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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lake region electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Lake Region Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Region Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Lake Region Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Eligibility Residential...

2

Lake Region Electric Cooperative - Commercial Energy Efficiency...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

details Lake Region Electric Cooperative (LREC) offers grants to commercial customers for electric energy efficiency improvements, audits, and engineering and design assistance for...

3

Lake Region Electric Cooperative | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cooperative Jump to: navigation, search Name Lake Region Electric Cooperative Place Minnesota Utility Id 10618 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes...

4

Lake Region Electric Cooperative- Commercial Energy Efficiency Grant Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Lake Region Electric Cooperative (LREC) offers grants to commercial customers for electric energy efficiency improvements, audits, and engineering and design assistance for new and existing...

5

Lake Region Electric Cooperative | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cooperative Cooperative (Redirected from Lake Region Coop Elec Assn) Jump to: navigation, search Name Lake Region Electric Cooperative Place Minnesota Utility Id 10618 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png 2013 Residential and Farm Rates Residential Interruptible Heating(Domestic Use) Interruptible Heating(Non-Domestic Use) Residential Irrigation Rate Commercial Large Commercial Commercial Offpeak Storage Residential Simultaneous Purchase and Sale Small Commercial Commercial

6

Lake Region Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Lake Region Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency Lake Region Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Lake Region Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Maximum Rebate Limit one rebate per appliance Geothermal Heat Pumps: 20 tons Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Refrigerator: $75 with recycling of old unit Freezer: $75 with recycling of old unit Ductless Air-Source Heat Pump: $300 Air-Source Heat Pump: $330 - $630 Central AC: $50 - $200 Geothermal Heat Pump: $100 - $400/ton CFLs: Free Recycling Provider Lake Region Electric Cooperative Lake Region Electric Cooperative (LREC) offers a variety of rebates for

7

Lake Region Electric Assn, Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lake Region Electric Assn, Inc Lake Region Electric Assn, Inc Place South Dakota Utility Id 10632 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location MRO NERC RFC Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png General Service - Large Three Phase Heating(Separate Metering) Industrial General Service Single Phase Commercial General Service Single Phase (Heat-separate meter) Commercial General Service- Large Three-Phase Controlled Commercial General Service- Large Three-Phase uncontrolled Industrial General Service- Seasonal Service Commercial General Service- Small Three-Phase Commercial

8

NBP RFI: Communications Requirements- Comments of Lake Region...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Lake Region Electric Cooperative- Minnesota NBP RFI: Communications Requirements- Comments of Lake Region Electric Cooperative- Minnesota Comments of Lake Region Electric...

9

Lakes, Electricity and You | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Lakes, Electricity and You Lakes, Electricity and You Why It's So Important That Lakes Are Used To Generate Electricity Lakes, Electricity and You More Documents & Publications A...

10

Lake Region State College | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

College College Jump to: navigation, search Name Lake Region State College Facility Lake Region State College Sector Wind energy Facility Type Community Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Lake Region State College Developer Lake Region State College Energy Purchaser Lake Region State College Location Devils Lake ND Coordinates 48.166071°, -98.864529° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":48.166071,"lon":-98.864529,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

11

Geophysical study of the Clear Lake region, California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Results of geophysical studies in the Clear Lake region of California, north of San Francisco, have revealed a prominent, nearly circular negative gravity anomaly with an amplitude of more than 25 milligals (mgal) and an areal extent of approximately 250 square miles and, in addition, a number of smaller positive and negative anomalies. The major negative gravity anomaly is closely associated with the Clear Lake volcanic field and with an area characterized by hot springs and geothermal fields. However, the anomaly cannot be explained by mapped surface geologic features of the area. Aeromagnetic data in the Clear Lake region show no apparent correlation with the major negative gravity anomaly; the local magnetic field is affected principally by serpentine. An electrical resistivity low marks the central part of the gravity minimum, and a concentration of earthquake epicenters characterizes the Clear Lake volcanic field area. The primary cause of the major negative gravity anomaly is believed to be a hot intrusive mass, possibly a magma chamber, that may underlie the Clear Lake volcanic field and vicinity. This mass may serve as a source of heat for the geothermal phenomena in the area. Other smaller gravity anomalies in the Clear Lake region are apparently caused by near-surface geologic features, including relatively dense units of the Franciscan Formation and less dense Cenozoic sedimentary and volcanic rock units.

Chapman, R.H.

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Iowa Lakes Electric Cooperative | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Iowa Lakes Electric Cooperative Iowa Lakes Electric Cooperative Place Estherville, Iowa Zip 51334 Sector Wind energy Product Iowa-based consumer-owned electric cooperative. The entity is a project developer for two wind farms. Coordinates 43.401935°, -94.838594° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.401935,"lon":-94.838594,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

13

Influence of the Laurentian Great Lakes on Regional Climate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The influence of the Laurentian Great Lakes on climate is assessed by comparing two decade-long simulations, with the lakes either included or excluded, using the Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics Regional Climate Model, ...

Michael Notaro; Kathleen Holman; Azar Zarrin; Elody Fluck; Steve Vavrus; Val Bennington

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Relations between Meteorology and Ozone in the Lake Michigan Region  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The field program phase of the Lake Michigan Ozone Study (LMOS) took place during the summer of 1991. Observed ozone concentrations and weather variables have been analyzed for the Lake Michigan region and the eastern United States for four 1991 ...

Steven R. Hanna; Joseph C. Chang

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

The Role of Northern Lakes in a Regional Energy Balance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There are many lakes of widely varying morphometry in northern latitudes. For this study region, in the central Mackenzie River valley of western Canada, lakes make up 37% of the landscape. The nonlake components of the landscape are divided into ...

Wayne R. Rouse; Claire J. Oswald; Jacqueline Binyamin; Christopher Spence; William M. Schertzer; Peter D. Blanken; Normand Bussires; Claude R. Duguay

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Regional Gravity Survey of the Northern Great Salt Lake Desert...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

of the Northern Great Salt Lake Desert and Adjacent Areas in Utah, Nevada, and Idaho Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Regional Gravity...

17

Mallard Lake Electric Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mallard Lake Electric Biomass Facility Mallard Lake Electric Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Mallard Lake Electric Biomass Facility Facility Mallard Lake Electric Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Du Page County, Illinois Coordinates 41.8243831°, -88.0900762° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.8243831,"lon":-88.0900762,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

18

Parameterization of Lakes and Wetlands for Energy and Water Balance Studies in the Great Lakes Region  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lakes and wetlands are prevalent around the Great Lakes and play an important role in the regional water and energy cycle. However, simulating their impacts on regional-scale hydrology is still a major challenge and not widely attempted. In the ...

Vimal Mishra; Keith A. Cherkauer; Laura C. Bowling

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Red Lake Electric Coop, Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Red Lake Electric Coop, Inc Red Lake Electric Coop, Inc Place Minnesota Utility Id 26934 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location MRO NERC ERCOT Yes NERC MRO Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Controlled Electric Water Heating - Commercial Commercial Controlled Electric Water Heating - Residential Residential General Service - 1.5 to 10 kVA - Commercial Commercial General Service - 1.5 to 10 kVA - Multiphase Commercial General Service - 1.5 to 10 kVA - Residential Residential General Service - 11 to 25 kVA - Commercial Commercial General Service - 11 to 25 kVA - Multiphase Commercial

20

Increasing Great LakeEffect Snowfall during the Twentieth Century: A Regional Response to Global Warming?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The influence of the Laurentian Great Lakes on the climate of surrounding regions is significant, especially in leeward settings where lake-effect snowfall occurs. Heavy lake-effect snow represents a potential natural hazard and plays important ...

Adam W. Burnett; Matthew E. Kirby; Henry T. Mullins; William P. Patterson

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lake region electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Hydrogeochemical evaluation of conventional and hot dry rock geothermal resource potential in the Clear Lake region, California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Chemistry, stable isotope, and tritium contents of thermal/mineral waters in the Clear Lake region were used to evaluate conventional and hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal potential for electrical generation. Thermal/mineral waters of the Clear Lake region are broadly classified as thermal meteoric and connate types based on chemical and isotopic criteria. Ratios of conservative components such as B/Cl are extremely different among all thermal/mineral waters of the Clear Lake region except for clusters of waters emerging from specific areas such as the Wilbur Springs district and the Agricultural Park area south of Mt. Konocti. In contrast ratios of conservative components in large, homogeneous geothermal reservoirs are constant. Stable isotope values of Clear Lake region waters show a mixing trend between thermal meteoric and connate (generic) end-members. The latter end-member has enriched {delta}D as well as enriched {delta}{sup 18}O, from typical high-temperature geothermal reservoir waters. Tritium data indicate most Clear Lake region waters are mixtures of old and young fluid components. Subsurface equilibration temperature of most thermal/mineral waters of the Clear Lake region is {le}150{degree}C based on chemical geothermometers but it is recognized that Clear Lake region waters are not typical geothermal fluids and that they violate rules of application of many geothermometers. The combined data indicate that no large geothermal reservoir underlies the Clear Lake region and that small localized reservoirs have equilibration temperatures {le}150{degree}C (except for Sulphur Bank mine). HDR technologies are probably the best way to commercially exploit the known high-temperatures existing beneath the Clear Lake region particularly within and near the main Clear Lake volcanic field.

Goff, F.; Adams, A.I.; Trujillo, P.E.; Counce, D.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Moon Lake Electric Assn Inc (Utah) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Moon Lake Electric Assn Inc Moon Lake Electric Assn Inc Place Utah Utility Id 12866 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location WECC NERC WECC Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1]Energy Information Administration Form 826[2] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png GREENWAY RATE FOR SCHEDULE GS-1 Commercial GREENWAY RATE FOR SCHEDULE R Residential GS (General Service 3 phase Secondary) Commercial Large Power Primary Service Industrial Large Power Secondary Service Industrial Large Power Service Industrial Residential Service Residential

23

Figure F2. Electricity market module regions  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration Annual Energy Outlook 2013 227 Regional maps Figure F2. Electricity market module regions Source: U.S. Energy Information ...

24

Wind energy resource atlas. Volume 3. Great Lakes Region  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Great Lakes Region atlas assimilates six collections of wind resource data, one for the region and one for each of the five states that compose the Great Lakes region: Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Ohio, Wisconsin. At the state level, features of the climate, topography, and wind resource are discussed in greater detail than in the regional discussion and the data locations on which the assessment is based are mapped. Variations over several time scales in the wind resource at selected stations in each state are shown on graphs of monthly average and interannual wind speed and power, and of hourly average wind speed for each season. Other graphs present speed, direction, and duration frequencies of the wind at these locations.

Paton, D.L.; Bass, A.; Smith, D.G.; Elliott, D.L.; Barchet, W.R.; George, R.L.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

USLCI Interconnect Region Electricity datasets, 2008 Datasets...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

spreadsheet are also included.

Datasets include generation and transmission of electricity for each of the interconnect regions. It is representative of the year...

26

City of Shasta Lake Electric Utility - PV Rebate Program | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

City of Shasta Lake Electric Utility - PV Rebate Program City of Shasta Lake Electric Utility - PV Rebate Program City of Shasta Lake Electric Utility - PV Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings Category Solar Buying & Making Electricity Maximum Rebate Residential: $9,050 Commercial: $192,000 Program Info State California Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Residential: $1.81/W Commercial: $1.92/W Provider City of Shasta Lake Electric Utility '''''Note: This program is currently not accepting applications. Check the program web site for information regarding future solicitations. ''''' City of Shasta Lake Electric Utility is providing rebates to their customers for the purchase of photovoltaic (PV) systems. The rebate levels will decrease annually over the life of the program. For fiscal year

27

AEO2011: Electricity Generation by Electricity Market Module Region and  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Generation by Electricity Market Module Region and Generation by Electricity Market Module Region and Source Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 96, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses billion kilowatthours. The data is broken down into texas regional entity, Florida reliability coordinating council, midwest reliability council and northeast power coordination council. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Electricity generation Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Electricity Generation by Electricity Market Module Region and Source- Reference Case (xls, 400.2 KiB) Quality Metrics

28

Great Lakes Biomass State and Regional Partnership (GLBSRP)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Council of Great Lakes Governors administered the Great Lakes Biomass State and Regional Partnership (GLBSRP) under contract with the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE). This Partnership grew out of the existing Regional Biomass Energy Program which the Council had administered since 1983. The GLBSRP includes the States of Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Michigan, Minnesota, Ohio and Wisconsin. The GLBSRP??s overall goal is to facilitate the increased production and use of bioenergy and biobased products throughout the region. The GLBSRP has traditionally addressed its goals and objectives through a three-pronged approach: providing grants to the States; undertaking region-wide education, outreach and technology transfer projects; and, providing in-house management, support and information dissemination. At the direction of US Department of Energy, the primary emphasis of the GLBSRP in recent years has been education and outreach. Therefore, most activities have centered on developing educational materials, hosting workshops and conferences, and providing technical assistance. This report summarizes a selection of activities that were accomplished under this cooperative agreement.

Frederic Kuzel

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Hydroclimate Analysis of Severe Floods in Chinas Poyang Lake Region  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Poyang Lake in Jiangxi Province is the largest freshwater lake in China and is historically a region of significant floods. Maximum annual lake stage and the number of severe flood events have increased during the past few decades because of levee ...

David Shankman; Barry D. Keim; Tadanobu Nakayama; Rongfang Li; Dunyin Wu; W. Craig Remington

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Moon Lake Electric Assn Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search Jump to: navigation, search Name Moon Lake Electric Assn Inc Place Colorado Utility Id 12866 References Energy Information Administration.[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png GREENWAY RATE FOR SCHEDULE R AND SCHEDULE GS-1 Commercial GREENWAY RATE FOR SCHEDULE R AND SCHEDULE GS-1 25% V2 Commercial GREENWAY RATE FOR SCHEDULE R AND SCHEDULE GS-1 50% V2 GREENWAY RATE FOR SCHEDULE R AND SCHEDULE GS-100% V2 Large Power Primary Service Industrial Large Power Secondary Service Industrial Large Power Service Industrial Residential Service Residential SCHEDULE GS - 3 Phase General Service Commercial SCHEDULE I - IRRIGATION Commercial

31

electricity market module region | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

342 342 Varnish cache server Browse Upload data GDR 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2142281342 Varnish cache server electricity market module region Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords AEO Electricity electricity market module region generation capacity Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Electricity Generation Capacity by Electricity Market Module Region and Source- Reference Case (xls, 10.6 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually

32

AEO2011: Electric Power Projections for EMM Region - Western Electricity  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

California California Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 92, and contains only the reference case. The data is broken down into electric power sector, cumulative planned additions,cumulative unplanned additions,cumulative retirements, end-use sector, electricity sales, net energy for load, generation by fuel type and price by service category. Source EIA Date Released August 10th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO California EIA Electric Power projections Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Electric Power Projections for EMM Region - Western Electricity Coordinating Council / California- Reference Case (xls, 259.5 KiB)

33

AEO2011: Electric Power Projections for EMM Region - Western Electricity  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Southwest Southwest Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 91, and contains only the reference case. The data is broken down into electric power sector, cumulative planned additions,cumulative unplanned additions,cumulative retirements, end-use sector, electricity sales, net energy for load, generation by fuel type and price by service category. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Electric Power projections Southwest WECC Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Electric Power Projections for EMM Region - Western Electricity Coordinating Council / Southwest- Reference Case (xls, 259.1 KiB)

34

AEO2011: Electric Power Projections for EMM Region - Western Electricity  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Northwest Power Pool Area Northwest Power Pool Area Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 93, and contains only the reference case. The data is broken down into electric power sector, cumulative planned additions,cumulative unplanned additions,cumulative retirements, end-use sector, electricity sales, net energy for load, generation by fuel type and price by service category. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Electric Power Northwest Power Pool Area projections Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Electric Power Projections for EMM Region - Western Electricity Coordinating Council / Northwest Power Pool Area (xls, 259.1 KiB)

35

AEO2011: Electric Power Projections for EMM Region - Western Electricity  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rockies Rockies Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 94, and contains only the reference case. The data is broken down into electric power sector, cumulative planned additions,cumulative unplanned additions,cumulative retirements, end-use sector, electricity sales, net energy for load, generation by fuel type and price by service category. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Electric Power projections Rockies Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Electric Power Projections for EMM Region - Western Electricity Coordinating Council / Rockies- Reference Case (xls, 258.8 KiB)

36

OE State and Regional Electricity Policy Assistance Program | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

OE State and Regional Electricity Policy Assistance Program OE State and Regional Electricity Policy Assistance Program OE State and Regional Electricity Policy Assistance Program The Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE)'s mission with regard to State and Regional Policy Assistance is to provide, on an as-requested basis, unbiased policy assistance and analysis to States and regions on State electricity policies, programs, laws, and regulations that facilitate electricity Infrastructure investment needed to deliver clean, affordable, and reliable electricity to customers. OE State and Regional Electricity Policy Assistance Program More Documents & Publications U.S. Department of Energy Office of Electricity Delivery & Energy Reliability: Electric Markets Technical Assistance Program

37

Furnace Blower Electricity: National and Regional Savings Potential  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Inc. Pigg, Scott. 2003. Electricity Use by New Furnaces: Astage furnaces offer national electricity savings, but withABORATORY Furnace Blower Electricity: National and Regional

Franco, Victor; Florida Solar Energy Center

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Electric System Decision Making in Other Regions: A Preliminary...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Analysis Prepared for Western Interstate Energy Board Committee on Regional Electric Power Cooperation Electric System Decision Making in Other Regions: A Preliminary...

39

The Electric Transmission Network: A Multi-Region Analysis  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Modeling and Analysis Papers>The Electric Transmission Network: A Multi-Region Analysis : The Electric Transmission Network: A Multi-Region Analysis

40

Evaluation of Regional Climate Simulations over the Great Lakes Region Driven by Three Global Data Sets  

SciTech Connect

The performance of regional climate simulations is evaluated for the Great Lakes region. Three 10-year (19901999) current-climate simulations are performed using the MM5 regional climate model (RCM) with 36-km horizontal resolution. The simulations employed identical configuration and physical parameterizations, but different lateral boundary conditions and sea-surface temperatures derived from the NCEP Global Reanalysis and output from the CCSM3 and GISS general circulation models (GCMs). The simulation results are compared to the North American Regional Reanalysis (NARR). The three RCM simulations appeared to be more accurate in winter and least accurate in summer, and more accurate aloft than near the surface. The reanalysis-constrained simulation adequately captured the spatial distribution and seasonal cycle of the observed surface-air temperature and precipitation, but it produced consistently across all seasons a cold bias that is generally larger over the lakes than over land and a wet bias due to an overestimation of nonconvective precipitation. The simulated seasonal cycle of moistureflux convergence over the region was in very good agreement with NARR. The two GCM-driven runs adequately simulated the spatial and seasonal variation of temperature, but overestimated cold-season precipitation and underestimated summer precipitation, reversing the observed annual precipitation cycle. The GISS-driven run failed to simulate the prevailing low-level flow and moisture convergence patterns. All three RCM simulations successfully captured the impact of the Great Lakes on the region's climate, especially on winter precipitation, a significant improvement over coarse-resolution GCM simulations over the region.

Zhong, Shiyuan (Sharon); Li, Xiuping; Bian, Xindi; Heilman, Warren E.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Gustafson, William I.

2012-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lake region electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Two-Year Simulation of the Great Lakes Region with a Coupled Modeling System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we report on an experiment aimed at evaluating the feasibility of the application of our coupled regional climate modeling system to long-term climate simulations over the Great Lakes region. The simulation analyzed covers a ...

Gary T. Bates; Steven W. Hostetler; Filippo Giorgi

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Analysis of the 18 July 2005 tornadic supercell over the Lake Geneva region  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On the afternoon of July 18th 2005, a particularly intense supercell thunderstorm struck the Lake Geneva region. The storm initiated just southwest of Lyon, France and tracked over 300 km towards the northeast before losing its supercell ...

Lionel Peyraud

43

A Climatology of Freezing Rain in the Great Lakes Region of North America  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A 15-yr climatology of freezing rain surrounding the Great Lakes region of North America has been constructed using data from rawinsondes, surface stations, and gridded reanalyses from the National Centers for Environmental Prediction. This ...

John Cortinas Jr.

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Regional Gravity Survey of the Northern Great Salt Lake Desert and Adjacent  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gravity Survey of the Northern Great Salt Lake Desert and Adjacent Gravity Survey of the Northern Great Salt Lake Desert and Adjacent Areas in Utah, Nevada, and Idaho Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Regional Gravity Survey of the Northern Great Salt Lake Desert and Adjacent Areas in Utah, Nevada, and Idaho Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: From 1957 to 1961 a regional gravity survey was made over the northern part of the Great Salt Lake Desert and adjacent areas in Utah, eastern Nevada, and southeastern Idaho. A total of 1040 stations were taken over an area of about 7000 square miles. The results were compiled as a Bouguer gravity anomaly map with a contour interval of 2 mgal. The Bouguer values ranged from a high of about -120 mgal over the outcrop areas to a

45

Electric System Decision Making in Other Regions: A Preliminary Analysis  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Decision Making in Other Regions: A Preliminary Decision Making in Other Regions: A Preliminary Analysis Prepared for Western Interstate Energy Board Committee on Regional Electric Power Cooperation Electric System Decision Making in Other Regions: A Preliminary Analysis Prepared for Western Interstate Energy Board Committee on Regional Electric Power Cooperation The nation's electricity system is regional in nature, because of the operation of the interconnected grids and the markets defined by them. Over the years, many regional organizations of utilities and governments have formed to manage and oversee these markets. Electric System Decision Making in Other Regions: A Preliminary Analysis Prepared for Western Interstate Energy Board Committee on Regional Electric Power Cooperation More Documents & Publications

46

Petrologic considerations for hot dry rock geothermal site selection in the Clear Lake Region, California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Clear Lake area is well known for anomalous heat flow, thermal springs, hydrothermal mineral deposits, and Quaternary volcanism. These factors, along with the apparent lack of a large reservoir of geothermal fluid north of Collayomi fault make the Clear Lake area an attractive target for hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal development. Petrologic considerations provide some constraints on site selection for HDR development. Spatial and temporal trends in volcanism in the Coast Ranges indicate that magmatism has migrated to the north with time, paralleling passage of the Mendocino triple junction and propagation of the San Andreas fault. Volcanism in the region may have resulted from upwelling of hot asthenosphere along the southern margin of the subducted segment of the Gorda plate. Spatial and temporal trends of volcanism within the Clear Lake volcanic field are similar to larger-scale trends of Neogene volcanism in the Cost Ranges. Volcanism (especially for silicic compositions) shows a general migration to the north over the {approximately}2 Ma history of the field, with the youngest two silicic centers located at Mt. Konocti and Borax Lake. The Mt. Konocti system (active from {approximately} 0.6 to 0.3 Ma) was large and long-lived, whereas the Borax Lake system is much smaller but younger (0.09 Ma). Remnants of silicic magma bodies under Mt. Konocti may be in the latter stages of cooling, whereas a magma body centered under Borax Lake may be in the early stages of development. The existence of an upper crustal silicic magma body of under Borax Lake has yet to be demonstrated by passive geophysics, however, subsurface temperatures in the area as high (> 200{degrees}C at 2000 m) as those beneath the Mt. Konocti area. Based on petrologic considerations alone, the Mt. Konocti-Borax Lake area appears to be the most logical choice for HDR geothermal development in the region.

Stimac, J.; Goff, F. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)); Hearn, B.C. Jr. (US Geological Survey, Reston, VA, Branch of Lithospheric Processes (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Lake Region Electric Coop, Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Coop, Inc Coop, Inc Place Oklahoma Utility Id 10599 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location SPP Activity Distribution Yes Activity Buying Distribution Yes Activity Retail Marketing Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Decorative Lights Lighting Distributed Generation Rider between 25kW and 3MW General Service Single Phase Net Metering General Service Single-phase Commercial General Service Three Phase Net Metering General Service Three-phase Commercial Outdoor Security Light with up to 20,000 initial lumens Lighting Outdoor Security Light with up to 20,000 initial lumens Metered Lighting

48

Figure 6. Electricity Market Model Supply Regions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The NEMS Electricity Market Module (EMM) represents the capacity planning, dispatching, and pricing of electricity. It is composed of four submoduleselectricity capacity planning, electricity fuel dispatching, load and demand electricity, and electricity finance and pricing. It includes nonutility capacity and generation, and electricity transmission and trade. A detailed description of the EMM is provided in the EIA publication, Electricity Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2010, DOE/EIA-M068(2010). Based on fuel prices and electricity demands provided by the other modules of the NEMS, the EMM determines the most economical way to supply electricity, within environmental and operational constraints. There are assumptions about the operations of the electricity sector and the costs of various options in each of the EMM submodules. This section describes the model parameters and assumptions used in EMM. It includes a discussion of legislation and regulations that are incorporated in EMM as well as information about the climate change action plan. The various electricity and technology cases are also described.

unknown authors

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Appendix C: Map of NEMS Electricity Market Module Regions  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Analysis of Impacts of a Clean Energy Standard as requested by Chairman Bingaman Appendix C: Map of NEMS Electricity Market Module Regions...

50

Appendix C. Map of NEMS Electricity Market Module Regions  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Analysis of Impacts of a Clean Energy Standard as requested by Chairman Hall Appendix C. Map of NEMS Electricity Market Module Regions...

51

A Climatology of Cold-Season Nonconvective Wind Events in the Great Lakes Region  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A 44-yr climatology of nonconvective wind events (NCWEs) for the Great Lakes region has been created using hourly wind data for 38 first-order weather stations during the months of November through April. The data were analyzed in terms of the ...

Matthew C. Lacke; John A. Knox; John D. Frye; Alan E. Stewart; Joshua D. Durkee; Christopher M. Fuhrmann; Sarah M. Dillingham

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Estimating the Effects on the Regional Precipitation Climate in a Semiarid Region Caused by an Artificial Lake Using a Mesoscale Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effects on the regional precipitation climate by the construction of an artificial lake, in a semiarid region are studied. The study is performed using a mesoscale model to identify the larger-scale meteorological conditions when ...

Leif Enger; Michael Tjernstrm

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Principal electric facilities: North Central region  

SciTech Connect

A map is presented which shows the location, capacity, type, and ownership of electric power generating stations and power transmission lines in North Dakota, South Dakota, Nebraska, Kansas, Missouri, Iowa, and Minnesota. (LCL)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects Electric Power Marketing Final Environmental Impact Statement  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

01eis0150_cov.html[6/24/2011 2:58:48 PM] 01eis0150_cov.html[6/24/2011 2:58:48 PM] COVER SHEET Title: Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects Electric Power Marketing Final Environmental Impact Statement, DOE/EIS-0150 Cooperating Agencies: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the National Park Service, and the Bureau of Reclamation Lead Agency: Western Area Power Administration, U.S. Department of Energy Written comments on this environmental impact statement (EIS) should be addressed to: For general information on the U.S. Department of Energy EIS process, contact: Mr. David Sabo Western Area Power Administration Colorado River Storage Project Customer Service Office P.O. Box 11606 Salt Lake City, Utah 84147-0606 Telephone: (801) 524-5392 Ms. Carol Borgstrom, Director Office of NEPA Policy and Assistance (EH-42)

55

AEO2011: Electric Power Projections for EMM Region - Texas Regional...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

end-use sector, electricity sales, net energy for load, generation by fuel type and price by service category.
2011-08-08T14:57:52Z 2011-08-16T23:43:11Z http:www.eia.gov...

56

ASEO2011: Electric Power Projections for EMM Region - SERC Reliability  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ASEO2011: Electric Power Projections for EMM Region - SERC Reliability ASEO2011: Electric Power Projections for EMM Region - SERC Reliability Corporation / Virginia-Carolina Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 88, and contains only the reference case. The data is broken down into electric power sector, cumulative planned additions,cumulative unplanned additions,cumulative retirements, end-use sector, electricity sales, net energy for load, generation by fuel type and price by service category. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO Carolina EIA Electric power projections Virginia Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon ASEO2011: Electric Power Projections for EMM Region - SERC Reliability Corporation / Virginia-Carolina- Reference Case (xls, 259.3 KiB)

57

Geochemistry of thermal/mineral waters in the Clear Lake region, California, and implications for hot dry rock geothermal development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thermal/mineral waters of the Clear Lake region are broadly classified as thermal meteoric and connote types based on chemical and isotopic criteria. Ratios of conservative components such as B/Cl are extremely different among all thermal/mineral waters of the Clear Lake region except for clusters of waters emerging from specific areas such as the Wilbur Springs district and the Agricultural Park area south of Mt. Konocti. In contrast, ratios of conservative components in large, homogeneous geothermal reservoirs are constant. Stable isotope values of Clear Lake region waters show a mixing trend between thermal meteoric and connote end-members. The latter end-member has enriched [delta]D as well as enriched d[sup l8]O, very different from typical high-temperature geothermal reservoir waters. Tritium data and modeling of ages indicate most Clear Lake region waters are 500 to > 10,000 yr., although mixing of old and young components is implied by the data. The age of end-member connate water is probably > 10,000 yr. Subsurface equilibration temperature of most thermal/mineral waters of the Clear Lake region is [le] 150[degrees]C based on chemical geothermometers but it is recognized that Clear Lake region waters are not typical geothermal fluids and that they violate rules of application of many geothermometers. The combined data indicate that no large geothermal reservoir underlies the Clear Lake region and that small localized reservoirs have equilibration temperatures [le] 150[degrees]C (except for Sulphur Bank Mine). Hot dry rock technologies are the best way to commercially exploit the known high temperatures existing beneath the Clear Lake region, particularly within the main Clear Lake volcanic field.

Goff, F.; Adams, A.I.; Trujillo, P.E.; Counce, D.; Mansfield, J.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Gainesville Regional Utilities - Solar-Electric (PV) System Rebate Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Gainesville Regional Utilities - Solar-Electric (PV) System Rebate Gainesville Regional Utilities - Solar-Electric (PV) System Rebate Program Gainesville Regional Utilities - Solar-Electric (PV) System Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Solar Buying & Making Electricity Maximum Rebate $5,000 Program Info Start Date 10/1/2010 State Florida Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Solar window of 80% or more: $1.00/watt Provider Gainesville Regional Utilities '''''NOTE: Application targets for fiscal year 2013 have been met for the GRU Solar PV Rebate Program. The next round of applications are scheduled to open on October 1, 2013 pending approval of the GRU budget by the Gainesville City Commission.''''' Gainesville Regional Utilities (GRU) offers its customers a rebate to install photovoltaic (PV) systems. Systems with solar windows of 80% or

59

Tectonic controls on magmatism in The Geysers--Clear Lake region: Evidence from new geophysical models  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In order to study magmatism and geothermal systems in the Geysers-Clear Lake region, the authors developed a detailed three-dimensional tomographic velocity model based on local earthquakes. This high-resolution model resolves the velocity structure of the crust in the region to depths of approximately 12 km. The most significant velocity contrasts in The Geysers-Clear Lake region occur in the steam production area, where high velocities are associated with a Quaternary granite pluton, and in the Mount Hannah region, where low velocities occur in a 5-km-thick section of Mesozoic argillites. In addition, a more regional tomographic model was developed using traveltimes from earthquakes covering most of northern California. This regional model sampled the whole crust, but at a lower resolution than the local model. No large silicic magma chamber is noted in either the local or regional tomographic models. A three-dimensional gravity model also has ben developed in the area of the tomographic imaging. The gravity model demonstrates that all density contrasts can be accounted for in the upper 5--7 km of the crust. Two-dimensional magnetotelluric models of data from a regional east-west profile indicate high resistivities associated with the granitic pluton in The Geysers production area and low resistivities in the low-velocity section of Mesozoic argillites near Mount Hannah. No indication of midcrustal magma bodies is present in the magnetotelluric data. The geophysical models, seismicity patterns, distribution of volcanic vents, heat flow, and other data indicate that small, young intrusive bodies that were injected along a northeast trend from The Geysers to Clear Lake probably control the thermal regime.

Stanley, W.D.; Benz, H.M.; Villasenor, A.; Rodriguez, B.D. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States). Denver Federal Center] [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States). Denver Federal Center; Walters, M.A. [CalEnergy Corp., Ridgecrest, CA (United States)] [CalEnergy Corp., Ridgecrest, CA (United States)

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

USLCI Interconnect Region Electricity datasets, 2008 | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

76 76 Varnish cache server Browse Upload data GDR 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2142278976 Varnish cache server USLCI Interconnect Region Electricity datasets, 2008 Dataset Summary Description Datasets are for the US electricity grid system interconnect regions (ASCC, FRCC, HICC, MRO, NPCC, RFC, SERC, SPP, TRE, WECC) for 2008. The data is provided in life cycle inventory (LCI) forms (both xls and xml). A module report and a detailed spreadsheet are also included.Datasets include generation and transmission of electricity for each of the interconnect regions. It is representative of the year 2008 mix of fuels used for utility generations for each of the interconnect regions and is based on the EIA electricity reports for all power plants in the US. Detailed information on the methodology is included in the module report and detailed spreadsheet.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lake region electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

File:Impacts of Regional Electricity Prices and Building Type...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

History Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon File:Impacts of Regional Electricity Prices and Building Type on the Economics of Commercial PV Systems NREL 2012.pdf...

62

Applications of the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS) to Provide Input to Photochemical Grid Models for the Lake Michigan Ozone Study (LMOS)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In spite of ongoing control measures, episodes of elevated boundary layer ozone in violation of national ambient air quality standards continue to occur in the Lake Michigan region. The Lake Michigan Ozone Study is a multiyear effort that ...

Walter A. Lyons; Craig J. Tremback; Roger A. Pielke

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects Electric Power Marketing Final Environmental Impact Statement  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Summary.html[6/24/2011 3:03:56 PM] Summary.html[6/24/2011 3:03:56 PM] SUMMARY S.1 DESCRIPTION OF THE PROPOSED ACTION The Western Area Power Administration (Western) proposes to establish the level of its commitment (sales) of long- term firm electrical capacity and energy from the Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects (SLCA/IP) hydroelectric power plants. Power generated by the SLCA/IP facilities or purchased by Western from other sources is provided to Western's customers under contracts that establish the terms for how capacity (generation capacity) and energy (quantity of electrical energy) are to be sold. The contracts also specify amounts of capacity and energy that Western agrees to offer for long-term (greater than 12 months) sale to its customers. These amounts constitute Western's

64

The effects of regional climate change on space conditioning needs and the energy industry in the Great Lakes region  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To date, studies of the effects of potential climate change on energy use and demand have been done on a macro scale or with coarse model data but, in reality, regional climate change effects will determine the actual behavior of energy users. The output from a 3-year simulation of the coupled NCAR CCM/MM4 regional climate modeling system is used to examine changes in average temperature and temperature variability on a regional scale, the impacts of such change on the need for space conditioning in the Great Lakes region, and the subsequent changes in energy demand. The NCAR modeling system uses general circulation model results to drive a more highly resolved mesoscale model to produce a detailed regional climate. A 3-year run of both base case and doubled CO{sub 2} climate for the United States has been produced. From these results, changes in heating and cooling degree days, and changes in consecutive days above or below various temperature thresholds were calculated. Heating and cooling energy use intensities that are representative of the residential building stock found in the region were used to convert climate data to energy demand. The implications for the energy industry are discussed. The model results indicate that the changed climate under doubled carbon dioxide conditions would have large impacts on energy use, although it is difficult to determine the balance between decreased heating needs and increased cooling needs. It was found that biases present in the temperature output of the modeling system are greater for the Great Lakes region than for the rest of the U.S. and limit the usefulness of the present data set for determining the effects of climate change on energy use in that area.

Fernau, M.E.; Maloney, E.D. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Bates, G.T. [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

65

Brazil and the electrical interconnections in the Mercosul Region  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article describes the state of relations among the four countries that form Mercosul, the common market that is being formed by Argentina, Brazil, Paraguay, and Uruguay, and the prospects for expansion of international electric energy commerce and exchanges in that region. The first part presents the main supply facilities already available, including hydroelectric power plants, power stations, frequency conversion stations, and transmission lines. The second part focuses on the status of the Brazilian electric power sector and analyzes some of its features that are considered to be an incentive to the expansion of the electric energy international commerce in the Mercosul region.

Alqueres, J.L.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Dynamic interactions between electricity prices and the regional economy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this thesis we study characterize the dynamic relationships among two electricity price variables (residential and commercial) and six regional economic variables in order to examine each individual variable??s role in regional economic activity. We also answer the question ??Do electricity prices have impact on regional economic variables??? We use two statistical techniques as engines of analysis. First, we use directed acyclic graphs to discover how surprises (innovations) in prices from each variable are communicated to other variables in contemporaneous time. Second, we use time series methods to capture regularities in time lags among the series. Yearly time series data on two electricity prices and six regional economic variables for Montgomery County (Texas) are studied using time series methods. Directed Acyclic Graphs (DAGs) are used to impose restrictions on the Vector Auto Regression model (VAR). Using Innovation Accounting Analysis of the estimated Vector Auto Regression (VAR) model we unravel the dynamic relationships between the eight variables. We conclude that rising electricity prices have a negative impact on allregional economic variables. The commercial average electricity prices lead residential average electricity prices in the time frame we studied (1969-2000). Rising residential electricity prices also have a positive impact on income derived from transfer payments.

Bethapudi, Daniel Naveen

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Regional factors governing performance and sustainability of wastewater treatment plants in Honduras : Lake Yojoa Subwatershed  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lake Yojoa, the largest natural lake in Honduras, is currently experiencing eutrophication from overloading of nutrients, in part due to inadequate wastewater treatment throughout the Lake Yojoa Subwatershed. Some efforts ...

Walker, Kent B. (Kent Bramwell)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

AEO2011: Electric Power Projections for EMM Region - Texas Regional Entity  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Texas Regional Entity Texas Regional Entity Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 73, and contains only the reference case. The data is broken down into electric power sector, cumulative planned additions,cumulative unplanned additions,cumulative retirements, end-use sector, electricity sales, net energy for load, generation by fuel type and price by service category. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Electric Power projections Texas Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Electric Power Projections for EMM Region - Texas Regional Entity - Reference Case (xls, 259.4 KiB)

69

Furnace Blower Electricity: National and Regional Savings Potential  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Furnace Blower Electricity: National and Regional Savings Potential Furnace Blower Electricity: National and Regional Savings Potential Title Furnace Blower Electricity: National and Regional Savings Potential Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-417E Year of Publication 2008 Authors Franco, Victor H., James D. Lutz, Alexander B. Lekov, and Lixing Gu Document Number LBNL-417E Pagination 14 Date Published August 1 Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory City Berkeley Abstract Currently, total electricity consumption of furnaces is unregulated, tested at laboratory conditions using the DOE test procedure, and is reported in the GAMA directory as varying from 76 kWh/year to 1,953 kWh/year. Furnace blowers account for about 80% of the total furnace electricity consumption and are primarily used to distribute warm air throughout the home during furnace operation as well as distribute cold air during air conditioning operation. Yet the furnace test procedure does not provide a means to calculate the electricity consumption during cooling operation or standby, which account for a large fraction of the total electricity consumption. Furthermore, blower electricity consumption is strongly affected by static pressure. Field data shows that static pressure in the house distribution ducts varies widely and that the static pressureused in the test procedure as well as the calculated fan power is not representative of actual field installations. Therefore, accurate determination of the blower electricity consumption is important to address electricity consumption of furnaces and air conditioners. This paper compares the potential regional and national energy savings of two-stage brushless permanent magnet (BPM) blower motors (the blower design option with the most potential savings that is currently available in the market) to single-stage permanent split capacitor (PSC) blower motors (the most common blower design option). Computer models were used to generate the heating and cooling loads for typical homes in 16 different climates which represent houses throughout the United States. The results show that the potential savings of using BPM motors vary by region and house characteristics, and are very strongly tied to improving house distribution ducts. Savings decrease dramatically with increased duct pressure. Cold climate locations will see savings even in the high static pressure duct situations, whilewarm climate locations will see less savings overall and negative savings in the high static pressure duct situations. Moderate climate locations will see little or no savings.

70

Future demand for electricity in the Nassau--Suffolk region  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Brookhaven National Laboratory established a new technology for load forecasting for the Long Island Lighting Company and prepared an independent forecast of the demand for electricity in the LILCO area. The method includes: demand for electricity placed in a total energy perspective so that substitutions between electricity and other fuels can be examined; assessment of the impact of conservation, new technology, gas curtailment, and other factors upon demand for electricity; and construction of the probability distribution of the demand for electricity. A detailed analysis of changing levels of demand for electricity, and other fuels, associated with these new developments is founded upon a disaggregated end-use characterization of energy utilization, including space heat, lighting, process energy, etc., coupled to basic driving forces for future demand, namely: population, housing mix, and economic growth in the region. The range of future events covers conservation, heat pumps, solar systems, storage resistance heaters, electric vehicles, extension of electrified rail, total energy systems, and gas curtailment. Based upon cost and other elements of the competition between technologies, BNL assessed the likelihood of these future developments. An optimistic view toward conservation leads to ''low'' demand for electricity, whereas rapid development of new technologies suggests ''high'' demand. (MCW)

Carroll, T.W.; Palmedo, P.F.; Stern, R.

1977-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Southeast European Regional Electricity Market Analysis | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electricity Market Analysis Electricity Market Analysis Jump to: navigation, search Name Southeast European Regional Electricity Market analysis Agency/Company /Organization Argonne National Laboratory Partner United States Agency for International Development, Montgomery Watson Harza Sector Energy Topics Market analysis, Background analysis Website http://www.dis.anl.gov/news/Ba UN Region "Western & Eastern Europe" is not in the list of possible values (Eastern Africa, Middle Africa, Northern Africa, Southern Africa, Western Africa, Caribbean, Central America, South America, Northern America, Central Asia, Eastern Asia, Southern Asia, South-Eastern Asia, Western Asia, Eastern Europe, Northern Europe, Southern Europe, Western Europe, Australia and New Zealand, Melanesia, Micronesia, Polynesia, Latin America and the Caribbean) for this property.

72

AEO2011: Electric Power Projections for EMM Region - Northeast Power  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NYC-Westchester NYC-Westchester Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 78, and contains only the reference case. The data is broken down into electric power sector, cumulative planned additions,cumulative unplanned additions,cumulative retirements, end-use sector, electricity sales, net energy for load, generation by fuel type and price by service category. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Electric Power Northeast projections Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Electric Power Projections for EMM Region - Northeast Power Coordinating Council / NYC-Westchester - Reference Case (xls, 259.2 KiB)

73

AEO2011: Electric Power Projections for EMM Region - Florida Reliability  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Florida Reliability Florida Reliability Coordinating Council Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 74, and contains only the reference case. The data is broken down into electric power sector, cumulative planned additions,cumulative unplanned additions,cumulative retirements, end-use sector, electricity sales, net energy for load, generation by fuel type and price by service category. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Electric Power Florida projections Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Electric Power Projections for EMM Region - Florida Reliability Coordinating Council- Reference Case (xls, 259.3 KiB)

74

AEO2011: Electric Power Projections for EMM Region - Reliability First  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Reliability First Reliability First Corporation / West Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 83, and contains only the reference case. The data is broken down into electric power sector, cumulative planned additions,cumulative unplanned additions,cumulative retirements, end-use sector, electricity sales, net energy for load, generation by fuel type and price by service category. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Electric Power projections Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Electric Power Projections for EMM Region - Reliability First Corporation / West- Reference Case (xls, 259.5 KiB)

75

AEO2011: Electric Power Projections for EMM Region - SERC Reliability  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gateway Gateway Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 85, and contains only the reference case. The data is broken down into electric power sector, cumulative planned additions,cumulative unplanned additions,cumulative retirements, end-use sector, electricity sales, net energy for load, generation by fuel type and price by service category. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Electric Power projection Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Electric Power Projections for EMM Region - SERC Reliability Corporation / Gateway - Reference Case (xls, 259 KiB)

76

AEO2011: Electric Power Projections for EMM Region - Midwest Reliability  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

West West Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 76, and contains only the reference case. The data is broken down into electric power sector, cumulative planned additions,cumulative unplanned additions,cumulative retirements, end-use sector, electricity sales, net energy for load, generation by fuel type and price by service category. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Electric Power midwest projections Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Electric Power Projections for EMM Region - Midwest Reliability Council / West- Reference Case (xls, 259.1 KiB)

77

AEO2011: Electric Power Projections for EMM Region - Midwest Reliability  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

East East Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 75, and contains only the reference case. The data is broken down into electric power sector, cumulative planned additions,cumulative unplanned additions,cumulative retirements, end-use sector, electricity sales, net energy for load, generation by fuel type and price by service category. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEIO EIA Electric Power projections Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Electric Power Projections for EMM Region - Midwest Reliability Council / East - Reference Case (xls, 258.6 KiB) Quality Metrics

78

AEO2011: Electric Power Projections for EMM Region - Reliability First  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

9643 9643 Varnish cache server AEO2011: Electric Power Projections for EMM Region - Reliability First Corporation / Michigan Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 82, and contains only the reference case. The data is broken down into electric power sector, cumulative planned additions,cumulative unplanned additions,cumulative retirements, end-use sector, electricity sales, net energy for load, generation by fuel type and price by service category. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Electric Power Michigan projections Data Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed

79

AEO2011: Electric Power Projections for EMM Region - SERC Reliability  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Southeastern Southeastern Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 86, and contains only the reference case. The data is broken down into electric power sector, cumulative planned additions,cumulative unplanned additions,cumulative retirements, end-use sector, electricity sales, net energy for load, generation by fuel type and price by service category. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Electric Power projections Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Electric Power Projections for EMM Region - SERC Reliability Corporation / Southeastern- Reference Case (xls, 259.3 KiB)

80

AEO2011: Electric Power Projections for EMM Region - SERC Reliability  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Central Central Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 87, and contains only the reference case. The data is broken down into electric power sector, cumulative planned additions,cumulative unplanned additions,cumulative retirements, end-use sector, electricity sales, net energy for load, generation by fuel type and price by service category. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO central EIA Electric power projections Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Electric Power Projections for EMM Region - SERC Reliability Corporation / Central- Reference Case (xls, 259.1 KiB)

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lake region electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

AEO2011: Electric Power Projections for EMM Region - Northeast Power  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Northeast Northeast Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 77, and contains only the reference case. The data is broken down into electric power sector, cumulative planned additions,cumulative unplanned additions,cumulative retirements, end-use sector, electricity sales, net energy for load, generation by fuel type and price by service category. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Electric Power Northeast projections Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Electric Power Projections for EMM Region - Northeast Power Coordinating Council / Northeast- Reference Case (xls, 259.2 KiB)

82

Lakes_Elec_You  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Lakes, Lakes, Electricity & You Why It's So Important That Lakes Are Used To Generate Electricity Why We Can Thank Our Lakes For Electricity Because lakes were made to generate electricity. Back in the mid-1940s, Congress recognized the need for better flood control and navigation. To pay for these services, Congress passed laws that started the building of federal hydroelectric dams, and sold the power from the dams under long-term contracts. Today these dams provide efficient, environmentally safe electricity for our cities and rural areas. And now these beautiful lakes are ours to enjoy. There are now 22 major man-made lakes all across the Southeast built under these federal programs and managed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers - lakes that help prevent flooding and harness the renewable power of water to generate electricity. Power produced at these lakes is marketed by the Elberton,

83

Dynamical Downscaling over the Great Lakes Basin of North America Using the WRF Regional Climate Model: The Impact of the Great Lakes System on Regional Greenhouse Warming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Weather Research and Forecasting model (WRF) is employed to dynamically downscale global warming projections produced using the Community Climate System Model (CCSM). The analyses are focused on the Great Lakes Basin of North America and the ...

Jonathan Gula; W. Richard Peltier

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Furnace Blower Electricity: National and Regional Savings Potential  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Currently, total electricity consumption of furnaces is unregulated, tested at laboratory conditions using the DOE test procedure, and is reported in the GAMA directory as varying from 76 kWh/year to 1,953 kWh/year. Furnace blowers account for about 80percent of the total furnace electricity consumption and are primarily used to distribute warm air throughout the home during furnace operation as well as distribute cold air during air conditioning operation. Yet the furnace test procedure does not provide a means to calculate the electricity consumption during cooling operation or standby, which account for a large fraction of the total electricity consumption. Furthermore, blower electricity consumption is strongly affected by static pressure. Field data shows that static pressure in the house distribution ducts varies widely and that the static pressure used in the test procedure as well as the calculated fan power is not representative of actual field installations. Therefore, accurate determination of the blower electricity consumption is important to address electricity consumption of furnaces and air conditioners. This paper compares the potential regional and national energy savings of two-stage brushless permanent magnet (BPM) blower motors (the blower design option with the most potential savings that is currently available in the market) to single-stage permanent split capacitor (PSC) blower motors (the most common blower design option). Computer models were used to generate the heating and cooling loads for typical homes in 16 different climates which represent houses throughout the United States. The results show that the potential savings of using BPM motors vary by region and house characteristics, and are very strongly tied to improving house distribution ducts. Savings decrease dramatically with increased duct pressure. Cold climate locations will see savings even in the high static pressure duct situations, while warm climate locations will see less savings overall and negative savings in the high static pressure duct situations. Moderate climate locations will see little or no savings.

Florida Solar Energy Center; Franco, Victor; Franco, Victor; Lutz, Jim; Lekov, Alex; Gu, Lixing

2008-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

85

Salt Lake Community College | .EDUconnections  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SLCC Partners with DOE's Rocky Mountain Solar Training Program This program is a joint partnership between DOE's Solar Energy Technogies Program, Salt Lake Community College, Solar Energy International, and the Utah Solar Energy Association that works to accelerate use of solar electric technologies, training and facilities at community and technical college solar training programs within a 15 western United States region. DOE Solar Instructor Training Network Salt Lake City, Utah DOE Applauds SLCC's Science and Technical Programs Architectural Technology Biology Biotechnology Biomanufacturing Chemistry Computer Science Electric Sector Training Energy Management Engineering Geographic Information Sciences Geosciences InnovaBio Manufacturing & Mechanical Engineering Technology

86

Circulations, Bounded Weak Echo Regions, and Horizontal Vortices Observed within Long-Lake-Axis-ParallelLake-Effect Storms by the Doppler on Wheels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The eastern Great Lakes (Erie and Ontario) are often affected by intense lake-effect snowfalls. Lake-effect storms that form parallel to the major axes of these lakes can strongly impact communities by depositing more than 100 cm of snowfall in ...

Scott M. Steiger; Robert Schrom; Alfred Stamm; Daniel Ruth; Keith Jaszka; Timothy Kress; Brett Rathbun; Jeffrey Frame; Joshua Wurman; Karen Kosiba

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Argonne Regional Middle School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Illinois: Cook (west of Harlem Ave), Lake, DuPage, Will, Kane, Grundy Date of Electric Car Competition: 4122014 Please contact the regional coordinator for more information on...

88

Central Wind Power Forecasting Programs in North America by Regional Transmission Organizations and Electric Utilities  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The report addresses the implementation of central wind power forecasting by electric utilities and regional transmission organizations in North America.

Porter, K.; Rogers, J.

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Best Practices for Wind Energy Development in the Great Lakes Region  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report offers a menu of 18 different, yet complementary, preferred practices and policies. The best practices cover all phases of the wind energy development process - from the policies that allow for wind development, to the sustainable operation of a wind project, to the best practices for decommissioning a spent turbine - including applications for offshore wind. Each best practice describes the opportunities and challenges (pros and cons), and offers a case example that illustrates how that best practice is being utilized by a particular jurisdiction or wind project. The practices described in this publication were selected by a diverse group of interests from the Great Lakes Wind Collaborative that included environmental groups, industry, academia, and federal, state and local government regulators. The practices were identified through a year-long process that included a literature review, online survey and interviews with individuals from the public, private and non-profit sectors. Optimally, a suite of these best practices would be applied in an appropriate combination to fit the conditions of a particular wind project or a set of wind projects within a given locality or region.

Pebbles, Victoria; Hummer, John; Haven, Celia

2011-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

90

Furnace Blower Electricity: National and Regional Savings Potential  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ducts Total Electricity Consumption (kWh/year) ity ni x FrDucts Total Electricity Consumption (kWh/year) nt a ni x Fryear. Furnace blowers account for about 80% of the total furnace electricity consumption

Franco, Victor; Florida Solar Energy Center

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Wholesale electricity price changes diverge across regions during ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Trends in average on-peak spot electricity prices, the wholesale price of electricity at major trading points, varied across the United States in the first half ...

92

Furnace Blower Electricity: National and Regional Savings Potential  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cooling operation or standby, which account for a largethe cooling season, and standby. Furnace electricity use isElectricity Use during Standby PE standby Burner Operating

Franco, Victor; Florida Solar Energy Center

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Impact of Urbanization on Heavy Convective Precipitation under Strong Large-Scale Forcing: A Case Study over the Milwaukee-Lake Michigan Region  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, observational and numerical modeling analyses based on the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model are used to investigate the impact of urbanization on heavy rainfall over the Milwaukee-Lake Michigan region. We examine urban ...

Long Yang; James A. Smith; Mary Lynn Baeck; Elie Bou-Zeid; Stephen M. Jessup; Fuqiang Tian; Heping Hu

94

Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects Electric Power Marketing. Draft environmental impact statement: Volume 4, Appendixes B-D  

SciTech Connect

The Salt Lake City Area Office of the Western Area Power Administration (Western) markets electricity produced at hydroelectric facilities operated by the Bureau of Reclamation. The facilities are known collectively as the Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects (SLCA/IP) and include dams equipped for power generation on the Green, Gunnison, Rio Grande, and Colorado rivers and on Deer and Plateau creeks in the states of Wyoming, Utah, Colorado, Arizona, and New Mexico. Of these facilities, only the Glen Canyon Unit, the Flaming Gorge Unit, and the Aspinall Unit (which includes Blue Mesa, Morrow Point, and Crystal dams;) are influenced by Western power scheduling and transmission decisions. The EIS alternatives, called commitment-level alternatives, reflect combinations of capacity and energy that would feasibly and reasonably fulfill Westerns firm power marketing responsibilities, needs, and statutory obligations. The viability of these alternatives relates directly to the combination of generation capability of the SLCA/IP with energy purchases and interchange. The economic and natural resource assessments in this environmental impact statement (EIS) include an analysis of commitment-level alternatives. Impacts of the no-action alternative are also assessed. Supply options, which include combinations of electrical power purchases and hydropower operational scenarios reflecting different operations of the dams, are also assessed. The EIS evaluates the impacts of these scenarios relative to socioeconomics, air resources, water resources, ecological resources, cultural resources, land use, recreation, and visual resources.

Not Available

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects Electric Power Marketing. Draft environmental impact statement: Volume 2, Sections 1-16  

SciTech Connect

The Salt Lake City Area Office of the Western Area Power Administration (Western) markets electricity produced at hydroelectric facilities operated by the Bureau of Reclamation. The facilities are known collectively as the Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects (SLCA/IP) and include dams equipped for power generation on the Green, Gunnison, Rio Grande, and Colorado rivers and on Deer and Plateau creeks in the states of Wyoming, Utah, Colorado, Arizona, and New Mexico. Of these facilities, only the Glen Canyon Unit, the Flaming Gorge Unit, and the Aspinall Unit (which includes Blue Mesa, Morrow Point, and Crystal dams;) are influenced by Western power scheduling and transmission decisions. The EIS alternatives, called commitment-level alternatives, reflect combinations of capacity and energy that would feasibly and reasonably fulfill Westerns firm power marketing responsibilities, needs, and statutory obligations. The viability of these alternatives relates directly to the combination of generation capability of the SLCA/IP with energy purchases and interchange. The economic and natural resource assessments in this environmental impact statement (EIS) include an analysis of commitment-level alternatives. Impacts of the no-action alternative are also assessed. Supply options, which include combinations of electrical power purchases and hydropower operational scenarios reflecting different operations of the dams, are also assessed. The EIS evaluates the impacts of these scenarios relative to socioeconomics, air resources, water resources, ecological resources, cultural resources, land use, recreation, and visual resources.

Not Available

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects Electric Power Marketing. Draft environmental impact statement: Volume 3, Appendix A  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Salt Lake City Area Office of the Western Area Power Administration (Western) markets electricity produced at hydroelectric facilities operated by the Bureau of Reclamation. The facilities are known collectively as the Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects (SLCA/IP) and include dams equipped for power generation on the Green, Gunnison, Rio Grande, and Colorado rivers and on Deer and Plateau creeks in the states of Wyoming, Utah, Colorado, Arizona, and New Mexico. Of these facilities, only the Glen Canyon Unit, the Flaming Gorge Unit, and the Aspinall Unit (which includes Blue Mesa, Morrow Point, and Crystal dams;) are influenced by Western power scheduling and transmission decisions. The EIS alternatives, called commitment-level alternatives, reflect combinations of capacity and energy that would feasibly and reasonably fulfill Westerns firm power marketing responsibilities, needs, and statutory obligations. The viability of these alternatives relates directly to the combination of generation capability of the SLCA/IP with energy purchases and interchange. The economic and natural resource assessments in this environmental impact statement (EIS) include an analysis of commitment-level alternatives. Impacts of the no-action alternative are also assessed. Supply options, which include combinations of electrical power purchases and hydropower operational scenarios reflecting different operations of the dams, are also assessed. The EIS evaluates the impacts of these scenarios relative to socioeconomics, air resources, water resources, ecological resources, cultural resources, land use, recreation, and visual resources.

Not Available

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Regional Economic Impacts of Electric Drive Vehicles and Technologies: Case Study of the Greater Cleveland Area  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs), which combine desirable aspects of battery electric vehicles and hybrid electric vehicles, offer owners the advantages of increased fuel efficiency and lower annual fuel bills without concern for dead batteries, long recharge time, or limited range. This study examines the potential regional economic impacts due to increasing electric transportation in the Greater Cleveland Area (GCA). By applying regional input-output (RIO) analysis, the study determines the imp...

2009-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

98

Central Wind Forecasting Programs in North America by Regional Transmission Organizations and Electric Utilities: Revised Edition  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The report and accompanying table addresses the implementation of central wind power forecasting by electric utilities and regional transmission organizations in North America. The first part of the table focuses on electric utilities and regional transmission organizations that have central wind power forecasting in place; the second part focuses on electric utilities and regional transmission organizations that plan to adopt central wind power forecasting in 2010. This is an update of the December 2009 report, NREL/SR-550-46763.

Rogers, J.; Porter, K.

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Category:Salt Lake City, UT | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

UT UT Jump to: navigation, search Go Back to PV Economics By Location Media in category "Salt Lake City, UT" The following 16 files are in this category, out of 16 total. SVFullServiceRestaurant Salt Lake City UT Moon Lake Electric Assn Inc (Utah).png SVFullServiceRestauran... 57 KB SVHospital Salt Lake City UT Moon Lake Electric Assn Inc (Utah).png SVHospital Salt Lake C... 57 KB SVLargeHotel Salt Lake City UT Moon Lake Electric Assn Inc (Utah).png SVLargeHotel Salt Lake... 55 KB SVLargeOffice Salt Lake City UT Moon Lake Electric Assn Inc (Utah).png SVLargeOffice Salt Lak... 57 KB SVMediumOffice Salt Lake City UT Moon Lake Electric Assn Inc (Utah).png SVMediumOffice Salt La... 62 KB SVMidriseApartment Salt Lake City UT Moon Lake Electric Assn Inc (Utah).png

100

Regional Per Capita Solar Electric Footprint for the United States  

SciTech Connect

In this report, we quantify the state-by-state per-capita 'solar electric footprint' for the United States. We use state-level data on population, electricity consumption, economic activity and solar insolation, along with solar photovoltaic (PV) array packing density data to develop a range of estimates of the solar electric footprint. We find that the solar electric footprint, defined as the land area required to supply all end-use electricity from solar photovoltaics, is about 181 m2 per person in the United States. Two key factors that influence the magnitude of the state-level solar electric footprint include how industrial energy is allocated (based on location of use vs. where goods are consumed) and the assumed distribution of PV configurations (flat rooftop vs. fixed tilt vs. tracking). The solar electric footprint is about 0.6% of the total land area of the United States with state-level estimates ranging from less than 0.1% for Wyoming to about 9% for New Jersey. We also compare the solar electric footprint to a number of other land uses. For example, we find that the solar electric footprint is equal to less than 2% of the land dedicated to cropland and grazing in the United States.

Denholm, P.; Margolis, R.

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lake region electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Regional Per Capita Solar Electric Footprint for the United States  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In this report, we quantify the state-by-state per-capita 'solar electric footprint' for the United States. We use state-level data on population, electricity consumption, economic activity and solar insolation, along with solar photovoltaic (PV) array packing density data to develop a range of estimates of the solar electric footprint. We find that the solar electric footprint, defined as the land area required to supply all end-use electricity from solar photovoltaics, is about 181 m2 per person in the United States. Two key factors that influence the magnitude of the state-level solar electric footprint include how industrial energy is allocated (based on location of use vs. where goods are consumed) and the assumed distribution of PV configurations (flat rooftop vs. fixed tilt vs. tracking). The solar electric footprint is about 0.6% of the total land area of the United States with state-level estimates ranging from less than 0.1% for Wyoming to about 9% for New Jersey. We also compare the solar electric footprint to a number of other land uses. For example, we find that the solar electric footprint is equal to less than 2% of the land dedicated to cropland and grazing in the United States.

Denholm, P.; Margolis, R.

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

AEO2011: Electric Power Projections for EMM Region - Southwest...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

unplanned additions,cumulative retirements, end-use sector, electricity sales, net energy for load, generation by fuel type and price by service category.
...

103

AEO2011: Electric Power Projections for EMM Region - Reliability...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

unplanned additions,cumulative retirements, end-use sector, electricity sales, net energy for load, generation by fuel type and price by service category.
...

104

AEO2011: Electric Power Projections for EMM Region - Western...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

unplanned additions,cumulative retirements, end-use sector, electricity sales, net energy for load, generation by fuel type and price by service category.
...

105

AEO2011: Electric Power Projections for EMM Region - Northeast...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

unplanned additions,cumulative retirements, end-use sector, electricity sales, net energy for load, generation by fuel type and price by service category.
...

106

AEO2011: Electric Power Projections for EMM Region - SERC Reliability  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

unplanned additions,cumulative retirements, end-use sector, electricity sales, net energy for load, generation by fuel type and price by service category.
...

107

AEO2011: Electric Power Projections for EMM Region - Midwest...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

unplanned additions,cumulative retirements, end-use sector, electricity sales, net energy for load, generation by fuel type and price by service category.
...

108

AEO2011: Electric Power Projections for EMM Region - Florida...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

unplanned additions,cumulative retirements, end-use sector, electricity sales, net energy for load, generation by fuel type and price by service category.
...

109

AEO2011: Electric Power Projections for EMM Region - United States...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

unplanned additions,cumulative retirements, end-use sector, electricity sales, net energy for load, generation by fuel type and price by service category.
...

110

ASEO2011: Electric Power Projections for EMM Region - SERC Reliability  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

unplanned additions,cumulative retirements, end-use sector, electricity sales, net energy for load, generation by fuel type and price by service category.
...

111

World Net Electricity Consumption, by Region, 1990-2020  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Electricity consumption worldwide increases by 76 percent in the reference case, from 12 trillion kilowatthours in 1997 to 22 trillion kilowatthours in 2020.

112

Regional electric energy planning: a case study in the politics of scarce resources. Master thesis  

SciTech Connect

An attempt was made to examine the regional electric energy picture in the Pacific Northwest. Using the Bonneville Power Administration and Seattle City Light as the two major foci, the analysis discusses the past and present interaction of the regional electric energy planning entities.

Birmingham, A.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

"Table A17. Components of Onsite Electricity Generation by Census Region,"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7. Components of Onsite Electricity Generation by Census Region," 7. Components of Onsite Electricity Generation by Census Region," " Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1991" " (Estimates in Million Kilowatthours)" " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," "," "," "," "," ","RSE" "SIC"," "," "," "," "," ","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Groups and Industry","Total","Cogeneration","Renewables","Other(b)","Factors" ,,"Total United States" ,"RSE Column Factors:",0.8,0.8,1.4,1.2

114

"Table A16. Components of Total Electricity Demand by Census Region, Industry"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6. Components of Total Electricity Demand by Census Region, Industry" 6. Components of Total Electricity Demand by Census Region, Industry" " Group, and Selected Industries, 1991" " (Estimates in Million Kilowatthours)" " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," "," "," "," ","Sales and/or"," ","RSE" "SIC"," "," ","Transfers","Total Onsite","Transfers","Net Demand for","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Groups and Industry","Purchases","In(b)","Generation(c)","Offsite","Electricity(d)","Factors"

115

USLCI eGrid region electricity datasets, 2008 | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

eGrid region electricity datasets, 2008 eGrid region electricity datasets, 2008 Dataset Summary Description Datasets are for the US electricity grid system for eGrid regions (AKGD, AKMS, AZNM, CAMX, ERCT, FRCC, HIMS, HIOA, MROE, MROW, NEWE, NWPP, NYCW, NYLI, NYUP, RFCE, RFCM, RFCW, RMPA, SPNO, SPSO, SRMV, SRMW, SRSO, SRTV, SRVC) for 2008. The data is provided in life cycle inventory forms (xls and xml) . A module report and a detailed spreadsheet are also included.Datasets include generation and transmission of electricity for each of the eGrid regions. It is representative of the year 2008 mix of fuels used for utility generations for each of the eGrid regions and is based on the EIA electricity reports for all power plants in the US. Detailed information on the methodology is included in the module

116

2020 Electric Car Exterior Design for Pearl River Delta Region.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Pearl River Delta (PRD) is one of the fastest economic development regions in China. The big cities in PRD attract a great many young high-educated (more)

Zhu, H.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Electric Transmission Network: A Multi-Region Analysis, The  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This paper examines the ability of the existing transmission network to respond efficiently to increased trade over four reliability regions in the northeastern United States.

Robert T. Eynon

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Review and evaluation of contingency plans for oil and hazardous substances in the upper Great Lakes region. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study was to update and supplement a contingency plan review conducted for the Corps in 1979 by the St. Lawrence-Eastern Ontario Commission for handling oil and hazardous-substance spills on the upper Great Lakes and their connecting channels. Special attention was given to cleanup and control methods described for ice conditions that may exist in the region in winter. The report identifies existing contingency plans in the study area; tabulates amounts, types, and locations of equipment and manpower that exist to implement the plans; describes methods to contain and recover oil in ice conditions; describes spill-mitigation plans and techniques to protect natural resources; describes techniques of deflecting oil in swift flowing waters; and describes disposal plans identified in the contingency plans.

Gundlach, E.R.; Murday, M.; Fanning, W.L.

1986-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

119

Two Types of Vertical Electrical Structures in Stratiform Precipitation Regions of Mesoscale Convective Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electric field (E) soundings in the stratiform regions and transition zones of mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) are reported. Most of the E soundings were made during the 1991 Cooperative Oklahoma Profiler Studies (COPS-91). Multiple E ...

Thomas C. Marshall; W. David Rust

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Regional comparison of nuclear and fossil electric power generation costs  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear's main disadvantages are its high capital investment cost and uncertainty in schedule compared with alternatives. Nuclear plant costs continue to rise whereas coal plant investment costs are staying relative steady. Based on average experience, nuclear capital investment costs are nearly double those of coal-fired generation plants. The capital investment cost disadvantage of nuclear is balanced by its fuel cost advantages. New base load nuclear power plants were projected to be competitive with coal-fired plants in most regions of the country. Nuclear power costs wre projected to be significantly less (10% or more) than coal-fired power costs in the South Atlantic region. Coal-fired plants were projected to have a significant economic advantage over nuclear plants in the Central and North Central regions. In the remaining seven regions, the levelized cost of power from either option was projected to be within 10%. Uncertainties in future costs of materials, services, and financing affect the relative economics of the nuclear and coal options significantly. 10 figures.

Bowers, H.I.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lake region electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

"Table A27. Components of Onsite Electricity Generation by Census Region,"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Components of Onsite Electricity Generation by Census Region," Components of Onsite Electricity Generation by Census Region," " Census Division, Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1994" " (Estimates in Million Kilowatthours)" ," "," "," "," " " "," "," "," ",," ","RSE" "SIC"," "," "," ",," ","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Group and Industry","Total","Cogeneration","Renewables","Other(b)","Factors" ,,"Total United States" ,"RSE Column Factors:",0.8,0.8,1.6,1 , 20,"Food and Kindred Products",6962,6754,90,118,11.2

122

Table A19. Components of Total Electricity Demand by Census Region and  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Components of Total Electricity Demand by Census Region and" Components of Total Electricity Demand by Census Region and" " Economic Characteristics of the Establishment, 1991" " (Estimates in Million Kilowatthours)" " "," "," "," ","Sales/"," ","RSE" " "," ","Transfers","Onsite","Transfers"," ","Row" "Economic Characteristics(a)","Purchases","In(b)","Generation(c)","Offsite","Net Demand(d)","Factors" ,"Total United States" "RSE Column Factors:",0.5,1.4,1.3,1.9,0.5 "Value of Shipments and Receipts" "(million dollars)"

123

Table A26. Components of Total Electricity Demand by Census Region, Census Di  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Components of Total Electricity Demand by Census Region, Census Division, and" Components of Total Electricity Demand by Census Region, Census Division, and" " Economic Characteristics of the Establishment, 1994" " (Estimates in Million Kilowatthours)" " "," "," "," ","Sales/"," ","RSE" " "," ","Transfers","Onsite","Transfers"," ","Row" "Economic Characteristics(a)","Purchases","In(b)","Generation(c)","Offsite","Net Demand(d)","Factors" ,"Total United States" "RSE Column Factors:",0.5,2.1,1.2,2,0.4 "Value of Shipments and Receipts"

124

Best Practices for Sustainable WInd Energy Development in the Great Lakes Region and Beyond  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document offers a menu of 18 different, yet complimentary preferred practices and policies. The best practices cover all phases of the wind energy development process - from the policies that allow for wind development, to the sustainable operation of a wind project, to the best practices for decommissioning a spent turbine - including applications for offshore wind. The practices include those that have been previously tested and proven effective, as well as new practices that were identified by experts in the field as needed for future wind developments. Each best practice includes information about the opportunities and challenges (pros and cons), and offers a case example that illustrates how that best practice is being utilized by a particular jurisdiction or wind project. The practices described in this publication were selected by a diverse group of interests from the Great Lakes Wind Collaborative that included environmental groups, industry, and federal, state and local government regulators. They were identified through a year long process that included a literature review, online survey and interviews with individuals from the public, private and non-profit sectors.

Great Lakes Commission; Victoria Pebbles; John Hummer; Celia Haven

2011-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

125

An integrated assessment of global and regional water demands for electricity generation to 2095  

SciTech Connect

Electric power plants currently account for approximately one-half of the global industrial water withdrawal. While continued expansion of the electric sector seems likely into the future, the consequent water demands are quite uncertain, and will depend on highly variable water intensities by electricity technologies, at present and in the future. Using GCAM, an integrated assessment model of energy, agriculture, and climate change, we first establish lower-bound, median, and upper-bound estimates for present-day electric sector water withdrawals and consumption by individual electric generation technologies in each of 14 geopolitical regions, and compare them with available estimates of regional industrial or electric sector water use. We then explore the evolution of global and regional electric sector water use over the next century, focusing on uncertainties related to withdrawal and consumption intensities for a variety of electric generation technologies, rates of change of power plant cooling system types, and rates of adoption of a suite of water-saving technologies. Results reveal that the water withdrawal intensity of electricity generation is likely to decrease in the near term with capital stock turnover, as wet towers replace once-through flow cooling systems and advanced electricity generation technologies replace conventional ones. An increase in consumptive use accompanies the decrease in water withdrawal rates; however, a suite of water conservation technologies currently under development could compensate for this increase in consumption. Finally, at a regional scale, water use characteristics vary significantly based on characteristics of the existing capital stock and the selection of electricity generation technologies into the future.

Davies, Evan; Kyle, G. Page; Edmonds, James A.

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

North Bar Lake South Bar Lake  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Traverse Lake Lime Lake Crystal River Sh alda Cr GOOD HARBOR BAY SLEEPING BEAR BAY PLATTE BA Y LAKE South Bar Lake Otter Lake Loon Lake Long Lake Rush Lake Platte Lake Little Platte Lake CRYSTAL LAKE MICHIGAN LAKE MICHIGAN Lake Elevation 580ft (177m) MANITOU PAS S A G E Ott er C reek Pl atte River Platt e

127

Contributions of Lake-Effect Periods to the Cool-Season Hydroclimate of the Great Salt Lake Basin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although smaller lakes are known to produce lake-effect precipitation, their influence on the precipitation climatology of lake-effect regions remains poorly documented. This study examines the contribution of lake-effect periods (LEPs) to the ...

Kristen N. Yeager; W. James Steenburgh; Trevor I. Alcott

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Heat flow and microearthquake studies, Coso Geothermal Area, China Lake,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and microearthquake studies, Coso Geothermal Area, China Lake, and microearthquake studies, Coso Geothermal Area, China Lake, California. Final report Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Book: Heat flow and microearthquake studies, Coso Geothermal Area, China Lake, California. Final report Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The present research effort at the Coso Geothermal Area located on the China Lake Naval Weapons Center, China Lake, California, was concerned with: (1) heat flow studies and (2) microearthquake studies associated with the geothermal phenomena in the Coso Hot Springs area. The sites for ten heat flow boreholes were located primarily using the available seismic ground noise and electrical resistivity data. Difficulty was encountered in the drilling of all of the holes due to altered, porous,

129

AMENDED AND RESTATED DELEGATION AGREEMENT BETWEEN NORTH AMERICAN ELECTRIC RELIABILITY CORPORATION AND TEXAS REGIONAL ENTITY A DIVISION OF ELECTRIC RELIABILITY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(NERC), an organization certified by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (Commission) pursuant to Section 215(c) of the Federal Power Act to establish and enforce Reliability Standards for the bulk power system, and the Texas Regional Entity a Division of Electric Reliability Council of Texas, Inc. (Texas RE), an organization established to develop and enforce Reliability Standards within the geographic boundaries identified on Exhibit A to this Agreement, and for other purposes. NERC and Texas RE may be individually referred to herein as Party or collectively as Parties. WITNESSETH WHEREAS, Subtitle A of the Electricity Modernization Act of 2005 added Section 215 to the Federal Power Act (16 U.S.C. 824n) (hereafter the Act) and, among other things, provides for the establishment of an electric reliability organization (ERO) to develop and enforce Reliability Standards applicable to all owners, operators, and users of the bulk power system; WHEREAS, the Commission has adopted regulations for the implementation of the Act

unknown authors

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

San Diego Gas & Electric: Leading the Region to Electric Vehicle Readiness  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Long before The EV Project announcement in 2009, SDG&E knew through its relationships with Nissan and General Motors (GM) that the automakers would bring PEVs to market. The utility knew it needed to lead the greater community to PEV readiness by working with all stakeholders. Together they would help PEV customers make informed purchasing decisions and realize all the benefits of electric transportation.

2013-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

131

Effects of regional insolation differences upon advanced solar thermal electric power plant performance and energy costs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study determines the performance and cost of four 10 MWe advanced solar thermal electric power plants sited in various regions of the continental United States. The solar plants are conceptualized to begin commercial operation in the year 2000. It is assumed that major subsystem performance will have improved substantially as compared to that of pilot plants currently operating or under construction. The net average annual system efficiency is therefore roughly twice that of current solar thermal electric power plant designs. Similarly, capital costs reflecting goals based on high-volume mass production that are considered to be appropriate for the year 2000 have been used. These costs, which are approximately an order of magnitude below the costs of current experimental projects, are believed to be achievable as a result of the anticipated sizeable solar penetration into the energy market in the 1990 to 2000 timeframe. The paraboloidal dish, central receiver, cylindrical parabolic trough, and compound parabolic concentrators comprise the advanced collector concepts studied. All concepts exhibit their best performance when sited in regional areas such as the sunbelt where the annual insolation is high. The regional variation in solar plant performance has been assessed in relation to the expected rise in the future cost of residential and commercial electricity in the same regions. A discussion of the regional insolation data base, a description of the solar systems performance and costs, and a presentation of a range for the forecast cost of conventional electricity by region and nationally over the next several decades are given.

Latta, A.F.; Bowyer, J.M.; Fujita, T.; Richter, P.H.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Flexible gas insulated transmission line having regions of reduced electric field  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gas insulated transmission line having radially flexible field control means for reducing the electric field along the periphery of the inner conductor at predetermined locations wherein the support insulators are located. The radially flexible field control means of the invention includes several structural variations of the inner conductor, wherein careful controlling of the length to depth of surface depressions produces regions of reduced electric field. Several embodiments of the invention dispose a flexible connector at the predetermined location along the inner conductor where the surface depressions that control the reduced electric field are located.

Cookson, Alan H. (Pittsburgh, PA); Fischer, William H. (Wilkins Township, Allegheny County, PA); Yoon, Kue H. (Pittsburgh, PA); Meyer, Jeffry R. (Penn Hills Township, Allegheny County, PA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Table A20. Components of Onsite Electricity Generation by Census Region and  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Components of Onsite Electricity Generation by Census Region and" Components of Onsite Electricity Generation by Census Region and" " Economic Characteristics of the Establishment, 1991" " (Estimates in Million Kilowatthours)" ,,,,,"RSE" " "," "," "," "," ","Row" "Economic Characteristics(a)","Total","Cogeneration","Renewables","Other(b)","Factors" ,"Total United States" "RSE Column Factors:",0.8,0.8,1.2,1.3 "Value of Shipments and Receipts" "(million dollars)" " Under 20",562,349,"W","W",23 " 20-49",4127,3917,79,131,20.1 " 50-99",8581,7255,955,371,10

134

Table A28. Components of Onsite Electricity Generation by Census Region, Cens  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Components of Onsite Electricity Generation by Census Region, Census Division, and" Components of Onsite Electricity Generation by Census Region, Census Division, and" " Economic Characteristics of the Establishment, 1994" " (Estimates in Million Kilowatthours)" ,,,"Renewables" ,,,"(excluding Wood",,"RSE" " "," "," ","and"," ","Row" "Economic Characteristics(a)","Total","Cogeneration(b)","Other Biomass)(c)","Other(d)","Factors" ,"Total United States" "RSE Column Factors:",0.6,0.6,1.8,1.4 "Value of Shipments and Receipts" "(million dollars)" " Under 20",1098,868," W "," W ",22.3

135

Regional Economic Benefits from Electric Transportation: Case Study of the Cleveland, Ohio Metropolitan Statistical Area  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study analyzes the economic impacts due to electric drive vehicle (EDVs) market penetration in the Cleveland metropolitan statistical area (MSA). Specifically, the study examines the economic impacts due to petroleum displacement and decreased pollution control compliance costs for local industry. The study applies a regional input-out put analysis to develop regional economic impact multipliers (REIMs) appropriate for EDV evaluation. These REIMs are integrated into a spreadsheet based Cleveland EDV...

2006-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

136

Low Wind Speed Technology Phase II: Developing Techniques to Evaluate the Designs and Operating Environments of Offshore Wind Turbines in the Mid-Atlantic and Lower Great Lakes Region; AWS Truewind, LLC  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This fact sheet describes a subcontract with AWS Truewind, LLC to study offshore wind and wave environments of the Atlantic and lower Great Lakes regions by estimating available wind power resource.

Not Available

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

" Electricity Generation by Census Region, Census Division, Industry Group, and"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A6. Total Inputs of Selected Byproduct Energy for Heat, Power, and" A6. Total Inputs of Selected Byproduct Energy for Heat, Power, and" " Electricity Generation by Census Region, Census Division, Industry Group, and" " Selected Industries, 1994" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ","Waste"," " " "," "," ","Blast"," "," "," "," ","Oils/Tars","RSE" "SIC"," "," ","Furnace/Coke"," ","Petroleum","Pulping","Wood Chips,","And Waste","Row"

138

Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles and Petroleum Displacement: A Regional Economic Impact Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Interest in alternatives to conventional vehicles such as plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) has risen because of the environmental and energy security concerns associated with petroleum dependence, but what would be the economic impact of the widespread use of such vehicles? This study quantified the regional economic impacts associated with an increased market penetration of PHEVs in the household vehicle market.

2007-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

139

Impacts of Regional Electricity Prices and Building Type on the Economics of Commercial Photovoltaic Systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To identify the impacts of regional electricity prices and building type on the economics of solar photovoltaic (PV) systems, 207 rate structures across 77 locations and 16 commercial building types were evaluated. Results for expected solar value are reported for each location and building type. Aggregated results are also reported, showing general trends across various impact categories.

Ong, S.; Campbell, C.; Clark, N.

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Lake Improvement District Law and County Lake Improvement Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Lake Improvement District Law and County Lake Improvement Program Lake Improvement District Law and County Lake Improvement Program (Minnesota) Lake Improvement District Law and County Lake Improvement Program (Minnesota) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Siting and Permitting Lake Improvement Districts may be established by county boards in order to

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141

AEO2011: Electric Power Projections for EMM Region - Southwest Power Pool /  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

South South Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 90, and contains only the reference case. The data is broken down into electric power sector, cumulative planned additions,cumulative unplanned additions,cumulative retirements, end-use sector, electricity sales, net energy for load, generation by fuel type and price by service category. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Electric Power projections South Southwest Power Pool Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Electric Power Projections for EMM Region - Southwest Power Pool / South- Reference Case (xls, 259 KiB)

142

AEO2011: Electric Power Projections for EMM Region - Southwest Power Pool /  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

North North Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 89, and contains only the reference case. The data is broken down into electric power sector, cumulative planned additions,cumulative unplanned additions,cumulative retirements, end-use sector, electricity sales, net energy for load, generation by fuel type and price by service category. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Electric Power Southwest Power Pool Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Electric Power Projections for EMM Region - Southwest Power Pool / North- Reference Case (xls, 258.6 KiB)

143

Region-specific study of the electric utility industry. Phase I, final report  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the financial background of the electric utility industry in VACAR, reports on the present condition of the industry and then assesses the future of this industry. The Virginia-Carolinas subregion (VACAR) of the Southeastern Electric Reliability Council (SERC) was selected for this regional study because of its cooperativeness and its representative mix of powerplants, for example coal, hydro, nuclear, oil. It was found that the supply of future economic electricity is in jeopardy because of the regulatory process, the increasing risk associated with large scale generating stations and the weakening of the nuclear option. A number of options for the future were considered, including deregulation, government ownership and retaining the present system with modifications. The option selected to improve the present condition of the electricity industry was to make the present system work. The present system is sound, and with modifications, problems could be solved within the existing framework. 8 figs., 4 tabs.

Wacaster, A.J. (ed.)

1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

AEO2011: Electric Power Projections for EMM Region - United States | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

United States United States Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 95, and contains only the reference case. The data is broken down into electric power sector, cumulative planned additions,cumulative unplanned additions,cumulative retirements, end-use sector, electricity sales, net energy for load, generation by fuel type and price by service category. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Electric Power projections United States Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Electric Power Projections for EMM Region - United States- Reference Case (xls, 260.9 KiB) Quality Metrics

145

Lake-Effect Thunderstorms in the Lower Great Lakes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cloud-to-ground (CG) lightning, radar, and radiosonde data were examined to determine how frequently lake-effect storms (rain/snow) with lightning occurred over and near the lower Great Lakes region (Lakes Erie and Ontario) from September 1995 ...

Scott M. Steiger; Robert Hamilton; Jason Keeler; Richard E. Orville

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Investment in Lake States Timberland June 24, 2008  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

­ Lake States Region Scott Henker, Senior Resource Manager Pete Coutu, Marketing Manager Our foresters

147

Potential Impacts of Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles on Regional Power Generation  

SciTech Connect

Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) are being developed around the world, with much work aiming to optimize engine and battery for efficient operation, both during discharge and when grid electricity is available for recharging. However, the general expectation has been that the grid will not be greatly affected by the use of PHEVs because the recharging will occur during off-peak hours, or the number of vehicles will grow slowly enough so that capacity planning will respond adequately. This expectation does not consider that drivers will control the timing of recharging, and their inclination will be to plug in when convenient, rather than when utilities would prefer. It is important to understand the ramifications of adding load from PHEVs onto the grid. Depending on when and where the vehicles are plugged in, they could cause local or regional constraints on the grid. They could require the addition of new electric capacity and increase the utilization of existing capacity. Usage patterns of local distribution grids will change, and some lines or substations may become overloaded sooner than expected. Furthermore, the type of generation used to meet the demand for recharging PHEVs will depend on the region of the country and the timing of recharging. This paper analyzes the potential impacts of PHEVs on electricity demand, supply, generation structure, prices, and associated emission levels in 2020 and 2030 in 13 regions specified by the North American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC) and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Energy Information Administration (EIA), and on which the data and analysis in EIA's Annual Energy Outlook 2007 are based (Figure ES-1). The estimates of power plant supplies and regional hourly electricity demand come from publicly available sources from EIA and the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission. Electricity requirements for PHEVs are based on analysis from the Electric Power Research Institute, with an optimistic projection of 25% market penetration by 2020, involving a mixture of sedans and sport utility vehicles. The calculations were done using the Oak Ridge Competitive Electricity Dispatch (ORCED) model, a model developed over the past 12 years to evaluate a wide variety of critical electricity sector issues. Seven scenarios were run for each region for 2020 and 2030, for a total of 182 scenarios. In addition to a base scenario of no PHEVs, the authors modeled scenarios assuming that vehicles were either plugged in starting at 5:00 p.m. (evening) or at 10:00 p.m.(night) and left until fully charged. Three charging rates were examined: 120V/15A (1.4 kW), 120V/20A (2 kW), and 220V/30A (6 kW). Most regions will need to build additional capacity or utilize demand response to meet the added demand from PHEVs in the evening charging scenarios, especially by 2030 when PHEVs have a larger share of the installed vehicle base and make a larger demand on the system. The added demands of evening charging, especially at high power levels, can impact the overall demand peaks and reduce the reserve margins for a region's system. Night recharging has little potential to influence peak loads, but will still influence the amount and type of generation.

Hadley, Stanton W [ORNL; Tsvetkova, Alexandra A [ORNL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Potential Impacts of Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles on Regional Power Generation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) are being developed around the world, with much work aiming to optimize engine and battery for efficient operation, both during discharge and when grid electricity is available for recharging. However, the general expectation has been that the grid will not be greatly affected by the use of PHEVs because the recharging will occur during off-peak hours, or the number of vehicles will grow slowly enough so that capacity planning will respond adequately. This expectation does not consider that drivers will control the timing of recharging, and their inclination will be to plug in when convenient, rather than when utilities would prefer. It is important to understand the ramifications of adding load from PHEVs onto the grid. Depending on when and where the vehicles are plugged in, they could cause local or regional constraints on the grid. They could require the addition of new electric capacity and increase the utilization of existing capacity. Usage patterns of local distribution grids will change, and some lines or substations may become overloaded sooner than expected. Furthermore, the type of generation used to meet the demand for recharging PHEVs will depend on the region of the country and the timing of recharging. This paper analyzes the potential impacts of PHEVs on electricity demand, supply, generation structure, prices, and associated emission levels in 2020 and 2030 in 13 regions specified by the North American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC) and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Energy Information Administration (EIA), and on which the data and analysis in EIA's Annual Energy Outlook 2007 are based (Figure ES-1). The estimates of power plant supplies and regional hourly electricity demand come from publicly available sources from EIA and the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission. Electricity requirements for PHEVs are based on analysis from the Electric Power Research Institute, with an optimistic projection of 25% market penetration by 2020, involving a mixture of sedans and sport utility vehicles. The calculations were done using the Oak Ridge Competitive Electricity Dispatch (ORCED) model, a model developed over the past 12 years to evaluate a wide variety of critical electricity sector issues. Seven scenarios were run for each region for 2020 and 2030, for a total of 182 scenarios. In addition to a base scenario of no PHEVs, the authors modeled scenarios assuming that vehicles were either plugged in starting at 5:00 p.m. (evening) or at 10:00 p.m.(night) and left until fully charged. Three charging rates were examined: 120V/15A (1.4 kW), 120V/20A (2 kW), and 220V/30A (6 kW). Most regions will need to build additional capacity or utilize demand response to meet the added demand from PHEVs in the evening charging scenarios, especially by 2030 when PHEVs have a larger share of the installed vehicle base and make a larger demand on the system. The added demands of evening charging, especially at high power levels, can impact the overall demand peaks and reduce the reserve margins for a region's system. Night recharging has little potential to influence peak loads, but will still influence the amount and type of generation.

Hadley, Stanton W [ORNL; Tsvetkova, Alexandra A [ORNL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Electric household equipment and electric fuel usage in the Tri-State Region and the United States: 1960-70. Working paper  

SciTech Connect

The possible impact of areawide residential location policy on future residential electricity usage in the Tri-State Metropolitan Region centering on New York City is investigated. This report is concerned with selected residential electric appliance usage in the Tri-State Region as compared with usage of these appliances across the United States between 1960 and 1970. Included are tabular representations of comparisons between residential air conditioner usage in the Tri-State Region and the United States. Tabular comparisons also are made with respect to residential appliance usage and electric fuel usage.

Hillman, B.

1973-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

"Table A25. Components of Total Electricity Demand by Census Region, Census Division, Industry"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Components of Total Electricity Demand by Census Region, Census Division, Industry" Components of Total Electricity Demand by Census Region, Census Division, Industry" " Group, and Selected Industries, 1994" " (Estimates in Million Kilowatthours)" " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," "," "," "," ","Sales and/or"," ","RSE" "SIC"," "," ","Transfers","Total Onsite","Transfers","Net Demand for","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Group and Industry","Purchases","In(b)","Generation(c)","Offsite","Electricity(d)","Factors"

151

Resource Planning Model: An Integrated Resource Planning and Dispatch Tool for Regional Electric Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report introduces a new capacity expansion model, the Resource Planning Model (RPM), with high spatial and temporal resolution that can be used for mid- and long-term scenario planning of regional power systems. Although RPM can be adapted to any geographic region, the report describes an initial version of the model adapted for the power system in Colorado. It presents examples of scenario results from the first version of the model, including an example of a 30%-by-2020 renewable electricity penetration scenario.

Mai, T.; Drury, E.; Eurek, K.; Bodington, N.; Lopez, A.; Perry, A.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Regional Impacts of Electric Utility Restructuring on Fuel Markets: Volumes 1 and 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Will open transmission under electric utility restructuring cause low-cost generation to displace high-cost generation? Will this lead to dramatic shifts in patterns of fuel use? This report, the second in a multivolume series by EPRI and GRI addressing deregulation, shows what to expect for each of 10 major regions in the nation. It also dispels many myths about the ongoing effects of restructuring.

1997-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

153

" and Electricity Generation by Census Region, Census Division, Industry Group,"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Total Inputs of Selected Wood and Wood-Related Products for Heat, Power," 3. Total Inputs of Selected Wood and Wood-Related Products for Heat, Power," " and Electricity Generation by Census Region, Census Division, Industry Group," " and Selected Industries, 1994" " (Estimates in Billion Btu)" ,,,,"Selected Wood and Wood-Related Products" ,,,,,"Biomass" " "," ",," "," "," ","Wood Residues","Wood-Related"," " " "," ","Pulping Liquor",," ","Wood Harvested","and Byproducts","and","RSE" "SIC"," ","or","Biomass","Agricultural","Directly","from","Paper-Related","Row"

154

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Electricity Components;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1.1 Electricity: Components of Net Demand, 2006; 1.1 Electricity: Components of Net Demand, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Electricity Components; Unit: Million Kilowatthours. Total Sales and Net Demand NAICS Transfers Onsite Transfers for Code(a) Subsector and Industry Purchases In(b) Generation(c) Offsite Electricity(d) Total United States 311 Food 73,242 309 4,563 111 78,003 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 15,283 253 2,845 72 18,310 311221 Wet Corn Milling 6,753 48 2,396 55 9,142 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 920 54 951 7 1,919 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Foo 9,720 1 268 13 9,976 3115 Dairy Products 10,079 0 44 0 10,123 3116 Animal Slaughtering and Processing 17,545 0 17 0 17,562 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products

155

Region-specific study of the electric utility industry. Phases I and II. Executive summary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the problems either confronting or likely to confront the electric utility industry in the event of a return of high rates of inflation. It attempts to assess the future of this industry and makes recommendations to resolve fundamental problems. The Virginia-Carolinas subregion (VACAR) of the Southeastern Electric Reliability Council (SERC) was selected for this regional study because of the willingness of a wide range of parties to participate and its representative mix of powerplants, for example coal, hydro, nuclear and oil. It was found that the future supply of reliable, economic electricity is in jeopardy because of the regulatory process, the increasing risk associated with large scale generating stations and the weakening of the nuclear option. A number of options for the future were considered, including deregulation, government ownership and retaining the present system with modifications. The option selected to improve the condition of the electricity industry was to make the present system work. The present system is sound and, with modifications, problems could be solved within the existing framework. A series of recommendations, developed through a consensus building effort involving state government officials, state regulators and investor-owned utility representatives, are presented. A discussion of the need for innovative solutions and one state's approach to the problem concludes the report.

Not Available

1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; 7 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Demand Residual and Natural Gas(c) LPG and Coke and Breeze) for Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) (billion NGL(d) (million End Use (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) Total United States TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 977,338 40 22 5,357 21 46 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel 24,584 21 4 2,059 2 25 Conventional Boiler Use 24,584 11 3 1,245 2 6 CHP and/or Cogeneration Process 0 10 1 814 * 19 Direct Uses-Total Process 773,574 10 9 2,709 10 19 Process Heating

157

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; 5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Residual and Natural Gas(c) LPG and Coke and Breeze) Total Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) (billion NGL(d) (million Other(e) End Use (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 15,658 835,382 40 22 5,357 21 46 5,820 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel -- 12,109 21 4 2,059 2 25 -- Conventional Boiler Use 12,109 11 3 1,245 2 6 CHP and/or Cogeneration Process 0 10 1 814 * 19 Direct Uses-Total Process

158

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; 6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal Net Residual and LPG and (excluding Coal End Use Total Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) Natural Gas(c) NGL(d) Coke and Breeze) Other(e) Total United States TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 15,658 2,850 251 129 5,512 79 1,016 5,820 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fue -- 41 133 23 2,119 8 547 -- Conventional Boiler Use 41 71 17 1,281 8 129 CHP and/or Cogeneration Process 0 62 6 838 1 417 Direct Uses-Total Process -- 2,244 62 52 2,788 39 412 -- Process Heating -- 346 59 19 2,487 32 345 -- Process Cooling and Refrigeration -- 206 * 1 32 * * -- Machine Drive

159

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Next MECS will be conducted in 2010 Table 5.8 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal Net Demand Residual and LPG and (excluding Coal End Use for Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) Natural Gas(c) NGL(d) Coke and Breeze) Total United States TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 3,335 251 129 5,512 79 1,016 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel 84 133 23 2,119 8 547 Conventional Boiler Use 84 71 17 1,281 8 129 CHP and/or Cogeneration Process 0 62 6 838 1 417 Direct Uses-Total Process 2,639 62 52 2,788 39 412 Process Heating 379 59 19 2,487 32 345 Process Cooling and Refrigeration

160

The impact of carbon taxes or allowances on the electric generation market in the Ohio and ECAR region  

SciTech Connect

The North American electricity grid is separated into 11 regional reliability councils, collectively called the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC). The East Central Area Reliability Coordination Agreement (ECAR) is the reliability council that covers Ohio and Indiana, along with parts of Kentucky, Illinois, Maryland, Michigan, Pennsylvania, Virginia, and West Virginia. Ohio and the rest of the ECAR region rely more heavily on coal-fired generation than any other US region. The purpose of this report is to study the effect of carbon reduction policies on the cost and price of generation in the ECAR region, with an emphasis on Ohio. In order to do that, the author modeled the possible electric generation system for the ECAR and Ohio region for the year 2010 using a model developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory called the Oak Ridge Competitive Electric Dispatch model (ORCED). He let the model optimize the system based on various factors and carbon reduction policies to understand their impact. He then used the electricity prices and assumed demand elasticities to change the demands while also requiring all power plants to be profitable. The author discusses the different potential policies for carbon reduction and issues involving a restructured market; describes the model used for this analysis, the ECAR electricity sector, and the establishment of a base case; and describes the results of applying various carbon emission reduction approaches to the region. 14 figs., 5 tabs.

Hadley, S.W.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lake region electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Regional load-curve models: scenario and forecast using the DRI model. Final report. [Forecasts of electric power loads in 32 US regions  

SciTech Connect

Regional load curve models were constructed for 32 regions that have been created by aggregating hourly load data from 146 electric utilities. These utilities supply approximately 95% of the electricity consumed in the continental US. The 32 models forecast electricity demands by hour, 8784 regional load forecasts per year. Because projections are made for each hour in the year, contemporaneous forecasts are available for peak demands, megawatt hour demands, load factors, load duration curves, and typical load shapes. The forecast scenario is described and documented in this volume and the forecast resulting from the use of this scenario is presented. The highlights of this forecast are two observations: (1) peak demands will once again become winter phenomena. By the year 2000, 18 of the 32 regions peak in a winter month as compared with the 8 winter peaking regions in 1977. In the heating season, the model is responsive to the number of heating degree-hours, the penetration rate of electric heating equipment, and the rate at which this space conditioning equipment is utilized, which itself is functionally dependent on the level of real electricity prices and real incomes. Thus, as the penetration rate of electric heating equipment increases, winter season demands grow more rapidly than demands in other seasons and peaks begin to appear in winter months; and (2) load factors begin to increase in the forecast, reversing the trend which began in the early 1960s. Nationally, load factors do not leap upwards, instead they increase gradually from .609 in 1977 to .629 in the year 2000. The improvement is more consequential in some regions, with load factors increasing, at times, by .10 or more. In some regions, load factors continue to decline.

Platt, H.D.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Regional load curve models: specification and estimation of the DRI Model. Final report. [Forecasts of electric loads in 32 US regions  

SciTech Connect

The DRI Model of hourly load curves is developed in this report. The model is capable of producing long-term forecasts for 32 US regions. These regions were created by aggregating hourly system load data from 146 electric utilities. These utilities supply approximately 95% of all electricity consumed in the continental US. The model forecasts electricity demands for each hour of the year for each of the 32 regions. Model output includes forecasts of peak demands, megawatt hour demands, load factors, and load duration curves. The DRI Model is estimated in two stages. In the first stage, for each region and month, hourly electricity demands are parameterized into load components representing the effects of lifestyles and weather on regional loads through a time-series model. In the second stage, the variation in these parameterized load components across months and regions is modeled econometrically in terms of energy prices, income levels, appliance saturation rates, and other variables. The second-stage models are essentially models of electricity demand which are estimated using estimated first-stage parameters as dependent variables, instead of observed demands. Regional price and income demand elasticities are implied by the second-stage models. Moreover, since the dependent variables refer to particular hours of the day, these estimated elasticities are hour-specific. (Since prices did not vary over the day in years when hourly load data were available, hour-to-hour, cross-price elasticities were not estimated.) Integrated system hourly load forecasts are obtained combining the influences of individual customer classes. Finally, approximate customer class hourly load shapes can be produced for each region, though these series may be useful only in research endeavors since they lack the precision available through survey methods.

Platt, H.D.; Einhorn, M.A.; Ignelzi, P.C.; Poirier, D.J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Summary of the GRI regional sectoral electricity model and the issues relating to those results. Occasional pub  

SciTech Connect

Results are summarized for an analysis of the U.S. electric utility industry conducted as an outgrowth of the '1984 GRI Baseline Projection of U.S. Energy Supply and Demand, 1983-2010.' The GRI Regional Sectoral Electricity Model shows a potential increase in gas demand by electric utilities of over one quad by the year 2000 if gas-fired combined-cycle is used to help offset any potential shortfall in generating capacity. Key issues emerging from the study include load growth, new generating capacity, capacity utilization, fuel choice, financial performance, and electricity prices.

Hilt, R.H.; Coyne, J.M.; Makovich, L.J.

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Summary of three regional assessment studies of solar electric generation opportunities in the Southwest, Southeast, and Northeast United States  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Market opportunities for solar generation of electricity for utility and for residential/commercial/industrial applications in the Northeast, Southeast, and Southwest regions of the United States were evaluated in three studies (JBF 1979, Stone and Webster 1979a, 1979b) and are summarized. The evaluations were based on both economic analyses and user perception of what they would require to select or approve the use of solar electric generation for themselves or for their employers. Over 30 utilities and several industrial and commercial firms and homeowners were involved. Solar electric technologies considered included biomass, hybrid retrofit, OTEC, photovoltaic, solar thermal, and wind. The studies projected that solar electric technologies could account for several percent of the forecast generation in year 2000 in the Southeast and Southwest regions,and up to 10 to 20% in the Northeast region. No single solar electric technology or application (for utility or industrial/commercial/residential use) arrived earlier at economic breakeven than other technologies in the Southeast region, but wind generation for both utility and industrial applications predominated in the Northeast region. The Southwest region, in which only utility applications were considered, showed wind energy and retrofit hybrid (a solar adjunct to an existing fossil-fueled plant) to be the most likely early applications.

Watts, R.L.; Harty, H.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Climatological Conditions of Lake-Effect Precipitation Events Associated with the New York State Finger Lakes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A climatological analysis was conducted of the environmental and atmospheric conditions that occurred during 125 identified lake-effect (LE) precipitation events in the New York State Finger Lakes region for the 11 winters (OctoberMarch) from ...

Neil Laird; Ryan Sobash; Natasha Hodas

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Temperature analysis for lake Yojoa, Honduras  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lake Yojoa is the largest freshwater lake in Honduras, located in the central west region of the country (1405' N, 88 W). The lake has a surface area of 82 km2, a maximum depth of 26 m. and an average depth of 16 m. The ...

Chokshi, Mira (Mira K.)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Electric  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Average Retail Price of Electricity to ... Period Residential Commercial Industrial ... or usage falling within specified limits by rate ...

168

Determinants of residential electrical appliance usage in the Tri-State Region, 1960-1970: a regression study. Working paper  

SciTech Connect

The possible impact of areawide residential location policy on future residential electricity usage in the Tri-State Metropolitan Region centering on New York City is investigated. This study was undertaken to assess residential electricity usage, particularly electrical appliance use, in the residential sector of the New York Metropolitan area from 1960 to 1970. The attempts to choose and quantify the contribution of various determinants of electrical appliance usage using multiple regression analyses has been relatively successful. In addition, these results were compared with 1960 and 1970 data in an effort to establish a degree of consistency over time. The implications of the findings here point toward two complementary institutions for change: urban planning and public administration. The relationship between single family structures and high energy usage argue strongly for more dense communities, while price elasticities can be used by regulators to control electrical usage.

Stone, B.

1974-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Impacts of Climate Variation and Catchment Area on Water Balance and Lake Hydrologic Type in Groundwater-Dominated Systems: A Generic Lake Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lakes are a major geologic feature in humid regions, and multiple lake hydrologic types exist with varying physical and chemical characteristics, connections among lakes, and relationships to the landscape. The authors developed a model of water ...

Jeffrey Cardille; Michael T. Coe; Julie A. Vano

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Electrical and Kinematic Structure of the Stratiform Precipitation Region Trailing an Oklahoma Squall Line  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An electric field sounding through the transition zone precipitation minimum that trailed an Oklahoma squall line on 18 June 1987 provides information about the electrical structure within a midlatitude trailing stratiform cloud. A single-Doppler ...

Terry J. Schuur; W. David Rust; Bradley F. Smull; Thomas C. Marshall

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Class 1 overview of cultural resources for the Western Area Power Administration Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects electric power marketing environmental impact statement  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Argonne National Laboratory conducted an inventory of known archaeological and historic sites in areas that could be affected by the hydropower operation alternatives under analysis in the power marketing environmental impact statement for the Western Area Power Administration`s Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects. The study areas included portions of the Green River (Flaming Gorge Dam to Cub Creek) in Utah and Colorado and the Gunnison River (Blue Mesa Reservoir to Crystal Dam) in Colorado. All previous archaeological surveys and previously recorded prehistoric and historic sites, structures, and features were inventoried and plotted on maps (only survey area maps are included in this report). The surveys were classified by their level of intensity, and the sites were classified according to their age, type, and contents. These data (presented here in tabular form) permit a general assessment of the character and distribution of archaeological remains in the study areas, as well as an indication of the sampling basis for such an assessment. To provide an adequate context for the descriptions of the archaeological and historic sites, this report also presents overviews of the environmental setting and the regional prehistory, history, and ethnography for each study area.

Moeller, K.L.; Malinowski, L.M.; Hoffecker, J.F.; Walitschek, D.A.; Shogren, L.; Mathews, J.E.; Verhaaren, B.T.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Electricity  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Electricity is an essential part of modern life. The Energy Department is working to create technology solutions that will reduce our energy use and save Americans money.

173

Direct heat applications of geothermal energy in The Geysers/Clear Lake region. Volume I. Geotechnical assessment, agribusiness applications, socioeconomic assessment, engineering assessment. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Discussion is presented under the following section headings: background and some technical characteristics of geothermal resources; geology and geohydrology, geophysics, and, conclusions regarding availability of geothermal energy for nonelectric uses; agricultural assessment of Lake County, site assessment for potential agricultural development, analysis of potential agricultural applications, special application of low cost geothermal energy to algae harvesting, development of an integrated agribusiness, geothermal complex in Lake County, analysis of individual enterprises, and, recommendations for subsequent work; demographic characteristics, economic condition and perspective of Lake County, economic impact of geothermal in Lake County, social and economic factors related to geothermal resource development, socioeconomic impact of nonelectric uses of geothermal energy, and, identification of direct heat applications of geothermal energy for Lake County based on selected interviews; cost estimate procedure, example, justification of procedure, and, typical costs and conclusions; and, recommended prefeasibility and feasibility studies related to construction of facilities for nonelectric applications of geothermal resource utilization. (JGB)

Not Available

1976-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Regional economic impacts of changes in electricity rates resulting from Western Area Power Administration`s power marketing alternatives  

SciTech Connect

This technical memorandum describes an analysis of regional economic impacts resulting from changes in retail electricity rates due to six power marketing programs proposed by Western Area Power Administration (Western). Regional economic impacts of changes in rates are estimated in terms of five key regional economic variables: population, gross regional product, disposable income, employment, and household income. The REMI (Regional Impact Models, Inc.) and IMPLAN (Impact Analysis for Planning) models simulate economic impacts in nine subregions in the area in which Western power is sold for the years 1993, 2000, and 2008. Estimates show that impacts on aggregate economic activity in any of the subregions or years would be minimal for three reasons. First, the utilities that buy power from Western sell only a relatively small proportion of the total electricity sold in any of the subregions. Second, reliance of Western customers on Western power is fairly low in each subregion. Finally, electricity is not a significant input cost for any industry or for households in any subregion.

Allison, T.; Griffes, P.; Edwards, B.K.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

CO{sub 2} allowance allocation in the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative and the effect on electricity investors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative (RGGI) is an effort by nine Northeast and Mid-Atlantic states to develop a regional, mandatory, market-based cap-and-trade program to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from the electricity sector. The initiative is expected to lead to an increase in the price of electricity in the RGGI region and beyond. The implications of these changes for the value of electricity-generating assets and the market value of the firms that own them depends on the initial allocation of carbon dioxide allowances, the composition of generating assets owned by the firm, and the locations of those assets. Changes in asset values inside the RGGI region may be positive or negative, whereas changes outside of the RGGI region are almost always positive but nonetheless vary greatly. Viewing changes at the firm level aggregates and moderates both positive and negative effects on market value compared with what would be observed by looking at changes at individual facilities. Nonetheless, a particular firm's portfolio of assets is unlikely to reflect the overall composition of assets in the industry as a whole, and some firms are likely to do substantially better or worse than the industry average. 16 refs., 4 figs.

Dallas Burtraw; Danny Kahn; Karen Palmerook

2005-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

176

Table 7b. U.S. Regional Electricity Retail Sales (Million ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Middle Atlantic ..... 417 417 485 401 427 414 473 400 430 413 468 401 430 429 428 E. N. Central ... Electric Power Monthly, DOE/EIA-0226; ...

177

A regional event analysis of electric vehicle technology development in the Netherlands.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??For the past 20 years battery electric transportation has frequently been assessed as the most desirable alternative for internal combustion driven cars. However widespread adoption (more)

Vries, M.J. de

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

American Electric Vehicles Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Vehicles Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name American Electric Vehicles Inc Place Palmer Lake, Colorado Zip 80133 Sector Vehicles Product American Electric Vehicles (AEV) builds...

179

Mesoscale Boundary Layer and Heat Flux Variations over Pack IceCovered Lake Erie  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The development of extensive pack ice fields on the Great Lakes significantly influences lake-effect storms and local airmass modification, as well as the regional hydrologic cycle and lake water levels. The evolution of the ice fields and their ...

Mathieu R. Gerbush; David A. R. Kristovich; Neil F. Laird

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Design and Analysis of a Region-Wide Remotely Controllable Electrical Lock-Out System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electric utilities have a main responsibility to protect the lives and safety of their workers when they are working on low-, medium-, and high-voltage power lines and distribution circuits. With the anticipated widespread deployment of smart grids, a secure and highly reliable means of maintaining isolation of customer-owned distributed generation (DG) from the affected distribution circuits during maintenance is necessary to provide a fully de-energized work area, ensure utility personnel safety, and prevent hazards that can lead to accidents such as accidental electrocution from unanticipated power sources. Some circuits are serviced while energized (live line work) while others are de-energized for maintenance. For servicing de-energized circuits and equipment, lock-out tag-out (LOTO) programs provide a verifiable procedure for ensuring that circuit breakers are locked in the off state and tagged to indicate that status to operational personnel so that the lines will be checked for voltage to verify they are de-energized. The de-energized area is isolated from any energized sources, which traditionally are the substations. This procedure works well when all power sources and their interconnections are known armed with this knowledge, utility personnel can determine the appropriate circuits to de-energize for isolating the target line or equipment. However, with customer-owned DG tied into the grid, the risk of inadvertently reenergizing a circuit increases because circuit connections may not be adequately documented and are not under the direct control of the local utility. Thus, the active device may not be properly de-energized or isolated from the work area. Further, a remote means of de-energizing and locking out energized devices provides an opportunity for greatly reduced safety risk to utility personnel compared to manual operations. In this paper, we present a remotely controllable LOTO system that allows individual workers to determine the configuration and status of electrical system circuits and permit them to lock out customer-owned DG devices for safety purposes using a highly secure and ultra-reliable radio signal. The system consists of: (1) individual personal lockout devices, (2) lockout communications and logic module at circuit breakers, which are located at all DG devices, and (3) a database and configuration control process located at the utility operations center. The lockout system is a close permissive, i.e., loss of control power or communications will cause the circuit breaker to open. Once the DG device is tripped open, a visual means will provide confirmation of a loss of voltage and current that verifies the disconnected status of the DG. Further the utility personnel will be able to place their own lock electronically on the system to ensure a lockout functionally. The proposed LOTO system provides enhanced worker safety and protection against unintended energized lines when DG is present. The main approaches and challenges encountered through designing the proposed region-wide LOTO system are discussed in this paper. These approaches include: (1) evaluating the reliability of the proposed approach under N-modular redundancy with voter/spares configurations and (2) conducting a system level risk assessment study using the failure modes and effects analysis (FMEA) technique to identify and rank failure modes by probability of occurrence, probability of detection, and severity of consequences. This ranking allows a cost benefits analysis to be conducted such that dollars and efforts will be applied to the failures that provide greatest incremental gains in system capability (resilience, survivability, security, reliability, availability, etc.) per dollar spent whether capital, operations, or investment. Several simulation scenarios and their results are presented to demonstrate the viability of these approaches.

Olama, Mohammed M [ORNL; Allgood, Glenn O [ORNL; Kuruganti, Phani Teja [ORNL; Howlader, Mostofa [ORNL; Kisner, Roger A [ORNL; Ewing, Paul D [ORNL; McIntyre, Timothy J [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lake region electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Horizontal Distribution of Electrical and Meteorological Conditions across the Stratiform Region of a Mesoscale Convective System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Five soundings of the electric field and thermodynamic properties were made in a mesoscale convective system (MCS) that occurred in Oklahoma and Texas on 23 June 1991. Airborne Doppler radar data were obtained from three passes through the ...

Maribeth Stolzenburg; Thomas C. Marshall; W. David Rust; Bradley F. Smull

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Electrifying Integration: Electricity Production and the South-East Europe Regional Energy Market  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

between state and private electricity generating companies in Spain. Using data on physical units, the authors show that privately owned generating companies are moving faster toward the efficiency frontier. Jamasb (2002) and Jamasb, Mota, Newberry...

Hooper, E; Medvedev, A

183

ELECTRIC  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

ELECTRIC cdrtrokArJclaeT 3 I+ &i, y I &OF I*- j< t j,fci..- ir )(yiT E-li, ( -,v? Cl -p4.4 RESEARCH LABORATORIES EAST PITTSBURGH, PA. 8ay 22, 1947 Mr. J. Carrel Vrilson...

184

The Frequency and Intensity of Great Lake Cyclones  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cyclones are an important feature of the Great Lakes region that can have important impacts on shipping, lake temperature profiles, ice cover, and shoreline property damages. The objective of this research is to analyze the frequency and ...

James R. Angel; Scott A. Isard

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

ELECTRIC  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

ELECTRIC ELECTRIC cdrtrokArJclaeT 3 I+ &i, y$ \I &OF I*- j< t j,fci..- ir )(yiT !E-li, ( \-,v? Cl -p/4.4 RESEARCH LABORATORIES EAST PITTSBURGH, PA. 8ay 22, 1947 Mr. J. Carrel Vrilson General ?!!mager Atomic Qxzgy Commission 1901 Constitution Avenue Kashington, D. C. Dear Sir: In the course of OUT nuclenr research we are planning to study the enc:ri;y threshold anti cross section for fission. For thib program we require a s<>piAroted sample of metallic Uranium 258 of high purity. A quantity of at lezst 5 grams would probably be sufficient for our purpose, and this was included in our 3@icntion for license to the Atonic Energy Coskqission.. This license has been approved, 2nd rre would Llp!Jreciate informztion as to how to ?r*oceed to obtain thit: m2teria.l.

186

" Electricity Generation by Census Region, Industry Group, and Selected"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2" 2" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ","RSE" "SIC"," "," "," ","Residual","Distillate"," "," "," ","Coke"," ","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Groups and Industry","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Natural Gas(d)","LPG","Coal","and Breeze","Other(e)","Factors"

187

Trends in Regional U.S. Electricity and Natural Gas Price Elasticity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The extent to which consumers are likely to alter energy consumption in response to energy price changes continues to be a critical element in energy policy analysis. Notably, climate change policies that are expected to increase the price of electricity will engender different consequences for the power industry, state economies, and power users, depending on how consumers respond to those prices. Understanding and acknowledging such impacts will be critical to the proper implementation of such policies...

2010-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

188

Mid-Atlantic Region Consumer's Guide to Buying a Solar Electric System - Revision  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Consumers in Pennsylvania, Virginia, Delaware, Maryland, the District of Columbia, West Virginia, and New Jersey are showing increased interest in solar electric systems for their homes and businesses. This booklet provides basic information about buying a PV system. Photovoltaic (PV) systems are reliable, pollution free, and use a renewable source of energy--the sun. A PV system can be a substantial investment and careful planning will help ensure that you make the right decisions.

Maryland Energy Administration

2001-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

189

Mid-Atlantic region consumer's guide to buying a solar electric system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Consumers in Pennsylvania, Virginia, Delaware, Maryland, the District of Columbia, West Virginia, and New Jersey are showing increased interest in solar electric systems for their homes and businesses. This booklet provides basic information about buying a PV system. Photovoltaic (PV) systems are reliable, pollution free, and use a renewable source of energy, the sun. A PV system can be a substantial investment and careful planning will help ensure that you make the right decisions.

NREL

1999-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

190

" Electricity Generation by Census Region, Industry Group, and Selected"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1" 1" " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)" " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ","Coke"," "," " " "," "," "," ","Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(d)"," ","Coal","and Breeze"," ","RSE" "SIC"," ","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","(billion","LPG","(1000","(1000","Other(e)","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Groups and Industry","(trillion Btu)","(million kWh)","(1000 bbls)","(1000 bbls)","cu ft)","(1000 bbls)","short tons)","short tons)","(trillion Btu)","Factors"

191

Lake-atmosphere feedbacks associated with paleolakes Bonneville and Lahontan  

SciTech Connect

A high-resolution, regional climate model nested within a general circulation model was used to study the interactions between the atmosphere and the large Pleistocene lakes in the Great Basin of the United States. Simulations for January and July 18,000 years ago indicate that moisture provided by synoptic-scale atmospheric circulation features was the primary component of the hydrologic budgets of Lakes Lahontan and Bonneville. In addition, lake-generated precipitation was a substantial component of the hydrologic budget of Lake Bonneville at that time. This local lake-atmosphere interaction may help explain differences in the relative size of these lakes 18,000 years ago.

Hostetler, S.W. (Geological Survey, Boulder, CO (United States)); Giorgi, F.; Bates, G.T. (National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States)); Bartlein, P.J. (Univ. of Oregon, Eugene, OR (United States))

1994-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

192

Potential impacts of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles on regional power generation  

SciTech Connect

Simulations predict that the introduction of PHEVs could impact demand peaks, reduce reserve margins, and increase prices. The type of power generation used to recharge the PHEVs and associated emissions will depend upon the region and the timing of the recharge. (author)

Hadley, Stanton W.; Tsvetkova, Alexandra A.

2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

193

The Regional Gas Infrastructure -- Is It Ready for the Power Boom?: How Changes in Gas and Electric Industries Affect Reliability an d Competitiveness of Gas-Fired Generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The boom in gas-fired capacity additions, coupled with today's overheated gas market, make questions of gas supply a top priority for gas and electric industry planners. The relationships between the gas and electric industries are changing -- with the latter becoming a premium customer of the former. While the commodity market is national in scope, many of the impacts and planning challenges are best understood on a regional basis. This report examines five regions where gas-fired capacity additions are...

2001-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

194

Electric power supply and demand 1979 to 1988 for the contiguous United States as projected by the Regional Electric Reliability Councils in their April 1, 1979 long-range coordinated planning reports to the Department of Energy  

SciTech Connect

Information concerning bulk electric power supply and demand is summarized and reviewed. Electric-utility power-supply systems are composed of power sources, transmission and distribution facilities, and users of electricity. In the United States there are three such systems of large geographic extent that together cover the entire country. Subjects covered are: energy forecasts, peak demand forecasts, generating-capacity forecasts, purchases and sales of capacity, and transmission. Extensive data are compiled in 17 tables. Information in two appendices includes a general description of the Regional Electric Reliability Councils and US generating capacity as of June 30, 1979. 3 figures, 17 tables.

Savage, N.; Graban, W.

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Lake Ecology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lake Ecology Lake Ecology Name: Jody Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: We have a partically natural/ partially man-dug lake in our back yard. It is approximately 3 acres in size. The fish in this tiny like are plentiful and HUGE :) Bass up to 20" s (so far) and blue gill up to 10"s (so far). My question is this... we appear to have a heavy goose population and I was wondering if they are the cause of the green slimmy stuff that is all over the top of the water as well as the lighter green slime on the plants growing under the water? Are the fish being harmed by waste from the geese and if so, what can I put in the water to ensure their health? Additionally, I noticed hundreds of frogs during the mating period yet I've yet to see even one tad pole and I am at the lake atleast 5 out of the 7 days in a week. Is there a reason for this. The frogs are two toned.. light green with patches of darker shades of green on the head and body. I've never seen frogs like these before but then again, I've never lived in wet lands prior. The frogs are also very agressive... tend to attack fishing line and even leap up to 4' in the air to attack a fishing rod. Thank heavens they don't have teeth! . We do not keep the fish we catch, we always release.

196

The Lake Trout  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Conservation THE LAKE TROUT Until thirty years ago, the Lake Trout was the choice food fish as well as the most highly prized game fish in the Great Lakes. Before that time,...

197

PADD IV PADD II lakes PADD V - PADD II - inland  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

228 U.S. Energy Information Administration Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Regional maps Source Maritime Canada Caribbean PADD V - other PADD II lakes PADD V -

198

Lake George Park Commission: Stormwater Management (New York) | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Lake George Park Commission: Stormwater Management (New York) Lake George Park Commission: Stormwater Management (New York) Lake George Park Commission: Stormwater Management (New York) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State New York Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Lake George Park Commission

199

White Bear Lake Conservation District (Minnesota) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

White Bear Lake Conservation District (Minnesota) White Bear Lake Conservation District (Minnesota) White Bear Lake Conservation District (Minnesota) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Siting and Permitting This statute establishes the White Bear Lake Conservation District, which

200

Recreational Lake and Water Quality Districts (Iowa) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Recreational Lake and Water Quality Districts (Iowa) Recreational Lake and Water Quality Districts (Iowa) Recreational Lake and Water Quality Districts (Iowa) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Iowa Program Type Environmental Regulations Territory contiguous to a recreational lake may be incorporated into a

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lake region electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Electrical Currents and Adhesion of Edge-Delete Regions of EVA-to-Glass Module Packaging: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Presented at the 2001 NCPV Program Review Meeting: Electrical conductivity pathways from the grounded frame to the cell area in a PV module are reviewed here. Electrical conductivity pathways from the grounded frame to the cell area in a PV module are reviewed here. Measurements are made on 4 inch x 8 inch soda lime (SL) glass substrates with contact patterns defined using 3-mil and 10-mil diameter bead-blast removal of the SnO{sub 2} coating to study the dominant path, which is the EVA/glass interface. The remaining SnO{sub 2} contact strips are separated by what would simulate the module edge delete regions. EVA encapsulated bead-blast surface resistances are 8 x 10{sup 15} ohm/sq compared to 8 x 10{sup 12} ohm/sq for native SL glass surfaces. Adhesion strengths to bead-blast surfaces are 25 to 30 lbs/in. Stress test results on these interfaces after removal from damp heat suggest corrosion of the glass at the glass-EVA interface.

McMahon, T. J.; Jorgensen, G. J.

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Obama Administration Hosts Great Lakes Offshore Wind Workshop in Chicago  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hosts Great Lakes Offshore Wind Workshop in Hosts Great Lakes Offshore Wind Workshop in Chicago with Great Lakes Wind Collaborative Obama Administration Hosts Great Lakes Offshore Wind Workshop in Chicago with Great Lakes Wind Collaborative October 28, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON - The White House Council on Environmental Quality and the U.S. Department of Energy hosted a workshop with the Great Lakes Wind Collaborative in Chicago on October 26 - 27, 2010, focused on the siting of offshore wind power in the Great Lakes. The two day workshop brought together wind developers, Federal and state regulators, environmental advocates, and other regional stakeholders to discuss methods for ensuring greater clarity, certainty and coordination of Federal and state decision-making for offshore wind development in the Great Lakes.

203

Assessment of the radon concentrations in air caused by emissions from multiple sources in a uranium mining and milling region. A case study of the Ambrosia Lake region of New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

The Ambrosia Lake uranium mining and milling operations were selected to characterize the relative importance of these sources on ambient atmospheric radon concentrations. All uranium mines at Ambrosia Lake are underground. The comparisons of interest were both between the sources and between the sources and background concentrations. The results show that vents are by far the greatest source of the computed radon concentrations in the immediate area of the operations. The computed radon concentrations at receptor points were largely influenced by the closer sources, rather than by more distant stronger sources. The area where computed radon concentrations significantly exceed the background is confined to the general area around the vents and mills. A comparison between computed radon concentrations and monitoring data at selected points demonstrates order of magnitude agreement.

Droppo, J.G.; Glissmeyer, J.A.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

POSTER DESCRIPTION: Poster Title: "Distributed Electric Power...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DESCRIPTION: Poster Title: "Distributed Electric Power from Bio-based and Fossil Fuels" Entity: Technology Management, Inc. 9718 Lake Shore Blvd., Cleveland, Ohio 44108 Author(s):...

205

Western Electricity Coordinating Council | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Council Jump to: navigation, search Name Western Electricity Coordinating Council Place Salt Lake City, UT References SGIC1 No information has been entered for this organization....

206

Clay Electric Cooperative, Inc- Solar Thermal Loans  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Clay Electric Cooperative (CEC), a Touchstone Energy Cooperative, covers 14 counties in northern Florida, including Gainesville, Keystone Heights, Lake City, Orange Park, Palatka, and Salt Springs....

207

Star Lakes and Rivers (Minnesota) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Star Lakes and Rivers (Minnesota) Star Lakes and Rivers (Minnesota) Star Lakes and Rivers (Minnesota) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Siting and Permitting An association organized for the purpose of addressing issues on a specific lake or river, a lake improvement district, or a lake conservation district

208

Iowa Lakes Superior Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lakes Superior Wind Farm Lakes Superior Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Iowa Lakes Superior Wind Farm Facility Iowa Lakes Superior Wind Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Iowa Lakes Electric Cooperative Developer Iowa Lakes Electric Cooperative Location West of Superior IA Coordinates 43.447756°, -94.980719° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.447756,"lon":-94.980719,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

209

Internal Compliance Program for Approved North American Electric Reliability Corporation and Regional Reliability Standards: A Guide to Compliance for Fossil Generators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to provide guidance to generator owner and operator members of the Electric Power Research Institute in complying with the North American Electric Reliability Corporations (NERCs) mandatory reliability standards. Included here are the standards and associated requirements applicable to generator owners and operators who have registered with their regional entity, along with guidance on how successful compliance has been achieved.This report ...

2012-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

210

202-328-5000 www.rff.orgCO2 Allowance Allocation in the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative and the Effect on Electricity Investors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative (RGGI) is an effort by nine Northeast and Mid-Atlantic states to develop a regional, mandatory, market-based cap-and-trade program to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from the electricity sector. The initiative is expected to lead to an increase in the price of electricity in the RGGI region and beyond. The implications of these changes for the value of electricity-generating assets and the market value of the firms that own them depends on the initial allocation of carbon dioxide allowances, the composition of generating assets owned by the firm, and the locations of those assets. Changes in asset values inside the RGGI region may be positive or negative, whereas changes outside of the RGGI region are almost always positive but nonetheless vary greatly. Viewing changes at the firm level aggregates and moderates both positive and negative effects on market value compared with what would be observed by looking at changes at individual facilities. Nonetheless, a particular firms portfolio of assets is unlikely to reflect the overall composition of assets in the industry as a whole, and some firms are likely to do substantially better or worse than the industry average. Key Words: emissions trading, allowance allocations, electricity, air pollution, auction, grandfathering, generation-performance standard, output-based allocation, costeffectiveness,

Dallas Burtraw; Danny Kahn; Karen Palmer; Dallas Burtraw; Danny Kahn; Karen Palmer

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Patterns of Local Circulation in the Itaipu Lake Area: Numerical Simulations of Lake Breeze  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The lake-breeze circulation in the Itaipu region was investigated numerically using a nonhydrostatic version of the Topographic Vorticity Model. The area of study corresponds to a 100 km 180 km rectangle, located on the BrazilParaguay border, ...

Snia M. S. Stivari; Amauri P. de Oliveira; Hugo A. Karam; Jacyra Soares

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Energy and water in the Great Lakes.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The nexus between thermoelectric power production and water use is not uniform across the U.S., but rather differs according to regional physiography, demography, power plant fleet composition, and the transmission network. That is, in some regions water demand for thermoelectric production is relatively small while in other regions it represents the dominate use. The later is the case for the Great Lakes region, which has important implications for the water resources and aquatic ecology of the Great Lakes watershed. This is today, but what about the future? Projected demographic trends, shifting lifestyles, and economic growth coupled with the threat of global climate change and mounting pressure for greater U.S. energy security could have profound effects on the region's energy future. Planning for such an uncertain future is further complicated by the fact that energy and environmental planning and regulatory decisionmaking is largely bifurcated in the region, with environmental and water resource concerns generally taken into account after new energy facilities and technologies have been proposed, or practices are already in place. Based on these confounding needs, the objective of this effort is to develop Great Lakes-specific methods and tools to integrate energy and water resource planning and thereby support the dual goals of smarter energy planning and development, and protection of Great Lakes water resources. Guiding policies for this planning are the Great Lakes and St. Lawrence River Basin Water Resources Compact and the Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement. The desired outcome of integrated energy-water-aquatic resource planning is a more sustainable regional energy mix for the Great Lakes basin ecosystem.

Tidwell, Vincent Carroll

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Simulated Physical Mechanisms Associated with Climate Variability over Lake Victoria Basin in East Africa  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A fully coupled regional climate, 3D lake modeling system is used to investigate the physical mechanisms associated with the multiscale variability of the Lake Victoria basin climate. To examine the relative influence of different processes on ...

Richard O. Anyah; Fredrick H. M. Semazzi; Lian Xie

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Observations of Transport Processes for Ozone and Ozone Precursors during the 1991 Lake Michigan Ozone Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Lake Michigan Air Quality Region (LMAQR) continues to experience ozone concentrations in urban and rural areas above the federal standard of 125 ppb. During the summer of 1991, the LMAQR states sponsored the Lake Michigan Ozone Study, which ...

Timothy S. Dye; Paul T. Roberts; Marcelo E. Korc

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

How different home styles are valued in the Salt Lake City market  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis focuses on market valuation of attributes of single family housing in the Salt Lake City market. Using data from different sub-regions of Salt Lake County, this paper addresses the question of buyer demand with ...

Peterson, Barrett, 1976-

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

NV-TRIBE-SUMMIT LAKE PAIUTE TRIBE  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NV-TRIBE-SUMMIT LAKE PAIUTE TRIBE NV-TRIBE-SUMMIT LAKE PAIUTE TRIBE Location: Tribe NV-TRIBE-SUMMIT NV LAKE PAIUTE TRIBE American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Proposed Action or Project Description The Summit Lake Paiute Tribe of Nevada will conduct energy building retrofits on several tribal-owned buildings including: Maintenance Shop (insulate walls and cover insulation to keep in place); Bunkhouse (replace single-pane glass windows, and repair or replace two exit doors); Tribal Administrative Office (replace old electric water heater and three air conditioner/heaters, and replace single-pane glass windows): Community Well Shed (install walls, cover insulation, and replace single-pane glass windows); Cabin #1 and Cabin #2 (insulate and/or replace single-pane windows). Conditions: None

217

Trend Reversal in Lake Michigan Contribution to Snowfall  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the most notable ways the Laurentian Great Lakes impact the regions climate is by augmenting snowfall in downwind locations during autumn and winter months. Among many negative consequences, this surplus of snow can cause substantial ...

Luke Bard; David A. R. Kristovich

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Geothermal Exploration Using Aviris Remote Sensing Data Over Fish Lake  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Using Aviris Remote Sensing Data Over Fish Lake Using Aviris Remote Sensing Data Over Fish Lake Valley, Nv Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Geothermal Exploration Using Aviris Remote Sensing Data Over Fish Lake Valley, Nv Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Fish Lake Valley, in Esmeralda County, Nevada, sits at the southern end of the Mina Deflection where the very active Death Valley-Furnace Creek-Fish Lake Valley fault system makes a right step to transfer slip northward into the Walker Lane. Northern Fish Lake Valley has been pulling part since ca. 6 Ma, primarily along the Emigrant Peak normal fault zone (Stockli et al., 2003). Elevated tectonic activity in Fish Lake Valley suggests there may be increased fracture permeability to facilitate

219

Natural Lakes: Drainage: Diversion: Application (Nebraska) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Lakes: Drainage: Diversion: Application (Nebraska) Lakes: Drainage: Diversion: Application (Nebraska) Natural Lakes: Drainage: Diversion: Application (Nebraska) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Nebraska Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Natural Resources This section provides limitations on water withdrawals and diversions from natural lakes. Any such activity requires a permit from the Department of Natural Resources

220

VERTEBRATES OF FISH LAKE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

VERTEBRATES OF FISH LAKE CAUTION! FISH LAKE SCAVANGER HUNT RED HEADED in large dead trees. Males and females both have the majestic red head the mound. Damselflies sit with their wings folded down, which differs them

Minnesota, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lake region electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Climate mitigations impact on global and regional electric power sector water use in the 21st Century  

SciTech Connect

Over the course of this coming century, global electricity use is expected to grow at least five fold and if stringent greenhouse gas emissions controls are in place the growth could be more than seven fold from current levels. Given that the electric power sector represents the second largest anthropogenic use of water and given growing concerns about the nature and extent of future water scarcity driven by population growth and a changing climate, significant concern has been expressed about the electricity sectors use of water going forward. In this paper, the authors demonstrate that an often overlooked but absolutely critical issue that needs to be taken into account in discussions about the sustainability of the electric sectors water use going forward is the tremendous turn over in electricity capital stock that will occur over the course of this century; i.e., in the scenarios examined here more than 80% of global electricity production in the year 2050 is from facilities that have not yet been built. The authors show that because of the large scale changes in the global electricity system, the water withdrawal intensity of electricity production is likely to drop precipitously with the result being relatively constant water withdrawals over the course of the century even in the face of the large growth in electricity usage. The ability to cost effectively reduce the water intensity of power plants with carbon dioxide capture and storage systems in particular is key to constraining overall global water use.

Dooley, James J.; Kyle, G. Page; Davies, Evan

2013-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

222

Mapping Fractures In The Medicine Lake Geothermal System | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fractures In The Medicine Lake Geothermal System Fractures In The Medicine Lake Geothermal System Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Mapping Fractures In The Medicine Lake Geothermal System Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: A major challenge to energy production in the region has been locating high-permability fracture zones in the largely impermeable volcanic host rock. An understanding of the fracture networks will be a key to harnessing geothermal resources in the Cascades Author(s): Steven Clausen, Michal Nemcok, Joseph Moore, Jeffrey Hulen, John Bartley Published: GRC, 2006 Document Number: Unavailable DOI: Unavailable Core Analysis At Medicine Lake Area (Clausen Et Al, 2006) Medicine Lake Geothermal Area Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Mapping_Fractures_In_The_Medicine_Lake_Geothermal_System&oldid=388927

223

Iowa Lakes Lakota Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Iowa Lakes Lakota Wind Farm Iowa Lakes Lakota Wind Farm Facility Iowa Lakes Lakota Wind Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Iowa Lakes Electric Cooperative Developer Iowa Lakes Electric Cooperative Location West of Lakota IA Coordinates 43.377021°, -94.139493° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.377021,"lon":-94.139493,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

224

Regional Maps  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

United States Census Divisions Figure 2.Electricity Market Module (EMM)Regions Source: Energy Information Administration, Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting Figure...

225

Lake-Effect Snowfall over Lake Michigan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aircraft measurements of snow particle size spectra from 36 flights on 26 snowy days are used to estimate snow precipitation rates over Lake Michigan. Results show that average rates during 14 wind-parallel-type lake-effect storms increased from ...

Roscoe R. Braham Jr.; Maureen J. Dungey

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Method and system to directly produce electrical power within the lithium blanket region of a magnetically confined, deuterium-tritium (DT) fueled, thermonuclear fusion reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for integrating liquid metal magnetohydrodynamic power generation with fusion blanket technology to produce electrical power from a thermonuclear fusion reactor located within a confining magnetic field and within a toroidal structure. A hot liquid metal flows from a liquid metal blanket region into a pump duct of an electromagnetic pump which moves the liquid metal to a mixer where a gas of predetermined pressure is mixed with the pressurized liquid metal to form a Froth mixture. Electrical power is generated by flowing the Froth mixture between electrodes in a generator duct. When the Froth mixture exits the generator the gas is separated from the liquid metal and both are recycled.

Woolley, Robert D. (Belle Mead, NJ)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Method and System to Directly Produce Electrical Power within the Lithium Blanket Region of a Magnetically Confined, Deuterium-Tritium (DT) Fueled, Thermonuclear Fusion Reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for integrating liquid metal magnetohydrodynamic power generation with fusion blanket technology to produce electrical power from a thermonuclear fusion reactor located within a confining magnetic field and within a toroidal structure. A hot liquid metal flows from a liquid metal blanket region into a pump duct of an electromagnetic pump which moves the liquid metal to a mixer where a gas of predetermined pressure is mixed with the pressurized liquid metal to form a Froth mixture. Electrical power is generated by flowing the Froth mixture between electrodes in a generator duct. When the Froth mixture exits the generator the gas is separated from the liquid metal and both are recycled.

Woolley, Robert D.

1998-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

228

Lake Titicaca - Physics of an Inherited Hydropower Macroproject Proposal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Shared almost evenly by Peru and Bolivia, Lake Titicaca is situated on an Altiplano endorheic region of the northern Andes Mountains. Rio Desaguadero is the lake only outlet. From 1908, several macro-engineers speculated on the creation of a second, completely artificial, outlet for Lake Titicaca freshwater. Here we reconsider several 20th Century macroproject proposals, with the goal of examining and enhancing this technically interesting South American 21st Century Macro-engineering inheritance.

R. Cathcart; A. Bolonkin

2007-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

229

A Study of the Correlation Between Electrical Resistivity and Matric Suction for Unsaturated Ash-Fall Pyroclastic Soils in the Campania Region (Southern Italy)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the territory of the Campania region (southern Italy), critical rainfall events periodically trigger dangerous fast slope movements involving ashy and pyroclastic soils originated by the explosive phases of the Mt. Somma-Vesuvius volcano and deposited along the surrounding mountain ranges. In this paper, an integration of engineering-geological and geophysical measurements is presented to characterize unsaturated pyroclastic samples collected in a test area on the Sarno Mountains (Salerno and Avellino provinces, Campania region). The laboratory analyses were aimed at defining both soil water retention and electrical resistivity curves versus water content. From the matching of the experimental data, a direct relationship between electrical resistivity and matric suction is retrieved for the investigated soil horizons typical of a ash-fall pyroclastic succession. The obtained relation turns out to be helpful in characterizing soils up to close saturation, which is a critical condition for the trigger of slo...

De Vita, Pantaleone; Piegari, Ester

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Lake Ontario Maritime Cultural Landscape  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The goal of the Lake Ontario Maritime Cultural Landscape project was to investigate the nature and distribution of archaeological sites along the northeast shoreline of Lake Ontario while examining the environmental, political, and cultural factors that influenced the position of these sites. The primary method of investigation was a combined archaeological and historical survey of the shoreline within seven 1-km square areas. The archaeological component of the survey covered both the terrestrial and submerged portions of the shore through marine remote sensing (side-scan sonar and magnetometer), diving surveys, pedestrian surveys, and informant interviews. A total of 39 sites and 51 isolated finds were identified or further analyzed as a result of this project. These sites ranged from the Middle Archaic period (ca. 5500-2500 B.C.) through the 19th century and included habitation, military, transportation, and recreational sites. Analysis of these findings was conducted at two scales: the individual survey area and Lake Ontario as a whole. By treating each survey area as a distinct landscape, it was possible to discuss how various cultures and groups used each space and to identify instances of both dynamism and continuity in the landscapes. Results of these analyses included the continuous occupation of several locations from pre-Contact times to the present, varying uses of the same environment in response to political and economic shifts, the formation of communities around transportation nodes, and recurring settlement patterns. The survey data was also combined to explore regional-scale trends that manifest themselves in the historical Lake Ontario littoral landscape including ephemeral landscapes, permeable boundaries, danger in the lake, and factors of change.

Ford, Benjamin L.

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Core Hole Drilling And Testing At The Lake City, California Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hole Drilling And Testing At The Lake City, California Geothermal Hole Drilling And Testing At The Lake City, California Geothermal Field Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Core Hole Drilling And Testing At The Lake City, California Geothermal Field Details Activities (4) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Unavailable Author(s): Dick Benoit, Joe Moore, Colin Goranson, David Blackwell Published: GRC, 2005 Document Number: Unavailable DOI: Unavailable Core Analysis At Lake City Hot Springs Area (Benoit Et Al., 2005) Core Holes At Lake City Hot Springs Area (Benoit Et Al., 2005) Flow Test At Lake City Hot Springs Area (Benoit Et Al., 2005) Static Temperature Survey At Lake City Hot Springs Area (Benoit Et Al., 2005) Lake City Hot Springs Geothermal Area Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Core_Hole_Drilling_And_Testing_At_The_Lake_City,_California_Geothermal_Field&oldid=389996

232

Lake-Effect Snowstorms over Southern Ontario, Canada, and Their Associated Synoptic-Scale Environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lake-effect snowstorms are an important source of severe winter weather over the Great Lakes region and are often triggered by the passage of synoptic-scale low pressure systems. In this paper, a climatology of lake-effect snowstorms over ...

A. Q. Liu; G. W. K. Moore

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Climatology of Lake-Effect Precipitation Events over Lake Champlain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study provides the first long-term climatological analysis of lake-effect precipitation events that developed in relation to a small lake (having a surface area of ?1500 km2). The frequency and environmental conditions favorable for Lake ...

Neil F. Laird; Jared Desrochers; Melissa Payer

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Geological History of Lake Lahontan, a Quaternary Lake of Northwestern...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Monograph M11 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet link for Geological History of Lake Lahontan, a Quaternary Lake of Northwestern...

235

Lake-Effect Rain Events  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Seven years of autumnal (SeptemberNovember) precipitation data are examined to determine the characteristics of lake-effect precipitation downwind of Lake Erie. Atmospheric conditions for each lake-effect event are compiled and the mean ...

Todd J. Miner; J. M. Fritsch

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Lakes and Rivers Improvement Act (Ontario, Canada) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Lakes and Rivers Improvement Act (Ontario, Canada) Lakes and Rivers Improvement Act (Ontario, Canada) Lakes and Rivers Improvement Act (Ontario, Canada) < Back Eligibility Construction Developer Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Utility Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Home Weatherization Program Info State Ontario Program Type Environmental Regulations Safety and Operational Guidelines Siting and Permitting Provider Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources The Lakes and Rivers Improvement Act proscribes the management, protection, preservation and use of the waters of the lakes and rivers of Ontario and the land under them. The Act also details regulations for the protection of persons and property by ensuring that dams are suitably located, constructed, operated and maintained and are of an appropriate nature. The

237

Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program : Limnological and Fisheries Monitoring Annual Report 1999.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Grand Coulee Dam was constructed in 1939 without a fish ladder, which eliminated steelhead (Onchorhynchus mykiss), chinook salmon (O. twshwastica), coho salmon (O. kisutch) and sockeye salmon (O. nerka) from returning to approximately 1,835 km (1,140 miles) of natal streams and tributaries found in the upper Columbia River Drainage in the United States and Canada. The Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980 gave the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), the authority and responsibility to use its legal and financial resources, 'to protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife to the extent affected by the development and operation of any hydroelectric project of the Columbia River and its tributaries. This is to be done in a manner consistent with the program adopted by the Northwest Power Planning Council (NWPPC), and the purposes of the Act' (NWPPC, 1987). With the phrase 'protect, mitigate and enhance', Congress signaled its intent that the NWPPC's fish and wildlife program should do more than avoid future hydroelectric damage to the basin's fish and wildlife. The program must also counter past damage, work toward rebuilding those fish and wildlife populations that have been harmed by the hydropower system, protect the Columbia Basin's fish and wildlife resources, and mitigate for harm caused by decades of hydroelectric development and operations. By law, this program is limited to measures that deal with impacts created by the development, operation and management of hydroelectric facilities on the Columbia River and its tributaries. However, off-site enhancement projects are used to address the effects of the hydropower system on fish and wildlife (NWPPC 1987). Resident game fish populations have been established in Franklin D. Roosevelt Lake, the reservoir behind Grand Coulee Dam, since the extirpation of anadromous fish species. The resident game fish populations are now responsible for attracting a large percentage of the recreational visits to the region. An increase in popularity has placed Lake Roosevelt fifth amongst the most visited State and Federal parks in Washington. Increased use of the reservoir prompted amplified efforts to enhance the Native American subsistence fishery and the resident sport fishery in 1984 with hatchery supplementation of rainbow trout (O. mykiss) and kokanee salmon (O. nerka). This was followed by the formation of the Spokane Tribal Lake Roosevelt Monitoring Project (LRMP) in 1988 and later by formation of the Lake Roosevelt Data Collection Project in 1991. The Lake Roosevelt Data Collection Project began in July 1991 as part of the BPA, Bureau of Reclamation, and U.S. Army Corps of Engineers System Operation Review process. This process sought to develop an operational scenario for the federal Columbia River hydropower system to maximize the in-reservoir fisheries with minimal impacts to all other stakeholders in the management of the Columbia River. The Lake Roosevelt Monitoring/Data Collection Program (LRMP) is the result of a merger between the Lake Roosevelt Monitoring Program (BPA No. 8806300) and the Lake Roosevelt Data Collection Project (BPA No. 9404300). These projects were merged in 1996 forming the Lake Roosevelt Monitoring Program (LRMP), which continues the work historically completed under the separate projects. The LRMP has two main goals. The first is to develop a biological model for Lake Roosevelt that will predict in-reservoir biological responses to a range of water management operational scenarios, and to develop fisheries and reservoir management strategies accordingly. The model will allow identification of lake operations that minimize impacts on lake biota while addressing the needs of other interests (e.g. flood control, hydropower generation, irrigation, and downstream resident and anadromous fisheries). Major components of the model will include: (1) quantification of entrainment and other impacts to phytoplankton, zooplankton and fish caused by reservoir drawdowns and low water retention times; (2) quantification

McLellan, Holly; Lee, Chuck; Scofield, Ben; Pavlik, Deanne

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Climatological Observations and Predicted Sublimation Rates at Lake Hoare, Antarctica  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In December 1985, an automated meteorological station was established at Lake Hoare in the dry valley region of Antarctica. Here, we report on the first year-round observations available for any site in Taylor Valley. This dataset augments the ...

Gary D. Clow; Christopher P. McKay; George M. Simmons Jr.; Robert A. Wharton Jr.

1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Lake Aggregate Mesoscale Disturbances. Part I: Linear Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The steady boundary-layer responses that occur over the Great Lakes region during wintertime cold air outbreaks are examined using a two-dimensional, linear, analytic model. The planetary boundary layer (PBL) is modeled as an idealized, ...

Peter J. Sousounis; Hampton N. Shirer

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Crow Lake Wind | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Crow Lake Wind Crow Lake Wind Jump to: navigation, search Name Crow Lake Wind Facility Crow Lake Wind Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Prairie Winds SD 1 Inc. (100) Mitchell Technical Institute (1) South Dakota Wind Partners (7) Developer Prairie Winds SD 1 Inc. Energy Purchaser Basin Electric Power Cooperative Location White Lake SD Coordinates 43.920959°, -98.7282157° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.920959,"lon":-98.7282157,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lake region electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Northwestern Indiana Regional Planning Commission (Indiana) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Northwestern Indiana Regional Planning Commission (Indiana) Northwestern Indiana Regional Planning Commission (Indiana) Northwestern Indiana Regional Planning Commission (Indiana) < Back Eligibility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Local Government Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Indiana Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Northwestern Indiana Regional Planning Commission NIRPC is a regional council of local governments serving the citizens of Lake, Porter, and LaPorte counties in Northwest Indiana. NIRPC provides a forum that enables the citizens of Northwest Indiana to address regional issues relating to transportation, the environment and community, and economic development. NIRPC, as a recipient of federal funds, is subject to

242

The Behavior of Lakes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Behavior of Lakes Behavior of Lakes Nature Bulletin No, 320-A November 9, 1968 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Richard B. Ogilvie, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation THE BEHAVIOR OF LAKES In many ways lakes are like living things -- especially a tree. A lake breathes and has a circulation; it is warmed and fed; it harbors many other living things; and in cold weather it goes into a winter sleep. If it were not for the special character of a body of standing water which we call a lake, the things that live in it would be radically different or, perhaps, not exist at all. Water is a very strange substance in many ways. For example, it is remarkable because it expands, becomes lighter and floats when it freezes into ice. If, like most substances, water shrank when it changed from a liquid to a solid, it would sink. Then, ponds and lakes would freeze from the bottom up and become solid blocks of ice. This would make life impossible for most kinds of aquatic plants and animals and indirectly affect all living things. Further, water is a poor conductor of heat -- otherwise lakes would freeze much deeper and, again most living things in it would perish.

243

The Role of Ice Cover in Heavy Lake-Effect Snowstorms over the Great Lakes Basin as Simulated by RegCM4  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A 20-km regional climate model, the Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics Regional Climate Model version 4 (ICTP RegCM4), is employed to investigate heavy lake-effect snowfall (HLES) over the Great Lakes Basin and the role of ...

Steve Vavrus; Michael Notaro; Azar Zarrin

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Examination of the Regional Supply and Demand Balance for Renewable Electricity in the United States through 2015: Projecting from 2009 through 2015 (Revised)  

SciTech Connect

This report examines the balance between the demand and supply of new renewable electricity in the United States on a regional basis through 2015. It expands on a 2007 NREL study that assessed the supply and demand balance on a national basis. As with the earlier study, this analysis relies on estimates of renewable energy supplies compared to demand for renewable energy generation needed to meet existing state renewable portfolio standard (RPS) policies in 28 states, as well as demand by consumers who voluntarily purchase renewable energy. However, it does not address demand by utilities that may procure cost-effective renewables through an integrated resource planning process or otherwise.

Bird, L.; Hurlbut, D.; Donohoo, P.; Cory, K.; Kreycik, C.

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Geological History of Lake Lahontan, a Quaternary Lake of Northwestern  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

History of Lake Lahontan, a Quaternary Lake of Northwestern History of Lake Lahontan, a Quaternary Lake of Northwestern Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Geological History of Lake Lahontan, a Quaternary Lake of Northwestern Nevada Abstract Abstract unavailable. Author Israel C. Russell Organization U.S. Geological Survey Published U.S. Government Printing Office, 1885 Report Number Monograph M11 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Geological History of Lake Lahontan, a Quaternary Lake of Northwestern Nevada Citation Israel C. Russell (U.S. Geological Survey). 1885. Geological History of Lake Lahontan, a Quaternary Lake of Northwestern Nevada. Washington, District of Columbia: U.S. Government Printing Office. Report No.:

246

Electrical engineering Electricity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

generation Transmission Distribution · Electrical generators · Electric motors · High voltage engineering associated with the systems Electrical engineering · Electric power generation Transmission Distribution The electricity transported to load locations from a power station transmission subsystem The transmission system

?nay, Devrim

247

Lake Minnetonka Conservation District (Minnesota) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Minnetonka Conservation District (Minnesota) Minnetonka Conservation District (Minnesota) Lake Minnetonka Conservation District (Minnesota) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Siting and Permitting This statute establishes the Lake Minnetonka Conservation District, which

248

Energy from Microbial Fuel Cells Constructed of Algae from Lake Taihu  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) generate electricity using bacteria to degrade something and produce current, which have gained much attention. Harmful algae blooms(HABs) in lakes and rivers are on the increase all over the world, which becomes a more and ... Keywords: MFCs, HABs, algae, Lake Taihu

Yang Fei; Qiu Yejing; Wu Wei; Rong Fei; Liu Lin; Wang Keshu

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Electric power annual 1994. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect

The Electric Power Annual presents a summary of electric power industry statistics at national, regional, and State levels.

NONE

1995-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

250

Winnemucca Dry Lake Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Winnemucca Dry Lake Geothermal Area Winnemucca Dry Lake Geothermal Area (Redirected from Winnemucca Dry Lake Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Winnemucca Dry Lake Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (1) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0

251

Walker Lake Valley Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Walker Lake Valley Geothermal Area Walker Lake Valley Geothermal Area (Redirected from Walker Lake Valley Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Walker Lake Valley Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (2) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0

252

The Lake Charles CCS Project  

SciTech Connect

The Lake Charles CCS Project is a large-scale industrial carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) project which will demonstrate advanced technologies that capture and sequester carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions from industrial sources into underground formations. Specifically the Lake Charles CCS Project will accelerate commercialization of large-scale CO{sub 2} storage from industrial sources by leveraging synergy between a proposed petroleum coke to chemicals plant (the LCC Gasification Project) and the largest integrated anthropogenic CO{sub 2} capture, transport, and monitored sequestration program in the U.S. Gulf Coast Region. The Lake Charles CCS Project will promote the expansion of EOR in Texas and Louisiana and supply greater energy security by expanding domestic energy supplies. The capture, compression, pipeline, injection, and monitoring infrastructure will continue to sequester CO{sub 2} for many years after the completion of the term of the DOE agreement. The objectives of this project are expected to be fulfilled by working through two distinct phases. The overall objective of Phase 1 was to develop a fully definitive project basis for a competitive Renewal Application process to proceed into Phase 2 - Design, Construction and Operations. Phase 1 includes the studies attached hereto that will establish: the engineering design basis for the capture, compression and transportation of CO{sub 2} from the LCC Gasification Project, and the criteria and specifications for a monitoring, verification and accounting (MVA) plan at the Hastings oil field in Texas. The overall objective of Phase 2, provided a successful competitive down-selection, is to execute design, construction and operations of three capital projects: (1) the CO{sub 2} capture and compression equipment, (2) a Connector Pipeline from the LLC Gasification Project to the Green Pipeline owned by Denbury and an affiliate of Denbury, and (3) a comprehensive MVA system at the Hastings oil field.

Doug Cathro

2010-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

253

Coal-fired electric generators continue to dominate electric ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

More than 60% of electricity in the central region of the United States comes from coal-fired electric generators, down from 80% in the early part of ...

254

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

s Colorado service area, system electricity requirementsColorado from the Southwest. ) The definitions of the three regions used by the Western Electricity

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Regional Profiles: Pipeline Capacity and Service  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Regional Profiles: Pipeline Capacity ... large petrochemical and electric utility industries drawn there ... accounts for large electricity load ...

256

Geothermal exploration assessment and interpretation, Upper Klamah Lake Area, Klamath Basin, Oregon  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Data from public and private sources on the Klamath Basin geothermal resource are reviewed, synthesized, and reinterpreted. In this, the second and final phase of the work, geological, remote sensing, geochemical, temperature gradient, gravity, aeromagnetic, and electrical resistivity data sets are examined. These data were derived from surveys concentrated on the east and west shores of Upper Klamath Lake. The geological, remote sensing, and potential field data suggest a few northeast-trending discontinuities, which cross the regional north-westerly strike. The near-surface distribution of warm water appears to be related to the intersections of these lineaments and northwest-trending faults. The groundwater geochemical data are reviewed and the various reservoir temperature estimates compared. Particular attention is given to specific electrical conductivities of waters as an interpretational aid to the subsurface resistivity results. A clear trend emerges in the Klamath Falls/Olene Gap area; hotter waters are associated with higher specific conductivities. In the Nuss Lake/Stukel Mountain area the opposite trend prevails, although the relationship is somewhat equivocal.

Stark, M.; Goldstein, N.E.; Wollenberg, H.A.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Black Hawk Lake Fresno River  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Black Hawk Lake Fresno River R D 4 0 0 RD 415 HWY41 RD 207 REVISRD YO SEM ITE SP RINGS P KY LILLEY County Rosedale Ranch Revis Mountain Daulton Spring Red Top Lookout Buford Mountain Black Hawk Lake

Wang, Zhi

258

Simulation of Heavy Lake-Effect Snowstorms across the Great Lakes Basin by RegCM4: Synoptic Climatology and Variability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A historical simulation (19762002) of the Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics Regional Climate Model, version 4 (ICTP RegCM4), coupled to a one-dimensional lake model, is validated against observed lake ice cover and snowfall ...

Michael Notaro; Azar Zarrin; Steve Vavrus; Val Bennington

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

PRISM 2.0: Regional Energy and Economic Model Development and Initial Application: Phase 2: Electric Sector CO2 Reduction Options to 2050: Dimensions of Technology, Energy Costs, and Environmental Scenarios  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI conducted an analysis of electric sector CO2 reduction options to 2050 across a range of scenarios covering dimensions of technology costs and availability, energy costs, and CO2 constraints. Using its U.S. Regional Economy, Greenhouse Gas, and Energy (US-REGEN) model, EPRI calculated the impact of changes in generation portfolio, generation capacity, expenditures, and electricity prices on power sector costs. This analysis estimates different levels of ...

2013-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

260

Obama Administration Hosts Great Lakes Offshore Wind Workshop...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hosts Great Lakes Offshore Wind Workshop in Chicago with Great Lakes Wind Collaborative Obama Administration Hosts Great Lakes Offshore Wind Workshop in Chicago with Great Lakes...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lake region electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Hot Water Electric Energy Use in Single-Family Residences in the Pacific Northwest : Regional End-Use Metering Project (REMP).  

SciTech Connect

The Office of Energy Resources of the Bonneville Power Administration carriers out generation and conservation resource planning. The analysis of historical trends in and determinants of energy consumption is carried out by the office's End-Use Research Section. The End-Use Research Section operates a comprehensive data collection program to provide pertinent information to support demand-side conservation planning, load forecasting, and conservation program development and delivery. Part of this on-going program, commonly known as the End-Use Load and Consumer Assessment Program (ELCAP), was recently renamed the Regional End-Use Metering Project (REMP) to reflect an emphasis on metering rather than analytical activities. REMP is designed to collect electricity usage data through direct monitoring of end-use loads in buildings in the residential and commercial sectors and is conducted for Bonneville by Pacific Northwest Laboratories (Battelle). The detailed summary information in this report is on energy used for water heaters in the residential sector and is based on data collected from September 1985 through December 1990 for 336 of the 499 REMP metered homes. Specific information is provided on annual loads averaged over the years and their variation across residences. Descriptions are given of use as associated with demographic and energy-related characteristics. Summaries are also provided for electricity use by each year, month, and daytype, as well as at peak hot water load and peak system times. This is the second residential report. This report focuses on a specific end use and adds detail to the first report. Subsequent reports are planned on other individual end uses or sets of end uses. 15 refs., 29 figs., 10 tabs.

Taylor, Megan E., Ritland, Keith G., Pratt, R.G.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles on Regional PowerTransmission Area, in Electric Vehicle Symposium, Anaheim,of Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles, ANL/ESD/09-2, Argonne

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Impacts of Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles on RegionalAnalysis of Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles, ANL/ESD/09-2,of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles, Volume 2: United States

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Geochemistry Of The Lake City Geothermal System, California, Usa | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geochemistry Of The Lake City Geothermal System, California, Usa Geochemistry Of The Lake City Geothermal System, California, Usa Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Geochemistry Of The Lake City Geothermal System, California, Usa Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Lake City hot springs and geothermal wells chemically fall into a narrow compositional group. This indicates that, with the exception of a few hot springs, mixing with shallow cold ground waters does not have a significant influence on the chemistry of the hot springs. Narrow ranges in plots of F, B and Li versus Cl, and _D to _18O values indicate minimal mixing. Because of this, the compositions of the natural hot spring waters are fairly representative of the parent geothermal water. The average

265

Heat flow studies, Coso Geothermal Area, China Lake, California. Technical  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

studies, Coso Geothermal Area, China Lake, California. Technical studies, Coso Geothermal Area, China Lake, California. Technical report Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Heat flow studies, Coso Geothermal Area, China Lake, California. Technical report Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Heat flow studies in the Coso Geothermal Area were conducted at China Lake, California. Temperature measurements were completed in nine of the heat flow boreholes. Temperatures were measured at five meter intervals from the ground surface to the deepest five meter interval. Subsequently, temperatures were remeasured two or three times in each borehole in order to demonstrate that equilibrium thermal conditions existed. The maximum difference in temperature, at any of the five meter intervals, was 0.03 deg

266

2012 National Electricity Forum  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 U.S. Department of Energy 2012 National Electric Transmission Congestion Study Western Regional Workshops December 13, 2011 - Portland, Oregon Sheraton Portland Airport Hotel...

267

Electric Power Annual 2011  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.A. Summer net internal demand, capacity resources, and capacity margins by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Region" "1999 through 2011 actual, 2012-2016 projected"...

268

The Tampa Electric Integrated Gasification  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A report on a project conducted jointly under a cooperative agreement between: The U.S. Department of Energy and Tampa Electric CompanyCover image: The Polk Power Plant site as seen from across the lake in early evening. Photography

An Update; Power Plant Description

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

A Process-Oriented Small Lake Scheme for Coupled Climate Modeling Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A one-dimensional dynamic lake model is presented as a candidate for simulating small unresolved lakes within the land surface scheme of a regional or global climate model. This model is based largely on well-established process algorithms with ...

Murray D. MacKay

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Mercury in the Lake Powell ecosystem  

SciTech Connect

Flameless atomic absorption analyses of samples from Lake Powell yield the following mercury levels (in mean parts per billion): 0.01 in lake water, 30 in bottom sediments, 10 in shoreline substrates, 34 in plant leaves, 145 in plant debris, 28 in algae, 10 in crayfish, and 232 in fish muscle. Bioamplification and the association of mercury with organic matter are evident in this recently created, relatively unpolluted reservoir. Formulation of an estimated mercury budget suggests that the restriction of outflow in the impounded Colorado River leads to mercury accumulation, and that projected regional coal-fired power generation may produce sufficient amounts of mercury to augment significantly the mercury released by natural weathering.

Standiford, D.R.; Potter, L.D.; Kidd, D.E.

1973-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Vermont Electricity Profile 2010 Vermont profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Vermont) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer...

272

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Regional Wholesale Markets: August 2011 The U.S. has many regional wholesale electricity markets. Below we look at monthly and annual ranges of on-peak, daily wholesale prices at...

273

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Resource Use: September 2011 Resource Use: September 2011 Supply and Fuel Consumption In this section, we look at what resources are used to produce electricity. Electricity supplied from the grid is consumed the moment it is produced. Generating units are chosen to run primarily on their operating costs, of which fuel costs account for the lion's share. Therefore, we present below electricity generation output by generator type and fuel type. Since the generator/fuel mix of utilities varies significantly by region, we also present generation output by region. Generation Output by Region By generator type By fuel type Region map map showing electricity regions Fossil steam generation, primarily coal-fired, is most pronounced in the Central region and supplies close to half of the electricity in the

274

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Resource Use: August 2011 Resource Use: August 2011 Supply and Fuel Consumption In this section, we look at what resources are used to produce electricity. Electricity supplied from the grid is consumed the moment it is produced. Generating units are chosen to run primarily on their operating costs, of which fuel costs account for the lion's share. Therefore, we present below electricity generation output by generator type and fuel type. Since the generator/fuel mix of utilities varies significantly by region, we also present generation output by region. Generation output by region By generator type By fuel type Region map map showing electricity regions Fossil steam generation, primarily coal-fired, predominants in the Central region and supplies close to half of the electricity in the Southeast and

275

salt lake city.cdr  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Locations of the Salt Lake City Processing and Disposal Sites Locations of the Salt Lake City Processing and Disposal Sites This fact sheet provides information about the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 Title I processing site and disposal site at Salt Lake City, Utah. These sites are managed by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. Salt Lake City, Utah, Processing and Disposal Sites Site Descriptions and History Regulatory Setting The former Salt Lake City processing site is located about 4 miles south-southwest of the center of Salt Lake City, Utah, at 3300 South and Interstate 15. The Vitro Chemical Company processed uranium and vanadium ore at the site from 1951 until 1968. Milling operations conducted at the processing site created radioactive tailings, a predominantly sandy material.

276

Method for lake restoration  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for removing pollutants or minerals from lake, river or ocean sediments or from mine tailings is disclosed. Magnetically attractable collection units containing an ion exchange or sorbent media with an affinity for a chosen target substance are distributed in the sediments or tailings. After a period of time has passed sufficient for the particles to bind up the target substances, a magnet drawn through the sediments or across the tailings retrieves the units along with the target substance.

Dawson, Gaynor W. (Richland, WA); Mercer, Basil W. (Pasco, WA)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Why Sequence Lake Vostok accretion ice?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sequence Lake Vostok accretion ice? Lake Vostok is the largest known subglacial lake in central Antarctica, though it's been buried under 4 kilometers (nearly 2.5 miles) of ice for...

278

Evaluation of the supply chain of key industrial sectors and its impact on the electricity demand for a regional distribution company.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Considering the international scenario, in a recent past, the electrical industry was based on the concepts of monopolistic concessions and vertical utilities structures. In Brazil, (more)

Mariotoni, Thiago Arruda

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Walker Lake Valley Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Walker Lake Valley Geothermal Area Walker Lake Valley Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Walker Lake Valley Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (2) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed.

280

Winnemucca Dry Lake Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Winnemucca Dry Lake Geothermal Area Winnemucca Dry Lake Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Winnemucca Dry Lake Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (1) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lake region electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Moose Lake Water & Light Comm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lake Water & Light Comm Lake Water & Light Comm Jump to: navigation, search Name Moose Lake Water & Light Comm Place Minnesota Utility Id 12897 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes ISO MISO Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png 2-250HPS-FRO Lighting 250 HPS ELEOLY Lighting 3-250 HPS Lighting 4-250 HPS Lighting 400 HPS Rent Lighting BEST OIL CO Commercial BIKE TRAIL Commercial CIP Commercial Commercial Demand Commercial Commercial Electricity Commercial Demand 1 Phase Industrial

282

Western Lake Superior Sanitary District (Minnesota) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Western Lake Superior Sanitary District (Minnesota) Western Lake Superior Sanitary District (Minnesota) Western Lake Superior Sanitary District (Minnesota) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Siting and Permitting A sanitary board is established to deal with long-term serious problems relating to water pollution and solid waste disposal in the area. The district can set regulations regarding garbage management and recycling,

283

Kangley - Echo Lake Transmission Line Project, Final Environmental Impact Statement  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

STATEMENT STATEMENT Kangley-Echo Lake Transmission Line Project Final Environmental Impact Statement Responsible Agency: U.S. Department of Energy, Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Cooperating Agency: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service (USFS) Title of Proposed Project: Kangley-Echo Lake Transmission Line Project State Involved: Washington Abstract: BPA is proposing to build a new transmission line to accommodate increasing demand for electricity and ensure reliability in the Puget Sound area. The Proposed Action would construct a new line that would connect to an existing transmis- sion line near the community of Kangley, and then connect with BPA's existing Echo Lake Substation. The major purpose of this proposal is to improve system reliability in the King County area. An outage on an existing line during times of heavy use, such as

284

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Resource Use: November 2011 Resource Use: November 2011 Supply and Fuel Consumption In this section, we look at what resources are used to produce electricity. Electricity supplied from the grid is consumed the moment it is produced. Generating units are chosen to run primarily on their operating costs, of which fuel costs account for the lion's share. Therefore, we present below electricity generation output by generator type and fuel type. Since the generator/fuel mix of utilities varies significantly by region, we also present generation output by region. Generation Output by Region By generator type By fuel type Region map map showing electricity regions Generation output declined or remained relatively flat in all regions except for Texas and the Southeast. Both of these regions saw generation

285

Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center Technologies Available ...  

Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center Technologies Available for Licensing Established by the Department of Energy (DOE) in 2007, the Great Lakes Bioenergy Research ...

286

meeting summary First Northeast Regional Operational Workshop  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The First Northeast Regional Operational Workshop, focusing on hydrometeorology in the northeastern United States, was held 2123 September 1999 in Albany, New York. Sessions in local and mesoscale modeling, lakeeffect snow, hydrology, heavy ...

Eugene P. Auciello

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Heat flow and microearthquake studies, Coso Geothermal Area, China Lake, California. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The present research effort at the Coso Geothermal Area located on the China Lake Naval Weapons Center, China Lake, California, was concerned with: (1) heat flow studies and (2) microearthquake studies associated with the geothermal phenomena in the Coso Hot Springs area. The sites for ten heat flow boreholes were located primarily using the available seismic ground noise and electrical resistivity data. Difficulty was encountered in the drilling of all of the holes due to altered, porous, faulted, and sometime highly fractures zones. Thermal conductivity measurements were completed using both the needle probe technique and the divided bar apparatus with a cell arrangement. Heat flow values were obtaned by combining equilibrium temperature measurements with the appropriate thermal conductivity values. Heat, in the upper few hundred meters of the subsurface associated with the Coso Geothermal Area, is being transferred by a conductive heat transfer mechanism with a value of approximately 15 ..mu..cal/cm/sup 2/-sec. This is typical of geothermal systems throughout the world and is approximately ten times the normal terrestrial heat flow of 1.5 HFU. The background heat flow for the Coso region is about 3.5 HFU.

Combs, J.

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Lake Michigan Lake Breezes: Climatology, Local Forcing, and Synoptic Environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method was developed to identify the occurrence of lake-breeze events along the eastern, western, and both shores of Lake Michigan during a 15-yr period (198296). Comparison with detailed observations from May through September of 199697 ...

Neil F. Laird; David A. R. Kristovich; Xin-Zhong Liang; Raymond W. Arritt; Kenneth Labas

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Rend Lake College celebrates the opening of a new coal miner training facility  

SciTech Connect

The Coal Miner Training Center at Rend Lake College recently hosted the Illinois Mining Institute's annual conference and a regional mine rescue competition. The article gives an outline of the coal miner training and refresher course offered. 3 photos.

Buchsbaum, L.

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

290

Thermal Mediation by Littoral Wetlands and Impact on Lake Intrusion Depth  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lake inflow dynamics can be affected by the thermal mediation provided by shallow littoral regions such as wetlands. In this study, wetland thermal mediation is evaluated using a linearized dead-zone model. Its impact on ...

Andradottir, Hrund O.

291

WRF Simulations of the Urban Circulation in the Salt Lake City Area for CO2 Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A recent National Research Council report highlighted the potential utility of atmospheric observations and models for detecting trends in concentrated emissions from localized regions, such as urban areas. The Salt Lake City (SLC), Utah, area was ...

Thomas Nehrkorn; John Henderson; Mark Leidner; Marikate Mountain; Janusz Eluszkiewicz; Kathryn McKain; Steven Wofsy

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Pyramid Lake Renewable Energy Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Pyramid Lake Paiute Tribe is a federally recognized Tribe residing on the Pyramid Lake Reservation in western Nevada. The funding for this project was used to identify blind geothermal systems disconnected from geothermal sacred sites and develop a Tribal energy corporation for evaluating potential economic development for profit.

John Jackson

2008-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

293

PYRAMID LAKE RENEWEABLE ENERGY PLAN  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Pyramid Lake Renewable Energy Plan covers these areas: energy potential (primarily focusing on geothermal resource potential, but also more generally addressing wind energy potential); renewable energy market potential; transmission system development; geothermal direct use potential; and business structures to accomplish the development objectives of the Pyramid Lake Paiute Tribe.

HIGH DESERT GEOCULTURE, LLC

2009-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

294

Why Sequence Great Salt Lake?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Great Salt Lake? Great Salt Lake? On average, the Great Salt Lake is four times saltier than the ocean and also has heavy metals, high concentrations of sulfur and petroleum seeps. In spite of all this, the lake is the saltiest body of water to support life. The lake hosts brine shrimp, algae and a diverse array of microbes, not to mention the roughly 5 million birds that migrate there annually. The secret to these microbes' ability to survive under such harsh conditions might be revealed in their genes. Researchers expect the genetic data will provide insight into how the microorganisms tolerate pollutants such as sulfur and detoxify pollutants such as sulfur and heavy metals like mercury. The information could then be used to develop bioremediation techniques. Researchers also expect that sequencing microorganisms sampled

295

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Resource Use: October 2011 Resource Use: October 2011 Supply and Fuel Consumption In this section, we look at what resources are used to produce electricity. Electricity supplied from the grid is consumed the moment it is produced. Generating units are chosen to run primarily on their operating costs, of which fuel costs account for the lion's share. Therefore, we present below electricity generation output by generator type and fuel type. Since the generator/fuel mix of utilities varies significantly by region, we also present generation output by region. Generation Output by Region By generator type By fuel type Region map map showing electricity regions Consistent with the retail sales numbers, generation output rose in Texas, as well as the Central and Mid-Atlantic regions and declined or remained

296

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Resource Use: October 2013 Resource Use: October 2013 Supply and Fuel Consumption In this section, we look at the resources used to produce electricity. Generating units are chosen to run primarily on their operating costs, of which fuel costs account for the lion's share. Therefore, we present below, electricity generation output by fuel type and generator type. Since the generator/fuel mix of utilities varies significantly by region, we also present generation output by region. Generation Output by Region By fuel type By generator type Region map map showing electricity regions In October 2013, net generation in the United States increased 1.0 percent compared to the previous year. This increase in electricity generation occurred mainly in the Mid-Atlantic, Central, and Southeast regions, along

297

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Resource Use: March 2012 Resource Use: March 2012 Supply and Fuel Consumption In this section, we look at what resources are used to produce electricity. Electricity supplied from the grid is consumed the moment it is produced. Generating units are chosen to run primarily on their operating costs, of which fuel costs account for the lion's share. Therefore, we present below electricity generation output by generator type and fuel type. Since the generator/fuel mix of utilities varies significantly by region, we also present generation output by region. Generation Output by Region By generator type By fuel type Region map map showing electricity regions Generation output declined across much of the country in March due to unseasonably warm temperatures. The two regions that observed small

298

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Resource Use: February 2012 Resource Use: February 2012 Supply and Fuel Consumption In this section, we look at what resources are used to produce electricity. Electricity supplied from the grid is consumed the moment it is produced. Generating units are chosen to run primarily on their operating costs, of which fuel costs account for the lion's share. Therefore, we present below electricity generation output by generator type and fuel type. Since the generator/fuel mix of utilities varies significantly by region, we also present generation output by region. Generation Output by Region By generator type By fuel type Region map map showing electricity regions Generation output declined in almost all regions in February due to unseasonably warm temperatures. Following the same pattern as January,

299

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Resource Use: December 2011 Resource Use: December 2011 Supply and Fuel Consumption In this section, we look at what resources are used to produce electricity. Electricity supplied from the grid is consumed the moment it is produced. Generating units are chosen to run primarily on their operating costs, of which fuel costs account for the lion's share. Therefore, we present below electricity generation output by generator type and fuel type. Since the generator/fuel mix of utilities varies significantly by region, we also present generation output by region. Generation Output by Region By generator type By fuel type Region map map showing electricity regions Generation output declined in all regions, with the exception of the West and Texas, due to unseasonably warm temperatures in December. Fossil steam

300

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Resource Use: January 2012 Resource Use: January 2012 Supply and Fuel Consumption In this section, we look at what resources are used to produce electricity. Electricity supplied from the grid is consumed the moment it is produced. Generating units are chosen to run primarily on their operating costs, of which fuel costs account for the lion's share. Therefore, we present below electricity generation output by generator type and fuel type. Since the generator/fuel mix of utilities varies significantly by region, we also present generation output by region. Generation Output by Region By generator type By fuel type Region map map showing electricity regions Generation output declined in all regions due to unseasonably warm temperatures in January. Fossil steam generation followed total generation

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lake region electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Tariff-based analysis of commercial building electricity prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

4 Calculation of Electricity Prices 4.1 Averageaverage seasonal and annual electricity prices by region inbased annual average electricity price vs. annual energy

Coughlin, Katie M.; Bolduc, Chris A.; Rosenquist, Greg J.; Van Buskirk, Robert D.; McMahon, James E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Tariff-based analysis of commercial building electricity prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

4 Calculation of Electricity Prices 4.1 Averageseasonal and annual electricity prices by region in c/kWh.based annual average electricity price vs. annual energy

Coughlin, Katie M.; Bolduc, Chris A.; Rosenquist, Greg J.; Van Buskirk, Robert D.; McMahon, James E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Power Politics: The Political Economy of Russia's Electricity Sector Liberalization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ownership data and electricity tariff data to establish theuse a data set on electricity tariffs obtained from the UESat the regional level. 149 Electricity tariffs and ownership

Wenle, Susanne Alice

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Power Politics: The Political Economy of Russia's Electricity Sector Liberalization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

taken from regional electricity bills. 526 Energos thatto pay for at least part of the electricity bill, many hadrealized that electricity bills could go unpaid without much

Wenle, Susanne Alice

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Tariff-based analysis of commercial building electricity prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

customers. Here we use the electricity bill survey data fromcalculate a customer electricity bill requires two sets ofsame region. Monthly electricity bill data is available for

Coughlin, Katie M.; Bolduc, Chris A.; Rosenquist, Greg J.; Van Buskirk, Robert D.; McMahon, James E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

U.S. Electric Utility Demand-Side Management 1994  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

10. U.S. Electric Utility Energy Savings by North American Electric Reliability Council Region and ... design, advanced electric motors and drive systems,

307

The Lake Effect of the Great Salt Lake: Overview and Forecast Problems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A lake-effect snow phenomenon along the shore of the Great Salt Lake (GSL) in Utah is documented and related to a similar, well-documented lake effect along the shores of the Great Lakes. Twenty-eight cases of GSL lake-effect snowfall are ...

David M. Carpenter

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Topic A" Awardee: Western Electricity Coordinating Council |...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A" Awardee: Western Electricity Coordinating Council Topic A" Awardee: Western Electricity Coordinating Council Regional Transmission Expansion Planning (RTEP) The America Recovery...

309

Western Electricity Coordinating Council (WECC) Webinar  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Hosted by the Western Electricity Coordinating Council (WECC), the regional entity responsible for coordinating and promoting bulk electric system reliability in the Western Interconnection, this...

310

Overview Of The Lake City, California Geothermal System | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Overview Of The Lake City, California Geothermal System Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Overview Of The Lake City, California Geothermal System Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Following a spectacular mud volcano eruption in 1951, the Lake City geothermal system has been intermittently explored for 44 years. A discovery well was drilled 30 years ago. The geothermal system is associated with a two mile-long, north-south trending, abnormally complex section of the active Surprise Valley fault zone that has uplifted the

311

The San Diego Foundation Regional Focus 2050 Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

33 Figure17. Peakelectricitydemandforecastsofpeakelectricitydemandintheregion,whichpeak temperaturedataandelectricitydemandaswellasa

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Uganda-Demonstrating Wind and Solar Energy on Lake Victoria | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Uganda-Demonstrating Wind and Solar Energy on Lake Victoria Uganda-Demonstrating Wind and Solar Energy on Lake Victoria Jump to: navigation, search Name Uganda-Demonstrating Wind and Solar Energy on Lake Victoria Agency/Company /Organization United Nations Development Programme Sector Energy Focus Area Renewable Energy, Solar, Wind Topics Policies/deployment programs, Background analysis, Technology characterizations Resource Type Guide/manual, Lessons learned/best practices Website http://sgp.undp.org/download/S Country Uganda UN Region Eastern Africa References Uganda-Demonstrating Wind and Solar Energy on Lake Victoria[1] Uganda-Demonstrating Wind and Solar Energy on Lake Victoria Screenshot Background "This project demonstrates the use of wind and solar energy sources to recharge batteries and meet lighting and other power needs within homes.A

313

Ground Gravity Survey At Clear Lake Area (Skokan, 1993) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ground Gravity Survey At Clear Lake Area (Skokan, 1993) Ground Gravity Survey At Clear Lake Area (Skokan, 1993) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Ground Gravity Survey At Clear Lake Area (Skokan, 1993) Exploration Activity Details Location Clear Lake Area Exploration Technique Ground Gravity Survey Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes A detailed gravity survey (Isherwood, 1975) was undertaken as a follow-up to a regional gravity survey of the area in order to detail a low in the Clear Lake volcanics. The low (Fig. 5 ) was thought to be caused by an intrusion of molten rock which would be mass deficient. Modeling and interpretation indicated a+K139 chamber-like feature with a radius of approximately 7 km within 7-8 km of the surface. References

314

Static Temperature Survey At Medicine Lake Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2002) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Medicine Lake Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2002) Medicine Lake Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Static Temperature Survey At Medicine Lake Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Medicine Lake Area Exploration Technique Static Temperature Survey Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes The Glass Mountain region of northern California, which is considered to be one of the sites of the greatest untapped geothermal potential in the lower 48 states, is the focus of an exploration project to identify the characteristics of the resource at the Fourmile Hill location (northwest of Medicine Lake in T44N R3E). The objective of Phase I work was to deepen a temperature gradient well to finalize the assessment of the site. The

315

AN ESTIMATE OF THE CHEMICAL COMPOSITION OF TITAN's LAKES  

SciTech Connect

Hundreds of radar-dark patches interpreted as lakes have been discovered in the north and south polar regions of Titan. We have estimated the composition of these lakes by using the direct abundance measurements from the Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometer aboard the Huygens probe and recent photochemical models based on the vertical temperature profile derived by the Huygens Atmospheric Structure Instrument. Thermodynamic equilibrium is assumed between the atmosphere and the lakes, which are also considered nonideal solutions. We find that the main constituents of the lakes are ethane (C{sub 2}H{sub 6}) (approx76%-79%), propane (C{sub 3}H{sub 8}) (approx7%-8%), methane (CH{sub 4}) (approx5%-10%), hydrogen cyanide (HCN) (approx2%-3%), butene (C{sub 4}H{sub 8}) (approx1%), butane (C{sub 4}H{sub 10}) (approx1%), and acetylene (C{sub 2}H{sub 2}) (approx1%). The calculated composition of lakes is then substantially different from what has been expected from models elaborated prior to the exploration of Titan by the Cassini-Huygens spacecraft.

Cordier, Daniel [Ecole Nationale Superieure de Chimie de Rennes, CNRS, UMR 6226, Avenue du General Leclerc, CS 50837, 35708 Rennes Cedex 7 (France); Mousis, Olivier; Lunine, Jonathan I.; Lavvas, Panayotis [Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States); Vuitton, Veronique, E-mail: daniel.cordier@ensc-rennes.f [Universite Joseph Fourier, Laboratoire de Planetologie de Grenoble, CNRS/INSU (France)

2009-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

316

Evaluation of the CLM4 Lake Model at a Large and Shallow Freshwater Lake  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Models of lake physical processes provide the lower flux boundary conditions for numerical predictions of weather and climate in lake basins. So far, there have been few studies on evaluating lake model performance at the diurnal time scale and ...

Bin Deng; Shoudong Liu; Wei Xiao; Wei Wang; Jiming Jin; Xuhui Lee

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Orographic Effects in Simulated Lake-Effect Snowstorms over Lake Michigan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Numerical simulations of lake-effect snowstorms over Lake Michigan show that orography enhances precipitation rates and mesoscale updrafts and strengthens the land breeze. The mild orographic changes east of Lake Michigan as modeled with an 8-km ...

Mark R. Hjelmfelt

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

AEOP2011:Electricity Generation Capacity by Electricity Market Module  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AEOP2011:Electricity Generation Capacity by Electricity Market Module AEOP2011:Electricity Generation Capacity by Electricity Market Module Region and Source Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 97, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses billion kilowatthours. The data is broken down into Texas regional entity, Florida reliability coordinating council, Midwest reliability council and Northeast power coordination council. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords AEO Electricity electricity market module region generation capacity Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Electricity Generation Capacity by Electricity Market Module Region and Source- Reference Case (xls, 10.6 KiB)

319

AEOP2011:Electricity Generation Capacity by Electricity Market...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AEOP2011:Electricity Generation Capacity by Electricity Market Module Region and Source

320

Marine Incursion: The Freshwater Herring of Lake Tanganyika Are the Product of a Marine Invasion into West Africa  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The spectacular marine-like diversity of the endemic fauna of Lake Tanganyika, the oldest of the African Great Lakes, led early researchers to suggest that the lake must have once been connected to the ocean. Recent geophysical reconstructions clearly indicate that Lake Tanganyika formed by rifting in the African subcontinent and was never directly linked to the sea. Although the Lake has a high proportion of specialized endemics, the absence of close relatives outside Tanganyika has complicated phylogeographic reconstructions of the timing of lake colonization and intralacustrine diversification. The freshwater herring of Lake Tanganyika are members of a large group of pellonuline herring found in western and southern Africa, offering one of the best opportunities to trace the evolutionary history of members of Tanganyikas biota. Molecular phylogenetic reconstructions indicate that herring colonized West Africa 2550MYA, at the end of a major marine incursion in the region. Pellonuline herring subsequently experienced an evolutionary radiation in West Africa, spreading across the continent and reaching East Africas Lake Tanganyika during its early formation. While Lake Tanganyika has never been directly connected with the sea, the endemic freshwater herring of the lake are the descendents of an ancient marine

Anthony B. Wilson; Guy G. Teugels; Axel Meyer

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lake region electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Electric Vehicles  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Electricity can be used as a transportation fuel to power battery electric vehicles (EVs). EVs store electricity in an energy storage device, such as a battery.

322

Fish of the Great Lakes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Cook County Richard B. Ogilvie, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation FISH OF THE GREAT LAKES As you stand at the top of one of the tallest buildings in downtown...

323

Recent Great Lakes Ice Trends  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Analysis of ice observations made by cooperative observers from shoreline stations reveals significant changes in the ice season on the North American Great Lakes over the past 35years. Although the dataset is highly inhomogeneous and year-to-...

Howard P. Hanson; Claire S. Hanson; Brenda H. Yoo

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Electricity Market Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6, DOE/EIA- 6, DOE/EIA- M068(2006). Based on fuel prices and electricity demands provided by the other modules of the NEMS, the EMM determines the most economical way to supply electricity, within environmental and operational constraints. There are assumptions about the operations of the electricity sector and the costs of various options in each of the EMM submodules. This section describes the model parameters and assumptions used in EMM. It includes a discussion of legislation and regulations that are incorporated in EMM as well as information about the climate change action plan. The various electricity and technology cases are also described. EMM Regions The supply regions used in EMM are based on the North American Electric Reliability Council regions and

325

An Oxygen Isotope Study Of Hydrothermal Alteration In The Lake City  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Isotope Study Of Hydrothermal Alteration In The Lake City Isotope Study Of Hydrothermal Alteration In The Lake City Caldera, San Juan Mountains, Colorado Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: An Oxygen Isotope Study Of Hydrothermal Alteration In The Lake City Caldera, San Juan Mountains, Colorado Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: A 23-m.y.-old, fossil meteoric-hydrothermal system in the Lake City caldera (11 _ 14 km) has been mapped out by measuring Δ 18O values of 300 rock and mineral samples. Δ 18O varies systematically throughout the caldera, reaching values as low as -2. Great topographic relief, regional tilting, and variable degrees of erosion within the caldera all combine to give us a very complete section through the hydrothermal system, from the

326

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Clear Lake Area (Skokan, 1993) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Clear Lake Area Clear Lake Area (Skokan, 1993) Exploration Activity Details Location Clear Lake Area Exploration Technique Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Figure 4 illustrates seismicity from January of 1969 to June of 1977 (Rapolla and Keller, 1984). During this span, most of the seismicity occurred in the region of the Geysers geothermal field. Additional clustered activity was noted to the north and east of the Collayomi Fault in the Clear Lake region. Curiously, no unusual earthquake activity was noted along the major trend of the Collayomi Fault. Instead, the Collayomi Fault seems to separate two areas of active seismicity. References Catherine K. Skokan (1993) Overview Of Electromagnetic Methods Applied In Active Volcanic Areas Of Western United States

327

Snettisham Hydroelectric Project, Alaska second stage development, Crater lake. Final foundation report. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The important geologic features and methods used to construct the Crater Lake stage of the Snettisham Hydroelectric project, built between 1985 and 1989, are discussed. The project added 31 megawatts of non-polluting, renewable electric power for Juneau, Alaska and the surrounding area. Features of the report include the power tunnel and access adits, penstock excavation, surge shaft, gate shaft and lake top. Construction aspects include the general geology, design features, construction methods, geologic conditions encountered, ground support requirements, grouting, instrumentation and tunnel filling. Foundation conditions for the Crater Lake status were excellent, permitting the power and penstock tunnel and shafts to be constructed essentially unlined. The basic rock type throughout the project is a high-quality, quartz diorite gneiss with randomly spaced, subparallel basalt dikes.... Unlined rock tunnels, Power tunnel, Penstocks, Lake tap, Surge shaft.

Not Available

1992-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

328

Direct-Current Resistivity At Clear Lake Area (Skokan, 1993) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Clear Lake Area (Skokan, 1993) Clear Lake Area (Skokan, 1993) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Direct-Current Resistivity At Clear Lake Area (Skokan, 1993) Exploration Activity Details Location Clear Lake Area Exploration Technique Direct-Current Resistivity Survey Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Several direct-current, bipole-dipole surveys were carried out in the area. These field measurements (Rapolla and Keller, 1984) were combined by spatially averaging apparent resistivities on a one kilometer grid ( Fig. 6 ). The authors felt that local geologic noise could be reduced and large-scale features would be emphasized by this averaging. The most significant feature which resulted was a clear electrical signature of the

329

Lake and reservoir restoration guidance manual: first edition  

SciTech Connect

This manual provides guidance to lake managers, homeowners, lake associations, and laypersons on lake and reservoir restoration, management and protection. It also provides information on how to identify lake problems, evaluate practices for restoring and protection lakes, watershed management, and creating a lake-management plan.

Moore, L.; Thornton, K.

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Estimating the Value of Electricity Storage Resources in Electricity  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Estimating the Value of Electricity Storage Resources in Estimating the Value of Electricity Storage Resources in Electricity Markets - EAC 2011 Estimating the Value of Electricity Storage Resources in Electricity Markets - EAC 2011 The purpose of this report is to assist the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in 1) establishing a framework for understanding the role electricity storage resources (storage) can play in wholesale and retail electricity markets, 2) assessing the value of electricity storage in a variety of regions or markets, 3) analyzing current and potential issues that can affect the valuation of storage by investors at the wholesale and retail level, and 4) identifying areas for future research and development for electricity storage technologies and applications. EAC - Estimating the Value of Electricity Storage Resources in Electricity

331

Estimating the Value of Electricity Storage Resources in Electricity  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Estimating the Value of Electricity Storage Resources in Estimating the Value of Electricity Storage Resources in Electricity Markets - EAC 2011 Estimating the Value of Electricity Storage Resources in Electricity Markets - EAC 2011 The purpose of this report is to assist the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in 1) establishing a framework for understanding the role electricity storage resources (storage) can play in wholesale and retail electricity markets, 2) assessing the value of electricity storage in a variety of regions or markets, 3) analyzing current and potential issues that can affect the valuation of storage by investors at the wholesale and retail level, and 4) identifying areas for future research and development for electricity storage technologies and applications. EAC - Estimating the Value of Electricity Storage Resources in Electricity

332

Power Politics: The Political Economy of Russia's Electricity Sector Liberalization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

tariffs/ in the electric power industry; gas industry;of the regions hydro-electric power. Unlike in Europeanshould the large hydro-electric power plants be admitted to

Wengle, Susanne Alice

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Abstract--South America has emerged in recent years as one of the most dynamic regions for natural gas and electricity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. · Flexibility of gas supply: the third reason for LNG imports is related to the nature of gas demand (2006) the construction of re- gasification stations, so as to import liquefied natural gas (LNG), from of LNG imported will depend crucially on the development of the natural gas reserves in the region

Rudnick, Hugh

334

Electrical Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electrical Techniques Electrical Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Electrical Techniques Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(1) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geophysical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Electrical Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Geophysical Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock composition, mineral and clay content Stratigraphic/Structural: Detection of permeable pathways, fracture zones, faults Hydrological: Resistivity influenced by porosity, grain size distribution, permeability, fluid saturation, fluid type and phase state of the pore water Thermal: Resistivity influenced by temperature Dictionary.png Electrical Techniques: Electrical techniques aim to image the electrical resistivity of the

335

Man-Made Lakes and Ponds  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MAN-MADE LAKES AND PONDS Conservation is on the march. Slowly, we are stopping the pollution of our streams by sewage and industrial wastes; we are restoring many lakes and...

336

Optimizing Industry Water Use: Evaluation of the Use of Water Stewardship Tools by Great Lakes Basin Industries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document reports on a research study funded by Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), the Great Lakes Protection Fund (GLPF), the National Council for Air and Stream Improvement (NCASI), and the Council of Great Lakes Industries (CGLI). The objective of the research was to understand and compare, with the assistance of case study applications, water resource stewardship assessment tools that have been proposed by different organizations. The report concludes that tools used to assess global water...

2012-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

337

RECIPIENT:Lake County, FL  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Lake County, FL Lake County, FL u.s. DEPARTIIIEN T OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CEN T ER NEPA DETERlIJJNATION PROJECf TITLE: Lake County, FL EECBG SOW (S) Page lof2 STATE: FL Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procurement Instrument Number NEPA Control Numbcr CID Numbtr OE·FOA-OOOOO13 DE·EE00Q0786.001 0 Based on my review of the information concerning the proposed adion, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized undtr DOE Order 451.IA), I have made the following determination: ex. EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: 65.1 Actions to conserve energy, demonstrate potential energy conserva tion, and promote energy-efficiency that do not increase the indoor concentrations of potentially harmful substances. These actions may involve financial and technical

338

Radioisotope Concentration in Lake Sediments of Maracaibo, Venezuela  

SciTech Connect

Maracaibo Lake is one of the most important water basing and oil producing regions in Venezuela. Changes in the local environment have been monitored for chemical pollution in the past. For this study we selected a set of sediment samples collected in the shore and analyzed for its radioisotope content. Results show the gamma emitting isotopes distribution. Isotopes concentrations have been determined within the natural K, Th and U families.

Salas, A. Rangel; Viloria, T. [La Universidad del Zulia (Venezuela); Sajo-Bohus, L.; Barros, H.; Greaves, E. D.; Palacios, D. [Universidad Simon Bolivar (Venezuela)

2007-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

339

" Level: National Data and Regional...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 Capability to Switch Electricity to Alternative Energy Sources, 2002; " " Level: National Data and Regional Totals;" " Row: NAICS Codes, Value of Shipments and Employment Sizes;"...

340

Lake-Breeze Fronts in the Salt Lake Valley  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Winds at the Salt Lake City International Airport (SLC) during the AprilOctober period from 1948 to 2003 have been observed to shift to the north (up-valley direction) between late morning and afternoon on over 70% of the days without ...

Daniel E. Zumpfe; John D. Horel

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lake region electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electric Power Sector Coal Stocks: January 2012 Electric Power Sector Coal Stocks: January 2012 Stocks Above normal temperatures in January have allowed electric utilities to significantly replinish stockpiles of coal. The upswing in coal stockpiles corresponds to decreasing consumption of coal at electric generators seen in the resource use section across all regions of the country. Days of Burn Days of burn Coal capacity The average number of days of burn held at electric power plants is a forward looking estimate of coal supply given a power plant's current stockpile and past consumption patterns. Along with coal stockpiles at electric power plants, the supply of coal significantly increased in January of 2012. Total bituminous coal days of burn increased 10 percent from January 2011 to 87, while subbituminous supply increased nearly 10

342

Electric power monthly  

SciTech Connect

The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepares the Electric Power Monthly (EPM) for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. This publication provides monthly statistics for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. The EIA publishes statistics in the EPM on net generation by energy source, consumption, stocks, quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels; and capability of new generating units by company and plant. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Regional Wholesale Markets: September 2011 Regional Wholesale Markets: September 2011 The United States. has many regional wholesale electricity markets. Below we look at monthly and annual ranges of on-peak, daily wholesale prices at selected pricing locations and daily peak demand for selected electricity systems in the U.S. The range of daily price and demand data is shown for the month of September 2011 and for the year ending on September 30, 2011. Prices and demand are shown for six Regional Transmission Operator (RTO) markets: ISO New England (ISO-NE), New York ISO (NYISO), PJM Interconnection (PJM), Midwest ISO (MISO), Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT), and California ISO (CAISO). Also shown are wholesale prices at trading hubs in Louisiana (into Entergy), Southwest (Palo Verde) and

344

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Regional Wholesale Markets: March 2012 Regional Wholesale Markets: March 2012 The United States has many regional wholesale electricity markets. Below we look at monthly and annual ranges of on-peak, daily wholesale prices at selected pricing locations and daily peak demand for selected electricity systems in the Nation. The range of daily prices and demand data is shown for the report month and for the year ending with the report month. Prices and demand are shown for six Regional Transmission Operator (RTO) markets: ISO New England (ISO-NE), New York ISO (NYISO), PJM Interconnection (PJM), Midwest ISO (MISO), Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT), and two locations in the California ISO (CAISO). Also shown are wholesale prices at trading hubs in Louisiana (into Entergy), Southwest

345

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Regional Wholesale Markets: November 2011 Regional Wholesale Markets: November 2011 The United States has many regional wholesale electricity markets. Below we look at monthly and annual ranges of on-peak, daily wholesale prices at selected pricing locations and daily peak demand for selected electricity systems in the U.S. The range of daily prices and demand data is shown for the report month and for the year ending with the report month. Prices and demand are shown for six Regional Transmission Operator (RTO) markets: ISO New England (ISO-NE), New York ISO (NYISO), PJM Interconnection (PJM), Midwest ISO (MISO), Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT), and two locations in the California ISO (CAISO). Also shown are wholesale prices at trading hubs in Louisiana (into Entergy), Southwest

346

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Regional Wholesale Markets: December 2011 Regional Wholesale Markets: December 2011 The United States has many regional wholesale electricity markets. Below we look at monthly and annual ranges of on-peak, daily wholesale prices at selected pricing locations and daily peak demand for selected electricity systems in the nation. The range of daily prices and demand data is shown for the report month and for the year ending with the report month. Prices and demand are shown for six Regional Transmission Operator (RTO) markets: ISO New England (ISO-NE), New York ISO (NYISO), PJM Interconnection (PJM), Midwest ISO (MISO), Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT), and two locations in the California ISO (CAISO). Also shown are wholesale prices at trading hubs in Louisiana (into Entergy), Southwest

347

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Regional Wholesale Markets: January 2012 Regional Wholesale Markets: January 2012 The United States has many regional wholesale electricity markets. Below we look at monthly and annual ranges of on-peak, daily wholesale prices at selected pricing locations and daily peak demand for selected electricity systems in the nation. The range of daily prices and demand data is shown for the report month and for the year ending with the report month. Prices and demand are shown for six Regional Transmission Operator (RTO) markets: ISO New England (ISO-NE), New York ISO (NYISO), PJM Interconnection (PJM), Midwest ISO (MISO), Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT), and two locations in the California ISO (CAISO). Also shown are wholesale prices at trading hubs in Louisiana (into Entergy), Southwest

348

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Regional Wholesale Markets: October 2011 Regional Wholesale Markets: October 2011 The United States has many regional wholesale electricity markets. Below we look at monthly and annual ranges of on-peak, daily wholesale prices at selected pricing locations and daily peak demand for selected electricity systems in the U.S. The range of daily prices and demand data is shown for the report month and for the year ending with the report month. Prices and demand are shown for six Regional Transmission Operator (RTO) markets: ISO New England (ISO-NE), New York ISO (NYISO), PJM Interconnection (PJM), Midwest ISO (MISO), Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT), and two locations in the California ISO (CAISO). Also shown are wholesale prices at trading hubs in Louisiana (into Entergy), Southwest

349

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Regional Wholesale Markets: February 2012 Regional Wholesale Markets: February 2012 The United States has many regional wholesale electricity markets. Below we look at monthly and annual ranges of on-peak, daily wholesale prices at selected pricing locations and daily peak demand for selected electricity systems in the Nation. The range of daily prices and demand data is shown for the report month and for the year ending with the report month. Prices and demand are shown for six Regional Transmission Operator (RTO) markets: ISO New England (ISO-NE), New York ISO (NYISO), PJM Interconnection (PJM), Midwest ISO (MISO), Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT), and two locations in the California ISO (CAISO). Also shown are wholesale prices at trading hubs in Louisiana (into Entergy), Southwest

350

Table 3. Top Five Retailers of Electricity, with End Use Sectors...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

of Murray","Public",416137,115880,255171,45086,"-" "5. Moon Lake Electric Assn Inc","Cooperative",412635,130571,226952,55112,"-" "Total Sales, Top Five Providers",,24668010,7306239...

351

Electricity Reliability  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

lines and bar graph Electricity Reliability The Consortium for Electric Reliability Technology Solutions (CERTS) conducts research, develops, and disseminates new methods, tools,...

352

Electric Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

government incentives or subsidies in the near future. Companies active in the electric automobile area There are no companies directly active in the electric automobile...

353

Wind Equipment: Creating Jobs Along the Lake Erie Shore | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wind Equipment: Creating Jobs Along the Lake Erie Shore Wind Equipment: Creating Jobs Along the Lake Erie Shore Wind Equipment: Creating Jobs Along the Lake Erie Shore August 16, 2012 - 9:36am Addthis 1 of 3 Finished wind tower sections await load-out at Ventower Industries, state-of-the-art fabrication facility in Monroe, MI. Image: Ventower Industries. 2 of 3 Ventower operations team loading out first sections produced at Monroe plant. Image: Ventower Industries 3 of 3 Production team members in attendance at Ventower's ribbon cutting ceremony in August 2011. Image: Ventower Industries Monroe, Michigan Niketa Kumar Niketa Kumar Public Affairs Specialist, Office of Public Affairs What are the key facts? Ventower Industries supplies wind turbine towers for projects throughout the Great Lakes and Northeast regions. Since opening, the company has grown to 53 employees.

354

Exploration And Discovery In Yellowstone Lake- Results From High-Resolution  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Exploration And Discovery In Yellowstone Lake- Results From High-Resolution Exploration And Discovery In Yellowstone Lake- Results From High-Resolution Sonar Imaging, Seismic Reflection Profiling, And Submersible Studies Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Exploration And Discovery In Yellowstone Lake- Results From High-Resolution Sonar Imaging, Seismic Reflection Profiling, And Submersible Studies Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: No portion of the American continent is perhaps so rich in wonders as the Yellow Stone' (F.V. Hayden, September 2, 1874) Discoveries from multi-beam sonar mapping and seismic reflection surveys of the northern, central, and West Thumb basins of Yellowstone Lake provide new insight into the extent of post-collapse volcanism and active hydrothermal

355

The Lake Thunderbird Micronet Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Lake Thunderbird Micronet is a dense network of environmental sensors and a meteorological tower situated on 10 acres of rural land in central Oklahoma. The Micronet was established in the spring of 2002 as part of a grassroots effort by a ...

Alan Shapiro; Petra M. Klein; Sean C. Arms; David Bodine; Matthew Carney

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Practical Estimates of Lake Evaporation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Practical estimates of lake evaporation must rely on data that can be observed in the land environment. This requires the ability to take into account the changes in the temperature and humidity that occur when the air passes from the land to the ...

F. I. Morton

1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Contaminant Monitoring Strategy for Henrys Lake, Idaho  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Henrys Lake, located in southeastern Idaho, is a large, shallow lake (6,600 acres, {approx} 17.1 feet maximum depth) located at 6,472 feet elevation in Fremont Co., Idaho at the headwaters of the Henrys Fork of the Snake River. The upper watershed is comprised of high mountains of the Targhee National Forest and the lakeshore is surrounded by extensive flats and wetlands, which are mostly privately owned. The lake has been dammed since 1922, and the upper 12 feet of the lake waters are allocated for downriver use. Henrys Lake is a naturally productive lake supporting a nationally recognized ''Blue Ribbon'' trout fishery. There is concern that increasing housing development and cattle grazing may accelerate eutrophication and result in winter and early spring fish kills. There has not been a recent thorough assessment of lake water quality. However, the Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) is currently conducting a study of water quality on Henrys Lake and tributary streams. Septic systems and lawn runoff from housing developments on the north, west, and southwest shores could potentially contribute to the nutrient enrichment of the lake. Many houses are on steep hillsides where runoff from lawns, driveways, etc. drain into wetland flats along the lake or directly into the lake. In addition, seepage from septic systems (drainfields) drain directly into the wetlands enter groundwater areas that seep into the lake. Cattle grazing along the lake margin, riparian areas, and uplands is likely accelerating erosion and nutrient enrichment. Also, cattle grazing along riparian areas likely adds to nutrient enrichment of the lake through subsurface flow and direct runoff. Stream bank and lakeshore erosion may also accelerate eutrophication by increasing the sedimentation of the lake. Approximately nine streams feed the lake (see map), but flows are often severely reduced or completely eliminated due to irrigation diversion. In addition, subsurface flows can occur as a result of severe cattle grazing along riparian areas and deltas. Groundwater and springs also feed the lake, and are likely critical for oxygen supply during winter stratification. During the winter of 1991, Henrys Lake experienced low dissolved oxygen levels resulting in large fish kills. It is thought that thick ice cover combined with an increase in nutrient loads created conditions resulting in poor water quality. The Idaho Department of Health and Welfare, DEQ is currently conducting a study to determine the water quality of Henrys Lake, the sources contributing to its deterioration, and potential remedial actions to correct problem areas.

John S. Irving; R. P. Breckenridge

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Silica Extraction at the Mammoth Lakes Geothermal Site  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this project is to develop a cost-effective method to extract marketable silica (SiO{sub 2}) from fluids at the Mammoth Lakes, California geothermal power plant. Marketable silica provides an additional revenue source for the geothermal power industry and therefore lowers the costs of geothermal power production. The use of this type of ''solution mining'' to extract resources from geothermal fluids eliminates the need for acquiring these resources through energy intensive and environmentally damaging mining technologies. We have demonstrated that both precipitated and colloidal silica can be produced from the geothermal fluids at Mammoth Lakes by first concentrating the silica to over 600 ppm using reverse osmosis (RO). The RO permeate can be used in evaporative cooling at the plant; the RO concentrate is used for silica and potentially other (Li, Cs, Rb) resource extraction. Preliminary results suggest that silica recovery at Mammoth Lakes could reduce the cost of geothermal electricity production by 1.0 cents/kWh.

Bourcier, W; Ralph, W; Johnson, M; Bruton, C; Gutierrez, P

2006-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

359

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Wyoming Electricity Profile 2010 Wyoming profile Wyoming Electricity Profile 2010 Wyoming profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Wyoming) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 7,986 37 Electric Utilities 6,931 31 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,056 41 Net Generation (megawatthours) 48,119,254 31 Electric Utilities 44,738,543 25 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,380,711 42 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 67 23 Nitrogen Oxide 61 15 Carbon Dioxide 45,703 21 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.1 19 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.8 7 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2,094 2 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 17,113,458 40 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 17,113,458 39

360

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Idaho Electricity Profile 2010 Idaho profile Idaho Electricity Profile 2010 Idaho profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Idaho) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Hydroelectric Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 3,990 44 Electric Utilities 3,035 36 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 955 42 Net Generation (megawatthours) 12,024,564 44 Electric Utilities 8,589,208 37 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,435,356 40 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 7 45 Nitrogen Oxide 4 48 Carbon Dioxide 1,213 49 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.2 39 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.8 43 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 222 50 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 22,797,668 38 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 22,797,668 37

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lake region electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

California Electricity Profile 2010 California profile California Electricity Profile 2010 California profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (California) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SPP/WECC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 67,328 2 Electric Utilities 28,689 2 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 38,639 4 Net Generation (megawatthours) 204,125,596 4 Electric Utilities 96,939,535 8 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 107,186,061 4 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 3 47 Nitrogen Oxide 80 9 Carbon Dioxide 55,406 16 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) * 49 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.9 41 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 598 46 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 258,525,414 2 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 240,948,673 2

362

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Tennessee Electricity Profile 2010 Tennessee full report Tennessee Electricity Profile 2010 Tennessee full report Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Tennessee) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC/SERC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 21,417 19 Electric Utilities 20,968 11 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 450 49 Net Generation (megawatthours) 82,348,625 19 Electric Utilities 79,816,049 15 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 2,532,576 45 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 138 13 Nitrogen Oxide 33 31 Carbon Dioxide 48,196 18 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.7 14 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.9 40 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,290 26 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 103,521,537 13 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 103,521,537 10

363

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Carolina Electricity Profile 2010 South Carolina profile Carolina Electricity Profile 2010 South Carolina profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (South Carolina) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 23,982 17 Electric Utilities 22,172 9 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,810 35 Net Generation (megawatthours) 104,153,133 14 Electric Utilities 100,610,887 6 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,542,246 39 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 106 19 Nitrogen Oxide 30 33 Carbon Dioxide 41,364 23 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.2 30 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.6 45 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 876 40 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 82,479,293 19 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 82,479,293 17

364

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Virginia Electricity Profile 2010 Virginia profile Virginia Electricity Profile 2010 Virginia profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Virginia) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC/SERC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 24,109 16 Electric Utilities 19,434 15 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,676 21 Net Generation (megawatthours) 72,966,456 21 Electric Utilities 58,902,054 16 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 14,064,402 25 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 120 16 Nitrogen Oxide 49 24 Carbon Dioxide 39,719 25 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.6 15 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.5 23 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,200 30 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 113,806,135 10 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 113,806,135 7

365

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Delaware Electricity Profile 2010 Delaware profile Delaware Electricity Profile 2010 Delaware profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Delaware) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 3,389 46 Electric Utilities 55 48 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,334 29 Net Generation (megawatthours) 5,627,645 50 Electric Utilities 30,059 46 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 5,597,586 36 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 13 41 Nitrogen Oxide 5 47 Carbon Dioxide 4,187 45 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 5.2 7 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 16 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,640 15 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 11,605,932 44 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 7,582,539 46

366

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Colorado Electricity Profile 2010 Colorado profile Colorado Electricity Profile 2010 Colorado profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Colorado) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC/WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 13,777 30 Electric Utilities 9,114 28 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,662 22 Net Generation (megawatthours) 50,720,792 30 Electric Utilities 39,584,166 28 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 11,136,626 31 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 45 29 Nitrogen Oxide 55 20 Carbon Dioxide 40,499 24 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.0 32 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.4 10 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,760 12 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 52,917,786 27 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 52,917,786 24

367

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Kansas Electricity Profile 2010 Kansas profile Kansas Electricity Profile 2010 Kansas profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Kansas) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/SPP Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 12,543 32 Electric Utilities 11,732 20 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 812 45 Net Generation (megawatthours) 47,923,762 32 Electric Utilities 45,270,047 24 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 2,653,716 44 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 41 30 Nitrogen Oxide 46 26 Carbon Dioxide 36,321 26 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 33 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.1 13 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,671 14 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 40,420,675 32 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 40,420,675 30

368

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Pennsylvania Electricity Profile 2010 Pennsylvania profile Pennsylvania Electricity Profile 2010 Pennsylvania profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Pennsylvania) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 45,575 4 Electric Utilities 455 44 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 45,120 2 Net Generation (megawatthours) 229,752,306 2 Electric Utilities 1,086,500 42 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 228,665,806 2 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 387 3 Nitrogen Oxide 136 2 Carbon Dioxide 122,830 3 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.7 13 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.3 27 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,179 32 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 148,963,968 5 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 114,787,417 6

369

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Pennsylvania Electricity Profile 2010 Pennsylvania profile Pennsylvania Electricity Profile 2010 Pennsylvania profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Pennsylvania) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 45,575 4 Electric Utilities 455 44 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 45,120 2 Net Generation (megawatthours) 229,752,306 2 Electric Utilities 1,086,500 42 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 228,665,806 2 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 387 3 Nitrogen Oxide 136 2 Carbon Dioxide 122,830 3 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.7 13 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.3 27 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,179 32 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 148,963,968 5 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 114,787,417 6

370

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Wyoming Electricity Profile 2010 Wyoming profile Wyoming Electricity Profile 2010 Wyoming profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Wyoming) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 7,986 37 Electric Utilities 6,931 31 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,056 41 Net Generation (megawatthours) 48,119,254 31 Electric Utilities 44,738,543 25 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,380,711 42 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 67 23 Nitrogen Oxide 61 15 Carbon Dioxide 45,703 21 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.1 19 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.8 7 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2,094 2 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 17,113,458 40 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 17,113,458 39

371

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Kentucky Electricity Profile 2010 Kentucky profile Kentucky Electricity Profile 2010 Kentucky profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Kentucky) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC/SERC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 20,453 21 Electric Utilities 18,945 16 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,507 38 Net Generation (megawatthours) 98,217,658 17 Electric Utilities 97,472,144 7 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 745,514 48 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 249 7 Nitrogen Oxide 85 7 Carbon Dioxide 93,160 7 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 5.6 5 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 15 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2,091 3 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 93,569,426 14 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 93,569,426 12

372

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Michigan Electricity Profile 2010 Michigan profile Michigan Electricity Profile 2010 Michigan profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Michigan) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 29,831 11 Electric Utilities 21,639 10 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 8,192 14 Net Generation (megawatthours) 111,551,371 13 Electric Utilities 89,666,874 13 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 21,884,497 16 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 254 6 Nitrogen Oxide 89 6 Carbon Dioxide 74,480 11 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 5.0 8 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.8 19 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,472 20 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 103,649,219 12 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 94,565,247 11

373

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Alabama Electricity Profile 2010 Alabama profile Alabama Electricity Profile 2010 Alabama profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Alabama) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 32,417 9 Electric Utilities 23,642 7 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 8,775 12 Net Generation (megawatthours) 152,150,512 6 Electric Utilities 122,766,490 2 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 29,384,022 12 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 218 10 Nitrogen Oxide 66 14 Carbon Dioxide 79,375 9 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.2 18 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 36 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,150 33 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 90,862,645 15 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 90,862,645 13

374

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Michigan Electricity Profile 2010 Michigan profile Michigan Electricity Profile 2010 Michigan profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Michigan) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 29,831 11 Electric Utilities 21,639 10 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 8,192 14 Net Generation (megawatthours) 111,551,371 13 Electric Utilities 89,666,874 13 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 21,884,497 16 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 254 6 Nitrogen Oxide 89 6 Carbon Dioxide 74,480 11 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 5.0 8 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.8 19 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,472 20 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 103,649,219 12 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 94,565,247 11

375

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Ohio Electricity Profile 2010 Ohio profile Ohio Electricity Profile 2010 Ohio profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Ohio) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 33,071 8 Electric Utilities 20,179 13 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 12,892 7 Net Generation (megawatthours) 143,598,337 7 Electric Utilities 92,198,096 10 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 51,400,241 7 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 610 1 Nitrogen Oxide 122 3 Carbon Dioxide 121,964 4 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 9.4 1 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 17 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,872 8 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 154,145,418 4 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 105,329,797 9

376

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Wisconsin Electricity Profile 2010 Wisconsin profile Wisconsin Electricity Profile 2010 Wisconsin profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Wisconsin) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 17,836 23 Electric Utilities 13,098 19 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,738 20 Net Generation (megawatthours) 64,314,067 24 Electric Utilities 45,579,970 22 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 18,734,097 18 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 145 12 Nitrogen Oxide 49 25 Carbon Dioxide 47,238 19 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 5.0 9 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.7 20 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,619 16 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 68,752,417 22 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 68,752,417 21

377

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Tennessee Electricity Profile 2010 Tennessee full report Tennessee Electricity Profile 2010 Tennessee full report Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Tennessee) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC/SERC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 21,417 19 Electric Utilities 20,968 11 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 450 49 Net Generation (megawatthours) 82,348,625 19 Electric Utilities 79,816,049 15 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 2,532,576 45 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 138 13 Nitrogen Oxide 33 31 Carbon Dioxide 48,196 18 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.7 14 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.9 40 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,290 26 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 103,521,537 13 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 103,521,537 10

378

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Florida Electricity Profile 2010 Florida profile Florida Electricity Profile 2010 Florida profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Florida) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) FRCC/SERC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 59,147 3 Electric Utilities 50,853 1 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 8,294 13 Net Generation (megawatthours) 229,095,935 3 Electric Utilities 206,062,185 1 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 23,033,750 15 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 160 11 Nitrogen Oxide 101 5 Carbon Dioxide 123,811 2 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.5 37 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 35 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,191 31 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 231,209,614 3 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 231,209,614 3

379

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Arizona Electricity Profile 2010 Arizona profile Arizona Electricity Profile 2010 Arizona profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Arizona) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 26,392 15 Electric Utilities 20,115 14 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 6,277 16 Net Generation (megawatthours) 111,750,957 12 Electric Utilities 91,232,664 11 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 20,518,293 17 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 33 33 Nitrogen Oxide 57 17 Carbon Dioxide 55,683 15 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.7 43 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.1 31 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,099 35 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 72,831,737 21 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 72,831,737 20

380

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Kentucky Electricity Profile 2010 Kentucky profile Kentucky Electricity Profile 2010 Kentucky profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Kentucky) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC/SERC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 20,453 21 Electric Utilities 18,945 16 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,507 38 Net Generation (megawatthours) 98,217,658 17 Electric Utilities 97,472,144 7 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 745,514 48 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 249 7 Nitrogen Oxide 85 7 Carbon Dioxide 93,160 7 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 5.6 5 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 15 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2,091 3 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 93,569,426 14 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 93,569,426 12

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lake region electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alabama Electricity Profile 2010 Alabama profile Alabama Electricity Profile 2010 Alabama profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Alabama) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 32,417 9 Electric Utilities 23,642 7 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 8,775 12 Net Generation (megawatthours) 152,150,512 6 Electric Utilities 122,766,490 2 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 29,384,022 12 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 218 10 Nitrogen Oxide 66 14 Carbon Dioxide 79,375 9 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.2 18 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 36 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,150 33 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 90,862,645 15 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 90,862,645 13

382

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Arkansas Electricity Profile 2010 Arkansas profile Arkansas Electricity Profile 2010 Arkansas profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Arkansas) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC/SPP Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 15,981 25 Electric Utilities 11,488 23 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,493 24 Net Generation (megawatthours) 61,000,185 25 Electric Utilities 47,108,063 20 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 13,892,122 27 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 74 22 Nitrogen Oxide 40 29 Carbon Dioxide 34,018 28 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.7 22 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.5 24 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,229 29 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 48,194,285 29 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 48,194,285 27

383

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Maryland Electricity Profile 2010 Maryland profile Maryland Electricity Profile 2010 Maryland profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Maryland) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 12,516 33 Electric Utilities 80 47 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 12,436 9 Net Generation (megawatthours) 43,607,264 33 Electric Utilities 2,996 48 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 43,604,268 9 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 45 28 Nitrogen Oxide 25 34 Carbon Dioxide 26,369 33 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.3 29 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.3 29 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,333 24 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 65,335,498 24 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 36,082,473 31

384

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Hawaii Electricity Profile 2010 Hawaii profile Hawaii Electricity Profile 2010 Hawaii profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Hawaii) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) -- Primary Energy Source Petroleum Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 2,536 47 Electric Utilities 1,828 40 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 708 47 Net Generation (megawatthours) 10,836,036 45 Electric Utilities 6,416,068 38 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,419,968 38 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 17 36 Nitrogen Oxide 21 36 Carbon Dioxide 8,287 42 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.4 16 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 4.3 2 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,686 13 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 10,016,509 48 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 10,016,509 44

385

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Mexico Electricity Profile 2010 New Mexico profile Mexico Electricity Profile 2010 New Mexico profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (New Mexico) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SPP/WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 8,130 36 Electric Utilities 6,345 33 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,785 36 Net Generation (megawatthours) 36,251,542 37 Electric Utilities 30,848,406 33 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 5,403,136 37 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 15 38 Nitrogen Oxide 56 19 Carbon Dioxide 29,379 31 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.9 42 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 3.4 5 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,787 11 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 22,428,344 39 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 22,428,344 38

386

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Hampshire Electricity Profile 2010 New Hampshire profile Hampshire Electricity Profile 2010 New Hampshire profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (New Hampshire) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 4,180 43 Electric Utilities 1,132 41 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,048 32 Net Generation (megawatthours) 22,195,912 42 Electric Utilities 3,979,333 41 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 18,216,579 19 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 34 32 Nitrogen Oxide 6 46 Carbon Dioxide 5,551 43 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.4 17 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.6 46 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 551 47 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 10,890,074 47 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 7,712,938 45

387

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Oregon Electricity Profile 2010 Oregon profile Oregon Electricity Profile 2010 Oregon profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Oregon) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Hydroelectric Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 14,261 29 Electric Utilities 10,846 27 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,415 28 Net Generation (megawatthours) 55,126,999 27 Electric Utilities 41,142,684 26 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 13,984,316 26 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 16 37 Nitrogen Oxide 15 42 Carbon Dioxide 10,094 40 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.6 44 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.6 47 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 404 48 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 46,025,945 30 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 44,525,865 29

388

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Maine Electricity Profile 2010 Maine profile Maine Electricity Profile 2010 Maine profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Maine) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 4,430 42 Electric Utilities 19 49 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,410 25 Net Generation (megawatthours) 17,018,660 43 Electric Utilities 1,759 49 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 17,016,901 22 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 12 42 Nitrogen Oxide 8 44 Carbon Dioxide 4,948 44 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.6 36 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.1 33 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 641 44 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 11,531,568 45 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 151,588 51 Energy-Only Provider Sales (megawatthours) 11,379,980 10

389

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Mississippi Electricity Profile 2010 Mississippi profile Mississippi Electricity Profile 2010 Mississippi profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Mississippi) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 15,691 26 Electric Utilities 10,858 26 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,833 18 Net Generation (megawatthours) 54,487,260 28 Electric Utilities 40,841,436 27 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 13,645,824 28 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 59 26 Nitrogen Oxide 31 32 Carbon Dioxide 26,845 32 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.4 26 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.2 30 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,086 36 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 49,687,166 28 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 49,687,166 26

390

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Washington Electricity Profile 2010 Washington profile Washington Electricity Profile 2010 Washington profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Washington) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Hydroelectric Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 30,478 10 Electric Utilities 26,498 5 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,979 26 Net Generation (megawatthours) 103,472,729 15 Electric Utilities 88,057,219 14 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 15,415,510 23 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 14 39 Nitrogen Oxide 21 37 Carbon Dioxide 13,984 39 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.3 47 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.4 50 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 298 49 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 90,379,970 16 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 88,116,958 14

391

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Mexico Electricity Profile 2010 New Mexico profile Mexico Electricity Profile 2010 New Mexico profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (New Mexico) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SPP/WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 8,130 36 Electric Utilities 6,345 33 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,785 36 Net Generation (megawatthours) 36,251,542 37 Electric Utilities 30,848,406 33 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 5,403,136 37 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 15 38 Nitrogen Oxide 56 19 Carbon Dioxide 29,379 31 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.9 42 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 3.4 5 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,787 11 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 22,428,344 39 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 22,428,344 38

392

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Delaware Electricity Profile 2010 Delaware profile Delaware Electricity Profile 2010 Delaware profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Delaware) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 3,389 46 Electric Utilities 55 48 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,334 29 Net Generation (megawatthours) 5,627,645 50 Electric Utilities 30,059 46 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 5,597,586 36 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 13 41 Nitrogen Oxide 5 47 Carbon Dioxide 4,187 45 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 5.2 7 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 16 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,640 15 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 11,605,932 44 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 7,582,539 46

393

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Ohio Electricity Profile 2010 Ohio profile Ohio Electricity Profile 2010 Ohio profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Ohio) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 33,071 8 Electric Utilities 20,179 13 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 12,892 7 Net Generation (megawatthours) 143,598,337 7 Electric Utilities 92,198,096 10 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 51,400,241 7 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 610 1 Nitrogen Oxide 122 3 Carbon Dioxide 121,964 4 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 9.4 1 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 17 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,872 8 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 154,145,418 4 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 105,329,797 9

394

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Arkansas Electricity Profile 2010 Arkansas profile Arkansas Electricity Profile 2010 Arkansas profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Arkansas) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC/SPP Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 15,981 25 Electric Utilities 11,488 23 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,493 24 Net Generation (megawatthours) 61,000,185 25 Electric Utilities 47,108,063 20 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 13,892,122 27 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 74 22 Nitrogen Oxide 40 29 Carbon Dioxide 34,018 28 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.7 22 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.5 24 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,229 29 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 48,194,285 29 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 48,194,285 27

395

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oklahoma Electricity Profile 2010 Oklahoma profile Oklahoma Electricity Profile 2010 Oklahoma profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Oklahoma) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SPP Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 21,022 20 Electric Utilities 16,015 18 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 5,006 17 Net Generation (megawatthours) 72,250,733 22 Electric Utilities 57,421,195 17 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 14,829,538 24 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 85 21 Nitrogen Oxide 71 12 Carbon Dioxide 49,536 17 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.6 24 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.2 11 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,512 17 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 57,845,980 25 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 57,845,980 23

396

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Iowa Electricity Profile 2010 Iowa profile Iowa Electricity Profile 2010 Iowa profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Iowa) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/SERC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 14,592 28 Electric Utilities 11,282 24 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,310 30 Net Generation (megawatthours) 57,508,721 26 Electric Utilities 46,188,988 21 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 11,319,733 30 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 108 18 Nitrogen Oxide 50 22 Carbon Dioxide 47,211 20 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 4.1 11 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 14 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,810 10 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 45,445,269 31 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 45,445,269 28

397

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

West Virginia Electricity Profile 2010 West Virginia profile West Virginia Electricity Profile 2010 West Virginia profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (West Virginia) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 16,495 24 Electric Utilities 11,719 21 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,775 19 Net Generation (megawatthours) 80,788,947 20 Electric Utilities 56,719,755 18 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 24,069,192 13 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 105 20 Nitrogen Oxide 49 23 Carbon Dioxide 74,283 12 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.9 20 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.3 25 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2,027 5 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 32,031,803 34 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 32,031,803 33

398

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Vermont Electricity Profile 2010 Vermont profile Vermont Electricity Profile 2010 Vermont profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Vermont) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 1,128 50 Electric Utilities 260 45 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 868 43 Net Generation (megawatthours) 6,619,990 49 Electric Utilities 720,853 44 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 5,899,137 35 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide * 51 Nitrogen Oxide 1 50 Carbon Dioxide 8 51 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) * 51 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.2 51 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3 51 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 5,594,833 51 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 5,594,833 48 Direct Use (megawatthours) 19,806 47

399

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Mississippi Electricity Profile 2010 Mississippi profile Mississippi Electricity Profile 2010 Mississippi profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Mississippi) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 15,691 26 Electric Utilities 10,858 26 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,833 18 Net Generation (megawatthours) 54,487,260 28 Electric Utilities 40,841,436 27 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 13,645,824 28 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 59 26 Nitrogen Oxide 31 32 Carbon Dioxide 26,845 32 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.4 26 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.2 30 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,086 36 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 49,687,166 28 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 49,687,166 26

400

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Wisconsin Electricity Profile 2010 Wisconsin profile Wisconsin Electricity Profile 2010 Wisconsin profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Wisconsin) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 17,836 23 Electric Utilities 13,098 19 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,738 20 Net Generation (megawatthours) 64,314,067 24 Electric Utilities 45,579,970 22 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 18,734,097 18 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 145 12 Nitrogen Oxide 49 25 Carbon Dioxide 47,238 19 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 5.0 9 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.7 20 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,619 16 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 68,752,417 22 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 68,752,417 21

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lake region electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Colorado Electricity Profile 2010 Colorado profile Colorado Electricity Profile 2010 Colorado profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Colorado) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC/WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 13,777 30 Electric Utilities 9,114 28 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,662 22 Net Generation (megawatthours) 50,720,792 30 Electric Utilities 39,584,166 28 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 11,136,626 31 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 45 29 Nitrogen Oxide 55 20 Carbon Dioxide 40,499 24 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.0 32 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.4 10 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,760 12 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 52,917,786 27 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 52,917,786 24

402

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Hampshire Electricity Profile 2010 New Hampshire profile Hampshire Electricity Profile 2010 New Hampshire profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (New Hampshire) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 4,180 43 Electric Utilities 1,132 41 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,048 32 Net Generation (megawatthours) 22,195,912 42 Electric Utilities 3,979,333 41 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 18,216,579 19 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 34 32 Nitrogen Oxide 6 46 Carbon Dioxide 5,551 43 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.4 17 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.6 46 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 551 47 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 10,890,074 47 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 7,712,938 45

403

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Carolina Electricity Profile 2010 North Carolina profile Carolina Electricity Profile 2010 North Carolina profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (North Carolina) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 27,674 12 Electric Utilities 25,553 6 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 2,121 34 Net Generation (megawatthours) 128,678,483 10 Electric Utilities 121,251,138 3 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 7,427,345 34 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 131 14 Nitrogen Oxide 57 16 Carbon Dioxide 73,241 13 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.2 31 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 34 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,255 28 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 136,414,947 9 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 136,414,947 5

404

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nevada Electricity Profile 2010 Nevada profile Nevada Electricity Profile 2010 Nevada profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Nevada) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 11,421 34 Electric Utilities 8,713 29 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 2,708 33 Net Generation (megawatthours) 35,146,248 38 Electric Utilities 23,710,917 34 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 11,435,331 29 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 7 44 Nitrogen Oxide 15 40 Carbon Dioxide 17,020 38 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.4 46 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 37 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,068 37 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 33,772,595 33 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 32,348,879 32

405

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Kansas Electricity Profile 2010 Kansas profile Kansas Electricity Profile 2010 Kansas profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Kansas) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/SPP Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 12,543 32 Electric Utilities 11,732 20 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 812 45 Net Generation (megawatthours) 47,923,762 32 Electric Utilities 45,270,047 24 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 2,653,716 44 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 41 30 Nitrogen Oxide 46 26 Carbon Dioxide 36,321 26 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 33 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.1 13 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,671 14 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 40,420,675 32 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 40,420,675 30

406

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nebraska Electricity Profile 2010 Nebraska profile Nebraska Electricity Profile 2010 Nebraska profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Nebraska) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/SPP Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 7,857 38 Electric Utilities 7,647 30 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 210 50 Net Generation (megawatthours) 36,630,006 36 Electric Utilities 36,242,921 30 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 387,085 50 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 65 24 Nitrogen Oxide 40 30 Carbon Dioxide 24,461 34 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.9 12 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.4 9 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,472 19 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 29,849,460 36 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 29,849,460 35

407

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Missouri Electricity Profile 2010 Missouri profile Missouri Electricity Profile 2010 Missouri profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Missouri) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC/SPP Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 21,739 18 Electric Utilities 20,360 12 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,378 39 Net Generation (megawatthours) 92,312,989 18 Electric Utilities 90,176,805 12 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 2,136,184 46 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 233 8 Nitrogen Oxide 56 18 Carbon Dioxide 78,815 10 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 5.6 6 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.3 26 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,882 7 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 86,085,117 17 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 86,085,117 15

408

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Dakota Electricity Profile 2010 North Dakota profile Dakota Electricity Profile 2010 North Dakota profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (North Dakota) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 6,188 40 Electric Utilities 4,912 34 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,276 40 Net Generation (megawatthours) 34,739,542 39 Electric Utilities 31,343,796 32 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,395,746 41 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 116 17 Nitrogen Oxide 52 21 Carbon Dioxide 31,064 30 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 7.3 3 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 3.3 6 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,971 6 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 12,956,263 42 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 12,956,263 41

409

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Minnesota Electricity Profile 2010 Minnesota profile Minnesota Electricity Profile 2010 Minnesota profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Minnesota) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 14,715 27 Electric Utilities 11,547 22 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,168 31 Net Generation (megawatthours) 53,670,227 29 Electric Utilities 45,428,599 23 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 8,241,628 32 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 57 27 Nitrogen Oxide 44 27 Carbon Dioxide 32,946 29 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.3 27 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.8 18 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,353 21 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 67,799,706 23 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 67,799,706 22

410

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Louisiana Electricity Profile 2010 Louisiana profile Louisiana Electricity Profile 2010 Louisiana profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Louisiana) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC/SPP Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 26,744 14 Electric Utilities 16,471 17 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 10,272 10 Net Generation (megawatthours) 102,884,940 16 Electric Utilities 51,680,682 19 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 51,204,258 8 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 126 15 Nitrogen Oxide 75 11 Carbon Dioxide 58,706 14 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.7 21 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.6 21 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,258 27 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 85,079,692 18 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 85,079,692 16

411

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Utah Electricity Profile 2010 Utah profile Utah Electricity Profile 2010 Utah profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Utah) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 7,497 39 Electric Utilities 6,648 32 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 849 44 Net Generation (megawatthours) 42,249,355 35 Electric Utilities 39,522,124 29 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 2,727,231 43 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 25 34 Nitrogen Oxide 68 13 Carbon Dioxide 35,519 27 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.3 38 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 3.6 4 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,853 9 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 28,044,001 37 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 28,044,001 36

412

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Virginia Electricity Profile 2010 Virginia profile Virginia Electricity Profile 2010 Virginia profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Virginia) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC/SERC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 24,109 16 Electric Utilities 19,434 15 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,676 21 Net Generation (megawatthours) 72,966,456 21 Electric Utilities 58,902,054 16 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 14,064,402 25 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 120 16 Nitrogen Oxide 49 24 Carbon Dioxide 39,719 25 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.6 15 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.5 23 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,200 30 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 113,806,135 10 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 113,806,135 7

413

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Dakota Electricity Profile 2010 North Dakota profile Dakota Electricity Profile 2010 North Dakota profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (North Dakota) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 6,188 40 Electric Utilities 4,912 34 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,276 40 Net Generation (megawatthours) 34,739,542 39 Electric Utilities 31,343,796 32 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,395,746 41 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 116 17 Nitrogen Oxide 52 21 Carbon Dioxide 31,064 30 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 7.3 3 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 3.3 6 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,971 6 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 12,956,263 42 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 12,956,263 41

414

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Alaska Electricity Profile 2010 Alaska profile Alaska Electricity Profile 2010 Alaska profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Alaska) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) -- Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 2,067 48 Electric Utilities 1,889 39 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 178 51 Net Generation (megawatthours) 6,759,576 48 Electric Utilities 6,205,050 40 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 554,526 49 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 3 46 Nitrogen Oxide 16 39 Carbon Dioxide 4,125 46 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 41 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 5.2 1 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,345 23 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 6,247,038 50 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 6,247,038 47

415

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Minnesota Electricity Profile 2010 Minnesota profile Minnesota Electricity Profile 2010 Minnesota profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Minnesota) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 14,715 27 Electric Utilities 11,547 22 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,168 31 Net Generation (megawatthours) 53,670,227 29 Electric Utilities 45,428,599 23 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 8,241,628 32 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 57 27 Nitrogen Oxide 44 27 Carbon Dioxide 32,946 29 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.3 27 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.8 18 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,353 21 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 67,799,706 23 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 67,799,706 22

416

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Maryland Electricity Profile 2010 Maryland profile Maryland Electricity Profile 2010 Maryland profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Maryland) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 12,516 33 Electric Utilities 80 47 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 12,436 9 Net Generation (megawatthours) 43,607,264 33 Electric Utilities 2,996 48 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 43,604,268 9 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 45 28 Nitrogen Oxide 25 34 Carbon Dioxide 26,369 33 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.3 29 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.3 29 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,333 24 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 65,335,498 24 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 36,082,473 31

417

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

York Electricity Profile 2010 New York profile York Electricity Profile 2010 New York profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (New York) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 39,357 6 Electric Utilities 11,032 25 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 28,325 5 Net Generation (megawatthours) 136,961,654 9 Electric Utilities 34,633,335 31 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 102,328,319 5 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 62 25 Nitrogen Oxide 44 28 Carbon Dioxide 41,584 22 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 40 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.7 44 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 669 42 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 144,623,573 7 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 79,119,769 18

418

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Carolina Electricity Profile 2010 North Carolina profile Carolina Electricity Profile 2010 North Carolina profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (North Carolina) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 27,674 12 Electric Utilities 25,553 6 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 2,121 34 Net Generation (megawatthours) 128,678,483 10 Electric Utilities 121,251,138 3 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 7,427,345 34 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 131 14 Nitrogen Oxide 57 16 Carbon Dioxide 73,241 13 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.2 31 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 34 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,255 28 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 136,414,947 9 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 136,414,947 5

419

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Montana Electricity Profile 2010 Montana profile Montana Electricity Profile 2010 Montana profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Montana) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 5,866 41 Electric Utilities 2,340 38 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,526 27 Net Generation (megawatthours) 29,791,181 41 Electric Utilities 6,271,180 39 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 23,520,001 14 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 22 35 Nitrogen Oxide 21 35 Carbon Dioxide 20,370 35 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.6 35 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.6 22 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,507 18 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 13,423,138 41 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 10,803,422 43

420

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Iowa Electricity Profile 2010 Iowa profile Iowa Electricity Profile 2010 Iowa profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Iowa) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/SERC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 14,592 28 Electric Utilities 11,282 24 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,310 30 Net Generation (megawatthours) 57,508,721 26 Electric Utilities 46,188,988 21 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 11,319,733 30 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 108 18 Nitrogen Oxide 50 22 Carbon Dioxide 47,211 20 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 4.1 11 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 14 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,810 10 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 45,445,269 31 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 45,445,269 28

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lake region electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Illinois Electricity Profile 2010 Illinois profile Illinois Electricity Profile 2010 Illinois profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Illinois) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/RFC/SERC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 44,127 5 Electric Utilities 4,800 35 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 39,327 3 Net Generation (megawatthours) 201,351,872 5 Electric Utilities 12,418,332 35 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 188,933,540 3 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 232 9 Nitrogen Oxide 83 8 Carbon Dioxide 103,128 6 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.5 25 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.9 38 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,129 34 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 144,760,674 6 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 77,890,532 19

422

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Louisiana Electricity Profile 2010 Louisiana profile Louisiana Electricity Profile 2010 Louisiana profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Louisiana) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC/SPP Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 26,744 14 Electric Utilities 16,471 17 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 10,272 10 Net Generation (megawatthours) 102,884,940 16 Electric Utilities 51,680,682 19 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 51,204,258 8 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 126 15 Nitrogen Oxide 75 11 Carbon Dioxide 58,706 14 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.7 21 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.6 21 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,258 27 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 85,079,692 18 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 85,079,692 16

423

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

California Electricity Profile 2010 California profile California Electricity Profile 2010 California profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (California) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SPP/WECC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 67,328 2 Electric Utilities 28,689 2 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 38,639 4 Net Generation (megawatthours) 204,125,596 4 Electric Utilities 96,939,535 8 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 107,186,061 4 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 3 47 Nitrogen Oxide 80 9 Carbon Dioxide 55,406 16 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) * 49 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.9 41 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 598 46 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 258,525,414 2 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 240,948,673 2

424

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Dakota Electricity Profile 2010 South Dakota profile Dakota Electricity Profile 2010 South Dakota profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (South Dakota) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/WECC Primary Energy Source Hydroelectric Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 3,623 45 Electric Utilities 2,994 37 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 629 48 Net Generation (megawatthours) 10,049,636 46 Electric Utilities 8,682,448 36 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,367,188 47 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 12 43 Nitrogen Oxide 12 43 Carbon Dioxide 3,611 47 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.6 23 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.6 8 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 792 41 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 11,356,149 46 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 11,356,149 42

425

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Jersey Electricity Profile 2010 New Jersey profile Jersey Electricity Profile 2010 New Jersey profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (New Jersey) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 18,424 22 Electric Utilities 460 43 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 17,964 6 Net Generation (megawatthours) 65,682,494 23 Electric Utilities -186,385 50 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 65,868,878 6 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 14 40 Nitrogen Oxide 15 41 Carbon Dioxide 19,160 37 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.5 45 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.5 48 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 643 43 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 79,179,427 20 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 50,482,035 25

426

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Massachusetts Electricity Profile 2010 Massachusetts profile Massachusetts Electricity Profile 2010 Massachusetts profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Massachusetts) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 13,697 31 Electric Utilities 937 42 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 12,760 8 Net Generation (megawatthours) 42,804,824 34 Electric Utilities 802,906 43 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 42,001,918 10 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 35 31 Nitrogen Oxide 17 38 Carbon Dioxide 20,291 36 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.8 34 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.9 39 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,045 38 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 57,123,422 26 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 31,822,942 34

427

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nebraska Electricity Profile 2010 Nebraska profile Nebraska Electricity Profile 2010 Nebraska profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Nebraska) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/SPP Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 7,857 38 Electric Utilities 7,647 30 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 210 50 Net Generation (megawatthours) 36,630,006 36 Electric Utilities 36,242,921 30 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 387,085 50 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 65 24 Nitrogen Oxide 40 30 Carbon Dioxide 24,461 34 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.9 12 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.4 9 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,472 19 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 29,849,460 36 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 29,849,460 35

428

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Montana Electricity Profile 2010 Montana profile Montana Electricity Profile 2010 Montana profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Montana) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 5,866 41 Electric Utilities 2,340 38 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,526 27 Net Generation (megawatthours) 29,791,181 41 Electric Utilities 6,271,180 39 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 23,520,001 14 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 22 35 Nitrogen Oxide 21 35 Carbon Dioxide 20,370 35 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.6 35 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.6 22 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,507 18 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 13,423,138 41 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 10,803,422 43

429

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Maine Electricity Profile 2010 Maine profile Maine Electricity Profile 2010 Maine profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Maine) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 4,430 42 Electric Utilities 19 49 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,410 25 Net Generation (megawatthours) 17,018,660 43 Electric Utilities 1,759 49 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 17,016,901 22 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 12 42 Nitrogen Oxide 8 44 Carbon Dioxide 4,948 44 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.6 36 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.1 33 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 641 44 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 11,531,568 45 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 151,588 51 Energy-Only Provider Sales (megawatthours) 11,379,980 10

430

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Texas Electricity Profile 2010 Texas profile Texas Electricity Profile 2010 Texas profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Texas) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC/SPP/TRE/WECC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 108,258 1 Electric Utilities 26,533 4 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 81,724 1 Net Generation (megawatthours) 411,695,046 1 Electric Utilities 95,099,161 9 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 316,595,885 1 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 430 2 Nitrogen Oxide 204 1 Carbon Dioxide 251,409 1 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.3 28 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.1 32 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,346 22 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 358,457,550 1 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 358,457,550 1

431

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Florida Electricity Profile 2010 Florida profile Florida Electricity Profile 2010 Florida profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Florida) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) FRCC/SERC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 59,147 3 Electric Utilities 50,853 1 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 8,294 13 Net Generation (megawatthours) 229,095,935 3 Electric Utilities 206,062,185 1 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 23,033,750 15 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 160 11 Nitrogen Oxide 101 5 Carbon Dioxide 123,811 2 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.5 37 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 35 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,191 31 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 231,209,614 3 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 231,209,614 3

432

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Hawaii Electricity Profile 2010 Hawaii profile Hawaii Electricity Profile 2010 Hawaii profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Hawaii) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) -- Primary Energy Source Petroleum Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 2,536 47 Electric Utilities 1,828 40 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 708 47 Net Generation (megawatthours) 10,836,036 45 Electric Utilities 6,416,068 38 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,419,968 38 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 17 36 Nitrogen Oxide 21 36 Carbon Dioxide 8,287 42 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.4 16 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 4.3 2 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,686 13 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 10,016,509 48 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 10,016,509 44

433

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Connecticut Electricity Profile 2010 Connecticut profile Connecticut Electricity Profile 2010 Connecticut profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Connecticut) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 8,284 35 Electric Utilities 160 46 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 8,124 15 Net Generation (megawatthours) 33,349,623 40 Electric Utilities 65,570 45 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 33,284,053 11 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 2 48 Nitrogen Oxide 7 45 Carbon Dioxide 9,201 41 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.1 48 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.5 49 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 608 45 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 30,391,766 35 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 13,714,958 40

434

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Connecticut Electricity Profile 2010 Connecticut profile Connecticut Electricity Profile 2010 Connecticut profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Connecticut) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 8,284 35 Electric Utilities 160 46 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 8,124 15 Net Generation (megawatthours) 33,349,623 40 Electric Utilities 65,570 45 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 33,284,053 11 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 2 48 Nitrogen Oxide 7 45 Carbon Dioxide 9,201 41 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.1 48 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.5 49 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 608 45 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 30,391,766 35 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 13,714,958 40

435

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Utah Electricity Profile 2010 Utah profile Utah Electricity Profile 2010 Utah profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Utah) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 7,497 39 Electric Utilities 6,648 32 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 849 44 Net Generation (megawatthours) 42,249,355 35 Electric Utilities 39,522,124 29 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 2,727,231 43 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 25 34 Nitrogen Oxide 68 13 Carbon Dioxide 35,519 27 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.3 38 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 3.6 4 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,853 9 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 28,044,001 37 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 28,044,001 36

436

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Carolina Electricity Profile 2010 South Carolina profile Carolina Electricity Profile 2010 South Carolina profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (South Carolina) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 23,982 17 Electric Utilities 22,172 9 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,810 35 Net Generation (megawatthours) 104,153,133 14 Electric Utilities 100,610,887 6 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,542,246 39 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 106 19 Nitrogen Oxide 30 33 Carbon Dioxide 41,364 23 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.2 30 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.6 45 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 876 40 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 82,479,293 19 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 82,479,293 17

437

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alaska Electricity Profile 2010 Alaska profile Alaska Electricity Profile 2010 Alaska profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Alaska) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) -- Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 2,067 48 Electric Utilities 1,889 39 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 178 51 Net Generation (megawatthours) 6,759,576 48 Electric Utilities 6,205,050 40 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 554,526 49 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 3 46 Nitrogen Oxide 16 39 Carbon Dioxide 4,125 46 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 41 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 5.2 1 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,345 23 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 6,247,038 50 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 6,247,038 47

438

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nevada Electricity Profile 2010 Nevada profile Nevada Electricity Profile 2010 Nevada profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Nevada) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 11,421 34 Electric Utilities 8,713 29 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 2,708 33 Net Generation (megawatthours) 35,146,248 38 Electric Utilities 23,710,917 34 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 11,435,331 29 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 7 44 Nitrogen Oxide 15 40 Carbon Dioxide 17,020 38 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.4 46 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 37 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,068 37 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 33,772,595 33 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 32,348,879 32

439

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Washington Electricity Profile 2010 Washington profile Washington Electricity Profile 2010 Washington profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Washington) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Hydroelectric Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 30,478 10 Electric Utilities 26,498 5 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,979 26 Net Generation (megawatthours) 103,472,729 15 Electric Utilities 88,057,219 14 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 15,415,510 23 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 14 39 Nitrogen Oxide 21 37 Carbon Dioxide 13,984 39 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.3 47 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.4 50 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 298 49 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 90,379,970 16 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 88,116,958 14

440

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Electricity Profile 2010 Oregon profile Oregon Electricity Profile 2010 Oregon profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Oregon) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Hydroelectric Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 14,261 29 Electric Utilities 10,846 27 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,415 28 Net Generation (megawatthours) 55,126,999 27 Electric Utilities 41,142,684 26 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 13,984,316 26 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 16 37 Nitrogen Oxide 15 42 Carbon Dioxide 10,094 40 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.6 44 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.6 47 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 404 48 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 46,025,945 30 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 44,525,865 29

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lake region electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Texas Electricity Profile 2010 Texas profile Texas Electricity Profile 2010 Texas profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Texas) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC/SPP/TRE/WECC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 108,258 1 Electric Utilities 26,533 4 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 81,724 1 Net Generation (megawatthours) 411,695,046 1 Electric Utilities 95,099,161 9 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 316,595,885 1 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 430 2 Nitrogen Oxide 204 1 Carbon Dioxide 251,409 1 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.3 28 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.1 32 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,346 22 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 358,457,550 1 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 358,457,550 1

442

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Indiana Electricity Profile 2010 Indiana profile Indiana Electricity Profile 2010 Indiana profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Indiana) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 27,638 13 Electric Utilities 23,008 8 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,630 23 Net Generation (megawatthours) 125,180,739 11 Electric Utilities 107,852,560 5 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 17,328,179 20 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 385 4 Nitrogen Oxide 120 4 Carbon Dioxide 116,283 5 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 6.8 4 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.1 12 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2,048 4 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 105,994,376 11 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 105,994,376 8

443

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Oklahoma Electricity Profile 2010 Oklahoma profile Oklahoma Electricity Profile 2010 Oklahoma profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Oklahoma) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SPP Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 21,022 20 Electric Utilities 16,015 18 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 5,006 17 Net Generation (megawatthours) 72,250,733 22 Electric Utilities 57,421,195 17 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 14,829,538 24 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 85 21 Nitrogen Oxide 71 12 Carbon Dioxide 49,536 17 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.6 24 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.2 11 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,512 17 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 57,845,980 25 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 57,845,980 23

444

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Jersey Electricity Profile 2010 New Jersey profile Jersey Electricity Profile 2010 New Jersey profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (New Jersey) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 18,424 22 Electric Utilities 460 43 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 17,964 6 Net Generation (megawatthours) 65,682,494 23 Electric Utilities -186,385 50 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 65,868,878 6 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 14 40 Nitrogen Oxide 15 41 Carbon Dioxide 19,160 37 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.5 45 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.5 48 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 643 43 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 79,179,427 20 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 50,482,035 25

445

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Idaho Electricity Profile 2010 Idaho profile Idaho Electricity Profile 2010 Idaho profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Idaho) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Hydroelectric Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 3,990 44 Electric Utilities 3,035 36 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 955 42 Net Generation (megawatthours) 12,024,564 44 Electric Utilities 8,589,208 37 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,435,356 40 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 7 45 Nitrogen Oxide 4 48 Carbon Dioxide 1,213 49 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.2 39 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.8 43 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 222 50 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 22,797,668 38 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 22,797,668 37

446

Detroit Lakes energy systems study: Phase I feasibility. Final report, February 1, 1978--July 31, 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of the Detroit Lakes Energy Systems Study is to determine the economic feasibility of alternative renewable energy system configurations in the northern latitudes. A forecast through both 1990 and the year 2000 is made of the demand for electrical energy in the Detroit Lakes area. An assessment of renewable energy resources including biomass, wind, and insolation is provided. A detailed analysis is made of system costs including biomass, wind, solar thermal, solar photovoltaic, selected hybrids, and conventional fuel systems. Lessons learned and recommendations for prototype fabrication are highlighted. (MHR)

none,

1978-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

447

Geothermal space/water heating for Mammoth Lakes Village, California. Quarterly technical progress report, September 13-December 12, 1976  

SciTech Connect

During the first three months of this one-year study to determine the technical, economic and environmental feasibility of heating the town of Mammoth Lakes, California using geothermal energy, the following work was completed. Literature concerning both geothermal and conventional hydronic heating systems was reviewed and put on file. Estimates were prepared for the monthly electrical energy consumption and peak electrical demand for space and water heating in Mammoth Lakes Village in 1980. An analysis of the energy potential of the Casa Diablo geothermal reservoir was completed. Discussions were held with US Forest Service and Mammoth County Water District employees, to obtain their input to the feasibility study.

Sims, A.V.; Racine, W.C.

1976-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

448

Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This presentation library summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. It was presented to the 2012 Western Conference of Public Service Commissioners, during their June, 2012, meeting. The Western Conference of Public Service Commissioners is a regional association within the National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners (NARUC).

Hand, M. M.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Integrated measures of anthropogenic stress in the U.S. Great Lakes Basin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using publicly available, pre-existing spatial datasets, we developed a geographic information system database of 86 variables related to five classes of anthropogenic stress in the U.S. Great Lakes basin: agriculture, atmospheric deposition, human population, land cover, and point source pollution. The original variables were quantified by a variety of data types over a broad range of spatial and classification resolutions. We summarized the original data for 762 watershed-based units that comprise the U.S. portion of the basin and then used principal components analysis to develop overall stress measures within each stress category. We developed a cumulative stress index by combining the first principal component from each of the five stress categories. Maps of the stress measures illustrate strong spatial patterns across the basin, with the greatest amount of stress occurring on the western shore of Lake Michigan, southwest Lake Erie, and southeastern Lake Ontario. We found strong relationships between the stress measures and characteristics of bird communities, fish communities, and water chemistry measurements from the coastal region. The stress measures are taken to represent the major threats to coastal ecosystems in the U.S. Great Lakes. Such regional-scale efforts are critical for understanding relationships between human disturbance and ecosystem response, and can be used to guide environmental decision-making at both regional and local scales.

Danz, Nicholas; Niemi, Gerald; Regal, Ronald (and others) [University of Minnesota Duluth, Duluth, MN (United States)

2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

450

Electric power annual 1992  

SciTech Connect

The Electric Power Annual presents a summary of electric utility statistics at national, regional and State levels. The objective of the publication is to provide industry decisionmakers, government policymakers, analysts and the general public with historical data that may be used in understanding US electricity markets. The Electric Power Annual is prepared by the Survey Management Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); US Department of Energy. ``The US Electric Power Industry at a Glance`` section presents a profile of the electric power industry ownership and performance, and a review of key statistics for the year. Subsequent sections present data on generating capability, including proposed capability additions; net generation; fossil-fuel statistics; retail sales; revenue; financial statistics; environmental statistics; electric power transactions; demand-side management; and nonutility power producers. In addition, the appendices provide supplemental data on major disturbances and unusual occurrences in US electricity power systems. Each section contains related text and tables and refers the reader to the appropriate publication that contains more detailed data on the subject matter. Monetary values in this publication are expressed in nominal terms.

Not Available

1994-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

451

Impacts of Western Area Power Administration`s power marketing alternatives on retail electricity rates and utility financial viability  

SciTech Connect

Changes in power contract terms for customers of Western`s Salt Lake City Area Office affect electricity rates for consumers of electric power in Arizona, Colorado, Nevada, New Mexico, Utah, and Wyoming. The impacts of electricity rate changes on consumers are studied by measuring impacts on the rates charged by individual utility systems, determining the average rates in regional areas, and conducting a detailed rate analysis of representative utility systems. The primary focus is an evaluation of the way retail electricity rates for Western`s preference customers vary with alternative pricing and power quantity commitment terms under Western`s long-term contracts to sell power (marketing programs). Retail rate impacts are emphasized because changes in the price of electricity are the most direct economic effect on businesses and residences arising from different Western contractual and operational policies. Retail rates are the mechanism by which changes in cost associated with Western`s contract terms are imposed on ultimate consumers, and rate changes determine the dollar level of payments for electric power incurred by the affected consumers. 41 figs., 9 tabs.

Bodmer, E.; Fisher, R.E.; Hemphill, R.C.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

EIA - 2010 International Energy Outlook - Electricity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Electricity International Energy Outlook 2010 Electricity World electricity generation increases by 87 percent from 2007 to 2035 in the IEO2010 Reference case. Non-OECD countries account for 61 percent of world electricity use in 2035. Figure 67. Growth in world electric power generation and total energy consumption, 1990-2035. Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 68. World net electricity generation by region, 1990-2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 69. Non-OECD net electricity generation by region, 1990-2035. Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 70. World net electricity generation by fuel, 2006-2030. Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 71. World net electricity generation from nuclear power by region, 2007-2030.

453

Climatic Effects on Lake Basins. Part I: Modeling Tropical Lake Levels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The availability of satellite estimates of rainfall and lake levels offers exciting new opportunities to estimate the hydrologic properties of lake systems. Combined with simple basin models, connections to climatic variations can then be explored ...

Martina Ricko; James A. Carton; Charon Birkett

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Convective Evolution across Lake Michigan during a Widespread Lake-Effect Snow Event  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lake-effect snowstorms generally develop within convective boundary layers, which are induced when cold air flows over relatively warm lakes in fall and winter. Mesoscale circulations within the boundary layers largely control which communities ...

David A. R. Kristovich; Neil F. Laird; Mark R. Hjelmfelt

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Numerical Study of the Influence of Environmental Conditions on Lake-Effect Snowstorms over Lake Michigan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Numerical simulations are used to examine the influence of environmental parameters on the morphology of lake effect snowstorms over Lake Michigan. A series of model sensitivity studies are performed using the Colorado State University mesoscale ...

Mark R. Hjelmfelt

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Real-Time Prediction of the Lake Breeze on the Western Shore of Lake Michigan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A forecast verification study of the occurrence and inland penetration of the lake breeze on the western shore of Lake Michigan was conducted. A real-time version of The Pennsylvania State UniversityNational Center for Atmospheric Research fifth-...

Paul J. Roebber; Mark G. Gehring

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Electric power monthly  

SciTech Connect

The Electric Power Monthly is prepared by the Survey Management Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy. This publication provides monthly statistics at the national, Census division, and State levels for net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, cost of fuel, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fuel are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. Additionally, statistics by company and plant are published in the EPM on capability of new plants, new generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, and cost of fuel.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Uppsala University Division for Electricity | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Division for Electricity Jump to: navigation, search Name Uppsala University Division for Electricity Sector Marine and Hydrokinetic Website http:www.el.angstrom.uu.sef Region...

459

Kuitun Xinbei Electric Power Co Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kuitun Xinbei Electric Power Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name Kuitun Xinbei Electric Power Co.,Ltd Place Kuitun City, Xinjiang Autonomous Region, China Zip 833200 Sector...

460

Spirit Lake Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Spirit Lake Wind Farm Spirit Lake Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Spirit Lake Wind Farm Facility Spirit Lake Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Spirit Lake School Developer Minnesota Windpower Energy Purchaser Alliant/IES Utilities Location Spirit Lake IA Coordinates 43.411381°, -95.10075° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.411381,"lon":-95.10075,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lake region electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

NAWS-China Lake Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

g g y g y S S C C NAWS NAWS - - China Lake China Lake Working with the Local Utility Working with the Local Utility Mark Shvartzman Mark Shvartzman Project Manager, Southern California Edison Project Manager, Southern California Edison Presented at the November FUPWG Meeting Presented at the November FUPWG Meeting November 18, 2009 November 18, 2009 1 1 g E t bli h d i 1998 d Ad i Fili 1358 E History of SCE's UESC Program History of SCE's UESC Program History of SCE s UESC Program History of SCE s UESC Program * Background - Edison developed Energy Related Services (ERS) to assist Federal customers in identifying and implementing energy efficiency and renewable energy projects at government owned and/or managed facilities within Southern California Edison service territory - Established in 1998 under Advice Filing 1358-E

462

Lake Winds | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Winds Winds Jump to: navigation, search Name Lake Winds Facility Lake Winds Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Consumers Energy Developer Consumers Energy Energy Purchaser Consumers Energy Location Ludington MI Coordinates 43.83972728°, -86.38154984° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.83972728,"lon":-86.38154984,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

463

NAWS-China Lake Project | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NAWS-China Lake Project NAWS-China Lake Project Presentation covers the NAWS-China Lake Project at the Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting, held on November...

464

Electricity Markets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electricity Markets Electricity Markets Researchers in the electricity markets area conduct technical, economic, and policy analysis of energy topics centered on the U.S. electricity sector. Current research seeks to inform public and private decision-making on public-interest issues related to energy efficiency and demand response, renewable energy, electricity resource and transmission planning, electricity reliability and distributed generation resources. Research is conducted in the following areas: Energy efficiency research focused on portfolio planning and market assessment, design and implementation of a portfolio of energy efficiency programs that achieve various policy objectives, utility sector energy efficiency business models, options for administering energy efficiency

465

Evolution of predator-prey interactions in ancient lakes: implications for coevolution in marine environments  

SciTech Connect

Highly generalized predator-prey interrelationships are a hallmark of most lacustrine ecosystems where accommodation to the physical environment plays the major role in determining organismal distributions. Since the vast majority of lakes are ephemeral on a geological and evolutionary times scale, dispersal, rather than organism interaction, appears to be the dominant selective theme in lacustrine species evolution. In a few, very long lasting lakes, notably modern Lakes Tanganyika (Africa) and Baikal (USSR) and ancient lakes of the Brazilian Rift (Cretaceous) and Snake River Plain (Tertiary), invertebrates and fish occur which demonstrate the development of intense biological accommodation in coevolving predator-prey interactions. Shell crushing experiments on 2 endemic Tanganyikan gastropods, Lavigeria nassa and Spekia zonata show them to be comparable to warm temperature marine species in terms of grow load strength: 1-2 orders of magnitude stronger than confamilial cosmopolitan species from more ephemeral lakes in the same region of Africa. Shell repair is commonly observed in these and other Tanganyikan endemic snails although it is exceedingly rare inmost other lakes. The study of these early stages of evolutionary processes and rates in coevolving predator-prey systems in isolated lacustrine microcosms has important implications for those paleontologists concerned with marine invertebrates. It may shed considerable light on the interpretation of such events as the marine Mesozoic Revolution.

Cohen, A.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Association between Winter Precipitation and Water Level Fluctuations in the Great Lakes and Atmospheric Circulation Patterns  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atmospheric precipitation in the Great Lakes basin, as a major mediating variable between atmospheric circulation and lake levels, is analyzed relative to both. The effect of cumulative winter precipitation on lake levels varies from lake to lake ...

Sergei N. Rodionov

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Why sequence Bacteria from Lake Washington?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

bacteria from Lake Washington? bacteria from Lake Washington? Previous collaborations between the University of Washington team and the DOE JGI involving both single genome and metagenomic sequencing have greatly enhanced the community's ability to explore the diversity of bacteria functionally active in metabolism of single carbon compounds, known as methylotrophs, isolated from Lake Washington (Seattle, Washington) sediment. Sequencing genomes of 50 methylotroph isolates from the Lake Washington will further enhance the methylotroph community knowledge database providing a much higher level of resolution of global (meta)transcriptomic and (meta)proteomic analyses, as well as species interaction studies, informing a better understanding of biogeochemical cycling of carbon and nitrogen.

468

great_lakes_90mwindspeed_off  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

GISDataTechnologySpecificUnitedStatesWindHighResolutionGreatLakes90mWindspeedOffshoreWindHighResolution.zip> Description: Abstract: Annual average offshore wind...

469

Nacimiento Reservoir San Antonio Reservoir Searles Lake  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lake (Dry) TRONA WE ST END MCG EN SE ARLE S 190 395 RANDS BURG BA RREN RIDG E PINE T REE WIND FA RM LO

470

Clear Lake Cogeneration LP | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cogeneration LP Jump to: navigation, search Name Clear Lake Cogeneration LP Place Idaho Utility Id 3775 References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File220101...

471

Glacial Lakes Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

search Name Glacial Lakes Energy Place Watertown, South Dakota Zip 57201 Product Bioethanol producer using corn as feedstock Coordinates 43.197366, -88.720469 Loading...

472

Model Simulations Examining the Relationship of Lake-Effect Morphology to Lake Shape, Wind Direction, and Wind Speed  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Idealized model simulations with an isolated elliptical lake and prescribed winter lake-effect environmental conditions were used to examine the influences of lake shape, wind speed, and wind direction on the mesoscale morphology. This study ...

Neil F. Laird; John E. Walsh; David A. R. Kristovich

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

City of Lake Mills, Iowa (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mills Mills Place Iowa Utility Id 10606 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes ISO MISO Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Commercial Commercial Commercial All Electric Commercial Industrial Electric Rate Industrial Residential Residential Average Rates Residential: $0.0988/kWh Commercial: $0.0948/kWh Industrial: $0.0786/kWh References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=City_of_Lake_Mills,_Iowa_(Utility_Company)&oldid=409818

474

Lake Charles, LA Natural Gas LNG Imports from Equatorial Guinea...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Lake Charles, LA Natural Gas LNG Imports from Equatorial Guinea (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Lake Charles, LA Natural Gas LNG Imports from Equatorial Guinea (Dollars per...

475

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Fish Lake Valley Area (DOE...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At Fish Lake Valley Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location Fish Lake Valley Area...

476

Obama Administration and Great Lakes States Announce Agreement...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Great Lakes States Announce Agreement to Spur Development of Offshore Wind Projects Obama Administration and Great Lakes States Announce Agreement to Spur Development of...

477

Lake Charles, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Lake Charles, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Trinidad and Tobago (Million Cubic Feet) Lake Charles, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Trinidad...

478

Division of Water, Part 675: Great Lakes Water Withdrawal Registration...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

75: Great Lakes Water Withdrawal Registration Regulations (New York) Division of Water, Part 675: Great Lakes Water Withdrawal Registration Regulations (New York) Eligibility...

479

HERO BX formerly Lake Erie Biofuels | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon HERO BX formerly Lake Erie Biofuels Jump to: navigation, search Name HERO BX (formerly Lake Erie Biofuels) Place Erie,...

480

VALUE DISTRIBUTION ASSESSMENT OF GEOTHERMAL DEVELOPMENT IN LAKE COUNTY, CA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Eleven: Lake County Geothermal Energy Resource. . . .by t h e Report of t h e State Geothermal Task Force WDISTRIBUTION ASSESSMENT OF GEOTHERMAL DEVELOP~NTIN LAKE

Churchman, C.W.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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