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Sample records for lac vieux desert

  1. Modeling the Lac repressor-operator assembly: The influence of DNA looping on Lac

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    number, and the end conditions imposed by the LacR tetramer. The tetramer can assume two types of confor

  2. Dominican Republic-Regional Programme for LAC: Support for the...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Programme for LAC: Support for the Preparation of the National Climate Change Policy (Redirected from UNDP-Dominican Republic Regional Programme for LAC - Support for the...

  3. The Geometry of Desert

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kagan, Shelly

    2005-01-01

    , better appreciate the com­ plex nature of desert if we approach it graphically. 5 Well-being Figure l. Desert Graph axes with a sample poinl In Figure 1, the X axis represents possible levels of well-being. Points to the right of the origin represent... of well-being. 10 One possible way of capturing a view like this is shown in Figure 5. Figure 5. Some desert lines with negative peaks. Now Figure 5 only displays desert lines for people who deserve to suffer. For each such person there is a...

  4. The RGB Sample of Intermediate BL Lacs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. A. Laurent-Muehleisen; R. I. Kollgaard; E. D. Feigelson; W. Brinkmann; J. Siebert

    1999-05-12

    Combining newly identified and previously known BL Lacs from the RASS-Green Bank (RGB) catalog, we present a sample of 127 BL Lacs, the largest ever derived from a single uniform survey. A Complete sample of 33 objects brighter than O=18.0 mag is also presented. These samples are compared to other known BL Lac samples and are generally found to exhibit properties intermediate between those of the previously disparate classes of High and Low energy peaked BL Lacs (HBLs and LBLs, respectively). This result is most dramatic in the distribution of the X-ray to radio logarithmic flux ratios, where the RGB BL Lacs are shown to peak precisely where the sharp dichotomy between the two subclasses was previously seen. The alpha_ro vs alpha_ox diagram also shows the RGB sample smoothly bridges the gap between the previously distinct subclasses of LBLs and HBLs. We also find a weak, but statistically significant correlation between the composite X-ray spectral index alpha_xox and alpha_ro. This implies that the more LBL-like RGB BL Lacs have a secondary source of X-ray emission, possibly from an inverse Compton component. We also present both the X-ray and radio logN-logS distributions for which the competing HBL/LBL unification scenarios have differing predictions. The unknown effects of the triple flux limit inherent in the RGB Complete sample makes quantitative analysis uncertain, but the characteristics of the RGB sample compare well both with results obtained from previous samples and with general theoretical predictions based on a simple Monte Carlo simulation. Our analysis indicates that the unimodal distribution of BL Lac properties found in the RGB sample likely reliably reflect the underlying population, while the bimodal distribution found in earlier studies arose primarily from observational selection effects.

  5. WATERCHARRETTE food deserts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    WATERCHARRETTE food deserts University of Kansas School of Architecture, Design, and Planning 3 summary introduction context To provide a more local society that is less dependent upon large-scale food dialogues will be held to engage students in the concepts of sustainable water management, food deserts

  6. Four New BL Lac Surveys: Sampling New Populations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. A. Laurent-Muehleisen; R. H. Becker; W. Brinkmann; J. Siebert; E. D. Feigelson; R. I. Kollgaard; G. D. Schmidt; P. S. Smith

    1998-10-15

    The advent of large area deep radio and X-ray surveys is leading to the creation of many new BL Lac samples. In particular, the ROSAT All-Sky, Green Bank and FIRST surveys are proving to be rich sources of new BL Lacs. We will discuss the methods used in four independent BL Lac searches based on these surveys. Comparison of the broadband spectral energy distributions of these BL Lacs with those of previously known objects clearly points to the existence of a large previously unrecognized population of objects with characteristics intermediate between those exhibited by Low and High energy peaked BL Lacs.

  7. E CO LAC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (UtilityInstrumentsAreafor GeothermalNorthWorldwide Solar Energy JumpEnergiLAC

  8. Mille Lacs Energy Cooperative | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland: Energy ResourcesDec 2005 WindPROLLC Jump to:Utah:Millard,Ohio: EnergyMille Lacs

  9. Fond du Lac Band Leads Climate Resilience Efforts on Lake Superior...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Fond du Lac Band Leads Climate Resilience Efforts on Lake Superior Chippewa Indian Reservation Fond du Lac Band Leads Climate Resilience Efforts on Lake Superior Chippewa Indian...

  10. Supersymmetry without the Desert

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nomura, Yasunori; Poland, David

    2006-09-26

    Naturalness of electroweak symmetry breaking in weak scale supersymmetric theories may suggest the absence of the conventional supersymmetric desert. We present a simple, realistic framework for supersymmetry in which (most of) the virtues of the supersymmetric desert are naturally reproduced without having a large energy interval above the weak scale. The successful supersymmetric prediction for the low-energy gauge couplings is reproduced due to a gauged R symmetry present in the effective theory at the weak scale. The observable sector superpotential naturally takes the form of the next-to-minimal supersymmetric standard model, but without being subject to the Landau pole constraints up to the conventional unification scale. Supersymmetry breaking masses are generated by the F-term and D-term VEVs of singlet and U(1){sub R} gauge fields, as well as by anomaly mediation, at a scale not far above the weak scale. We study the resulting pattern of supersymmetry breaking masses in detail, and find that it can be quite distinct. We construct classes of explicit models within this framework, based on higher dimensional unified theories with TeV-sized extra dimensions. A similar model based on a non-R symmetry is also presented. These models have a rich phenomenology at the TeV scale, and allow for detailed analyses of, e.g., electroweak symmetry breaking.

  11. The cultural eutrophication of Lac la Biche, Alberta, Canada: a paleoecological study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolfe, Alexander P.

    The cultural eutrophication of Lac la Biche, Alberta, Canada: a paleoecological study D, and Bianca Perren Abstract: A multiproxy paleoecological investigation of Lac la Biche, a large boreal lake

  12. Desert Rock Coatings Ronald I. Dorn

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dorn, Ron

    Chapter 7 Desert Rock Coatings Ronald I. Dorn Introduction Desert landforms are characterized, that the supposed funda- mental bare-rock nature of desert landforms stretches the truth. In reality, rock coatings Petra tourist attraction of the Al-Khazneh Tomb fac¸ade is coated with a black manganese-rich varnish

  13. Wind Resource Assessment Report: Mille Lacs Indian Reservation, Minnesota

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jimenez, A. C.

    2013-12-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) launched the RE-Powering America's Land initiative to encourage development of renewable energy on potentially contaminated land and mine sites. EPA collaborated with the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Mille Lacs Band of Chippewa Indians to evaluate the wind resource and examine the feasibility of a wind project at a contaminated site located on the Mille Lacs Indian Reservation in Minnesota. The wind monitoring effort involved the installation of a 60-m met tower and the collection of 18 months of wind data at multiple heights above the ground. This report focuses on the wind resource assessment, the estimated energy production of wind turbines, and an assessment of the economic feasibility of a potential wind project sited this site.

  14. UNLV DESERT SUNRISE DESERT SUNRISE HOME Project Summary

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-Sessions | Department of Correctiveof Deliverables UDACSmart GridUNLV DESERT

  15. California Desert Fish Farm Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    California Desert Fish Farm Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name California Desert Fish Farm Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal...

  16. Understanding the 30-year Barbados desert dust record

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mahowald, Natalie M; Zender, C. S.; Luo, C.; Savoie, D.; Torres, O.; del Corral, J.

    2002-01-01

    UNDERSTANDING THE 30-YEAR BARBADOS DESERT DUST Moulin, C. ,on mineral dust in the Barbados trade winds, Nature, 320,Understanding the 30-year Barbados desert dust record, J.

  17. LAC Regional Platform Workshop Report | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas: EnergyKulpsville, Pennsylvania: Energy Resources Jump to:Kyle,LAC Regional Platform

  18. H33B-05H33B-05 Water subsidies from mountains to deserts:Water subsidies from mountains to deserts:Water subsidies from mountains to deserts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nacional de San Luis, Universidad

    water Bare dunes, instead, experienced deep drainage & local recharge. quicktour Site A bare interduneH33B-05H33B-05 Water subsidies from mountains to deserts:Water subsidies from mountains to deserts:Water subsidies from mountains to deserts: groundwater-fed oases in a sandy landscape Water subsidies from

  19. Sustaining the natural and economical resources of the Lac Courte Oreilles, Leslie Isham; Jason Weaver

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Isham, Leslie; Weaver, Jason

    2013-09-30

    The Lac Courte Oreilles Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians, located in northwest Wisconsin has developed a project, entitled Sustaining the Natural and Economic Resources of the LCO Ojibwe. This technical report is a summary of the project.

  20. Every Square Inch: The Fight for the California Desert

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Argandona, Monica

    2012-01-01

    and James B. Greenberg. "Fight for the West: A PoliticalEvery Square Inch: The Fight for the California Desert AEvery Square Inch: A Fight for the California Desert by

  1. Critical Zones in Desert Fog: Aids to Multiscale Navigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Furnas, George W.

    Critical Zones in Desert Fog: Aids to Multiscale Navigation Susanne Jul Computer Science +1 734-763-0076 furnas@umich.edu ABSTRACT In this paper, we introduce the problem of "desert fog desert fog in multiscale electronic worlds. Prototypes of these aids have been implemented

  2. Desert Sunlight | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (UtilityInstruments IncMississippi:DeltaFishDesert Queen GeothermalDesert

  3. High-Resolution Radio Imaging of Gravitational Lensing Candidates in the 1 Jansky BL Lac Sample

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. A. Rector; J. T. Stocke

    2003-02-19

    While BL Lacertae objects are widely believed to be highly beamed, low-luminosity radio galaxies, many radio-selected BL Lacs have extended radio power levels and optical emission lines that are too luminous to be low-luminosity radio galaxies. Also, Stocke & Rector discovered an excess of MgII absorption systems along BL Lac sightlines compared to quasars, suggesting that gravitational lensing may be another means of creating the BL Lac phenomenon in some cases. We present a search for gravitationally-lensed BL Lacs with deep, high-resolution, two-frequency VLA radio maps of seven lensing candidates from the 1 Jansky BL Lac sample. We find that none of these objects are resolved into an Einstein ring like B 0218+357, nor do any show multiple images of the core. All of the lensing candidates that were resolved show a flat-spectrum core and very unusual, steep-spectrum extended morphology that is incompatible with a multiply lensed system. Thus, while these observations do not rule out microlensing, no macrolensing is observed.

  4. The transition between BL Lac objects and Flat Spectrum Radio Quasars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghisellini, G; Foschini, L; Ghirlanda, G

    2010-01-01

    We study the BL Lac objects detected in the one year all sky survey of the Fermi satellite, with a energy spectral slope alpha_gamma in the [0.1-100 GeV] band greater than 1.2. In the alpha_gamma vs gamma-ray luminosity plane, these BL Lacs occupy the region populated by Flat Spectrum Radio Quasars (FSRQs). Studying the properties of their spectral energy distributions (SED) and of their emitting lines, we find that several of these BL Lacs have a SED similar to FSRQs and that they do have broad lines of large equivalent width, and should be reclassified as FSRQs even adopting the current phenomenological definition (i.e. equivalent width EW of the emitting line greater than 5 A). In other cases, even if the EW width is small, the emitting lines can be as luminous as in quasars, and again their SED is similar to the SED of FSRQs. Sources classified as BL Lacs with a SED appearing as intermediate between BL Lacs and FSRQs also have relatively weak broad emission lines and small EW, and can be considered as tra...

  5. The Sedentary Survey of Extreme High Energy Peaked BL Lacs III. Results from Optical Spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Piranomonte; M. Perri; P. Giommi; H. Landt; P. Padovani

    2007-05-04

    The multi-frequency Sedentary Survey is a flux limited, statistically well-defined sample of highly X-ray dominated BL Lacertae objects (HBLs) which includes 150 sources. In this paper, the third of the series, we report the results of a dedicated optical spectroscopy campaign that, together with results from other independent optical follow up programs, led to the spectroscopic identification of all sources in the sample. We carried out a systematic spectroscopic campaign for the observation of all unidentified objects of the sample using the ESO 3.6m, the KPNO 4m, and the TNG optical telescopes. We present new identifications and optical spectra for 76 sources, 50 of which are new BL Lac objects, 18 are sources previously referred as BL Lacs but for which no redshift information was available, and 8 are broad emission lines AGNs. We find that the multi-frequency selection technique used to build the survey is highly efficient (about 90%) in selecting BL Lacs objects. We present positional and spectroscopic information for all confirmed BL Lac objects. Our data allowed us to determined 36 redshifts out of the 50 new BL Lacs and 5 new redshifts for the previously known objects. The redshift distribution of the complete sample is presented and compared with that of other BL Lacs samples. For 26 sources without recognizable absorption features, we calculated lower limits to the redshift using a method based on simulated optical spectra with different ratios between jet and galaxy emission. For a subsample of 38 object with high-quality spectra, we find a correlation between the optical spectral slope, the 1.4 GHz radio luminosity, and the Ca H&K break value, indicating that for powerful/beamed sources the optical light is dominated by the non-thermal emission from the jet.

  6. Every Square Inch: The Fight for the California Desert

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Argandona, Monica

    2012-01-01

    centers as a clean and renewable energy resource. The demandProtective Council Desert Renewable Energy Conservation Plancenters as a clean and renewable energy resource. Whether

  7. Every Square Inch: The Fight for the California Desert

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Argandona, Monica

    2012-01-01

    centers as a clean and renewable energy resource. The demandfor Energy Efficiency and Renewable Technologies CaliforniaProtective Council Desert Renewable Energy Conservation Plan

  8. Desert dust suppressing precipitation: A possible desertification feedback loop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel, Rosenfeld

    Desert dust suppressing precipitation: A possible desertification feedback loop Daniel Rosenfeld of land use exposing the topsoil can initiate such a desertification feedback process. Satellite

  9. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Desert Peak Area (Wisian & Blackwell...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Exploration Activity Details Location Desert Peak Area Exploration Technique Modeling-Computer Simulations Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References...

  10. Boundary processes between a desert sand dune community and an encroaching suburban landscape

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrows, Cameron W.; Allen, M F; Rotenberry, J T

    2006-01-01

    biology of the Namib dune lizard, Aporosaura anchietae,energetics of a Namib Desert dune ecosystem. Journal of Aridbetween a desert sand dune community and an encroaching

  11. An Investigation of Gravitational Lensing in the Southern BL Lac PKS 0537-441

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. F. Lewis; R. A. Ibata

    1999-08-16

    The BL-Lac family of active galaxies possess almost featureless spectra and exhibit rapid variability over their entire spectral range. A number of models have been developed to explain these extreme properties, several of which have invoked the action of microlensing by sub-stellar mass objects in a foreground galaxy; this not only introduces variability, but also amplifies an otherwise normal quasar source. Here we present recent spectroscopy and photometry of the southern BL Lac PKS 0537-441; with an inferred redshift of z~0.9 it represents one of the most distant and most luminous members of the BL Lac family. The goal of the observations was not only to confirm the redshift of PKS~0537-441, but also to determine the redshift of a putative galaxy along the line of sight to the BL-Lac; it has been proposed that this galaxy is the host of microlensing stars that account for PKS 0537-441's extreme properties. While several observations have failed to detect any extended emission in PKS 0537-441, the HST imaging data presented here indicate the presence of a galactic component, although we fail to identify any absorption features that reveal the redshift of the emission. It is also noted that PKS 0537-441 is accompanied by several small, but extended companions, located a few arcseconds from the point-like BL-Lac source. Two possibilities present themselves; either they represent true companions of PKS 0537-441, or are themselves gravitationally lensed images of more distant sources.

  12. Assessing Desert Tortoise Survival and Reproduction at a Wind Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Assessing Desert Tortoise Survival and Reproduction at a Wind Energy Facility Near Palm Springs of their habitat are characterized by significant wind and solar energy potential. As a result, the species in the Mojave and Sonoran Deserts have preexisting wind energy facilities dating back over 25 years. One

  13. ORIGINAL PAPER Neoproterozoic diamictite in the Eastern Desert of Egypt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stern, Robert J.

    ORIGINAL PAPER Neoproterozoic diamictite in the Eastern Desert of Egypt and Northern Saudi Arabia in Wadi Kareim and Wadi Mobarak in the Eastern Desert of Egypt and the Nuwaybah formation in NW Saudi and extends from Egypt, Israel, and Jordan to Ethiopia and Yemen. The ANS (Fig. 1a) developed during

  14. Desert Queen Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (UtilityInstruments IncMississippi:DeltaFishDesert Queen Geothermal Area

  15. STRUCTURED JETS IN BL LAC OBJECTS: EFFICIENT PeV NEUTRINO FACTORIES?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tavecchio, Fabrizio; Ghisellini, Gabriele; Guetta, Dafne

    2014-09-20

    The origin of high-energy neutrinos (0.1–1 PeV range) detected by IceCube remains a mystery. In this work, we explore the possibility that efficient neutrino production can occur in structured jets of BL Lac objects, characterized by a fast inner spine surrounded by a slower layer. This scenario has been widely discussed in the framework of the high-energy emission models for BL Lac objects and radio galaxies. One of the relevant consequences of a velocity structure is the enhancement of the inverse Compton emission caused by the radiative coupling of the two zones. We show that a similar boosting could occur for the neutrino output of the spine through the photo-meson reaction of high-energy protons scattering off the amplified soft target photon field of the layer. Assuming the local density and the cosmological evolution of ?-ray BL Lac object derived from Fermi Large Area Telescope data, we calculate the expected diffuse neutrino intensity, which can match the IceCube data for a reasonable choice of parameters.

  16. Desert pavement morphology and dynamics, Big Bend National Park, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harmon, Courtney Michelle

    2009-05-15

    29 30 41 42 44 47 48 50 51 52 ix FIGURE 20 Grain size distribution of Study Area 2 sediments, BBNP???. 21 Soil profile cross-sections (10 cm), Study Area 2??????... 22 Grain size distribution of Study Area 3... et al., (2002). Plan view photos show desert pavement from the Cima Volcanic Field in the eastern Mojave Desert, with a 50cm field of view (Wood, 2002). 18 The above study in the Mojave Desert concluded that DP1 has successively more ground...

  17. Regional Gravity Survey of the Northern Great Salt Lake Desert...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Regional Gravity Survey of the Northern Great Salt Lake Desert and Adjacent Areas in Utah, Nevada, and Idaho Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library...

  18. Into the Desert: Reflections on the Gulf War 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Engel, Jeff

    2015-06-09

    Engel Presents his book, "Into the Desert: Reflections on the Gulf War," a reevaluation of the Gulf War's origins, the war itself, and its regional and long term impact on international relations.

  19. Aeolian depositional landforms of the south eastern Mojave Desert, California 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvis, William Thomas

    2000-01-01

    Remote sensing and photo interpretation techniques are used to describe and map aeolian deposits found along two sediment transport corridors in the south eastern Mojave Desert. The first pathway and associated sand deposits extend eastward from...

  20. Thyroid function in the desert tortoise, Gopherus agassizii 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kohel, Kathryn Anne

    1994-01-01

    stimulate nutrient absorption across the intestine (Higgs et al. , 1982; Collie and Ferraris, 1994). However, there is a lack of information on the influence of food intake in most ectotherms, especially reptiles. 1f the desert tortoise resembles fish...

  1. Desert Sunlight is Shining Example of How DOE Loan Guarantees...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Sunlight is Shining Example of How DOE Loan Guarantees Helped Launch Utility-scale PV Solar Market Desert Sunlight is Shining Example of How DOE Loan Guarantees Helped Launch...

  2. Desert Sunlight is Shining Example of How DOE Loan Guarantees...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    (EIA) forecasted in 2008 that just 140 MW of total utility-scale PV solar capacity would be installed by 2015. Now we're in 2015 and Desert Sunlight itself represents...

  3. Lac du Flambeau Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians Strategic Energy Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bryan Hoover

    2009-11-16

    This plan discusses the current energy use on the Lac du Flambeau Reservation, the current status of the Tribe's energy program, as well as the issues and concerns with energy on the reservation. This plan also identifies and outlines energy opportunities, goals, and objectives for the Tribe to accomplish. The overall goal of this plan is to address the energy situation of the reservation in a holistic manner for the maximum benefit to the Tribe. This plan is an evolving document that will be re-evaluated as the Tribe's energy situation changes.

  4. Effects of Land Surface Characteristics on Pedogenesis, Biological Soil Crust Community Diversity, and Ecosystem Functions in a Mojave Desert Piedmont Landscape

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pietrasiak, Nicole

    2012-01-01

    shrub patches and water harvesting in the Negev Desert: theshrub patches and water harvesting in the Negev Desert: the

  5. Parsec-scale Magnetic-Field Structures in HEAO-1 BL Lacs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Kharb; D. Gabuzda; P. Shastri

    2007-11-07

    We present very long baseline interferometry polarization images of an X-ray selected sample of BL Lacertae objects belonging to the first High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO-1) and the ROSAT-Green Bank (RGB) surveys. These are primarily high-energy-peaked BL Lacs (HBLs) and exhibit core-jet radio morphologies on pc-scales. They show moderately polarized jet components, similar to those of low-energy-peaked BL Lacs (LBLs). The fractional polarization in the unresolved cores of the HBLs is, on average, lower than in the LBLs, while the fractional polarizations in the pc-scale jets of HBLs and LBLs are comparable. However a difference is observed in the orientation of the inferred jet magnetic fields -- while LBL jets are well-known to preferentially exhibit transverse magnetic fields, the HBL jets tend to display longitudinal magnetic fields. Although a `spine-sheath' jet velocity structure, along with larger viewing angles for HBLs could produce the observed magnetic field configuration, differences in other properties of LBLs and HBLs, such as their total radio power, cannot be fully reconciled with the different-angle scenario alone. Instead it appears that LBLs and HBLs differ intrinsically, perhaps in the spin rates of their central black holes.

  6. Geography of urban food access : exploring potential causes of food deserts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cameron, Caitlin

    2012-01-01

    We believe we understand food deserts, but we do not. In the last decade the phenomenon of food deserts has been often discussed, and many solutions are proposed to alleviate food access issues in American cities. However, ...

  7. An Investigation into Early Desert Pastoralism: Excavations at the Camel Site, Negev

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosen, Steven A

    2011-01-01

    architecture in the deserts of the Near East, and for that matter among mobile pastoralists in Eurasia and North Africa

  8. Research news: UC Desert Research and Extension Center celebrates 100 years

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meadows, Robin

    2012-01-01

    for low desert biofuel production. Leafy greens and climateyield crops for biofuel production in the Imperial Valley

  9. Glaciation temperatures of convective clouds ingesting desert dust, air pollution and smoke from forest fires

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel, Rosenfeld

    Glaciation temperatures of convective clouds ingesting desert dust, air pollution and smoke from observations show that desert dust and heavy air pollution over East Asia have similar ability to glaciate desert dust, air pollution and smoke from forest fires, Geophys. Res. Lett., 38, L21804, doi:10

  10. Redshift measurement of the BL-Lac gamma-ray blazar PKS 1424+240

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rovero, A C; Pichel, A; Muriel, H

    2015-01-01

    PKS 1424+240 is a BL-Lac blazar with unknown redshift detected at high-energy gamma rays by Fermi-LAT with a hard spectrum. It was first detected at very-high-energy by VERITAS and latter confirmed by MAGIC. Attempts to find limits on its redshift include three estimations by modeling gamma-ray observations, and one obtained by analyzing Lyb and Lyg absorption lines observed in the far-UV spectra (from HST/COS) caused by absorbing gas along the line of sight. They allowed to constrain the redshift range to 0:6measurements with the Gemini North telescope of galaxies in its field of view...

  11. Global observations and spectral characteristics of desert dust and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graaf, Martin de

    characteristics of desert dust and biomass burning scenes · Conclusions and Outlook #12;where Rayleigh R340 Doubling-Adding KNMI Radiative Transfer Model Solar zenith angle = 30° Viewing zenith angle = 0° Surface Model Solar zenith angle = 30° Viewing zenith angle = 0° Surface albedo = 5% Absorbing aerosols

  12. Global observations of desert dust and biomass burning aerosols

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graaf, Martin de

    and desert dust observations from GOME and SCIAMACHY · Conclusions and Outlook #12; · Absorbing Aerosol Transfer Model Solar zenith angle = 30° Viewing zenith angle = 0° Surface albedo = 5% #12;Reflectance at TOA with absorbing aerosols Doubling-Adding KNMI Radiative Transfer Model Solar zenith angle = 30

  13. Desert Island Contribution --ASE Journal Software Engineering --A Human Activity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischer, Gerhard

    Desert Island Contribution -- ASE Journal Software Engineering -- A Human Activity Gerhard Fischer of software engineering? Without a doubt, different people will have very different answers to this question their ideas and visions. Software engineering (especially its upstream activities) is a human-oriented field

  14. Dramatic Demand Reduction In The Desert Southwest

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boehm, Robert; Hsieh, Sean; Lee, Joon; Baghzouz, Yahia; Cross, Andrew; Chatterjee, Sarah

    2015-07-06

    This report summarizes a project that was funded to the University of Nevada Las Vegas (UNLV), with subcontractors Pulte Homes and NV Energy. The project was motivated by the fact that locations in the Desert Southwest portion of the US demonstrate very high peak electrical demands, typically in the late afternoons in the summer. These high demands often require high priced power to supply the needs, and the large loads can cause grid supply problems. An approach was proposed through this contact that would reduce the peak electrical demands to an anticipated 65% of what code-built houses of the similar size would have. It was proposed to achieve energy reduction through four approaches applied to a development of 185 homes in northwest part of Las Vegas named Villa Trieste. First, the homes would all be highly energy efficient. Secondly, each house would have a PV array installed on it. Third, an advanced demand response technique would be developed to allow the resident to have some control over the energy used. Finally, some type of battery storage would be used in the project. Pulte Homes designed the houses. The company considered initial cost vs. long-term savings and chose options that had relatively short paybacks. HERS (Home Energy Rating Service) ratings for the homes are approximately 43 on this scale. On this scale, code-built homes rate at 100, zero energy homes rate a 0, and Energy Star homes are 85. In addition a 1.764 Wp (peak Watt) rated PV array was used on each house. This was made up of solar shakes that were in visual harmony with the roofing material used. A demand response tool was developed to control the amount of electricity used during times of peak demand. While demand response techniques have been used in the utility industry for some time, this particular approach is designed to allow the customer to decide the degree of participation in the response activity. The temperature change in the residence can be decided by the residents by adjusting settings. In a sense the customer can choose between greater comfort and greater money savings during demand response circumstances. Finally a battery application was to be considered. Initially it was thought that a large battery (probably a sodium-sulfur type) would be installed. However, after the contract was awarded, it was determined that a single, centrally-located battery system would not be appropriate for many reasons, including that with the build out plan there would not be any location to put it. The price had risen substantially since the budget for the project was put together. Also, that type of battery has to be kept hot all the time, but its use was only sought for summer operation. Hence, individual house batteries would be used, and these are discussed at the end of this report. Many aspects of the energy use for climate control in selected houses were monitored before residents moved in. This was done both to understand the magnitude of the energy flows but also to have data that could be compared to the computer simulations. The latter would be used to evaluate various aspects of our plan. It was found that good agreement existed between actual energy use and computed energy use. Hence, various studies were performed via simulations. Performance simulations showed the impact on peak energy usage between a code built house of same size and shape compared to the Villa Trieste homes with and without the PV arrays on the latter. Computations were also used to understand the effect of varying orientations of the houses in this typical housing development, including the effect of PV electrical generation. Energy conservation features of the Villa Trieste homes decreased the energy use during peak times (as well as all others), but the resulting decreased peak occurred at about the same time as the code-built houses. Consideration of the PV generation decreases the grid energy use further during daylight hours, but did not extend long enough many days to decrease the peak. Hence, a demand response approach, as planned, was needed. With p

  15. A BIBLIOMETRIC ANALYSIS OF CLIMATE ENGINEERING RESEARCH Christopher W. Belter (Chris.Belter@noaa.gov), NOAA Central Library, LAC Group, Silver Spring, MD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .Belter@noaa.gov), NOAA Central Library, LAC Group, Silver Spring, MD Dian J. Seidel, NOAA Air Resources Laboratory the publication trends, geo- graphic distribution, intellectual structure, and col- laborative network

  16. Radio-loud Active Galaxies in the Northern ROSAT All-Sky Survey III: New Spectroscopic Identifications from the RGB BL Lac Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. A. Laurent-Muehleisen; R. I. Kollgaard; R. B. Ciardullo; E. D. Feigelson; W. Brinkmann; J. Siebert

    1997-11-22

    We present new spectroscopic identifications for 169 objects in the RASS-Green Bank (RGB) catalog of radio- and X-ray-emitting AGN. These data significantly increase the fraction of bright RGB objects with classifications. Specifically, we report and discuss the classification of 66 radio-loud quasars, 53 BL Lacs, 33 Broad Line Radio Galaxies, 5 Narrow Line Radio Galaxies, 1 Seyfert I galaxy and 11 galaxies or galaxies in clusters. Over 78% of the identifications we present here are new. The observations we report were undertaken as part of our targeted search program to identify a new, large unbiased sample of BL Lac Objects and we therefore discuss the BL Lac sample extensively. Unlike many previous surveys, we impose no selection criteria based on optical morphology, color or broadband spectral energy distribution. Our classifications are based solely on a carefully defined set of self-consistent spectroscopic classification criteria. We show the 53 RGB presented here exhibit transitional properties between normal galaxies and BL Lacs discovered previously. We show there is no clear separation in CaII break strength between RGB BL Lacs and galaxies, with the distribution of break strengths varying smoothly between 0% and 50%. We also show that the newly discovered RGB BL Lacs reside in a "zone of avoidance" in the log(S_x/S_r) vs. log(S_o/S_r) diagram. This has important implications for BL Lac search strategies since it shows that RASS BL Lac samples will be severely incomplete if candidates are chosen only from among those objects with the highest S_x/S_r flux ratios.

  17. Desert Sunlight Solar Power Plant | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (UtilityInstruments IncMississippi:DeltaFishDesert Queen Geothermal

  18. Desert View Highlands, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (UtilityInstruments IncMississippi:DeltaFishDesert Queen

  19. THE 2001-2003 LOW STATE OF NOVA LACERTAE 1950 (DK LAC)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Honeycutt, R. K.; Jacobson, H.; Hoffman, D.; Maxwell, T.; Croxall, K.; Kafka, S.; Henden, A. A.; Robertson, J. W. E-mail: jacob189@msu.edu E-mail: tmaxwell@astro.indiana.edu E-mail: skafka@dtm.ciw.edu E-mail: Jeff.Robertson@atu.edu

    2011-04-15

    We report on extensive photometry of DK Lac obtained during the interval 1990-2009, which includes a 2 mag low state during 2001-2003. Much of the photometry consists of exposures obtained with a typical spacing of several days, but also includes 26 sequences of continuous photometry each lasting 2-7 hr. We find no evidence for periodicities in our data. We do find that the random variations in the low state are approximately twice those in the high state, when expressed in magnitudes. The lack of orbital-timescale variations is attributed to the nearly face-on presentation of the disk. There is a 0.2 mag decline in the high-state brightness of the system over 19 years, which is consistent with the behavior of other old novae in the decades following outburst. High-state spectra are also presented and discussed. We find that the equivalent width of H{alpha} falls by about double from 1991 to 2008. The photometric properties are discussed in the context of the hibernation scenario for the behavior of novae between outbursts, in which we conclude that low states in old novae are probably unrelated to their possible entrance into hibernation.

  20. Spectroscopic monitoring of the BL Lac object AO 0235+164

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raiteri, C M; Capetti, A; Heidt, J; Arnaboldi, M; Magazzu`, A; 10.1051/0004-6361:20066599

    2009-01-01

    We performed optical spectroscopic monitoring of the BL Lac object AO 0235+164 (z=0.94) with the VLT and TNG telescopes from Aug. 2003 to Dec. 2004, during an extended WEBT campaign. The flux of this source is both contaminated and absorbed by a foreground galactic system at z=0.524, the stars of which can act as gravitational micro-lenses. In this period the object was in an optically faint, though variable state, and a broad Mg II emission line was visible at all epochs. The spectroscopic analysis reveals an overall variation in the Mg II line flux of a factor 1.9, while the corresponding continuum flux density changed by a factor 4.3. Most likely, the photoionising radiation can be identified with the emission component that was earlier recognised to be present as a UV-soft-X-ray bump in the source SED and that is visible in the optical domain only in very faint optical states. We estimate an upper limit to the BLR size of a few light months from the historical minimum brightness level; from this we infer ...

  1. Discovery of VHE gamma-rays from the BL Lac object PKS 0548-322

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akhperjanian, A G; de Almeida, U Barres; Bazer-Bachi, A R; Becherini, Y; Behera, B; Benbow, W; Bernlöhr, K; Bochow, A; Boisson, C; Bolmont, J; Borrel, V; Brucker, J; Brun, F; Brun, P; Bühler, R; Bulik, T; Büsching, I; Boutelier, T; Chadwick, P M; Charbonnier, A; Chaves, R C G; Cheesebrough, A; Chounet, L -M; Clapson, A C; Coignet, G; Dalton, M; Daniel, M K; Davids, I D; Degrange, B; Deil, C; Dickinson, H J; Djannati-Ataï, A; Domainko, W; Drury, L O'C; Dubois, F; Dubus, G; Dyks, J; Dyrda, M; Egberts, K; Emmanoulopoulos, D; Espigat, P; Farnier, C; Feinstein, F; Fiasson, A; Förster, A; Fontaine, G; Füssling, M; Gabici, S; Gallant, Y A; Gérard, L; Gerbig, D; Giebels, B; Glicenstein, J F; Glück, B; Goret, P; Göring, D; Hauser, D; Hauser, M; Heinz, S; Heinzelmann, G; Henri, G; Hermann, G; Hinton, J A; Hoffmann, A; Hofmann, W; Holleran, M; Hoppe, S; Horns, D; Jacholkowska, A; deJager, O C; Jahn, C; Jung, I; Katarzy?ski, K; Katz, U; Kaufmann, S; Kendziorra, E; Kerschhagg, M; Khangulyan, D; Khélifi, B; Keogh, D; Klu?niak, W; Kneiske, T; Komin, Nu; Kosack, K; Lamanna, G; Lenain, J -P; Lohse, T; Marandon, V; Martin, J M; Martineau-Huynh, O; Marcowith, A; Masbou, J; Maurin, D; McComb, T J L; Medina, M C; Moderski, R; Moulin, E; Naumann-Godo, M; deNaurois, M; Nedbal, D; Nekrassov, D; Nicholas, B; Niemiec, J; Nolan, S J; Ohm, S; Olive, J-F; Wilhelm, E de Oña; Orford, K J; Ostrowski, M; Panter, M; Arribas, M Paz; Pedaletti, G; Pelletier, G; Petrucci, P -O; Pita, S; Pühlhofer, G; Punch, M; Quirrenbach, A; Raubenheimer, B C; Raue, M; Rayner, S M; Renaud, M; Rieger, F; Ripken, J; Rob, L; Rosier-Lees, S; Rowell, G; Rudak, B; Rulten, C B; Ruppel, J; Sahakian, V; Santangelo, A; Schlickeiser, R; Schöck, F M; Schröder, R; Schwanke, U; Schwarzburg, S; Schwemmer, S; Shalchi, A; Sikora, M; Skilton, J L; Sol, H; Spangler, D; Stawarz, L; Steenkamp, R; Stegmann, C; Stinzing, F; Superina, G; Szostek, A; Tam, P H; Tavernet, J -P; Terrier, R; Tibolla, O; Tluczykont, M; vanEldik, C; Vasileiadis, G; Venter, C; Venter, L; Vialle, J P; Vincent, P; Vivier, M; Völk, H J; Volp, F; Wagner, S J; Ward, M; Zdziarski, A A; Zech, A

    2010-01-01

    PKS 0548-322 (z=0.069) is a ``high-frequency-peaked'' BL Lac object and a candidate very high energy (VHE, E>100 GeV) gamma-ray emitter, due to its high X-ray and radio flux. Observations at the VHE band provide insights into the origin of very energetic particles present in this source and the radiation processes at work. We report observations made between October 2004 and January 2008 with the H.E.S.S. array, a four imaging atmospheric-Cherenkov telescopes. Contemporaneous UV and X-ray observations with the Swift satellite in November 2006 are also reported. PKS 0548-322 is detected for the first time in the VHE band with H.E.S.S. We measure an excess of 216 gamma-rays corresponding to a significance of 5.6 standard deviations. The photon spectrum of the source is described by a power-law, with a photon index of Gamma=2.86 +/- 0.34 (stat) +/- 0.10 (sys). The integral flux above 200 GeV is 1.3 % of the flux of the Crab Nebula, and is consistent with being constant in time. Contemporaneous Swift/XRT observat...

  2. Discovery of VHE gamma-rays from the distant BL Lac 1ES 0347-121

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aharonian, F; Barres de Almeida, U; Bazer-Bachi, A R; Behera, B; Beilicke, M; Benbow, W; Bernlöhr, K; Boisson, C; Bolz, O; Borrel, V; Braun, I; Brion, E; Brown, A M; Buhler, R; Bulik, T; Büsching, I; Boutelier, T; Carrigan, S; Chadwick, P M; Chounet, L M; Clapson, A C; Coignet, G; Cornils, R; Costamante, L; Dalton, M; Degrange, B; Dickinson, H J; Djannati-Ata:, A; Domainko, W; O'Connor-Drury, L; Dubois, F; Dubus, G; Dyks, J; Egberts, K; Emmanoulopoulos, D; Espigat, P; Farnier, C; Feinstein, F; Fiasson, A; Förster, A; Fontaine, G; Funk, Seb; Fuling, M; Gallant, Y A; Giebels, B; Glicenstein, J F; Glück, B; Goret, P; Hadjichristidis, C; Hauser, D; Hauser, M; Heinzelmann, G; Henri, G; Hermann, G; Hinton, J A; Hoffmann, A; Hofmann, W; Holleran, M; Hoppe, S; Horns, D; Jacholkowska, A; De Jager, O C; Jung, I; Katarzynski, K; Kendziorra, E; Kerschhaggl, M; Khelifi, B; Keogh, D; Komin, Nu; Kosack, K; Lamanna, G; Latham, I J; Lemiere, A; Lemoine-Goumard, M; Lenain, J P; Lohse, T; Martin, J M; Martineau-Huynh, O; Marcowith, A; Masterson, C; Maurin, D; Maurin, G; McComb, T J L; Moderski, R; Moulin, E; De Naurois, Mathieu; Nedbal, D; Nolan, S J; Ohm, S; Olive, J P; De Ona Wilhelmi, E; Orford, K J; Osborne, J L; Ostrowski, M; Panter, M; Pedaletti, G; Pelletier, G; Petrucci, P O; Pita, S; Pühlhofer, G; Punch, M; Ranchon, S; Raubenheimer, B C; Raue, M; Rayner, S M; Renaud, M; Ripken, J; Rob, L; Rolland, L; Rosier-Lees, S; Rowell, G; Rudak, B; Ruppel, J; Sahakian, V V; Santangelo, A; Schlickeiser, R; Schock, F; Schroder, R; Schwanke, U; Schwarzburg, S; Schwemmer, S; Shalchi, A; Sol, H; Spangler, D; Stawarz,; Steenkamp, R; Stegmann, C; Superina, G; Tam, P H; Tavernet, J P; Terrier, R; Van Eldik, C; Vasileiadis, G; Venter, C; Vialle, J P; Vincent, P; Vivier, M; Völk, H J; Volpe, F; Wagner, S J; Ward, M; Zdziarski, A A; Zech, A

    2007-01-01

    Aims: Our aim is to study the production mechanism for very-high-energy (VHE; >100GeV) gamma-rays in distant active galactic nuclei (AGN) and use the observed VHE spectrum to derive limits on the Extragalactic Background Light (EBL). We also want to determine physical quantities through the modeling of the object's broad-band spectral energy distribution (SED). Methods: VHE observations (~25h live time) of the BL Lac 1ES 0347-121 (redshift z=0.188) were conducted with the High Energy Stereoscopic System (H.E.S.S.) between August and December 2006. Contemporaneous X-ray and UV/optical observations from the SWIFT satellite are used to interpret the SED of the source in terms of a synchrotron self Compton (SSC) model. Results: An excess of 327 events, corresponding to a statistical significance of 10.1 standard deviations, is detected from 1ES 0347-121. Its photon spectrum, ranging from ~250GeV to ~3TeV, is well described by a power law with a photon index of Gamma = 3.10 +/- 0.23_stat +/- 0.10_sys. The integral...

  3. Thermal Performance of Building Envelope in Very Hot Dry Desert Region in Egypt (Toshky) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khalil, M. H.; Sheble, S. S.; Helal, M. A.; El-Demirdash, M.

    2010-01-01

    of Building Envelope in Very Hot Dry Desert Region in Egypt (Toshky Region) S.S. Sheble* M. H. Khalil M. A. Helal Prof. M. El- Demirdash3 Asso. Prof. Building Physics Institute (HBRC) Asso. Prof. Building Physics Institute (HBRC) Prof. & head... of Building Physics Institute (HBRC) Prof. & Chairman of HBRC Housing & Building National Research Center (HBRC) Cairo, Egypt * Author ABSTRACT Toshky region is a desert region located in the south east of Egyptian western desert...

  4. Fire Impacts on the Mojave Desert Ecosystem: Literature Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fenstermaker Lynn

    2012-01-01

    The Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) is located within the Mojave Desert, which is the driest region in North America. Precipitation on the NNSS varies from an annual average of 130 millimeters (mm; 5.1 inches) with a minimum of 47 mm (1.9 inches) and maximum of 328 mm (12.9 inches) over the past 15 year period to an annual average of 205 mm (8.1 inches) with an annual minimum of 89 mm (3.5 inches) and maximum of 391 mm (15.4 inches) for the same time period; for a Frenchman Flat location at 970 meters (m; 3182 feet) and a Pahute Mesa location at 1986 m (6516 feet), respectively. The combination of aridity and temperature extremes has resulted in sparsely vegetated basins (desert shrub plant communities) to moderately vegetated mountains (mixed coniferous forest plant communities); both plant density and precipitation increase with increasing elevation. Whereas some plant communities have evolved under fire regimes and are dependent upon fire for seed germination, plant communities within the Mojave Desert are not dependent on a fire regime and therefore are highly impacted by fire (Brown and Minnich, 1986; Brooks, 1999). As noted by Johansen (2003) natural range fires are not prevalent in the Mojave and Sonoran Deserts because there is not enough vegetation present (too many shrub interspaces) to sustain a fire. Fire research and hence publications addressing fires in the Southwestern United States (U.S.) have therefore focused on forest, shrub-steppe and grassland fires caused by both natural and anthropogenic ignition sources. In the last few decades, however, invasion of mid-elevation shrublands by non-native Bromus madritensis ssp. rubens and Bromus tectorum (Hunter, 1991) have been highly correlated with increased fire frequency (Brooks and Berry, 2006; Brooks and Matchett, 2006). Coupled with the impact of climate change, which has already been shown to be playing a role in increased forest fires (Westerling et al., 2006), it is likely that the fire frequency will further increase in the Mojave Desert (Knapp 1998; Smith et al., 1987; Smith et al., 2000).

  5. Understanding the 30-year Barbados desert dust record Natalie M. Mahowald,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mahowald, Natalie

    (such as new sources due to desertification or land use) may be difficult to distinguish from: Aerosols (0305); KEYWORDS: mineral aerosols, desert dust, North Africa, desertification Citation: Mahowald

  6. Ecological controls on water-cycle response to climate variability in deserts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scanlon, Bridget R.

    sites for waste disposal (4). For example, the proposed U.S. repository to isolate highly radioactive are critical for water resources and waste disposal in deserts. Desert environments are particularly vulnerable in response to elevated winter precipitation reduced soil water storage to half of that in a nonvegetated

  7. Deserts are water-controlled ecosystems characterized by high ambient temperature (Ta), intense solar radiation,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Jos. B.

    , it can be argued that rates of energy flow through desert ecosystems are controlled by available water dominated by, the availability of water in desert ecosystems. Animals that occupy arid climes face the challenge of meeting their daily energy and water requirements in an environment that, on average, provides

  8. Microbial Origin of Desert Varnish Abstract. Scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray analyse,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dorn, Ron

    Reports Microbial Origin of Desert Varnish Abstract. Scanning electron microscopy and energy bacteria support a microbial originfor manganese-) films. Varnish microbes can be cultured and produce environments appear to be a product of microbial activity. Desert varnish is a natural coating dominatedby

  9. REGULAR ARTICLE Impact of biological soil crusts and desert plants on soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neher, Deborah A.

    REGULAR ARTICLE Impact of biological soil crusts and desert plants on soil microfaunal community plants and biological soil crusts on desert soil nematode and protozoan abundance and community composition. In the first experiment, biological soil crusts were removed by physical trampling. Treatments

  10. Neoproterozoic tectonothermal evolution of the Central Eastern Desert, Egypt: a slow velocity tectonic process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fritz, Harald

    Neoproterozoic tectonothermal evolution of the Central Eastern Desert, Egypt: a slow velocity, University of Assiut, Egypt Received 10 January 2001; received in revised form 24 October 2001; accepted 25 in the Central Eastern Desert of Egypt is constraint by 40 Ar/39 Ar ages of hornblende and muscovite from Meatiq

  11. Desert Shores, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (UtilityInstruments IncMississippi:DeltaFishDesert Queen Geothermal AreaShores,

  12. Desert Hills, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButtePower VenturesInformation9) WindGridDeepiSolar and Wind JumpEnergy|Desert

  13. LPO5-002-Proj-Poster-PV-DesertSunlight

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergyInterested Parties - WAPA PublicLED ADOPTION REPORT LED8-14 LMBLUE MOUNTAINTo boostDESERT

  14. Nitrate dynamics in the soil and unconfined aquifer in arid groundwater coupled ecosystems of the Monte desert, Argentina

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nacional de San Luis, Universidad

    of the Monte desert, Argentina J. N. Aranibar,1,2 P. E. Villagra,1,3 M. L. Gomez,1 E. Jobbágy,4 M. Quiroga,1 R desert, Argentina, J. Geophys. Res., 116, G04015, doi:10.1029/2010JG001618. 1. Introduction [2] Drylands desert, Argentina, shallow groundwater is exploited by deep rooted trees, increasing primary productivity

  15. Andean uplift and climate evolution in the southern Atacama Desert deduced from geomorphology and supergene alunite-group minerals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reiners, Peter W.

    Andean uplift and climate evolution in the southern Atacama Desert deduced from geomorphology 2010 Available online 18 October 2010 Editor: T.M. Harrison Keywords: Atacama Desert Andes uplift Atacama Desert had been uplifted as early as the late Eocene and, thus, significantly prior

  16. Multiple Co-Evolutionary Networks Are Supported by the Common Tertiary Scaffold of the LacI/GalR Proteins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parente, Daniel J.; Swint-Kruse, Liskin

    2013-12-31

    ]. Here, we used the 6 largest subfamilies – CcpA, GalRS, GntR, PurR, RbsR-A, and TreR – (Table 1 and Figure 2a) to compare and contrast the amino acid positions on the common tertiary structure that are under evolutionary constraint. (E. coli PLOS ONE... of the LacI/GalR family. For PurR and CcpA, endogenous effector binding enhances DNA binding (Table 1). Further, CcpA is primarily allosterically regulated by a protein-protein interaction with HPr-Ser46-P, with only a secondary, ‘fine-tuning’ role for small...

  17. When dunes move together, structure of deserts emerges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Génois, Mathieu; Pont, Sylvain Courrech du; Grégoire, Guillaume

    2012-01-01

    Crescent shaped barchan dunes are highly mobile dunes that are usually presented as a prototypical model of sand dunes. Although they have been theoretically shown to be unstable when considered separately, it is well known that they form large assemblies in desert. Collisions of dunes have been proposed as a mechanism to redistribute sand between dunes and prevent the formation of heavily large dunes, resulting in a stabilizing effect in the context of a dense barchan field. Yet, no models are able to explain the spatial structures of dunes observed in deserts. Here, we use an agent-based model with elementary rules of sand redistribution during collisions to access the full dynamics of very large barchan dune fields. Consequently, stationnary, out of equilibrium states emerge. Trigging the dune field density by a sand load/lost ratio, we show that large dune fields exhibit two assymtotic regimes: a dilute regime, where sand dune nucleation is needed to maintain a dune field, and a dense regime, where dune c...

  18. Connection between inner jet kinematics and broadband flux variability in the BL Lac object S5 0716+714

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rani, B; Marscher, A P; Hodgson, J A; Fuhrmann, L; Angelakis, E; Britzen, S; Zensus, J A

    2015-01-01

    We present a high-frequency very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) kinematical study of the BL Lac object S5 0716+714 over the time period of September 2008 to October 2010. The aim of the study is to investigate the relation of the jet kinematics to the observed broadband flux variability. We find significant non-radial motions in the jet outflow of the source. In the radial direction, the highest measured apparent speed is \\sim37 c, which is exceptionally high, especially for a BL Lac object. Patterns in the jet flow reveal a roughly stationary feature \\sim0.15 mas downstream of the core. The long-term fits to the component trajectories reveal acceleration in the sub-mas region of the jet. The measured brightness temperature, T_{B}, follows a continuous trend of decline with distance, T_B \\propto r_{jet}^{-(2.36\\pm0.41)}, which suggests a gradient in Doppler factor along the jet axis. Our analysis suggest that a moving disturbance (or a shock wave) from the base of the jet produces the high-energy (optica...

  19. CO2 EFFECTS ON MOJAVE DESERT PLANT INTERACTIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L. A. DEFALCO; G. C. FERNANDEZ; S. D. SMITH; R. S. NOWAK

    2004-01-01

    Seasonal and interannual droughts characteristic of deserts have the potential to modify plant interactions as atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations continue to rise. At the Nevada Desert FACE (free-air CO{sub 2} enrichment) facility in the northern Mojave Desert, the effects of elevated atmospheric C02 (550 vs. ambient {approx}360 {micro}mol mol{sup -1}) on plant interactions were examined during two years of high and low rainfall. Results suggest that CO{sub 2} effects on the interaction between native species and their understory herbs are dependent on the strength of competition when rainfall is plentiful, but are unimportant during annual drought. Seasonal rainfall for 1999 was 23% the long-term average for the area, and neither elevated CO{sub 2} nor the low production of herbaceous neighbors had an effect on relative growth rate (RGR, d{sup -1}) and reproductive effort (RE, number of flowers g{sup -1}) for Achnatherum hymenoides (early season perennial C{sub 3} grass), Pleuraphis rigida (late season perennial C{sub 4} grass), and Larrea tridentata (evergreen C{sub 3} shrub). In contrast, 1998 received 213% the average rainfall. Consequently, the decrease in RGR and increase in RE for Achnatherum, whose period of growth overlaps directly with that of its neighbors, was exaggerated at elevated CO{sub 2}. However, competitive effects of neighbors on Eriogonum trichopes (a winter annual growing in shrub interspaces), Pleuraphis and Larrea were not affected by elevated CO{sub 2}, and possible explanations are discussed. Contrary to expectations, the invasive annual neighbor Bromus madritensis ssp. rubens had little influence on target plant responses because densities in 1998 and 1999 at this site were well below those found in other studies where it has negatively affected perennial plant growth. The extent that elevated CO{sub 2} reduces the performance of Achnatherum in successive years to cause its loss from the plant community depends more on future pressure from herbaceous neighbors and less on the extent that CO{sub 2} enhances Achnatherum growth during periods of severe drought.

  20. Biotic Processes Regulating the Carbon Balance of Desert Ecosystems - Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nowak, Robert S; Smith, Stanley D; Evans, Dave; Ogle, Kiona; Fenstermaker, Lynn

    2012-12-13

    Our results from the 10-year elevated atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration study at the Nevada Desert FACE (Free-air CO{sub 2} Enrichment) Facility (NDFF) indicate that the Mojave Desert is a dynamic ecosystem with the capacity to respond quickly to environmental changes. The Mojave Desert ecosystem is accumulating carbon (C), and over the 10-year experiment, C accumulation was significantly greater under elevated [CO{sub 2}] than under ambient, despite great fluctuations in C inputs from year to year and even apparent reversals in which [CO{sub 2}] treatment had greater C accumulations.

  1. ROSAT/ASCA Observations of a Serendipitous BL Lac Object PKS 2316-423: The Variable High-Energy Tail of Synchrotron Radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sui-Jian Xue; You-Hong Zhang; Jian-Sheng Chen

    2000-05-22

    We present the analysis of archival data from ROSAT and ASCA of a serendipitous BL Lac object PKS 2316-423. Because of its featureless non-thermal radio/optical continuum, PKS 2316-423 has been called as a BL Lac candidate in the literature. PKS 2316-423 was evidently variable over the multiple X-ray observations, in particular, a variable high-energy tail of the synchrotron radiation is revealed. The X-ray spectral analysis provides further evidence of the synchrotron nature of its broad-band spectrum: a steep and downward curving spectrum between 0.1--10 keV, typical of high-energy peaked BL Lacs (HBL). The spectral energy distribution (SED) through radio-to-X-ray yields the synchrotron radiation peak at frequency Vp=7.3 10^{15} Hz, with integrated luminosity of Lsyn=2.1 10^{44} ergs s^{-1}. The averaged SED properties of PKS 2316-423 are very similar to those ``intermediate'' BL Lac objects (IBL) found recently in several deep surveys, such as Deep X-ray Radio Blazar, Radio-Emitting X-ray, and ROSAT-Green Bank surveys. We suggest that PKS 2316-423 is an IBL though it also shows some general features of a HBL. Actually, this double attribute of PKS 2316-423 provides a good test of the prediction that an IBL object can show either synchrotron or inverse-Compton characteristics in different variability states.

  2. Discovery and geology of the Desert Peak geothermal field: a case history. Bulletin 97

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benoit, W.R.; Hiner, J.E.; Forest, R.T.

    1982-09-01

    A case history of the exploration, development (through 1980), and geology of the Desert Peak geothermal field is presented. Sections on geochemistry, geophysics, and temperature-gradient drilling are included.

  3. From Industrial Garden to Food Desert: Unearthing the Root Structure of Urban Agriculture in Oakland, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McClintock, Nathan

    2008-01-01

    A Theory of Agro-Industrial Development. New York: BasilSERIES 2007-2008.32 From Industrial Garden to Food Desert:I demonstrate how flows of industrial capital and racialized

  4. Food deserts and access to fresh food in low-income San Diego

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Puhl, Emily Theresa

    2011-01-01

    R. Kaufman (2003) “Exploring Food Purchase Behavior of Low-Do the Poor Still Pay More? Food Price Variations in Largeand Pavan Yadav. 2008. “Beyond Food Deserts: Measuring and

  5. Ecohydrological Analysis of the Transport of Nitrate and Ammonium in Sandy Desert Soils in Southern California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scanlan, Julie Marie

    2012-01-01

    of nitrate beneath desert soils. Science 302:1021-1024. DOI:deposition on vegetation and soils in Joshua Tree NationalAndraski B.J. (1997) Soil-water movement under natural-site

  6. Observed 20th century desert dust variability: impact on climate and biogeochemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the 30-year Barbados desert dust record, J.tration data observed at Barbados (Prospero and Lamb, 2003)on the shorter in situ Barbados concentration data (1968 to

  7. MRF Technical Note # 49 Can desert dust explain the anomalous greenhouse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allan, Richard P.

    MRF Technical Note # 49 Can desert dust explain the anomalous greenhouse effect observed over greenhouse effect observed over the Sahara during July 2003 revealed by GERB/UM intercomparisons? Jim M

  8. VP of Transmission System Asset Management for Desert Southwest Region (Maintenance Manager)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    (See Frequently Asked Questions for more information). Where would I be working? Western Area Power Administration Desert Southwest Region Maintenance (G5000) 615 S. 43rd Avenue Phoenix, AZ 85009...

  9. Sites with Holocene dung deposits in the Eastern Desert of Egypt: Visited by herders?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marinova, Elena

    Sites with Holocene dung deposits in the Eastern Desert of Egypt: Visited by herders? V. Linseele a by the Belgian Middle Egypt Prehistoric Project of Leuven University under the direction of P.M. Vermeersch

  10. Long-term insights into the influence of precipitation on community dynamics in desert rodents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, James H.

    for ecosystem dynamics. DOI: 10.1644/09-MAMM-S-142.1. Key words: consumer dynamics, desertification, desert ecosystems (Easterling et al. 2000), and desertification (Van Auken 2000). The dynamics of small mammals

  11. Observed 20th Century Desert Dust Variability: Impact on Climate and Biogeochemistry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahowald, Natalie; Kloster, Silvia; Engelstaedter, S.; Moore, Jefferson Keith; Mukhopadhyay, S.; McConnell, J. R.; Albani, S.; Doney, Scott C.; Bhattacharya, A.; Curran, M. A. J.; Flanner, Mark G.; Hoffman, Forrest M; Lawrence, David M.; Lindsay, Keith; Mayewski, P. A.; Neff, Jason; Rothenberg, D.; Thomas, E.; Thornton, Peter E; Zender, Charlie S.

    2010-01-01

    Desert dust perturbs climate by directly and indirectly interacting with incoming solar and outgoing long wave radiation, thereby changing precipitation and temperature, in addition to modifying ocean and land biogeochemistry. While we know that desert dust is sensitive to perturbations in climate and human land use, previous studies have been unable to determine whether humans were increasing or decreasing desert dust in the global average. Here we present observational estimates of desert dust based on paleodata proxies showing a doubling of desert dust during the 20th century over much, but not all the globe. Large uncertainties remain in estimates of desert dust variability over 20th century due to limited data. Using these observational estimates of desert dust change in combination with ocean, atmosphere and land models, we calculate the net radiative effect of these observed changes (top of atmosphere) over the 20th century to be -0.14 {+-} 0.11 W/m{sup 2} (1990-1999 vs. 1905-1914). The estimated radiative change due to dust is especially strong between the heavily loaded 1980-1989 and the less heavily loaded 1955-1964 time periods (-0.57 {+-} 0.46 W/m{sup 2}), which model simulations suggest may have reduced the rate of temperature increase between these time periods by 0.11 C. Model simulations also indicate strong regional shifts in precipitation and temperature from desert dust changes, causing 6 ppm (12 PgC) reduction in model carbon uptake by the terrestrial biosphere over the 20th century. Desert dust carries iron, an important micronutrient for ocean biogeochemistry that can modulate ocean carbon storage; here we show that dust deposition trends increase ocean productivity by an estimated 6% over the 20th century, drawing down an additional 4 ppm (8 PgC) of carbon dioxide into the oceans. Thus, perturbations to desert dust over the 20th century inferred from observations are potentially important for climate and biogeochemistry, and our understanding of these changes and their impacts should continue to be refined.

  12. Conservation Planning for Offsetting the Impacts of Development: A Case Study of Biodiversity and Renewable Energy in the Mojave Desert.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kreitler, J; Schloss, CA; Soong, O; Hannah, L; Davis, FW

    2015-01-01

    environmental impacts of renewable energy sources. Appliedbiological impacts. Renewable Energy. 2013; 57: 289–98. doi:of biodiversity and renewable energy in the Mojave Desert.

  13. Ground-water sapping processes, Western Desert, Egypt

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luo, W.; Arvidson, R.E.; Sultan, M.; Becker, R.; Crombie, M.K. [Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States)] [Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States); Sturchio, N. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)] [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Alfy, Z.E. [Egyptian Geological Survey and Mining Authority, Cairo (Egypt)] [Egyptian Geological Survey and Mining Authority, Cairo (Egypt)

    1997-01-01

    Depressions of the Western Desert of Egypt (specifically, Kharga, Farafra, and Kurkur regions) are mainly occupied by shales that are impermeable, but easily erodible by rainfall and runoff, whereas the surrounding plateaus are composed of limestones that are permeable and more resistant to fluvial erosion under semiarid to arid conditions. A computer simulation model was developed to quantify the ground-water sapping processes, using a cellular automata algorithm with coupled surface runoff and ground-water flow for a permeable, resistant layer over an impermeable, friable unit. Erosion, deposition, slumping, and generation of spring-derived tufas were parametrically modeled. Simulations using geologically reasonable parameters demonstrate that relatively rapid erosion of the shales by surface runoff, ground-water sapping, and slumping of the limestones, and detailed control by hydraulic conductivity inhomogeneities associated with structures explain the depressions, escarpments, and associated landforms and deposits. Using episodic wet pulses, keyed by {delta}{sup 18}O deep-sea core record, the model produced tufa ages that are statistically consistent with the observed U/Th tufa ages. This result supports the hypothesis that northeastern African wet periods occurred during interglacial maxima. This {delta}{sup 18}O-forced model also replicates the decrease in fluvial and sapping activity over the past million years. 65 refs., 21 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Photovoltaic at Hollywood and Desert Breeze Recreational Centers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ammerman, Shane

    2015-09-24

    Executive Summary Renewable Energy Initiatives for Clark County Parks and Recreation Solar Project DOE grant # DE-EE0003180 In accordance with the goals of the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy for promoting solar energy as clean, carbon-free and cost-effective, the County believed that a recreational center was an ideal place to promote solar energy technologies to the public. This project included the construction of solar electricity generation facilities (40kW) at two Clark County facility sites, Desert Breeze Recreational Center and Hollywood Recreational Center, with educational kiosks and Green Boxes for classroom instruction. The major objectives and goals of this Solar Project include demonstration of state of the art technologies for the generation of electricity from solar technology and the creation of an informative and educational tool in regards to the benefits and process of generating alternative energy. Clark County partnered with Anne Johnson (design architect/consultant), Affiliated Engineers Inc. (AEI), Desert Research Institute (DRI), and Morse Electric. The latest photovoltaic technologies were used in the project to help create the greatest expected energy savings for60443 each recreational center. This coupled with the data created from the monitoring system will help Clark County and NREL further understand the real time outputs from the system. The educational portion created with AEI and DRI incorporates material for all ages with a focus on K - 12. The AEI component is an animated story telling the fundamentals of how sunlight is turned into electricity and DRI‘s creation of Solar Green Boxes brings environmental education into the classroom. In addition to the educational component for the public, the energy that is created through the photovoltaic system also translates into saved money and health benefits for the general public. This project has helped Clark County to further add to its own energy reduction goals created by the energy management agenda (Resolution to Encourage Sustainability) and the County’s Eco-initiative. Each site has installed photovoltaic panels on the existing roof structures that exhibit suitable solar exposure. The generation systems utilize solar energy creating electricity used for the facility’s lighting system and other electrical requirements. Unused electricity is sent to the electric utility grid, often at peak demand times. Educational signage, kiosks and information have been included to inform and expand the public’s understanding of solar energy technology. The Solar Green Boxes were created for further hands on classroom education of solar power. In addition, data is sent by a Long Term PV performance monitoring system, complete with data transmission to NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory), located in Golden, CO. This system correlates local solar irradiance and weather with power production. The expected outcomes of this Solar Project are as follows: (1) Successful photovoltaic electricity generation technologies to capture solar energy in a useful form of electrical energy. (2) Reduction of greenhouse gas emissions and environmental degradation resulting from reduced energy demand from traditional electricity sources such as fossil fuel fired and nuclear power plants. (3) Advance the research and development of solar electricity generation. (4) The education of the general public in regards to the benefits of environmentally friendly electricity generation and Clark County’s efforts to encourage sustainable living practices. (5) To provide momentum for the nexus for future solar generation facilities in Clark County facilities and buildings and further the County’s energy reduction goals. (6) To ultimately contribute to the reduction of dependence on foreign oil and other unsustainable sources of energy. This Solar Project addresses several objectives and goals of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Solar Energy Technology Program. The project improves the integration and performance of sola

  15. SYSTEMATICS AND EVOLUTION IN THE TRIBE SCHIZOPETALAE (BRASSICACEAE): A MOLECULAR, MORPHOLOGICAL, AND ECOLOGICAL ANALYSIS OF THE DIVERSIFICATION OF AN ENDEMIC LINEAGE FROM THE ATACAMA DESERT (CHILE)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toro Nunez, Oscar Fernando

    2013-12-31

    As aridity has been identified as an active promoter of diversification in deserts, attempts to test organismal differentiation in the Atacama Desert have resulted particularly challenging. Most limitations are related to ...

  16. Anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility versus lattice-and shape-preferred orientation in the Lac Tio hemo-ilmenite ore body

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bascou, Jérôme

    Tio hemo-ilmenite ore body (Grenville province, Quebec) Olivier Bolle a, ,1 , Bernard Charlier a, N-7491 Trondheim, Norway a b s t r a c ta r t i c l e i n f o Article history: Received 31 May 2013, in the Quebec province. This magmatic ilmenite de- posit crops out in the 1.06 Ga Lac Allard anorthosite which

  17. Pre-treating Seed to Enhance Germination of Desert Shrubs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    W. K. Ostler; D. C. Anderson; D. J. Hansen

    2002-06-01

    Creosotebush [Larrea tridentata (D.C.) Cav.] and white bursage [Ambrosia dumosa (A. Gray) W.W. Payne] seeds were subjected to pre-treatments of rinsing and soaking in water and thiourea to enhance germination in laboratory experiments. The effects of darkness, temperature, seed source, and soil moisture were also evaluated in the laboratory. The best pre-treatment from the laboratory experiments, rinsing with water for 36 hours followed by drying, was field-tested at Fort Irwin, California. Two sites and two seeding dates (early March and mid April) were determined for each site. Five mulch treatments (no mulch, straw, gravel, chemical stabilizer, and plastic) were evaluated in combination with the seed pre-treatments. Field emergence was greatly enhanced with the seed pre-treatment for white bursage during the March (18-42% increase in germination) and April seedings (16-23% increase in germination). Creosotebush showed poor germination during March (2-5%) when soil temperatures averaged 15 C, but germination increased during the April trials (6-43%) when soil temperatures averaged 23 C. The seed pre-treatment during the April trials increased germination from 16-23%. The plastic mulch treatment increased germination dramatically during both the March and April trials. The plastic mulch increased soil temperatures (8-10 C)and maintained high humidity during germination. Both the chemical stabilizer and the gravel mulches improved germination over the control while the straw mulch decreased germination. These results suggest that seed pre-treatments combined with irrigation and mulch are effective techniques to establish these two dominant Mojave Desert species from seed.

  18. Species Diversity of Seed-Eating Desert Rodents in Sand Dune Habitats Author(s): James H. Brown

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, James H.

    Species Diversity of Seed-Eating Desert Rodents in Sand Dune Habitats Author(s): James H. Brown DIVERSITY OF SEED-EATING DESERT RODENTS IN SAND DUNE HABITATS' JAMES H. BROWN Department of Biology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City 84112 Abstract.The seed-eatingrodent faunas were sampled on 18 dunes

  19. Holocene freshwater carbonate structures in the hyper-arid Gebel Uweinat region of the Sahara Desert (Southwestern Egypt) q

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilli, Adrian

    Desert (Southwestern Egypt) q Margarita M. Marinova a,b , A. Nele Meckler c , Christopher P. McKay b region of the Sahara Desert, near the triple border of Egypt, Sudan, and Libya (N22°, E25°), re- ceives- ibrated years BP; Wendorf and expedition, 1977). While some parts of southwest Egypt have been extensively

  20. Phanerozoic tectonothermal history of the ArabianNubian shield in the Eastern Desert of Egypt: evidence from fission track

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fritz, Harald

    Phanerozoic tectonothermal history of the Arabian­Nubian shield in the Eastern Desert of Egypt were performed in the Eastern Desert of Egypt. The results provide insights into the processes driving reserved. Keywords: Phanerozoic; Fission track thermochronology; Palaeostress; Arabian­Nubien shield; Egypt

  1. Are both BL Lacs and pulsar wind nebulae the astrophysical counterparts of IceCube neutrino events?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Padovani; E. Resconi

    2014-06-10

    IceCube has recently reported the discovery of high-energy neutrinos of astrophysical origin, opening up the PeV (10^15 eV) sky. Because of their large positional uncertainties, these events have not yet been associated to any astrophysical source. We have found plausible astronomical counterparts in the GeV -- TeV bands by looking for sources in the available large area high-energy gamma-ray catalogues within the error circles of the IceCube events. We then built the spectral energy distribution of these sources and compared it with the energy and flux of the corresponding neutrino. Likely counterparts include mostly BL Lacs and two Galactic pulsar wind nebulae. On the one hand many objects, including the starburst galaxy NGC 253 and Centaurus A, despite being spatially coincident with neutrino events, are too weak to be reconciled with the neutrino flux. On the other hand, various GeV powerful objects cannot be assessed as possible counterparts due to their lack of TeV data. The definitive association between high-energy astrophysical neutrinos and our candidates will be significantly helped by new TeV observations but will be confirmed or disproved only by further IceCube data. Either way, this will have momentous implications for blazar jets, high-energy astrophysics, and cosmic-ray and neutrino astronomy.

  2. Discovery of high and very high-energy emission from the BL Lac object SHBL J001355.9-185406

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    :,; Acero, F; Aharonian, F; Akhperjanian, A G; Angüner, E; Anton, G; Balenderan, S; Balzer, A; Barnacka, A; Becherini, Y; Tjus, J Becker; Bernlöhr, K; Birsin, E; Bissaldi, E; Biteau, J; Boisson, C; Bolmont, J; Bordas, P; Brucker, J; Brun, F; Brun, P; Bulik, T; Carrigan, S; Casanova, S; Cerruti, M; Chadwick, P M; Chalme-Calvet, R; Chaves, R C G; Cheesebrough, A; Chrétien, M; Colafrancesco, S; Cologna, G; Conrad, J; Couturier, C; Dalton, M; Daniel, M K; Davids, I D; Degrange, B; Deil, C; deWilt, P; Dickinson, H J; Djannati-Ataï, A; Domainko, W; Drury, L O'C; Dubus, G; Dutson, K; Dyks, J; Dyrda, M; Edwards, T; Egberts, K; Eger, P; Espigat, P; Farnier, C; Fegan, S; Feinstein, F; Fernandes, M V; Fernandez, D; Fiasson, A; Fontaine, G; Förster, A; Füßling, M; Gajdus, M; Gallant, Y A; Garrigoux, T; Gast, H; Giebels, B; Glicenstein, J F; Göring, D; Grondin, M -H; Grudzi?ska, M; Häffner, S; Hague, J D; Hahn, J; Harris, J; Heinzelmann, G; Henri, G; Hermann, G; Hervet, O; Hillert, A; Hinton, J A; Hofmann, W; Hofverberg, P; Holler, M; Horns, D; Jacholkowska, A; Jahn, C; Jamrozy, M; Janiak, M; Jankowsky, F; Jung, I; Kastendieck, M A; Katarzy?ski, K; Katz, U; Kaufmann, S; Khélifi, B; Kieffer, M; Klepser, S; Klochkov, D; Klu?niak, W; Kneiske, T; Kolitzus, D; Komin, Nu; Kosack, K; Krakau, S; Krayzel, F; Krüger, P P; Laffon, H; Lamanna, G; Lefaucheur, J; Lemoine-Goumard, M; Lenain, J -P; Lennarz, D; Lohse, T; Lopatin, A; Lu, C -C; Marandon, V; Marcowith, A; Maurin, G; Maxted, N; Mayer, M; McComb, T J L; Medina, M C; Méhault, J; Menzler, U; Meyer, M; Moderski, R; Mohamed, M; Moulin, E; Murach, T; Naumann, C L; de Naurois, M; Nedbal, D; Niemiec, J; Nolan, S J; Oakes, L; Ohm, S; Wilhelmi, E de O\; Opitz, B; Ostrowski, M; Oya, I; Panter, M; Parsons, R D; Arribas, M Paz; Pekeur, N W; Pelletier, G; Perez, J; Petrucci, P -O; Peyaud, B; Pita, S; Poon, H; Pühlhofer, G; Punch, M; Quirrenbach, A; Raab, S; Raue, M; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Renaud, M; Reyes, R de los; Rieger, F; Rob, L; Rosier-Lees, S; Rowell, G; Rudak, B; Rulten, C B; Sahakian, V; Sanchez, D A; Santangelo, A; Schlickeiser, R; Schüssler, F; Schulz, A; Schwanke, U; Schwarzburg, S; Schwemmer, S; Sol, H; Spengler, G; Spieß, F; Stawarz, {? }; Steenkamp, R; Stegmann, C; Stinzing, F; Stycz, K; Sushch, I; Szostek, A; Tavernet, J -P; Terrier, R; Tluczykont, M; Trichard, C; Valerius, K; van Eldik, C; Vasileiadis, G; Venter, C; Viana, A; Vincent, P; Völk, H J; Volpe, F; Vorster, M; Wagner, S J; Wagner, P; Ward, M; Weidinger, M; White, R; Wierzcholska, A; Willmann, P; Wörnlein, A; Wouters, D; Zacharias, M; Zajczyk, A; Zdziarski, A A; Zech, A; Zechlin, H -S

    2013-01-01

    The detection of the high-frequency peaked BL Lac object (HBL) SHBL J001355.9-185406 ($z$=0.095) at high (HE; 100 MeV$100\\,{\\rm GeV}$) with the \\fer\\ Large Area Telescope (LAT) and the High Energy Stereoscopic System (H.E.S.S.) is reported. Dedicated observations have been performed with the H.E.S.S. telescopes, leading to a detection at the $5.5\\,\\sigma$ significance level. The measured flux above 310 GeV is $(8.3 \\pm 1.7_{\\rm{stat}}\\pm 1.7_{\\rm{sys}})\\times 10^{-13}$ photons \\cms\\ (about 0.6% of that of the Crab Nebula), and the power law spectrum has a photon index of \\indexHESS. Using 3.5 years of publicly available \\fla\\ data, a faint counterpart has been detected in the LAT data at the $5.5\\,\\sigma$ significance level, with an integrated flux above 300 MeV of $(9.3 \\pm 3.4_{\\rm stat} \\pm 0.8_{\\rm sys})\\times 10^{-10}$ photons \\cms\\ and a photon index of $\\Gamma = 1.96 \\pm 0.20_{\\rm stat} \\pm 0.08_{\\rm sys}$. X-ray observations with \\textit{Swift}-XRT allow the synchrotron peak energy in $\

  3. HST/COS Observations of the Ly alpha Forest toward the BL Lac Object 1ES1553+113

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Danforth, Charles W; Stocke, John T; Shull, J Michael; Yao, Yangsen

    2010-01-01

    We present new far-ultraviolet spectra from the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (HST/COS) of the BL Lac object 1ES1553+113 covering the wavelength range 1135-1795 A. The data show a smooth continuum with a wealth of narrow absorption features arising in the ISM and IGM. These features include 41 Lya absorbers at 00.6 for the strongest component of the absorber complex. Galaxy redshift surveys show a number of massive galaxies at approximately the same redshift as this absorption complex, suggesting that it arises in a large-scale galaxy filament. As one of the brightest extragalactic X-ray and gamma-ray sources, 1ES1553+113 is of great interest to the high-energy astrophysics community. With no intrinsic emission or absorption features, 1ES1553+113 has no direct redshift determination. We use intervening Lya absorbers to place a direct limit on the redshift: z_em>0.395 based on a confirmed Lya+OVI absorber and z_em>0.433 based on a single-line detection of Lya. COS/FUV data are only sensitive to Lya absorbers at ...

  4. Variability in desert bighorn and Rambouillet sheep using restriction fragment length polymorphisms 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lyles, Ingrid Doodeheefver

    1989-01-01

    , was resuspended in Tris-EDTA, and the concentration of DNA in yg/ml was determined (Skow et al. 1988). 18 Table 1. Species identification. No. 1 2 3 4 6 7 DBHS NV/TX DBHS NV/TX DBHS NV/TX DBHS NV/TX DBHS NV/TX DBHS NV/TX Heparinized Blood.... Rambo. Calif. Rambo. Calif. Rambo. DNA extracted form DNA extracted form DNA extracted form DNA extracted form DNA extracted form UCB UCB UCB UCB UCB DBHS NV/TX: Desert Bighorn Sheep Nevada/Texas cross DBHS AZ/AZ: Desert Bighorn Sheep...

  5. EFFECTS OF ELEVATED CO2 ON ROOT FUNCTION AND SOIL RESPIRATION IN A MOJAVE DESERT ECOSYSTEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nowak, Robert S.

    2007-12-19

    Increases in atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration during the last 250 years are unequivocal, and CO{sub 2} will continue to increase at least for the next several decades (Houghton et al. 2001, Keeling & Whorf 2002). Arid ecosystems are some of the most important biomes globally on a land surface area basis, are increasing in area at an alarming pace (Dregne 1991), and have a strong coupling with regional climate (Asner & Heidebrecht 2005). These water-limited ecosystems also are predicted to be the most sensitive to elevated CO{sub 2}, in part because they are stressful environments where plant responses to elevated CO{sub 2} may be amplified (Strain & Bazzaz 1983). Indeed, all C{sub 3} species examined at the Nevada Desert FACE Facility (NDFF) have shown increased A{sub net} under elevated CO{sub 2} (Ellsworth et al. 2004, Naumburg et al. 2003, Nowak et al. 2004). Furthermore, increased shoot growth for individual species under elevated CO{sub 2} was spectacular in a very wet year (Smith et al. 2000), although the response in low to average precipitation years has been smaller (Housman et al. 2006). Increases in perennial cover and biomass at the NDFF are consistent with long term trends in the Mojave Desert and elsewhere in the Southwest, indicating C sequestration in woody biomass (Potter et al. 2006). Elevated CO{sub 2} also increases belowground net primary production (BNPP), with average increases of 70%, 21%, and 11% for forests, bogs, and grasslands, respectively (Nowak et al. 2004). Although detailed studies of elevated CO{sub 2} responses for desert root systems were virtually non-existent prior to our research, we anticipated that C sequestration may occur by desert root systems for several reasons. First, desert ecosystems exhibit increases in net photosynthesis and primary production at elevated CO{sub 2}. If large quantities of root litter enter the ecosystem at a time when most decomposers are inactive, significant quantities of carbon may be stored belowground in relatively recalcitrant forms. Indeed, a model-based analysis predicted that the arid/semiarid southwestern bioclimatic region had one of the highest rates of net carbon storage in the United States over the past century (Schimel et al. 2000). Second, root systems of desert plants are often extensive (Foxx et al. 1984, Hartle et al. 2006) with relatively large proportions of roots deep in the soil (Schenk & Jackson 2002). Thus, an understanding of belowground processes in desert ecosystems provides information on the potential for terrestrial carbon sequestration in desert ecosystems.

  6. MODELING WATER MOVEMENT BETWEEN THE GLACIAL, AGRICULTURAL OASIS AND DESERT IN THE HEIHE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the watershed respectively (Pan and Tien 2001). While glacial/snow melt in the Qilianshan Mountain contribute1 MODELING WATER MOVEMENT BETWEEN THE GLACIAL, AGRICULTURAL OASIS AND DESERT IN THE HEIHE WATERSHED inland river in arid Northwestern China, with a drainage area of 128,000 km2) for understanding glacial

  7. Stimulation at Desert Peak -modeling with the coupled THM code FEHM

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    kelkar, sharad

    Numerical modeling of the 2011 shear stimulation at the Desert Peak well 27-15. This submission contains the FEHM executable code for a 64-bit PC Windows-7 machine, and the input and output files for the results presented in the included paper from ARMA-213 meeting.

  8. Estimating the influence of the thermal environment on activity patterns of the desert

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Felisa A.

    Estimating the influence of the thermal environment on activity patterns of the desert woodrat temperature influences the ecology and life history of animals. In habitats near the thermal range boundary temperature might influence both the timing and the duration of activity. To test this idea, we attached i

  9. Can Desert Dwellers Continue To Afford Lush Lawns: Analyzing Consumer Response to Rate Changes in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fay, Noah

    Can Desert Dwellers Continue To Afford Lush Lawns: Analyzing Consumer Response to Rate Changes of price and weather on wa- ter demand is important for Arizona. If the effect of weather is not well. In part, this is because few other studies use household data, and instead use data aggregated

  10. Ion Secretion by Salt Glands of Desert Iguanas (Dipsosaurus dorsalis) Lisa C. Hazard*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hazard, Lisa C.

    22 Ion Secretion by Salt Glands of Desert Iguanas (Dipsosaurus dorsalis) Lisa C. Hazard* DepartmentCl-secreting salt glands of many birds and reptiles, the nasal salt glands of lizards can secrete potassium as well iguana, Dipsosaurus dorsalis. Lizards were given combinations of ions for several days, and secreted salt

  11. Metabolism, Swimming Performance, and Tissue Biochemistry of High Desert Redband Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss ssp.): Evidence for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keeley, Ernest R.

    413 Metabolism, Swimming Performance, and Tissue Biochemistry of High Desert Redband Trout (Ucrit) and oxygen consumption in the field at 12 and 24 C; (2) biochemical indices of energy metabolism gradient. Fur- ther, we also examined genetic and morphological character- istics of fish from these two

  12. Modelling Desert Dune Fields Based on Discrete Dynamics STEVEN R. BISHOPa,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carretero, Ricardo

    Modelling Desert Dune Fields Based on Discrete Dynamics STEVEN R. BISHOPa, *, HIROSHI MOMIJIb is developed to model the dynamics of sand dunes. The physical processes display strong non-linearity that has features we monitor morphology, dune growth, dune migration and spatial patterns within a dune field

  13. Relations between albedos and emissivities from MODIS and ASTER data over North African Desert

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Liming

    of incident solar energy reflected by the land surface in all directions. They determine the surface radiation map over the arid areas of Algeria, Libya, and Tunisia in North Africa at 30 second (about 1 km) and 2 in climate model deserts such as the Sahara. However, solar short- wave diffuse albedos vary by a factor

  14. Mineral magnetic study of the Taklimakan desert sands and its relevance to the Chinese loess

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utrecht, Universiteit

    Mineral magnetic study of the Taklimakan desert sands and its relevance to the Chinese loess M and weathered loess sections from the Chinese Loess Plateau. We found an apparent decreasing grain size trend it is located more than 2000 km west of the central Loess Plateau. Key words: Chinese loess, magnetic

  15. Expansion of the world's deserts due to vegetation-albedo feedback under global warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zeng, Ning

    -ocean-land model with a dynamic vegetation component that predicts surface albedo change, here we simulate, the model simulated an increase in the world's `warm desert' area of 2.5 million km2 or 10% at the end Coupled- Carbon-Cycle-Climate Model Intercomparison Project [Friedlingstein et al., 2006] (C4MIP) has

  16. Developmental plasticity of cutaneous water loss and lipid composition in stratum corneum of desert

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Jos. B.

    Developmental plasticity of cutaneous water loss and lipid composition in stratum corneum of desert and cerebrosides in the SC compared with mesic spar- rows. In this study, we investigated developmental plasticity modifications of the lipid composition of the SC. The expression of plasticity in CWL seems to be a response

  17. First Tracer Test After Circulation in Desert Peak 27-15

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Rose, Peter

    2013-11-16

    Following the successful stimulation of Desert Peak target EGS well 27-15, a circulation test was initiated by injecting a conservative tracer (1,5-nds) in combination with a reactive tracer (7-amino-1,3-naphthalene disulfonate). The closest production well 74-21 was monitored over the subsequent several months.

  18. Stimulation at Desert Peak -modeling with the coupled THM code FEHM

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    kelkar, sharad

    2013-04-30

    Numerical modeling of the 2011 shear stimulation at the Desert Peak well 27-15. This submission contains the FEHM executable code for a 64-bit PC Windows-7 machine, and the input and output files for the results presented in the included paper from ARMA-213 meeting.

  19. Balancing Energy and Water Consumption in an Urban Desert Environment: A Case

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Sharon J.

    at the Census block group level for 2005 3. Energy consumption data from 2005 Census Mesic Landscaping XericBalancing Energy and Water Consumption in an Urban Desert Environment: A Case Study on Phoenix, AZ effect, water scarcity, and energy consumption. The transformation of native landscapes into built

  20. Soil microbial activity and N availability with elevated CO2 in Mojave Desert soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Billings, Sharon A.; Schaeffer, Sean M.

    2004-01-01

    We examined the effects of elevated CO2 on soil nitrogen (N) dynamics in the Mojave Desert by measuring plant N isotope composition (?15N), soil microbial biomass N, soil respiration, resin-available N, and C and N dynamics during soil incubations...

  1. Remote sensing approaches for reconstructing fire perimeters and burn severity mosaics in desert spring ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weisberg, Peter J.

    Remote sensing approaches for reconstructing fire perimeters and burn severity mosaics in desert. Remote sensing methods have been used in other environments to gain information about fires that have reported sizes of less than one hectare. Additional refinement of remote sensing methods is necessary

  2. Precambrian Research 136 (2005) 2750 The Wadi Mubarak belt, Eastern Desert of Egypt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fritz, Harald

    2005-01-01

    Precambrian Research 136 (2005) 27­50 The Wadi Mubarak belt, Eastern Desert of Egypt, Graz, Austria b Mansoura University, Faculty of Science, Geology Department, El Mansoura, Egypt c February 2003; accepted 3 September 2004 Abstract The Wadi Mubarak belt in Egypt strikes west­east (and

  3. Using cosmogenic nuclides to decipher desert piedmont surface histories and process We used cosmogenic 10

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nichols, Kyle K.

    Using cosmogenic nuclides to decipher desert piedmont surface histories and process rates We used. Comparison of the different data sets allows us to see similarities in piedmont behavior over time. Nuclide of sediment as it is transported down each piedmont. Nuclide activities in sediment samples from two soil pits

  4. First Tracer Test After Circulation in Desert Peak 27-15

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Rose, Peter

    Following the successful stimulation of Desert Peak target EGS well 27-15, a circulation test was initiated by injecting a conservative tracer (1,5-nds) in combination with a reactive tracer (7-amino-1,3-naphthalene disulfonate). The closest production well 74-21 was monitored over the subsequent several months.

  5. Interactive effects of keystone rodents on the structure of desert grassland arthropod communities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davidson, Ana

    Interactive effects of keystone rodents on the structure of desert grassland arthropod communities to as keystones. However, little is known about the interactive effects of these species where they co keystone species of grassland ecosystems, creating a mosaic of unique habitats on the landscape through

  6. Very high-energy observations of the two high-frequency peaked BL Lac objects 1ES 1218+304 and H 1426+428

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Mueller; N. Akhter; J. Ball; D. A. Bramel; J. Carson; C. E. Covault; D. Driscoll; P. Fortin; D. M. Gingrich; D. S. Hanna; A. Jarvis; J. Kildea; T. Lindner; R. Mukherjee; R. A. Ong; K. Ragan; R. A. Scalzo; D. A. Williams; J. Zweerink

    2011-04-14

    We present results of very-high-energy gamma-ray observations (E > 160 GeV) of two high-frequency-peaked BL Lac (HBL) objects, 1ES 1218+304 and H 1426+428, with the Solar Tower Atmospheric Cherenkov Effect Experiment (STACEE). Both sources are very-high-energy gamma-ray emitters above 100 GeV, detected using ground-based Cherenkov telescopes. STACEE observations of 1ES 1218+304 and H 1426+428 did not produce detections; we present 99% CL flux upper limits for both sources, assuming spectral indices measured mostly at higher energies.

  7. HUBBLE/COS OBSERVATIONS OF THE Ly{alpha} FOREST TOWARD THE BL Lac OBJECT 1ES 1553+113

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Danforth, Charles W.; Keeney, Brian A.; Stocke, John T.; Shull, J. Michael; Yao Yangsen, E-mail: danforth@casa.colorado.ed [CASA, Department of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences, University of Colorado, 389-UCB, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States)

    2010-09-01

    We present new moderate-resolution, far-ultraviolet spectra from the Hubble Space Telescope/Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (HST/COS) of the BL Lac object 1ES 1553+113 covering the wavelength range 1135 A < {lambda} < 1795 A. The data show a smooth continuum with a wealth of narrow (b < 100 km s{sup -1}) absorption features arising in the interstellar medium and intergalactic medium. These features include 41 Ly{alpha} absorbers at 0 < z{sub abs} < 0.43, 14 of which are detected in multiple Lyman lines and 6 of which show absorption in one or more metal lines. We analyze a metal-rich triplet ({Delta}cz {approx} 1000 km s{sup -1}) of Ly{alpha} absorbers at z{sub abs} {approx} 0.188 in which O VI, N V, and C III absorption is detected. Silicon ions (Si III, Si IV) are not detected to fairly strong upper limits and we use the measured Si III/C III upper limit to derive an abundance limit (C/Si) {>=} 4(C/Si){sub sun} for the strongest component of the absorber complex. Galaxy redshift surveys show a number of massive galaxies at approximately the same redshift as this absorption complex, suggesting that it arises in a large-scale galaxy filament. As one of the brightest extragalactic X-ray and {gamma}-ray sources, 1ES 1553+113 is of great interest to the high-energy astrophysics community. With no intrinsic emission or absorption features, 1ES 1553+113 has no direct redshift determination. We use intervening Ly{alpha} absorbers to place a direct limit on the redshift: z{sub em}>0.395 based on a confirmed Ly{alpha}+O VI absorber and z{sub em}>0.433 based on a single-line detection of Ly{alpha}. The current COS data are only sensitive to Ly{alpha} absorbers at z < 0.47, but we present statistical arguments that z{sub em} {approx}< 0.58 (at a 1{sigma} confidence limit) based on the non-detection of any Ly{beta} absorbers at z>0.4.

  8. Solar Power in the Desert: Are the current large-scale solar developments really improving California’s environment?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allen, Michael F.; McHughen, Alan

    2011-01-01

    D EVELOPMENT I SSUES Solar Power in the Desert: Are the2 Most of the large-scale solar power projects utilize largethat will be affected by solar power facilities. There are

  9. Wood-Producing Sunflower? Mining Genetic Diversity in Desert-Dwelling Wild Species (2010 JGI User Meeting)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knapp, Steve

    2010-03-25

    Steve Knapp from Monsanto on "Wood-Producing Sunflower? Mining Genetic Diversity in Desert-Dwelling Wild Species" on March 25, 2010 at the 5th Annual DOE JGI User Meeting

  10. Wood-Producing Sunflower? Mining Genetic Diversity in Desert-Dwelling Wild Species (2010 JGI User Meeting)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Knapp, Steve

    2011-04-26

    Steve Knapp from Monsanto on "Wood-Producing Sunflower? Mining Genetic Diversity in Desert-Dwelling Wild Species" on March 25, 2010 at the 5th Annual DOE JGI User Meeting

  11. Ecological energetics of the desert tortoise (Gopherus Agassizii): Effects of rainfall and drought

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, C.C.

    1996-09-01

    To elucidate ecological effects of variation in the temporal distribution of a limiting resource (water in the Mojave Desert), energetics of two free-living populations of desert tortoises (Gopherus [=Xerobates] agassizii) were studied concurrently over 18 mo with use of doubly-labeled water. Field metabolic rates (FMR) and feeding rates were highly variable. This variability was manifested at several levels, including seasonal changes within populations, year-to-year differences within populations, and differences between populations. Underlying observed patterns and contrasts was considerable variation among individuals. Much of the variation in energetic variables was associated with a single climatic variable, rainfall. Seasonal, annual, and interpopulation differences in FMR and foraging rates corresponded to differences in availability of free-standing water from rainstorms. Some differences among individuals were apparently due to differences in proclivity or ability to drink. Tortoises had very low FMRs relative to other reptiles, allowed them to tolerate long periods of chronic energy shortage during a drought. Calculations suggested that tortoises experienced a net loss of energy shortage during a drought and tortoises experienced a net loss of energy on their spring diet of succulent annual plants. If so, tortoises require drier forage to accrue an energy profit, emphasizing reliance on drinking rainwater. Further, it suggests that growth (as protein deposition) and net acquisition of energy may be temporally decoupled in desert tortoises, with potential consequences for geographic variation in life history. Energy acquisition and expenditure in desert tortoises are strongly constrained by the contingencies of rainfall, both indirectly through effects on availability and quality of food, and directly through reliance on free-standing water for drinking, which is apparently necessary for achieving a net annual energy profit. 61 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs.

  12. Ground-Dwelling Arthropod and Small Mammal Responses to Anthropogenic Disturbances Within Southern California Deserts: From Plant Invasions to Altered Fire Regimes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hulton VanTassel, Heather Lynn

    2015-01-01

    selected California sand dunes. Bureau of Land Management,Coachella Valley sand dunes, Coleoptera: (Tenebrionidae).schemes within a desert sand dune landscape. Journal of Arid

  13. VERITAS detection of $\\gamma$-ray flaring activity from the BL Lac object 1ES 1727+502 during bright moonlight observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Archambault, S; Beilicke, M; Benbow, W; Bird, R; Biteau, J; Bouvier, A; Bugaev, V; Cardenzana, J V; Cerruti, M; Chen, X; Ciupik, L; Connolly, M P; Cui, W; Dickinson, H J; Dumm, J; Eisch, J D; Errando, M; Falcone, A; Feng, Q; Finley, J P; Fleischhack, H; Fortin, P; Fortson, L; Furniss, A; Gillanders, G H; Griffin, S; Griffiths, S T; Grube, J; Gyuk, G; Håkansson, N; Hanna, D; Holder, J; Humensky, T B; Johnson, C A; Kaaret, P; Kar, P; Kertzman, M; Khassen, Y; Kieda, D; Krause, M; Krennrich, F; Kumar, S; Lang, M J; Maier, G; McArthur, S; McCann, A; Meagher, K; Millis, J; Moriarty, P; Mukherjee, R; Nieto, D; de Bhróithe, A O'Faoláin; Ong, R A; Otte, A N; Park, N; Pohl, M; Popkow, A; Prokoph, H; Pueschel, E; Quinn, J; Ragan, K; Reyes, L C; Reynolds, P T; Richards, G T; Roache, E; Santander, M; Sembroski, G H; Shahinyan, K; Smith, A W; Staszak, D; Telezhinsky, I; Tucci, J V; Tyler, J; Varlotta, A; Vincent, S; Wakely, S P; Weinstein, A; Welsing, R; Wilhelm, A; Williams, D A; Zitzer, B; Hughes, Z D

    2015-01-01

    During moonlit nights, observations with ground-based Cherenkov telescopes at very high energies (VHE, $E>100$ GeV) are constrained since the photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) in the telescope camera are extremely sensitive to the background moonlight. Observations with the VERITAS telescopes in the standard configuration are performed only with a moon illumination less than 35$\\%$ of full moon. Since 2012, the VERITAS collaboration has implemented a new observing mode under bright moonlight, by either reducing the voltage applied to the PMTs (reduced-high-voltage configuration, RHV), or by utilizing UV-transparent filters. While these operating modes result in lower sensitivity and increased energy thresholds, the extension of the available observing time is useful for monitoring variable sources such as blazars and sources requiring spectral measurements at the highest energies. In this paper we report the detection of $\\gamma$-ray flaring activity from the BL Lac object 1ES 1727+502 during RHV observations. Thi...

  14. Resource Utilization and Coexistence of Seed-Eating Desert Rodents in Sand Dune Habitats Author(s): James H. Brown and Gerald A. Lieberman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, James H.

    Resource Utilization and Coexistence of Seed-Eating Desert Rodents in Sand Dune Habitats Author UTILIZATION AND COEXISTENCE OF SEED-EATING DESERT RODENTS IN SAND DUNE HABITATS' JAMES H. BROWN Department how these differences affect the utilization of seeds. Our estimates of total overlap in resource

  15. Banded Iron Formations from the Eastern Desert of Egypt: A new type of Ore? KHALIL, Khalil Isaac1 and EL-SHAZLY, Aley K.2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    El-Shazly, Aley

    Banded Iron Formations from the Eastern Desert of Egypt: A new type of Ore? KHALIL, Khalil Isaac1 and EL-SHAZLY, Aley K.2 1 Department of Geology, University of Alexandria, Egypt 2 Geology Department localities in an area approximately 30,000 km2 within the eastern desert of Egypt. With the exception

  16. The El Mayah molasse basin in the Eastern Desert of Egypt A. Shalaby a,b,*, K. Stuwe a,*, H. Fritz a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fritz, Harald

    The El Mayah molasse basin in the Eastern Desert of Egypt A. Shalaby a,b,*, K. Stu¨we a,*, H. Fritz, Austria b Department of Geology, Mansoura University, Mansoura, Egypt Received 8 September 2004; received of kilometres of the East- ern Desert of Egypt. Its sedimentary record shows that deposition occurred in two

  17. High-Tech Energy "Oasis" to Bloom in the Desert?1 by Christine Dell'Amore for www.nationalgeographic.com2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    South Bohemia, University of

    technologies designed to bring green4 living to the desert. The planned research center is part of the Sahara to build in deserts around the globe. Experts are now examining arid sites in Australia, the U and seawater make fresh water for growing crops, solar energy would be collected to generate power, and algae

  18. A Microcantilever Sensor Array for the Detection and Inventory of Desert Tortoises

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Venedam, R. J.; Dillingham, T. R.

    2008-07-01

    We have designed and tested a portable instrument consisting of a small infrared camera coupled with an array of piezoresistive microcantilever sensors that is used to provide real-time, non-invasive data on desert tortoise den occupancy. The piezoresistive microcantilever (PMC) sensors are used to obtain a chemical “signature” of tortoise presence from the air deep within the dens, and provide data in cases where the camera cannot extend deep enough into the den to provide visual evidence of tortoise presence. The infrared camera was used to verify the PMC data during testing, and in many cases, such as shallower dens, may be used to provide exact numbers on den populations.

  19. Field Mapping At San Emidio Desert Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, AlabamaETEC GmbHFarinello GeothermalFideris Inc formerly1-2003)Emidio Desert Area (DOE

  20. Teleost fish are found in thermal environments ranging from 44C (desert pupfish, Cyprinodon macularius; Schoenherr and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bennett, Albert F.

    Teleost fish are found in thermal environments ranging from 44°C (desert pupfish, Cyprinodon with a Q10 of 2 or greater (see Bennett, 1985), it has traditionally been assumed that the thermal show a significant thermal dependence in ectotherms. For example, goldfish fast muscle myofibrillar

  1. Environmental effects on distributions of culturable soil oligotrophic bacteria along an elevational gradient in the Chihuahuan Desert

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strauss, Richard E.

    an elevational gradient in the Chihuahuan Desert James H. Campbell*, John C. Zak, Randall M. Jeter, Richard E from five sites along an elevational and vegetational gradient within Big Bend National Park during the first stressors to be investigated. Microbes capable of metabolism at low concentra- tions of carbon

  2. HABITAT SELECTION BY MOUNTAIN SHEEP IN MOJAVE DESERT SCRUB LOUISR. BERNER,PAULR. KRAUSMAN,ANDMARK C. WALLACE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wallace, Mark C.

    HABITAT SELECTION BY MOUNTAIN SHEEP IN MOJAVE DESERT SCRUB .. .. LOUISR. BERNER,PAULR. KRAUSMAN use by 12-18 mountain sheep(Ovis canadensis nelsom)in a 320-ha enclosure betweenJune 1990and June 1991-collared mountain sheep. Mountain sheepusedmidslopes and drawassociationson the westside of the enclosure

  3. The Kelso dune field is located in the eastern Mojave Desert, California, at the terminus of a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramsey, Michael

    ABSTRACT The Kelso dune field is located in the eastern Mojave Desert, California, at the terminus significant spectral variations that indicate potential mineralogic heterogeneities within the active dunes-member minerals that showed marked variations within the dunes. In addition, standard petrographic techniques re

  4. &p.1:Abstract We investigated the occurrence of freezing-in-duced cavitation in the evergreen desert shrub Larrea tri-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pockman, William T.

    &p.1:Abstract We investigated the occurrence of freezing-in- duced cavitation in the evergreen, freezing exotherms occurred at temperatures between ­6.5 and ­9°C and as long as temperatures were held · Prosopis velutina · Cavitation · Freezing tolerance · Deserts&bdy: Introduction Freezing tolerance

  5. Summer rain pulse size and rainwater uptake by three dominant desert plants in a desertified grassland ecosystem in northwestern China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Jiquan

    Summer rain pulse size and rainwater uptake by three dominant desert plants in a desertified composition, Rain pulse size, Summer precipitation Abstract To examine the different effects of rain pulse with different pulse sizes based on the changes in the hydrogen isotope ratios (dD) of their stem water 7 days

  6. Ecophysiological responses of Chihuahuan desert grasses to fire B.W. Allred , K.A. Snyder 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allred, Brady

    Nitrogen Photosynthesis a b s t r a c t To better understand the effects of fire in the Chihuahuan desert, gas exchange characteristics of two dominant grass species, Bouteloua eriopoda and Aristida purpurea, and soil nitrogen availability were studied in response to prescribed fire at the Jornada Experimental

  7. Summer rain pulse size and rainwater uptake by three dominant desert plants in a desertified grassland ecosystem in northwestern China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    water sources derived from small (rain events, A. ordosia took advantage of deeper soil waterSummer rain pulse size and rainwater uptake by three dominant desert plants in a desertified composition, Rain pulse size, Summer precipitation Abstract To examine the different effects of rain pulse

  8. Final Technical Report: Effects of Changing Water and Nitrogen Inputs on a Mojave Desert Ecosystem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Stanley, D.; Nowak, Robert S.; Fenstermaker, Lynn, F.; Young, Michael,H.

    2007-11-30

    In order to anticipate the effects of global change on ecosystem function, it is essential that predictive relationships be established linking ecosystem function to global change scenarios. The Mojave Desert is of considerable interest with respect to global change. It contains the driest habitats in North America, and thus most closely approximates the world’s great arid deserts. In order to examine the effects of climate and land use changes, in 2001 we established a long-term manipulative global change experiment, called the Mojave Global Change Facility. Manipulations in this study include the potential effects of (1) increased summer rainfall (75 mm over three discrete 25 mm events), (2) increased nitrogen deposition (10 and 40 kg ha-1), and (3) the disturbance of biological N-fixing crusts . Questions addressed under this grant shared the common hypothesis that plant and ecosystem performance will positively respond to the augmentation of the most limiting resources to plant growth in the Mojave Desert, e.g., water and nitrogen. Specific hypotheses include (1) increased summer rainfall will significantly increase plant production through an alleviation of moisture stress in the dry summer months, (2) N-deposition will increase plant production in this N-limited system, particularly in wet years or in concert with added summer rain, and (3) biological crust disturbance will gradually decrease bio-available N, with concomitant long-term reductions in photosynthesis and ANPP. Individual plant and ecosystem responses to global change may be regulated by biogeochemical processes and natural weather variability, and changes in plant and ecosystem processes may occur rapidly, may occur only after a time lag, or may not occur at all. During the first PER grant period, we observed changes in plant and ecosystem processes that would fall under each of these time-response intervals: plant and ecosystem processes responded rapidly to added summer rain, whereas most processes responded slowly or in a lag fashion to N-deposition and with no significant response to crust disturbance. Therefore, the primary objectives of this renewal grant were to: (1) continue ongoing measurements of soil and plant parameters that assess primary treatment responses; (2) address the potential heterogeneity of soil properties and (3) initiate a new suite of measurements that will provide data necessary for scaling/modeling of whole-plot to ecosystem-level responses. Our experimental approach included soil plant-water interactions using TDR, neutron probe, and miniaturized soil matric potential and moisture sensors, plant ecophysiological and productivity responses to water and nitrogen treatments and remote sensing methodologies deployed on a radio control platform. We report here the most significant findings of our study.

  9. The WEBT campaign on the BL Lac object PG 1553+113 in 2013. An analysis of the enigmatic synchrotron emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raiteri, C M; Villata, M; Larionov, V M; Acosta-Pulido, J A

    2015-01-01

    A multifrequency campaign on the BL Lac object PG 1553+113 was organized by the Whole Earth Blazar Telescope (WEBT) in 2013 April-August, involving 19 optical, two near-IR, and three radio telescopes. The aim was to study the source behaviour at low energies during and around the high-energy observations by the Major Atmospheric Gamma-ray Imaging Cherenkov (MAGIC) telescopes in April-July. We also analyse the UV and X-ray data acquired by the Swift and XMM-Newton satellites in the same period. The WEBT and satellite observations allow us to detail the synchrotron emission bump in the source spectral energy distribution (SED). In the optical we found a general bluer-when-brighter trend. The X-ray spectrum remained stable during 2013, but a comparison with previous observations suggests that it becomes harder when the X-ray flux increases. The long XMM-Newton exposure reveals a curved X-ray spectrum. In the SED, the XMM-Newton data show a hard near-UV spectrum, while Swift data display a softer shape that is co...

  10. Discovery of VHE \\gamma-ray emission and multi-wavelength observations of the BL Lac object 1RXS J101015.9-311909

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abramowski, A; Aharonian, F; Akhperjanian, A G; Anton, G; Balzer, A; Barnacka, A; Becherini, Y; Becker, J; Bernlöhr, K; Birsin, E; Biteau, J; Bochow, A; Boisson, C; Bolmont, J; Bordas, P; Brucker, J; Brun, F; Brun, P; Bulik, T; Büsching, I; Carrigan, S; Casanova, S; Cerruti, M; Chadwick, P M; Charbonnier, A; Chaves, R C G; Cheesebrough, A; Cologna, G; Conrad, J; Dalton, M; Daniel, M K; Davids, I D; Degrange, B; Deil, C; Dickinson, H J; Djannati-Ataï, A; Domainko, W; Drury, L O'C; Dubus, G; Dutson, K; Dyks, J; Dyrda, M; Egberts, K; Eger, P; Espigat, P; Fallon, L; Fegan, S; Feinstein, F; Fernandes, M V; Fiasson, A; Fontaine, G; Förster, A; Füßling, M; Gallant, Y A; Gast, H; Gérard, L; Gerbig, D; Giebels, B; Glicenstein, J F; Glück, B; Göring, D; Häffner, S; Hague, J D; Hahn, J; Hampf, D; Harris, J; Hauser, M; Heinz, S; Heinzelmann, G; Henri, G; Hermann, G; Hillert, A; Hinton, J A; Hofmann, W; Hofverberg, P; Holler, M; Horns, D; Jacholkowska, A; de Jager, O C; Jahn, C; Jamrozy, M; Jung, I; Kastendieck, M A; Katarzy?ski, K; Katz, U; Kaufmann, S; Keogh, D; Khélifi, B; Klochkov, D; Klu?niak, W; Kneiske, T; Komin, Nu; Kosack, K; Kossakowski, R; Krayzel, F; Laffon, H; Lamanna, G; Lenain, J -P; Lennarz, D; Lohse, T; Lopatin, A; Lu, C -C; Marandon, V; Marcowith, A; Masbou, J; Maxted, N; Mayer, M; McComb, T J L; Medina, M C; Méhault, J; Moderski, R; Mohamed, M; Moulin, E; Naumann, C L; Naumann-Godo, M; de Naurois, M; Nedbal, D; Nekrassov, D; Nguyen, N; Nicholas, B; Niemiec, J; Nolan, S J; Ohm, S; Wilhelmi, E de Oña; Opitz, B; Ostrowski, M; Oya, I; Panter, M; Arribas, M Paz; Pekeur, N W; Pelletier, G; Perez, J; Petrucci, P -O; Peyaud, B; Pita, S; Pühlhofer, G; Punch, M; Quirrenbach, A; Raue, M; Rayner, S M; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Renaud, M; Reyes, R de los; Rieger, F; Ripken, J; Rob, L; Rosier-Lees, S; Rowell, G; Rudak, B; Rulten, C B; Sahakian, V; Sanchez, D A; Santangelo, A; Schlickeiser, R; Schulz, A; Schwanke, U; Schwarzburg, S; Schwemmer, S; Sheidaei, F; Skilton, J L; Sol, H; Spengler, G; Stawarz, ?; Steenkamp, R; Stegmann, C; Stinzing, F; Stycz, K; Sushch, I; Szostek, A; Tavernet, J -P; Terrier, R; Tluczykont, M; Valerius, K; van Eldik, C; Vasileiadis, G; Venter, C; Viana, A; Vincent, P; Völk, H J; Volpe, F; Vorobiov, S; Vorster, M; Wagner, S J; Ward, M; White, R; Wierzcholska, A; Zacharias, M; Zajczyk, A; Zdziarski, A A; Zech, A; Zechlin, H -S

    2012-01-01

    1RXS J101015.9-311909 is a galaxy located at a redshift of z=0.14 hosting an active nucleus belonging to the class of bright BL Lac objects. Observations at high (HE, E > 100 MeV) and very high (VHE, E > 100 GeV) energies provide insights into the origin of very energetic particles present in such sources and the radiation processes at work. We report on results from VHE observations performed between 2006-10 with H.E.S.S. H.E.S.S. data have been analysed with enhanced analysis methods, making the detection of faint sources more significant. VHE emission at a position coincident with 1RXS J101015.9-311909 is detected with H.E.S.S. for the first time. In a total good-quality livetime of about 49 h, we measure 263 excess counts, corresponding to a significance of 7.1\\sigma. The photon spectrum above 0.2 TeV can be described by a power-law with a photon index of \\Gamma\\ = 3.08\\pm0.42_{stat}\\pm0.20_{sys}. The integral flux above 0.2 TeV is about 0.8% of the flux of the Crab nebula and shows no significant variabi...

  11. Detection of TeV Gamma-Rays from the BL Lac 1ES1959+650 in its low states and during a major outburst in 2002

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aharonian, F A; Borst, H G; Bojahr, H; Bolz, O; Coarasa, T; Contreras, J L; Cortina, J; Denninghoff, S; Fonseca, M V; Girma, M; Götting, N; Heinzelmann, G; Hermann, G; Heusler, A; Hofmann, W; Horns, D; Jung, I; Kankanyan, R; Kestel, M; Kohnle, A; Konopelko, A; Kornmeyer, H; Kranich, D; Lampeitl, H; López, M; Lorenz, E; Lucarelli, F; Mang, O; Meyer, H; Mirzoyan, R; Moralejo, A; Oña-Wilhelmi, E; Panter, M; Plyasheshnikov, A V; Pühlhofer, G; De los Reyes, R; Rhode, W; Ripken, G; Robrade, J; Rowell, G; Sahakian, V V; Samorski, M; Schilling, M; Siems, M; Sobzynska, D; Stamm, W; Tluczykont, M; Vitale, V; Völk, H J; Wiedner, C A; Wittek, W

    2003-01-01

    TeV gamma-rays from the BL Lac object 1ES1959+650 have been measured during the years 2000 and 2001 with a significance of 5.2 sigma at a value of 5.3% of the Crab flux and in May 2002 during strong outbursts with > 23 sigma at a flux level of up to 2.2 Crab, making 1ES1959+650 the TeV Blazar with the third best event statistics. The deep observation of 197.4 h has been performed with the HEGRA stereoscopic system of 5 imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes (IACT system). 1ES1959+650 is located at a redshift of z = 0.047, providing an intermediate distance between the nearby Blazars Mkn 421 and Mkn 501, and the much more distant object H1426+428. This makes 1ES1959+650 an important candidate of the class of TeV Blazars in view of the absorption of TeV photons by the diffuse extragalactic background radiation (DEBRA). The differential energy spectrum of 1ES1959+650 during the flares can be well described by a power law with an exponential cut-off at (4.2 (+0.8 -0.6)_stat +- 0.9_sys) TeV and a spectral index ...

  12. Coupled Environmental Processes and Long-term Performance of Landfill Covers in the northern Mojave Desert

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Shafer; Michael Young; Stephen Zitzer; Eric McDonald; Todd Caldwell

    2004-05-12

    Evapotransiration (ET) covers have gained widespread acceptance as a closure feature for waste disposal sites, particularly in the arid and semi-arid regions of the southwestern U.S. But as landforms, ET covers are subject to change over time because of processes such as pedogenesis, hydrologic processes, vegetation establishment and change, and biological processes. To better understand the effects of coupled process changes to ET covers, a series of four primary analog sites in Yucca Flat on the Nevada Test Site, along with measurements and observations from other locations in the Mojave Desert, were selected to evaluate changes in ET covers over time. The analog sites, of varying ages, were selected to address changes in the early post-institutional control period, the 1,000-year compliance period for disposal of low-level and mixed low-level waste, and the 10,000-year compliance period for transuranic waste sites.

  13. Free Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) Research Data from the Nevada Desert FACE Facility (NDFF)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    DOE has conducted trace gas enrichment experiments since the mid 1990s. The FACE Data Management System is a central repository and archive for Free-Air Carbon Dioxide Enrichment (FACE) data, as well as for the related open-top chamber (OTC) experiments. FACE Data Management System is located at the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC). While the data from the various FACE sites, each one a unique user facility, are centralized at CDIAC, each of the FACE sites presents its own view of its activities and information. For that reason, DOE Data Explorer users are advised to see both the central repository at http://public.ornl.gov/face/index.shtml and the individual home pages of each site. NDFF whole-ecosystem manipulation is a flagship experiment of the Terrestrial Carbon Process (TCP) research program of the US Dept. of Energy. It is also a core project of the International Geosphere-Biosphere Program (IGBP) and a contribution to the US Global Change Research Program. The NDFF was developed in conjunction with the National Science Foundation (NSF) and DOE-EPSCoR programs. FACE (Free-Air-Carbon dioxide-Enrichment) technology allows researchers to elevate the carbon dioxide level in large study plots while minimizing ecosystem disturbance. At the NDFF the concentration of CO2 was elevated by 50 percent above the present atmospheric levels in three plots in the Mojave Desert ecosystem, while six other plots remained at the current level. This experimental design provided a large area in which integrated teams of scientists could describe and quantify processes regulating carbon, nutrient, and water balances in desert ecosystems.

  14. Thermochronometric Investigation of Multiple Unconformities and Post-depositional Thermal History of a Fault Block in the Northern Western Desert, Egypt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glauser, Travis Robert

    2010-12-13

    Detrital apatite and zircon (U-TH)/He analysis across a recently discovered unconformity in the Western Desert of Egypt provides new insight into the tectonic evolution of northeastern Africa. The unconformity juxtaposes ...

  15. Impact of Desert Dust Radiative Forcing on Sahel Precipitation: Relative Importance of Dust Compared to Sea Surface Temperature Variations, Vegetation Changes, and Greenhouse Gas Warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01

    Understanding the 30-year Barbados desert dust record. J.on mineral dust in the Barbados trade winds. Nature, 320,late 1960s to 1980s over Barbados (13°N, 60°W; Prospero and

  16. Large-magnitude miocene extension in the central Mojave Desert: Implications for Paleozoic to Tertiary paleogeography and tectonics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, J. Douglas; Bartley, John M.; Glazner, Allen F.

    1990-01-10

    JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. 95, NO. B l, PAGES 557-569, JANUARY 10, 1990 Large-Magnitude Miocene Extension in the Central Mojave Desert' Implications for Paleozoic to Tertiary Paleogeography and Tectonics J. DOUGLAS WALKER Department... of Geology, University of Kansas, La}rwence JOHN M. BARTLEY Department of Geology and Geophysics, University of Utah, Salt Lake City ALLEN F. GLAZNER Department of Geology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill The main Cenozoic extensional structure...

  17. PHOTOSYNTHESIS AND RESOURCE ALLOCATION OF THREE MOJAVE DESERT GRASSES IN RESPONSE TO ELEVATED ATMOSPHERIC CO2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L. A. DEFALCO; C. K. IVANS; P. VIVIN; J. R. SEEMANN; R. S. NOWAK

    2004-01-01

    Gas exchange, biomass and N allocation were compared among three Mojave Desert grasses representing different functional types to determine if photosynthetic responses and the associated allocation of resources within the plant changed after prolonged exposure to elevated CO{sub 2}. Leaf gas exchange characteristics were measured for Bromus madritensis ssp. rubens (C{sub 3} invasive annual), Achnatherum hymenoides (C{sub 3} native perennial) and Pleuraphis rigida (C{sub 4} native perennial) exposed to 360 {micro}mol mol{sup -1} (ambient) and 1000 {micro}mol mol{sup -1} (elevated) CO{sub 2} concentrations in a glasshouse experiment, and tissue biomass and total N pools were quantified from three harvests during development. The maximum rate of carboxylation by the N-rich enzyme Rubisco (Vc{sub max}), which was inferred from the relationship between net CO{sub 2} assimilation (A{sub net}) and intracellular CO{sub 2} concentration (c{sub i}), declined in the C{sub 3} species Bromus and Achnatherum across all sampling dates, but did not change at elevated CO{sub 2} for the C{sub 4} Pleuraphis. Whole plant N remained the same between CO{sub 2} treatments for all species, but patterns of allocation differed for the short- and long-lived C{sub 3} species. For Bromus, leaf N used for photosynthesis was reallocated to reproduction at elevated CO{sub 2} as inferred from the combination of lower Vc{sub max} and N per leaf area (NLA) at elevated CO{sub 2}, but similar specific leaf area (SLA, cm{sup 2} g{sup -1}), and of greater reproductive effort (RE) for the elevated CO{sub 2} treatment. Vc{sub max}, leaf N concentration and NLA declined for the perennial Achnatherum at elevated CO{sub 2} potentially due to accumulation of carbohydrates or changes in leaf morphology inferred from lower SLA and greater total biomass at elevated CO{sub 2}. In contrast, Vc{sub max} for the C{sub 4} perennial Pleuraphis did not change at elevated CO{sub 2}, and tissue biomass and total N were the same between CO{sub 2} treatments. Adjustments in photosynthetic capacity at elevated CO{sub 2} may optimize N allocation of C{sub 3} species in the Mojave Desert, which may influence plant performance and plant-plant interactions of these co-occurring species.

  18. PLUTONIUM UPTAKE AND BEHAVIOR IN PLANTS OF THE DESERT SOUTHWEST: A PRELIMINARY ASSESSMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caldwell, E.; Duff, M.; Ferguson, C.

    2011-03-01

    Eight species of desert vegetation and associated soils were collected from the Nevada National Security Site (N2S2) and analyzed for 238Pu and 239+240Pu concentrations. Amongst the plant species sampled were: atmospheric elemental accumulators (moss and lichen), the very slow growing, long-lived creosote bush and the rapidly growing, short-lived cheatgrass brome. The diversity of growth strategies provided insight into the geochemical behavior and bio-availability of Pu at the N2S2. The highest concentrations of Pu were measured in the onion moss (24.27 Bq kg-1 238Pu and 52.78 Bq kg-1 239+240Pu) followed by the rimmed navel lichen (8.18 Bq kg-1 and 18.4 Bq kg-1 respectively), pointing to the importance of eolian transport of Pu. Brome and desert globemallow accumulated between 3 and 9 times higher concentrations of Pu than creosote and sage brush species. These results support the importance of species specific elemental accumulation strategies rather than exposure duration as the dominant variable influencing Pu concentrations in these plants. Total vegetation elemental concentrations of Ce, Fe, Al, Sm and others were also analyzed. Strong correlations were observed between Fe and Pu. This supports the conclusion that Pu was accumulated as a consequence of the active accumulation of Fe and other plant required nutrients. Cerium and Pu are considered to be chemical analogs. Strong correlations observed in plants support the conclusion that these elements displayed similar geochemical behavior in the environment as it related to the biochemical uptake process of vegetation. Soils were also sampled in association with vegetation samples. This allowed for the calculation of a concentration ratio (CR). The CR values for Pu in plants were highly influenced by the heterogeneity of Pu distribution among sites. Results from the naturally occurring elements of concern were more evenly distributed between sample sites. This allowed for the development of a pattern of plant species that accumulated Ce, Sm, Fe and Al. The highest accumulators of these elements were onion moss, lichen flowed by brome. The lowest accumulators were creosote bush and fourwing saltbush. This ranked order corresponds to plant accumulations of Pu.

  19. Secondary production of benthic insects in three cold-desert streams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gaines, W.L.

    1987-07-01

    Aquatic insect production was studied in three cold-desert streams in eastern Washington (Douglas Creek, Snively Springs, and Rattlesnake Springs). The size-frequency method was applied to individual taxa to estimate total insect production. production was also assessed for functional groups and trophic levels in each stream. Optioservus sp. (riffle beetles) and Baetis sp. (mayflies) accounted for 72% of the total insect numbers and 50% of the total biomass in Douglas Creek. Baetis sp. accounted for 42% of the total insect numbers and 25% of the total biomass in Snively Springs. Simulium sp. (blackflies) and Baetis sp. comprised 74% of the total insect numbers and 55% of the total biomass in Rattlesnake Springs. Grazer-scrapers (49%) and collectors (48%) were the most abundant functional groups in Douglas Creek. Collectors were the most abundant functional group in Snively Springs and Rattlesnake Springs. Herbivores and detritivores were the most abundant trophic level in Snively Springs and Rattlesnake Springs. Dipterans (midges and blackflies) were the most productive taxa within the study streams, accounting for 40% to 70% of the total community production. Production by collectors and detritivores was the highest of all functional groups and trophic levels in all study streams.

  20. Estimating Annual Precipitation in the Fenner Basin of the Eastern Mojave Desert, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davisson, M.L.; Rose, T.P.

    2000-05-15

    Metropolitan Water District (MWD) of southern California and Cadiz Inc. investigated the feasibility of storing Colorado River water in groundwater aquifers of the eastern Mojave Desert as a future drought mitigation strategy. This culminated in the public release of the Cadiz Groundwater Storage and Dry-Year Supply program Draft EIR, which included pilot percolation studies, groundwater modeling, and precipitation/runoff analysis in the Fenner groundwater basin, which overlies the proposed storage site. The project proposes to store and withdrawal Colorado River water over a 50-year period, but will not exceed the natural replenishment rates of the groundwater basin. Several independent analyses were conducted to estimate the rates of natural groundwater replenishment to the Fenner Groundwater Basin which was included in the Draft EIR. The US Geologic Survey, Water Resources Division (WRD) officially submitted comments during public review and concluded that the natural groundwater replenishment rates calculated for the Draft EIR were too high. In the WRD review, they provided a much lower recharge calculation based on a Maxey-Eakin estimation approach. This approach estimates annual precipitation over an entire basin as a function of elevation, followed by calibration against annual recharge rates. Previous attempts to create precipitation-elevation functions in western Nevada have been difficult and result in large uncertainty. In the WRD data analysis, the effect of geographic scale on the precipitation-elevation function was overlooked. This contributed to an erroneous Maxey-Eakin recharge estimate.

  1. Feasibility study of the seismic reflection method in Amargosa Desert, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brocher, T.M.; Hart, P.E.; Carle, S.F.

    1990-11-01

    The US Geological Survey (USGS) working under an Interagency agreement with the Department of Energy is engaged in a broad geoscience program to assess and identify a potential repository for high level nuclear waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada. The USGS program, referred to as the Yucca Mountain Project, or YMP, consists of integrated geologic, hydrologic and geophysical studies which range in nature from site specific to regional. This report is an evaluation of different acquisition methods for future regional seismic reflection studies to be conducted in the vicinity of Yucca Mountain, located in the southwestern corner of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). In January 1988, field studies were conducted to investigate the feasibility of using the common-depth point (CDP) seismic reflection method to map subsurface geological horizons within the Amargosa Desert, Nye County, Nevada. The goal of the field study was to investigate which seismic reflection method(s) should be used for mapping shallow to lower-crustal horizons. Therefore, a wide-variety of field acquisition parameters were tested, included point versus linear receiver group arrays; Vibroseis (service and trademark of Conoco, Inc.) versus explosive sources; Vibroseis array patterns; and Vibroseis sweep and frequency range. 31 refs., 33 figs., 8 tabs.

  2. Final Technical Report: Effects of Changing Water and Nitrogen Inputs on a Mojave Desert Ecosystem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Stanley D. [University of Nevada, Las Vegas; Nowak, Robert S. [University of Nevada, Reno

    2007-11-30

    Questions addressed under this grant shared the common hypothesis that plant and ecosystem performance will positively respond to the augmentation of the most limiting resources to plant growth in the Mojave Desert, e.g., water and nitrogen. Specific hypothesis include (1) increased summer rainfall will significantly increase plant production thorugh an alleviation of moisture stress in the dry summer months, (2) N-deposition will increase plan production in this N-limited system, particularly in wet years or in concert with added summer rain, and (3) biological crust disturbance will gradually decrease bio-available N, with concomitant long-term reductions in photosynthesis and ANPP. Individual plan and ecosystem responses to global change may be regulated by biogeochemical processes and natural weather variability, and changes in plant and ecosystem processes may occur rapidly, may occur only after a time lag, or may not occur at all. During the first PER grant period, we observed changes in plant and ecosystem processes that would fall under each of these time-response intervals: plant and ecosystem processes responded rapidly to added summer rain, whereas most processes responded slowly or in a lag fashion to N-deposition and with no significant response to crust disturbance. Therefore, the primary objectives of this renewal grant were to: (1) continue ongoing measurements of soil and plant parameters that assess primary treatment responses; (2) address the potential heterogeneity of soil properties and (3) initiate a new suite of measurements that will provide data necessary for scaling/modeling of whole-plot to ecosystem-level responses. Our experimental approach included soil plan-water interactions using TDR, neutron probe, and miniaturized soil matric potential and moisture sensors, plant ecophysiological and productivity responses to water and nitrogen treatments and remote sensing methodologies deployed on a radio control platform.

  3. Geochemistry of the Banded Iron Formations and their Host Rocks in the Eastern Desert of Egypt BACKUS, Ethan L.1, GAGNON, Kelli E.1, EL-SHAZLY, Aley K.1, and KHALIL, Khalil Isaac2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    El-Shazly, Aley

    Geochemistry of the Banded Iron Formations and their Host Rocks in the Eastern Desert of Egypt University, Egypt Sponsored by NSF-OISE-1004021 Session 92:T3. Sigma Gamma Epsilon Undergraduate Research over 30,000 km2 in the central Eastern Desert of Egypt. The deposits most resemble Algoma-type iron

  4. ARBUSCULAR MYCORRHIZAL COLONIZATION OF LARREA TRIDENTATA AND AMBROSIA DUMOSA ROOTS VARIES WITH PRECIPITATION AND SEASON IN THE MOJAVE DESERT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. E. APPLE; C. I. THEE; V. L. SMITH-LONGOZO; C. R. COGAR; C. E. WELLS; R. S. NOWAK

    2004-01-01

    The percentage of fine roots colonized by arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi varied with season and with species in the co-dominant shrubs Lurreu tridentutu and Ambrosia dumosu at a site adjacent to the Nevada Desert FACE (Free-Air CO{sub 2} Enrichment) Facility (NDFF) in the Mojave Desert. We excavated downward and outward from the shrub bases in both species to collect and examine fine roots (< 1.0 mm diameter) at monthly intervals throughout 2001 and from October 2002 to September 2003. Fungal structures became visible in cleared roots stained with trypan blue. We quantified the percent colonization of roots by AM fungi via the line intercept method. In both years and for both species, colonization was highest in fall, relatively low in spring when root growth began, increased in late spring, and decreased during summer drought periods. Increases in colonization during summer and fall reflect corresponding increases in precipitation. Spring mycorrhizal colonization is low despite peaks in soil water availability and precipitation, indicating that precipitation is not the only factor influencing mycorrhizal colonization. Because the spring decrease in mycorrhizal colonization occurs when these shrubs initiate a major flush of fine root growth, other phenological events such as competing demands for carbon by fine root initiation, early season shoot growth, and flowering may reduce carbon availability to the fungus, and hence decrease colonization. Another possibility is that root growth exceeds the rate of mycorrhizal colonization.

  5. DESERT PAVEMENTS AND SOILS ON BASALTIC PYROCLASTIC DEPOSITS AT LATHROP WELLS AND RED CONE VOLCANOES, SOUTHERN NEVADA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G.A. Valentine; C.D. Harrington

    2005-08-10

    Formation of desert pavement and accretionary soils are intimately linked in arid environments such as the Mojave Desert. Well-sorted fallout scoria lapilli at Lathrop Wells (75-80 ky) and Red Cone ({approx}1 Ma) volcanoes (southern Nevada) formed an excellent starting material for pavement, allowing infiltration of eolian silt and fine sand that first clogs the pore space of underlying tephra and then aggrades and develops vesicular A (Av) horizons. Variations in original pyroclast sizes provide insight into minimum and maximum clast sizes that promote pavement and soil formation: pavement becomes ineffective when clasts can saltate under the strongest winds, while clasts larger than coarse lapilli are unable to form an interlocking pavement that promotes silt accumulation (necessary for Av development). Contrary to predictions that all pavements above altitudes of {approx}400 m would have been ''reset'' in their development after late Pleistocene vegetation advances (about 15 ka), the soils and pavements show clear differences in maturity between the two volcanoes. This indicates that either the pavement soils develop slowly over many 10,000's of years and then are very stable, or that, if they are disrupted by vegetation advances, subsequent pavements are reestablished with successively more mature characteristics.

  6. A Calibrated Maxey-Eakin Curve for the Fenner Basin of the Eastern Mojave Desert, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davisson, M.L.; Rose, T.P.

    2000-05-15

    Metropolitan Water District (MWD) of southern California and Cadiz Inc. investigated the feasibility of storing Colorado River water in groundwater aquifers of the eastern Mojave Desert as a future drought mitigation strategy. This culminated in the public release of the Cadiz Groundwater Storage and Dry-Year Supply program Draft EIR, which included pilot percolation studies, groundwater modeling, and precipitation/runoff analysis in the Fenner groundwater basin, which overlies the proposed storage site. The project proposes to store and withdrawal Colorado River water over a 50-year period, but will not exceed the natural replenishment rates of the groundwater basin. Several independent analyses were conducted to estimate the rates of natural groundwater replenishment to the Fenner Groundwater Basin, which was included in the Draft EIR. The US Geologic Survey, Water Resources Division (WRD) officially submitted comments during public review and concluded that the natural groundwater replenishment rates calculated for the Draft EIR were too high. In the WRD review, they provided a much lower recharge calculation based on a Maxey-Eakin estimation approach. This approach estimates annual precipitation over an entire basin as a function of elevation, followed by calibration against annual recharge rates. Recharge rates are estimated on the basis that some fraction of annual precipitation will recharge, and that fraction will increase with increasing elevation. This results in a hypothetical curve relating annual groundwater recharge to annual precipitation. Field validation of recharge rates is critical in order to establish credibility to any estimate. This is due to the fact that the Maxey-Eakin model is empirical. An empirical model is derived from practical experience rather than basic theory. Therefore, a validated Maxey-Eakin model in one groundwater basin does not translate to a different one. In the WRD's Maxey-Eakin model, they used a curve calibrated against three locations in western Nevada and applied it to the Fenner Basin. It is of particular importance to note that all three of the WRD's location are west of longitude 116{sup o}W, where annual precipitation is significantly lower. Therefore, The WRD's Maxey-Eakin curve was calibrated to a drier climate, and its application to the Fenner Basin lacks credibility.

  7. Draft Genome Sequence of Streptomyces sp. Strain Wb2n-11, a Desert Isolate with Broad-Spectrum Antagonism against Soilborne Phytopathogens

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Köberl, Martina; White, Richard A.; Erschen, Sabine; El-Arabi, Tarek F.; Jansson, Janet K.; Berg, Gabriele

    2015-08-06

    Streptomyces sp. strain Wb2n-11, isolated from native desert soil, exhibited broad-spectrum antagonism against plant pathogenic fungi, bacteria, and nematodes. The 8.2-Mb draft genome reveals genes putatively responsible for its promising biocontrol activity and genes which enable the soil bacterium to directly interact beneficially with plants.

  8. Non-visual orientation of desert sand scorpions. R. McKee & D. Gaffin, University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma, U.S.A

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gaffin, Doug

    Non-visual orientation of desert sand scorpions. R. McKee & D. Gaffin, University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma, U.S.A OU Behavioral Neuroscience Works Cited. Brownell, P.H. & R.D. Farley. 1979 Arachnological Society. Burnham Beeches, Bucks. Stephens, A.V. 1999. Honors Thesis. University of Oklahoma

  9. Age constraints on the formation and emplacement of Neoproterozoic ophiolites along the AllaqiHeiani Suture, South Eastern Desert of Egypt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stern, Robert J.

    ­Heiani Suture, South Eastern Desert of Egypt K.A. Ali a,d, , M.K. Azer b , H.A. Gahlan c , S.A. Wilde d , M., Richardson, TX 75080, USA b Geology Department, National Research Centre, Dokki-Cairo, Egypt c Geology Department, Faculty of Science, Assiut University, Assiut 71516, Egypt d Department of Applied Geology

  10. Regular Cosmogenic Nuclide Dosing of Sediment Moving Down Desert Piedmonts Nichols, K K, Bierman, P R, Hooke, R L, Persico, L, Caffee, M, Finkel, R

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nichols, Kyle K.

    Regular Cosmogenic Nuclide Dosing of Sediment Moving Down Desert Piedmonts Nichols, K K, Bierman, P the variability of nuclide activity between sub-sample locations and thus gives a long-term dosing history. Nuclide activity and distance are well correlated (r$^{2}$ = 0.95) suggesting that sediment is dosed

  11. [Climate implications of terrestrial paleoclimate]. Quaternary Sciences Center, Desert Research Institute annual report, fiscal year 1994/1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wigand, P.E.

    1995-12-31

    The objective of this study is to collect terrestrial climate indicators for paleoclimate synthesis. The paleobiotic and geomorphic records are being examined for the local and regional impact of past climates to assess Yucca Mountain`s suitability as a high-level nuclear waste repository. In particular these data are being used to provide estimates of the timing, duration and extremes of past periods of moister climate for use in hydrological models of local and regional recharge that are being formulated by USGS and other hydrologists for the Yucca Mountain area. The project includes botanical, faunal, and geomorphic components that will be integrated to accomplish this goal. To this end personnel at the Quaternary Sciences Center of the Desert Research Institute in Reno, Nevada are conducting the following activities: Analyses of packrat middens; Analysis of pollen samples; and Determination of vegetation climate relationships.

  12. Nitrogen control of 13C enrichment in heterotrophic organs relative to leaves in a landscape-building desert plant species

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Jinxin [Chinese Academy of Forestry; Gu, Lianhong [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    A longstanding puzzle in isotopic studies of C3 plant species is that heterotrophic plant organs (e.g., stems, roots, seeds, and fruits) tend to be enriched in 13C compared to the autotrophic organ (leaves) that provides them with photosynthate. Our inability to explain this puzzle suggests key deficiencies in understanding post-photosynthetic metabolic processes. It also limits the effectiveness of applications of stable carbon isotope analyses in a variety of scientific disciplines ranging from plant physiology to global carbon cycle studies. To gain insight into this puzzle, we excavated whole plant architectures of Nitraria tangutorum Bobrov, a C3 species that has an exceptional capability of fixing sands and building sand dunes, in two deserts in northwestern China. We systematically and simultaneously measured carbon isotopic ratios and nitrogen and phosphorous concentrations of different parts of the excavated plants. We also determined the seasonal variations in leaf carbon isotopic ratios on nearby intact plants of N. tangutorum. We found that higher nitrogen concentrations in heterotrophic organs were significantly correlated with increased heterotrophic 13C enrichment compared to leaves. However, phosphorous concentrations had no effect on the enrichment. In addition, new leaves had carbon isotopic ratios similar to roots but were progressively depleted in 13C as they matured. We concluded that a nitrogen-mediated process, probably the refixation of respiratory CO2 by phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) carboxylase, was responsible for the differences in 13C enrichment among different heterotrophic organs while processes within leaves or during phloem loading may contribute to the overall autotrophic heterotrophic difference in carbon isotopic compositions.

  13. Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact: The Nevada Test Site Development Corporations's Desert Rock Sky Park at the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2000-03-01

    The United States Department of Energy has prepared an Environmental Assessment (DOE/EA-1300) (EA) which analyzes the potential environmental effects of developing operating and maintaining a commercial/industrial park in Area 22 of the Nevada Test Site, between Mercury Camp and U.S. Highway 95 and east of Desert Rock Airport. The EA evaluates the potential impacts of infrastructure improvements necessary to support fill build out of the 512-acre Desert Rock Sky Park. Two alternative actions were evaluated: (1) Develop, operate and maintain a commercial/industrial park in Area 22 of the Nevada Test Site, and (2) taking no action. The purpose and need for the commercial industrial park are addressed in Section 1.0 of the EA. A detailed description of the proposed action and alternatives is in section 2.0. Section 3.0 describes the affected environment. Section 4.0 the environmental consequences of the proposed action and alternative. Cumulative effects are addressed in Section 5.0. Mitigation measures are addressed in Section 6.0. The Department of Energy determined that the proposed action of developing, operating and maintaining a commercial/industrial park in Area 22 of the Nevada Test Site would best meet the needs of the agency.

  14. Lac Courte Oreilles Hydro Dam Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weaver, Jason; Meyers, Amy

    2014-12-31

    The main objective of this project was to investigate upgrading the existing hydro power generating system at the Winter Dam. The tribe would like to produce more energy and receive a fair market power purchase agreement so the dam is no longer a drain on our budget but a contributor to our economy. We contracted Kiser Hydro, LLC Engineering for this project and received an engineering report that includes options for producing more energy with cost effective upgrades to the existing turbines. Included in this project was a negotiation of energy price sales negotiations.

  15. Mille Lacs Energy Cooperative | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop Inc Jump to: navigation,Mereg GmbH Jump

  16. Drinking up the desert

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Song, Lisa

    2009-01-01

    As one of the fastest-growing cities in America, Tucson, Arizona suffers from a classic case of urban sprawl. Fueled by the prevalence of lot splits and cheap suburban land, little was done to curb the city's unsustainable ...

  17. White Desert, New Mexico 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2011-09-05

    , bibliographic information, and a subheading reflecting the information contained in the paper. Subject headings with numerous entries are separated into alphabetized subdivisions, e.g., Immunity Immunity, Agglutination Immunity, Allergy Treatment.... ? Cirug. ?????, v. 32 (6), 393-403 human hepatic amoebic abscess with resulting amoebic pericarditis, need for early diagno- sis stressed: Mexico Abscess , Amebic Dournovo, P.; et al., 1976, Nouv. Presse. Med., v. 5 (34), 2237-2239 human hepatic...

  18. Surviving Operation Desert Storm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vice, J. (Booz, Allen and Hamilton, Inc., Dayton, OH (United States))

    1992-08-01

    The importance of aircraft survivability during the invasion of Iraq is examined detailing anecdotal evidence of susceptibility and vulnerability reduction. Among the aircraft used that were designed to be more survivable than their predecessors were the F-117, A-10, F/A-18, and the AH-64. Reduced vulnerability is incorporated into the aircraft designs in the form of damage tolerant components, redundancy, self-sealing fluid systems, and miniaturization.

  19. DESERT RESEARCH INSTITUTE

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbins and700, 1. .&.Chupadera Mesa,oy&$=

  20. Desert Peak EGS Project

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based| Department8, 20153Danielthrough theKDesert Peak EGS Project DOE Award:

  1. SEASONALITY OF ANNUAL PLANT ESTABLISHMENT INFLUENCES THE INTERACTIONBETWEEN THE NON-NATIVE ANNUAL GRASS BROMUS MADRITENSIS SSP. RUBENS AND MOJAVE DESERT PERENNIALS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L A. DEFALCO; G. C. FERNANDEZ; R. S. NOWAK

    2004-01-01

    Competition between native and non-native species can change the composition and structure of plant communities, but in deserts the timing of non-native plant establishment can modulate their impacts to native species. In a field experiment, we varied densities of the non-native annual grass Bromus madritensis ssp. rubens around individuals of three native perennials--Larrea iridentata, Achnatherum hymenoides, and Pleuraphis rigida--in either winter or spring. Additional plots were prepared for the Same perennial species and seasons, but with a mixture of native annual species. Relative growth rates of perennial shoots (RGRs) declined with increasing Bromus biomass when Bromus that was established in winter had 2-3 mo of growth and high water use before perennial growth began. However, this high water use did not significantly reduce water potentials for the perennials, suggesting Bromus that established earlier depleted other soil resources, such as N, otherwise used by perennial plants. Spring-established Bromus had low biomass even at higher densities and did not effectively reduce RGRs, resulting in an overall lower impact to perennials than when Bromus was established in winter. Similarly, growth and reproduction of perennials with mixed annuals as neighbors did not differ from those with Bromus neighbors of equivalent biomass, but densities of these annuals did not support the high biomass necessary to reduce perennial growth. Thus, impacts of native Mojave Desert annuals to perennials are expected to be lower than those of Bromus because seed dormancy and narrow requirements for seedling survivorship produce densities and biomass lower than those achieved by Bromus. In comparing the effects of Bromus among perennial species, the impact of increased Bromus biomass on RGR was lower for Larrea than for the two perennial grasses, probably because Lurrea maintains low growth rates throughout the year, even after Bromus has completed its life cycle. This contrasts with the perennial grasses, whose phenology overlaps completely with (Achnatherum) or closely follows (Pleuraphis) that of Bromus.

  2. TWO PLANETARY COMPANIONS AROUND THE K7 DWARF GJ 221: A HOT SUPER-EARTH AND A CANDIDATE IN THE SUB-SATURN DESERT RANGE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arriagada, Pamela; Minniti, Dante; Anglada-Escude, Guillem; Butler, R. Paul; Crane, Jeffrey D.; Shectman, Stephen A.; Thompson, Ian; Wende, Sebastian

    2013-07-01

    We report two low-mass companions orbiting the nearby K7 dwarf GJ 221 that have emerged from reanalyzing 4.4 yr of publicly available HARPS spectra complemented with 2 years of high-precision Doppler measurements with Magellan/PFS. The HARPS measurements alone contain the clear signal of a low-mass companion with a period of 125 days and a minimum mass of 53.2 M{sub Circled-Plus} (GJ 221b), falling in a mass range where very few planet candidates have been found (sub-Saturn desert). The addition of 17 PFS observations allows the confident detection of a second low-mass companion (6.5 M{sub Circled-Plus }) in a hot orbit (3.87 day period, GJ 221c). Spectroscopic and photometric calibrations suggest that GJ 221 is slightly depleted ([Fe/H] {approx} -0.1) compared to the Sun, so the presence of two low-mass companions in the system confirms the trend that slightly reduced stellar metallicity does not prevent the formation of planets in the super-Earth to sub-Saturn mass regime.

  3. Comparative Plutonium-239 Dose Assessment for Three Desert Sites: Maralinga, Australia; Palomares, Spain; and the Nevada Test Site, USA - Before and After Remedial Action

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Church, B W; Shinn, J; Williams, G A; Martin, L J; O'Brien, R S; Adams, S R

    2000-07-14

    As a result of nuclear weapons testing and accidents, plutonium has been distributed into the environment. The areas close to the sites of these tests and accidental dispersions contain plutonium deposition of such a magnitude that health authorities and responsible officials have mandated that the contaminated areas be protected, generally through isolation or removal of the contaminated areas. In recent years remedial actions have taken place at all these sites. For reasons not entirely clear, the public perceives radiation exposure risk to be much greater than the evidence would suggest [1]. This perception seems to be particularly true for plutonium, which has often been ''demonized'' in various publications as the ''most hazardous substance known to man'' [2]. As the position statement adapted by the Health Physics Society explains, ''Plutonium's demonization is an example of how the public has been misled about radiation's environmental and health threats generally, and in cases like plutonium, how it has developed a warped ''risk perception'' that does not reflect reality'' [3]. As a result of this risk perception and ongoing debate surrounding environmental plutonium contamination, remedial action criteria are difficult to establish. By examining the data available before and after remedial actions taken at the three sites discussed in our report, we hope to present data that will illustrate that plutonium measured as aged deposition (older than several months) does not present as high a dose or risk as many had expected. The authors show that even though dose to the lung from inhalation (the primary pathway for the high-fired plutonium oxide particles present at these sites) is reduced, such a reduction is achieved at significant cost. The cost comes from damage to the environment, large expenditures per hectare rehabilitated, and the risk to occupational workers. This paper specifically examines sites that are similar in many ways. These sites were chosen for their similarities to make comparisons. The sites are all desert in nature i.e., have low rainfall (all receive about 20 cm per year), have minimal vegetative ground cover, and have high summer temperatures. These sites are Palomares, Spain; the Nevada Test Site (NTS); and the Maralinga site in Australia. One significant difference, however, is that the Palomares site has been used continuously for residential and agriculture purposes since the plutonium remediation was completed. Maralinga is being remediated with the objective of returning the land to its former owners, but it will have some use restrictions for the remaining contaminated areas. Any decision to return the land being remediated by the United States Department of Energy (USDOE) at its Nevada sites, for public use, is in the distant future.

  4. Desert Southwest Region Ten Year...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    carcinogenic characteristics, especially the penta and creosote, and the arsenic is a poison that has proven to cause adverse health effects. Many jurisdictions now consider...

  5. Desert Solar | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LIST OFAMERICA'SHeavy Electricals Ltd BHELEuropeLage Landen

  6. DESERT SUNLIGHT | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergy A plug-in electric vehicle (PEV)Day-June2012environmentThe| DepartmentN V EDESERT

  7. DESERT SUNLIGHT | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergy A plug-in electric vehicle (PEV)Day-June2012environmentThe| DepartmentN V

  8. Genevive Philibert EVOLUTION TARDI-QUATERNAIRE DU LAC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and the history of the Holocene seismicity in a key sector located near the Charlevoix-Kamouraska Seismic Zone the stratigraphie framework of Quaternary lacustrine deposits and identify various disturbances affecting

  9. Costa Rica-Regional Programme for LAC: Preparation of Sectoral...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of regional and global partners." Program Focus The program will focus on reducing poverty and inequality, strengthening democratic governance, increasing disaster preparedness...

  10. Dominican Republic-Regional Programme for LAC: Support for the...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of regional and global partners." Program Focus The program will focus on reducing poverty and inequality, strengthening democratic governance, increasing disaster preparedness...

  11. The young active star SAO 51891 (V383 Lac)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biazzo, Katia; Marilli, Ettore; Covino, Elvira; Alcala', Juan M; Cakirli, Omur; Klutsch, Alexis; Meyer, Michael R

    2009-01-01

    Our aim is investigating surface inhomogeneities of the young late-type star SAO51891, from photosphere to upper chromosphere, analyzing contemporaneous high-resolution spectra and broad-band photometry. The FOCES@CAHA spectral range is used to determine spectral classification and derive vsini and Vrad. The Li abundance is measured to estimate the age. The BVRIJHKs bands are used to construct the SED. The variations of our BV fluxes and Teff are used to infer the presence of photospheric spots and observe their behavior over time. The chromospheric activity is studied applying the spectral subtraction technique to Halpha, CaII H&K, Heps, and CaII IRT lines. We find SAO51891 to be a young K0-1V star with Li abundance close to the Pleiades upper envelope, confirming its youth (~100 Myr), also inferred from its kinematical membership to the Local Association. We detect no IR excess from SED analysis, and rotational modulation of luminosity, Teff, CaII, and Heps total fluxes. A spot model with two active reg...

  12. The Alternating Access Transport Mechanism in LacY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaback, H. Ronald; Smirnova, Irina; Kasho, Vladimir; Nie, Yiling; Zhou, Yonggang

    2011-01-01

    Á I. Smirnova Á V. Kasho Á Y. Nie Á Y. Zhou Department ofas black spheres mostly entropic (Nie et al. 2006), inducingin Kaback et al. 2007; Nie et al. 2007, 2008; Nie and Kaback

  13. Fond du Lac County, Wisconsin: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View New PagesSustainable Urban Transport JumpFlowood, Mississippi:Open(Sasada,FlyingFolsom,NewFond

  14. File:(131112) Presentacion LAC LEDs.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, AlabamaETEC GmbHFarinello GeothermalFideris IncFile FTP Document Upload Website(131112)

  15. Mille Lacs County, Minnesota: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland: Energy ResourcesDec 2005 WindPROLLC Jump to:Utah:Millard,Ohio: Energy

  16. LAC Regional Platform Workshop Agenda | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas: EnergyKulpsville, Pennsylvania: Energy Resources Jump to:Kyle, Texas:OLABOR Srl

  17. LAC Regional Platform Workshop General Information | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas: EnergyKulpsville, Pennsylvania: Energy Resources Jump to:Kyle, Texas:OLABOR

  18. LAC Regional Platform Workshop Links | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas: EnergyKulpsville, Pennsylvania: Energy Resources Jump to:Kyle, Texas:OLABORLAC

  19. LAC Regional Platform Workshop Participant Package | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas: EnergyKulpsville, Pennsylvania: Energy Resources Jump to:Kyle,

  20. Lac La Belle, Wisconsin: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas: EnergyKulpsville,LEDSGP/activitiesPlata Electric Assn,LaGrangeLabette

  1. Lac qui Parle County, Minnesota: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas: EnergyKulpsville,LEDSGP/activitiesPlata Electric Assn,LaGrangeLabetteCounty,

  2. Lac qui Parle Valley School Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource History ViewInformation Actions(Redirected fromAvoidtoolsLabsphere Jump

  3. Comments of Mille Lacs Energy Cooperative | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p aDepartment of EnergyofDepartment ofCrow Wing Power onDEAMille

  4. A modeling study of the effect of depth of burial of depleted uranium and thorium on radon gas flux at a dry desert alluvial soil radioactive waste management site (RWMS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lindstrom, F.T.; Cawlfield, D.E.; Emer, D.F.; Shott, G.J.

    1993-08-01

    An integral part of designing low-level waste (LLW) disposal pits and their associated closure covers in very dry desert alluvium is the use of a radon gas transport and fate model. Radon-222 has the potential to be a real heath hazard. The production of radon-222 results from the radioactive decay (a particle emission) of radium-226 in the uranium-235 and 238 Bateman chains. It is also produced in the thorium-230 series. Both long lived radionuclides have been proposed for disposal in the shallow land burial pits in Area 5 RWMS compound of Nevada Test Site (NTS). The constructed physics based model includes diffusion and barometric pressure-induced advection of an M-chain of radionuclides. The usual Bateman decay mechanics are included for each radionuclide. Both linear reversible and linear irreversible first order sorption kinetics are assumed for each radionuclide. This report presents the details of using the noble gas transport model, CASCADR9, in an engineering design study mode. Given data on the low-level waste stream, which constitutes the ultimate source of radon-222 in the RWMS, CASCADR9 is used to generate the surface flux (pCi/cm{sup 2}-sec) of radon-222 under the realistic atmospheric and alluvial soil conditions found in the RWMS at Area 5, of the NTS. Specifically, this study examines the surface flux of radon-222 as a function of the depth of burial below the land surface.

  5. Western Area Power Administration, Desert Southwest Region

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    should cease until the condor(s) leaves on its own. The Navajo Nation Department of Fish and Wildlife (928-871-6450), or the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (602-242-0210),...

  6. Suicide, Watch: A Mojave Desert Memoir

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nolan, Ruth Marie

    2014-01-01

    Dam in the 1930’s, archaeologists had just discovered Lost City, which was adjacent to one of the world's largest, underground

  7. Interdisciplinary Graduate Internship Opportunities Desert Archaeology, Inc.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watkins, Joseph C.

    the community about the plans of four of the world's largest oil companies to drill in the Arctic National surveys to large excavations. We have established a record of work that is timely, cost effective

  8. Temal Wakhish: A Desert Cahuilla Village

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lando, Richard; Modesto, Ruby E.

    1977-01-01

    with the flour of wild seeds, such as chia, to form a stapleseeds were difficult to crack, but good to eat. Pasal, or chia {

  9. Desert Peak Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (UtilityInstruments IncMississippi:DeltaFish

  10. Desert Peak EGS Project | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergy A plug-in electricLaboratoryof EnergyWASHINGTON, DC - U.S.The Department

  11. Desert Peak Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar2-0057-EA Jump to: navigation,Department of Defense 3 GW Solarde La

  12. Desert Queen Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar2-0057-EA Jump to: navigation,Department of Defense 3 GW Solarde

  13. Desert Queen Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButtePower VenturesInformation9) WindGridDeepiSolar and WindQueen Geothermal

  14. Desert Sky Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButtePower VenturesInformation9) WindGridDeepiSolar and WindQueen GeothermalSky

  15. Desert Wind Power | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButtePower VenturesInformation9) WindGridDeepiSolar and WindQueenWind Power

  16. Desert Peak EGS Project | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based| Department8, 20153Danielthrough theKDesert Peak EGS Project DOE

  17. Insertional mutant analysis reveals that long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase 1 (LACS1), but not LACS8, functionally overlaps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kunst, Ljerka

    seedling before photosynthesis is established. TAGs are also of great economic importance in human including hexose phosphates, phosphoenol- pyruvate and pyruvate (Hills, 2004). Phosphoenolpyruvate

  18. Harmonic QPOs and Thick Accretion Disk Oscillations in BL Lac Object AO 0235+164

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. K. Liu; G. Zhao; Xue-Bing Wu

    2006-06-27

    Periodic outbursts are observed in many AGNs and usually explained with a supermassive black hole binary (SMBHB) scenario. However, multiple periods are observed in some AGNs and cannot be explained with it. Here we analyze the periodicity of the radio light curves of AO 0235+164 at multi-frequencies and report the discovery of six QPOs in integer ratio 1:2:3:4:5:6 of QPO frequencies, of which the second with period $P_2 = (5.46 \\pm 0.47) {\\rm yr}$ is the strongest. We fit the radio light curves and show that the initial phases of six QPOs have zero or $\\pi$ differences relative to each other. We suggest a harmonic relationship of QPOs. The centroid frequency, relative strength, harmonic relationship and relative initial phases of QPOs are independent of radio frequency. The harmonic QPOs are likely due to the quasi-periodic injection of plasma from an oscillating accretion disk into the jet. We estimate the supermassive black hole mass $M_{\\rm BH} \\simeq (4.72\\pm 2.04) \\times 10^8 M_\\odot$ and the accretion rate $\\dot{m}\\simeq 0.007$. With the knowledge of accretion disk, it implies that the inner region of accretion disk of AO 0235+164 is a radiatively inefficient accretion flow. The oscillation accretion is due to the p-mode oscillation of the thick disk probably excited by a SMBHB. The theoretical predications of fundamental oscillation frequency and the harmonics are well consistent with the observations. Harmonic QPOs would be absent when the thick disk becomes geometrically thin due to the increase of accretion rate. We discuss the observations of AO 0235+164 basing on the SMBHB-thick disk oscillation scenario.

  19. Estimation of the extragalactic background light using TeV observations of BL Lac objects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sinha, Atreyee; Acharya, B. S.; Sahayanathan, S.; Godambe, S.; Misra, R. E-mail: acharya@tifr.res.in E-mail: gsagar@barc.ernet.in

    2014-11-01

    The very high-energy (VHE) gamma-ray spectral index of high-energy peaked blazars correlates strongly with its corresponding redshift, whereas no such correlation is observed in the X-ray or GeV bands. We attribute this correlation to photon-photon absorption of TeV photons with the extragalactic background light (EBL), and utilizing this we compute the allowed flux range for the EBL, which is independent of previous estimates. The observed VHE spectrum of the sources in our sample can be well approximated by a power law, and if the de-absorbed spectrum is also assumed to be a power law, then we show that the spectral shape of EBL will be ?n(?) ? klog (?/? {sub p}). We estimate the range of values for the parameters defining the EBL spectrum, k and ? {sub p}, such that the correlation of the intrinsic VHE spectrum with redshift is nullified. The estimated EBL depends only on the observed correlation and the assumption of a power-law source spectrum. Specifically, it does not depend on the spectral modeling or radiative mechanism of the sources or on any theoretical shape of the EBL spectrum obtained through cosmological calculations. The estimated EBL spectrum is consistent with the upper and lower limits imposed by different observations. Moreover, it also agrees closely with the theoretical estimates obtained through cosmological evolution models.

  20. The Periplasmic Cavity of LacY Mutant Cys154 -> Gly: How Open Is Open?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, X; Driessen, AJM; Feringa, BL; Kaback, HR

    2013-01-01

    GroEL-GroES- mediated protein folding. Chem. Rev. 106, 1917–of chaperone-mediated protein folding in the cytosol. Nat.that impair membrane protein folding and generate a membrane

  1. Project Reports for Lac Courte Oreilles Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians- 2010 Project

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This weatherization training will result in a reduction of the use and cost of energy by increasing the number of homes that are weatherized.

  2. An active state of the BL Lac Object Markarian 421 detected by INTEGRAL in April 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pian, E; Fiocchi, M; Bazzano, A; Foschini, L; Tavecchio, F; Bianchin, V; Boissay, R; Castignani, G; Ferrigno, C; Raiteri, C M; Villata, M; Beckmann, V; D'Ammando, F; Hudec, R; Malaguti, G; Maraschi, L; Pursimo, T; Romano, P; Soldi, S; Stamerra, A; Treves, A; Ubertini, P; Vercellone, S; Walter, R

    2013-01-01

    (abridged) Multi-wavelength variability of blazars offers effective insight into the mechanisms through which energy is propagated from the center down the jet. In this context, we activated INTEGRAL observations of the blazar Markarian 421 in an active state on 16-21 April 2013, and complemented them with Fermi-LAT data. We obtained well sampled optical, soft and hard X-ray light curves that show the presence of two flares, the first one reaching a brighter maximum than the second one at X-rays. The average flux in the 20-100 keV range is 9.1e-11 cgs and the nuclear average apparent magnitude, corrected for Galactic extinction, is V ~ 12.2. In the time-resolved JEMX+IBIS spectra we see a change of spectral slope at an energy that correlates with flux, as expected in refreshed energy injections in a population of electrons that cool thereafter via synchrotron radiation. During the observation, the variability level increases monotonically from the optical to the hard X-rays, and the cross-correlation analysis...

  3. Project Reports for Lac Courte Oreilles Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians- 2010 Project

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The feasibility study of hydropower will answer three questions: 1) How can hydropower be developed to create a sustainable economic stream that contributes to the financial viability of the tribe? 2) How can this venture meet the energy needs of the community? 3) How can hydropower be developed without jeopardizing Mother Earth or the cultural beliefs of the tribe?

  4. LEDSGP/about/Latin America and Caribbean Regional Platform/LAC Regional

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas: EnergyKulpsville, Pennsylvania:LEDSGP/about < LEDSGP(RedirectedAsiaPlatform

  5. LEDSGP/about/Latin America and Caribbean Regional Platform/LAC Regional

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas: EnergyKulpsville, Pennsylvania:LEDSGP/about <

  6. Costa Rica-Regional Programme for LAC: Preparation of Sectoral LEDs for

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar EnergyLawler,CoalConcordiaConsumerLEDS Tier I Activities Jump to:Transport

  7. Dominican Republic-Regional Programme for LAC: Support for the Preparation

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar2-0057-EA Jump to:of the National Climate Change Policy | Open Energy

  8. Dominican Republic-Regional Programme for LAC: Support for the Preparation

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar2-0057-EA Jump to:of the National Climate Change Policy | Open Energyof the

  9. Fond du Lac Band Leads Climate Resilience Efforts on Lake Superior Chippewa

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12, 2015ExecutiveFluorescent Lamp BallastsActivities, OAS-M-06-09 | Department

  10. SPECIAL FEATURE: FOR THE LOVE OF MONTREAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shoubridge, Eric

    ://www.mcgill.ca/medicine/ugme-accreditation On the cover: A drone's-eye view of Vieux-Montréal. Photo courtesy of Adam Lackman. 1 #12;I am a Montrealer

  11. PLANNING FOR PROBLEM FORMULATION IN ADVICE-GIVING DIALOGUE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jullien, Jean-Philippe Solvay Cap Sogeti Innovation Centre de Recherche de Grenoble Chemin du Vieux Chine reasoning at the pragmatic level of the communication process. The com- petence of most intelligent systems

  12. Western Area Power Administration, Desert Southwest Region Tucson...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    shellfish populations, unless the activity is directly related to a shellfish harvesting activity authorized by NWPs 4 and 48, or is a shellfish seeding or habitat...

  13. Phylogenetic revision of desert fireflies (Coleoptera: Lampyridae: microphotus) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Usener, Jessica LeAnn

    2006-04-12

    sequences were amplified via PCR in a Peltier thermal cycler (PTC-200) using the following conditions: an initial denaturation at 95?C for 150 s, annealing at 45?C for 30 11 s, and extension at 72?C for 60 s for a total of 36 cycles, followed by 72?C... extension for 5 min. Luciferase sequences were amplified via PCR in a Peltier thermal cycler (PTC- 200) under the following conditions: 95?C for 150 s, 55?C for 30 s, and 72?C for 60 s for a total of 36 cycles, followed by 72?C for 5 min. All PCR products...

  14. Structural Analysis of the Desert Peak-Brady Geothermal Fields...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Nevada: Implications for Understanding Linkages Between Northeast-Trending Structures and Geothermal Reservoirs in the Humboldt Structural Zone Jump to: navigation,...

  15. MOA-2007-BLG-197: Exploring the brown dwarf desert

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ranc, C; Albrow, M D; Kubas, D; Bond, I A; Batista, V; Beaulieu, J -P; Bennett, D P; Dominik, M; Dong, Subo; Fouqué, P; Gould, A; Greenhill, J; Jørgensen, U G; Kains, N; Menzies, J; Sumi, T; Bachelet, E; Coutures, C; Dieters, S; Prester, D Dominis; Donatowicz, J; Gaudi, B S; Han, C; Hundertmark, M; Horne, K; Kane, S R; Lee, C -U; Marquette, J -B; Park, B -G; Pollard, K R; Sahu, K C; Street, R; Tsapras, Y; Wambsganss, J; Williams, A; Zub, M; Abe, F; Fukui, A; Itow, Y; Masuda, K; Matsubara, Y; Muraki, Y; Ohnishi, K; Rattenbury, N; Saito, To; Sullivan, D J; Sweatman, W L; Tristram, P J; Yock, P C M; Yonehara, A

    2015-01-01

    We present the analysis of MOA-2007-BLG-197Lb, the first brown dwarf companion to a Sun-like star detected through gravitational microlensing. The event was alerted and followed-up photometrically by a network of telescopes from the PLANET, MOA, and uFUN collaborations, and observed at high angular resolution using the NaCo instrument at the VLT. From the modelling of the microlensing light curve, we derived the binary lens separation in Einstein radius units (s~1.13) and a mass ratio of (4.732+/-0.020)x10^{-2}. Annual parallax, lens orbital motion and finite source effects were included in the models. To recover the lens system's physical parameters, we combined the resulting light curve best-fit parameters with (J,H,Ks) magnitudes obtained with VLT NaCo and calibrated using IRSF and 2MASS data. We derived a lens total mass of 0.86+/-0.04 Msun and a lens distance of 4.2+/-0.3 kpc. We find that the companion of MOA-2007-BLG-197L is a brown dwarf of 41+/-2 Mjup observed at a projected separation of 4.3+/-0.1 A...

  16. Every Square Inch: The Fight for the California Desert

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Argandona, Monica

    2012-01-01

    Catellus lands as potential renewable energy zones as a partpotential development such as mining and renewable energypotential wilderness as long as it kept out renewable energy

  17. Lithic Raw Material Prospects in the Mojave Desert, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilke, Philip J.; Schroth, Adella B.

    1989-01-01

    A Prehistoric Lithic Raw Material Prospect in the Castle146-174 (1989). Lithic Raw Material Prospects in the Mojavepaper discusses lithic raw material prospects (or simply "

  18. Review: Sonoran Desert Life: Understanding, Insight and Enjoyment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Javed, Muhammad Tayyeb

    2010-01-01

    and Materials Engineering, Pakistan Institute of EngineeringP.O. Nilore, Islamabad, Pakistan. TEL: 92-51-2207381-3 xby Muhammed Tayyeb Javed Pakistan Institute of Engineering

  19. Desert Symposium 2014 Information/Call for Papers/Registration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    brine playa and salt extraction facilities. Discuss drill core records of past Fault (Durmid Hills, Salt Creek and Bertram Siding). Examine

  20. Water Resources Center, Desert Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    term drainage from the heap leach structures can be used to directly estimate the recharge rates (and-Leach Site using Transient Electrical Resistivity Surveys. Paper No. 7-21. Geological Society of America Association. #12;Research Objectives: This research utilized the unique geometry and construction practices

  1. SunLine Tests HHICE Bus in Desert Climate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2006-10-01

    Fact sheet describes the demonstration of a hybrid hydrogen internal combustion engine (HHICE) bus at SunLine Transit Agency.

  2. Deserting Gender: A Feminist Rhetorical Approach to Vietnam War Novels 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Womack, Anne-Marie

    2012-07-16

    Female characters and references to femininity throughout American war literature disrupt discursive and biological divisions of the masculine and feminine. In examining gender and war literature over the twentieth century, ...

  3. Synaptic Thermoprotection in a Desert-Dwelling Drosophila Species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robertson, Meldrum

    shown that prior heat-shock exposure protects syn- aptic transmission against failure during subsequent Received 15 August 2004; accepted 9 November 2004 ABSTRACT: Synaptic transmission is a critical mechanism temperature, can disrupt synaptic transmission and result in death. Previous work on larval Drosophila has

  4. Evolution and functional classification of vertebrate gene deserts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hardison, Ross C.

    . Loots,2 Marcelo A. Nobrega,3 Ross C. Hardison,4 Webb Miller,5,6 and Lisa Stubbs2 1 Energy, Environment physi- cal domains, and sequences that anchor genomic regions to spe- cific nuclear locations (Dorsett

  5. Willows Aid Flood Recovery in Los Alamos Desert

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    LOS ALAMOS, N.M. – Los Alamos National Laboratory’s Associate Directorate of Environmental Programs (ADEP) has been busy with various flood recovery activities since last fall. 

  6. Geologic evolution of Iron Mountain, central Mojave Desert, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boettcher, Stefan S.; Walker, J. Douglas

    1993-04-01

    Geologic mapping, structural analysis, petrologic study, and U-Pb geochronology at Iron Mountain, 20 km southwest of Barstow, California, place important constraints on the paleogeographic affinities of metasedimentary rocks in the area and provide...

  7. Every Square Inch: The Fight for the California Desert

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Argandona, Monica

    2012-01-01

    and open space to focusing on renewable energy, required therenewable energy projects – nearly year-round sunshine and plenty of open space (it as open space. With the threat of renewable energy

  8. Impact of feedbacks on Chihuahuan desert grasslands: Transience and metastability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Archer, Steven R.

    .e., desertification) directly impacts ca. 250 million people in the developing world and could potentially impact the 2.5 billion people who live in dry lands worldwide [Reynolds et al., 2007]. Desertification is also and albedo accom- panying desertification can significantly impact regional climate with feedbacks

  9. Desert Hot Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (UtilityInstruments IncMississippi:DeltaFish LakeDepew,Energy'sEnergy

  10. Desert Hot Springs, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (UtilityInstruments IncMississippi:DeltaFish LakeDepew,Energy'sEnergySprings,

  11. San Emidio Desert Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onRAPID/Geothermal/Exploration/ColoradoRemsenburg-Speonk,Sage Resources JumpDimas, California: Energy ResourcesSan Emidio

  12. San Emidio Desert Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onRAPID/Geothermal/Exploration/ColoradoRemsenburg-Speonk,Sage Resources JumpDimas, California: Energy ResourcesSan

  13. Palm Desert, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPIProtectio Program |View New Pages Recent ChangesEt Al.,

  14. Desert scientists turn to rainforest for climate answers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HAB Packet HanfordDOEDanielDeSmall Business Forum & Expo00-00:

  15. BLM California Desert District Office | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar Energy LLC Jump to:Greece: EnergyMontana)

  16. Structural Analysis of the Desert Peak-Brady Geothermal Fields,

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EIS ReportEurope GmbHSoloPageBeforeCreek Wind

  17. California Desert Fish Farm Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmentalBowerbank, Maine:Kansas: EnergyCalendarCalhounWebpage | Open EnergyCommissionWater|

  18. California Desert Native Plants Act | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmentalBowerbank, Maine:Kansas: EnergyCalendarCalhounWebpage | Open

  19. Gaseous Emissions From Steamboat Springs, Brady'S Hot Springs, And Desert

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButtePowerEdistoWhiskeyFootprintGEXA Corp. (Delaware)GalvestonWindSampling

  20. Lake Lahontan: Geology of Southern Carson Desert, Nevada | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource History ViewInformation Actions(RedirectedLouisiana:

  1. BLM West Desert District Office | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowaWisconsin: EnergyYorkColorado State Office JumpUtah State Office JumpWest

  2. Cuttings Analysis At Desert Peak Area (Laney, 2005) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButtePower VenturesInformation9) Wind Farm JumpAlum Area (DOE

  3. Desert Peak II Geothermal Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButtePower VenturesInformation9) WindGridDeepiSolar and Wind

  4. Desert Sunlight goes online! | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButtePower VenturesInformation9) WindGridDeepiSolar and WindQueen

  5. City of Palm Desert - Energy Independence Program | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p aDepartment of Energy < BackDepartmentAgricultural Savings

  6. Origin And Characterization Of Geothermal Waters At Desert Queen, Nevada |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceII JumpQuarterly Smart Grid DataInformationOpen Energy Information Origin

  7. Evaluation of a Translocated Population of Desert Mule Deer in the Chihuahuan Desert of Northern Coahuila, Mexico 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ortega-Sanchez, Alfonso

    2013-12-10

    these methods (P = 0.793). Mule deer habitat was characterized in 3 different classes: creosote flats, lechuguilla hills, and xeroriparian vegetation types. At second order analysis, xeroriparian vegetation type had a higher use/availability ratio...

  8. YidC protein, a molecular chaperone for LacY protein folding via the SecYEG protein machinery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, L; Kaback, HR; Dalbey, RE

    2013-01-01

    GroEL-GroES- mediated protein folding. Chem. Rev. 106, 1917–of chaperone-mediated protein folding in the cytosol. Nat.that impair membrane protein folding and generate a membrane

  9. INMM 54th Annual Meeting, July 14-18, 2013, JW Marriott Desert Springs, Palm Desert, California USA Comprehensive Nuclear Material Surveillance with a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kemner, Ken

    , IL 60439 1 U.S. Department of Energy, Washington, D.C. 20585 ABSTRACT Comprehensive monitoring.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Packaging and Certification Program, for use in managing sensitive nuclear packages and global positioning system receivers and the management infrastructure available from DOE

  10. A Determination of the Gamma-ray Flux and Photon Spectral Index Distributions of Blazars from the Fermi-LAT 3LAC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singal, J

    2015-01-01

    We present a determination of the distributions of gamma-ray photon flux -- the so called LogN-LogS relation -- and photon spectral index for blazars, based on the third extragalactic source catalog of the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope's Large Area Telescope, and considering the photon energy range from 100 MeV to 100 GeV. The dataset consists of the 774 blazars in the so-called "Clean" sample detected with a greater than approximately seven sigma detection threshold and located above $\\pm$20 deg Galactic latitude. We use non-parametric methods verified in previous works to reconstruct the intrinsic distributions from the observed ones which account for the data truncations introduced by observational bias and includes the effects of the possible correlation between the flux and photon index. The intrinsic flux distribution can be represented by a broken power law with a high flux power-law index of -2.43$\\pm$0.08 and a low flux power-law index of -1.87$\\pm$0.10. The intrinsic photon index distribution can ...

  11. Ground-water geochemistry and radionuclide activity in the Cambrian-Ordovician aquifer of Dodge and Fond du Lac counties, Wisconsin. Technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weaver, T.R.; Bahr, J.M.; Anderson, M.P.

    1990-01-01

    Analyses of groundwater from wells in the Cambrian-Ordovician aquifer of eastern Wisconsin indicate that regions of the aquifer contain elevated concentrations of dissolved solids, chloride and sulfate. Groundwater from several wells in the area also approach or exceed the current drinking water standard for combined radium activity. Significant changes in groundwater chemistry occur where the aquifer becomes confined by the Maquoketa shale. Concentrations of Cl(-), SO4(2-) and Na(+) increase in the confined region, and the highest combined radium activities are typically observed in the area. Geochemical modeling implies that the observed changes in major ion groundwater chemistry occur in response to the presence of the confining unit which may act as a source of SO4(2-), through gypsum dissolution, and Na(+), through cation exchange. A finite difference groundwater flow model was linked to a particle tracking routine to determine groundwater flow paths and residence times in the aquifer near the boundary between unconfined and confined conditions. Results suggest that the presence of the confining unit produces a vertically stratified flow regime in the confined region.

  12. ESI/TOF Measurements of a Noncovalent Complex between Lactose Repressor Protein (LacI) and Double-Stranded DNA Containing its Specific Operator Sequence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ens, Werner

    M buffer solution. Initial attempts to observe the protein tetramer were unsuccessful (as in the case rather broad peaks for both dimer and tetramer. The tetramer appears in two separate envelopes, suggesting that the the charge states 20 to 22 between m/z 7000 and 8000 represent the native tetramer

  13. An Investigation into Early Desert Pastoralism: Excavations at the Camel Site, Negev

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosen, Steven A

    2011-01-01

    or area, the stratigraphy nevertheless defines a sequence ofnorthern sequence is based on culture-stratigraphy in thesequence of the site components is beyond our abilities. S TRATIGRAPHY Stratigraphy

  14. From Industrial Garden to Food Desert: Unearthing the Root Structure of Urban Agriculture in Oakland, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McClintock, Nathan

    2008-01-01

    between trade, production, and consumption of both food andsurrounding food production and consumption have graduallyreintegrates production and consumption by teaching a

  15. TECHNICAL NOTE Variable nuclear markers for a Sonoran Desert bark beetle,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garrick, Ryan

    Euphorbiaceae (e.g., Jordal and Hewitt 2004, 2006). As part of a research program investigating the genetic

  16. Structure and Function of Chihuahuan Desert Ecosystem The Jornada Basin Long-Term Ecological Research Site

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on these data. With the launch of Earth resources satellites in 1972, a variety of sensors have been available to collect remote sensing data. These sensors are typically satellite- based but can be used from other satellites. These different platforms (ground, aircraft, and satellite) allow evaluation of landscape

  17. Villa Trieste Homes Building Reduced-Energy Homes in the Southwest U.S. Desert

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Lawrence R.

    , and a HERS rating of 36-39 including the PV system impact. Standard features o A tankless water heater o and o Photovoltaic units for solar energy on the roofs of these homes. o A system that allowsVilla TriesteRomaNVLas VegasNV #12;Design Details Center for Energy Research at UNLV Solar Energy Each

  18. Ben-Gurion University of the Negev Blaustein Institutes for Desert Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prigozhin, Leonid

    -assembled structures and functionality in CNT-conjugated polymer composites. We will review some of the studies%. Moreover, a CNT content of 8-10 wt% did not compromise the low bulk thermal conductivity of the polymer: Carbon Nanotubes/Polythiophene composite for thermoelectectric and photovolataic applications Speaker

  19. Soil Formation and Transport Processes on Hillslopes along a Precipitation Gradient in the Atacama Desert, Chile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Owen, Justine J.

    2009-01-01

    Marcel, C. , Ghaleb, B. , and Cournoyer, L. , 1996, CoastalMarcel C, Ghaleb B, Cournoyer L. 1996. Coastal deformation

  20. Maternal Effects in Insect-Plant Interactions: Lessons From a Desert Seed Beetle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fox, Charles W.

    the magnitude of natural selection and the proportion of phenotypic variation in a population that is due variation within populations and understand the consequences of this variation for the production of new strains of agricultural plants and animals. In this framework, phenotypic variation among individuals (VP

  1. The spatial and temporal variability of aerosol optical depths in the Mojave Desert of southern California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frank, Thomas D.

    California Thomas D. Frank a,, Larry Di Girolamo b,1 , Shannon Geegan a a Department of Geography, University of Illinois, 220 Davenport Hall, 607 S. Mathews Ave, Urbana, IL 61801, USA b Dept. of Atmospheric Sciences

  2. Self-revegetation of disturbed ground in the deserts of Nevada and Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rickard, W.H.; Sauer, R.H.

    1982-01-01

    Plant cover established without purposeful soil preparation or seeding was measured on ground disturbed by plowing in Washington and by aboveground nuclear explosions in Nevada. After a time lapse of three decades in Washington and two decades in Nevada, fewer species were self-established on the disturbed ground than the nearby undisturbed ground. Alien annual plants were the dominants on the disturbed ground. Cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum) dominated abandoned fields in Washington, and filaree (Erodium cicutarium) dominated disturbed ground in Nevada. Perennial grasses and shrubs appeared to be more successful as invaders in Nevada than in Washington. This distinction is attributed to the superior competitive ability of cheatgrass in Washington.

  3. Introducing a terrestrial carbon pool in warm desert bedrock mountains, southwestern USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dorn, Ron

    short-term sources, such as fossil fuel combustion and changes in land cover biomass [Liu et al., 2003 to be balanced by rates of weathering and geologic CO2 emissions [Sundquist, 1993]. Decay of calcium

  4. Observed 20th century desert dust variability: impact on climate and biogeochemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01

    Bhattacharya 3 , M. A. J. Curran 7,8 , M. G. Flanner 9 , F.Godwin, I. , Morgan, V. , Curran, M. A. J. , van Ommen, T.

  5. ANCIENT CALENDRICAL OBSERVING SITES IN CALIFORNIA’S MOJAVE DESERT AND SIERRA NEVADA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Merle F

    2012-01-01

    Rocks 4 Observing the Equinox 5 Mid-Season Day at Counselmodels: Shadow tracks on day of autumnal equinox . . .on day after autumnal equinox . Barrier Hill: Cairn, with

  6. Distribution of Soil Temperature Regimes and Climate Change in the Mojave Desert Region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bai, Yanying

    2009-01-01

    W.Kingman Ariz. E.Yucca Ariz. Alamo Rd Ariz. N F S N S N S SW.Kingman Ariz. E.Yucca Ariz. Alamo Rd Ariz. Longitude ( o )

  7. Testing the Extensional Detachment Paradigm: A Borehole Observatory in the Sevier Desert Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christie-Blick, Nicholas

    Scientific Drilling, No. 8, September 2009 57 doi:10.2204/iodp.sd.8.09.2009 Low-angle normal faults of forty-seven scientists and drilling experts from five countries met for four days on 15­18 July 2008 was held at two venues in Utah (the Utah Department of Natural Resources in Salt Lake City, and Solitude

  8. Desertion of the colonists of New Mexico 1601: 3d part

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carlin, A. Roberta; De Marco, Barbara; Craddock, Jerry R; Polt, John H. R.

    2013-01-01

    y conbento con dos o tres espa- ñoles y otro en Santa Claravenirse a esta Nueva Espa- 10 ña con los dichos conpañeros;temen muncho a los dichos espa- ñoles y anssi no an fecho

  9. Research news: UC Desert Research and Extension Center celebrates 100 years

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meadows, Robin

    2012-01-01

    desertresearch UC ANR Research and Extension Center Systemacres. Results of first research on artificial shades forIttner and C.F. Kelly; research by V.E. Mendel, W.N. Garrett

  10. An Investigation into Early Desert Pastoralism: Excavations at the Camel Site, Negev

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosen, Steven A

    2011-01-01

    London. Porat, N. 1989 Petrography of Pottery from SouthernPress, Cambridge. Porat, N. 1989 Petrography of Pottery frombased on both typology and petrography, and ev- idence for

  11. ANCIENT CALENDRICAL OBSERVING SITES IN CALIFORNIA’S MOJAVE DESERT AND SIERRA NEVADA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Merle F

    2012-01-01

    models: Shadow tracks on day of autumnal equinox . . .tracks on day after autumnal equinox . Barrier Hill: Cairn,day following the autumnal equinox, produced by the gnomons

  12. Groundwater recharge in natural dune systems and agricultural ecosystems in the Thar Desert region, Rajasthan, India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scanlon, Bridget R.

    Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s10040-009-0555-7) contains

  13. City of Palm Desert This page outlines solar PV incentives, financing mechanisms, permitting process, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ://www.dsireusa.org/incentives/incentive.cfm?Incentive_Code=U S02F&re=1&ee=1 Third Party Ownership o Solar Power Purchase Agreements · A Solar Power Purchase to the host customer. o Solar Leases · Solar Leases are similar to Power Purchase Agreements in that a third PV system to be interconnected to your utility's power grid · California Solar Statistics provides

  14. Miocene unroofing of the Canyon Range during extension along the Sevier Desert Detachment, west central Utah

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stockli, Daniel F.; Linn, Jonathan K.; Walker, J. Douglas; Dumitru, Trevor A.

    2001-06-01

    Apatite fission track results from Neoproterozoic and Lower Cambrian quartzites collected from the Canyon Range in west central Utah reveal a significant early to middle Miocene cooling event (?19–15 Ma). Preextensional temperatures estimated from...

  15. DESERT SOUTHWEST REGION FY15 TEN-YEAR APPROPRIATED CAPITAL PROGRAM

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    water projects. Western's transmission system carries electricity from 57 power plants. These power plants are operated by agencies such as the Bureau of Reclamation, U.S....

  16. Assessing the potential for luminescence dating in the Mojave Desert, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roder, Belinda J.

    2012-01-01

    deposits where offset landforms necessary for measuring rates of strike-slip movement are often found. Uranium-

  17. Coupled Environmental Processes in the Mojave Desert and Implications for ET Covers as Stable Landforms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. Shafer; M. Y oung; S. Zitzer; E. McDonald; T. Caldwell

    2006-01-18

    Monolayer evapotranspiration (ET) covers are the baseline method for closure of disposal sites for low-level radioactive waste (LLW), mixed LLW, and transuranic (TRU) waste at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The regulatory timeline is typically 1,000 years for LLW and 10,000 years for TRU waste. Covers for such waste have different technical considerations than those with shorter timelines because they are subject to environmental change for longer periods of time, and because the environmental processes are often coupled. To evaluate these changes, four analog sites (approximately 30, 1,000 to 2,000, 7,000 to 12,500, and 125,000 years in age) on the NTS were analyzed to address the early post-institutional control period (the youngest site), the 1,000-year compliance period for disposal of LLW, and the 10,000-year period for TRU waste. Tests included soil texture, structure, and morphology; surface soil infiltration and hydraulic conductivity; vegetation and faunal surveys; and literature reviews. Separate measurements were made in plant undercanopy and intercanopy areas. The results showed a progressive increase in silt and clay content of surface soils with age. Changes in soil texture and structure led to a fivefold decline in saturated hydraulic conductivity in intercanopy areas, but no change in undercanopies, which were subject to bioturbation. These changes may have been responsible for the reduction in total plant cover, most dramatically in intercanopy areas, primarily because more precipitation either runs off the site or is held nearer to the surface where plant roots are less common. The results suggest that covers may evolve over longer timeframes to stable landforms that minimize the need for active maintenance.

  18. Food Deserts and Eating Habits of Children Participating in the WIC Program 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jewell, Kassi Kae

    2013-08-07

    . Alaska, Hawaii and Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands have been excluded because the USDA data does not include these states, and the western region Indian tribes have been excluded in order to decrease confounding factors. The goal...

  19. Soil Formation and Transport Processes on Hillslopes along a Precipitation Gradient in the Atacama Desert, Chile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Owen, Justine J.

    2009-01-01

    Nacional de Geología y Minería. Geologic map No. 18, 1:Nacional de Geología y Minería. Geologic map No. 18, 1:Nacional de Geología y Minería, Geologic map of Chile No. 5-

  20. Soil Formation and Transport Processes on Hillslopes along a Precipitation Gradient in the Atacama Desert, Chile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Owen, Justine J.

    2009-01-01

    R. 2006. A threshold in soil formation at Earth's arid-R. , 2006, A threshold in soil formation at Earth's arid-in situ aqueous alteration of soils on Mars. Geochimica et

  1. PATTERNS OF MORPHOLOGY AND RESOURCE USE IN NORTH AMERICAN DESERT RODENT COMMUNITIES'

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, James H.

    of good experimental studies of predation in terrestrial vertebrate systems. We outline a general protocol. Hart Merriam-- who developed their ideas about limits to an- imal distributions in large part from

  2. Biocontrol of Lettuce Drop Caused by Sclerotinia sclerotiorum and S. minor in Desert Agroecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subbarao, Krishna V

    2008-01-01

    application of fungal biocontrol agents for the control ofpure cultures of each biocontrol agent and transferred intoFig. 3). The other biocontrol agents and Rovral did not

  3. The War in the Desert: The Vietnam Antiwar Movement in the American Southwest 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ward, Brandon M.

    2010-10-12

    The Vietnam antiwar movement developed in the American Southwest out of a coalition of Chicanos, GI's, and students who agreed that the Vietnam War was racist, imperialist, costly, and negatively affected them and their communities. The antiwar...

  4. Molecular hydrogen uptake by soils in forest, desert, and marsh ecosystems in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith-Downey, Nicole V; Randerson, James T; Eiler, John M

    2008-01-01

    deposition to boreal forest soil in southern Finland,The over- whelming role of soils in the global atmosphericuptake by temperate forest soils: The effects of leaves and

  5. Isolation of a significant fraction of non-phototroph diversity from a desert Biological Soil Crust

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Nunes da Rocha, Ulisses; Cadillo-Quiroz, Hinsby; Karaoz, Ulas; Rajeev, Lara; Klitgord, Niels; Dunn, Sean; Truong, Viet; Buenrostro, Mayra; Bowen, Benjamin P.; Garcia-Pichel, Ferran; et al

    2015-04-14

    Biological Soil Crusts (BSCs) are organosedimentary assemblages comprised of microbes and minerals in topsoil of terrestrial environments. BSCs strongly impact soil quality in dryland ecosystems (e.g., soil structure and nutrient yields) due to pioneer species such as Microcoleus vaginatus; phototrophs that produce filaments that bind the soil together, and support an array of heterotrophic microorganisms. These microorganisms in turn contribute to soil stability and biogeochemistry of BSCs. Non-cyanobacterial populations of BSCs are less well known than cyanobacterial populations. Therefore, we attempted to isolate a broad range of numerically significant and phylogenetically representative BSC aerobic heterotrophs. Combining simple pre-treatments (hydration ofmore »BSCs under dark and light) and isolation strategies (media with varying nutrient availability and protection from oxidative stress) we recovered 402 bacterial and one fungal isolate in axenic culture, which comprised 116 phylotypes (at 97% 16S rRNA gene sequence homology), 115 bacterial and one fungal. Each medium enriched a mostly distinct subset of phylotypes, and cultivated phylotypes varied due to the BSC pre-treatment. The fraction of the total phylotype diversity isolated, weighted by relative abundance in the community, was determined by the overlap between isolate sequences and OTUs reconstructed from metagenome or metatranscriptome reads. Together, more than 8% of relative abundance of OTUs in the metagenome was represented by our isolates, a cultivation efficiency much larger than typically expected from most soils. We conclude that simple cultivation procedures combined with specific pre-treatment of samples afford a significant reduction in the culturability gap, enabling physiological and metabolic assays that rely on ecologically relevant axenic cultures.« less

  6. Isolation of a significant fraction of non-phototroph diversity from a desert Biological Soil Crust

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nunes da Rocha, Ulisses; Cadillo-Quiroz, Hinsby; Karaoz, Ulas; Rajeev, Lara; Klitgord, Niels; Dunn, Sean; Truong, Viet; Buenrostro, Mayra; Bowen, Benjamin P.; Garcia-Pichel, Ferran; Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila; Northen, Trent R.; Brodie, Eoin L.

    2015-04-14

    Biological Soil Crusts (BSCs) are organosedimentary assemblages comprised of microbes and minerals in topsoil of terrestrial environments. BSCs strongly impact soil quality in dryland ecosystems (e.g., soil structure and nutrient yields) due to pioneer species such as Microcoleus vaginatus; phototrophs that produce filaments that bind the soil together, and support an array of heterotrophic microorganisms. These microorganisms in turn contribute to soil stability and biogeochemistry of BSCs. Non-cyanobacterial populations of BSCs are less well known than cyanobacterial populations. Therefore, we attempted to isolate a broad range of numerically significant and phylogenetically representative BSC aerobic heterotrophs. Combining simple pre-treatments (hydration of BSCs under dark and light) and isolation strategies (media with varying nutrient availability and protection from oxidative stress) we recovered 402 bacterial and one fungal isolate in axenic culture, which comprised 116 phylotypes (at 97% 16S rRNA gene sequence homology), 115 bacterial and one fungal. Each medium enriched a mostly distinct subset of phylotypes, and cultivated phylotypes varied due to the BSC pre-treatment. The fraction of the total phylotype diversity isolated, weighted by relative abundance in the community, was determined by the overlap between isolate sequences and OTUs reconstructed from metagenome or metatranscriptome reads. Together, more than 8% of relative abundance of OTUs in the metagenome was represented by our isolates, a cultivation efficiency much larger than typically expected from most soils. We conclude that simple cultivation procedures combined with specific pre-treatment of samples afford a significant reduction in the culturability gap, enabling physiological and metabolic assays that rely on ecologically relevant axenic cultures.

  7. Distribution of Soil Temperature Regimes and Climate Change in the Mojave Desert Region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bai, Yanying

    2009-01-01

    and H. Diaz (eds). El Niño and the Southern Oscillation:and D. Parker. 1996. El Niño Southern Oscillation and285 Bowers, J. E. 2005. El Nino and displays of spring-

  8. Distribution of Soil Temperature Regimes and Climate Change in the Mojave Desert Region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bai, Yanying

    2009-01-01

    after time t, the mean reaction velocity coefficient ( k )? x )] [Eq. 3-2] The reaction velocity is proportion to thereaction depends on temperature according to the Van Hoff-Arrhenius law, namely, the logarithm of the velocity

  9. Trace-element evidence for the origin of desert varnish by direct aqueous atmospheric deposition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Cin-Ty Aeolus

    , Ni, Pb and the rare-earth elements (REEs). In particular, they have anomalously high Ce/La and low Y Nivedita Thiagarajan, Cin-Ty Aeolus Lee* Department of Earth Science, MS-126, Rice University, Houston, TX elemental fractionations. One remaining possibility is that the Fe, Mn and trace metals in varnish

  10. Watering the Desert: Environment, Irrigation, and Society in the Premodern Fayyum, Egypt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haug, Brendan James

    2012-01-01

    Delta Barrage of Lower Egypt (National Printing Department:a problem throughout Egypt and declarations of uninundated241, ll. 11-12: ???????? Egypt requires approximately 1.25

  11. Thermal Performance of Exposed Composed Roofs in Very Hot Dry Desert Region in Egypt (Toshky) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khalil, M. H.; Sheble, S.; Morsey, M. S.; Fakhry, S.

    2010-01-01

    is considered the major part of the building envelop which exposed to high thermal load due to the high solar intensity and high outdoor air temperature through summer season which reach to 6 months. In Egypt the thermal effect of roof is increased as one go...

  12. Distribution of Soil Temperature Regimes and Climate Change in the Mojave Desert Region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bai, Yanying

    2009-01-01

    1. Locations of the soil temperature monitoring sites in the6-1. Paired soil temperature monitoring sites and weatherW.R. , 1980. Monitoring long term temperature and humidity.

  13. Soil Formation and Transport Processes on Hillslopes along a Precipitation Gradient in the Atacama Desert, Chile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Owen, Justine J.

    2009-01-01

    Macalady, J. , Kohl, S. , Wankel, S. , Kendall, C. , McKay,Macalady, J. , Kohl, S. , Wankel, S. , Kendall, C. , Mckay,Quinn R, Macalady J, Kohl S, Wankel S, Kendall C, McKay CP,

  14. Global observations and spectral characteristics of desert dust and biomass burning aerosols

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graaf, Martin de

    the advantage of monitoring of the global atmosphere. The disadvantage is often a poor spacial reso- lution quantity, but a radiation difference in the UV. Its main advantages are its insensitivity to scattering in climate physics today is the effect of aerosols on the global energy budget. The amount and sign

  15. Vesicular Horizon Distribution, Properties, and Pedogenic Processes in Deserts of the Western United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turk, Judith Katherine

    2012-01-01

    feedbacks in global desertification. Science 247:1043-1048.feedbacks in global desertification. Science 247:1043-1048.feedback that promotes desertification in semi-arid lands by

  16. Plant Science Bulletin 55(2) 2009 The Biology of Deserts. Ward, David. 2008. ISBN-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gorelick, Root

    on human influences, desertification, and conservation. While this book usually describes things that many to 2650 rpm and 1.5 m/sec. The author's discussion of desertification has some conventionally bad aspects

  17. Soil Formation and Transport Processes on Hillslopes along a Precipitation Gradient in the Atacama Desert, Chile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Owen, Justine J.

    2009-01-01

    Implications for the desertification of western SouthImplications for the desertification of western SouthImplications for the desertification of western South

  18. Diurnal cycle of land surface temperature in a desert encroachment zone as observed from satellites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , such as onset and termination dates of the rainy season, desertification, and droughts are major issues

  19. Observed 20th century desert dust variability: impact on climate and biogeochemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01

    climate change and desertification in South America, P.precipitation: a possible desertification feedback loop, P.

  20. Plant Science Bulletin 53(4) 2007 Structure and Function of a Chihuahuan Desert

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gorelick, Root

    happen to be former Jornada LTER PIs, repeatedly in one chapter talk about "desertification, primarily of beef cattle. Desertification is a problem if you graze cattle, but should not necessarily

  1. Foraging distances and forager population sizes of the desert termite Gnathamitermes tubiformans (Buckley) (Isoptera: Termitidae) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Narayanan, Anne Michelle

    2005-11-01

    ) with mesh (0.6 cm x 0.6 cm openings) bottom exposed..............10 3. After the five-day foraging period, G. tubiformans were separated from the manure bait using a sorter constructed from an inclined plastic shoebox lid with tubing leading... study that compared areas with termite activity and added straw mulch, plots where termites were present and straw mulch was added, nitrogen soil levels were significantly higher than levels in plots where termites were absent and straw mulch...

  2. Analytical Perspectives on a Protohistoric Cache of Ceramic Jars from the Lower Colorado Desert

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bayman, James M; Hevly, Richard H; Johnson, Boma; Reinhard, Karl J; Ryan, Richard

    1996-01-01

    Sutton, Mark Q. 1988 Insects as Food: Aboriginal Entomophagydocumented that insects were a val- ued food source amongto minimize food loss due to moisture, fungi, insects, or

  3. The Desertion of the colonists of New Mexico 1601: 1st part

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carlin, A. Roberta; De Marco, Barbara; Craddock, Jerry R; Polt, John H. R.

    2013-01-01

    declaraçiones neçesarias, ansi rresçi- viendo los pareçeresde dios y de su magestad y ansi lo haziendo // dixo quede dios y de su magestad y ansi lo haziendo = dixo y depusso

  4. Desertion of the colonists of New Mexico 1601: 2d part

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carlin, A. Roberta; De Marco, Barbara; Craddock, Jerry R; Polt, John H. R.

    2013-01-01

    veera lo que mas convenga e ansi lo proveyo e mando e firmoque biniesen mas cas- tillas que ansi nos llaman ellos y quelas mugeres e haziendas, ansi capitanes como rreligiosos, y

  5. Assessing the potential for luminescence dating in the Mojave Desert, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roder, Belinda J.

    2012-01-01

    3.1.1 Geomorphology 3.1.2 Sedimentology 3.1.3 Field methodssubdued activity. Sedimentology The playa sediments at the

  6. Grassland to shrubland state transitions enhance carbon sequestration in the northern Chihuahuan Desert

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grassland to shrubland state transitions enhance carbon sequestration in the northern Chihuahuan in woody vegetation may be enhanced ecosystem carbon sequestration, although the responses of arid at least be partially offset by increased ecosystem carbon sequestration. Keywords: carbon sequestration

  7. Assessing the potential for luminescence dating in the Mojave Desert, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roder, Belinda J.

    2012-01-01

    IRSL dating. Quaternary Geochronology 2, 216- Wintle, A. ,SAR procedure. Quaternary Geochronology 1, 101-108. Dawson,and behavior. Quaternary Geochronology 5, 91-95. Fletcher,

  8. Project title: Stimulation at Desert Peak and Bradys reservoirs...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Imaging, Characterizing, and Modeling of Fracture Networks and Fluid Flow in EGS Reservoirs; II: Full-Waveform Inversion of 3D-9C VSP...

  9. Stepout-Deepening Wells At San Emidio Desert Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-Enhancing CapacityVectren) Jumpand MaintenanceStationaryStennisColradoInformation

  10. DOE/NV/10845 IT U S VECAS LIBRARY UC-703 I?. DESERT RESEARCH INSTITUTE

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbins and700, 1.Reports1 Rev. 0 EnvironmentalI .

  11. InSAR At Desert Peak Area (Laney, 2005) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas: Energy ResourcesOrder at 8, 13 (Vt. Water Res. Bd. May, 2004) |Coso Geothermal

  12. Ground Gravity Survey At San Emidio Desert Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View New PagesSustainableGlynn County,Solar Jump to:ResourcesGriggsOpen|

  13. Gas Flux Sampling At Desert Peak Area (Lechler And Coolbaugh, 2007) | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View New PagesSustainable UrbanKentucky: Energy Resources JumpGarfieldGarvin

  14. Mercury Vapor At Desert Peak Area (Varekamp & Buseck, 1983) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland: Energy Resources Jump1.2619821°, -80.1875065° Show MapEnergyOpen

  15. Refraction Survey At San Emidio Desert Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onRAPID/Geothermal/Exploration/Colorado <RAPID/Geothermal/WaterEnergyRedfield1989) Jump to:| Open1979)

  16. PSInSAR At San Emidio Desert Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPIProtectio Program | OpenWisconsin:NewOverPPS Enviro Power Pvt

  17. Desert Peak to Humboldt House and Winnemucca, in: Lane, M.A., (ed) Nevada

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar2-0057-EA Jump to: navigation,Department of Defense 3 GW Solarde Lageothermal

  18. Project title: Stimulation at Desert Peak and Bradys reservoirs: modeling

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURINGEnergy Bills andOrderNATIONALofDefineEnergy NationalDepartmentProjectNE

  19. Operation Clean Desert Educates Hundreds of Students on EM Program in

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURINGEnergy Bills and ReduceNovemberDOE'sManagementOpenEI and LinkedNevada | Department

  20. Reflection Survey At San Emidio Desert Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EIS Report UrlNM-b < RAPID‎WindRecycleBank|JemezLaney, 2005)

  1. Regional Gravity Survey of the Northern Great Salt Lake Desert and Adjacent

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EIS Report UrlNM-b <Refurbished Projects Wind Farm

  2. Thermal Gradient Holes At San Emidio Desert Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EISTJ AutomationTexas/WindEnergyOpen

  3. 2-M Probe At Desert Peak Area (Sladek, Et Al., 2007) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EAand Dalton Jump to:Wylie, Texas:V.S.A.EnergyInformation Dead

  4. DESERT RESEARCH INSTITUTE 11 UNIVERSITY OF NEVADA SYSTEM DOE/W/10162--20

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal01 Sandia4) AugustA. Geographic Available for® ALOHA A R E A L%

  5. Flow Test At San Emidio Desert Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButtePowerEdistoWhiskey flatsInformationFlint Geothermal

  6. Geothermometry At Desert Queen Area (Garchar & Arehart, 2008) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource History View New Pages RecentPlant < Geothermal(Redirected fromInformation

  7. Ground Magnetics At San Emidio Desert Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource History View New PagesInformationEnergy Information|Energy|2007)

  8. Micro-Earthquake At Desert Peak Geothermal Area (2011) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource HistoryScenariosMarysville MtMedicalInformation 2-2005) Jump to:11) Jump

  9. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Desert Peak Area (Wisian & Blackwell,

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceII Jump to: navigation, searchsource History View NewOpen Energy

  10. Core Analysis At Desert Peak Area (Laney, 2005) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButtePower Ventures JumpCommercialRenewableGlobal L P JumpFarmCopisaCoram79)

  11. Numerical modeling of aerial bursts and ablation melting of Libyan desert

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTech Connect Nanomechanical switchFlue Gas StreamsConnectArticle)reversal

  12. Stimulation at Desert Peak -modeling with the coupled THM code FEHM

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail. (Conference)Feedback System inStatus of the MEIC ion colliderArticle)(Dataset) |

  13. EA-1912: Midway-Benton No. 1 Rebuild Project, near town of Desert Aire,

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based|Department of Energy 8: DOEFinding of NoDraft EnvironmentalBenton

  14. EIS-0448: First Solar Desert Sunlight Project in Riverside County, CA |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based|DepartmentStatement | Department ofStatement |Statement |Statement

  15. SunLine Tests HHICE Bus in Desert Climate | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURINGEnergyPlan | Department of EnergySummary: The FirstInfrastructureTests HHICE

  16. Desert Sunlight is Shining Example of How DOE Loan Guarantees Helped Launch

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels DataEnergy Webinar:IAbout Us|of EnergySmall Business Forum|Utility-scale

  17. Invasive Plants, Fire Succession, and Restoration of Creosote Bush Scrub in Southern California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steers, Robert Jeremy

    2008-01-01

    Southeastern Deserts Bioregion. Chp 16 in: Sugihara, N. G. ,Southeastern Deserts Bioregion. Chp 16 in: Sugihara, N. G. ,Southeastern Deserts Bioregion. Chp 16 in: Sugihara, N. G. ,

  18. Lightning Arrestor Connectors Production Readiness

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marten, Steve; Linder, Kim; Emmons, Jim; Gomez, Antonio; Hasam, Dawud; Maurer, Michelle

    2008-10-20

    The Lightning Arrestor Connector (LAC), part “M”, presented opportunities to improve the processes used to fabricate LACs. The A## LACs were the first production LACs produced at the KCP, after the product was transferred from Pinnellas. The new LAC relied on the lessons learned from the A## LACs; however, additional improvements were needed to meet the required budget, yield, and schedule requirements. Improvement projects completed since 2001 include Hermetic Connector Sealing Improvement, Contact Assembly molding Improvement, development of a second vendor for LAC shells, general process improvement, tooling improvement, reduction of the LAC production cycle time, and documention of the LAC granule fabrication process. This report summarizes the accomplishments achieved in improving the LAC Production Readiness.

  19. Failure analysis of rutile sleeves in MC3080 lightning arrestor connectors.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kilgo, Alice C.; Monroe, Saundra L.; Watson, Chad Samuel; Ernest, Terry L.

    2006-02-01

    The purpose of this SAND Report is to document efforts in the extraction and failure analyses of sleeve-style Lightning Arrestor Connectors (LACs). Several MC3080 and MC3079 LACs were recovered from the field and tested as part of the Enhanced Surveillance Campaign. A portion of these LACs failed retesting. Terry Ernest (01733), the LAC Component Engineer, provided eleven MC3080 LACs for evaluation where four of the LACs failed IR/DCW and one failed FRB requirements. The extraction of rutile sleeves from failed LACs was required to determine the source of failure. Rutile sleeves associated with connector function failures were examined for cracks, debris as well as any other anomalies which could have caused the LAC to not function properly. Sleeves that failed FRB or that experienced high FRB exhibited high symmetry, smooth surface, long-flow amicon, and slightly over-sized inside diameter. LACs that failed DCW or IR requirements had rutile sleeves that exhibited breakdown tracks.

  20. Livestock stations as foci of groundwater recharge and nitrate leaching in a sandy desert of the Central Monte, Argentina

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nacional de San Luis, Universidad

    of the Central Monte, Argentina Pablo A. Meglioli,1 * Julieta N. Aranibar,1,2 Pablo E. Villagra,1,3 Juan A. Ruiz Leal s/n, Parque General San Martín, CP 5500, Mendoza, Argentina 2 Instituto de Ciencias Básicas, Universidad Nacional de Cuyo, Padre Contreras 1300, Parque General San Martín, CP M5502JMA, Mendoza, Argentina

  1. Comparison of Ambient Radon Concentrations in Air in the Northern Mojave Desert from Continuous and Integrating Instruments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David S. Shafer; David McGraw; Lynn H. Karr; Greg McCurdy; Tammy L. Kluesner; Karen J. Gray; Jeffrey Tappen

    2010-05-18

    As part of a program to characterize and baseline environmental parameters, ambient radon-222 (Rn) monitoring was conducted in the rural community of Amargosa Valley, NV, the closest community to Yucca Mountain. Passive integrating and continuous Rn monitoring instruments were deployed adjacent to the Community Environmental Monitoring Program (CEMP) station in Amargosa Valley. The CEMP station provided real-time ambient gamma exposure and meteorological data used to correct the integrated Rn measurements, verified the meteorological data collected by the continuous Rn monitoring instrument, and for provided instrumentation for evaluating the relationships between meteorological conditions and Rn concentrations. Hourly Rn concentrations in air measured by the continuous Rn monitoring instrument (AlphaGUARD®) were compared to the average hourly values for the integrating Rn measurements (E-PERM®) by dividing the total Rn measurements by the number of hours the instruments were deployed. The results of the comparison indicated that average hourly ambient Rn concentrations as measured by both methods ranged from 0.2 to 0.4 pico-curies per liter of air. Ambient Rn values for the AlphaGUARD exhibited diurnal variations. When Rn concentrations were compared with measurements of temperature (T), barometric pressure, and relative humidity, the correlation (inversely) was highest with T, albeit weakly.

  2. High Bacterial Diversity of Biological Soil Crusts in Water Tracks over Permafrost in the High Arctic Polar Desert

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vincent, Warwick F.

    abundance based on their location either inside or outside of the water tracks. Among cyanobacterial to publish, or preparation of the manuscript. Competing Interests: The authors have declared tracks have been shown to alter nutrient flow and increase plant productivity in tundra soils [2

  3. Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 329: Area 22 Desert Rock Airstrip Fuel Spill with Errata Sheet, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Navarro Nevada Environmental Services

    2010-08-10

    In Appendix 0, Use Restriction (UR) Form, the drawing of the use restricted area shows the incorrect coordinates for the use restricted area, the coordinates on the drawing do not match the approved UR Form. The coordinates have been verified and this Errata Sheet replaces the drawing of the use restricted area with an aerial photo showing the use restricted area and the correct coordinates that match the approved UR Form.

  4. Solar Power in the Desert: Are the current large-scale solar developments really improving California’s environment?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allen, Michael F.; McHughen, Alan

    2011-01-01

    solar energy: Photovoltaic vs Solar Thermal. In: Planetaryexpectancy of a thermal solar energy development? A common

  5. Blue fan palm distribution and seed removal patterns in three desert oases of northern Baja California, Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wehncke, Elisabet V.; López-Medellín, Xavier; Ezcurra, Exequiel

    2010-01-01

    DOI 10.1007/s11258-009-9682-4 Blue fan palm distribution anddistribution patterns of the blue fan palm, Brahea armata,evaluating (i) the levels of blue fan palm seed removal by

  6. Using Stable Isotopes of Nitrogen and Oxygen as Environmental Indicators of Nitrogen Deposition in the Sonoran Desert

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bell, Michael David

    2012-01-01

    the Denitrifier Method. Analytical Chemistry 74:4905-4912.Isotopic Analyses. Analytical Chemistry 83:1850-1856.the Denitrifier Method. Analytical Chemistry 74:4905-4912.

  7. Solar Power in the Desert: Are the current large-scale solar developments really improving California’s environment?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allen, Michael F.; McHughen, Alan

    2011-01-01

    we are not objecting to renewable energy development in theWe can do the same with renewable energy projects. However,

  8. Specters in the Sand: The Urban Hauntings in Alicia Gaspar de Alba’s Desert Blood: The Juárez Murders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ocegueda, Isela

    2008-01-01

    279. Symons, Julian. Bloody Murder: From the Detective Story10 Trujillo, Patricia. “Juárez murders are the subject ofA True Story of Serial Murder South of the Border. New York:

  9. The origin of a derived superkingdom: how a gram-positive bacterium crossed the desert to become an archaeon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valas, Ruben E; Bourne, Philip E

    2011-01-01

    with enough bacteria to need the resistance inferred by thisEven though bacteria are able to gain resistance through a

  10. ANCIENT CALENDRICAL OBSERVING SITES IN CALIFORNIA’S MOJAVE DESERT AND SIERRA NEVADA, 2nd Edition April 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Merle

    2013-01-01

    models: Shadow tracks on day of autumnal equinox . . .on day after autumnal equinox . Barrier Hill: Cairn, withRocks 4 Observing the Equinox 5 Mid-Season Day at Counsel

  11. Combined effects of precipitation and nitrogen deposition on native and invasive winter annual production in California deserts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rao, Leela E.; Allen, Edith B.

    2010-01-01

    2 . The only harvests with a signiWcant water eVect were theBy the Wnal harvest, the plants in the high-water treatmentNo N £ water interactions were observed at any harvest for

  12. EA-1912: Midway-Benton No. 1 Rebuild Project, near town of Desert Aire, Benton County, WA

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal by DOE’s Bonneville Power Administration to rebuild its existing Midway-Benton No.1 transmission line in place, or to reroute a portion of the Midway-Benton No. 1 transmission line that currently crosses Gable Mountain and Gable Butte in order to avoid crossing these features.

  13. Rich lizards: How affluence and land cover influence the diversity and abundance of desert reptiles persisting in an urban landscape

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Angilletta, Michael

    development could lower water and energy use while benefiting lizards in undisturbed habitats. However introduce exotic plants and supplement natural sources of food and water for animals (Fuller et al., 2008

  14. Lunette dunes and yardangs of the Carson desert, Nevada: Implications for Holocene eolian activity in the northern Great Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lancaster, N. (Desert Research Inst., Reno, NV (United States). Quaternary Sciences Center)

    1993-04-01

    A large complex of lunette dunes consisting of two and locally three ridges up to 40 m high occurs on the northeast margin of the Carson Sink playa. The outer, or north-easterly, ridge consists of a core of fine and coarse and partially cemented by saline clay and silt (Unit 1) with avalanche face cross-beds dipping to the north-east at 25--30[degree], as well as planar sets of wind ripple laminae with dips to both the northeast and west at 2--5[degree]. Overlying this unit on the crest and lee side of the ridge is 2--5 m of mobile poorly sorted, very fine and coarse sand that forms an active avalanche face up to 25 m high on the east side of the ridge (Unit 3). At a number of localities, the indurated core of the larger dune ridge is carved into yardanges, or streamlined small hills with a lemniscate shape that result from wind erosion of homogeneous sediments. The dunes overlie, with an erosional contact, Late Pleistocene saline lacustrine clays of paleolake Lahontan. They represent at least two episodes of mid- to late-Holocene deflation of sediments from the Carson Sink playa. Erosion of the dunes and yardang formation suggests: (1) termination of sediment supply from the playa as a result of reduced sediment supply and runoff from the Carson River, (2) cementation of the dunes by clay and silt accumulation, and (3) modern eolian erosion through flow acceleration on dune windward slopes.

  15. Neogene to Quaternary tectonics of the Garlock Fault and the Eastern California shear zone in the northern Mojave Desert, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rittase, William Michael

    2012-12-31

    and student workers - Jenna Coker (for taking care of my plants while away for field work), Yolanda, Gwethalyn (super helpful and all-around awesome person!), Liz, Maria and Sarah. I thank Dr. Bob Goldstein, the former department chair, for forgiving me...

  16. ANCIENT CALENDRICAL OBSERVING SITES IN CALIFORNIA’S MOJAVE DESERT AND SIERRA NEVADA, 2nd Edition April 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Merle

    2013-01-01

    models: Shadow tracks on day of autumnal equinox . . .tracks on day after autumnal equinox . Barrier Hill: Cairn,day following the autumnal equinox, produced by the gnomons

  17. A gravity study of the Great Basin-Sonoran Desert transition zone, Basin and Range province, western United States 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brooks, Debra Ann

    1989-01-01

    120 118P 116 112 p QQg g, , h(Q ( ~pi Qpj -~, , ) go q t) ( g' 0 ~a ~ce i(( Q "I, ';;, ( (qy p, , ~, O, j ~, g r~~ g 9 I i i Q Q CI 0 D & OO i j~g ? - i (oft c QP. T28 g igO ~0~ (, . &, o ~ D -/gE. - . ~, ~ o Cj) 4 L ', 8 Q '0... '. i 0 ~ g ' 0 0 O& Qo 0 ' '5 -i-"'. "'~ Q~~ g D, fJ I , //) 'i) () j 0 f &yP// + /j, 1f g('. ((jj() (', ' i ' (iQ' /O Qo I 38' ), &, x. Ji, (n , gi, (0(, , 4. ~. (7'~(, , . , ) ?. ), ((, ($, 2, g(P) o )r~ C O gc 0 (fi ~~o 0 , :Qa 0...

  18. Solar Power in the Desert: Are the current large-scale solar developments really improving California’s environment?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allen, Michael F.; McHughen, Alan

    2011-01-01

    habitat loss from solar and thermal power expansions (Photovoltaic vs Solar Thermal. In: Planetary Stewardship.of the vegetation for thermal solar power units. The net C

  19. Solar Power in the Desert: Are the current large-scale solar developments really improving California’s environment?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allen, Michael F.; McHughen, Alan

    2011-01-01

    Jenerette. 2010. Box 11: Two paths towards solar energy:Photovoltaic vs Solar Thermal. In: Planetary Stewardship.government betting on the wrong solar horse. Natural Gas &

  20. Two ITS forms co-inhabiting a single genet of an isolate of Terfezia boudieri (Ascomycotina), a desert truffle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zur, Varda Kagan

    (Machery- surface-sterilised (dipped in 95% ethanol and fire Nagel, Duren, GmbH) and sent for sequencing

  1. Workshop on Physics beyond the Standard Model ... "Beyond the Desert" Accelerator-and Non-Accelerator approaches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    surround the detectors, as well as Pb and polyethylene passive shielding. The detectors are operated

  2. Ripe for investment : refocusing the food desert debate on smaller stores, wholesale markets and regional distribution systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tamis, Laurie P

    2009-01-01

    This thesis argues that food distribution systems must be strengthened in order to address the challenge of urban food access. The argument rests on a historical analysis of the supermarket industry and a comparative study ...

  3. Specters in the Sand: The Urban Hauntings in Alicia Gaspar de Alba’s Desert Blood: The Juárez Murders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ocegueda, Isela

    2008-01-01

    Specters in the Sand: The Urban Hauntings in Alicia Gasparentitled “Specters in the Sand: The Urban Hauntings in

  4. Marking boundary : a didactic base camp facility between desert and mountain, along the Los Angeles aqueduct in Owens Valley, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johns, Christopher Aaron, 1977-

    2004-01-01

    No problem for the future holds so great a potential for changing the quality of life in California as water and its supportive infrastructure. An obsession with water, which began with the infamous five words "there it ...

  5. Using Stable Isotopes of Nitrogen and Oxygen as Environmental Indicators of Nitrogen Deposition in the Sonoran Desert

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bell, Michael David

    2012-01-01

    Applications 7:737-750. Wankel, S. D. , C. Kendall, C. A.E. M. , C. Kendall, S. D. Wankel, D. A. Burns, E. W. Boyer,E. M. , C. Kendall, S. D. Wankel, D. A. Burns, E. W. Boyer,

  6. The Bulletin, Mount Desert Island Biological Laboratory 2004, volume 43, 99-101 The mechanical consequences of vertebral centra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long Jr., John H.

    on the axial skeleton's mechanical properties. Fig. 1. Artificial vertebral column. Hagfish notochord (inner consequences of vertebral centra John H. Long, Jr.1 , Magdalena Koob-Emunds2 , Thomas J. Koob2 1 Department Biology Shriners Hospital for Children, Tampa, FL 33612 In spite of their name, the first vertebrates

  7. Solar Power in the Desert: Are the current large-scale solar developments really improving California’s environment?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allen, Michael F.; McHughen, Alan

    2011-01-01

    expectancy of a thermal solar energy development? A commontowards solar energy: Photovoltaic vs Solar Thermal. In:

  8. Combined effects of precipitation and nitrogen deposition on native and invasive winter annual production in California deserts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rao, Leela E.; Allen, Edith B.

    2010-01-01

    E R Combined eVects of precipitation and nitrogen depositionN deposition and precipitation regimes altered as aby November–December precipitation. Biomass exceeded the

  9. Conservation Planning for Offsetting the Impacts of Development: A Case Study of Biodiversity and Renewable Energy in the Mojave Desert.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kreitler, J; Schloss, CA; Soong, O; Hannah, L; Davis, FW

    2015-01-01

    that will be impacted by potential solar sites are used forthe potential impacts to biodi- versity from a solarsolar facilities (http://www.energy.ca.gov/ 33by2020/). We queried this database to determine the location and size of potential

  10. The origin of a derived superkingdom: how a gram-positive bacterium crossed the desert to become an archaeon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valas, Ruben E; Bourne, Philip E

    2011-01-01

    Bourne: The origin of a derived superkingdom: how a gram-Access The origin of a derived superkingdom: how a gram-evidence that archaea are derived, as well as their biggest

  11. Atmos. Chem. Phys., 8, 51615186, 2008 www.atmos-chem-phys.net/8/5161/2008/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meskhidze, Nicholas

    , as well as strong sources, of light absorbing carbon (LAC). The ratio of LAC to CO concentration regulated truck traffic). The daytime average mid-visible single scattering albedo of 0.87 appears

  12. CX-003491: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Fond du Lac Hydroelectric ProjectCX(s) Applied: B5.1Date: 08/17/2010Location(s): Fond du Lac, MinnesotaOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office

  13. BACTERIAL PROTEIN EXPRESSION SYSTEM CASCADE (*) is a bacterial protein expression system that provides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lebendiker, Mario

    . (*) CASCADE is a trade mark of Active Motif, Inc., Carlsbad. The CASCADE expression system is patent pending sal m xylS2 nahR sal Xyl m lacZa cZ - + - + - + b-galactosidase XylS2 NahR XylS2NahR lacZa cZ lacZa c

  14. Honorary Recognition 1909-2013 City County

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walworth George Cook Hill Rosendale Fond du Lac Seaman Asahel Knapp Washington, DC 1911 Alexander Galbraith Bridgman Stanley Chippewa Theophilus Levi Haecker St. Anthony Park, MN Edwin Chauncey Jacobs Elk Mound Dunn. Brace Lone Rock Richland Charles Lewis Hill Rosendale Fond du Lac Mina O'Neil Hill Rosendale Fond du Lac

  15. Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Western Area PowerAdministratio...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Desert Southwest Region Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region Categorical Exclusion Determinations issued by Western Area...

  16. Numerical simulation study of silica and calcite dissolution around a geothermal well by injecting high pH solutions with chelating agent.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Tianfu

    2009-01-01

    at the Desert Peak east EGS area, Nevada, In Proceedings ofthe Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) site at Desert Peak (chemical stimulation of an EGS reservoir. A general kinetic

  17. On modeling of chemical stimulation of an enhanced geothermal system using a high pH solution with chelating agent

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, T.

    2009-01-01

    at the Desert Peak east EGS area, Nevada, In Proceedings ofof enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) on the United States inthe Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) site at Desert Peak (

  18. BERGMANN'S RULE AND CLIMATIC ADAPTATION IN WOODRATS (NEOTOMA)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, James H.

    (California) nearSequoia National Park, 1800 Giant Forest N. cinerea Tulare Co., California High desert

  19. Salinity controls on trophic interactions among invertebrates and algae of solar evaporation ponds in the Mojave Desert and relation to shorebird foraging and selenium risk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herbst, David B

    2006-01-01

    AMONG INVERTEBRATES AND ALGAE OF SOLAR EVAPORATION PONDS INplanktonic invertebrates and algae present along with avianof invertebrates and algae, and avian foraging were examined

  20. Impact of Desert Dust Radiative Forcing on Sahel Precipitation: Relative Importance of Dust Compared to Sea Surface Temperature Variations, Vegetation Changes, and Greenhouse Gas Warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01

    Vegetation Changes, and Greenhouse Gas Warming M ASARU Yin the simulation. Greenhouse gas warming * The Nationalvegetation change, and greenhouse gas (GHG) warming using

  1. Initial evidence of path integration in desert sand scorpions. Douglas D. Gaffin, Jay E. Vinnedge, Tristan N. Barker; University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma, USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gaffin, Doug

    selected areas. 10 cm Tail Photoreceptor ? (light) Medial Eyes (light) Trichobothria (mechanical) Pec:nes (chemical) Lateral Eyes (light) Constella:on Array (thermal displaced. Scorpion accidently dragged away from its burrow never gets back home. Path integra3on A B C

  2. The natural geochemistry of tetrafluoromethane and sulfur hexafluoride : : studies of ancient Mojave Desert groundwaters, North Pacific seawaters and the summit emissions of Kilauea Volcano

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deeds, Daniel A.

    2008-01-01

    5.1 with an in-situ helium production rate of 4.4 × 10 – cmhelium abundance, the crustal degassing of 4 He must be roughly equivalent to its radiogenic production

  3. The Natural Geochemistry of Tetrafluoromethane and Sulfur Hexafluoride : Studies of Ancient Mojave Desert Groundwaters, North Pacific Seawaters and the Summit Emissions of Kilauea Volcano

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deeds, Daniel A

    2008-01-01

    5.1 with an in-situ helium production rate of 4.4 × 10 – cmhelium abundance, the crustal degassing of 4 He must be roughly equivalent to its radiogenic production

  4. Nomad rover field experiment, Atacama desert, Chile 2. Identification of paleolife evidence using a robotic vehicle: Lessons and recommendations for a Mars sample return mission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cabrol, N. A.; Bettis III, E. A.; Glenister, B. F.; Chong, G.; Herrera, C.; Jensen, A.; Pereira, M.; Stoker, R.; Grin, E. A.; Landheim, R.; Thomas, G.; Golden, Jennifer E.; Saville, K.; Ludvigson, Gregory A.; Witzke, B.

    2001-04-25

    69-G81, 1970. Ramirez, C. F., and M. Gardeweg, Carta geo16gica de Chile, region de Antofagasta, scale 1:250,000, Serv. Nac. de Geol. y Mineria Chile, 1982. Squyres, S. W., et al., The Athena Mars Rover Science Payload, paper presented at Mars...

  5. Salinity controls on trophic interactions among invertebrates and algae of solar evaporation ponds in the Mojave Desert and relation to shorebird foraging and selenium risk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herbst, David B

    2006-01-01

    arti?cial salt evaporation ponds of the San Fran- cisco Bayindustrial evaporation ponds. Water Environment Research 71:Hydrobiology of the Alviso salt ponds. Ecol- ogy 38:382–385.

  6. An Experimental Study of Competition between Seed-Eating Desert Rodents and Ants Author(s): James H. Brown, Diane W. Davidson, O. J. Reichman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, James H.

    , available at . http://www.jstor.org/page/info/about/policies/terms.jsp. JSTOR's Terms and Conditions of Use) and the struc? ture and function of natural communities (e.g., Cody and Diamond, 1975; see Wiens, 1977 competition between them is implicitly assumed. How? ever, if food, space, or other resources are sufficiently

  7. A comparison of methods for estimating fractional green vegetation cover within a desert-to-upland transition zone in central New Mexico, USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiao, Jingfeng

    , University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-3220, USA b Department of Geography and Curriculum in Ecology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-3220, USA Received., 2001; Tueller, 1987; Ward & Robinson, 2000). Thus, fractional green vegetation cover ( fc

  8. Secretary Chu Announces Funding for Clean Energy Projects on...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Lac Court Oreilles Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians Feasibility: Renewables Hydro-power WI 201,643 0 201,643 Lower Sioux Indian Community Feasibility: Renewables...

  9. -galactosidase histochemistrical analysis Whole mount X-gal staining and histology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ferrocyanide (5 mM) (Sigma P-9387, FW 422.4) in lacZ rinse solution Sectioning of X-gal stained embryos 1

  10. Sculpting bespoke mountains: Determining free energies with basis...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ; McGovern, Michael 2 ; de Pablo, Juan J. 3 + Show Author Affiliations Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Notre Dame du Lac, Notre Dame,...

  11. University of Alberta Library Release Form

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Venturelli, Paul

    of Alberta, the Mountain Equipment Co-operative, and an NSERC operating grant to Dr. Bill Tonn. The Lac La Fisheries Biologist Chris Davis, who endorsed this pr

  12. A Gooooodmorning! Spring has sprung! Thank goodness too, winter was really

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New South Wales, University of

    Award. Then going back out west, we check out the current Desert Equinox exhibition featuring works 8 - 9. Kudos Award 10 - 11. WHAT'S ON 12 - 13. Desert Equinox Exhibition 14 - 15. The Green House 18

  13. Executive Summary Today NASA pursues technical innovations and scientific discoveries to advance human exploration ofspace.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    ) .......................................................................................................................... Page 36 Pavilion Lake, British Columbia, Canada is home to rare carbonate structures called the last few years: *Desert Research and Technology Studies (Desert RATS, Mars, and other planetary bodies by testing technologies and operations and conducting science research

  14. Photo of the Week: Mapping the Link between Invasive Plants and...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Mapping the Link between Invasive Plants and Wildfire in the Mojave Desert Photo of the Week: Mapping the Link between Invasive Plants and Wildfire in the Mojave Desert August 21,...

  15. Re-evaluation of mid-Holocene deposits at Quebrada Puripica, northern Chile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    canyon systems, such as R|¤o Puripica, when stream power and channel erosion is reduced during prolonged in arid and semiarid regions, including the Sinai Desert, Egypt (Gladfelter, 1990), Mojave Desert

  16. A B C D E F G H A B C D E F G H

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rohs, Remo

    UKC CHP HC2 HSV ZNI ISC NRT HC4 KMC CSA CSC CCC LAC + USC Outpatient Facility LAC + USC Inpatient Teaching and Research E5 CCC Child Care Center G4 CHP Center for the Health Professions F3 CLB Clinical Floor F4 CHP CHP Executive Conference, Room 102 F3 CSC Harkness Assembly, Room 250 H3 HC4 USC Healthcare

  17. UHP Parking A B C D E F G H

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leahy, Richard M.

    CSB TRC CHP HCT CPT HSV ZNI ISC NRT DEI UNH CSA CSB CSC CCC NIT LAC + USC Outpatient Facility LAC Credit Union SRH ATM E4 E4 E4 UNH ATM G3 CHP ATM F3 Auditoriums & Conference Centers HMR Hastings Auditorium, Room 100 CHP CHP Executive Conference, Room 102 DEI Conference Center, Room 3200 DOH Doheny

  18. Economic Impact of New Residents in Big Stone,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Economic Impact of New Residents in Big Stone, Chippewa, Lac Qui Parle, Swift, and Yellow of Minnesota Extension Center for Community Vitality August 2011 1 ECONOMIC IMPACT ANALYSIS An Extension Community Economics Program #12; Economic Impact of New Residents: Big Stone, Chippewa, Lac Qui

  19. Biomedical Engineering Specimen Curriculum National University of Ireland, Galway

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biomedical Engineering Specimen Curriculum National University of Ireland, Galway Fall Semester Biomedical Sciences 4 MATH 175 Multivariable Calculus 3 MATH 196 Differential Equations and Linear Algebra 4 Biomedical Materials 3 LAC Liberal Arts Core 3 LAC Liberal Arts Core 3 17 17 Junior Year Fall NUIG Spring VU

  20. Biomedical Engineering Specimen Curriculum National University of Singapore

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biomedical Engineering Specimen Curriculum National University of Singapore Fall Semester Junior 15 15 Sophomore Year Fall VU Spring VU BSCI 110a/111a Intro to Bio Sciences 4 BSCI XXX Biomedical Biomedical Materials 3 LAC Liberal Arts Core 3 LAC Liberal Arts Core 3 17 17 Junior Year Fall NUS Spring VU

  1. Biomedical Engineering Specimen Curriculum University of New South Wales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biomedical Engineering Specimen Curriculum University of New South Wales Spring Semester Junior 15 15 Sophomore Year Fall VU Spring VU BSCI 110a/111a Intro to Bio Sciences 4 BSCI XXX Biomedical Biomedical Materials 3 LAC Liberal Arts Core 3 LAC Liberal Arts Core 3 17 17 Junior Year Fall VU Spring UNSW

  2. Biomedical Engineering Specimen Curriculum National University of Ireland, Galway

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biomedical Engineering Specimen Curriculum National University of Ireland, Galway Spring Semester BSCI XXX Biomedical Sciences Course 4 MATH 175 Multivariable Calculus 3 MATH 196 Differential Equations to Biomechanics 3 BME 103 Biomedical Materials 3 LAC Liberal Arts Core 3 LAC Liberal Arts Core 3 17 17 Junior Year

  3. PROGRAMA INSTITUCIONAL DE BOLSAS PIBIC/PIBITI -INPE/CNPq

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    / LAC Dr. José Carlos Becceneri ­ CTE/LAC Dr. Cláudio Solano Pereira ­ CPT / DMD Dr. Fabiano Luís de Sousa ­ ETE / DMC Dr. Joaquim José Barroso de Castro ­ CTE / LAP Dr. Jonas Rodrigues de Souza ­ CEA / DAE Dra. Maria Cristina Forti ­ CCST Comitê Externo do CNPq ­ Comissão Julgadora Prof. Dr. Armando

  4. B O S T O N C O L L E G E | C 21 R E S O U R C E S | F A L L 2004 1 in this issue

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Jianyu

    and dialogue is as demanding in its asceti- cism as the spirituality of desert or cloister. Like them

  5. Intercode comparisons for simulating water balance of surficial sediments in semiarid regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scanlon, Bridget R.

    , engineered covers in semiarid regions in warm (Chihuahuan Desert of Texas) and cold (Snake River Plain, Idaho

  6. BIRD COMMUNITIES AT \\VASTEWATER PONDS IN SOUTHEASTERN IDAHO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ponds. In the semiarid desert ofthe upper Snake River Plain, where the INEL lies, many water sources

  7. International Bibliography of Vegetation Maps 2nd Edition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ku?chler, A. W. (August William)

    1980-01-01

    . Parana-Uruguay c. Patagonia d. Mountain e. Marsh IV. Bushlands 8. a. Humid mountains b. Arid mountains c. Intermontanc valley d. Patagonia e. Inner coastal desert V. Deserts 9. a. Peruvian-Chilean b. Lomas c. Venezuelan sand-dunes d. Salt.... Bunch grasses, annual grasses and herbs, and shrubs 1. Tola heath puna 2. Paramo grassland: grasses 3. Tundra: low shrubs, mosses VI. Desert A. Coastal desert of Peru and Chile B. Fog vegetation of Peru Coast (lomas vegetation). Predominantly...

  8. Rheostats and Toggle Switches for Modulating Protein Function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meinhardt, Sarah; Manley Jr., Michael W.; Parente, Daniel J.; Swint-Kruse, Liskin

    2013-12-30

    the coding region for LLhP on the pHG165 vector, using the QuikChange protocol (Table S1 in Data S1). LGhP comprises LacI 1–45, GalR 44–59, and PurR 60–341. For dimeric LacI (‘‘LacI-11’’) and all chimeras, linker variants were constructed via site... the family of 14 synthetic LacI/GalR proteins [17] and dimeric LacI [34] (Table 1), we compared and contrasted the functional outcomes for .1000 variants at nonconserved linker positions 46, 48, 50, 51, 52, 54, 55, 58, 59, 60, 61, and 62. These positions have...

  9. Tuesday, March 14, 2006 MARS: ANALOG STUDIES AND AEOLIAN DEPOSITION/EROSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    Hyper-Arid Desert Analog to Mars: The Western Desert of Egypt [#2335] We are conducting transient electromagnetic and vertical electrical soundings of potential Mars analog sites to quantify the geoelectrical in the western desert of Egypt. 2:45 p.m. Quinn R. C. * Ehrenfreund P. Grunthaner F. J. Taylor C. L. Zent A. P

  10. A survey of the microbial community in the rhizosphere of two dominant shrubs of the Negev Desert highlands, Zygophyllum dumosum (Zygophyllaceae) and Atriplex halimus (Amaranthaceae), using cultivation-dependent and cultivation-independent methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01

    Flavobacterium–Bacteroides (CFB). and A. halimus , growingFlavobacterium-Bacteroides [CFB] group) and low levels ofFlavobacteria–Bacteroides (CFB) group was found at site A

  11. Abdel Wahab M., El-Metwally M., Hassan R., Lefvre M., Oumbe A., Wald L., 2008. Assessing surface solar irradiance in Northern Africa desert climate and its long-term variations from Meteosat images. International

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    -Qubba, Cairo, Egypt. Mines ParisTech, Center for Energy and Processes, BP 207, 06904 Sophia Antipolis cedex under concern in this paper: Algeria, Egypt, Libya, Tunisia, is the prospect of energy production from sun. These four nations comprise approximately 130 millions inhabitants altogether and solar energy

  12. The effect of psbA gene inactivation on the production of D1 form II in Synechococcus sp strain PCC 7942 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fox, Rita Elizabeth

    1992-01-01

    of psbA gene inactivations was made and used to trans- form a reporter strain which contained a translational psbA::lacZ gene fusion located at a neutral site in the Synechococcus chromosome. Reporter strains were constructed for psbAII::lacZ and psb... four base pair deletion of a region of the psbDII upstream regulatory region showed a decrease in expression of a psbDII-lacZ gene fusion, but the same pattern of light induction was maintained (6). This may indicate the presence of separate cis...

  13. AN HST/COS OBSERVATION OF BROAD Ly? EMISSION AND ASSOCIATED ABSORPTION LINES OF THE BL LACERTAE OBJECT H 2356-309

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fang, Taotao

    Weak spectral features in BL Lacertae objects (BL Lacs) often provide a unique opportunity to probe the inner region of this rare type of active galactic nucleus. We present a Hubble Space Telescope/Cosmic Origins Spectrograph ...

  14. Original article Lactose hydrolysing ability of sonicated cultures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    , or a 30% lac- tose or whey permeate solutions. Freezing point changes were used to measure the progress- meate solution and the hydrolysis rate was acceptable at a low temperature (7 o C) in skim milk

  15. High density growth of T7 expression strains with auto-induction option

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Studier, F. William (Stony Brook, NY)

    2010-07-20

    A bacterial growth medium for promoting auto-induction of transcription of cloned DNA in cultures of bacterial cells grown batchwise is disclosed. The transcription is under the control of a lac repressor. Also disclosed is a bacterial growth medium for improving the production of a selenomethionine-containing protein or polypeptide in a bacterial cell, the protein or polypeptide being produced by recombinant DNA techniques from a lac or T7lac promoter, the bacterial cell encoding a vitamin B12-dependent homocysteine methylase. Finally, disclosed is a bacterial growth medium for suppressing auto-induction of expression in cultures of bacterial cells grown batchwise, said transcription being under the control of lac repressor.

  16. Differentiation of normal and cancerous lung tissues by multiphoton imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Chun-Chin

    We utilize multiphoton microscopy for the label-free diagnosis of noncancerous, lung adenocarcinoma (LAC), and lung squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) tissues from humans. Our results show that the combination of second-harmonic ...

  17. ESO VERY LARGE TELESCOPE OPTICAL SPECTROSCOPY OF BL LACERTAE OBJECTS. IV. NEW SPECTRA AND PROPERTIES OF THE FULL SAMPLE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Landoni, M.; Treves, A.; Barattini, M.; Falomo, R.; Sbarufatti, B.; Decarli, R.; Kotilainen, J.

    2013-04-15

    We present the last chapter of a spectroscopy program aimed at deriving the redshift or a lower limit to the redshift of BL Lac objects using medium-resolution spectroscopy. Here we report new spectra for 33 BL Lac object candidates obtained in 2008-2009, confirming the BL Lac nature of 25 sources and obtaining new redshifts for 5 objects. These new observations are combined with our previous data in order to construct a homogeneous sample of {approx}70 BL Lac objects with high-quality spectroscopy. All these spectra can be accessed at the Web site http://www.oapd.inaf.it/zbllac/. The average spectrum, beaming properties of the full sample, discussion of intervening systems, and future perspectives are addressed.

  18. Risk of sexually transmitted infections among Mayan women in rural Guatemala whose partners are migrant workers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ikeda, JM; Schaffer, JR; Ixcot, MLS; Page, K; Hearst, N

    2014-01-01

    aids/ Countries/lac/guatemala_profile.pdf (2010). AccessedHIV and AIDS study among Mayan populations in Guatemala.Guatemala City: National HIV/AIDS program and UN Population

  19. Understanding government and railroad strategy for crude oil transportation in North America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carlson, S. Joel (Stephen Joel)

    2014-01-01

    On July 6, 2013, an oil-laden unit train derailed and exploded in Lac-Megantic, Quebec, Canada, killing 47 people, shocking and saddening many, and leading to significantly increased public scrutiny of crude oil transported ...

  20. National Cooperative Geologic Mapping Program STATEMAP/EDMAP Component: States compete for federal matching funds for geologic mapping

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ciocan-Fontanine, Ionut

    MEDICINE LAC QUI PARLE CHIPPEWA RENVILLE KANDIYOHI SWIFT MC LEOD STEARNS POPESTEVENS BIG STONE GRANT POLK PENNINGT ON MARSHALL BELTRAMI WASHINGTON ST LOUIS CROW WING CARLTON PINE RICE OLMSTED

  1. CX-006083: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Ground Source Heat Pump Installation - Lac Qui Parle County Courthouse, MinnesotaCX(s) Applied: B5.1Date: 06/27/2011Location(s): Madison, MinnesotaOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office

  2. White House Climate Task Force Tribal Leaders Listening Session

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    On Wednesday, February 12, Karen Diver, Chairwoman of the Fond du Lac Band of Lake Superior Chippewa, and Reggie Joule, Mayor of Alaska’s Northwest Arctic Borough, both of whom are members of...

  3. Manipulation of the Carbon Storage Regulator System for Metabolite Remodeling and Biofuel Production in Escherichia coli

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01

    Transport Glycolysis / Gluconeogenesis Sugars ATP ProtonPgk pBbA5C [Control] Gluconeogenesis 3PG Pgm GpmA lacI (glycogen biosynthesis, gluconeogenesis, cell size, and

  4. CAL/ACEP Joins CAL/AAEM and UC Irvine in Sponsoring the Western Journal of Emergency Medicine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mallon, William K.; Swadron, Stuart P

    2009-01-01

    Department of Emergency Medicine, LAC+USC Medical Center,Journal of Emergency Medicine Volume X, no . 3 : NovemberWestern Journal of Emergency Medicine William K. Mallon, MD*

  5. Harmful Algae 4 (2005) 651672 The proliferation of the toxic cyanobacterium Planktothrix

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacquet, Stéphan

    2005-01-01

    water residence time), local conditions (the nutrient load and charge) and global changes (global. rubescens in Lac du Bourget is probably due to increased transparency and a longer stratified period

  6. Transposable elements Updated March 29, 2012 4 (none) Tpm kan (Tn903) Tn903 pkan none none --K CDE Epicentre

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borenstein, Elhanan

    - - L2 CDI [6] T14 mTn5*-lacZ1 -em pLG51 Tpm (P) erm ? lacZ TS none - - L2 CDI [6] T15 ISR6K-em 7 pLG52a, pLG53, pLG55a Tpm (P) erm ? none none - ori R6K E ACE [6] T16 ISR6K-kan 8 pLG56a Tpm (P) kan ? none

  7. Partnerships: The Value of Two Companies Working Together 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Newell, R.

    1996-01-01

    DCS, and to house customer training facilities. In addition to Sm..., Honeywell has fonned an alliance with Sinopec headquarters to help bring together Sinopec's vast ex-pertise in Oil and Natural Gas refining and mamJfacturing, and Honeywel1's...: THE VALUE OF TWO COMPANIES WORKING TOGETHER Robert Newell Director, Power and Energy Honeywell lAC Phoenix, AZ ABSTRACT This paper descnbes how Honeywell Industrial Automation and Control (lAC) has developed and continues to utilize alliances...

  8. A simplified view of blazars: clearing the fog around long-standing selection effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giommi, P; Polenta, G; Turriziani, S; D'Elia, V; Piranomonte, S

    2011-01-01

    We propose a scenario where blazars are classified as flat-spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs), BL Lacs, low synchrotron, or high synchrotron peaked objects according to a varying mix of the Doppler boosted radiation from the jet, the emission from the accretion disk, the broad line region, and the light from the host galaxy. In this framework the peak energy of the synchrotron power (nu_peak) in blazars is independent of source type and of radio luminosity. We test this new approach, which builds upon unified schemes, using extensive Monte Carlo simulations and show that it can provide simple answers to a number of long-standing issues including, amongst others, the different cosmological evolution of BL Lacs selected in the radio and X-ray bands, the larger nu_peak values observed in BL Lacs, the fact that high synchrotron peaked blazars are always of the BL Lac type, and the existence of FSRQ/BL Lac transition objects. Objects so far classified as BL Lacs on the basis of their observed weak, or undetectable, em...

  9. World’s Largest Solar Energy Project Heads to Mojave

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A California company will harness the Mojave Desert sunshine to create the world’s largest solar energy system by the end of 2013.

  10. Multiphase fluid flow and subsequent geochemical transport in variably saturated fractured rocks: 1. Approaches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Tianfu; Pruess, Karsten

    2000-01-01

    copper enrichment in the Atacama Desert, Northern Chile (Alpers and Brimhall, 1988), hydrothermal alteration at a potential high-level nuclear waste

  11. Evidence for Systemic Outbreeding: A Rejoinder to Denham, 'Beyond Fictions of Closure in Australian Aboriginal Kinship'

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dousset, Laurent

    2013-01-01

    Desert. Marseille: pacific-credo Publications. Dousset,NIVERSITÉ , CNRS, EHESS, CREDO UMR 7308, 13003 M ARSEILLES ,LAURENT . DOUSSET @ PACIFIC - CREDO . FR C OPYRIGHT 2013 A

  12. Transmission Infrastructure Program

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Electric District 5 to Palo Verde Hub 191M Construction & Term Loan Facility Major capex project by Desert South Region of Western to upgrade material segments and expand...

  13. Black carbon transport and deposition to the California mountain snow pack

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hadley, Odelle L.

    2008-01-01

    desert soils on duration of mountain snow cover, Geophys Resdesert soils on duration of mountain snow cover, Geophys Resdesert soils on duration of mountain snow cover, Geophys Res

  14. SciTech Connect:

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    States) Denver Regional Office, Golden, CO (United States) Department of Energy's (DOE) Nuclear Energy (NE) Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) Program Desert Research Institute,...

  15. CX-010763: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    CX-010763: Categorical Exclusion Determination Nevada Desert Research Institute- Photovoltaic Installation CX(s) Applied: B5.16 Date: 07172013 Location(s): Nevada Offices(s):...

  16. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Regional Office, Golden, CO (United States) Department of Energy's (DOE) Nuclear Energy (NE) Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) Program Desert Research Institute, Nevada...

  17. International Microgrid Assessment: Governance, INcentives, and Experience (IMAGINE)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marnay, Chris

    2014-01-01

    renewables (onshore and offshore wind, solar PV and thermal,environmental review (such as offshore wind or large desertenvironmental review (such as offshore wind or large desert

  18. Calvin 2015 Peer Review Poster Reduced

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    gic-mechanical-chemical coupled modeling to investigate fracture network permeability evolution during enhanced geothermal system stimulation at Desert Peak, Nevada PI Matt Reeves,...

  19. School of Environmental & Forest Sciences, College of the Environment, University of Washington Benjamin Hagood

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Sally

    - road tracks to take "woodchips" for energy production" fracking- have serious concerns of the rapid population increase and tourism impact on the forest and desert

  20. SciTech Connect:

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    CO (United States) Department of Energy's (DOE) Nuclear Energy (NE) Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) Program Desert Research Institute, Nevada University, Reno, NV (United...

  1. EM SSAB ITR Landfill Assessment Project Lessons Learned Presentation...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Benson, PhD, PE - University of Wisconsin-Madison: waste containment systems, civil engineering, geotechnical engineering. * William H. Albright, PhD - Desert Research Institute,...

  2. Scientists Help Define the Healthy Human Microbiome

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    intestine. The microbial communities in each body site can be as different as the microbes in the Amazon Rainforest versus the Sahara Desert. Researchers then purified all...

  3. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    CO (United States) Department of Energy's (DOE) Nuclear Energy (NE) Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) Program Desert Research Institute, Nevada University, Reno, NV (United...

  4. EIS-0455: EPA Notice of Availability of the Final Environmental...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Project, Application for a Right-of-Way Grant to Construct, Operate and Decommission a Solar Thermal Facility on Public Lands, California Desert Conservation Area Plan,...

  5. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Denver Regional Office, Golden, CO (United States) Department of Energy's (DOE) Nuclear Energy (NE) Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) Program Desert Research Institute,...

  6. Sandia National Laboratories: News: Publications: Lab News: Archive

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    use of renewable energy technologies in eight Mexican states: Marcos Alvarez, a cattle rancher in the desert of Baja California, Mexico, faced a dilemma each year that cost...

  7. News & Blog | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Energy Finance for Global Cooperation and Competition Financing the Growing American Auto Industry Desert Sunlight is Shining Example of How DOE Loan Guarantees Helped Launch...

  8. A, Science Service Feature Released w o n receipt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheelm nh gig- you a r e standing near your nerorJlane i n the desert and a l w g e Any- "If dust devil

  9. Climatic effects of different aerosol types in China simulated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y. GU

    2006-01-01

    P. Shettle (1991), Atmospheric Aero- sols—Global ClimatologyEffects of stratospheric aero- sols and preliminarytypes, such as volcanic aero- sols, desert aerosols, or

  10. Investigation of the Role of Trap States in Solar Cell Reliability using Photothermal Deflection Spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bezryadina, Anna Sergeyevna

    2012-01-01

    earth desert areas with solar panels would provide enoughthe amount of sunlight solar panels receive varies greatlyif moderate efficiency (10%) solar panels were used just for

  11. Barney Bricmont, Founder, California Certified Organic Farmers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farmer, Ellen

    2010-01-01

    to produce flexible solar panels. It’s a flexible sheet. Fordirectly, have solar panels in the Mojave desert, and on

  12. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    States) Denver Regional Office, Golden, CO (United States) Department of Energy's (DOE) Nuclear Energy (NE) Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) Program Desert Research Institute,...

  13. Scenarios for Deep Carbon Emission Reductions from Electricity by 2050 in Western North America Using the SWITCH Electric Power Sector Planning Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nelson, James Henry

    2013-01-01

    of  out-­?of-­?state  nuclear  power  or  a  lack  of  fired   CCS   and   nuclear   power   are   found   to  as   coal   and   nuclear   power   from   the   Desert  

  14. Changing Places: How Communities Will Improve the Health of Boys of Color

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edley, Christopher; Ruiz de Velasco, Jorge

    2010-01-01

    Association of America. Detroit, Mich. April 30 –MayDeserts on Public Health in Detroit, Full Report. Chicago:San Francisco Kansas City Detroit San Jose Omaha Cleveland

  15. Agency Financial Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    loan guarantees to support the construction and start-up of Ivanpah Solar Complex, three utility-scale concentrated solar power plants located in California's Mojave Desert. The...

  16. GTO Director Doug Hollett Delivers Keynote at the Nation's Largest...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Desert Peak, Nevada. photo courtesy of Ormat First Commercial Success for Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) Spells Exponential Growth for Geothermal Energy Energy Department...

  17. Characterizing Structural Controls of Geothermal Fields in the...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Our findings from the Bradys, Desert Peak, Needle Rocks, Salt Wells, and Gerlach geothermal systems suggest that many fields occupy discrete steps in fault zones or lie in...

  18. Search for: All records | DOE PAGES

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    such as semi-arid deserts or seasonally dry forests. Human population growth and global climate change now present challenges for agricultural production systems to increase...

  19. Nomads in transition : mortuary archaeology in the lowlands of Edom (Jordan)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beherec, Marc A.

    2011-01-01

    Two Deserts: Contrasting Desertification Histories on Rome’s2000. “Archaeology and Desertification in the Wadi Faynan:369- 395 in Archaeology and Desertification: The Wadi Faynan

  20. Few apparent short-term effects of elevated soil temperature and increased frequency of summer precipitation on the abundance and taxonomic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neher, Deborah A.

    rights reserved. 1. Introduction Desertification is the collective process of reduced productivity of cyanobacteria, lichens, green algae, and mosses) may slow desertification in many desert soils by increasing

  1. Atmospheric Environment 41 (2007) 92889299 Dust storm frequency and its relation to climate changes in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Esper, Jan

    2007-01-01

    , Zhibao Donga , Jan Esperd a Key Laboratory of Desert and Desertification, Cold and Arid Regions and Desertification, Cold and Arid Regions Environmental and Engineering Research Institute, Chinese Academy

  2. Feeding the periphery : modeling early Bronze Age economies and the cultural landscape of the Faynan District, Southern Jordan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muniz, Adolfo A.

    2007-01-01

    2000 Archaeology and desertification in Wadi Faynan. LevantDeserts: Constrasting Desertification Histories on Rome's2000 Archaeology and Desertification in the Wadi Faynan: The

  3. TRACKING PAINTED PEBBLES IN THE MOJAVE-OFFROAD VEHICLES AND THEIR IMPACT ON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nichols, Kyle K.

    TRACKING PAINTED PEBBLES IN THE MOJAVE- OFFROAD VEHICLES AND THEIR IMPACT ON SEDIMENT TRANSPORT painted pebbles across 4 sites in the Mojave Desert, Southern California: the Iron Mountains

  4. Geothermal Discovery Offers Hope for More Potential Across the...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The Basin and Range Province contains dozens of basins whose geometry and stratigraphy mimics that of Black Rock Desert basin. The carbonate aquifer unit that hosts the...

  5. Sustainable Housing for Park Rangers in Big Bend National Park, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garrison, M.; Griswold, S.

    1996-01-01

    by the National Park Service, design teams in the joint project have developed permanent sustainable housing responsive to the hot-arid desert climate....

  6. Sandia Energy - Siting

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    potential conflicts. Water Availability Water availability is a critical issue with the potential to significantly impede utility-scale solar energy development in the desert...

  7. NOTE / NOTE New observations on urine contents in water-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vatnick, Itzick

    NOTE / NOTE New observations on urine contents in water- deprived Negev Desert rodents Carmi Korine of the murid subfamilies Gerbillinae and Cricetomyinae from the Namib Desert, when deprived of water, excreted much water. This phenomenon has not been reported in other rodents, and whether it is a trait

  8. 3/14/08 5:40 PMGeotimes -March 2008 -Dunes: they're electric Page 1 of 2http://www.geotimes.org/mar08/article.html?id=nn_dunes.html

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michigan, University of

    Submit or View Results Chin-Kiu Chris Cheng NEWS NOTES Dunes: they're electric Winds whipping across Earth's deserts have the power to dramatically alter the landscape. Sand gets violently thrown about and, given time, even a desert's dunes migrate. But the winds aren't acting alone. Scientists think

  9. Satellite remote sensing of aerosol absorption in the presence of clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graaf, Martin de

    from desert dust storms and biomass burning events, but also forest fires, such as the ones in Siberia desert Indonesian forest fires Siberian forest fires in July 2006 Californian forest fires Canadian and Alaskan forest fires June-July 2004 biomass burning smoke Smoke from forest fires Rice straw burning

  10. Introduction There is a perception among many people both in the scientific community as

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frank, Thomas D.

    , and the desert has been used historically by the military for training with tracked vehicles (Anderson, et al of pollutants from as far away as the San Joaquin Valley and the Los Angeles basin. Local pollution sources in the desert consist primarily of particulate matter from off-highway vehicles, windblown soil, mining

  11. Precambrian Research, 46 (1990) 259-272 259 Elsevier Science Publishers B.V., Amsterdam --Printed in The Netherlands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stern, Robert J.

    1990-01-01

    in The Netherlands Origin of Late Precambrian Intrusive Carbonates, Eastern Desert of Egypt and Sudan: C, 0 and Sr,Richardson, TX 75083-0688(U.S.A.) CYNTHIA J. GWINN* ARCO Oil and Gas Company, Research and Technical Services carbonates, Eastern Desert of Egypt and Sudan: C, 0 and Sr isotopic evidence. Precambrian Res., 46: 259

  12. Individuals Agricultural

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Sharon J.

    , with the highest density in the first year, and no obvious differences between the second and the third year. We in the first year, and the lowest in the third year Though taxa diversity was lower in the third year Yards Mesic Yards Year Yea r 321 8 10 12 14 16 18 20 Agricultural Desert Parks Desert Remnants

  13. ALLUVIAL SCRUB VEGETATION IN COASTAL SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA1 Ted L. Hanes, Richard D. Friesen, and Kathy Keane2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ALLUVIAL SCRUB VEGETATION IN COASTAL SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA1 Ted L. Hanes, Richard D. Friesen deposits along the coastal side of major mountains of southern California. This vegetation type is adapted coastal and desert dunes, coastal val- leys and foothills, interior mountains and desert flats. Holland

  14. June 2008June 2008 2323 Climate Change and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Archer, Steven R.

    susceptible to climate change and climate variability. Plants and ani- mals in this region live near communities are typically desert scrub, shrub­ steppe, or desert grassland/savanna and are home to charis of extreme weather events (heat waves, droughts, and floods). Fur- thermore, warmer nights and projected

  15. Evidence for Early and Mid-Cryogenian glaciation in the Northern ArabianNubian Shield (Egypt, Sudan, and western Arabia)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stern, Robert J.

    (Egypt, Sudan, and western Arabia) ROBERT J. STERN1*, PETER R. JOHNSON2, KAMAL A. ALI1,3 & SUMIT K over broad regions of the Central Eastern Desert of Egypt, NW Arabia and possible correlative units diamictite and BIFs of the Central Eastern Desert of Egypt and the correlative Nuwaybah diamictite and BIF

  16. On the detectability of Lorentz invariance violation through anomalous multi-TeV $\\gamma$-ray spectra of blazars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tavecchio, F

    2015-01-01

    Cosmic opacity for very high-energy gamma rays ($E>10$ TeV) due to the interaction with the extragalactic background light can be strongly reduced because of possible Lorentz-violating terms in the particle dispersion relations expected, e.g., in several versions of quantum gravity theories. We discuss the possibility to use very high energy observations of blazars to detect anomalies of the cosmic opacity induced by LIV, considering in particular the possibility to use -- besides the bright and close-by BL Lac Mkn 501 -- extreme BL Lac objects. We derive the modified expression for the optical depth of $\\gamma$ rays considering also the redshift dependence and we apply it to derive the expected high-energy spectrum above 10 TeV of Mkn 501 in high and low state and the extreme BL Lac 1ES 0229+200. We find that, besides the nearby and well studied BL Lac Mkn 501 -- especially in high state --, suitable targets are extreme BL Lac objects, characterized by quite hard TeV intrinsic spectra likely extending at the...

  17. Relativistic jet properties of GeV-TeV blazars and possible implications for the jet formation, composition, and cavity kinematics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Jin; Lu, Ye; Zhang, Shuang-Nan; Sun, Xiao-Na; Liang, En-Wei; Lu, Rui-Jing E-mail: lew@gxu.edu.cn

    2014-06-20

    We fit the spectral energy distributions of a GeV-TeV flat spectrum radio quasar (FSRQ) sample with the leptonic model. Their ?{sub min} of the relativistic electron distributions, which significantly affect the estimate of the jet properties, are constrained, with a typical value of ?48. Their jet power, magnetized parameter, radiation efficiency, and jet production and radiation rates per central black hole (BH) mass are derived and compared with those of BL Lacertae (BL Lac) objects. We show that the FSRQ jets may be dominated by the Poynting flux and have a high radiation efficiency, whereas the BL Lac object jets are likely dominated by particles and have a lower radiation efficiency than FSRQs. Being different from BL Lac objects, the jet powers of FSRQs are proportional to their central BH masses. The jet production and radiation rates of the FSRQs distribute in narrow ranges and are correlated with each other, whereas no similar feature is found for the BL Lac objects. We also show that the jet power is correlated with the cavity kinetic power: the magnetic field energy in the jets may provide the cavity kinetic energy of FSRQs, and the kinetic energy of cold protons in the jets may be crucial for the cavity kinetic energy of BL Lac objects. We suggest that the dominating formation mechanism of FSRQ jets may be the Blandford-Znajek process, but BL Lac object jets may be produced via the Blandford-Payne and/or Blandford-Znajek processes, depending on the structures and accretion rates of accretion disks.

  18. PctpB-ctpB PsspB-ctpB PspoIVF-ctpB Figure S1. Synthesis of CtpB in the forespore is necessary and sufficient for the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rudner, David

    al., 1988 BNC738 spoIVF::cat, lacA::PspoIVF-B (erm) , amyE::PspoIVF-A S155R (spec), ctp) This work BNC1043 amyE::PsspB-yfp (JF) (spec) This work BNC1045 spoIVF::cat, lacA::PspoIVF-B (erm) , amyA::PspoIVF-B (erm) , amyE::PspoIVF-A S155R (spec), ctpB::tet, yycR::PsspB-ctpB (phleo) This work BNC1049 spo

  19. Cell, Volume 137 Supplemental Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rudner, David

    SUPPLEMENTAL EXPERIMENTAL PROCEDURES Plasmid construction pKM011 [lacA::PspoIIQ-cfp (erm)] was generated by inserting PspoIIQ-cfp from pKM008 (Doan et al., 2005) into pDR183 between EcoRI and BamHI. pDR183 [lacA::erm insertions into the nonessential ywjI locus (K.A.M. and D.Z.R. unpublished). pKM186 [355°(parS*) in pMAD (erm

  20. The construction and use of a plasmid vector system for studying Q mediated transcription termination in bacteriophage (lambda) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eller, Richard Frank

    1986-01-01

    , the lacZ fusion is under direct control of the 1sc promoter since ps, as well as c?, were deleted from this plasmid. As noted, pTER3 produces a nonfunctional Q protein since it does not carry the last part of the Q gene (Fig. 6E). pTER3 was used... Genes 57 DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSIONS 59 Components of the pTER Vector System A. The lac Promoter and Operator B. The px. Promoter C. The ts. Terminator D. The trpzzlacZ Operon Fusion Induction Leads to Q Protein Synthesis gpQ Modified...