstone reservoir models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gross, Stephen Joseph

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Case 3 - Alternatin h1 h and low ermeabilities Waterflood performance of the Case 3 reservoir is shown in Figures 19 and 20. The process 1s practically rate insensitive for both the high and low viscosity ratio cases because of the ex istence... The results of the water flood study indicate that lower rates result i n higher waterflood oil recoveries from heterogeneous reservoirs, particularly where high oil-water viscosity ratios exist. These results support the conclusions of Jordan et. al...

  6. SEISMIC ATTENUATION FOR RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joel Walls; M.T. Taner; Gary Mavko; Jack Dvorkin

    2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In fully-saturated rock and at ultrasonic frequencies, the microscopic squirt flow induced between the stiff and soft parts of the pore space by an elastic wave is responsible for velocity-frequency dispersion and attenuation. In the seismic frequency range, it is the macroscopic cross-flow between the stiffer and softer parts of the rock. We use the latter hypothesis to introduce simple approximate equations for velocity-frequency dispersion and attenuation in a fully water saturated reservoir. The equations are based on the assumption that in heterogeneous rock and at a very low frequency, the effective elastic modulus of the fully-saturated rock can be estimated by applying a fluid substitution procedure to the averaged (upscaled) dry frame whose effective porosity is the mean porosity and the effective elastic modulus is the Backus-average (geometric mean) of the individual dry-frame elastic moduli of parts of the rock. At a higher frequency, the effective elastic modulus of the saturated rock is the Backus-average of the individual fully-saturated-rock elastic moduli of parts of the rock. The difference between the effective elastic modulus calculated separately by these two methods determines the velocity-frequency dispersion. The corresponding attenuation is calculated from this dispersion by using (e.g.) the standard linear solid attenuation model.

  7. Analysis of Sweet Lake geopressured-geothermal aquifer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrade, M.; Rago, F.; Ohkuma, H.; Sepehrnoori, K.; Peters, E.; Dorfman, M.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Sweet Lake geopressured-geothermal aquifer, located southeast of Lake Charles, Louisiana, is modeled by a two-dimensional geopressured-geothermal simulator. This aquifer is a sandstone within the Frio formation at depths between 15,000 to 15,640 ft with a net porous thickness of 250 ft, a calculated in-situ permeability (from drawdown data) of 17 md, an estimated porosity of 24%, a uniaxial compaction coefficient of 4.5 x 10/sup -7/ psi/sup -1/ and a solution gas-water ratio of 11 SCF/STB all at the initial reservoir pressure of 12,060 psi. These parameters are typically pressure sensitive in geopressured-geothermal aquifers and are critically important to aquifer performance. Several simulation experiments are conducted which investigate the effects of varying initial values for these parameters with the experimentally determined values as means. The simulations give both optimistic and pessimistic expectations for aquifer performance. The expected life of the geopressured-geothermal well is reported for each simulation.

  8. An approach to integrated assessement of reservoir siltation: the Joaqun Costa reservoir as a case study Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 8(6), 11931199 (2004) EGU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    An approach to integrated assessement of reservoir siltation: the Joaquín Costa reservoir as a case to integrated assessement of reservoir siltation: the Joaquín Costa reservoir as a case study A. Navas1 , B of the main environments in the reservoir. Records of known flood events and of reservoir management data have

  9. A differential model for predicting growth of the upper convective zone of a solar pond due to wind speed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hullender, Todd Allan

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the ability to both absorb and store large quantities of solar energy for a variety of uses, such as electrical power generation, desalination, space and water heating, and process heat generation, A salt-gradient solar pond (SGSP) is a relatively shallow.... It is therefore highly desirable to collect and store solar energy as a means of reducing the demand for power generation. There are many different methods by which solar energy can be stored. one of which is a salt-gradient solar pond. Solar ponds have...

  10. The microbial flora of pond-reared shrimp (Penaeus stylirostris, P. setiferus, P. vannamei, and Macrobrachium rosenbergii)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christopher, Frank Mitchell

    1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    methods, None of these organisms were detected in the shrimp or pond waters. A CKN 0WLEDGENEN T S The author wishes to express his appreciation to Dr. Carl Vanderzant for his help and guidance in the organization of this study and the writing... of these technological changes. MATERIALS AND METHODS P ond. 0 on s true ti on and Nana e ment The rearing of shrimp in artificial ponds is a unique aspect of mariculture research on the Gulf Coast. In Louisiana, ponds have been in operation since the early 1960's...

  11. Effects of a reduction of blue tilapia Oreochromis aureus on the ichthyofauna of a power-plant reservoir

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Starling, Scott Michael

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    without the help of' Gerry McIlveen, Joe Sanifer, Ray White, and Wend ell White side. Funds were administered through the Department of Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences and the Texas Agriculture Experiment Station (Project 6462-5197 ) . Appreciation... effluent is discharged from the plant into a 60 ha "hot lake" and reenters the reservoir via a 2. 1 km canal. Construction was concluded in September, 1969, and was filled to capacity by August, 197 1 with water pumped from the nearby Trinity River...

  12. HYDROPOWER RESERVOIR FOR FLOOD CONTROL: A CASE STUDY ON RINGLET RESERVOIR, CAMERON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Julien, Pierre Y.

    HYDROPOWER RESERVOIR FOR FLOOD CONTROL: A CASE STUDY ON RINGLET RESERVOIR, CAMERON HIGHLANDS, Malaysia 4 Professor, Department of Civil Engineering, Colorado State University, USA ABSTRACT: Hydropower as possible for daily hydropower generation as well as to prevent any spillage at dam. However

  13. Formation and thermal evolution of insoluble reservoir bitumen in Angolan carbonate reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Formation and thermal evolution of insoluble reservoir bitumen in Angolan carbonate reservoirs from 98% insoluble bitumen to 45% insoluble, indicating a substantial spread of maturity. However, the discordance shown by these parameters (e.g. bitumen reflectance and bitumen solubility in DCM) indicates

  14. Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Monitoring Program; 1988-1989 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peone, Tim L.; Scholz, Allan T.; Griffith, James R.

    1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the Northwest Power Planning Council's 1987 Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (NPPC 1987), the Council directed the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to construct two kokanee salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) hatcheries as partial mitigation for the loss of anadromous salmon and steelhead incurred by construction of Grand Coulee Dam [Section 903 (g)(l)(C)]. The hatcheries will produce kokanee salmon for outplanting into Lake Roosevelt as well as rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) for the Lake Roosevelt net-pen program. In section 903 (g)(l)(E), the Council also directed BPA to fund a monitoring program to evaluate the effectiveness of the kokanee hatcheries. The monitoring program included the following components: (1) a year-round, reservoir-wide, creel survey to determine angler use, catch rates and composition, and growth and condition of fish; (2) assessment of kokanee, rainbow, and walleye (Stizostedion vitreum) feeding habits and densities of their preferred prey, and; (3) a mark and recapture study designed to assess the effectiveness of different locations where hatchery-raised kokanee and net pen reared rainbow trout are released. The above measures were adopted by the Council based on a management plan, developed by the Upper Columbia United Tribes Fisheries Center, Spokane Indian Tribe, Colville Confederated Tribes, Washington Department of Wildlife, and National Park Service, that examined the feasibility of restoring and enhancing Lake Roosevelt fisheries (Scholz et al. 1986). In July 1988, BPA entered into a contract with the Spokane Indian Tribe to initiate the monitoring program. The projected duration of the monitoring program is through 1995. This report contains the results of the monitoring program from August 1988 to December 1989.

  15. A triple-continuum pressure-transient model for a naturally fractured vuggy reservoir

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    simulation of naturally fractured reservoirs, Water Resour.model for fissured fractured reservoir, Soc. Pet. Eng. J. ,behavior of naturally fractured reservoirs, Soc. Pet. Eng.

  16. A physically based numerical approach for modeling fracture-matrix interaction in fractured reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yu-Shu; Pruess, Karsten

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of naturally fractured reservoirs with uniform fracturefor naturally fractured reservoirs, SPE-11688, Presented atflow simulations in fractured reservoirs, Report LBL- 15227,

  17. Numerical modeling of water injection into vapor-dominated geothermal reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pruess, Karsten

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in heterogeneous fractured reservoirs in three dimensions,others employed a fractured reservoir description, using theused for the fractured reservoir problem are given in Table

  18. An Analytical Solution for Slug-Tracer Tests in Fractured Reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shan, Chao; Pruess, Karsten

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tracer Tests in Fractured Reservoirs Chao Shan and Karstenof chemicals or heat in fractured reservoirs is stronglyin a water-saturated fractured reservoir. The solution shows

  19. Aligned vertical fractures, HTI reservoir symmetry, and Thomsen seismic anisotropy parameters for polar media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berryman, James G.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    waves in such fractured reservoirs (Hsu and Schoenberg,i.e. , for cracked/fractured reservoirs), the vertical phasemore closely. FRACTURED RESERVOIRS AND CRACK-INFLUENCE

  20. Pore-scale mechanisms of gas flow in tight sand reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silin, D.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fundamentals of fractured reservoir engineering, Elsevierof naturally fractured reservoirs, SPEJ (1963), 106. J. D.37]. In a fractured conventional reservoir, the accumulating

  1. Effects of non-condensible gases on fluid recovery in fractured geothermal reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.; Gaulke, Scott

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Simu- lations in Fractured Reservoirs,” Lawrence Berkeleyfrom a twctphase fractured reservoir. T h e results obtainedRecovery in Fractured Geothermal Reservoirs Gudmundur S.

  2. STATUS OF GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING RESEARCH PROJECTS SUPPORTED BY USDOE/DIVISION OF GEOTHERMAL ENERGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howard, J.H.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Summary of reservoir engineering data: from the authors.of new data important to geo- thermal reservoir engineeringdata and other information related to geothermal reservoir

  3. Lakes and Rivers Improvement Act (Ontario, Canada)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Lakes and Rivers Improvement Act proscribes the management, protection, preservation and use of the waters of the lakes and rivers of Ontario and the land under them. The Act also details...

  4. Recreational Lake and Water Quality Districts (Iowa)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Territory contiguous to a recreational lake may be incorporated into a recreational lake and water quality district if such action is conducive to the public health, comfort, convenience, water...

  5. Reservoir Characterization, Production Characteristics, and Research Needs for Fluvial/Alluvial Reservoirs in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cole, E.L.; Fowler, M.L.; Jackson, S.R.; Madden, M.P.; Raw-Schatzinger, V.; Salamy, S.P.; Sarathi, P.; Young, M.A.

    1999-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy's (DOE's) Oil Recovery Field Demonstration Program was initiated in 1992 to maximize the economically and environmentally sound recovery of oil from known domestic reservoirs and to preserve access to this resource. Cost-shared field demonstration projects are being initiated in geology defined reservoir classes which have been prioritized by their potential for incremental recovery and their risk of abandonment. This document defines the characteristics of the fifth geological reservoir class in the series, fluvial/alluvial reservoirs. The reservoirs of Class 5 include deposits of alluvial fans, braided streams, and meandering streams. Deposit morphologies vary as a complex function of climate and tectonics and are characterized by a high degree of heterogeneity to fluid flow as a result of extreme variations in water energy as the deposits formed.

  6. Seismic imaging of reservoir flow properties: Resolving waterinflux and reservoir permeability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vasco, D.W.; Keers, Henk

    2006-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods for geophysical model assessment, in particuale thecomputation of model parameter resolution, indicate the value and thelimitations of time-lapse data in estimating reservoir flow properties. Atrajectory-based method for computing sensitivities provides an effectivemeans to compute model parameter resolutions. We examine the commonsituation in which water encroaches into a resrvoir from below, as due tothe upward movement of an oil-water contact. Using straight-forwardtechniques we find that, by inclusing reflections off the top and bottomof a reservoir tens of meters thick, we can infer reservoir permeabilitybased upon time-lapse data. We find that, for the caseof water influxfrom below, using multiple time-lapse 'snapshots' does not necessarilyimprove the resolution of reservoir permeability. An application totime-lapse data from the Norne field illustrates that we can resolve thepermeability near a producing well using reflections from threeinterfaces associated with the reservoir.

  7. Radionuclides and heavy metals in rainbow trout from Tsichomo, Nana Ka, Wen Povi, and Pin De Lakes in Santa Clara Canyon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fresquez, P.R.; Armstrong, D.R.; Naranjo, L. Jr.

    1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Radionuclide ({sup 3}H, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 238}Pu, {sup 239}Pu, and total uranium) and heavy metal (Ag, As, Ba, Be, Cd, Cr, Hg, Ni, Pb, Sb, Se, and TI) concentrations were determined in rainbow trout collected from Tsichomo, Nana Ka, Wen Povi, and Pin De lakes in Santa Clara Canyon in 1997. Most radionuclide and heavy metal concentrations in fish collected from these four lakes were within or just above upper limit background concentrations (Abiquiu reservoir), and as a group were statistically (p < 0.05) similar in most parameters to background.

  8. Climate Change and Variability Lake Ice, Fishes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    #12;Climate Change and Variability Lake Ice, Fishes and Water Levels John J. Magnuson Center to everything else." #12;The Invisible Present The Invisible Place Magnuson 2006 #12;Ice-on Day 2007 Peter W. Schmitz Photo Local Lake Mendota #12;Ice Breakup 2010 Lake Mendota March 20 #12;March 21 Ice Breakup 2010

  9. Temperature analysis for lake Yojoa, Honduras

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chokshi, Mira (Mira K.)

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lake Yojoa is the largest freshwater lake in Honduras, located in the central west region of the country (1405' N, 88° W). The lake has a surface area of 82 km2, a maximum depth of 26 m. and an average depth of 16 m. The ...

  10. A feasibility study of solar ponds for Wisconsin industrial process heat applications -- Impact of lining material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henning, M.A.; Reid, R.L. [Marquette Univ., Milwaukee, WI (United States). Coll. of Engineering

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An economic feasibility study of a salinity gradient solar pond for providing industrial process heat (IPH) in the state of Wisconsin is presented. A survey of current low temperature energy load demands of several companies within Wisconsin was completed. The data obtained was analyzed using a microcomputer based program to assess feasibility. Economic feasibility and thermal performance depends upon area. The area of the pond would determine the corresponding quantities of excavation, salt and lining material required to establish a salinity gradient solar pond (SGSP). The cost of the lining material also has a large impact upon the economic feasibility of a SGSP. The results of the economic feasibility study of a SGSP based on the selection of four types of liners is presented. These liners are a high density polyethylene (HDPE) liner, two forms of a geosynthetic clay liner (GCL) and a chemical and weather resistant polymer coated polyester fabric liner (XR-5). For a load of 10,000 GJ/month on an annual operating schedule for the most favorable economic performance resulted from a geosynthetic clay liner with a high density polyethylene backing. For a 10,000 m{sup 2} pond a payback of 8.4 years can be obtained with a unit cost of $43.20/m{sup 2}. It was also determined that if a larger load was demanded and the corresponding optimal area was provided the economic feasibility of a SGSP increased greatly. For a load of 100,000 GJ/Month on an annual operating schedule, using the same lining material, the optimal pond area was found to be 35,800 m{sup 2}, with a discounted payback of 3.8 years and a unit cost of $35.40/ms{sup 2}. Similar results were obtained for the other materials. From these findings it appears that a SGSP using a geosynthetic clay liner with HDPE backing will be economically feasible for a load of 10,000 GJ/month. The economic feasibility improves with increased thermal load and the corresponding optimal pond area.

  11. Integral cesium reservoir: Design and transient operation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, J.N. Jr.; Horner, M.H.; Begg, L.L. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Wrobleski, W.J. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., West Mifflin, PA (United States). Bettis Atomic Power Lab.

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrically heated thermionic converter has been designed built and successfully tested in air (Homer et.al., 1995). One of the unique features of this converter was an integral cesium reservoir thermally coupled to the emitter. The reservoir consisted of fifteen cesiated graphite pins located in pockets situated in the emitter lead with thermal coupling to the emitter, collector and the emitter terminal; there were no auxiliary electric heaters on the reservoir. Test results are described for conditions in which the input thermal power to the converter was ramped up and down between 50% and 100% of full power in times as short as 50 sec, with data acquisition occurring every 12 sec. During the ramps the emitter and collector temperature profiles. the reservoir temperature and the electric output into a fixed load resistor are reported. The converter responded promptly to the power ramps without excessive overshoot and with no tendency to develop instabilities. This is the rust demonstration of the performance of a cesium-graphite integral reservoir in a fast transient

  12. Integrated reservoir management doubles Nigerian field reserves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akinlawon, Y.; Nwosu, T.; Satter, A.; Jespersen, R.

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An integrated alliance across disciplines, companies and countries enabled Texaco to conduct a comprehensive reservoir analysis of the North Apoi/Funiwa field in Nigeria. Recommendations implemented in 3 months doubled the book reserves of this mature field. The paper discusses the objectives, the integration of organizations, reservoir analysis, and conclusions. The conclusions made from the integrated study are: (1) 3-D seismic data dramatically improved reservoir description. (2) OOIP is considerably more than the booked values and reserves additions are substantial. (3) Significant value has been added to TOPCON`s assets as a result of teamwork and a multidisciplinary approach to evaluating the reservoirs and optimizing the scenarios for reservoir management. (4) Teamwork and integration of professionals, data, technology and tools was critical to the projects success. (5) The study set an example for effective and expeditious technology transfer and applications. (6) Partnering of TOPCON, DPR, NAPIMS, EPTD and SSI resulted in a quick cycle time and set an excellent example of integration and alliance.

  13. Fractured shale reservoirs: Towards a realistic model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamilton-Smith, T. [Applied Earth Science, Lexington, KY (United States)

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fractured shale reservoirs are fundamentally unconventional, which is to say that their behavior is qualitatively different from reservoirs characterized by intergranular pore space. Attempts to analyze fractured shale reservoirs are essentially misleading. Reliance on such models can have only negative results for fractured shale oil and gas exploration and development. A realistic model of fractured shale reservoirs begins with the history of the shale as a hydrocarbon source rock. Minimum levels of both kerogen concentration and thermal maturity are required for effective hydrocarbon generation. Hydrocarbon generation results in overpressuring of the shale. At some critical level of repressuring, the shale fractures in the ambient stress field. This primary natural fracture system is fundamental to the future behavior of the fractured shale gas reservoir. The fractures facilitate primary migration of oil and gas out of the shale and into the basin. In this process, all connate water is expelled, leaving the fractured shale oil-wet and saturated with oil and gas. What fluids are eventually produced from the fractured shale depends on the consequent structural and geochemical history. As long as the shale remains hot, oil production may be obtained. (e.g. Bakken Shale, Green River Shale). If the shale is significantly cooled, mainly gas will be produced (e.g. Antrim Shale, Ohio Shale, New Albany Shale). Where secondary natural fracture systems are developed and connect the shale to aquifers or to surface recharge, the fractured shale will also produce water (e.g. Antrim Shale, Indiana New Albany Shale).

  14. The redox and iron-sulfide geochemistry of Salt Pond and the thermodynamic constraints on native magnetotactic bacteria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Canovas, Peter A

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Salt pond is a meromictic system with an outlet to the sea allowing denser seawater to occupy the monimolimnion while the mixolimnion has relatively low salinity and is the site of greater mixing and microbial activity. ...

  15. Evaluation of the Eological Management and Enhancement Alernative for Remediation of the K1007-P1 Pond

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, M.J.

    2005-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    An evaluation of the human and ecological risks associated with the P1 Pond and surrounding environs was conducted as part of the ETTP Site-Wide Remedial Investigation. The RI provides the basis for the focus on PCBs as the most important unacceptable risk to human and ecological health in the pond. Other P1 contaminants, media, or pathways of risk to receptors are identified in the RI, but are not addressed as a major risk reduction goal for the ETTP Site-Wide Feasibility Study. Therefore, the goal of the Ecological Management alternative is to reduce unacceptable risks associated with PCBs in fish. Many of the actions proposed for this alternative, however, are likely to reduce risks associated with other contaminants and their pathways. The high PCB concentrations in fish from the P1 Pond are most certainly due in part to the current ecological condition of the pond that maximizes PCB biomagnification. This basic assumption and the factors contributing to it were evaluated by conducting an intensive field study of the P1 Pond in the summer of 2004 (for a thorough presentation of current P1 Pond biological conditions, see Peterson et al. 2005). Major hypotheses regarding the P1 Pond's current fish community, PCB fate and transport processes, pond vegetation, and limnological conditions that contribute to the high PCB levels in fish were validated by the study (Appendix A), The results of the 2004 ecological assessment, in concert with long-term datasets obtained as part of the ETTP Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) and recent abiotic sampling for the RI, provide the basis for the assessment of current conditions.

  16. Reservoir characterization and enhanced oil recovery research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lake, L.W.; Pope, G.A.; Schechter, R.S.

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The research in this annual report falls into three tasks each dealing with a different aspect of enhanced oil recovery. The first task strives to develop procedures for accurately modeling reservoirs for use as input to numerical simulation flow models. This action describes how we have used a detail characterization of an outcrop to provide insights into what features are important to fluid flow modeling. The second task deals with scaling-up and modeling chemical and solvent EOR processes. In a sense this task is the natural extension of task 1 and, in fact, one of the subtasks uses many of the same statistical procedures for insight into the effects of viscous fingering and heterogeneity. The final task involves surfactants and their interactions with carbon dioxide and reservoir minerals. This research deals primarily with phenomena observed when aqueous surfactant solutions are injected into oil reservoirs.

  17. Horizontal well applications in complex carbonate reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rahman, M.; Al-Awami, H.

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the past four years, Saudi Aramco has drilled over eighty horizontal wells, onshore and offshore. It has successfully applied this technology to develop new reservoirs as well as enhance recovery from its mature fields. This paper presents the reservoir engineering aspects of `horizontal` and `high angle` wells drilled in a major offshore field in Saudi Arabia. It shows how horizontal wells have (a) increased the recovery of bypassed oil, (b) improved well productivity in tight reservoirs, (c) increased production from thin oil zones underlain by water, and (d) improved peripheral injection. The paper discusses the actual performance of the horizontal wells and compares them with offset conventional wells. It presents the results of logging and testing of these wells, and highlights actual field data on (a) relationship between productivity gain and horizontal length, (b) pressure loss along the horizontal wellbore, and (c) effect of heterogeneity on coning an inflow performance.

  18. Pond Creek coal seam in eastern Kentucky - new look at an old resource

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hower, J.C.; Pollock, J.D.; Klapheke, J.G.

    1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Middle Pennsylvania/Westphalian B Pond Creek Coal is an important low-sulfur resource in Pike and Martin Counties, Kentucky. The Breathitt Formation seam, also known as the lower Elkhorn coal, accounted for nearly 40% of Pike County's 1983 production of 22 million tons. Although the coal is nearly mined out through central Pike County, substantial reserves still exist in the northern part of the county. Past studies of the seam by the US Bureau of Mines concentrated on the utility of the seam as a coking blend, with additional consideration of the megascopic and microscopic coal petrology. The authors research has focused on the regional variations in the Pond Creek seam, with emphasis on the petrographic variations.

  19. State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA) Environmental Checklist Form 216-B-3 Expansion Ponds Closure Plan. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 216-B-3 Expansion Ponds Closure Plan (Revision 1) consists of a Part A Dangerous Waste Permit Application and a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Closure Plan. An explanation of the Part A submitted with this document is provided at the beginning of the Part A Section. The closure plan consists of nine chapters and five appendices. The 216-B-3 Pond System consists of a series of four earthen, unlined, interconnected ponds and the 216-B-3-3 Ditch that receive waste water from various 200 East Area operating facilities. These four ponds, collectively. Waste water (primarily cooling water, steam condensate, and sanitary water) from various 200 East Area facilities is discharged to the 216-B-3-3 Ditch. Water discharged to the 216-8-3-3 Ditch flows directly into the 216-B-3 Pond. In the past, waste water discharges to B Pond and the 216-B-3-3 Ditch contained mixed waste (radioactive waste and dangerous waste). The radioactive portion of mixed waste has been interpreted by the US Department of Energy (DOE) to be regulated under the Atomic Energy Act of 1954; the nonradioactive dangerous portion of mixed waste is regulated under RCRA. Mixed waste also may be considered a hazardous substance under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) when considering remediation of waste sites.

  20. An Intelligent Systems Approach to Reservoir Characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shahab D. Mohaghegh; Jaime Toro; Thomas H. Wilson; Emre Artun; Alejandro Sanchez; Sandeep Pyakurel

    2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Today, the major challenge in reservoir characterization is integrating data coming from different sources in varying scales, in order to obtain an accurate and high-resolution reservoir model. The role of seismic data in this integration is often limited to providing a structural model for the reservoir. Its relatively low resolution usually limits its further use. However, its areal coverage and availability suggest that it has the potential of providing valuable data for more detailed reservoir characterization studies through the process of seismic inversion. In this paper, a novel intelligent seismic inversion methodology is presented to achieve a desirable correlation between relatively low-frequency seismic signals, and the much higher frequency wireline-log data. Vertical seismic profile (VSP) is used as an intermediate step between the well logs and the surface seismic. A synthetic seismic model is developed by using real data and seismic interpretation. In the example presented here, the model represents the Atoka and Morrow formations, and the overlying Pennsylvanian sequence of the Buffalo Valley Field in New Mexico. Generalized regression neural network (GRNN) is used to build two independent correlation models between; (1) Surface seismic and VSP, (2) VSP and well logs. After generating virtual VSP's from the surface seismic, well logs are predicted by using the correlation between VSP and well logs. The values of the density log, which is a surrogate for reservoir porosity, are predicted for each seismic trace through the seismic line with a classification approach having a correlation coefficient of 0.81. The same methodology is then applied to real data taken from the Buffalo Valley Field, to predict inter-well gamma ray and neutron porosity logs through the seismic line of interest. The same procedure can be applied to a complete 3D seismic block to obtain 3D distributions of reservoir properties with less uncertainty than the geostatistical estimation methods. The intelligent seismic inversion method should help to increase the success of drilling new wells during field development.

  1. The application of seismic stratigraphic methods on exploration 3D seismic data to define a reservoir model in OPL 210, Deepwater Nigeria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ragnhild, L.; Ventris, P. [Statoil and BP Alliance, Stavanger (Norway); Osahon, G. [Allied Energy Resources (Nig) Ltd., Lagos (Nigeria)

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    OPL 210 lies in deepwater on the northwestern flank of the Niger Delta. The partners in this block are Allied Energy and The Statoil and BP Alliance. The license has a 5 year initial exploration phase and carries a 2 well commitment. At present the database comprises a 1 x 1 km grid of 2D seismic across the block, and 450 sq. km of 3D in an area of special interest. A larger 3D survey is planned for 1995. Little is known about the reservoir in the deep water, but we expect our main target to be ponded slope and basin turbidites. As such the bulk of the shelf well data available has little or no relevance to the play type likely to be encountered. Prior to drilling, seismic stratigraphy has been one of several methods used to generate a consistent predictive reservoir model. The excellent quality and high resolution of the 3D data have allowed identification and detailed description of several distinctive seismic facies. These facies are described in terms of their internal geometries and stacking patterns. The geometries are then interpreted based on a knowledge of depositional processes from analog slope settings. This enables a predictive model to be constructed for the distribution of reservoir within the observed facies. These predictions will be tested by one of the first wells drilled in the Nigerian deepwater in mid 1995.

  2. Structural Reliability: Assessing the Condition and Reliability of Casing in Compacting Reservoirs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chantose, Prasongsit

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Casing has a higher risk of failure in a compacting reservoir than in a typical reservoir. Casing fails when reservoir compaction induces compression and shear stresses onto it. They compact as reservoir pressure depletes during production. High...

  3. Petrophysics -The Integration of Reservoir Geosciences Date: 8th -11th September 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levi, Ran

    & Integrated Petrophyiscs and Uncertainty Management Date: 2nd - 7th February 2015 Reservoir SurveillancePetrophysics - The Integration of Reservoir Geosciences Date: 8th - 11th September 2014 Integrating Petrophysics and Seismic Data for Reservoir Characterisation GL55518 Reservoir Surveillance

  4. INCREASING WATERFLOOD RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH IMPROVED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND RESERVOIR MANAGEMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott Walker; Chris Phillips; Roy Koerner; Don Clarke; Dan Moos; Kwasi Tagbor

    2002-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This project increased recoverable waterflood reserves in slope and basin reservoirs through improved reservoir characterization and reservoir management. The particular application of this project is in portions of Fault Blocks IV and V of the Wilmington Oil Field, in Long Beach, California, but the approach is widely applicable in slope and basin reservoirs. Transferring technology so that it can be applied in other sections of the Wilmington Field and by operators in other slope and basin reservoirs is a primary component of the project. This project used advanced reservoir characterization tools, including the pulsed acoustic cased-hole logging tool, geologic three-dimensional (3-D) modeling software, and commercially available reservoir management software to identify sands with remaining high oil saturation following waterflood. Production from the identified high oil saturated sands was stimulated by recompleting existing production and injection wells in these sands using conventional means as well as a short radius redrill candidate. Although these reservoirs have been waterflooded over 40 years, researchers have found areas of remaining oil saturation. Areas such as the top sand in the Upper Terminal Zone Fault Block V, the western fault slivers of Upper Terminal Zone Fault Block V, the bottom sands of the Tar Zone Fault Block V, and the eastern edge of Fault Block IV in both the Upper Terminal and Lower Terminal Zones all show significant remaining oil saturation. Each area of interest was uncovered emphasizing a different type of reservoir characterization technique or practice. This was not the original strategy but was necessitated by the different levels of progress in each of the project activities.

  5. Improved characterization of reservoir behavior by integration of reservoir performances data and rock type distributions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davies, D.K.; Vessell, R.K. [David K. Davies & Associates, Kingwood, TX (United States); Doublet, L.E. [Texas A& M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)] [and others

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An integrated geological/petrophysical and reservoir engineering study was performed for a large, mature waterflood project (>250 wells, {approximately}80% water cut) at the North Robertson (Clear Fork) Unit, Gaines County, Texas. The primary goal of the study was to develop an integrated reservoir description for {open_quotes}targeted{close_quotes} (economic) 10-acre (4-hectare) infill drilling and future recovery operations in a low permeability, carbonate (dolomite) reservoir. Integration of the results from geological/petrophysical studies and reservoir performance analyses provide a rapid and effective method for developing a comprehensive reservoir description. This reservoir description can be used for reservoir flow simulation, performance prediction, infill targeting, waterflood management, and for optimizing well developments (patterns, completions, and stimulations). The following analyses were performed as part of this study: (1) Geological/petrophysical analyses: (core and well log data) - {open_quotes}Rock typing{close_quotes} based on qualitative and quantitative visualization of pore-scale features. Reservoir layering based on {open_quotes}rock typing {close_quotes} and hydraulic flow units. Development of a {open_quotes}core-log{close_quotes} model to estimate permeability using porosity and other properties derived from well logs. The core-log model is based on {open_quotes}rock types.{close_quotes} (2) Engineering analyses: (production and injection history, well tests) Material balance decline type curve analyses to estimate total reservoir volume, formation flow characteristics (flow capacity, skin factor, and fracture half-length), and indications of well/boundary interference. Estimated ultimate recovery analyses to yield movable oil (or injectable water) volumes, as well as indications of well and boundary interference.

  6. Characterization of oil and gas reservoir heterogeneity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the cooperative research program is to characterize Alaskan reservoirs in terms of their reserves, physical and chemical properties, geologic configuration and structure, and the development potential. The tasks completed during this period include: (1) geologic reservoir description of Endicott Field; (2) petrographic characterization of core samples taken from selected stratigraphic horizons of the West Sak and Ugnu (Brookian) wells; (3) development of a polydispersed thermodynamic model for predicting asphaltene equilibria and asphaltene precipitation from crude oil-solvent mixtures, and (4) preliminary geologic description of the Milne Point Unit.

  7. Seawater can damage Saudi sandstone oil reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dahab, A.S. (King Saud Univ., Riyadh (SA))

    1990-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Experiments have shown that formation damage from waterflooding of the Aramco and Alkhafji sandstones of Saudi Arabia will not occur if the salinity of the injected brines is higher than 20% NaCl. Because the connate water in these reservoirs has a high salt content of up to 231,000 ppm, Saudi oil fields are almost always susceptible to formation damage when flooded with seawater (about 38,500 ppm). The productive behavior of a reservoir can be affected by clay crystals developed within rock pores.

  8. Changing the Rules on Fuel Export at Sellafield's First Fuel Storage Pond - 12065

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlisle, Derek [Sellafield Ltd, Sellafield, Cumbria (United Kingdom)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pile Fuel Storage Pond (PFSP) was built in 1949/50 to receive, store and de-can fuel and isotopes from the Windscale Piles. Following closure of the Piles in 1957, plant operations were scaled down until fuel processing eventually ceased in 1962. The facility has held an inventory of metal fuel both from the Piles and from other programmes since that time. The pond is currently undergoing remediation and removal of the fuel is a key step in that process, unfortunately the fuel export infrastructure on the plant is no longer functional and due to the size and limited lifting capability, the plant is not compatible with today's large volume heavy export flasks. The baseline scheme for the plant is to package fuel into a small capacity flask and transfer it to another facility for treatment and repackaging into a flask compatible with other facilities on site. Due to programme priorities the repackaging facility is not available to do this work for several years causing a delay to the work. In an effort accelerate the programme the Metal Fuel Pilot Project (MFPP) was initiated to challenge the norms for fuel transfer and develop a new methodology for transferring the fuel. In developing a transfer scheme the team had to overcome challenges associated with unknown fuel condition, transfers outside of bulk containment, pyro-phoricity and oxidisation hazards as well as developing remote control and recovery systems for equipment not designed for this purpose. A combination of novel engineering and enhanced operational controls were developed which resulted in the successful export of the first fuel to leave the Pile Fuel Storage Pond in over 40 years. The learning from the pilot project is now being considered by the main project team to see how the new methodology can be applied to the full inventory of the pond. (author)

  9. POND CONSERVATION Inter-and intra-annual variations of macroinvertebrate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murcia, Universidad de

    to the hydroperiod in Mediterranean temporary ponds Margarita Florencio Æ Laura Serrano Æ Carola Go´mez-Rodri´guez Æ­16 May 2008 M. Florencio (&) Á C. Go´mez-Rodri´guez Á C. Di´az-Paniagua Don~ana Biological Station-CSIC, P.O. Box 1056, 41080 Seville, Spain e-mail: margarita@ebd.csic.es C. Go´mez-Rodri´guez e

  10. Numerical-Model Investigation of the Hydrothermal Regime of a Straight-Through Shallow Cooling Pond

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sokolov, A. S. [JSC 'VNIIG im. B. E. Vedeneeva' (Russian Federation)] [JSC 'VNIIG im. B. E. Vedeneeva' (Russian Federation)

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A mathematic model based on solution of hydrodynamics and heat-transfer equations by the finite-element method is constructed to predict the hydrothermal regime of a straight-through shallow cooling pond, which provides cooling circulating water to a repository of spent nuclear fuel. Numerical experiments made it possible to evaluate the influence exerted by wind conditions and flow rate of water in the river on the temperature of the circulating water.

  11. Waterfowl use of sediment ponds on an east Texas coal mine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reynolds, Larry A

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    appreciation. Lastly, I thank my wife, Diana, who makes my life a continual adventure. She provided the love, encouragement, and confidence I often needed during my graduate work. vii TABLE OF CONTENTS Page ABSTRACT. ACKNOWLEDGEMENT. TABLE OF CONTENTS... Brown Mine by waterfowl use in Year 1. 2 Measurements of vegetative cover (m and k), shallow water, light transmission (cm), slope (k), and vegetative richness for 15 ponds in high, medium, and low waterfowl use classes at Big Brown Mine. 41 42...

  12. Analysis of microearthquake data at Cold Lake and its applications to reservoir monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Snieder, Roel

    been studied in mines, geothermal fields, and in hydraulic fracture stimulation, but is an emerging using advanced algorithms for microearthquake loca- tion and subsurface tomography. Robust determination the ambient stress field to trigger brit- tle failure on small fractures or faults, resulting

  13. GISbased modeling approach to estimate nitrogen loading and load reduction in lakes/ reservoirs with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Zong-Liang

    led to increases in energy and food production, use of fertilizer and animal manure, atmospheric Whiteaker, Lisa H. Meyer and Cedric H. David Texas Water Forum III October 1415 2013 #12;2 Importance the Texas gulf coast region study to answer the following questions: (1) How total nitrogen delivered

  14. Lakes & Reservoirs: Research and Management 2002 7: 189199 Modelling the impact of historical land uses on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    uses on surface-water quality using groundwater flow and solute-transport models Karen G. Wayland,1-use effects on surface-water quality. Key words groundwater lag time, groundwater modelling, land use, water quality, watersheds. INTRODUCTION The biogeochemistry of surface water and groundwater are related to land

  15. SEISMIC DETERMINATION OF RESERVOIR HETEROGENEITY; APPLICATION TO THE CHARACTERIZATION OF HEAVY OIL RESERVOIRS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matthias G. Imhof; James W. Castle

    2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the project is to examine how seismic and geologic data can be used to improve characterization of small-scale heterogeneity and their parameterization in reservoir models. The study is performed at West Coalinga Field in California. We continued our investigation on the nature of seismic reactions from heterogeneous reservoirs. We began testing our algorithm to infer parameters of object-based reservoir models from seismic data. We began integration of seismic and geologic data to determine the deterministic limits of conventional seismic data interpretation. Lastly, we began integration of seismic and geologic heterogeneity using stochastic models conditioned both on wireline and seismic data.

  16. DEVELOPMENT OF RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION TECHNIQUES AND PRODUCTION MODELS FOR EXPLOITING NATURALLY FRACTURED RESERVOIRS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael L. Wiggins; Raymon L. Brown; Faruk Civan; Richard G. Hughes

    2002-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    For many years, geoscientists and engineers have undertaken research to characterize naturally fractured reservoirs. Geoscientists have focused on understanding the process of fracturing and the subsequent measurement and description of fracture characteristics. Engineers have concentrated on the fluid flow behavior in the fracture-porous media system and the development of models to predict the hydrocarbon production from these complex systems. This research attempts to integrate these two complementary views to develop a quantitative reservoir characterization methodology and flow performance model for naturally fractured reservoirs. The research has focused on estimating naturally fractured reservoir properties from seismic data, predicting fracture characteristics from well logs, and developing a naturally fractured reservoir simulator. It is important to develop techniques that can be applied to estimate the important parameters in predicting the performance of naturally fractured reservoirs. This project proposes a method to relate seismic properties to the elastic compliance and permeability of the reservoir based upon a sugar cube model. In addition, methods are presented to use conventional well logs to estimate localized fracture information for reservoir characterization purposes. The ability to estimate fracture information from conventional well logs is very important in older wells where data are often limited. Finally, a desktop naturally fractured reservoir simulator has been developed for the purpose of predicting the performance of these complex reservoirs. The simulator incorporates vertical and horizontal wellbore models, methods to handle matrix to fracture fluid transfer, and fracture permeability tensors. This research project has developed methods to characterize and study the performance of naturally fractured reservoirs that integrate geoscience and engineering data. This is an important step in developing exploitation strategies for optimizing the recovery from naturally fractured reservoir systems. The next logical extension of this work is to apply the proposed methods to an actual field case study to provide information for verification and modification of the techniques and simulator. This report provides the details of the proposed techniques and summarizes the activities undertaken during the course of this project. Technology transfer activities were highlighted by a two-day technical conference held in Oklahoma City in June 2002. This conference attracted over 90 participants and included the presentation of seventeen technical papers from researchers throughout the United States.

  17. Application of horizontal wells in steeply dipping reservoirs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lopez Navarro, Jose David

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A three-dimensional reservoir simulation study is performed to evaluate the impact of horizontal well applications on oil recovery from steeply dipping reservoirs. The Provincia field, located in Colombia, provided the ...

  18. Integrated Reservoir Characterization: Offshore Louisiana, Grand Isle Blocks 32 & 33 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Casey, Michael Chase

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    several areas that are shaled-out effectively creating a flow barrier within reservoir compartments. Due to the barrier in the PM-1 reservoir compartment, an area of potentially recoverable hydrocarbons remains. In Grand Isle 33, the middle QH sand...

  19. Integrated Reservoir Characterization: Offshore Louisiana, Grand Isle Blocks 32 & 33

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Casey, Michael Chase

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    several areas that are shaled-out effectively creating a flow barrier within reservoir compartments. Due to the barrier in the PM-1 reservoir compartment, an area of potentially recoverable hydrocarbons remains. In Grand Isle 33, the middle QH sand...

  20. Feasibility of waterflooding Soku E7000 gas-condensate reservoir

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ajayi, Arashi

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . To achieve this recovery, the reservoir should return to natural depletion after four years of water injection, before water invades the producing wells. Factors that affect the effectiveness of water injection in this reservoir include aquifer strength...

  1. Optimal Hydropower Reservoir Operation with Environmental Requirements MARCELO ALBERTO OLIVARES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lund, Jay R.

    Optimal Hydropower Reservoir Operation with Environmental Requirements By MARCELO ALBERTO OLIVARES Engineering Optimal Hydropower Reservoir Operation with Environmental Requirements Abstract Engineering solutions to the environmental impacts of hydropower operations on downstream aquatic ecosystem are studied

  2. Monitoring and Modeling Fluid Flow in a Developing EGS Reservoir

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Project objectives: Better understand and model fluid injection into a tight reservoir on the edges of a hydrothermal field. Use seismic data to constrain geomechanical/hydrologic/thermal model of reservoir.

  3. Modeling of Magnetic Nanoparticles Transport in Shale Reservoirs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    An, Cheng

    2014-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    of this technology for enhanced oil recovery, nano-scale sensors and subsurface mapping. Little work has been conducted to establish numerical models to investigate nanoparticle transport in reservoirs, and particularly much less for shale reservoirs. Unlike...

  4. Techniques of High Performance Reservoir Simulation for Unconventional Challenges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yuhe

    2013-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The quest to improve the performance of reservoir simulators has been evolving with the newly encountered challenges of modeling more complex recovery mechanisms and related phenomena. Reservoir subsidence, fracturing and fault reactivation etc...

  5. Optimizing Development Strategies to Increase Reserves in Unconventional Gas Reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turkarslan, Gulcan

    2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    in tight gas fields is challenging, not only because of the wide range of depositional environments and large variability in reservoir properties, but also because the evaluation often has to deal with a multitude of wells, limited reservoir information...

  6. Feasibility of waterflooding Soku E7000 gas-condensate reservoir 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ajayi, Arashi

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . To achieve this recovery, the reservoir should return to natural depletion after four years of water injection, before water invades the producing wells. Factors that affect the effectiveness of water injection in this reservoir include aquifer strength...

  7. Modeling of Magnetic Nanoparticles Transport in Shale Reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    An, Cheng

    2014-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    of this technology for enhanced oil recovery, nano-scale sensors and subsurface mapping. Little work has been conducted to establish numerical models to investigate nanoparticle transport in reservoirs, and particularly much less for shale reservoirs. Unlike...

  8. Evaluating human fecal contamination sources in Kranji Reservoir Catchment, Singapore

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nshimyimana, Jean Pierre

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Singapore government through its Public Utilities Board is interested in opening Kranji Reservoir to recreational use. However, water courses within the Kranji Reservoir catchment contain human fecal indicator bacteria ...

  9. K-Area and Par Pond Sewage Sludge Application Sites groundwater monitoring report: Second quarter 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During second quarter 1993, samples from the three monitoring wells at the K-Area site (KSS series) and the three monitoring wells at the Par Pond site (PSS series) were analyzed for constituents required by South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control Construction Permit 13,173 and for other constituents as part of the Savannah River Site (SRS) Groundwater Monitoring Program. This report describes monitoring results that exceeded the final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) or the SRS flagging criteria. During second quarter 1993, no constituents exceeded the final PDWS or any other flagging criteria at the K-Area and Par Pond Sewage Sludge Application Sites. During first quarter 1993, aluminum and iron exceeded the SRS Flag 2 criteria in one or more of the KSS and the PSS wells. These constituents were not analyzed second quarter 1993. In the KSS well series, the field measurement for alkalinity ranged as high as 35 mg/L in well KSS 1D. Alkalinity measurements were zero in the PSS wells, except for a single measurement of 1 mg/L in well PSS 1D. Historical and current water-level elevations at the K-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site indicate that the groundwater flow direction is south to southwest (SRS grid coordinates). The groundwater flow direction at the Par Pond Sewage Sludge Application Site could not be determined second quarter 1993.

  10. Development of an analytical solution for thermal single-well injection-withdrawal tests in horizontally fractured reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jung, Y.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    I. (2005), Geothermal Reservoir Characterization via Thermalfor characterization of fractured geothermal reservoirs. For

  11. SOUTH CARIBOO 2011 Williams Lake

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Northern British Columbia, University of

    , Spectra Energy Transmission Bursaries for Aboriginal Students Jinny Donovan UNBC Scholars Award Cassandra First-year students (left to right) Emmaline Hanet of Williams Lake, and Allison Matfin of Lone Butte University Way · Prince George, BC, Canada V2N 4Z9

  12. Performance prediction of oil wells producing water in bounded reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jochen, Valerie Ann Ellis

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of reservoir rock and fluid properties. Vogel6, based on computer simulation of dissolved gas drive reservoirs, developed a dimensionless inflow performance relationship (IPR). Vogel suggested that the ratio of the oil rate at a given time, to its maximum..., were developed for solution gas drive reservoirs, but they have often been used for other types of reservoirs due to a lack of suitable substitutes. Evinger and Muskat9 also conducted one of the earliest investigations of three phase flow...

  13. Feasibility of seasonal multipurpose reservoir operation in Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tibbets, Michael N

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    constant top of conservation pool elevation. Managing Texas reservoirs by seasonal rule curve operation shows the potential for increasing the firm yield from a reservoir and at the same time decreasing damages due to flooding. However, seasonal rule... Framework for Reservoir Management . . Flood Control Versus Conservation Purposes Conservation Operations . Flood Control Operations Operating Procedures Seasonal Rule Curve Operation in Texas CHAPTER III SEASONAL FACTORS AFFECTING RESERVOIR OPERATION...

  14. Contaminant Monitoring Strategy for Henrys Lake, Idaho

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John S. Irving; R. P. Breckenridge

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Henrys Lake, located in southeastern Idaho, is a large, shallow lake (6,600 acres, {approx} 17.1 feet maximum depth) located at 6,472 feet elevation in Fremont Co., Idaho at the headwaters of the Henrys Fork of the Snake River. The upper watershed is comprised of high mountains of the Targhee National Forest and the lakeshore is surrounded by extensive flats and wetlands, which are mostly privately owned. The lake has been dammed since 1922, and the upper 12 feet of the lake waters are allocated for downriver use. Henrys Lake is a naturally productive lake supporting a nationally recognized ''Blue Ribbon'' trout fishery. There is concern that increasing housing development and cattle grazing may accelerate eutrophication and result in winter and early spring fish kills. There has not been a recent thorough assessment of lake water quality. However, the Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) is currently conducting a study of water quality on Henrys Lake and tributary streams. Septic systems and lawn runoff from housing developments on the north, west, and southwest shores could potentially contribute to the nutrient enrichment of the lake. Many houses are on steep hillsides where runoff from lawns, driveways, etc. drain into wetland flats along the lake or directly into the lake. In addition, seepage from septic systems (drainfields) drain directly into the wetlands enter groundwater areas that seep into the lake. Cattle grazing along the lake margin, riparian areas, and uplands is likely accelerating erosion and nutrient enrichment. Also, cattle grazing along riparian areas likely adds to nutrient enrichment of the lake through subsurface flow and direct runoff. Stream bank and lakeshore erosion may also accelerate eutrophication by increasing the sedimentation of the lake. Approximately nine streams feed the lake (see map), but flows are often severely reduced or completely eliminated due to irrigation diversion. In addition, subsurface flows can occur as a result of severe cattle grazing along riparian areas and deltas. Groundwater and springs also feed the lake, and are likely critical for oxygen supply during winter stratification. During the winter of 1991, Henrys Lake experienced low dissolved oxygen levels resulting in large fish kills. It is thought that thick ice cover combined with an increase in nutrient loads created conditions resulting in poor water quality. The Idaho Department of Health and Welfare, DEQ is currently conducting a study to determine the water quality of Henrys Lake, the sources contributing to its deterioration, and potential remedial actions to correct problem areas.

  15. MODELING OF NATURALLY FRACTURED RESERVOIRS BY FORMAL HOMOGENIZATION TECHNIQUES*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Douglas Jr., Jim

    MODELING OF NATURALLY FRACTURED RESERVOIRS BY FORMAL HOMOGENIZATION TECHNIQUES* Todd Arbogast,y Jim in naturally fractured reservoirs. A single component in a single phase and two-component mis- cible. porous medium, double porosity, fractured reservoir, homogenization. yDepartment of Mathematics, Purdue

  16. ESTIMATION OF MATRIX BLOCK SIZE DISTRIBUTION IN NATURALLY FRACTURED RESERVOIRS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    ESTIMATION OF MATRIX BLOCK SIZE DISTRIBUTION IN NATURALLY FRACTURED RESERVOIRS A Report Submitted;2 ABSTRACT Interporosity flow in a naturslly fractured reservoir is modelled by a new formulation of the distribution. Thus, observed pressure response from fractured reservoirs can be analysed to obtain the matrix

  17. EFFECTS OF WATER INJECTION INTO FRACTURED GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    SGP-TR-57 SGP-TR-57 EFFECTS OF WATER INJECTION INTO FRACTURED GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS: A SUMMARY INTO FRACTURED GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS A SUMMARY OP EXPERImCE WORtDWIDE Roland N. Horne Stanford University ABSTRACT Reinjection of water i n t o fractured geothermal reservoirs holds potential both f o r

  18. Improving Reservoir Management from an Ecological Perspective JOHN TERANCE HICKEY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lund, Jay R.

    i Improving Reservoir Management from an Ecological Perspective By JOHN TERANCE HICKEY B.S. (SUNY and future water resource challenges. Water managers are asked that reservoir operations provide additional opportunities. These and other interests share reservoir reoperation as a common solution often integrated

  19. INVERSION OF CONVERTED-WAVE SEISMIC DATA FOR RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    INVERSION OF CONVERTED-WAVE SEISMIC DATA FOR RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AT RULISON FIELD, COLORADO Basin of northwest Colorado. The reservoir consists of lenticular fluvial sands, shales, and coals of magnitude lower than the seismic resolution which is 105 ft. The sandstone reservoirs are the primary target

  20. ELASTIC ROCK PROPERTIES OF TIGHT GAS SANDSTONES FOR RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to successfully produce low permeability gas reservoirs. My study links rock physics to well log and seismic data shales to reservoir sandstones. Typically, the presence of gas-saturated sandstones lowers the Vp/Vs evenELASTIC ROCK PROPERTIES OF TIGHT GAS SANDSTONES FOR RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AT RULISON FIELD

  1. The Statistical Reservoir Model: calibrating faults and fractures, and predicting reservoir response to water flood

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    geomechanics to have a significant influence on hydrocarbon production rates through changes in the effective 2004). Geomechanics not only predicts a reservoir response in the near field, but also at long range i

  2. Type curve analysis for naturally fractured reservoirs (infinite-acting reservoir case): a new approach 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Angel Restrepo, Juan Alejandro

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . The objectives of this work are as follows: First, we generated new type curves for the analysis of pressure drawdown and buildup tests performed in naturally fractured reservoirs. Next, we develop a systematic approach for the analysis and interpretation...

  3. Type curve analysis for naturally fractured reservoirs (infinite-acting reservoir case): a new approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Angel Restrepo, Juan Alejandro

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This work introduces new type curve solutions for an unfractured well in an infinite-acting naturally fractured reservoir, including wellbore storage and skin effects. Both pseudosteady-state¹ and transient²?³ interporosity flow models are studied...

  4. Seismic Determination of Reservoir Heterogeneity: Application to the Characterization of Heavy Oil Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Imhof, Matthias G.; Castle, James W.

    2003-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the project was to examine how seismic and geologic data could be used to improve characterization of small-scale heterogeneity and their parameterization in reservoir models. The study was performed at West Coalinga Field in California.

  5. Innovative MIOR Process Utilizing Indigenous Reservoir Constituents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hitzman, D.O.; Stepp, A.K.; Dennis, D.M.; Graumann, L.R.

    2003-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This research program was directed at improving the knowledge of reservoir ecology and developing practical microbial solutions for improving oil production. The goal was to identify indigenous microbial populations which can produce beneficial metabolic products and develop a methodology to stimulate those select microbes with nutrient amendments to increase oil recovery. This microbial technology has the capability of producing multiple oil-releasing agents.

  6. Hydroelectric Reservoirs -the Carbon Dioxide and Methane

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischlin, Andreas

    and contribute to global warming. The problem of greenhouse gases and their impact on global warming have become gas source. #12;1 1. Introduction The electricity produced by hydroelectric reservoirs is commonly greenhouse gases. One good point to know by dealing with these two greenhouse gases is that the global

  7. Network Stochastic Programming for Valuing Reservoir Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    complicates the simultaneous optimization of hydropower for a multi-stage, multi-reservoir system. The expected value of hydropower must be simultaneously optimized over all time steps and scenarios. Previous stochastic programming model of the Tennessee River Basin converged rapidly to an upper bound on hydropower

  8. Evolution of analyzing reservoir simulation data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phelps, R.E.; Huang, A.Y.

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Numerical Reservoir Simulation is routinely used by the petroleum producing companies world-wide as an engineering tool to efficiently manage their hydrocarbon reservoirs. The task of building models with a large number of grid-blocks is not easy, and to analyze the voluminous results produced by such models is even more difficult. This paper discusses the historical evolution of techniques used to analyze reservoir simulation data over the past decade. It outlines how the advancement of workstation technology and the introduction of X-Window System opened up an entirely new way of utilizing mainframe computing power and workstation graphical display capabilities, simultaneously. The paper also discusses Saudi Aramco`s experience in the development of sophisticated reservoir simulation post-processing packages. The need for direct communication between the programmer and end-users to facilitate a user-friendly package is emphasized. A practical example illustrating the benefit of these post-processing packages in the construction and history matching of a large model with approximately 52,000 cells is presented. Savings in manpower and computer resources using current technology are estimated.

  9. Evolution of analyzing reservoir simulation data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phelps, R.E.; Huang, A.Y.

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Petroleum-producing companies world-wide routinely use numerical reservoir simulation as an engineering tool to manage their hydrocarbon reservoirs efficiently. The task of building models with a large number of gridblocks is not easy, and analyzing the voluminous results produced by such models is even more difficult. This paper discusses the historical evolution of techniques used to analyze reservoir simulation data over the past decade. It outlines how the advancement of workstation technology and the introduction of an X-Window system opened up an entirely new way of using mainframe computing power and workstation graphical display capabilities simultaneously. The paper also discusses Saudi Aramco`s experience in the development of sophisticated reservoir simulation postprocessing packages. The authors emphasize the need for direct communication between the programmer and end users to facilitate a user-friendly package. They present a practical example illustrating the benefit of these postprocessing packages in the construction and history matching of a large model with approximately 52,000 cells. They estimate savings in manpower and computer resources using current technology.

  10. Tight gas reservoirs: A visual depiction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Future gas supplies in the US will depend on an increasing contribution from unconventional sources such as overpressured and tight gas reservoirs. Exploitation of these resources and their conversion to economically producible gas reserves represents a major challenge. Meeting this challenge will require not only the continuing development and application of new technologies, but also a detailed understanding of the complex nature of the reservoirs themselves. This report seeks to promote understanding of these reservoirs by providing examples. Examples of gas productive overpressured tight reservoirs in the Greater Green River Basin, Wyoming are presented. These examples show log data (raw and interpreted), well completion and stimulation information, and production decline curves. A sampling of wells from the Lewis and Mesaverde formations are included. Both poor and good wells have been chosen to illustrate the range of productivity that is observed. The second section of this document displays decline curves and completion details for 30 of the best wells in the Greater Green River Basin. These are included to illustrate the potential that is present when wells are fortuitously located with respect to local stratigraphy and natural fracturing, and are successfully hydraulically fractured.

  11. Reservoir offset models for Radiocarbon calibration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicholls, Geoff

    Reservoir offset models for Radiocarbon calibration Martin Jones Department of Anthropology mdj offset is to enable the application of calibration data (µ(), e.g. Stuiver et al. 1998) developed for one are not independent. However, the standard procedure for incorporating offset error into calibrated distributions

  12. Non-Darcy flow in geothermal reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zyvoloski, G.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effects of non-Darcy flow laws are investigated for two geothermal reservoir types: multiphase and Hot Dry Rock (HDR). Long-term thermal behavior is emphasized as short-term pressure transient behavior is addressed in the oil field literature. Comparisons of Darcy and non-Darcy flow laws are made.

  13. Fourteenth workshop geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.; Horne, R.N.; Miller, F.G.; Brigham, W.E.; Cook, J.W.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Fourteenth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering was held at Stanford University on January 24--26, 1989. Major areas of discussion include: (1) well testing; (2) various field results; (3) geoscience; (4) geochemistry; (5) reinjection; (6) hot dry rock; and (7) numerical modelling. For these workshop proceedings, individual papers are processed separately for the Energy Data Base.

  14. Fourteenth workshop geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.; Horne, R.N.; Miller, F.G.; Brigham, W.E.; Cook, J.W.

    1989-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Fourteenth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering was held at Stanford University on January 24--26, 1989. Major areas of discussion include: (1) well testing; (2) various field results; (3) geoscience; (4) geochemistry; (5) reinjection; (6) hot dry rock; and (7) numerical modelling. For these workshop proceedings, individual papers are processed separately for the Energy Data Base.

  15. Greentree Reservoir Management Matthew J. Gray

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    1 Greentree Reservoir Management Matthew J. Gray University of Tennessee Hardwood Bottomlands in Openings Guy Baldassarre Should Manage for Forest Openings >1 acre #12;4 Other Important Functions Bottomline on Bottomlands Hardwood bottomlands are critical ecosystems that play an integral role

  16. Semi-analytical solutions for multilayer reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lolon, Elyezer Pabibak

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , we develop, validate, and present five new approximate solutions for the case of a multilayer reservoir system - these solutions are: [ Solution p[wDj(tD)] Description 1 a[j] Constant p[wDj(tD)] Case 2 a[j tD] Linear p[wDj(tD)] Zero...

  17. Coarse scale simulation of tight gas reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    El-Ahmady, Mohamed Hamed

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    It is common for field models of tight gas reservoirs to include several wells with hydraulic fractures. These hydraulic fractures can be very long, extending for more than a thousand feet. A hydraulic fracture width is usually no more than about 0...

  18. Increasing Waterflood Reserves in the Wilmington Oil Field through Improved Reservoir Characterization and Reservoir Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clarke, D.; Koerner, R.; Moos D.; Nguyen, J.; Phillips, C.; Tagbor, K.; Walker, S.

    1999-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This project used advanced reservoir characterization tools, including the pulsed acoustic cased-hole logging tool, geologic three-dimensional (3-D) modeling software, and commercially available reservoir management software to identify sands with remaining high oil saturation following waterflood. Production from the identified high oil saturated sands was stimulated by recompleting existing production and injection wells in these sands using conventional means as well as a short radius redrill candidate.

  19. Development of Reservoir Characterization Techniques and Production Models for Exploiting Naturally Fractured Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiggins, Michael L; Brown, Raymon L.; Civan, Faruk; Hughes, Richard G.

    2002-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    During this reporting period, research was continued on characterizing and modeling the behavior of naturally fractured reservoir systems. This report proposed a model to relate the seismic response to production data to determine crack spacing and aperture, provided details of tests of proposed models to obtain fracture properties from conventional well logs with actual field data, and verification of the naturally fractured reservoir simulator developed in this project.

  20. The culture of marine fish and their use as biological monitors of water quality in ponds receiving heated discharge water from a power station

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Linder, Donald Ray

    1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to escape into the ponds' drainage system. This pond flooding complicated the interpretation of survival data for the first 7 months of the study. Survival of all species except striped mullet (47. 5-85. 2$) was poor (0. 2-37. 3$). Survival of pinfish... in Thermal Effluents. Fish Mariculture in the United States 3 3 7 8 DESCRIPTION OF AREA. Power Plant Ponds EQUIPMENT AND MATERIALS. 11 11 11 15 METHODS. Pond Preparation. Procurement of Stock and Stocking Hydrological Data Fish Sampling...

  1. Salinity controls on trophic interactions among invertebrates and algae of solar evaporation ponds in the Mojave Desert and relation to shorebird foraging and selenium risk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herbst, David B

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    AMONG INVERTEBRATES AND ALGAE OF SOLAR EVAPORATION PONDS INplanktonic invertebrates and algae present along with avianof invertebrates and algae, and avian foraging were examined

  2. Impes modeling of volumetric dry gas reservoirs with mobile water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forghany, Saeed

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    . For abnormally or geopressured reservoirs, pressure gradients often approach values equal to the overburden pressure gradient (i.e., ~1.0 psi/ft). 8, 9 Among these types of dry gas reservoirs, in this study we will focus on volumetric reservoir. 1... properties of a given reservoir?s gas and water can handle pressures starting from standard conditions up to 4,000 psi and the units for this table are tabulated in Table 3.1. Table 3.1- Units for the PVT properties used in the input file Pressure...

  3. Advanced reservoir characterization for improved oil recovery in a New Mexico Delaware basin project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, F.D.; Kendall, R.P.; Whitney, E.M. [Dave Martin and Associates, Inc., Socorro, NM (United States)] [and others

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nash Draw Brushy Canyon Pool in Eddy County, New Mexico is a field demonstration site in the Department of Energy Class III program. The basic problem at the Nash Draw Pool is the low recovery typically observed in similar Delaware fields. By comparing a control area using standard infill drilling techniques to a pilot area developed using advanced reservoir characterization methods, the goal of the project is to demonstrate that advanced technology can significantly improve oil recovery. During the first year of the project, four new producing wells were drilled, serving as data acquisition wells. Vertical seismic profiles and a 3-D seismic survey were acquired to assist in interwell correlations and facies prediction. Limited surface access at the Nash Draw Pool, caused by proximity of underground potash mining and surface playa lakes, limits development with conventional drilling. Combinations of vertical and horizontal wells combined with selective completions are being evaluated to optimize production performance. Based on the production response of similar Delaware fields, pressure maintenance is a likely requirement at the Nash Draw Pool. A detailed reservoir model of pilot area was developed, and enhanced recovery options, including waterflooding, lean gas, and carbon dioxide injection, are being evaluated.

  4. Heavy oil reservoirs recoverable by thermal technology. Annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kujawa, P.

    1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume contains reservoir, production, and project data for target reservoirs which contain heavy oil in the 8 to 25/sup 0/ API gravity range and are susceptible to recovery by in situ combustion and steam drive. The reservoirs for steam recovery are less than 2500 feet deep to comply with state-of-the-art technology. In cases where one reservoir would be a target for in situ combustion or steam drive, that reservoir is reported in both sections. Data were collectd from three source types: hands-on (A), once-removed (B), and twice-removed (C). In all cases, data were sought depicting and characterizing individual reservoirs as opposed to data covering an entire field with more than one producing interval or reservoir. The data sources are listed at the end of each case. This volume also contains a complete listing of operators and projects, as well as a bibliography of source material.

  5. J. Great Lakes Res. 33 (Special Issue 3):211223 Internat. Assoc. Great Lakes Res., 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dorcas, Michael E.

    , coastal wetlands, Great Lakes. *Corresponding author. E-mail: hower@uwgb.edu 211 #12;212 Price et al

  6. Great Lakes Steel -- PCI facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eichinger, F.T. [BMH Claudius Peters AG, Buxtehude (Germany); Dake, S.H.; Wagner, E.D.; Brown, G.S. [Raytheon Engineers and Constructors, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper discusses the planning, design, and start-up of the 90 tph PCI facility for National Steel`s Great Lakes Steel Division in River Rouge, MI. This project is owned and operated by Edison Energy Services, and was implemented on a fast-track basis by Raytheon Engineers and Constructors, Babcock Material Handling, and Babcock and Wilcox. This paper presents important process issues, basic design criteria, an the challenges of engineering and building a state-of-the-art PCI facility in two existing plants. Pulverized coal is prepared at the River Rouge Power Plant of Detroit Edison, is pneumatically conveyed 6,000 feet to a storage silo at Great Lakes Steel, and is injected into three blast furnaces.

  7. N e v a d a O r e g o n

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caples Lake Fordyce Creek Silver Lake Little Grass Valley Reservoir San Vincente Reservoir Beardsley Lake Ice House Reservoir Salt Spring Valley Reservoir Smoke Creek Reservoir Donnell Lake Thermalito Sly Creek Reservoir Prosser Creek Pinecrest Lake Upper Blue Lake Alpine Lake Bear River Reservoir Almanor

  8. CLEAR LAKE BASIN 2000 PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LAKE COUNTY SANITATION DISTRICT

    2003-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The following is a final report for the Clear Lake Basin 2000 project. All of the major project construction work was complete and this phase generally included final details and testing. Most of the work was electrical. Erosion control activities were underway to prepare for the rainy season. System testing including pump stations, electrical and computer control systems was conducted. Most of the project focus from November onward was completing punch list items.

  9. 2012 Annual Industrial Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site's Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mike Lewis

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (#LA 000161 01, Modification B), for the wastewater land application site at the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond from November 1, 2011 through October 31, 2012. The report contains the following information: Facility and system description Permit required effluent monitoring data and loading rates Groundwater monitoring data Status of compliance activities Noncompliance issues Discussion of the facility’s environmental impacts During the 2012 permit year, approximately 183 million gallons of wastewater were discharged to the Cold Waste Pond. This is well below the maximum annual permit limit of 375 million gallons. As shown by the groundwater sampling data, sulfate and total dissolved solids concentrations are highest near the Cold Waste Pond and decrease rapidly as the distance from the Cold Waste Pond increases. Although concentrations of sulfate and total dissolved solids are elevated near the Cold Waste Pond, both parameters were below the Ground Water Quality Rule Secondary Constituent Standards in the down gradient monitoring wells.

  10. 2011 Annual Industrial Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site's Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mike Lewis

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (LA 000161 01, Modification B), for the wastewater land application site at the Idaho National Laboratory Site's Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond from November 1, 2010 through October 31, 2011. The report contains the following information: Facility and system description Permit required effluent monitoring data and loading rates Groundwater monitoring data Status of compliance activities Noncompliance and other issues Discussion of the facility's environmental impacts During the 2011 permit year, approximately 166 million gallons of wastewater were discharged to the Cold Waste Pond. This is well below the maximum annual permit limit of 375 million gallons. As shown by the groundwater sampling data, sulfate and total dissolved solids concentrations are highest near the Cold Waste Pond and decrease rapidly as the distance from the Cold Waste Pond increases. Although concentrations of sulfate and total dissolved solids are elevated near the Cold Waste Pond, both parameters were below the Ground Water Quality Rule Secondary Constituent Standards in the down gradient monitoring wells.

  11. Developing Great Lakes Ice Model (GLIM) using CIOM (Coupled Ice-Ocean Model) in Lake Erie

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Developing Great Lakes Ice Model (GLIM) using CIOM (Coupled Ice- Ocean Model) in Lake Erie Primary of the ice-ocean models, assistance with development of project reports and scientific presentations will first start the implementation of the CIOM in Lake Erie, assemble satellite observations of ice cover

  12. Disparities in Salt Lake County and Salt Lake City Mortgage Outcomes and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feschotte, Cedric

    Disparities in Salt Lake County and Salt Lake City Mortgage Outcomes and Lending Practices Darius of lending practices. This article is an adapted excerpt from the Salt Lake County Regional Analysis impediments in the home mortgage application process. The HMDA data from 2006 to 2011 were compiled for Salt

  13. Temperature Influence on Commercial Lake Whitefish Harvest in Eastern Lake Michigan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Temperature Influence on Commercial Lake Whitefish Harvest in Eastern Lake Michigan Holly Price1 of Statistics University of Michigan Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 2Cooperative Institute for Limnology and Ecosystems Research University of Michigan Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 3NOAA, Great Lakes Environmental

  14. J. Great Lakes Res. 25(4):663682 Internat. Assoc. Great Lakes Res., 1999

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Inventories and Mercury Profiles from Lake Superior: Evidence for Mining Impacts W. Charles Kerfoot*,1, Sandra size of Lake Superior, were sediment profiles at locations far offshore impacted by nearshore activi, copper, mining, mercury, sediment. 663 INTRODUCTION The Great Lakes ecosystem is susceptible to loading

  15. Quantification of Libby Reservoir Levels Needed to Maintain or Enhance Reservoir Fisheries, 1983-1987 Methods and Data Summary.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chisholm, Ian

    1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Libby Reservoir was created under an International Columbia River Treaty between the United States and Canada for cooperative water development of the Columbia River Basin. The authorized purpose of the dam is to provide power, flood control, and navigation and other benefits. Research began in May 1983 to determine how operations of Libby dam impact the reservoir fishery and to suggest ways to lessen these impacts. This study is unique in that it was designed to accomplish its goal through detailed information gathering on every trophic level in the reservoir system and integration of this information into a quantitative computer model. The specific study objectives are to: quantify available reservoir habitat, determine abundance, growth and distribution of fish within the reservoir and potential recruitment of salmonids from Libby Reservoir tributaries within the United States, determine abundance and availability of food organisms for fish in the reservoir, quantify fish use of available food items, develop relationships between reservoir drawdown and reservoir habitat for fish and fish food organisms, and estimate impacts of reservoir operation on the reservoir fishery. 115 refs., 22 figs., 51 tabs.

  16. Toxic and deadly: Working to manage algae in Lake Granbury

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Toxic and deadly Working to manage algae in Lake Granbury Lake Granbury, located about 33 miles southwest of Fort Worth, is a recreation haven for water enthusiasts. In recent years, however, bacteria and golden algae have threatened the lake...?s water quality. Educating citizens about water quality issues affecting Lake Granbury and determining ways to manage the deadly algae are the focus of two Texas Water Resources Institute (TWRI) projects. Lake Granbury, a critical water supply...

  17. Toxic and deadly: Working to manage algae in Lake Granbury

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Toxic and deadly Working to manage algae in Lake Granbury Lake Granbury, located about 33 miles southwest of Fort Worth, is a recreation haven for water enthusiasts. In recent years, however, bacteria and golden algae have threatened the lake...?s water quality. Educating citizens about water quality issues affecting Lake Granbury and determining ways to manage the deadly algae are the focus of two Texas Water Resources Institute (TWRI) projects. Lake Granbury, a critical water supply...

  18. Remedial Investigation Report on Chestnut Ridge Operable Unit 2 (Filled Coal Ash Pond/Upper McCoy Branch) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 1. Main Text

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is a report on the remedial investigation (RI) of Chestnut Ridge Operable Unit (OU) 2 at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. Chestnut Ridge OU 2 consists of Upper McCoy Branch (UMB), the Filled Coal Ash Pond (FCAP), and the area surrounding the Sluice Channel formerly associated with coal ash disposal in the FCAP. Chestnut Ridge OU 2 is located within the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Oak Ridge Reservation in Anderson County, Tennessee, approximately 24 miles west of Knoxville. The pond is an 8.5-acre area on the southern slope of Chestnut Ridge, 0.5 mile south of the main Y-12 Plant and geographically separated from the Y-12 Plant by Chestnut Ridge. The elevation of the FCAP is {approximately} 950 ft above mean sea level (msl), and it is relatively flat and largely vegetated. Two small ponds are usually present at the northeast and northwest comers of the FCAP. The Sluice Channel Area extends {approximately}1000 ft from the northern margin of the FCAP to the crest of Chestnut Ridge, which has an elevation of {approximately}1100 ft above msl. The Sluice Channel Area is largely vegetated also. McCoy Branch runs from the top of Chestnut Ridge across the FCAP into Rogers Quarry and out of the quarry where it runs a short distance into Milton Hill Lake at McCoy Embayment, termed UMB. The portion south of Rogers Quarry, within Chestnut Ridge OU 4, is termed Lower McCoy Branch. The DOE Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant disposed of coal ash from its steam plant operations as a slurry that was discharged into an ash retention impoundment; this impoundment is the FCAP. The FCAP was built in 1955 to serve as a settling basin after coal ash slurried over Chestnut Ridge from the Y-12 Plant. The FCAP was constructed by building an earthen dam across the northern tributary of McCoy Branch. The dam was designed to hold 20 years of Y-12 steam plant ash. By July 1967, ash had filled up the impoundment storage behind the dam to within 4 ft of the top.

  19. Advanced Oil Recovery Technologies for Improved Recovery from Slope Basin Clastic Reservoirs, Nash Draw Brushy Canyon Pool, Eddy County, NM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark B. Murphy

    2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nash Draw Brushy Canyon Pool in Eddy County New Mexico was a cost-shared field demonstration project in the U.S. Department of Energy Class III Program. A major goal of the Class III Program was to stimulate the use of advanced technologies to increase ultimate recovery from slope-basin clastic reservoirs. Advanced characterization techniques were used at the Nash Draw Pool (NDP) project to develop reservoir management strategies for optimizing oil recovery from this Delaware reservoir. The objective of the project was to demonstrate that a development program, which was based on advanced reservoir management methods, could significantly improve oil recovery at the NDP. Initial goals were (1) to demonstrate that an advanced development drilling and pressure maintenance program can significantly improve oil recovery compared to existing technology applications and (2) to transfer these advanced methodologies to other oil and gas producers. Analysis, interpretation, and integration of recently acquired geological, geophysical, and engineering data revealed that the initial reservoir characterization was too simplistic to capture the critical features of this complex formation. Contrary to the initial characterization, a new reservoir description evolved that provided sufficient detail regarding the complexity of the Brushy Canyon interval at Nash Draw. This new reservoir description was used as a risk reduction tool to identify 'sweet spots' for a development drilling program as well as to evaluate pressure maintenance strategies. The reservoir characterization, geological modeling, 3-D seismic interpretation, and simulation studies have provided a detailed model of the Brushy Canyon zones. This model was used to predict the success of different reservoir management scenarios and to aid in determining the most favorable combination of targeted drilling, pressure maintenance, well stimulation, and well spacing to improve recovery from this reservoir. An Advanced Log Analysis technique developed from the NDP project has proven useful in defining additional productive zones and refining completion techniques. This program proved to be especially helpful in locating and evaluating potential recompletion intervals, which has resulted in low development costs with only small incremental increases in lifting costs. To develop additional reserves at lower costs, zones behind pipe in existing wells were evaluated using techniques developed for the Brushy Canyon interval. These techniques were used to complete uphole zones in thirteen of the NDP wells. A total of 14 recompletions were done: four during 1999, four during 2000, two during 2001, and four during 2002-2003. These workovers added reserves of 332,304 barrels of oil (BO) and 640,363 MCFG (thousand cubic feet of gas) at an overall weighted average development cost of $1.87 per BOE (barrel of oil equivalent). A pressure maintenance pilot project in a developed area of the field was not conducted because the pilot area was pressure depleted, and the reservoir in that area was found to be compartmentalized and discontinuous. Economic analyses and simulation studies indicated that immiscible injection of lean hydrocarbon gas for pressure maintenance was not warranted at the NDP and would need to be considered for implementation in similar fields very soon after production has started. Simulation studies suggested that the injection of miscible carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) could recover significant quantities of oil at the NDP, but a source of low-cost CO{sub 2} was not available in the area. Results from the project indicated that further development will be under playa lakes and potash areas that were beyond the regions covered by well control and are not accessible with vertical wells. These areas, covered by 3-D seismic surveys that were obtained as part of the project, were accessed with combinations of deviated/horizontal wells. Three directional/horizontal wells have been drilled and completed to develop reserves under surface-restricted areas and potash mines. The third

  20. Watershed Management And Modeling Development and Application of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sukop, Mike

    30% of ponds, lakes and reservoirs 40% of estuaries #12;Watershed Management And Modeling Sources-transpiration Elemental responses are integrated to determine system response #12;Watershed Management And ModelingWatershed Management And Modeling Development and Application of Watershed Models for Simulation

  1. Tuesday, January 17, 2012 303 International Center, Michigan State University, East Lansing Michigan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , reservoirs, wetlands, ponds and other pooled water make up more than 90% of the readily available fresh water global water debates. Join Dr. Masahisa Nakamura as he discusses an approach termed as Integrated Lake Basin Management (ILBM). Find out what is known about these water systems and how crises

  2. Novel Adsorbent-Reactants for Treatment of Ash and Scrubber Pond Effluents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bill Batchelor; Dong Suk Han; Eun Jung Kim

    2010-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall goal of this project was to evaluate the ability of novel adsorbent/reactants to remove specific toxic target chemicals from ash and scrubber pond effluents while producing stable residuals for ultimate disposal. The target chemicals studied were arsenic (As(III) and As(V)), mercury (Hg(II)) and selenium (Se(IV) and Se(VI)). The adsorbent/reactants that were evaluated are iron sulfide (FeS) and pyrite (FeS{sub 2}). Procedures for measuring concentrations of target compounds and characterizing the surfaces of adsorbent-reactants were developed. Effects of contact time, pH (7, 8, 9, 10) and sulfate concentration (0, 1, 10 mM) on removal of all target compounds on both adsorbent-reactants were determined. Stability tests were conducted to evaluate the extent to which target compounds were released from the adsorbent-reactants when pH changed. Surface characterization was conducted with x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to identify reactions occurring on the surface between the target compounds and surface iron and sulfur. Results indicated that target compounds could be removed by FeS{sub 2} and FeS and that removal was affected by time, pH and surface reactions. Stability of residuals was generally good and appeared to be affected by the extent of surface reactions. Synthesized pyrite and mackinawite appear to have the required characteristics for removing the target compounds from wastewaters from ash ponds and scrubber ponds and producing stable residuals.

  3. Innovative MIOR Process Utilizing Indigenous Reservoir Constituents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. O. Hitzman; A. K. Stepp; D. M. Dennis; L. R. Graumann

    2003-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This research program is directed at improving the knowledge of reservoir ecology and developing practical microbial solutions for improving oil production. The goal is to identify indigenous microbial populations which can produce beneficial metabolic products and develop a methodology to stimulate those select microbes with nutrient amendments to increase oil recovery. This microbial technology has the capability of producing multiple oil-releasing agents. Experimental laboratory work is underway. Microbial cultures have been isolated from produced water samples. Comparative laboratory studies demonstrating in situ production of microbial products as oil recovery agents were conducted in sand packs with natural field waters with cultures and conditions representative of oil reservoirs. Field pilot studies are underway.

  4. Fractured reservoir evaluation using Monte Carlo techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sears, G.F.; Phillips, N.V.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pro forma cash-flow analysis of petroleum ventures usually is considered as a deterministic model. In the last 10 years, Monte Carlo analysis has allowed the introduction of probability distributions of input variables in place of single-valued functions. Reserve determination and rate scheduling in these current Monte Carlo techniques have relied on the volumetric formula, which works well in nonfractured reservoirs. Recent massive drilling in fractured reservoirs has rendered this approach unusable. This paper develops a variation of the Arps rate-cumulative equation as a basic model for the determination of the distribution of original reserves and the decline rates. Continuation of the Monte Carlo technique into net present value analysis and internal rate of return (IRR) is also developed.

  5. Seismic of the territory Toktogul reservoir, Kyrgyzstan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kamchybekov, Murataly; Yegemberdiyeva, Kuliya [Institute of Seismology of National Academy Science Kyrgyz Republic (Kyrgyzstan)

    2008-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    In connection with that this seismic in the territory of Naryn cascade maybe has its peculiarity in cludding in the territory Toktogul reservoir before of the building of the Toktogul dam, during of the building and after accordingly was decided to consider the seismic in this space of times. The arm of the present paper is estimation seismic of the territory Toktogul reservoir for different times: before of the building of the Toktogul dam (1960-1973), during its filling (1974-1980) and since start it's of the uninterruptedly exploitation to present time (1981-2006). The territory in that located the cascade of Naryn River is considered that seismic active in the Central part of the Tien Shan. The tectonic motions are become here intensity. The presence of the large faults is complicating significantly the seismic situation of the study region.

  6. Evaluation of Devonian shale gas reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vanorsdale, C.R.

    1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The evaluation of predominantly shale reservoirs presents a problem for engineers traditionally educated either to correct for or to ignore such lithologic zones. Currently accepted evaluation techniques and their applicability are discussed to determine the best way to forecast remaining recoverable gas reserves from the Devonian shales of the Appalachian basin. This study indicates that rate/time decline-curve analysis is the most reliable technique and presents typical decline curves based on production data gathered from 508 shale wells in a three-state study area. The resultant type curves illustrate a dual- (or multiple-) porosity mechanism that violates standard decline-curve analysis guidelines. The results, however, are typical not only for the Devonian shales but for all naturally fractured, multilayered, or similar shale reservoirs.

  7. american great lakes: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    polynorphismsobserved among the North American Great Lakes ciscoes suggest that this fish group has Bernatchez, Louis 2 Great Lakes CiteSeer Summary: Grant realized an...

  8. Hyperspectral Imaging At Fish Lake Valley Area (Littlefield ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Fish Lake Valley Area (Littlefield & Calvin, 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Hyperspectral Imaging At Fish Lake Valley Area...

  9. VALUE DISTRIBUTION ASSESSMENT OF GEOTHERMAL DEVELOPMENT IN LAKE COUNTY, CA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Churchman, C.W.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Eleven: Lake County Geothermal Energy Resource. . . .of Susanville, Susanville Geothermal Energy Project Workshopparts of the state. Geothermal energy is only one of Lake

  10. ancylus lake age: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    North Entrance of the University's Lake Honduras Iraq Israel Japan Korea Kuwait Libya Peru Saudi Arabia Taiwan Thailand Turkey Ukraine United Pilyugin, Sergei S. 46 Mirror Lake...

  11. Obama Administration and Great Lakes States Announce Agreement...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Obama Administration and Great Lakes States Announce Agreement to Spur Development of Offshore Wind Projects Obama Administration and Great Lakes States Announce Agreement to Spur...

  12. Steel Creek fish: L-Lake/Steel Creek Biological Monitoring Program, January 1986--December 1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paller, M.H.; Heuer, J.H.; Kissick, L.A.

    1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fish samples were collected from Steel Creek during 1986 and 1987 following the impoundment of the headwaters of the stream to form L-Lake, a cooling reservoir for L-Reactor which began operating late in 1985. Electrofishing and ichthyoplankton sample stations were located throughout the creek. Fykenetting sample stations were located in the creek mouth and just above the Steel Creek swamp. Larval fish and fish eggs were collected with 0.5 m plankton nets. Multivariate analysis of the electrofishing data suggested that the fish assemblages in Steel Creek exhibited structural differences associated with proximity to L-Lake, and habitat gradients of current velocity, depth, and canopy cover. The Steel Creek corridor, a lotic reach beginning at the base of the L-Lake embankment was dominated by stream species and bluegill. The delta/swamp, formed where Steel Creek enters the Savannah River floodplain, was dominated by fishes characteristic of slow flowing waters and heavily vegetated habitats. The large channel draining the swamp supported many of the species found in the swamp plus riverine and anadromous forms.

  13. Steel Creek fish, L-Lake/Steel Creek Biological Monitoring Program, January 1986--December 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sayers, R.E. Jr.; Mealing, H.G. III [Normandeau Associates, Inc., New Ellenton, SC (United States)

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) encompasses 300 sq mi of the Atlantic Coastal plain in west-central South Carolina. The Savannah River forms the western boundary of the site. Five major tributaries of the Savannah River -- Upper Three Runs Creek, Four Mile Creek, Pen Branch, Steel Creek, and Lower Three Runs Creek -- drain the site. All but Upper Three Runs Creek receive, or in the past received, thermal effluents from nuclear production reactors. In 1985, L Lake, a 400-hectare cooling reservoir, was built on the upper reaches of Steel Creek to receive effluent from the restart of L-Reactor, and protect the lower reaches from thermal impacts. The lake has an average width of approximately 600 m and extends along the Steel Creek valley approximately 7000 m from the dam to the headwaters. Water level is maintained at a normal pool elevation of 58 m above mean sea level by overflow into a vertical intake tower that has multilevel discharge gates. The intake tower is connected to a horizontal conduit that passes through the dam and releases water into Steel Creek. The Steel Creek Biological Monitoring Program was designed to meet environmental regulatory requirements associated with the restart of L-Reactor and complements the Biological Monitoring Program for L Lake. This extensive program was implemented to address portions of Section 316(a) of the Clean Water Act. The Department of Energy (DOE) must demonstrate that the operation of L-Reactor will not significantly alter the established aquatic ecosystems.

  14. Innovative MIOR Process Utilizing Indigenous Reservoir Constituents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hitzman, D.O.; Stepp, A.K.; Dennis, D.M.; Graumann, L.R.

    2003-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This research program was directed at improving the knowledge of reservoir ecology and developing practical microbial solutions for improving oil production. The goal was to identify indigenous microbial populations which can produce beneficial metabolic products and develop a methodology to stimulate those select microbes with inorganic nutrient amendments to increase oil recovery. This microbial technology has the capability of producing multiple oil-releasing agents.

  15. Reservoir analysis model for battlefield operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, Garrett James

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    'age. Tbe concrete gravity dam had eighteen spillway gates thirty-tvo feet in height along the top of the stxucture (Figure 7). The United Nations Copyright (1952) by the Society of Amexican Nilitaxy Engineers. Reprinted by permission from the January... of expert systems for Military Hydrology applications, specifically the reservoir drawdown problem. Finally, a next generation notional concept for the RANBO concept is presented incorporating a wide range of military requirements (dam-break analysis...

  16. Technology and Economics Affecting Unconventional Reservoir Development 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flores Campero, Cecilia P.

    2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    5.1.1 Low-Permeability Oil (Chalk Reservoirs) ???...? 47 5.1.1.1 Austin Chalk Formation????????? 48 5.1.1.1.1 Production History?????????. 49 5.1.2 Oil Shale???????????????..??. 53 5.1.2.1 Bakken Shale Formation... are more sensitive to certain type of resources such as oil shales and gas hydrates????????????????????.. 3 1.2 Oil shale resources in the Green River formation are giant accumulations waiting for economical exploitation???????????...???... 4 1...

  17. Experimental production characteristics of anticlinal reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Charles David

    1959-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The production characteristics of an anticlinal model reservoir have been studied. The results show the effects of production rate, structural well location, well density, and fluid properties on the oil and gas recovery. The results of this study indicate... the need to shut in high gas- oil ratio wells in order to achieve maximum recovery. An increase in well density increased recovery significantly for both upstructure and downstructure wells. An increase in the production rate appeared to increase re...

  18. Experimental production characteristics of anticlinal reservoirs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Charles David

    1959-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    field examples showing the importance of gxavity dxain- age on oil reservoir, perfoxmance have been pubhshed. Among these are the Gook Ranch Field in Shackleford County, Texas, the Mile (5) Six Pool in Peru, the Elk Basin Tensleep Reservoiz in Wyom... through the kerosene until a pressure above the desired bubble point pressure was attained. Kerosene was then circulated through. the gas cap in the mixing cylinder with a Hills-McGanna proportlosing pump until no further pressure drop was noted...

  19. Closure report for CAU 93: Area 6 steam cleaning effluent ponds, Nevada Test Site. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Steam Cleaning Effluent Ponds (SCEP) waste unit is located in Area 6 at the Nevada Test Site. The SCEPs are evaporation basins formerly used for the disposal of untreated liquid effluent discharged from steam cleaning activities associated with Buildings 6-623 and 6-800. This closure report documents the strategy and analytical results that support the clean closure or closure in place of each of the components within CAU 93. In addition, the report documents all deviations from the approved closure plan and provides rationale for all deviations.

  20. The effects of cattle on shoreline vegetation of ponds and tanks in south Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whyte, Richard John

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ~ Hilvy !1 s udy wa conducted to determine the eft'ects of cattle on pond and ', ink shorelj. ne vegetation in south Texas from June i977 to Nay L)78. F iur 'I! . . wore selectedi on the Rob end Bessie welder Wildlife Foundation Reiuge near Hinton... ~: most grat ofu 1. Dr. L. J. Folse contributed. a real taler t fox making ocmlactor run smoothly. I acv grateful to the Rob and Bessie Melclex Wxldlife Four dation for *"onerously fun~!. g this study and for the 15 mor, ths accommodation cluxin. , my...

  1. Dual-porosity reservoir modeling of the fractured Hanifa reservoir, Abqaiq Field, Saudi Arabia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luthy, S.T. [Saudi Aramco, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Fractures play a significant role in the transmissibility of the Hanifa reservoir at Abqaiq Field. The Hanifa is a Type 2 fractured reservoir characterized by a finely-crystalline carbonate matrix which contains most of the reservoir storage porosity, and a stylolitic fracture system which provides essential permeability. Comparisons of over 5000 fractures identified from core and borehole image data with open-hole log data showed that porosity is negatively correlated with fracture density and mechanical rock strength. From these relationships, it was possible to utilize additional wells where porosity log data was available to calculate fracture densities. These wells were used to generate matrix porosity and permeability as well as fracture density attributes in a 12-sequence, 29-layer geocellular model. The effect of structural curvature on fracture intensity in the reservoir was estimated by mapping the derivative of structural dip. Incorporation of structural curvature explained variations in well test behavior not predicted by initial estimates of fracture density from porosity alone. Resultant fracture permeabilities compared favorably with well-test derived productivity indices. Three-dimensional visualization of model attributes showed that a monotonous and low (<10 md) distribution of matrix-related permeability contrasts sharply with highly variable and relatively high (>50 md) permeabilities of the fracture system. Reliability of the geocellular model to predict fracture densities and associated permeabilities has been confirmed by subsequent drilling of high cost horizontal wells, and is being used in reservoir engineering and development drilling planning efforts.

  2. Dual-porosity reservoir modeling of the fractured Hanifa reservoir, Abqaiq Field, Saudi Arabia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luthy, S.T. (Saudi Aramco, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia))

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fractures play a significant role in the transmissibility of the Hanifa reservoir at Abqaiq Field. The Hanifa is a Type 2 fractured reservoir characterized by a finely-crystalline carbonate matrix which contains most of the reservoir storage porosity, and a stylolitic fracture system which provides essential permeability. Comparisons of over 5000 fractures identified from core and borehole image data with open-hole log data showed that porosity is negatively correlated with fracture density and mechanical rock strength. From these relationships, it was possible to utilize additional wells where porosity log data was available to calculate fracture densities. These wells were used to generate matrix porosity and permeability as well as fracture density attributes in a 12-sequence, 29-layer geocellular model. The effect of structural curvature on fracture intensity in the reservoir was estimated by mapping the derivative of structural dip. Incorporation of structural curvature explained variations in well test behavior not predicted by initial estimates of fracture density from porosity alone. Resultant fracture permeabilities compared favorably with well-test derived productivity indices. Three-dimensional visualization of model attributes showed that a monotonous and low (<10 md) distribution of matrix-related permeability contrasts sharply with highly variable and relatively high (>50 md) permeabilities of the fracture system. Reliability of the geocellular model to predict fracture densities and associated permeabilities has been confirmed by subsequent drilling of high cost horizontal wells, and is being used in reservoir engineering and development drilling planning efforts.

  3. Effects of diagenesis on reservoir quality within two Cypress reservoirs in the Illinois basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott, B.D.; McGee, K.R.; Seyler, B. (Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign (United States))

    1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One billion bbl of oil have been produced from the Chesterian Cypress Formation in the Illinois basin. These heterogeneous reservoirs may consist of deltaic, marine-reworked deltaic, and/or reworked marine sandstone within mixed siliciclastic-carbonate environments. Thin section, x-ray diffraction, and scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive x-ray analysis indicate that the effects of diagenesis play a significant role in reservoir quality of Mattoon and Parkersburg fields in Illinois. Five separate Cypress sandstones may be present at Mattoon field (Coles County), a predominantly stratigraphic trap, produces from three distinct Cypress strata. In these fields, reservoir quality is reduced when quartz overgrowths and later stage, blocky mosaic ferroan-calcite cement occlude pore throats. Authigenic clay minerals occur as pore-lining particles that inhibit fluid-flow. Clay minerals preset are illite, mixed-layered illite/smectite, chlorite, and kaolinite. Reservoir quality is enhanced through dissolution of early ferroan-calcite cement, dissolution of detrital feldspar, and microfracturing. Completion, stimulation, and production programs within the heterogeneous Cypress sandstone reservoirs would be improved by recognition of mineral relationships and diagenetic overprints. Developments programs may need to include the use of clay stabilizers in mud clean-out acid treatments.

  4. Lake-effect snowfall in Western New York and surface temperatures of Lakes Erie and Ontario

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agrella, William

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    - tures (' F) 39 A comparison of mean monthly lake ? surface temperatures and their standard deviations (' F) for Lakes Erie and Ontario 45 Estimates o f Lake Erie average monthly ice cover, percent, 1962-1968 (after Derecki, 1975) 50 Correlation... on such cities as Buffalo and Watertown. Buffalo, perched at the eastern end of Lake Erie, received over 16 ft of snow from November through April, nearly 6 ft of which fell during January alone. At Watertown, situated on the eastern shore of Lake Ontario...

  5. Harvesting Ornamental Fish From Ponds1 Tina C. Crosby, Jeffrey E. Hill, Carlos V. Martinez, Craig A. Watson, Deborah B. Pouder, and Roy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    FA-117 Harvesting Ornamental Fish From Ponds1 Tina C. Crosby, Jeffrey E. Hill, Carlos V. Martinez, ornamental fish are predominantly farmed in earthen ponds. Once fish reach marketable size and are ready and physical damage during harvesting (see UF IFAS Circular 919 Stress-Its Role in Fish Disease). Overall, col

  6. Ponding Test Results Seepage Losses Laterals 8E and 2A-C, Maverick County Water Control and Improvement District No. 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leigh, Eric; Fipps, Guy

    TR-336 2008 Ponding Test Results Seepage Losses Laterals 8E and 2A-C Maverick County Water Control and Improvement District No. 1 By: Eric Leigh, Extension Associate, Biological and Agricultural... Engineering Guy Fipps, Professor and Extension Agricultural Engineer, Biological and Agricultural Engineering Texas Water Resources Institute Technical Report November 2008 PONDING TEST RESULTS SEEPAGE LOSSES LATERALS 8E AND 2A...

  7. An integrated study of dietary lipid manipulation and thermal-refuge technology for overwintering red drum (Sciaenops ocellatus) in outdoor ponds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boren, Ronald Scott

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    designed to afford red drum sub-habitat warmer than other parts of the ponds. Geothermal water (22 OC) from a freshwater well heated the refuges. An opening in each refuge's pond-ward side provided access for the fish. Mean water temperatures inside...

  8. SEISMIC DETERMINATION OF RESERVOIR HETEROGENEITY: APPLICATION TO THE CHARACTERIZATION OF HEAVY OIL RESERVOIRS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matthias G. Imhof; James W. Castle

    2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the project was to examine how seismic and geologic data can be used to improve characterization of small-scale heterogeneity and their parameterization in reservoir models. The study focused on West Coalinga Field in California. The project initially attempted to build reservoir models based on different geologic and geophysical data independently using different tools, then to compare the results, and ultimately to integrate them all. We learned, however, that this strategy was impractical. The different data and tools need to be integrated from the beginning because they are all interrelated. This report describes a new approach to geostatistical modeling and presents an integration of geology and geophysics to explain the formation of the complex Coalinga reservoir.

  9. The effects of fish density on wading bird use of sediment ponds on an East Texas coal mine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Renfrow, Donna Hubbard

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE EFFECTS OF FISH DENSITY ON WADING BIRD USE OF SEDIMENT PONDS ON AN EAST TEXAS COAL MINE A Thesis by DONNA HUBBARD RENFROW Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A8cM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1993 Major Subject: Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences THE EFFECTS OF FISH DENSITY ON WADING BIRD USE OF SEDIMENT PONDS ON AN EAST TEXAS COAL MINE A Thesis by DONNA HUBBARD RENFROW Submitted to Texas A&M University...

  10. Ice Cover on the Great Lakes NATIONALOCEANIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ice Cover on the Great Lakes NATIONALOCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION U.S. D EPARTMENT OF COMM ER CE Great Lakes Ice Cover facts since 1973 - 94.7% ice coverage in 1979 is the maximum on record - 9.5% ice coverage in 2002 is the lowest on record - 11.5% ice coverage in 1998, a strong El Nino

  11. LAKE MICHIGAN'S TRIBUTARY AND NEARSHORE FISH HABITATS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    7 LAKE MICHIGAN'S TRIBUTARY AND NEARSHORE FISH HABITATS Edward S. Rutherford1 Background, the Lake Michigan LaMP was developed to comply with provisions in the GLWQA and to guide management-ranging, cooperative effort to design and implement a strategy for the 1 E.S. Rutherford. University of Michigan School

  12. Economic reservoir design and storage conservation by reduced sedimentation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, K.P.; Durgunoglu, A.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A mathematical model has been developed for estimating the design storage capacity of a reservoir by using the expected water demand, storage loss due to sedimentation, and physical and hydrological characteristics of the watershed. Suitable mitigative measures can be incorporated in dam design and reservoir operation to substantially reduce sediment entrapment in the reservoir, and to improve dissolved oxygen levels by releasing hypolimnetic waters from the reservoir. These measures may also greatly reduce streambed degradation downstream of the dam and consequent initiation of a new erosion cycle in the tributaries. Economic analyses for different storage-maintenance measures (such as undersluices and flushing pipes) have been investigated in terms of reduction in initial reservoir design storage, cost of installing measures, and cost of any dredging operations. These analyses are performed for a site in Illinois for several water-demand levels and useful lives of the reservoir.

  13. Development of an analytical solution for thermal single-well injection-withdrawal tests in horizontally fractured reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jung, Y.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Transfer Area in Fractured Reservoirs, paper presented attests in horizontally fractured reservoirs Yoojin Jung Earthtests in horizontally fractured reservoirs where fluid flow

  14. Use of TOUGHREACT to Simulate Effects of Fluid Chemistry on Injectivity in Fractured Geothermal Reservoirs with High Ionic Strength Fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Tianfu; Zhang, Guoxiang; Pruess, Karsten

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    swelling in a fractured geothermal reservoir, Proceedings ofon Injectivity in Fractured Geothermal Reservoirs with Highdry rock and hot fractured rock reservoirs in a sustainable

  15. Numerical simulation of single-phase and multiphase non-Darcy flow in porous and fractured reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yu-Shu

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    flow simulations in fractured reservoirs, Report LBL-15227,behavior of naturally fractured reservoirs, Soc. Pet. Eng.Flow in Porous and Fractured Reservoirs Yu-Shu Wu Earth

  16. GEOTHERMAL RESOURCE AND RESERVOIR INVESTIGATIONS OF U.S. BUREAU OF RECLAMATION LEASEHOLDS AT EAST MESA, IMPERIAL VALLEY, CALIFORNIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    southwest. Much valuable reservoir data have been collectedAnalysis of pressure data gives reservoir transmissivityThe detailed data of the reservoir that are needed to

  17. Constraining the reservoir model of an injected CO2 plume with crosswell CASSM at the Frio-II brine plot

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daley, T.M.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CASSM monitoring data with the reservoir model to obtain anof CASSM data and updating the Reservoir Model Using thedata and, when the match is unsatisfactory, the initial reservoir

  18. Geophysical Prospecting, 1997, 45, 39-64 Fractured reservoir delineation using

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edinburgh, University of

    Geophysical Prospecting, 1997, 45, 39-64 Fractured reservoir delineation using multicomponent of delineating fractured reservoirs and optimizing the development of the reservoirs using shear-wave data the potential of shear waves for fractured reservoir delineation. Introduction Most carbonate reservoirs contain

  19. The Lake Charles CCS Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doug Cathro

    2010-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Lake Charles CCS Project is a large-scale industrial carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) project which will demonstrate advanced technologies that capture and sequester carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions from industrial sources into underground formations. Specifically the Lake Charles CCS Project will accelerate commercialization of large-scale CO{sub 2} storage from industrial sources by leveraging synergy between a proposed petroleum coke to chemicals plant (the LCC Gasification Project) and the largest integrated anthropogenic CO{sub 2} capture, transport, and monitored sequestration program in the U.S. Gulf Coast Region. The Lake Charles CCS Project will promote the expansion of EOR in Texas and Louisiana and supply greater energy security by expanding domestic energy supplies. The capture, compression, pipeline, injection, and monitoring infrastructure will continue to sequester CO{sub 2} for many years after the completion of the term of the DOE agreement. The objectives of this project are expected to be fulfilled by working through two distinct phases. The overall objective of Phase 1 was to develop a fully definitive project basis for a competitive Renewal Application process to proceed into Phase 2 - Design, Construction and Operations. Phase 1 includes the studies attached hereto that will establish: the engineering design basis for the capture, compression and transportation of CO{sub 2} from the LCC Gasification Project, and the criteria and specifications for a monitoring, verification and accounting (MVA) plan at the Hastings oil field in Texas. The overall objective of Phase 2, provided a successful competitive down-selection, is to execute design, construction and operations of three capital projects: (1) the CO{sub 2} capture and compression equipment, (2) a Connector Pipeline from the LLC Gasification Project to the Green Pipeline owned by Denbury and an affiliate of Denbury, and (3) a comprehensive MVA system at the Hastings oil field.

  20. Cooling of Kilauea Iki lava lake

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hills, R.G.

    1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1959 Kilauea Iki erupted leaving a 110 to 120 m lake of molten lava in its crater. The resulting lava lake has provided a unique opportunity to study the cooling dynamics of a molten body and its associated hydrothermal system. Field measurements taken at Kilauea Iki indicate that the hydrothermal system above the cooling magma body goes through several stages, some of which are well modeled analytically. Field measurements also indicate that during most of the solidification period of the lake, cooling from above is controlled by 2-phase convection while conduction dominates the cooling of the lake from below. A summary of the field work related to the study of the cooling dynamics of Kilauea Iki is presented. Quantitative and qualitative cooling models for the lake are discussed.

  1. Geothermal Reservoir Technology Research Program: Abstracts of selected research projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reed, M.J. (ed.)

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Research projects are described in the following areas: geothermal exploration, mapping reservoir properties and reservoir monitoring, and well testing, simulation, and predicting reservoir performance. The objectives, technical approach, and project status of each project are presented. The background, research results, and future plans for each project are discussed. The names, addresses, and telephone and telefax numbers are given for the DOE program manager and the principal investigators. (MHR)

  2. Simulation of paraffin damage due to natural cooling in reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peddibhotla, Sriram

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and phases at reservoir conditions Fig. 4 - Solid-liquid phase equilibrium Fig. 5 - Paraffin plugging pore spaces 12 15 Fig. 6 - Simulated oil rates for a well in a reservoir without gas . . . . . . . . . Fig. 7 - Paraffin deposition profile... of paraffin removal with cyclic ERH heating for Case 1 Fig. 15 - Simulated oil rates for a well in a reservoir with gas. . . . , . . . . . Fig. 16 - Paraffin deposition profile for an initial solid concentration 3. 5/o Fig. 17 - Production ratio as a...

  3. Analyzing aquifers associated with gas reservoirs using aquifer influence functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Targac, Gary Wayne

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    - teristics of the associated aquifer are vital to proper management of the reservoir. Typically, the reservoir and associated aquifer are located in a geologic setting which is highly faulted. Limited geologic and seismic knowledge exists about...ANALYZING AQUIFERS ASSOCIATED WITH GAS RESERVOIRS USING AQUIFER INFLUENCE FUNCTIONS A Thesis by GARY WAYNE TARGAC Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER...

  4. Lake Winds | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOf Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii9969995°,ILEDSGP/joinHavasuPalmdaleLake

  5. animal reservoir hosts: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AND SIMULATION OF A MATURE FIELD USING AN INTEGRATED APPROACH University of Kansas - KU ScholarWorks Summary: Reservoir characterization involves various studies...

  6. ageologic storage reservoir: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AND SIMULATION OF A MATURE FIELD USING AN INTEGRATED APPROACH University of Kansas - KU ScholarWorks Summary: Reservoir characterization involves various studies...

  7. Effects of Original Vegatation on Reservoir Water Quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ball, J.; Weldon, C.; Crocker, B.

    TR- 64 1975 Effects of Original Vegetation on Reservoir Water Quality J. Ball C. Weldon B. Crocker Texas Water Resources Institute Texas A&M University ...

  8. 5641_FrozenReservoirs | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    from a frozen reservoir. Most prior work has been on developing production techniques for heavy oil in unconsolidated but unfrozen sands, or for gas hydrates. There is no...

  9. Use Of Electrical Surveys For Geothermal Reservoir Characterization...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    For Geothermal Reservoir Characterization- Beowawe Geothermal Field Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Use Of Electrical Surveys...

  10. Variations in dissolved gas compositions of reservoir fluids...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    from the Coso geothermal field Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Proceedings: Variations in dissolved gas compositions of reservoir...

  11. Reservoir-Scale Fracture Permeability in the Dixie Valley, Nevada...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Nevada, Geothermal Field Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Reservoir-Scale Fracture Permeability in the Dixie Valley,...

  12. Reservoir Investigations on the Hot Dry Rock Geothermal System...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Mexico- Tracer Test Results Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Reservoir Investigations on the Hot Dry Rock Geothermal System,...

  13. Lithology and Alteration Mineralogy of Reservoir Rocks at Coso...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of the upwelling plume were investigated using petrographic and analytical analyses of reservoir rock and vein material. The nature of the low-angle outflow zone and the...

  14. Lithology and alteration mineralogy of reservoir rocks at Coso...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of the upwelling plume were investigated using petrographic and analytical analyses of reservoir rock and vein material. The nature of the low-angle outflow zone and the...

  15. Dispersed Fluid Flow in Fractured Reservoirs- an Analysis of...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Distributions Abstract A methodology for analyzing the internal flow characteristics of a fractured geothermal reservoir using tracer-determined residence time distribution curves...

  16. An Updated Conceptual Model Of The Los Humeros Geothermal Reservoir...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Both reservoirs seem to be separated by a vitreous tuff lithological unit, but hydraulic connectivity occurs through faults and fractures of the system, allowing deep steam...

  17. Geothermal reservoir temperatures estimated from the oxygen isotope...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    reservoir temperatures estimated from the oxygen isotope compositions of dissolved sulfate and water from hot springs and shallow drillholes Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI...

  18. Application of thermal depletion model to geothermal reservoirs...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    PROCEEDINGS, Second workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering, Stanford, CA, USA, 1 Dec 1976, 111977 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org...

  19. Carbonation Mechanism of Reservoir Rock by Supercritical Carbon...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Task 3: Mechanical behaviors of carbonated minerals. - Task 4: Modeling of CO2- reservoir rock interactions. - Task 5: Preparation of report covering the four tasks previous task,...

  20. Carbon Dioxide and Helium Emissions from a Reservoir of Magmatic...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Carbon Dioxide and Helium Emissions from a Reservoir of Magmatic Gas Beneath Mammoth...