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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lake utilities effective" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Rice Lake Utilities | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rice Lake Utilities Rice Lake Utilities Jump to: navigation, search Name Rice Lake Utilities Place Wisconsin Utility Id 15938 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Cp-1 Small Power Service Industrial Cp-1 Small Power Service with Parallel Generation(20kW or less) Industrial Cp-1 TOD Small Power Optional Time-of-Day Service Primary Metering Discount Industrial Cp-1 TOD Small Power Optional Time-of-Day Service Primary Metering Discount with Parallel Generation(20kW or less) Industrial

2

Lake-Effect Rain Events  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Seven years of autumnal (SeptemberNovember) precipitation data are examined to determine the characteristics of lake-effect precipitation downwind of Lake Erie. Atmospheric conditions for each lake-effect event are compiled and the mean ...

Todd J. Miner; J. M. Fritsch

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Lake-Effect Snowfall over Lake Michigan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aircraft measurements of snow particle size spectra from 36 flights on 26 snowy days are used to estimate snow precipitation rates over Lake Michigan. Results show that average rates during 14 wind-parallel-type lake-effect storms increased from ...

Roscoe R. Braham Jr.; Maureen J. Dungey

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Lake Worth Utilities - Residential Solar Water Heating Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Lake Worth Utilities - Residential Solar Water Heating Rebate Lake Worth Utilities - Residential Solar Water Heating Rebate Program Lake Worth Utilities - Residential Solar Water Heating Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Solar Water Heating Maximum Rebate $450 Rebates must not exceed purchase price Program Info State Florida Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount $450 per system Provider City of Lake Worth Utilities The City of Lake Worth Utilities (CLWU), in conjunction with Florida Municipal Power Agency, offers rebates to customers who purchase and install a solar water heating system for residential use. A rebate of $450 per system is available to eligible applicants. Eligible equipment must be located on customer premises within the CLWU service territory, and must

5

Wall Lake Municipal Utilities Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wall Lake Municipal Utilities Wind Farm Wall Lake Municipal Utilities Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Wall Lake Municipal Utilities Wind Farm Facility Wall Lake Municipal Utilities Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Wall Lake Municipal Utilities Developer Wall Lake Municipal Utilities Energy Purchaser Wall Lake Municipal Utilities Location Wall Lake IA Coordinates 42.281965°, -95.094098° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.281965,"lon":-95.094098,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

6

Lake Worth Utilities - Energy Conservation Rebate Program | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Lake Worth Utilities - Energy Conservation Rebate Program Lake Worth Utilities - Energy Conservation Rebate Program Lake Worth Utilities - Energy Conservation Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Appliances & Electronics Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Maximum Rebate Limit one of each type of equipment per customer account Program Info State Florida Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Residential Energy Savings Kit: Free AC/Heat Pump: $250 Clothes Washer: $100 Dishwasher: $75 Freezer: $100 Refrigerator: $100 Programmable Thermostat: $25 Room AC: $100 Insulation Upgrade: up to $300 Commercial Commercial Lighting: up to $1,000 Insulation Upgrade: up to $1,000

7

Climatology of Lake-Effect Precipitation Events over Lake Champlain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study provides the first long-term climatological analysis of lake-effect precipitation events that developed in relation to a small lake (having a surface area of ?1500 km2). The frequency and environmental conditions favorable for Lake ...

Neil F. Laird; Jared Desrochers; Melissa Payer

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

City of Elbow Lake, Minnesota (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lake, Minnesota (Utility Company) Lake, Minnesota (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name City of Elbow Lake Place Minnesota Utility Id 5732 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Commercial Dual Fuel Heating Commercial Controlled Central Air Conditioning Controlled Water Heater Large Commercial Commercial Off Peak Heating Residential Rate Residential Security Lighting 150 Watt HPS Lighting Security Lighting 250 Watt HPS Lighting Small Commercial Rate Single Phase Commercial

9

Village of Tupper Lake, New York (Utility Company) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tupper Lake, New York (Utility Company) Tupper Lake, New York (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name Village of Tupper Lake Place New York Utility Id 19274 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location NPCC NERC NPCC Yes ISO NY Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Large Commercial Rate 500 kW Max Commercial Large Commercial Rate Greater than 500 kW Commercial Residential Residential Small Commercial Commercial Average Rates Residential: $0.0378/kWh Commercial: $0.0464/kWh Industrial: $0.0388/kWh References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a"

10

Lake City Utilities - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Lake City Utilities - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Lake City Utilities - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Lake City Utilities - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Appliances & Electronics Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Lighting: Varies, see program website Room A/C: $25, plus $25 for recycling an old, working unit Central A/C: $100 - $200, plus additional rebate for efficiency ratings above 14.5 SEER Air Source Heat Pump:$100 - $200, plus additional rebate for efficiency ratings above 14.5 SEER Geothermal Heat Pump:$200/ton, plus $25/ton for every 1 EER above minimum required EER Refrigerators: $25, plus $50 for recycling an old, working unit

11

City of Mountain Lake, Minnesota (Utility Company) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mountain Lake Mountain Lake Place Minnesota Utility Id 13048 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png City Rates Commercial Commercial Commercial Industrial Industrial Residential- Rural Residential Residential- Urban Residential Average Rates Residential: $0.0957/kWh Commercial: $0.0842/kWh Industrial: $0.0804/kWh References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=City_of_Mountain_Lake,_Minnesota_(Utility_Company)&oldid=40998

12

Lake Placid Village, Inc (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Placid Village, Inc (Utility Company) Placid Village, Inc (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name Lake Placid Village, Inc Place New York Utility Id 10610 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location NPCC Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Non-Residential Commercial Non-Residential with Demand More than 25kW Commercial Residential Residential Average Rates Residential: $0.0488/kWh Commercial: $0.0450/kWh References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Lake_Placid_Village,_Inc_(Utility_Company)&oldid=410966

13

Lake-Effect Thunderstorms in the Lower Great Lakes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cloud-to-ground (CG) lightning, radar, and radiosonde data were examined to determine how frequently lake-effect storms (rain/snow) with lightning occurred over and near the lower Great Lakes region (Lakes Erie and Ontario) from September 1995 ...

Scott M. Steiger; Robert Hamilton; Jason Keeler; Richard E. Orville

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

City of Shasta Lake, California (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Shasta Lake Shasta Lake Place California Utility Id 17896 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location WECC NERC WECC Yes ISO CA Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Bundled Services Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Commercial Service Commercial Economic Development Discount Rider Commercial Government Service Commercial Large Industrial Service Industrial Lifeline Discount Rider Net Surplus Compensation Rate Commercial Residential Service Residential Small Industrial Service Industrial Social Service Commercial Average Rates Residential: $0.1350/kWh Commercial: $0.1430/kWh

15

City of Lake Crystal, Minnesota (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Crystal, Minnesota (Utility Company) Crystal, Minnesota (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name City of Lake Crystal Place Minnesota Utility Id 10596 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location MRO Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] Energy Information Administration Form 826[2] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Commercial Heat Commercial Commercial Service Rate Commercial Industrial Service Rate Industrial Residential Service Rate Residential Rural Service Rate Residential Average Rates Residential: $0.1430/kWh Commercial: $0.1210/kWh

16

City of Lake Worth, Florida (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Worth, Florida (Utility Company) Worth, Florida (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name City of Lake Worth Place Florida Utility Id 10620 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location FRCC NERC FRCC Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Schedule GS-S: Regular General Service Commercial Schedule GS-S: Regular General Service, Time of Use Commercial Schedule GSD-S: Regular General Service-Demand Industrial Schedule GSD-S: Regular General Service-Demand, Time of Use Commercial Schedule L-P: Private Area Lighting, 1,000 Watt (55,000 Lumen), Mercury

17

City of Lake Park, Minnesota (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Park, Minnesota (Utility Company) Park, Minnesota (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name Lake Park City of Place Minnesota Utility Id 10609 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png COMMERCIAL CONTROLLED A/C CREDIT Commercial COMMERCIAL DUAL FUEL AND STORAGE HEATING Commercial COMMERCIAL SERVICE RATE Commercial COMMERCIAL WATER HEATER CREDIT Commercial PRIVATE YARD LIGHTS Lighting RESIDENTIAL CONTROLLED A/C CREDIT Residential RESIDENTIAL DUAL FUEL AND STORAGE HEATING Residential RESIDENTIAL SERVICE RATE Residential

18

City of Detroit Lakes, Minnesota (Utility Company) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Minnesota (Utility Company) Minnesota (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name City of Detroit Lakes Place Minnesota Utility Id 5111 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes ISO MISO Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Area Lights - 100 Watt HPS (Unmetered) Lighting Area Lights - 100 Watt HPS (metered) Lighting Area Lights - 250 Watt HPS (Unmetered) Lighting Area Lights - 250 Watt HPS (metered) Lighting Area Lights - 400 Watt HPS (Unmetered) Lighting Area Lights - 400 Watt HPS (metered) Lighting

19

City of Lake City, Minnesota (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Minnesota (Utility Company) Minnesota (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name City of Lake City Place Minnesota Utility Id 10595 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location MAPP Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Large Commercial-Rural Commercial Large Commercial-Urban Commercial Large Industrial Industrial Residential Rural Residential Residential Urban Residential Small Commercial-Rural Commercial Small Commercial-Urban Commercial Small Industrial Industrial Small Industrial(Schools) Industrial Average Rates Residential: $0.0737/kWh Commercial: $0.0961/kWh

20

City of Lake View, Iowa (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Place Iowa Place Iowa Utility Id 10617 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes ISO MISO Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Bundled Services Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Commercial Service Commercial Residential Service Residential Rural Service Residential Three-Phase Service Industrial Average Rates Residential: $0.0698/kWh Commercial: $0.0685/kWh Industrial: $0.0710/kWh References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=City_of_Lake_View,_Iowa_(Utility_Company)&oldid=409821

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lake utilities effective" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

City of Lake Mills, Iowa (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mills Mills Place Iowa Utility Id 10606 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes ISO MISO Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Commercial Commercial Commercial All Electric Commercial Industrial Electric Rate Industrial Residential Residential Average Rates Residential: $0.0988/kWh Commercial: $0.0948/kWh Industrial: $0.0786/kWh References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=City_of_Lake_Mills,_Iowa_(Utility_Company)&oldid=409818

22

Orographic Effects in Simulated Lake-Effect Snowstorms over Lake Michigan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Numerical simulations of lake-effect snowstorms over Lake Michigan show that orography enhances precipitation rates and mesoscale updrafts and strengthens the land breeze. The mild orographic changes east of Lake Michigan as modeled with an 8-km ...

Mark R. Hjelmfelt

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

The Lake Effect of the Great Salt Lake: Overview and Forecast Problems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A lake-effect snow phenomenon along the shore of the Great Salt Lake (GSL) in Utah is documented and related to a similar, well-documented lake effect along the shores of the Great Lakes. Twenty-eight cases of GSL lake-effect snowfall are ...

David M. Carpenter

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

City of Shasta Lake Electric Utility - PV Rebate Program | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

City of Shasta Lake Electric Utility - PV Rebate Program City of Shasta Lake Electric Utility - PV Rebate Program City of Shasta Lake Electric Utility - PV Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings Category Solar Buying & Making Electricity Maximum Rebate Residential: $9,050 Commercial: $192,000 Program Info State California Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Residential: $1.81/W Commercial: $1.92/W Provider City of Shasta Lake Electric Utility '''''Note: This program is currently not accepting applications. Check the program web site for information regarding future solicitations. ''''' City of Shasta Lake Electric Utility is providing rebates to their customers for the purchase of photovoltaic (PV) systems. The rebate levels will decrease annually over the life of the program. For fiscal year

25

Contributions of Lake-Effect Periods to the Cool-Season Hydroclimate of the Great Salt Lake Basin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although smaller lakes are known to produce lake-effect precipitation, their influence on the precipitation climatology of lake-effect regions remains poorly documented. This study examines the contribution of lake-effect periods (LEPs) to the ...

Kristen N. Yeager; W. James Steenburgh; Trevor I. Alcott

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Great Lakes fish and the greenhouse effect  

SciTech Connect

This short article discusses data presented at the Second North American Conference on Preparing for Climate Change, held in Washington, D.C. Magnuson and Regier predicted that Great Lakes fish productivity may increase as a result of the increased water temperatures caused by the greenhouse effect. However, they also predicted that other indirect alterations could do more harm than good; for example, the effects of warming on lake oxygen levels, or wind, which affects the mixing of warm, cool, and cold water.

Mlot, C.

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Convective Evolution across Lake Michigan during a Widespread Lake-Effect Snow Event  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lake-effect snowstorms generally develop within convective boundary layers, which are induced when cold air flows over relatively warm lakes in fall and winter. Mesoscale circulations within the boundary layers largely control which communities ...

David A. R. Kristovich; Neil F. Laird; Mark R. Hjelmfelt

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Numerical Study of the Influence of Environmental Conditions on Lake-Effect Snowstorms over Lake Michigan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Numerical simulations are used to examine the influence of environmental parameters on the morphology of lake effect snowstorms over Lake Michigan. A series of model sensitivity studies are performed using the Colorado State University mesoscale ...

Mark R. Hjelmfelt

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Climatological Conditions of Lake-Effect Precipitation Events Associated with the New York State Finger Lakes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A climatological analysis was conducted of the environmental and atmospheric conditions that occurred during 125 identified lake-effect (LE) precipitation events in the New York State Finger Lakes region for the 11 winters (OctoberMarch) from ...

Neil Laird; Ryan Sobash; Natasha Hodas

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

City of Lake Park, Iowa (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

City of City of Place Iowa Utility Id 10608 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Commercial Single Phase Commercial Commercial Three Phase Commercial Large Commercial Commercial Residential Rate Residential Seasonal Residential Security Light Lighting Street lighting Lighting Average Rates Residential: $0.1160/kWh Commercial: $0.1360/kWh Industrial: $0.0988/kWh References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a"

31

Model Simulations Examining the Relationship of Lake-Effect Morphology to Lake Shape, Wind Direction, and Wind Speed  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Idealized model simulations with an isolated elliptical lake and prescribed winter lake-effect environmental conditions were used to examine the influences of lake shape, wind speed, and wind direction on the mesoscale morphology. This study ...

Neil F. Laird; John E. Walsh; David A. R. Kristovich

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Lake Elizabeth Micro-Utility Geothermal Project | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

to industry, academia, and government, (f) demonstrate a cost-effective model for carbon reduction, renewable energy development, and reduced maintenance costs, (g) capture...

33

Observations of the Cross-Lake Cloud and Snow Evolution in a Lake-Effect Snow Event  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

While the total snowfall produced in lake-effect storms can be considerable, little is known about how clouds and snow evolve within lake-effect boundary layers. Data collected over Lake Michigan on 10 January 1998 during the Lake-Induced ...

Faye E. Barthold; David A. R. Kristovich

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Numerical Simulation of the Airflow over Lake Michigan for a Major Lake-Effect Snow Event  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A mesoscale model is used to simulate the airflow over Lake Michigan for the major lake-effect snowstorm of 10 December 1977. This storm was characterized by a land breeze circulation and a narrow shore-parallel radar reflectivity band. The model ...

Mark R. Hjelmfelt; Roscoe R. Braham Jr.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Mesoscale Lake-effect Snowstorms in the Vicinity of Lake Michigan: Linear Theory and Numerical Simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mesoscale lake-effect snowstorms in the vicinity of Lake Michigan are studied by a linear steady-state analytic model and a nonlinear time-dependent numerical model with parameterized subgrid-scale physics. The solutions of the linear model show ...

Hsiao-ming Hsu

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Lake Effect Energy LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Effect Energy LLC Effect Energy LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Lake Effect Energy LLC Place Buffalo, New York Sector Wind energy Product Wind Project Developer in New York State. Coordinates 42.88544°, -78.878464° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.88544,"lon":-78.878464,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

37

Numerical Simulation of Transitions in Boundary Layer Convective Structures in a Lake-Effect Snow Event  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Numerical simulations are used to study transitions between boundary layer rolls and more cellular convective structures observed during a lake-effect snow event over Lake Michigan on 17 December 1983. Weak lake-effect nonroll convection was ...

Kevin A. Cooper; Mark R. Hjelmfelt; Russell G. Derickson; David A. R. Kristovich; Neil F. Laird

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Increasing Great LakeEffect Snowfall during the Twentieth Century: A Regional Response to Global Warming?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The influence of the Laurentian Great Lakes on the climate of surrounding regions is significant, especially in leeward settings where lake-effect snowfall occurs. Heavy lake-effect snow represents a potential natural hazard and plays important ...

Adam W. Burnett; Matthew E. Kirby; Henry T. Mullins; William P. Patterson

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

The Effect of Groundwater Inflow on Evaporation from a Saline Lake  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A decade study of the hydrometeorology of Big Quill Lake in Saskatchewan, a saline prairie lake, has effectively used remote sensing to delineate groundwater inflow. The lake covers an area of 250 square kilometers with the groundwater seeping ...

Jeffrey M. Whiting

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Circulations, Bounded Weak Echo Regions, and Horizontal Vortices Observed within Long-Lake-Axis-ParallelLake-Effect Storms by the Doppler on Wheels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The eastern Great Lakes (Erie and Ontario) are often affected by intense lake-effect snowfalls. Lake-effect storms that form parallel to the major axes of these lakes can strongly impact communities by depositing more than 100 cm of snowfall in ...

Scott M. Steiger; Robert Schrom; Alfred Stamm; Daniel Ruth; Keith Jaszka; Timothy Kress; Brett Rathbun; Jeffrey Frame; Joshua Wurman; Karen Kosiba

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lake utilities effective" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Lake-Effect Snowstorms in Northern Utah and Western New York with and without Lightning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lake-effect snowstorms in northern Utah and western New York with and without lightning/thunder are examined. Lake-effect snowstorms with lightning have significantly higher temperatures and dewpoints in the lower troposphere and significantly ...

David M. Schultz

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Lake-Effect Snowstorms over Southern Ontario, Canada, and Their Associated Synoptic-Scale Environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lake-effect snowstorms are an important source of severe winter weather over the Great Lakes region and are often triggered by the passage of synoptic-scale low pressure systems. In this paper, a climatology of lake-effect snowstorms over ...

A. Q. Liu; G. W. K. Moore

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Climatic Effects on Lake Basins. Part I: Modeling Tropical Lake Levels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The availability of satellite estimates of rainfall and lake levels offers exciting new opportunities to estimate the hydrologic properties of lake systems. Combined with simple basin models, connections to climatic variations can then be explored ...

Martina Ricko; James A. Carton; Charon Birkett

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Numerical Study of the 10 January 1998 Lake-Effect Bands Observed during Lake-ICE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents the results of a series of idealized cloud resolving simulations of the evolution of moist roll convection observed as part of the Lake-Induced Convection Experiment (Lake-ICE) that took place during the 1997/98 winter over ...

Gregory J. Tripoli

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Spatiotemporal Trends in Lake Effect and Continental Snowfall in the Laurentian Great Lakes, 19511980  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new raster-based monthly snowfall climatology was derived from 19511980 snowfall station data for the Laurentian Great Lakes. An automated methodology was used to obtain higher spatial resolution than previously obtained. The increase in ...

D. C. Norton; S. J. Bolsenga

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Mesoscale Model Simulation of the 45 January 1995 Lake-Effect Snowstorm  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Pennsylvania State UniversityNCAR Mesoscale Model version 5 (MM5), running on a triply nested grid, was used to simulate the intense lake-effect snowstorm of 45 January 1995. On the finest grid (5-km resolution) centered over Lake Ontario, ...

Robert J. Ballentine; Alfred J. Stamm; Eugene E. Chermack; Gregory P. Byrd; Donald Schleede

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Operational Forecasting of Lake Effect Snowfall in Western and Central New York  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lake effect snowstorms frequently produce heavy snow in western and central New York State during the late fall and winter months when the waters of Lakes Erie and Ontario are relatively ice free. Mesoscale snowbands account for most of the snow. ...

Thomas A. Niziol

1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

The Characteristics of the Chicago Lake Breeze and Its Effects on Trace Particle Transport: Results from an Episodic Event Simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The lake-breeze circulation that forms over Lake Michigan during the summer influences the Chicago, Illinois, metropolitan areas weather in several ways. Of particular significance is the circulations effect on the dispersion of pollutants such ...

Lucas Harris; V. Rao Kotamarthi

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

The Role of Ice Cover in Heavy Lake-Effect Snowstorms over the Great Lakes Basin as Simulated by RegCM4  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A 20-km regional climate model, the Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics Regional Climate Model version 4 (ICTP RegCM4), is employed to investigate heavy lake-effect snowfall (HLES) over the Great Lakes Basin and the role of ...

Steve Vavrus; Michael Notaro; Azar Zarrin

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Multiscale Analysis of the 7 December 1998 Great Salt LakeEffect Snowstorm  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The large-scale and mesoscale structure of the Great Salt Lakeeffect snowstorm of 7 December 1998 is examined using radar analyses, high-density surface observations, conventional meteorological data, and a simulation by the Pennsylvania State ...

W. James Steenburgh; Daryl J. Onton

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Winter Weather Forecasting throughout the Eastern United States. Part IV: Lake Effect Snow  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article is the final installment of a four-part series that examines the challenge of forecasting winter weather throughout the eastern United States. This paper examines the problems and challenges of forecasting lake effect snows. The ...

Thomas A. Niziol; Warren R. Snyder; Jeff S. Waldstreicher

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Mobile Sounding Observations of Lake-Effect Snowbands in Western and Central New York  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measurements of the thermodynamic environments in the vicinity of lake-effect snowbands were obtained during the winter of 1987/88, using portable radiosonde equipment. During the experimental period, a total of 17 soundings were launched on ten ...

Gregory P. Byrd; Richard A. Anstett; Joseph E. Heim; David M. Usinski

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Combustion Effects Investigation at the Martin Lake Station  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One key to improving the availability of coal-fired plants is an improved understanding of the impact of combustion conditions on deposit formation on furnace walls. This report builds on a previously developed model of a unit at the Martin Lake Generating Station to investigate the conditions contributing to excessive slagging at the plant.

2009-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

54

Geothermal Energy Utilization via Effective Design of Ground-Coupled  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Geothermal Energy Utilization via Effective Design of Ground-Coupled Heat Exchange System Charlie of Tennessee Knoxville, TN 37996 05/18/2010 #12;Geothermal energy is the most recent research subject AJ and I ­ Reactive Flow Film Cooling in Turbine · Renewable Energy ­ Geothermal Energy Heat Exchange System ­ Bio

Tennessee, University of

55

Utility green pricing programs: A statistical analysis of program effectiveness  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Size Participation Rate (%) Utility Size (# customers) Non-Size Participation Rate (%) Utility Size (# customers)non-residential participation rates in utility green pricing

Wiser, Ryan; Olson, Scott; Bird, Lori; Swezey, Blair

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

North Bar Lake South Bar Lake  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Traverse Lake Lime Lake Crystal River Sh alda Cr GOOD HARBOR BAY SLEEPING BEAR BAY PLATTE BA Y LAKE South Bar Lake Otter Lake Loon Lake Long Lake Rush Lake Platte Lake Little Platte Lake CRYSTAL LAKE MICHIGAN LAKE MICHIGAN Lake Elevation 580ft (177m) MANITOU PAS S A G E Ott er C reek Pl atte River Platt e

57

Lake Region Electric Cooperative | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cooperative Jump to: navigation, search Name Lake Region Electric Cooperative Place Minnesota Utility Id 10618 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes...

58

Lake Improvement District Law and County Lake Improvement Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Lake Improvement District Law and County Lake Improvement Program Lake Improvement District Law and County Lake Improvement Program (Minnesota) Lake Improvement District Law and County Lake Improvement Program (Minnesota) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Siting and Permitting Lake Improvement Districts may be established by county boards in order to

59

Potential Effects of Climate Change on Electric Utilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In recent years, increasing attention has been focused on the potential for greenhouse gas emissions to modify the global climate system. Significant climate change could affect utility operations and costs through impacts on electricity demand and on generation and delivery systems. Utilities, moreover, may be called upon to take actions to reduce their emissions of CO2, an important greenhouse gas. This report summarizes an assessment of the long-term risks to individual utilities posed by the potentia...

1995-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

60

NAWS-China Lake Project | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NAWS-China Lake Project NAWS-China Lake Project Presentation covers the NAWS-China Lake Project at the Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting, held on November...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lake utilities effective" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Utility Green Pricing Programs: A Statistical Analysis of Program Effectiveness  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report analyzes actual utility green pricing program data to provide further insight into which program features might help maximize both customer participation in green pricing programs and the amount of renewable energy purchased by customers in those programs.

Wiser, R.; Olson, S.; Bird, L.; Swezey, B.

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Middle east crisis has varied effect on wastewater utilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The jump in oil prices that followed Iraq's invasion of Kuwait in early August of 1990 was felt throughout the US economy. The authors particularly discuss the impact of the Middle East Crisis as it relates to wastewater utilities.

Nichols, A.B.

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Modeling the Effects of Lakes and Wetlands on the Water Balance of Arctic Environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lakes, ponds, and wetlands are common features in many low-gradient arctic watersheds. Storage of snowmelt runoff in lakes and wetlands exerts a strong influence on both the interannual and interseasonal variability of northern rivers. This ...

Laura C. Bowling; Dennis P. Lettenmaier

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Association between Winter Precipitation and Water Level Fluctuations in the Great Lakes and Atmospheric Circulation Patterns  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atmospheric precipitation in the Great Lakes basin, as a major mediating variable between atmospheric circulation and lake levels, is analyzed relative to both. The effect of cumulative winter precipitation on lake levels varies from lake to lake ...

Sergei N. Rodionov

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Effect of energy supply on amino acid utilization by growing steers.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Effects of energy supply on the efficiency of methionine and leucine utilization in growing steers were evaluated in 3 studies. We hypothesized that increased energy (more)

Schroeder, Guillermo Fernando

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Asymptotic Cellular Growth Rate as the Effective Information Utilization Rate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the average asymptotic growth rate of cells in randomly fluctuating environments. Using a game-theoretic perspective, we show that any response strategy has an asymptotic growth rate, which is the sum of: (i) the maximal growth rate at the worst possible distribution of environments, (ii) relative information between the actual distribution of environments to the worst one, and (iii) information utilization rate which is the information rate of the sensory devices minus the "information dissipation rate", the amount of information not utilized by the cell for growth. In non-stationary environments, the optimal strategy is the time average of the instantaneous optimal strategy and the optimal switching times are evenly spaced in the statistical (Fisher) metric.

Pugatch, Rami; Tlusty, Tsvi

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Clear Lake Cogeneration LP | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cogeneration LP Jump to: navigation, search Name Clear Lake Cogeneration LP Place Idaho Utility Id 3775 References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File220101...

68

Utilization of CO2 to Mitigate Greenhouse Gas Effect.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Greenhouse effect is the phenomenon of warming of the earths surface and its lower atmosphere due to increased levels of carbon dioxide and other gases, (more)

Al-Batty, Sirhan Ibrahim

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Triple effect absorption chiller utilizing two refrigeration circuits  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A triple effect absorption method and apparatus having a high coefficient of performance. Two single effect absorption circuits are combined with heat exchange occurring between a condenser and absorber of a high temperature circuit, and a generator of a low temperature circuit. The evaporators of both the high and low temperature circuits provide cooling to an external heat load.

DeVault, Robert C. (Knoxville, TN)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Early, Cost-Effective Applications of Photovoltaics in the Electric Utility Industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Photovoltaic (PV)-powered systems can compete economically with conventional utility approaches such as distribution line extensions and step-down transformer installation for powering small electric loads. This study identified more than 60 cost-effective applications of PV-powered systems for utilities and their customers.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Simulation of Heavy Lake-Effect Snowstorms across the Great Lakes Basin by RegCM4: Synoptic Climatology and Variability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A historical simulation (19762002) of the Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics Regional Climate Model, version 4 (ICTP RegCM4), coupled to a one-dimensional lake model, is validated against observed lake ice cover and snowfall ...

Michael Notaro; Azar Zarrin; Steve Vavrus; Val Bennington

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Estimating the Effects on the Regional Precipitation Climate in a Semiarid Region Caused by an Artificial Lake Using a Mesoscale Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effects on the regional precipitation climate by the construction of an artificial lake, in a semiarid region are studied. The study is performed using a mesoscale model to identify the larger-scale meteorological conditions when ...

Leif Enger; Michael Tjernstrm

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

The effects of utility DSM programs on electricity costs and prices  

SciTech Connect

More and more US utilities are running more and larger demand-side management (DSM) programs. Assessing the cost-effectiveness of these programs raises difficult questions for utilities and their regulators. Should these programs aim to minimize the total cost of providing electric-energy services or should they minimize the price of electricity? This study offers quantitative estimates on the tradeoffs between total costs and electricity prices. This study uses a dynamic model to assess the effects of energy-efficiency programs on utility revenues, total resource costs, electricity prices, and electricity consumption for the period 1990 to 2010. These DSM programs are assessed under alternative scenarios. In these cases, fossil-fuel prices, load growth, the amount of excess capacity the utility has in 1990, planned retirements of power plants, the financial treatment of DSM programs, and the costs of energy- efficient programs vary. These analyses are conducted for three utilities: a ``base`` that is typical of US utilities; a ``surplus`` utility that has excess capacity, few planned retirements, and slow growth in fossil-fuel prices and incomes; and a ``deficit`` utility that has little excess capacity, many planned retirements, and rapid growth in fossil-fuel prices and incomes. 28 refs.

Hirst, E.

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

The effects of utility DSM programs on electricity costs and prices  

SciTech Connect

More and more US utilities are running more and larger demand-side management (DSM) programs. Assessing the cost-effectiveness of these programs raises difficult questions for utilities and their regulators. Should these programs aim to minimize the total cost of providing electric-energy services or should they minimize the price of electricity This study offers quantitative estimates on the tradeoffs between total costs and electricity prices. This study uses a dynamic model to assess the effects of energy-efficiency programs on utility revenues, total resource costs, electricity prices, and electricity consumption for the period 1990 to 2010. These DSM programs are assessed under alternative scenarios. In these cases, fossil-fuel prices, load growth, the amount of excess capacity the utility has in 1990, planned retirements of power plants, the financial treatment of DSM programs, and the costs of energy- efficient programs vary. These analyses are conducted for three utilities: a base'' that is typical of US utilities; a surplus'' utility that has excess capacity, few planned retirements, and slow growth in fossil-fuel prices and incomes; and a deficit'' utility that has little excess capacity, many planned retirements, and rapid growth in fossil-fuel prices and incomes. 28 refs.

Hirst, E.

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Lake Pend Oreille Predation Research, Annual Report 2002-2003.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During August 2002 we conducted a hydroacoustic survey to enumerate pelagic fish >406 mm in Lake Pend Oreille, Idaho. The purpose of this survey was to determine a collective lakewide biomass estimate of pelagic bull trout Salvelinus confluentus, rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss, and lake trout S. namaycush and compare it to pelagic prey (kokanee salmon O. nerka) biomass. By developing hydroacoustic techniques to determine the pelagic predator to prey ratio, we can annually monitor their balance. Hydroacoustic surveys were also performed during December 2002 and February 2003 to investigate the effectiveness of autumn and winter surveys for pelagic predators. The inherent problem associated with hydroacoustic sampling is the inability to directly identify fish species. Therefore, we utilized sonic tracking techniques to describe rainbow trout and lake trout habitat use during our winter hydroacoustic survey to help identify fish targets from the hydroacoustic echograms. During August 2002 we estimated there were 39,044 pelagic fish >406 mm in Lake Pend Oreille (1.84 f/ha). Based on temperature and depth utilization, two distinct groups of pelagic fish >406 mm were located during August; one group was located between 10 and 35 m and the other between 40 and 70 m. The biomass for pelagic fish >406 mm during August 2002 was 73 t (metric ton). This would account for a ratio of 1 kg of pelagic predator for every 2.63 kg of kokanee prey, assuming all pelagic fish >406 mm are predators. During our late fall and winter hydroacoustic surveys, pelagic fish >406 mm were observed at lake depths between 20 and 90 m. During late fall and winter, we tracked three rainbow trout (168 habitat observations) and found that they mostly occupied pelagic areas and predominantly stayed within the top 10 m of the water column. During late fall (one lake trout) and winter (four lake trout), we found that lake trout (184 habitat observations) utilized benthic-nearshore areas 65% of the time and were found in the pelagic area only 35% of the time. Lake trout were found at depths between 10 and 90 m (average was approximately 30 m). Based on hydroacoustic surveys of pelagic fish >406 mm and habitat use of sonic tagged rainbow trout and lake trout during late fall and winter, we conclude that hydroacoustic sampling during those times would be ineffective at acquiring an accurate pelagic predator population estimate and recommend conducting abundance estimates for pelagic predators when Lake Pend Oreille is thermally stratified (i.e. August).

Bassista, Thomas

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Electric-utility DSM-program costs and effects, 1991 to 2001  

SciTech Connect

For the past three years (1989, 1990, and 1991), all US electric utilities that sell more than 120 GWh/year have been required to report to the Energy Information Administration data on their demand-side management (DSM) programs. These data provide a rich and uniquely comprehensive picture of electric-utility DSM programs in the United States. Altogether, 890 utilities (of about 3250 in the United States) ran DSM programs in 1991; of these, 439 sold more than 120 GWh and reported details on their DSM programs. These 439 utilities represent more than 80% of total US electricity sales and revenues. Altogether, these utilities spent almost $1.8 billion on DSM programs in 1991, equal to 1.0% of total utility revenues that year. In return for these (and prior-year) expenditures, utility DSM programs cut potential peak demand by 26,700 MW (4.8% of the national total) and cut annual electricity use by 23,300 GWh (0.9% of the national total). These 1991 numbers represent substantial increases over the 1989 and 1990 numbers on utility DSM programs. Specifically, utility DSM expenditures doubled, energy savings increased by almost 50%, and demand reductions increased by one-third between 1989 and 1991. Utilities differed enormously in their DSM-program expenditures and effects. Almost 12% of the reporting utilities spent more than 2% of total revenues on DSM programs in 1991, while almost 60% spent less than 0.5% of revenues on DSM. Utility estimates of future DSM-program expenditures and benefits show continuing growth. By the year 2001, US utilities expect to spend 1.2% of revenues on DSM and to cut demand by 8.8% and annual sales by 2.7%. Here, too, expectations vary by region. Utilities in the West and Northwest plan to spend more than 2% of revenues on DSM that year, while utilities in the Mid-Atlantic, Midwest, Southwest, Central, and North Central regions plan to spend less than 1% of revenues on DSM.

Hirst, E.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Effects of LCRA Lakes on Riparian Property Values: Recreational and Aesthetic Components of Lake Side Housing in the Colorado River Basin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Lower Colorado River Authority (LCRA) manages the Colorado River Basin in a ten county area stretching from central Texas to the gulf coast of Texas. In its recent "Water Management Plan for the Lower Colorado River," the Lower Colorado River Authority (LCRAb) stated: The "business" of water resources management in Texas, and throughout the nation, is in the midst of transition and transformation. The transition is largely the result of ever increasing demands and competition for renewable but limited water supplies and a growing awareness of the limits of "traditional" water supply management strategies. ... In response to new challenges and uncertainties, it is imperative that water management institutions, at all levels, adopt a balanced, flexible approach that gives due weight to all the conflicting demands on the water, including the heavy economic dependence of the rice farmers on historic uses of irrigation water, rapidly emerging public interest in recreation, and environmental values. (p. 1) The problem is that the total quantity demanded is increasing and peak demand for agricultural, municipal, industrial, and recreational uses occurs at the same time of year. Since the supply is limited in any given year, efficient water management requires knowledge of the benefits to the various user groups. The research described in this paper focuses on the user group whose benefits have received relatively little attention in the past. These are the recreational and aesthetic users who own property and live around reservoirs in the Lower Colorado River basin. This study employs a "hedonic" or "implicit" price approach to examine a component of the recreational (and aesthetic) value of two lakes in the "Highland Lakes" chain. The study addresses the implicit recreational and aesthetic (RA) price placed on Lakes Austin and Travis by homeowners living near the lakes. It also examines the relationship between lake management practices and the value of lake front properties.

Lansford, Notie H. Jr.; Jones, Lonnie L.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Drought-Driven Changes in Lake Areas and Their Effects on the Surface Energy Balance of Minnesotas Lake-Dotted Landscape  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Open water within Minnesota constitutes 11 830 km2 and represents a significant proportion of the moisture available on the landscape. Because lakes absorb and store heat in the spring and summer, and release heat in the autumn and winter, they ...

Colin Plank; Bryan Shuman

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Identifying Cost-Effective Residential Energy Efficiency Opportunities for the Kauai Island Utility Cooperative  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

267 267 June 2010 Identifying Cost-Effective Residential Energy Efficiency Opportunities for the Kauai Island Utility Cooperative S. Busche and S. Hockett National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC Contract No. DE-AC36-08-GO28308 Technical Report NREL/TP-7A2-48267 June 2010 Identifying Cost-Effective Residential Energy Efficiency Opportunities for the Kauai Island Utility Cooperative S. Busche and S. Hockett Prepared under Task No. IDHW9170 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government.

80

Identifying Cost-Effective Residential Energy Efficiency Opportunities for the Kauai Island Utility Cooperative  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This analysis is an update to the 2005 Energy Efficiency Potential Study completed by KEMA for the Kauai Island Utility Cooperative (KIUC) and identifies potential energy efficiency opportunities in the residential sector on Kauai (KEMA 2005). The Total Resource Cost (TRC) test is used to determine which of the energy efficiency measures analyzed in the KEMA report are cost effective for KIUC to include in a residential energy efficiency program. This report finds that there remains potential energy efficiency savings that could be cost-effectively incentivized through a utility residential demand-side management program on Kauai if implemented in such a way that the program costs per measure are consistent with the current residential program costs.

Busche, S.; Hockett, S.

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lake utilities effective" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Identifying Cost-Effective Residential Energy Efficiency Opportunities for the Kauai Island Utility Cooperative  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8267 8267 June 2010 Identifying Cost-Effective Residential Energy Efficiency Opportunities for the Kauai Island Utility Cooperative S. Busche and S. Hockett National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC Contract No. DE-AC36-08-GO28308 Technical Report NREL/TP-7A2-48267 June 2010 Identifying Cost-Effective Residential Energy Efficiency Opportunities for the Kauai Island Utility Cooperative S. Busche and S. Hockett Prepared under Task No. IDHW9170 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government.

82

Cavitation Measurements on Silicone Oils by Utilization of a Pumping Effect  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Characteristic types of cavitation in silicone oils of different gas content and viscosities between 3 and 760 cP have been investigated microscopically and by utilization of a cavitation?pumping effect. The transducer was a 20?kHz stepped horn with a center hole 3 mm in diameter. At hydrostatic pressures between 30 and 760 Torr and transducer amplitudes between 0 and 24 ?

Ernest G. Lierke; Heinz Wollny

1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Effects of uranium mining of ground water in Ambrosia Lake area, New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

The principal ore-bearing zone in the Ambrosia Lake area of the Grants uranium district is the Westwater Canyon Member of the Morrison Formation (Jurassic). This unit is also one of the major artesian aquifers in the region. Significant declines in the potentiometric lead within the aquifer have been recorded, although cones of depression do not appear to have spread laterally more than a few miles. Loss of potentiometric head in the Westwater Canyon Member has resulted in the interformational migration of ground water along fault zones from overlying aquifers of Cretaceous age. This migration has produced local deterioration in chemical quality of the ground water.

Kelly, T.E.; Link, R.L.; Schipper, M.R.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Impacts of Water Level Fluctuations on Kokanee Reproduction in Flathead Lake; Effects of Operation of Kerr and Hungry Horse Dam on Reproductive Success, 1983 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Koktneesalmon (Oncorhvnchusnerka), the land-locked form of sockeye salmon, were originally introduced to Flathead Lake in 1916. My 1933, kokanee had become established in the lake and provided a popular summer trolling fishery as well as a fall snagging fishery in shoreline areas. Presently, Flathead Lake supports the second highest fishing pressure of any lake or reservoir in Montana (Montana Department of Fish and Game 1976). During 1981-82, the lake provided 168,792 man-days of fishing pressure. Ninety-two percent of the estimated 536,870 fish caught in Flathead Lake in 1981-82 were kokanee salmon. Kokanee also provided forage for bull trout seasonally and year round for lake trout. Kokanee rear to maturity in Flathead Lake, then return to various total grounds to spawn. Spawning occurred in lake outlet streams, springs, larger rivers and lake shoreline areas in suitable but often limited habitat. Shoreline spawning in Flathead Lake was first documented in the mid-1930's. Spawning kokanee were seized from shoreline areas in 1933 and 21,000 cans were processed and packed for distribution to the needy. Stefanich (1953 and 1954) later documented extensive but an unquantified amount of spawning along the shoreline as well as runs in Whitefish River and McDonald Creek in the 1950's. A creel census conducted in 1962-63 determined 11 to 13 percent of the kokanee caught annually were taken during the spawning period (Robbins 1966). During a 1981-82 creel census, less than one percent of the fishermen on Flathead Lake were snagging kokanee (Graham and Fredenberg 1982). The operation of Kerr Dam, located below Flathead Lake on the Flathead River, has altered seasonal fluctuations of Flathead Lake. Lake levels presently remain high during kokanee spawning in November and decline during the incubation and emergence periods. Groundwater plays an important role in embryo and fry survival in redds of shoreline areas exposed by lake drawdown. Stefanich (1954) and Domrose (1968) found live eggs and fry only in shoreline spawning areas wetted by groundwater seeps. Impacts of the operation of Kerr Dam on lakeshore spawning have not been quantified. Recent studies have revealed that operation of Hungry Horse Dam severely impacted successful kokanee spawning and incubation in the Flathead River above Flathead Lake (Graham et al. 1980, McMullin and Graham 1981, Fraley and Graham 1982 and Fraley and McMullin 1983). Flows from Hungry Horse Dam to enhance kokanee reproduction in the river system have been voluntarily met by the Bureau of Reclamation since 1981. In lakeshore spawning areas in other Pacific Northwest systems, spawning habitat for kokanee and sockeye salmon was characterized by seepage or groundwater flow where suitable substrate composition existed (Foerster 1968). Spawning primarily occurred in shallower depths (<6 m) where gravels were cleaned by wave action (Hassemer and Rieman 1979 and 1980, Stober et al. 1979a). Seasonal drawdown of reservoirs can adversely affect survival of incubating kokanee eggs and fry spawned in shallow shoreline areas. Jeppon (1955 and 1960) and Whitt (1957) estimated 10-75 percent kokanee egg loss in shoreline areas of Pend Oreille Lake, Idaho after regulation of the upper three meters occurred in 1952. After 20 years of operation, Bowler (1979) found Pend Oreille shoreline spawning to occur in fewer areas with generally lower numbers of adults. In studies on Priest Lake, Idaho, Bjornn (1957) attributed frozen eggs and stranded fry to winter fluctuations of the upper three meters of the lake. Eggs and fry frozen during winter drawdown accounted for a 90 percent loss to shoreline spawning kokanee in Donner Lake, California (Kimsey 1951). Stober et al. (1979a) determined irrigation drawdown of Banks Lake, Washington reduced shoreline survival during five of the seven years the system was studied. The goal of this phase of the study was to evaluate and document effects of the operation of Kerr Dam on kokanee shoreline reproduction in Flathead Lake. Specific objectives to meet this goal are: (1) Del

Decker-Hess, Janet; McMullin, Steve L.

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

The effects of regional climate change on space conditioning needs and the energy industry in the Great Lakes region  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To date, studies of the effects of potential climate change on energy use and demand have been done on a macro scale or with coarse model data but, in reality, regional climate change effects will determine the actual behavior of energy users. The output from a 3-year simulation of the coupled NCAR CCM/MM4 regional climate modeling system is used to examine changes in average temperature and temperature variability on a regional scale, the impacts of such change on the need for space conditioning in the Great Lakes region, and the subsequent changes in energy demand. The NCAR modeling system uses general circulation model results to drive a more highly resolved mesoscale model to produce a detailed regional climate. A 3-year run of both base case and doubled CO{sub 2} climate for the United States has been produced. From these results, changes in heating and cooling degree days, and changes in consecutive days above or below various temperature thresholds were calculated. Heating and cooling energy use intensities that are representative of the residential building stock found in the region were used to convert climate data to energy demand. The implications for the energy industry are discussed. The model results indicate that the changed climate under doubled carbon dioxide conditions would have large impacts on energy use, although it is difficult to determine the balance between decreased heating needs and increased cooling needs. It was found that biases present in the temperature output of the modeling system are greater for the Great Lakes region than for the rest of the U.S. and limit the usefulness of the present data set for determining the effects of climate change on energy use in that area.

Fernau, M.E.; Maloney, E.D. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Bates, G.T. [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

86

A Study of the Early Winter Effects of the Great Lakes.I: Comparison of Very Fine Scale Numerical Simulations with Observed Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Development of a framework for study of the Great Lakes' effects on late fall-early winter cyclones andArctic air masses has been initiated. The central theoretical component is a three-dimensional numericalprimitive equations model. The 40-45 km ...

Douglas B. Boudra

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Spirit Lake Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Spirit Lake Wind Farm Spirit Lake Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Spirit Lake Wind Farm Facility Spirit Lake Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Spirit Lake School Developer Minnesota Windpower Energy Purchaser Alliant/IES Utilities Location Spirit Lake IA Coordinates 43.411381°, -95.10075° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.411381,"lon":-95.10075,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

88

White Bear Lake Conservation District (Minnesota) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

White Bear Lake Conservation District (Minnesota) White Bear Lake Conservation District (Minnesota) White Bear Lake Conservation District (Minnesota) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Siting and Permitting This statute establishes the White Bear Lake Conservation District, which

89

Recreational Lake and Water Quality Districts (Iowa) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Recreational Lake and Water Quality Districts (Iowa) Recreational Lake and Water Quality Districts (Iowa) Recreational Lake and Water Quality Districts (Iowa) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Iowa Program Type Environmental Regulations Territory contiguous to a recreational lake may be incorporated into a

90

Lake George Park Commission: Stormwater Management (New York) | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Lake George Park Commission: Stormwater Management (New York) Lake George Park Commission: Stormwater Management (New York) Lake George Park Commission: Stormwater Management (New York) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State New York Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Lake George Park Commission

91

Natural Lakes: Drainage: Diversion: Application (Nebraska) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Lakes: Drainage: Diversion: Application (Nebraska) Lakes: Drainage: Diversion: Application (Nebraska) Natural Lakes: Drainage: Diversion: Application (Nebraska) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Nebraska Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Natural Resources This section provides limitations on water withdrawals and diversions from natural lakes. Any such activity requires a permit from the Department of Natural Resources

92

Diacylglycerol Oil, 2nd Edition Chapter 5 The Effect of Diacylglycerols on Energy Expenditure and Substrate Utilization in Humans  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Diacylglycerol Oil, 2nd Edition Chapter 5 The Effect of Diacylglycerols on Energy Expenditure and Substrate Utilization in Humans Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Bioc

93

Mesoscale Boundary Layer and Heat Flux Variations over Pack IceCovered Lake Erie  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The development of extensive pack ice fields on the Great Lakes significantly influences lake-effect storms and local airmass modification, as well as the regional hydrologic cycle and lake water levels. The evolution of the ice fields and their ...

Mathieu R. Gerbush; David A. R. Kristovich; Neil F. Laird

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Star Lakes and Rivers (Minnesota) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Star Lakes and Rivers (Minnesota) Star Lakes and Rivers (Minnesota) Star Lakes and Rivers (Minnesota) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Siting and Permitting An association organized for the purpose of addressing issues on a specific lake or river, a lake improvement district, or a lake conservation district

95

WHAT GOOD IS WEALTH WITHOUT HEALTH? THE EFFECT OF HEALTH ON THE MARGINAL UTILITY OF CONSUMPTION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We estimate how the marginal utility of consumption varies with health. To do so, we develop a simple model in which the impact of health on the marginal utility of consumption can be estimated from data on permanent income, ...

Finkelstein, Amy

96

Lake Ecology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lake Ecology Lake Ecology Name: Jody Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: We have a partically natural/ partially man-dug lake in our back yard. It is approximately 3 acres in size. The fish in this tiny like are plentiful and HUGE :) Bass up to 20" s (so far) and blue gill up to 10"s (so far). My question is this... we appear to have a heavy goose population and I was wondering if they are the cause of the green slimmy stuff that is all over the top of the water as well as the lighter green slime on the plants growing under the water? Are the fish being harmed by waste from the geese and if so, what can I put in the water to ensure their health? Additionally, I noticed hundreds of frogs during the mating period yet I've yet to see even one tad pole and I am at the lake atleast 5 out of the 7 days in a week. Is there a reason for this. The frogs are two toned.. light green with patches of darker shades of green on the head and body. I've never seen frogs like these before but then again, I've never lived in wet lands prior. The frogs are also very agressive... tend to attack fishing line and even leap up to 4' in the air to attack a fishing rod. Thank heavens they don't have teeth! . We do not keep the fish we catch, we always release.

97

The Lake Trout  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Conservation THE LAKE TROUT Until thirty years ago, the Lake Trout was the choice food fish as well as the most highly prized game fish in the Great Lakes. Before that time,...

98

An analysis of the hydrologic effects of proposed test drilling in the Winema National Forest near Crater Lake, Oregon  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the results of a preliminary study on the hydrologic regime underlying the Crater Lake Caldera, Oregon. The study was performed to provide a basis for evaluating the potential for polluting Crater Lake by drilling exploratory boreholes on the flanks of the mountain. A simple conceptual model of the hydrologic regime was developed by synthesizing the data from the region surrounding the Caldera. Based on the conceptual model, a series of numerical simulations aimed at establishing the basic groundwater flow patterns under and surrounding the lake were performed. In addition to the numerical simulations, we used simple volumetric techniques for estimating the distance that drilling mud would migrate away from the borehole if drilling proceeded without drilling fluid returns. Based on our calculations that show the regional flow of groundwater will oppose the flow of drilling mud toward the lake, and based on our volumetric estimate of drilling mud migration, our study concludes that drilling without returns will not pollute Crater Lake, nor will it affect the hydrologic regime in the immediate vicinity of the Crater Lake Caldera.

Sammel, E.A.; Benson, S.

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

The effects of Title IV of the Clean Air Act amendments of 1990 on electric utilities: An update  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents data and analyses related to Phase I implementation of the Clean Air Act Amendment by electric utilities. It describes the strategies used to comply with the Acid Rain Program in 1995, the effect of compliance on sulfur dioxide emissions levels, the cost of compliance, and the effects of the program on coal supply and demand. The first year of Phase I demonstrated that the market-based sulfur dioxide emissions control system could achieve significant reductions in emissions at lower than expected costs. Some utilities reduced aggregate emissions below legal requirements due to economic incentives; other utilities purchased additional allowances to avoid noncompliance. More than half of the utilities switched to or blended with lower sulfur coal, due to price reductions in the coal market which were partially due to the allowance trading program. 21 figs., 20 tabs.

NONE

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Effects of Title IV of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 on Electric Utilities: An Update, The  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Describes the strategies used to comply with the Acid Rain Program in 1995, the effect of compliance on SO2 emissions levels, the cost of compliance, and the effects of the program on coal supply and demand. It updates and expands the EIA report, Electric Utility Phase I Acid Rain Compliance Strategies for the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990.

Information Center

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lake utilities effective" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

NAWS-China Lake Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

g g y g y S S C C NAWS NAWS - - China Lake China Lake Working with the Local Utility Working with the Local Utility Mark Shvartzman Mark Shvartzman Project Manager, Southern California Edison Project Manager, Southern California Edison Presented at the November FUPWG Meeting Presented at the November FUPWG Meeting November 18, 2009 November 18, 2009 1 1 g E t bli h d i 1998 d Ad i Fili 1358 E History of SCE's UESC Program History of SCE's UESC Program History of SCE s UESC Program History of SCE s UESC Program * Background - Edison developed Energy Related Services (ERS) to assist Federal customers in identifying and implementing energy efficiency and renewable energy projects at government owned and/or managed facilities within Southern California Edison service territory - Established in 1998 under Advice Filing 1358-E

102

Source Characterization and Temporal Variation of Methane Seepage from Thermokarst Lakes on the Alaska North Slope in Response to Arctic Climate Change  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goals of this research were to characterize the source, magnitude and temporal variability of methane seepage from thermokarst lakes (TKL) within the Alaska North Slope gas hydrate province, assess the vulnerability of these areas to ongoing and future arctic climate change and determine if gas hydrate dissociation resulting from permafrost melting is contributing to the current lake emissions. Analyses were focused on four main lake locations referred to in this report: Lake Qalluuraq (referred to as Lake Q) and Lake Teshekpuk (both on Alaska?s North Slope) and Lake Killarney and Goldstream Bill Lake (both in Alaska?s interior). From analyses of gases coming from lakes in Alaska, we showed that ecological seeps are common in Alaska and they account for a larger source of atmospheric methane today than geologic subcap seeps. Emissions from the geologic source could increase with potential implications for climate warming feedbacks. Our analyses of TKL sites showing gas ebullition were complemented with geophysical surveys, providing important insight about the distribution of shallow gas in the sediments and the lake bottom manifestation of seepage (e.g., pockmarks). In Lake Q, Chirp data were limited in their capacity to image deeper sediments and did not capture the thaw bulb. The failure to capture the thaw bulb at Lake Q may in part be related to the fact that the present day lake is a remnant of an older, larger, and now-partially drained lake. These suggestions are consistent with our analyses of a dated core of sediment from the lake that shows that a wetland has been present at the site of Lake Q since approximately 12,000 thousand years ago. Chemical analyses of the core indicate that the availability of methane at the site has changed during the past and is correlated with past environmental changes (i.e. temperature and hydrology) in the Arctic. Discovery of methane seeps in Lake Teshekpuk in the northernmost part of the lake during 2009 reconnaissance surveys provided a strong impetus to visit this area in 2010. The seismic methods applied in Lake Teshekpuk were able to image pockmarks, widespread shallow gas in the sediments, and the relationship among different sediment packages on the lake?s bottom, but even boomer seismics did not detect permafrost beneath the northern part of the lake. By characterizing the biogeochemistry of shallow TKL with methane seeps we showed that the radical seasonal shifts in ice cover and temperature. These seasonal environmental differences result in distinct consumption and production processes of biologically-relevant compounds. The combined effects of temperature, ice-volume and other lithological factors linked to seepage from the lake are manifest in the distribution of sedimentary methane in Lake Q during icecovered and ice-free conditions. The biogeochemistry results illustrated very active methanotrophy in TKLs. Substantial effort was subsequently made to characterize the nature of methanotrophic communities in TKLs. We applied stable isotope probing approaches to genetically characterize the methanotrophs most active in utilizing methane in TKLs. Our study is the first to identify methane oxidizing organisms active in arctic TKLs, and revealing that type I methanotrophs and type II methanotrophs are abundant and active in assimilating methane in TKLs. These organisms play an important role in limiting the flux of methane from these sites. Our investigations indicate that as temperatures increase in the Arctic, oxidation rates and active methanotrophic populations will also shift. Whether these changes can offset predicted increases in methanogenesis is an important question underlying models of future methane flux and resultant climate change. Overall our findings indicate that TKLs and their ability to act as both source and sink of methane are exceedingly sensitive to environmental change.

None

2012-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

103

Lakes and Rivers Improvement Act (Ontario, Canada) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Lakes and Rivers Improvement Act (Ontario, Canada) Lakes and Rivers Improvement Act (Ontario, Canada) Lakes and Rivers Improvement Act (Ontario, Canada) < Back Eligibility Construction Developer Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Utility Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Home Weatherization Program Info State Ontario Program Type Environmental Regulations Safety and Operational Guidelines Siting and Permitting Provider Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources The Lakes and Rivers Improvement Act proscribes the management, protection, preservation and use of the waters of the lakes and rivers of Ontario and the land under them. The Act also details regulations for the protection of persons and property by ensuring that dams are suitably located, constructed, operated and maintained and are of an appropriate nature. The

104

Cost-effective applications of photovoltaics for electric utilities: An overview  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Cost targets for the large-scale entry of photovoltaic (PV) systems keep moving, subject to the vagaries of global oil prices and the economic health of the world. Over the last four decades since a practical PV device was announced, costs have come down by a factor of 20 or more and this downward trend is expected to continue, albeit at a slower pace. Simultaneously, conversion efficiencies have nearly tripled. There are many applications today for which PV is cost-effective. In recognition of this, utility interest in PV is increasing and this is manifested by projects such as PVUSA and Central and South West`s renewable resource development effort. While no major technical barriers for the entry of PV systems have been uncovered, several key issues such as power quality, system reliability, ramp rates, spinning reserve requirements, and misoperation of protection schemes will have to be dealt with as the penetration of this technology increases. PV is still in the evolutionary phase and is expected to grow for several decades to come. Fueled by environmental considerations, interest in PV is showing a healthy rise both in the minds of the public and in the planning realms of the electric power community. In recognition of this, the Energy Development Subcommittee of the IEEE Energy Development and Power Generation Committee organized a Panel Session on photovoltaics applications at the 1993 International Joint Power Generation Conference held in Kansas City, Missouri. Summaries of the four presentations are assembled here for the benefit of the readers of this Review.

Bigger, J.E. [Electric Power Research Inst., Palo Alto, CA (United States)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

105

Lakes_Elec_You  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Lakes, Lakes, Electricity & You Why It's So Important That Lakes Are Used To Generate Electricity Why We Can Thank Our Lakes For Electricity Because lakes were made to generate electricity. Back in the mid-1940s, Congress recognized the need for better flood control and navigation. To pay for these services, Congress passed laws that started the building of federal hydroelectric dams, and sold the power from the dams under long-term contracts. Today these dams provide efficient, environmentally safe electricity for our cities and rural areas. And now these beautiful lakes are ours to enjoy. There are now 22 major man-made lakes all across the Southeast built under these federal programs and managed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers - lakes that help prevent flooding and harness the renewable power of water to generate electricity. Power produced at these lakes is marketed by the Elberton,

106

CA-TRIBE-BLUE LAKE RANCHERIA  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CA-TRIBE-BLUE LAKE RANCHERIA CA-TRIBE-BLUE LAKE RANCHERIA Location: Tribe CA-TRIBE-BLUE CA LAKE RANCHERIA American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Proposed Action or Project Description The Blue Lake Rancheria Tribe of California proposes to hire a technical consultant to gather additional information and make recommendations as to the best energy efficiency and conservation project or projects to utilize energy efficiency and conservation block grant funds. Following these recommendations, a decision will be made on building retrofits, and the specific retrofits will be identified and submitted for NEPA review. Conditions: None Categorical Exclusion(s) Applied: A9, A11 *-For the complete DOE National Environmental Policy Act regulations regarding categorical exclusions, see Subpart D of 10 CFR10 21

107

Cogeneration - A Utility Perspective  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cogeneration has become an extremely popular subject when discussing conservation and energy saving techniques. One of the key factors which effect conservation is the utility viewpoint on PURPA and cogeneration rule making. These topics are discussed from a utility perspective as how they influence utility participation in future projects. The avoided cost methodology is examined, and these payments for sale of energy to the utility are compared with utility industrial rates. In addition to utilities and industry, third party owner/operation is also a viable option to cogeneration. These options are also discussed as to their impact on the utility and the potential of these ownership arrangements.

Williams, M.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Criteria for determining the effectiveness of utility-initiated energy assistance  

SciTech Connect

The affordability of electricity and natural gas to all households requires some form of energy assistance, funded by utilities and their customers. Good regulation demands that EA initiatives have favorable benefit-cost ratios. Regulators should strive to assure that each dollar expended returns the highest possible dividend and that EA initiatives do not seriously impede other regulatory objectives. (author)

Costello, Ken

2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

109

VERTEBRATES OF FISH LAKE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

VERTEBRATES OF FISH LAKE CAUTION! FISH LAKE SCAVANGER HUNT RED HEADED in large dead trees. Males and females both have the majestic red head the mound. Damselflies sit with their wings folded down, which differs them

Minnesota, University of

110

The effects of ergonomic stressors on process tool maintenance and utilization  

SciTech Connect

This study examines ergonomic stressors associated with front-end process tool maintenance, relates them to decreased machine utilization, and proposes solution strategies to reduce their negative impact on productivity. Member company ergonomists observed technicians performing field maintenance tasks on seven different bottleneck tools and recorded ergonomic stressors using SEMaCheck, a graphics-based, integrated checklist developed by Sandia National Laboratories. The top ten stressors were prioritized according to a cost formula that accounted for difficulty, time, and potential errors. Estimates of additional time on a task caused by ergonomic stressors demonstrated that machine utilization could be increased from 6% to 25%. Optimal solution strategies were formulated based on redesign budget, stressor cost, and estimates of solution costs and benefits

Miller, D.

1998-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

111

Great Lakes Energy - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Great Lakes Energy - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Great Lakes Energy - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Great Lakes Energy - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heat Pumps Program Info State Michigan Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Air-Source Heat Pumps: $250 Geothermal Heat Pumps: $500 Provider Great Lakes Energy Great Lakes Energy offers rebates to residential customers for the purchase of efficiency air-source heat pumps or geothermal heat pumps. A rebate of $250 is available for air-source heat pumps, and a $500 rebate is available for geothermal heat pumps. View the program website listed above to view program and efficiency specifics. A variety of rebates may also be available to Great Lake Energy residential

112

Public Utility Commission Regulation and Cost-Effectiveness of Title IV: Lessons for CAIR  

SciTech Connect

There is growing evidence that the cost savings potential of the Title IV SO{sub 2} cap-and-trade program is not being reached. PUC regulatory treatment of compliance options appears to provide one explanation for this finding. That suggests that PUCs and utility companies should work together to develop incentive plans that will encourage cost-minimizing behavior for compliance with the EPA's recently issued Clean Air Interstate Rule.

Sotkiewicz, Paul M.; Holt, Lynne

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Lakes, Electricity and You | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Lakes, Electricity and You Lakes, Electricity and You Why It's So Important That Lakes Are Used To Generate Electricity Lakes, Electricity and You More Documents & Publications A...

114

Impacts of Western Area Power Administration`s power marketing alternatives on electric utility systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This technical memorandum estimates the effects of alternative contractual commitments that may be initiated by the Western Area Power Administration`s Salt Lake City Area Office. It also studies hydropower operational restrictions at the Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects in combination with these alternatives. Power marketing and hydropower operational effects are estimated in support of Western`s Electric Power Marketing Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). Electricity production and capacity expansion for utility systems that will be directly affected by alternatives specified in the EIS are simulated. Cost estimates are presented by utility type and for various activities such as capacity expansion, generation, long-term firm purchases and sales, fixed operation and maintenance expenses, and spot market activities. Operational changes at hydropower facilities are also investigated.

Veselka, T.D.; Portante, E.C.; Koritarov, V. [and others

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Effects of ethanol, heat, and lipid treatment of soybean meal on nitrogen utilization by ruminants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ruminant nitrogen utilization of soybean meal treated with (1) 70% ethanol at 23 or 78/sup 0/C, (2) 10% coconut oil or tallow, or (3) a combination of 70% ethanol at 78/sup 0/C and coconut oil or tallow was evaluated. Nitrogen solubility was lowest for soybean meal treated with ethanol at 78/sup 0/C, ethanol plus coconut oil and ethanol plus tallow. In situ nitrogen disappearance was lowest for soybean meal treated with ethanol at 78/sup 0/C, ethanol plus coconut oil, and ethanol plus tallow. Rates of nitrogen disappearance between 3 and 12 h were lowest for soybean meal treated with ethanol at 78/sup 0/C, ethanol plus coconut oil, and ethanol plus tallow. Nitrogen retained by lambs was greater for lambs fed soybean meal treated with ethanol at 78/sup 0/C than for those fed untreated soybean meal. Ruminal ammonia 4 h post feeding was lowest for lambs fed soybean meal treated with ethanol at 78/sup 0/C, ethanol plus coconut oil, and coconut oil. These data indicate that the 78/sup 0/C ethanol treatment improved nitrogen utilization.

Lynch, G.L.; Berger, L.L.; Fahey, G.C. Jr.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Evaluation of a Cooling Lake Fishery, Volume 3: Fish Population Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Surveys were conducted in Lake Sangchris, a cooling lake, and Lake Shelbyville, a nearby flood control reservoir, to compare the size and composition of the fish populations and to determine the effects, if any, of the thermal discharge from the power plant on the fish community. Quantitative samples of fishes were collected (by electrofishing, gillnetting, and seining) bimonthly from Lake Sangchris and quarterly from Lake Shelbyville. Preferred temperatures and movements of fishes were studied by radiot...

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Beyond the Price Effect in Time-of-Use Programs: Results from a Municipal Utility Pilot, 2007-2008  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a number of utilities offered rates on an experimental basisMany utilities offer other seasonal rates, of course, whichinvestor-owned utilities (IOUs) offer TOU rates to their

Lutzenhiser, Susan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Lake Region Electric Cooperative | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cooperative Cooperative (Redirected from Lake Region Coop Elec Assn) Jump to: navigation, search Name Lake Region Electric Cooperative Place Minnesota Utility Id 10618 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png 2013 Residential and Farm Rates Residential Interruptible Heating(Domestic Use) Interruptible Heating(Non-Domestic Use) Residential Irrigation Rate Commercial Large Commercial Commercial Offpeak Storage Residential Simultaneous Purchase and Sale Small Commercial Commercial

119

Tire Development for Effective Transportation and Utilization of Used Tires, CRADA 01-N044, Final Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Scrap tires represent a significant disposal and recycling challenge for the United States. Over 280 million tires are generated on an annual basis, and several states have large stockpiles or abandoned tire piles that are slated for remediation. While most states have programs to address the accumulation and generation of scrap tires, most of these states struggle with creating and sustaining recycling or beneficial end use markets. One of the major issues with market development has been the costs associated with transporting and processing the tires into material for recycling or disposal. According to a report by the Rubber Manufactures Association tire-derived fuel (TDF) represents the largest market for scrap tires, and approximately 115 million tires were consumed in 2001 as TDF (U.S. Scrap Tire Markets, 2001, December 2002, www.rma.org/scraptires). This market is supported primarily by cement kilns, followed by various industries including companies that operate utility and industrial boilers. However the use of TDF has not increased and the amount of TDF used by boiler operators has declined. The work completed through this cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA) has shown the potential of a mobile tire shredding unit to economically produce TDF and to provide an alterative low cost fuel to suitable coal-fired power systems. This novel system addresses the economic barriers by processing the tires at the retailer, thereby eliminating the costs associated with hauling whole tires. The equipment incorporated into the design allow for small 1-inch chunks of TDF to be produced in a timely fashion. The TDF can then be co-fired with coal in suitable combustion systems, such as a fluidized bed. Proper use of TDF has been shown to boost efficiency and reduce emissions from power generation systems, which is beneficial to coal utilization in existing power plants. Since the original scope of work outlined in the CRADA could not be completed because of lack of progress by the CRADA members, the agreement was not extended beyond February 2004. The work completed included the detailed design of the mobile unit, a general economic analysis of the operating the system, and outreach activities.

Susan M. Maley

2004-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

120

Effective Grid Utilization: A Technical Assessment and Application Guide; April 2011 - September 2012  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In order to more fully integrate renewable resources, such as wind and solar, into the transmission system, additional capacity must be realized in the short term using the installed transmission capacity that exists today. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory Transmission and Grid Integration Group supported this study to assemble the history of regulations and status of transmission technology to expand existing grid capacity. This report compiles data on various transmission technology methods and upgrades for increased capacity utilization of the existing transmission system and transmission corridors. The report discusses the technical merit of each method and explains how the method could be applied within the current regulatory structure to increase existing transmission conductor and/or corridor capacity. The history and current state of alternatives to new construction is presented for regulators, legislators, and other policy makers wrestling with issues surrounding integration of variable generation. Current regulations are assessed for opportunities to change them to promote grid expansion. To support consideration of these alternatives for expanding grid capacity, the report lists relevant rules, standards, and policy changes.

Balser, S.; Sankar, S.; Miller, R.; Rawlins, A.; Israel, M.; Curry, T.; Mason, T.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lake utilities effective" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

The state of energy storage in electric utility systems and its effect on renewable energy resources  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the state of the art of electric energy storage technologies and discusses how adding intermittent renewable energy technologies (IRETs) to a utility network affects the benefits from storage dispatch. Load leveling was the mode of storage dispatch examined in the study. However, the report recommended that other modes be examined in the future for kilowatt and kilowatt-hour optimization of storage. The motivation to install storage with IRET generation can arise from two considerations: reliability and enhancement of the value of energy. Because adding storage increases cost, reliability-related storage is attractive only if the accruing benefits exceed the cost of storage installation. The study revealed that the operation of storage should not be guided by the output of the IRET but rather by system marginal costs. Consequently, in planning studies to quantify benefits, storage should not be considered as an entity belonging to the system and not as a component of IRETS. The study also indicted that because the infusion of IRET energy tends to reduce system marginal cost, the benefits from load leveling (value of energy) would be reduced. However, if a system has storage, particularly if the storage is underutilized, its dispatch can be reoriented to enhance the benefits of IRET integration.

Rau, N.S.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Assessment of effectiveness of geologic isolation systems. CIRMIS data system. Volume 4. Driller's logs, stratigraphic cross section and utility routines  

SciTech Connect

The Assessment of Effectiveness of Geologic Isolation Systems (AEGIS) Program is developing and applying the methodology for assessing the far-field, long-term post-closure safety of deep geologic nuclear waste repositories. AEGIS is being performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) under contract with the Office of Nuclear Waste Isolation (ONWI) for the Department of Energy (DOE). One task within AEGIS is the development of methodology for analysis of the consequences (water pathway) from loss of repository containment as defined by various release scenarios. Analysis of the long-term, far-field consequences of release scenarios requires the application of numerical codes which simulate the hydrologic systems, model the transport of released radionuclides through the hydrologic systems to the biosphere, and, where applicable, assess the radiological dose to humans. The various input parameters required in the analysis are compiled in data systems. The data are organized and prepared by various input subroutines for use by the hydrologic and transport codes. The hydrologic models simulate the groundwater flow systems and provide water flow directions, rates, and velocities as inputs to the transport models. Outputs from the transport models are basically graphs of radionuclide concentration in the groundwater plotted against time. After dilution in the receiving surface-water body (e.g., lake, river, bay), these data are the input source terms for the dose models, if dose assessments are required. The dose models calculate radiation dose to individuals and populations. CIRMIS (Comprehensive Information Retrieval and Model Input Sequence) Data System is a storage and retrieval system for model input and output data, including graphical interpretation and display. This is the fourth of four volumes of the description of the CIRMIS Data System.

Friedrichs, D.R.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

NSLS Utilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Utilities Utilities The Utilities Group, led by project engineer Ron Beauman, is responsible for providing Utilities Engineering and Technical services to NSLS, Users, and SDL including cooling water at controlled flow rates, pressures, and temperatures, compressed air and other gases. In addition, they provide HVAC engineering, technical, and electrical services as needed. Utilities systems include cooling and process water, gas, and compressed air systems. These systems are essential to NSLS operations. Working behind the scenes, the Utilities group continuously performs preventative maintenance to ensure that the NSLS has minimal downtime. This is quite a feat, considering that the Utilities group has to maintain seven very large and independent systems that extent throughout NSLS. Part of the group's

124

Geological History of Lake Lahontan, a Quaternary Lake of Northwestern...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Monograph M11 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet link for Geological History of Lake Lahontan, a Quaternary Lake of Northwestern...

125

Effects of voltage control in utility interactive dispersed storage and generation systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

When a small generator is connected to the distribution system, the voltage at the point of interconnection is determined largely by the system and not the generator. This report examines the effect on the generator, on the load voltage and on the distribution system of a number of different voltage control strategies in the generator. Synchronous generators with three kinds of exciter control are considered, as well as induction generators and dc/ac inverters, with and without capacitor compensation. The effect of varying input power during operation (which may be experienced by generators based on renewable resources) is explored, as well as the effect of connecting and disconnecting the generator at ten percent of its rated power.

Kirkham, H.; Das, R.

1983-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

126

Lake Minnetonka Conservation District (Minnesota) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Minnetonka Conservation District (Minnesota) Minnetonka Conservation District (Minnesota) Lake Minnetonka Conservation District (Minnesota) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Siting and Permitting This statute establishes the Lake Minnetonka Conservation District, which

127

Lake Region Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Lake Region Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency Lake Region Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Lake Region Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Maximum Rebate Limit one rebate per appliance Geothermal Heat Pumps: 20 tons Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Refrigerator: $75 with recycling of old unit Freezer: $75 with recycling of old unit Ductless Air-Source Heat Pump: $300 Air-Source Heat Pump: $330 - $630 Central AC: $50 - $200 Geothermal Heat Pump: $100 - $400/ton CFLs: Free Recycling Provider Lake Region Electric Cooperative Lake Region Electric Cooperative (LREC) offers a variety of rebates for

128

Lake Granbury and Lake Whitney Assessment Initiative Final Scientific/Technical Report Summary  

SciTech Connect

A team of Texas AgriLife Research, Baylor University and University of Texas at Arlington researchers studied the biology and ecology of Prymnesium parvum (golden algae) in Texas lakes using a three-fold approach that involved system-wide monitoring, experimentation at the microcosm and mesocosm scales, and mathematical modeling. The following are conclusions, to date, regarding this organism??s ecology and potential strategies for mitigation of blooms by this organism. In-lake monitoring revealed that golden algae are present throughout the year, even in lakes where blooms do not occur. Compilation of our field monitoring data with data collected by Texas Parks and Wildlife and Brazos River Authority (a period spanning a decade) revealed that inflow and salinity variables affect bloom formations. Thresholds for algae populations vary per lake, likely due to adaptations to local conditions, and also to variations in lake-basin morphometry, especially the presence of coves that may serve as hydraulic storage zones for P. parvum populations. More specifically, our in-lake monitoring showed that the highly toxic bloom that occurred in Lake Granbury in the winter of 2006/2007 was eliminated by increased river inflow events. The bloom was flushed from the system. The lower salinities that resulted contributed to golden algae not blooming in the following years. However, flushing is not an absolute requirement for bloom termination. Laboratory experiments have shown that growth of golden algae can occur at salinities ~1-2 psu but only when temperatures are also low. This helps to explain why blooms are possible during winter months in Texas lakes. Our in-lake experiments in Lake Whitney and Lake Waco, as well as our laboratory experiments, revealed that cyanobacteria, or some other bacteria capable of producing algicides, were able to prevent golden algae from blooming. Identification of this organism is a high priority as it may be a key to managing golden algae blooms. Our numerical modeling results support the idea that cyanobacteria, through allelopathy, control the timing of golden algae blooms in Lake Granbury. The in-lake experiments in Lake Whitney and Lake Waco also revealed that as golden algae blooms develop, there are natural enemies (a species of rotifer, and a virus) that help slow the population growth. Again, better characterization of these organisms is a high priority as it may be key to managing golden algae blooms. Our laboratory and in-lake experiments and field monitoring have shown that nutrient additions will remove toxicity and prevent golden algae from blooming. In fact, other algae displace the golden algae after nutrient additions. Additions of ammonia are particularly effective, even at low doses (much lower than what is employed in fish hatchery ponds). Application of ammonia in limited areas of lakes, such as in coves, should be explored as a management option. The laboratory experiments and field monitoring also show that the potency of toxins produced by P. parvum is greatly reduced when water pH is lower, closer to neutral levels. Application of mild acid to limited areas of lakes (but not to a level where acidic conditions are created), such as in coves, should be explored as a management option. Finally, our field monitoring and mathematical modeling revealed that flushing/dilution at high enough levels could prevent P. parvum from forming blooms and/or terminate existing blooms. This technique could work using deeper waters within a lake to flush the surface waters of limited areas of the same lakes, such as in coves and should be explored as a management option. In this way, water releases from upstream reservoirs would not be necessary and there would be no addition of nutrients in the lake.

Harris, B.L.; Roelke, Daniel; Brooks, Bryan; Grover, James

2010-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

129

Industrial Utilization of Surfactants: Principles & PracticeCh 4 Chemical Structure and Microenvironmental Effects on Surfactant Fundamental Properties/Related Performance Properties  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Industrial Utilization of Surfactants: Principles & Practice Ch 4 Chemical Structure and Microenvironmental Effects on Surfactant Fundamental Properties/Related Performance Properties Surfactants and Detergents eChapters Surfactants - Dete

130

Sandia Lake Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sandia Lake Facility Sandia Lake Facility Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Sandia Lake Facility Overseeing Organization Sandia National Laboratories Hydrodynamics Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Wave Basin Length(m) 57.3 Beam(m) 36.6 Depth(m) 15.2 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) $5000-15000 Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities Yes Maximum Velocity(m/s) 15.2 Length of Effective Tow(m) 45.7 Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.9 Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) 3.0 Maximum Wave Length(m) 4.57 Wave Period Range(s) 3.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Wavemaking Description Values listed are for a conceptual design yet to be implemented for the Sandia Lake facility.

131

Mesoscale Frequencies and Seasonal Snowfalls for Different Types of Lake Michigan Snow Storms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Members of the Cloud Physics Laboratory, University of Chicago, have identified three different mesoscale organization patterns of lake-effect snow storms over Lake Michigan: multiple wind-parallel bands, single midlake bands, and single ...

Robert D. Kelly

1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Observational Study of a Convective Internal Boundary Layer over Lake Michigan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using aircraft data collected during the University of Chicago Lake-Effect Snow Storm project, the results of a case study of the convective thermal internal boundary layer (TIBL) over Lake Michigan are presented. An intense cold air outbreak on ...

Sam S. Chang; Roscoe R. Braham Jr.

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Control System Design for Effective Energy Utilization...A Case Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper describes the activities and results of a typical plant powerhouse energy management survey. The powerhouse provides electrical energy, steam supply at two different pressure levels, and compressed air for the process plant. The owners had already performed energy loss surveys and implemented maintenance and energy management programs. The activities described include a follow-up survey and a concentration on the improvement of the boiler operations and efficiencies. The Input-Output and Heat Loss methods of determining boiler efficiency, in accordance with ANSI & ASME PTC4.1, are explained. A comparison of the methods, including a sensitivity analysis, shows the effects of measurement inaccuracies on each. Each boiler is studied and the required measurements identified and described. The importance of flue gas oxygen measurements is described along with the variations in readings obtained using dry or wet basis measurements. The existing operating efficiency of each boiler is determined and the effects of improved controls identified. The considerations for Security, Reliability, Maintainability, and Efficiency Improvement required by any control system are described. A control strategy is selected and hardware chosen to implement the improved boiler and overall steam generation performance. Focus is shifted from the single boiler problem to the requirements for optimal loading of each boiler to meet total system load requirements. The economics of multiple boiler loading is discussed with the introduction of the Cost Function. This permits direct comparison of boilers even when using different fuels of varying costs. Provisions are included for operator limits of each boiler. These limits are required to permit identification of maximum boiler steaming rates or to provide hot standby (spinning) reserves. Minimum limitations on boiler loading such as burner turn-down are also recognized. In addition, the amount of boiler bias or offset can be limited on a per boiler basis. Lastly. a comparison is made between the powerhouse operation initially, following installation of improved controls. and finally when optimal boiler loading is implemented.

Dziubakowski, D. J.; Keyes, M. A., IV

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

The Behavior of Lakes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Behavior of Lakes Behavior of Lakes Nature Bulletin No, 320-A November 9, 1968 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Richard B. Ogilvie, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation THE BEHAVIOR OF LAKES In many ways lakes are like living things -- especially a tree. A lake breathes and has a circulation; it is warmed and fed; it harbors many other living things; and in cold weather it goes into a winter sleep. If it were not for the special character of a body of standing water which we call a lake, the things that live in it would be radically different or, perhaps, not exist at all. Water is a very strange substance in many ways. For example, it is remarkable because it expands, becomes lighter and floats when it freezes into ice. If, like most substances, water shrank when it changed from a liquid to a solid, it would sink. Then, ponds and lakes would freeze from the bottom up and become solid blocks of ice. This would make life impossible for most kinds of aquatic plants and animals and indirectly affect all living things. Further, water is a poor conductor of heat -- otherwise lakes would freeze much deeper and, again most living things in it would perish.

135

Industrial - Utility Cogeneration Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cogeneration may be described as an efficient method for the production of electric power in conjunction with process steam or heat which optimizes the energy supplied as fuel to maximize the energy produced for consumption. In a conventional electric utility power plant, considerable energy is wasted in the form of heat rejection to the atmosphere thru cooling towers, ponds or lakes, or to rivers. In a cogeneration system heat rejection can be minimized by systems which apply the otherwise wasted energy to process systems requiring energy in the form of steam or heat. Texas has a base load of some 75 million pounds per hour of process steam usage, of which a considerable portion could be generated through cogeneration methods. The objective of this paper is to describe the various aspects of cogeneration in a manner which will illustrate the energy saving potential available utilizing proven technology. This paper illustrates the technical and economical benefits of cogeneration in addition to demonstrating the fuel savings per unit of energy required. Specific examples show the feasibility and desirability of cogeneration systems for utility and industrial cases. Consideration of utility-industrial systems as well as industrial-industrial systems will be described in technical arrangement as well as including a discussion of financial approaches and ownership arrangements available to the parties involved. There is a considerable impetus developing for the utilization of coal as the energy source for the production of steam and electricity. In many cases, because of economics and site problems, the central cogeneration facility will be the best alternative for many users.

Harkins, H. L.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Geological History of Lake Lahontan, a Quaternary Lake of Northwestern  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

History of Lake Lahontan, a Quaternary Lake of Northwestern History of Lake Lahontan, a Quaternary Lake of Northwestern Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Geological History of Lake Lahontan, a Quaternary Lake of Northwestern Nevada Abstract Abstract unavailable. Author Israel C. Russell Organization U.S. Geological Survey Published U.S. Government Printing Office, 1885 Report Number Monograph M11 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Geological History of Lake Lahontan, a Quaternary Lake of Northwestern Nevada Citation Israel C. Russell (U.S. Geological Survey). 1885. Geological History of Lake Lahontan, a Quaternary Lake of Northwestern Nevada. Washington, District of Columbia: U.S. Government Printing Office. Report No.:

137

Alturas Lake Creek Flow Augmentation, 1986 Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Two alternatives were outlined in the first statement of work as possibilities for flow augmentation in Alturas Lake Creek. The alternatives were to raise the level of Alturas Lake and to acquire necessary water rights in Alturas Lake Creek. The first alternative considered in the study was raising the water level at Alturas Lake with a low head dam. Raising Alturas Lake, appeared feasible in that it provided the necessary fish flows in Alturas Lake Creek. However, raising the level of Alturas Lake has adverse effects to other resources and forced pursuing the second alternative as defined in this report. Some of these effects included: flooding Smokey Bear boat ramp, inundation of recreation beaches for extended periods, flooding of the campground and some of the road system, potentially contaminating the quality of lake water from flooded toilet vaults, and destroying the conifer canopy around the lake. Maintenance and operation costs of the dam, along with the need to have a watermaster to distribute flows over the course of the irrigation season, raised additional concerns that detracted from this alternative. The second alternative considered was the acquisition of water rights. This led to an appraisal of the water right values which was completed by BPA with a comparison appraisal done by the Forest Service.

Andrews, John; Lloyd, John; Webster, Bert (Sawtooth National Forest, Twin Falls, ID)

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Moose Lake Water & Light Comm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lake Water & Light Comm Lake Water & Light Comm Jump to: navigation, search Name Moose Lake Water & Light Comm Place Minnesota Utility Id 12897 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes ISO MISO Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png 2-250HPS-FRO Lighting 250 HPS ELEOLY Lighting 3-250 HPS Lighting 4-250 HPS Lighting 400 HPS Rent Lighting BEST OIL CO Commercial BIKE TRAIL Commercial CIP Commercial Commercial Demand Commercial Commercial Electricity Commercial Demand 1 Phase Industrial

139

Western Lake Superior Sanitary District (Minnesota) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Western Lake Superior Sanitary District (Minnesota) Western Lake Superior Sanitary District (Minnesota) Western Lake Superior Sanitary District (Minnesota) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Siting and Permitting A sanitary board is established to deal with long-term serious problems relating to water pollution and solid waste disposal in the area. The district can set regulations regarding garbage management and recycling,

140

Federal Utility Partnership Working Group - Utility Interconnection Panel  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

WORKING GROUP - Utility Interconnection Panel M. Renee Jewell, Program/Energy Manager, & Contracting Officer, Forest Service (reneejewell@fs.fed.us) SCENARIO: Fed Agencies had Solar PV Projects To Connect with Utility in California * United States (US) Forest Service (FS) - 1 small Solar Photovoltaic (PV) project; and - 1 small Renewable project (Solar PV) exporting energy to grid. * U.S. National Park Service (NPS) - 24 Small Solar Photovoltaic projects. * U.S. Dept. of Veterans Affairs (VA) - 6 Renewable generation projects of different sizes. FS Region 5 (California) - Solar Photovoltaic Installations Solar PV Project @ Mono Lake Visitor Center (Inyo NF) Solar PV Project (net exporter) @ San Dimas Technology and Development Center SITUATION - Utility Wanted Feds to Sign Its

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While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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141

Effect of coarse or fine grinding on utilization of dry or ensiled corn by lactating dairy cows  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study evaluated the effect of coarse or fine grinding of three forms of corn on the performance of lactating cows. Six diets, fed as total mixed rations, were identical except for the corn portion of the diet. Corn treatments were dry shelled corn, high moisture ensiled ear corn, and high moisture ensiled shelled corn, either coarsely or finely ground. The experimental design was a6 6 Latin square with 36 cows. Eighteen cows were assigned to the six different treatments and were fed once daily. Within this group of 18 cows, six had a ruminal cannula and were used to evaluate nutrient digestibilities and ruminal fermentation. The remaining 18 cows, six of which were ruminally cannulated, were similarly assigned, except they were fed twice daily. In the group fed once daily, milk production and composition were not affected by treatment. Starch digestibility was greater with the high moisture and with the finely ground corn treatments. In addition, the high moisture ensiled corn treatments had reduced ruminal ammonia concentrations. In the group that was fed twice daily, milk production and protein yield were greatest for the finely ground high moisture ensiled shelled corn treatment. Starch utilization was improved by fine grinding. Lower ruminal ammonia concentrations were obtained with the high moisture ensiled corn treatments, and there was a tendency for reduced ammonia concentration with fine grinding. Results indicate that high moisture ensiled corn as well as fine grinding improved nitrogen and starch utilization. (Key words: corn, milk, particle size, starch) Abbreviation key: CG = coarsely ground, DSC = dry shelled corn, FG = finely ground, HMEC = high mois-

F. San Emeterio; R. B. Reis; W. E. Campos; L. D. Satter

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

ESP: A system utilization benchmark  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ESP: A System Utilization Benchmark Adrian T. Wong, LeonidEffective System Performance (ESP) test, which is designedEffective System Performance (ESP) benchmark, which measures

Wong, Adrian T.; Oliker, Leonid; Kramer, William T.C.; Kaltz, Teresa L.; Bailey, David H.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Beyond the Price Effect in Time-of-Use Programs: Results from a Municipal Utility Pilot, 2007-2008  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper discusses results of a two-year collaborative research project between the authors and the Demand Response Research Center focused on behavioral response to a voluntary time-of-use pilot rate offered by the Sacramento Municipal Utilities District (SMUD) under the PowerChoice label. The project had two purposes: one was to assess the potential for increasing demand response through the introduction of enhanced information and real-time consumption feedback; the second was to better understand behavioral response to a TOU rate. Three successive waves of telephone surveys collected details about reasons for participation, actions taken, capacities and constraints to altering behavior, and a range of salient conditions, such as demographics and dwelling characteristics. Pre- and post-program interval meter data for participants and a comparison sample of households were also collected and analyzed to consider initial and season-change price effects of the rate and the effect of supplemental information treatments on response. Over half of surveyed participating households reported that they had made a great deal of effort to adjust their electricity consumption to the rate. Despite this, load data analysis revealed only minimal price effects; and, though households subjected to information treatments seemed to have learned from these treatments, load data analysis again detected only minimal effects on load. Given the currently high hopes for behavioral intervention and residential TOU rates, these unexpected results require explanation. We suggest a number of possibilities and discuss some implications for TOU programs, and for understanding demand response behavior and approaches to experiments with TOU rates.

Lutzenhiser, Susan; Peters, Jane; Moezzi, Mithra; Woods, James

2009-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

144

Further Studies of a Lake Breeze Part ll: Theoretical Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The three-dimensional structure and behavior of the lake-land breeze circulation which is induced by Lake Ontario is studied by means of a numerical model. The model is a primitive equation model which incorporates the effects of orography and ...

Mariano A. Estoque; James M. Gross

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

The Potential Impacts of Climate Change on the Great Lakes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Global climate change could have a significant impact on the Great Lakes. A number of studies of the potential effects of climate change on the Great Lakes were commissioned by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, using common scenarios of ...

Joel B. Smith

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Numerical Simulation of Land-Breeze-Induced Snowbands Along the Western Shore of Lake Michigan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Case studies are presented which describe a type of lake-effect snowband which forms along the western shore of Lake Michigan when a cold anticyclone to the north sets up an easterly gradient over the lake. Numerical simulations indicate that the ...

Robert J. Ballentine

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Numerical Simulation of Land-Breeze-Induced Snowbands Along the Western Shore of Lake Michigan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Case studies are presented which describe a type of lake-effect snowband which forms along the western shore of Lake Michigan when a cold anticyclone to the north sets up an easterly gradient over the lake. Numerical simulations indicate that the ...

Robert J. Ballentine

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Energy and water in the Great Lakes.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The nexus between thermoelectric power production and water use is not uniform across the U.S., but rather differs according to regional physiography, demography, power plant fleet composition, and the transmission network. That is, in some regions water demand for thermoelectric production is relatively small while in other regions it represents the dominate use. The later is the case for the Great Lakes region, which has important implications for the water resources and aquatic ecology of the Great Lakes watershed. This is today, but what about the future? Projected demographic trends, shifting lifestyles, and economic growth coupled with the threat of global climate change and mounting pressure for greater U.S. energy security could have profound effects on the region's energy future. Planning for such an uncertain future is further complicated by the fact that energy and environmental planning and regulatory decisionmaking is largely bifurcated in the region, with environmental and water resource concerns generally taken into account after new energy facilities and technologies have been proposed, or practices are already in place. Based on these confounding needs, the objective of this effort is to develop Great Lakes-specific methods and tools to integrate energy and water resource planning and thereby support the dual goals of smarter energy planning and development, and protection of Great Lakes water resources. Guiding policies for this planning are the Great Lakes and St. Lawrence River Basin Water Resources Compact and the Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement. The desired outcome of integrated energy-water-aquatic resource planning is a more sustainable regional energy mix for the Great Lakes basin ecosystem.

Tidwell, Vincent Carroll

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

WRF Simulations of the Urban Circulation in the Salt Lake City Area for CO2 Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A recent National Research Council report highlighted the potential utility of atmospheric observations and models for detecting trends in concentrated emissions from localized regions, such as urban areas. The Salt Lake City (SLC), Utah, area was ...

Thomas Nehrkorn; John Henderson; Mark Leidner; Marikate Mountain; Janusz Eluszkiewicz; Kathryn McKain; Steven Wofsy

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Dissolved organic matter and lake metabolism. Technical progress report, 1 April 1973--31 March 1974  

SciTech Connect

A detailed temporal and spatial carbon budget, essentially a functional detrital carbon budget, was evaluated for an oligotrophic lake system. Emphasis was placed on the fate and mechanisms regulating the qualitative and quantitative utilization and losses of organic carbon. (CH)

Wetzel, G.H.

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Analysis of the effects of integrating wind turbines into a conventional utility: a case study. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The impact on a utility incorporating wind turbine generation due to wind speed sampling frequency, wind turbine performance model, and wind speed forecasting accuracy is examined. The utility analyzed in the study was the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power and the wind turbine assumed was the MOD-2. The sensitivity of the economic value of wind turbine generation to wind speed sampling frequency and wind turbine modeling technique is examined as well as the impact of wind forecasting accuracy on utility operation and production costs. Wind speed data from San Gorgonio Pass, California during 1979 are used to estimate wind turbine performance using four different simulation methods. (LEW)

Goldenblatt, M.K.; Wegley, H.L.; Miller, A.H.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Analysis of the effects of integrating wind turbines into a conventional utility: a case study. Revised final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The impact on a utility incorporating wind turbine generation due to wind speed sampling frequency, wind turbine performance model, and wind speed forecasting accuracy is examined. The utility analyzed in this study was the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power, and the wind turbine assumed was the MOD-2. The sensitivity of the economic value of wind turbine generation to wind speed sampling frequency and wind turbine modeling technique is examined as well as the impact of wind forecasting accuracy on utility operation and production costs. Wind speed data from San Gorgonio Pass, California during 1979 are used to estimate wind turbine performance using four different simulation methods. (LEW)

Goldenblatt, M.K.; Wegley, H.L.; Miller, A.H.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Black Hawk Lake Fresno River  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Black Hawk Lake Fresno River R D 4 0 0 RD 415 HWY41 RD 207 REVISRD YO SEM ITE SP RINGS P KY LILLEY County Rosedale Ranch Revis Mountain Daulton Spring Red Top Lookout Buford Mountain Black Hawk Lake

Wang, Zhi

154

Utah Division of Public Utilities | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Utah Division of Public Utilities Utah Division of Public Utilities Jump to: navigation, search Name Utah Division of Public Utilities Address 160 East 300 South Place Salt Lake City, Utah Zip 84111 Phone number 800-874-0904 Website http://publicutilities.utah.go References Website[1] This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utah Division of Public Utilities is an organization based in Salt Lake City, Utah. The Division of Public Utilities, makes recommendations to the Utah Public Service Commission for rate-making purposes, applications, hearings and other issues affecting quality of service. The Division also handles and investigates consumer complaints and monitors utility operations to ensure compliance with Public Service Commission rules, regulations and orders.

155

Great Lakes Energy Coop | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy Coop Energy Coop Jump to: navigation, search Name Great Lakes Energy Coop Place Michigan Utility Id 38084 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location MRO NERC RFC Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Alternative - Residential Residential Commercial and Industrial Loads Automated Power Monitoring Commercial Commercial and Industrial Loads Automated Power Monitoring - 200kW Commercial Commercial and industrial Loads Automated Power Monitoring Industrial Controlled Heating Commercial Controlled Water Heater - Opt 1 Commercial

156

Lake Country Power | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Power Power Jump to: navigation, search Name Lake Country Power Place Minnesota Utility Id 10697 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes ISO MISO Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Cycled/Interruptible Air Conditioning Cycled Air (metered) Residential Cycled/Interruptible Air Conditioning Cycled Air (unmetered) Residential Heat Pumps Air-Source if Cycled Residential Heat Pumps Duel Fuel Residential Heat Pumps Ground Source Residential Residential Service Residential Space Heating Duel Fuel Residential

157

Obama Administration Hosts Great Lakes Offshore Wind Workshop...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hosts Great Lakes Offshore Wind Workshop in Chicago with Great Lakes Wind Collaborative Obama Administration Hosts Great Lakes Offshore Wind Workshop in Chicago with Great Lakes...

158

Lake City Utilities- Commercial & Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Southern Minnesota Municipal Power Agency ([http://www.smmpa.com SMMPA]) is a joint-action agency which generates and sells reliable electricity at wholesale to its eighteen non-profit,...

159

Copy of Lake Worth Utilities - Energy Conservation Rebate Program...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Website http:www.coj.netDepartmentsEnvironmental+and+ComplianceOffice+of+SustainabilitySustainable+Building+Program.htm Date added to DSIRE 2010-11-05 Last DSIRE Review...

160

Lake City Utilities- Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Southern Minnesota Municipal Power Agency ([http://www.smmpa.com SMMPA]) is a joint-action agency which generates and sells reliable electricity at wholesale to its eighteen non-profit,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lake utilities effective" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Red Lake Electric Coop, Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Red Lake Electric Coop, Inc Red Lake Electric Coop, Inc Place Minnesota Utility Id 26934 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location MRO NERC ERCOT Yes NERC MRO Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Controlled Electric Water Heating - Commercial Commercial Controlled Electric Water Heating - Residential Residential General Service - 1.5 to 10 kVA - Commercial Commercial General Service - 1.5 to 10 kVA - Multiphase Commercial General Service - 1.5 to 10 kVA - Residential Residential General Service - 11 to 25 kVA - Commercial Commercial General Service - 11 to 25 kVA - Multiphase Commercial

162

Lake Region Electric Assn, Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lake Region Electric Assn, Inc Lake Region Electric Assn, Inc Place South Dakota Utility Id 10632 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location MRO NERC RFC Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png General Service - Large Three Phase Heating(Separate Metering) Industrial General Service Single Phase Commercial General Service Single Phase (Heat-separate meter) Commercial General Service- Large Three-Phase Controlled Commercial General Service- Large Three-Phase uncontrolled Industrial General Service- Seasonal Service Commercial General Service- Small Three-Phase Commercial

163

Moon Lake Electric Assn Inc (Utah) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Moon Lake Electric Assn Inc Moon Lake Electric Assn Inc Place Utah Utility Id 12866 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location WECC NERC WECC Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1]Energy Information Administration Form 826[2] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png GREENWAY RATE FOR SCHEDULE GS-1 Commercial GREENWAY RATE FOR SCHEDULE R Residential GS (General Service 3 phase Secondary) Commercial Large Power Primary Service Industrial Large Power Secondary Service Industrial Large Power Service Industrial Residential Service Residential

164

Energy Efficient Buildings, Salt Lake County, Utah  

SciTech Connect

Executive Summary Salt Lake County's Solar Photovoltaic Project - an unprecedented public/private partnership Salt Lake County is pleased to announce the completion of its unprecedented solar photovoltaic (PV) installation on the Calvin R. Rampton Salt Palace Convention Center. This 1.65 MW installation will be one the largest solar roof top installations in the country and will more than double the current installed solar capacity in the state of Utah. Construction is complete and the system will be operational in May 2012. The County has accomplished this project using a Power Purchase Agreement (PPA) financing model. In a PPA model a third-party solar developer will finance, develop, own, operate, and maintain the solar array. Salt Lake County will lease its roof, and purchase the power from this third-party under a long-term Power Purchase Agreement contract. In fact, this will be one of the first projects in the state of Utah to take advantage of the recent (March 2010) legislation which makes PPA models possible for projects of this type. In addition to utilizing a PPA, this solar project will employ public and private capital, Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grants (EECBG), and public/private subsidized bonds that are able to work together efficiently because of the recent stimulus bill. The project also makes use of recent changes to federal tax rules, and the recent re-awakening of private capital markets that make a significant public-private partnership possible. This is an extremely innovative project, and will mark the first time that all of these incentives (EECBG grants, Qualified Energy Conservation Bonds, New Markets tax credits, investment tax credits, public and private funds) have been packaged into one project. All of Salt Lake County's research documents and studies, agreements, and technical information is available to the public. In addition, the County has already shared a variety of information with the public through webinars, site tours, presentations, and written correspondence.

Barnett, Kimberly

2012-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

165

Lake Roosevelt Fisheries and Limnological Research : 1996 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Lake Roosevelt Monitoring/Data Collection Program resulted from a merger between the Lake Roosevelt Monitoring Program and the Lake Roosevelt Data Collection Project. This project will model biological responses to reservoir operations, evaluate the effects of releasing hatchery origin kokanee salmon and rainbow trout on the fishery, and evaluate the success of various stocking strategies. In 1996, limnological, reservoir operation, zooplankton, and tagging data were collected. Mean reservoir elevation, storage volume and water retention time were reduced in 1996 relative to the last five years. In 1996, Lake Roosevelt reached a yearly low of 1,227 feet above mean sea level in April, a yearly high of 1,289 feet in July, and a mean yearly reservoir elevation of 1,271.4 feet. Mean monthly water retention times in Lake Roosevelt during 1996 ranged from 15.7 days in May to 49.2 days in October. Average zooplankton densities and biomass were lower in 1996 than 1995. Daphnia spp. and total zooplankton densities peaked during the summer, whereas minimum densities occurred during the spring. Approximately 300,000 kokanee salmon and 400,000 rainbow trout were released into Lake Roosevelt in 1996. The authors estimated 195,628 angler trips to Lake Roosevelt during 1996 with an economic value of $7,629,492.

Cichosz, Thomas A.; Underwood, Keith D.; Shields, John; Scholz, Allan; Tilson, Mary Beth

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

salt lake city.cdr  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Locations of the Salt Lake City Processing and Disposal Sites Locations of the Salt Lake City Processing and Disposal Sites This fact sheet provides information about the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 Title I processing site and disposal site at Salt Lake City, Utah. These sites are managed by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. Salt Lake City, Utah, Processing and Disposal Sites Site Descriptions and History Regulatory Setting The former Salt Lake City processing site is located about 4 miles south-southwest of the center of Salt Lake City, Utah, at 3300 South and Interstate 15. The Vitro Chemical Company processed uranium and vanadium ore at the site from 1951 until 1968. Milling operations conducted at the processing site created radioactive tailings, a predominantly sandy material.

167

Method for lake restoration  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for removing pollutants or minerals from lake, river or ocean sediments or from mine tailings is disclosed. Magnetically attractable collection units containing an ion exchange or sorbent media with an affinity for a chosen target substance are distributed in the sediments or tailings. After a period of time has passed sufficient for the particles to bind up the target substances, a magnet drawn through the sediments or across the tailings retrieves the units along with the target substance.

Dawson, Gaynor W. (Richland, WA); Mercer, Basil W. (Pasco, WA)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Why Sequence Lake Vostok accretion ice?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sequence Lake Vostok accretion ice? Lake Vostok is the largest known subglacial lake in central Antarctica, though it's been buried under 4 kilometers (nearly 2.5 miles) of ice for...

169

Coal Utilization Science Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Coal Utilization SCienCe Program Coal Utilization SCienCe Program Description The Coal Utilization Science (CUS) Program sponsors research and development (R&D) in fundamental science and technology areas that have the potential to result in major improvements in the efficiency, reliability, and environmental performance of advanced power generation systems using coal, the Nation's most abundant fossil fuel resource. The challenge for these systems is to produce power in an efficient and environmentally benign manner while remaining cost effective for power providers as well as consumers. The CUS Program is carried out by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) under the Office of Fossil Energy (FE) of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The program supports DOE's Strategic Plan to:

170

Dewatering of Ambrosia Lake Mines  

SciTech Connect

The paper discusses the design of an aquifer depressurisation system using wells at Mt. Taylor Mine, Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico. The concepts discussed should be valid for any shaft of mine in a sandstone aquifer with predominantly matrix permeability. The system uses a number of wells surrounding the mine shaft to reduce the aquifer pressure in the vicinity of the shaft. The effect of various parameters such as number of wells, wellbore diameter, time and well location are considered. It is concluded that, with a properly designed system, the aquifer pressure and water inflow rate to the shaft may be reduced to less than 15% of their potential values in the absence of wells.

Juvkam-Wold, H.C.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center Technologies Available ...  

Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center Technologies Available for Licensing Established by the Department of Energy (DOE) in 2007, the Great Lakes Bioenergy Research ...

172

Lake Michigan Lake Breezes: Climatology, Local Forcing, and Synoptic Environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method was developed to identify the occurrence of lake-breeze events along the eastern, western, and both shores of Lake Michigan during a 15-yr period (198296). Comparison with detailed observations from May through September of 199697 ...

Neil F. Laird; David A. R. Kristovich; Xin-Zhong Liang; Raymond W. Arritt; Kenneth Labas

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

NET PRED UTILITY  

Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

002602IBMPC00 Normalized Elution Time Prediction Utility http://omics.pnl.gov/software/NETPredictionUtility.php

174

Moses Lake Fishery Restoration Project; Factors Affecting the Recreational Fishery in Moses Lake Washington, Annual Report 2002-2003.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This annual report is a precursor to the final technical report we will be writing the next contract period. Consequently, this report, covering the period between September 27, 2002, and September 26, 2003, represents a progress report towards the final technical report we anticipate completing by September 26, 2004. Sample analysis and field work have progressed well and we anticipate no further delays. There are 4 objectives: (1) To quantify secondary production Moses Lake; (2) To quantify the influence of predation on target fishes in Moses Lake; (3) To quantify mortality of selected fished in Moses Lake; and (4) To assess effects of habitat changes from shoreline development and carp on the fish community in Moses Lake.

Burgess, Dave

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Pyramid Lake Renewable Energy Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Pyramid Lake Paiute Tribe is a federally recognized Tribe residing on the Pyramid Lake Reservation in western Nevada. The funding for this project was used to identify blind geothermal systems disconnected from geothermal sacred sites and develop a Tribal energy corporation for evaluating potential economic development for profit.

John Jackson

2008-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

176

PYRAMID LAKE RENEWEABLE ENERGY PLAN  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Pyramid Lake Renewable Energy Plan covers these areas: energy potential (primarily focusing on geothermal resource potential, but also more generally addressing wind energy potential); renewable energy market potential; transmission system development; geothermal direct use potential; and business structures to accomplish the development objectives of the Pyramid Lake Paiute Tribe.

HIGH DESERT GEOCULTURE, LLC

2009-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

177

DEMEC Member Utilities - Green Energy Program Incentives (8 utilities...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Member Utilities - Green Energy Program Incentives (8 utilities) DEMEC Member Utilities - Green Energy Program Incentives (8 utilities) Eligibility Agricultural Commercial...

178

Utilities | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Utilities Utilities Jump to: navigation, search Utilities Electric Utility Rates The Utilities Gateway houses OpenEI's free, community-editable utility rate repository. OpenEI users may browse, edit and add new electric utility rates to OpenEI's repository. EIA provides the authoritative list of utility companies in the United States, and thus OpenEI limits utility rates to companies listed by EIA. 43,031 rates have been contributed for 3,832 EIA-recognized utility companies. Browse rates by zip code Browse rates by utility name Create or edit a rate Number of Utility Companies by State Click on a state to view summaries for that state. See a list of all U.S. utility companies and aliases Utility Rate Database Description The Utility Rate Database (URDB) is a free storehouse of rate structure

179

Why Sequence Great Salt Lake?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Great Salt Lake? Great Salt Lake? On average, the Great Salt Lake is four times saltier than the ocean and also has heavy metals, high concentrations of sulfur and petroleum seeps. In spite of all this, the lake is the saltiest body of water to support life. The lake hosts brine shrimp, algae and a diverse array of microbes, not to mention the roughly 5 million birds that migrate there annually. The secret to these microbes' ability to survive under such harsh conditions might be revealed in their genes. Researchers expect the genetic data will provide insight into how the microorganisms tolerate pollutants such as sulfur and detoxify pollutants such as sulfur and heavy metals like mercury. The information could then be used to develop bioremediation techniques. Researchers also expect that sequencing microorganisms sampled

180

Design and characterization of a low cost dual differential proving ring force sensor utilizing Hall-effect sensors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A novel dual differential hall-effect based proving ring force sensor has been designed, manufactured, and tested. Strain gauge based force sensors are among the most common methods of measuring static and dynamic forces, ...

Rivest, Christopher W. (Christopher Warren)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lake utilities effective" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Utility solar water heating workshops  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to explore the problems and opportunities for utility participation with solar water heating as a DSM measure. Expected benefits from the workshops included an increased awareness and interest by utilities in solar water heating as well as greater understanding by federal research and policy officials of utility perspectives for purposes of planning and programming. Ultimately, the project could result in better information transfer, increased implementation of solar water heating programs, greater penetration of solar systems, and more effective research projects. The objective of the workshops was satisfied. Each workshop succeeded in exploring the problems and opportunities for utility participation with solar water heating as a DSM option. The participants provided a range of ideas and suggestions regarding useful next steps for utilities and NREL. According to evaluations, the participants believed the workshops were very valuable, and they returned to their utilities with new information, ideas, and commitment.

Barrett, L.B. (Barrett Consulting Associates, Inc., Colorado Springs, CO (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Measurement of Lake Roosevelt Biota in Relation to Reservoir Operations : Final Report 1993.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to collect biological data from Lake Roosevelt to be used in the design of a computer model that will predict biological responses to reservoir operations as part of the System Operation Review Program. This study worked in conjunction with Lake Roosevelt Monitoring Project which investigated the effectiveness of two kokanee salmon hatcheries. This report summarized the data collected from Lake Roosevelt from 1993 and includes limnological, reservoir operation, zooplankton, benthic macroinvertebrate, experimental trawling, and net-pen rainbow trout tagging data. Major components of the Lake Roosevelt model include quantification of impacts to zooplankton, benthic macroinvertebrates, and fish caused by reservoir drawdowns and low water retention times.

Voeller, Amy C.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Cooperative L&P Assn Lake Cnty | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

L&P Assn Lake Cnty L&P Assn Lake Cnty Jump to: navigation, search Name Cooperative L&P Assn Lake Cnty Place Minnesota Utility Id 4346 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png General Service Residential Heat Pumps Residential Space Heating Interruptible Dual Fuel Residential Space Heating Off-Peak Storage Residential Water Heating Off-Peak Storage Residential Wellspring Wind Power Residential Average Rates Residential: $0.1080/kWh Commercial: $0.1070/kWh Industrial: $0.0746/kWh

184

Energy Efficient Buildings, Salt Lake County, Utah  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Salt Lake County is pleased to announce the completion of its unprecedented solar photovoltaic (PV) installation on the Calvin R. Rampton Salt Palace Convention Center. This 1.65 MW installation will be one the largest solar roof top installations in the country and will more than double the current installed solar capacity in the state of Utah. Construction is complete and the system will be operational in May 2012. The County has accomplished this project using a Power Purchase Agreement (PPA) financing model. In a PPA model a third-party solar developer will finance, develop, own, operate, and maintain the solar array. Salt Lake County will lease its roof, and purchase the power from this third-party under a long-term Power Purchase Agreement contract. In fact, this will be one of the first projects in the state of Utah to take advantage of the recent (March 2010) legislation which makes PPA models possible for projects of this type. In addition to utilizing a PPA, this solar project will employ public and private capital, Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grants (EECBG), and public/private subsidized bonds that are able to work together efficiently because of the recent stimulus bill. The project also makes use of recent changes to federal tax rules, and the recent re-awakening of private capital markets that make a significant public-private partnership possible. This is an extremely innovative project, and will mark the first time that all of these incentives (EECBG grants, Qualified Energy Conservation Bonds, New Markets tax credits, investment tax credits, public and private funds) have been packaged into one project. All of Salt Lake County's research documents and studies, agreements, and technical information is available to the public. In addition, the County has already shared a variety of information with the public through webinars, site tours, presentations, and written correspondence.

Barnett, Kimberly

2012-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

185

NBP RFI: Communications Requirements- Comments of Lake Region...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Lake Region Electric Cooperative- Minnesota NBP RFI: Communications Requirements- Comments of Lake Region Electric Cooperative- Minnesota Comments of Lake Region Electric...

186

Evaluation of the CLM4 Lake Model at a Large and Shallow Freshwater Lake  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Models of lake physical processes provide the lower flux boundary conditions for numerical predictions of weather and climate in lake basins. So far, there have been few studies on evaluating lake model performance at the diurnal time scale and ...

Bin Deng; Shoudong Liu; Wei Xiao; Wei Wang; Jiming Jin; Xuhui Lee

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Coal use in the People`s Republic of China, Volume 2: The economic effects of constraining coal utilization  

SciTech Connect

The People`s Republic of China (hereafter referred to as China) is the largest producer and consumer of coal in the world. The dominance of coal in China`s energy balance has come at a high price to the environment. With the recent attention given to global warming issues, China`s energy consumption and production practices have become the subject of much concern. Of particular concern is China`s ability to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions by constraining coal use and the impact such policies will likely have on the Chinese economy. The study is divided into two reports. Volume 1 focuses on the full coal fuel cycle, emissions, and environmental effects. This report (Volume 2) analyzes various CO{sub 2} mitigation strategies and determines their effect on economic growth. Contrary to what some analysts have claimed, the current work suggests that it would not be costly for the Chinese to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions. In fact, some strategies were accompanied by increases in China`s energy and economic efficiency, which actually stimulated economic growth.

Rose, A.; Lim, D.; Frias, O.; Benavides, J. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Dept. of Mineral Economics; Tompkins, M.M. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Lake Pend Oreille Fishery Recovery Project, 1996-1997 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During the winter of 1996-97, the elevation of Lake Pend Oreille was kept 1.2 m higher in an attempt to recover the impacted Kokanee fishery. This was the first winter of the scheduled three-year test. We found that kokanee spawned on the newly inundated gravels provided by the higher water levels. Many of the redds were at depths of 0.5 to 2 m with the highest density of redds at the 1.2 m depth. We also found the numbers of kokanee spawning in tributary streams declined sharply with the higher lake levels. Presumably, these fish spawned on the lakeshore because of the abundance of shoreline gravel rather than migrate up tributary streams. Kokanee spawning sites were mapped around the entire perimeter of the lake. Most spawning occurred at the southern end of the lake; however, kokanee utilized the newly available spawning gravels throughout much of lake's shorelines. Unusually high spring run-off in 1997 produced an inflow to the lake of 4,360 m{sup 3}/s and raised the lake 1 m above full pool. We found that all age-classes of kokanee declined sharply between 1996 and 1997. Survival rates of all age-classes were at or near the lowest point on record. The cause of these declines is unknown; possible causes include kokanee emigrating from the lake and mortality of kokanee due to dissolved gases in the northern third of the lake reaching 120% to 130% of saturation. High dissolved gases were caused by the Cabinet Gorge and Noxon dams on the Clark Fork River. Kokanee population declines caused by flooding would have masked any benefits to the population resulting from a higher winter lake level.

Maiolie, Melo A.; Harryman, Bill; Elam, Steve (Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Boise, ID)

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Improved Detection Using Negative Elevation Angles for Mountaintop WSR-88Ds. Part III: Simulations of Shallow Convective Activity over and around Lake Ontario  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the winter, lake-effect snowstorms that form over Lake Ontario represent a significant weather hazard for the populace around the lake. These storms, which typically are only 2 km deep, frequently can produce narrow swaths (2050 km wide) ...

Rodger A. Brown; Thomas A. Niziol; Norman R. Donaldson; Paul I. Joe; Vincent T. Wood

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Recent Great Lakes Ice Trends  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Analysis of ice observations made by cooperative observers from shoreline stations reveals significant changes in the ice season on the North American Great Lakes over the past 35years. Although the dataset is highly inhomogeneous and year-to-...

Howard P. Hanson; Claire S. Hanson; Brenda H. Yoo

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Fish of the Great Lakes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Cook County Richard B. Ogilvie, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation FISH OF THE GREAT LAKES As you stand at the top of one of the tallest buildings in downtown...

192

Effects of the Cabinet Gorge Kokanee Hatchery on Wintering Bald Eagles in the Lower Clark Fork River and Lake Pend, Oreille, Idaho: 1986 Final Report.  

SciTech Connect

The abundance and distribution of bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) on the lower Clark Fork River, Lake Pend Oreille, and the upper Pend Oreille River, Idaho, were documented during the winters of 1985--86 and 1986--87. Peak counts of bald eagles in weekly aerial censuses were higher in 1985--86 (274) and 1986--87 (429) than previously recorded in mid-winter surveys. Differences in eagle distribution within and between years were apparently responses to changes in prey availability. Eight bald eagles were captured and equipped with radio transmitters in the winter and spring of 1986. Residencies within the study area averaged 13.9 days in 1985--86 and 58.3 days for the four eagles that returned in 1986-87. The eagles exhibited considerable daily movement throughout the study area. After departing the area, one eagle was later sighted approximately 1185 km to the southwest in northern California. Eagle behavioral activity was recorded at time budget sessions at areas of heavy use. Perching in live trees was the most common behavior observed. 34 refs., 39 figs., 17 tabs.

Crenshaw, John G.

1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Utility Energy Services Contracts: Enabling Documents Update  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Documents Documents Update San Diego, CA November 28, 2007 Deb Beattie & Karen Thomas Overview  Legislative & Executive Actions  Legal Opinions  Agency Guidance  Contracts  Sample Documents  Resources www.eere.energy.gov/femp/pdfs/28792.pdf Enabling Legislation for Utility Programs Energy Policy Act of 1992 Section 152(f) - Utility Incentive Programs Section 152(f) - Utility Incentive Programs Agencies:  Are authorized and encouraged to participate in utility programs generally available to customers  May accept utility financial incentives, goods, and services generally available to customers  Are encouraged to enter into negotiations with utilities to design cost effective programs to address unique needs of facilities used by agency

194

Lake and reservoir restoration guidance manual: first edition  

SciTech Connect

This manual provides guidance to lake managers, homeowners, lake associations, and laypersons on lake and reservoir restoration, management and protection. It also provides information on how to identify lake problems, evaluate practices for restoring and protection lakes, watershed management, and creating a lake-management plan.

Moore, L.; Thornton, K.

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Category:Salt Lake City, UT | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

UT UT Jump to: navigation, search Go Back to PV Economics By Location Media in category "Salt Lake City, UT" The following 16 files are in this category, out of 16 total. SVFullServiceRestaurant Salt Lake City UT Moon Lake Electric Assn Inc (Utah).png SVFullServiceRestauran... 57 KB SVHospital Salt Lake City UT Moon Lake Electric Assn Inc (Utah).png SVHospital Salt Lake C... 57 KB SVLargeHotel Salt Lake City UT Moon Lake Electric Assn Inc (Utah).png SVLargeHotel Salt Lake... 55 KB SVLargeOffice Salt Lake City UT Moon Lake Electric Assn Inc (Utah).png SVLargeOffice Salt Lak... 57 KB SVMediumOffice Salt Lake City UT Moon Lake Electric Assn Inc (Utah).png SVMediumOffice Salt La... 62 KB SVMidriseApartment Salt Lake City UT Moon Lake Electric Assn Inc (Utah).png

196

Effectiveness of External Window Attachments Based on Daylight Utilization and Cooling Load Reduction for Small Office Buildings in Hot Humid Climates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study explored the effectiveness of selected external shading devices and glazing treatments used to minimize the total annual energy consumption in small office buildings in hot humid climates. The external shading devices included a permanent horizontal overhang and a light shelf. The selected types of glazing included clear, reflective, tinted, low-emissivity coating, and heat-mirror glass. One concern about using external window attachments is that while reducing the solar heat gains, they also reduce the amount of the daylight needed to supplement interior lighting. Therefore the objective of this study was to explore which strategy would give a balance between solar heat gain reduction and daylight utilization and result in the most energy savings in the building. Computer simulations using an hourly energy calculation model were conducted to predict the building's total energy consumption using each strategy. The economics of each strategy were analyzed with lifecycle costing techniques using the present value technique. Results show that properly designed overhangs that shade clear glazing are slightly more cost-effective than specialized low-e glazing systems. These results are unique for hot humid climates where winter heating is not an issue. On the contrary, when used in cold climates, external shading devices tend to increase the building's energy consumption.

Soebarto, V. I.; Degelman, L. O.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Utilities | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Utilities Utilities Utilities Below are resources for Tribes about utilities. The Economics of Electric System Municipalization Looks at the economic environment in California to determine whether municipalization would be a beneficial option for many California cities. Source: Bay Area Economic Forum. Establishing a Tribal Utility Authority Handbook Provides an introduction to electric utility operation and general guidance for the steps required to form a tribal utility authority. Funded by an economic development grant awarded by the U.S. Department of the Interior's Office of Indian Energy and Economic Development to the Ak-Chin Indian Community and its tribal utility authority, Ak-Chin Energy Services. Source: Leonard S. Gold, Utility Strategies Consulting Group,

198

Man-Made Lakes and Ponds  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MAN-MADE LAKES AND PONDS Conservation is on the march. Slowly, we are stopping the pollution of our streams by sewage and industrial wastes; we are restoring many lakes and...

199

Springfield Utility Board- Energy Savings Plan Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Springfield Utility Board provides industrial customers with a comprehensive report to identify cost effective efficiency improvements. Eligible measures include high efficiency motors,...

200

Storm Lake II Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

II Wind Farm II Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Storm Lake II Wind Farm Facility Storm Lake II Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner AES Corp. Developer GE Energy Energy Purchaser Alliant/IES Utilities Location Buena Vista and Cherokee Counties IA Coordinates 42.655334°, -95.383651° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.655334,"lon":-95.383651,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lake utilities effective" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Lake Region Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Region Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Lake Region Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Eligibility Residential...

202

FEMP Utility Services  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Utility Services Utility Services Karen Thomas & Deb Beattie  SPONSORED BY THE FEDERAL ENERGY MANAGEMENT PROGRAM  Overview  UESC Project Support  Agency / Utility Partnerships  Renewable Project Support  Design Assistance  Agency Energy Implementation Plans * * * * * * UESC Project Support Education UESC Workshops Agency Briefings Utility Briefings On-site team training Communications Web site Enabling documents * Case studies UESC Project Support Direct Project Assistance Project facilitation Advise & Consult In depth Contract development Technical Proposal review Performance Verification Agency / Utility Partnerships Federal Utility Partnership Working Group Strategic Partnering Meeting Renewable Projects  Resource Screening: - PV - Solar Hot Water

203

Temperature analysis for lake Yojoa, Honduras  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lake Yojoa is the largest freshwater lake in Honduras, located in the central west region of the country (1405' N, 88 W). The lake has a surface area of 82 km2, a maximum depth of 26 m. and an average depth of 16 m. The ...

Chokshi, Mira (Mira K.)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

RECIPIENT:Lake County, FL  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Lake County, FL Lake County, FL u.s. DEPARTIIIEN T OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CEN T ER NEPA DETERlIJJNATION PROJECf TITLE: Lake County, FL EECBG SOW (S) Page lof2 STATE: FL Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procurement Instrument Number NEPA Control Numbcr CID Numbtr OE·FOA-OOOOO13 DE·EE00Q0786.001 0 Based on my review of the information concerning the proposed adion, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized undtr DOE Order 451.IA), I have made the following determination: ex. EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: 65.1 Actions to conserve energy, demonstrate potential energy conserva tion, and promote energy-efficiency that do not increase the indoor concentrations of potentially harmful substances. These actions may involve financial and technical

205

Avista Utilities- Net Metering  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Idaho does not have a statewide net-metering policy. However, each of the state's three investor-owned utilities -- Avista Utilities, Idaho Power and Rocky Mountain Power -- has developed a net...

206

Utility Brownfields Resource Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI has established a program designed to assist utilities wishing to participate in local Brownfields redevelopment projects. EPRI developed this Brownfields guide to educate utility economic and real estate development personnel in identifying, screening, and supporting Brownfields projects.

1998-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

207

Salt Lake Community College | .EDUconnections  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SLCC Partners with DOE's Rocky Mountain Solar Training Program This program is a joint partnership between DOE's Solar Energy Technogies Program, Salt Lake Community College, Solar Energy International, and the Utah Solar Energy Association that works to accelerate use of solar electric technologies, training and facilities at community and technical college solar training programs within a 15 western United States region. DOE Solar Instructor Training Network Salt Lake City, Utah DOE Applauds SLCC's Science and Technical Programs Architectural Technology Biology Biotechnology Biomanufacturing Chemistry Computer Science Electric Sector Training Energy Management Engineering Geographic Information Sciences Geosciences InnovaBio Manufacturing & Mechanical Engineering Technology

208

Lake Mills Light & Water | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water Water Jump to: navigation, search Name Lake Mills Light & Water Place Wisconsin Utility Id 10605 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes ISO MISO Yes Activity Distribution Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle2 Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Cp-1 Small Power Service between 50kW and 200kW Demand Primary Metering and Transformer Ownership Discount with Parallel Generation(20kW or less) Industrial Cp-1 Small Power Service between 50kW and 200kW Demand Primary Metering and Transformer Ownership Discount Industrial

209

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for rapid identification of buried utilities, blended coal ash, and non-spec./off-spec. aggregates and fly

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

210

Lake-Breeze Fronts in the Salt Lake Valley  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Winds at the Salt Lake City International Airport (SLC) during the AprilOctober period from 1948 to 2003 have been observed to shift to the north (up-valley direction) between late morning and afternoon on over 70% of the days without ...

Daniel E. Zumpfe; John D. Horel

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Practical Estimates of Lake Evaporation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Practical estimates of lake evaporation must rely on data that can be observed in the land environment. This requires the ability to take into account the changes in the temperature and humidity that occur when the air passes from the land to the ...

F. I. Morton

1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

The Lake Thunderbird Micronet Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Lake Thunderbird Micronet is a dense network of environmental sensors and a meteorological tower situated on 10 acres of rural land in central Oklahoma. The Micronet was established in the spring of 2002 as part of a grassroots effort by a ...

Alan Shapiro; Petra M. Klein; Sean C. Arms; David Bodine; Matthew Carney

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Utility Partnership Working  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Utility Partnership Working Group Utility Partnership Working Group The Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) establishes partnerships and facilitates communications among Federal agencies, utilities, and energy service companies. The group develops strategies to implement cost-effective energy efficiency and water conservation projects through utility incentive programs at Federal sites. The mission and objectives of the Federal Utility Partnership Working Group are to: Enhance existing or foster new partnerships between Federal agencies and their servicing utilities to identify, develop, and implement cost-effective energy efficiency, water conservation, and renewable energy projects at Federal sites Identify how utilities can help Federal agencies meet energy management goals required by legislation

214

Contaminant Monitoring Strategy for Henrys Lake, Idaho  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Henrys Lake, located in southeastern Idaho, is a large, shallow lake (6,600 acres, {approx} 17.1 feet maximum depth) located at 6,472 feet elevation in Fremont Co., Idaho at the headwaters of the Henrys Fork of the Snake River. The upper watershed is comprised of high mountains of the Targhee National Forest and the lakeshore is surrounded by extensive flats and wetlands, which are mostly privately owned. The lake has been dammed since 1922, and the upper 12 feet of the lake waters are allocated for downriver use. Henrys Lake is a naturally productive lake supporting a nationally recognized ''Blue Ribbon'' trout fishery. There is concern that increasing housing development and cattle grazing may accelerate eutrophication and result in winter and early spring fish kills. There has not been a recent thorough assessment of lake water quality. However, the Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) is currently conducting a study of water quality on Henrys Lake and tributary streams. Septic systems and lawn runoff from housing developments on the north, west, and southwest shores could potentially contribute to the nutrient enrichment of the lake. Many houses are on steep hillsides where runoff from lawns, driveways, etc. drain into wetland flats along the lake or directly into the lake. In addition, seepage from septic systems (drainfields) drain directly into the wetlands enter groundwater areas that seep into the lake. Cattle grazing along the lake margin, riparian areas, and uplands is likely accelerating erosion and nutrient enrichment. Also, cattle grazing along riparian areas likely adds to nutrient enrichment of the lake through subsurface flow and direct runoff. Stream bank and lakeshore erosion may also accelerate eutrophication by increasing the sedimentation of the lake. Approximately nine streams feed the lake (see map), but flows are often severely reduced or completely eliminated due to irrigation diversion. In addition, subsurface flows can occur as a result of severe cattle grazing along riparian areas and deltas. Groundwater and springs also feed the lake, and are likely critical for oxygen supply during winter stratification. During the winter of 1991, Henrys Lake experienced low dissolved oxygen levels resulting in large fish kills. It is thought that thick ice cover combined with an increase in nutrient loads created conditions resulting in poor water quality. The Idaho Department of Health and Welfare, DEQ is currently conducting a study to determine the water quality of Henrys Lake, the sources contributing to its deterioration, and potential remedial actions to correct problem areas.

John S. Irving; R. P. Breckenridge

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Lake Ontario Maritime Cultural Landscape  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The goal of the Lake Ontario Maritime Cultural Landscape project was to investigate the nature and distribution of archaeological sites along the northeast shoreline of Lake Ontario while examining the environmental, political, and cultural factors that influenced the position of these sites. The primary method of investigation was a combined archaeological and historical survey of the shoreline within seven 1-km square areas. The archaeological component of the survey covered both the terrestrial and submerged portions of the shore through marine remote sensing (side-scan sonar and magnetometer), diving surveys, pedestrian surveys, and informant interviews. A total of 39 sites and 51 isolated finds were identified or further analyzed as a result of this project. These sites ranged from the Middle Archaic period (ca. 5500-2500 B.C.) through the 19th century and included habitation, military, transportation, and recreational sites. Analysis of these findings was conducted at two scales: the individual survey area and Lake Ontario as a whole. By treating each survey area as a distinct landscape, it was possible to discuss how various cultures and groups used each space and to identify instances of both dynamism and continuity in the landscapes. Results of these analyses included the continuous occupation of several locations from pre-Contact times to the present, varying uses of the same environment in response to political and economic shifts, the formation of communities around transportation nodes, and recurring settlement patterns. The survey data was also combined to explore regional-scale trends that manifest themselves in the historical Lake Ontario littoral landscape including ephemeral landscapes, permeable boundaries, danger in the lake, and factors of change.

Ford, Benjamin L.

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Study on the Law of the Phosphorus Forms Transformation in the Sediment of Excess Alga Period Lake  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Based on the experiment of the phosphorus forms and the effect factors of phosphorus release from sediment in the urban shallow lake (taking Lake Xuanwu as a example)?the results showed that when the water body had higher pH value during the excess ... Keywords: phosphorus forms, phosphorus release from sediment, excess alga period, eutrophication, alkaline phosphate

Cao Shiwei; Chen Wei; Yang Min

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Effect of level of dietary calcium and phosphorus on the site of absorption and utilization of phosphorus in gestating and lactating ruminants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Two digestion trials were conducted to determine the effect of level of Ca and P on the site and extent of absorption of P in gestating and lactating ruminants. Gestating Nubian dairy nannies (n=8; 41-55 kg) with abomasal cannulas were used in the gestation feeding trial, which consisted of three 20 d dietary treatment periods. Nannies were randomly assigned to the following dietary treatments of Ca and P: 1) Ca 0.4%, P 0.3% (LCLP), 2) Ca 0.8%, P 0.3% (HCLP) and 3) Ca 0.8% and P 0.6% (HCHP) in a replicated 3x3 Latin Square designed experiment. Reassignment of diets during subsequent periods assured that animals would not consume a diet they were previously exposed to. All diets contained 0.25% chromium oxide as a digestive tract marker. Limestone and monocalcium phosphate were utilized to supply the necessary Ca and P. Six d sample periods were used to collect diets beginning on d 13 of each period, refusals beginning on d 14 and abomasal digesta and feces beginning on d 15. Blood was collected 3 h post-feeding on d 20. Nannies fed HCLP had more (P.05) on fecal excretion. Increasing dietary P in the presence of elevated Ca decreased (P.05) were detected between dietary treatment groups because the desired P intake was not achieved. These data suggest that dietary Ca levels may be increased with increasing Ca requirements for gestation and lactation without increasing P to maintain a 1.5:1 to 2:1 ratio.

Barrett, Robert Clay

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

OpenEI Community - Utility+Utility Access Map  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Finding Utility Finding Utility Companies Under a Given Utility ID http://en.openei.org/community/blog/finding-utility-companies-under-given-utility-id  Here's a quick way to find all the utility company pages under a given utility id.  From the Special Ask page, in the query box enter the following: [[Category:Utility Companies]][[EiaUtilityId::15248]] substituting your utility id of interest for 15248, and click "Find results". http://en.openei.org/community/blog/finding-utility-companies-under-given-utility-id#comments

219

"List of Covered Electric Utilities" under the Public Utility...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6 Revised "List of Covered Electric Utilities" under the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA) - 2006 Revised Under Title I of the Public Utility Regulatory...

220

Carrots for Utilities: Providing Financial Returns for Utility...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Carrots for Utilities: Providing Financial Returns for Utility Investments in Energy Efficiency Jump to: navigation, search Name Carrots for Utilities: Providing Financial Returns...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lake utilities effective" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Utility Solar Business Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many utilities are initiating business plans that enable them to play a more integral role in the solar power value chain. This report summarizes research completed to identify and track utility solar business models (USBMs) in the United States. EPRI and the Solar Electric Power Association (SEPA) are conducting an ongoing joint research effort to evaluate the expanding range of utility activities in acquiring solar energy, including photovoltaic (PV) asset ownership. Throughout 2011, USBMs have been ca...

2011-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

222

Utilities weather the storm  

SciTech Connect

Utilities must restore power to storm-damaged transmission and distribution systems, even if it means going out in ice storms or during lightning and hurricane conditions. Weather forecasting helps utilities plan for possible damage as well as alerting them to long-term trends. Storm planning includes having trained repair personnel available and adjusting the system so that less power imports are needed. Storm damage response requires teamwork and cooperation between utilities. Utilities can strengthen equipment in storm-prone or vulnerable areas, but good data are necessary to document the incidence of lighning strikes, hurricanes, etc. 2 references, 8 figures.

Lihach, N.

1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Tribal Utility Feasibility Study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Facility scale, net metered renewable energy systems These are renewable energy systems that provide power to individual households or facilities that are connected to conventional electric utility grid.

Engel, R. A.; Zoellick, J. J.

2007-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

224

Municipal Utility Districts (Texas)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Municipal Utility Districts, regulated by the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality, may be created for the following purposes: (1) the control, storage, preservation, and distribution of its...

225

Public Utilities Act (Illinois) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Public Utilities Act (Illinois) Public Utilities Act (Illinois) Public Utilities Act (Illinois) < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Program Info State Illinois Program Type Environmental Regulations Generating Facility Rate-Making Safety and Operational Guidelines Provider Illinois Commerce Commission This act aims to make energy services in the state reliable and efficient, while preserving the quality if the environment. It states the duties of public utilities in terms of accounts and reports. Every public utility shall furnish to the Commission all information required by it to carry into effect the provisions of this Act, and shall make specific answers to

226

DIRECT MEASUREMENT OF HEAT FLUX FROM COOLING LAKE THERMAL IMAGERY  

SciTech Connect

Laboratory experiments show a linear relationship between the total heat flux from a water surface to air and the standard deviation of the surface temperature field, {sigma}, derived from thermal images of the water surface over a range of heat fluxes from 400 to 1800 Wm{sup -2}. Thermal imagery and surface data were collected at two power plant cooling lakes to determine if the laboratory relationship between heat flux and {sigma} exists in large heated bodies of water. The heat fluxes computed from the cooling lake data range from 200 to 1400 Wm{sup -2}. The linear relationship between {sigma} and Q is evident in the cooling lake data, but it is necessary to apply band pass filtering to the thermal imagery to remove camera artifacts and non-convective thermal gradients. The correlation between {sigma} and Q is improved if a correction to the measured {sigma} is made that accounts for wind speed effects on the thermal convection. Based on more than a thousand cooling lake images, the correlation coefficients between {sigma} and Q ranged from about 0.8 to 0.9.

Garrett, A; Eliel Villa-Aleman, E; Robert Kurzeja, R; Malcolm Pendergast, M; Timothy Brown, T; Saleem Salaymeh, S

2007-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

227

Hungry Horse Mitigation; Flathead Lake, 2004-2005 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes (CSKT) and Montana Fish Wildlife and Parks (MFWP) wrote the ''Fisheries Mitigation Plan for Losses Attributable to the Construction and Operation of Hungry Horse Dam'' in March 1991 to define the fisheries losses, mitigation alternatives and recommendations to protect, mitigate and enhance resident fish and aquatic habitat affected by Hungry Horse Dam. On November 12, 1991, the Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) approved the mitigation plan with minor modifications, called for a detailed implementation plan, and amended measures 903(h)(1) through (7). A long-term mitigation plan was submitted in August 1992, was approved by the Council in 1993, and the first contract for this project was signed on November 11, 1993. The problem this project addresses is the loss of habitat, both in quality and quantity, in the Flathead Lake and River basin resulting from the construction and operation of Hungry Horse Dam. The purpose of the project is to both implement mitigation measures and monitor the biological responses to those measures including those implemented by Project Numbers 9101903 and 9101904. Goals and objectives of the 1994 Fish and Wildlife Program (Section 10.1) addressed by this project are the rebuilding to sustainable levels weak, but recoverable, native populations injured by the hydropower system. The project mitigates the blockage of spawning runs by Hungry Horse Dam by restoring and even creating spawning habitats within direct drainages to Flathead Lake. The project also addresses the altered habitat within Flathead Lake resulting from species shifts and consequent dominance of new species that restricts the potential success of mitigation measures. Specific goals of this project are to create and restore habitat and quantitatively monitor changes in fish populations to verify the efficacy of our mitigation measures. The project consists of three components: monitoring, restoration and research. Monitoring, for example, includes a spring gillnetting series conducted annually in Flathead Lake and builds on an existing data set initiated in 1981. Monitoring of the experimental kokanee reintroduction was a primary activity of this project between 1992 and 1997. Lake trout, whose high densities have precluded successful mitigation of losses of other species in Flathead Lake, have been monitored since 1996 to measure several biological parameters. Results of this work have utility in determining the population status of this key predator in Flathead Lake. The project has also defined the baseline condition of the Flathead Lake fishery in 1992-1993 and has conducted annual lakewide surveys since 1998. The restoration component of the project has addressed several stream channel, riparian, and fish passage problems, and suppression of non-native fish. The research component of the project began in FY 2000 and measured trophic linkages between M. relicta and other species to assist in predicting the results of our efforts to suppress lake trout. Only Work Element A in the Statement of Work is funded entirely by Hungry Horse Mitigation funds. Additional funds are drawn from other sources to assist in completion of all remaining Work Elements.

Hansen, Barry; Evarts, Les (Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes of the Flathead Nation, Pablo, MT)

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Hungry Horse Mitigation : Flathead Lake : Annual Progress Report 2008.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes (CSKT) and Montana Fish Wildlife and Parks (MFWP) wrote the 'Fisheries Mitigation Plan for Losses Attributable to the Construction and Operation of Hungry Horse Dam' in March 1991 to define the fisheries losses, mitigation alternatives and recommendations to protect, mitigate and enhance resident fish and aquatic habitat affected by Hungry Horse Dam. On November 12, 1991, the Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) approved the mitigation plan with minor modifications, called for a detailed implementation plan, and amended measures 903(h)(1) through (7). A long-term mitigation plan was submitted in August 1992, was approved by the Council in 1993, and the first contract for this project was signed on November 11, 1993. The problem this project addresses is the loss of habitat, both in quality and quantity, in the Flathead Lake and River basin resulting from the construction and operation of Hungry Horse Dam. The purpose of the project is to both implement mitigation measures and monitor the biological responses to those measures including those implemented by Project Numbers 9101903 and 9101904. Goals and objectives of the 1994 Fish and Wildlife Program (Section 10.1) addressed by this project are the rebuilding to sustainable levels weak, but recoverable, native populations injured by the hydropower system. The project mitigates the blockage of spawning runs by Hungry Horse Dam by restoring and even creating spawning habitats within direct drainages to Flathead Lake. The project also addresses the altered habitat within Flathead Lake resulting from species shifts and consequent dominance of new species that restricts the potential success of mitigation measures. Specific goals of this project are to create and restore habitat and quantitatively monitor changes in fish populations to verify the efficacy of our mitigation measures. The project consists of three components: monitoring, restoration and research. Monitoring, for example, includes a spring gillnetting series conducted annually in Flathead Lake and builds on an existing data set initiated in 1981. Monitoring of the experimental kokanee reintroduction was a primary activity of this project between 1992 and 1997. Lake trout, whose high densities have precluded successful mitigation of losses of other species in Flathead Lake, have been monitored since 1996 to measure several biological parameters. Results of this work have utility in determining the population status of this key predator in Flathead Lake. The project has also defined the baseline condition of the Flathead Lake fishery in 1992-1993 and has conducted annual lakewide surveys since 1998. The restoration component of the project has addressed several stream channel, riparian, and fish passage problems, and suppression of non-native fish. The research component of the project began in FY 2000 and measured trophic linkages between M. relicta and other species to assist in predicting the results of our efforts to suppress lake trout. Only Work Element A in the Statement of Work is funded entirely by Hungry Horse Mitigation funds. Additional funds are drawn from other sources to assist in completion of all remaining Work Elements.

Hansen, Barry; Evarts, Les [Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes

2009-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

229

Hungry Horse Mitigation : Flathead Lake : Annual Progress Report 2007.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes (CSKT) and Montana Fish Wildlife and Parks (MFWP) wrote the 'Fisheries Mitigation Plan for Losses Attributable to the Construction and Operation of Hungry Horse Dam' in March 1991 to define the fisheries losses, mitigation alternatives and recommendations to protect, mitigate and enhance resident fish and aquatic habitat affected by Hungry Horse Dam. On November 12, 1991, the Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) approved the mitigation plan with minor modifications, called for a detailed implementation plan, and amended measures 903(h)(1) through (7). A long-term mitigation plan was submitted in August 1992, was approved by the Council in 1993, and the first contract for this project was signed on November 11, 1993. The problem this project addresses is the loss of habitat, both in quality and quantity, in the Flathead Lake and River basin resulting from the construction and operation of Hungry Horse Dam. The purpose of the project is to both implement mitigation measures and monitor the biological responses to those measures including those implemented by Project Numbers 9101903 and 9101904. Goals and objectives of the 1994 Fish and Wildlife Program (Section 10.1) addressed by this project are the rebuilding to sustainable levels weak, but recoverable, native populations injured by the hydropower system. The project mitigates the blockage of spawning runs by Hungry Horse Dam by restoring and even creating spawning habitats within direct drainages to Flathead Lake. The project also addresses the altered habitat within Flathead Lake resulting from species shifts and consequent dominance of new species that restricts the potential success of mitigation measures. Specific goals of this project are to create and restore habitat and quantitatively monitor changes in fish populations to verify the efficacy of our mitigation measures. The project consists of three components: monitoring, restoration and research. Monitoring, for example, includes a spring gillnetting series conducted annually in Flathead Lake and builds on an existing data set initiated in 1981. Monitoring of the experimental kokanee reintroduction was a primary activity of this project between 1992 and 1997. Lake trout, whose high densities have precluded successful mitigation of losses of other species in Flathead Lake, have been monitored since 1996 to measure several biological parameters. Results of this work have utility in determining the population status of this key predator in Flathead Lake. The project has also defined the baseline condition of the Flathead Lake fishery in 1992-1993 and has conducted annual lakewide surveys since 1998. The restoration component of the project has addressed several stream channel, riparian, and fish passage problems, and suppression of non-native fish. The research component of the project began in FY 2000 and measured trophic linkages between M. relicta and other species to assist in predicting the results of our efforts to suppress lake trout. Only Work Element A in the Statement of Work is funded entirely by Hungry Horse Mitigation funds. Additional funds are drawn from other sources to assist in completion of all remaining Work Elements.

Hansen, Barry; Evarts, Les [Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes

2008-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

230

Hungry Horse Mitigation; Flathead Lake, 2003-2004 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes (CSKT) and Montana Fish Wildlife and Parks (MFWP) wrote the ''Fisheries Mitigation Plan for Losses Attributable to the Construction and Operation of Hungry Horse Dam'' in March 1991 to define the fisheries losses, mitigation alternatives and recommendations to protect, mitigate and enhance resident fish and aquatic habitat affected by Hungry Horse Dam. On November 12, 1991, the Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) approved the mitigation plan with minor modifications, called for a detailed implementation plan, and amended measures 903(h)(1) through (7). A long-term mitigation plan was submitted in August 1992, was approved by the Council in 1993, and the first contract for this project was signed on November 11, 1993. The problem this project addresses is the loss of habitat, both in quality and quantity, in the Flathead Lake and River basin resulting from the construction and operation of Hungry Horse Dam. The purpose of the project is to both implement mitigation measures and monitor the biological responses to those measures including those implemented by Project Numbers 9101903 and 9101904. Goals and objectives of the 1994 Fish and Wildlife Program (Section 10.1) addressed by this project are the rebuilding to sustainable levels weak, but recoverable, native populations injured by the hydropower system. The project mitigates the blockage of spawning runs by Hungry Horse Dam by restoring and even creating spawning habitats within direct drainages to Flathead Lake. The project also addresses the altered habitat within Flathead Lake resulting from species shifts and consequent dominance of new species that restricts the potential success of mitigation measures. Specific goals of this project are to create and restore habitat and quantitatively monitor changes in fish populations to verify the efficacy of our mitigation measures. The project consists of three components: monitoring, restoration and research. Monitoring, for example, includes a spring gillnetting series conducted annually in Flathead Lake and builds on an existing data set initiated in 1981. Monitoring of the experimental kokanee reintroduction was a primary activity of this project between 1992 and 1997. Lake trout, whose high densities have precluded successful mitigation of losses of other species in Flathead Lake, have been monitored since 1996 to measure several biological parameters. Results of this work have utility in determining the population status of this key predator in Flathead Lake. The project has also defined the baseline condition of the Flathead Lake fishery in 1992-1993 and has conducted annual lakewide surveys since 1998. The restoration component of the project has addressed several stream channel, riparian, and fish passage problems, and suppression of non-native fish. The research component of the project began in FY 2000 and measured trophic linkages between M. relicta and other species to assist in predicting the results of our efforts to suppress lake trout. Only Objective 1 in the workplan is funded entirely by Hungry Horse Mitigation funds. Additional funds are drawn from other sources to assist in completion of Objectives 2-8.

Hansen, Barry; Evarts, Les (Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes of the Flathead Nation, Pablo, MT)

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Real-Time Prediction of the Lake Breeze on the Western Shore of Lake Michigan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A forecast verification study of the occurrence and inland penetration of the lake breeze on the western shore of Lake Michigan was conducted. A real-time version of The Pennsylvania State UniversityNational Center for Atmospheric Research fifth-...

Paul J. Roebber; Mark G. Gehring

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Utility+Utility Access Map | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

the utility company pages under a given utility id. From the Special Ask page, in the query box enter the following: Category:Utility CompaniesEiaUtilityId::15248...

233

Lake Winds | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Winds Winds Jump to: navigation, search Name Lake Winds Facility Lake Winds Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Consumers Energy Developer Consumers Energy Energy Purchaser Consumers Energy Location Ludington MI Coordinates 43.83972728°, -86.38154984° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.83972728,"lon":-86.38154984,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

234

Lake Region State College | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

College College Jump to: navigation, search Name Lake Region State College Facility Lake Region State College Sector Wind energy Facility Type Community Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Lake Region State College Developer Lake Region State College Energy Purchaser Lake Region State College Location Devils Lake ND Coordinates 48.166071°, -98.864529° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":48.166071,"lon":-98.864529,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

235

Domestic utility attitudes toward foreign uranium supply  

SciTech Connect

The current embargo on the enrichment of foreign-origin uranium for use in domestic utilization facilities is scheduled to be removed in 1984. The pending removal of this embargo, complicated by a depressed worldwide market for uranium, has prompted consideration of a new or extended embargo within the US Government. As part of its on-going data collection activities, Nuclear Resources International (NRI) has surveyed 50 domestic utility/utility holding companies (representing 60 lead operator-utilities) on their foreign uranium purchase strategies and intentions. The most recent survey was conducted in early May 1981. A number of qualitative observations were made during the course of the survey. The major observations are: domestic utility views toward foreign uranium purchase are dynamic; all but three utilities had some considered foreign purchase strategy; some utilities have problems with buying foreign uranium from particular countries; an inducement is often required by some utilities to buy foreign uranium; opinions varied among utilities concerning the viability of the domestic uranium industry; and many utilities could have foreign uranium fed through their domestic uranium contracts (indirect purchases). The above observations are expanded in the final section of the report. However, it should be noted that two of the observations are particularly important and should be seriously considered in formulation of foreign uranium import restrictions. These important observations are the dynamic nature of the subject matter and the potentially large and imbalanced effect the indirect purchases could have on utility foreign uranium procurement.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Voices of Experience: New Guide Offers Utilities' Insights on...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

vendors, regulators, consumer advocates, and other stakeholders from across the electricity industry, utilities discussed their experiences with creating effective...

237

Evaluation of an Experimental Re-introduction of Sockeye Salmon into Skaha Lake; Year 1 of 3, 2000 Technical Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Historical records indicate that sockeye salmon were once found in most of the lakes in the Okanagan River Basin. Currently, the only sockeye population within the Okanagan River Basin is found in Osoyoos Lake. Abundance of this stock has declined significantly in the last fifty years. The Okanagan Nation and tribes in the U.S. have proposed re-introducing the species into Okanagan Lake, which has a large rearing capacity. However, assessing the potential benefits and risks associated with a reintroduction of sockeye salmon into Okanagan Lake is difficult because of uncertainties about factors that determine production of Okanagan sockeye, and potential interactions with other species in Okanagan Lake. Associated with this proposal are the potential risks of re-introduction of sockeye salmon into Okanagan Lake. One of these is the effects of sockeye on the resident Okanagan Lake kokanee population, which has declined significantly in the past several years because of habitat loss due to human encroachment, competition with introduced mysid shrimp, and the reduction of biological productivity in the lake as municipalities have moved to more complete effluent treatment. Another concern is the possibility of the transmission of diseases that are currently not found in Okanagan and Skaha lakes from re-introduced sockeye to resident fish. An additional concern is the risk that exotic species (e.g. tench, largemouth bass), that have become established in southern Okanagan Lakes (principally as a result of purposeful introductions in the US Columbia/Okanagan river system), may be able to extend their range to Skaha and Okanagan Lakes, through fish ladders provided at the outlets of Vaseaux (McIntyre Dam) and Skaha Lakes (Okanagan Falls Dam), for natural upstream migration of sockeye. A transboundary multi-agency workshop was hosted in November of 1997 to discuss the potential risks and benefits of reintroducing sockeye salmon into Okanagan Lake. These discussions were summarized into a Draft Action Plan that recommended that sockeye be re-introduced to Skaha Lake as an experimental management strategy to resolve some of these uncertainties (Peters et al. 1998). The purpose of this project is to assess the risks and benefits of an experimental reintroduction of sockeye salmon into Skaha Lake. The assessment will be accomplished by completing the following six objectives over three years: (1) Disease Risk Assessment; (2) Exotic species Re-introduction risk Assessment; (3) Inventory of Existing Habitat and Opportunities for Habitat Enhancement; (4) Development of a life-cycle model of Okanagan salmonids, including interaction with resident kokanee; (5) Development of an experimental design and; (6) Finalize a plan for experimental re-introduction of sockeye salmon into Skaha Lake and associated monitoring programs.

Hammell, Larry (University of Prince Edward Island, Atlantic Veterinary College, Charlottetown, PE, Canada); Machin, Deanna; Long, Karilyn (Okanagan National Fisheries Commission, Westbank, BC, Canada)

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Utility Solar Generation Valuation Methods  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Tucson Electric Power (TEP) developed, tested and verified the results of a new and appropriate method for accurately evaluating the capacity credit of time variant solar generating sources and reviewed new methods to appropriately and fairly evaluate the value of solar generation to electric utilities. The project also reviewed general integrated approaches for adequately compensating owners of solar generation for their benefits to utilities. However, given the limited funding support and time duration of this project combined with the significant differences between utilities regarding rate structures, solar resource availability and coincidence of solar generation with peak load periods, it is well beyond the scope of this project to develop specific rate, rebate, and interconnection approaches to capture utility benefits for all possible utilities. The project developed computer software based evaluation method models to compare solar generation production data measured in very short term time increments called Sample Intervals over a typical utility Dispatch Cycle during an Evaluation Period against utility system load data. Ten second resolution generation production data from the SGSSS and actual one minute resolution TEP system load data for 2006 and 2007, along with data from the Pennington Street Garage 60 kW DC capacity solar unit installed in downtown Tucson will be applied to the model for testing and verification of the evaluation method. Data was provided by other utilities, but critical time periods of data were missing making results derived from that data inaccurate. The algorithms are based on previous analysis and review of specific 2005 and 2006 SGSSS production data. The model was built, tested and verified by in house TEP personnel. For this phase of the project, TEP communicated with, shared solar production data with and collaborated on the development of solar generation valuation tools with other utilities, including Arizona Public Service, Salt River Project, Xcel and Nevada Power Company as well as the Arizona electric cooperatives. In the second phase of the project, three years of 10 second power output data of the SGSSS was used to evaluate the effectiveness of frequency domain analysis, normal statistical distribution analysis and finally maximum/minimum differential output analysis to test the applicability of these mathematic methods in accurately modeling the output variations produced by clouds passing over the SGSSS array.

Hansen, Thomas N.; Dion, Phillip J.

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

239

PFBC Utility Demonstration Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides a summary of activities by American Electric Power Service Corporation during the first budget period of the PFBC Utility Demonstration Project. In April 1990, AEP signed a Cooperative Agreement with the US Department of Energy to repower the Philip Sporn Plant, Units 3 4 in New Haven, West Virginia, with a 330 KW PFBC plant. The purpose of the program was to demonstrate and verify PFBC in a full-scale commercial plant. The technical and cost baselines of the Cooperative Agreement were based on a preliminary engineering and design and a cost estimate developed by AEP subsequent to AEP's proposal submittal in May 1988, and prior to the signing of the Cooperative Agreement. The Statement of Work in the first budget period of the Cooperative Agreement included a task to develop a preliminary design and cost estimate for erecting a Greenfield plant and to conduct a comparison with the repowering option. The comparative assessment of the options concluded that erecting a Greenfield plant rather than repowering the existing Sporn Plant could be the technically and economically superior alternative. The Greenfield plant would have a capacity of 340 MW. The ten additional MW output is due to the ability to better match the steam cycle to the PFBC system with a new balance of plant design. In addition to this study, the conceptual design of the Sporn Repowering led to several items which warranted optimization studies with the goal to develop a more cost effective design.

Not Available

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Moon Lake Electric Assn Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search Jump to: navigation, search Name Moon Lake Electric Assn Inc Place Colorado Utility Id 12866 References Energy Information Administration.[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png GREENWAY RATE FOR SCHEDULE R AND SCHEDULE GS-1 Commercial GREENWAY RATE FOR SCHEDULE R AND SCHEDULE GS-1 25% V2 Commercial GREENWAY RATE FOR SCHEDULE R AND SCHEDULE GS-1 50% V2 GREENWAY RATE FOR SCHEDULE R AND SCHEDULE GS-100% V2 Large Power Primary Service Industrial Large Power Secondary Service Industrial Large Power Service Industrial Residential Service Residential SCHEDULE GS - 3 Phase General Service Commercial SCHEDULE I - IRRIGATION Commercial

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lake utilities effective" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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241

Why sequence Bacteria from Lake Washington?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

bacteria from Lake Washington? bacteria from Lake Washington? Previous collaborations between the University of Washington team and the DOE JGI involving both single genome and metagenomic sequencing have greatly enhanced the community's ability to explore the diversity of bacteria functionally active in metabolism of single carbon compounds, known as methylotrophs, isolated from Lake Washington (Seattle, Washington) sediment. Sequencing genomes of 50 methylotroph isolates from the Lake Washington will further enhance the methylotroph community knowledge database providing a much higher level of resolution of global (meta)transcriptomic and (meta)proteomic analyses, as well as species interaction studies, informing a better understanding of biogeochemical cycling of carbon and nitrogen.

242

great_lakes_90mwindspeed_off  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

GISDataTechnologySpecificUnitedStatesWindHighResolutionGreatLakes90mWindspeedOffshoreWindHighResolution.zip> Description: Abstract: Annual average offshore wind...

243

Lake Region Electric Cooperative - Commercial Energy Efficiency...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

details Lake Region Electric Cooperative (LREC) offers grants to commercial customers for electric energy efficiency improvements, audits, and engineering and design assistance for...

244

Glacial Lakes Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

search Name Glacial Lakes Energy Place Watertown, South Dakota Zip 57201 Product Bioethanol producer using corn as feedstock Coordinates 43.197366, -88.720469 Loading...

245

Nacimiento Reservoir San Antonio Reservoir Searles Lake  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lake (Dry) TRONA WE ST END MCG EN SE ARLE S 190 395 RANDS BURG BA RREN RIDG E PINE T REE WIND FA RM LO

246

Direct heat applications of geothermal energy in The Geysers/Clear Lake region. Volume I. Geotechnical assessment, agribusiness applications, socioeconomic assessment, engineering assessment. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Discussion is presented under the following section headings: background and some technical characteristics of geothermal resources; geology and geohydrology, geophysics, and, conclusions regarding availability of geothermal energy for nonelectric uses; agricultural assessment of Lake County, site assessment for potential agricultural development, analysis of potential agricultural applications, special application of low cost geothermal energy to algae harvesting, development of an integrated agribusiness, geothermal complex in Lake County, analysis of individual enterprises, and, recommendations for subsequent work; demographic characteristics, economic condition and perspective of Lake County, economic impact of geothermal in Lake County, social and economic factors related to geothermal resource development, socioeconomic impact of nonelectric uses of geothermal energy, and, identification of direct heat applications of geothermal energy for Lake County based on selected interviews; cost estimate procedure, example, justification of procedure, and, typical costs and conclusions; and, recommended prefeasibility and feasibility studies related to construction of facilities for nonelectric applications of geothermal resource utilization. (JGB)

Not Available

1976-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

YEAR 2 BIOMASS UTILIZATION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) Year 2 Biomass Utilization Final Technical Report summarizes multiple projects in biopower or bioenergy, transportation biofuels, and bioproducts. A prototype of a novel advanced power system, termed the high-temperature air furnace (HITAF), was tested for performance while converting biomass and coal blends to energy. Three biomass fuels--wood residue or hog fuel, corn stover, and switchgrass--and Wyoming subbituminous coal were acquired for combustion tests in the 3-million-Btu/hr system. Blend levels were 20% biomass--80% coal on a heat basis. Hog fuel was prepared for the upcoming combustion test by air-drying and processing through a hammer mill and screen. A K-Tron biomass feeder capable of operating in both gravimetric and volumetric modes was selected as the HITAF feed system. Two oxide dispersion-strengthened (ODS) alloys that would be used in the HITAF high-temperature heat exchanger were tested for slag corrosion rates. An alumina layer formed on one particular alloy, which was more corrosion-resistant than a chromia layer that formed on the other alloy. Research activities were completed in the development of an atmospheric pressure, fluidized-bed pyrolysis-type system called the controlled spontaneous reactor (CSR), which is used to process and condition biomass. Tree trimmings were physically and chemically altered by the CSR process, resulting in a fuel that was very suitable for feeding into a coal combustion or gasification system with little or no feed system modifications required. Experimental procedures were successful for producing hydrogen from biomass using the bacteria Thermotoga, a deep-ocean thermal vent organism. Analytical procedures for hydrogen were evaluated, a gas chromatography (GC) method was derived for measuring hydrogen yields, and adaptation culturing and protocols for mutagenesis were initiated to better develop strains that can use biomass cellulose. Fly ash derived from cofiring coal with waste paper, sunflower hulls, and wood waste showed a broad spectrum of chemical and physical characteristics, according to American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) C618 procedures. Higher-than-normal levels of magnesium, sodium, and potassium oxide were observed for the biomass-coal fly ash, which may impact utilization in cement replacement in concrete under ASTM requirements. Other niche markets for biomass-derived fly ash were explored. Research was conducted to develop/optimize a catalytic partial oxidation-based concept for a simple, low-cost fuel processor (reformer). Work progressed to evaluate the effects of temperature and denaturant on ethanol catalytic partial oxidation. A catalyst was isolated that had a yield of 24 mole percent, with catalyst coking limited to less than 15% over a period of 2 hours. In biodiesel research, conversion of vegetable oils to biodiesel using an alternative alkaline catalyst was demonstrated without the need for subsequent water washing. In work related to biorefinery technologies, a continuous-flow reactor was used to react ethanol with lactic acid prepared from an ammonium lactate concentrate produced in fermentations conducted at the EERC. Good yields of ester were obtained even though the concentration of lactic acid in the feed was low with respect to the amount of water present. Esterification gave lower yields of ester, owing to the lowered lactic acid content of the feed. All lactic acid fermentation from amylose hydrolysate test trials was completed. Management activities included a decision to extend several projects to December 31, 2003, because of delays in receiving biomass feedstocks for testing and acquisition of commercial matching funds. In strategic studies, methods for producing acetate esters for high-value fibers, fuel additives, solvents, and chemical intermediates were discussed with several commercial entities. Commercial industries have an interest in efficient biomass gasification designs but are waiting for economic incentives. Utility, biorefinery, pulp and paper, or o

Christopher J. Zygarlicke

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

storage (CCS) technologies. CCSI will util  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(CCS) technologies. CCSI will utilize a software infrastructure (CCS) technologies. CCSI will utilize a software infrastructure to accelerate the development and deployment of new, cost-effective CCS technologies. This will be achieved by identifying promising concepts through rapid computational screening of devices and processes; reducing the time and expense to design and troubleshoot new devices and processes through science-based optimal designs;

249

Utility-affiliated cogeneration developer perspective  

SciTech Connect

The ability of the cogeneration industry to address electric power market requirements, some market observations and forecasts, and changes in the cogeneration industry are discussed. It is concluded that utility planning will increasingly need to account for the noted changing power market characteristics. Effective planning for electric utilities will require recognition of the competitive nature of the power business.

Ferrar, T.A.

1985-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Division of Water, Part 675: Great Lakes Water Withdrawal Registration...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

75: Great Lakes Water Withdrawal Registration Regulations (New York) Division of Water, Part 675: Great Lakes Water Withdrawal Registration Regulations (New York) Eligibility...

251

Lake Charles, LA Natural Gas LNG Imports from Equatorial Guinea...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Lake Charles, LA Natural Gas LNG Imports from Equatorial Guinea (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Lake Charles, LA Natural Gas LNG Imports from Equatorial Guinea (Dollars per...

252

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Fish Lake Valley Area (DOE...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At Fish Lake Valley Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location Fish Lake Valley Area...

253

VALUE DISTRIBUTION ASSESSMENT OF GEOTHERMAL DEVELOPMENT IN LAKE COUNTY, CA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Eleven: Lake County Geothermal Energy Resource. . . .by t h e Report of t h e State Geothermal Task Force WDISTRIBUTION ASSESSMENT OF GEOTHERMAL DEVELOP~NTIN LAKE

Churchman, C.W.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Obama Administration and Great Lakes States Announce Agreement...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Great Lakes States Announce Agreement to Spur Development of Offshore Wind Projects Obama Administration and Great Lakes States Announce Agreement to Spur Development of...

255

HERO BX formerly Lake Erie Biofuels | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon HERO BX formerly Lake Erie Biofuels Jump to: navigation, search Name HERO BX (formerly Lake Erie Biofuels) Place Erie,...

256

Geothermometry At Fish Lake Valley Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fish Lake Valley Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermometry At Fish Lake Valley Area (DOE GTP) Exploration...

257

Thermochronometry At Fish Lake Valley Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Thermochronometry At Fish Lake Valley Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermochronometry At Fish Lake Valley Area...

258

Lake Charles, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Lake Charles, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Trinidad and Tobago (Million Cubic Feet) Lake Charles, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Trinidad...

259

Licenses Available in Energy & Utilities | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy and Utilities Energy and Utilities SHARE Energy and Utilities 200000741 Automatic Detection of Bone Fragments in Poultry 200000782 Droplet Acoustic Wave Sensors 200000784 Method for the Enhancement of Aqueous Cleaning Operations 200000785 Bulk Metallic Glass Surgical Tools and Orthopedic Implants 200000789 Device for Separating CO2 from Fossil Power Plant Emissions 200000791 Wheel Reaction Force Sensing Apparatus/Whole-Vehicle Brake Tester 200000796 Fossil Fuel Combined Cycle Power System 200000799 Method for Accelerated Curing of Coatings for Explosion Prevention and Other Needs Using Microwave Technology 200000807 Effective Switching Frequency Multiplier Inverter 200000809 Improved Response Microcantilever Thermal Detector 200000813 High Slot Utilization System for Electric Machines

260

Dekker PMIS Extraction Utility  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0907. The Extraction Utility is used for retrieving project 0907. The Extraction Utility is used for retrieving project management data from a variety of source systems for upload into Dekker PMIS(tm) (Dekker iPursuit®, Dekker iProgram(tm), or DOE PARSII). This release incorporates a number of new features and updates focused to improve existing functionality. The quality of each Dekker PMIS(tm) Extraction Utility release is a primary consideration at Dekker, Ltd. Since every customer environment is unique, Dekker strongly recommends that each implementation validate any software update prior to its release into the production environment. Dekker continually strives to enhance the features and capabilities of the Dekker PMIS(tm) Extraction Utility. We are very excited about this update and look forward to its implementation in your

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lake utilities effective" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Electric Utility Industry Update  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Electric Utility Industry Update Electric Utility Industry Update Steve Kiesner Director, National Customer Markets Edison Electric Institute FUPWG Spring 2012 April 12, 2012 Edison Electric Institute  Investor-Owned Electric Companies  Membership includes  200 US companies,  More than 65 international affiliates and  170 associates  US members  Serve more than 95% of the ultimate customers in the investor-owned segment of the industry and  Nearly 70% of all electric utility ultimate customers, and  Our mission focuses on advocating public policy; expanding market opportunities; and providing strategic business information Agenda Significant Industry Trends Utility Infrastructure Investments Generation and Fuel Landscape

262

Dekker PMIS Extraction Utility  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1217. The Extraction Utility is used for retrieving project 1217. The Extraction Utility is used for retrieving project management data from a variety of source systems for upload into the Dekker PMIS(tm) (Dekker iPursuit®, Dekker iProgram(tm), or DOE PARSII). This release incorporates a number of new features and updates primarily focused to improve the existing functionality. The quality of each Dekker PMIS(tm) Extraction Utility release is a primary consideration at Dekker, Ltd. Since every customer environment is unique, Dekker strongly recommends that each implementation site validate all software updates prior to release into the production environment. Dekker continually strives to enhance the features and capabilities of the Dekker PMIS(tm) Extraction Utility. We are very excited about this update and look forward to its implementation in your

263

Gas Utilities (New York)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This chapter regulates natural gas utilities in the State of New York, and describes standards and procedures for gas meters and accessories, gas quality, line and main extensions, transmission and...

264

Physical and Chemical Implications of Mid-Winter Pumping of Trunda Lakes - North Slope, Alaska  

SciTech Connect

Tundra lakes on the North Slope, Alaska, are an important resource for energy development and petroleum field operations. A majority of exploration activities, pipeline maintenance, and restoration activities take place on winter ice roads that depend on water availability at key times of the winter operating season. These same lakes provide important fisheries and ecosystem functions. In particular, overwintering habitat for fish is one important management concern. This study focused on the evaluation of winter water use in the current field operating areas to provide a better understanding of the current water use practices. It found that under the current water use practices, there were no measurable negative effects of winter pumping on the lakes studied and current water use management practices were appropriately conservative. The study did find many areas where improvements in the understanding of tundra lake hydrology and water usage would benefit industry, management agencies, and the protection of fisheries and ecosystems.

Hinzman, Larry D. (University of Alaska Fairbanks, Water and Environmental Research Center); Lilly, Michael R. (Geo-Watersheds Scientific); Kane, Douglas L. (University of Alaska Fairbanks, Water and Environmental Research Center); Miller, D. Dan (University of Alaska Fairbanks, Water and Environmental Research Center); Galloway, Braden K. (University of Alaska Fairbanks, Water and Environmental Research Center); Hilton, Kristie M. (Geo-Watersheds Scientific); White, Daniel M. (University of Alaska Fairbanks, Water and Environmental Research Center)

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

265

Utility Solar Business Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and the Solar Electric Power Association (SEPA) are conducting an ongoing joint research effort, initiated in 2011, to define, track, and evaluate the expanding range of regulated utility solar energy acquisition activities. This report provides a high-level overview of the conceptual framework by which EPRI-SEPA are classifying regulated utility solar business models (USBMs) in the United States. It then provides five case studies detailing existing ...

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

266

Banks Lake Fishery Evaluation Annual Report 2002-2003.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife implemented the Banks Lake Fishery Evaluation Project (BLFEP) in September 2001 with funds from the Bonneville Power Administration. Fiscal Year (FY) 2001 of the BLFEP was used to gather historic information, establish methods and protocols, collect limnology data, and conduct the first seasonal fish surveys. FY 2002 was used to continue seasonal fish and lakewide creel surveys and adjust methods and protocols as needed. Water quality parameters were collected monthly from February to May and bi-monthly from June to August. Banks Lake water temperatures began to increase in April and stratification was apparent by June at all 3 limnology collection sites. By late August, the thermocline had dropped to nearly 20 meters deep, with 16-17 C temperatures throughout the epilimnion. Dissolved oxygen levels were generally above 10 mg/L until August when dissolved oxygen dropped near or below 5 mg/L below 20-meters deep. Secchi depths ranged from 2.5-8 meters and varied by location and date. Nearshore and offshore fish surveys were conducted in October 2002 and May and July 2003 using boat electrofishing, fyke net, gill net, and hydroacoustic surveys. Yellow Perch Perca flavescens (32 %) and cottid spp. (22 %) dominated the nearshore species composition in October; however, by May yellow perch (12 %) were the third most common species followed by smallmouth bass Micropterous dolomieui (34 %) and lake whitefish Coregonus clupeaformis (14 %). Lake whitefish dominated the offshore catch during October (78 %) and May (81 %). Fish diet analysis indicated that juvenile fishes consumed primarily insects and zooplankton, while adult piscivores consumed cottids spp. and yellow perch most frequently. For FY 2002, the following creel statistics are comprehensive through August 31, 2003. The highest angling pressure occurred in June 2003, when anglers were primarily targeting walleye and smallmouth bass. Boat anglers utilized Steamboat State Park more frequently than any other boat ramp on Banks Lake. Shore anglers used the rock jetty at Coulee City Park 76 % of the time, with highest use occurring from November through April. An estimated total of 11,915 ({+-}140 SD) smallmouth bass, 6,412 ({+-}59 SD) walleye, 5,470 ({+-}260 SD) rainbow trout, and 1,949 ({+-}118 SD) yellow perch were harvested from Banks Lake in FY 2002. Only 3 kokanee were reported in the catch during the FY 2002 creel survey. In the future, data from the seasonal surveys and creel will be used to identify potential factors that may limit the production and harvest of kokanee, rainbow trout, and various spiny-rayed fishes in Banks Lake. The limiting factors that will be examined consist of: abiotic factors including water temperature, dissolved oxygen levels, habitat, exploitation and entrainment; and biotic factors including food limitation and predation. The BLFEP will also evaluate the success of several rearing and stocking strategies for hatchery kokanee in Banks Lake.

Polacek, Matt; Knuttgen, Kamia; Shipley, Rochelle

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Hungry Horse Mitigation; Flathead Lake, 2001-2002 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes (CSKT) and Montana Fish Wildlife and Parks (MFWP) wrote ''Fisheries Mitigation Plan for Losses Attributable to the Construction and Operation of Hungry Horse Dam'' in March 1991 to define the fisheries losses, mitigation alternatives and recommendations to protect, mitigate and enhance resident fish and aquatic habitat affected by Hungry Horse Dam. On November 12, 1991, the Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) approved the mitigation plan with minor modifications, called for a detailed implementation plan, and amended measures 903(h)(1) through (7). A long-term mitigation plan was submitted in August 1992, was approved by the Council in 1993, and the first contract for this project was signed on November 11, 1993. The problem this project addresses is the loss of habitat, both in quality and quantity, in the interconnected Flathead Lake and River basin resulting from the construction and operation of Hungry Horse Dam. The purpose of the project is to both implement mitigation measures and monitor the biological responses to those measures including those implemented by Project Numbers 9101903 and 9101904. Goals and objectives of the 1994 Fish and Wildlife Program (Section 10.1) addressed by this project are the rebuilding to sustainable levels weak, but recoverable, native populations injured by the hydropower system. The project mitigates the blockage of spawning runs by Hungry Horse Dam by restoring and even creating spawning habitats within direct drainages to Flathead Lake. The project also addresses the altered habitat within Flathead Lake resulting from species shifts and consequent dominance of new species that restricts the potential success of mitigation measures. Specific goals of this project are to create and restore habitat and quantitatively monitor changes in fish populations to verify the efficacy of our mitigation measures. The project consists of three components: monitoring, restoration and research. Monitoring, for example, includes a spring gillnetting series conducted annually in Flathead Lake and builds on an existing data set initiated in 1981. Monitoring of the experimental kokanee reintroduction was a primary activity of this project between 1992 and 1997. Lake trout, whose high densities have precluded successful mitigation of losses of other species in Flathead Lake, have been monitored since 1996 to measure several biological parameters. Results of this work have utility in determining the population status of this key predator in Flathead Lake. The project has also defined the baseline condition of the Flathead Lake fishery in 1992-1993 and has conducted annual lakewide surveys since 1998. The restoration component of the project has addressed several stream channel, riparian, and fish passage problems. The research component of the project began in FY 2000 and measured trophic linkages between M. relicta and other species to assist in predicting the results of potential mitigation strategies. Only Objective 1 in the workplan is funded entirely by Hungry Horse Mitigation funds. Additional funds are drawn from other sources to assist in completion of Objectives 2-6.

Hansen, Barry (Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes of the Flathead Nation, Pablo, MT)

2003-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

268

Treatment of acid mine lakes.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Mining of lignite in Lusatia has a long history of over 100 years. The extracted brown coal is utilized to generate electricity in three large (more)

Schipek, Mandy

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

The Lake Charles CCS Project  

SciTech Connect

The Lake Charles CCS Project is a large-scale industrial carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) project which will demonstrate advanced technologies that capture and sequester carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions from industrial sources into underground formations. Specifically the Lake Charles CCS Project will accelerate commercialization of large-scale CO{sub 2} storage from industrial sources by leveraging synergy between a proposed petroleum coke to chemicals plant (the LCC Gasification Project) and the largest integrated anthropogenic CO{sub 2} capture, transport, and monitored sequestration program in the U.S. Gulf Coast Region. The Lake Charles CCS Project will promote the expansion of EOR in Texas and Louisiana and supply greater energy security by expanding domestic energy supplies. The capture, compression, pipeline, injection, and monitoring infrastructure will continue to sequester CO{sub 2} for many years after the completion of the term of the DOE agreement. The objectives of this project are expected to be fulfilled by working through two distinct phases. The overall objective of Phase 1 was to develop a fully definitive project basis for a competitive Renewal Application process to proceed into Phase 2 - Design, Construction and Operations. Phase 1 includes the studies attached hereto that will establish: the engineering design basis for the capture, compression and transportation of CO{sub 2} from the LCC Gasification Project, and the criteria and specifications for a monitoring, verification and accounting (MVA) plan at the Hastings oil field in Texas. The overall objective of Phase 2, provided a successful competitive down-selection, is to execute design, construction and operations of three capital projects: (1) the CO{sub 2} capture and compression equipment, (2) a Connector Pipeline from the LLC Gasification Project to the Green Pipeline owned by Denbury and an affiliate of Denbury, and (3) a comprehensive MVA system at the Hastings oil field.

Doug Cathro

2010-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

270

Bingham Lake Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lake Wind Farm Lake Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Bingham Lake Wind Farm Facility Bingham Lake Wind Farm Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Edison Mission Group owns majority Developer Edison Mission Group Energy Purchaser Alliant Energy Location Bingham Lake MN Coordinates 43.909°, -95.0464° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.909,"lon":-95.0464,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

271

Why sequence novel haloarchaea from Deep Lake?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

novel haloarchaea from Deep Lake? novel haloarchaea from Deep Lake? Antarctica's Deep Lake was isolated from the ocean by glaciers long ago, creating a salt water lake with a unique ecosystem for studying the evolution of marine microorganisms in harsh extremes. Among these microorganisms are haloarchaea, members of the halophile community which need high salt concentrations in order to grow. Haloarchaea are a distinct evolutionary branch of the Archaea, and are considered extremophiles. The haloarchaea from Deep Lake are naturally adapted to cold, nutrient-limited and high saline level conditions that would kill almost any other life. The enzymes in these naturally adapted microorganisms can provide insight into bioprospecting and bioengineering cold active and salt-adapted enzymes. Understanding how haloarchaea

272

Doing business with business: Municipal utility energy audits  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article is a review of the ways in which municipal utilities can use energy audits to identify the energy efficiency measures that are most effective for themselves and their customers. Two examples, Osage Municipal Utilities in Iowa and Sacramento Municipal Utility District in California, are used to illustrate the strategies that are most cost effective.

NONE

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

"List of Covered Electric Utilities" under the Public Utility...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9 "List of Covered Electric Utilities" under the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA) - 2009 Under Title I, Sec. 102(c) of the Public Utility Regulatory Policies...

274

"List of Covered Electric Utilities" under the Public Utility...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8 "List of Covered Electric Utilities" under the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA) - 2008 Under Title I of the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978...

275

CONFIRMATORY SURVEY REPORT FOR THE SECTION 4 AREA AT THE RIO ALGOM AMBROSIA LAKE FACILITY NEW MEXICO  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of the confirmatory survey were to verify that remedial actions were effective in meeting established release criteria and that documentation accurately and adequately described the final radiological conditions of the RAM Ambrosia Lake, Section 4 Areas.

W.C. Adams

2010-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

276

Geohydrology and evapotranspiration at Franklin Lake playa, Inyo County, California  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Franklin Lake playa is one of the principal discharge areas of the Furnace Creek Ranch-Alkali Flat ground-water-flow system in southern Nevada and adjacent California. Yucca Mountain, Nevada, located within this flow system, is being evaluated by the US Department of Energy to determine its suitability as a potential site for a high-level nuclear-waste repository. To assist the U.S. Department of Energy with its evaluation of the Yucca Mountain site, the US Geological Survey developed a parameter-estimation model of the Furnace Creek Ranch-Alkali Flat ground-water-flow system. Results from sensitivity analyses made using the parameter-estimation model indicated that simulated rates of evapotranspiration at Franklin Lake playa had the largest effect on the calculation of transmissivity values at Yucca Mountain of all the model-boundary conditions and, therefore, that evapotranspiration required careful definition.

Czarnecki, J.B.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

277

Value distribution assessment of geothermal development in Lake County, CA  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A value distribution assessment is defined as the determination of the distribution of benefits and costs of a proposed or actual development, with the intent of comparing such a development with alternative plans. Included are not only the social and economic effects, but also people's perceptions of their roles and how they are affected by the proposed or actual development. Discussion is presented under the following section headings: on morality and ethics; the vanishing community; case study of pre-development planning--Lake County; methodology for research; Lake County geothermal energy resource; decision making; Planning Commission hearing; communication examples; benefit tracing; response to issues raised by the report of the State Geothermal Task Force; and, conclusions and recommendations. (JGB)

Churchman, C.W.; Nelson, H.G.; Eacret, K.

1977-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

utilities | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

utilities utilities Dataset Summary Description Datasets are for the US electricity grid system interconnect regions (ASCC, FRCC, HICC, MRO, NPCC, RFC, SERC, SPP, TRE, WECC) for 2008. The data is provided in life cycle inventory (LCI) forms (both xls and xml). A module report and a detailed spreadsheet are also included. Source US Life Cycle Inventory Database Date Released May 01st, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords ASCC FRCC HICC interconnect region LCI life cycle inventory MRO NPCC RFC SERC SPP TRE unit process US utilities WECC Data application/zip icon interconnect_lci_datasets_2008.zip (zip, 6.3 MiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period License License Open Data Commons Public Domain Dedication and Licence (PDDL)

279

Investment in Lake States Timberland June 24, 2008  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

­ Lake States Region Scott Henker, Senior Resource Manager Pete Coutu, Marketing Manager Our foresters

280

Utility Stack Opacity Troubleshooting Guidelines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Utilities have become increasingly concerned about stack plume visibility, and some have been cited for excess plume opacity. This troubleshooting guide enables utilities to characterize plume opacity problems at full-scale utility sites and evaluate possible solutions.

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lake utilities effective" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Category:Houghton-Lake, MI | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Houghton-Lake, MI Houghton-Lake, MI Jump to: navigation, search Go Back to PV Economics By Location Media in category "Houghton-Lake, MI" The following 16 files are in this category, out of 16 total. SVFullServiceRestaurant Houghton-Lake MI Detroit Edison Co.png SVFullServiceRestauran... 64 KB SVHospital Houghton-Lake MI Detroit Edison Co.png SVHospital Houghton-La... 64 KB SVLargeHotel Houghton-Lake MI Detroit Edison Co.png SVLargeHotel Houghton-... 61 KB SVLargeOffice Houghton-Lake MI Detroit Edison Co.png SVLargeOffice Houghton... 64 KB SVMediumOffice Houghton-Lake MI Detroit Edison Co.png SVMediumOffice Houghto... 61 KB SVMidriseApartment Houghton-Lake MI Detroit Edison Co.png SVMidriseApartment Hou... 65 KB SVOutPatient Houghton-Lake MI Detroit Edison Co.png SVOutPatient Houghton-...

282

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

was produced by Wisconsin Electric's coal-fired power plants. The criteria for selecting these mixtures was to utilize minimal cost materials, such as coal combustion by-products (fly ash, bottom ash, etc of sufficient strength to withstand handling, transfer and long term exposure. The final phase (4) was designed

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

283

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

investigation. Two additional ash samples were prepared by blending these selected conventional and clean coalCenter for By-Products Utilization HIGH-STRENGTH HVFA CONCRETE CONTAINING CLEAN COAL ASH By Tarun R #12;1 HIGH-STRENGTH HVFA CONCRETE CONTAINING CLEAN COAL ASH By Tarun R. Naik, Shiw S. Singh, and Bruce

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

284

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Center for By-Products Utilization USE OF CLASS F FLY ASH AND CLEAN-COAL ASH BLENDS FOR CAST by blending these selected conventional and clean coal ashes. Using these sixdifferent ash samples, eleven of 0 and60 percent by high-sulfurcoal ashes (Class F and clean-coal ashes) andcoal ash blends (Class F

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

285

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Center for By-Products Utilization USE OF CLASS F FLY ASH AND CLEAN-COAL ASH BLENDS FOR CAST OF CLASS F FLY ASH AND CLEAN-COAL ASH BLENDS FOR CAST CONCRETE PRODUCTS Authors: Tarun R. Naik, Director investigation. Two additional ash samples were prepared by blending these selected conventional and clean coal

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

286

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as the coal ash derived from SOx control technology. Up to 80% of CCA was blended with ground portland cement: blended cement, clean coal ash, sulfate resistance, time of setting #12;3 Zichao Wu is Structural EngineerCenter for By-Products Utilization USE OF CLEAN COAL ASH AS SETTING TIME REGULATOR IN PORTLAND

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

287

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and clean-coal ashes) andcoal ash blends (Class F plus clean-coal ash blends) in the range of 0 to 60Center for By-Products Utilization CHARACTERIZATION AND APPLICATION OF CLASSF FLY ASHCOAL AND CLEAN-COAL,and Bruce W. Ramme CBU-1996-08 REP-283 July 1996 Presented andPublished at the American Coal Ash Association

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

288

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Test results indicated that all the blends with coal ash had lower expansion than the control mixtureCenter for By-Products Utilization USE OF CLEAN-COAL ASH FOR MANAGING ASR By Zichao Wu and Tarun R College of Engineering and Applied Science THE UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN­MILWAUKEE #12;USE OF CLEAN-COAL ASH

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

289

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

mixtures were developed using blends of wood FA and Class C coal FA. Two levels of blended ash of concrete. Blending of wood FA with Class C coal FA improved performance of wood FA to a significant extentCenter for By-Products Utilization GREENER CONCRETE FROM WOOD FLY ASH AND COAL FLY ASH By Tarun R

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

290

Utility spot pricing, California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The objective of the present spot pricing study carried out for SCE and PG&E is to develop the concepts which wculd lead to an experimental design for spot pricing in the two utilities. The report suggests a set of experiments ...

Schweppe, Fred C.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Advanced fossil energy utilization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This special issue of Fuel is a selection of papers presented at the symposium Advanced Fossil Energy Utilization co-sponsored by the Fuels and Petrochemicals Division and Research and New Technology Committee in the 2009 American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE) Spring National Meeting Tampa, FL, on April 2630, 2009.

Shekhawat, D.; Berry, D.; Spivey, J.; Pennline, H.; Granite, E.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Utility Baghouse Survey 2009  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI conducted comprehensive surveys of utility baghouse installations in 1981, 1991, and 2005 to summarize the state of the technology. The current survey focuses on nine selected pulse-jet baghouses to provide a better understanding of the design, performance, and operation of recent installations.

2009-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

293

Federal Utility Partnership Working Group | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Project Funding » Utility Energy Service Contracts » Federal Project Funding » Utility Energy Service Contracts » Federal Utility Partnership Working Group Federal Utility Partnership Working Group October 7, 2013 - 2:31pm Addthis The Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) establishes partnerships and facilitates communications among Federal agencies, utilities, and energy service companies. The group develops strategies to implement cost-effective energy efficiency and water conservation projects through utility incentive programs at Federal sites. The mission and objectives of the Federal Utility Partnership Working Group are to: Enhance existing or foster new partnerships between Federal agencies and their servicing utilities to identify, develop, and implement cost-effective energy efficiency, water conservation, and renewable energy

294

TANK OPERATIONS CONTRACT CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT METHODOLOGY UTILIZING THE AGENCY METHOD OF CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT TO SAFELY AND EFFECTIVELY COMPLETE NUCLEAR CONSTRUCTION WORK  

SciTech Connect

Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (WRPS) has faced significant project management challenges in managing Davis-Bacon construction work that meets contractually required small business goals. The unique challenge is to provide contracting opportunities to multiple small business construction subcontractors while performing high hazard work in a safe and productive manner. Previous to the Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC contract, Construction work at the Hanford Tank Farms was contracted to large companies, while current Department of Energy (DOE) Contracts typically emphasize small business awards. As an integral part of Nuclear Project Management at Hanford Tank Farms, construction involves removal of old equipment and structures and installation of new infrastructure to support waste retrieval and waste feed delivery to the Waste Treatment Plant. Utilizing the optimum construction approach ensures that the contractors responsible for this work are successful in meeting safety, quality, cost and schedule objectives while working in a very hazardous environment. This paper describes the successful transition from a traditional project delivery method that utilized a large business general contractor and subcontractors to a new project construction management model that is more oriented to small businesses. Construction has selected the Agency Construction Management Method. This method was implemented in the first quarter of Fiscal Year (FY) 2009, where Construction Management is performed by substantially home office resources from the URS Northwest Office in Richland, Washington. The Agency Method has allowed WRPS to provide proven Construction Managers and Field Leads to mentor and direct small business contractors, thus providing expertise and assurance of a successful project. Construction execution contracts are subcontracted directly by WRPS to small or disadvantaged contractors that are mentored and supported by DRS personnel. Each small contractor is mentored and supported utilizing the principles of the Construction Industry Institute (CII) Partnering process. Some of the key mentoring and partnering areas that are explored in this paper are, internal and external safety professional support, subcontractor safety teams and the interface with project and site safety teams, quality assurance program support to facilitate compliance with NQA-1, construction, team roles and responsibilities, work definition for successful fixed price contracts, scheduling and interface with project schedules and cost projection/accruals. The practical application of the CII Partnering principles, with the Construction Management expertise of URS, has led to a highly successful construction model that also meets small business contracting goals.

LESO KF; HAMILTON HM; FARNER M; HEATH T

2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

295

Power Sales to Electric Utilities  

SciTech Connect

The Public Utilities Regulatory Policies Act (PURPA) of 1979 requires that electrical utilities interconnect with qualifying facilities and purchase electricity at a rate based upon their full avoided costs (i.e., costs of providing both capacity and energy). Qualifying facilities (QF) include solar or geothermal electric units, hydropower, municipal solid waste or biomass-fired power plants, and cogeneration projects that satisfy maximum size, fuel use, ownership, location, and/or efficiency criteria. In Washington State, neither standard power purchase prices based upon a proxy ''avoided plant'', standard contracts, or a standard offer process have been used. Instead, a variety of power purchase contracts have been negotiated by developers of qualifying facilities with investor-owned utilities, public utility districts, and municipally-owned and operated utilities. With a hydro-based system, benefits associated with resource acquisition are determined in large part by how compatible the resource is with a utility's existing generation mix. Power purchase rates are negotiated and vary according to firm energy production, guarantees, ability to schedule maintenance or downtime, rights of refusal, power plant purchase options, project start date and length of contract; front-loading or levelization provisions; and the ability of the project to provide ''demonstrated'' capacity. Legislation was also enacted which allows PURPA to work effectively. Initial laws established ownership rights and provided irrigation districts, PUDs, and municipalities with expanded enabling powers. Financial processes were streamlined and, in some cases, simplified. Finally, laws were passed which are designed to ensure that development proceeds in an environmentally acceptable manner. In retrospect, PURPA has worked well within Washington. In the state of Washington, 20 small-scale hydroelectric projects with a combined generating capacity of 77 MW, 3 solid waste-to-energy facilities with 55 MW of electrical output, 4 cogeneration projects with 34.5 MW of generating capability, and 4 wastewater treatment facility digester gas-to-energy projects with 5 MW of electrical production have come on-line (or are in the final stages of construction) since the passage of PURPA. These numbers represent only a small portion of Washington's untapped and underutilized cogeneration and renewable resource generating potentials. [DJE-2005

None

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Power Sales to Electric Utilities  

SciTech Connect

The Public Utilities Regulatory Policies Act (PURPA) of 1979 requires that electrical utilities interconnect with qualifying facilities and purchase electricity at a rate based upon their full avoided costs (i.e., costs of providing both capacity and energy). Qualifying facilities (QF) include solar or geothermal electric units, hydropower, municipal solid waste or biomass-fired power plants, and cogeneration projects that satisfy maximum size, fuel use, ownership, location, and/or efficiency criteria. In Washington State, neither standard power purchase prices based upon a proxy ''avoided plant'', standard contracts, or a standard offer process have been used. Instead, a variety of power purchase contracts have been negotiated by developers of qualifying facilities with investor-owned utilities, public utility districts, and municipally-owned and operated utilities. With a hydro-based system, benefits associated with resource acquisition are determined in large part by how compatible the resource is with a utility's existing generation mix. Power purchase rates are negotiated and vary according to firm energy production, guarantees, ability to schedule maintenance or downtime, rights of refusal, power plant purchase options, project start date and length of contract; front-loading or levelization provisions; and the ability of the project to provide ''demonstrated'' capacity. Legislation was also enacted which allows PURPA to work effectively. Initial laws established ownership rights and provided irrigation districts, PUDs, and municipalities with expanded enabling powers. Financial processes were streamlined and, in some cases, simplified. Finally, laws were passed which are designed to ensure that development proceeds in an environmentally acceptable manner. In retrospect, PURPA has worked well within Washington. In the state of Washington, 20 small-scale hydroelectric projects with a combined generating capacity of 77 MW, 3 solid waste-to-energy facilities with 55 MW of electrical output, 4 cogeneration projects with 34.5 MW of generating capability, and 4 wastewater treatment facility digester gas-to-energy projects with 5 MW of electrical production have come on-line (or are in the final stages of construction) since the passage of PURPA. These numbers represent only a small portion of Washington's untapped and underutilized cogeneration and renewable resource generating potentials. [DJE-2005

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Utility Line Inspections and Audits  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Utility Line Inspections and Audits provides utility engineers with a concise reference for the pros, cons, and how to related to performing various line inspections and audits.

2007-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

298

Using Snow Fences to Augument Fresh Water Supplies in Shallow Arctic Lakes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to address environmental research questions specifically related to Alaska?s oil and gas natural resources development. The focus of this project was on the environmental issues associated with allocation of water resources for construction of ice roads and ice pads. Earlier NETL projects showed that oil and gas exploration activities in the U.S. Arctic require large amounts of water for ice road and ice pad construction. Traditionally, lakes have been the source of freshwater for this purpose. The distinctive hydrological regime of northern lakes, caused by the presence of ice cover and permafrost, exerts influence on lake water availability in winter. Lakes are covered with ice from October to June, and there is often no water recharge of lakes until snowmelt in early June. After snowmelt, water volumes in the lakes decrease throughout the summer, when water loss due to evaporation is considerably greater than water gained from rainfall. This balance switches in August, when air temperature drops, evaporation decreases, and rain (or snow) is more likely to occur. Some of the summer surface storage deficit in the active layer and surface water bodies (lakes, ponds, wetlands) is recharged during this time. However, if the surface storage deficit is not replenished (for example, precipitation in the fall is low and near?surface soils are dry), lake recharge is directly affected, and water availability for the following winter is reduced. In this study, we used snow fences to augment fresh water supplies in shallow arctic lakes despite unfavorable natural conditions. We implemented snow?control practices to enhance snowdrift accumulation (greater snow water equivalent), which led to increased meltwater production and an extended melting season that resulted in lake recharge despite low precipitation during the years of the experiment. For three years (2009, 2010, and 2011), we selected and monitored two lakes with similar hydrological regimes. Both lakes are located 30 miles south of Prudhoe Bay, Alaska, near Franklin Bluffs. One is an experimental lake, where we installed a snow fence; the other is a control lake, where the natural regime was preserved. The general approach was to compare the hydrologic response of the lake to the snowdrift during the summers of 2010 and 2011 against the ?baseline? conditions in 2009. Highlights of the project included new data on snow transport rates on the Alaska North Slope, an evaluation of the experimental lake?s hydrological response to snowdrift melt, and cost assessment of snowdrift?generated water. High snow transport rates (0.49 kg/s/m) ensured that the snowdrift reached its equilibrium profile by winter's end. Generally, natural snowpack disappeared by the beginning of June in this area. In contrast, snow in the drift lasted through early July, supplying the experimental lake with snowmelt when water in other tundra lakes was decreasing. The experimental lake retained elevated water levels during the entire open?water season. Comparison of lake water volumes during the experiment against the baseline year showed that, by the end of summer, the drift generated by the snow fence had increased lake water volume by at least 21?29%. We estimated water cost at 1.9 cents per gallon during the first year and 0.8 cents per gallon during the second year. This estimate depends on the cost of snow fence construction in remote arctic locations, which we assumed to be at $7.66 per square foot of snow fence frontal area. The snow fence technique was effective in augmenting the supply of lake water during summers 2010 and 2011 despite low rainfall during both summers. Snow fences are a simple, yet an effective, way to replenish tundra lakes with freshwater and increase water availability in winter. This research project was synergetic with the NETL project, "North Slope Decision Support System (NSDSS) for Water Resources Planning and Management." The results

Stuefer, Svetlana

2013-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

299

Using Snow Fences to Augument Fresh Water Supplies in Shallow Arctic Lakes  

SciTech Connect

This project was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to address environmental research questions specifically related to Alaska?s oil and gas natural resources development. The focus of this project was on the environmental issues associated with allocation of water resources for construction of ice roads and ice pads. Earlier NETL projects showed that oil and gas exploration activities in the U.S. Arctic require large amounts of water for ice road and ice pad construction. Traditionally, lakes have been the source of freshwater for this purpose. The distinctive hydrological regime of northern lakes, caused by the presence of ice cover and permafrost, exerts influence on lake water availability in winter. Lakes are covered with ice from October to June, and there is often no water recharge of lakes until snowmelt in early June. After snowmelt, water volumes in the lakes decrease throughout the summer, when water loss due to evaporation is considerably greater than water gained from rainfall. This balance switches in August, when air temperature drops, evaporation decreases, and rain (or snow) is more likely to occur. Some of the summer surface storage deficit in the active layer and surface water bodies (lakes, ponds, wetlands) is recharged during this time. However, if the surface storage deficit is not replenished (for example, precipitation in the fall is low and near?surface soils are dry), lake recharge is directly affected, and water availability for the following winter is reduced. In this study, we used snow fences to augment fresh water supplies in shallow arctic lakes despite unfavorable natural conditions. We implemented snow?control practices to enhance snowdrift accumulation (greater snow water equivalent), which led to increased meltwater production and an extended melting season that resulted in lake recharge despite low precipitation during the years of the experiment. For three years (2009, 2010, and 2011), we selected and monitored two lakes with similar hydrological regimes. Both lakes are located 30 miles south of Prudhoe Bay, Alaska, near Franklin Bluffs. One is an experimental lake, where we installed a snow fence; the other is a control lake, where the natural regime was preserved. The general approach was to compare the hydrologic response of the lake to the snowdrift during the summers of 2010 and 2011 against the ?baseline? conditions in 2009. Highlights of the project included new data on snow transport rates on the Alaska North Slope, an evaluation of the experimental lake?s hydrological response to snowdrift melt, and cost assessment of snowdrift?generated water. High snow transport rates (0.49 kg/s/m) ensured that the snowdrift reached its equilibrium profile by winter's end. Generally, natural snowpack disappeared by the beginning of June in this area. In contrast, snow in the drift lasted through early July, supplying the experimental lake with snowmelt when water in other tundra lakes was decreasing. The experimental lake retained elevated water levels during the entire open?water season. Comparison of lake water volumes during the experiment against the baseline year showed that, by the end of summer, the drift generated by the snow fence had increased lake water volume by at least 21?29%. We estimated water cost at 1.9 cents per gallon during the first year and 0.8 cents per gallon during the second year. This estimate depends on the cost of snow fence construction in remote arctic locations, which we assumed to be at $7.66 per square foot of snow fence frontal area. The snow fence technique was effective in augmenting the supply of lake water during summers 2010 and 2011 despite low rainfall during both summers. Snow fences are a simple, yet an effective, way to replenish tundra lakes with freshwater and increase water availability in winter. This research project was synergetic with the NETL project, "North Slope Decision Support System (NSDSS) for Water Resources Planning and Management." The results

Stuefer, Svetlana

2013-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

300

utility | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

utility utility Home Sfomail's picture Submitted by Sfomail(48) Member 17 May, 2013 - 11:14 Utility Rates API Version 2 is Live! API developer OpenEI update utility Utility Companies utility rate Utility Rates version 1 version 2 version 3 web service Smart meter After several months of development and testing, the next generation web service for the utility rate database is finally here! I encourage you to check out the V2 Utility Rates API at http://en.openei.org/services/doc/rest/util_rates Graham7781's picture Submitted by Graham7781(2002) Super contributor 11 January, 2013 - 14:21 Swinerton Renewable Energy Awarded Contract to Construct and Operate 250 MWac K Road Moapa Solar Plant Marketwire OpenEI Renewable Energy Solar Swinerton utility Syndicate content 429 Throttled (bot load)

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lake utilities effective" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Silica Extraction at the Mammoth Lakes Geothermal Site  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this project is to develop a cost-effective method to extract marketable silica (SiO{sub 2}) from fluids at the Mammoth Lakes, California geothermal power plant. Marketable silica provides an additional revenue source for the geothermal power industry and therefore lowers the costs of geothermal power production. The use of this type of ''solution mining'' to extract resources from geothermal fluids eliminates the need for acquiring these resources through energy intensive and environmentally damaging mining technologies. We have demonstrated that both precipitated and colloidal silica can be produced from the geothermal fluids at Mammoth Lakes by first concentrating the silica to over 600 ppm using reverse osmosis (RO). The RO permeate can be used in evaporative cooling at the plant; the RO concentrate is used for silica and potentially other (Li, Cs, Rb) resource extraction. Preliminary results suggest that silica recovery at Mammoth Lakes could reduce the cost of geothermal electricity production by 1.0 cents/kWh.

Bourcier, W; Ralph, W; Johnson, M; Bruton, C; Gutierrez, P

2006-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

302

Hydrological and solute budgets of Lake Qinghai, the largest lake on the Tibetan Plateau  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Water level and chemistry of Lake Qinghai are sensitive to climate changes and are important for paleoclimatic implications. An accurate understanding of hydrological and chemical budgets is crucial for quantifying geochemical proxies and carbon cycle. Published results of water budget are firstly reviewed in this paper. Chemical budget and residence time of major dissolved constituents in the lake are estimated using reliable water budget and newly obtained data for seasonal water chemistry. The results indicate that carbonate weathering is the most important riverine process, resulting in dominance of Ca2+ and DIC for river waters and groundwater. Groundwater contribution to major dissolved constituents is relatively small (4.2 0.5%). Wet atmospheric deposition contributes annually 7.444.0% soluble flux to the lake, resulting from eolian dust throughout the seasons. Estimates of chemical budget further suggest that (1) the Buha-type water dominates the chemical components of the lake water, (2) Na+, Cl?, Mg2+, and K+ in lake water are enriched owing to their conservative behaviors, and (3) precipitation of authigenic carbonates (low-Mg calcite, aragonite, and dolomite) transits quickly dissolved Ca2+ into the bottom sediments of the lake, resulting in very low Ca2+ in the lake water. Therefore, authigenic carbonates in the sediments hold potential information on the relative contribution of different solute inputs to the lake and the lake chemistry in the past.

Jin, Zhangdong; You, Chen-Feng; Wang, Yi; Shi, Yuewei

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Best Practices for Sustainable WInd Energy Development in the Great Lakes Region and Beyond  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document offers a menu of 18 different, yet complimentary preferred practices and policies. The best practices cover all phases of the wind energy development process - from the policies that allow for wind development, to the sustainable operation of a wind project, to the best practices for decommissioning a spent turbine - including applications for offshore wind. The practices include those that have been previously tested and proven effective, as well as new practices that were identified by experts in the field as needed for future wind developments. Each best practice includes information about the opportunities and challenges (pros and cons), and offers a case example that illustrates how that best practice is being utilized by a particular jurisdiction or wind project. The practices described in this publication were selected by a diverse group of interests from the Great Lakes Wind Collaborative that included environmental groups, industry, and federal, state and local government regulators. They were identified through a year long process that included a literature review, online survey and interviews with individuals from the public, private and non-profit sectors.

Great Lakes Commission; Victoria Pebbles; John Hummer; Celia Haven

2011-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

304

pine (mail utility info)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

pine (mail utility info) pine (mail utility info) Basics, FAQ, etc, On our UNIX machines, module load pine The line module load pine should ALSO be in the file ~/.rc/user_modules (The pine module also includes pico) pine usage with IMAP4 (UNIX) Moving pine email files into IMAP4 LBNL UNIX info on pine links to Pine Information Center Pine 4.2.1/Solaris: Forwarding as attachment; the following procedure has proved successful for at least some users: Check the option "enable-full-header-cmd". To get to this option, 1. M (Main Menu) 2. S (Setup) "Choose a setup task from the menu below :" 3. C (Configure) 4. Scroll down to "Advanced Command Preferences", and press "X" to set "enable-full-header-cmd". It looks like this: ================================================================

305

PDSF Utilization Graphs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Graphs Graphs Utilization Graphs This page contains a series of graphs that use data from the PDSF batch scheduler (SGE) to show the utilization of the cluster over the past 24 hours. The graphs were generated with RRDTool and are updated approximately every 15 minutes. This graph shows the aggregate cluster CPU availablity and usage according to sgeload: 24 hour rolling usage graph (click to see long term averages) This graph shows the number of jobs being run by each group: Rolling 24 Running Jobs by Group (click to see long term averages) This is the same graph as above weighted by the clockspeed (GHz) of the node used for the job: Rolling 24 Running Jobs by Group (click to see long term averages) This graph show the number of pending jobs by group: Rolling 24 Pending Jobs

306

Launching Agency and Utility Participation and Projects  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Launching Agency and Utility Launching Agency and Utility Participation and Projects (UESC Lessons Learned & Breaking Down the Barriers) [Direct Assistance] Working Session: Facilitated Group Discussion Cape Canaveral, Florida May 1, 2007 Objectives of this Working Session Outcomes of the San Francisco working session * Increase awareness of UESC vehicles * Better promote FUPWG * Improve communication among partners and stakeholders * Educate key stakeholders * Provide technical assistance to kick-start projects * Reach out to new partners * Make UESC website easier to find Overview of FEMP UESC Assistance Utility Energy Services Contract (UESC) Direct Assistance provides guidance, training and direct support to agencies so that they may accomplish cost effective, sensible, and comprehensive

307

Meadow Lake III | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lake III Lake III Jump to: navigation, search Name Meadow Lake III Facility Meadow Lake III Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Horizon Wind Energy Developer EDP Renewables Location Brookston IN Coordinates 40.601111°, -86.864167° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.601111,"lon":-86.864167,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

308

Lake View Geothermal Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Lake View Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Lake View Geothermal Facility General Information Name Lake View Geothermal Facility Facility Lake View Sector Geothermal energy Location Information Location The Geysers, California Coordinates 38.823527148671°, -122.78173327446° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.823527148671,"lon":-122.78173327446,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

309

Lake Erie Alternative Power | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Erie Alternative Power Erie Alternative Power Jump to: navigation, search Name Lake Erie Alternative Power Facility Lake Erie Alternative Power Sector Wind energy Facility Type Offshore Wind Facility Status Proposed Developer Lake Erie Alternative Power LLC Location Lake Erie PA Coordinates 42.265°, -80.642° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.265,"lon":-80.642,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

310

Lost Lakes Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lakes Wind Farm Lakes Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Lost Lakes Wind Farm Facility Lost Lakes Wind Farm Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Horizon-EDPR Developer Horizon-EDPR Energy Purchaser Market Location Dickinson County IA Coordinates 43.32401°, -95.264354° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.32401,"lon":-95.264354,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

311

NV-TRIBE-SUMMIT LAKE PAIUTE TRIBE  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NV-TRIBE-SUMMIT LAKE PAIUTE TRIBE NV-TRIBE-SUMMIT LAKE PAIUTE TRIBE Location: Tribe NV-TRIBE-SUMMIT NV LAKE PAIUTE TRIBE American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Proposed Action or Project Description The Summit Lake Paiute Tribe of Nevada will conduct energy building retrofits on several tribal-owned buildings including: Maintenance Shop (insulate walls and cover insulation to keep in place); Bunkhouse (replace single-pane glass windows, and repair or replace two exit doors); Tribal Administrative Office (replace old electric water heater and three air conditioner/heaters, and replace single-pane glass windows): Community Well Shed (install walls, cover insulation, and replace single-pane glass windows); Cabin #1 and Cabin #2 (insulate and/or replace single-pane windows). Conditions: None

312

Vortex Modes in Southern Lake Michigan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Current velocities and water temperatures were observed in southern Lake Michigan with an array of AMF vector-averaging current meters during late spring, summer and fall 1976. Analyses of the recorded current data have revealed that persistent ...

James H. Saylor; Joseph C. K. Huang; Robert O. Reid

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Control of Mississippi Headwater Lakes (Minnesota)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The lakes at the headwaters of the Mississippi River are subject to joint federal and state control, and the Commissioner of the Department of Natural Resources is responsible for establishing a...

314

Geology of the Soda Lake geothermal area  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Soda Lake geothermal area is located in the Carson Desert, west-central Nevada. Hot springs activity has occurred in the Soda Lake area in the past, resulting in surface deposits which have motivated present geothermal exploration. The geothermal anomaly is in Quaternary clastic sediments which are as much as 4600 feet thick. The sediments consist of interbedded deltaic, lacustrine, and alluvial sediments. Quaternary basaltic igneous activity has produced cinder cones, phreatic explosions that formed the maar occupied by Soda Lake, and possible dikes. Opal deposition and soil alteration are restricted to a small area two miles north of Soda Lake. The location of hot springs activity and the surface thermal anomaly may be partially controlled by north-northeast-trending faults.

Sibbett, B.S.

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Salt Lake City- High Performance Buildings Requirement  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Salt Lake City's mayor issued an executive order in July 2005 requiring that all public buildings owned and controlled by the city be built or renovated to meet the requirements of LEED "silver"...

316

Synthetic ecology : revisiting Mexico City's lakes project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mexico City was founded 700 years ago on man made islets in the middle of a lake. Today, it faces a contradictory situation were water is running scarce, but simultaneously the city runs the risk of drowning in its own ...

Daou, Daniel (Daou Ornelas)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Utility Documentation of Switching and Clearance Procedures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report builds on previous research, notably EPRI Report 1013109 Study of Outage Request Switching and Clearance Forms, and examines the documentation that specifies how utility personnel are expected to perform switching tagging and clearance activities. Materials were collected from some 20 utilities and were analyzed to evaluate characteristics of the documents related to ease of use and effective presentation of information. The research also examines completeness and the level of detail of the i...

2006-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

318

Lake Country Power - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Country Power - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Country Power - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Lake Country Power - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Geothermal Heat Pump: $400 per ton Central AC: $30 - $630 Air Source Heat Pumps: $330 - $630 Ductless Air-source Heat Pump: $300 ECM Furnace Motor: $100 Off-Peak ETS Heating System: $25/KW Cycled AC/Heat Pump: $100 Off-Peak Water Heater: $100 - $200 Heat Pump Water Heater: $200 Refrigerator/Freezer: $75 (with recycling of old appliance) CFL: $1 per bulb LED holiday lights: $3 per strand

319

Innovative Utility Pricing for Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The electric utility industry represents only one source of power available to industry. Although the monopolistic structure of the electric utility industry may convey a perception that an electric utility is unaffected by competition, this is an erroneous perception with regard to industry. Electric utilities face increased competition, both from other utilities and from industrial self-generation. The paper discusses competition for industrial customers and innovative pricing trends that have evolved nationally to meet the growing competition for industrial sales. Cogeneration activities and the emerging concepts of wheeling power are also discussed. Specifics of industry evaluation and reaction to utility pricing are presented. Also enumerated are examples of the response various utilities throughout the United States have made to the needs of their industrial customers through innovative rate design. Industry/utility cooperation can result in benefits to industry, to the electric utility and to all other ratepayers. This discussion includes examples of successful cooperation between industry and utilities.

Ross, J. A.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Impacts of Water Level Fluctuations on Kokanee Reproduction in Flathead Lake, 1985 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study has investigated the effects of the operation of Kerr Dam on the reproductive success of kokanee that spawn along the shores of Flathead Lake. We have estimated the spawning escapement to the lakeshore, characterized spawning habitat, monitored egg and alevin survival in redds, and related survival to length of redd exposure due to lake drawdown. Groundwater discharge apparently attracts kokanee to spawning sites along the lakeshore and is responsible for prolonging egg survival in redds above minimum pool. We have quantified and described the effect of lake drawdown on groundwater flux in spawning areas. This report defines optimal lakeshore spawning habitat and discusses eqg and alevin survival both in and below the varial zone.

Beattie, Will; Fraley, John J.; Decker-Hess, Janet (Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks, Kalispell, MT)

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lake utilities effective" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Sourcebook for Utility Communications on EMF: Final Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Increasing public concern that exposure to 60-Hz electric and magnetic fields (EMF) may cause adverse human health effects poses difficult communications problems for utilities. This sourcebook will assist utilities in clearly conveying the current scientific understanding of EMF and explaining corporate positions on the issue. Moreover, the sourcebook should help utilities achieve appropriate levels of public involvement in EMF issues.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Tribal Utility Feasibility Study  

SciTech Connect

The Schatz Energy Research Center (SERC) assisted the Yurok Tribe in investigating the feasibility of creating a permanent energy services program for the Tribe. The original purpose of the DOE grant that funded this project was to determine the feasibility of creating a full-blown Yurok Tribal electric utility to buy and sell electric power and own and maintain all electric power infrastructure on the Reservation. The original project consultant found this opportunity to be infeasible for the Tribe. When SERC took over as project consultant, we took a different approach. We explored opportunities for the Tribe to develop its own renewable energy resources for use on the Reservation and/or off-Reservation sales as a means of generating revenue for the Tribe. We also looked at ways the Tribe can provide energy services to its members and how to fund such efforts. We identified opportunities for the development of renewable energy resources and energy services on the Yurok Reservation that fall into five basic categories: Demand-side management This refers to efforts to reduce energy use through energy efficiency and conservation measures. Off-grid, facility and household scale renewable energy systems These systems can provide electricity to individual homes and Tribal facilities in areas of the Reservation that do not currently have access to the electric utility grid. Village scale, micro-grid renewable energy systems - These are larger scale systems that can provide electricity to interconnected groups of homes and Tribal facilities in areas of the Reservation that do not have access to the conventional electric grid. This will require the development of miniature electric grids to serve these interconnected facilities. Medium to large scale renewable energy development for sale to the grid In areas where viable renewable energy resources exist and there is access to the conventional electric utility grid, these resources can be developed and sold to the wholesale electricity market. Facility scale, net metered renewable energy systems These are renewable energy systems that provide power to individual households or facilities that are connected to conventional electric utility grid.

Engel, R. A.; Zoellick, J. J.

2007-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

323

Parameterization of Lakes and Wetlands for Energy and Water Balance Studies in the Great Lakes Region  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lakes and wetlands are prevalent around the Great Lakes and play an important role in the regional water and energy cycle. However, simulating their impacts on regional-scale hydrology is still a major challenge and not widely attempted. In the ...

Vimal Mishra; Keith A. Cherkauer; Laura C. Bowling

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Lake-atmosphere feedbacks associated with paleolakes Bonneville and Lahontan  

SciTech Connect

A high-resolution, regional climate model nested within a general circulation model was used to study the interactions between the atmosphere and the large Pleistocene lakes in the Great Basin of the United States. Simulations for January and July 18,000 years ago indicate that moisture provided by synoptic-scale atmospheric circulation features was the primary component of the hydrologic budgets of Lakes Lahontan and Bonneville. In addition, lake-generated precipitation was a substantial component of the hydrologic budget of Lake Bonneville at that time. This local lake-atmosphere interaction may help explain differences in the relative size of these lakes 18,000 years ago.

Hostetler, S.W. (Geological Survey, Boulder, CO (United States)); Giorgi, F.; Bates, G.T. (National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States)); Bartlein, P.J. (Univ. of Oregon, Eugene, OR (United States))

1994-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

325

Effects of consumers' attitudes and knowledge on the acceptance and utilization of time-of-use rates: Edmond, Oklahoma. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The Edmond, Oklahoma, Time-of-use (TOU) Rate Demonstration Project was concerned with the effects of various TOU rate schedules on consumers' electrical usage. Both total usage and temporal patterns of electric consumption were studied in this demonstration. This report summarizes the results of a series of secondary analyses of data based on exit and followup surveys. These analyses were focused principally on the effects of consumers' knowledge of, and attitudes toward, the TOU rate structure to which they were assigned, and the impact of these reactions on their electric usage, relative to that of a comparable group of consumers.

Crano, W.D.; Messe, L.A.; Buldain, R.W.; Johnson, C.D.

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

OpenEI - US utilities  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electric Utility Electric Utility Companies and Rates: Look-up by Zipcode (Feb 2011) http://en.openei.org/datasets/node/899 This dataset, compiled by NREL and Ventyx, provides average residential, commercial and industrial electricity rates by zip code for both investor owned utilities (IOU) and non-investor owned utilities. Note: the file includes average rates for each utility, but not the detailed rate structure data found in the database available via the zip-code look-up feature on the OpenEI Utilities page (Utilities" title="http://en.openei.org/wiki/Gateway:Utilities">http://en.openei.org/wiki/Gateway:Utilities). The data was released by NREL/Ventyx in February 2011.

327

Federal Energy Management Program: Utility Energy Service Contracts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(OMB) guidance on reporting to the Federal Energy Management Program and OMB. Utility energy service contracts (UESCs) offer Federal agencies an effective means to implement...

328

UTILIZATION OF MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE COMPOST IN HORTICULTURE.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Composting of municipal solid waste (MSW) has long been considered an attractive waste management tool for effective reduction of waste volume and beneficial utilization of (more)

Lu, Wenliang

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Extraction Utility Design Specification  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Extraction Utility Extraction Utility Design Specification January 11, 2011 Document Version 1.9 1 Revision History Date Version Section and Titles Author Summary of Change January 15, 2010 1.0 All Eric Morgan, Dekker, Ltd. Initial Draft Document January 19, 2010 1.1 All Igor Pedan, Dekker, Ltd. Document update with EM team review notes January 20, 2010 1.2 2.1.1 EM Project Team Document Review January 27, 2010 1.3 All Bruce Bartells Final Draft Review May 10, 2010 1.4.1 2.8 Igor Pedan, Dekker, Ltd. Section Update May 14, 2010 1.4.2 2.3.1 Igor Pedan, Dekker, Ltd. System Tables Added May 17, 2010 1.4.3 2.3 Igor Pedan, Dekker, Ltd. Enhancements Update June 29, 2010 1.5 All Igor Pedan, Dekker, Ltd. Revised for Version 8.0.20100628 July 14, 2010 1.5.1 2.8 Igor Pedan,

330

2012 Green Utility Leaders | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Utility Leaders 2012 Green Utility Leaders 2012 Green Utility Leaders Ranking the Top Green Utilities See All Rankings x Renewable Energy Sales Total Customer Participants...

331

PARS II Extraction Utility | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Extraction Utility PARS II Extraction Utility PARS II Extraction Utility v8020130510.zip More Documents & Publications PARS II Extraction Utility Release Notes PARS II CPP...

332

Carrots for Utilities: Providing Financial Returns for Utility Investments  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Carrots for Utilities: Providing Financial Returns for Utility Investments Carrots for Utilities: Providing Financial Returns for Utility Investments in Energy Efficiency Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Carrots for Utilities: Providing Financial Returns for Utility Investments in Energy Efficiency Focus Area: Energy Efficiency Topics: Socio-Economic Website: www.aceee.org/research-report/u111 Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/carrots-utilities-providing-financial Language: English Policies: "Regulations,Financial Incentives" is not in the list of possible values (Deployment Programs, Financial Incentives, Regulations) for this property. Regulations: Cost Recovery/Allocation This report examines state experiences with shareholder financial incentives that encourage investor-owned utilities to provide energy

333

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Beaver Lake, Technical Report 2005.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

On August 14, 2003, the Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was used to determine baseline habitat suitability on the Beaver Lake property, an acquisition completed by the Kalispel Tribe of Indians in November 2002. Evaluation species and appropriate models include bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, Canada goose, mallard, muskrat, yellow warbler, and white-tailed deer. Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) values were visually estimated and agreed upon by all HEP team members. The Beaver Lake Project provides a total of 232.26 Habitat Units (HUs) for the species evaluated. Conifer forest habitat provides 136.58 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, mallard, and white-tailed deer. Forested wetland habitat provides 20.02 HUs for bald eagle, black-caped chickadee, mallard, and white-tailed deer. Scrub-shrub wetland habitat provides 7.67 HUs for mallard, yellow warbler, and white-tailed deer. Grassland meadow provides 22.69 HUs for Canada goose and mallard. Emergent wetlands provide 35.04 HUs for Canada goose, mallard, and muskrat. Open water provided 10.26 HUs for Canada goose, mallard, and muskrat. The objective of using HEP at the Beaver Lake Project and other protected properties is to document the quality and quantity of available habitat for selected wildlife species. In this way, HEP provides information on the relative value of the same area at future points in time so that the effect of management activities on wildlife habitat can be quantified. When combined with other tools, the baseline HEP will be used to determine the most effective on-site management, restoration, and enhancement actions to increase habitat suitability for targeted species. The same process will be replicated every five years to quantitatively evaluate the effectiveness of management strategies in improving and maintaining habitat conditions while providing additional crediting to BPA for enhanced habitat values.

Entz, Ray

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Gamblin Lake, Technical Report 2005.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

On August 12, 2003, the Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was used to determine baseline habitat suitability on the Gamblin Lake property, an acquisition completed by the Kalispel Tribe of Indians in December 2002. Evaluation species and appropriate models include bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, mallard, muskrat, and white-tailed deer. Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) values were visually estimated and agreed upon by all HEP team members. The Gamblin Lake Project provides a total of 273.28 Habitat Units (HUs) for the species evaluated. Conifer forest habitat provides 127.92 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, mallard, and white-tailed deer. Forested wetland habitat provides 21.06 HUs for bald eagle, black-caped chickadee, mallard, and white-tailed deer. Wet meadow provides 78.05 HUs for Canada goose and mallard. Emergent wetland habitat provides 46.25 HUs for mallard, muskrat, and Canada goose. The objective of using HEP at the Gamblin Lake Project and other protected properties is to document the quality and quantity of available habitat for selected wildlife species. In this way, HEP provides information on the relative value of the same area at future points in time so that the effect of management activities on wildlife habitat can be quantified. When combined with other tools, the baseline HEP will be used to determine the most effective on-site management, restoration, and enhancement actions to increase habitat suitability for targeted species. The same process will be replicated every five years to quantitatively evaluate the effectiveness of management strategies in improving and maintaining habitat conditions while providing additional crediting to BPA for enhanced habitat values.

Entz, Ray

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

NREL: Wind Research - Utility Grid Integration Assessment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Utility Grid Integration Assessment Utility Grid Integration Assessment Photo of large power transmission towers set against a sunset. The national need for transmission improvements will have a direct impact on the effective use of renewable energy sources such as wind. For wind energy to play a larger role in supplying the nation's energy needs, integrating wind energy into the power grid of the United States is an important challenge to address. NREL's transmission grid integration staff collaborates with utility industry partners and provides data, analysis, and techniques to increase utility understanding of integration issues and confidence in the reliability of new wind turbines. For more information, contact Brian Parsons at 303-384-6958. Printable Version Wind Research Home Capabilities

336

Effects of prebiotics on growth performance, nutrient utilization and the gastrointestinal tract microbial community of hybrid striped bass (Morone chrysops x M. saxatilis) and red drum (Sciaenops ocellatus)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A series of experiments examined the effects of four potential prebiotics-- GroBiotic-A (a mixture of partially autolyzed brewers yeast, dairy components and dried fermentation products), mannanoligosaccharide (MOS), galactooligosaccharide (GOS), and inulin/ fructooligosaccharide (FOS)--on the gastrointestinal (GI) tracts microbial community in hybrid striped bass and red drum. The first in vitro experiment applied denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) to examine responses of red drum GI tract microbiota to anaerobic incubation with brewers yeast, FOS, and GroBiotic-A. Brewers yeast and GroBiotic-A produced unique microbial communities compared to that associated with the basal diet. Volatile fatty acid (VFA) profiles did not differ among treatments, with acetate being the major fermentation product. A second in vitro experiment examined effects of GroBiotic-A, MOS, GOS, and FOS on the GI tract microbiota of hybrid striped bass. None of the prebiotics altered the culturable microbial community, but all tended to lower acetate production and increase butyrate production. A third experiment examined the effects of the four prebiotics fed to juvenile hybrid striped bass for 8 weeks. Growth, feed efficiency ratio (FER) and protein efficiency ratio (PER) were not affected by the different prebiotics, but the GI tracts microbial community was altered from that associated with the basal diet. The fourth experiment consisted of an 8-week feeding trial and one 6-week feeding trial in which the effects of GroBiotic-A and FOS on growth performance and microbial community composition were compared for red drum living in independent tanks versus tanks with a shared water system. Neither the intestinal microbial community nor growth performance were significantly altered by the prebiotics in these trials; fish in independent and shared water tanks produced similar results. The final experiment examined the effects of GroBiotic-A, FOS, MOS and GOS on nutrient and energy digestibility of sub-adult red drum fed diets containing fish meal and soybean meal. The prebiotics generally increased protein, organic matter, and energy digestibility, with the exception of FOS/inulin. Lipid digestibility was decreased by GOS, MOS and FOS. These studies are the first to establish that prebiotics can alter the GI tract microbial community of these fish and influence nutrient digestibility.

Burr, Gary Stephen

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Effects of conventional or low bull to female ratio and utilization of reproductive tract scores in extensively-managed, natural mating breeding groups  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The current study involved two experiments which were conducted at the Texas A&M Agricultural Research and Extension Center in Uvalde (semi-arid environment) from 2002 to 2004. In experiment one, Bonsmara bulls (n = 19; 20-24 mo of age) were joined with multiparous, crossbred females (n =586) for 90 d in 2003 and 2004. Bulls were allotted by selected physical traits, seminal traits, social rank, and serving capacity to one of two bull to female ratio (BFR) treatments: Conventional (1:21-1:29; n = 6 pastures) or Low (1:47-1:52; n = 2 pastures) BFR. Pregnancy rate (P = 0.33), calving rate (P = 0.26), and calving date (P = 0.22) did not differ between Conventional and Low BFR treatments. Post-breeding evaluation of bulls in 2002 (n = 16) indicated that social rank, but not seminal traits, was significantly correlated with pre-breeding values (P < 0.05). The current study demonstrates that Low BFR can be utilized in single- and multisire, 90-d breeding pastures of up to 2,090 ha without adversely affecting reproductive performance. In experiment two, yearling, one-half or three-quarter Bonsmara heifers (n = 106; 11-14 mo of age) were palpated per rectum and assigned a reproductive tract score (RTS) immediately prior to the beginning of the breeding season. Reproductive performance was measured in their two subsequent breeding years in order to estimate the value of the RTS system in extensively-managed, natural mating, 90-d breeding season programs. RTS was positively correlated (p < 0.01) with frame score (r = 0.25), age (r = 0.31), weaning weight (r = 0.47), and the weight of the heifer on the day of RTS exam (r = 0.56). The RTS means by dam parity also differed (P < 0.03). A lower (P < 0.01) percentage of females conceived during each of their first two breeding seasons for heifers of RTS 1 and 2 (65.2%) than for heifers of RTS 3, 4, and 5 (91.2%). Females with a RTS of 1 had a lower pregnancy rate over each of their first two breeding seasons, conceived later during their first breeding season, weaned lighter first calves, and remained lighter each year for fall body weight and body condition score than did heifers with RTS of 2 to 5 (P < 0.05). Collectively, the results of the current study indicate that heifers with a RTS of 1 immediately prior to a 90-d breeding season should be culled. Consideration should also be given to eliminating RTS 2 heifers, but further studies will be needed to confirm the potential economic advantage of this practice.

Rathmann, Ryan James

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Banks Lake Fishery Evaluation Project Annual Report : Fiscal Year 2008 (March 1, 2008 to February 1, 2009).  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife implemented the Banks Lake Fishery Evaluation Project (BLFEP) in September 2001 with funds from the Bonneville Power Administration, and continued project tasks in 2008. The objective was to evaluate factors that could limit kokanee in Banks Lake, including water quality, prey availability, harvest, and acute predation during hatchery releases. Water quality parameters were collected twice monthly from March through November. Banks Lake water temperatures began to increase in May and stratification was apparent by July. By late August, the thermocline had dropped to 15 meters deep, with temperatures of 21-23 C in the epilimnion and 16-19 C in the hypolimnion. Dissolved oxygen levels were generally above 8 mg/L until August when they dropped near or below 5 mg/L deeper than 20-meters. Secchi depths ranged from 3.2 to 6.2 meters and varied spatially and temporally. Daphnia and copepod densities were the highest in May and June, reaching densities of 26 copepods/liter and 9 Daphnia/liter. Fish surveys were conducted in July and October 2008 using boat electrofishing, gill netting, and hydroacoustic surveys. Lake whitefish (71%) and yellow perch (16%) dominated the limnetic fish assemblage in the summer, while lake whitefish (46%) and walleye (22%) were the most abundant in gill net catch during the fall survey. Piscivore diets switched from crayfish prior to the release of rainbow trout to crayfish and rainbow trout following the release. The highest angling pressure occurred in May, when anglers were primarily targeting walleye and smallmouth bass. Boat anglers utilized Steamboat State Park more frequently than any other boat ramp on Banks Lake. Shore anglers used the rock jetty at Coulee City Park 45% of the time, with highest use occurring from November through April. Ice fishing occurred in January and February at the south end of the lake. An estimated total of 4,397 smallmouth bass, 11,106 walleye, 371 rainbow trout, and 509 yellow perch were harvested from Banks Lake in 2008. No kokanee were reported in the creel; however, local reports indicated that anglers were targeting and catching kokanee. The economic benefit of the Banks Lake fishery was estimated at $2,288,005 during 2008. Abundance estimates from the hydroacoustic survey in July were 514,435 lake whitefish and 10,662 kokanee, with an overall abundance estimate of 626,061 limnetic fish greater than 100 mm. When comparing spring fry, fall fingerling and yearling net pen release strategies of kokanee, 95% were of hatchery origin, with the highest recaptures coming from the fall fingerling release group.

Polacek, Matt [Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

339

Extraction Utility Design Specification  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Extraction Extraction Utility Design Specification May 13, 2013 Document Version 1.10 1 Revision History Date Version Section and Titles Author Summary of Change January 15, 2010 1.0 All Eric Morgan, Dekker, Ltd. Initial Draft Document January 19, 2010 1.1 All Igor Pedan, Dekker, Ltd. Document update with EM team review notes January 20, 2010 1.2 2.1.1 EM Project Team Document Review January 27, 2010 1.3 All Bruce Bartells Final Draft Review May 10, 2010 1.4.1 2.8 Igor Pedan, Dekker, Ltd. Section Update May 14, 2010 1.4.2 2.3.1 Igor Pedan, Dekker, Ltd. System Tables Added May 17, 2010 1.4.3 2.3 Igor Pedan, Dekker, Ltd. Enhancements Update June 29, 2010 1.5 All Igor Pedan, Dekker, Ltd. Revised for Version

340

Utility Data Collection Service  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Data Collection Service Data Collection Service Federal-Utility Partnership Working Group 4 May 2006 Paul Kelley, Chief of Operations, 78 th CES, Robins AFB David Dykes, Industrial Segment Mgr, Federal, GPC Topics  Background  Commodities Metered  Data Collection  Cost  Results Background  Robins AFB (RAFB) needed to:  Control electricity usage and considered Demand Control  Track and bill base tenants for energy usage  Metering Project Originated in 1993  $$ requirements limited interest  Developed criteria for available $$  Energy Policy Act 2005:  All facilities sub-metered by 2012  $$ no longer restricts metering project Metering Criteria prior to EPACT 2005  All New Construction - (per Air Force Instructions)

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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

EM Utility Contracts  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

12 12 EM UTILITY CONTRACT Site State Supplier Executed Contract Type DOE Contract # East Tennessee Technology Park TN Tennessee Valley Authority 4/27/2007 Energy supply contract (retail) DE-AC05-07OR23242 Hanford WA Bonneville Power Administration 10/1/2001 Transmission Service Agreement Hanford WA Bonneville Power Administration 10/1/2011 Power Sales Agreement (retail) Moab UT Paducah KY Electric Energy, Inc. (EEI as agent for DOE) Original Power Contract Portsmouth OH Pike Natural Gas 2/28/2007 Negotiated contract Portsmouth OH Ohio Valley Electric Corporation (OVEC) 9/10/2008 Letter Agreement DE-AC05-03OR22988 Savannah River Site SC South Carolina Electric & Gas

342

Utility Metering - AGL Resources  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

AGL Resources AGL Resources Mike Ellis Director, AGL Energy Services Federal Utility Partnership Working Group Spring 2013 - May 22-23 San Francisco, CA Hosted by: Pacific Gas and Electric Company  Multiple LDCs with legacy metering equipment  Several use Itron 100G technology ◦ Mobile, once-a-month data collection ◦ Meter can store interval data for >30 days ◦ Meter technology could be leverage on fixed-base network, however there are no current plans for upgrade  Technology for capturing interval data is installed on case by case basis ◦ Customers on Interruptible Rate ◦ Large users  Electronic corrector installed on the meter ◦ Pressure and Temperature compensation  Typically data is retrieved once a day ◦ Transmission frequency impacts battery life

343

Utility spot pricing study : Wisconsin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Spot pricing covers a range of electric utility pricing structures which relate the marginal costs of electric generation to the prices seen by utility customers. At the shortest time frames prices change every five ...

Caramanis, Michael C.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Lake Nyos and Mammoth Mountain: What Do They Tell Us about the Security of Engineered Storage of CO2 Underground?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lake Nyos aNd MaMMoth MouNtaiN: Lake Nyos aNd MaMMoth MouNtaiN: What do they teLL us about the security of eNgiNeered storage of co 2 uNdergrouNd? Introduction Lake Nyos in the Northwest Province of Cameroon in western Africa and Mammoth Mountain in California are the sites of two well-known underground releases of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) in nature, both with adverse effects. Both Lake Nyos and Mammoth Mountain are atop current or former volcanoes and the released CO 2 is volcanic in origin (sometimes referred to as magmatic origin). Molten rock (magma) far below the Earth's surface contains entrained amounts of water, CO 2 , and other gases. If the magma rises toward the Earth's surface, the pressure it is under is reduced and the entrained gases begin to expand. The expansion of the

345

Obama Administration Hosts Great Lakes Offshore Wind Workshop in Chicago  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hosts Great Lakes Offshore Wind Workshop in Hosts Great Lakes Offshore Wind Workshop in Chicago with Great Lakes Wind Collaborative Obama Administration Hosts Great Lakes Offshore Wind Workshop in Chicago with Great Lakes Wind Collaborative October 28, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON - The White House Council on Environmental Quality and the U.S. Department of Energy hosted a workshop with the Great Lakes Wind Collaborative in Chicago on October 26 - 27, 2010, focused on the siting of offshore wind power in the Great Lakes. The two day workshop brought together wind developers, Federal and state regulators, environmental advocates, and other regional stakeholders to discuss methods for ensuring greater clarity, certainty and coordination of Federal and state decision-making for offshore wind development in the Great Lakes.

346

Energy Budget Processes of a Small Northern Lake  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There is a paucity of information on the energy budget of Canada's northern lakes. This research determines processes controlling the magnitude of energy fluxes between a small Canadian Shield lake and the atmosphere. Meteorological instruments ...

Christopher Spence; Wayne R. Rouse; Devon Worth; Claire Oswald

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Interpreting Annual Rainfall from the Levels of Lake Victoria  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a water balance model for Lake Victoria that can be inverted to estimate annual rainfall over the lake. The model is calibrated using a fixed value of evaporation and the regression expressions for inflow, discharge, and ...

Xungang Yin; Sharon E. Nicholson

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Influence of the Laurentian Great Lakes on Regional Climate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The influence of the Laurentian Great Lakes on climate is assessed by comparing two decade-long simulations, with the lakes either included or excluded, using the Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics Regional Climate Model, ...

Michael Notaro; Kathleen Holman; Azar Zarrin; Elody Fluck; Steve Vavrus; Val Bennington

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

The Role of Northern Lakes in a Regional Energy Balance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There are many lakes of widely varying morphometry in northern latitudes. For this study region, in the central Mackenzie River valley of western Canada, lakes make up 37% of the landscape. The nonlake components of the landscape are divided into ...

Wayne R. Rouse; Claire J. Oswald; Jacqueline Binyamin; Christopher Spence; William M. Schertzer; Peter D. Blanken; Normand Bussires; Claude R. Duguay

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Simulations of the Summer Hydrometeorological Processes of Lake Kinneret  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lake Kinneret is a 168-km2 lake located in northern Israel. It provides about 50% of the drinking water consumed in this arid country. To manage correctly this vital water resource, it is essential to understand the various hydrometeorological ...

Roni Avissar; Hai Pan

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

The Frequency and Intensity of Great Lake Cyclones  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cyclones are an important feature of the Great Lakes region that can have important impacts on shipping, lake temperature profiles, ice cover, and shoreline property damages. The objective of this research is to analyze the frequency and ...

James R. Angel; Scott A. Isard

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Simulating Upwelling in a Large Lake Using Slippery Sacks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Lagrangian numerical model is used to simulate upwelling in an idealized large lake. This simulation is carried out to test the model's potential for simulating lake and ocean circulations.

Patrick T. Haertel; David A. Randall; Tommy G. Jensen

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Wind Equipment: Creating Jobs Along the Lake Erie Shore | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wind Equipment: Creating Jobs Along the Lake Erie Shore Wind Equipment: Creating Jobs Along the Lake Erie Shore August 16, 2012 - 9:36am Addthis 1 of 3 Finished wind tower sections...

354

Pine Lake Corn Processors LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Farmer owned investment and management team which developed and manages the Pine Lake ethanol plant. References Pine Lake Corn Processors LLC1 LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase...

355

Relations between Meteorology and Ozone in the Lake Michigan Region  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The field program phase of the Lake Michigan Ozone Study (LMOS) took place during the summer of 1991. Observed ozone concentrations and weather variables have been analyzed for the Lake Michigan region and the eastern United States for four 1991 ...

Steven R. Hanna; Joseph C. Chang

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Crow Lake Wind | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Crow Lake Wind Crow Lake Wind Jump to: navigation, search Name Crow Lake Wind Facility Crow Lake Wind Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Prairie Winds SD 1 Inc. (100) Mitchell Technical Institute (1) South Dakota Wind Partners (7) Developer Prairie Winds SD 1 Inc. Energy Purchaser Basin Electric Power Cooperative Location White Lake SD Coordinates 43.920959°, -98.7282157° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.920959,"lon":-98.7282157,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

357

THERMODYNAMICS OF PARTIALLY FROZEN COOLING LAKES  

SciTech Connect

The Rochester Institute of Technology (RIT) collected visible, SWIR, MWIR and LWIR imagery of the Midland (Michigan) Cogeneration Ventures Plant from aircraft during the winter of 2008-2009. RIT also made ground-based measurements of lake water and ice temperatures, ice thickness and atmospheric variables. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) used the data collected by RIT and a 3-D hydrodynamic code to simulate the Midland cooling lake. The hydrodynamic code was able to reproduce the time distribution of ice coverage on the lake during the entire winter. The simulations and data show that the amount of ice coverage is almost linearly proportional to the rate at which heat is injected into the lake (Q). Very rapid melting of ice occurs when strong winds accelerate the movement of warm water underneath the ice. A snow layer on top of the ice acts as an insulator and decreases the rate of heat loss from the water below the ice to the atmosphere above. The simulated ice cover on the lake was not highly sensitive to the thickness of the snow layer. The simplicity of the relationship between ice cover and Q and the weak responses of ice cover to snow depth over the ice are probably attributable to the negative feedback loop that exists between ice cover and heat loss to the atmosphere.

Garrett, A.; Casterline, M.; Salvaggio, C.

2010-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

358

Carbon Dioxide Utilization Archived Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Utility Mercury Sorbent Field Testing Program Sorbent Technologies Corporation Western Kentucky University 9292003 Enhanced Practical Photosynthesis Carbon Sequestration ORNL...

359

Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Monitoring Program; 1988-1989 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In the Northwest Power Planning Council's 1987 Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (NPPC 1987), the Council directed the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to construct two kokanee salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) hatcheries as partial mitigation for the loss of anadromous salmon and steelhead incurred by construction of Grand Coulee Dam [Section 903 (g)(l)(C)]. The hatcheries will produce kokanee salmon for outplanting into Lake Roosevelt as well as rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) for the Lake Roosevelt net-pen program. In section 903 (g)(l)(E), the Council also directed BPA to fund a monitoring program to evaluate the effectiveness of the kokanee hatcheries. The monitoring program included the following components: (1) a year-round, reservoir-wide, creel survey to determine angler use, catch rates and composition, and growth and condition of fish; (2) assessment of kokanee, rainbow, and walleye (Stizostedion vitreum) feeding habits and densities of their preferred prey, and; (3) a mark and recapture study designed to assess the effectiveness of different locations where hatchery-raised kokanee and net pen reared rainbow trout are released. The above measures were adopted by the Council based on a management plan, developed by the Upper Columbia United Tribes Fisheries Center, Spokane Indian Tribe, Colville Confederated Tribes, Washington Department of Wildlife, and National Park Service, that examined the feasibility of restoring and enhancing Lake Roosevelt fisheries (Scholz et al. 1986). In July 1988, BPA entered into a contract with the Spokane Indian Tribe to initiate the monitoring program. The projected duration of the monitoring program is through 1995. This report contains the results of the monitoring program from August 1988 to December 1989.

Peone, Tim L.; Scholz, Allan T.; Griffith, James R.

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Cogeneration Assessment Methodology for Utilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A methodology is presented that enables electric utilities to assess the cogeneration potential among industrial, commercial, and institutional customers within the utility's service area. The methodology includes a survey design, analytic assessment model, and a data base to track customers over time. A case study is presented describing the background, procedures, and results of a cogeneration investigation for Northeast Utilities.

Sedlik, B.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lake utilities effective" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Monitoring Program; 1990 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As partial mitigation for the loss of anadromous salmon and steelhead incurred by construction of Grand Coulee Dam, the Northwest Power Planning Council directed Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to construct two kokanee salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) hatcheries on Lake Roosevelt (NPPC 1987 [Section 903 (g)(l)(C)]). The hatcheries are to produce 8 million kokanee salmon fry or 3.2 million adults for outplanting into Lake Roosevelt as well as 500,000 rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) for the Lake Roosevelt net-pen programs. In section 903 (g)(l)(E), the Council also directed BPA to fund a monitoring program to evaluate the effectiveness of the kokanee hatcheries. The monitoring program included the following components: (1) conduction of a year-round creel census survey to determine angler pressure, catch rates and composition, growth and condition of fish caught by anglers, and economic value of the fishery. Comparisons will be made before and after hatcheries are on-line to determine hatchery effectiveness; (2) conduct an assessment of kokanee, rainbow trout, and walleye feeding habits, growth rates, and densities of their preferred prey at different locations in the reservoir and how reservoir operations affect population dynamics of preferred prey organisms. This information will be used to determine kokanee and rainbow trout stocking locations, stocking densities and stocking times; (3) conduct a mark-recapture study designed to assess effectiveness of various release times and locations for hatchery-raised kokanee and net-pen raised rainbow so fish-loss over Grand Coulee Dam will be minimized, homing to egg collection sites will be improved and angler harvest will be increased. The above measures were adopted by the Council based on a management plan developed by Upper Columbia United Tribes Fisheries Center, Spokane Indian Tribe, Colville Confederated Tribes, Washington Department of Wildlife, and the National Park Service. This plan examined the feasibility of restoring and enhancing Lake Roosevelt fisheries (Scholz et al. 1986). In July 1988, BPA entered into a contract with the Spokane Indian Tribe to initiate the monitoring program and continue research through 1995. This report contains the results of the monitoring program from January to December 1990.

Griffith, Janelle R.; Scholz, Allan T. (Eastern Washington University, Upper Columbia United Tribes Fisheries Research Center, Cheney, WA)

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program; Meadow Creek vs. Lake Whatcom Stock Kokanee Salmon Investigations in Lake Roosevelt, 2001 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Lake Roosevelt has been stocked with Lake Whatcom stock kokanee since 1989 with the primary objective of creating a self-sustaining recreational fishery. Due to low return numbers, it was hypothesized a stock of kokanee, native to the upper Columbia River, might perform better than the coastal Lake Whatcom strain. Kokanee from Meadow Creek, a tributary of Kootenay Lake, British Columbia were selected as an alternative stock. Matched pair releases of Lake Whatcom and Meadow Creek kokanee were made from Sherman Creek Hatchery in late June 2000 and repeated in 2001. Stock performance between Lake Whatcom and Meadow Creek kokanee was evaluated using three performance measures; (1) the number of returns to Sherman Creek, the primary egg collection facility, (2) the number of returns to other tributaries and (3) the number of returns to the creel. Kokanee were collected during five passes through the reservoir via electrofishing, which included 87 tributary mouths during the fall of 2000 and 2001. Chi-square analysis indicated age two Meadow Creek kokanee returned to Sherman Creek in significantly higher numbers when compared to the Whatcom stock in 2000 ({chi}{sup 2} = 736.6; d.f. = 1; P < 0.01) and 2001 ({chi}{sup 2} = 156.2; d.f. = 1; P < 0.01). Reservoir wide recoveries of age two kokanee had similar results in 2000 ({chi}{sup 2} = 735.3; d.f. = 1; P < 0.01) and 2001 ({chi}{sup 2} = 150.1; d.f. = 1; P < 0.01). Six Lake Whatcom and seven Meadow Creek three year olds were collected in 2001. The sample size of three year olds was too small for statistical analysis. No kokanee were collected during creel surveys in 2000, and two (age three kokanee) were collected in 2001. Neither of the hatchery kokanee collected were coded wire tagged, therefore stock could not be distinguished. After two years of monitoring, neither Meadow Creek or Lake Whatcom kokanee appear to be capable of providing a run of three-year-old spawners to sustain stocking efforts. The small number of hatchery three-year-olds collected indicated that the current stocking methods will continue to produce a limited jacking run largely composed of precocious males and a small number of three-year-olds. However, supplemental creel data indicated anglers harvested two-year-old hatchery kokanee 30-45 days after release. Supplemental creel data should continue to be collected to accurately evaluate hatchery contributions to the creel.

McLellan, Holly; Scholz, Allan

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program; Meadow Creek vs. Lake Whatcom Stock Kokanee Salmon Investigations in Lake Roosevelt, Annual Report 2002.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Lake Whatcom, Washington kokanee have been stocked in Lake Roosevelt since 1987 with the primary objective of creating a self-sustaining fishery. Success has been limited by low recruitment to the fishery, low adult returns to hatcheries, and a skewed sex ratio. It was hypothesized that a stock native to the upper Columbia River might perform better than the coastal Lake Whatcom stock. Kokanee from Meadow Creek, a tributary of Kootenay Lake, British Columbia were selected as an alternative stock. Post smolts from each stock were released from Sherman Creek Hatchery in late June 2000 and repeated in 2001. Stock performance was evaluated using three measures; (1) number of returns to Sherman Creek, the primary egg collection facility, (2) the number of returns to 86 tributaries sampled and, (3) the number of returns to the creel. In two repeated experiments, neither Meadow Creek or Lake Whatcom kokanee appeared to be capable of providing a run of three-year old spawners to sustain stocking efforts. Less than 10 three-years olds from either stock were collected during the study period. Chi-square analysis indicated age two Meadow Creek kokanee returned to Sherman Creek and to other tributaries in significantly higher numbers when compared to the Lake Whatcom stock in both 2000 and 2001. However, preliminary data from the Spokane Tribe of Indians indicated that a large number of both stocks were precocial before they were stocked. The small number of hatchery three-year olds collected indicated that the current hatchery rearing and stocking methods will continue to produce a limited jacking run largely composed of precocious males and a small number of three-year olds. No kokanee from the study were collected during standard lake wide creel surveys. Supplemental creel data, including fishing derbies, test fisheries, and angler diaries, indicated anglers harvested two-year-old hatchery kokanee a month after release. The majority of the two-year old kokanee harvested were from a direct stock at the Fort Spokane boat launch. Only Lake Whatcom kokanee were stocked from the boat launch, therefore stock performance was not evaluated, however the high success of the stocking location will likely increase harvest of hatchery kokanee in the future. Despite low numbers of the targeted three-year olds, Meadow Creek kokanee should be stocked when possible to promote fish native to the upper Columbia River.

McLellan, Holly

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

The LakeInduced Convection Experiment and the Snowband Dynamics Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A severe 5day lakeeffect storm resulted in eight deaths, hundreds of injuries, and over $3 million in damage to a small area of northeastern Ohio and northwestern Pennsylvania in November 1996. In 1999, a blizzard associated with an intense ...

David A. R. Kristovich; George S. Young; Johannes Verlinde; Peter J. Sousounis; Pierre Mourad; Donald Lenschow; Robert M. Rauber; Mohan K. Ramamurthy; Brian F. Jewett; Kenneth Beard; Elen Cutrim; Paul J. DeMott; Edwin W. Eloranta; Mark R. Hjelmfelt; Sonia M. Kreidenweis; Jon Martin; James Moore; Harry T. Ochs III; David C. Rogers; John Scala; Gregory Tripoli; John Young

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Utility downsizings pose a dilemma for regulators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A utility's job-generating potential is critical to most local economies. At the same time, however, high utility employment levels maintain an upward pressure on rates, an effect that does not escape regulators' notice, especially during an economic slowdown. More than on regulator has been heard to say that hard-hit ratepayers should not be called on to support what some may seen as a bloated utility workforce scaled to better times. To complicate things even more, popular cost-cutting goals that include improving productivity and relying more on conservation could mean fewer jobs, at least at the utility. What's more, utility rates play a significant role in how local industries and businesses respond to an economic slowdown. This interplay of economic forces has complicated the ratemaking process. The size of a utility's workforce is an issue of growing significance in rate hearings. Forecasts for test-period salary and wage expenses are less reliable. Early retirement plans promise future savings for ratepayers, but at a cost today.

Cross, P.S.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

The Utilities' Role in Conservation and Cogeneration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The electric utility industry is uniquely qualified and positioned to serve as an effective 'deliverer' of energy conservation services and alternative energy supply options, such as cogeneration, rather than merely as a 'facilitator' of their development by other parties. Amendments to current legislation are required to remove the barriers to utility participation and to provide electric utilities with appropriate incentives to deliver conservation and alternative power sources in their own self-interest. That utility self-interest can take the form of benefits to its ratepayers or stockholders -- or, optimally, to both. Moreover, adequate, reliable and economical electric energy from the utility grid is vital to our nation's economic well-being. A financially healthy electric utility industry is essential to the realization of this goal. Therefore, as we continue to refine a national energy policy, we must give this requisite careful attention when developing positions on conservation, cogeneration, equitable rate design, and all of the other elements, for they are inextricably related.

Mitchell, R. C., III

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

A parameterized model of heat storage by lake sediments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A model of seasonal heat storage by lake sediments is proposed oriented at applications in climate modeling and at lake parameterization in numerical weather prediction. The computational efficiency is achieved by reformulating of the heat transfer problem ... Keywords: Bulk model, Climate modeling, Lake temperature, Sediment processes, Temperature wave, Water-sediment exchange

Sergey Golosov; Georgiy Kirillin

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Medicine Lake Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Medicine Lake Geothermal Area Medicine Lake Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Medicine Lake Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (1) 9 Exploration Activities (9) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.57,"lon":-121.57,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

369

Harney Lake Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lake Geothermal Area Lake Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Harney Lake Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.18166667,"lon":-119.0533333,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

370

Lake Palmdale Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lake Palmdale Wind Farm Lake Palmdale Wind Farm Facility Lake Palmdale Sector Wind energy Facility Type Community Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Palmdale Water District Developer Palmdale Water District Energy Purchaser Palmdale Water District Location Palmdale CA Coordinates 34.555932°, -118.118307° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.555932,"lon":-118.118307,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

371

Meadow Lake IV | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Meadow Lake IV Meadow Lake IV Facility Meadow Lake IV Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Horizon Wind Energy Developer EDP Renewables Location Brookston IN Coordinates 40.601111°, -86.864167° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.601111,"lon":-86.864167,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

372

Why sequence metagenomics in freshwater lakes?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

metagenomics in freshwater lakes? metagenomics in freshwater lakes? Aquatic microbial communities represent one of the largest reservoirs of genetic and biochemical diversity on the planet, and metagenomic studies have led to the discovery of novel gene families and a deeper understanding of how microbial communities mediate the flow of carbon and energy. However, most of these studies have been based on a static 'snap shot' of genetic diversity found under a particular set of environmental conditions. This study involves a metagenomic time-series to better understand how microbial communities control carbon cycling in freshwater systems. Principal Investigators: Katherine McMahon, University of Wisconsin Program: CSP 2011 Home > Sequencing > Why sequence metagenomics in freshwater lakes

373

Emmons Lake Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lake Geothermal Area Lake Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Emmons Lake Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":55.3333,"lon":-162.14,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

374

Meadow Lake II | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Meadow Lake II Meadow Lake II Facility Meadow Lake II Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Horizon Wind Energy Developer EDP Renewables Location Brookston IN Coordinates 40.601111°, -86.864167° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.601111,"lon":-86.864167,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

375

Great Lakes | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lakes Lakes Dataset Summary Description This dataset is a geographic shapefile generated from the original raster data. The original raster data resolution is a 200-meter cell size. Source National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Date Released August 19th, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated August 23rd, 2010 (4 years ago) Keywords GIS Great Lakes NREL offshore wind shapefile U.S. wind windspeed Data application/zip icon Download Shapefile (zip, 11.8 MiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period License License Other or unspecified, see optional comment below Comment DISCLAIMER NOTICE This GIS data was developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory ("NREL"), which is operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC for the U.S. Department of Energy ("DOE"). The user is granted the right, without any fee or cost, to use, copy, modify, alter, enhance and distribute this data for any purpose whatsoever, provided that this entire notice appears in all copies of the data. Further, the user of this data agrees to credit NREL in any publications or software that incorporate or use the data. Access to and use of the GIS data shall further impose the following obligations on the User. The names DOE/NREL may not be used in any advertising or publicity to endorse or promote any product or commercial entity using or incorporating the GIS data unless specific written authorization is obtained from DOE/NREL. The User also understands that DOE/NREL shall not be obligated to provide updates, support, consulting, training or assistance of any kind whatsoever with regard to the use of the GIS data. THE GIS DATA IS PROVIDED "AS IS" AND ANY EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WARRANTIES, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE ARE DISCLAIMED. IN NO EVENT SHALL DOE/NREL BE LIABLE FOR ANY SPECIAL, INDIRECT OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES OR ANY DAMAGES WHATSOEVER, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO CLAIMS ASSOCIATED WITH THE LOSS OF DATA OR PROFITS, WHICH MAY RESULT FROM AN ACTION IN CONTRACT, NEGLIGENCE OR OTHER TORTIOUS CLAIM THAT ARISES OUT OF OR IN CONNECTION WITH THE ACCESS OR USE OF THE GIS DATA. The User acknowledges that access to the GIS data is subject to U.S. Export laws and regulations and any use or transfer of the GIS data must be authorized under those regulations. The User shall not use, distribute, transfer, or transmit GIS data or any products incorporating the GIS data except in compliance with U.S. export regulations. If requested by DOE/NREL, the User agrees to sign written assurances and other export-related documentation as may be required to comply with U.S. export regulations. DISCLAIMER NOTICE This GIS data was developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory ("NREL"), which is operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC for the U.S. Department of Energy ("DOE"). The user is granted the right, without any fee or cost, to use, copy, modify, alter, enhance and distribute this data for any purpose whatsoever, provided that this entire notice appears in all copies of the data. Further, the user of this data agrees to credit NREL in any publications or software that incorporate or use the data. Access to and use of the GIS data shall further impose the following obligations on the User. The names DOE/NREL may not be used in any advertising or publicity to endorse or promote any product or commercial entity using or incorporating the GIS data unless specific written authorization is obtained from DOE/NREL. The User also understands that DOE/NREL shall not be obligated to provide updates, support, consulting, training or assistance of any kind whatsoever with regard to the use of the GIS data. THE GIS DATA IS PROVIDED "AS IS" AND ANY EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WARRANTIES, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE ARE DISCLAIMED. IN NO EVENT SHALL DOE/NREL BE LIABLE FOR ANY SPECIAL, INDIRECT OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES OR ANY DAMAGES WHATSOEVER, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO CLAIMS ASSOCIATED WITH THE LOSS OF DATA OR PROFITS, WHICH MAY RESULT FROM AN ACTION IN CONTRACT, NEGLIGENCE OR OTHER TORTIOUS CLAIM THAT ARISES OUT OF OR IN CONNECTION WITH THE ACCESS OR USE OF THE GIS DATA. The User acknowledges that access to the GIS data is subject to U.S. Export laws and regulations and any use or transfer of the GIS data must be authorized under those regulations. The User shall not use, distribute, transfer, or transmit GIS data or any products incorporating the GIS data except in compliance with U.S. export regulations. If requested by DOE/NREL, the User agrees to sign written assurances and other export-related documentation as may be required to comply with U.S. export regulations.

376

National Utility Rate Database: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

When modeling solar energy technologies and other distributed energy systems, using high-quality expansive electricity rates is essential. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) developed a utility rate platform for entering, storing, updating, and accessing a large collection of utility rates from around the United States. This utility rate platform lives on the Open Energy Information (OpenEI) website, OpenEI.org, allowing the data to be programmatically accessed from a web browser, using an application programming interface (API). The semantic-based utility rate platform currently has record of 1,885 utility rates and covers over 85% of the electricity consumption in the United States.

Ong, S.; McKeel, R.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Lake Roosevelt Rainbow Trout : Habitat/Passage Improvement Project Annual Report 1999.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Lake Franklin D. Roosevelt was created with the completion of the Grand Coulee Dam in 1942. The lake stretches 151 miles up-stream to the International border between the United States and Canada at the 49th parallel. Increased recreational use, subsistence and sport fishing has resulted in intense interest and possible exploitation of the resources within the lake. Previous studies of the lake and its fishery have been limited. Early studies indicate that natural reproduction within the lake and tributaries are not sufficient to support a rainbow trout (Onchoryhnchus mykiss) fishery (Scholz et. al., 1988). These studies indicate that the rainbow trout population may be limited by lack of suitable habitat for spawning and rearing (Scholz et. al., 1988). The initial phase of this project (Phase I, baseline data collection- 1990-91) was directed at the assessment of limiting factors such as quality and quantity of available spawning gravel, identification of passage barriers, and assessment of other limiting factors. Population estimates were conducted using the Seber/LeCren removal/depletion method. After the initial assessment of stream parameters, several streams were selected for habitat/passage improvement projects (Phase II, implementation-1992-96). At the completion of project habitat improvements, the final phase (Phase III, monitoring) began. This phase will assess changes and gauge the success achieved through the improvements. The objective of the project is to correct passage barriers and improve habitat conditions of selected tributaries to Lake Roosevelt for adfluvial rainbow trout that utilize tributary streams for spawning and rearing. Streams with restorable habitats were selected for improvements. Completion of improvement efforts should increase the adfluvial rainbow trout contribution to the resident fishery in Lake Roosevelt. Three co-operating agencies, the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation (CCT), the Spokane Tribe of Indians (STI) and the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife initiated the project fieldwork in 1990. Phase II included only the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation and the Spokane Tribe of Indians. Phase III is being completed by the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation.

Jones, Charles D.

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Pelican Utility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pelican Utility Pelican Utility Jump to: navigation, search Name Pelican Utility Place Alaska Utility Id 29297 Utility Location Yes Ownership I NERC Location AK Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png No rate schedules available. Average Rates Residential: $0.4450/kWh Commercial: $0.4450/kWh Industrial: $0.3890/kWh References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Pelican_Utility&oldid=411348

379

Flora Utilities | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Flora Utilities Flora Utilities Jump to: navigation, search Name Flora Utilities Place Indiana Utility Id 6425 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Commercial Rate Commercial Municipal Rate Commercial Power Acct. Rate Commercial Residential Rate Residential Average Rates Residential: $0.0958/kWh Commercial: $0.0893/kWh Industrial: $0.0805/kWh References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Flora_Utilities&oldid=410706

380

Utility Connection | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Utility Connection Utility Connection Jump to: navigation, search Return to Connections to Energy Use Data and Information Page Please tell us how connected you are to your customers Thank you for taking the time to complete this questionnaire! As you know, utility data is very important and, if used correctly, can educate consumers and change their behavior to save money and energy. First select your utility company, then provide us a little information about yourself. Only one person from each utility can answer these questions and the results from your input will be shown on the Utility Data Accessibility Map. If the questionnaire has already been completed for your utility and you think the answers need to be changed, or if you are having trouble accessing your questionnaire, please contact the .

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lake utilities effective" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

US utilities | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

6489 6489 Varnish cache server US utilities Dataset Summary Description This dataset, compiled by NREL and Ventyx, provides average residential, commercial and industrial electricity rates by zip code for both investor owned utilities (IOU) and non-investor owned utilities. Note: the file includes average rates for each utility, but not the detailed rate structure data found in the database available via the zip-code look-up feature on the OpenEI Utilities page (http://en.openei.org/wiki/Gateway:Utilities). The data was released by NREL/Ventyx in February 2011. Source NREL and Ventyx Date Released February 24th, 2012 (2 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords electric rates rates US utilities Data text/csv icon IOU rates by zipcode (csv, 1.7 MiB) text/csv icon Non-IOU rates by zipcode (csv, 2.1 MiB)

382

Gas utilization technologies  

SciTech Connect

One of the constant challenges facing the research community is the identification of technology needs 5 to 15 years from now. A look back into history indicates that the forces driving natural gas research have changed from decade to decade. In the 1970s research was driven by concerns for adequate supply; in the 1980s research was aimed at creating new markets for natural gas. What then are the driving forces for the 1990s? Recent reports from the natural gas industry have helped define a new direction driven primarily by market demand for natural gas. A study prepared by the Interstate Natural Gas Association of America Foundation entitled ``Survey of Natural Research, Development, and Demonstration RD&D Priorities`` indicated that in the 1990s the highest research priority should be for natural gas utilization and that technology development efforts should not only address efficiency and cost, but environmental and regulatory issues as well. This study and others, such as the report by the American Gas Association (A.G.A.) entitled ``Strategic Vision for Natural Gas Through the Year 2000,`` clearly identify the market sectors driving today`s technology development needs. The biggest driver is the power generation market followed by the industrial, transportation, appliance, and gas cooling markets. This is best illustrated by the GRI 1994 Baseline Projection on market growth in various sectors between the year 1992 and 2010. This paper highlights some of the recent technology developments in each one of these sectors.

Biljetina, R.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Reedy Creek Utilities, Lake Buena Vista, Florida, solar energy system performance evaluation, December 1979-March 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Reedy Creek solar system operated moderately well during the December 1979 through March 1980 heating season. The overall performance of the system was below estimated design performance but the solar system still supplied 47% of the building conditioning loads. The thermal performance is summarized. The system failed to reach design performance levels in the cooling subsystem. Since the cooling load of 40.24 million Btu was nearly three times larger than the space heating and domestic hot water loads of 14.44 million Btu, the overall system performance was significantly reduced. Although collected solar energy exceeds the system load in most months, the solar fraction is necessarily less than 100% due to the normal operating inefficiencies of pumps, heat exchanger, and particularly the absorption chiller. At Reedy Creek, excessive storage losses, presumably due to high storage temperatures, further degrade system performance. Collector array efficiency based on the total incident solar radiation was 11%. This was significantly lower than the 14% collector array efficiency for the 1979 heating season.

Logee, T.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Impacts of Western Area Power Administration`s power marketing alternatives on retail electricity rates and utility financial viability  

SciTech Connect

Changes in power contract terms for customers of Western`s Salt Lake City Area Office affect electricity rates for consumers of electric power in Arizona, Colorado, Nevada, New Mexico, Utah, and Wyoming. The impacts of electricity rate changes on consumers are studied by measuring impacts on the rates charged by individual utility systems, determining the average rates in regional areas, and conducting a detailed rate analysis of representative utility systems. The primary focus is an evaluation of the way retail electricity rates for Western`s preference customers vary with alternative pricing and power quantity commitment terms under Western`s long-term contracts to sell power (marketing programs). Retail rate impacts are emphasized because changes in the price of electricity are the most direct economic effect on businesses and residences arising from different Western contractual and operational policies. Retail rates are the mechanism by which changes in cost associated with Western`s contract terms are imposed on ultimate consumers, and rate changes determine the dollar level of payments for electric power incurred by the affected consumers. 41 figs., 9 tabs.

Bodmer, E.; Fisher, R.E.; Hemphill, R.C.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Public opinion concerning geothermal development in Lake County, California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A random sample of 2500 of the registered voters of Lake County, California, were polled about their opinions regarding the prospect of the development of geothermal energy in Lake County. The results of a secondary analysis of their responses are presented. The main conclusions are: (1) A large majority of the respondents are in favor of geothermal development provided that it is suitably regulated to minimize negative environmental impacts. (2) The main determinants of the respondents' approval or disapproval of geothermal development are their expectations concerning the environmental impacts of geothermal development and the economic benefits of development for the county. Essentially all respondents who do not perceive negative environmental impacts support development, and the expectation of increased job opportunities and/or tax revenues is a nearly absolute prerequisite for support of development. (auth) (3) Pro- and anti-geothermal bias have strong effects upon the formation of opinions about leasing and the perception of environmental impacts. (4) Purely demographic characteristics of the respondents, such as employment status and years of residence in the county, have only limited effects upon their attitudes toward geothermal development except in the southern portion of the county, where longer term residents and those who live in the county for reasons of employment are more in favor of development.

Vollintine, L.; Weres, O.

1976-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

NETL: IEP - Coal Utilization By-Products - Utilization Projects...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

University of North Dakota, EERC - Table of Contents Coal Ash Resources Research Consortium Stabilizing Feedlots Using Coal Ash Environmental Evaluation for Utilization of Ash in...

387

Convective Structures in a Cold Air Outbreak over Lake Michigan during Lake-ICE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Lake-Induced Convection Experiment provided special field data during a westerly flow cold air outbreak (CAO) on 13 January 1998, which has afforded the opportunity to examine in detail an evolving convective boundary layer. Vertical cross ...

Suzanne M. Zurn-Birkhimer; Ernest M. Agee; Zbigniew Sorbjan

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Patterns of Local Circulation in the Itaipu Lake Area: Numerical Simulations of Lake Breeze  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The lake-breeze circulation in the Itaipu region was investigated numerically using a nonhydrostatic version of the Topographic Vorticity Model. The area of study corresponds to a 100 km 180 km rectangle, located on the BrazilParaguay border, ...

Snia M. S. Stivari; Amauri P. de Oliveira; Hugo A. Karam; Jacyra Soares

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Impacts of Climate Variation and Catchment Area on Water Balance and Lake Hydrologic Type in Groundwater-Dominated Systems: A Generic Lake Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lakes are a major geologic feature in humid regions, and multiple lake hydrologic types exist with varying physical and chemical characteristics, connections among lakes, and relationships to the landscape. The authors developed a model of water ...

Jeffrey Cardille; Michael T. Coe; Julie A. Vano

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Detroit Lakes Energy Systems Study: Phase I extension. Final report, August 1, 1978-January 15, 1979. [Biomass for power plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An assessment of the resource availability of biomass and the potential of utilization of renewable energy systems in Detroit Lakes, Minnesota is presented. The feasibility of retrofitting the existing power plant to house a biomass energy system is discussed. Survey and evaluation of current off-the-shelf farm implement equipment which can be adapted to the handling of selected biomass materials is presented. Density studies on sunflower stalks, grain straw, and forest residues are included. (DC)

Not Available

1979-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

391

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

coal FA. Two levels of blended ash of approximately 25% and 35% were used. The effect of source of wood FA was noticeably different on the performance of concrete. Blending of wood FA with Class C coal FA-grade concrete can be made using wood FA and/or its blends with Class C coal FA as a replacement of cement

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

392

Slinger Utilities | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Slinger Utilities Slinger Utilities Jump to: navigation, search Name Slinger Utilities Place Wisconsin Utility Id 17324 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes ISO MISO Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png General Service- Single-Phase Commercial General Service- Single-Phase- Time-of-Day Commercial General Service- Three-Phase Commercial General Service- Three-Phase- Time-of-Day Commercial Industrial Power- Time-of-Day Industrial Large Power- Time-of-Day Commercial Ornamental Street Lighting- 150W HPS Lighting Overhead Street Lighting- 150W HPS Lighting

393

Dalton Utilities | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dalton Utilities Dalton Utilities Jump to: navigation, search Name Dalton Utilities Place Georgia Utility Id 4744 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location SERC NERC SERC Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Bundled Services Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png 100 - Watt Sodium Vapor Lighting 1000 - Watt Metal Halide Directional Type Lighting 150 Watt Mercury Vapor Underground Service Lighting 150 Watt Sodium Vapor Underground Service Lighting 175 - Watt Mercury Vapor Lighting 175 - Watt Sodium Vapor Lighting

394

Waupun Utilities | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Waupun Utilities Waupun Utilities Jump to: navigation, search Name Waupun Utilities Place Wisconsin Utility Id 20213 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes ISO MISO Yes Activity Distribution Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle2 Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Commercial Single Phase Commercial Commercial Three Phase Commercial Renewable Energy Residential Residential Small Power Industrial Average Rates Residential: $0.1060/kWh Commercial: $0.0968/kWh Industrial: $0.0770/kWh References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a"

395

Maryville Utilities | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Maryville Utilities Maryville Utilities Jump to: navigation, search Name Maryville Utilities Place Tennessee Utility Id 11789 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location SERC NERC SERC Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Commercial- Schedule GSA-1 Commercial Commercial- Schedule GSA-2 Commercial Commercial- Schedule GSA-3 Commercial Outdoor Light- 100W HP Sodium Security Light Lighting Outdoor Light- 175W Mercury Vapor Lighting Outdoor Light- 250W HP Sodium Flood Light Lighting Outdoor Light- 250W HP Sodium Security Light Lighting Outdoor Light- 400W Mercury Vapor Lighting

396

Oconomowoc Utilities | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Utilities Utilities Jump to: navigation, search Name Oconomowoc Utilities Place Wisconsin Utility Id 13963 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes ISO MISO Yes Activity Distribution Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle2 Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Cp-1 Small Power Service Industrial Cp-1 Small Power Service Primary Metering Discount with Parallel Generation(20kW or less) Industrial Cp-1 Small Power Service Primary Metering and Transformer Ownership Discount Industrial Cp-1 Small Power Service Primary Metering and Transformer Ownership

397

Sheffield Utilities | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Utilities Utilities Jump to: navigation, search Name Sheffield Utilities Place Alabama Utility Id 17033 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location SERC NERC SERC Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Security Light 100 W HPS Openbottom Lighting Security Light 150 W HPS Cobrahead Lighting Security Light 150 W HPS Decorative Light Lighting Security Light 1500 W MH Floodlight Lighting Security Light 175 W MV Openbottom Lighting Security Light 250 W HPS Cobrahead Lighting Security Light 250 W HPS Decorative Light Lighting Security Light 250 W HPS Floodlight Lighting

398

Cannelton Utilities | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cannelton Utilities Cannelton Utilities Jump to: navigation, search Name Cannelton Utilities Place Indiana Utility Id 2964 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes ISO MISO Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Outdoor Lighting: Murcury Vapor Light, 175 Watt Lighting Rate 1: Residential Residential Rate 2: Multi-Phase Commercial Rate 2: Single Phase Commercial Rate 3: Industrial Phase II Residential Rate 3: Industrial phase I Industrial Street Lighting: Decorative Metal Halide, 175 Watt Lighting Street Lighting: High Pressure Sodium, 100 Watt Lighting

399

Decatur Utilities | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Utilities Utilities Jump to: navigation, search Name Decatur Utilities Place Alabama Utility Id 4958 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location SERC NERC SERC Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] Energy Information Administration Form 826[2] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Commercial - BILL CODE 50 Commercial Commercial - Bill Code 40 Commercial Residential - Bill Code 22 Residential Security Light 100 W HPS (No Pole) Lighting Security Light 100 W HPS (With Pole) Lighting Security Light 250 W HPS (No Pole) Lighting Security Light 250 W HPS (With Pole) Lighting

400

Geothermal Exploration Using Aviris Remote Sensing Data Over Fish Lake  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Using Aviris Remote Sensing Data Over Fish Lake Using Aviris Remote Sensing Data Over Fish Lake Valley, Nv Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Geothermal Exploration Using Aviris Remote Sensing Data Over Fish Lake Valley, Nv Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Fish Lake Valley, in Esmeralda County, Nevada, sits at the southern end of the Mina Deflection where the very active Death Valley-Furnace Creek-Fish Lake Valley fault system makes a right step to transfer slip northward into the Walker Lane. Northern Fish Lake Valley has been pulling part since ca. 6 Ma, primarily along the Emigrant Peak normal fault zone (Stockli et al., 2003). Elevated tectonic activity in Fish Lake Valley suggests there may be increased fracture permeability to facilitate

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lake utilities effective" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Medicine Lake Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Medicine Lake Geothermal Area Medicine Lake Geothermal Area (Redirected from Medicine Lake Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Medicine Lake Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (1) 9 Exploration Activities (9) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.57,"lon":-121.57,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

402

Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program : Limnological and Fisheries Monitoring Annual Report 1999.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Grand Coulee Dam was constructed in 1939 without a fish ladder, which eliminated steelhead (Onchorhynchus mykiss), chinook salmon (O. twshwastica), coho salmon (O. kisutch) and sockeye salmon (O. nerka) from returning to approximately 1,835 km (1,140 miles) of natal streams and tributaries found in the upper Columbia River Drainage in the United States and Canada. The Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980 gave the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), the authority and responsibility to use its legal and financial resources, 'to protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife to the extent affected by the development and operation of any hydroelectric project of the Columbia River and its tributaries. This is to be done in a manner consistent with the program adopted by the Northwest Power Planning Council (NWPPC), and the purposes of the Act' (NWPPC, 1987). With the phrase 'protect, mitigate and enhance', Congress signaled its intent that the NWPPC's fish and wildlife program should do more than avoid future hydroelectric damage to the basin's fish and wildlife. The program must also counter past damage, work toward rebuilding those fish and wildlife populations that have been harmed by the hydropower system, protect the Columbia Basin's fish and wildlife resources, and mitigate for harm caused by decades of hydroelectric development and operations. By law, this program is limited to measures that deal with impacts created by the development, operation and management of hydroelectric facilities on the Columbia River and its tributaries. However, off-site enhancement projects are used to address the effects of the hydropower system on fish and wildlife (NWPPC 1987). Resident game fish populations have been established in Franklin D. Roosevelt Lake, the reservoir behind Grand Coulee Dam, since the extirpation of anadromous fish species. The resident game fish populations are now responsible for attracting a large percentage of the recreational visits to the region. An increase in popularity has placed Lake Roosevelt fifth amongst the most visited State and Federal parks in Washington. Increased use of the reservoir prompted amplified efforts to enhance the Native American subsistence fishery and the resident sport fishery in 1984 with hatchery supplementation of rainbow trout (O. mykiss) and kokanee salmon (O. nerka). This was followed by the formation of the Spokane Tribal Lake Roosevelt Monitoring Project (LRMP) in 1988 and later by formation of the Lake Roosevelt Data Collection Project in 1991. The Lake Roosevelt Data Collection Project began in July 1991 as part of the BPA, Bureau of Reclamation, and U.S. Army Corps of Engineers System Operation Review process. This process sought to develop an operational scenario for the federal Columbia River hydropower system to maximize the in-reservoir fisheries with minimal impacts to all other stakeholders in the management of the Columbia River. The Lake Roosevelt Monitoring/Data Collection Program (LRMP) is the result of a merger between the Lake Roosevelt Monitoring Program (BPA No. 8806300) and the Lake Roosevelt Data Collection Project (BPA No. 9404300). These projects were merged in 1996 forming the Lake Roosevelt Monitoring Program (LRMP), which continues the work historically completed under the separate projects. The LRMP has two main goals. The first is to develop a biological model for Lake Roosevelt that will predict in-reservoir biological responses to a range of water management operational scenarios, and to develop fisheries and reservoir management strategies accordingly. The model will allow identification of lake operations that minimize impacts on lake biota while addressing the needs of other interests (e.g. flood control, hydropower generation, irrigation, and downstream resident and anadromous fisheries). Major components of the model will include: (1) quantification of entrainment and other impacts to phytoplankton, zooplankton and fish caused by reservoir drawdowns and low water retention times; (2) quantification

McLellan, Holly; Lee, Chuck; Scofield, Ben; Pavlik, Deanne

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Utility Partnerships Program Overview (Brochure)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Program overview brochure for the Utility Partnerships Program within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP).

Not Available

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Advanced Manufacturing Office: Utility Partnerships  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Printable Version Save Energy Now Utility Partnerships In order to reduce industrial energy intensity and use, the Industrial Technologies Program (ITP) is forming...

405

APS sector layout: Utilities, etc  

SciTech Connect

This bulletin describes the general physical layout of the APS Experiment Hall and the utilities that will be available for the beamlines.

Davey, S.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

APS sector layout: Utilities, etc.  

SciTech Connect

This bulletin describes the general physical layout of the APS Experiment Hall and the utilities that will be available for the beamlines.

Davey, S.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Mandatory Utility Green Power Option  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

In Montana, regulated electric utilities are required to offer customers the option of purchasing electricity generated by certified, environmentally-preferred resources that include, but are not...

408

Effectively utilizing project, product and process knowledge  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Improving project management, product development and engineering processes is for many companies crucial to survive in a fast changing environment. However, these activities are rarely integrated well due to the diversity of stakeholders with individual ... Keywords: CMMI, KM, PLM, Process improvement, Project management

Christof Ebert; Jozef De Man

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Utility stresses environmental programs, research projects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

B.C. Hydro, the provincial electric utility of British Columbia, views environmental programs and research projects as an important part of its business. Many of these activities stem from some aspect of hydroelectric generation as the utility relies on 39 reservoirs and 30 hydro stations for the bulk of its electricity production. These programs and research projects are featured in B.C. Hydro's first annual Report on the Environment, which summarizes the utility's work to minimize the effects of operations on the natural and social environment. Some programs and research projects were initiated some years ago, while others are new. B.C.'s environmental programs include environmental audits and fish and wildlife compensation (mitigation) programs. In 1988, the utility and the province's Ministry of Environment, Lands and Parks began developing compensation programs to address water license requirements for B.C. Hydro's hydroelectric developments. Today, compensation programs for the Peace and Columbia river area serve as models for future programs. The utility also reports it is reviewing all operating orders for its water system to identify opportunities to make operations more sensitive to environmental concerns. Additionally, work is under way on a preliminary strategy for addressing fish and water quality issues and setting minimum flow requirements. And in an effort to control dust storms, B.C. Hydro reports it is studying native perennial plants that can endure the flooding/drawdown cycle typical of a water storage reservoir.

Not Available

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

2012 Green Utility Leaders | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Field Sites Power Marketing Administration Other Agencies You are here Home 2012 Green Utility Leaders 2012 Green Utility Leaders 2012 Green Utility Leaders Ranking the Top...

411

Utility Scale Solar Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Utility Scale Solar Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name Utility Scale Solar Inc Place Palo Alto, California Zip 94301 Product California-based PV tracker maker. References Utility...

412

Columbia Utilities Electricity | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Utilities Electricity Place New York Utility Id 55814 Utility Location Yes Ownership R Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Retail Marketing Yes References EIA Form EIA-861...

413

Hawaii technology utilization experiment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A one-year technology-transfer project involving ERDA installations and Hawaii consisted of sending teams from the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory on week-long field trips every two months to test the effectiveness of different methods of transferring technology information from federal sources to civilian clients. The team was questioned primarily on non-energy matters, and the energy questions asked related mostly to individuals or small industries. The team responed to all questions and found that a wide range of knowledge was more effective than having a sequence of experts. Hawaiians considered current major ERDA projects to be irrelevant to their needs. The team was most successful on a one-to-one basis because large groups and state agencies tend to be more policy- than action-oriented. Personal followup was considered essential. The team also learned that their visits generated ten times as many inquiries as were received unsolicited by the laboratory. Most inquiries involved biomass and use of agricultural wastes, solar energy, and transportation. An important contribution of the team's workshops was linking groups to work together on common problems. An appendix lists the subjects of queries and the names and addresses of consortium participants and Hawaiian contacts. (DCK)

Dorn, D.W.; Miller, C.F.

1976-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

414

Measurement of Lake Roosevelt Biota in Relation to Reservoir Operations; 1991 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to collect biological data from Lake Roosevelt to be used in the design of a computer model that would predict biological responses to reservoir operations as part of the System Operation Review program. Major components of the Lake Roosevelt model included: quantification of impacts to phytoplankton, zooplanktons, benthic invertebrates, and fish caused by reservoir drawdowns and low water retention times; quantification of number, distribution, and use of fish food organisms in the reservoir by season; determination of seasonal growth of fish species as related to reservoir operations, prey abundance and utilization; and quantification of entrainment levels of zooplankton and fish as related to reservoir operations and water retention times. This report summarized the data collected on Lake Roosevelt for 1991 and includes limnological, zooplankton, benthic macroinvertebrate, fishery, and reservoir operation data. Discussions cover reservoir operation affect upon zooplankton, benthic macroinvertebrates, and fish. Reservoir operations brought reservoir elevations to a low of 1,221.7 in April, the result of power operations and a flood control shift from Dworshak Dam, in Idaho, to Grand Coulee Dam. Water retention times were correspondingly low reaching a minimum of 14.7 days on April 27th.

Griffith, Janelle R.; McDowell, Amy C.; Scholz, Allan T.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

PRELIMINARY UTILITY SERVICE CONNECTION APPLICATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SERVICES: WATER, SANITARY, STORM, GAS, and DISTRICT HEATING Part 3 (a). Water Distribution. Water service.5.7 and Section 02730, Clause 2.5.6). #12;Page 2 of 2 Revised 4 October 2011 Part 3 (c). Gas and District Heating) and Section (TBA-District Heating ­ contact UBC Utilities. · Fax or mail request to UBC Utilities (address

Vellend, Mark

416

Utility battery storage systems program report for FY 94  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico, conducts the Utility Battery Storage Systems Program, which is sponsored by the US Department of Energy`s Office of Energy Management. The goal of this program is to assist industry in developing cost-effective battery systems as a utility resource option by 2000. Sandia is responsible for the engineering analyses, contracted development, and testing of rechargeable batteries and systems for utility energy storage applications. This report details the technical achievements realized during fiscal year 1994.

Butler, P.C.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

An Innovative Approach to Plant Utility Audits Yields Significant Results  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents innovative methods to conduct powerhouse audits when applying advanced energy management to utility systems. Specifically, a new class of Energy Management and Reporting Systems (EMRS) applied to plant wide utility control systems is a cost effective method to improve overall system efficiency and reliability. Typical returns for an industrial CHP fuel-switching powerhouse utilizing an EMRS range from $150K/Month to $450K/Month based on the facility size, functionality, and fuel types.

Robinson, J. E.; Moore, D. A.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Property:OpenEI/UtilityRate/Utility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Utility Utility Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Page. Name: Utility Subproperties This property has the following 1 subproperty: A Data:Add4bb7f-e6bd-4427-a614-3a92bd5ba15d Pages using the property "OpenEI/UtilityRate/Utility" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 0 0000827d-84d0-453d-b659-b86869323897 + Prairie Land Electric Coop Inc + 000086db-7a5e-4356-9c57-c912f7d1622e + Talquin Electric Coop, Inc + 0003a8b3-04b9-4ecb-b06d-6022e7f0f009 + Central Electric Membership Corporation + 000470c7-df04-47aa-bdd2-d70f0a2c52b3 + New London Electric&Water Util + 000b6dfa-a541-428a-9029-423006e22a34 + City of Plymouth, Wisconsin (Utility Company) + 000db36e-b548-43e7-a283-d37ecc77cef1 + Surprise Valley Electrification Corp. +

419

GSA-Utility Interconnection Agreements  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Property Property Asset Management Office of General Counsel Real Property Division Richard R. Butterworth Senior Assistant General Counsel (202) 501-4436 richard.butterworth@gsa.gov The Problem: * Most agreements require indemnity clauses - usually either by tariff or by the submission of standard contracts to PSCs * Federal Government precluded from providing indemnity by: * Anti-deficiency Act - 31 U.S.C. 665(a) * Adequacy of Appropriations Act - 41 U.S.C. 11 GSA - Utility Interconnection Agreements GSA - Utility Interconnection Agreements Exception: Utility Contracts * GAO decision sets the foundation for exception for utility contracts - 59 Comp. Gen. 705 * But it's a narrow exception - B-197583, January 19, 1981 GSA - Utility Interconnection Agreements

420

Proceedings: 1991 Fuel Oil Utilization Workshop  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To assist utilities in improving fossil steam plant operations, EPRI continues to conduct annual fuel oil utilization workshops. At the 1991 conference, personnel from 16 electric utilities exchanged ideas on improving residual fuel oil utilization in their generating plants.

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lake utilities effective" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Hualapai Tribal Utility Development Project  

SciTech Connect

The first phase of the Hualapai Tribal Utility Development Project (Project) studied the feasibility of establishing a tribally operated utility to provide electric service to tribal customers at Grand Canyon West (see objective 1 below). The project was successful in completing the analysis of the energy production from the solar power systems at Grand Canyon West and developing a financial model, based on rates to be charged to Grand Canyon West customers connected to the solar systems, that would provide sufficient revenue for a Tribal Utility Authority to operate and maintain those systems. The objective to establish a central power grid over which the TUA would have authority and responsibility had to be modified because the construction schedule of GCW facilities, specifically the new air terminal, did not match up with the construction schedule for the solar power system. Therefore, two distributed systems were constructed instead of one central system with a high voltage distribution network. The Hualapai Tribal Council has not taken the action necessary to establish the Tribal Utility Authority that could be responsible for the electric service at GCW. The creation of a Tribal Utility Authority (TUA) was the subject of the second objective of the project. The second phase of the project examined the feasibility and strategy for establishing a tribal utility to serve the remainder of the Hualapai Reservation and the feasibility of including wind energy from a tribal wind generator in the energy resource portfolio of the tribal utility (see objective 2 below). It is currently unknown when the Tribal Council will consider the implementation of the results of the study. Objective 1 - Develop the basic organizational structure and operational strategy for a tribally controlled utility to operate at the Tribes tourism enterprise district, Grand Canyon West. Coordinate the development of the Tribal Utility structure with the development of the Grand Canyon West Power Project construction of the power infrastructure at Grand Canyon West. Develop the maintenance and operations capacity necessary to support utility operations. Develop rates for customers on the Grand Canyon West mini-grid sufficient for the tribal utility to be self-sustaining. Establish an implementation strategy for tribal utility service at Grand Canyon West Objective 2 - Develop a strategy for tribal utility takeover of electric service on the Reservation. Perform a cost analysis of Reservation electrical service. Develop an implementation strategy for tribal takeover of Reservation electrical service. Examine options and costs associated with integration of the Tribes wind resources.

Hualapai Tribal Nation

2008-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

422

American Municipal Power (Public Electric Utilities) - Residential...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

American Municipal Power (Public Electric Utilities) - Residential Efficiency Smart Program (Ohio) American Municipal Power (Public Electric Utilities) - Residential Efficiency...

423

NETL: Coal Utilization By-Products (CUB)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home > Technologies > Coal & Power Systems > Innovations for Existing Plants > Coal Utilization Byproducts Innovations for Existing Plants Solid Waste (Coal Utilization...

424

Energy Crossroads: Utility Energy Efficiency Programs Delaware...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Delaware Energy Crossroads Index Utility Energy Efficiency Programs Index Suggest a Listing Chesapeake Utilities Information for Businesses Delmarva Power...

425

Technology Utilization Program (Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Utilization Program (Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada) Technology Utilization Program (Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada) Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fuel...

426

Measurement of Lake Roosevelt Biota in Relation to Reservoir Operations; 1992 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this research project is to collect data to model resident fish requirements for Lake Roosevelt as part of the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), Bureau of Reclamation (BoR), and U.S. Army Corps of Engineer`s (ACE) System Operation Review. The System Operation Review (SOR) is a tri-agency team functioning to review the use and partitioning of Columbia Basin waters. User groups of the Columbia have been defined as power, irrigation, flood control, anadromous fish, resident fish, wildlife, recreation, water quality, navigation, and cultural resources. Once completed the model will predict biological responses to different reservoir operation strategies. The model being developed for resident fish is based on Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife, and Parks model for resident fish requirements within Hungry Horse and Libby Reservoirs. While the Montana model predicts fish growth based on the impacts of reservoir operation and flow conditions on primary and secondary production levels, the Lake Roosevelt model will also factor in the affects of water retention time on zooplankton production levels and fish entrainment. Major components of the Lake Roosevelt model include: (1) quantification of impacts to zooplankton, benthic invertebrates, and fish caused by reservoir drawdowns and low water retention times; (2) quantification of number, distribution, and use of fish food organisms in the reservoir by season; (3) determination of seasonal growth of fish species as related to reservoir operations, prey abundance and utilization; and (4) quantification of entrainment levels of fish as related to reservoir operations and water retention times. This report contains the results of the resident fish system operation review program for Lake Roosevelt from January through December 1992.

Griffith, Janelle R.; McDowell, Amy C.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Lake Whitney Comprehensive Water Quality Assessment, Phase 1B- Physical and Biological Assessment (USDOE)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Baylor University Center for Reservoir and Aquatic Systems Research (CRASR) has conducted a phased, comprehensive evaluation of Lake Whitney to determine its suitability for use as a regional water supply reservoir. The area along the Interstate 35 corridor between Dallas / Fort Worth Metroplex and the Waco / Temple Centroplex represents one of the fastest growth areas in the State of Texas and reliable water supplies are critical to sustainable growth. Lake Whitney is situated midway between these two metropolitan areas. Currently, the City of Whitney as well as all of Bosque and Hill counties obtain their potable water from the Trinity Sands aquifer. Additionally, parts of the adjoining McLennan and Burleson counties utilize the Trinity sands aquifer system as a supplement to their surface water supplies. Population growth coupled with increasing demands on this aquifer system in both the Metroplex and Centroplex have resulted in a rapid depletion of groundwater in these rural areas. The Lake Whitney reservoir represents both a potentially local and regional solution for an area experiencing high levels of growth. Because of the large scope of this project as well as the local, regional and national implications, we have designed a multifaceted approach that will lead to the solution of numerous issues related to the feasibility of using Lake Whitney as a water resource to the region. Phase IA (USEPA, QAPP Study Elements 1-4) of this research focused on the physical limnology of the reservoir (bathymetry and fine scale salinity determination) and develops hydrodynamic watershed and reservoir models to evaluate how salinity would be expected to change with varying hydrologic and climatic factors. To this end, we implemented a basic water quality modeling program in collaboration with the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department and the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality to add to the developing long-term database on Lake Whitney. Finally, we conducted an initial assessment of knowledge of watershed and water quality related issues by local residents and stakeholders of Lake Whitney and design an intervention educational program to address any deficiencies discovered. Phase IA was funded primarily from EPA Cooperative Agreement X7-9769 8901-0. Phase IC (USEPA, QAPP Study Element 5) of this research focused on the ambient toxicity of the reservoir with respect to periodic blooms of golden algae. Phase IC was funded primarily from Cooperative Agreement EM-96638001. Phase 1B (USDOE, Study Elements 6-11) complemented work being done via EPA funding on study elements 1-5 and added five new study elements: 6) Salinity Transport in the Brazos Watershed to Lake Whitney; 7) Bacterial Assessment; 8) Organic Contaminant Analysis on Lake Whitney; 9) Plankton Photosynthesis; 10) Lake Whitney Resident Knowledge Assessment; and 11) Engineering Scoping Perspective: Recommendations for Use.

Doyle, Robert D; Byars, Bruce W

2009-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

428

Iowa Lakes Electric Cooperative | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Iowa Lakes Electric Cooperative Iowa Lakes Electric Cooperative Place Estherville, Iowa Zip 51334 Sector Wind energy Product Iowa-based consumer-owned electric cooperative. The entity is a project developer for two wind farms. Coordinates 43.401935°, -94.838594° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.401935,"lon":-94.838594,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

429

Carson Lake Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Carson Lake Geothermal Project Carson Lake Geothermal Project Project Location Information Coordinates 39.321111111111°, -118.70388888889° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.321111111111,"lon":-118.70388888889,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

430

Great Lakes Biofuels LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Great Lakes Biofuels LLC Great Lakes Biofuels LLC Place Madison, Wisconsin Zip 53704 Sector Services Product Biodiesel research, consulting, management distribution and services company. Coordinates 43.07295°, -89.386694° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.07295,"lon":-89.386694,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

431

Dry Lake Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wind Farm Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Dry Lake Wind Farm Facility Dry Lake Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Iberdrola Renewables Developer Iberdrola Renewables Energy Purchaser Iberdrola Renewables Location Navajo County AZ Coordinates 34.635651°, -110.357351° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.635651,"lon":-110.357351,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

432

Mercury in the Lake Powell ecosystem  

SciTech Connect

Flameless atomic absorption analyses of samples from Lake Powell yield the following mercury levels (in mean parts per billion): 0.01 in lake water, 30 in bottom sediments, 10 in shoreline substrates, 34 in plant leaves, 145 in plant debris, 28 in algae, 10 in crayfish, and 232 in fish muscle. Bioamplification and the association of mercury with organic matter are evident in this recently created, relatively unpolluted reservoir. Formulation of an estimated mercury budget suggests that the restriction of outflow in the impounded Colorado River leads to mercury accumulation, and that projected regional coal-fired power generation may produce sufficient amounts of mercury to augment significantly the mercury released by natural weathering.

Standiford, D.R.; Potter, L.D.; Kidd, D.E.

1973-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

A utility`s perspective of the market for IGCC  

SciTech Connect

I believe, in the short-term U. S. market that IGCC`s primary competition is, natural gas-fired combined cycle technology. I believe that in order for IGCC to compete on a commercial basis, that natural gas prices have to rise relative to coal prices, and that the capital cost of the technology must come down. While this statement may seem to be somewhat obvious, it raises two interesting points. The first is that while the relative pricing of natural gas and coal is not generally within the technology supplier`s control, the capital cost is. The reduction of capital cost represents a major challenge for the technology suppliers in order for this technology to become commercialized. The second point is that the improvements being achieved with IGCC efficiencies probably won`t help it outperform the effects of natural gas pricing. This is due to the fact that the combined cycle portion of the IGCC technology is experiencing the most significant improvements in efficiency. I do see, however, a significant advantage for IGCC technology compared to conventional pulverized coal-fired units. As IGCC efficiencies continue to improve, combined with their environmentally superior performance, I believe that IGCC will be the ``technology of choice`` for utilities that install new coal-fired generation. We have achieved economic justification of our project by virtue of the DOE`s funding of $120 million awarded in Round III of their Clean Coal Technology Program. This program provides the bridge between current technology economics and those of the future. And Tampa Electric is pleased to be taking a leadership position in furthering the IGCC knowledge base.

Black, C.R. [Tampa Electric Co., FL (United States)

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Spirit Lake II Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

II Wind Farm II Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Spirit Lake II Wind Farm Facility Spirit Lake II Sector Wind energy Facility Type Community Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Spirit Lake School Dist Developer Spirit Lake School District Energy Purchaser Spirit Lake School District Location Spirit Lake IA Coordinates 43.411412°, -95.09914° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.411412,"lon":-95.09914,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

435

Mapping Fractures In The Medicine Lake Geothermal System | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fractures In The Medicine Lake Geothermal System Fractures In The Medicine Lake Geothermal System Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Mapping Fractures In The Medicine Lake Geothermal System Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: A major challenge to energy production in the region has been locating high-permability fracture zones in the largely impermeable volcanic host rock. An understanding of the fracture networks will be a key to harnessing geothermal resources in the Cascades Author(s): Steven Clausen, Michal Nemcok, Joseph Moore, Jeffrey Hulen, John Bartley Published: GRC, 2006 Document Number: Unavailable DOI: Unavailable Core Analysis At Medicine Lake Area (Clausen Et Al, 2006) Medicine Lake Geothermal Area Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Mapping_Fractures_In_The_Medicine_Lake_Geothermal_System&oldid=388927

436

National Park Service - Lake Powell, Utah | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Lake Powell, Utah Lake Powell, Utah National Park Service - Lake Powell, Utah October 7, 2013 - 9:58am Addthis Photo of the Photovoltaic System at Lake Powell, Utah Lake Powell is part of Utah's Glen Canyon National Recreation Area. The Dangling Rope Marina operates by using diesel generators to supply power. They use 65,000 gallons of diesel fuel per year that has to be barged in over Lake Powell. The potential for environmental damage to the marina in the event of a fuel spill is significant, and the cost to the National Park Service (NPS) for transporting each fuel delivery is considerable. Consequently, the installation of a photovoltaic (PV) system presented many advantages. This is the largest PV system the NPS has installed with 115 kilowatts of energy being produced. A 59% improvement in energy efficiency has been

437

Lake Lahontan: Geology of Southern Carson Desert, Nevada | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lake Lahontan: Geology of Southern Carson Desert, Nevada Lake Lahontan: Geology of Southern Carson Desert, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Lake Lahontan: Geology of Southern Carson Desert, Nevada Abstract This report presents a stratigraphic study of an area of about 860 square miles in the southern part of the Carson Desert, near Fallen, Churchill County, Nev. The exposed rocks and surficial sediments range in age from early Tertiary (?) to Recent. The late Quaternary sediments and soils were especially studied: they furnish a detailed history of the fluctuations of Lake Lahontan (a huge but intermittent late Pleistocene lake) and of younger lakes, as well as a history of late Quaternary sedimentation, erosion, soil development, and climatic change that probably is

438

Iowa Lakes Superior Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lakes Superior Wind Farm Lakes Superior Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Iowa Lakes Superior Wind Farm Facility Iowa Lakes Superior Wind Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Iowa Lakes Electric Cooperative Developer Iowa Lakes Electric Cooperative Location West of Superior IA Coordinates 43.447756°, -94.980719° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.447756,"lon":-94.980719,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

439

Utility battery storage systems. Program report for FY95  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico, conducts the Utility Battery Storage Systems Program, which is sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy`s Office of Utility Technologies. The goal of this program is to assist industry in developing cost-effective battery systems as a utility resource option by 2000. Sandia is responsible for the engineering analyses, contracted development, and testing of rechargeable batteries and systems for utility energy storage applications. This report details the technical achievements realized during fiscal year 1995.

Butler, P.C.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Kilauea Iki lava lake experiment plans  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Twelve experimental studies are proposed to complete field laboratory work at Kilauea Iki lava lake. Of these twelve experiments, eleven do not require the presence of melt. Some studies are designed to use proven techniques in order to expand our existing knowledge, while others are designed to test new concepts. Experiments are grouped into three main categories: geophysics, energy extraction, and drilling technology. Each experiment is described in terms of its location, purpose, background, configuration, operation, and feasibility.

Dunn, J.C.; Hills, R.G.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lake utilities effective" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

The Lake Baikal neutrino experiment: selected results  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We review the present status of the lake Baikal Neutrino Experiment and present selected physical results gained with the consequetive stages of the stepwise increasing detector: from NT-36 to NT-96. Results cover atmospheric muons, neutrino events, very high energy neutrinos, search for neutrino events from WIMP annihilation, search for magnetic monopoles and environmental studies. We also describe an air Cherenkov array developed for the study of angular resolution of NT-200.

BAIKAL Collaboration; V. Balkanov

2000-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

442

Quality and Membrane Treatability of the Lake Houston Water Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Currently, sections of Harris and Montgomery counties located North and Northeast of Houston use groundwater almost exclusively. These areas have witnessed substantial population growth and associated increases in water demand. In 1999 approximately 60% of potable water in Houston and its adjoining communities was produced from surface water. The remaining approximately 40% was derived from groundwater. However, the "Subsidence District" which is the authority responsible for granting groundwater permits has mandated that groundwater use needs to be decreased to 20% within the next few years so as to limit subsidence. Pipelines are not available to distribute purified water from the existing surface water treatment plants located in the South and East of Houston to the Northern areas that actually require additional water. Because Lake Houston is located in the geographical area of interest and is a surface water source, the City of Houston is interested in developing it for its future water needs. Additionally, a favorable hydraulic gradient exists from the Lake to the proposed service areas in Harris and Montgomery counties. Federal regulations such as the Stage II of the Disinfectant/Disinfection By-Products Rule (1) and the Enhanced Surface Water Treatment Rule (2) are expected to be promulgated in the near future. These rules are anticipated to introduce more stringent maximum contaminant levels (MCLs) for total trihalomethanes (THMs) and haloacetic acids (HAAs), possibly introduce new MCLs for individual species of THMs and HAAs, reduce turbidity levels, and enhance inactivation/removal requirements for Cryptosporidium. (Cryptosporidium was the causative protozoan for the more than 400,000 cases of acute gastrointestinal disease in Milwaukee, WI in March 1993.) The treatment processes in the City of Houston's existing water purification plants are not expected to be sufficient in meeting these anticipated regulations. Therefore, both regulatory requirements and engineering considerations point towards Lake Houston as an attractive surface water source for the next water purification plant to supply potable water to the City and its adjoining communities. However, water quality in Lake Houston can be characterized as being poor with high concentrations of turbidity, color, total organic carbon (TOC), nutrients such as phosphorus and nitrogen, etc. (3). Pressure-driven membrane processes can be employed as effective barriers against a wide range of contaminants including particles, turbidity, protozoan cysts and oocysts, bacteria, viruses, color, organic carbon, disinfection by-product (DBP) precursors, and dissolved metals. Additionally, microfiltration (MF) and ultrafiltration (UF) pretreatment may be necessary to reduce fouling rates and increase chemical cleaning intervals during surface water nanofiltration (NF) (4). Therefore, an integrated membrane system employing MF or UF pretreatment to NF is expected to be an important treatment candidate for Lake Houston water. Nanofiltration (NF) membranes typically operate at pressures less than 100 psi and are capable of high rejections of natural organic matter (NOM) and precursors to disinfection by-products (DBP) including trihalomethanes (THMs) and haloacetic acids (HAAs) (5-8), many of which are suspected carcinogens, mutagens, or teratogens.

Chellam, Shankar; Sharma, Ramesh; Shetty, Grishma; Wei, Ying

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Regional factors governing performance and sustainability of wastewater treatment plants in Honduras : Lake Yojoa Subwatershed  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lake Yojoa, the largest natural lake in Honduras, is currently experiencing eutrophication from overloading of nutrients, in part due to inadequate wastewater treatment throughout the Lake Yojoa Subwatershed. Some efforts ...

Walker, Kent B. (Kent Bramwell)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Temporal and Spatial Variability of Great Lakes Ice Cover, 19732010  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, temporal and spatial variability of ice cover in the Great Lakes are investigated using historical satellite measurements from 1973 to 2010. The seasonal cycle of ice cover was constructed for all the lakes, including Lake St. ...

Jia Wang; Xuezhi Bai; Haoguo Hu; Anne Clites; Marie Colton; Brent Lofgren

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Supporting Water, Ecological, and Transportation Systems in the Great Lakes Basin Ecosystem  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

8-9, 2004. Ann Arbor, Michigan. Great Lakes InformationKeystone, Colorado. Lake Michigan (MI) Lakewide ManagementOffice (GLNPO) Lake Michigan Lakewide Management Plan (LaMP)

Beck, Judy; Kamke, Sherry; Majerus, Kimberly

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Lake Titicaca - Physics of an Inherited Hydropower Macroproject Proposal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Shared almost evenly by Peru and Bolivia, Lake Titicaca is situated on an Altiplano endorheic region of the northern Andes Mountains. Rio Desaguadero is the lake only outlet. From 1908, several macro-engineers speculated on the creation of a second, completely artificial, outlet for Lake Titicaca freshwater. Here we reconsider several 20th Century macroproject proposals, with the goal of examining and enhancing this technically interesting South American 21st Century Macro-engineering inheritance.

R. Cathcart; A. Bolonkin

2007-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

447

Clear Lake Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Clear Lake Geothermal Area (Redirected from Clear Lake Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Clear Lake Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (9) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.01666667,"lon":-122.65,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

448

Soda Lake Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Soda Lake Geothermal Area Soda Lake Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Soda Lake Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (3) 9 Exploration Activities (9) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.56666667,"lon":-118.85,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

449

Clear Lake Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Clear Lake Geothermal Area Clear Lake Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Clear Lake Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (9) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.01666667,"lon":-122.65,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

450

Soda Lake Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Soda Lake Geothermal Area (Redirected from Soda Lake Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Soda Lake Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (3) 9 Exploration Activities (9) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.56666667,"lon":-118.85,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

451

Hot Lake Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hot Lake Geothermal Area Hot Lake Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Hot Lake Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (2) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":fals