Sample records for lake charles liquefaction

  1. The Lake Charles CCS Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doug Cathro

    2010-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Lake Charles CCS Project is a large-scale industrial carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) project which will demonstrate advanced technologies that capture and sequester carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions from industrial sources into underground formations. Specifically the Lake Charles CCS Project will accelerate commercialization of large-scale CO{sub 2} storage from industrial sources by leveraging synergy between a proposed petroleum coke to chemicals plant (the LCC Gasification Project) and the largest integrated anthropogenic CO{sub 2} capture, transport, and monitored sequestration program in the U.S. Gulf Coast Region. The Lake Charles CCS Project will promote the expansion of EOR in Texas and Louisiana and supply greater energy security by expanding domestic energy supplies. The capture, compression, pipeline, injection, and monitoring infrastructure will continue to sequester CO{sub 2} for many years after the completion of the term of the DOE agreement. The objectives of this project are expected to be fulfilled by working through two distinct phases. The overall objective of Phase 1 was to develop a fully definitive project basis for a competitive Renewal Application process to proceed into Phase 2 - Design, Construction and Operations. Phase 1 includes the studies attached hereto that will establish: the engineering design basis for the capture, compression and transportation of CO{sub 2} from the LCC Gasification Project, and the criteria and specifications for a monitoring, verification and accounting (MVA) plan at the Hastings oil field in Texas. The overall objective of Phase 2, provided a successful competitive down-selection, is to execute design, construction and operations of three capital projects: (1) the CO{sub 2} capture and compression equipment, (2) a Connector Pipeline from the LLC Gasification Project to the Green Pipeline owned by Denbury and an affiliate of Denbury, and (3) a comprehensive MVA system at the Hastings oil field.

  2. Lake Charles Carbon Capture and Sequestration Project U. S. Department...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lake Charles Carbon Capture and Sequestration Project U. S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory March 2014 1 INTRODUCTION The United States (U.S.) Department...

  3. SEMI-ANNUAL REPORTS FOR LAKE CHARLES EXPORTS, LLC - FE DKT. NO...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    LAKE CHARLES EXPORTS, LLC - FE DKT. NO. 11-59-LNG - ORDER 3324 SEMI-ANNUAL REPORTS FOR LAKE CHARLES EXPORTS, LLC - FE DKT. NO. 11-59-LNG - ORDER 3324 October 2013 April 2014...

  4. EIS-0491: Lake Charles Liquefaction Project, Calcasieu Parish...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    impacts of a proposal to expand an existing liquefied natural gas (LNG) import terminal in Calcasieu Parish, Louisiana, by constructing and operating natural gas...

  5. EIS-0491: Lake Charles Liquefaction Project, Calcasieu Parish, Louisiana |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:Revised FindingDepartmentDepartment ofDepartment488: FinalStatement0: FHWA

  6. QER- Comment of Lake Charles Harbor & Terminal District

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Good Afternoon, Please find the Lake Charles Harbor and Terminal District’s comments on Infrastructure Constraints in re: the QER Investigation hearing scheduled for Bismarck, ND on August 8, 2014. Please include these comments in the public record of the hearing. Thank you.

  7. Lake Charles Carbon Capture and Sequestration Project U. S. Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(FactDepartment ofLetter Report:40PM toLEDControl Concept | DepartmentLake Charles

  8. Lake Charles Carbon Capture and Sequestration Project U. S. Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron 9 5 - -/e),,sand CERN 73-11LabyrinthLake Charles

  9. Industrial-hygiene walk-through survey report of Firestone Synthetic Rubber and Latex Company, Lake Charles, Louisiana

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fajen, J.M.; Ungers, L.J.

    1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A walk-through survey was conducted at the Firestone Synthetic Rubber and Latex Company, Lake Charles, Louisiana in July, 1985. The purpose of the survey was to obtain information on the 1,3-butadiene polymer manufacturing process and evaluate exposure potential. Bulk samples of vinylpyridine latex, styrene/butadiene rubber, and polybutadiene rubber were analyzed for residual 1,3-butadiene.

  10. Response of rice to ammonium and nitrate nitrogen applied at various stages of plant growth on limed and unlimed Beaumont and Lake Charles clays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gay, William Blalock, III

    1962-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    RESPONSE OF RICE TO AMMONIUM AND NITRATE NITROGEN APPLIED AT VARIOUS STAGES OF PLANT GROWTH ON LIMED AND UNLINED BEAUNONT AND LAKE CHARLES CLAYS A Thesis By William B. Gay, III Submitted to the Graduate Sohool of the Agricultural... BEAUMONT AND LAKE CHARLES CLAYS A Thesis By Nilliam B. Gay, III Chairman of Committee Head of the Department of Soil Sc Crop Sciences ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS I would like to express my appreciation to Dr. A. G. Caldwell for his 1nterest and guidance...

  11. CATALYTIC BIOMASS LIQUEFACTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ergun, Sabri

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Solvent Systems Catalystic Biomass Liquefaction Investigatereactor Product collection Biomass liquefaction process12-13, 1980 CATALYTIC BIOMASS LIQUEFACTION Sabri Ergun,

  12. CATALYTIC BIOMASS LIQUEFACTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ergun, Sabri

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    LBL-11 019 UC-61 CATALYTIC BIOMASS LIQUEFACTION Sabri Ergun,Catalytic Liquefaction of Biomass,n M, Seth, R. Djafar, G.of California. CATALYTIC BIOMASS LIQUEFACTION QUARTERLY

  13. Hydrogen Delivery Liquefaction and Compression

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hydrogen Delivery Liquefaction and Compression - Overview of commercial hydrogen liquefaction and compression and opportunities to improve efficiencies and reduce cost.

  14. Industry-wide studies report of an in-depth survey at Firestone Synthetic Rubber and Latex Company, Lake Charles, Louisiana

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krishnan, E.R.; Ungers, L.J.; Fajen, J.M.

    1987-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to assess worker exposure to 1,3-butadiene at a polymer production facility, an in-depth industrial-hygiene survey was conducted at Firestone Synthetic Rubber and Latex Company, Lake Charles, Louisiana. This facility incorporated a number of controls designed to prevent the release of chemical intermediates and products into the air. Personal protective equipment included rubber, cotton, or vinyl gloves depending on the job performed. Respirators were required for field lab samplers and maintenance personnel performing specific tasks. Half-face organic vapor respirators were used. The authors recommend that consideration be given to converting to a closed-loop sampling system for obtaining quality control samples.

  15. Response of rice to ammonium and nitrate nitrogen applied at various stages of plant growth on limed and unlimed Beaumont and Lake Charles clays 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gay, William Blalock, III

    1962-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Patna1k (1 ) partially support th1s explanation. They found that lime at ths rate of one percent of the weight of the so11 increased mineralisat1on of nitrogen, but most of the n1trogen in their tests accumulated as ammonia rather than nitrate under...RESPONSE OF RICE TO AMMONIUM AND NITRATE NITROGEN APPLIED AT VARIOUS STAGES OF PLANT GROWTH ON LIMED AND UNLINED BEAUNONT AND LAKE CHARLES CLAYS A Thesis By William B. Gay, III Submitted to the Graduate Sohool of the Agricultural...

  16. CATALYTIC LIQUEFACTION OF BIOMASS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seth, Manu

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    liquid Fuels from Biomass: "Catalyst Screening and KineticUC-61 (l, RCO osn CDL or BIOMASS CATALYTIC LIQUEFACTION ManuCATALYTIC LIQUEFACTION OF BIOMASS Manu Seth, Roger Djafar,

  17. Coal liquefaction quenching process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thorogood, Robert M. (Macungie, PA); Yeh, Chung-Liang (Bethlehem, PA); Donath, Ernest E. (St. Croix, VI)

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There is described an improved coal liquefaction quenching process which prevents the formation of coke with a minimum reduction of thermal efficiency of the coal liquefaction process. In the process, the rapid cooling of the liquid/solid products of the coal liquefaction reaction is performed without the cooling of the associated vapor stream to thereby prevent formation of coke and the occurrence of retrograde reactions. The rapid cooling is achieved by recycling a subcooled portion of the liquid/solid mixture to the lower section of a phase separator that separates the vapor from the liquid/solid products leaving the coal reactor.

  18. Coal liquefaction and hydrogenation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schindler, Harvey D. (Fair Lawn, NJ); Chen, James M. (Edison, NJ)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed is a coal liquefaction process using two stages. The first stage liquefies the coal and maximizes the product while the second stage hydrocracks the remainder of the coal liquid to produce solvent.

  19. The influences of various factors on the adsorption-desorption behaviors of hydrophobic organic compounds in sediments of Lake Charles, LA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wei Chen; Kan, A.T.; Tomson, M.B. [Rice Univ., Houston, TX (United States)

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Both the adsorption and the desorption processes play important roles in the transport and fate of organic contaminants in water-sediments and groundwater systems. The adsorption-desorption processes are shown to be influenced by a number of factors, including sediments organic carbon content, contaminant aqueous solubility, aqueous-phase concentration as well as some natural environmental factors such as pH, pE, ionic strength and temperature. External mechanical forces, such as sediment perturbation, and repeated dredging will also have finite effect on the microscopic interparticle forces that control bonds between large and small grain particles. The objective of this research is to study the influences of various environmental effects on the equilibrium or non-equilibrium desorption behavior of nonpolar organic pollutants in historically contaminated natural sediments of Lake Charles, LA. Differences of desorption behavior between freshly and historically contaminated sediments will be compared in order to evaluated the desorption mechanism. The influences of particle size, mineral composition, organic matter concentration, and aqueous phase matrix composition on desorption behaviour will also be evaluated.

  20. antelope lake tonopah: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Model Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: 189 Preliminary Evaluation of a Lake Whitefish (Coregonus clupeaformis) Bioenergetics Model Charles whitefish...

  1. antelope lake ttr: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Model Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: 189 Preliminary Evaluation of a Lake Whitefish (Coregonus clupeaformis) Bioenergetics Model Charles whitefish...

  2. Method for coal liquefaction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wiser, Wendell H. (Kaysville, UT); Oblad, Alex G. (Salt Lake City, UT); Shabtai, Joseph S. (Salt Lake City, UT)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process is disclosed for coal liquefaction in which minute particles of coal in intimate contact with a hydrogenation catalyst and hydrogen arc reacted for a very short time at a temperature in excess of 400.degree. C. at a pressure of at least 1500 psi to yield over 50% liquids with a liquid to gaseous hydrocarbon ratio in excess of 8:1.

  3. Coal liquefaction process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carr, Norman L. (Allison Park, PA); Moon, William G. (Cheswick, PA); Prudich, Michael E. (Pittsburgh, PA)

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A C.sub.5 -900.degree. F. (C.sub.5 -482.degree. C.) liquid yield greater than 50 weight percent MAF feed coal is obtained in a coal liquefaction process wherein a selected combination of higher hydrogen partial pressure, longer slurry residence time and increased recycle ash content of the feed slurry are controlled within defined ranges.

  4. Zinc sulfide liquefaction catalyst

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Garg, Diwakar (Macungie, PA)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for the liquefaction of carbonaceous material, such as coal, is set forth wherein coal is liquefied in a catalytic solvent refining reaction wherein an activated zinc sulfide catalyst is utilized which is activated by hydrogenation in a coal derived process solvent in the absence of coal.

  5. Coal Liquefaction desulfurization process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Givens, Edwin N. (Bethlehem, PA)

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In a solvent refined coal liquefaction process, more effective desulfurization of the high boiling point components is effected by first stripping the solvent-coal reacted slurry of lower boiling point components, particularly including hydrogen sulfide and low molecular weight sulfur compounds, and then reacting the slurry with a solid sulfur getter material, such as iron. The sulfur getter compound, with reacted sulfur included, is then removed with other solids in the slurry.

  6. Method for coal liquefaction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wiser, W.H.; Oblad, A.G.; Shabtai, J.S.

    1994-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A process is disclosed for coal liquefaction in which minute particles of coal in intimate contact with a hydrogenation catalyst and hydrogen arc reacted for a very short time at a temperature in excess of 400 C at a pressure of at least 1500 psi to yield over 50% liquids with a liquid to gaseous hydrocarbon ratio in excess of 8:1. 1 figures.

  7. Cooperative research in coal liquefaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huffman, G.P.; Sendlein, L.V.A. (eds.)

    1991-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Significant progress was made in the May 1990--May 1991 contract period in three primary coal liquefaction research areas: catalysis, structure-reactivity studies, and novel liquefaction processes. A brief summary of the accomplishments in the past year in each of these areas is given.

  8. LBL CONTINUOUS BIOMASS LIQUEFACTION PROCESS ENGINEERING UNIT (PEU)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Figueroa, Carlos

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    0092 UC-61 ORNIA LBL CONTINUOUS BIOMASS LIQUEFACTION PROCESSLBL~l0092 LBL CONTINUOUS BIOMASS LIQUEFACTION PROCESSof Energy LBL CONTINUOUS BIOMASS LIQUEFACTION PROCESS

  9. MULTIPHASE REACTOR MODELING FOR ZINC CHLORIDE CATALYZED COAL LIQUEFACTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joyce, Peter James

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ix Introduction. A. Coal Liquefaction Overview B.L ZnCl 2-catalyzed Coal Liquefaction . . . . . . . . . • ,Results. . . • . ZnC1 2/MeOH Coal liquefaction Process

  10. arsenic-rich soda lakes: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Model Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: 189 Preliminary Evaluation of a Lake Whitefish (Coregonus clupeaformis) Bioenergetics Model Charles whitefish...

  11. Coal liquefaction process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wright, C.H.

    1986-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A process is described for the liquefaction of coal wherein raw feed coal is dissolved in recycle solvent with a slurry containing recycle coal minerals in the presence of added hydrogen at elevated temperature and pressure. The highest boiling distillable dissolved liquid fraction is obtained from a vacuum distillation zone and is entirely recycled to extinction. Lower boiling distillable dissolved liquid is removed in vapor phase from the dissolver zone and passed without purification and essentially without reduction in pressure to a catalytic hydrogenation zone where it is converted to an essentially colorless liquid product boiling in the transportation fuel range. 1 fig.

  12. Coal liquefaction process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wright, Charles H. (Overland Park, KS)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for the liquefaction of coal wherein raw feed coal is dissolved in recycle solvent with a slurry containing recycle coal minerals in the presence of added hydrogen at elevated temperature and pressure. The highest boiling distillable dissolved liquid fraction is obtained from a vacuum distillation zone and is entirely recycled to extinction. Lower boiling distillable dissolved liquid is removed in vapor phase from the dissolver zone and passed without purification and essentially without reduction in pressure to a catalytic hydrogenation zone where it is converted to an essentially colorless liquid product boiling in the transportation fuel range.

  13. Hydrothermal Liquefaction of Biomass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliott, Douglas C.

    2010-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydrothermal liquefaction technology is describes in its relationship to fast pyrolysis of biomass. The scope of work at PNNL is discussed and some intial results are presented. HydroThermal Liquefaction (HTL), called high-pressure liquefaction in earlier years, is an alternative process for conversion of biomass into liquid products. Some experts consider it to be pyrolysis in solvent phase. It is typically performed at about 350 C and 200 atm pressure such that the water carrier for biomass slurry is maintained in a liquid phase, i.e. below super-critical conditions. In some applications catalysts and/or reducing gases have been added to the system with the expectation of producing higher yields of higher quality products. Slurry agents ('carriers') evaluated have included water, various hydrocarbon oils and recycled bio-oil. High-pressure pumping of biomass slurry has been a major limitation in the process development. Process research in this field faded away in the 1990s except for the HydroThermal Upgrading (HTU) effort in the Netherlands, but has new resurgence with other renewable fuels in light of the increased oil prices and climate change concerns. Research restarted at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in 2007 with a project, 'HydroThermal Liquefaction of Agricultural and Biorefinery Residues' with partners Archer-Daniels-Midland Company and ConocoPhillips. Through bench-scale experimentation in a continuous-flow system this project investigated the bio-oil yield and quality that could be achieved from a range of biomass feedstocks and derivatives. The project was completed earlier this year with the issuance of the final report. HydroThermal Liquefaction research continues within the National Advanced Biofuels Consortium with the effort focused at PNNL. The bench-scale reactor is being used for conversion of lignocellulosic biomass including pine forest residue and corn stover. A complementary project is an international collaboration with Canada to investigate kelp (seaweed) as a biomass feedstock. The collaborative project includes process testing of the kelp in HydroThermal Liquefaction in the bench-scale unit at PNNL. HydroThermal Liquefaction at PNNL is performed in the hydrothermal processing bench-scale reactor system. Slurries of biomass are prepared in the laboratory from whole ground biomass materials. Both wet processing and dry processing mills can be used, but the wet milling to final slurry is accomplished in a stirred ball mill filled with angle-cut stainless steel shot. The PNNL HTL system, as shown in the figure, is a continuous-flow system including a 1-litre stirred tank preheater/reactor, which can be connected to a 1-litre tubular reactor. The product is filtered at high-pressure to remove mineral precipitate before it is collected in the two high-pressure collectors, which allow the liquid products to be collected batchwise and recovered alternately from the process flow. The filter can be intermittently back-flushed as needed during the run to maintain operation. By-product gas is vented out the wet test meter for volume measurement and samples are collected for gas chromatography compositional analysis. The bio-oil product is analyzed for elemental content in order to calculate mass and elemental balances around the experiments. Detailed chemical analysis is performed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and 13-C nuclear magnetic resonance is used to evaluate functional group types in the bio-oil. Sufficient product is produced to allow subsequent catalytic hydroprocessing to produce liquid hydrocarbon fuels. The product bio-oil from hydrothermal liquefaction is typically a more viscous product compared to fast pyrolysis bio-oil. There are several reasons for this difference. The HTL bio-oil contains a lower level of oxygen because of more extensive secondary reaction of the pyrolysis products. There are less amounts of the many light oxygenates derived from the carbohydrate structures as they have been further reacted to phenolic Aldol condensation products. The bio-oil

  14. Direct coal liquefaction process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rindt, J.R.; Hetland, M.D.

    1993-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved multistep liquefaction process for organic carbonaceous mater which produces a virtually completely solvent-soluble carbonaceous liquid product. The solubilized product may be more amenable to further processing than liquid products produced by current methods. In the initial processing step, the finely divided organic carbonaceous material is treated with a hydrocarbonaceous pasting solvent containing from 10% and 100% by weight process-derived phenolic species at a temperature within the range of 300 C to 400 C for typically from 2 minutes to 120 minutes in the presence of a carbon monoxide reductant and an optional hydrogen sulfide reaction promoter in an amount ranging from 0 to 10% by weight of the moisture- and ash-free organic carbonaceous material fed to the system. As a result, hydrogen is generated via the water/gas shift reaction at a rate necessary to prevent condensation reactions. In a second step, the reaction product of the first step is hydrogenated.

  15. Analysis of a supercritical hydrogen liquefaction cycle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Staats, Wayne Lawrence

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work, a supercritical hydrogen liquefaction cycle is proposed and analyzed numerically. If hydrogen is to be used as an energy carrier, the efficiency of liquefaction will become increasingly important. By examining ...

  16. Freeport LNG Expansion, L.P., FLNG Liquefaction, LLC, FLNG Liquefactio...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    LLC, FLNG Liquefaction 2, LLC and FLNG Liquefaction 3, LLC - 14-005-CIC Freeport LNG Expansion, L.P., FLNG Liquefaction, LLC, FLNG Liquefaction 2, LLC and FLNG Liquefaction...

  17. Complete liquefaction methods and apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Turner, Terry D.; Wilding, Bruce M.

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus are described to provide complete gas utilization in the liquefaction operation from a source of gas without return of natural gas to the source thereof from the process and apparatus. The mass flow rate of gas input into the system and apparatus may be substantially equal to the mass flow rate of liquefied product output from the system, such as for storage or use.

  18. EIS-0491: EPA Notice of Availability of Draft Environmental Impact...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    1: EPA Notice of Availability of Draft Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0491: EPA Notice of Availability of Draft Environmental Impact Statement Lake Charles Liquefaction...

  19. Solvent treatment of coal for improved liquefaction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Appell, Herbert R. (Pitcairn, PA); Narain, Nand K. (Bethel Park, PA); Utz, Bruce R. (Pittsburgh, PA)

    1986-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Increased liquefaction yield is obtained by pretreating a slurry of solid carbonaceous material and a liquid hydrocarbonaceous solvent at a temperature above 200.degree. C. but below 350.degree. C. for a period of 10 minutes to four hours prior to exposure to liquefaction temperatures.

  20. Novel supports for coal liquefaction catalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haynes, H.W. Jr.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This research is divided into three parts: (1) Evaluation of Alkaline-Earth-Promoted CoMo/Alumina Catalysts in a Bench Scale Hydrotreater, (2) Development of a Novel Catalytic Coal Liquefaction Microreactor (CCLM) Unit, and (3) Evaluation of Novel Catalyst Preparations for Direct Coal Liquefaction. (VC)

  1. Liquefaction and Pipeline Costs Bruce Kelly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Liquefaction and Pipeline Costs Bruce Kelly Nexant, Inc. Hydrogen Delivery Analysis Meeting May 8 are representative of hydrogen pipeline costs; 10 percent added to unit hydrogen costs as a contingency Better-9, 2007 Columbia, Maryland #12;2 Hydrogen Liquefaction Basic process Compress Cool to temperature

  2. J. Great Lakes Res. 25(4):663682 Internat. Assoc. Great Lakes Res., 1999

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Inventories and Mercury Profiles from Lake Superior: Evidence for Mining Impacts W. Charles Kerfoot*,1, Sandra size of Lake Superior, were sediment profiles at locations far offshore impacted by nearshore activi, copper, mining, mercury, sediment. 663 INTRODUCTION The Great Lakes ecosystem is susceptible to loading

  3. Coal liquefaction with preasphaltene recycle

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weimer, Robert F. (Allentown, PA); Miller, Robert N. (Allentown, PA)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A coal liquefaction system is disclosed with a novel preasphaltene recycle from a supercritical extraction unit to the slurry mix tank wherein the recycle stream contains at least 90% preasphaltenes (benzene insoluble, pyridine soluble organics) with other residual materials such as unconverted coal and ash. This subject process results in the production of asphaltene materials which can be subjected to hydrotreating to acquire a substitute for No. 6 fuel oil. The preasphaltene-predominant recycle reduces the hydrogen consumption for a process where asphaltene material is being sought.

  4. Charles Kerans Publications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Zong-Liang

    of Economic Geology University Station, Box X Austin, Texas 78713-8924 (512) 471-1368 E-mail address: charles portfolio of major oil reservoirs in the Permian Basin: The University of Texas at Austin, Bureau of Economic Geology Report of Investigations No. 271, 287 p., CD-ROM. Kerans, Charles, and Fitchen, W. M

  5. Extending the viability theory framework of resilience to uncertain dynamics, and application to lake eutrophication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    to lake eutrophication Charles Rougé1 , Jean-Denis Mathias1 and Guillaume Deuant1 December 2012 )>IJH on the example of lake eutrophication and shown to foster the use of dierent indicators that are adapted

  6. BIOMASS LIQUEFACTION EFFORTS IN THE UNITED STATES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ergun, Sabri

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    icat ion Preheat zone Biomass liquefaction Tubular reactor (design is shown in Figure 7, C I Biomass ua efaction Fic LBL Process BiOMASS t NON-REVERS lNG CYCLONE CONDENSER (

  7. BIOMASS LIQUEFACTION EFFORTS IN THE UNITED STATES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ergun, Sabri

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    coil) Pyrolysis zone j Gasification zone j · Combustion zoneis a reactor for both gasification and liquefaction. The$0 lb = 17~6 lb 13.5 lb Gasification stoichiometry (at 1290°

  8. Iron catalyzed coal liquefaction process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Garg, Diwakar (Macungie, PA); Givens, Edwin N. (Bethlehem, PA)

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process is described for the solvent refining of coal into a gas product, a liquid product and a normally solid dissolved product. Particulate coal and a unique co-catalyst system are suspended in a coal solvent and processed in a coal liquefaction reactor, preferably an ebullated bed reactor. The co-catalyst system comprises a combination of a stoichiometric excess of iron oxide and pyrite which reduce predominantly to active iron sulfide catalysts in the reaction zone. This catalyst system results in increased catalytic activity with attendant improved coal conversion and enhanced oil product distribution as well as reduced sulfide effluent. Iron oxide is used in a stoichiometric excess of that required to react with sulfur indigenous to the feed coal and that produced during reduction of the pyrite catalyst to iron sulfide.

  9. Charles Pratt | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Phone: (509) 371-6742 Contact Email: Charles.Pratt@pnnl.gov Overview: EMSL Computer and Network Support, CaNS (since 2009) S.T.I.D.P. Program S.A.S.T. Program Atmospherics...

  10. Lake Charles Urbanized Area MTP 2034

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lake Charles Urbanized Area Metropolitan Planning Organization

    2009-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    demand at both the regional and corridor levels. ? Invest in a public transit system that meets the existing and projected needs of the region by developing coordinated routes and schedules through the establishment of a coordinated region transit...

  11. Coal liquefaction and gas conversion: Proceedings. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Volume II contains papers presented at the following sessions: Indirect Liquefaction (oxygenated fuels); and Indirect Liquefaction (Fischer-Tropsch technology). Selected papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  12. Coal liquefaction and gas conversion: Proceedings. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Volume I contains papers presented at the following sessions: AR-Coal Liquefaction; Gas to Liquids; and Direct Liquefaction. Selected papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  13. Preliminary Evaluation of a Lake Whitefish (Coregonus clupeaformis) Bioenergetics Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    189 Preliminary Evaluation of a Lake Whitefish (Coregonus clupeaformis) Bioenergetics Model Charles whitefish (Coregonus clupeaformis) bioenergetics model by applying the model to size-at-age data for lake bioenergetics model with previously published estimates of GGE for bloater (C. hoyi) in Lake Michigan

  14. DIRECT LIQUEFACTION PROOF OF CONCEPT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The eighth bench scale test of POC program, Run PB-08, was successfully completed from August 8 to August 26, 1997. A total of five operating conditions were tested aiming at evaluating the reactivity of different pyrolysis oils in liquefaction of a Wyoming sub-bituminous coal (Black Thunder coal). For the first time, water soluble promoters were incorporated into the iron-based GelCat to improve the dispersion of the promoter metals in the feed blend. The concentration of the active metals, Mo and Fe, was 100 and 1000 ppm of moisture-free coal, respectively. Black Thunder coal used in this run was the same batch as tested in HTI?s Run POC-02. Similar to Runs PB-01 through 7, this run employed two back mixed slurry reactors, an interstage gas/slurry separator and a direct-coupled hydrotreater. In addition to the hot vapor from the second stage separator, the first stage separator overhead liquid was also fed to the hydrotreater, which was packed with Criterion C-411 hydrotreating catalyst. Pyrolysis oil was produced off-line from a pyrolysis unit acquired from University of Wyoming. Solids rejection was achieved by purging out pressure filter solid. The recycle solvents consisted of O-6 separator bottoms and pressure filter liquid (PFL). The Run PB-08 proceeded very smoothly without any interruptions. Coal conversion consistently above 90W% was achieved. High resid conversion and distillate yield have been obtained from co-processing of coal and 343°C+ (650°F+) pyrolysis oil. Light gas (C1-C3 ) yield was minimized and hydrogen consumption was reduced due to the introduction of pyrolysis oil, compared with conventional coal-derived solvent. Catalytic activity was improved by incorporating a promoter metal into the iron-based GelCat. It seemed that lowering the first stage temperature to 435°C might increase the hydrogenation function of the promoter metal. In comparison with previous coal-waste coprocessing run (PB-06), significant improvements in the process performance were achieved due to catalyst modification and integration of pyrolysis technique into liquefaction.

  15. BIOMASS TO BIO-OIL BY LIQUEFACTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Huamin; Wang, Yong

    2013-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Significant efforts have been devoted to develop processes for the conversion of biomass, an abundant and sustainable source of energy, to liquid fuels and chemicals, in order to replace diminishing fossil fuels and mitigate global warming. Thermochemical and biochemical methods have attracted the most attention. Among the thermochemical processes, pyrolysis and liquefaction are the two major technologies for the direct conversion of biomass to produce a liquid product, often called bio-oil. This chapter focuses on the liquefaction, a medium-temperature and high-pressure thermochemical process for the conversion of biomass to bio-oil. Water has been most commonly used as a solvent and the process is known as hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL). Fundamentals of HTL process, key factors determining HTL behavior, role of catalyst in HTL, properties of produced bio-oil, and the current status of the technology are summarized. The liquefaction of biomass by using organic solvents, a process called solvolysis, is also discussed. A wide range of biomass feedstocks have been tested for liquefaction including wood, crop residues, algae, food processing waste, and animal manure.

  16. Two-stage coal liquefaction process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Skinner, Ronald W. (Allentown, PA); Tao, John C. (Perkiomenville, PA); Znaimer, Samuel (Vancouver, CA)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved SRC-I two-stage coal liquefaction process which improves the product slate is provided. Substantially all of the net yield of 650.degree.-850.degree. F. heavy distillate from the LC-Finer is combined with the SRC process solvent, substantially all of the net 400.degree.-650.degree. F. middle distillate from the SRC section is combined with the hydrocracker solvent in the LC-Finer, and the initial boiling point of the SRC process solvent is increased sufficiently high to produce a net yield of 650.degree.-850.degree. F. heavy distillate of zero for the two-stage liquefaction process.

  17. Catalytic multi-stage liquefaction (CMSL)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Comolli, A.G.; Ganguli, P.; Karolkiewicz, W.F.; Lee, T.L.K.; Pradhan, V.R.; Popper, G.A.; Smith, T.; Stalzer, R.

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Under contract with the U.S. Department of Energy, Hydrocarbon Technologies, Inc. has conducted a series of eleven catalytic, multi-stage, liquefaction (CMSL) bench scale runs between February, 1991, and September, 1995. The purpose of these runs was to investigate novel approaches to liquefaction relating to feedstocks, hydrogen source, improved catalysts as well as processing variables, all of which are designed to lower the cost of producing coal-derived liquid products. This report summarizes the technical assessment of these runs, and in particular the evaluation of the economic impact of the results.

  18. Low severity coal liquefaction promoted by cyclic olefins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curtis, C.W.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to evaluate the efficacy of low severity coal liquefaction in the presence of highly reactive hydrogen donors, cyclic olefins. The work that was performed this quarter involved performing a literature search in which different aspects of low severity coal liquefaction were examined. In addition, two new mater's graduate students learned the fundamental differences between high severity coal liquefaction and low severity coal liquefaction by examining the literature and reading texts on coal liquefaction. The literature review presented for the first quarter's work is a compilation of the material which we have found to data involving low severity coal liquefaction. Additional review of low severity liquefaction literature is being conducted this quarter and will be reported in the next quarterly report. In addition, a summary of the work involving the reactivity of cyclic olefins in the absence and presence of coal will be presented next quarter.

  19. Methods of natural gas liquefaction and natural gas liquefaction plants utilizing multiple and varying gas streams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wilding, Bruce M; Turner, Terry D

    2014-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of natural gas liquefaction may include cooling a gaseous NG process stream to form a liquid NG process stream. The method may further include directing the first tail gas stream out of a plant at a first pressure and directing a second tail gas stream out of the plant at a second pressure. An additional method of natural gas liquefaction may include separating CO.sub.2 from a liquid NG process stream and processing the CO.sub.2 to provide a CO.sub.2 product stream. Another method of natural gas liquefaction may include combining a marginal gaseous NG process stream with a secondary substantially pure NG stream to provide an improved gaseous NG process stream. Additionally, a NG liquefaction plant may include a first tail gas outlet, and at least a second tail gas outlet, the at least a second tail gas outlet separate from the first tail gas outlet.

  20. Catalyst for coal liquefaction process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Huibers, Derk T. A. (Pennington, NJ); Kang, Chia-Chen C. (Princeton, NJ)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved catalyst for a coal liquefaction process; e.g., the H-Coal Process, for converting coal into liquid fuels, and where the conversion is carried out in an ebullated-catalyst-bed reactor wherein the coal contacts catalyst particles and is converted, in addition to liquid fuels, to gas and residual oil which includes preasphaltenes and asphaltenes. The improvement comprises a catalyst selected from the group consisting of the oxides of nickel molybdenum, cobalt molybdenum, cobalt tungsten, and nickel tungsten on a carrier of alumina, silica, or a combination of alumina and silica. The catalyst has a total pore volume of about 0.500 to about 0.900 cc/g and the pore volume comprises micropores, intermediate pores and macropores, the surface of the intermediate pores being sufficiently large to convert the preasphaltenes to asphaltenes and lighter molecules. The conversion of the asphaltenes takes place on the surface of micropores. The macropores are for metal deposition and to prevent catalyst agglomeration. The micropores have diameters between about 50 and about 200 angstroms (.ANG.) and comprise from about 50 to about 80% of the pore volume, whereas the intermediate pores have diameters between about 200 and 2000 angstroms (.ANG.) and comprise from about 10 to about 25% of the pore volume, and the macropores have diameters between about 2000 and about 10,000 angstroms (.ANG.) and comprise from about 10 to about 25% of the pore volume. The catalysts are further improved where they contain promoters. Such promoters include the oxides of vanadium, tungsten, copper, iron and barium, tin chloride, tin fluoride and rare earth metals.

  1. Coal liquefaction process with enhanced process solvent

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Givens, Edwin N. (Bethlehem, PA); Kang, Dohee (Macungie, PA)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In an improved coal liquefaction process, including a critical solvent deashing stage, high value product recovery is improved and enhanced process-derived solvent is provided by recycling second separator underflow in the critical solvent deashing stage to the coal slurry mix, for inclusion in the process solvent pool.

  2. Fired heater for coal liquefaction process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ying, David H. S. (Macungie, PA)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A fired heater for a coal liquefaction process is constructed with a heat transfer tube having U-bends at regular intervals along the length thereof to increase the slug frequency of the multi-phase mixture flowing therethrough to thereby improve the heat transfer efficiency.

  3. Synthetic fuel production by indirect coal liquefaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and dimethyl ether) by indirect coal liquefaction (ICL). Gasification of coal pro- duces a synthesis gas by coal gasification. The principal con- stituents of ``syngas'' are carbon monoxide and hydrogen, which modern coal gasification facilities in operation to make hydrogen for ammonia production. Also

  4. COAL LIQUEFACTION USING ZINC CHLORIDE CATALYST IN AN EXTRACTING SOLVENT MEDIUM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gandhi, Shamim Ahmed

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    iv List of Tables . , I. INTRODUCTION e o Coal Chemistry B.Coal Liquefaction c.Coal Liquefaction a D. II. o Experiment Equipment Summary of

  5. Influence of soil permeability on liquefaction-induced lateral pile response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramirez, Jose Manuel

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to lateral spreads: Centrifuge modeling," Journal ofof liquefaction analyses by centrifuge studies, laboratoryV. and Liu, L. (1995). "Centrifuge modeling of liquefaction

  6. Two-stage coal liquefaction without gas-phase hydrogen

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stephens, H.P.

    1986-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A process is provided for the production of a hydrogen-donor solvent useful in the liquefaction of coal, wherein the water-gas shift reaction is used to produce hydrogen while simultaneously hydrogenating a donor solvent. A process for the liquefaction of coal using said solvent is also provided. The process enables avoiding the use of a separate water-gas shift reactor as well as high pressure equipment for liquefaction. 3 tabs.

  7. EA-1942: Cove Point Liquefaction Project, Lusby, Maryland | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    to add natural gas liquefaction and exportation capabilities to an existing Cove Point LNG Terminal located on the Chesapeake Bay in Lusby, Maryland. DOE, Office of Fossil...

  8. acute liquefaction necrosis: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Pipeline Costs Bruce Kelly Renewable Energy Websites Summary: 1 Liquefaction and Pipeline Costs Bruce Kelly Nexant, Inc. Hydrogen Delivery Analysis Meeting May 8 total...

  9. advanced liquefaction processes: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Pipeline Costs Bruce Kelly Renewable Energy Websites Summary: 1 Liquefaction and Pipeline Costs Bruce Kelly Nexant, Inc. Hydrogen Delivery Analysis Meeting May 8 total...

  10. advanced direct liquefaction: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Pipeline Costs Bruce Kelly Renewable Energy Websites Summary: 1 Liquefaction and Pipeline Costs Bruce Kelly Nexant, Inc. Hydrogen Delivery Analysis Meeting May 8 total...

  11. EIS-0487: Freeport LNG Liquefaction Project, Brazoria County...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    impacts of a proposal to construct and operate the Freeport Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) Liquefaction Project, which would expand an existing LNG import terminal and...

  12. EA-1942: Cove Point Liquefaction Project, Lusby, Maryland | Department...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    to add natural gas liquefaction and exportation capabilities to the existing Cove Point LNG Terminal. DOE, Office of Fossil Energy, was a cooperating agency because it had an...

  13. Parallel finite element modeling of earthquake ground response and liquefaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Jinchi

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Failure of Sand Slope in Centrifuge Test." Proceedings ofStephen E. (2001b). "Centrifuge Modeling of Pile-Supportedof Site Liquefaction Using Centrifuge Tests." Proceedings of

  14. SYNTHESIS GAS UTILIZATION AND PRODUCTION IN A BIOMASS LIQUEFACTION FACILITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Figueroa, C.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pressure on the Steam Gasification of Biomass," Departmentof Energy, Catalytic Steam Gasification of Biomass, 11 AprilII. DISCUSSION III. GASIFICATION/LIQUEFACTION DESIGN BASIS

  15. Whole Algae Hydrothermal Liquefaction Technology Pathway

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biddy, Mary J.; Davis, Ryan; Jones, Susanne B.; Zhu, Yunhua

    2013-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In support of the Bioenergy Technologies Office, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) are undertaking studies of biomass conversion technologies to hydrocarbon fuels to identify barriers and target research toward reducing conversion costs. Process designs and preliminary economic estimates for each of these pathway cases were developed using rigorous modeling tools (Aspen Plus and Chemcad). These analyses incorporated the best information available at the time of development, including data from recent pilot and bench-scale demonstrations, collaborative industrial and academic partners, and published literature and patents. This pathway case investigates the feasibility of using whole wet microalgae as a feedstock for conversion via hydrothermal liquefaction. Technical barriers and key research needs have been assessed in order for the hydrothermal liquefaction of microalgae to be competitive with petroleum-derived gasoline, diesel and jet range blendstocks.

  16. EA-1963: Elba Liquefaction Project, Savannah, Georgia

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) is preparing, with DOE as a cooperating agency, an EA to analyze the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to add natural gas liquefaction and export capabilities at the existing Elba Liquefied Natural Gas Terminal near Savannah, Georgia. Additional information is available at FERC’s eLibrary website, elibrary.ferc.gov/idmws/docket_search.asp; search for docket number PF13-3.

  17. Fired heater for coal liquefaction process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ying, David H. S. (Macungie, PA); McDermott, Wayne T. (Allentown, PA); Givens, Edwin N. (Bethlehem, PA)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A fired heater for a coal liquefaction process is operated under conditions to maximize the slurry slug frequency and thereby improve the heat transfer efficiency. The operating conditions controlled are (1) the pipe diameter and pipe arrangement, (2) the minimum coal/solvent slurry velocity, (3) the maximum gas superficial velocity, and (4) the range of the volumetric flow velocity ratio of gas to coal/solvent slurry.

  18. Coal liquefaction process with increased naphtha yields

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ryan, Daniel F. (Friendswood, TX)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved process for liquefying solid carbonaceous materials wherein the solid carbonaceous material is slurried with a suitable solvent and then subjected to liquefaction at elevated temperature and pressure to produce a normally gaseous product, a normally liquid product and a normally solid product. The normally liquid product is further separated into a naphtha boiling range product, a solvent boiling range product and a vacuum gas-oil boiling range product. At least a portion of the solvent boiling-range product and the vacuum gas-oil boiling range product are then combined and passed to a hydrotreater where the mixture is hydrotreated at relatively severe hydrotreating conditions and the liquid product from the hydrotreater then passed to a catalytic cracker. In the catalytic cracker, the hydrotreater effluent is converted partially to a naphtha boiling range product and to a solvent boiling range product. The naphtha boiling range product is added to the naphtha boiling range product from coal liquefaction to thereby significantly increase the production of naphtha boiling range materials. At least a portion of the solvent boiling range product, on the other hand, is separately hydrogenated and used as solvent for the liquefaction. Use of this material as at least a portion of the solvent significantly reduces the amount of saturated materials in said solvent.

  19. Modeling Liquefaction Targeted Age: Elementary to High School

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polly, David

    , well-sorted sand water Introduction This activity allows students to construct a small-scale model smaller scale. Liquefaction is typically limited to relatively loose, silty or sandy soil deposits where://igs.indiana.edu/Earthquakes/) Miscellaneous Map 81 (scale,1:193,061) and 86 ( scale, 1:500,000): Map of Indiana Showing Liquefaction Potential

  20. Prevention of deleterious deposits in a coal liquefaction system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carr, Norman L. (Allison Park, PA); Prudich, Michael E. (Pittsburgh, PA); King, Jr., William E. (Gibsonia, PA); Moon, William G. (Cheswick, PA)

    1984-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for preventing the formation of deleterious coke deposits on the walls of coal liquefaction reactor vessels involves passing hydrogen and a feed slurry comprising feed coal and recycle liquid solvent to a coal liquefaction reaction zone while imparting a critical mixing energy of at least 3500 ergs per cubic centimeter of reaction zone volume per second to the reacting slurry.

  1. Charles L. Brown Department of Electrical & Computer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Acton, Scott

    -imaging and -electronics, and superconducting electronics Every faculty member in the Charles L. Brown Department

  2. Curriculum Vitae Charles S. Jackson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pillow, Jonathan

    -0401 (phone) (512) 471-8844 (fax) charles@ig.utexas.edu Education Ph.D. Geophysical Science 1998 Department, PI), + 15 other co-PIs. $549,999 (UT portion) NSF Office of Polar Programs, award ANT-1142139 "The

  3. Direct liquefaction proof-of-concept facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alfred G. Comolli; Peizheng Zhou; HTI Staff

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The main objective of the U.S. DOE, Office of Fossil Energy, is to ensure the US a secure energy supply at an affordable price. An integral part of this program was the demonstration of fully developed coal liquefaction processes that could be implemented if market and supply considerations so required, Demonstration of the technology, even if not commercialized, provides a security factor for the country if it is known that the coal to liquid processes are proven and readily available. Direct liquefaction breaks down and rearranges complex hydrocarbon molecules from coal, adds hydrogen, and cracks the large molecules to those in the fuel range, removes hetero-atoms and gives the liquids characteristics comparable to petroleum derived fuels. The current processes being scaled and demonstrated are based on two reactor stages that increase conversion efficiency and improve quality by providing the flexibility to adjust process conditions to accommodate favorable reactions. The first stage conditions promote hydrogenation and some oxygen, sulfur and nitrogen removal. The second stage hydrocracks and speeds the conversion to liquids while removing the remaining sulfur and nitrogen. A third hydrotreatment stage can be used to upgrade the liquids to clean specification fuels.

  4. Whole Algae Hydrothermal Liquefaction: 2014 State of Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, Susanne B.; Zhu, Yunhua; Snowden-Swan, Lesley J.; Anderson, Daniel; Hallen, Richard T.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Albrecht, Karl O.; Elliott, Douglas C.

    2014-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the base case yields and operating conditions for converting whole microalgae via hydrothermal liquefaction and upgrading to liquid fuels. This serves as the basis against which future technical improvements will be measured.

  5. Sabine Pass Liquefaction, LLC- Dkt. No 15-63-LNG

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of Fossil Energy gives notice of receipt of an Application filed on April 20, 2015, by Sabine Pass Liquefaction, LLC (SPL), seeking long-term multi-contract authorization to export...

  6. Process for coal liquefaction in staged dissolvers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Roberts, George W. (Emmaus, PA); Givens, Edwin N. (Bethlehem, PA); Skinner, Ronald W. (Allentown, PA)

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There is described an improved liquefaction process by which coal is converted to a low ash and low sulfur carbonaceous material that can be used as a fuel in an environmentally acceptable manner without costly gas scrubbing equipment. In the process, coal is slurried with a pasting oil, passed through a preheater and at least two dissolvers in series in the presence of hydrogen-rich gases at elevated temperatures and pressures. Solids, including mineral ash and unconverted coal macerals, are separated from the condensed reactor effluent. In accordance with the improved process, the first dissolver is operated at a higher temperature than the second dissolver. This temperature sequence produces improved product selectivity and permits the incorporation of sufficient hydrogen in the solvent for adequate recycle operations.

  7. Integrated coal cleaning, liquefaction, and gasification process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chervenak, Michael C. (Pennington, NJ)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Coal is finely ground and cleaned so as to preferentially remove denser ash-containing particles along with some coal. The resulting cleaned coal portion having reduced ash content is then fed to a coal hydrogenation system for the production of desirable hydrocarbon gases and liquid products. The remaining ash-enriched coal portion is gasified to produce a synthesis gas, the ash is removed from the gasifier usually as slag, and the synthesis gas is shift converted with steam and purified to produce the high purity hydrogen needed in the coal hydrogenation system. This overall process increases the utilization of as-mined coal, reduces the problems associated with ash in the liquefaction-hydrogenation system, and permits a desirable simplification of a liquids-solids separation step otherwise required in the coal hydrogenation system.

  8. Coal liquefaction process streams characterization and evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rathbone, R.F.; Hower, J.C.; Derbyshire, F.J. (Kentucky Univ., Lexington, KY (United States). Center for Applied Energy Research)

    1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study demonstrated the feasibility of using fluorescence and reflectance microscopy techniques for the examination of distillation resid materials derived from direct coal liquefaction. Resid, as defined here, is the 850{degrees}F{sup +} portion of the process stream, and includes soluble organics, insoluble organics and ash. The technique can be used to determine the degree of hydrogenation and the presence of multiple phases occurring within a resid sample. It can also be used to infer resid reactivity. The technique is rapid, requiring less than one hour for sample preparation and examination, and thus has apparent usefulness for process monitoring. Additionally, the technique can distinguish differences in samples produced under various process conditions. It can, therefore, be considered a potentially useful technique for the process developer. Further development and application of this analytical method as a process development tool is justified based on these results.

  9. Advanced progress concepts for direct coal liquefaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, R.; Derbyshire, F.; Givens, E. [Univ. of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research, Lexington, KY (United States)] [and others

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Given the low cost of petroleum crude, direct coal liquefaction is still not an economically viable process. The DOE objectives are to further reduce the cost of coal liquefaction to a more competitive level. In this project the primary focus is on the use of low-rank coal feedstocks. A particular strength is the use of process-derived liquids rather than model compound solvents. The original concepts are illustrated in Figure 1, where they are shown on a schematic of the Wilsonville pilot plant operation. Wilsonville operating data have been used to define a base case scenario using run {number_sign}263J, and Wilsonville process materials have been used in experimental work. The CAER has investigated: low severity CO pretreatment of coal for oxygen rejection, increasing coal reactivity and mg inhibiting the propensity for regressive reactions; the application of more active. Low-cost Fe and Mo dispersed catalysts; and the possible use of fluid coking for solids rejection and to generate an overhead product for recycle. CONSOL has investigated: oil agglomeration for coal ash rejection, for the possible rejection of ash in the recycled resid, and for catalyst addition and recovery; and distillate dewaxing to remove naphthenes and paraffins, and to generate an improved quality feed for recycle distillate hydrogenation. At Sandia, research has been concerned with the production of active hydrogen donor distillate solvent fractions produced by the hydrogenation of dewaxed distillates and by fluid coking via low severity reaction with H{sub 2}/CO/H{sub 2}O mixtures using hydrous metal oxide and other catalysts.

  10. Re-Condensation and Liquefaction of Helium and Hydrogen Using Coolers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Green, Michael A.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    AND LIQUEFACTION OF HELIUM AND HYDROGEN USING COOLERS M. A.liquefaction for helium and hydrogen can occur. KEYWORDS:each contain a liquid hydrogen absorber [4] that is cooled

  11. Freeport LNG Expansion, L.P. and FLNG Liquefaction, LLC - FE...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Freeport LNG Expansion, L.P. and FLNG Liquefaction, LLC - FE Dkt. No. 11-161-LNG Freeport LNG Expansion, L.P. and FLNG Liquefaction, LLC - FE Dkt. No. 11-161-LNG On November 15,...

  12. Freeport LNG Expansion, L.P. and FLNG Liquefaction, LLC - FE...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    and FLNG Liquefaction, LLC - FE Dkt. No. 10-161-LNG Freeport LNG Expansion, L.P. and FLNG Liquefaction, LLC - FE Dkt. No. 10-161-LNG On May 17, 2013, the Office of Fossil Energy...

  13. Freeport LNG Expansion, L.P., FLNG Liquefaction, LLC, FLNG Liquefaction 2,

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport inEnergy0.pdf Flash2010-60.pdf2 DOE March, 20152LLC and FLNG Liquefaction 3,

  14. An Experimental Set-up to Investigate Tailings Liquefaction and Control Measures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aubertin, Michel

    on liquefaction has focused on naturally occurring soils and has used conventional, small-scale testing equipment dedicated to the evaluation of the liquefaction potential of mine tailings. A mid-size (larger-scaleAn Experimental Set-up to Investigate Tailings Liquefaction and Control Measures Michael James

  15. A General Criterion for Liquefaction in Granular Layers with Heterogeneous Pore Pressure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Einat, Aharonov

    A General Criterion for Liquefaction in Granular Layers with Heterogeneous Pore Pressure Liran-saturated granular and porous layers can undergo liquefaction and lose their shear resistance when subjected to shear forcing. In geosystems, such a process can lead to severe natural hazards of soil liquefaction

  16. ASSESSING THE LIQUEFACTION RISK REDUCTION OF REINFORCED SOILS: A HOMOGENIZATION APPROACH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    liquefaction risk reduction factor. Then section 4 develops the same evaluation for a cross trench reinforcedASSESSING THE LIQUEFACTION RISK REDUCTION OF REINFORCED SOILS: A HOMOGENIZATION APPROACH Maxime for the reduction of the liquefaction risk, which can be expected from reinforcing the soil by a periodic array

  17. A General Criterion for Liquefaction in Granular Layers with Heterogeneous Pore Pressure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    numerical simulations a general criterion for liquefaction that applies also for the cases in which the poreA General Criterion for Liquefaction in Granular Layers with Heterogeneous Pore Pressure December.g.flekkoy@fys.uio.no ABSTRACT Fluid-saturated granular and porous layers can undergo liquefaction and lose their shear

  18. ANALYTIC COMPLETION (DRAFT) CHARLES REZK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rezk, Charles

    "Ext-p completion", and is well-known to be closely linked to computing the homotopy groups of p-completionsANALYTIC COMPLETION (DRAFT) CHARLES REZK Abstract. This is an expository treatment of what we call "analytic completion" of R- modules, which is a kind of completion defined in terms of quotients of power

  19. Fluid-escape features as a precursor of a large sublacustrine sediment slide in Lake Le Bourget, NW Alps, France

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilli, Adrian

    environment associated with discontinuous small-scale faults and fractures, and we discuss how they may Introduction Glacial lakes are prone to large-scale sediment slides and slumps owing to their high sediment triggered by sediment liquefaction during strong local earthquakes (Schilts and Clague, 1992). Earthquake

  20. Liquefaction process for solid carbonaceous materials containing alkaline earth metal humates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Epperly, William R. (Summit, NJ); Deane, Barry C. (East Brunswick, NJ); Brunson, Roy J. (Buffalo Grove, IL)

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved liquefaction process wherein wall scale and particulate agglomeration during the liquefaction of solid carbonaceous materials containing alkaline earth metal humates is reduced and/or eliminated by subjecting the solid carbonaceous materials to controlled cyclic cavitation during liquefaction. It is important that the solid carbonaceous material be slurried in a suitable solvent or diluent during liquefaction. The cyclic cavitation may be imparted via pressure cycling, cyclic agitation and the like. When pressure cycling or the like is employed an amplitude equivalent to at least 25 psia is required to effectively remove scale from the liquefaction vessel walls.

  1. Cooperative research in coal liquefaction. Final report, May 1, 1990-- April 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huffman, G.P. [ed.

    1992-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Consortium for Fossil Fuel Liquefaction Science (CFFLS) is currently engaged in a three year contract with the US Department of Energy investigating a range of research topics dealing with direct coal liquefaction. This report summarizes the results of this program in its second year, from May 1, 1990 to April 30, 1991. Accomplishments for this period are presented for the following tasks: Iron-based catalysts for coal liquefaction, exploratory research on coal conversion, novel coal liquefaction concepts, and novel catalysts for coal liquefaction.

  2. Donor solvent coal liquefaction with bottoms recycle at elevated pressure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bauman, Richard F. (Houston, TX); Taunton, John W. (Seabrook, TX); Anderson, George H. (Houston, TX); Trachte, Ken L. (Baytown, TX); Hsia, Steve J. (Friendswood, TX)

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved process for liquefying solid carbonaceous materials wherein increased naphtha yields are achieved by effecting the liquefaction at a pressure within the range from about 1750 to about 2800 psig in the presence of recycled bottoms and a hydrogen-donor solvent containing at least 0.8 wt % donatable hydrogen. The liquefaction is accomplished at a temperature within the range from about 700.degree. to about 950.degree. F. The coal:bottoms ratio in the feed to liquefaction will be within the range from about 1:1 to about 5:1 and the solvent or diluent to total solids ratio will be at least 1.5:1 and preferably within the range from about 1.6:1 to about 3:1. The yield of naphtha boiling range materials increases as the pressure increases but generally reaches a maximum at a pressure within the range from about 2000 to about 2500 psig.

  3. Liquefaction of solid carbonaceous material with catalyst recycle

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gupta, Avinash (Bloomfield, NJ); Greene, Marvin I. (Oradell, NJ)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the two stage liquefaction of a carbonaceous solid such as coal wherein coal is liquefied in a first stage in the presence of a liquefaction solvent and the first stage effluent is hydrogenated in the presence of a supported hydrogenation catalyst in a second stage, catalyst which has been previously employed in the second stage and comminuted to a particle size distribution equivalent to 100% passing through U.S. 100 Mesh, is passed to the first stage to improve the overall operation.

  4. Low severity coal liquefaction promoted by cyclic olefins. Quarterly report, October 1991--December 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curtis, C.W.

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to evaluate the efficacy of low severity coal liquefaction in the presence of highly reactive hydrogen donors, cyclic olefins. The work that was performed this quarter involved performing a literature search in which different aspects of low severity coal liquefaction were examined. In addition, two new mater`s graduate students learned the fundamental differences between high severity coal liquefaction and low severity coal liquefaction by examining the literature and reading texts on coal liquefaction. The literature review presented for the first quarter`s work is a compilation of the material which we have found to data involving low severity coal liquefaction. Additional review of low severity liquefaction literature is being conducted this quarter and will be reported in the next quarterly report. In addition, a summary of the work involving the reactivity of cyclic olefins in the absence and presence of coal will be presented next quarter.

  5. Cooperative research in coal liquefaction. Technical progress report, May 1, 1993--April 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huffman, G.P. [ed.

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Accomplishments for the past year are presented for the following tasks: coliquefaction of coal with waste materials; catalysts for coal liquefaction to clean transportation fuels; fundamental research in coal liquefaction; and in situ analytical techniques for coal liquefaction and coal liquefaction catalysts some of the highlights are: very promising results have been obtained from the liquefaction of plastics, rubber tires, paper and other wastes, and the coliquefaction of wastes with coal; a number of water soluble coal liquefaction catalysts, iron, cobalt, nickel and molybdenum, have been comparatively tested; mossbauer spectroscopy, XAFS spectroscopy, TEM and XPS have been used to characterize a variety of catalysts and other samples from numerous consortium and DOE liquefaction projects and in situ ESR measurements of the free radical density have been conducted at temperatures from 100 to 600{degrees}C and H{sub 2} pressures up to 600 psi.

  6. Enduring Legacy? Charles Tilly and Durable Inequality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Voss, Kim

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Charles Tilly’s durable inequality. Comparative Studies inThe relational basis of inequality: generic and contingentA. , & Voss, K. (1996). Inequality by design: Cracking the

  7. Coal liquefaction process streams characterization and evaluation. Novel analytical techniques for coal liquefaction: Fluorescence microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rathbone, R.F.; Hower, J.C.; Derbyshire, F.J. [Kentucky Univ., Lexington, KY (United States). Center for Applied Energy Research

    1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study demonstrated the feasibility of using fluorescence and reflectance microscopy techniques for the examination of distillation resid materials derived from direct coal liquefaction. Resid, as defined here, is the 850{degrees}F{sup +} portion of the process stream, and includes soluble organics, insoluble organics and ash. The technique can be used to determine the degree of hydrogenation and the presence of multiple phases occurring within a resid sample. It can also be used to infer resid reactivity. The technique is rapid, requiring less than one hour for sample preparation and examination, and thus has apparent usefulness for process monitoring. Additionally, the technique can distinguish differences in samples produced under various process conditions. It can, therefore, be considered a potentially useful technique for the process developer. Further development and application of this analytical method as a process development tool is justified based on these results.

  8. Karl Terzaghi Research Collection / Charles F. Ripley (collector)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Handy, Todd C.

    Karl Terzaghi Research Collection / Charles F. Ripley (collector) Compiled by Christopher Hives Karl Terzaghi Research Collection / Charles F. Ripley (collector). ­ 1912 1997. 1.31 m of textual

  9. DISCUSSIONS AND CLOSURES Discussion of "1907 Static Liquefaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    from the north dike failure of the Wachu sett Dam by force matching the postfailure geometry. The post-------------- DISCUSSIONS AND CLOSURES Discussion of "1907 Static Liquefaction Flow Failure of North Dike of Wachusett Dam" by Scott M. Olson, Timothy D. Stark, William H. Walton, and Gonzalo Castro

  10. Fine particle clay catalysts for coal liquefaction. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olson, E.S.

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In an effort to develop new disposable catalysts for direct coal liquefaction, several types of clay-supported pyrrhotite catalysts were prepared and tested. These included iron-pillared montmorillonite, mixed iron/alumina-pillared montmorillonite, iron-impregnated montmorillonite, and iron oxometallate-impregnated montmorillonite.

  11. The latest developments and outlook for hydrogen liquefaction technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ohlig, K.; Decker, L. [Linde Kryotechnik AG, Pfungen, CH-8422 (Switzerland)

    2014-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Liquefied hydrogen is presently mainly used for space applications and the semiconductor industry. While clean energy applications, for e.g. the automotive sector, currently contribute to this demand with a small share only, their demand may see a significant boost in the next years with the need for large scale liquefaction plants exceeding the current plant sizes by far. Hydrogen liquefaction for small scale plants with a maximum capacity of 3 tons per day (tpd) is accomplished with a Brayton refrigeration cycle using helium as refrigerant. This technology is characterized by low investment costs but lower process efficiency and hence higher operating costs. For larger plants, a hydrogen Claude cycle is used, characterized by higher investment but lower operating costs. However, liquefaction plants meeting the potentially high demand in the clean energy sector will need further optimization with regard to energy efficiency and hence operating costs. The present paper gives an overview of the currently applied technologies, including their thermodynamic and technical background. Areas of improvement are identified to derive process concepts for future large scale hydrogen liquefaction plants meeting the needs of clean energy applications with optimized energy efficiency and hence minimized operating costs. Compared to studies in this field, this paper focuses on application of new technology and innovative concepts which are either readily available or will require short qualification procedures. They will hence allow implementation in plants in the close future.

  12. EIS-0464: Lake Charles Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) Project...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    for an award of financial assistance through a competitive process under the Industrial Carbon Capture and Sequestration Program. Public Comment Opportunities None available at...

  13. EIS-0498: Magnolia LNG and Lake Charles Expansion Projects, Calcasieu

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:Revised FindingDepartmentDepartment ofDepartment488:PatricioStatementStatement

  14. Lake Charles, Louisiana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant Jump to: navigation,working-groups <LackawannaLagoBenton,

  15. Impact of hydrodynamics on coal liquefaction. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kang, D.; Ying, D.H.S.; Givens, E.N.

    1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have attempted to determine the hydrodynamic effects of various reactor configurations on coal liquefaction, to help select the optimal reactor configuration and to provide additional understanding of coal liquefaction reaction kinetics, which cannot be definitively determined by a CSTR alone. Only a qualitative understanding of the fluid dynamic effects on product yields has been perceived by operating various sizes of open-column tubular reactors, because the fluid-dynamic characteristics of these reactors were not clearly understood and could not be varied significantly. Indirect studies, by cold-flow simulation, have been of little help in defining the fluid dynamic impact on coal liquefaction. Comparison of actual coal liquefaction data from both the plug-flow reactor and the CSTR showed that the plug-flow configuration had various advantages. Reactor yields improved significantly, especially the primary product conversions. At 840/sup 0/F and residence times of 29 and 40 min, coal and preasphaltene conversions were enhanced approximately 6 and 10%, respectively. At these conditions, the plug-flow reactor also yielded about 10% more oils than the CSTR with significant increase in hydrogen utilization. Also, this study provided an opportunity to examine the soundness of APCI/ICRC's sequential kinetic model, by interfacing the plug-flow and CSTR yield data. Transforming CSTR yields to plug-flow data showed that product yields deviated considerably from the measured plug-flow data, suggesting the need to improve the existing reaction model. Having both CSTR and plug-flow reactor data bases is important for developing a sound coal reaction model and for determining hydrodynamic effects on coal liquefaction in a direct way. The results will lead to an optimized reactor configuration as well as optimized operation. 5 references, 23 figures, 20 tables.

  16. Charles Rousseaux | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube platformBuilding RemovalCSSDepartment of Energy5-4-20129 -Charles Rousseaux

  17. Charles Russomanno | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube platformBuilding RemovalCSSDepartment of Energy5-4-20129 -Charles

  18. Charles Elachi | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO OverviewAttachments4 Chairs Meeting - April 2014 ENVIRONMENTALChapter2 Special206Charles

  19. ANNUAL REPORT OCTOBER 1, 1979-SEPTEMBER 30, 1980 CHEMISTRY AND MORPHOLOGY OF COAL LIQUEFACTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinemann, Heinz

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    AND MORPHOLOGY OF COAL LIQUEFACTION LA , . . ,:;. ~~Microscope Studies of Coal during Hydrogenation Taskspread evenly over the coal grains of this particular area.

  20. Advanced direct liquefaction concepts for PETC generic units. Quarterly technical progress report, January 1993--March 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Progress in a number of laboratory projects supporting direct liquefaction are described. There are too many different topics to be accommodated in a single abstract.

  1. Study of pore pressure variation during liquefaction using two constitutive models for sand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taiebat, Mahdi; Shahir, Hadi; Pak, Ali

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of liquefiable sand in the centrifuge test. Keywords: Fullyof Liquefaction Analyses by Centrifuge Studies - Laboratory18. [19] Tan TS, Scott RF. Centrifuge scaling considerations

  2. Nitrogen expander cycles for large capacity liquefaction of natural gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, Ho-Myung; Park, Jae Hoon; Gwak, Kyung Hyun [Hong Ik University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Seoul, 121-791 (Korea, Republic of); Choe, Kun Hyung [Korea Gas Corporation, Incheon, 406-130 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermodynamic study is performed on nitrogen expander cycles for large capacity liquefaction of natural gas. In order to substantially increase the capacity, a Brayton refrigeration cycle with nitrogen expander was recently added to the cold end of the reputable propane pre-cooled mixed-refrigerant (C3-MR) process. Similar modifications with a nitrogen expander cycle are extensively investigated on a variety of cycle configurations. The existing and modified cycles are simulated with commercial process software (Aspen HYSYS) based on selected specifications. The results are compared in terms of thermodynamic efficiency, liquefaction capacity, and estimated size of heat exchangers. The combination of C3-MR with partial regeneration and pre-cooling of nitrogen expander cycle is recommended to have a great potential for high efficiency and large capacity.

  3. Slurry Phase Iron Catalysts for Indirect Coal Liquefaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abhaya K. Datye

    1998-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes research conducted to support the DOE program in indirect coal liquefaction. Specifically, we have studied the attrition behavior of Iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysts, their interaction with the silica binder and the evolution of iron phases in a synthesis gas conversion process. The results provide significant insight into factors that should be considered in the design of catalysts for the conversion of coal-derived synthesis gas into liquid fuels.

  4. Control of pyrite addition in coal liquefaction process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schmid, Bruce K. (Englewood, CO); Junkin, James E. (Englewood, CO)

    1982-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Pyrite addition to a coal liquefaction process (22, 26) is controlled (118) in inverse proportion to the calcium content of the feed coal to maximize the C.sub.5 --900.degree. F. (482.degree. C.) liquid yield per unit weight of pyrite added (110). The pyrite addition is controlled in this manner so as to minimize the amount of pyrite used and thus reduce pyrite contribution to the slurry pumping load and disposal problems connected with pyrite produced slag.

  5. A Characterization and Evaluation of Coal Liquefaction Process Streams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An updated assessment of the physico-chemical analytical methodology applicable to coal-liquefaction product streams and a review of the literature dealing with the modeling of fossil-fuel resid conversion to product oils are presented in this document. In addition, a summary is provided for the University of Delaware program conducted under this contract to develop an empirical test to determine relative resid reactivity and to construct a computer model to describe resid structure and predict reactivity.

  6. Health and environmental effects document for direct coal liquefaction - 1981.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mellinger, P.J.; Wilson, B.W.; Mahlum, D.D.; Sever, L.E.; Olsen, A.R.

    1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents initial estimates of potential human health effects from inhalation of nonmethane hydrocarbons (NMHC) that may be released from a future hypothetical industry producing about 600,000 bb1/day of synthetic fuel by direct liquefaction of coal. The assessment approach starts wth general assumptions that are then refined in a tiered sequence that considers available epidemiological, environmental and chemical data. The uncertainties involved in such an evaluation have been quantified where possible at this early stage of health risk analysis. Many surrogate data bases were considered for application to coal liquefaction including coke oven, British gas retort, roofing tar and asphalts, and cigarette smoke. The coke oven data base was selected for this assessment because the chemical and physical nature of coke oven emissions are judged to more closely approximate potential coal liquefaction emissions. Utilizing the extensive epidemiological data base for coke oven workers as a surrogate model, health effects from release of coal liquefaction NMHC may be quantified. This method results in estimates of about 1 x 10/sup -3/ excess cancer deaths/yr to an industrial work force of 7800 persons and 5 x 10/sup -2/ excess cancer deaths/yr in the U.S. population as a whole from NMHC that boil above 600/sup 0/F. Sources of uncertainty in the estimates are listed. Using these uncertainties, it is estimated that from 2 x 10/sup -4/ to 5 x 10/sup -3/ lung cancer deaths/yr may occur in the industrial work force and from 1 x 10/sup -2/ to 2.5 x 10/sup -1/ lung cancer deaths/yr in the U.S. population as a whole. On an individual basis, the excess lifetime risk to occupationally exposed workers is estimated to be 500 times greater than to members of the U.S. public.

  7. SLURRY PHASE IRON CATALYSTS FOR INDIRECT COAL LIQUEFACTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abhaya K. Datye

    1998-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes research conducted to support the DOE program in indirect coal liquefaction. Specifically, they have studied the attrition behavior of iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysts, their interaction with the silica binder and the evolution of iron phases in a synthesis gas conversion process. The results provide significant insight into factors that should be considered in the design of catalysts for converting coal based syngas into liquid fuels.

  8. Active constraint regions for a natural gas liquefaction process Magnus G. Jacobsen a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skogestad, Sigurd

    processes. 2. Optimal operation of a PRICO liquefaction plant 2.1. Plant description The PRICO processActive constraint regions for a natural gas liquefaction process Magnus G. Jacobsen a , Sigurd Keywords: Self-optimizing control Liquefied natural gas LNG PRICO Disturbances Optimal operation a b s t r

  9. Active constraint regions for a natural gas liquefaction process Magnus G. Jacobsena

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skogestad, Sigurd

    Active constraint regions for a natural gas liquefaction process Magnus G. Jacobsena , Sigurd little attention. this paper addresses optimal operation of a simple natural gas liquefaction process at all times. Keywords: Self-optimizing control, liquefied natural gas, LNG, PRICO, disturbances, optimal

  10. Cooperative research in coal liquefaction infratechnology and generic technology development: Final report, October 1, 1985 to December 31, 1986

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sendlein, L.V.A.

    1987-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    During the first year of its research program, the Consortium for Fossil Fuel Liquefaction Science has made significant progress in many areas of coal liquefaction and coal structure research. Research topics for which substantial progress has been made include integrated coal structure and liquefaction studies, investigation of differential liquefaction processes, development and application of sophisticated techniques for structural analysis, computer analysis of multivariate data, biodesulfurization of coal, catalysis studies, co-processing of coal and crude oil, coal dissolution and extraction processes, coal depolymerization, determination of the liquefaction characteristics of many US coals for use in a liquefaction database, and completion of a retrospective technology assessment for direct coal liquefaction. These and related topics are discussed in considerably more detail in the remainder of this report. Individual projects are processed separately for the data base.

  11. Direct liquefaction proof-of-concept program. Topical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Comolli, A.G.; Lee, L.K.; Pradhan, V.R. [and others

    1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of work conducted under the DOE Proof-of-Concept Program in direct coal liquefaction at Hydrocarbon Technologies, Inc. in Lawrenceville, New Jersey, from February 1994 through April 1995. The work includes modifications to HRI`s existing 3 ton per day Process Development Unit (PDU) and completion of the second PDU run (POC Run 2) under the Program. The 45-day POC Run 2 demonstrated scale up of the Catalytic Two-Stage Liquefaction (CTSL Process) for a subbituminous Wyoming Black Thunder Mine coal to produce distillate liquid products at a rate of up to 4 barrels per ton of moisture-ash-free coal. The combined processing of organic hydrocarbon wastes, such as waste plastics and used tire rubber, with coal was also successfully demonstrated during the last nine days of operations of Run POC-02. Prior to the first PDU run (POC-01) in this program, a major effort was made to modify the PDU to improve reliability and to provide the flexibility to operate in several alternative modes. The Kerr McGee Rose-SR{sup SM} unit from Wilsonville, Alabama, was redesigned and installed next to the U.S. Filter installation to allow a comparison of the two solids removal systems. The 45-day CTSL Wyoming Black Thunder Mine coal demonstration run achieved several milestones in the effort to further reduce the cost of liquid fuels from coal. The primary objective of PDU Run POC-02 was to scale-up the CTSL extinction recycle process for subbituminous coal to produce a total distillate product using an in-line fixed-bed hydrotreater. Of major concern was whether calcium-carbon deposits would occur in the system as has happened in other low rank coal conversion processes. An additional objective of major importance was to study the co-liquefaction of plastics with coal and waste tire rubber with coal.

  12. EIS-0487: Freeport LNG Liquefaction Project, Brazoria County, Texas

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) prepared an EIS to analyze the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to construct and operate the Freeport Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) Liquefaction Project, which would expand an existing LNG import terminal and associated facilities in Brazoria County, Texas, to enable the terminal to liquefy and export LNG. DOE, Office of Fossil Energy – a cooperating agency in preparing the EIS – has an obligation under Section 3 of the Natural Gas Act to authorize the import and export of natural gas, including LNG, unless it finds that the import or export is not consistent with the public interest.

  13. EA-1942: Cove Point Liquefaction Project, Lusby, Maryland

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) prepared an EA that examined the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to add natural gas liquefaction and exportation capabilities to the existing Cove Point LNG Terminal. DOE, Office of Fossil Energy, was a cooperating agency because it had an obligation under Section 3 of the Natural Gas Act to authorize the import and export of natural gas, including LNG, unless it found that the import or export is not consistent with the public interest. DOE adopted FERC’s EA and issued a Finding of No Significant Impact.

  14. A kinetic model for the liquefaction of Texas lignite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haley, Sandra Kay

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    shortages in the United States has led to investigations in alternative energy sources. Of particular interest is the lignite resource in Texas which is mainly situated in the east and central regions north of the Colorado River. There is an estimated...A KINETIC MODEL FOR THE LIQUEFACTION OF TEXAS LIGNITE 4 Thesis by SANDRA KAY BALKY Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE y 1980 Major Subject...

  15. Ass. Charles Gide Justice & Economics Toulouse, June 16 &17, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Ass. Charles Gide Justice & Economics Toulouse, June 16 &17, 2011 English corrections in progress in a specific assessment (Sen, 1992 and see Sen,1990). #12;Ass. Charles Gide Justice & Economics Toulouse, June

  16. Physical Geology Laboratory Manual Charles Merguerian and J Bret Bennington

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Merguerian, Charles

    Physical Geology Laboratory Manual Charles Merguerian and J Bret Bennington Geology Department Hofstra University © 2006 #12;i PHYSICAL GEOLOGY LABORATORY MANUAL Ninth Edition Professors Charles Merguerian and J Bret Bennington Geology Department Hofstra University #12;ii ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS We thank

  17. Novel bimetallic dispersed catalysts for temperature-programmed coal liquefaction. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chunshan Song; Schobert, H.H.; Parfitt, D.P. [and others

    1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Development of new catalysts is a promising approach to more efficient coal liquefaction. It has been recognized that dispersed catalysts are superior to supported catalysts for primary liquefaction of coals, because the control of initial coal dissolution or depolymerization requires intimate contact between the catalyst and coal. This research is a fundamental and exploratory study on catalytic coal liquefaction, with the emphasis on exploring novel bimetallic dispersed catalysts for coal liquefaction and the effectiveness of temperature-programmed liquefaction using dispersed catalysts. The primary objective of this research was to explore novel bimetallic dispersed catalysts from organometallic molecular precursors, that could be used in low concentrations but exhibit relatively high activity for efficient hydroliquefaction of coals under temperature-programmed conditions. We have synthesized and tested various catalyst precursors in liquefaction of subbituminous and bituminous coals and in model compound studies to examine how do the composition and structure of the catalytic precursors affect their effectiveness for coal liquefaction under different reaction conditions, and how do these factors affect their catalytic functions for hydrogenation of polyaromatic hydrocarbons, for cleavage of C-C bonds in polycyclic systems such as 4-(1-naphthylmethyl)bibenzyl, for hydrogenolysis of C-O bond such as that in dinaphthylether, for hydrodeoxygenation of phenolic compounds and other oxygen-containing compounds such as xanthene, and for hydrodesulfurization of polycyclic sulfur compounds such as dibenzothiophene. The novel bimetallic and monometallic precursors synthesized and tested in this project include various Mo- and Fe-based compounds.

  18. Liquefaction of calcium-containing subbituminous coals and coals of lower rank

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gorbaty, Martin L. (Sanwood, NJ); Taunton, John W. (Seabrook, TX)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for the treatment of a calcium-containing subbituminous coal and coals of lower rank to form insoluble, thermally stable calcium salts which remain within the solids portions of the residue on liquefaction of the coal, thereby suppressing the formation scale, made up largely of calcium carbonate deposits, e.g., vaterite, which normally forms within the coal liquefaction reactor (i.e., coal liquefaction zone), e.g., on reactor surfaces, lines, auxiliary equipment and the like. A solution of a compound or salt characterized by the formula MX, where M is a Group IA metal of the Periodic Table of the Elements, and X is an anion which is capable of forming water-insoluble, thermally stable calcium compounds, is maintained in contact with a particulate coal feed sufficient to impregnate said salt or compound into the pores of the coal. On separation of the impregnated particulate coal from the solution, the coal can be liquefied in a coal liquefaction reactor (reaction zone) at coal liquefaction conditions without significant formation of vaterite or other forms of calcium carbonate on reactor surfaces, auxiliary equipment and the like; and the Group IA metal which remains within the liquefaction bottoms catalyzes the reaction when the liquefaction bottoms are subjected to a gasification reaction.

  19. Title Position Holder Increased GPA Student Affairs Dr. Charles Brown

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    Dr. Charles Brown Associate Vice President & Dean of Students Dr. Corey King 3 6 15 $4000-10,000 per Dr. Charles Brown Associate Vice President & Dean of Students Dr. Corey King Develop a program. Charles Brown Associate Vice President & Dean of Students Dr. Corey King identify student needs, location

  20. Subtask 3.9 - Direct Coal Liquefaction Process Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aulich, Ted; Sharma, Ramesh

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC), in partnership with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and Accelergy Corporation, an advanced fuels developer with technologies exclusively licensed from ExxonMobil, undertook Subtask 3.9 to design, build, and preliminarily operate a bench-scale direct coal liquefaction (DCL) system capable of converting 45 pounds/hour of pulverized, dried coal to a liquid suitable for upgrading to fuels and/or chemicals. Fabrication and installation of the DCL system and an accompanying distillation system for off-line fractionation of raw coal liquids into 1) a naphtha?middle distillate stream for upgrading and 2) a recycle stream was completed in May 2012. Shakedown of the system was initiated in July 2012. In addition to completing fabrication of the DCL system, the project also produced a 500-milliliter sample of jet fuel derived in part from direct liquefaction of Illinois No. 6 coal, and submitted the sample to the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) at Wright? Patterson Air Force Base, Dayton, Ohio, for evaluation. The sample was confirmed by AFRL to be in compliance with all U.S. Air Force-prescribed alternative aviation fuel initial screening criteria.

  1. H-coal liquefaction: moving toward commercial reality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schneiderman, S.J.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The successful operation of the H-Coal pilot plant has allowed Ashland management to vigorously pursue the option to build a commercial plant. Ashland Synthetic Fuels has applied to the United States Synthetic Fuels Corporation for a loan guarantee to construct a commercial H-Coal liquefaction facility in Breckinridge County, Kentucky. Ashland would like to develop this project with four other partners. In November 1981, Bechtel Inc., joined Ashland in the development of the Breckinridge Project. Under this recent agreement, the two companies will cooperate to prepare a detailed project cost estimate, an environmental impact statement, secure the necessary permits, and form a joint venture group to facilitate the involvement of other companies to develop this facility. The future of the Breckinridge project depends completely on the United States Synthetic Fuels Corporation. If this government agency declines to supply the loan guarantees for this project there is little chance the facility will be built. Capital requirements have been estimated at $5,200,000,000. The proposed Breckinridge liquefaction facility would process 18,500 tons of high-sulphur bituminous coal per day and produce 50,000 barrels per day of liquid product.

  2. Cooperative research program in coal liquefaction. Quarterly report, May 1, 1993--October 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoffman, G.P. [ed.

    1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes progress in four areas of research under the general heading of Coal Liquefaction. Results of studies concerning the coliquefaction of coal with waste organic polymers or chemical products of these polymers were reported. Secondly, studies of catalytic systems for the production of clean transportation fuels from coal were discussed. Thirdly, investigations of the chemical composition of coals and their dehydrogenated counterparts were presented. These studies were directed toward elucidation of coal liquefaction processes on the chemical level. Finally, analytical methodologies developed for in situ monitoring of coal liquefaction were reported. Techniques utilizing model reactions and methods based on XAFS, ESR, and GC/MS are discussed.

  3. SEMI-ANNUAL REPORTS FOR SABINE PASS LIQUEFACTION, LLC - FE DKT...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    111-LNG - ORDER 2961 & 2961-A SEMI-ANNUAL REPORTS FOR SABINE PASS LIQUEFACTION, LLC - FE DKT. NO. 10-111-LNG - ORDER 2961 & 2961-A April 2011 October 2011 April 2012 October 2012...

  4. SEMI-ANNUAL REPORTS FOR SABINE PASS LIQUEFACTION, LLC - FE DKT...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    30-LNG - ORDER 3306 SEMI-ANNUAL REPORTS FOR SABINE PASS LIQUEFACTION, LLC - FE DKT. NO. 13-30-LNG - ORDER 3306 No reports submitted. More Documents & Publications SEMI-ANNUAL...

  5. SEMI-ANNUAL REPORTS FOR SABINE PASS LIQUEFACTION, LLC - FE DKT...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    42-LNG - ORDER 3307 SEMI-ANNUAL REPORTS FOR SABINE PASS LIQUEFACTION, LLC - FE DKT. NO. 13-42-LNG - ORDER 3307 No reports submitted. More Documents & Publications SEMI-ANNUAL...

  6. SEMI-ANNUAL REPORTS FOR SABINE PASS LIQUEFACTION, LLC - FE DKT...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    85-LNG - ORDER 2833 SEMI-ANNUAL REPORTS FOR SABINE PASS LIQUEFACTION, LLC - FE DKT. NO. 10-85-LNG - ORDER 2833 April 2011 October 2011 April 2012 October 2012 April 2013 October...

  7. Effect of liquefaction on the behavior of a retrofitted pile foundation subjected to cyclic loading

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buchanan, Jennifer Leona

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Liquefaction is a major concern for bridge column foundations in earthquake prone regions. Although its effects are devastating to the structural integrity of foundations, there is little quantitative information to guide engineers in the design...

  8. Environmental and Economical Evaluation of Integrating NGL Extraction and LNG Liquefaction Technology in Iran LNG Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manesh, M. H. K.; Mazhari, V.

    The combination of changing global markets for natural gas liquids (NGL) with the simultaneous increase in global demand for liquefied natural gas (LNG) has stimulated an interest in the integration of NGL recovery technology with LNG liquefaction...

  9. Subtask 3.3 - Feasibility of Direct Coal Liquefaction in the Modern Economic Climate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benjamin Oster; Joshua Strege; Marc Kurz; Anthony Snyder; Melanie Jensen

    2009-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Coal liquefaction provides an alternative to petroleum for the production of liquid hydrocarbon-based fuels. There are two main processes to liquefy coal: direct coal liquefaction (DCL) and indirect coal liquefaction (ICL). Because ICL has been demonstrated to a greater extent than DCL, ICL may be viewed as the lower-risk option when it comes to building a coal liquefaction facility. However, a closer look, based on conversion efficiencies and economics, is necessary to determine the optimal technology. This report summarizes historical DCL efforts in the United States, describes the technical challenges facing DCL, overviews Shenhua's current DCL project in China, provides a DCL conceptual cost estimate based on a literature review, and compares the carbon dioxide emissions from a DCL facility to those from an ICL facility.

  10. Contributions to the analysis and mitigation of liquefaction in loose sand slopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vytiniotis, Antonios

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This research analyzes the vulnerability of loose granular waterfront fills to liquefaction in seismic events and considers the effectiveness of Pre-fabricated Vertical (PV) drain systems in mitigating potential damage. ...

  11. Coal liquefaction: A research and development needs assessment: Final report, Volume II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schindler, H.D.; Burke, F.P.; Chao, K.C.; Davis, B.H.; Gorbaty, M.L.; Klier, K.; Kruse, C.W.; Larsen, J.W.; Lumpkin, R.E.; McIlwain, M.E.; Wender, I.; Stewart, N.

    1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Volume II of this report on an assessment of research needs for coal liquefaction contains reviews of the five liquefaction technologies---direct, indirect, pyrolysis, coprocessing, and bioconversion. These reviews are not meant to be encyclopedic; several outstanding reviews of liquefaction have appeared in recent years and the reader is referred to these whenever applicable. Instead, these chapters contain reviews of selected topics that serve to support the panel's recommendations or to illustrate recent accomplishments, work in progress, or areas of major research interest. At the beginning of each of these chapters is a brief introduction and a summary of the most important research recommendations brought out during the panel discussions and supported by the material presented in the review. A review of liquefaction developments outside the US is included. 594 refs., 100 figs., 60 tabs.

  12. Environmental and Economical Evaluation of Integrating NGL Extraction and LNG Liquefaction Technology in Iran LNG Project 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manesh, M. H. K.; Mazhari, V.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    LNG and NGL for comparable compression schemes as compared to stand-alone LNG liquefaction and NGL extraction facilities. In addition, there are potential enhancements to the overall facility availability and project economics and environmental impacts...

  13. Canadian Unity Collection / Charles Connaghan (collector)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Handy, Todd C.

    Canadian Unity Collection / Charles Connaghan (collector) University of British Columbia Archives Collector's Biographical Sketch o Scope and Content o Notes Series Descriptions o Council for Canadian) #12;Collection Description Canadian Unity Collection. - 1975-1980 39 cm of textual records. Collector

  14. Where Eagles FlyTM CHARLES COUNTY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maryland at College Park, University of

    with the development of new energetic systems, CECD's expansion calls for the creation of other areas of excellenceWhere Eagles FlyTM CHARLES COUNTY MARYLAND CENTER FOR ENERGETIC CONCEPTS DEVELOPMENT Dr. D. K Phone 301.405.5294 Fax 301.314.9477 dkanand@umd.edu Website: www.cecd.umd.edu ENERGETICS TECHNOLOGY

  15. Correlation of cyclic testing procedures for determining liquefaction potential of sands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Janicek, John Patrick

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the added danger of liquefaction caused by surface wave loading. Whereas earthquake loading can be characterized by relat1vely high stresses occurr1ng over a very short t1me per1od, wave- induced stresses are usually small, but several thousand repetit1... waves. At certain permeabilities, relatively small waves may cause significant pore pressure buildup when the cohesionless deposit is subjected to several thousand wave repetitions. (!ave-induced liquefaction is obviously a complex process involving...

  16. Assessment of Long-Term Research Needs for Coal-Liquefaction Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Penner, S.S.

    1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Fossil Energy Research Working Group (FERWG), at the request of J.M. Deutch (Under Secretary of DOE), E. Frieman (Director, Office of Energy Research) and G. Fumich, Jr. (Assistant Secretary for Fossil Fuels), has studied and reviewed currently funded coal-liquefaction technologies. These studies were performed in order to provide an independent assessment of critical research areas that affect the long-term development of coal-liquefaction technologies. This report summarizes the findings and research recommendations of FERWG.

  17. Coal liquefaction process streams characterization and evaluation. Volume 2, Participants program final summary evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandes, S.D.; Robbins, G.A.; Winschel, R.A.; Burke, F.P.

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This 4.5-year project consisted of routine analytical support to DOE`s direct liquefaction process development effort (the Base Program), and an extensive effort to develop, demonstate, and apply new analytical methods for the characterization of liquefaction process streams (the Participants Program). The objective of the Base Program was to support the on-going DOE direct coal liquefaction process development program. Feed, process, and product samples were used to assess process operations, product quality, and the effects of process variables, and to direct future testing. The primary objective of the Participants Program was to identify and demonstrate analytical methods for use in support of liquefaction process develpment, and in so doing, provide a bridge between process design, development, and operation and analytical chemistry. To achieve this direct coal liquefaction-derived materials. CONSOL made an evaluation of each analytical technique. During the performance of this project, we obtained analyses on samples from numerous process development and research programs and we evaluated a variety of analytical techniques for their usefulness in supporting liquefaction process development. Because of the diverse nature of this program, we provide here an annotated bibliography of the technical reports, publications, and formal presentations that resulted from this program to serve as a comprehensive summary of contract activities.

  18. Low-Cost Methane Liquefaction Plant and Vehicle Refueling Station

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    B. Wilding; D. Bramwell

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) is currently negotiating a collaborative effort with Pacific Gas and Electric (PG&E) that will advance the use of liquefied natural gas (LNG) as a vehicle fuel. We plan to develop and demonstrate a small-scale methane liquefaction plant (production of 5,000 to 10,000 gallons per day) and a low-cost ($150,000) LNG refueling station to supply fuel to LNG-powered transit buses and other heavy-duty vehicles. INEEL will perform the research and development work. PG&E will deploy the new facilities commercially in two demonstration projects, one in northern California, and one in southern California.

  19. Low Severity Coal Liquefaction Promoted by Cyclic Olefins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christine W. Curtis

    1998-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of the donor solvent technology for coal liquefaction has drawn a good deal of attention over the last three decades. The search for better hydrogen donors led investigators to a class of compounds known as cyclic olefins. Cyclic olefins are analogues of the conventional hydroaromatic donor species but do not contain aromatic rings. The cyclic olefins are highly reactive compounds which readily release their hydrogen at temperatures of 200 C or higher. Considerable effort has been o expended toward understanding the process of hydrogen donation. Most of this work was conducted in bomb reactors, with product analysis being carried out after the reaction was complete. Efforts directed towards fundamental studies of these reactions in situ are rare. The current work employs a high temperature and high pressure infrared cell to monitor in situ the concentrations of reactants and products during hydrogen release from hydrogen donor compounds.

  20. Charles County- Agricultural Preservation Districts- Renewable Generation Allowed

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Charles County provides that producing energy "from solar, wind, biomass, and farm waste and residue crops" is a permitted agricultural use in areas zoned as Agricultural Preservation Districts.

  1. Human dimensions of Marine Protected Areas Anthony Charles and Lisette Wilson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Charles, Anthony

    , Canada. Correspondence to A. Charles: tel: ţ1 902 4205732; fax: ţ1 902 4968101; e-mail: tony.charles@smu

  2. Exploratory Research on Novel Coal Liquefaction Concept - Task 2: Evaluation of Process Steps.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandes, S.D.; Winschel, R.A.

    1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel direct coal liquefaction technology is being investigated in a program being conducted by CONSOL Inc. with the University of Kentucky, Center for Applied Energy Research and LDP Associates under DOE Contract DE-AC22-95PC95050. The novel concept consists of a new approach to coal liquefaction chemistry which avoids some of the inherent limitations of current high-temperature thermal liquefaction processes. The chemistry employed is based on hydride ion donation to solubilize coal at temperatures (350-400{degrees}C) significantly lower than those typically used in conventional coal liquefaction. The process concept being explored consists of two reaction stages. In the first stage, the coal is solubilized by hydride ion donation. In the second, the products are catalytically upgraded to acceptable refinery feedstocks. The program explores not only the initial solubilization step, but integration of the subsequent processing steps, including an interstage solids-separation step, to produce distillate products. A unique feature of the process concept is that many of the individual reaction steps can be decoupled, because little recycle around the liquefaction system is expected. This allows for considerable latitude in the process design. Furthermore, this has allowed for each key element in the process to be explored independently in laboratory work conducted under Task 2 of the program.

  3. To Brunswick Folsom Lake

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MASONITE UPPER LAKE LUCERNE WILLIAMS MERIDAN CORTINA PEASE BARRY BOGUE OLIVEHURST HARTER Marysville Yuba

  4. Improving conversion rates in low severity coal liquefaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, B. [West Georgia College, Carrollton, GA (United States)

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of reactions were run with lignite coal and subbituminous coal. The purpose was: (1) to prove the importance that various treatments have in producing high conversion rates in low severity coal liquefaction, and (2) to determine their independent and combined effectiveness. The coal was pretreated with HCI and methanol. Molybdenum naphthanate and nickel octoate were independently used as catalysts. Also, the cyclic olefin, 1, 4, 5, 8, 9, 10-hexahydroanthracene (HHA), was tested as a hydrogen donor. By using all of these treatments with molybdenum naphthanate as the catalyst, the best conversion rate of 56% was achieved. This project was made possible by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) University Coal Research (UCR) Internship Program. This program is managed and operated for DOE by the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE). Participants are assigned to universities conducting fossil energy-related research under UCR grants from the Pittsburgh Technology Center (PETC). All research was performed at Auburn University under the supervision of Dr. Christine W. Curtis.

  5. A CHARACTERIZATION AND EVALUATION OF COAL LIQUEFACTION PROCESS STREAMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G.A. Robbins; S.D. Brandes; D.J. Pazuchanics; D.G. Nichols; R.A. Winschel

    1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the Technical Progress Report for the fifteenth quarter of activities under DOE Contract No. DE-AC22-94PC93054. It covers the period January 1 through March 31, 1998. Described in this report are the following activities: (1) CONSOL characterized 41 process stream samples obtained from HTI Run PB-01 (227-90), in which Black Thunder Mine coal, Hondo VTB resid, municipal solid waste (MSW) plastics, and virgin plastics were co-liquefaction feedstocks with all-dispersed Fe and Mo catalysts. (2) A request was made for samples from the Nippon Coal Oil NEDOL pilot plant in Kashima, Japan. (3) Phenols were extracted from two samples of separator overhead oil from HTI Run PB-03 Periods 10A and 10B. The phenols were converted to ethylphenyl ethers, and the ethers were distilled to produce a sample within the diesel fuel boiling range. The ethers were mixed with diesel fuel to make 1%, 5%, 10%, and 20% solutions. The four mixtures and a control sample (0% ether) were tested for diesel fuel properties by Intertek Testing Services, Caleb Brett. (4) Computational studies related to the University of Delaware's resid conversion model were continued on the Hewlett Packard Apollo HP-735 RISC workstation at CONSOL R and D. The Structure Optimization Program and the Structure Once-Through Program were used to generate physicochemical properties and structure models for the 15 coal resid samples which have been under study.

  6. Biomass Direct Liquefaction Options: TechnoEconomic and Life Cycle Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tews, Iva J.; Zhu, Yunhua; Drennan, Corinne; Elliott, Douglas C.; Snowden-Swan, Lesley J.; Onarheim, Kristin; Solantausta, Yrjo; Beckman, David

    2014-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this work was to assess the competitiveness of two biomass to transportation fuel processing routes, which were under development in Finland, the U.S. and elsewhere. Concepts included fast pyrolysis (FP), and hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL), both followed by hydrodeoxygenation, and final product refining. This work was carried out as a collaboration between VTT (Finland), and PNNL (USA). The public funding agents for the work were Tekes in Finland and the Bioenergy Technologies Office of the U.S. Department of Energy. The effort was proposed as an update of the earlier comparative technoeconomic assessment performed by the IEA Bioenergy Direct Biomass Liquefaction Task in the 1980s. New developments in HTL and the upgrading of the HTL biocrude product triggered the interest in reinvestigating this comparison of these biomass liquefaction processes. In addition, developments in FP bio-oil upgrading had provided additional definition of this process option, which could provide an interesting comparison.

  7. Advanced direct liquefaction concepts for PETC generic units. Quarterly technical progress report, April 1993--June 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Section 1 contains a report of the progress by the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research on the following tasks: laboratory support (liquefaction in dewaxed and hydrotreated dewaxed solvent); CO pretreatment (effect of process variables on CO pretreatment, CO-pretreated product characterization, and liquefaction results); and iron based dispersed catalysts (production, characterization and testing of sulfated hematites and reaction model development). Section 2 contains a progress report by CONSOL, Inc. on the following tasks: laboratory support; pretreatment work on dewaxing; pretreatment work on agglomeration; and economic evaluation. Progress by Sandia National Laboratories is reported in Section 3 on the following: laboratory support (TGA methods) and solvent pretreatment (coker tar hydrogenation and coal liquefaction results). Section 4 gives a preliminary technical assessment by LDP Associates on the following: baseline economic assessment; assessment of improved coal conversion; and fluid coking.

  8. TERMINATION OF NON-SIMPLE REWRITE SYSTEMS CHARLES GLEN HOOT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dershowitz, Nachum

    TERMINATION OF NON-SIMPLE REWRITE SYSTEMS BY CHARLES GLEN HOOT B.A., University of California, San at Urbana-Champaign, 1996 Urbana, Illinois #12;TERMINATION OF NON-SIMPLE REWRITE SYSTEMS Charles Glen Hoot system has the property thatno derivation can continue inde nitely, it is said to be terminating. Showing

  9. TERMINATION OF NONSIMPLE REWRITE SYSTEMS CHARLES GLEN HOOT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dershowitz, Nachum

    TERMINATION OF NON­SIMPLE REWRITE SYSTEMS BY CHARLES GLEN HOOT B.A., University of California, San at Urbana­Champaign, 1996 Urbana, Illinois #12; TERMINATION OF NON­SIMPLE REWRITE SYSTEMS Charles Glen Hoot system) has the property that no derivation can continue indefinitely, it is said to be terminating

  10. SUMMARY REPORT OF THE DOE DIRECT LIQUEFACTION PROCESS DEVELOPMENT CAMPAIGN OF THE LATE TWENTIETH CENTURY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    F.P. Burke; S.D. Brandes; D.C. McCoy; R.A. Winschel; D. Gray; G. Tomlinson

    2001-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Following the petroleum price and supply disruptions of 1973, the U.S. government began a substantial program to fund the development of alternative fuels. Direct coal liquefaction was one of the potential routes to alternative fuels. The direct coal liquefaction program was funded at substantial levels through 1982, and at much lower levels thereafter. Those processes that were of most interest during this period were designed to produce primarily distillate fuels. By 1999, U.S. government funding for the development of direct coal liquefaction ended. Now that the end of this campaign has arrived, it is appropriate to summarize the process learnings derived from it. This report is a summary of the process learnings derived from the DOE direct coal liquefaction process development campaign of the late twentieth century. The report concentrates on those process development programs that were designed to produce primarily distillate fuels and were largely funded by DOE and its predecessors in response to the petroleum supply and price disruptions of the 1970s. The report is structured as chapters written by different authors on most of the major individual DOE-funded process development programs. The focus of the report is process learnings, as opposed to, say, fundamental coal liquefaction science or equipment design. As detailed in the overview (Chapter 2), DOE's direct coal liquefaction campaign made substantial progress in improving the process yields and the quality of the distillate product. Much of the progress was made after termination by 1983 of the major demonstration programs of the ''first generation'' (SRC-II, H-Coal, EDS) processes.

  11. Catalyst system and process for benzyl ether fragmentation and coal liquefaction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zoeller, Joseph Robert (Kingsport, TN)

    1998-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Dibenzyl ether can be readily cleaved to form primarily benzaldehyde and toluene as products, along with minor amounts of bibenzyl and benzyl benzoate, in the presence of a catalyst system comprising a Group 6 metal, preferably molybdenum, a salt, and an organic halide. Although useful synthetically for the cleavage of benzyl ethers, this cleavage also represents a key model reaction for the liquefaction of coal; thus this catalyst system and process should be useful in coal liquefaction with the advantage of operating at significantly lower temperatures and pressures.

  12. The Wilsonville Advanced Coal Liquefaction Research and Development Facility, Wilsonville, Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This reports presents the operating results for Run 252 at the Advanced Coal Liquefaction R D Facility in Wilsonville, Alabama. This run operated in the Close-Coupled Integrated Two-Stage Liquefaction mode (CC-ITSL) using Illinois No. 6 bituminous coal. The primary run objective was demonstration of unit and system operability in the CC-ITSL mode with catalytic-catalytic reactors and with ash recycle. Run 252 began on 26 November 1986 and continued through 3 February 1987. During this period 214.4 MF tons of Illinois No. 6 coal were fed in 1250 hours of operation. 3 refs., 29 figs., 18 tabs.

  13. Charles L Neumeyer | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWPSuccessAlamosCharacterization of Selective BindingD. ScottCharles L

  14. Charles Townes, the Maser, and the Laser

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Garyand TechnicalAbout AboutWelcomeScientific and Charles

  15. Cooperative Research Program in Coal-Waste Liquefaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerald Huffman

    2000-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of a feasibility study for a demonstration plant for the liquefaction of waste plastic and tires and the coprocessing of these waste polymers with coal are presented. The study was conducted by a committee that included nine representatives from the CFFS, six from the U.S. Department of Energy - Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC), and four from Burns and Roe, Inc. The study included: (1) An assessment of current recycling practices, particularly feedstock recycling in Germany; (2) A review of pertinent research, and a survey of feedstock availability for various types of waste polymers; and (3) A conceptual design for a demonstration plant was developed and an economic analysis for various feedstock mixes. The base case for feedstock scenarios was chosen to be 200 tons per day of waste plastic and 100 tons per day of waste tires. For this base case with oil priced at $20 per barrel, the return on investment (ROI) was found to range from 9% to 20%, using tipping fees for waste plastic and tires typical of those existing in the U.S. The most profitable feedstock appeared to waste plastic alone, with a plant processing 300 t/d of plastic yielding ROI's from 13 to 27 %, depending on the tipping fees for waste plastic. Feedstock recycling of tires was highly dependent on the price that could be obtained for recovered carbon. Addition of even relatively small amounts (20 t/d) of coal to waste plastic and/or coal feeds lowered the ROI's substantially. It should also be noted that increasing the size of the plant significantly improved all ROI's. For example, increasing plant size from 300 t/d to1200 t/d approximately doubles the estimated ROI's for a waste plastic feedstock.

  16. Macromolecular structure analysis and effective liquefaction pretreatment. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suuberg, E.M.; Yun, Y.; Lilly, W.D.; Leung, K.; Gates, T.; Otake, Y.; Deevi, S.C.

    1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project was concerned with characterizing the changes in coal macromolecular structure, that are of significance for liquefaction pretreatments of coal. The macromolecular structure of the insoluble portion of coal is difficult to characterize. Techniques that do so indirectly (based upon, for example, NMR and FTIR characterizations of atomic linkages) are not particularly sensitive for this purpose. Techniques that characterize the elastic structure (such as solvent swelling) are much more sensitive to subtle changes in the network structure. It is for this reason that we focused upon these techniques. The overall objective involved identifying pretreatments that reduce the crosslinking (physical or chemical) of the network structure, and thus lead to materials that can be handled to a greater extent by traditional liquid-phase processing techniques. These techniques tend to be inherently more efficient at producing desirable products. This report is divided into seven chapters. Chapter II summarizes the main experimental approaches used throughout the project, and summarizes the main findings on the Argonne Premium coal samples. Chapter III considers synergistic effects of solvent pairs. It is divided into two subsections. The first is concerned with mixtures of CS{sub 2} with electron donor solvents. The second subsection is concerned with aromatic hydrocarbon - alcohol or hydrocarbon - alcohol mixtures, as might be of interest for preliquefaction delivery of catalysts into bituminous coals. Chapter IV deals with questions of how oxidation might influence the results that are obtained. Chapter V briefly details what conclusions may be drawn concerning the elastic behavior of coals, and the effects of thermal treatments on this behavior. Chapter VI is concerned with theories to describe the action of solvents that are capable of dissociating non-covalent crosslinks. Finally, Chapter VII discusses the practical implications of the study.

  17. Paper No. 12A-12 ERRORS IN DESIGN LEADING TO PILE FAILURES DURING SEISMIC LIQUEFACTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolton, Malcolm

    Paper No. 12A-12 1 ERRORS IN DESIGN LEADING TO PILE FAILURES DURING SEISMIC LIQUEFACTION Subhamoy.K) University of Cambridge (U.K) ABSTRACT Collapse of piled foundations in liquefiable soils has been observed. The current method of pile design under earthquake loading is based on a bending mechanism where the inertia

  18. The Wilsonville Advanced Coal Liquefaction Research and Development Facility, Wilsonville, Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The investigation of various Two-Stage Liquefaction (TSL) process configurations was conducted at the Wilsonville Advanced Coal Liquefaction R D Facility between July 1982 and September 1986. The facility combines three process units. There are the liquefaction unit, either thermal (TLU) or catalytic, for the dissolution of coal, the Critical Solvent Deashing unit (CSD) for the separation of ash and undissolved coal, and a catalytic hydrogenation unit (HTR) for product upgrading and recycle process solvent replenishment. The various TSL process configurations were created by changing the process sequence of these three units and by recycling hydrotreated solvents between the units. This report presents a description of the TSL configurations investigated and an analysis of the operating and performance data from the period of study. Illinois No. 6 Burning Star Mine coal Wyodak Clovis Point Mine coal were processed. Cobalt-molybdenum and disposable iron-oxide catalysts were used to improve coal liquefaction reactions and nickel-molybdenum catalysts were used in the hydrotreater. 28 refs., 31 figs., 13 tabs.

  19. 1032 / JOURNAL OF GEOTECHNICAL AND GEOENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING / DECEMBER 1999 LIQUEFACTION OPPORTUNITY MAPPING VIA SEISMIC WAVE ENERGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Southern California, University of

    OPPORTUNITY MAPPING VIA SEISMIC WAVE ENERGY By M. I. Todorovska1 and M. D. Trifunac2 ABSTRACT: An empirical, energy-based methodology for liquefaction hazard assessment and microzonation mapping is presented at level ground. The energy of ground shaking is estimated from the Fourier amplitude spectra

  20. EIS-0494: Excelerate Liquefaction Solutions Lavaca Bay LNG Project, Calhoun and Jackson Counties, Texas

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) is preparing, with DOE as a cooperating agency, an EIS to analyze the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to construct and operate a liquefied natural gas terminal consisting of two floating liquefaction, storage and offloading units and a 29-mile pipeline header system to transport natural gas from existing pipeline systems to the LNG terminal facilities.

  1. CURRICULUM VITAE Name: John Charles Priscu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, Rick L.

    /Chief Scientist, Whillans Ice Stream Subglacial Access Research Drilling (WISSARD) project. 2009-present. Co and Oceanography winter meeting, Salt Lake City. February 2003. Participant and discussion leader, National Science member. 2002-2008. Advisory Committee for the United States Ice Core Drilling Services. 2002

  2. LAKE COLUSA SAN JOAQUIN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DEL NORTE SISKIYOU MODOC LASSEN BUTTE PLUMAS GLENN LAKE COLUSA SUTTER YUBA NEVADA SIERRA PLACER EL ˇ˘ 1 0 1 "!9 6 Lake Tahoe HUMBOLDT TEHAMA MENDOCINO DEL NORTE SISKIYOU MODOC LASSEN BUTTE PLUMAS GLENN

  3. Status of health and environmental research relative to direct coal liquefaction: 1976 to the present

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gray, R.H.; Cowser, K.E. (eds.)

    1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes the status of health and environmental research efforts, supported by the US Department of Energy (DOE), to assist in the development of environmentally acceptable coal liquefaction processes. Four major direct coal liquefaction processes are currently in (or have been investigated at) the pilot plant stage of development. Two solvent refined coal processes (SRC-I and -II), H-coal (a catalytic liquefaction process) and Exxon donor solvent (EDS). The Pacific Northwest Laboratory was assigned responsibility for evaluating SRC process materials and prepared comprehensive health and environmental effects research program plans for SRC-I and -II. A similar program plan was prepared for H-coal process materials by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. A program has been developed for EDS process materials by Exxon Research and Engineering Co. The program includes short-term screening of coal-derived materials for potential health and ecological effects. Longer-term assays are used to evaluate materials considered most representative of potential commercial practice and with greatest potential for human exposure or release to the environment. Effects of process modification, control technologies and changing operational conditions on potential health and ecological effects are also being evaluated. These assessments are being conducted to assist in formulating cost-effective environmental research programs and to estimate health and environmental risks associated with a large-scale coal liquefaction industry. Significant results of DOE's health and environmental research efforts relative to coal liquefaction include the following: chemical characterization, health effects, ecological fate and effects, amelioration and risk assessment.

  4. Guide to Douglas Point, Charles County, Maryland

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jensen, B.L.; Miles, K.J.; Strass, P.K.; McDonald, B.S. Jr.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1974, the tract of land now known as the Douglas Point Ecology Laboratory was pieced together from approximately 10 smaller pieces by the Potomac Electric Power Company (PEPCO) for the purpose of developing a nuclear power generating station. At that time they decided to leave the bulk of the property in its natural state for ecological research. Douglas Point is reasonably representative of a large section of the Atlantic Coastal plain. Results from research on the site may be applicable to larger coastal plain areas. This section of Charles County is one of the least populated areas in Maryland, and the portion of the county known as Maryland Point, which includes Douglas Point, contains some of the most extensive, continuous forested tracts of land remaining in the state. The present publication is intended to be used as an introduction to Douglas Point, its history, biology, geology, topography, soils, and climatology.

  5. National Science Foundation, Lake Hoare, Antarctica | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    National Science Foundation, Lake Hoare, Antarctica National Science Foundation, Lake Hoare, Antarctica Photo of a Photovoltaic System Located at Lake Hoare, Antarctica Lake Hoare...

  6. Empirical design charts against earthquake-induced liquefaction in cohesionless soils based on in-situ tests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Menendez, Jose Rafael

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Available methods to predict the liquefaction susceptibility of cohesionless soils are based either in empirical charts (in-situ test) or laboratory tests. In-situ tests are a valuable source of information; especially in cohesionless soils, due...

  7. Ir. Charles Mussche 8 Spruce St, New York

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ir. Charles Mussche 8 Spruce St, New York 10038 NYC Mobile: +1 (347 at an industrial solar-energy project developer. Function: Autonomy Auditing New business in Renewable Energy Ecole Des Mines ParisTech ­ Kassel University First Semester

  8. Charles Eames and communication : from education to computers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lai, Constance Chunlan, 1972-

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis looks at a variety of projects done by Charles and Ray Eames that emphasize their interest in communication leading up to their 1953 film A Communications Primer. The significance of this film is threefold: ...

  9. Charles "Chuck" Farrar to receive DeMichele Award

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Farrar to receive DeMichele Award Charles "Chuck" Farrar to receive DeMichele Award The award is presented for demonstrated "exemplary service and support of promoting the science...

  10. TBU-0067- In the Matter of Charles Montano

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Charles Montano (the complainant), appeals the dismissal of his complaint of retaliation filed under 10 C.F.R. Part 708, the Department of Energy (DOE) Contractor Employee Protection Program. The...

  11. TBU-0026- In the Matter of Charles L. Evans

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Charles Evans, a former employee of Fluor Hanford Inc. (Fluor), a Department of Energy (DOE) contractor, appeals the DOE Richland Operations Office=s (Richland) dismissal of the whistleblower...

  12. Charles R. Fay Is Vice Provost for Research Administration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Danforth, Bryan Nicholas

    administrator of the university's Office of the Vice Provost for Research. He also serves as cochair28] Administration Charles R. Fay, former for research administration. Vice Provost for Research Robert C. Richardson says Fay serves as senior

  13. Lake Granbury and Lake Whitney Assessment Initiative

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris, B.L.; Roelke, Daniel; Grover, James; Brooks, Bryan

    bloom level, occurred when 7-day accumulated inflows were <10 x 106 m3 for Lake Possum Kingdom, <20 x 106 m3 for Lake Granbury and conservatively <40 x 106 m3 for Lake Whitney. These bloom inflow-thresholds corresponded to system flushing rates of 0...-24 h at -20? C. Extracts were filtered (0.2 ?m) and injected (300 ul) into an HPLC system equipped with reverse-phase C18 columns in series (Rainin Microsorb-MV, 0.46 x 10 cm, 3mm, Vydac 201TP, 0.46 x 25cm, 5mm). A nonlinear binary gradient...

  14. Lake Improvement District Law and County Lake Improvement Program (Minnesota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Lake Improvement Districts may be established by county boards in order to “improve the quality of water in lakes; provide for reasonable assurance of water quantity in lakes, where feasible and...

  15. Evaluation of coal minerals and metal residues as coal-liquefaction catalysts. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garg, D.; Givens, E. N.; Schweighardt, F. K.; Tarrer, A. R.; Guin, J. A.; Curtis, C. W.; Huang, W. J.; Shridharani, K.; Clinton, J. H.

    1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The catalytic activity of various minerals, metallic wastes, and transition metals was investigated in the liquefaction of various coals. The effects of coal type, process variables, coal cleaning, catalyst addition mode, solvent quality, and solvent modification on coal conversion and oil production were also studied. Coal conversion and oil production improved significantly by the addition of pyrite, reduced pyrite, speculite, red mud, flue dust, zinc sulfide, and various transition metal compounds. Impregnation and molecular dispersion of iron gave higher oil production than particulate incorporation of iron. However, the mode of molybdenum addition was inconsequential. Oil production increased considerably both by adding a stoichiometric mixture of iron oxide and pyrite and by simultaneous impregnation of coal with iron and molybdenum. Hydrogenation activity of disposable catalysts decreased sharply in the presence of nitrogen compounds. The removal of heteroatoms from process solvent improved thermal as well as catalytic coal liquefaction. The improvement in oil production was very dramatic with a catalyst.

  16. Method for controlling boiling point distribution of coal liquefaction oil product

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, Raymond P. (Overland Park, KS); Schmalzer, David K. (Englewood, CO); Wright, Charles H. (Overland Park, KS)

    1982-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The relative ratio of heavy distillate to light distillate produced in a coal liquefaction process is continuously controlled by automatically and continuously controlling the ratio of heavy distillate to light distillate in a liquid solvent used to form the feed slurry to the coal liquefaction zone, and varying the weight ratio of heavy distillate to light distillate in the liquid solvent inversely with respect to the desired weight ratio of heavy distillate to light distillate in the distillate fuel oil product. The concentration of light distillate and heavy distillate in the liquid solvent is controlled by recycling predetermined amounts of light distillate and heavy distillate for admixture with feed coal to the process in accordance with the foregoing relationships.

  17. Method for controlling boiling point distribution of coal liquefaction oil product

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, R.P.; Schmalzer, D.K.; Wright, C.H.

    1982-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The relative ratio of heavy distillate to light distillate produced in a coal liquefaction process is continuously controlled by automatically and continuously controlling the ratio of heavy distillate to light distillate in a liquid solvent used to form the feed slurry to the coal liquefaction zone, and varying the weight ratio of heavy distillate to light distillate in the liquid solvent inversely with respect to the desired weight ratio of heavy distillate to light distillate in the distillate fuel oil product. The concentration of light distillate and heavy distillate in the liquid solvent is controlled by recycling predetermined amounts of light distillate and heavy distillate for admixture with feed coal to the process in accordance with the foregoing relationships. 3 figs.

  18. Advanced direct liquefaction concepts for PETC generic units. Final report, Phase I

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Advanced Concepts for Direct Coal Liquefaction program was initiated by the Department of Energy in 1991 to develop technologies that could significantly reduce the cost of producing liquid fuels by the direct liquefaction of coal. The advanced 2-stage liquefaction technology that was developed at Wilsonville over the past 10 years has contributed significantly toward decreasing the cost of producing liquids from coal to about $33/bbl. It remains, however, the objective of DOE to further reduce this cost to a level more competitive with petroleum based products. This project, among others, was initiated to investigate various alternative approaches to develop technologies that might ultimately lead to a 25 % reduction in cost of product. In this project a number of novel concepts were investigated, either individually or in a coupled configuration that had the potential to contribute toward meeting the DOE goal. The concepts included mature technologies or ones closely related to them, such as coal cleaning by oil agglomeration, fluid coking and distillate hydrotreating and dewaxing. Other approaches that were either embryonic or less developed were chemical pretreatment of coal to remove oxygen, and dispersed catalyst development for application in the 2-stage liquefaction process. This report presents the results of this project. It is arranged in four sections which were prepared by participating organizations responsible for that phase of the project. A summary of the overall project and the principal results are given in this section. First, however, an overview of the process economics and the process concepts that were developed during the course of this program is presented.

  19. Mild coal pretreatment to improve liquefaction reactivity. Final technical report, September 1990--February 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, R.L.; Shams, K.G.

    1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent research efforts in direct coal liquefaction are focused on lowering the level of reaction severity, identification and determination of the causes of retrogressive reactions, and improving the economics of the process. Ambient pretreatment of coals using methanol and a trace amount of hydrochloric acid was extensively studied in connection with low severity coal liquefaction. Ambient pretreatment of eight Argonne coals using methanol/HCl improved THF-soluble conversions 24.5 wt % (maf basis) for Wyodak subbituminous coal and 28.4 wt % for Beulah-Zap lignite with an average increase of 14.9 wt % for the eight Argonne coals at 623 K (350{degrees}C) reaction temperature and 30 minutes reaction time. Optimal pretreatment conditions were determined using Wyodak and Illinois No. 6 coals. Acid concentration was the most important pretreatment variable studied; liquefaction reactivity increased with increasing acid concentration up to 2 vol %. The FTIR spectra of treated and untreated Wyodak coal samples demonstrated formation of carboxylic functional groups during pretreatment, a result of divalent (Ca, Mg) cationic bridge destruction. The extent of liquefaction reactivity directly correlated with the amount of calcium removed during pretreatment, and results from calcium ``addback`` experiments supported the observation that calcium adversely affected coal reactivity at low severity reaction conditions. Model compound studies using benzyl phenyl ether demonstrated that calcium cations catalyzed retrogressive reactions, inhibited hydrogenation reactions at low severity reaction conditions, and were more active at higher reaction temperatures. Based on kinetic data, mechanisms for hydrogenation-based inhibition and base-catalyzed retrogressive reactions are proposed. The base-catalyzed retrogressive reactions are shown to occur via a hydrogen abstraction mechanism where hydrogenation inhibition reactions are shown to take place via a surface quenching mechanism.

  20. A kinetic model for the liquefaction of lignite in a continuous stirred tank reactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Culpon, Douglas Holmes

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    can be transported by pipelines or other means at greatly reduced cost. Lignite liquefaction appears especially attractive in North Dakota, where combustion of vast deposits of lignite has made the state a net exporter of electricity. This has..., and equimolar CO/H2. The lignite for this work was mined from the Beulah mine in Mercer County, North Dakota (Beulah 3). The sample was selected for its unusually high ash content, which was INPUT ALTERNATE PREHEATERS ALTERNATE REACTORS GAS ? LIOUIO...

  1. Texas' Natural Lake

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in Texas A&M?s Department of Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences, said the summary report synthesizes the ?state of knowl- edge? about the geography, hydrology, ecology and environmental impacts affecting Caddo Lake and Big Cypress Creek. At the second...; and heavy metals, including mercury found in the lignite coal used to power electricity-generating plants, are accumulating in fish tissues. Texas? Natural Lake tx H2O | pg. 2 Research to help restore environmental flows to Caddo Lake Scientists...

  2. Tritium inventory control in ITER Charles Skinner with key contributions from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

    Tritium inventory control in ITER Charles Skinner with key contributions from Charles Gentile permitted" Tritium inventory control Worrisome issue: Once at the tritium limit there won't be any more

  3. NONLINEAR TIME SERIES MODEL FOR VBR VIDEO TRAFFIC JIMMIE L. DAVIS, KAVITHA CHANDRA AND CHARLES THOMPSON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chandra, Kavitha

    THOMPSON Center for Advanced Computation and Telecommunications University of Massachusetts Lowell One, nonlinear time-series Corresponding author: Charles Thompson; charles_thompson2@uml.edu 1 INTRODUCTION

  4. Coal liquefaction process streams characterization and evaluation: Application of liquid chromatographic separation methods to THF-soluble portions of integrated two-stage coal liquefaction resids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, J.B.; Pearson, C.D.; Young, L.L.; Green, J.A. [National Inst. for Petroleum and Energy Research, Bartlesville, OK (United States)

    1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study demonstrated the feasibility of using non-aqueous ion exchange liquid chromatography (NIELC) for the examination of the tetrahydrofuran (THF)-soluble distillation resids and THF-soluble whole oils derived from direct coal liquefaction. The technique can be used to separate the material into a number of acid, base, and neutral fractions. Each of the fractions obtained by NIELC was analyzed and then further fractionated by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The separation and analysis schemes are given in the accompanying report. With this approach, differences can be distinguished among samples obtained from different process streams in the liquefaction plant and among samples obtained at the same sampling location, but produced from different feed coals. HPLC was directly applied to one THF-soluble whole process oil without the NIELC preparation, with limited success. The direct HPLC technique used was directed toward the elution of the acid species into defined classes. The non-retained neutral and basic components of the oil were not analyzable by the direct HPLC method because of solubility limitations. Sample solubility is a major concern in the application of these techniques.

  5. A review of "Charles II and the Politics of Access" by Brian Weiser.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ty M. Reese

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    REVIEWS 257 Brian Weiser. Charles II and the Politics of Access. Suffolk: The Boydell Press, 2003. xii + 208 pp. Review by TY M. REESE, UNIVERSITY OF NORTH DAKOTA. The English Civil War and subsequent restoration of Charles II to the English... Charles II and the Politics of Access, Brian Weiser successfully challenges this idea of continual access by arguing that Charles II skillfully con- trolled access for political reasons. The book?s main argument, that access was one of the ?most...

  6. Lake Ontario Maritime Cultural Landscape

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ford, Benjamin L.

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    ........................................................................................... 64 Ice ................................................................................................... 66 Storms............................................................................................. 67 Lake Fauna and Ecology............................................................................... 342 Introduction .................................................................................... 342 Ephemeral Landscapes and Ice Roads ........................................... 342 Boundaries and the Pan-Lake Identity...

  7. Charles N. Rotimi, PhD Director: Center for Research on Genomics and Global Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Research Sites Charles Rotimi - crggh.nih.gov Africa: 1)Nigeria 2)Ghana 3) Kenya 4) Ethiopia China: Suizhou Era Charles Rotimi - crggh.nih.gov #12;http://crggh.nih.gov The mission of the Center for Research Charles Rotimi - crggh.nih.gov #12;· Addressing social factors that contribute to health disparities

  8. A characterization and evaluation of coal liquefaction process streams. Quarterly technical progress report, April 1--June 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robbins, G.A.; Brandes, S.D.; Winschel, R.A.; Burke, F.P.

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of this project are to support the DOE direct coal liquefaction process development program and to improve the useful application of analytical chemistry to direct coal liquefaction process development. Independent analyses by well-established methods will be obtained of samples produced in direct coal liquefaction processes under evaluation by DOE. Additionally, analytical instruments and techniques which are currently underutilized for the purpose of examining coal-derived samples will be evaluated. The data obtained from this study will be used to help guide current process development and to develop an improved data base on coal and coal liquids properties. A sample bank will be established and maintained for use in this project and will be available for use by other researchers. The reactivity of the non-distillable resids toward hydrocracking at liquefaction conditions (i.e., resid reactivity) will be examined. From the literature and data experimentally obtained, a mathematical kinetic model of resid conversion will be constructed. It is anticipated that such a model will provide insights useful for improving process performance and thus the economics of direct coal liquefaction. The paper describes activities carried out this quarter. 11 refs., 21 figs., 17 tabs.

  9. EIS-0464: Lake Charles Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) Project in Calcasieu Parish, Louisiana

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS evaluates the potential environmental impacts of providing financial assistance for the construction and operation of a project proposed by Leucadia Energy, LLC. DOE selected this project for an award of financial assistance through a competitive process under the Industrial Carbon Capture and Sequestration Program.

  10. Lake Charles, LA Natural Gas LNG Imports from Equatorial Guinea (Dollars

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million Cubic Feet) 3 0 0 0 156 57 61 76 673 12 12 9 19per

  11. Lake Charles, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Trinidad

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million Cubic Feet) 3 0 0 0 156 57 61 76 673 12 12 9 19perand

  12. Price of Lake Charles, LA Natural Gas LNG Imports from Trinidad and Tobago

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousand Cubic Feet) Oman (Dollars per Thousand(Dollars per

  13. Price of Lake Charles, LA Natural Gas LNG Imports from Trinidad and Tobago

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousand Cubic Feet) Oman (Dollars per Thousand(Dollars

  14. Price of Lake Charles, LA Natural Gas LNG Imports from United Arab Emirates

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousand Cubic Feet) Oman (Dollars per

  15. SEMI-ANNUAL REPORTS FOR LAKE CHARLES EXPORTS, LLC - FE DKT. NO. 11-59-LNG -

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin ofEnergy atLLC - FE DKT. 10-160-LNG - ORDER 2913 | Department ofORDER 3324 |

  16. SEMI-ANNUAL REPORTS FOR LAKE CHARLES EXPORTS, LLC - FE DKT. NO. 11-59-LNG -

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Site EnvironmentalEnergy Rights and Benefits of Reservists|23566 |ORDERLLC -ORDER 3412

  17. Price of Lake Charles, LA Liquefied Natural Gas Total Imports (Dollars per

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan Feb Mar(Dollars per Thousand CubicDollars

  18. Price of Lake Charles, LA Natural Gas LNG Imports from Algeria (Dollars per

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan Feb Mar(Dollars per Thousand CubicDollarsThousand Cubic

  19. Price of Lake Charles, LA Natural Gas LNG Imports from Australia (Dollars

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan Feb Mar(Dollars per Thousand CubicDollarsThousand Cubicper

  20. Price of Lake Charles, LA Natural Gas LNG Imports from Brunei (Dollars per

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan Feb Mar(Dollars per Thousand CubicDollarsThousand

  1. Price of Lake Charles, LA Natural Gas LNG Imports from Egypt (Nominal

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan Feb Mar(Dollars per Thousand CubicDollarsThousandDollars

  2. Price of Lake Charles, LA Natural Gas LNG Imports from Indonesia (Dollars

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan Feb Mar(Dollars per Thousand

  3. Price of Lake Charles, LA Natural Gas LNG Imports from Malaysia (Dollars

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan Feb Mar(Dollars per Thousandper Thousand Cubic Feet)

  4. Price of Lake Charles, LA Natural Gas LNG Imports from Nigeria (Dollars per

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan Feb Mar(Dollars per Thousandper Thousand Cubic

  5. Price of Lake Charles, LA Natural Gas LNG Imports from Oman (Dollars per

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan Feb Mar(Dollars per Thousandper Thousand CubicThousand

  6. Price of Lake Charles, LA Natural Gas LNG Imports from Other Countries

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan Feb Mar(Dollars per Thousandper Thousand

  7. Price of Lake Charles, LA Natural Gas LNG Imports from Qatar (Dollars per

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan Feb Mar(Dollars per Thousandper ThousandThousand Cubic

  8. Coal liquefaction process wherein jet fuel, diesel fuel and/or ASTM No. 2 fuel oil is recovered

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bauman, Richard F. (Houston, TX); Ryan, Daniel F. (Friendswood, TX)

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved process for the liquefaction of coal and similar solid carbonaceous materials wherein a hydrogen donor solvent or diluent derived from the solid carbonaceous material is used to form a slurry of the solid carbonaceous material and wherein the naphthenic components from the solvent or diluent fraction are separated and used as jet fuel components. The extraction increases the relative concentration of hydroaromatic (hydrogen donor) components and as a result reduces the gas yield during liquefaction and decreases hydrogen consumption during said liquefaction. The hydrogenation severity can be controlled to increase the yield of naphthenic components and hence the yield of jet fuel and in a preferred embodiment jet fuel yield is maximized while at the same time maintaining solvent balance.

  9. Virtual Testing for Smart Buildings Julien Bruneau, Charles Consel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Virtual Testing for Smart Buildings Julien Bruneau, Charles Consel INRIA Bordeaux Sud-Ouest Talence Consultant Cairo, Egypt wail hannourah@yahoo.com Abstract--Smart buildings promise to revolutionize the way on the quality and cost of these services. However, smart buildings and any technology with direct effect

  10. Managing Florida Ponds for Fishing 1 Charles E. Cichra2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    CIR802 Managing Florida Ponds for Fishing 1 Charles E. Cichra2 1. This document is CIR802, one-out and impounded waters, limerock pits, and sand or gravel pits, commonly called borrow pits. Fishing pressure in fishing as a source of recreation and food. Competition for public fishery resources, coupled

  11. Volatility Persistence in Crude Oil Markets Amlie CHARLES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    , reflecting rising demand for crude oil, particularly from developing nations. Oil prices have been veryVolatility Persistence in Crude Oil Markets Amélie CHARLES Audencia Nantes, School of Management oil markets ­ Brent, West Texas Intermediate (WTI) and Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries

  12. Forest inventory Charles T. Scott & Jeffrey H. Gove

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forest inventory Charles T. Scott & Jeffrey H. Gove Volume 2, pp 814­820 in Encyclopedia, Chichester, 2002 #12;Forest inventory Forest inventory is an accounting of trees and their related by a comprehensive survey of all households in the country. Similarly, forest inventories seek to enumerate

  13. Optimal control of interacting particle systems Charles Bordenave

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Optimal control of interacting particle systems Charles Bordenave CNRS & Universit´e de Toulouse are in interaction and a central controller may aim at optimizing a performance measure of the system via a control the symmetry breaking phenomena for optimal control strategies. 2 Controlled particle systems 2.1 Model

  14. Einstein Manifolds and Contact Geometry Charles P. Boyer Krzysztof Galicki

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Einstein Manifolds and Contact Geometry Charles P. Boyer Krzysztof Galicki Abstract. We show that every K­contact Einstein manifold is Sasakian­Einstein and discuss several corollaries of this result. 1 types of Riemannian contact manifolds to construct Einstein metrics of positive scalar curvature

  15. Business models: A challenging agenda Charles Baden-Fuller

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Business models: A challenging agenda Charles Baden-Fuller Cass Business School, City University literature on business models lies mainly in the literature on strategy and competitive advantage and focuses explore how business models can be seen as a set of cognitive configurations that can be manipulable

  16. Heating the Outer Heliosphere by Pickup Charles W. Smith

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richardson, John

    Heating the Outer Heliosphere by Pickup Protons Charles W. SmithŁ , Philip A. IsenbergŁ , William H the ability of a turbulent cascade within the solar wind to heat the thermal protons. Several sources of energy are required to accom- plish the observed heating. Wind shear and shocks originating

  17. A Synchronous Approach to Reactive System Design1 Charles Andr

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    André, Charles

    our experience teaching discrete-event reactive systems to Electrical Engineering students. The courseA Synchronous Approach to Reactive System Design1 Charles André I3S Laboratory ­ UNSA/CNRS BP 121 This paper was presented at the 12th EAEEIE Annual Conf., 14-16 May 2001, Nancy (France). Abstract Reactive

  18. Charles J. Vrsmarty & the UNH Water Systems Analysis Group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slatton, Clint

    .1 billion people lack clean drinking water 2.6 billion people lack basic sanitationCharles J. Vörösmarty & the UNH Water Systems Analysis Group Fall Water Institute Seminar Series Corridor #12;Goals for This Discussion · Describe chief forces shaping the contemporary and future water

  19. Epidemiology 69 Sander Greenland and Charles Poole1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gelman, Andrew

    Epidemiology 69 COMMENTARY Sander Greenland and Charles Poole1 accept that P values are here discussed, for example, by Greenland in 2011).2 The formal view of the P value as a probability conditional of the model). I find Greenland and Poole's1 perspective to be valuable: it is important to go beyond criticism

  20. Profile: Charles Wellner Columbiana, Spring 1987, Volume 1, Number 1.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wellner, Jon A.

    than 100 of those natural areas have been protected statewide. And he is still looking for more Over 100 Research Natural Areas have been set aside in Idaho thanks to a small group of volunteers led efforts to protect its beauty. Charles Wellner has done more than anyone to establish Research Natural

  1. The Object Orientation of Object Petri Nets Charles Lakos,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lakos, Charles

    The Object Orientation of Object Petri Nets Charles Lakos, Computer Science Department, University informally introduces Object Petri Nets (OPNs) with a number of examples and discusses how this kind of Petri Net addresses a number of issues pertinent to Concurrent Object­Oriented Programming Languages. OPNs

  2. Automated apparatus for solvent separation of a coal liquefaction product stream

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schweighardt, Frank K. (Upper Macungie, PA)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An automated apparatus for the solvent separation of a coal liquefaction product stream that operates continuously and unattended and eliminates potential errors resulting from subjectivity and the aging of the sample during analysis. In use of the apparatus, metered amounts of one or more solvents are passed sequentially through a filter containing the sample under the direction of a microprocessor control means. The mixture in the filter is agitated by means of ultrasonic cavitation for a timed period and the filtrate is collected. The filtrate of each solvent extraction is collected individually and the residue on the filter element is collected to complete the extraction process.

  3. A solvent study of the direct liquefaction of Big Brown lignite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Helton, Terry Eugene

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of an experiment. A commercially obtained anthracene oil spiked with tetralin was used in conjunction with a lignite obtained from a mine located near Beulah, North Dakota. Knudson found that the primary role of the gas phase in low-rank coal liquefaction appears... by the University of North Dakota Energy Research Center (UNDERC) and were stored in polyethylene bags inside 5 gallon containers. The particle size distribution of the lignite was such that all of it was below 246 microns and 90% was below 74 microns. Proximate...

  4. Lake Preservation (Indiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The construction, reconstruction, recleaning, or repair of a dam, ditch, or other project is prohibited when the action is likely to lower the water level of a public freshwater lake, regulated or...

  5. A characterization and evaluation of coal liquefaction process streams. Status assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandes, S.D.

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A review of the literature dealing with the modeling of fossil-fuel resid conversion to product oils and an updated assessment of the physico-chemical analytical methodology applicable to coal-liquefaction product streams is presented in this document. Analytical methodologies included here are either those which are different than those previously surveyed or are improvements on, or significantly different applications of methods previously surveyed. The literature cited spans the time period from 1991 to the present. The literature was examined from the 1960s through the present. When possible, for each model described, the methodology for deriving the model and the relative quality of the kinetic parameters derived is discussed. Proposed reaction schemes used for constructing coal-conversion models, in many cases, include the conversion of a resid intermediate to light products. These models are, therefore, also of interest, and are included here. Analytical techniques were identified that were shown to be useful for providing physico-chemical information of coal-liquefaction resids. These techniques are nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, mass spectrometry (especially the technique of field ionization mass spectrometry), electron spin resonance spectroscopy coupled to thermogravimetric analysis, and a suite of petroleum inspection tests. It is recommended that these techniques be used in the present contract. 76 refs.

  6. Impact of hydrogen partial pressure on coal liquefaction. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kang, D.; Hoover, D.S.; Schweighardt, F.K.

    1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This program was conducted to determine the effects of hydrogen partial pressure on the SRC-I direct coal liquefaction process and SRC-I Demonstration Plant design. A native solvent was produced in quantity and slurried with Kentucky number 9 Mulford coal in a series of coal liquefaction runs under varying hydrogen gas rates, temperatures, residence times, and hydrogen partial pressures. The results showed that hydrogen partial pressure significantly affected product distribution; the magnitude of the effect was comparable to changes in temperature and residence time. Also, the impact of hydrogen partial pressure was enhanced by increases in both temperature and residence time. Operating at low hydrogen partial pressure did not show any apparent advantage; it reduced coal conversion, reduced oil yield, and had a detrimental effect on the yield distribution of other products. An increase in hydrogen partial pressure had the following effects: increased coal conversion; increased conversion of asphaltenes and preasphaltenes to lighter products; significantly increased the oil yield; increased light gas yields; decreased sulfur content in the SRC; increased hydrogen content of the recycle solvent; and increased hydrogen consumption. This study strongly suggests that further studies should be conducted to optimize the effects of hydrogen partial pressure on the process, both within and, preferably, beyond the constraints of the current basic SRC-I design, considering the major impact of this variable on the process. 10 references, 37 figures, 10 tables.

  7. Apparatus for the liquefaction of natural gas and methods relating to same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wilding, Bruce M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Bingham, Dennis N. (Idaho Falls, ID); McKellar, Michael G. (Idaho Falls, ID); Turner, Terry D. (Ammon, ID); Raterman, Kevin T. (Idaho Falls, ID); Palmer, Gary L. (Shelley, ID); Klingler, Kerry M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Vranicar, John J. (Concord, CA)

    2007-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method for producing liquefied natural gas. A liquefaction plant may be coupled to a source of unpurified natural gas, such as a natural gas pipeline at a pressure letdown station. A portion of the gas is drawn off and split into a process stream and a cooling stream. The cooling stream passes through a turbo expander creating work output. A compressor is driven by the work output and compresses the process stream. The compressed process stream is cooled, such as by the expanded cooling stream. The cooled, compressed process stream is divided into first and second portions with the first portion being expanded to liquefy the natural gas. A gas-liquid separator separates the vapor from the liquid natural gas. The second portion of the cooled, compressed process stream is also expanded and used to cool the compressed process stream. Additional features and techniques may be integrated with the liquefaction process including a water clean-up cycle and a carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) clean-up cycle.

  8. Process Design and Economics for the Conversion of Algal Biomass to Hydrocarbons: Whole Algae Hydrothermal Liquefaction and Upgrading

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, Susanne B.; Zhu, Yunhua; Anderson, Daniel B.; Hallen, Richard T.; Elliott, Douglas C.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Albrecht, Karl O.; Hart, Todd R.; Butcher, Mark G.; Drennan, Corinne; Snowden-Swan, Lesley J.; Davis, Ryan; Kinchin, Christopher

    2014-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides a preliminary analysis of the costs associated with converting whole wet algal biomass into primarily diesel fuel. Hydrothermal liquefaction converts the whole algae into an oil that is then hydrotreated and distilled. The secondary aqueous product containing significant organic material is converted to a medium btu gas via catalytic hydrothermal gasification.

  9. Novel nanodispersed coal liquefaction catalysts: Molecular design via microemulsion-based synthesis. Final technical report, October 1990--December 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Osseo-Asare, K.; Boakye, E.; Vittal, M. [and others

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report described the synthesis of Molybdenum Sulfides in microemulsions by acidification of ammonium tetrathiomolybdate. Molybdenum Sulfides have been shown to be potential coal liquefaction catalysts. The importance of particle size, temperature effects, and coal surface chemistry to impregnation are discussed.

  10. Highly Dispersed Pseudo-Homogeneous and Heterogeneous Catalysts Synthesized via Inverse Micelle Solutions for the Liquefaction of Coal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hampden-Smith, M.; Kawola, J.S.; Martino, A.; Sault, A.G.; Yamanaka, S.A.

    1999-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The mission of this project was to use inverse micelle solutions to synthesize nanometer sized metal particles and test the particles as catalysts in the liquefaction of coal and other related reactions. The initial focus of the project was the synthesis of iron based materials in pseudo-homogeneous form. The frost three chapters discuss the synthesis, characterization, and catalyst testing in coal liquefaction and model coal liquefaction reactions of iron based pseudo-homogeneous materials. Later, we became interested in highly dispersed catalysts for coprocessing of coal and plastic waste. Bifunctional catalysts . to hydrogenate the coal and depolymerize the plastic waste are ideal. We began studying, based on our previously devised synthesis strategies, the synthesis of heterogeneous catalysts with a bifunctional nature. In chapter 4, we discuss the fundamental principles in heterogeneous catalysis synthesis with inverse micelle solutions. In chapter 5, we extend the synthesis of chapter 4 to practical systems and use the materials in catalyst testing. Finally in chapter 6, we return to iron and coal liquefaction now studied with the heterogeneous catalysts.

  11. A characterization and evaluation of coal liquefaction process streams. Quarterly technical progress report, July 1--September 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robbins, G.A.; Brandes, S.D.; Winschel, R.A.; Burke, F.P.

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of this project are to support the DOE direct coal liquefaction process development program and to improve the useful application of analytical chemistry to direct coal liquefaction process development. Independent analyses by well-established methods will be obtained of samples produced in direct coal liquefaction processes under evaluation by DOE. Additionally, analytical instruments and techniques which are currently underutilized for the purpose of examining coal-derived samples will be evaluated. The data obtained from this study will be used to help guide current process development and to develop an improved data base on coal and coal liquids properties. A sample bank will be established and maintained for use in this project and will be available for use by other researchers. The reactivity of the non-distillable resids toward hydrocracking at liquefaction conditions (i.e., resid reactivity) will be examined. From the literature and data experimentally obtained, a mathematical kinetic model of resid conversion will be constructed. It is anticipated that such a model will provide insights useful for improving process performance and thus the economics of direct coal liquefaction. Some of the contract activities for this quarter are: We completed many of the analyses on the 81 samples received from HTI bench-scale run CMSL-9, in which coal, coal/mixed plastics, and coal/high density polyethylene were fed; Liquid chromatographic separations of the 15 samples in the University of Delaware sample set were completed; and WRI completed CP/MAS {sup 13}C-NMR analyses on the Delaware sample set.

  12. Power operations in Morava E-theory Charles Rezk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rezk, Charles

    Power operations in Morava E-theory a survey Charles Rezk University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign May 2, 2009 http://www.math.uiuc.edu/~rezk/midwest-2009-power-ops.pdf #12;What are power operations? h = multiplicative cohomology theory: hp(X) hq(X) hp+q(X). m-th power map: x xm : hq (X) hmq (X). If h comes from

  13. Lake Ontario Maritime Cultural Landscape 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ford, Benjamin L.

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of the Lake Ontario Maritime Cultural Landscape project was to investigate the nature and distribution of archaeological sites along the northeast shoreline of Lake Ontario while examining the environmental, ...

  14. Lake restoration by dredging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gorini, R.F.

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper is a summary overview of the $17 million Vancouver Lake Restoration Project, the largest project of its type ever undertaken through the Federal Clean Lakes Program. It was funded jointly by the US Environmental Protection Agency, the Washington State Department of Ecology, and the Port of Vancouver. Although the project was conceived in 1965, a nationwide program to help fund such projects did not exist until 1976. Then, final approval was not received until 1981, after many volumes of studies and reviews. Construction was completed in June 1983, after 30 months--6 months ahead of schedule and underbudget. A great deal of time, money, and energy was expended to demonstrate to Federal and state environmental agencies that dredging was a key tool in effecting this lake's restoration.

  15. A LIMNOLOGICAL STUDY OF THE FINGER LAKES OF NEW YORK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 569 Heat supply of the smaller lakes

  16. Charles Darwin University Flinders University Griffith University James Cook University La Trobe University Murdoch University The University of Newcastle Biography for GLOVER, Professor Barney

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    University Murdoch University The University of Newcastle Biography for GLOVER, Professor Barney Vice Chancellor, Charles Darwin University Professor Barney Glover is Vice-Chancellor of Charles Darwin University

  17. Lakes_Elec_You

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(FactDepartment ofLetter Report:40PM toLEDControl Concept | DepartmentLakeLakes,

  18. Process for coal liquefaction by separation of entrained gases from slurry exiting staged dissolvers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Givens, Edwin N. (Bethlehem, PA); Ying, David H. S. (Macungie, PA)

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There is described an improved liquefaction process by which coal is converted to a low ash and low sulfur carbonaceous material that can be used as a fuel in an environmentally acceptable manner without costly gas scrubbing equipment. In the process, coal is slurried with a solvent, passed through a preheater and at least two dissolvers in series in the presence of hydrogen-rich gases at elevated temperatures and pressures. Solids, including mineral ash and unconverted coal macerals are separated from the condensed dissolver effluent. In accordance with the improved process, fresh hydrogen is fed to each dissolver and the entrained gas from each dissolver is separated from the slurry phase and removed from the reactor system before the condensed phase is passed to the next dissolver in the series. In accordance with another process, the feeds to the dissolvers are such that the top of each downstream dissolver is used as a gas-liquid separator.

  19. Activity testing of fine-particle size, iron catalysts for coal liquefaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stohl, F.V.; Diegert, K.V.; Gugliotta, T.P.

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of fine-particle size (< 40 nm) unsupported catalysts in direct coal liquefaction may result in improved economics due to possible enhanced yields of desired products, the potential for decreasing reaction severity, and the possibility of using less catalyst. Sandia has developed a standard testing procedure for evaluating and comparing the fine-particle catalysts. The test procedure uses phenanthrene as the reaction solvent, the DECS-17 Blind Canyon Coal, and a statistical experimental design to enable evaluation of the catalysts over ranges of temperature (350 to 400{degrees}C), time (20 to 60 minutes), and catalyst loading (0 to 1 wt % on a dmmf coal basis). Product analyses include tetrahydrofuran (THF) conversion, heptane conversion, solvent recovery, and gas analyses. Phenanthrene as the solvent in the testing procedure yielded significant differences between thermal and catalytic reactions, whereas using a good hydrogen donor such as 9,10-dihydrophenanthrene (DHP) showed no catalytic effects.

  20. Catalytic two-stage coal liquefaction process having improved nitrogen removal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Comolli, Alfred G. (Yardley, PA)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for catalytic multi-stage hydrogenation and liquefaction of coal to produce high yields of low-boiling hydrocarbon liquids containing low concentrations of nitogen compounds. First stage catalytic reaction conditions are 700.degree.-800.degree. F. temperature, 1500-3500 psig hydrogen partial pressure, with the space velocity maintained in a critical range of 10-40 lb coal/hr ft.sup.3 catalyst settled volume. The first stage catalyst has 0.3-1.2 cc/gm total pore volume with at least 25% of the pore volume in pores having diameters of 200-2000 Angstroms. Second stage reaction conditions are 760.degree.-870.degree. F. temperature with space velocity exceeding that in the first stage reactor, so as to achieve increased hydrogenation yield of low-boiling hydrocarbon liquid products having at least 75% removal of nitrogen compounds from the coal-derived liquid products.

  1. Cooperative research in coal liquefaction. Final report, May 1, 1992--April 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huffman, G.P. [ed.

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Research on sulfate and metal (Mo, Sn) promoted Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts in the current year focused on optimization of conditions. Parameters varied included temperature, solvent, solvent-to-coal ratio, and the effect of presulfiding versus in situ sulfiding. Oil yields were found to increase approximately proportionately with both temperature and solvent-to-coal ratio. The donor solvent, tetralin, proved to give better total conversion and oil yields than either 1-methylnaphthalene or Wilsonville recycle oil. A significant enhancement of both total liquefaction yields and oil yields from lignites and subbituminous coals has been achieved by incorporating iron into the coal matrix by cation exchange. A study has been conducted on the synthesis of iron, molybdenum, and tungsten catalysts using a laser pyrolysis technique.

  2. Apparatus for the liquefaction of a gas and methods relating to same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Turner, Terry D. (Idaho Falls, ID) [Idaho Falls, ID; Wilding, Bruce M. (Idaho Falls, ID) [Idaho Falls, ID; McKellar, Michael G. (Idaho Falls, ID) [Idaho Falls, ID

    2009-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatuses and methods are provided for producing liquefied gas, such as liquefied natural gas. In one embodiment, a liquefaction plant may be coupled to a source of unpurified natural gas, such as a natural gas pipeline at a pressure letdown station. A portion of the gas is drawn off and split into a process stream and a cooling stream. The cooling stream may be sequentially pass through a compressor and an expander. The process stream may also pass through a compressor. The compressed process stream is cooled, such as by the expanded cooling stream. The cooled, compressed process stream is expanded to liquefy the natural gas. A gas-liquid separator separates the vapor from the liquid natural gas. A portion of the liquid gas may be used for additional cooling. Gas produced within the system may be recompressed for reintroduction into a receiving line.

  3. Apparatus for the liquefaction of natural gas and methods relating to same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wilding, Bruce M. (Idaho Falls, ID) [Idaho Falls, ID; McKellar, Michael G. (Idaho Falls, ID) [Idaho Falls, ID; Turner, Terry D. (Ammon, ID) [Ammon, ID; Carney, Francis H. (Idaho Falls, ID) [Idaho Falls, ID

    2009-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method for producing liquefied natural gas. A liquefaction plant may be coupled to a source of unpurified natural gas, such as a natural gas pipeline at a pressure letdown station. A portion of the gas is drawn off and split into a process stream and a cooling stream. The cooling stream passes through an expander creating work output. A compressor may be driven by the work output and compresses the process stream. The compressed process stream is cooled, such as by the expanded cooling stream. The cooled, compressed process stream is divided into first and second portions with the first portion being expanded to liquefy the natural gas. A gas-liquid separator separates the vapor from the liquid natural gas. The second portion of the cooled, compressed process stream is also expanded and used to cool the compressed process stream.

  4. Apparatus for the liquefaction of natural gas and methods relating to same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Turner, Terry D. (Ammon, ID); Wilding, Bruce M. (Idaho Falls, ID); McKellar, Michael G. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2009-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method for producing liquefied natural gas. A liquefaction plant may be coupled to a source of unpurified natural gas, such as a natural gas pipeline at a pressure letdown station. A portion of the gas is drawn off and split into a process stream and a cooling stream. The cooling stream passes through an expander creating work output. A compressor may be driven by the work output and compresses the process stream. The compressed process stream is cooled, such as by the expanded cooling stream. The cooled, compressed process stream is expanded to liquefy the natural gas. A gas-liquid separator separates a vapor from the liquid natural gas. A portion of the liquid gas is used for additional cooling. Gas produced within the system may be recompressed for reintroduction into a receiving line or recirculation within the system for further processing.

  5. Direct liquefaction proof-of-concept program: Final topical report, Bench Run 03 (227-93)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Comolli, A.G.; Pradhan, V.R.; Lee, T.L.K.; Karolkiewicz, W.F.; Popper, G.

    1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of bench-scale work, Bench Run PB-03, conducted under the DOE Proof of Concept--Bench Option Program in direct coal liquefaction at Hydrocarbon Technologies, Inc. in Lawrenceville, New Jersey. The Bench Run PB-03 was the third of the nine runs planned in the POC Bench Option Contract between the US DOE and Hydrocarbon Technologies, Inc. The Bench Run PB-03 had multiple goals. These included the evaluation of the effects of dispersed slurry catalyst loadings and types on the performance of two-stage direct coal liquefaction, the effect of HTI`s new iron catalyst, modified with phosphorus, and the evaluation of the effect of recycle solvent hydrotreatment on the overall process performance. PB-03 employed a close-coupled (no interstage separator) configuration of hydroconversion reactors. Other features of PB-03 included the use of an in-line fixed bed hydrotreater for the net product. No significant effects on process performance was found by changing the loadings of iron and molybdenum in the ranges of 1,000--5,000 ppm for iron and 50--100 ppm for molybdenum. However, the modification of HTI`s iron-based gel catalyst with 100 ppm of phosphorous improved the process performance significantly. A newly tested Mo-Carbon dispersed catalyst was not found to be any better than Molyvan-A, which was used during all but one condition of PB-03. Hydrotreatment of part of the recycle solvent was found to have a positive influence on the overall performance.

  6. Analysis of Sweet Lake geopressured-geothermal aquifer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrade, M.; Rago, F.; Ohkuma, H.; Sepehrnoori, K.; Peters, E.; Dorfman, M.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Sweet Lake geopressured-geothermal aquifer, located southeast of Lake Charles, Louisiana, is modeled by a two-dimensional geopressured-geothermal simulator. This aquifer is a sandstone within the Frio formation at depths between 15,000 to 15,640 ft with a net porous thickness of 250 ft, a calculated in-situ permeability (from drawdown data) of 17 md, an estimated porosity of 24%, a uniaxial compaction coefficient of 4.5 x 10/sup -7/ psi/sup -1/ and a solution gas-water ratio of 11 SCF/STB all at the initial reservoir pressure of 12,060 psi. These parameters are typically pressure sensitive in geopressured-geothermal aquifers and are critically important to aquifer performance. Several simulation experiments are conducted which investigate the effects of varying initial values for these parameters with the experimentally determined values as means. The simulations give both optimistic and pessimistic expectations for aquifer performance. The expected life of the geopressured-geothermal well is reported for each simulation.

  7. Lake Survey DETROIT, MICH.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . DEPARTMENT OF' COMMERCE National Ouanic and Atmospheric Admlnl,trltion National OeUII SUI"II, Great Lakes Ice ................. .... ............. . $l'.iUllary ice charts ..............·.......·................. Area ice charts - winter 1971-72 ......... . ,, Table Tabl e l.--Ice 2.--Key to ice chart sy

  8. Hydrogen Liquefaction

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(Fact Sheet), GeothermalGridHYDROGEND D e e&Funding and

  9. Fishery systems and linkages: from clockworks to soft watches Serge M. Garcia and Anthony T. Charles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Charles, Anthony

    Fishery systems and linkages: from clockworks to soft watches Serge M. Garcia and Anthony T. Charles Garcia, S. M., and Charles, A. T. 2007. Fishery systems and linkages: from clockworks to soft watches. ­ ICES Journal of Marine Science, 64: 580­587. The complex systemic nature of fisheries has been

  10. A review of "The Spanish Match: Prince Charles’ Journey to Madrid, 1623." by Alexander Samson ed.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pursell, Brennan C.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in the story, that between Charles and Henrietta Maria of France, and how its literary supporters interpreted the debacle of 1623 in retrospect. These writers did their best to downplay the shows of affection that Charles had directed toward the Infanta...

  11. Physical Geology Laboratory J Bret Bennington, Charles Merguerian and John E. Sanders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Merguerian, Charles

    Physical Geology Laboratory Manual J Bret Bennington, Charles Merguerian and John E. Sanders Geology Department Hofstra University © 1999 #12;PHYSICAL GEOLOGY LABORATORY MANUAL Third Edition (Revised) by J Bret Bennington, Charles Merguerian, and John E. Sanders Department of Geology Hofstra University

  12. PRESS RELEASE Charles University in Prague opens its doors wide to the world -computer science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerveny, Vlastislav

    PRESS RELEASE Charles University in Prague opens its doors wide to the world - computer science course in computer science in English. In 1952, when the Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles's and master's study programs in computer science with English as the language of instruction. Attention

  13. Water balance in rats exposed to chronic centrifugation RUDY M. ORTIZ AND CHARLES E. WADE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ortiz, Rudy M.

    was observed, the lack of a change in %TBW among the three measurement periods or in water flux over the 12Water balance in rats exposed to chronic centrifugation RUDY M. ORTIZ AND CHARLES E. WADE Life; accepted in final form 22 February 2000 Ortiz, Rudy M., and Charles E. Wade. Water balance in rats exposed

  14. Development of the Great Lakes Ice-circulation Model (GLIM): Application to Lake Erie in 20032004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Development of the Great Lakes Ice-circulation Model (GLIM): Application to Lake Erie in 2003: Received 4 May 2009 Accepted 30 November 2009 Communicated by Dr. Ram Yerubandi Index words: Coupled Ice-Ocean Model Ice modeling Lake ice cover Ice thickness Ice speed Lake surface temperature Great Lakes Lake Erie

  15. Charles Mix Electric Assn, Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof EnergyInnovation inOpenadd: ChinaInformation Changzhou JiangnanstandsCharles

  16. Charles City (1Q08) Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia:PowerCER.png El CER es una instituciĂłnBy Shear-WaveOpenCharles City

  17. Charles City (2Q08) Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia:PowerCER.png El CER es una instituciĂłnBy Shear-WaveOpenCharles

  18. Novel bimetallic dispersed catalysts for temperature-programmed coal liquefaction. Technical progress report, October 1995--December 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Song, C.; Cooke, W.S.; Schmidt, E.; Schobert, H.H.

    1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Coal liquefaction involves cleavage of methylene, dimethylene and ether bridges connecting polycyclic aromatic units and the reactions of various oxygen functional groups. Here in this quarterly, we report on the catalytic effects of several molybdenum-, cobalt-, and iron-containing compounds in the reactions of dibenzothiophene (DBT) with hydrogen under conditions related to coal liquefaction. The catalytic effects of several molybdenum-, cobalt-, and iron-containing compounds have been examined in the hydrogenation and hydrodesulfurization reactions of dibenzothiophene (DBT) under conditions related to coal liquefaction. The metal compounds are candidate catalyst precursors for direct coal liquefaction. The reactions were carried out in batch microautoclave reactors at 400{degrees}C for 30 minutes with 6.9 MPa (cold) hydrogen pressure, and tridecane solvent. A metal loading of 0.5 mol% resulted in low conversion and only hydrogenation. Addition of sulfur in 4:1 molar ratio led only to a minor increase in conversion and hydrodesulfurization. The use of a higher boiling solvent (octadecane vs. tridecane) was beneficial in providing increased conversion, hydrodesulfurization, and hydrogenation. An increase in metal compound loading to 36.2 mol% led to a dramatic increase in conversion, hydrodesulfurization, and hydrocracking. Molybdenum hexacarbonyl at 36 mol% loading, with added sulfur at 6:1 ratio and octadecane solvent, gave 100% conversion of dibenzothiophene to other products with 100% hydrodesulfurization. Ammonium tetrathiomolybdate and molybdenum(III) chloride are less active under similar conditions. A cobalt-molybdenum thiocubane complex gave unexpectedly low conversions. Iron and cobalt carbonyls also provided very low conversions, even with added sulfur.

  19. An investigation of the role of water on retrograde/condensation reactions and enhanced liquefaction yields. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miknis, F.P.; Netzel, D.A.; Wallace, J.C. Jr.; Butcher, C.H.; Mitzel, J.M.; Turner, T.F.

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    While great strides have been made in developing the technology of coal liquefaction processes in recent years, many unsolved problems still remain before a viable and economical process can be achieved. The technological problems that still exist can be solved through a more fundamental understanding of the chemistry associated with each stage of the coal liquefaction process, starting with any pretreatment steps that may be carried out on the coal itself. Western Research Institute, under the a contract from the US Department of Energy, has conducted a study of different methods of coal drying as pretreatment steps before liquefaction. The results of that study are the subject of this report. Coals that were dried or partially dried thermally and with microwaves had lower liquefaction conversions than coals containing equilibrium moisture contents. However, chemically dried coals had conversions equal to or greater than the premoisturized coals. The conversion behavior is consistent with changes in the physical structure and cross linking reactions because of drying. Thermal and microwave drying appear to cause a collapse in the pore structure, thus preventing donor solvents such as tetralin from contacting reactive sites inside the coals. Chemical dehydration does not appear to collapse the pore structure. From the study of the kinetics of the chemical dehydration of coals, it was possible to quantify the amount of water on the surface, the amount readily accessible in pores, and the amount more strongly bonded in the internal structure of the coals. The results indicate that high-rank coals have proportionally less surface and easily accessible water than the lower rank coals.

  20. NAWS-China Lake Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation covers the NAWS-China Lake Project at the Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting, held on November 18-19, 2009.

  1. White Bear Lake Conservation District (Minnesota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This statute establishes the White Bear Lake Conservation District, which has the authority to set water and land use regulations for the area around White Bear Lake.

  2. Selection of components for the IDEALHY preferred cycle for the large scale liquefaction of hydrogen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quack, H.; Seemann, I.; Klaus, M.; Haberstroh, Ch. [Technische Universitaet Dresden, Dresden (Germany); Berstad, D.; Walnum, H. T.; Neksa, P. [SINTEF Energy Research, Trondheim (Norway); Decker, L. [Linde Kryotechnik AG, Pfungen (Switzerland)

    2014-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    In a future energy scenario, in which storage and transport of liquid hydrogen in large quantities will be used, the efficiency of the liquefaction of hydrogen will be of utmost importance. The goal of the IDEALHY working party is to identify the most promising process for a 50 t/d plant and to select the components, with which such a process can be realized. In the first stage the team has compared several processes, which have been proposed or realized in the past. Based on this information a process has been selected, which is thermodynamically most promising and for which it could be assumed that good components already exist or can be developed in the foreseeable future. Main features of the selected process are the compression of the feed stream to a relatively high pressure level, o-p conversion inside plate-fin heat exchangers and expansion turbines in the supercritical region. Precooling to a temperature between 150 and 100 K will be obtained from a mixed refrigerant cycle similar to the systems used successfully in natural gas liquefaction plants. The final cooling will be produced by two Brayton cycles, both having several expansion turbines in series. The selected overall process has still a number of parameters, which can be varied. The optimum, i.e. the final choice will depend mainly on the quality of the available components. Key components are the expansion turbines of the two Brayton cycles and the main recycle compressor, which may be common to both Brayton cycles. A six-stage turbo-compressor with intercooling between the stages is expected to be the optimum choice here. Each stage may consist of several wheels in series. To make such a high efficient and cost-effective compressor feasible, one has to choose a refrigerant, which has a higher molecular weight than helium. The present preferred choice is a mixture of helium and neon with a molecular weight of about 8 kg/kmol. Such an expensive refrigerant requires that the whole refrigeration loop is extremely tight.

  3. Advanced liquefaction using coal swelling and catalyst dispersion techniques. Volume 2, appendices. Final technical report, October 1, 1991--September 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curtis, C.W. [Auburn Univ., AL (United States); Chander, S. [Pennsylvania State Univ., College Park, PA (United States); Gutterman, C.

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Liquefaction experiments were undertaken using subbituminous Black Thunder mine coal to observe the effects of aqueous SO{sub 2} coal beneficiation and the introduction of various coal swelling solvents and catalyst precursors. Aqueous SO{sub 2} beneficiation of Black Thunder coal removed alkali metals and alkaline earth metals, increased the sulfur content and increased the catalytic liquefaction conversion to THF solubles compared to untreated Black Thunder coal. The liquefaction solvent had varying effects on coal conversion, depending upon the type of solvent added. The hydrogen donor solvent, dihydroanthracene, was most effective, while a coal-derived Wilsonville solvent promoted more coal conversion than did relatively inert 1-methylnaphthalene. Swelling of coal with hydrogen bonding solvents tetrahydrofuran (THF), isopropanol, and methanol, prior to reaction resulted in increased noncatalytic conversion of both untreated and SO{sub 2} treated Black Thunder coals, while dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO), which was absorbed more into the coal than any other swelling solvent, was detrimental to coal conversion. Swelling of SO{sub 2} treated coal before liquefaction resulted in the highest coal conversions; however, the untreated coal showed the most improvements in catalytic reactions when swelled in either THF, isopropanol, or methanol prior to liquefaction. The aprotic solvent DMSO was detrimental to coal conversion.

  4. ISET Journal of Earthquake Technology, Paper No. 494, Vol. 45, No. 1-2, March-June 2008, pp. 112 INFLUENCE OF LIQUEFACTION ON PILE-SOIL INTERACTION IN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gupta, Vinay Kumar

    ­12 INFLUENCE OF LIQUEFACTION ON PILE-SOIL INTERACTION IN VERTICAL VIBRATION B.K. Maheshwari*, U.K. Nath** and G. In such soil stratum, pile foundations may undergo substantial shaking while the soil is in a fully liquefied the liquefaction phenomenon. The Winkler soil model has been used to model the pile-soil interaction. Combining

  5. Charles V. Jakowatz, 1996 | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t z CPlasma of the Rotating WallCharles E.CharlesCharles

  6. Coal liquefaction process utilizing coal/CO.sub.2 slurry feedstream

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Comolli, Alfred G. (Yardley, PA); McLean, Joseph B. (S. Somerville, NJ)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A coal hydrogenation and liquefaction process in which particulate coal feed is pressurized to an intermediate pressure of at least 500 psig and slurried with CO.sub.2 liquid to provide a flowable coal/CO.sub.2 slurry feedstream, which is further pressurized to at least 1000 psig and fed into a catalytic reactor. The coal particle size is 50-375 mesh (U.S. Sieve Series) and provides 50-80 W % coal in the coal/CO.sub.2 slurry feedstream. Catalytic reaction conditions are maintained at 650.degree.-850.degree. F. temperature, 1000-4000 psig hydrogen partial pressure and coal feed rate of 10-100 lb coal/hr ft.sup.3 reactor volume to produce hydrocarbon gas and liquid products. The hydrogen and CO.sub.2 are recovered from the reactor effluent gaseous fraction, hydrogen is recycled to the catalytic reactor, and CO.sub.2 is liquefied and recycled to the coal slurrying step. If desired, two catalytic reaction stages close coupled together in series relation can be used. The process advantageously minimizes the recycle and processing of excess hydrocarbon liquid previously needed for slurrying the coal feed to the reactor(s).

  7. MAGNETO-CHEMICAL CHARACTER STUDIES OF NOVEL Fe CATALYSTS FOR COAL LIQUEFACTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murty A. Akundi; Jian H. Zhang; A.N. Murty; S.V. Naidu

    2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of the present study are: (1) To synthesize iron catalysts: Fe/MoO{sub 3}, and Fe/Co/MoO{sub 3} employing two distinct techniques: Pyrolysis with organic precursors and Co-precipitation of metal nitrates; (2) To investigate the magnetic character of the catalysts before and after exposure to CO and CO+H{sub 2} by (a) Mossbauer study of Iron (b) Zerofield Nuclear Magnetic Resonance study of Cobalt, and (c) Magnetic character of the catalyst composite; (3) To study the IR active surface species of the catalyst while stimulating (CO--Metal, (CO+H{sub 2})--Metal) interactions, by FTIR Spectroscopy; and (4) To analyze the catalytic character (conversion efficiency and product distribution) in both direct and indirect liquefaction Process and (5) To examine the correlations between the magnetic and chemical characteristics. This report presents the results of our investigation on (a) the effect of metal loading (b) the effect of intermetallic ratio and (c) the effect of catalyst preparation procedure on (i) the magnetic character of the catalyst composite (ii) the IR active surface species of the catalyst and (iii) the catalytic yields for three different metal loadings: 5%, 15%, and 25% (nominal) for three distinct intermetallic ratios (Fe/Co = 0.3, 1.5, 3.0).

  8. Apparatus and process for the refrigeration, liquefaction and separation of gases with varying levels of purity

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bingham, Dennis N. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wilding, Bruce M. (Idaho Falls, ID); McKellar, Michael G. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for the separation and liquefaction of component gasses from a pressurized mix gas stream is disclosed. The process involves cooling the pressurized mixed gas stream in a heat exchanger so as to condense one or more of the gas components having the highest condensation point; separating the condensed components from the remaining mixed gas stream in a gas-liquid separator; cooling the separated condensed component stream by passing it through an expander; and passing the cooled component stream back through the heat exchanger such that the cooled component stream functions as the refrigerant for the heat exchanger. The cycle is then repeated for the remaining mixed gas stream so as to draw off the next component gas and further cool the remaining mixed gas stream. The process continues until all of the component gases are separated from the desired gas stream. The final gas stream is then passed through a final heat exchanger and expander. The expander decreases the pressure on the gas stream, thereby cooling the stream and causing a portion of the gas stream to liquify within a tank. The portion of the gas which is not liquefied is passed back through each of the heat exchanges where it functions as a refrigerant.

  9. Apparatus and process for the refrigeration, liquefaction and separation of gases with varying levels of purity

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bingham, Dennis N. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wilding, Bruce M. (Idaho Falls, ID); McKellar, Michael G. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for the separation and liquefaction of component gasses from a pressurized mix gas stream is disclosed. The process involves cooling the pressurized mixed gas stream in a heat exchanger so as to condensing one or more of the gas components having the highest condensation point; separating the condensed components from the remaining mixed gas stream in a gas-liquid separator; cooling the separated condensed component stream by passing it through an expander; and passing the cooled component stream back through the heat exchanger such that the cooled component stream functions as the refrigerant for the heat exchanger. The cycle is then repeated for the remaining mixed gas stream so as to draw off the next component gas and further cool the remaining mixed gas stream. The process continues until all of the component gases are separated from the desired gas stream. The final gas stream is then passed through a final heat exchanger and expander. The expander decreases the pressure on the gas stream, thereby cooling the stream and causing a portion of the gas stream to liquify within a tank. The portion of the gas which is hot liquefied is passed back through each of the heat exchanges where it functions as a refrigerant.

  10. Feasibility study for a demonstration plant for liquefaction and coprocessing of waste plastics and tires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huffman, G.P.; Shah, N. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States); Shelley, M. [Auburn Univ., AL (United States)] [and others

    1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of a feasibility study for a demonstration plant for the liquefaction of waste polymers and the coprocessing of waste polymers with coal are presented. The study was carried out by a committee of participants from five universities, the US DOE Federal Energy Technology Center, and Burns & Roe Corporation. The study included an assessment of current recycling practices, a review of pertinent research, and a survey of feedstock availability. A conceptual design for a demonstration plant was developed and a preliminary economic analysis for various feedstock mixes was carried out. The base case for feedstock scenarios was chosen to be 200 tons per day of waste plastic and 100 tons per day of waste tires. For this base case, the return on investment (ROI) was found to range from 8% to 16% as tipping fees for waste plastic and tires increased over a range comparable to that existing in the US. A number of additional feedstock scenarios that were both more and less profitable were also considered and are briefly discussed.

  11. Some Important Aspects of Physical Modelling of Liquefaction in 1-g Shaking Table

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alam, Md. Jahangir [Department of Civil Engineering, Bangladesh University of Engineering and Technology, Dhaka-1000 (Bangladesh); Towhata, Ikuo [Department of Civil Engineering, University of Tokyo (Japan)

    2008-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Physical modeling of liquefaction in 1-g shaking table and dynamic centrifuge test become very popular to simulate the ground behavior during earthquake motion. 1-g shaking table tests require scaled down model ground which can be prepared in three methods; water sedimentation, moist tamping and dry deposition method. Moist tamping and dry deposition method need saturation of model ground which is expensive and very difficult to achieve. Some model tests were performed in 1-g shaking table to see the influence of preparation method of model ground. Wet tamping and water sedimentation method of ground preparation were compared in these tests. Behavior of level ground and slope were also examined. Slope and level ground model test increased the understanding of excess pore pressure generation in both cases. Wet tamping method has a possibility of not being fully saturated. Pore pressure transducers should be fixed vertically so that it can not settle down during shaking but can move with ground. There was insignificant difference in acceleration and excess pore pressure responses between wet tamping and water sedimentation method in case of level ground. Spiky accelerations were prominent in slope prepared by water sedimentation method. Spiky accelerations were the result of lateral displacement induced dilatancy of soil.

  12. Exploratory research on solvent refined coal liquefaction. Annual technical progress report, January 1-December 31, 1979

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the progress of the Exploratory Research on Solvent Refined Coal Liquefaction project by The Pittsburg and Midway Coal Mining Co.'s Merriam Laboratory during 1979. In a series of experiments with varying feed gas composition, low levels (5 to 10 mole %) of carbon monoxide had little effect on the SRC II processing of Pittsburgh Seam coal (Powhatan No. 5 Mine) while higher levels (20 to 40 mole %) resulted in a general degradation of operability and reduced oil yields. Addition of finely divided (approx. 1 ..mu..m) pyrite to the reactive Powhatan coal had little effect on oil yields although the molecular weight of the distillation residue was apparently decreased. When finely divided pyrite and magnetite were added to the less reactive coals from the Loveridge and Blacksville No. 1 Mines (also Pittsburgh Seam), however, substantial increases in oil yields and product quality were obtained. In a comparison of upflow and downflow dissolver configurations with Powhatan coal in the SRC II mode, there was no difference in yields or product quality. A study characterizing specific reactors revealed a significantly higher conversion in the SRC I mode with a reactor approximating plug flow conditions compared to a completely backmixed reactor. In the SRC II mode there was only a slightly higher oil yield with the plug flow reactor.

  13. Production and Optimization of Direct Coal Liquefaction derived Low Carbon-Footprint Transportation Fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steven Markovich

    2010-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes works conducted under DOE Contract No. DE-FC26-05NT42448. The work scope was divided into two categories - (a) experimental program to pretreat and refine a coal derived syncrude sample to meet transportation fuels requirements; (b) system analysis of a commercial scale direct coal liquefaction facility. The coal syncrude was derived from a bituminous coal by Headwaters CTL, while the refining study was carried out under a subcontract to Axens North America. The system analysis included H{sub 2} production cost via six different options, conceptual process design, utilities requirements, CO{sub 2} emission and overall plant economy. As part of the system analysis, impact of various H{sub 2} production options was evaluated. For consistence the comparison was carried out using the DOE H2A model. However, assumptions in the model were updated using Headwaters database. Results of Tier 2 jet fuel specifications evaluation by the Fuels & Energy Branch, US Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL/RZPF) located at Wright Patterson Air Force Base (Ohio) are also discussed in this report.

  14. Development of Hydrothermal Liquefaction and Upgrading Technologies for Lipid-Extracted Algae Conversion to Liquid Fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhu, Yunhua; Albrecht, Karl O.; Elliott, Douglas C.; Hallen, Richard T.; Jones, Susanne B.

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bench-scale tests were performed for lipid-extracted microalgae (LEA) conversion to liquid fuels via hydrotreating liquefaction (HTL) and upgrading processes. Process simulation and economic analysis for a large-scale LEA HTL and upgrading system were developed based on the best available test results. The system assumes an LEA feed rate of 608 dry metric ton/day and that the feedstock is converted to a crude HTL bio-oil and further upgraded via hydrotreating and hydrocracking to produce liquid hydrocarbon fuels, mainly alkanes. Performance and cost results demonstrate that HTL would be an effective option to convert LEA to liquid fuel. The liquid fuels annual yield was estimated to be 26.9 million gallon gasoline-equivalent and the overall energy efficiency at higher heating value basis was estimated to be 69.5%. The minimum fuel selling price (MFSP) was estimated to be $0.75/L with LEA feedstock price at $33.1 metric ton at dry basis and 10% internal rate of return. A sensitivity analysis indicated that the largest effects to production cost would come from the final products yields and the upgrading equipments cost. The impact of plant scale on MFSP was also investigated.

  15. PYRAMID LAKE RENEWEABLE ENERGY PLAN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HIGH DESERT GEOCULTURE, LLC

    2009-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pyramid Lake Renewable Energy Plan covers these areas: energy potential (primarily focusing on geothermal resource potential, but also more generally addressing wind energy potential); renewable energy market potential; transmission system development; geothermal direct use potential; and business structures to accomplish the development objectives of the Pyramid Lake Paiute Tribe.

  16. An urban lake remediation experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Castelli, S.E.; Gardner, K.H.; Jennings, A.A.

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Circumstances provided the opportunity to study a small urban lake as the surrounding municipalities attempted to improve its aesthetic quality by dredging. This manuscript focuses primarily on the sediments in the system: accumulation rates, the expected dynamics of the lake bed drying process, and the influence of the sediments on water quality.

  17. Interactive Translucent Volume Rendering and Procedural Modeling Joe Kniss Simon Premoze Charles Hansen David Ebert

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kniss, Joe Michael

    Interactive Translucent Volume Rendering and Procedural Modeling Joe Kniss Simon Premoze¶ Charles School of Electrical and Computer Engineering Purdue University Figure 1: A translucent fish rendered. Abstract Direct volume rendering is a commonly used technique in visual- ization applications. Many

  18. Inventing the Charles River Basin : urban images and civic discourse in Boston, 1844-1994

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haglund, Karl T

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Charles River Basin, extending from the foot of Beacon Hill upstream past Harvard's Soldiers Field, has been called Boston's "Central Park." The river looks to all appearances tranquil and unchanging, one of the most ...

  19. Charles River City : an educational augmented reality simulation pocket PC game

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheung, Priscilla, 1980-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis has designed and implemented Charles River City, an educational, location-based augmented reality simulation game that uses Pocket PC devices and GPS technology. As mobile devices and processing power become ...

  20. Community, individual, and world in the later works of Josiah Royce and Charles Taylor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hilde, Thomas Christian

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    are those of Josiah Royce and Charles Taylor. I wish to show the similarities and dissimilarities between their respective social philosophies, their social ontologies, and the ameliorative practices they advocate. Although I find Taylor's account...

  1. Library of Charles Areskine (1680-1763): Scottish lawyers and book collecting, 1700-1760 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baston, Karen Grudzien

    2012-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The thesis uses the study of an individual’s book collection to examine wider themes in eighteenth century Scottish legal, social, political, and intellectual history. Charles Areskine’s library was made up of the books ...

  2. TO: Deans, Directors and Department Heads FROM: Charles Eaton, Interim Controller and Director of Accounting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holsinger, Kent

    TO: Deans, Directors and Department Heads FROM: Charles Eaton, Interim Controller and Director in the current fiscal year. Purchase Requisitions: Purchases under $10,000 (Includes Corporate Express) June 11

  3. Public Information Charles W. Durham School of Architectural Engineering and Construction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Powers, Robert

    Public Information for Charles W. Durham School of Architectural Engineering and Construction Construction Management (CM) Program #12;Table of Contents I. Institution Mission for Durham School of Architectural Engineering and Construction Construction Management (CM) Program I

  4. Development of quantum perspectives in modern physics Charles Baily* and Noah D. Finkelstein

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    Development of quantum perspectives in modern physics Charles Baily* and Noah in modern physics, many students are still exhibiting a realist perspective D. Finkelstein Department of Physics, University of Colorado, Boulder CO 80309

  5. VWA-0014- In the Matter of Charles Barry DeLoach

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Decision involves a whistleblower complaint filed by Charles Barry DeLoach (DeLoach) under the Department of Energy's (DOE) Contractor Employee Protection Program, 10 C.F.R. Part 708. For a...

  6. The use of turbulent jets to destratify the Charles River Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Church, Jeffrey H. (Jeffrey Harrison)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study examines the feasibility of using turbulent jets to destratify the Lower Charles River Basin between the Longfellow and Craigie Bridges between Boston and Cambridge. The basin is currently filled with salt water ...

  7. PRINCIPLES OF SEISMIC HOLOGRAPHY FOR DIAGNOSTICS OF THE SHALLOW SUBPHOTOSPHERE Charles Lindsey and D. C. Braun

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Braun, Douglas C.

    PRINCIPLES OF SEISMIC HOLOGRAPHY FOR DIAGNOSTICS OF THE SHALLOW SUBPHOTOSPHERE Charles Lindsey develop the wave-mechanical formalism for phase-correlation computational seismic holography headinggs: Sun: activity -- Sun: helioseismology -- sunspots 1. INTRODUCTION Computational seismic

  8. BYU Salt Lake Center Financial Aid Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martinez, Tony R.

    BYU Salt Lake Center Financial Aid Program 2011 A financial aid program of the Brigham Young University Division of Continuing Education BYU Salt Lake Center 345 West North Temple Street 3 Triad Center Salt Lake City, UT 84180 Fax: (801) 933­9456 Email: slc@byu.edu #12;BYU Salt Lake Center Financial Aid

  9. BYU Salt Lake Center Financial Aid Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olsen Jr., Dan R.

    BYU Salt Lake Center Financial Aid Program 2013 A financial aid program of the Brigham Young University Division of Continuing Education BYU Salt Lake Center 345 West North Temple Street 3 Triad Center Salt Lake City, UT 84180 Fax: (801) 933­9456 Email: slc@byu.edu #12;BYU Salt Lake Center Financial Aid

  10. BYU Salt Lake Center Financial Aid Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hart, Gus

    BYU Salt Lake Center Financial Aid Program 2014 A financial aid program of the Brigham Young University Division of Continuing Education BYU Salt Lake Center 345 West North Temple Street 3 Triad Center Salt Lake City, UT 84180 Fax: (801) 933­9456 Email: slc@byu.edu #12;BYU Salt Lake Center Financial Aid

  11. BYU Salt Lake Center Financial Aid Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hart, Gus

    BYU Salt Lake Center Financial Aid Program 2012 A financial aid program of the Brigham Young University Division of Continuing Education BYU Salt Lake Center 345 West North Temple Street 3 Triad Center Salt Lake City, UT 84180 Fax: (801) 933­9456 Email: slc@byu.edu #12;BYU Salt Lake Center Financial Aid

  12. Oakland Sub-Area Folsom Lake

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UPPER LAKE LUCERNE WILLIAMS MERIDAN CORTINA PEASE BARRY BOGUE OLIVEHURST HARTER Marysville Yuba City

  13. From Alexander von Humboldt to Charles Darwin: Evolution in Observation and Interpretation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baron, Frank

    2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    “From Alexander von Humboldt to Charles Darwin: Evolution in Observation and Interpretation.” Internet Zeitschrift für Kulturwissensdhaften, 17. Nr. February 2010. http://www.inst.at/trans/17Nr/7-8/7-8_baron17.htm. Publisher’s official version... citation: “From Alexander von Humboldt to Charles Darwin: Evolution in Observation and Interpretation.” Internet Zeitschrift für Kulturwissensdhaften, 17. Nr. February 2010. http://www.inst.at/trans/17Nr/7-8/7- 8_baron17.htm Text of paper: From...

  14. Catalysts and process developments for two-stage liquefaction. Final technical report, October 1, 1989--September 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cronauer, D.C.; Swanson, A.J.; Sajkowski, D.J.

    1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Research in this project centered upon developing and evaluating catalysts and process improvements for coal liquefaction in the two-stage, close-coupled catalytic process. The major results are summarized here and they are described in more detail under each Task. In tasks for coal pretreatment and beneficiation, it was shown for coal handling that drying of both lignite or subbituminous coals using warm air, vacuum oven or exposing to air for long time was detrimental to subsequent liquefaction. Both laboratory and bench-scale beneficiations indicated that in order to achieve increased liquefaction yield for Illinois No. 6 bituminous coal, size separation with in sink-float technique should be used. For subbituminous coal, the best beneficiation was aqueous SO{sub 2} treatment, which reduced mineral matter. In the case of lignite, the fines should be rejected prior to aqueous SO{sub 2} treatment and sink-float gravity separation. In liquefying coals with supported catalysts in both first and second stages, coal conversion was highest (93%) with Illinois No. 6 coal, which also had the highest total liquid yield of 80%, however, the product contained unacceptably high level of resid (30%). Both low rank coals gave lower conversion (85--87%) and liquid yields (57--59%), but lighter products (no resid). The analysis of spent first stage catalysts indicated significant sodium and calcium deposits causing severe deactivation. The second stage catalysts were in better condition showing high surface areas and low coke and metal deposits. The use of dispersed catalyst in the first stage would combat the severe deactivation.

  15. Reassessment of liquefaction potential and estimation of earthquake- induced settlements at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Paducah, Kentucky. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sykora, D.W.; Yule, D.E.

    1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents a reassessment of liquefaction potential and estimation of earthquake-induced settlements for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP), located southwest of Paducah, KY. The U.S. Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station (WES) was authorized to conduct this study from FY91 to FY94 by the DOE, Oak Ridge Operations (ORO), Oak Ridge, TN, through Inter- Agency Agreement (IAG) No. DE-AI05-91OR21971. The study was conducted under the Gaseous Diffusion Plant Safety Analysis Report (GDP SAR) Program.

  16. Liquefaction of Forest Biomass to ÂŤDrop-inÂŽ Hydrocarbon Biofuels Presentation for BETO 2015 Project Peer Review

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(FactDepartment ofLetterEconomy and Emissions EstimatesLindseyLiquefaction of

  17. ASPEN simulation of the SNG production process in an indirect coal-liquefaction plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bistline, J E; Shafer, T B

    1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The synthetic natural gas (SNG) production process (methanation, CO-shift, and hydrogen removal) in an indirect coal-liquefaction plant was simulated using the Advanced System for Process Engineering (ASPEN). The simulation of the methanation unit agreed to within 12% of Fluor's design for converting carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide. A parametric study examined the effect of four important operating parameters on product composition, process thermal efficiency, and outlet temperature from the second methanation reactor. The molar split of gas feed to the CO-shift unit before methanation was varied from 0.2 to 0.6; variations of molar recycle ratio (0.01 - 0.67), molar steam-to-feed ratio (0.04 - 0.19), and feed temperature (478 - 533 K, 400-500/sup 0/F) to the first methanation reactor were also studied. A 50%-lower split improved thermal efficiency by 6%, but the mole % hydrogen and carbon monoxide in the product SNG required to meet pipeline-quality standards and temperature constraints were not met. Increasing the steam-to-feed ratio from 0.04 to 0.19 improved product quality but decreased thermal efficiency by 8%. By decreasing the feed temperature from 533 to 477 K (500 to 400/sup 0/F), product specifications and temperature constraints were met with no effect on thermal efficiency. However, it may be impractical to operate the reactor at 477 K (400/sup 0/F) because the kinetics are too slow. Increasing the recycle ratio from 0.4 to 0.67 had no effect on thermal efficiency, and temperature constraints and product specifications were met. The SNG production process should be optimized at recycle ratios above 0.67.

  18. Lifecycle Assessment of Microalgae to Biofuel: Thermochemical Processing through Hydrothermal Liquefaction or Pyrolysis.

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bennion, Edward P.; Ginosar, Daniel M.; Moses, John; Agblevor, Foster; Quinn, Jason C.

    2015-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Microalgae are currently being investigated as a renewable transportation fuel feedstock based on various advantages that include high annual yields, utilization of poor quality land, does not compete with food, and can be integrated with various waste streams. This study focuses on directly assessing the impact of two different thermochemical conversion technologies on the microalgae to biofuel process through life cycle assessment. A system boundary of a “well to pump” (WTP) is defined and includes sub-process models of the growth, dewatering, thermochemical bio-oil recovery, bio-oil stabilization, conversion to renewable diesel, and transport to the pump. Models were validated with experimental and literature data and are representative of an industrial-scale microalgae to biofuel process. Two different thermochemical bio-oil conversion systems are modeled and compared on a systems level, hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL) and pyrolysis. The environmental impact of the two pathways were quantified on the metrics of net energy ratio (NER), defined here as energy consumed over energy produced, and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Results for WTP biofuel production through the HTL pathway were determined to be 1.23 for the NER and GHG emissions of -11.4 g CO2 eq (MJ renewable diesel)-1. WTP biofuel production through the pyrolysis pathway results in a NER of 2.27 and GHG emissions of 210 g CO2 eq (MJ renewable diesel)-1. The large environmental impact associated with the pyrolysis pathway is attributed to feedstock drying requirements and combustion of co-products to improve system energetics. Discussion focuses on a detailed breakdown of the overall process energetics and GHGs, impact of modeling at laboratory- scale compared to industrial-scale, environmental impact sensitivity to engineering systems input parameters for future focused research and development and a comparison of results to literature.

  19. Direct liquefaction Proof-of-Concept facility. Final technical progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Comolli, A.G.; Lee, L.K.; Pradhan, V.R.; Stalzer, R.H.; Harris, E.C.; Mountainland, D.M.; Karolkiewicz, W.F.; Pablacio, R.M.

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of work which included extensive modifications to HRI`s existing 3 ton per day Process Development Unit (PDU) and completion of the first PDU run. The 58-day Run 1 demonstrated scale-up of the Catalytic Two-Stage Liquefaction (CTSL Process) on Illinois No. 6 coal to produce distillate liquid products at a rate of up to 5 barrels per to of moisture-ash-free coal. The Kerr McGee Rose-SR unit from Wilsonville was redesigned and installed next to the US Filter installation to allow a comparison of the two solids removal systems. Also included was a new enclosed reactor tower, upgraded computer controls and a data acquisition system, an alternate power supply, a newly refurbished reactor, an in-line hydrotreater, interstage sampling system, coal handling unit, a new ebullating pump, load cells and improved controls and remodeled preheaters. Distillate liquid yields of 5 barrels/ton of moisture ash free coal were achieved. Coal slurry recycle rates were reduced from the 2--2.5 to 1 ratio demonstrated at Wilsonville to as low as 0.9 to 1. Coal feed rates were increased during the test by 50% while maintaining process performance at a marginally higher reactor severity. Sulfur in the coal was reduced from 4 wt% to ca. 0.02 wt% sulfur in the clean distillate fuel product. More than 3,500 gallons of distillate fuels were collected for evaluation and upgrading studies. The ROSE-SR Process was operated for the first time with a pentane solvent in a steady-state model. The energy rejection of the ash concentrate was consistently below prior data, being as low as 12%, allowing improved liquid yields and recovery.

  20. Global Change and Mountain Lakes: Establishing Nutrient Criteria and Critical Loads for Sierra Nevada Lakes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heard, ANDREA Michelle

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the summer and fall of 2011 at Emerald Lake (EML) and Marblethe summer and fall of 2011 at Emerald Lake (EML) and Marble

  1. Preconversion processing of bituminous coals: New directions to improved direct catalytic coal liquefaction. Final report, September 20, 1991--September 19, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the main goals for competitive coal liquefaction is to decrease gas yields to reduce hydrogen consumption. Complexing this element as methane and ethane decreases process efficiently and is less cost effective. To decrease the gas yield and increase the liquid yield, an effective preconversion process has been explored on the basis of the physically associated molecular nature of coal. Activities have been focused on two issues: (1) maximizing the dissolution of associated coal and (2) defining the different reactivity associated with a wide molecular weight distribution. Two-step soaking at 350{degrees}C and 400{degrees}C in a recycle oil was found to be very effective for coal solubilization. No additional chemicals, catalysts, and hydrogen are required for this preconversion process. High-volatile bituminous coals tested before liquefaction showed 80--90% conversion with 50--55% oil yields. New preconversion steps suggested are as follows: (1) dissolution of coal with two-step high-temperature soaking, (2) separation into oil and heavy fractions of dissolved coal with vacuum distillation, and (3) selective liquefaction of the separated heavy fractions under relatively mild conditions. Laboratory scale tests of the proposed procedure mode using a small autoclave showed a 30% increase in the oil yield with a 15--20% decrease in the gas yield. This batch operation projects a substantial reduction in the ultimate cost of coal liquefaction.

  2. Great Lakes Water Level Statistics Primary Investigator: Cynthia Sellinger

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Great Lakes Water Level Statistics Primary Investigator: Cynthia Sellinger Overview Extreme Great disruption throughout the Great Lakes system. Reliable lake level frequency distributions are a critical of monthly lake levels reflect secular changes in connecting channel hydraulics, watershed hydrologic

  3. Advanced coal liquefaction research. Quarterly technical progress report, July 1, 1983-September 30, 1983

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Work this quarter focused on staged liquefaction. The effect of residence time on conversion in single pass experiments was found to be quite different for the subbituminous Belle Ayr Mine and bituminous Illinois No. 6 coals studied. With bituminous coal, conversion to soluble material is quite high and the limit of conversion is approached in only a few minutes. With a subbituminous coal, however, conversion is much lower and the limit of conversion is approached much more slowly. Short contact time (SCT) dissolution of Belle Ayr coal was studied as a possible first stage in a two-stage process. Conversion, hydrocarbon gas yield and hydrogen consumption were increased as residence time or temperature were increased. Conversion was also significantly increased by partial slurry recycle. Pyrite was found to be the most effective slurry catalyst for increasing conversion, followed by ammonium molybdate emulsion and finally nickel-molybdenum on alumina. Illinois No. 6 coal was liquefied in two stages. Conditions in the first stage dissolution were varied to determine the effect on upgradability in the second stage. An SCT (6 minute) coal dissolution stage is preferred over one at 30 minutes because hydrocarbon gas yield was much lower while overall oil yields for the combined dissolution and upgrading stages were nearly the same. Use of a NiMo/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ catalyst in a trickle-bed second stage resulted in a higher oil yield and lower product heteroatom content than use of the same catalyst in the slurry phase. The total oil yield was lower with a pyrite slurry catalyst than with a NiMo/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ slurry catalyst. With Belle Ayr coal and added pyrite, there was no change in total oil yield, conversion or product quality brought about by adding an 8-minute first stage at 450/sup 0/C (842/sup 0/F) to a 2-hour second stage operated at 420/sup 0/C (788/sup 0/F). 39 figures, 12 tables.

  4. Lakes and Rivers Improvement Act (Ontario, Canada)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Lakes and Rivers Improvement Act proscribes the management, protection, preservation and use of the waters of the lakes and rivers of Ontario and the land under them. The Act also details...

  5. Recreational Lake and Water Quality Districts (Iowa)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Territory contiguous to a recreational lake may be incorporated into a recreational lake and water quality district if such action is conducive to the public health, comfort, convenience, water...

  6. Cellulase for commodity products from cellulosic biomass Michael E Himmel*?, Mark F Ruth*1 and Charles E Wymans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Riverside, University of

    and Charles E Wymans A vital objective for second millennium biotechnology will be the enzymatic conversion 03755, USA; e-mail: Charles.E.Wyman@Dartmouth.edu Current Opinion in Biotechnology 1999, 10:358-364 http- modity products, this vast resource can provide environmental, economic, and strategic benefits

  7. Monitoring the obesity epidemic in France: the Obepi surveys 1997-2006 Charles Marie-Aline 1 *

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Monitoring the obesity epidemic in France: the Obepi surveys 1997-2006 Charles Marie-Aline 1-aline.charles@inserm.fr> Abstract The objective of the study is to describe the prevalences of obesity in French adults over a 9 members of the selected households 18 years and older. Obesity was defined according to WHO criteria, BMI

  8. Climate Change and Variability Lake Ice, Fishes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    #12;Climate Change and Variability Lake Ice, Fishes and Water Levels John J. Magnuson Center to everything else." #12;The Invisible Present The Invisible Place Magnuson 2006 #12;Ice-on Day 2007 Peter W. Schmitz Photo Local Lake Mendota #12;Ice Breakup 2010 Lake Mendota March 20 #12;March 21 Ice Breakup 2010

  9. Temperature analysis for lake Yojoa, Honduras

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chokshi, Mira (Mira K.)

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lake Yojoa is the largest freshwater lake in Honduras, located in the central west region of the country (1405' N, 88° W). The lake has a surface area of 82 km2, a maximum depth of 26 m. and an average depth of 16 m. The ...

  10. Charles Roger Alcock, 1996 | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t z CPlasma of the Rotating WallCharles E.Charles Roger

  11. Advanced direct liquefaction concepts for PETC generic units phase II. Quarterly technical progress report, April--June 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A catalyst screening test (CST) was developed to evaluate the activity of various catalyst precursors for their liquefaction activity in a solvent comprising the solids-free components of a recycle solvent generated at Wilsonville, namely a ROSE SR V-130 deashed resid from period A and V-1074 heavy distillate from period B. Since the deashed resid has an elemental composition very nearly the same distillate from period B. Since the deashed resid has an elemental composition very nearly the same as in the solids-free fraction of the recycle solvent, the reactivity of these two resid and dry coal are nearly the same as in Run 263J, the overall composition should approximate the feed stream used in the Wilsonville pilot plant except for the absence of the solids component. Removing the solids from the reaction mixture should simplify the interpretation of the results since normally a considerable amount or recycled catalyst is contained in this fraction.

  12. "An Economic Process for Coal Liquefaction to Liquid Fuels" SBIR Phase II -- Final Scientific/Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ganguli, Partha Sarathi

    2009-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The current commercial processes for direct coal liquefaction utilize expensive backmix-flow reactor system and conventional catalysts resulting in incomplete and retrogressive reactions that produce low distillate liquid yield and high gas yield, with high hydrogen consumption. The new process we have developed, which uses a less expensive reactor system and highly active special catalysts, resulted in high distillate liquid yield, low gas yield and low hydrogen consumption. The new reactor system using the special catalyst can be operated smoothly for direct catalytic coal liquefaction. Due to high hydrogenation and hydrocracking activities of the special catalysts, moderate temperatures and high residence time in each stage of the reactor system resulted in high distillate yield in the C{sub 4}-650{degrees}F range with no 650{degrees}F{sup +} product formed except for the remaining unconverted coal residue. The C{sub 4}-650{degrees}F distillate is more valuable than the light petroleum crude. Since there is no 650{degrees}F{sup +} liquid product, simple reforming and hydrotreating of the C{sub 4}-650{degrees}F product will produce the commercial grade light liquid fuels. There is no need for further refinement using catalytic cracking process that is currently used in petroleum refining. The special catalysts prepared and used in the experimental runs had surface area between 40-155 m{sup 2}/gm. The liquid distillate yield in the new process is >20 w% higher than that in the current commercial process. Coal conversion in the experimental runs was moderate, in the range of 88 - 94 w% maf-coal. Though coal conversion can be increased by adjustment in operating conditions, the purpose of limiting coal conversion to moderate amounts in the process was to use the remaining unconverted coal for hydrogen production by steam reforming. Hydrogen consumption was in the range of 4.0 - 6.0 w% maf-coal. A preliminary economic analysis of the new coal liquefaction process was carried out by comparing the design and costs of the current commercial plant of the Shenhua Corporation in Erdos, Inner Mongolia. The cost of producing synthetic crude oil from coal in the current commercial process was estimated to be $50.5 per barrel compared to the estimated cost of $41.7 per barrel in the new process. As mentioned earlier, the light distillate product in the new process is of higher quality and value than the C{sub 4}-975{degrees}F product in the current commercial process adopted by the Shenhua Corporation. In sum, the new coal liquefaction process is superior and less capital intensive to current commercial process, and has a high potential for commercialization.

  13. SOUTH CARIBOO 2011 Williams Lake

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Northern British Columbia, University of

    , Spectra Energy Transmission Bursaries for Aboriginal Students Jinny Donovan UNBC Scholars Award Cassandra First-year students (left to right) Emmaline Hanet of Williams Lake, and Allison Matfin of Lone Butte University Way · Prince George, BC, Canada V2N 4Z9

  14. Contaminant Monitoring Strategy for Henrys Lake, Idaho

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John S. Irving; R. P. Breckenridge

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Henrys Lake, located in southeastern Idaho, is a large, shallow lake (6,600 acres, {approx} 17.1 feet maximum depth) located at 6,472 feet elevation in Fremont Co., Idaho at the headwaters of the Henrys Fork of the Snake River. The upper watershed is comprised of high mountains of the Targhee National Forest and the lakeshore is surrounded by extensive flats and wetlands, which are mostly privately owned. The lake has been dammed since 1922, and the upper 12 feet of the lake waters are allocated for downriver use. Henrys Lake is a naturally productive lake supporting a nationally recognized ''Blue Ribbon'' trout fishery. There is concern that increasing housing development and cattle grazing may accelerate eutrophication and result in winter and early spring fish kills. There has not been a recent thorough assessment of lake water quality. However, the Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) is currently conducting a study of water quality on Henrys Lake and tributary streams. Septic systems and lawn runoff from housing developments on the north, west, and southwest shores could potentially contribute to the nutrient enrichment of the lake. Many houses are on steep hillsides where runoff from lawns, driveways, etc. drain into wetland flats along the lake or directly into the lake. In addition, seepage from septic systems (drainfields) drain directly into the wetlands enter groundwater areas that seep into the lake. Cattle grazing along the lake margin, riparian areas, and uplands is likely accelerating erosion and nutrient enrichment. Also, cattle grazing along riparian areas likely adds to nutrient enrichment of the lake through subsurface flow and direct runoff. Stream bank and lakeshore erosion may also accelerate eutrophication by increasing the sedimentation of the lake. Approximately nine streams feed the lake (see map), but flows are often severely reduced or completely eliminated due to irrigation diversion. In addition, subsurface flows can occur as a result of severe cattle grazing along riparian areas and deltas. Groundwater and springs also feed the lake, and are likely critical for oxygen supply during winter stratification. During the winter of 1991, Henrys Lake experienced low dissolved oxygen levels resulting in large fish kills. It is thought that thick ice cover combined with an increase in nutrient loads created conditions resulting in poor water quality. The Idaho Department of Health and Welfare, DEQ is currently conducting a study to determine the water quality of Henrys Lake, the sources contributing to its deterioration, and potential remedial actions to correct problem areas.

  15. Efficiencyof current drive by fast waves CharlesF. F. Karneyand NathanielJ. Fisch

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karney, Charles

    Efficiencyof current drive by fast waves CharlesF. F. Karneyand NathanielJ. Fisch Plasma Physics Antonsen and Chu can then be used to calculatethe efficiencyof current driveby fast waves in a relativistic plasma. Accurate numerical results and analytic asymptotic limits for the efficienciesare given. I

  16. 1. Charles Clore International House 2. David Lopatie Conference Centre; Caf Mada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shamir, Ron

    1. Charles Clore International House 2. David Lopatie Conference Centre; Café Mada 3. Barbara and Naomi Cohen Building 62. Mexico Building 63. Leon and Gina Fromer Building (main library) 64. Ecological of Samuel Jacob Zacks of Toronto 84. Weizmann House 85. Anixter Family Foundation Early Childhood Village 86

  17. A SUBBAND HYBRID BEAMFORMING FOR IN-CAR SPEECH ENHANCEMENT Charles Fox

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Badeau, Roland

    A SUBBAND HYBRID BEAMFORMING FOR IN-CAR SPEECH ENHANCEMENT Charles Fox , Guillaume Vitte , Maurice is pre- sented, dedicated to in-car communication. An experimental study of the acoustic field inside the car interior leads us to propose a hy- brid beamforming algorithm, taking two frequency ranges into ac

  18. A review of "The Peronsal Rule of Charles II, 1681 - 85" by Grant Tapsell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McClain, Molly

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    - tions and hypothetical propositions?strategically and imaginatively combined to convey a plausible cause-and-effect finale. Grant Tapsell. The Personal Rule of Charles II, 1681-85. Woodbridge and Rochester: Boydell, 2007. $90.00. Review by MOLLY MCCLAIN...

  19. The Economic Impact of the Charles Town Thoroughbred Horse Racing Industry on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    The Economic Impact of the Charles Town Thoroughbred Horse Racing Industry on the Jefferson County Research Assistant Tom S Witt, Director and Associate Dean Bureau of Business and Economic Research College of Business and Economics West Virginia University November 2011 Funding for this research was provided

  20. Cultural Macroevolution and the Transmission of MONIQUE BORGERHOFF MULDER, CHARLES L. NUNN, AND MARY C. TOWNER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nunn, Charles

    ARTICLES Cultural Macroevolution and the Transmission of Traits MONIQUE BORGERHOFF MULDER, CHARLES to which trait distributions can be explained by random drift.13 Despite major conceptual develop- ments,30,31 and yet others adhere to a model wherein traits diffuse across Monique Borgerhoff Mulder

  1. Fertilization of Fresh Water Fish Ponds 1 Craig Watson and Charles E. Cichra2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    FA17 Fertilization of Fresh Water Fish Ponds 1 Craig Watson and Charles E. Cichra2 1. This document. If a fish species which consumes small natural foods is grown, such as the bluegill or golden shiner, then pond fertilization can increase the production of these fish. Fertilizers provide nutrients

  2. Interactive Translucent Volume Rendering and Procedural Modeling Simon Premoze Charles Hansen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kniss, Joe Michael

    Interactive Translucent Volume Rendering and Procedural Modeling Joe Kniss Simon Premozeˇ Charles rendered from a CT scan of a carp. Left: Blinn-Phong shading. Center and right: translucent volume shading. Abstract Direct volume rendering is a commonly used technique in visual- ization applications. Many

  3. Image-Based Volume Rendering with Opacity Light Miriah Meyer, Hanspeter Pfister, Charles Hansen, Chris Johnson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utah, University of

    1 Image-Based Volume Rendering with Opacity Light Fields Miriah Meyer, Hanspeter Pfister, Charles valuable for volume rendering, large datasets continue to overwhelm the capabilities of the graphics cards, reducing the interactivity of volume rendering utilizing such hardware. We present a novel, image

  4. ELECTROMAGNETICANALYSIS OFAXI-SYMMETRIC STRUCTURES VicenteRodriguez-Pereyra,Atef Z. Elsherbeni, and Charles E. Smith

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elsherbeni, Atef Z.

    , and Charles E. Smith Department of Electrical Engineering, The University of Mississippi University, Mississippi38677 e-mail: atef@olemiss.edu Abstract - Various types of antennas and transmission media are transmission media, (coaxial cables and cylindrical waveguides), antennas (wire dipoles, circular microstrip

  5. LuaAV: Extensibility and Heterogeneity for Audiovisual Graham WAKEFIELD and Wesley SMITH and Charles ROBERTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Barbara, University of

    LuaAV: Extensibility and Heterogeneity for Audiovisual Computing Graham WAKEFIELD and Wesley SMITH and Charles ROBERTS Media Arts and Technology, University of California Santa Barbara Santa Barbara, CA 93110 providing the flexibility and temporal accuracy demanded by interactive audio-visual media. Code generation

  6. Risk-based modelling of surface water quality: a case study of the Charles River, Massachusetts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wagener, Thorsten

    : Water quality; Risk; Monte Carlo; Sensitivity analysis; Eutrophication 1. Introduction 1.1. Motivation recognised in the development of some decision-support tools, for example, QUAL2E- UNCAS (Brown and BarnwellRisk-based modelling of surface water quality: a case study of the Charles River, Massachusetts

  7. Imaging Young Giant Planets From Ground and Space CHARLES A. BEICHMAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). Monte Carlo modeling reveals that JWST can detect planets with masses of a dust disk. What is needed to anchor the models of young planets are objects of known ageImaging Young Giant Planets From Ground and Space CHARLES A. BEICHMAN NASA Exoplanet Science

  8. EINSTEIN METRICS ON SPHERES CHARLES P. BOYER, KRZYSZTOF GALICKI AND J ANOS KOLLAR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    EINSTEIN METRICS ON SPHERES CHARLES P. BOYER, KRZYSZTOF GALICKI AND J ´ANOS KOLL´AR 1. Introduction and Einstein, that is the Ricci curvature is a constant multiple of the metric. The spheres S4m+3 , m > 1 are known to have another Sp(m + 1)-homogeneous Einstein metric discovered by Jensen [Jen73]. In addi- tion

  9. New Einstein Metrics on 8#(S 2 S 3 ) Charles P. Boyer Krzysztof Galicki

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Einstein Metrics on 8#(S 2 #2; S 3 ) Charles P. Boyer Krzysztof Galicki Abstract: We show that #8(S 2 #2;S 3 ) admits two 8-dimensional complex family of inequiva- lent non-regular Sasakian-Einstein structures. These are the #12;rst known non-regular Sasakian- Einstein metrics on this 5-manifold

  10. EINSTEIN METRICS ON RATIONAL HOMOLOGY SPHERES CHARLES P. BOYER AND KRZYSZTOF GALICKI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    EINSTEIN METRICS ON RATIONAL HOMOLOGY SPHERES CHARLES P. BOYER AND KRZYSZTOF GALICKI 1. Introduction In this paper we prove the existence of Einstein metrics, actually Sasakian- Einstein metrics is known about the existence of Einstein metrics on rational homology spheres, and the known ones

  11. EINSTEIN METRICS ON SPHERES CHARLES P. BOYER, KRZYSZTOF GALICKI AND J

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    EINSTEIN METRICS ON SPHERES CHARLES P. BOYER, KRZYSZTOF GALICKI AND J â?? ANOS KOLL â?? AR 1 are homogeneous and Einstein, that is the Ricci curvature is a constant multiple of the metric. The spheres S 4m+3 , m > 1 are known to have another Sp(m + 1)­homogeneous Einstein metric discovered by Jensen [Jen73

  12. Electrical Engineering Graduate Handbook Charles L. Brown Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Acton, Scott

    1 Electrical Engineering Graduate Handbook 2014-2015 Charles L. Brown Department of Electrical from the Chairman Electrical engineers continue to provide technological leadership for developments of Electrical and Computer Engineering, at the University of Virginia, is one of the eight departments

  13. Joule heating and nitric oxide in the thermosphere, 2 Charles A. Barth1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bailey, Scott

    Joule heating and nitric oxide in the thermosphere, 2 Charles A. Barth1 Received 14 April 2010, gravity waves propagate from the polar regions toward the equator heating the thermosphere at 140 km and higher. These gravity waves are produced by Joule heating that occurs at latitudes of 60° and higher

  14. Surveillance and Control: Legislative Power in Argentina and Brazil* Charles Pessanha**

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Surveillance and Control: Legislative Power in Argentina and Brazil* Charles Pessanha and Control: Legislative Power in Argentina and Brazil "La société a le droit de demander compte à tout agent countries. Key-words: Accountability; External Control; Legislative Power; Brazil; Argentina Introduction

  15. Techniques for the removal of marker genes from transgenic plants Charles P. Scutt a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyer, Peter

    Review Techniques for the removal of marker genes from transgenic plants Charles P. Scutt a, *, Elena Zubko b , Peter Meyer b a Reproduction et Développement des Plantes, École Normale Supérieure de Lyon, 46, allée d'Italie, 69364 Lyon cedex 07, France b Centre for Plant Sciences, University of Leeds

  16. 13 Impacts of Invasive Species on Ecosystem Services Heather Charles and Jeffrey S. Dukes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dukes, Jeffrey

    humans (Daily 1997). In this chapter, we introduce concepts associated with the valuation of ecosystem services, and discuss how costs generated by invasions relate to impacts on ecosystem services.We link13 Impacts of Invasive Species on Ecosystem Services Heather Charles and Jeffrey S. Dukes 13

  17. Information Sharing and Security in Dynamic Coalitions Charles E. Phillips, Jr.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Ruby B.

    Information Sharing and Security in Dynamic Coalitions Charles E. Phillips, Jr. Computer Science in one crisis and adversaries in another, raising difficult security issues with respect to information on the information sharing and security risks when coalitions are formed in response to a crisis. This paper defines

  18. THE CHEMICAL HYGIENE PLAN UPDATED FEBRUARY 2013 BY CHARLES MARTUCCI, PhD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aronov, Boris

    THE CHEMICAL HYGIENE PLAN UPDATED FEBRUARY 2013 BY CHARLES MARTUCCI, PhD A. POLICY A of this Chemical Hygiene Plan. On 31 January, 1990 the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA to develop and carry out the provisions of a Chemical Hygiene Plan (CHP). The standard requires that the CHP

  19. Lithium Research Status and PlansLithium Research Status and Plans Charles H. Skinner, PPPL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

    Lithium Research Status and PlansLithium Research Status and Plans Charles H. Skinner, PPPL Robert February 3-5, 2010 #12;NSTX PAC-27 ­ Lithium Research Status and Plans 2/15February 3-5, 2010 NSTX lithium research is an integral part of a program to develop lithium as a PFC concept for magnetic fusion NSTX w

  20. Transdisciplinary electric power grid science Charles D. Brummitta,b,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D'Souza, Raissa

    storm damage or build distributed generation?). The "smart grid," which monitors and controls electrical to cities couples distant regions. Connections among regions of a power grid spread risk, like in otherOPINION Transdisciplinary electric power grid science Charles D. Brummitta,b,1 , Paul D. H. Hinesc

  1. Defining Complexity: A Commentary to a paper by Charles H. Bennett

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mark Perakh

    2007-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The letter by Mark Perakh entitled "DEFINING COMPLEXITY: A Commentary to a paper by Charles H. Bennett" is here archived with the permission of the author. This letter was downloaded from the site "On Talk Reason, http://www.talkreason.org/articles/complexity.pdf, August (2004)".

  2. Teaching and understanding of quantum interpretations in modern physics courses Charles Baily1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    Teaching and understanding of quantum interpretations in modern physics courses Charles Baily1 to interpretation in two similar modern physics courses recently taught at the University of Colorado, and examine the advantage of appealing to students' everyday intuitions. However, many introductory modern physics students

  3. The Life of Charles O. Fuller in Central Kansas, 1855-1879.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stratton, John M.

    2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The article presents a biography of Charles Oscar Fuller, 1928-1979, who established a ranch on Running Turkey Creek along the Santa Fe Trail n what is now McPherson County, Kansas. Fuller went on to other pursuits later in life, and served a term...

  4. First Name Last Name Parish/School System Michelle Adkins St. Charles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harms, Kyle E.

    Calcasieu Monica Aphonso Vernon Hettie Averite St. Charles Dawn Babineaux Evangeline Jasmine Banks West Vernon Kelly Brant Washington Denise Brashear Calcasieu Jared Breaux West Baton Rouge Joanna Brockhoff St Cole Lafourche Cody Cole Beauregard Jodi Cole Sabine Walter Cole Bossier Connie Conner Beauregard

  5. Decision Trees with Minimal Costs Charles X. Ling CLING@CSD.UWO.CA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ling, Charles X.

    Decision Trees with Minimal Costs Charles X. Ling CLING@CSD.UWO.CA Department of Computer Science, Ontario N6A 5B7, Canada Shichao Zhang ZHANGSC@IT.UTS.EDU.AU Guangxi Normal University, China. (Also FIT costs. More specifically, we first put forward an original and simple splitting criterion for attribute

  6. Charles Booth’s Policemen: Crime, Police and Community in Jack-the-Ripper’s London

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bailey, Victor

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Exploiting the vast archive that Charles Booth amassed for his leviathan social investigation to explore the social order of Londonąs East End, Life and Labour of the People in London, this volume takes issue with this answer. The East End was notorious as a...

  7. J. Great Lakes Res. 33 (Special Issue 3):211223 Internat. Assoc. Great Lakes Res., 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dorcas, Michael E.

    , coastal wetlands, Great Lakes. *Corresponding author. E-mail: hower@uwgb.edu 211 #12;212 Price et al

  8. Great Lakes Steel -- PCI facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eichinger, F.T. [BMH Claudius Peters AG, Buxtehude (Germany); Dake, S.H.; Wagner, E.D.; Brown, G.S. [Raytheon Engineers and Constructors, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper discusses the planning, design, and start-up of the 90 tph PCI facility for National Steel`s Great Lakes Steel Division in River Rouge, MI. This project is owned and operated by Edison Energy Services, and was implemented on a fast-track basis by Raytheon Engineers and Constructors, Babcock Material Handling, and Babcock and Wilcox. This paper presents important process issues, basic design criteria, an the challenges of engineering and building a state-of-the-art PCI facility in two existing plants. Pulverized coal is prepared at the River Rouge Power Plant of Detroit Edison, is pneumatically conveyed 6,000 feet to a storage silo at Great Lakes Steel, and is injected into three blast furnaces.

  9. CLEAR LAKE BASIN 2000 PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LAKE COUNTY SANITATION DISTRICT

    2003-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The following is a final report for the Clear Lake Basin 2000 project. All of the major project construction work was complete and this phase generally included final details and testing. Most of the work was electrical. Erosion control activities were underway to prepare for the rainy season. System testing including pump stations, electrical and computer control systems was conducted. Most of the project focus from November onward was completing punch list items.

  10. EIS-0464: DOE Notice of Availability of the Draft Environmental...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    DOE Notice of Availability of the Draft Environmental Impact Statement Lake Charles Carbon Capture and Sequestration Project, Lake Charles, Louisiana and Brazoria County,...

  11. EIS-0464: EPA Notice of Availability of the Draft Environmental...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Protection Agency announces the availability of the Draft EIS for the Lake Charles Carbon Capture and Sequestration Project, Lake Charles, Louisiana and Brazoria County,...

  12. EIS-0464: EPA Notice of Availability of Final Environmental Impact...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    EIS-0464: EPA Notice of Availability of Final Environmental Impact Statement Lake Charles Carbon Capture and Sequestration Project, Lake Charles, Louisiana and Brazoria County,...

  13. iccs-leucadia | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Industrial Carbon Capture and Storage: Area 1 Leucadia Energy, LLC: Lake Charles Carbon Capture & Sequestration Project Lake Charles, Louisiana PROJECT TIMELINE PROJECT FACT SHEET...

  14. Developing Great Lakes Ice Model (GLIM) using CIOM (Coupled Ice-Ocean Model) in Lake Erie

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Developing Great Lakes Ice Model (GLIM) using CIOM (Coupled Ice- Ocean Model) in Lake Erie Primary of the ice-ocean models, assistance with development of project reports and scientific presentations will first start the implementation of the CIOM in Lake Erie, assemble satellite observations of ice cover

  15. Disparities in Salt Lake County and Salt Lake City Mortgage Outcomes and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feschotte, Cedric

    Disparities in Salt Lake County and Salt Lake City Mortgage Outcomes and Lending Practices Darius of lending practices. This article is an adapted excerpt from the Salt Lake County Regional Analysis impediments in the home mortgage application process. The HMDA data from 2006 to 2011 were compiled for Salt

  16. Temperature Influence on Commercial Lake Whitefish Harvest in Eastern Lake Michigan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Temperature Influence on Commercial Lake Whitefish Harvest in Eastern Lake Michigan Holly Price1 of Statistics University of Michigan Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 2Cooperative Institute for Limnology and Ecosystems Research University of Michigan Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 3NOAA, Great Lakes Environmental

  17. WIDEBAND PLANAR SLOT ANTENNAS Abdelnasser A. Eldek, Atef Z. Elsherbeni, Charles E. Smith and Kai-Fong Lee

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elsherbeni, Atef Z.

    WIDEBAND PLANAR SLOT ANTENNAS Abdelnasser A. Eldek, Atef Z. Elsherbeni, Charles E. Smith and KaiM) technique for layered media. Momentum solves mixed potential integral equations (MPIE) using full wave Green

  18. COPLANAR WAVEGUIDE FED BOW-TIE SLOT ANTENNAS FOR WIDEBAND Abdelnasser A. Eldek, Atef Z. Elsherbeni, and Charles E. Smith

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elsherbeni, Atef Z.

    . Elsherbeni, and Charles E. Smith Center of Applied Electromagnetic Systems Research (CAESR) Department is based on the method of moment (MoM) technique for layered media. The ADS simulator, Momentum, solves

  19. The Department of Anthropology, International Relations, The Fares Center for Eastern Mediterranean Studies, The Charles Smith Endowment Fund, Commu-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tufts University

    Studies, The Charles Smith Endowment Fund, Commu- nications and Media Studies, The Institute for Global from state pressures and challenged Palestinian political norms about news media. This is also a story

  20. Unified geophysical and geological 3-D Earth models Colin Farquharson, Peter Leli`evre, and Charles Hurich

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farquharson, Colin G.

    Unified geophysical and geological 3-D Earth models Colin Farquharson, Peter Leli`evre, and Charles and geophysics. Outline Geological models Geophysical models and numerical modelling Rectilinear grids vs triangles. Can capture arbitrarily complicated subsurface contacts. #12;Geophysical models: rectilinear

  1. MARK R. T. DALE, SHAWN FRANCIS, CHARLES J. KREBS, & VILIS 0. NAMS 7.1 Tree Community at Kluane

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krebs, Charles J.

    7 Trees MARK R. T. DALE, SHAWN FRANCIS, CHARLES J. KREBS, & VILIS 0. NAMS 7.1 Tree Community perpendicular to the main trench (the Alsek, Slims, and Jarvis rivers), can funnel katabatic and glacial winds

  2. Lithium isotopes in global mid-ocean ridge basalts Paul B. Tomascak a,*, Charles H. Langmuir b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Langmuir, Charles H.

    Lithium isotopes in global mid-ocean ridge basalts Paul B. Tomascak a,*, Charles H. Langmuir b January 2008 Abstract The lithium isotope compositions of 30 well-characterized samples of glassy lavas

  3. Toxic and deadly: Working to manage algae in Lake Granbury

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Toxic and deadly Working to manage algae in Lake Granbury Lake Granbury, located about 33 miles southwest of Fort Worth, is a recreation haven for water enthusiasts. In recent years, however, bacteria and golden algae have threatened the lake...?s water quality. Educating citizens about water quality issues affecting Lake Granbury and determining ways to manage the deadly algae are the focus of two Texas Water Resources Institute (TWRI) projects. Lake Granbury, a critical water supply...

  4. Toxic and deadly: Working to manage algae in Lake Granbury

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Toxic and deadly Working to manage algae in Lake Granbury Lake Granbury, located about 33 miles southwest of Fort Worth, is a recreation haven for water enthusiasts. In recent years, however, bacteria and golden algae have threatened the lake...?s water quality. Educating citizens about water quality issues affecting Lake Granbury and determining ways to manage the deadly algae are the focus of two Texas Water Resources Institute (TWRI) projects. Lake Granbury, a critical water supply...

  5. american great lakes: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    polynorphismsobserved among the North American Great Lakes ciscoes suggest that this fish group has Bernatchez, Louis 2 Great Lakes CiteSeer Summary: Grant realized an...

  6. Hyperspectral Imaging At Fish Lake Valley Area (Littlefield ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Fish Lake Valley Area (Littlefield & Calvin, 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Hyperspectral Imaging At Fish Lake Valley Area...

  7. VALUE DISTRIBUTION ASSESSMENT OF GEOTHERMAL DEVELOPMENT IN LAKE COUNTY, CA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Churchman, C.W.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Eleven: Lake County Geothermal Energy Resource. . . .of Susanville, Susanville Geothermal Energy Project Workshopparts of the state. Geothermal energy is only one of Lake

  8. ancylus lake age: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    North Entrance of the University's Lake Honduras Iraq Israel Japan Korea Kuwait Libya Peru Saudi Arabia Taiwan Thailand Turkey Ukraine United Pilyugin, Sergei S. 46 Mirror Lake...

  9. Obama Administration and Great Lakes States Announce Agreement...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Obama Administration and Great Lakes States Announce Agreement to Spur Development of Offshore Wind Projects Obama Administration and Great Lakes States Announce Agreement to Spur...

  10. Lake-effect snowfall in Western New York and surface temperatures of Lakes Erie and Ontario

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agrella, William

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    - tures (' F) 39 A comparison of mean monthly lake ? surface temperatures and their standard deviations (' F) for Lakes Erie and Ontario 45 Estimates o f Lake Erie average monthly ice cover, percent, 1962-1968 (after Derecki, 1975) 50 Correlation... on such cities as Buffalo and Watertown. Buffalo, perched at the eastern end of Lake Erie, received over 16 ft of snow from November through April, nearly 6 ft of which fell during January alone. At Watertown, situated on the eastern shore of Lake Ontario...

  11. A review of "A Companion to Juan Luis Vives" by Charles Fantazzi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, Elizabeth R.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Armas Wilson, and Isabel Lozano Renieblas when seeking to understand The Labors of Persiles and Sigismunda. Charles Fantazzi. A Companion to Juan Luis Vives. Leiden and Boston: Brill, 2008. viii + 430 pp. $185.00. Review by elizabeth r. wright..., university of georgia. This volume offers detailed analysis and rigorous contextual- ization of the diverse writings of Juan Luis Vives (Valencia, Spain 1492/93?Bruges, Belgium, 1540). In the course of some sixty differ- ent publications, this Valencian...

  12. New Einstein Metrics in Dimension Five Charles P. Boyer Krzysztof Galicki

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Einstein Metrics in Dimension Five Charles P. Boyer Krzysztof Galicki Abstract: The purpose of this note is to prove the existence of new Sasakian­Einstein met­ rics on S 2 \\ThetaS 3 and on (S 2 \\ThetaS 3 )#(S 2 \\ThetaS 3 ): These give the first known examples of non­regular Sasakian­Einstein 5

  13. Ice Cover on the Great Lakes NATIONALOCEANIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ice Cover on the Great Lakes NATIONALOCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION U.S. D EPARTMENT OF COMM ER CE Great Lakes Ice Cover facts since 1973 - 94.7% ice coverage in 1979 is the maximum on record - 9.5% ice coverage in 2002 is the lowest on record - 11.5% ice coverage in 1998, a strong El Nino

  14. LAKE MICHIGAN'S TRIBUTARY AND NEARSHORE FISH HABITATS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    7 LAKE MICHIGAN'S TRIBUTARY AND NEARSHORE FISH HABITATS Edward S. Rutherford1 Background, the Lake Michigan LaMP was developed to comply with provisions in the GLWQA and to guide management-ranging, cooperative effort to design and implement a strategy for the 1 E.S. Rutherford. University of Michigan School

  15. Cooling of Kilauea Iki lava lake

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hills, R.G.

    1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1959 Kilauea Iki erupted leaving a 110 to 120 m lake of molten lava in its crater. The resulting lava lake has provided a unique opportunity to study the cooling dynamics of a molten body and its associated hydrothermal system. Field measurements taken at Kilauea Iki indicate that the hydrothermal system above the cooling magma body goes through several stages, some of which are well modeled analytically. Field measurements also indicate that during most of the solidification period of the lake, cooling from above is controlled by 2-phase convection while conduction dominates the cooling of the lake from below. A summary of the field work related to the study of the cooling dynamics of Kilauea Iki is presented. Quantitative and qualitative cooling models for the lake are discussed.

  16. Lake Winds | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOf Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii9969995°,ILEDSGP/joinHavasuPalmdaleLake

  17. Dependence of liquefaction behavior on coal characteristics. Part VI. Relationship of liquefaction behavior of a set of high sulfur coals to chemical structural characteristics. Final technical report, March 1981 to February 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neill, P. H.; Given, P. H.

    1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The initial aim of this research was to use empirical mathematical relationships to formulate a better understanding of the processes involved in the liquefaction of a set of medium rank high sulfur coals. In all, just over 50 structural parameters and yields of product classes were determined. In order to gain a more complete understanding of the empirical relationships between the various properties, a number of relatively complex statistical procedures and tests were applied to the data, mostly selected from the field of multivariate analysis. These can be broken down into two groups. The first group included grouping techniques such as non-linear mapping, hierarchical and tree clustering, and linear discriminant analyses. These techniques were utilized in determining if more than one statistical population was present in the data set; it was concluded that there was not. The second group of techniques included factor analysis and stepwise multivariate linear regressions. Linear discriminant analyses were able to show that five distinct groups of coals were represented in the data set. However only seven of the properties seemed to follow this trend. The chemical property that appeared to follow the trend most closely was the aromaticity, where a series of five parallel straight lines was observed for a plot of f/sub a/ versus carbon content. The factor patterns for each of the product classes indicated that although each of the individual product classes tended to load on factors defined by specific chemical properties, the yields of the broader product classes, such as total conversion to liquids + gases and conversion to asphaltenes, tended to load largely on factors defined by rank. The variance explained and the communalities tended to be relatively low. Evidently important sources of variance have still to be found.

  18. Contemporary Lake Superior Ice Cover Climatology Raymond A. Assel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Contemporary Lake Superior Ice Cover Climatology Raymond A. Assel NOAA Great Lakes Environmental Introduction A brief discussion of Lake Superior ice cover climatology (Phillips, 1978) was included) almost three decades ago. Much additional information (and analysis) of Great Lakes ice cover has been

  19. LAKE AND RESERVOIR MANAGEMENT, 1990 6(2): 175-180 C 1990 North American Lake Management Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in both lakes. Prior Lake contained a fish community in which the largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoicks at Prior Lake was 2,200 uS/cm. The most abundant fish species in this lake were largemouth bass, bluegill carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella) is a her- bivorous fish that can control nuisance aquatic vegetation

  20. Catalytic methods for improved coal liquefaction and hydrotreating. Quarterly report No. 2, December 23, 1985-March 22, 1986

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirschon, A.S.; Laine, R.M.; Wilson, R.B. Jr.

    1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this project is to optimize the reaction conditions for coal liquefaction and upgrading coal liquids. Results for this quarter are summarized by task. Task 1, Synthesis of Catalysts. From our surface-confined catalysts and doped conventional catalysts, we found that the molybdenum(II) tetraallyl surface-confined catalysts were superior to conventionally made catalysts. We also raised the activation temperature of one catalyst from 200/sup 0/C to 400/sup 0/C and found that higher activation temperatures resulted in improved activity. Task 2, HDN Activity of Catalysts with Model Systems. We compared the effects of molybdenum(II) tetraallyl and molybdenum tetraacetate precursors and found that the allyl derivative was far superior. We also tested the effect of hydrogen pressure on the HDN activity of the ruthenium-doped CoMo catalyst and found that the amount of hydrogenation is greatly decreased compared with the C-N bond cleavage with lower hydrogen pressure. Thus, we can selectively cleave C-N bonds, which is the first step in our efforts to form a more selective HDN process. Also, to determine if other additives enhance the HDN process, we added tungsten carbonyl to the CoMo catalyst. However, no enhancement in the HDN activity of the catalyst was observed. Task 3, Catalytic Reactions and Additives on Coal and Coal Liquids. We found that adding acid to either quinoline or tetrahydroquinoline under HDN conditions results in no reaction unless a catalyst is added. A summary of the effects of additives is also presented under this task. 19 refs., 15 figs., 7 tabs.

  1. Techno-Economic Analysis of Liquid Fuel Production from Woody Biomass via Hydrothermal Liquefaction (HTL) and Upgrading

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhu, Yunhua; Biddy, Mary J.; Jones, Susanne B.; Elliott, Douglas C.; Schmidt, Andrew J.

    2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of experimental work was conducted to convert woody biomass to gasoline and diesel range products via hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL) and catalytic hydroprocessing. Based on the best available test data, a techno-economic analysis (TEA) was developed for a large scale woody biomass based HTL and upgrading system to evaluate the feasibility of this technology. In this system, 2000 dry metric ton per day woody biomass was assumed to be converted to bio-oil in hot compressed water and the bio-oil was hydrotreated and/or hydrocracked to produce gasoline and diesel range liquid fuel. Two cases were evaluated: a stage-of-technology (SOT) case based on the tests results, and a goal case considering potential improvements based on the SOT case. Process simulation models were developed and cost analysis was implemented based on the performance results. The major performance results included final products and co-products yields, raw materials consumption, carbon efficiency, and energy efficiency. The overall efficiency (higher heating value basis) was 52% for the SOT case and 66% for the goal case. The production cost, with a 10% internal rate of return and 2007 constant dollars, was estimated to be $1.29 /L for the SOT case and $0.74 /L for the goal case. The cost impacts of major improvements for moving from the SOT to the goal case were evaluated and the assumption of reducing the organics loss to the water phase lead to the biggest reduction in the production cost. Sensitivity analysis indicated that the final products yields had the largest impact on the production cost compared to other parameters. Plant size analysis demonstrated that the process was economically attractive if the woody biomass feed rate was over 1,500 dry tonne/day, the production cost was competitive with the then current petroleum-based gasoline price.

  2. Review and Assessment of Commercial Vendors/Options for Feeding and Pumping Biomass Slurries for Hydrothermal Liquefaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berglin, Eric J.; Enderlin, Carl W.; Schmidt, Andrew J.

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Advanced Biofuels Consortium is working to develop improved methods for producing high-value hydrocarbon fuels. The development of one such method, the hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL) process, is being led by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The HTL process uses a wet biomass slurry at elevated temperatures (i.e., 300 to 360°C [570 to 680°F]) and pressures above the vapor pressure of water (i.e., 15 to 20 MPa [2200 to 3000 psi] at these temperatures) to facilitate a condensed-phase reaction medium. The process has been successfully tested at bench-scale and development and testing at a larger scale is required to prove the viability of the process at production levels. Near-term development plans include a pilot-scale system on the order of 0.5 to 40 gpm, followed by a larger production-scale system on the order of 2000 dry metric tons per day (DMTPD). A significant challenge to the scale-up of the HTL process is feeding a highly viscous fibrous biomass wood/corn stover feedstock into a pump system that provides the required 3000 psi of pressure for downstream processing. In October 2011, PNNL began investigating commercial feed and pumping options that would meet these HTL process requirements. Initial efforts focused on generating a HTL feed and pump specification and then providing the specification to prospective vendors to determine the suitability of their pumps for the pilot-scale and production-scale plants. Six vendors were identified that could provide viable equipment to meet HTL feed and/or pump needs. Those six vendors provided options consisting three types of positive displacement pumps (i.e., diaphragm, piston, and lobe pumps). Vendors provided capabilities and equipment related to HTL application. This information was collected, assessed, and summarized and is provided as appendices to this report.

  3. Toxic and deadly: Working to manage algae in Lake Granbury 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Toxic and deadly Working to manage algae in Lake Granbury Lake Granbury, located about 33 miles southwest of Fort Worth, is a recreation haven for water enthusiasts. In recent years, however, bacteria and golden algae have threatened the lake... of water and the presence of pathogens. These E. coli sources can be from sewage overflows, polluted stormwater runoff, or malfunctioning septic systems. Toxic golden algae blooms have killed fish in Lake Granbury and Lake Whitney, downstream...

  4. Toxic and deadly: Working to manage algae in Lake Granbury 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Toxic and deadly Working to manage algae in Lake Granbury Lake Granbury, located about 33 miles southwest of Fort Worth, is a recreation haven for water enthusiasts. In recent years, however, bacteria and golden algae have threatened the lake... of water and the presence of pathogens. These E. coli sources can be from sewage overflows, polluted stormwater runoff, or malfunctioning septic systems. Toxic golden algae blooms have killed fish in Lake Granbury and Lake Whitney, downstream...

  5. Lakes Survey Year 1 www.waterboards.ca.gov/swamp

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .14 0.4 0.8 0.0 1 Trinity Lake Rainbow Trout C1 0.11 1 Trinity Lake Rainbow Trout C2 0.11 1 Trinity Lake Rainbow Trout C3 0.08 1 Trinity Lake Rainbow Trout C4 0.05 1 Trinity Lake Rainbow Trout LC 0.0 0.32 0.0 0

  6. Pore water chemistry of an alkaline rift valley lake: Lake Turkana, Kenya

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cerling, T.E.; Johnson, T.C.; Halfman, J.D.; Lister, G.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lake Turkana is the largest closed basin lake in the African rift system. It has evolved through the past 5000 years to become a moderately alkaline lake. Previous mass balance argument suggest that sulfate is removed from the lake by sulfate reduction in the sediments, and that the lake is accumulating in chloride, sodium, and alkalinity. Studies of pore water from 12 meter cores collected in November 1984 show that sulfate is reduced in the sediment column with a net production of alkalinity. Some sodium is lost from the lake and diffuses into the sediment to maintain charge balance. At several meters depth, organic matter is destroyed by methanogenic bacteria, as shown by the high delta /sup 13/C values for dissolved inorganic carbon. Magnesium and calcium molar ratios change with depth; chloride, sodium, and alkalinity also change with depth.

  7. Hydrological and solute budgets of Lake Qinghai, the largest lake on the Tibetan Plateau

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jin, Zhangdong; You, Chen-Feng; Wang, Yi; Shi, Yuewei

    2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Water level and chemistry of Lake Qinghai are sensitive to climate changes and are important for paleoclimatic implications. An accurate understanding of hydrological and chemical budgets is crucial for quantifying geochemical proxies and carbon cycle. Published results of water budget are firstly reviewed in this paper. Chemical budget and residence time of major dissolved constituents in the lake are estimated using reliable water budget and newly obtained data for seasonal water chemistry. The results indicate that carbonate weathering is the most important riverine process, resulting in dominance of Ca2+ and DIC for river waters and groundwater. Groundwater contribution to major dissolved constituents is relatively small (4.2 ± 0.5%). Wet atmospheric deposition contributes annually 7.4–44.0% soluble flux to the lake, resulting from eolian dust throughout the seasons. Estimates of chemical budget further suggest that (1) the Buha-type water dominates the chemical components of the lake water, (2) Na+, Cl?, Mg2+, and K+ in lake water are enriched owing to their conservative behaviors, and (3) precipitation of authigenic carbonates (low-Mg calcite, aragonite, and dolomite) transits quickly dissolved Ca2+ into the bottom sediments of the lake, resulting in very low Ca2+ in the lake water. Therefore, authigenic carbonates in the sediments hold potential information on the relative contribution of different solute inputs to the lake and the lake chemistry in the past.

  8. Coal liquefaction process streams characterization and evaluation. Topical report: Analytical methods for application to coal-derived resids, A literature survey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandes, S.D.

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This literature survey was conducted to address an important question: What are the methods available in the realm of analytical chemistry that may have potential usefulness to the development of coal liquefaction technology? In an attempt to answer to that question, the emphasis of this survey was directed at analytical techniques which would be applicable to the high molecular weight, non-distillable residue of coal-derived liquids. It is this material which is most problematic to the analytical investigator and the developer of direct coal liquefaction processes. A number of comprehensive analytical reviews of literature dealing with coal and other fossil fuels are available. This literature survey will (1) be limited to articles published between 1980--1991, with some exceptions; (2) be limited to the use of analytical methods for high molecular weight, primarily nondistillable, fossil fuel-derived materials, except where the application of an analytical method to coals or distillates may show promise for application to non-distillable coal-derived materials; and (3) demonstrate the potential usefulness of an analytical method by showing how the method has been applied to high molecular weight, non-distillable materials, if not specifically to coal liquids. The text is divided by type of methodology, i.e. spectroscopy, microscopy, etc. Each section will be essentially free-standing. An historical background is provided.

  9. Solar Policy Environment: Salt Lake

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The overall objective of the “Solar Salt Lake” (SSL) team is to develop a fully-scoped city and county-level implementation plan that will facilitate at least an additional ten megawatts of solar photovoltaic (PV) installations in the government, commercial, industrial, and residential sectors by 2015. To achieve this aggressive goal, the program strategy includes a combination of barrier identification, research, and policy analysis that utilizes the input of various stakeholders. Coupled with these activities will be the development and implementation of pilot installations in the government and residential sectors, and broad outreach to builders and potential practitioners of solar energy products in the process. In this way, while creating mechanisms to enable a demand for solar, SSL will also facilitate capacity building for suppliers, thereby helping to ensure long-term sustainability for the regional market.

  10. cetinney@mail.utexas.eduTheUniversityofTexasatAustin,CharlesE.Tinney,Ph.D.,JayantSirohi,Ph.D.,(512)471-4147 http://www.ae.utexas.edu/facultysites/tinney/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tinney, Charles E.

    cetinney@mail.utexas.eduTheUniversityofTexasatAustin,CharlesE.Tinney,Ph.D.,JayantSirohi,Ph.D.,(512.eduTheUniversityofTexasatAustin,CharlesE.Tinney,Ph.D.,JayantSirohi,Ph.D.,(512)471-4147 httpTexasatAustin,CharlesE.Tinney,Ph.D.,JayantSirohi,Ph.D.,(512)471-4147 http

  11. cetinney@mail.utexas.eduTheUniversityofTexasatAustin,CharlesE.Tinney,Ph.D.,JayantSirohi,Ph.D.,(512)471-4147 http://www.ae.utexas.edu/facultysites/tinney/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tinney, Charles E.

    cetinney@mail.utexas.eduTheUniversityofTexasatAustin,CharlesE.Tinney,Ph.D.,JayantSirohi,Ph.D.,(512TheUniversityofTexasatAustin,CharlesE.Tinney,Ph.D.,JayantSirohi,Ph.D.,(512)471-4147 http% open area. #12;cetinney@mail.utexas.eduTheUniversityofTexasatAustin,CharlesE.Tinney,Ph.D.,JayantSirohi

  12. cetinney@mail.utexas.eduTheUniversityofTexasatAustin,CharlesE.Tinney,Ph.D.,JayantSirohi,Ph.D.,(512)471-4147 http://www.ae.utexas.edu/facultysites/tinney/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tinney, Charles E.

    cetinney@mail.utexas.eduTheUniversityofTexasatAustin,CharlesE.Tinney,Ph.D.,JayantSirohi,Ph.D.,(512.utexas.eduTheUniversityofTexasatAustin,CharlesE.Tinney,Ph.D.,JayantSirohi,Ph.D.,(512)471-4147 http installation, ~July 2009 #12;cetinney@mail.utexas.eduTheUniversityofTexasatAustin,CharlesE.Tinney,Ph.D.,JayantSirohi

  13. Lakes: Restrictions on Ditches and Drains (Indiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The construction or alteration of new ditches and drains that may result in a lowering of the water level of a given lake must be accompanied by the construction of a dam to protect the water level...

  14. Synthetic ecology : revisiting Mexico City's lakes project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daou, Daniel (Daou Ornelas)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mexico City was founded 700 years ago on man made islets in the middle of a lake. Today, it faces a contradictory situation were water is running scarce, but simultaneously the city runs the risk of drowning in its own ...

  15. Salt Lake City- High Performance Buildings Requirement

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Salt Lake City's mayor issued an executive order in July 2005 requiring that all public buildings owned and controlled by the city be built or renovated to meet the requirements of LEED "silver"...

  16. Lake Worth Utilities- Energy Conservation Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The City of Lake Worth Utilities, in conjunction with Florida Municipal Power Agency, offers a variety of rebates to residential and commercial customers for upgrading to energy saving equipment....

  17. Charles McMillan to lead Los Alamos National Laboratory's Weapons Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWPSuccessAlamosCharacterization of Selective BindingD. ScottCharles

  18. Charles C. Cremer, 1972 | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t z CPlasma of the Rotating Wall MachineCharles C.

  19. Charles D. Scott, 1980 | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t z CPlasma of the Rotating Wall MachineCharles

  20. Charles E. Elderkin, 1975 | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t z CPlasma of the Rotating WallCharles E. Elderkin,

  1. Dr. Charles (Chuck) Peden | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurTheBrookhaven National LaboratoryJeffrey L Krause ChemicalDr. PhilipRobertCharles

  2. Lake Granbury and Lake Whitney Assessment Initiative Final Scientific/Technical Report Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harris, B.L.; Roelke, Daniel; Brooks, Bryan; Grover, James

    2010-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A team of Texas AgriLife Research, Baylor University and University of Texas at Arlington researchers studied the biology and ecology of Prymnesium parvum (golden algae) in Texas lakes using a three-fold approach that involved system-wide monitoring, experimentation at the microcosm and mesocosm scales, and mathematical modeling. The following are conclusions, to date, regarding this organismâ??s ecology and potential strategies for mitigation of blooms by this organism. In-lake monitoring revealed that golden algae are present throughout the year, even in lakes where blooms do not occur. Compilation of our field monitoring data with data collected by Texas Parks and Wildlife and Brazos River Authority (a period spanning a decade) revealed that inflow and salinity variables affect bloom formations. Thresholds for algae populations vary per lake, likely due to adaptations to local conditions, and also to variations in lake-basin morphometry, especially the presence of coves that may serve as hydraulic storage zones for P. parvum populations. More specifically, our in-lake monitoring showed that the highly toxic bloom that occurred in Lake Granbury in the winter of 2006/2007 was eliminated by increased river inflow events. The bloom was flushed from the system. The lower salinities that resulted contributed to golden algae not blooming in the following years. However, flushing is not an absolute requirement for bloom termination. Laboratory experiments have shown that growth of golden algae can occur at salinities ~1-2 psu but only when temperatures are also low. This helps to explain why blooms are possible during winter months in Texas lakes. Our in-lake experiments in Lake Whitney and Lake Waco, as well as our laboratory experiments, revealed that cyanobacteria, or some other bacteria capable of producing algicides, were able to prevent golden algae from blooming. Identification of this organism is a high priority as it may be a key to managing golden algae blooms. Our numerical modeling results support the idea that cyanobacteria, through allelopathy, control the timing of golden algae blooms in Lake Granbury. The in-lake experiments in Lake Whitney and Lake Waco also revealed that as golden algae blooms develop, there are natural enemies (a species of rotifer, and a virus) that help slow the population growth. Again, better characterization of these organisms is a high priority as it may be key to managing golden algae blooms. Our laboratory and in-lake experiments and field monitoring have shown that nutrient additions will remove toxicity and prevent golden algae from blooming. In fact, other algae displace the golden algae after nutrient additions. Additions of ammonia are particularly effective, even at low doses (much lower than what is employed in fish hatchery ponds). Application of ammonia in limited areas of lakes, such as in coves, should be explored as a management option. The laboratory experiments and field monitoring also show that the potency of toxins produced by P. parvum is greatly reduced when water pH is lower, closer to neutral levels. Application of mild acid to limited areas of lakes (but not to a level where acidic conditions are created), such as in coves, should be explored as a management option. Finally, our field monitoring and mathematical modeling revealed that flushing/dilution at high enough levels could prevent P. parvum from forming blooms and/or terminate existing blooms. This technique could work using deeper waters within a lake to flush the surface waters of limited areas of the same lakes, such as in coves and should be explored as a management option. In this way, water releases from upstream reservoirs would not be necessary and there would be no addition of nutrients in the lake.

  3. Bioenergetics of Lake Whitefish in the Great Lakes Primary Investigator: Steve Pothoven -NOAA GLERL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bioenergetics of Lake Whitefish in the Great Lakes Primary Investigator: Steve Pothoven - NOAA elicited concern by fishery managers and commercial fishermen. We propose to use bioenergetics modeling that are contributing to declines in fish growth is bioenergetics modeling. We recently evaluated and modified

  4. Energy and water in the Great Lakes.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tidwell, Vincent Carroll

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The nexus between thermoelectric power production and water use is not uniform across the U.S., but rather differs according to regional physiography, demography, power plant fleet composition, and the transmission network. That is, in some regions water demand for thermoelectric production is relatively small while in other regions it represents the dominate use. The later is the case for the Great Lakes region, which has important implications for the water resources and aquatic ecology of the Great Lakes watershed. This is today, but what about the future? Projected demographic trends, shifting lifestyles, and economic growth coupled with the threat of global climate change and mounting pressure for greater U.S. energy security could have profound effects on the region's energy future. Planning for such an uncertain future is further complicated by the fact that energy and environmental planning and regulatory decisionmaking is largely bifurcated in the region, with environmental and water resource concerns generally taken into account after new energy facilities and technologies have been proposed, or practices are already in place. Based on these confounding needs, the objective of this effort is to develop Great Lakes-specific methods and tools to integrate energy and water resource planning and thereby support the dual goals of smarter energy planning and development, and protection of Great Lakes water resources. Guiding policies for this planning are the Great Lakes and St. Lawrence River Basin Water Resources Compact and the Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement. The desired outcome of integrated energy-water-aquatic resource planning is a more sustainable regional energy mix for the Great Lakes basin ecosystem.

  5. Validation of an Agent-based Model of Deregulated Electric Power Markets Charles M. Macal and Michael J. North

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tesfatsion, Leigh

    Validation of an Agent-based Model of Deregulated Electric Power Markets Charles M. Macal model of the electric power market designed to investigate market restructuring and deregulation, deregulated electric power markets Acknowledgments: The authors would like to acknowledge the other members

  6. Quantifying Wasted Write Energy in the Memory Hierarchy Charles Shelor, Jim Buchanan, and Krishna Kavi Ron Cytron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kavi, Krishna

    Quantifying Wasted Write Energy in the Memory Hierarchy Charles Shelor, Jim Buchanan, and Krishna. Wasted writes consume energy, consume execution time as memory bandwidth and consume component lifetime of potential energy savings that can be obtained from eliminating wasted writes. If all of the wasted writes

  7. Charles J. Vorosmarty, Ellen M. Douglas, Pamela A. Green and Carmen Revenga Geospatial Indicators of Emerging Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Douglas, Ellen M.

    Charles J. Vo¨ro¨smarty, Ellen M. Douglas, Pamela A. Green and Carmen Revenga Geospatial Indicators. Geospatial analysis at 8 km resolution shows that 64% of Africans rely on water resources that are limited explicit geospatial indicators that link biogeophysical, socioeconomic, and engineering perspectives

  8. Growth, morphology, and optical and electrical properties of semicontinuous metallic films Katyayani Seal, Mark A. Nelson,* and Z. Charles Ying

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shalaev, Vladimir M.

    Katyayani Seal, Mark A. Nelson,* and Z. Charles Ying Department of Physics, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, New Mexico 88003-8001 Dentcho A. Genov, Andrey K. Sarychev, and Vladimir M. Shalaev School the percolation threshold (pc) initially separated clus- ters interconnect to form an infinite cluster of metal

  9. Resource Sharing in QPN-based Performance Models Charles University Prague, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Prague, Czech Republic.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Resource Sharing in QPN-based Performance Models V. Babka Charles University Prague, Faculty needed to solve the model can be significantly influenced by resource sharing, capturing this influence separate resource and performance models and proposes a method of integrating these models at the tool

  10. Monitoring the obesity epidemic in France: The Obepi surveys 1997-2006 Marie-Aline Charles*, Eveline Eschwge*, Arnaud Basdevant**

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Monitoring the obesity epidemic in France: The Obepi surveys 1997-2006 Marie-Aline Charles*, Eveline Eschwčge*, Arnaud Basdevant§¶** Short running title: Increases in the prevalence of obesity, published in "Obesity (Silver Spring, Md.) 16, 9 (2008) 2182-6" DOI : 10.1038/oby.2008.285 #12;2 Abstract

  11. Fast Image Database Search using TreeStructured VQ #+ JauYuen Chen, Charles A. Bouman and Jan P. Allebach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fast Image Database Search using Tree­Structured VQ #+ Jau­Yuen Chen, Charles A. Bouman and Jan P the search of large image databases. Our method can reduce search computation required to locate images which for searching large image databases based on image content. The interest in im­ age search algorithms has grown

  12. Fast Image Database Search using Tree-Structured VQ Jau-Yuen Chen, Charles A. Bouman and Jan P. Allebach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fast Image Database Search using Tree-Structured VQ Jau-Yuen Chen, Charles A. Bouman and Jan P the search of large image databases. Our method can reduce search computation required to locate images which for searching large image databases based on image content. The interest in im- age search algorithms has grown

  13. Net alkalinity and net acidity 2: Practical considerations Carl S. Kirby a,*, Charles A. Cravotta III b,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirby, Carl S.

    Net alkalinity and net acidity 2: Practical considerations Carl S. Kirby a,*, Charles A. Cravotta of the sample. The Hot Acidity directly measures net acidity (=Ă?net alkalinity). Samples that had near-neutral p in their alkalinities and dissolved Fe, Mn, and Al concentrations. Hot Acidity was approximately equal to net acidity

  14. ICS Symposium in honor of the 2012 Wolf Prize laureates A. Paul Alivisatos and Charles M. Lieber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adler, Joan

    ICS Symposium in honor of the 2012 Wolf Prize laureates A. Paul Alivisatos and Charles M. Lieber. Eran Rabani, Tel Aviv University | Paul Alivisatos | | Fernando Patolsky | | Ernesto Joselevich Ori Cheshnovski, Tel Aviv University 9:45-10:35 Prof. A. Paul Alivisatos, Department of Chemistry

  15. Competitive Vaporization and Decomposition of Liquid RDX Gregory T. Long, Sergey Vyazovkin, Brittany A. Brems, and Charles A. Wight*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utah, University of

    that occur in both the gas and condensed phases. Individual steps are likely to have different activation, Brittany A. Brems, and Charles A. Wight* Center for Thermal Analysis, Department of Chemistry, Uni by thermo- gravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Activation energies

  16. The Large Genome Constraint Hypothesis: Evolution, Ecology and Phenotype CHARLES A. KNIGHT1,* , NICOLE A. MOLINARI1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petrov, Dmitri

    The Large Genome Constraint Hypothesis: Evolution, Ecology and Phenotype CHARLES A. KNIGHT1 Accepted: 18 March 2004 Background and Aims If large genomes are truly saturated with unnecessary `junk genome constraint'. We examine the large genome constraint at three scales: evolution, ecology

  17. A Field-Wise Wind Retrieval Algorithm for Satellite Scatterometers Charles G. Brown and David G . Long

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, David G.

    A Field-Wise Wind Retrieval Algorithm for Satellite Scatterometers Charles G. Brown and David G-378-6586 browncg@salt.ee.byii.edu Abstract-Traditional satellite scatterometer wind retrieval algorithms consist of point-wise wind estimation and point- wise ambiguity removal. Point-wise estimation yields mul- tiple

  18. Lyapunov exponents for 2-D ray tracing without interfaces Ludek Klimes , Department of Geophysics, Charles University, Prague, Czech Republic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerveny, Vlastislav

    Lyapunov exponents for 2-D ray tracing without interfaces Ludek Klimes , Department of Geophysics, Charles University, Prague, Czech Republic Summary The Lyapunov exponents asymptotically quantify the ex- ponential divergence of rays. The \\Lyapunov exponent" for a nite 2-D ray and the average \\Lyapunov exponents

  19. Lyapunov exponents for 2D ray tracing without interfaces Ludek Klimes \\Lambda , Department of Geophysics, Charles University, Prague, Czech Republic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerveny, Vlastislav

    Lyapunov exponents for 2­D ray tracing without interfaces LudŸek KlimeŸs \\Lambda , Department of Geophysics, Charles University, Prague, Czech Republic Summary The Lyapunov exponents asymptotically quantify the ex­ ponential divergence of rays. The ``Lyapunov exponent'' for a finite 2­D ray and the average

  20. Charles Darwin University welcomes applications for Master by Research and PhD degrees from DIKTI scholarship awardees

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Charles Darwin University welcomes applications for Master by Research and PhD degrees from DIKTI to be eligible. Evidence of English language proficiency must be provided at initial Master by Research or PhD application stage. Tuition fee waiver for a third year (Master by Research) and fourth year (PhD) of study

  1. When asked the question, "What makes Lake Mendota

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turner, Monica G.

    . Although in relation to blue- green algae the lake's health is improving, human impact, climate change for Limnology is housed in the Hasler Laborato- ry of Limnology building which is located on Lake Mendota

  2. Lake George Park Commission: Stormwater Management (New York)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Lake George Park Commission is a quasi-independent commission within the Department of Environmental Protection that is responsible for environmental conservation in the Lake George Park area....

  3. INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF CLIMATOLOGY,VOL. 10,731-748 (1990) AN ICE-COVER CLIMATOLOGY FOR LAKE ERIE AND LAKE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    / INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF CLIMATOLOGY,VOL. 10,731-748 (1990) AN ICE-COVER CLIMATOLOGY FOR LAKE-lake Great Lakes ice cover are sparse prior to the decade of the 1960s.In an effort to provide an historical perspective of mid-lake ice cover back to the turn of the century, daily average ice cover for Lakes Erie

  4. Great Lakes Water Scarcity and Regional Economic Development

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Cameron Davis; Tim Eder; David Ulrich; David Naftzger; Donald J. Wuebbles; Mark C. Petri

    2013-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Great Lakes Water Scarcity and Regional Economic Development panel at Northwestern University on 10/10/2012

  5. Battling Golden Algae: Results suggest preventative lake management approaches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Supercinski, Danielle

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    14 tx H2O Winter 2011 Story by Danielle Supercinski Battling golden algae Results suggest preventative lake management approaches Golden algae blooms, or the explosive growth of algae, are known to be toxic, but recent #28;ndings from.... Bryan Brooks at Baylor University, working jointly, recently completed the Lake Granbury and Lake Whitney Assessment Initiative project studying the biology and ecology of golden algae (Prymnesium parvum) in Texas lakes. First appearing in Texas...

  6. Battling golden algae: Results suggest preventative lake managment approaches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Supercinski, Danielle

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    14 tx H2O Winter 2011 Story by Danielle Supercinski Battling golden algae Results suggest preventative lake management approaches Golden algae blooms, or the explosive growth of algae, are known to be toxic, but recent #28;ndings from.... Bryan Brooks at Baylor University, working jointly, recently completed the Lake Granbury and Lake Whitney Assessment Initiative project studying the biology and ecology of golden algae (Prymnesium parvum) in Texas lakes. First appearing in Texas...

  7. Lake Effect Snow Storms METR 4433, Mesoscale Meteorology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Droegemeier, Kelvin K.

    , cutting off or reducing the heat supply. Lake Erie often freezes entirely because it is more shallow

  8. Great Lakes Water Scarcity and Regional Economic Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cameron Davis; Tim Eder; David Ulrich; David Naftzger; Donald J. Wuebbles; Mark C. Petri

    2012-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Great Lakes Water Scarcity and Regional Economic Development panel at Northwestern University on 10/10/2012

  9. EIS-0489: Jordan Cove Liquefaction Project (Coos County, OR) and Pacific Connector Pipeline Project (Coos, Klamath, Jackson, and Douglas Counties, OR)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), with DOE as a cooperating agency, is preparing an EIS to analyze the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to construct and operate the Jordan Cove Liquefaction and Pacific Connector Pipeline Projects, respectively a proposed new liquefied natural gas (LNG) export terminal and associated facilities in Coos County, Oregon, and a natural gas pipeline between the Malin Hub in Klamath County, Oregon, and the Jordan Cove terminal. DOE, Office of Fossil Energy, has an obligation under Section 3 of the Natural Gas Act to authorize the import and export of natural gas, including LNG, unless it finds that the import or export is not consistent with the public interest.

  10. High resolution FT-ICR mass spectral analysis of bio-oil and residual water soluble organics produced by hydrothermal liquefaction of the marine microalga Nannochloropsis salina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sudasinghe, Nilusha; Dungan, Barry; Lammers, Peter; Albrecht, Karl O.; Elliott, Douglas C.; Hallen, Richard T.; Schaub, Tanner

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report a detailed compositional characterization of a bio-crude oil and aqueous by-product from hydrothermal liquefaction of Nannochloropsis salina by direct infusion Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry (FT-ICR MS) in both positive- and negative-ionization modes. The FT-ICR MS instrumentation approach facilitates direct assignment of elemental composition to >7000 resolved mass spectral peaks and three-dimensional mass spectral images for individual heteroatom classes highlight compositional diversity of the two samples and provide a baseline description of these materials. Aromatic nitrogen compounds and free fatty acids are predominant species observed in both the bio-oil and aqueous fraction. Residual organic compounds present in the aqueous fraction show distributions that are slightly lower in both molecular ring and/or double bond value and carbon number relative to those found in the bio-oil, albeit with a high degree of commonality between the two compositions.

  11. EVALUATING THE ENVIRONMENTAL IMAPCT OF DREDGING BURNABY LAKE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;EVALUATING THE ENVIRONMENTAL IMAPCT OF DREDGING BURNABY LAKE FINAL REPORT DOE FRAP 1997 the environmental impacts of dredging Burnaby Lake. The purpose of this study is to assess the potential environmental implications of dredging the lake for environmental rejuvenation in order to assist decision

  12. GREAT LAKES ICE COVER RaymondA. Asset'

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapter 6 GREAT LAKES ICE COVER RaymondA. Asset' ABSTRACT: Theformation of ice on the Lallrentian (~rthe Great Lakes anel local weather and climate. The (I1Inllal seasonal and ~'Patialprogression of ice Lake (Section 6.2) incillding ice thickness, the different types of iceformed, and ice classification

  13. Hypolimnetic Oxygen Depletion in Eutrophic Lakes Beat Muller,*,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wehrli, Bernhard

    Hypolimnetic Oxygen Depletion in Eutrophic Lakes Beat Muller,*, Lee D. Bryant,, Andreas Matzinger obtained from 11 eutrophic lakes and suggests a model describing the consumption of dissolved oxygen (O2) in the hypolimnia of eutrophic lakes as a result of only two fundamental processes: O2 is consumed (i) by settled

  14. Bridge Creek Watershed Volunteer Lake Secchi Disk Monitoring Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;Bridge Creek Watershed Volunteer Lake Secchi Disk Monitoring Program 1996 DOE FRAP 1996-13 Ryan Creek Watershed Volunteer Lake Monitoring Program. Using a Secchi disk, volunteers collected water transparency data from 22 lakes in the Bridge Creek watershed. Secchi depth readings were collected between May

  15. Canada Lynx in the Great Lakes Region 2004 Annual Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Canada Lynx in the Great Lakes Region 2004 Annual Report to USDA Forest Service and MN Cooperative. #12;Canada Lynx in the Great Lakes Region 2004 Annual Report ii Executive Summary We summarize the second year of a project on the Canada lynx ecology in the Great Lakes region. The project is designed

  16. NOAA Selects Muskegon Lake as Habitat Focus Area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , foundries, a coal-fired power plant, and a paper mill. Muskegon Lake has suffered water quality concerns on the fishery, aquatic organisms and vegetation in Muskegon Lake; · monitoring the socio-economic impacts Fisheries, and the Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory have implemented numerous projects

  17. ORIGINAL PAPER Calcium Carbonate Nucleation in an Alkaline Lake

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ORIGINAL PAPER Calcium Carbonate Nucleation in an Alkaline Lake Surface Water, Pyramid Lake, Nevada (X) needed for calcium carbonate nucleation and crystal growth in Pyramid Lake (PL) surface water­16. Notwithstanding high X, calcium carbonate growth did not occur on aragonite single crystals suspended PL surface

  18. SURFACE CURRENTS OF LAKE MICHIGAN 1931 AND 1932

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    413 SURFACE CURRENTS OF LAKE MICHIGAN 1931 AND 1932 Marine Biological Laboratory x,i23:r jKernan, Director SURFACE CURRENTS OF LAKE MICHIGAN, 1931 AND 1932 by John Van Oosten United States Fish Introduction 1 History of Lake Michigan current samiec 1 Materials and methods 3 Releases and recoveries

  19. COMMERCIAL FISHERY FOR CHUBS (CISCOES) IN LAKE MICHIGAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    COMMERCIAL FISHERY FOR CHUBS (CISCOES) IN LAKE MICHIGAN THROUGH 1953 Marine Biological Laboratory COMMERCIAL FISHERY FOR CHUBS (CISCOES) IN LAKE MICHIGAN THROUGH 1953 By Ralph Hile and Howard J . Buettner #12;ABSTRACT The chub fishery of Lake Michigan is based on 7 deep-water species of coregonines . Small

  20. SURFACE CURRENTS IN LAKE MICHIGAN 1954 and 1955

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SURFACE CURRENTS IN LAKE MICHIGAN 1954 and 1955 j Mafine Biological Laboratory .-'Ml 41960 'i WOODS, Secretary Fish and Wildlife Service, Amle J. Suoaela, Commissioner SURFACE CURREirrS IN LAKE MICHIGAN, 1954 Page Introduction 1 General features of Lake Michigan Current -generating agents and modifying factors

  1. Close-coupled Catalytic Two-Stage Liquefaction (CTSL{trademark}) process bench studies. Final report, [October 1, 1988--July 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Comolli, A.G.; Johanson, E.S.; Karolkiewicz, W.F.; Lee, L.K.; Popper, G.A.; Stalzer, R.H.; Smith, T.O.

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the final report of a four year and ten month contract starting on October 1, 1988 to July 31, 1993 with the US Department of Energy to study and improve Close-Coupled Catalytic Two-Stage Direct Liquefaction of coal by producing high yields of distillate with improved quality at lower capital and production costs in comparison to existing technologies. Laboratory, Bench and PDU scale studies on sub-bituminous and bituminous coals are summarized and referenced in this volume. Details are presented in the three topical reports of this contract; CTSL Process Bench Studies and PDU Scale-Up with Sub-Bituminous Coal-DE-88818-TOP-1, CTSL Process Bench Studies with Bituminous Coal-DE-88818-TOP-2, and CTSL Process Laboratory Scale Studies, Modelling and Technical Assessment-DE-88818-TOP-3. Results are summarized on experiments and studies covering several process configurations, cleaned coals, solid separation methods, additives and catalysts both dispersed and supported. Laboratory microautoclave scale experiments, economic analysis and modelling studies are also included along with the PDU-Scale-Up of the CTSL processing of sub-bituminous Black Thunder Mine Wyoming coal. During this DOE/HRI effort, high distillate yields were maintained at higher throughput rates while quality was markedly improved using on-line hydrotreating and cleaned coals. Solid separations options of filtration and delayed coking were evaluated on a Bench-Scale with filtration successfully scaled to a PDU demonstration. Directions for future direct coal liquefaction related work are outlined herein based on the results from this and previous programs.

  2. Lake Michigan Offshore Wind Feasibility Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boezaart, Arnold [GVSU; Edmonson, James [GVSU; Standridge, Charles [GVSU; Pervez, Nahid [GVSU; Desai, Neel [University of Michigan; Williams, Bruce [University of Delaware; Clark, Aaron [GVSU; Zeitler, David [GVSU; Kendall, Scott [GVSU; Biddanda, Bopi [GVSU; Steinman, Alan [GVSU; Klatt, Brian [Michigan State University; Gehring, J. L. [Michigan State University; Walter, K. [Michigan State University; Nordman, Erik E. [GVSU

    2014-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this project was to conduct the first comprehensive offshore wind assessment over Lake Michigan and to advance the body of knowledge needed to support future commercial wind energy development on the Great Lakes. The project involved evaluation and selection of emerging wind measurement technology and the permitting, installation and operation of the first mid-lake wind assessment meteorological (MET) facilities in Michigan’s Great Lakes. In addition, the project provided the first opportunity to deploy and field test floating LIDAR and Laser Wind Sensor (LWS) technology, and important research related equipment key to the sitting and permitting of future offshore wind energy development in accordance with public participation guidelines established by the Michigan Great Lakes Wind Council (GLOW). The project created opportunities for public dialogue and community education about offshore wind resource management and continued the dialogue to foster Great Lake wind resource utilization consistent with the focus of the GLOW Council. The technology proved to be effective, affordable, mobile, and the methods of data measurement accurate. The public benefited from a substantial increase in knowledge of the wind resources over Lake Michigan and gained insights about the potential environmental impacts of offshore wind turbine placements in the future. The unique first ever hub height wind resource assessment using LWS technology over water and development of related research data along with the permitting, sitting, and deployment of the WindSentinel MET buoy has captured public attention and has helped to increase awareness of the potential of future offshore wind energy development on the Great Lakes. Specifically, this project supported the acquisition and operation of a WindSentinel (WS) MET wind assessment buoy, and associated research for 549 days over multiple years at three locations on Lake Michigan. Four research objectives were defined for the project including to: 1) test and validate floating LIDAR technology; 2) collect and access offshore wind data; 3) detect and measure bird and bat activity over Lake Michigan; 4) conduct an over water sound propagation study; 5) prepare and offer a college course on offshore energy, and; 6) collect other environmental, bathometric, and atmospheric data. Desk-top research was performed to select anchorage sites and to secure permits to deploy the buoy. The project also collected and analyzed data essential to wind industry investment decision-making including: deploying highly mobile floating equipment to gather offshore wind data; correlating offshore wind data with conventional on-shore MET tower data; and performing studies that can contribute to the advancement and deployment of offshore wind technologies. Related activities included: • Siting, permitting, and deploying an offshore floating MET facility; • Validating the accuracy of floating LWS using near shoreline cup anemometer MET instruments; • Assessment of laser pulse technology (LIDAR) capability to establish hub height measurement of wind conditions at multiple locations on Lake Michigan; • Utilizing an extended-season (9-10 month) strategy to collect hub height wind data and weather conditions on Lake Michigan; • Investigation of technology best suited for wireless data transmission from distant offshore structures; • Conducting field-validated sound propagation study for a hypothetical offshore wind farm from shoreline locations; • Identifying the presence or absence of bird and bat species near wind assessment facilities; • Identifying the presence or absence of benthic and pelagic species near wind assessment facilities; All proposed project activities were completed with the following major findings: • Floating Laser Wind Sensors are capable of high quality measurement and recordings of wind resources. The WindSentinel presented no significant operational or statistical limitations in recording wind data technology at a at a high confidence level as compared to traditional an

  3. Sealing Ponds and Lakes with Bentonite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of 1 pound per square foot will require two bags of 50 pounds each in each square (each square contains 100 square feet). Large ponds or lakes may require the bentonite to be delivered to the site in bulk quantities. Spread the bentonite even- ly over... of Bentonite to Use The amount of bentonite required to effectively reduce seepage losses from a pond or lake varies from 1 to 2 pounds per square foot of soil surface. One-half pound of bentonite per square foot of soil is usually satisfactory when the bottom...

  4. Lake Country Power | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant Jump to: navigation,working-groups <LackawannaLagoBenton,(Redirected from LakeLake

  5. INDICATOR: LAKE ERIE ICE COVER Winter ice cover on Lake Erie affects the amount of heat and moisture transferred

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    102 INDICATOR: LAKE ERIE ICE COVER Background Winter ice cover on Lake Erie affects the amount of heat and moisture transferred between the lake and the atmosphere. During winter, ice and snow can decrease the amount of light available below the ice surface for photosynthesis. In the absence of an ice

  6. CATALYTIC BIOMASS LIQUEFACTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ergun, Sabri

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the U. S, Department of Energy under Contract W-7405-ENG-48,of Energy under Contract W-7405-ENG-48 C " DISCLAIMER This

  7. Coal liquefaction process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Skinner, Ronald W. (Allentown, PA); Tao, John C. (Perkiomenville, PA); Znaimer, Samuel (Vancouver, CA)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates to an improved process for the production of liquid carbonaceous fuels and solvents from carbonaceous solid fuels, especially coal. The claimed improved process includes the hydrocracking of the light SRC mixed with a suitable hydrocracker solvent. The recycle of the resulting hydrocracked product, after separation and distillation, is used to produce a solvent for the hydrocracking of the light solvent refined coal.

  8. CATALYTIC LIQUEFACTION OF BIOMASS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seth, Manu

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    +material obtained by water extraction) were determined forwith acetone and water, both these extractions are doneproduct obtained by extraction with water. About 67% of the

  9. CATALYTIC BIOMASS LIQUEFACTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ergun, Sabri

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    earlier observation made by Battelle-PHN that the oil frombiomass. Work done at Battelle PNL and at LBL (see earlier

  10. Hydrogen Delivery Liquefaction & Compression

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    temperature refrigeration Magnetic refrigerators Acoustic refrigerators #12;12 Challenges: More cost effective Refrigeration GN2 to N2 Liquefier To Feed H2 Flash Compressor H2 Recycle Compressor LN2 Add. To Storage/Fill #12 Higher efficiency compressors and expanders More efficient refrigeration Lower cost high

  11. STOICHIOMETRY OF WOOD LIQUEFACTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, Hubert G.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Run 8C By reduction with syngas Add: (1) - 0 in oil 2 o lost+ 8.6 + 0.7 = 100.0 Mo1s syngas used = 0.63 = 239 SCF = 434= 40.7- 38.9 or 1.8 1b Syngas used= 0.11 Mol or 42 SCF/100

  12. Catalytic coal liquefaction process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Garg, D.; Sunder, S.

    1986-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved process for catalytic solvent refining or hydroliquefaction of non-anthracitic coal at elevated temperatures under hydrogen pressure in a solvent comprises using as catalyst a mixture of a 1,2- or 1,4-quinone and an alkaline compound, selected from ammonium, alkali metal, and alkaline earth metal oxides, hydroxides or salts of weak acids. 1 fig.

  13. STOICHIOMETRY OF WOOD LIQUEFACTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, Hubert G.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    assumption that the overall non-gaseous product has the same analysis as that reported for recovered product oil

  14. Genetic Assessment of Lake Sturgeon Population Structure in the Laurentian Great Lakes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    May, Bernie

    Water Street, Alpena, Michigan 49707, USA HENRY QUINLAN U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Ashland National Fish and Wildlife Conservation Office, 2800 Lake Shore Drive East, Ashland, Wisconsin 54806, USA

  15. The biogeochemistry of tropical lakes: A case study from Lake Matano, Indonesia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crowe, S.A.; O'Neill, A.H.; Katsev, S.; Hehanussa, P.; Haffner, G. Douglas; Sundby, Bjorn; Mucci, Alfonso; Fowle, David A.

    2008-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We examined the chemical composition of the water column of Lake Matano, Sulawesi Island, Indonesia, to document how the high abundances of Fe (hydr)oxides in tropical soils and minimal seasonal temperature variability affect biogeochemical cycling...

  16. J. Great Lakes Res. 27(4):518546 Internat. Assoc. Great Lakes Res., 2001

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schaetzl, Randall

    glacial lakes can be found in Farrand 1969, Karrow et al. 1975, Karrow and Calkin 1985, Larsen 1987, Teller 1987, Hansel and Mickelson 1988, Schnei- der and Fraser 1990, Colman et al. 1994a, and Lewis et al

  17. Fall 2014 / LAKELINE 25 Terminal Lakes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tarboton, David

    used commercially for mineral extraction and brine shrimp harvest. GSL is vital to the local-largest in the world. The only outflow of water is via evaporation, causing a very gradual accumulation of minerals a very small amount of water to the lake. averaging 317 g/L since 1966, while the south is considerably

  18. Fish Grubs in Freshwater Ponds and Lakes.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Sterling K.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    rooc Z TA245.7 8873 N0.1380 r--- u ----!i -- B-1380 Fish Grubs in Freshwater Ponds and Lakes Sterling K. Johnson* Fish grubs are the immature forms of parasitic worms that invade the flesh of fishes. Grubs appear as round or bead...

  19. Fish mercury distribution in Massachusetts, USA lakes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rose, J.; Hutcheson, M.S.; West, C.R.; Pancorbo, O.; Hulme, K.; Cooperman, A.; DeCesare, G.; Isaac, R.; Screpetis, A.

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The sediment, water, and three species of fish from 24 of Massachusetts' (relatively) least-impacted water bodies were sampled to determine the patterns of variation in edible tissue mercury concentrations and the relationships of these patterns to characteristics of the water, sediment, and water bodies (lake, wetland, and watershed areas). Sampling was apportioned among three different ecological subregions and among lakes of differing trophic status. The authors sought to partition the variance to discover if these broadly defined concepts are suitable predictors of mercury levels in fish. Average muscle mercury concentrations were 0.15 mg/kg wet weight in the bottom-feeding brown bullheads (Ameriurus nebulosus); 0.31 mg/kg in the omnivorous yellow perch (Perca flavescens); and 0.39 mg/kg in the predaceous largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides). Statistically significant differences in fish mercury concentrations between ecological subregions in Massachusetts, USA, existed only in yellow perch. The productivity level of the lakes (as deduced from Carlson's Trophic Status Index) was not a strong predictor of tissue mercury concentrations in any species. pH was a highly (inversely) correlated environmental variable with yellow perch and brown bullhead tissue mercury. Largemouth bass tissue mercury concentrations were most highly correlated with the weight of the fish (+), lake size (+), and source area sizes (+). Properties of individual lakes appear more important for determining fish tissue mercury concentrations than do small-scale ecoregional differences. Species that show major mercury variation with size or trophic level may not be good choices for use in evaluating the importance of environmental variables.

  20. Incident and in situ irradiance in Lakes Cadagno and Lucerne: A comparison of methods and models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sommaruga, Ruben

    Incident and in situ irradiance in Lakes Cadagno and Lucerne: A comparison of methods and models Key words: Lake Lucerne, Lake Cadagno, PAR, UV-A, UV-B, irradiance regime, radiative transfer models) at the field stations Kastanienbaum at Lake Lucerne (434 m a.s.l.) and Piora at Lake Cadagno (1923 m a

  1. The use of rhetorical appeals to convey a Christian world-view in Charles Williams' All hallows' eve

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kok, Marilyn R

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Kok, B. A. , Wheaton College Chairman of Advisory Ccnmittee: Hr. Uavid H. Stewart Charles Williams, who lived from 1886 to 1945, produced a large collection of literature, including poetry, biographies, plays, and seven novels. In this thesis, I... examine tbe rhetorical appeals he uses in bis last novel, All Hallows' Eve, to determine their effect on the novel as a whole and to suggest some principles for their most effec- tive use. In tbe first chapter after summarizing Williams' life, I...

  2. The precipitation response to the desiccation of Lake Chad

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lauwaet D.; VanWeverberg K.; vanLipzig, N. P. M., Weverberg, K. V., Ridderb, K. D., and Goyens, C.

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Located in the semi-arid African Sahel, Lake Chad has shrunk from a surface area of 25000 km2 in 1960 to about 1350 km2 due to a series of droughts and anthropogenic influences. The disappearance of such a large open-water body can be expected to have a noticeable effect on the meteorology in the surroundings of the lake. The impact could extend even further to the west as westward propagating convective systems pass Lake Chad in the rainfall season. This study examines the sensitivity of the regional hydrology and convective processes to the desiccation of the lake using a regional atmospheric model. Three Lake Chad scenarios are applied reflecting the situation in 1960, the current situation and a potential future scenario in which the lake and the surrounding wetlands have disappeared. The model simulations span the months July-September in 2006, which includes the rainfall season in the Lake Chad area. Total precipitation amounts and the components of the hydrological cycle are found to be hardly affected by the existence of the lake. A filled Lake Chad does, however, increase the precipitation at the east side of the lake. The model results indicate that the boundary layer moisture and temperature are significantly altered downwind of the lake. By investigating a mesoscale convective system (MCS) case, this is found to affect the development and progress of the system. At first, the MCS is intensified by the more unstable boundary layer air but the persistence of the system is altered as the cold pool propagation becomes less effective. The proposed mechanism is able to explain the differences in the rainfall patterns nearby Lake Chad between the scenarios. This highlights the local sensitivity to the desiccation of Lake Chad whereas the large-scale atmospheric processes are not affected.

  3. cetinney@mail.utexas.eduTheUniversityofTexasatAustin,CharlesE.Tinney,Ph.D.,JayantSirohi,Ph.D.,(512)471-4147 http://www.ae.utexas.edu/facultysites/tinney/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tinney, Charles E.

    cetinney@mail.utexas.eduTheUniversityofTexasatAustin,CharlesE.Tinney,Ph.D.,JayantSirohi,Ph.D.,(512.utexas.eduTheUniversityofTexasatAustin,CharlesE.Tinney,Ph.D.,JayantSirohi,Ph.D.,(512)471-4147 http://www.ae.utexas.edu/facultysites/tinney/ High pressure piping and jet rig #12;cetinney@mail.utexas.eduTheUniversityofTexasatAustin,CharlesE.Tinney,Ph.D.,JayantSirohi

  4. NOAA Technical Memorandum ERL GLERL-113 Proceedings of the Great Lakes Paleo-Levels Workshop: The Last 4000 Years

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ........................................................................................................................................... 5 3. HOLOCENE LAKE LEVELS AND CLIMATE, LAKES WINNIPEG, ERIE, AND ONTARIO C.F.M. Lewis ..................................................................................................................................... 6 4. RECONSTRUCTING HOLOCENE LAKE LEVEL FLUCTUATIONS IN THE LAKE SUPERIOR BASIN Curtis Larsen

  5. The limnology of L Lake: Results of the L-Lake monitoring program, 1986--1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bowers, J.A.

    1991-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    L Lake was constructed in 1985 on the upper regions of Steel Creek, SRS to mitigate the heated effluents from L Reactor. In addition to the NPDES permit specifications (Outfall L-007) for the L-Reactor outfall, DOE-SR executed an agreement with the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC), that thermal effluents from L-Reactor will not substantially alter ecosystem components in the approximate lower half of L Lake. This region should be inhabited by Balanced (Indigenous) Biological Communities (BBCs) in accordance with Section 316(a) of the Pollution Control (Clean Water) Act (Public Law 92-500). In response to this requirement the Environmental Sciences Section/Ecology Group initiated a comprehensive biomonitoring program which documented the development of BBCs in L Lake from January 1986 through December 1989. This report summarizes the principal results of the program with regards to BBC compliance issues and community succession in L Lake. The results are divided into six sections: water quality, macronutrients, and phytoplankton, aquatic macrophytes, zooplankton, benthic macroinvertebrates, fish, and community succession. One of the prime goals of the program was to detect potential reactor impacts on L Lake.

  6. Variation of mercury in fish from Massachusetts lakes based on ecoregion and lake trophic status

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rose, J.; Hutcheson, M.; West, C.R. [Massachusetts Dept. of Environmental Protection, Boston, MA (United States). Office of Research and Standards] [and others

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Twenty-four of the state`s least-impacted waterbodies were sampled for sediment, water, physical characteristics and 3 species of fish to determine the extent of, and patterns of variation in, mercury contamination. Sampling effort was apportioned among three different ecological subregions of the state, as defined by EPA, and among lakes of differing trophic status. The authors sought to partition the variance to discover if these broadly defined concepts are suitable predictors of mercury levels in fish. Mean fish mercury was 0.14 ppm wet weight in samples of 168 of the bottom feeding brown bullheads (Ameriurus nebulosus) (range = 0.01--0.79 ppm); 0.3 ppm in 199 of the omnivorous yellow perch (Perca flavescens) (range = 0.01--0.75 ppm); and 0.4 ppm in samples of 152 of the predaceous largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) (range = 0.05--1.1 ppm). Multivariate statistics are employed to determine how mercury concentrations in fish correlate with sediment chemistry, water chemistry, fish trophic status, fish size and age, lake and watershed size, the presence and extent of wetlands in the watershed, and physical characteristics of the lake. The survey design complements ongoing efforts begun in 1983 to test fish in a variety of waters, from which emanated fish advisories for impacted rivers and lakes. The study defines a baseline for fish contamination in Massachusetts lakes and ponds that serves as a template for public health decisions regarding fish consumption.

  7. Regional factors governing performance and sustainability of wastewater treatment plants in Honduras : Lake Yojoa Subwatershed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Kent B. (Kent Bramwell)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lake Yojoa, the largest natural lake in Honduras, is currently experiencing eutrophication from overloading of nutrients, in part due to inadequate wastewater treatment throughout the Lake Yojoa Subwatershed. Some efforts ...

  8. Spatiotemporal nutrient loading to Cultus Lake: Context for eutrophication and implications for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spatiotemporal nutrient loading to Cultus Lake: Context for eutrophication and implications of Thesis: Spatiotemporal nutrient loading to Cultus Lake: Context for eutrophication and implications Cultus Lake, British Columbia experiences significant anthropogenic nutrient loadings and eutrophication

  9. Neutral carbohydrate geochemistry of particulate material (trap and core sediments) in an eutrophic lake (Aydat,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Neutral carbohydrate geochemistry of particulate material (trap and core sediments) in an eutrophic Carbohydrate compositions were determined on sinking particles and core samples from eutrophic lake Aydat; Eutrophic lake; Aydat lake 1. Introduction Polysaccharides are common structural and storage polymers

  10. Lake Titicaca - Physics of an Inherited Hydropower Macroproject Proposal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cathcart, R

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Shared almost evenly by Peru and Bolivia, Lake Titicaca is situated on an Altiplano endorheic region of the northern Andes Mountains. Rio Desaguadero is the lake only outlet. From 1908, several macro-engineers speculated on the creation of a second, completely artificial, outlet for Lake Titicaca freshwater. Here we reconsider several 20th Century macroproject proposals, with the goal of examining and enhancing this technically interesting South American 21st Century Macro-engineering inheritance.

  11. Lake Titicaca - Physics of an Inherited Hydropower Macroproject Proposal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Cathcart; A. Bolonkin

    2007-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Shared almost evenly by Peru and Bolivia, Lake Titicaca is situated on an Altiplano endorheic region of the northern Andes Mountains. Rio Desaguadero is the lake only outlet. From 1908, several macro-engineers speculated on the creation of a second, completely artificial, outlet for Lake Titicaca freshwater. Here we reconsider several 20th Century macroproject proposals, with the goal of examining and enhancing this technically interesting South American 21st Century Macro-engineering inheritance.

  12. Palaeoflood activity and climate change over the last 1400 years recorded by lake sediments in the NW European Alps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    ;2 Abstract A high-resolution sedimentological and geochemical study of a high-altitude proglacial lake (Lake

  13. Energy Efficient Buildings, Salt Lake County, Utah

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnett, Kimberly

    2012-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Executive Summary Salt Lake County's Solar Photovoltaic Project - an unprecedented public/private partnership Salt Lake County is pleased to announce the completion of its unprecedented solar photovoltaic (PV) installation on the Calvin R. Rampton Salt Palace Convention Center. This 1.65 MW installation will be one the largest solar roof top installations in the country and will more than double the current installed solar capacity in the state of Utah. Construction is complete and the system will be operational in May 2012. The County has accomplished this project using a Power Purchase Agreement (PPA) financing model. In a PPA model a third-party solar developer will finance, develop, own, operate, and maintain the solar array. Salt Lake County will lease its roof, and purchase the power from this third-party under a long-term Power Purchase Agreement contract. In fact, this will be one of the first projects in the state of Utah to take advantage of the recent (March 2010) legislation which makes PPA models possible for projects of this type. In addition to utilizing a PPA, this solar project will employ public and private capital, Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grants (EECBG), and public/private subsidized bonds that are able to work together efficiently because of the recent stimulus bill. The project also makes use of recent changes to federal tax rules, and the recent re-awakening of private capital markets that make a significant public-private partnership possible. This is an extremely innovative project, and will mark the first time that all of these incentives (EECBG grants, Qualified Energy Conservation Bonds, New Markets tax credits, investment tax credits, public and private funds) have been packaged into one project. All of Salt Lake County's research documents and studies, agreements, and technical information is available to the public. In addition, the County has already shared a variety of information with the public through webinars, site tours, presentations, and written correspondence.

  14. Stochastic Forecasting of Algae Blooms in Lakes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Peng; Tartakovsky, Daniel M.; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.

    2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the development of harmful algae blooms (HABs) in a lake with uncertain nutrients inflow. Two general frameworks, Fokker-Planck equation and the PDF methods, are developed to quantify the resultant concentration uncertainty of various algae groups, via deriving a deterministic equation of their joint probability density function (PDF). A computational example is examined to study the evolution of cyanobacteria (the blue-green algae) and the impacts of initial concentration and inflow-outflow ratio.

  15. The southern Lake Michigan coastal erosion study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Folger, D.W. (Geological Survey, Woods Hole, MA (United States))

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As a result of damage inflicted on the Chicago shoreline by exceptionally high waters in 1985-87, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) initiated a cooperative 5-year (1988--1992) study to evaluate the geologic framework of the area, the frequency of lake level fluctuations, and the processes responsible for the intense coastal erosion. The study involved 19 scientists from the USGS, Illinois State Geological Survey, Indiana Geological Survey, Indiana University, Purdue University, Northeastern Illinois University, Oregon State University, and the University of Washington. Some important results of the study follow: (1) the failure of revetments protecting the Chicago lakeshore is mainly structural and not erosional. (2) Prehistoric lake level fluctuations exceeded historic fluctuations by as much as a factor of two. For example, in the 17th century, lake level changed over a range of [approximately]3 m, whereas between the 1964 low and the 1986 high it changed only [approximately]1.6 m. (3) Bluff retreat between Wilmette and Waukegan varies from 10--75 cm/yr and averages 20--25 cm/yr; erosion rates north of Waukegan have been as high as 3 m/yr. (4) Eroding bluffs provide most of the sand to the nearshore zone; however, possibly due to construction of shore protection, the nearshore sand wedge has shown a dramatic decrease in volume during the last two decades. (5) Ice ridges as high as 7 m form along the lakeshore but do not effectively protect the beach from winter erosion as previously thought. (6) The Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore apparently was a major sink for sand moving southward along both sides of the lake; sediment input now appears to come mostly from the eastern shore.

  16. Sediment resuspension in Lake St. Clair

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hawley, N. (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)); Lesht, B.M. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States))

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Time-series measurements of water transparency, wave conditions, and current speed were made at several different sites in Lake St. Clair during five different 1-month periods in 1985 and 1986. Observed changes in suspended sediment concentration were modeled with a simple zero-dimensional, spatially averaged, mass balance model in which local bottom erosion was expressed as a linear function of the bottom shear stress. Estimates of the three parameters required by the model (particle settling velocity, resuspension concentration, and background suspended material concentration) are reasonably consistent for the various data sets, suggesting that the properties of the lake bottom do not change significantly through either space or time. The modeled settling velocities agree with the observed suspended particle size data and the erosion rates are comparable to laboratory results for freshwater sediments. The results show that a simple mass flux model can be used to model local sediment resuspension events in Lake St. Clair with reasonable accuracy. 23 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. Lake Region Electric Cooperative- Commercial Energy Efficiency Grant Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Lake Region Electric Cooperative (LREC) offers grants to commercial customers for electric energy efficiency improvements, audits, and engineering and design assistance for new and existing...

  18. Lake Region Electric Cooperative- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Lake Region Electric Cooperative (LREC) offers a variety of rebates for residential customers to improve the energy efficiency of homes. Rebates are available for Energy Star refrigerators and...

  19. Static Temperature Survey At Lake City Hot Springs Area (Benoit...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Benoit Et Al., 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Lake City Hot Springs Area Exploration Technique Static Temperature Survey Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding...

  20. Geothermal Literature Review At Lake City Hot Springs Area (Benoit...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Et Al., 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Lake City Hot Springs Area Exploration Technique Geothermal Literature Review Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding...