National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for laboratory performance assessment

  1. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Emergency Response Capability 2009 Baseline Needs Assessment Performance Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharry, J A

    2009-12-30

    This document was prepared by John A. Sharry, LLNL Fire Marshal and Division Leader for Fire Protection and was reviewed by Sandia/CA Fire Marshal, Martin Gresho. This document is the second of a two-part analysis of Emergency Response Capabilities of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The first part, 2009 Baseline Needs Assessment Requirements Document established the minimum performance criteria necessary to meet mandatory requirements. This second part analyses the performance of Lawrence Livermore Laboratory Emergency Management Department to the contents of the Requirements Document. The document was prepared based on an extensive review of information contained in the 2004 BNA, a review of Emergency Planning Hazards Assessments, a review of building construction, occupancy, fire protection features, dispatch records, LLNL alarm system records, fire department training records, and fire department policies and procedures. On October 1, 2007, LLNL contracted with the Alameda County Fire Department to provide emergency response services. The level of service called for in that contract is the same level of service as was provided by the LLNL Fire Department prior to that date. This Compliance Assessment will evaluate fire department services beginning October 1, 2008 as provided by the Alameda County Fire Department.

  2. Performance Assessment for the Idaho National Laboratory Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Annette L. Schafer; A. Jeffrey Sondrup; Arthur S. Rood

    2012-05-01

    This performance assessment for the Remote-Handled Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Facility at the Idaho National Laboratory documents the projected radiological dose impacts associated with the disposal of low-level radioactive waste at the facility. This assessment evaluates compliance with the applicable radiological criteria of the U.S. Department of Energy and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for protection of the public and the environment. The calculations involve modeling transport of radionuclides from buried waste to surface soil and subsurface media, and eventually to members of the public via air, groundwater, and food chain pathways. Projections of doses are calculated for both offsite receptors and individuals who inadvertently intrude into the waste after site closure. The results of the calculations are used to evaluate the future performance of the low-level radioactive waste disposal facility and to provide input for establishment of waste acceptance criteria. In addition, one-factor-at-a-time, Monte Carlo, and rank correlation analyses are included for sensitivity and uncertainty analysis. The comparison of the performance assessment results to the applicable performance objectives provides reasonable expectation that the performance objectives will be met

  3. Laboratory Testing of Bulk Vitrified Low-Activity Waste Forms to Support the 2005 Integrated Disposal Facility Performance Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pierce, Eric M.; McGrail, B. Peter; Bagaasen, Larry M.; Rodriguez, Elsa A.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Geiszler, Keith N.; Baum, Steven R.; Reed, Lunde R.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Schaef, Herbert T.

    2006-06-30

    The purpose of this report is to document the results from laboratory testing of the bulk vitri-fied (BV) waste form that was conducted in support of the 2005 integrated disposal facility (IDF) performance assessment (PA). Laboratory testing provides a majority of the key input data re-quired to assess the long-term performance of the BV waste package with the STORM code. Test data from three principal methods, as described by McGrail et al. (2000a; 2003a), are dis-cussed in this testing report including the single-pass flow-through test (SPFT) and product con-sistency test (PCT). Each of these test methods focuses on different aspects of the glass corrosion process. See McGrail et al. (2000a; 2003a) for additional details regarding these test methods and their use in evaluating long-term glass performance. In addition to evaluating the long-term glass performance, this report discusses the results and methods used to provided a recommended best estimate of the soluble fraction of 99Tc that can be leached from the engineer-ing-scale BV waste package. These laboratory tests are part of a continuum of testing that is aimed at improving the performance of the BV waste package.

  4. Laboratory Testing of Bulk Vitrified Low-Activity Waste Forms to Support the 2005 Integrated Disposal Facility Performance Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pierce, Eric M.; McGrail, B. Peter; Bagaasen, Larry M.; Rodriguez, Elsa A.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Geiszler, Keith N.; Baum, Steven R.; Reed, Lunde R.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Schaef, Herbert T.

    2005-03-31

    The purpose of this report is to document the results from laboratory testing of the bulk vitri-fied (BV) waste form that was conducted in support of the 2005 integrated disposal facility (IDF) performance assessment (PA). Laboratory testing provides a majority of the key input data re-quired to assess the long-term performance of the BV waste package with the STORM code. Test data from three principal methods, as described by McGrail et al. (2000a; 2003a), are dis-cussed in this testing report including the single-pass flow-through test (SPFT) and product con-sistency test (PCT). Each of these test methods focuses on different aspects of the glass corrosion process. See McGrail et al. (2000a; 2003a) for additional details regarding these test methods and their use in evaluating long-term glass performance. In addition to evaluating the long-term glass performance, this report discusses the results and methods used to provided a recommended best estimate of the soluble fraction of 99Tc that can be leached from the engineer-ing-scale BV waste package. These laboratory tests are part of a continuum of testing that is aimed at improving the performance of the BV waste package.

  5. Performance Assessment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  6. Sandia National Laboratories performance assessment methodology for long-term environmental programs : the history of nuclear waste management.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marietta, Melvin Gary; Anderson, D. Richard; Bonano, Evaristo J.; Meacham, Paul Gregory

    2011-11-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is the world leader in the development of the detailed science underpinning the application of a probabilistic risk assessment methodology, referred to in this report as performance assessment (PA), for (1) understanding and forecasting the long-term behavior of a radioactive waste disposal system, (2) estimating the ability of the disposal system and its various components to isolate the waste, (3) developing regulations, (4) implementing programs to estimate the safety that the system can afford to individuals and to the environment, and (5) demonstrating compliance with the attendant regulatory requirements. This report documents the evolution of the SNL PA methodology from inception in the mid-1970s, summarizing major SNL PA applications including: the Subseabed Disposal Project PAs for high-level radioactive waste; the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant PAs for disposal of defense transuranic waste; the Yucca Mountain Project total system PAs for deep geologic disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste; PAs for the Greater Confinement Borehole Disposal boreholes at the Nevada National Security Site; and PA evaluations for disposal of high-level wastes and Department of Energy spent nuclear fuels stored at Idaho National Laboratory. In addition, the report summarizes smaller PA programs for long-term cover systems implemented for the Monticello, Utah, mill-tailings repository; a PA for the SNL Mixed Waste Landfill in support of environmental restoration; PA support for radioactive waste management efforts in Egypt, Iraq, and Taiwan; and, most recently, PAs for analysis of alternative high-level radioactive waste disposal strategies including repositories deep borehole disposal and geologic repositories in shale and granite. Finally, this report summarizes the extension of the PA methodology for radioactive waste disposal toward development of an enhanced PA system for carbon sequestration and storage systems. These efforts have produced a generic PA methodology for the evaluation of waste management systems that has gained wide acceptance within the international community. This report documents how this methodology has been used as an effective management tool to evaluate different disposal designs and sites; inform development of regulatory requirements; identify, prioritize, and guide research aimed at reducing uncertainties for objective estimations of risk; and support safety assessments.

  7. Summary Report and Run Control for the 2012 WIPP Panel Closure System Performance Assessment SANDIA NATIONAL LABORATORIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Summary Report and Run Control for the 2012 WIPP Panel Closure System Performance Assessment for the 2012 WIPP Panel Closure System Performance Assessment Revision 0 Author: R. Chris Camphouse 6/( C~ L~--_A~~_I/iJ+__WIPP:1.4.1.2:PAQA-L:557393 Information Only #12;Summary Report and Run Control

  8. Preliminary Review of Models, Assumptions, and Key Data used in Performance Assessments and Composite Analysis at the Idaho National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arthur S. Rood; Swen O. Magnuson

    2009-07-01

    This document is in response to a request by Ming Zhu, DOE-EM to provide a preliminary review of existing models and data used in completed or soon to be completed Performance Assessments and Composite Analyses (PA/CA) documents, to identify codes, methodologies, main assumptions, and key data sets used.

  9. Initial performance assessment of the disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level waste stored at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Volume 1, Methodology and results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rechard, R.P. [ed.

    1993-12-01

    This performance assessment characterized plausible treatment options conceived by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) for its spent fuel and high-level radioactive waste and then modeled the performance of the resulting waste forms in two hypothetical, deep, geologic repositories: one in bedded salt and the other in granite. The results of the performance assessment are intended to help guide INEL in its study of how to prepare wastes and spent fuel for eventual permanent disposal. This assessment was part of the Waste Management Technology Development Program designed to help the US Department of Energy develop and demonstrate the capability to dispose of its nuclear waste. Although numerous caveats must be placed on the results, the general findings were as follows: Though the waste form behavior depended upon the repository type, all current and proposed waste forms provided acceptable behavior in the salt and granite repositories.

  10. Laboratory Performance Testing of Residential Window Mounted...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Laboratory Performance Testing of Residential Window Mounted Air Conditioners Laboratory Performance Testing of Residential Window Mounted Air Conditioners This presentation was...

  11. Enterprise Assessments Targeted Review, Idaho National Laboratory...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Laboratory Fire Protection Program as Implemented at the Irradiated Materials Characterization Laboratory The Office of Nuclear Safety and Environmental Assessments, within the...

  12. Enterprise Assessments Targeted Review, Argonne National Laboratory...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Targeted Review, Argonne National Laboratory - November 2014 Enterprise Assessments Targeted Review, Argonne National Laboratory - November 2014 November 2014 Review of the...

  13. Initial performance assessment of the disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level waste stored at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Volume 2: Appendices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rechard, R.P. [ed.

    1993-12-01

    This performance assessment characterized plausible treatment options conceived by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) for its spent fuel and high-level radioactive waste and then modeled the performance of the resulting waste forms in two hypothetical, deep, geologic repositories: one in bedded salt and the other in granite. The results of the performance assessment are intended to help guide INEL in its study of how to prepare wastes and spent fuel for eventual permanent disposal. This assessment was part of the Waste Management Technology Development Program designed to help the US Department of Energy develop and demonstrate the capability to dispose of its nuclear waste, as mandated by the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982. The waste forms comprised about 700 metric tons of initial heavy metal (or equivalent units) stored at the INEL: graphite spent fuel, experimental low enriched and highly enriched spent fuel, and high-level waste generated during reprocessing of some spent fuel. Five different waste treatment options were studied; in the analysis, the options and resulting waste forms were analyzed separately and in combination as five waste disposal groups. When the waste forms were studied in combination, the repository was assumed to also contain vitrified high-level waste from three DOE sites for a common basis of comparison and to simulate the impact of the INEL waste forms on a moderate-sized repository, The performance of the waste form was assessed within the context of a whole disposal system, using the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency`s Environmental Radiation Protection Standards for Management and Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel, High-Level and Transuranic Radioactive Wastes, 40 CFR 191, promulgated in 1985. Though the waste form behavior depended upon the repository type, all current and proposed waste forms provided acceptable behavior in the salt and granite repositories.

  14. Laboratory Hazard Assessment Tool UC Laboratory Hazard Assessment v11 UC Regents Page 1 of 28

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aluwihare, Lihini

    Laboratory Hazard Assessment Tool UC Laboratory Hazard Assessment v11 © UC Regents Page 1 of 28 This Laboratory Hazard Assessment Tool (LHAT) facilitates identification of hazards and identifies the Personal or personnel. The LHAT will provide a summary report of hazards present in the laboratory and the PPE

  15. Preliminary melter performance assessment report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliott, M.L.; Eyler, L.L.; Mahoney, L.A.; Cooper, M.F.; Whitney, L.D.; Shafer, P.J.

    1994-08-01

    The Melter Performance Assessment activity, a component of the Pacific Northwest Laboratory`s (PNL) Vitrification Technology Development (PVTD) effort, was designed to determine the impact of noble metals on the operational life of the reference Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) melter. The melter performance assessment consisted of several activities, including a literature review of all work done with noble metals in glass, gradient furnace testing to study the behavior of noble metals during the melting process, research-scale and engineering-scale melter testing to evaluate effects of noble metals on melter operation, and computer modeling that used the experimental data to predict effects of noble metals on the full-scale melter. Feed used in these tests simulated neutralized current acid waste (NCAW) feed. This report summarizes the results of the melter performance assessment and predicts the lifetime of the HWVP melter. It should be noted that this work was conducted before the recent Tri-Party Agreement changes, so the reference melter referred to here is the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) melter design.

  16. Enterprise Assessments Review, Los Alamos National Laboratory...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    November 2014 Review of the Fire Protection Program at the Los Alamos National Laboratory The Department of Energy Office of Enterprise Assessments was established in May 2014 and...

  17. Independent Oversight Assessment, Los Alamos National Laboratory...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    April 2012 Assessment of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Los Alamos National Laboratory Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Replacement Project This report provides the results of an...

  18. Assessing the Costs and Benefits of the Superior Energy Performance...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    LBNL-6349E ERNEST ORLANDO LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY Assessing the Costs and Benefits of the Superior Energy Performance Program Peter Therkelsen and Aimee McKane...

  19. Performance Assessment Institute-NV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lombardo, Joesph

    2012-12-31

    The National Supercomputing Center for Energy and the Environment’s intention is to purchase a multi-purpose computer cluster in support of the Performance Assessment Institute (PA Institute). The PA Institute will serve as a research consortium located in Las Vegas Nevada with membership that includes: national laboratories, universities, industry partners, and domestic and international governments. This center will provide a one-of-a-kind centralized facility for the accumulation of information for use by Institutions of Higher Learning, the U.S. Government, and Regulatory Agencies and approved users. This initiative will enhance and extend High Performance Computing (HPC) resources in Nevada to support critical national and international needs in "scientific confirmation". The PA Institute will be promoted as the leading Modeling, Learning and Research Center worldwide. The program proposes to utilize the existing supercomputing capabilities and alliances of the University of Nevada Las Vegas as a base, and to extend these resource and capabilities through a collaborative relationship with its membership. The PA Institute will provide an academic setting for interactive sharing, learning, mentoring and monitoring of multi-disciplinary performance assessment and performance confirmation information. The role of the PA Institute is to facilitate research, knowledge-increase, and knowledge-sharing among users.

  20. Energy and Water Conservation Assessment of the Radiochemical Processing Laboratory (RPL) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Stephanie R.; Koehler, Theresa M.; Boyd, Brian K.

    2014-05-31

    This report summarizes the results of an energy and water conservation assessment of the Radiochemical Processing Laboratory (RPL) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The assessment was performed in October 2013 by engineers from the PNNL Building Performance Team with the support of the dedicated RPL staff and several Facilities and Operations (F&O) department engineers. The assessment was completed for the Facilities and Operations (F&O) department at PNNL in support of the requirements within Section 432 of the Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) of 2007.

  1. High-performance laboratories and cleanrooms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tschudi, William; Sartor, Dale; Mills, Evan; Xu, Tengfang

    2002-07-01

    The California Energy Commission sponsored this roadmap to guide energy efficiency research and deployment for high performance cleanrooms and laboratories. Industries and institutions utilizing these building types (termed high-tech buildings) have played an important part in the vitality of the California economy. This roadmap's key objective to present a multi-year agenda to prioritize and coordinate research efforts. It also addresses delivery mechanisms to get the research products into the market. Because of the importance to the California economy, it is appropriate and important for California to take the lead in assessing the energy efficiency research needs, opportunities, and priorities for this market. In addition to the importance to California's economy, energy demand for this market segment is large and growing (estimated at 9400 GWH for 1996, Mills et al. 1996). With their 24hr. continuous operation, high tech facilities are a major contributor to the peak electrical demand. Laboratories and cleanrooms constitute the high tech building market, and although each building type has its unique features, they are similar in that they are extremely energy intensive, involve special environmental considerations, have very high ventilation requirements, and are subject to regulations--primarily safety driven--that tend to have adverse energy implications. High-tech buildings have largely been overlooked in past energy efficiency research. Many industries and institutions utilize laboratories and cleanrooms. As illustrated, there are many industries operating cleanrooms in California. These include semiconductor manufacturing, semiconductor suppliers, pharmaceutical, biotechnology, disk drive manufacturing, flat panel displays, automotive, aerospace, food, hospitals, medical devices, universities, and federal research facilities.

  2. Laboratory performance evaluation reports for management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lindahl, P.C.; Hensley, J.E.; Bass, D.A.; Johnson, P.L.; Marr, J.J.; Streets, W.E.; Warren, S.W.; Newberry, R.W.

    1995-05-01

    In support of the US DOE`s environmental restoration efforts, the Integrated Performance Evaluation Program (IPEP) was developed to produce laboratory performance evaluation reports for management. These reports will provide information necessary to allow DOE headquarters and field offices to determine whether or not contracted analytical laboratories have the capability to produce environmental data of the quality necessary for the remediation program. This document describes the management report.

  3. Performance Measures | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass mapSpeeding access| DepartmentPeer ReviewRadiationAward at Small BusinessPerformance

  4. Tiger Team Assessment of the Ames Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    This report documents the Tiger Assessment of the Ames Laboratory (Ames), located in Ames, Iowa. Ames is operated for the US Department of Energy (DOE) by Iowa State University. The assessment was conducted from February 10 to March 5, 1992, under the auspices of the Office of Special Projects, Office of the Assistant Secretary of Environment, Safety and Health, Headquarters, DOE. The assessment was comprehensive, encompassing Environment, Safety, and Health (ES H) disciplines; management practices; and contractor and DOE self-assessments. Compliance with applicable Federal, State of Iowa, and local regulations; applicable DOE Orders; best management practices; and internal requirements at Ames Laboratory were assessed. In addition, an evaluation of the adequacy and effectiveness of DOE and the site contractor's management of ES H/quality assurance program was conducted.

  5. Ergonomic assessments of three Idaho National Engineering Laboratory cafeterias

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ostrom, L.T.; Romero, H.A.; Gilbert, B.G.; Wilhelmsen, C.A.

    1993-05-01

    The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory is a Department of Energy facility that performs a variety of engineering and research projects. EG&G Idaho is the prime contractor for the laboratory and, as such, performs the support functions in addition to technical, research, and development functions. As a part of the EG&G Idaho Industrial Hygiene Initiative, ergonomic assessments were conducted at three Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Cafeterias. The purposes of the assessments were to determine whether ergonomic problems existed in the work places and, if so, to make recommendations to improve the work place and task designs. The study showed there were ergonomic problems in all three cafeterias assessed. The primary ergonomic stresses observed included wrist and shoulder stress in the dish washing task, postural stress in the dish washing and food preparation tasks, and back stress in the food handling tasks.

  6. Preliminary parametric performance assessment of potential final waste forms for alpha low-level waste at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, T.H.; Sussman, M.E. [Lockheed Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Myers, J.; Djordjevic, S.M.; DeBiase, T.A.; Goodrich, M.T.; DeWitt, D. [IT Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1995-08-01

    This report presents a preliminary parametric performance assessment (PA) of potential waste disposal systems for alpha-contaminated, mixed, low-level waste (ALLW) currently stored at the Transuranic Storage Area of INEL. The ALLW, which contains from 10 to 100 nCi/g of transuranic (TRU) radionuclides, is awaiting treatment and disposal. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of several parameters on the radiological-confinement performance of potential disposal systems for the ALLW. The principal emphasis was on the performance of final waste forms (FWFs). Three categories of FWF (cement, glass, and ceramic) were addressed by evaluating the performance of two limiting FWFs for each category. Performance at five conceptual disposal sites was evaluated to illustrate the effects of site characteristics on the performance of the total disposal system. Other parameters investigated for effects on receptor dose included inventory assumptions, TRU radionuclide concentration, FWF fracture, disposal depth, water infiltration rates, subsurface-transport modeling assumptions, receptor well location, intrusion scenario assumptions, and the absence of waste immobilization. These and other factors were varied singly and in some combinations. The results indicate that compliance of the treated and disposed ALLW with the performance objectives depends on the assumptions made, as well as on the FWF and the disposal site. Some combinations result in compliance, while others do not. The implications of these results for decision making relative to treatment and disposal of the INEL ALLW are discussed. The report compares the degree of conservatism in this preliminary parametric PA against that in four other PAs and one risk assessment. All of the assessments addressed the same disposal site, but different wastes. The report also presents a qualitative evaluation of the uncertainties in the PA and makes recommendations for further study.

  7. Enterprise Assessments Review of the Sandia National Laboratories...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Sandia National Laboratories New Mexico Emergency Management Exercise Program - November 2015 Enterprise Assessments Review of the Sandia National Laboratories New Mexico...

  8. Enterprise Assessments Review of the Argonne National Laboratory...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Review of the Argonne National Laboratory Fire Protection Program - August 2015 Enterprise Assessments Review of the Argonne National Laboratory Fire Protection Program - August...

  9. Performance assessment to enhance training effectiveness.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stevens-Adams, Susan Marie; Gieseler, Charles J.; Basilico, Justin Derrick; Abbott, Robert G.; Forsythe, James Chris

    2010-09-01

    Training simulators have become increasingly popular tools for instructing humans on performance in complex environments. However, the question of how to provide individualized and scenario-specific assessment and feedback to students remains largely an open question. To maximize training efficiency, new technologies are required that assist instructors in providing individually relevant instruction. Sandia National Laboratories has shown the feasibility of automated performance assessment tools, such as the Sandia-developed Automated Expert Modeling and Student Evaluation (AEMASE) software, through proof-of-concept demonstrations, a pilot study, and an experiment. In the pilot study, the AEMASE system, which automatically assesses student performance based on observed examples of good and bad performance in a given domain, achieved a high degree of agreement with a human grader (89%) in assessing tactical air engagement scenarios. In more recent work, we found that AEMASE achieved a high degree of agreement with human graders (83-99%) for three Navy E-2 domain-relevant performance metrics. The current study provides a rigorous empirical evaluation of the enhanced training effectiveness achievable with this technology. In particular, we assessed whether giving students feedback based on automated metrics would enhance training effectiveness and improve student performance. We trained two groups of employees (differentiated by type of feedback) on a Navy E-2 simulator and assessed their performance on three domain-specific performance metrics. We found that students given feedback via the AEMASE-based debrief tool performed significantly better than students given only instructor feedback on two out of three metrics. Future work will focus on extending these developments for automated assessment of teamwork.

  10. Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Seismic Risk Assessment Project...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Risk Assessment Project: Implementation of Proposed Methodology at INL and Associated Risk Studies Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Seismic Risk Assessment Project: Implementation...

  11. Tiger Team assessment of the Brookhaven National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-06-01

    This report documents the results of the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Tiger Team Assessment conducted at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) in Upton, New York, between March 26 and April 27, 1990. The BNL is a multiprogram laboratory operated by the Associated Universities, Inc., (AUI) for DOE. The purpose of the assessment was to provide the status of environment, safety, and health (ES H) programs at the Laboratory. The scope of the assessment included a review of management systems and operating procedures and records; observations of facility operations; and interviews at the facilities. Subteams in four areas performed the review: ES H, Occupational Safety and Health, and Management and Organization. The assessment was comprehensive, covering all areas of ES H activities and waste management operations. Compliance with applicable Federal, State, and local regulations; applicable DOE Orders; and internal BNL requirements was assessed. In addition, the assessment included an evaluation of the adequacy and effectiveness of the DOE and the site contractor, Associated Universities, Inc. (AUI), management, organization, and administration of the ES H programs at BNL.

  12. Tiger Team assessment of the Brookhaven National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-06-01

    This report documents the results of the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Tiger Team Assessment conducted at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) in Upton, New York, between March 26 and April 27, 1990. The BNL is a multiprogram laboratory operated by the Associated Universities, Inc., (AUI) for DOE. The purpose of the assessment was to provide the status of environment, safety, and health (ES H) programs at the laboratory. The scope of the assessment included a review of management systems and operating procedures and records; observations of facility operations; and interviews at the facilities. Subteams in four areas performed the review: ES H, Occupational Safety and Health, and Management and Organization. The assessment was comprehensive, covering all areas of ES H activities and waste management operations. Compliance with applicable Federal, State, and local regulations; applicable DOE Orders; and internal BNL requirements was assessed. In addition, the assessment included an evaluation of the adequacy and effectiveness of the DOE and the site contractor, Associated Universities, Inc. (AUI), management, organization, and administration of the ES H programs at BNL. This volume contains appendices.

  13. Independent Oversight Assessment, Los Alamos National Laboratory- August 2011

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Facility Centered Assessment of the Los Alamos National Laboratory Science and Technology Operations - Facility Operations Director Managed Facilities

  14. Tiger Team Assessment of the Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-11-01

    The Management Subteam conducted a management and organization assessment of environment, safety, and health (ES H) activities performed by the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and onsite contractor personnel. The objectives of the assessment were to (1) evaluate the effectiveness of management systems and practices in terms of ensuring environmental compliance and the safety and health of workers and the general public, (2) identify key findings, and (3) identify root causes for all ES H findings and concerns. The scope of the assessment included examinations of the following from an ES H perspective: (1) strategic and program planning; (2) organizational structure and management configuration; (3) human resource management, including training and staffing; (4) management systems, including performance monitoring and assessment; (5) conduct of operations; (6) public and institutional interactions; and (7) corporate'' parent support.

  15. Environmental Management Assessment of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    This report documents the results of the environmental management assessment performed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in Golden, Colorado. The onsite portion of the assessment was conducted from September 14 through September 27, 1993, by DOE`s Office of Environmental Audit (EH-24) located within the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety, and Health (EH-1). During this assessment, the activities conducted by the assessment team included reviews of internal documents and reports from previous audits and assessments; interviews with US Department of Energy (DOE) and NREL contractor personnel; and inspections and observations of selected facilities and operations. The environmental management assessment of NREL focused on the adequacy of environmental management systems and assessed the formality of programs employing an approach that recognizes the level of formality implementing environmental programs may vary commensurate with non-nuclear research and development operations. The Assessment Team evaluated environmental monitoring, waste management and National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) activities at NREL, from a programmatic standpoint. The results of the evaluation of these areas are contained in the Environmental Protection Programs section of this report. The scope of the NREL Environmental Management Assessment was comprehensive and included all areas of environmental management. At the same time, environmental monitoring, waste management, and NEPA activities were evaluated to develop a programmatic understanding of these environmental disciplines, building upon the results of previous appraisals, audits, and reviews performed at the NREL.

  16. Tiger Team assessment of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKenzie, Barbara J.; West, Stephanie G.; Jones, Olga G.; Kerr, Dorothy A.; Bieri, Rita A.; Sanderson, Nancy L.

    1991-08-01

    The purpose of the Safety and Health (S H) Subteam assessment was to determine the effectiveness of representative safety and health programs at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) site. Four Technical Safety Appraisal (TSA) Teams were assembled for this purpose by the US Department of Energy (DOE), Deputy Assistant Secretary for Safety and Quality Assurance, Office of Safety Appraisals (OSA). Team No. 1 reviewed EG G Idaho, Inc. (EG G Idaho) and the Department of Energy Field Office, Idaho (ID) Fire Department. Team No. 2 reviewed Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W). Team No. 3 reviewed selected contractors at the INEL; specifically, Morrison Knudsen-Ferguson of Idaho Company (MK-FIC), Protection Technology of Idaho, Inc. (PTI), Radiological and Environmental Sciences Laboratory (RESL), and Rockwell-INEL. Team No. 4 provided an Occupational Safety and Health Act (OSHA)-type compliance sitewide assessment of INEL. The S H Subteam assessment was performed concurrently with assessments conducted by Environmental and Management Subteams. Performance was appraised in the following technical areas: Organization and Administration, Quality Verification, Operations, Maintenance, Training and Certification, Auxiliary Systems, Emergency Preparedness, Technical Support, Packaging and Transportation, Nuclear Criticality Safety, Security/Safety Interface, Experimental Activities, Site/Facility Safety Review, Radiological Protection, Personnel Protection, Worker Safety and Health (OSHA) Compliance, Fire Protection, Aviation Safety, Medical Services, and Firearms Safety.

  17. Tiger Team Assessment of the Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-11-01

    The purpose of the safety and health assessment was to determine the effectiveness of representative safety and health programs at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Within the safety and health programs at LANL, performance was assessed in the following technical areas: Organization and Administration, Quality Verification, Operations, Maintenance, Training and Certification, Auxiliary Systems, Emergency Preparedness, Technical Support, Packaging and Transportation, Nuclear Criticality Safety, Security/Safety Interface, Experimental Activities, Site/Facility Safety Review, Radiological Protection, Personnel Protection, Worker Safety and Health (OSHA) Compliance, Fire Protection, Aviation Safety, Explosives Safety, Natural Phenomena, and Medical Services.

  18. Total System Performance Assessment Peer Review Panel

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) Peer Review Panel for predicting the performance of a repository at Yucca Mountain.

  19. Two Los Alamos National Laboratory organizations receive Performance...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laboratory organizations receive Performance Excellence recognition from Quality New Mexico Nuclear Material Control and Accountability Group and the Quality and Performance...

  20. Idaho National Laboratory Quarterly Performance Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lisbeth Mitchell

    2014-11-01

    This report is published quarterly by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Quality and Performance Management Organization. The Department of Energy (DOE) Occurrence Reporting and Processing System (ORPS), as prescribed in DOE Order 232.2, “Occurrence Reporting and Processing of Operations Information,” requires a quarterly analysis of events, both reportable and not reportable, for the previous 12 months. This report is the analysis of 60 reportable events (23 from the 4th Qtr FY14 and 37 from the prior three reporting quarters) as well as 58 other issue reports (including not reportable events and Significant Category A and B conditions) identified at INL from July 2013 through October 2014. Battelle Energy Alliance (BEA) operates the INL under contract DE AC07 051D14517.

  1. Los Alamos National Laboratory 1995 self assessment report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-06-30

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Safeguards and Security (S and S) Assurance Program (AP) is designed to ensure the adequacy and effectiveness of the LANL S and S program. The Assurance Program provides a mechanism for discovering deficiencies, determining causes, conducting risk assessments, implementing corrective actions, and documenting the assessment process. Selection of organizations for self assessments is based on the criteria established in the LANL S and S Assurance Program. For FY 1995, 12 organizations were selected for self assessments, these organizations are identified fin the schedule at Appendix A. The S and S topical areas selected for review in each organization varied depending on their security interests and included: Program Planning and Management (PPM); Protection Program Operations (PPO); Material Control and Accountability (MC and A); Computer and Communications Security (COMPSEC and COMSEC); Information Security (INFOSEC); Personnel Security (PERSEC); and Operational Security (OPSEC). The objective was to ascertain the effectiveness of S and S programs in each organization, its formality of operations, and its integration with the overall Laboratory S and S program. The goal was to meet both the DOE self-assessment requirements and the UC performance criteria and document the results.

  2. Enterprise Assessments, Oak Ridge National Laboratory Irradiated...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    of the Safety-Significant Ventilation Systems at the Irradiated Fuels Examination Laboratory Operated by UT-Battelle for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Office of Science The...

  3. Computational Tools to Assess Turbine Biological Performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richmond, Marshall C.; Serkowski, John A.; Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Strickler, Brad; Weisbeck, Molly; Dotson, Curtis L.

    2014-07-24

    Public Utility District No. 2 of Grant County (GCPUD) operates the Priest Rapids Dam (PRD), a hydroelectric facility on the Columbia River in Washington State. The dam contains 10 Kaplan-type turbine units that are now more than 50 years old. Plans are underway to refit these aging turbines with new runners. The Columbia River at PRD is a migratory pathway for several species of juvenile and adult salmonids, so passage of fish through the dam is a major consideration when upgrading the turbines. In this paper, a method for turbine biological performance assessment (BioPA) is demonstrated. Using this method, a suite of biological performance indicators is computed based on simulated data from a CFD model of a proposed turbine design. Each performance indicator is a measure of the probability of exposure to a certain dose of an injury mechanism. Using known relationships between the dose of an injury mechanism and frequency of injury (dose–response) from laboratory or field studies, the likelihood of fish injury for a turbine design can be computed from the performance indicator. By comparing the values of the indicators from proposed designs, the engineer can identify the more-promising alternatives. We present an application of the BioPA method for baseline risk assessment calculations for the existing Kaplan turbines at PRD that will be used as the minimum biological performance that a proposed new design must achieve.

  4. Enterprise Assessments Review of the Sandia National Laboratories...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Sandia National LaboratoriesNew Mexico Emergency Management Exercise Program November 2015 Office of Emergency Management Assessments Office of Environment, Safety and Health...

  5. PERFORMANCE OBJECTIVES FOR TANK FARM CLOSURE PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MANN, F.M.; CRUMPLER, J.D.

    2005-09-30

    This report documents the performance objectives (metrics, times of analyses, and times of compliance) to be used in performance assessments of Hanford Site tank farm closure.

  6. Performance Assessment Report Domain CHP System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Performance Assessment Report for the Domain CHP System November 2005 By Burns & McDonnell Engineering #12;Domain CHP System Performance Assessment Report for the Packaged Cooling, Heating and Power

  7. PERFORMANCE AND RISK ASSESSMENT COMMUNITY OF PRACTICE

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    --- Topic: Performance & Risk Assessment Community of Practice Webinar Date: Thursday, February 20, 2014 Time: 11:00 am,...

  8. Communicating Performance Assessments Results - 13609

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Layton, Mark [Savannah River Remediation LLC, Building 705-1C, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)] [Savannah River Remediation LLC, Building 705-1C, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    The F-Area Tank Farms (FTF) and H-Area Tank Farm (HTF) are owned by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and operated by Savannah River Remediation LLC (SRR), Liquid Waste Operations contractor at DOE's Savannah River Site (SRS). The FTF and HTF are active radioactive waste storage and treatment facilities consisting of 51 carbon steel waste tanks and ancillary equipment such as transfer lines, evaporators and pump tanks. Performance Assessments (PAs) for each Tank Farm have been prepared to support the eventual closure of the underground radioactive waste tanks and ancillary equipment. PAs provide the technical bases and results to be used in subsequent documents to demonstrate compliance with the pertinent requirements for final closure of the Tank Farms. The Tank Farms are subject to a number of regulatory requirements. The State regulates Tank Farm operations through an industrial waste water permit and through a Federal Facility Agreement approved by the State, DOE and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Closure documentation will include State-approved Tank Farm Closure Plans and tank-specific closure modules utilizing information from the PAs. For this reason, the State of South Carolina and the EPA must be involved in the performance assessment review process. The residual material remaining after tank cleaning is also subject to reclassification prior to closure via a waste determination pursuant to Section 3116 of the Ronald W. Reagan National Defense Authorization Act of Fiscal Year 2005. PAs are performance-based, risk-informed analyses of the fate and transport of FTF and HTF residual wastes following final closure of the Tank Farms. Since the PAs serve as the primary risk assessment tools in evaluating readiness for closure, it is vital that PA conclusions be communicated effectively. In the course of developing the FTF and HTF PAs, several lessons learned have emerged regarding communicating PA results. When communicating PA results it is important to stress that the primary goal of the PA results is to provide risk understanding, recognizing the magnitude of risk and identifying the conceptual model decisions and critical assumptions that most impact the results. Conceptual models that describe reality using simplified, mathematical approaches, and their roles in arriving at the PA results, must also be communicated. When presenting PA results, evaluations will typically be focused on a single baseline (or Base Case) to provide a foundation for discussion. The PA results are supplemented by other studies (alternate configurations, uncertainty analyses, and sensitivity analyses) which provide a breadth of modeling to supplement the Base Case. The suite of information offered by the various modeling cases and studies provides confidence that the overall risk is understood along with the underlying parameters and conditions that contribute to risk. (author)

  9. Enterprise Assessments Review, Los Alamos National Laboratory...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    - November 2014 November 2014 Review of the Los Alamos National Laboratory Weapons Engineering Tritium Facility Fire Suppression System The Department of Energy Office of...

  10. 2004 Compliance Recertification Application Performance Assessment Baseline Calculation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2004 Compliance Recertification Application Performance Assessment Baseline Calculation Revision O Sandia National Laboratories Waste Isolation Pilot Plant 2004 Compliance Recertification Application (2 ~"f, Date QA Review Mario Chavez Print WIPP: 1.4.1.1.:P A:QA-L:540232 lof153 #12;2004 Compliance

  11. Environmental Health and Safety Chemical Hygiene Laboratory Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Environmental Health and Safety Chemical Hygiene Laboratory Assessment PI or environmental concerns were identified. B. Items of safety or environmental concerns were identified. C. Uncorrected repeated safety or environmental items were identified. Compressed Gas Cylinders / Distribution

  12. Enterprise Assessments Review, Sandia National Laboratories/New...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    April 2015 Review of the Sandia National LaboratoriesNew Mexico 2014 Site-Level Emergency Management Exercise The Office of Emergency Management Assessments, within the U.S....

  13. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory FY96 evaluation of Integrated Assessment Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-10-01

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory`s Integrated Assessment Program (IAP) is the primary system to assess and monitor overall performance and to drive continuous improvement in the Laboratory. The approach used is a significant departure from the Laboratory`s traditional reliance on auditing methods. It is a move toward the contemporary concepts of measuring organizational performance by encouraging scientific, operational, and business excellence, through self-assessment and strengthening line management accountability for results in product and service quality, safety, and cost. This report describes the approach used (methods and processes), the deployment of that approach in the six Laboratory organizations selected to pilot the approach, and a summary of how the pilot organizations used the results they obtained. Section 3.0 of this report summarizes the top strengths and weaknesses in performance as identified by Division/Directorate self-assessments, Independent Oversight, Internal Audit and peer reviews, and includes the actions that have been, or will be taken, to improve performance in areas that are weak.

  14. Nevada National Security Site Performance Assessment Updates...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    New Waste Streams Greg Shott National Security Technologies, LLC Performance and Risk Assessment Community of Practice Annual Technical Exchange Meeting December 11 and 12, 2014...

  15. Enterprise Assessments Targeted Review, Sandia National Laboratories...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Nuclear Security Administration sites that perform work at nuclear facilities and other high consequence hazards (e.g., chemical and biological). This targeted review area also...

  16. High-Level Waste Corporate Board Performance Assessment Subcommittee

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    - Performance Assessment Process Performance assessments are the fundamental risk assessment tool used by the DOE to evaluate and communicate the effectiveness and long-term...

  17. Advanced Manufacturing Processes Laboratory Building 878 hazards assessment document

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wood, C.; Thornton, W.; Swihart, A.; Gilman, T.

    1994-07-01

    The introduction of the hazards assessment process is to document the impact of the release of hazards at the Advanced Manufacturing Processes Laboratory (AMPL) that are significant enough to warrant consideration in Sandia National Laboratories` operational emergency management program. This hazards assessment is prepared in accordance with the Department of Energy Order 5500.3A requirement that facility-specific hazards assessments be prepared, maintained, and used for emergency planning purposes. This hazards assessment provides an analysis of the potential airborne release of chemicals associated with the operations and processes at the AMPL. This research and development laboratory develops advanced manufacturing technologies, practices, and unique equipment and provides the fabrication of prototype hardware to meet the needs of Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico (SNL/NM). The focus of the hazards assessment is the airborne release of materials because this requires the most rapid, coordinated emergency response on the part of the AMPL, SNL/NM, collocated facilities, and surrounding jurisdiction to protect workers, the public, and the environment.

  18. Pacific Northwest Laboratory facilities radionuclide inventory assessment CY 1992-1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sula, M.J.; Jette, S.J.

    1994-09-01

    Assessments for evaluating compliance with airborne radionuclide emission monitoring requirements in the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPs - U.S. Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40 Part 61, Subparts H and I) were performed for 33 buildings at the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) Pacific Northwest Laboratory on the Hanford Site, and for five buildings owned and operated by Battelle, Pacific Northwest Laboratories in Richland, Washington. The assessments were performed using building radionuclide inventory data obtained in 1992 and 1993. Results of the assessments are summarized in Table S.1 for DOE-PNL buildings and in Table S.2 for Battelle-owned buildings. Based on the radionuclide inventory assessments, four DOE-PNL buildings (one with two emission points) require continuous sampling for radionuclides per 40 CFR 61. None of the Battelle-owned buildings require continuous emission sampling.

  19. Quality Assurance for Performance Assessment Modeling

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation from the 2015 Annual Performance and Risk Assessment (P&RA) Community of Practice (CoP) Technical Exchange Meeting held in Richland, Washington on December 15-16, 2015.

  20. Deep Borehole Disposal (DBD) Performance Assessment

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation from the 2015 Annual Performance and Risk Assessment (P&RA) Community of Practice (CoP) Technical Exchange Meeting held in Richland, Washington on December 15-16, 2015.

  1. Tiger Team assessment of the Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-05-01

    This report documents the Tiger Team Assessment of Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), Albuquerque, located in Albuquerque, New Mexico. SNL, Albuquerque, is operated by the Sandia Corporation (a wholly owned subsidiary of the American Telephone and Telegraph Company) for the US Department of Energy (DOE). The environmental assessment also included DOE tenant facilities at Ross Aviation, Albuquerque Microelectronics Operation, and the Central Training Academy. The assessment was conducted from April 15 to May 24, 1991, under the auspices of DOE's Office of Special Projects under the Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety and Health (ES H). The assessment was comprehensive, encompassing ES H disciplines, management, self-assessments, and quality assurance; transportation; and waste management operations. Compliance with applicable federal, state, and local regulations; applicable DOE Orders; best management practices; and internal SNL, Albuquerque, requirements were assessed. In addition, an evaluation of the adequacy and effectiveness of DOE and SNL, Albuquerque management of ES H programs was conducted.

  2. Page 1 of 3 Laboratory Safety and Environmental Health Assessment Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Page 1 of 3 Laboratory Safety and Environmental Health Assessment Program Principal Investigators responsibilities. This Laboratory Assessment Program identifies four processes to evaluate safety and environmental to modify an assessment checklist that best addresses specific safety and environmental compliance needs

  3. Quality Assurance Baseline Assessment Report to Los Alamos National Laboratory Analytical Chemistry Operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jordan, R. A.

    1998-09-01

    This report summarizes observations that were made during a Quality Assurance (QA) Baseline Assessment of the Nuclear Materials Technology Analytical Chemistry Group (NMT-1). The Quality and Planning personnel, for NMT-1, are spending a significant amount of time transitioning out of their roles of environmental oversight into production oversight. A team from the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Defense Program Environmental Surety Program performed an assessment of the current status of the QA Program. Several Los Alamos National Laboratory Analytical Chemistry procedures were reviewed, as well as Transuranic Waste Characterization Program (TWCP) QA documents. Checklists were developed and the assessment was performed according to an Implementation Work Plan, INEEL/EXT-98-00740.

  4. Tiger Team assessment of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldberg, Edward S.; Keating, John J.

    1991-08-01

    The Management Subteam conducted a management assessment of Environment, Safety, and Health (ES H) programs and their implementation of Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The objectives of the assessment were to: (1) evaluate the effectiveness of existing management functions and processes in terms of ensuring environmental compliance, and the health and safety of workers and the general public; and (2) identify probable root causes for ES H findings and concerns. Organizations reviewed were DOE-Headquarters: DOE Field Offices, Chicago (CH) and Idaho (ID); Argonne Area Offices, East (AAO-E) and West (AAO-W); Radiological and Environmental Sciences Laboratory (RESL); Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); EG G Idaho, Inc. (EG G); Westinghouse Idaho Nuclear Company, Inc. (WINCO); Rockwell-INEL; MK-Ferguson of Idaho Company (MK-FIC); and Protection Technology of Idaho, Inc. (PTI). The scope of the assessment covered the following ES H management issues: policies and procedures; roles, responsibilities, and authorities; management commitment; communication; staff development, training, and certification; recruitment; compliance management; conduct of operations; emergency planning and preparedness; quality assurance; self assessment; oversight activities; and cost plus award fee processes.

  5. Strategy for experimental validation of waste package performance assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bates, J.K.; Abrajano, T.A. Jr.; Wronkiewicz, D.J.; Gerding, T.J.; Seils, C.A.

    1990-07-01

    A strategy for the experimental validation of waste package performance assessment has been developed as part of a program supported by the Repository Technology Program. The strategy was developed by reviewing the results of laboratory analog experiments, in-situ tests, repository simulation tests, and material interaction tests. As a result of the review, a listing of dependent and independent variables that influence the ingress of water into the near-field environment, the reaction between water and the waste form, and the transport of radionuclides from the near-field environment was developed. The variables necessary to incorporate into an experimental validation strategy were chosen by identifying those which had the greatest effect of each of the three major events, i.e., groundwater ingress, waste package reactions, and radionuclide transport. The methodology to perform validation experiments was examined by utilizing an existing laboratory analog approach developed for unsaturated testing of glass waste forms. 185 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Hanford Site Waste Management Area C Performance Assessment ...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Waste Management Area C Performance Assessment (PA) Current Status Hanford Site Waste Management Area C Performance Assessment (PA) Current Status Marcel Bergeron Washignton River...

  7. List of Topics for Interagency Performance & Risk Assessment...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    List of Topics for Interagency Performance & Risk Assessment Community of Practice (P&RA CoP) Discussion List of Topics for Interagency Performance & Risk Assessment Community of...

  8. WINTER PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT OF PERMEABLE PAVEMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    WINTER PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT OF PERMEABLE PAVEMENTS A COMPARATIVE STUDY OF POROUS ASPHALT, PERVIOUS CONCRETE, AND CONVENTIONAL ASPHALT IN A NORTHERN CLIMATE BY KRISTOPHER M. HOULE BS, Worcester the University of New Hampshire, the Northern New England Concrete Promotion Association (NNECPA), the Northeast

  9. Assessment of Unabated Facility Emission Potentials for Evaluating Airborne Radionuclide Monitoring Requirements at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory - 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ballinger, Marcel Y.; Barfuss, Brad C.; Gervais, Todd L.

    2008-01-01

    Assessments were performed to evaluate compliance with the airborne radionuclide emission monitoring requirements in the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP – U.S. Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40, Part 61, Subpart H) and Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 246-247: Radiation Protection – Air Emissions. In these NESHAP assessments, potential unabated offsite doses were evaluated for emission locations at buildings that are part of the consolidated laboratory campus of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. This report describes the inventory-based methods and provides the results for the NESHAP assessment performed in 2007.

  10. Assessment of Unabated Facility Emission Potentials for Evaluating Airborne Radionuclide Monitoring Requirements at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory - 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ballinger, Marcel Y.; Gervais, Todd L.; Barnett, J. M.

    2011-05-13

    Assessments were performed to evaluate compliance with the airborne radionuclide emission monitoring requirements in the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants ([NESHAP]; U.S. Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40, Part 61, Subpart H) and Washington Administrative Code 246-247: Radiation Protection - Air Emissions. In these NESHAP assessments, potential unabated off-site doses were evaluated for emission locations at buildings that are part of the consolidated laboratory campus of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. This report describes the inventory-based methods and provides the results for the NESHAP assessment performed in 2010.

  11. Laboratory Performance Testing of Residential Window Air Conditioners

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Winkler, J.; Booten, C.; Christensen, D.; Tomerlin, J.

    2013-03-01

    Window air conditioners are the dominant cooling product for residences, in terms of annual unit sales. They are inexpensive, portable and can be installed by the owner. For this reason, they are an attractive solution for supplemental cooling, for retrofitting air conditioning into a home which lacks ductwork, and for renters. Window air conditioners for sale in the United States are required to meet very modest minimum efficiency standards. Four window air conditioners' performance were tested in the Advanced HVAC Systems Laboratory on NREL's campus in Golden, CO. In order to separate and study the refrigerant system's performance, the unit's internal leakage pathways, the unit's fanforced ventilation, and the leakage around the unit resulting from installation in a window, a series of tests were devised that focused on each aspect of the unit's performance. These tests were designed to develop a detailed performance map to determine whole-house performance in different climates. Even though the test regimen deviated thoroughly from the industry-standard ratings test, the results permit simple calculation of an estimated rating for both capacity and efficiency that would result from a standard ratings test. Using this calculation method, it was found that the three new air conditioners' measured performance was consistent with their ratings. This method also permits calculation of equivalent SEER for the test articles. Performance datasets were developed across a broad range of indoor and outdoor operating conditions, and used them to generate performance maps.

  12. Climate Change Vulnerability Assessment for Idaho National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christopher P. Ischay; Ernest L. Fossum; Polly C. Buotte; Jeffrey A. Hicke; Alexander Peterson

    2014-10-01

    The University of Idaho (UI) was asked to participate in the development of a climate change vulnerability assessment for Idaho National Laboratory (INL). This report describes the outcome of that assessment. The climate change happening now, due in large part to human activities, is expected to continue in the future. UI and INL used a common framework for assessing vulnerability that considers exposure (future climate change), sensitivity (system or component responses to climate), impact (exposure combined with sensitivity), and adaptive capacity (capability of INL to modify operations to minimize climate change impacts) to assess vulnerability. Analyses of climate change (exposure) revealed that warming that is ongoing at INL will continue in the coming decades, with increased warming in later decades and under scenarios of greater greenhouse gas emissions. Projections of precipitation are more uncertain, with multi model means exhibiting somewhat wetter conditions and more wet days per year. Additional impacts relevant to INL include estimates of more burned area and increased evaporation and transpiration, leading to reduced soil moisture and plant growth.

  13. Guidance for performing preliminary assessments under CERCLA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1991-09-01

    EPA headquarters and a national site assessment workgroup produced this guidance for Regional, State, and contractor staff who manage or perform preliminary assessments (PAs). EPA has focused this guidance on the types of sites and site conditions most commonly encountered. The PA approach described in this guidance is generally applicable to a wide variety of sites. However, because of the variability among sites, the amount of information available, and the level of investigative effort required, it is not possible to provide guidance that is equally applicable to all sites. PA investigators should recognize this and be aware that variation from this guidance may be necessary for some sites, particularly for PAs performed at Federal facilities, PAs conducted under EPA`s Environmental Priorities Initiative (EPI), and PAs at sites that have previously been extensively investigated by EPA or others. The purpose of this guidance is to provide instructions for conducting a PA and reporting results. This guidance discusses the information required to evaluate a site and how to obtain it, how to score a site, and reporting requirements. This document also provides guidelines and instruction on PA evaluation, scoring, and the use of standard PA scoresheets. The overall goal of this guidance is to assist PA investigators in conducting high-quality assessments that result in correct site screening or further action recommendations on a nationally consistent basis.

  14. Laboratory Performance Evaluation of Residential Integrated Heat Pump Water Heaters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sparn, B.; Hudon, K.; Christensen, D.

    2014-06-01

    This paper explores the laboratory performance of five integrated Heat Pump Water Heaters (HPWHs) across a wide range of operating conditions representative of U.S. climate regions. HPWHs are expected to provide significant energy savings in certain climate zones when compared to typical electric resistance water heaters. Results show that this technology is a viable option in most climates, but differences in control schemes and design features impact the performance of the units tested. Tests were conducted to map heat pump performance across the operating range and to determine the logic used to control the heat pump and the backup electric heaters. Other tests performed include two unique draw profile tests, reduced air flow performance tests and the standard DOE rating tests. The results from all these tests are presented here for all five units tested. The results of these tests will be used to improve the EnergyPlus heat pump water heater for use in BEopt™ whole-house building simulations.

  15. Laboratory Performance Evaluation of Residential Integrated Heat Pump Water Heaters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sparn, B.; Hudon, K.; Christensen, D.

    2014-06-01

    This paper explores the laboratory performance of five integrated Heat Pump Water Heaters (HPWHs) across a wide range of operating conditions representative of US climate regions. HPWHs are expected to provide significant energy savings in certain climate zones when compared to typical electric resistance water heaters. Results show that this technology is a viable option in most climates, but differences in control schemes and design features impact the performance of the units tested. Tests were conducted to map heat pump performance across the operating range and to determine the logic used to control the heat pump and the backup electric heaters. Other tests performed include two unique draw profile tests, reduced air flow performance tests and the standard DOE rating tests. The results from all these tests are presented here for all five units tested. The results of these tests will be used to improve the EnergyPlus heat pump water heater for use in BEopt(tm) whole-house building simulations.

  16. Synchronous and Cogged Fan Belt Performance Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cutler, D.; Dean, J.; Acosta, J.

    2014-02-01

    The GSA Regional GPG Team commissioned the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to perform monitoring of cogged V-belts and synchronous belts on both a constant volume and a variable air volume fan at the Byron G. Rodgers Federal Building and U.S. Courthouse in Denver, Colorado. These motor/fan combinations were tested with their original, standard V-belts (appropriately tensioned by an operation and maintenance professional) to obtain a baseline for standard operation. They were then switched to the cogged V-belts, and finally to synchronous belts. The power consumption by the motor was normalized for both fan speed and air density changes. This was necessary to ensure that the power readings were not influenced by a change in rotational fan speed or by the power required to push denser air. Finally, energy savings and operation and maintenance savings were compiled into an economic life-cycle cost analysis of the different belt options.

  17. Tiger Team assessment of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Washington, DC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-02-01

    This report documents the results of the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Tiger Team Assessment of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) conducted from January 14 through February 15, 1991. The purpose of the assessment was to provide the Secretary of Energy with the status of environment, safety, and health (ES H) programs at LBL. The Tiger Team concluded that curtailment of cessation of any operations at LBL is not warranted. However, the number and breadth of findings and concerns from this assessment reflect a serious condition at this site. In spite of its late start, LBL has recently made progress in increasing ES H awareness at all staff levels and in identifying ES H deficiencies. Corrective action plans are inadequate, however, many compensatory actions are underway. Also, LBL does not have the technical expertise or training programs nor the tracking and followup to effectively direct and control sitewide guidance and oversight by DOE of ES H activities at LBL. As a result of these deficiencies, the Tiger Team has reservations about LBL's ability to implement effective actions in a timely manner and, thereby, achieve excellence in their ES H program. 4 figs., 24 tabs.

  18. Data used in preliminary performance assessment of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (1990)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rechard, R.P (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (USA)); Luzzolino, H. (Geo-Centers, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (USA)); Sandha, J.S. (Science Applications International Corp., Albuquerque, NM (USA))

    1990-12-01

    This report documents the data available as of August 1990 and used by the Performance Assessment Division of Sandia National Laboratories in its December 1990 preliminary performance assessment of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Parameter values are presented in table form for the geologic subsystem, engineered barriers, borehole flow properties, climate variability, and intrusion characteristics. Sources for the data and a brief discussion of each parameter are provided. 101 refs., 72 figs., 21 tabs.

  19. Laboratory Performance Evaluation Report of SEL 421 Phasor Measurement Unit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Zhenyu; faris, Anthony J.; Martin, Kenneth E.; Hauer, John F.; Bonebrake, Christopher A.; Shaw, James M.

    2007-12-01

    PNNL and BPA have been in close collaboration on laboratory performance evaluation of phasor measurement units for over ten years. A series of evaluation tests are designed to confirm accuracy and determine measurement performance under a variety of conditions that may be encountered in actual use. Ultimately the testing conducted should provide parameters that can be used to adjust all measurements to a standardized basis. These tests are performed with a standard relay test set using recorded files of precisely generated test signals. The test set provides test signals at a level and in a format suitable for input to a PMU that accurately reproduces the signals in both signal amplitude and timing. Test set outputs are checked to confirm the accuracy of the output signal. The recorded signals include both current and voltage waveforms and a digital timing track used to relate the PMU measured value with the test signal. Test signals include steady-state waveforms to test amplitude, phase, and frequency accuracy, modulated signals to determine measurement and rejection bands, and step tests to determine timing and response accuracy. Additional tests are included as necessary to fully describe the PMU operation. Testing is done with a BPA phasor data concentrator (PDC) which provides communication support and monitors data input for dropouts and data errors.

  20. Status Updates on the Performance and Risk Assessment Community...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Updates on the Performance and Risk Assessment Community of Practice (P&RA CoP) Status Updates on the Performance and Risk Assessment Community of Practice (P&RA CoP) Ming Zhu,...

  1. Interagency Performance and Risk Assessment Community of Practice...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Interagency Performance and Risk Assessment Community of Practice (P&RA CoP) Charter Interagency Performance and Risk Assessment Community of Practice (P&RA CoP) Charter Charter...

  2. Annual summary of ILAW performance assessment for 2002

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MANN, F M

    2002-11-01

    An annual summary of the adequacy of the Hanford Immobilized Low-Activity Tank Waste Performance Assessment (ILAW PA) is necessary in each year in which a full performance assessment is not issued.

  3. Assessing the Costs and Benefits of the Superior Energy Performance...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Assessing the Costs and Benefits of the Superior Energy Performance Program Superior Energy Performance logo This paper focuses on the business value of Superior Energy...

  4. PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT ASSISTANCE ACTIVITIES IN THE DOE COMPLEX

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seitz, R.

    2012-01-23

    The United States Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) has established a Performance Assessment Community of Practice (PA CoP) to foster the sharing of information among performance assessment (PA) and risk assessment practitioners, regulators and oversight personnel. The general intent is to contribute to continuous improvement in the consistency, technical adequacy and quality of implementation of PAs and risk assessments around the DOE Complex. The PA CoP activities have involved commercial disposal facilities and international participants to provide a global perspective. The PA CoP has also sponsored annual technical exchanges as a means to foster improved communication and to share lessons learned from on-going modelling activities. The PA CoP encourages activities to provide programmatic and technical assistance in the form of sharing experience and lessons learned with practitioners during the development of PAs and risk assessments. This assistance complements DOE-EM reviews through the Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility Federal Review Group (LFRG) that are conducted after modelling efforts are completed. Such up-front assistance is providing additional value in terms of improving consistency and sharing of information. There has been a substantial increase in the amount of assistance being provided. The assistance has been well received by practitioners and regulators that have been involved. The paper highlights assistance and sharing of information that has been conducted in the last two years to support activities underway in support of proposed disposal facilities at Paducah, Portsmouth, and the Idaho National Laboratory and tank closure at Hanford.

  5. RCRA Facilities Assessment (RFA)---Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-03-01

    US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities are required to be in full compliance with all federal and state regulations. In response to this requirement, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has established a Remedial Action Program (RAP) to provide comprehensive management of areas where past and current research, development, and waste management activities have resulted in residual contamination of facilities or the environment. This report presents the RCRA Facility Assessment (RFA) required to meet the requirements of RCRA Section 3004(u). Included in the RFA are (1) a listing of all sites identified at ORNL that could be considered sources of releases or potential releases; (2) background information on each of these sites, including location, type, size, period of operation, current operational status, and information on observed or potential releases (as required in Section II.A.1 of the RCRA permit); (3) analytical results obtained from preliminary surveys conducted to verify the presence or absence of releases from some of the sites; and (4) ORNL`s assessment of the need for further remedial attention.

  6. RCRA Facilities Assessment (RFA)---Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-03-01

    US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities are required to be in full compliance with all federal and state regulations. In response to this requirement, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has established a Remedial Action Program (RAP) to provide comprehensive management of areas where past and current research, development, and waste management activities have resulted in residual contamination of facilities or the environment. This report presents the RCRA Facility Assessment (RFA) required to meet the requirements of RCRA Section 3004(u). Included in the RFA are (1) a listing of all sites identified at ORNL that could be considered sources of releases or potential releases; (2) background information on each of these sites, including location, type, size, period of operation, current operational status, and information on observed or potential releases (as required in Section II.A.1 of the RCRA permit); (3) analytical results obtained from preliminary surveys conducted to verify the presence or absence of releases from some of the sites; and (4) ORNL's assessment of the need for further remedial attention.

  7. Idaho National Laboratory Advanced Test Reactor Probabilistic Risk Assessment

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Presenter: Bentley Harwood, Advanced Test Reactor Nuclear Safety Engineer Battelle Energy Alliance Idaho National Laboratory

  8. Performing Probabilistic Risk Assessment Through RAVEN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A. Alfonsi; C. Rabiti; D. Mandelli; J. Cogliati; R. Kinoshita

    2013-06-01

    The Reactor Analysis and Virtual control ENviroment (RAVEN) code is a software tool that acts as the control logic driver and post-processing engine for the newly developed Thermal-Hydraulic code RELAP-7. RAVEN is now a multi-purpose Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) software framework that allows dispatching different functionalities: Derive and actuate the control logic required to simulate the plant control system and operator actions (guided procedures), allowing on-line monitoring/controlling in the Phase Space Perform both Monte-Carlo sampling of random distributed events and Dynamic Event Tree based analysis Facilitate the input/output handling through a Graphical User Interface (GUI) and a post-processing data mining module

  9. Assessment of Unabated Facility Emission Potentials for Evaluating Airborne Radionuclide Monitoring Requirements at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory - 2001

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ballinger, Marcel Y.; Sula, Monte J.; Gervais, Todd L.; Shields, Keith D.; Edwards, Daniel R.

    2001-09-28

    Assessments were performed to evaluate compliance with the airborne radionuclide emission monitoring requirements in the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP - U.S. Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40 Part 61, Subpart H) and Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 246-247: Radiation Protection - Air Emissions. In these assessments, potential unabated offsite doses were evaluated for emission locations at facilities owned by the U.S. Department of Energy and operated by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) on the Hanford Site. This report describes the inventory-based methods, and provides the results, for the assessment performed in 2001.

  10. Assessment of Unabated Facility Emission Potentials for Evaluating Airborne Radionuclide Monitoring Requirements at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory - 2003

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ballinger, Marcel Y.; Sula, Monte J.; Gervais, Todd L.; Edwards, Daniel L.

    2003-12-05

    Assessments were performed to evaluate compliance with the airborne radionuclide emission monitoring requirements in the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP - U.S. Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40, Part 61, Subpart H) and Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 246-247: Radiation Protection - Air Emissions. In these assessments, potential unabated offsite doses were evaluated for emission locations at facilities owned by the U.S. Department of Energy and operated by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) on the Hanford Site. This report describes the inventory-based methods and provides the results for the assessment performed in 2003.

  11. E-Area Performance Assessment Interim Measures Assessment FY2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stallings, M

    2006-01-31

    After major changes to the limits for various disposal units of the E-Area Low Level Waste Facility (ELLWF) last year, no major changes have been made during FY2005. A Special Analysis was completed which removes the air pathway {sup 14}C limit from the Intermediate Level Vault (ILV). This analysis will allow the disposal of reactor moderator deionizers which previously had no pathway to disposal. Several studies have also been completed providing groundwater transport input for future special analyses. During the past year, since Slit Trenches No.1 and No.2 were nearing volumetric capacity, they were operationally closed under a preliminary closure analysis. This analysis was performed using as-disposed conditions and data and showed that concrete rubble from the demolition of 232-F was acceptable for disposal in the STs even though the latest special analysis for the STs had reduced the tritium limits so that the inventory in the rubble exceeded limits. A number of special studies are planned during the next years; perhaps the largest of these will be revision of the Performance Assessment (PA) for the ELLWF. The revision will be accomplished by incorporating special analyses performed since the last PA revision as well as revising analyses to include new data. Projected impacts on disposal limits of more recent studies have been estimated. No interim measures will be applied during this year. However, it is being recommended that tritium disposals to the Components-in-Grout (CIG) Trenches be suspended until a limited Special Analysis (SA) currently in progress is completed. This SA will give recommendations for optimum placement of tritiated D-Area tower waste. Further recommendations for tritiated waste placement in the CIG Trenches will be given in the upcoming PA revision.

  12. Pollution prevention opportunity assessment for Sandia National Laboratories/California recycling programs.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wrons, Ralph Jordan; Vetter, Douglas Walter

    2007-07-01

    This Pollution Prevention Opportunity Assessment (PPOA) was conducted for the Sandia National Laboratories/California (SNL/CA) Environmental Management Department between May 2006 and March 2007, to evaluate the current site-wide recycling program for potential opportunities to improve the efficiency of the program. This report contains a summary of the information collected and analyses performed with recommended options for implementation. The SNL/NM Pollution Prevention (P2) staff worked with the SNL/CA P2 Staff to arrive at these options.

  13. Assessment of Unabated Facility Emission Potentials for Evaluating Airborne Radionuclide Monitoring Requirements at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory - 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DL Edwards; KD Shields; MJ Sula; MY Ballinger

    1999-09-28

    Assessments were performed to evaluate compliance with the airborne radionuclide emission monitoring requirements in the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP--US Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40 Part 61, Subpart H). In these assessments, potential unabated offsite doses were evaluated for emission locations at facilities owned by the US Department of Energy and operated by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (Pacific Northwest) on the Hanford Site. Two of the facilities evaluated, 325 Building Radiochemical Processing Laboratory, and 331 Building Life Sciences Laboratory met state and federal criteria for continuous sampling of airborne radionuclide emissions. One other building, the 3720 Environmental Sciences Laboratory, was recognized as being in transition with the potential for meeting the continuous sampling criteria.

  14. Performance model assessment for multi-junction concentrating photovoltaic systems.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riley, Daniel M.; McConnell, Robert.; Sahm, Aaron; Crawford, Clark; King, David L.; Cameron, Christopher P.; Foresi, James S.

    2010-03-01

    Four approaches to modeling multi-junction concentrating photovoltaic system performance are assessed by comparing modeled performance to measured performance. Measured weather, irradiance, and system performance data were collected on two systems over a one month period. Residual analysis is used to assess the models and to identify opportunities for model improvement.

  15. EM Performs Tenth Technology Readiness Assessment

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    WASHINGTON, D.C. – EM recently completed its tenth Technology Readiness Assessment (TRA) since piloting the TRA process in 2006.

  16. HighHigh--Performance Computing Research atPerformance Computing Research at Oak Ridge National LaboratoryOak Ridge National Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Engelmann, Christian

    Computing 1/47 · Nation's largest energy laboratory · Nation's largest science facility: · The $1.4 billion Science Laboratory within the U.S. Department of Energywithin the U.S. Department of Energy · Privately of Energy Bland_Jaguar_SC08 Peak performance 1.645 PF System memory 362 TB Disk space 10.7 PB Disk bandwidth

  17. Assessing the Costs and Benefits of the Superior Energy Performance...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Industry hosted by the American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy Assessing the Costs and Benefits of the Superior Energy Performance Program Presentation (July 2013) More...

  18. PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT OF PV MODULES RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN STC RATING AND FIELD PERFORMANCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sites, James R.

    PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT OF PV MODULES ­ RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN STC RATING AND FIELD PERFORMANCE Marko USA ABSTRACT PV module field performance can be assessed by annual effective efficiency and module performance ratio and present results for six PV modules at two locations and different tilts. Results

  19. Performance objectives for the Hanford Immobilized Low-Activity Waste (ILAW) performance assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MANN, F.M.

    1999-03-17

    Performance objectives for the disposal of low activity waste from Hanford Waste Tanks have been developed. These objectives have been based on DOE requirements, programmatic requirements, and public involvement. The DOE requirements include regulations that direct the performance assessment and are cited within the Radioactive Waste Management Order (DOE Order 435.1). Performance objectives for other DOE complex performance assessments have been included.

  20. Supply Chain Performance Assessment and Supplier and Component Importance Identification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagurney, Anna

    Supply Chain Performance Assessment and Supplier and Component Importance Identification and Motivation The Multitiered Supply Chain Network Game Theory Model with Suppliers Supply Chain Network Performance Measures and Supplier and Component Importance Identification The Algorithm Numerical Examples

  1. Literature Review and Assessment of Plant and Animal Transfer Factors Used in Performance Assessment Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robertson, David E.; Cataldo, Dominic A.; Napier, Bruce A.; Krupka, Kenneth M.; Sasser, Lyle B.

    2003-07-20

    A literature review and assessment was conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to update information on plant and animal radionuclide transfer factors used in performance-assessment modeling. A group of 15 radionuclides was included in this review and assessment. The review is composed of four main sections, not including the Introduction. Section 2.0 provides a review of the critically important issue of physicochemical speciation and geochemistry of the radionuclides in natural soil-water systems as it relates to the bioavailability of the radionuclides. Section 3.0 provides an updated review of the parameters of importance in the uptake of radionuclides by plants, including root uptake via the soil-groundwater system and foliar uptake due to overhead irrigation. Section 3.0 also provides a compilation of concentration ratios (CRs) for soil-to-plant uptake for the 15 selected radionuclides. Section 4.0 provides an updated review on radionuclide uptake data for animal products related to absorption, homeostatic control, approach to equilibration, chemical and physical form, diet, and age. Compiled transfer coefficients are provided for cow’s milk, sheep’s milk, goat’s milk, beef, goat meat, pork, poultry, and eggs. Section 5.0 discusses the use of transfer coefficients in soil, plant, and animal modeling using regulatory models for evaluating radioactive waste disposal or decommissioned sites. Each section makes specific suggestions for future research in its area.

  2. CARD No. 33 Consideration of Drilling Events in Performance Assessments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CARD No. 33 Consideration of Drilling Events in Performance Assessments 33.A.1 BACKGROUND have an effect on the disposal system (61 FR 5228). Section 194.33, "Consideration of drilling events in performance assessments," sets forth specific requirements for incorporation of human-initiated drilling

  3. Supply Chain Performance Assessment and Supplier and Component Importance Identification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagurney, Anna

    Supply Chain Performance Assessment and Supplier and Component Importance Identification on the paper: Li, D., Nagurney, A., 2015. Supply Chain Performance Assessment and Supplier and Component Background and Motivation The Multitiered Supply Chain Network Game Theory Model with Suppliers Supply Chain

  4. Laboratory Performance Evaluation of Residential Integrated Heat Pump Water Heaters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sparn, B.; Hudon, K.; Christensen, D.

    2011-09-01

    This report discusses how a significant opportunity for energy savings is domestic hot water heating, where an emerging technology has recently arrived in the U.S. market: the residential integrated heat pump water heater. A laboratory evaluation is presented of the five integrated HPWHs available in the U.S. today.

  5. Laboratory Design for High-Performance Electron Microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knowles, David William

    in the need to construct special laboratories. As resolutions improve, transmission electron microscopes (TEMs) and scanning transmission electron microscopes (STEMs) become more sensitive to ambient conditions. State plenum of air in the HVAC system) and have only the minimum number of heat-producing sources. Similarly

  6. Pollution prevention opportunity assessment for MicroFab and SiFab facilities at Sandia National Laboratories.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerard, Morgan Evan

    2011-12-01

    This Pollution Prevention Opportunity Assessment (PPOA) was conducted for the MicroFab and SiFab facilities at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico in Fiscal Year 2011. The primary purpose of this PPOA is to provide recommendations to assist organizations in reducing the generation of waste and improving the efficiency of their processes and procedures. This report contains a summary of the information collected, the analyses performed, and recommended options for implementation. The Sandia National Laboratories Environmental Management System (EMS) and Pollution Prevention (P2) staff will continue to work with the organizations to implement the recommendations.

  7. Field metabolomics and laboratory assessments of anaerobic intrinsic bioremediation of hydrocarbons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez, Pedro J.

    Field metabolomics and laboratory assessments of anaerobic intrinsic bioremediation of hydrocarbons the in situ anaerobic attenuation of hydrocarbons in a contaminated aquifer underly- ing a former refinery. Metabolite profiles associated with anaerobic hydrocarbon decay revealed the microbial utilization

  8. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Emergency Response Capability Baseline Needs Assessment Requirement Document

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharry, J A

    2009-12-30

    This revision of the LLNL Fire Protection Baseline Needs Assessment (BNA) was prepared by John A. Sharry, LLNL Fire Marshal and LLNL Division Leader for Fire Protection and reviewed by Martin Gresho, Sandia/CA Fire Marshal. The document follows and expands upon the format and contents of the DOE Model Fire Protection Baseline Capabilities Assessment document contained on the DOE Fire Protection Web Site, but only address emergency response. The original LLNL BNA was created on April 23, 1997 as a means of collecting all requirements concerning emergency response capabilities at LLNL (including response to emergencies at Sandia/CA) into one BNA document. The original BNA documented the basis for emergency response, emergency personnel staffing, and emergency response equipment over the years. The BNA has been updated and reissued five times since in 1998, 1999, 2000, 2002, and 2004. A significant format change was performed in the 2004 update of the BNA in that it was 'zero based.' Starting with the requirement documents, the 2004 BNA evaluated the requirements, and determined minimum needs without regard to previous evaluations. This 2010 update maintains the same basic format and requirements as the 2004 BNA. In this 2010 BNA, as in the previous BNA, the document has been intentionally divided into two separate documents - the needs assessment (1) and the compliance assessment (2). The needs assessment will be referred to as the BNA and the compliance assessment will be referred to as the BNA Compliance Assessment. The primary driver for separation is that the needs assessment identifies the detailed applicable regulations (primarily NFPA Standards) for emergency response capabilities based on the hazards present at LLNL and Sandia/CA and the geographical location of the facilities. The needs assessment also identifies areas where the modification of the requirements in the applicable NFPA standards is appropriate, due to the improved fire protection provided, the remote location and low population density of some the facilities. As such, the needs assessment contains equivalencies to the applicable requirements. The compliance assessment contains no such equivalencies and simply assesses the existing emergency response resources to the requirements of the BNA and can be updated as compliance changes independent of the BNA update schedule. There are numerous NFPA codes and standards and other requirements and guidance documents that address the subject of emergency response. These requirements documents are not always well coordinated and may contain duplicative or conflicting requirements or even coverage gaps. Left unaddressed, this regulatory situation results in frequent interpretation of requirements documents. Different interpretations can then lead to inconsistent implementation. This BNA addresses this situation by compiling applicable requirements from all identified sources (see Section 5) and analyzing them collectively to address conflict and overlap as applicable to the hazards presented by the LLNL and Sandia/CA sites (see Section 7). The BNA also generates requirements when needed to fill any identified gaps in regulatory coverage. Finally, the BNA produces a customized simple set of requirements, appropriate for the DOE protection goals, such as those defined in DOE O 420.1B, the hazard level, the population density, the topography, and the site layout at LLNL and Sandia/CA that will be used as the baseline requirements set - the 'baseline needs' - for emergency response at LLNL and Sandia/CA. A template approach is utilized to accomplish this evaluation for each of the nine topical areas that comprise the baseline needs for emergency response. The basis for conclusions reached in determining the baseline needs for each of the topical areas is presented in Sections 7.1 through 7.9. This BNA identifies only mandatory requirements and establishes the minimum performance criteria. The minimum performance criteria may not be the level of performance desired Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory or Sandia/CA

  9. Assessing various carbon dioxide flow rates to minimize distress during laboratory mouse euthanasia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farrell, Anthony P.

    Assessing various carbon dioxide flow rates to minimize distress during laboratory mouse euthanasia, University of British Columbia · Laboratory rodents are commonly euthanized by exposure to carbon dioxide (CO Carly Moody, Beverly Chua, I. Joanna Makowska, Daniel M. Weary Faculty of Land and Food Systems

  10. Seismic performance assessment for structural optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghisbain, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    The economic impact of earthquakes has spurred the implementation of performance-based design to mitigate damage in addition to protecting human lives. A developing trend is to consider damage directly as a measure of ...

  11. Program management assessment of Federal Facility Compliance Agreement regarding CAA-40 C.F.R. Part 61, Subpart H at the Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-01-01

    An assessment of Los Alamos National Laboratory`s management system related to facility compliance with an element of the Clean Air Act was performed under contract by a team from Northern Arizona University. More specifically, a Federal Facilities Compliance Agreement (FFCA) was established in 1996 to bring the Laboratory into compliance with emissions standards of radionuclides, commonly referred to as Rad/NESHAP. In the fall of 1996, the four-person team of experienced environmental managers evaluated the adequacy of relevant management systems to implement the FFCA provisions. The assessment process utilized multiple procedures including document review, personnel interviews and re-interviews, and facility observations. The management system assessment was completed with a meeting among team members, Laboratory officials and others on November 1, 1996 and preparation of an assessment report.

  12. WHAT'S INSIDE THE BLACK BOX - EXPLAINING PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT TO STAKEHOLDERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seitz, R; Elmer Wilhite, E

    2009-01-06

    The performance assessment (PA) process is being applied to support an increasing variety of waste management decisions that involve the whole spectrum of stakeholders. As with many technical tools, the PA process can be seen as a black box, which can be difficult to understand when implemented. Recognizing the increasing use of PA and the concerns about difficulties with understanding, the Savannah River Site Citizens Advisory Board (CAB) made a recommendation that the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) provide a Public Educational Forum on PAs. The DOE-Headquarters Environmental Management (DOE-EM) Office of Compliance and the DOE-Savannah River (DOE-SR) responded to this recommendation by supporting the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) in developing several presentation modules that can be used to describe different aspects of the PA process. For the Public Educational Forum, the PA modules were combined with presentations on DOE perspectives, historical modeling efforts at the Savannah River Site, and review perspectives from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The overall goals are to help the public understand how PAs are implemented and the rigor that is applied, and to provide insight into the use of PAs for waste management decision-making.

  13. Technical Basis for Assessing Uranium Bioremediation Performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PE Long; SB Yabusaki; PD Meyer; CJ Murray; AL N’Guessan

    2008-04-01

    In situ bioremediation of uranium holds significant promise for effective stabilization of U(VI) from groundwater at reduced cost compared to conventional pump and treat. This promise is unlikely to be realized unless researchers and practitioners successfully predict and demonstrate the long-term effectiveness of uranium bioremediation protocols. Field research to date has focused on both proof of principle and a mechanistic level of understanding. Current practice typically involves an engineering approach using proprietary amendments that focuses mainly on monitoring U(VI) concentration for a limited time period. Given the complexity of uranium biogeochemistry and uranium secondary minerals, and the lack of documented case studies, a systematic monitoring approach using multiple performance indicators is needed. This document provides an overview of uranium bioremediation, summarizes design considerations, and identifies and prioritizes field performance indicators for the application of uranium bioremediation. The performance indicators provided as part of this document are based on current biogeochemical understanding of uranium and will enable practitioners to monitor the performance of their system and make a strong case to clients, regulators, and the public that the future performance of the system can be assured and changes in performance addressed as needed. The performance indicators established by this document and the information gained by using these indicators do add to the cost of uranium bioremediation. However, they are vital to the long-term success of the application of uranium bioremediation and provide a significant assurance that regulatory goals will be met. The document also emphasizes the need for systematic development of key information from bench scale tests and pilot scales tests prior to full-scale implementation.

  14. Quantitative training system assessments using General Systems Performance Theory 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kashyap, Sujatha

    2000-01-01

    of training. Furthermore, performance evaluations of CBT systems to date have been performed using ad-hoc, context-specific methods. There is thus a need to provide a uniform basis for performance assessments of computer-based training systems. This thesis...

  15. Assessment of Energy Efficiency Project Financing Alternatives for Brookhaven National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunt, W. D.; Hail, John C.; Sullivan, Gregory P.

    2000-02-14

    This document provides findings and recommendations that resulted from an assessment of the Brookhaven National Laboratory by a team from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to assess the site's potential for various alternative financing options as a means to implement energy-efficiency improvements. The assessment looked for life-cycle cost-effective energy-efficiency improvement opportunities, and through a series of staff interviews, evaluated the various methods by which these opportunities may be financed, while considering availability of funds, staff, and available financing options. This report summarizes the findings of the visit and the resulting recommendations.

  16. Final environmental assessment: TRU waste drum staging building, Technical Area 55, Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-02-09

    Much of the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) research on plutonium metallurgy and plutonium processing is performed at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), in Los Alamos, New Mexico. LANL`s main facility for plutonium research is the Plutonium Facility, also referred to as Technical Area 55 (TA-55). The main laboratory building for plutonium work within the Plutonium Facility (TA-55) is the Plutonium Facility Building 4, or PF-4. This Environmental Assessment (EA) analyzes the potential environmental effects that would be expected to occur if DOE were to stage sealed containers of transuranic (TRU) and TRU mixed waste in a support building at the Plutonium Facility (TA-55) that is adjacent to PF-4. At present, the waste containers are staged in the basement of PF-4. The proposed project is to convert an existing support structure (Building 185), a prefabricated metal building on a concrete foundation, and operate it as a temporary staging facility for sealed containers of solid TRU and TRU mixed waste. The TRU and TRU mixed wastes would be contained in sealed 55-gallon drums and standard waste boxes as they await approval to be transported to TA-54. The containers would then be transported to a longer term TRU waste storage area at TA-54. The TRU wastes are generated from plutonium operations carried out in PF-4. The drum staging building would also be used to store and prepare for use new, empty TRU waste containers.

  17. Hanford Site Waste Management Area C Performance Assessment

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Presentation from the 2015 Annual Performance and Risk Assessment (P&RA) Community of Practice (CoP) Technical Exchange Meeting held in Richland, Washington on December 15-16, 2015.

  18. Status of SRS Liquid Waste Performance Assessment Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation from the 2015 Annual Performance and Risk Assessment (P&RA) Community of Practice (CoP) Technical Exchange Meeting held in Richland, Washington on December 15-16, 2015.

  19. Hanford low-level tank waste interim performance assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mann, F.M.

    1996-09-16

    The Hanford Low-Level Tank Waste Interim Performance Assessment examines the long-term environmental and human health effects associated with the disposal of the low-level fraction of the Hanford single- and double-shell tank waste in the Hanford Site 200 East Area. This report was prepared as a good management practice to provide needed information about the relationship between the disposal system design and its performance as early as possible in the project cycle. The calculations in this performance assessment show that the disposal of the low-level fraction can meet environmental and health performance objectives.

  20. Labs21: Improving the Environmental Performance of U.S. Laboratories 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mathew, P.

    2003-01-01

    , offering educational and training opportunities, and developing tools to facilitate innovative laboratory design and operation. Our presentation will also introduce the Environmental Performance Criteria, a high-value tool under development by the Labs21...

  1. Performance Assessment and Composit Analysis Material Disposal Area G Revision 4

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL or the Laboratory) generates radioactive waste as a result of various activities. Most is low-level radioactive waste that is disposed of at Technical Area (TA) 54, Area G. U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 435.1 requires that DOE field sites prepare and maintain site-specific radiological performance assessments and composite analyses for lowlevel radioactive waste disposal facilities that accept waste after September 26, 1988. This report presents the radiological performance assessment and composite analysis for TA 54, Area G. The performance assessment and composite analysis model the long-term performance of the Area G disposal facility so that the risk posed by the disposed waste to human health and safety and the environment can be determined. Rates of radionuclide release from the waste and the transport of these releases to locations accessible to humans are evaluated and used to project radiation doses that may be received by exposed persons. The release rates of radon gas from the disposal facility are also estimated. The dose and radon flux projections are compared to the performance objectives provided in DOE M 435.1 to evaluate the ability of the disposal facility to safely isolate the waste.

  2. Preliminary performance assessment for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, December 1992. Volume 3, Model parameters: Sandia WIPP Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-12-29

    This volume documents model parameters chosen as of July 1992 that were used by the Performance Assessment Department of Sandia National Laboratories in its 1992 preliminary performance assessment of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Ranges and distributions for about 300 modeling parameters in the current secondary data base are presented in tables for the geologic and engineered barriers, global materials (e.g., fluid properties), and agents that act upon the WIPP disposal system such as climate variability and human-intrusion boreholes. The 49 parameters sampled in the 1992 Preliminary Performance Assessment are given special emphasis with tables and graphics that provide insight and sources of data for each parameter.

  3. Enhanced Performance Assessment System (EPAS) for carbon sequestration.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Yifeng; Sun, Amy Cha-Tien; McNeish, Jerry A. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Dewers, Thomas A.; Hadgu, Teklu; Jove-Colon, Carlos F.

    2010-09-01

    Carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) is an option to mitigate impacts of atmospheric carbon emission. Numerous factors are important in determining the overall effectiveness of long-term geologic storage of carbon, including leakage rates, volume of storage available, and system costs. Recent efforts have been made to apply an existing probabilistic performance assessment (PA) methodology developed for deep nuclear waste geologic repositories to evaluate the effectiveness of subsurface carbon storage (Viswanathan et al., 2008; Stauffer et al., 2009). However, to address the most pressing management, regulatory, and scientific concerns with subsurface carbon storage (CS), the existing PA methodology and tools must be enhanced and upgraded. For example, in the evaluation of a nuclear waste repository, a PA model is essentially a forward model that samples input parameters and runs multiple realizations to estimate future consequences and determine important parameters driving the system performance. In the CS evaluation, however, a PA model must be able to run both forward and inverse calculations to support optimization of CO{sub 2} injection and real-time site monitoring as an integral part of the system design and operation. The monitoring data must be continually fused into the PA model through model inversion and parameter estimation. Model calculations will in turn guide the design of optimal monitoring and carbon-injection strategies (e.g., in terms of monitoring techniques, locations, and time intervals). Under the support of Laboratory-Directed Research & Development (LDRD), a late-start LDRD project was initiated in June of Fiscal Year 2010 to explore the concept of an enhanced performance assessment system (EPAS) for carbon sequestration and storage. In spite of the tight time constraints, significant progress has been made on the project: (1) Following the general PA methodology, a preliminary Feature, Event, and Process (FEP) analysis was performed for a hypothetical CS system. Through this FEP analysis, relevant scenarios for CO{sub 2} release were defined. (2) A prototype of EPAS was developed by wrapping an existing multi-phase, multi-component reservoir simulator (TOUGH2) with an uncertainty quantification and optimization code (DAKOTA). (3) For demonstration, a probabilistic PA analysis was successfully performed for a hypothetical CS system based on an existing project in a brine-bearing sandstone. The work lays the foundation for the development of a new generation of PA tools for effective management of CS activities. At a top-level, the work supports energy security and climate change/adaptation by furthering the capability to effectively manage proposed carbon capture and sequestration activities (both research and development as well as operational), and it greatly enhances the technical capability to address this national problem. The next phase of the work will include (1) full capability demonstration of the EPAS, especially for data fusion, carbon storage system optimization, and process optimization of CO{sub 2} injection, and (2) application of the EPAS to actual carbon storage systems.

  4. Implementing Best Practices for Data Quality Assessment of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory?s Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilcox, S. M.; McCormack, P.

    2011-04-01

    Effective solar radiation measurements for research and economic analyses require a strict protocol for maintenance, calibration, and documentation to minimize station downtime and data corruption. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Concentrating Solar Power: Best Practices Handbook for the Collection and Use of Solar Resource Data includes guidelines for operating a solar measurement station. This paper describes a suite of automated and semi-automated routines based on the best practices handbook as developed for the National Renewable Energy Laboratory Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project. These routines allow efficient inspection and data flagging to alert operators of conditions that require immediate attention. Although the handbook is targeted for concentrating solar power applications, the quality-assessment procedures described are generic and should benefit many solar measurement applications. The routines use data in one-minute measurement resolution, as suggested by the handbook, but they could be modified for other time scales.

  5. ASSESSING THE PERFORMANCE OF HUMAN-AUTOMATION COLLABORATIVE PLANNING SYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cummings, Mary "Missy"

    to perform high-level task planning for deck operations on United States Naval aircraft carriers is utilized in a testing program that utilizes three different planning conditions, with a focus on validat- ingASSESSING THE PERFORMANCE OF HUMAN- AUTOMATION COLLABORATIVE PLANNING SYSTEMS by Jason C. Ryan B. S

  6. Performance Assessment of the Wave Dragon Wave Energy Converter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, René Rydhof

    Performance Assessment of the Wave Dragon Wave Energy Converter Based on the EquiMar Methodology S of the wave energy sector, device developers are called to provide reliable estimates on power performanceMar, Nissum Bredning, Hanstholm, North Sea, Ekofisk, Wave-to-wire, Wave energy. I. INTRODUCTION The wave

  7. Performance Assessment for Pump-and-Treat Closure or Transition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Truex, Michael J.; Johnson, Christian D.; Becker, Dave J.; Lee, Michelle H.; Nimmons, Michael J.

    2015-09-29

    A structured performance assessment approach is useful to evaluate pump-and-treat (P&T) groundwater remediation, which has been applied at numerous sites. Consistent with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Groundwater Road Map, performance assessment during remedy implementation may be needed, and should consider remedy optimization, transition to alternative remedies, or remedy closure. In addition, a recent National Research Council study examined groundwater remediation at complex contaminated sites and concluded that it may be beneficial to evaluate remedy performance and the potential need for transition to alternative approaches at these sites. The intent of this document is to provide a structured approach for assessing P&T performance to support a decision to optimize, transition, or close a P&T remedy. The process presented in this document for gathering information and performing evaluations to support P&T remedy decisions includes use of decision elements to distinguish between potential outcomes of a remedy decision. Case studies are used to augment descriptions of decision elements and to illustrate each type of outcome identified in the performance assessment approach. The document provides references to resources for tools and other guidance relevant to conducting the P&T assessment.

  8. Risk assessment and optimization (ALARA) analysis for the environmental remediation of Brookhaven National Laboratory`s hazardous waste management facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dionne, B.J.; Morris, S. III; Baum, J.W. [and others

    1998-03-01

    The Department of Energy`s (DOE) Office of Environment, Safety, and Health (EH) sought examples of risk-based approaches to environmental restoration to include in their guidance for DOE nuclear facilities. Extensive measurements of radiological contamination in soil and ground water have been made at Brookhaven National Laboratory`s Hazardous Waste Management Facility (HWMF) as part of a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) remediation process. This provided an ideal opportunity for a case study. This report provides a risk assessment and an {open_quotes}As Low as Reasonably Achievable{close_quotes} (ALARA) analysis for use at other DOE nuclear facilities as an example of a risk-based decision technique.

  9. Risk assessment and optimization (ALARA) analysis for the environmental remediation of Brookhaven National Laboratory`s hazardous waste management facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dionne, B.J.; Morris, S.C. III; Baum, J.W. [and others] [and others

    1998-01-01

    The Department of Energy`s (DOE) Office of Environment, Safety, and Health (EH) sought examples of risk-based approaches to environmental restoration to include in their guidance for DOE nuclear facilities. Extensive measurements of radiological contamination in soil and ground water have been made at Brookhaven National Laboratory`s Hazardous Waste Management Facility (HWMF) as part of a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) remediation process. This provided an ideal opportunity for a case study. This report provides a risk assessment and an {open_quotes}As Low as Reasonably Achievable{close_quotes} (ALARA) analysis for use at other DOE nuclear facilities as an example of a risk-based decision technique. This document contains the Appendices for the report.

  10. THE IPOS FRAMEWORK: LINKING FISH SWIMMING PERFORMANCE IN ALTERED FLOWS FROM LABORATORY EXPERIMENTS TO RIVERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liao, James C.

    THE IPOS FRAMEWORK: LINKING FISH SWIMMING PERFORMANCE IN ALTERED FLOWS FROM LABORATORY EXPERIMENTS The current understanding of the effects of turbulence on the swimming performance of fish is primarily. These studies have produced valuable information on the swimming mechanics and behaviour of fish in turbulent

  11. Key results of battery performance and life tests at Argonne National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeLuca, W.H.; Gillie, K.R.; Kulaga, J.E.; Smaga, J.A.; Tummillo, A.F.; Webster, C.E.

    1991-12-31

    Advanced battery technology evaluations are performed under simulated electric vehicle operating conditions at Argonne National Laboratory`s & Diagnostic Laboratory (ADL). The ADL provide a common basis for both performance characterization and life evaluation with unbiased application of tests and analyses. This paper summarizes the performance characterizations and life evaluations conducted in 1991 on twelve single cells and eight 3- to 360-cell modules that encompass six battery technologies (Na/S, Li/MS, Ni/MH, Zn/Br, Ni/Fe, and Pb-Acid). These evaluations were performed for the Department of Energy, Office of Transportation Technologies, Electric and Hybrid Propulsion Division. The results measure progress in battery R & D programs, compare battery technologies, and provide basic data for modeling and continuing R & D to battery users, developers, and program managers.

  12. Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mexican pueblo preserves cultural history through collaborative tours with Los Alamos National Laboratory August 24, 2015 Students gain new insights into their ancestry LOS ALAMOS,...

  13. White paper updating conclusions of 1998 ILAW performance assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MANN, F.M.

    2000-05-11

    The purpose of this document is to provide a comparison of the estimated immobilized low-activity waste (LAW) disposal system performance against established performance objectives using the beat estimates for parameters and models to describe the system. The principal advances in knowledge since the last performance assessment (known as the 1998 ILAW PA [Mann 1998a]) have been in site specific information and data on the waste form performance for BNFL, Inc. relevant glass formulations. The white paper also estimates the maximum release rates for technetium and other key radionuclides and chemicals from the waste form. Finally, this white paper provides limited information on the impact of changes in waste form loading.

  14. Performing Energy Security Assessments - A How-To Guide for Federal...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Performing Energy Security Assessments - A How-To Guide for Federal Facility Managers Performing Energy Security Assessments - A How-To Guide for Federal Facility Managers Guide...

  15. FY 2006 ANNUAL REVIEW-SALTSTONE DISPOSAL FACILITY PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crapse, K; Benjamin Culbertson, B

    2007-03-15

    The Z-Area Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF) consists of two disposal units, Vaults 1 and 4, described in the Performance Assessment (PA) (WSRC 1992). The FY06 PA Annual Review concludes that both vaults contain much lower levels of radionuclides (curies) than that allowed by the PA. The PA controls established to govern waste operations and monitor disposal facility performance are determined to be adequate.

  16. RCRA Facilities Assessment (RFA) Oak Ridge National Laboratory addendum August 25, 1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-08-01

    The RCRA Facilities Assessment (RFA) report identified approximately 250 Solid Waste Management Units (SWMUs) that were grouped into 20 Waste Area Groupings (WAGs) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Identification of each SWMU included information as to location, type, size, dates of operation, type of waste handled, and evidence of releases. Preliminary sampling studies were performed around each WAG to determine if there was evidence of releases beyond its perimeter. Analytical results from the surveys and historical information were the basis for recommendations concerning further actions for each WAG. Remedial investigations (RIs) were recommended for WAGs 1--10 and 17; for WAGs 14, 16, 18, and 20, it was suggested that they be removed from further consideration for remedial action. For the remaining WAGs (11, 12, 13, 15, and 19) the evidence concerning the possible release of contaminants was inconclusive and additional sampling was recommended. The purpose of this Addendum is to report the analytical data obtained from the additional surveys, to make recommendations concerning future remedial actions within these WAGs, and to provide descriptive information for additional sites listed in Table 1.2 of the RFA. Since information concerning the rationale for identifying releases, the sampling survey methodology, and background information for each WAG is presented in the RFA, it is not repeated in this Addendum.

  17. Assessing Student Performance in Solving Complex Physics Problems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gustafsson, Torgny

    the problem statement to find the general physics principles that apply, write the equations that follow fromAssessing Student Performance in Solving Complex Physics Problems C.W. Liew Department of Computer Department of Physics and Astronomy Rutgers University Piscataway, NJ 08854-8019 shapiro@physics

  18. Results of Performance Assessments 34.A.1 BACKGROUND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the likelihood that the WIPP will meet the Appendix A release limits is conducted through the use of a process known as "performance assessment" (PA). The WIPP PA essentially consists of a series of computer. In addition, any subsurface transport of radioactivity beyond the boundary of the WIPP controlled area is also

  19. A formal expert judgment procedure for performance assessments of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trauth, K.M.; Guzowski, R.V.; Hora, S.C.

    1994-09-01

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is an experimental facility located in southeastern New Mexico. It has been designed to determine the feasibility of the geologic disposal of defense-generated transuranic waste in a deep bedded-salt formation. The WIPP was also designed for disposal and will operate in that capacity if approved. The WIPP Performance Assessment Department at Sandia National Laboratories has been conducting analyses to assess the long-term performance of the WIPP. These analyses sometimes require the use of expert judgment. This Department has convened several expert-judgment panels and from that experience has developed an internal quality-assurance procedure to guide the formal elicitation of expert judgment. This protocol is based on the principles found in the decision-analysis literature.

  20. Los Alamos low-level waste performance assessment status

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wenzel, W.J.; Purtymun, W.D.; Dewart, J.M.; Rodgers, J.E. (comps.)

    1986-06-01

    This report reviews the documented Los Alamos studies done to assess the containment of buried hazardous wastes. Five sections logically present the environmental studies, operational source terms, transport pathways, environmental dosimetry, and computer model development and use. This review gives a general picture of the Los Alamos solid waste disposal and liquid effluent sites and is intended for technical readers with waste management and environmental science backgrounds but without a detailed familiarization with Los Alamos. The review begins with a wide perspective on environmental studies at Los Alamos. Hydrology, geology, and meteorology are described for the site and region. The ongoing Laboratory-wide environmental surveillance and waste management environmental studies are presented. The next section describes the waste disposal sites and summarizes the current source terms for these sites. Hazardous chemical wastes and liquid effluents are also addressed by describing the sites and canyons that are impacted. The review then focuses on the transport pathways addressed mainly in reports by Healy and Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. Once the source terms and potential transport pathways are described, the dose assessment methods are addressed. Three major studies, the waste alternatives, Hansen and Rogers, and the Pantex Environmental Impact Statement, contributed to the current Los Alamos dose assessment methodology. Finally, the current Los Alamos groundwater, surface water, and environmental assessment models for these mesa top and canyon sites are described.

  1. Idaho National Laboratory Materials and Fuels Complex Natural Phenomena Hazards Flood Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerald Sehlke; Paul Wichlacz

    2010-12-01

    This report presents the results of flood hazards analyses performed for the Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) and the adjacent Transient Reactor Experiment and Test Facility (TREAT) located at Idaho National Laboratory. The requirements of these analyses are provided in the U.S. Department of Energy Order 420.1B and supporting Department of Energy (DOE) Natural Phenomenon Hazard standards. The flood hazards analyses were performed by Battelle Energy Alliance and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The analyses addressed the following: • Determination of the design basis flood (DBFL) • Evaluation of the DBFL versus the Critical Flood Elevations (CFEs) for critical existing structures, systems, and components (SSCs).

  2. Consideration of liners and covers in performance assessments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phifer, Mark A.; Seitz, Robert R.; Suttora, Linda C.

    2014-09-18

    On-site disposal cells are in use and being considered at several United States Department of Energy (USDOE) sites as the final disposition for large amounts of waste associated with cleanup of contaminated areas and facilities. These disposal cells are typically regulated by States and/or the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) in addition to having to comply with requirements in DOE Order 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management due to the radioactive waste. The USDOE-Environmental Management Office of Site Restoration formed a working group to foster improved communication and sharing of information for personnel associated with these CERCLA disposal cells and work towards more consistent assumptions, as appropriate, for technical and policy considerations related to CERCLA risk assessments and DOE Order 435.1 performance assessments in support of a Record of Decision and Disposal Authorization Statement, respectively. One of the issues considered by the working group, which is addressed in this report, was how to appropriately consider the performance of covers and liners/leachate collections systems in the context of a DOE Order 435.1 performance assessment (PA). This same information may be appropriate for consideration within CERCLA risk assessments for these facilities. These OSDCs are generally developed to meet hazardous waste (HW) disposal design standards under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) as well as the DOE Order 435.1 performance based standards for disposal of radioactive waste. To meet the standards for HW, the facilities typically include engineered covers and liner/leachate collection systems. Thus, when considering such facilities in the context of a DOE Order 435.1 PA, there is a need to address the evolution of performance of covers and liner/leachate collection systems in the context of meeting a performance standard considering time frames of 1,000 years for compliance and potentially thousands of years based on the wastes to test the robustness of the system. Experience has shown that there are a range of expectations and perspectives from the different regulators involved at different sites when reviewing assumptions related to cover and liner/leachate collection system performance. However for HW disposal alone under RCRA the design standards are typically considered sufficient by the regulators without a requirement to assess long-term performance thus avoiding the need to consider the details addressed in this report. This report provides suggestions for a general approach to address covers and liners/leachate collection systems in a DOE Order 435.1 PA and how to integrate assessments with defense-in-depth considerations such as design, operations, and waste acceptance criteria to address uncertainties. The emphasis is on water balances and management in such assessments. Specific information and references are provided for details needed to address the evolution of individual components of cover and liner/leachate collection systems. This information was then synthesized into suggestions for best practices for cover and liner system design and examples of approaches to address the performance of covers and liners as part of a performance assessment of the disposal system. Numerous references are provided for sources of information to help describe the basis for performance of individual components of cover and liner systems.

  3. Key results of battery performance and life tests at Argonne National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeLuca, W.H.; Gillie, K.R.; Kulaga, J.E.; Smaga, J.A.; Tummillo, A.F.; Webster, C.E.

    1991-01-01

    Advanced battery technology evaluations are performed under simulated electric vehicle operating conditions at Argonne National Laboratory's Diagnostic Laboratory (ADL). The ADL provide a common basis for both performance characterization and life evaluation with unbiased application of tests and analyses. This paper summarizes the performance characterizations and life evaluations conducted in 1991 on twelve single cells and eight 3- to 360-cell modules that encompass six battery technologies (Na/S, Li/MS, Ni/MH, Zn/Br, Ni/Fe, and Pb-Acid). These evaluations were performed for the Department of Energy, Office of Transportation Technologies, Electric and Hybrid Propulsion Division. The results measure progress in battery R D programs, compare battery technologies, and provide basic data for modeling and continuing R D to battery users, developers, and program managers.

  4. Laboratory Glass Columns "Next Generation" technology for high-performance preparative chromatography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lebendiker, Mario

    SNAP ® Laboratory Glass Columns "Next Generation" technology for high-performance preparative lesiones graves o la muerte! WARNING Glass SNAP® columns are intended for use in a liquid environment disassembly or cleaning for scratches, chips or defects, particularly on the glass surfaces. DO NOT use column

  5. 2002 Wastewater Land Application Site Performance Reports for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meachum, T.R.; Lewis, M.G.

    2003-02-20

    The 2002 Wastewater Land Application site Performance Reports for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory describe site conditions for the facilities with State of Idaho Wastewater Land Application Permits. Permit-required monitoring data are summarized, and permit exceedences or environmental impacts relating to the operation of the facilities during the 2002 permit year are discussed.

  6. 2003 Wastewater Land Application Site Performance Reports for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Teresa R. Meachum

    2004-02-01

    The 2003 Wastewater Land Application Site Performance Reports for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory describe the conditions for the facilities with State of Idaho Wastewater Land Application Permits. Permit-required monitoring data are summarized, and permit exceedences or environmental impacts relating to the operations of the facilities during the 2003 permit year are discussed.

  7. Idaho National Laboratory Quarterly Event Performance Analysis FY 2013 4th Quarter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lisbeth A. Mitchell

    2013-11-01

    This report is published quarterly by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Performance Assurance Organization. The Department of Energy Occurrence Reporting and Processing System (ORPS) as prescribed in DOE Order 232.2 “Occurrence Reporting and Processing of Operations Information” requires a quarterly analysis of events, both reportable and not reportable for the previous twelve months. This report is the analysis of occurrence reports and deficiency reports (including not reportable events) identified at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) during the period of October 2012 through September 2013.

  8. Environmental assessment of the Environmental Restoration Project at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM) is managed and operated for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) by Sandia Corporation, a subsidiary of the Lockheed Martin Company. SNL/NM is located on land controlled by DOE within the boundaries of Kirtland Air Force Base (KAFB) in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The major responsibilities of SNL/NM are the support of national security and energy projects. This report provides an environmental assessment of proposed remedial action activities at the solid waste management units at SNL/NM. A risk assessment of health hazards is also discussed.

  9. Laboratory evaluation of fan/filter units' aerodynamic and energy performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Tengfang; Jeng, Ming-Shan

    2004-07-27

    The paper discusses the benefits of having a consistent testing method to characterize aerodynamic and energy performance of FFUs. It presents evaluation methods of laboratory-measured performance of ten relatively new, 1220 mm x 610 mm (or 4 ft x 2 ft) fan-filter units (FFUs), and includes results of a set of relevant metrics such as energy performance indices (EPI) based upon the sample FFUs tested. This paper concludes that there are variations in FFUs' performance, and that using a consistent testing and evaluation method can generate compatible and comparable FFU performance information. The paper also suggests that benefits and opportunities exist for our method of testing FFU energy performance to be integrated in future recommended practices.

  10. Environmental assessment related to the operation of Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-08-01

    In order to evaluate the environmental impacts of Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) operations, this assessment includes a descriptive section which is intended to provide sufficient detail to allow the various impacts to be viewed in proper perspective. In particular, details are provided on site characteristics, current programs, characterization of the existing site environment, and in-place environmental monitoring programs. In addition, specific facilities and operations that could conceivably impact the environment are described at length. 77 refs., 16 figs., 47 tabs.

  11. Hanford immobilized low-activity tank waste performance assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mann, F.M.

    1998-03-26

    The Hanford Immobilized Low-Activity Tank Waste Performance Assessment examines the long-term environmental and human health effects associated with the planned disposal of the vitrified low-level fraction of waste presently contained in Hanford Site tanks. The tank waste is the by-product of separating special nuclear materials from irradiated nuclear fuels over the past 50 years. This waste has been stored in underground single and double-shell tanks. The tank waste is to be retrieved, separated into low and high-activity fractions, and then immobilized by private vendors. The US Department of Energy (DOE) will receive the vitrified waste from private vendors and plans to dispose of the low-activity fraction in the Hanford Site 200 East Area. The high-level fraction will be stored at Hanford until a national repository is approved. This report provides the site-specific long-term environmental information needed by the DOE to issue a Disposal Authorization Statement that would allow the modification of the four existing concrete disposal vaults to provide better access for emplacement of the immobilized low-activity waste (ILAW) containers; filling of the modified vaults with the approximately 5,000 ILAW containers and filler material with the intent to dispose of the containers; construction of the first set of next-generation disposal facilities. The performance assessment activity will continue beyond this assessment. The activity will collect additional data on the geotechnical features of the disposal sites, the disposal facility design and construction, and the long-term performance of the waste. Better estimates of long-term performance will be produced and reviewed on a regular basis. Performance assessments supporting closure of filled facilities will be issued seeking approval of those actions necessary to conclude active disposal facility operations. This report also analyzes the long-term performance of the currently planned disposal system as a basis to set requirements on the waste form and the facility design that will protect the long-term public health and safety and protect the environment.

  12. Annual Performance Assessment and Composite Analysis Review for the ICDF Landfill FY 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karen Koslow Arthur Rood

    2009-08-31

    This report addresses low-level waste disposal operations at the Idaho Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Disposal Facility (ICDF) landfill from the start of operations in Fiscal Year 2003 through Fiscal Year 2008. The ICDF was authorized in the Operable Unit 3-13 Record of Decision for disposal of waste from the Idaho National Laboratory Site CERCLA environmental restoration activities. The ICDF has been operating since 2003 in compliance with the CERCLA requirements and the waste acceptance criteria developed in the CERCLA process. In developing the Operable Unit 3-13 Record of Decision, U.S. Department of Energy Order (DOE) 435.1, 'Radioactive Waste Management', was identified as a 'to be considered' requirement for the ICDF. The annual review requirement under DOE Order 435.1 was determined to be an administrative requirement and, therefore, annual reviews were not prepared on an annual basis. However, the landfill has been operating for 5 years and, since the waste forms and inventories disposed of have changed from what was originally envisioned for the ICDF landfill, the ICDF project team has decided that this annual review is necessary to document the changes and provide a basis for any updates in analyses that may be necessary to continue to meet the substantive requirements of DOE Order 435.1. For facilities regulated under DOE Order 435.1-1, U.S. DOE Manual 435.1-1, 'Radioactive Waste Management', IV.P.(4)(c) stipulates that annual summaries of low-level waste disposal operations shall be prepared with respect to the conclusions and recommendations of the performance assessment and composite analysis. Important factors considered in this review include facility operations, waste receipts, and results from monitoring and research and development programs. There have been no significant changes in operations at the landfill in respect to the disposal geometry, the verification of waste characteristics, and the tracking of inventories against total limits that would affect the results and conclusions of the performance assessment. Waste receipts to date and projected waste receipts through Fiscal Year 2012 are both greater than the inventory assessed in the performance assessment and composite analysis. The waste forms disposed of to the landfill are different from the waste form (compacted soil) assessed in the performance assessment. The leak detection system and groundwater monitoring results indicate the landfill has not leaked. The results of the performance assessment/composite analysis are valid (i.e., there is still a reasonable expectation of meeting performance objectives) but the new information indicates less conservatism in the results than previously believed.

  13. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Corrective Action Plan in response to Tiger Team assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuliasha, Michael A.

    1991-08-23

    This report presents a complete response to the Tiger Team assessment that was conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Operations Office (ORO) from October 22, 1990, through November 30, 1990. The action plans have undergone both a discipline review and a cross-cutting review with respect to root cause. In addition, the action plans have been integrated with initiatives being pursued across Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., in response to Tiger Team findings at other DOE facilities operated by Energy Systems. The root cause section is complete and describes how ORNL intends to address the root causes of the findings identified during the assessment. The action plan has benefited from a complete review by various offices at DOE Headquarters as well as review by the Tiger Team that conducted the assessment to ensure that the described actions are responsive to the observed problems.

  14. Idaho National Laboratory Quarterly Performance Analysis - 3rd Quarter FY2014

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lisbeth A. Mitchell

    2014-09-01

    This report is published quarterly by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Performance Assurance Organization. The Department of Energy (DOE) Occurrence Reporting and Processing System (ORPS), as prescribed in DOE Order 232.2, “Occurrence Reporting and Processing of Operations Information,” requires a quarterly analysis of events, both reportable and not reportable, for the previous 12 months. This report is the analysis of occurrence reports and other non-reportable issues identified at INL from July 2013 through June 2014.

  15. Idaho National Laboratory Quarterly Performance Analysis - 2nd Quarter FY2014

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lisbeth A. Mitchell

    2014-06-01

    This report is published quarterly by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Performance Assurance Organization. The Department of Energy Occurrence Reporting and Processing System (ORPS), as prescribed in DOE Order 232.2, “Occurrence Reporting and Processing of Operations Information,” requires a quarterly analysis of events, both reportable and not reportable, for the previous 12 months. This report is the analysis of occurrence reports and other deficiency reports (including not reportable events) identified at INL from January 2014 through March 2014.

  16. Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACTThousand CubicResource andfirstDeviceLabLabor ComplianceLaboratories

  17. Implementing Best Practices for Data Quality Assessment of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilcox, S. M.; McCormack, P.

    2011-01-01

    Effective solar radiation measurements for research and economic analyses require a strict protocol for maintenance, calibration, and documentation to minimize station down-time and data corruption. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Concentrating Solar Power: Best Practices Handbook for the Collection and Use of Solar Resource Data (1) includes guidelines for operating a solar measure-ment station. This paper describes a suite of automated and semi-automated routines based on the best practices hand-book as developed for the National Renewable Energy La-boratory Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project. These routines allow efficient inspection and data flagging to alert operators of conditions that require imme-diate attention. Although the handbook is targeted for con-centrating solar power applications, the quality-assessment procedures described are generic and should benefit many solar measurement applications. The routines use data in one-minute measurement resolution, as suggested by the handbook, but they could be modified for other time scales.

  18. 2009 Performance Assessment for the Saltstone Disposal Facility

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This Performance Assessment (PA) for the Savannah River Site (SRS) was prepared to support the operation and eventual closure of the Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF). This PA was prepared to demonstrate compliance with the pertinent requirements of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Order 435.1, Change 1, Radioactive Waste Management, Chapter IV, and Title 10, of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 61, Licensing Requirements for Land Disposal of Radioactive Waste, Subpart C as required by the Ronald W. Reagan National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) for Fiscal Year 2005, Section 3116. [DOE O 435.1-1, 10 CFR 61, NDAA_3116

  19. Radioactive Waste Management Complex low-level waste radiological performance assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maheras, S.J.; Rood, A.S.; Magnuson, S.O.; Sussman, M.E.; Bhatt, R.N.

    1994-04-01

    This report documents the projected radiological dose impacts associated with the disposal of radioactive low-level waste at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. This radiological performance assessment was conducted to evaluate compliance with applicable radiological criteria of the US Department of Energy and the US Environmental Protection Agency for protection of the public and the environment. The calculations involved modeling the transport of radionuclides from buried waste, to surface soil and subsurface media, and eventually to members of the public via air, groundwater, and food chain pathways. Projections of doses were made for both offsite receptors and individuals inadvertently intruding onto the site after closure. In addition, uncertainty and sensitivity analyses were performed. The results of the analyses indicate compliance with established radiological criteria and provide reasonable assurance that public health and safety will be protected.

  20. Performance objectives for the Hanford immobilized low-activity waste (ILAW) performance assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MANN, F.M.

    1999-09-09

    Before low-level waste may be disposed of, a performance assessment must be written and then approved by the DOE (DOE 1988a DOE 1999a). The performance assessment is to determine whether ''reasonable assurance'' exists that the performance objectives of the disposal facility will be met. The DOE requirements for waste disposal (DOE 1988a DOE 1999a) require the protection of public health and safety; and the protection of the environment. Although quantitative limits are sometimes stated (for example, the all-pathways exposure limit is 25 mrem/year), usually the requirements are stated in a general nature. Quantitative limits were established by: investigating all potentially applicable regulations as well as interpretations of the review panels which DOE has established to review performance assessments, interacting with program management to establish the additional requirements of the program, and interacting with the public (i.e., the Hanford Advisory Board members; as well as affected Tribal Governments) to understand the values of residents in the Pacific Northwest. Because of space considerations, not all radionuclides and dangerous chemicals are listed in this document. The radionuclides listed here are those which were explicitly treated in the ILAW PA (Mann 1998). The dangerous chemicals listed here are those most often detected in Hanford tank waste as documented in the Regulatory Data Quality Objectives Supporting Tank Waste Remediation System Privatization Project (Wiemers 1998).

  1. Near-Field Hydrology Data Package for the Integrated Disposal Facility 2005 Performance Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyer, Philip D.; Saripalli, Prasad; Freedman, Vicky L.

    2004-06-25

    CH2MHill Hanford Group, Inc. (CHG) is designing and assessing the performance of an Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF) to receive immobilized low-activity waste (ILAW), Low-Level and Mixed Low-Level Wastes (LLW/MLLW), and the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) melters used to vitrify the ILAW. The IDF Performance Assessment (PA) assesses the performance of the disposal facility to provide a reasonable expectation that the disposal of the waste is protective of the general public, groundwater resources, air resources, surface water resources, and inadvertent intruders. The PA requires prediction of contaminant migration from the facilities, which is expected to occur primarily via the movement of water through the facilities and the consequent transport of dissolved contaminants in the pore water of the vadose zone. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) assists CHG in its performance assessment activities. One of PNNL’s tasks is to provide estimates of the physical, hydraulic, and transport properties of the materials comprising the disposal facilities and the disturbed region around them. These materials are referred to as the near-field materials. Their properties are expressed as parameters of constitutive models used in simulations of subsurface flow and transport. In addition to the best-estimate parameter values, information on uncertainty in the parameter values and estimates of the changes in parameter values over time are required to complete the PA. These parameter estimates and information were previously presented in a report prepared for the 2001 ILAW PA. This report updates the parameter estimates for the 2005 IDF PA using additional information and data collected since publication of the earlier report.

  2. Near-Field Hydrology Data Package for the Immobilized Low-Activity Waste 2001 Performance Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PD Meyer; RJ Serne

    1999-12-21

    Lockheed Martin Hanford Company (LMHC) is designing and assessing the performance of disposal facilities to receive radioactive wastes that are currently stored in single- and double-shell tanks at the Hanford Site. The preferred method for disposing of the portion that is classified as immobilized low-activity waste (ILAW) is to vitrify the waste and place the product in new-surface, shallow land burial facilities. The LMHC project to assess the performance of these disposal facilities is the Hanford ILAW Performance Assessment (PA) Activity. The goal of this project is to provide a reasonable expectation that the disposal of the waste is protective of the general public, groundwater resources, air resources, surface water resources, and inadvertent intruders. Achieving this goal will require prediction of contaminant migration from the facilities. This migration is expected to occur primarily via the movement of water through the facilities and the consequent transport of dissolved contaminants in the pore water of the vadose zone. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) assists LMHC in its performance assessment activities. One of PNNL's tasks is to provide estimates of the physical, hydraulic, and transport properties of the materials comprising the disposal facilities and the disturbed region around them. These materials are referred to as the near-field materials. Their properties are expressed as parameters of constitutive models used in simulations of subsurface flow and transport. In addition to the best-estimate parameter values, information on uncertainty in the parameter values and estimates of the changes in parameter values over time are required to complete the PA. These parameter estimates and information are contained in this report, the Near-Field Hydrology Data Package.

  3. Heat Pump Water Heater Technology Assessment Based on Laboratory Research and Energy Simulation Models: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hudon, K.; Sparn, B.; Christensen, D.; Maguire, J.

    2012-02-01

    This paper explores the laboratory performance of five integrated Heat Pump Water Heaters (HPWHs) across a wide range of operating conditions representative of US climate regions. Laboratory results demonstrate the efficiency of this technology under most of the conditions tested and show that differences in control schemes and design features impact the performance of the individual units. These results were used to understand current model limitations, and then to bracket the energy savings potential for HPWH technology in various US climate regions. Simulation results show that HPWHs are expected to provide significant energy savings in many climate zones when compared to other types of water heaters (up to 64%, including impact on HVAC systems).

  4. PORFLOW Modeling Supporting The H-Tank Farm Performance Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jordan, J. M.; Flach, G. P.; Westbrook, M. L.

    2012-08-31

    Numerical simulations of groundwater flow and contaminant transport in the vadose and saturated zones have been conducted using the PORFLOW code in support of an overall Performance Assessment (PA) of the H-Tank Farm. This report provides technical detail on selected aspects of PORFLOW model development and describes the structure of the associated electronic files. The PORFLOW models for the H-Tank Farm PA, Rev. 1 were updated with grout, solubility, and inventory changes. The aquifer model was refined. In addition, a set of flow sensitivity runs were performed to allow flow to be varied in the related probabilistic GoldSim models. The final PORFLOW concentration values are used as input into a GoldSim dose calculator.

  5. Models used to assess the performance of photovoltaic systems.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stein, Joshua S.; Klise, Geoffrey T.

    2009-12-01

    This report documents the various photovoltaic (PV) performance models and software developed and utilized by researchers at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) in support of the Photovoltaics and Grid Integration Department. In addition to PV performance models, hybrid system and battery storage models are discussed. A hybrid system using other distributed sources and energy storage can help reduce the variability inherent in PV generation, and due to the complexity of combining multiple generation sources and system loads, these models are invaluable for system design and optimization. Energy storage plays an important role in reducing PV intermittency and battery storage models are used to understand the best configurations and technologies to store PV generated electricity. Other researcher's models used by SNL are discussed including some widely known models that incorporate algorithms developed at SNL. There are other models included in the discussion that are not used by or were not adopted from SNL research but may provide some benefit to researchers working on PV array performance, hybrid system models and energy storage. The paper is organized into three sections to describe the different software models as applied to photovoltaic performance, hybrid systems, and battery storage. For each model, there is a description which includes where to find the model, whether it is currently maintained and any references that may be available. Modeling improvements underway at SNL include quantifying the uncertainty of individual system components, the overall uncertainty in modeled vs. measured results and modeling large PV systems. SNL is also conducting research into the overall reliability of PV systems.

  6. Assessment of the Financial and Intellectual Value of a Research Library and its Application at the Idaho National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lynn E. Melander

    2012-08-01

    Over the last several decades, libraries across the nation have undergone dramatic budget cuts, despite being an important resource for regional and national economic growth and innovation. Numerous studies have attempted to show that libraries increase the intellectual level of users and contribute to the economic growth of communities through surveys and customer service data. Within this study, we have attempted to develop a more analytical method for assessing library performance, using the Idaho National Laboratory Research Library as a sample subject. We have developed a mathematical model to measure the financial value of a library’s material resources as well as its intellectual value to determine if the library is a positive contributor to the wider organization and community it serves.

  7. SUMO, System performance assessment for a high-level nuclear waste repository: Mathematical models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eslinger, P.W.; Miley, T.B.; Engel, D.W.; Chamberlain, P.J. II

    1992-09-01

    Following completion of the preliminary risk assessment of the potential Yucca Mountain Site by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) in 1988, the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) of the US Department of Energy (DOE) requested the Performance Assessment Scientific Support (PASS) Program at PNL to develop an integrated system model and computer code that provides performance and risk assessment analysis capabilities for a potential high-level nuclear waste repository. The system model that has been developed addresses the cumulative radionuclide release criteria established by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and estimates population risks in terms of dose to humans. The system model embodied in the SUMO (System Unsaturated Model) code will also allow benchmarking of other models being developed for the Yucca Mountain Project. The system model has three natural divisions: (1) source term, (2) far-field transport, and (3) dose to humans. This document gives a detailed description of the mathematics of each of these three divisions. Each of the governing equations employed is based on modeling assumptions that are widely accepted within the scientific community.

  8. Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Wildland Fire Management Environmental Assessment - April 2003

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Irving, J.S.

    2003-04-30

    DOE prepared an environmental assessment (EA)for wildland fire management activities on the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) (DOE/EA-1372). The EA was developed to evaluate wildland fire management options for pre-fire, fire suppression, and post fire activities. Those activities have an important role in minimizing the conversion of the native sagebrush steppe ecosystem found on the INEEL to non-native weeds. Four alternative management approaches were analyzed: Alternative 1 - maximum fire protection; Alternative 2 - balanced fire protection; Alternative 2 - balanced fire protection; Alternative 3 - protect infrastructure and personnel; and Alternative 4 - no action/traditional fire protection.

  9. Environmental Assessment Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, low-level and mixed waste processing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA), DOE/EA-0843, for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) low-level and mixed waste processing. The original proposed action, as reviewed in this EA, was (1) to incinerate INEL`s mixed low-level waste (MLLW) at the Waste Experimental Reduction Facility (WERF); (2) reduce the volume of INEL generated low-level waste (LLW) through sizing, compaction, and stabilization at the WERF; and (3) to ship INEL LLW to a commercial incinerator for supplemental LLW volume reduction.

  10. Performance assessment for the class L-II disposal facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-03-01

    This draft radiological performance assessment (PA) for the proposed Class L-II Disposal Facility (CIIDF) on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) has been prepared to demonstrate compliance with the requirements of the US Department of Energy Order 5820.2A. This PA considers the disposal of low-level radioactive wastes (LLW) over the operating life of the facility and the long-term performance of the facility in providing protection to public health and the environment. The performance objectives contained in the order require that the facility be managed to accomplish the following: (1) Protect public health and safety in accordance with standards specified in environmental health orders and other DOE orders. (2) Ensure that external exposure to the waste and concentrations of radioactive material that may be released into surface water, groundwater, soil, plants, and animals results in an effective dose equivalent (EDE) that does not exceed 25 mrem/year to a member of the public. Releases to the atmosphere shall meet the requirements of 40 CFR Pt. 61. Reasonable effort should be made to maintain releases of radioactivity in effluents to the general environment as low as reasonably achievable. (1) Ensure that the committed EDEs received by individual who inadvertently may intrude into the facility after the loss of active institutional control (100 years) will not exceed 100 mrem/year for continuous exposure of 500 mrem for a single acute exposure. (4) Protect groundwater resources, consistent with federal, state, and local requirements.

  11. Test Plan for Field Experiments to Support the Immobilized Low-Activity Waste Disposal Performance Assessment at the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyer, Philip D.; McGrail, B. Peter; Bacon, Diana H.

    2001-09-01

    Much of the data collected to support the Immobilized Low-Activity Waste Performance Assessment (ILAW PA) simulations have been obtained in the laboratory on a relatively small scale (less than 10 cm). In addition, the PA simulations themselves are currently the only means available to integrate the chemical and hydrologic processes involved in the transport of contaminants from the disposal facility into the environment. This report describes the test plan for field experiments to provide data on the hydraulic, transport, and geochemical characteristics of the near-field materials on a more representative (i.e., larger) scale than the laboratory data currently available. The experiments will also provide results that encompass a variety of transport processes likely to occur within the actual disposal facility. These experiments will thus provide the first integrated data on the ILAW facility performance and will provide a crucial dataset to evaluate the simulation-based estimates of overall facility performance used in the PA.

  12. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Life Cycle Assessment of the Aquatic Ecosystems Research Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of life cycle assessment (LCA). The information and findings contained in this report have not been, 2013 Final Report #12;CIVL 498C: Life Cycle Assessment of the Aquatic Ecosystems Research LaboratoryUBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Daniel Tse Life Cycle

  13. Smith Newton Vehicle Performance Evaluation – 4th Quarter 2013; NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2014-01-01

    The Fleet Test and Evaluation Team at the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory is evaluating and documenting the performance of electric and plug-in hybrid electric drive systems in medium-duty trucks across the nation. U.S. companies participating in this evaluation project received funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act to cover part of the cost of purchasing these vehicles. Through this project, Smith Electric Vehicles is building and deploying 500 all-electric medium-duty trucks that will be deployed by a variety of companies in diverse climates across the country.

  14. Navistar eStar Vehicle Performance Evaluation -- Cumulative; NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2015-01-01

    The Fleet Test and Evaluation Team at the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory is evaluating and documenting the performance of electric and plug-in hybrid electric drive systems in medium duty trucks across the nation. U.S. companies participating in this evaluation project received funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act to cover part of the cost of purchasing these vehicles. Through this project, Navistar will build and deploy all-electric medium-duty trucks. The trucks will be deployed in diverse climates across the country.

  15. Assessment of performing an MST strike in Tank 21H

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poirier, Michael R.

    2014-09-29

    Previous Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) tank mixing studies performed for the Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) project have shown that 3 Submersible Mixer Pumps (SMPs) installed in Tank 41 are sufficient to support actinide removal by MST sorption as well as subsequent resuspension and removal of settled solids. Savannah River Remediation (SRR) is pursuing MST addition into Tank 21 as part of the Large Tank Strike (LTS) project. The preliminary scope for LTS involves the use of three standard slurry pumps (installed in N, SE, and SW risers) in a Type IV tank. Due to the differences in tank size, internal interferences, and pump design, a separate mixing evaluation is required to determine if the proposed configuration will allow for MST suspension and strontium and actinide sorption. The author performed the analysis by reviewing drawings for Tank 21 [W231023] and determining the required cleaning radius or zone of influence for the pumps. This requirement was compared with previous pilot-scale MST suspension data collected for SCIX that determined the cleaning radius, or zone of influence, as a function of pump operating parameters. The author also reviewed a previous Tank 50 mixing analysis that examined the ability of standard slurry pumps to suspend sludge particles. Based on a review of the pilot-scale SCIX mixing tests and Tank 50 pump operating experience, three standard slurry pumps should be able to suspend sludge and MST to effectively sorb strontium and actinides onto the MST. Using the SCIX data requires an assumption about the impact of cooling coils on slurry pump mixing. The basis for this assumption is described in this report. Using the Tank 50 operating experience shows three standard slurry pumps should be able to suspend solids if the shear strength of the settled solids is less than 160 Pa. Because Tank 21 does not contain cooling coils, the shear strength could be larger.

  16. Leadership development study :success profile competencies and high-performing leaders at Sandia National Laboratories.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Becker, Katherine M.; Mulligan, Deborah Rae; Szenasi, Gail L.; Crowder, Stephen Vernon

    2005-04-01

    Sandia is undergoing tremendous change. Sandia's executive management recognized the need for leadership development. About ten years ago the Business, Leadership, and Management Development department in partnership with executive management developed and implemented the organizational leadership Success Profile Competencies to help address some of the changes on the horizon such as workforce losses and lack of a skill set in the area of interpersonal skills. This study addresses the need for the Business, Leadership, and Management Development department to provide statistically sound data in two areas. One is to demonstrate that the organizational 360-degree success profile assessment tool has made a difference for leaders. A second area is to demonstrate the presence of high performing leaders at the Labs. The study utilized two tools to address these two areas. Study participants were made up of individuals who have solid data on Sandia's 360-degree success profile assessment tool. The second assessment tool was comprised of those leaders who participated in the Lockheed Martin Corporation Employee Preferences Survey. Statistical data supports the connection between leader indicators and the 360-degree assessment tool. The study also indicates the presence of high performing leaders at Sandia.

  17. 2011 PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT COMMUNITY OF PRACTICE TECHNICAL EXCHANGE - SUMMARY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seitz, R.

    2011-12-30

    The Performance Assessment Community of Practice (PA CoP) was developed in 2008 to improve consistency and quality in the preparation of performance assessments (PAs) and risk assessments across the Department of Energy (DOE) Complex. The term, PA, is used to represent all of these modeling applications in this report. The PA CoP goals are to foster the exchange of information among PA practitioners and to share lessons learned from PAs conducted for DOE, commercial disposal facilities, and international entities. Technical exchanges and workshops are a cornerstone of PA CoP activities. Previous technical exchanges have addressed Engineered Barriers (2009 - http://www.cresp.org/education/workshops/pacop/), the Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management and the Cementitious Barriers Partnership (2010 - http://srnl.doe.gov/copexchange/links.htm). Each technical exchange also includes summary presentations regarding activities at DOE, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and other organizations (e.g., International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)) as well as a number of presentations from selected sites to provide insight and perspective from on-going modeling activities. Through the deployment of PA Assistance Teams, the PA CoP has also been engaged in the development of new PAs across the DOE Complex. As a way of improving consistency in the preparation of new PAs, the teams provide technical advice and share experiences, noteworthy practices, and lessons learned from previous Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility Federal Review Group (LFRG) reviews. Teams have provided support for PAs at Hanford, Idaho, Paducah and Portsmouth. The third annual PA CoP Technical Exchange was held on May 25-26, 2011 in Atlanta, GA. The PA CoP Steering Committee Meeting held its first meeting on May 24 prior to the Technical Exchange. Decision making using models and software quality assurance were the topical emphasis for the exchange. A new feature at the 2011 technical exchange was the use of panel discussions to solicit feedback from regulators and practitioners. This report summarizes discussions and recommendations from the steering committee meeting and presentations and feedback obtained at the technical exchange. Appendix I includes the steering committee meeting agenda and Appendix II includes the agenda for the technical exchange and a screenshot of the presentations and video files that are available online.

  18. Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Radiological Control Performance Indicator Report -- Fourth Quarter, Calendar Year 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hinckley, F.L.

    1999-02-01

    This document provides a report of an analysis of the Radiological Control Program through the fourth quarter of Calendar Year (CY-98) and is the annual report for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). This Performance Indicator Report is provided in accordance with Article 133 of the INEEL Radiological Control Manual. The INEEL collective occupational radiation deep dose is 63.034 person-rem year to date, compared to a goal of 83.1 person-rem. During the fourth quarter, all areas experienced deletions of work resulting from the Maintenance Stand Down. This reduction in work is a primary factor in the difference in the year end dose and the ALARA goal. The work will be completed during CY-99. Beginning in CY-98, a numeric Radiological Performance Index (RPI) is being used to compare radiological performance. The RPI takes into consideration frequency and severity of events such as skin contaminations, clothing contaminations, spills, exposures to radiation exceeding limits, and positive internal dose. The RPI measures the cost of these events in cents per hour of radiological work performed. To make the RPI meaningful, tables have been prepared to show the facility that contributes to the values used. The data are compared on a quarterly basis to the prior year to show measurable performance.

  19. Impact assessment and performance targets for lighting and envelope systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan, R.; Lee, E.S.; Selkowitz, S.

    1992-06-01

    Electric lighting loads and cooling from solar heat gains and from lights are the two largest components of peak demand in commercial buildings. The most cost effective demand side management solutions are generally those that directly reduce or eliminate these loads. Existing technologies can provide modest reductions, however they are typically applied an a piecemeal manner that yields less than optimal results. The full potential of existing technologies will be realized when they are commercially available in an integrated package easily specifiable by architects and engineers. Emerging technologies can also be developed to provide even greater savings and extend the savings over a greater portion of the building floor area. This report assesses achievable energy and peak demand performance in California commercial buildings with technologies available today and in the future. We characterize energy performance over a large range of building envelope and lighting conditions, both through computer simulation models and through case study measured data, and subsequently determine reasonable energy targets if building design were further optimized with integrated systems of current or new technologies. Energy targets are derived from the study after consideration of industry priorities, design constraints, market forces, energy code influence, and the state of current building stock.

  20. Recharge Data Package for the 2005 Integrated Disposal Facility Performance Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fayer, Michael J.; Szecsody, Jim E.

    2004-06-30

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory assisted CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc., (CHG) by providing estimates of recharge rates for current conditions and long-term scenarios involving disposal in the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). The IDF will be located in the 200 East Area at the Hanford Site and will receive several types of waste including immobilized low-activity waste. The recharge estimates for each scenario were derived from lysimeter and tracer data collected by the IDF PA Project and from modeling studies conducted for the project. Recharge estimates were provided for three specific site features (the surface barrier; possible barrier side slopes; and the surrounding soil) and four specific time periods (pre-Hanford; Hanford operations; surface barrier design life; post-barrier design life). CHG plans to conduct a performance assessment of the latest IDF design and call it the IDF 2005 PA; this recharge data package supports the upcoming IDF 2005 PA.

  1. Performance of corrosion inhibiting admixtures for structural concrete -- assessment methods and predictive modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yunovich, M.; Thompson, N.G.

    1998-12-31

    During the past fifteen years corrosion inhibiting admixtures (CIAs) have become increasingly popular for protection of reinforced components of highway bridges and other structures from damage induced by chlorides. However, there remains considerable debate about the benefits of CIAs in concrete. A variety of testing methods to assess the performance of CIA have been reported in the literature, ranging from tests in simulated pore solutions to long-term exposures of concrete slabs. The paper reviews the published techniques and recommends the methods which would make up a comprehensive CIA effectiveness testing program. The results of this set of tests would provide the data which can be used to rank the presently commercially available CIA and future candidate formulations utilizing a proposed predictive model. The model is based on relatively short-term laboratory testing and considers several phases of a service life of a structure (corrosion initiation, corrosion propagation without damage, and damage to the structure).

  2. Design Tools to Assess Hydro-Turbine Biological Performance: Priest Rapids Dam Turbine Replacement Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richmond, Marshall C.; Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Serkowski, John A.; Strickler, Brad; Weisbeck, Molly; Dotson, Curtis L.

    2013-06-25

    Over the past two decades, there have been many studies describing injury mechanisms associated with turbine passage, the response of various fish species to these mechanisms, and the probability of survival through dams. Although developing tools to design turbines that improve passage survival has been difficult and slow, a more robust quantification of the turbine environment has emerged through integrating physical model data, fish survival data, and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) studies. Grant County Public Utility District (GCPUD) operates the Priest Rapids Dam (PRD), a hydroelectric facility on the Columbia River in Washington State. The dam contains 10 Kaplan-type turbine units that are now almost 50 years old. The Utility District plans to refit all of these aging turbines with new turbines. The Columbia River at PRD is a migratory pathway for several species of juvenile and adult salmonids, so passage of fish through the dam is a major consideration when replacing the turbines. In this presentation, a method for turbine biological performance assessment (BioPA) is introduced. Using this method, a suite of biological performance indicators is computed based on simulated data from a CFD model of a proposed turbine design. Each performance indicator is a measure of the probability of exposure to a certain dose of an injury mechanism. Using known relationships between the dose of an injury mechanism and frequency of injury (dose–response) from laboratory or field studies, the likelihood of fish injury for a turbine design can be computed from the performance indicator. By comparing the values of the indicators from proposed designs, the engineer can identify the more-promising alternatives. We will present application of the BioPA method for baseline risk assessment calculations for the existing Kaplan turbines at PRD that will be used as the minimum biological performance that a proposed new design must achieve.

  3. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Corrective Action Plan in response to Tiger Team assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuliasha, Michael A.

    1991-08-23

    This report presents a complete response to the Tiger Team assessment that was conducted to Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Operations Office (ORO) from October 2, 1990, through November 30, 1990. The action plans have undergone both a discipline review and a cross-cutting review with respect to root cause. In addition, the action plans have been integrated with initiatives being pursued across Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., in response to Tiger Team findings at other DOE facilities operated by Energy Systems. The root cause section is complete and describes how ORNL intends to address the root cause of the findings identified during the assessment. This report is concerned with reactors safety and health findings, responses, and planned actions. Specific areas include: organization and administration; quality verification; operations; maintenance; training and certification; auxiliary systems; emergency preparedness; technical support; nuclear criticality safety; security/safety interface; experimental activities; site/facility safety review; radiological protection; personnel protection; fire protection; management findings, responses, and planned actions; self-assessment findings, responses, and planned actions; and summary of planned actions, schedules, and costs.

  4. Performance-based assessment of daylight on tropical buildings- a case Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Szu Cheng, CHIEN

    2013-01-01

    Sustainability in the Tropics For the visual performance ofSustainability in the Tropics Table 3 Metrics conducted to assess dayliglzting performanceSustainability in the Tropics APPROACH Description of the case study model Daylight performance

  5. Construction and operation of replacement hazardous waste handling facility at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Environmental Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-09-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA), DOE/EA-0423, for the construction and operation of a replacement hazardous waste handling facility (HWHF) and decontamination of the existing HWHF at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL), Berkeley, California. The proposed facility would replace several older buildings and cargo containers currently being used for waste handling activities and consolidate the LBL`s existing waste handling activities in one location. The nature of the waste handling activities and the waste volume and characteristics would not change as a result of construction of the new facility. Based on the analysis in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action would not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969, 42 USC. 4321 et seq. Therefore, an environmental impact statement is not required.

  6. Improving Site-Specific Radiological Performance Assessments - 13431

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tauxe, John; Black, Paul; Catlett, Kate; Lee, Robert; Perona, Ralph; Stockton, Tom; Sully, Mike

    2013-07-01

    An improved approach is presented for conducting complete and defensible radiological site-specific performance assessments (PAs) to support radioactive waste disposal decisions. The basic tenets of PA were initiated some thirty years ago, focusing on geologic disposals and evaluating compliance with regulations. Some of these regulations were inherently probabilistic (i.e., addressing uncertainty in a quantitative fashion), such as the containment requirements of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) 40 CFR 191, Environmental Radiation Protection Standards for Management and Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel, High-Level and Transuranic Radioactive Wastes, Chap. 191.13 [1]. Methods of analysis were developed to meet those requirements, but at their core early PAs used 'conservative' parameter values and modeling approaches. This limited the utility of such PAs to compliance evaluation, and did little to inform decisions about optimizing disposal, closure and long-term monitoring and maintenance, or, in general, maintaining doses 'as low as reasonably achievable' (ALARA). This basic approach to PA development in the United States was employed essentially unchanged through the end of the 20. century, principally by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Performance assessments developed in support of private radioactive waste disposal operations, regulated by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and its agreement states, were typically not as sophisticated. Discussion of new approaches to PA is timely, since at the time of this writing, the DOE is in the midst of revising its Order 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management [2], and the NRC is revising 10 CFR 61, Licensing Requirements for Land Disposal of Radioactive Waste [3]. Over the previous decade, theoretical developments and improved computational technology have provided the foundation for integrating decision analysis (DA) concepts and objective-focused thinking, plus a Bayesian approach to probabilistic modeling and risk analysis, to guide improvements in PA. This decision-making approach, [4, 5, 6] provides a transparent formal framework for using a value- or objective-focused approach to decision-making. DA, as an analytical means to implement structured decision making, provides a context for both understanding how uncertainty affects decisions and for targeting uncertainty reduction. The proposed DA approach improves defensibility and transparency of decision-making. The DA approach is fully consistent with the need to perform realistic modeling (rather than conservative modeling), including evaluation of site-specific factors. Instead of using generic stylized scenarios for radionuclide fate and transport and for human exposures to radionuclides, site-specific scenarios better represent the advantages and disadvantages of alternative disposal sites or engineered designs, thus clarifying their differences as well as providing a sound basis for evaluation of site performance. The full DA approach to PA is described, from explicitly incorporating societal values through stakeholder involvement to model building. Model building involves scoping by considering features, events, processes, and exposure scenarios (FEPSs), development of a conceptual site model (CSM), translation into numerical models and subsequent computation, and model evaluation. These are implemented in a cycle of uncertainty analysis, sensitivity analysis and value of information analysis so that uncertainty can be reduced until sufficient confidence is gained in the decisions to be made. This includes the traditional focus on hydrogeological processes, but also places emphasis on other FEPSs such as biotically-induced transport and human exposure phenomena. The significance of human exposure scenarios is emphasized by modifying the traditional acronym 'FEPs' to include them, hence 'FEPSs'. The radioactive waste community is also recognizing that disposal sites are to be considered a national (or even global) resource. As such, there is a pressing need to optimize their utility withi

  7. High Performance Lipoprotein Profiling for Cardiovascular Risk Assessment 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Larner, Craig

    2012-10-19

    With the severity of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and the related mortality rate to this disease, new methods are necessary for risk assessment and treatment prior to the onset of the disease. The current paradigm in CVD risk assessment has shifted...

  8. EA-1422: Sandia National Laboratories Site-Wide Environmental Assessment/California

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is one of three national laboratories that support the DOE’s statutory responsibilities for nuclear weapons research and design, development of energy...

  9. Corrosion testing of spent nuclear fuel performed at Argonne National Laboratory for repository acceptance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldberg, M. M.

    2000-07-20

    Corrosion tests of DOE-owned spent nuclear fuel are performed at Argonne National Laboratory to support the license application for the Yucca Mountain Repository. The tests are designed to determine corrosion rates and degradation products formed when fuel is reacted at elevated temperature in different aqueous environments, including vapor, dripping water, submersion, and liquid film contact. Corrosion rates are determined from the quantity of radionuclides released from wetted fuel and from the weight loss of the test fuel specimen as a function of time. Degradation products include secondary mineral phases and dissolved, adsorbed, and colloidal species. Solid phase examinations determine fuel/mineral interface relationships, characterize radionuclide incorporation into secondary phases, and determine corrosion mechanisms at grain interfaces within the fuel. Leachate solution analyses quantify released radionuclides and determine the size and charge distribution of colloids. This paper presents selected results from corrosion tests on metallic fuels.

  10. Recharge Data Package for the Immobilized Low-Activity Waste 2001 Performance Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MJ Fayer; EM Murphy; JL Downs; FO Khan; CW Lindenmeier; BN Bjornstad

    2000-01-18

    Lockheed Martin Hanford Company (LMHC) is designing and assessing the performance of disposal facilities to receive radioactive wastes that are currently stored in single- and double-shell tanks at the Hanford Site. The preferred method of disposing of the portion that is classified as immobilized low-activity waste (ILAW) is to vitrify the waste and place the product in near-surface, shallow-land burial facilities. The LMHC project to assess the performance of these disposal facilities is known as the Hanford ILAW Performance Assessment (PA) Activity, hereafter called the ILAW PA project. The goal of this project is to provide a reasonable expectation that the disposal of the waste is protective of the general public, groundwater resources, air resources, surface-water resources, and inadvertent intruders. Achieving this goal will require predictions of contaminant migration from the facility. To make such predictions will require estimates of the fluxes of water moving through the sediments within the vadose zone around and beneath the disposal facility. These fluxes, loosely called recharge rates, are the primary mechanism for transporting contaminants to the groundwater. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) assists LMHC in their performance assessment activities. One of the PNNL tasks is to provide estimates of recharge rates for current conditions and long-term scenarios involving the shallow-land disposal of ILAW. Specifically, recharge estimates are needed for a filly functional surface cover; the cover sideslope, and the immediately surrounding terrain. In addition, recharge estimates are needed for degraded cover conditions. The temporal scope of the analysis is 10,000 years, but could be longer if some contaminant peaks occur after 10,000 years. The elements of this report compose the Recharge Data Package, which provides estimates of recharge rates for the scenarios being considered in the 2001 PA. Table S.1 identifies the surface features and time periods evaluated. The most important feature, the surface cover, is expected to be the modified RCRA Subtitle C design. This design uses a 1-m-thick silt loam layer above sand and gravel filter layers to create a capillary break. A 0.15-m-thick asphalt layer underlies the filter layers to function as a backup barrier and to promote lateral drainage. Cover sideslopes are expected to be constructed with 1V:10H slopes using sandy gravel. The recharge estimates for each scenario were derived from lysimeter and tracer data collected by the ILAW PA and other projects and from modeling analyses.

  11. Development and Implementation of a Statistical Risk Assessment Method for New Aircraft Performance at XYZ Corporation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schroeder, Christopher R.

    2009-12-18

    arose. Although a myriad of risk assessment techniques exist in literature, a specific technique for performance guarantees was not available. This research develops a specific statistical risk assessment method (SRAM) that fits with XYZ’s tools...

  12. Assessment of Proportional-Integral Control Loop Performance for Input Load Disturbance Rejection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Jiandong

    Assessment of Proportional-Integral Control Loop Performance for Input Load Disturbance Rejection: This paper studies the performance assessment of proportional-integral (PI) control loops in terms and to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed performance index. 1. INTRODUCTION Proportional

  13. A qualitative cross-case analysis of postsecondary students' performance in asynchronous mechanical system laboratories 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hays, Kim Thomas

    2007-04-25

    sufficient instructor time; (e) standardize computer software and applications; and (f) pilot-test and field-test laboratory equipment and activities. Conclusions drawn indicate limited applications of asynchronous laboratories for select prepared individuals...

  14. Peak picking and the assessment of separation performance in two-dimensional high performance liquid chromatography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guiochon, Georges A; Shalliker, R. Andrew

    2010-01-01

    An algorithm was developed for 2DHPLC that automated the process of peak recognition, measuring their retention times, and then subsequently plotting the information in a two-dimensional retention plane. Following the recognition of peaks, the software then performed a series of statistical assessments of the separation performance, measuring for example, correlation between dimensions, peak capacity and the percentage of usage of the separation space. Peak recognition was achieved by interpreting the first and second derivatives of each respective one-dimensional chromatogram to determine the 1D retention times of each solute and then compiling these retention times for each respective fraction 'cut'. Due to the nature of comprehensive 2DHPLC adjacent cut fractions may contain peaks common to more than one cut fraction. The algorithm determined which components were common in adjacent cuts and subsequently calculated the peak maximum profile by interpolating the space between adjacent peaks. This algorithm was applied to the analysis of a two-dimensional separation of an apple flesh extract separated in a first dimension comprising a cyano stationary phase and an aqueous/THF mobile phase as the first dimension and a second dimension comprising C18-Hydro with an aqueous/MeOH mobile phase. A total of 187 peaks were detected.

  15. 2005 EPA WIPP RECERTIFICATIONPERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT FACT SHEET No. 3 Performance Assessments (PA) are conducted by DOE to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2005 EPA WIPP RECERTIFICATIONPERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT FACT SHEET No. 3 Performance Assessments (PA) are conducted by DOE to demonstrate that the WIPP meets EPA's release require- ments for radionuclides. A PA. The recertification PA shows that WIPP continues to meet EPA's limits for the release of radionuclides. What's New

  16. Preliminary performance assessment for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, December 1992. Volume 2, Technical basis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    Before disposing of transuranic radioactive waste in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), the United States Department of Energy (DOE) must evaluate compliance with applicable long-term regulations of the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Sandia National Laboratories is conducting iterative performance assessments (PAs) of the WIPP for the DOE to provide interim guidance while preparing for a final compliance evaluation. This volume, Volume 2, contains the technical basis for the 1992 PA. Specifically, it describes the conceptual basis for consequence modeling and the PA methodology, including the selection of scenarios for analysis, the determination of scenario probabilities, and the estimation of scenario consequences using a Monte Carlo technique and a linked system of computational models. Additional information about the 1992 PA is provided in other volumes. Volume I contains an overview of WIPP PA and results of a preliminary comparison with the long-term requirements of the EPA`s Environmental Protection Standards for Management and Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel, High-Level and Transuranic Radioactive Wastes (40 CFR 191, Subpart B). Volume 3 contains the reference data base and values for input parameters used in consequence and probability modeling. Volume 4 contains uncertainty and sensitivity analyses related to the preliminary comparison with 40 CFR 191B. Volume 5 contains uncertainty and sensitivity analyses of gas and brine migration for undisturbed performance. Finally, guidance derived from the entire 1992 PA is presented in Volume 6.

  17. Evolution Of USDOE Performance Assessments Over 20 Years

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seitz, Roger R. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Suttora, Linda C. [U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Site Restoration, Germantown, MD (United States)

    2013-02-26

    Performance assessments (PAs) have been used for many years for the analysis of post-closure hazards associated with a radioactive waste disposal facility and to provide a reasonable expectation of the ability of the site and facility design to meet objectives for the protection of members of the public and the environment. The use of PA to support decision-making for LLW disposal facilities has been mandated in United States Department of Energy (USDOE) directives governing radioactive waste management since 1988 (currently DOE Order 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management). Prior to that time, PAs were also used in a less formal role. Over the past 20+ years, the USDOE approach to conduct, review and apply PAs has evolved into an efficient, rigorous and mature process that includes specific requirements for continuous improvement and independent reviews. The PA process has evolved through refinement of a graded and iterative approach designed to help focus efforts on those aspects of the problem expected to have the greatest influence on the decision being made. Many of the evolutionary changes to the PA process are linked to the refinement of the PA maintenance concept that has proven to be an important element of USDOE PA requirements in the context of supporting decision-making for safe disposal of LLW. The PA maintenance concept represents the evolution of the graded and iterative philosophy and has helped to drive the evolution of PAs from a deterministic compliance calculation into a systematic approach that helps to focus on critical aspects of the disposal system in a manner designed to provide a more informed basis for decision-making throughout the life of a disposal facility (e.g., monitoring, research and testing, waste acceptance criteria, design improvements, data collection, model refinements). A significant evolution in PA modeling has been associated with improved use of uncertainty and sensitivity analysis techniques to support efficient implementation of the graded and iterative approach. Rather than attempt to exactly predict the migration of radionuclides in a disposal unit, the best PAs have evolved into tools that provide a range of results to guide decision-makers in planning the most efficient, cost effective, and safe disposal of radionuclides.

  18. Environmental assessment for the proposed CMR Building upgrades at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico. Final document

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-02-04

    In order to maintain its ability to continue to conduct uninterrupted radioactive and metallurgical research in a safe, secure, and environmentally sound manner, the US Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to upgrade the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Chemistry and Metallurgy Research (CMR) Building. The building was built in the early 1950s to provide a research and experimental facility for analytical chemistry, plutonium and uranium chemistry, and metallurgy. Today, research and development activities are performed involving nuclear materials. A variety of radioactive and chemical hazards are present. The CMR Building is nearing the end of its original design life and does not meet many of today`s design codes and standards. The Proposed Action for this Environmental Assessment (EA) includes structural modifications to some portions of the CMR Building which do not meet current seismic criteria for a Hazard Category 2 Facility. Also included are upgrades and improvements in building ventilation, communications, monitoring, and fire protection systems. This EA analyzes the environmental effects of construction of the proposed upgrades. The Proposed Action will have no adverse effects upon agricultural and cultural resources, wetlands and floodplains, endangered and threatened species, recreational resources, or water resources. The Proposed Action would have negligible effects on human health and transportation, and would not pose a disproportionate adverse health or environmental impact on minority or low-income populations within an 80 kilometer (50 mile) radius of the CMR Building.

  19. INTERAGENCY PERFORMANCE AND RISK ASSESSMENT COMMUNITY OF PRACTICE...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Introduction (Dr. Ming Zhu, DOE EM) 2:05 am - 2:55 pm Presentation - EPA Radiation Risk Assessment Approach (PRG and DSS Calculators) (Mr. Stuart Walker, EPA). Time will be...

  20. A Strategy to Assess Performance of Selected Low-Activity Waste Forms in an Integrated Disposal Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McGrail, B PETER.; Bacon, Diana H.; Serne, R JEFFREY.; Pierce, Eric M.

    2003-08-22

    An overall strategy for evaluating the long-term performance of three waste forms being considered for supplemental treatment of low-activity waste at Hanford is discussed. The same computational framework used to conduct the 2001 ILAW performance assessment will be used for all three waste forms. Cast stone will be modeled with a diffusion-advection transport model and bulk vitrified glass and steam reformed LAW will be modeled with a reactive chemical transport simulator. The recommended laboratory testing to support the supplemental LAW form selection includes single-pass flow-through (SPFT), product consistency (PCT), and vapor hydration tests for glass, SPFT and PCT tests for steam reformed LAW forms, and ANS 16.1 tests for cast stone. These and potentially other laboratory tests for the selected waste form(s) would also be the basis for more detailed studies needed to support a comprehensive long-term performance assessment should one or more of these waste forms be selected for disposal in an integrated disposal facility.

  1. Environmental assessment for the Radioactive and Mixed Waste Management Facility: Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-06-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA) (DOE/EA-0466) under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969 for the proposed completion of construction and subsequent operation of a central Radioactive and Mixed Waste Management Facility (RMWMF), in the southeastern portion of Technical Area III at Sandia National Laboratory, Albuquerque (SNLA). The RMWMF is designed to receive, store, characterize, conduct limited bench-scale treatment of, repackage, and certify low-level waste (LLW) and mixed waste (MW) (as necessary) for shipment to an offsite disposal or treatment facility. The RMWMF was partially constructed in 1989. Due to changing regulatory requirements, planned facility upgrades would be undertaken as part of the proposed action. These upgrades would include paving of road surfaces and work areas, installation of pumping equipment and lines for surface impoundment, and design and construction of air locks and truck decontamination and water treatment systems. The proposed action also includes an adjacent corrosive and reactive metals storage area, and associated roads and paving. LLW and MW generated at SNLA would be transported from the technical areas to the RMWMF in containers approved by the Department of Transportation. The RMWMF would not handle nonradioactive hazardous waste. Based on the analysis in the EA, the proposed completion of construction and operation of the RMWMF does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of NEPA. Therefore, preparation of an environmental impact statement for the proposed action is not required.

  2. Performance of the BL4 Beamline for Surface and Interface Research at the Siam Photon Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakajima, Hideki; Buddhakala, Moragote; Chumpolkulwong, Somchai; Supruangnet, Ratchadapora; Kakizaki, Akito; Songsiriritthigul, Prayoon

    2007-01-19

    The evaluations of the monochromator of the BL4 beamline at the Siam Photon Laboratory were carried out by gas-phase photoionization measurements. The beamline employs a varied-line-spacing plane grating monochromator, which delivers photons with energies between 20-240 eV. The resolving power of the monochromator depends strongly with the alignment of the exit slit. The designed resolving power of 5000 has been achieved. The experimental station of the beamline has been upgraded for surface and interface research. The new experimental station removes the disadvantage and expands the capabilities of the old one in such a way that photoemission experiments using synchrotron light can be performed in parallel with other in situ surface analysis techniques, as well as with preparation of other samples. The new system includes the old photoemission system and a multi-UHV-chamber system. The standard surface-sensitive techniques available in addition to photoemission spectroscopy using synchrotron light are UPS, XPS, AES and LEED. The new experimental station also includes a metal MBE system for preparing samples for the studies of ultra-thin magnetic films and metal-semiconductor interfaces.

  3. Assessment of PCMI Simulation Using the Multidimensional Multiphysics BISON Fuel Performance Code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephen R. Novascone; Jason D. Hales; Benjamin W. Spencer; Richard L. Williamson

    2012-09-01

    Since 2008, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has been developing a next-generation nuclear fuel performance code called BISON. BISON is built using INL’s Multiphysics Object-Oriented Simulation Environment, or MOOSE. MOOSE is a massively parallel, finite element-based framework to solve systems of coupled non-linear partial differential equations using the Jacobian-FreeNewton Krylov (JFNK) method. MOOSE supports the use of complex two- and three-dimensional meshes and uses implicit time integration, which is important for the widely varied time scales in nuclear fuel simulation. MOOSE’s object-oriented architecture minimizes the programming required to add new physics models. BISON has been applied to various nuclear fuel problems to assess the accuracy of its 2D and 3D capabilities. The benchmark results used in this assessment range from simulation results from other fuel performance codes to measurements from well-known and documented reactor experiments. An example of a well-documented experiment used in this assessment is the Third Risø Fission Gas Project, referred to as “Bump Test GE7”, which was performed on rod ZX115. This experiment was chosen because it allows for an evaluation of several aspects of the code, including fully coupled thermo-mechanics, contact, and several nonlinear material models. Bump Test GE7 consists of a base-irradiation period of a full-length rod in the Quad-Cities-1 BWR for nearly 7 years to a burnup of 4.17% FIMA. The base irradiation test is followed by a “bump test” of a sub-section of the original rod. The bump test takes place in the test reactor DR3 at Risø in a water-cooled HP1 rig under BWR conditions where the power level is increased by about 50% over base irradiation levels in the span of several hours. During base irradiation, the axial power profile is flat. During the bump test, the axial power profile changes so that the bottom half of the rod is at approximately 50% higher power than at the base irradiation level, while the power at the top of the rod is at about 20% of the base irradiation power level. 2D BISON simulations of the Bump Test GE7 were run using both discrete and smeared pellet geometry. Comparisons between these calculations and experimental measurements are presented for clad diameter and elongation after the base irradiation and clad profile along the length of the test section after the bump test. Preliminary comparisons between calculations and measurements are favorable, supporting the use of BISON as an accurate multiphysics fuel simulation tool.

  4. Annual Summary of Immobilized Low Activity Tank Waste (ILAW) Performance Assessment for 2002

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mann, F. M.

    2002-08-01

    As required by the Department of Energy ( DOE), an annual summary of the adequacy of the Hanford Immobilized Low-Activity Tank Waste Performance Assessment (ILAW PA) is necessary in each year in which a full performance assessment is not issued.

  5. Energy Performance Assessment for Equipment and Utility Systems...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    performance in the field. Chapters address furnaces, thermal power systems, electric motors, and other equipment. References Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgw...

  6. Performance assessment model of a single waste package (Conference...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    12 MANAGEMENT OF RADIOACTIVE AND NON-RADIOACTIVE WASTES FROM NUCLEAR FACILITIES; 11 NUCLEAR FUEL CYCLE AND FUEL MATERIALS; WASTE FORMS; PERFORMANCE; P CODES; RADIOACTIVE...

  7. Preliminary performance assessment for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, December 1992. Volume 1, Third comparison with 40 CFR 191, Subpart B

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    Before disposing of transuranic radioactive wastes in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), the United States Department of Energy (DOE) must evaluate compliance with applicable long-term regulations of the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Sandia National Laboratories is conducting iterative performance assessments of the WIPP for the DOE to provide interim guidance while preparing for final compliance evaluations. This volume contains an overview of WIPP performance assessment and a preliminary comparison with the long-term requirements of the Environmental Radiation Protection Standards for Management and Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel, High-Level and Transuranic Radioactive Wastes (40 CFR 191, Subpart B).

  8. Laboratory performances of the solar multichannel resonant scattering spectrometer prototype of the GOLF-New Generation instrument

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Turck-Chieze; P. H. Carton; S. Mathur; J. -C. Barriere; P. Daniel-Thomas; C. Lahonde-Hamdoun; R. Granelli; D. Loiseau; F. Nunio; Y. Piret; J. M. Robillot

    2008-06-21

    This article quickly summarizes the performances and results of the GOLF/SoHO resonant spectrometer, thus justifying to go a step further. We then recall the characteristics of the multichannel resonant GOLF-NG spectrometer and present the first successful performances of the laboratory tests on the prototype and also the limitations of this first technological instrument. Scientific questions and an observation strategy are discussed.

  9. 2002 Wastewater Land Application Site Performance Reports for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory and Associated Documentation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meachum, Teresa Ray; Michael G. Lewis

    2003-02-01

    The 2002 Wastewater Land Application site Performance Reports for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory describe site conditions for the facilities with State of Idaho Wastewater Land Application Permits. Permit-required monitoring data are summarized, and permit exceedences or environmental impacts relating to the operation of the facilities during the 2002 permit year are discussed.

  10. Recommended Method To Account For Daughter Ingrowth For The Portsmouth On-Site Waste Disposal Facility Performance Assessment Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phifer, Mark A.; Smith, Frank G. III

    2013-06-21

    A 3-D STOMP model has been developed for the Portsmouth On-Site Waste Disposal Facility (OSWDF) at Site D as outlined in Appendix K of FBP 2013. This model projects the flow and transport of the following radionuclides to various points of assessments: Tc-99, U-234, U-235, U-236, U-238, Am-241, Np-237, Pu-238, Pu-239, Pu-240, Th-228, and Th-230. The model includes the radioactive decay of these parents, but does not include the associated daughter ingrowth because the STOMP model does not have the capability to model daughter ingrowth. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) provides herein a recommended method to account for daughter ingrowth in association with the Portsmouth OSWDF Performance Assessment (PA) modeling.

  11. The power balance method For aerodynamic performance assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sato, Sho, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2012-01-01

    This thesis describes the use of the power balance method for performance estimation of aircraft configurations. In this method, mechanical power production and mechanical power consumption of the aircraft are balanced, ...

  12. Hydro Review: Computational Tools to Assess Turbine Biological Performance

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This review covers the BioPA method used to analyze the biological performance of proposed designs to help ensure the safety of fish passing through the turbines at the Priest Rapids Dam in Grant County, Washington.

  13. Hybrid wing-body aircraft noise and performance assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weed, Philip Andrew

    2010-01-01

    Hybrid wing-body aircraft noise generation and boundary layer ingestion (BLI) performance trends with increased fan face Mach number inlet designs are investigated. The presented topics are in support of the NASA subsonic ...

  14. Geochemical Data Package for the 2005 Hanford Integrated Disposal Facility Performance Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krupka, Kenneth M.; Serne, R JEFFREY.; Kaplan, D I.

    2004-09-30

    CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. (CH2M HILL) is designing and assessing the performance of an integrated disposal facility (IDF) to receive low-level waste (LLW), mixed low-level waste (MLLW), immobilized low-activity waste (ILAW), and failed or decommissioned melters. The CH2M HILL project to assess the performance of this disposal facility is the Hanford IDF Performance Assessment (PA) activity. The goal of the Hanford IDF PA activity is to provide a reasonable expectation that the disposal of the waste is protective of the general public, groundwater resources, air resources, surface-water resources, and inadvertent intruders. Achieving this goal will require prediction of contaminant migration from the facilities. This migration is expected to occur primarily via the movement of water through the facilities, and the consequent transport of dissolved contaminants in the vadose zone to groundwater where contaminants may be re-introduced to receptors via drinking water wells or mixing in the Columbia River. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) assists CH2M HILL in their performance assessment activities. One of the PNNL tasks is to provide estimates of the geochemical properties of the materials comprising the IDF, the disturbed region around the facility, and the physically undisturbed sediments below the facility (including the vadose zone sediments and the aquifer sediments in the upper unconfined aquifer). The geochemical properties are expressed as parameters that quantify the adsorption of contaminants and the solubility constraints that might apply for those contaminants that may exceed solubility constraints. The common parameters used to quantify adsorption and solubility are the distribution coefficient (Kd) and the thermodynamic solubility product (Ksp), respectively. In this data package, we approximate the solubility of contaminants using a more simplified construct, called the solution concentration limit, a constant value. The Kd values and solution concentration limits for each contaminant are direct inputs to subsurface flow and transport codes used to predict the performance of the IDF system. In addition to the best-estimate Kd values, a reasonable conservative value and a range are provided. The data package does not list estimates for the range in solubility limits or their uncertainty. However, the data package does provide different values for both the Kd values and solution concentration limits for different spatial zones in the IDF system and does supply time-varying Kd values for the cement solidified waste. The Kd values and solution concentration limits presented for each contaminant were previously presented in a report prepared by Kaplan and Serne (2000) for the 2001 ILAW PA, and have been updated to include applicable data from investigations completed since the issuance of that report and improvements in our understanding of the geochemistry specific to Hanford. A discussion is also included of the evolution of the Kd values recommended from the original 1999 ILAW PA through the 2001 ILAW and 2003 Supplement PAs to the current values to be used for the 2005 IDF PA for the key contaminants of concern: Cr(VI), nitrate, 129I, 79Se, 99Tc, and U(VI). This discussion provides the rationale for why certain Kd have changed with time.

  15. Introductory materials for committee members: 1) instructions for the Los Alamos National Laboratory fiscal year 2010 capability reviews 2) NPAC strategic capability planning 3) Summary self-assessment for the nuclear and particle physics, astrophysics an

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Redondo, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) uses external peer review to measure and continuously improve the quality of its science, technology and engineering (STE). LANL uses capability reviews to assess the STE quality and institutional integration and to advise Laboratory Management on the current and future health of the STE. Capability reviews address the STE integration that LANL uses to meet mission requirements. STE capabilities are define to cut across directorates providing a more holistic view of the STE quality, integration to achieve mission requirements, and mission relevance. The scope of these capabilities necessitate that there will be significant overlap in technical areas covered by capability reviews (e.g., materials research and weapons science and engineering). In addition, LANL staff may be reviewed in different capability reviews because of their varied assignments and expertise. LANL plans to perform a complete review of the Laboratory's STE capabilities (hence staff) in a three-year cycle. The principal product of an external review is a report that includes the review committee's assessments, commendations, and recommendations for STE. The Capability Review Committees serve a dual role of providing assessment of the Laboratory's technical contributions and integration towards its missions and providing advice to Laboratory Management. The assessments and advice are documented in reports prepared by the Capability Review Committees that are delivered to the Director and to the Principal Associate Director for Science, Technology and Engineering (PADSTE). This report will be used by Laboratory Management for STE assessment and planning. The report is also provided to the Department of Energy (DOE) as part of LANL's Annual Performance Plan and to the Los Alamos National Security (LANS) LLC's Science and Technology Committee (STC) as part of its responsibilities to the LANS Board of Governors.

  16. Historical Relationship Between Performance Assessment for Radioactive Waste Disposal and Other Types of Risk Assessment in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    RECHARD,ROBERT P.

    2000-07-14

    This paper describes the evolution of the process for assessing the hazards of a geologic disposal system for radioactive waste and, similarly, nuclear power reactors, and the relationship of this process with other assessments of risk, particularly assessments of hazards from manufactured carcinogenic chemicals during use and disposal. This perspective reviews the common history of scientific concepts for risk assessment developed to the 1950s. Computational tools and techniques developed in the late 1950s and early 1960s to analyze the reliability of nuclear weapon delivery systems were adopted in the early 1970s for probabilistic risk assessment of nuclear power reactors, a technology for which behavior was unknown. In turn, these analyses became an important foundation for performance assessment of nuclear waste disposal in the late 1970s. The evaluation of risk to human health and the environment from chemical hazards is built upon methods for assessing the dose response of radionuclides in the 1950s. Despite a shared background, however, societal events, often in the form of legislation, have affected the development path for risk assessment for human health, producing dissimilarities between these risk assessments and those for nuclear facilities. An important difference is the regulator's interest in accounting for uncertainty and the tools used to evaluate it.

  17. DOE ASSESSMENT SEAB Recommendations Related to High Performance Computing

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergy A plug-in electric vehicle10 DOE ASSESSMENT SEAB Recommendations Related to High

  18. Assessing Urban Residential Irrigation Performance Using a Water Budget Approach 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewis, Alan Christopher

    2014-12-16

    Systems HOA Homeowners Association IR Irrigation Requirement SFR Single-Family Residential TWDB Texas Water Development Board TWRI Texas Water Resources Institute USGS United States Geological Survey vi TABLE OF CONTENTS Page ABSTRACT... ........................................................................................................................ 18 Figure 4. College Station neighborhoods and the number of SFR lots selected for study of irrigation performance ........................................................................................ 19 Figure 5. Close-up of GIS layers...

  19. Performance assessment of variable gain controlled optical storage drives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in face of disturbances 1. Low-frequency shocks 2. High-frequency noise Solutions: 1. Feedforward: Acc for Convergence 3. Frequency domain condition: and , _ 0 #12;15 for a periodic disturbance of period time T Under disturbance (200 Hz): , #12;17 Closed-loop Response: Frequency Domain #12;18 What is Performance? What does

  20. Using multicriteria decision analysis to assess the sustainable safety performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Libre de Bruxelles, Université

    the sustainable safety performance of road projects at the design stage Renaud Sarrazin1 2 , Yves De Smet1 1 of sustainable road safety and we address the multicriteria problem by detailing the set of considered criteria, road design, safety, sustainability. 1. Introduction For many years, considering sustainable

  1. Methodology assessment and recommendations for the Mars science laboratory launch safety analysis.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sturgis, Beverly Rainwater; Metzinger, Kurt Evan; Powers, Dana Auburn; Atcitty, Christopher B.; Robinson, David B; Hewson, John C.; Bixler, Nathan E.; Dodson, Brian W.; Potter, Donald L.; Kelly, John E.; MacLean, Heather J.; Bergeron, Kenneth Donald; Bessette, Gregory Carl; Lipinski, Ronald J.

    2006-09-01

    The Department of Energy has assigned to Sandia National Laboratories the responsibility of producing a Safety Analysis Report (SAR) for the plutonium-dioxide fueled Multi-Mission Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (MMRTG) proposed to be used in the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission. The National Aeronautic and Space Administration (NASA) is anticipating a launch in fall of 2009, and the SAR will play a critical role in the launch approval process. As in past safety evaluations of MMRTG missions, a wide range of potential accident conditions differing widely in probability and seventy must be considered, and the resulting risk to the public will be presented in the form of probability distribution functions of health effects in terms of latent cancer fatalities. The basic descriptions of accident cases will be provided by NASA in the MSL SAR Databook for the mission, and on the basis of these descriptions, Sandia will apply a variety of sophisticated computational simulation tools to evaluate the potential release of plutonium dioxide, its transport to human populations, and the consequent health effects. The first step in carrying out this project is to evaluate the existing computational analysis tools (computer codes) for suitability to the analysis and, when appropriate, to identify areas where modifications or improvements are warranted. The overall calculation of health risks can be divided into three levels of analysis. Level A involves detailed simulations of the interactions of the MMRTG or its components with the broad range of insults (e.g., shrapnel, blast waves, fires) posed by the various accident environments. There are a number of candidate codes for this level; they are typically high resolution computational simulation tools that capture details of each type of interaction and that can predict damage and plutonium dioxide release for a range of choices of controlling parameters. Level B utilizes these detailed results to study many thousands of possible event sequences and to build up a statistical representation of the releases for each accident case. A code to carry out this process will have to be developed or adapted from previous MMRTG missions. Finally, Level C translates the release (or ''source term'') information from Level B into public risk by applying models for atmospheric transport and the health consequences of exposure to the released plutonium dioxide. A number of candidate codes for this level of analysis are available. This report surveys the range of available codes and tools for each of these levels and makes recommendations for which choices are best for the MSL mission. It also identities areas where improvements to the codes are needed. In some cases a second tier of codes may be identified to provide supporting or clarifying insight about particular issues. The main focus of the methodology assessment is to identify a suite of computational tools that can produce a high quality SAR that can be successfully reviewed by external bodies (such as the Interagency Nuclear Safety Review Panel) on the schedule established by NASA and DOE.

  2. Water resource opportunity assessment: Fort Dix

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan, G.P.; Hostick, D.J.; Elliott, D.B.; Fitzpatrick, Q.K.; Dahowski, R.T.; Dison, D.R

    1996-12-01

    This report provides the results of the water resource opportunity assessments performed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory at the Fort Dix facility located in Fort Dix, New Jersey.

  3. Savannah River Site H-Area Tank Farm Performance Assessment Scoping...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    H-Area Tank Farm Performance Assessment Scoping Meeting April 20-22, 2010 230 Green Blvd. Aiken Design Center Building Village at Woodside Aiken, SC DRAFT MEETING NOTES Tuesday,...

  4. SPECIFICATION AND IMPLEMENTATION OF IFC BASED PERFORMANCE METRICS TO SUPPORT BUILDING LIFE CYCLE ASSESSMENT OF HYBRID

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of a performance metrics programming hierarchy is displayed for a heat pump and a solar array. Utilising the sets ASSESSMENT OF HYBRID ENERGY SYSTEMS Elmer Morrissey1 & 2 , James O'Donnell1 & 2 , Marcus Keane1 and Vladimir

  5. Assessment of durability performance of "Early-Opening-to-Traffic" Portland Cement Concrete pavement and patches 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shrestha, Pradhumna Babu

    1999-01-01

    -thaw, shrinkage, chemical attack, abrasion resistance, fatigue life, volumetric expansion, practicality, and concrete costs. The assessment discusses material combinations, mixture designs, and construction practices on performance. A computer program using...

  6. Performance Assessment of the Portsmouth On-Site Waste Disposal Facility

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation from the 2015 Annual Performance and Risk Assessment (P&RA) Community of Practice (CoP) Technical Exchange Meeting held in Richland, Washington on December 15-16, 2015.

  7. Nuclear power plant performance assessment pertaining to plant aging in France and the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guyer, Brittany (Brittany Leigh)

    2013-01-01

    The effect of aging on nuclear power plant performance has come under increased scrutiny in recent years. The approaches used to make an assessment of this effect strongly influence the economics of nuclear power plant ...

  8. Pacific Northwest Laboratory: Director`s overview of research performed for DOE Office of Health And Environmental Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-06-01

    A significant portion of the research undertaken at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is focused on the strategic programs of the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Office of Health and Environmental Research (OHER). These programs, which include Environmental Processes (Subsurface Science, Ecosystem Function and Response, and Atmospheric Chemistry), Global Change (Climate Change, Environmental Vulnerability, and Integrated Assessments), Biotechnology (Human Genome and Structural Biology), and Health (Health Effects and Medical Applications), have been established by OHER to support DOE business areas in science and technology and environmental quality. PNL uses a set of critical capabilities based on the Laboratory`s research facilities and the scientific and technological expertise of its staff to help OHER achieve its programmatic research goals. Integration of these capabilities across the Laboratory enables PNL to assemble multidisciplinary research teams that are highly effective in addressing the complex scientific and technical issues associated with OHER-sponsored research. PNL research efforts increasingly are focused on complex environmental and health problems that require multidisciplinary teams to address the multitude of time and spatial scales found in health and environmental research. PNL is currently engaged in research in the following areas for these OHER Divisions: Environmental Sciences -- atmospheric radiation monitoring, climate modeling, carbon cycle, atmospheric chemistry, ecological research, subsurface sciences, bioremediation, and environmental molecular sciences; Health Effects and Life Sciences -- cell/molecular biology, and biotechnology; Medical Applications and Biophysical Research -- analytical technology, and radiological and chemical physics. PNL`s contributions to OHER strategic research programs are described in this report.

  9. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Corrective Action Plan in response to Tiger Team assessment. Volume 1, Revision 5

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuliasha, Michael A.

    1991-08-23

    This report presents a complete response to the Tiger Team assessment that was conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Operations Office (ORO) from October 22, 1990, through November 30, 1990. The action plans have undergone both a discipline review and a cross-cutting review with respect to root cause. In addition, the action plans have been integrated with initiatives being pursued across Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., in response to Tiger Team findings at other DOE facilities operated by Energy Systems. The root cause section is complete and describes how ORNL intends to address the root causes of the findings identified during the assessment. The action plan has benefited from a complete review by various offices at DOE Headquarters as well as review by the Tiger Team that conducted the assessment to ensure that the described actions are responsive to the observed problems.

  10. Annual summary of Immobilized Low-Activity Waste (ILAW) Performance Assessment for 2003 Incorporating the Integrated Disposal Facility Concept

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MANN, F M

    2003-09-01

    To Erik Olds 09/30/03 - An annual summary of the adequacy of the Hanford Immobilized Low-Activity Tank Waste Performance Assessment (ILAW PA) is necessary in each year in which a full performance assessment is not issued.

  11. The comparative accuracy of performance distribution assessments versus conventional summary judgment assessments 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McMonagle, David Coglan

    2002-01-01

    (Appendix I) and explained the process of categorizing the observed behaviors on the Behavior Listing Form according to the performance dimensions already explained. Depending on their experimental condition, the participants were given either the SJ..., p & . 05), Problem Solving (t(156) = 6. 22, p (. 05), and Organizing and Planning (t(198) = 1. 82, p ( . 05) performance dimensions. However, the AI measure for SJ ratings of Energy's Team Building (r(201) = -4. 22, P & . 05) performance dimension...

  12. Annual Summary of Immobilized Low Activity Tank Waste (ILAW) Performance Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MANN, F M

    2000-05-01

    As required by the Department of Energy (DOE) order on radioactive waste management (DOE 1999a) as implemented by the Maintenance Plan for the Hanford Immobilized Low-Activity Tank Waste Performance Assessment (Mann 2000a), an annual summary of the adequacy of the Hanford Immobilized Low-Activity Tank Waste Performance Assessment (ILAW PA) must be submitted to DOE headquarters each year that a performance assessment is not submitted. Considering the results of data collection and analysis, the conclusions of the 1998 version of the ILAW PA (Mann 1998) as conditionally approved (DOE 1999b) remain valid, but new information indicates more conservatism in the results than previously estimated. A white paper (Mann 2000b) is attached as Appendix A to justify this statement. Recent ILAW performance estimates used on the waste form and geochemical data have resulted in increased confidence that the disposal of ILAW will meet performance objectives. The ILAW performance assessment program will continue to interact with science and technology activities, disposal facility design staff, and operations, as well as to continue to collect new waste form and disposal system data to further increase the understanding of the impacts of the disposal of ILAW. The next full performance assessment should be issued in the spring of 2001.

  13. Total system performance assessment - 1995: An evaluation of the potential Yucca Mountain repository

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atkins, J.E.; Lee, J.H.; Lingineni, S.; Mishra, S; McNeish, J.A.; Sassani, D.C.; Sevougian, S.D.

    1995-11-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is currently investigating the feasibility of permanently disposing the nation`s commercial high-level radioactive wastes (in the form of spent fuel from the over 100 electric power-generating nuclear reactors across the U.S.) and a portion of the defense high-level radioactive wastes (currently stored at federal facilities around the country) in the unsaturated tuffaceous rocks at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Quantitative predictions based on the most current understanding of the processes and parameters potentially affecting the long-term behavior of the disposal system are used to assess the ability of the site and its associated engineered designs to meet regulatory objectives of the US NRC and the US EPA. The evaluation of the ability of the overall system to meet the performance objectives specified in the applicable regulatory standards has been termed total system performance assessment (TSPA). Total system performance assessments require the explicit quantification of the relevant processes and process interactions. In addition assessments are useful to help define the most significant processes, the information gaps and uncertainties and therefore the additional information required for more robust and defensible assessment of the overall performance. The aim of any total system performance assessment is to be as complete and reasonably conservative as possible and to assure that the descriptions of the predictive models and parameters are sufficient to ascertain their accuracy. Total system performance assessments evolve with time. Previous iterations of total system performance assessment of the Yucca Mountain site and associated engineered barriers have been conducted in 1991 and 1993.

  14. Performance assessment of the PNM Prosperity electricity storage project :

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roberson, Dakota; Ellison, James F.; Bhatnagar, Dhruv; Schoenwald, David A.

    2014-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to characterize the technical performance of the PNM Prosperity electricity storage project, and to identify lessons learned that can be used to improve similar projects in the future. The PNM Prosperity electricity storage project consists of a 500 kW/350 kWh advanced lead-acid battery with integrated supercapacitor (for energy smoothing) and a 250 kW/1 MWh advanced lead-acid battery (for energy shifting), and is co-located with a 500 kW solar photovoltaic (PV) resource. The project received American Reinvestment and Recovery Act (ARRA) funding. The smoothing system is e ective in smoothing intermittent PV output. The shifting system exhibits good round-trip efficiencies, though the AC-to-AC annual average efficiency is lower than one might hope. Given the current utilization of the smoothing system, there is an opportunity to incorporate additional control algorithms in order to increase the value of the energy storage system.

  15. Paper submitted for EWEC'04, London, 2004 IPSYS A simulation tool for performance assessment and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A key factor in hybrid systems performance assessment is the ability to model the power system for easy exchange of controllers. The modelling concept and verification is presented. System performance this a new tool has been developed, IPSYS. This includes explicit modelling of the power system using a multi

  16. Quantification of Valve Stiction for Control Loop Performance Assessment Guohua Wang and liandong Wang*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Jiandong

    Quantification of Valve Stiction for Control Loop Performance Assessment Guohua Wang and liandong, Beijing, P. R. China (*Email: jiandong@pku.edu.cn) Abstract - Control valves are extensively used in the process industry and valve stiction limits the performance of control loops. This study aims

  17. Covariant energy density functionals: the assessment of global performance across the nuclear landscape

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Afanasjev, A V

    2015-01-01

    The assessment of the global performance of the state-of-the-art covariant energy density functionals and related theoretical uncertainties in the description of ground state observables has recently been performed. Based on these results, the correlations between global description of binding energies and nuclear matter properties of covariant energy density functionals have been studied in this contribution.

  18. Fusion Engineering and Design 80 (2006) 99110 Nuclear performance assessment of ARIES-AT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01

    of energy. During the course of the ARIES-AT study, we closely monitored the key nuclear parametersFusion Engineering and Design 80 (2006) 99­110 Nuclear performance assessment of ARIES-AT L.A. El compactness and the high-conversion efficiency (60%) of the LiPb/SiC blanket that is capable of performing

  19. Covariant energy density functionals: the assessment of global performance across the nuclear landscape

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. V. Afanasjev

    2015-08-22

    The assessment of the global performance of the state-of-the-art covariant energy density functionals and related theoretical uncertainties in the description of ground state observables has recently been performed. Based on these results, the correlations between global description of binding energies and nuclear matter properties of covariant energy density functionals have been studied in this contribution.

  20. Needs assessment for fire department services and resources for the Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-11-15

    This report has been developed in response to a request from the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to evaluate the need for fire department services so as to enable the Laboratory to plan effective fire protection and thereby: meet LANL`s regulatory and contractual obligations; interface with the Department of Energy (DOE) and other agencies on matters relating to fire and emergency services; and ensure appropriate protection of the community and environment. This study is an outgrowth of the 1993 Fire Department Needs Assessment (prepared for DOE) but is developed from the LANL perspective. Input has been received from cognizant and responsible representatives at LANL, DOE, Los Alamos County (LAC) and the Los Alamos Fire Department (LAFD).

  1. Hydrogeologic analyses in support of the conceptual model for the LANL Area G LLRW performance assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vold, E.L.; Birdsell, K.; Rogers, D.; Springer, E.; Krier, D.; Turin, H.J.

    1996-04-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory low level radioactive waste disposal facility at Area G is currently completing a draft of the site Performance Assessment. Results from previous field studies have estimated a range in recharge rate up to 1 cm/yr. Recent estimates of unsaturated hydraulic conductivity for each stratigraphic layer under a unit gradient assumption show a wide range in recharge rate of 10{sup {minus}4} to 1 cm/yr depending upon location. Numerical computations show that a single net infiltration rate at the mesa surface does not match the moisture profile in each stratigraphic layer simultaneously, suggesting local source or sink terms possibly due to surface connected porous regions. The best fit to field data at deeper stratigraphic layers occurs for a net infiltration of about 0.1 cm/yr. A recent detailed analysis evaluated liquid phase vertical moisture flux, based on moisture profiles in several boreholes and van Genuchten fits to the hydraulic properties for each of the stratigraphic units. Results show a near surface infiltration region averages 8m deep, below which is a dry, low moisture content, and low flux region, where liquid phase recharge averages to zero. Analysis shows this low flux region is dominated by vapor movement. Field data from tritium diffusion studies, from pressure fluctuation attenuation studies, and from comparisons of in-situ and core sample permeabilities indicate that the vapor diffusion is enhanced above that expected in the matrix and is presumably due to enhanced flow through the fractures. Below this dry region within the mesa is a moisture spike which analyses show corresponds to a moisture source. The likely physical explanation is seasonal transient infiltration through surface-connected fractures. This anomalous region is being investigated in current field studies, because it is critical in understanding the moisture flux which continues to deeper regions through the unsaturated zone.

  2. Scenarios for the Hanford immobilized Low-Activity waste (ILAW) performance assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MANN, F.M.

    1999-09-09

    The purpose of the next version of the Hanford Immobilized Low-Activity Tank Waste (ILAW) Performance Assessment (ILAW PA) is to provide an updated estimate of the long-term human health and environmental impact of the disposal of ILAW and to compare these estimates against performance objectives displayed in Tables 1,2, and 3 (Mann 1999a). Such a radiological performance assessment is required by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Orders on radioactive waste management (DOE 1988a and DOE 1999a). This document defines the scenarios that will be used for the next update of the PA that is scheduled to be issued in 2001. Since the previous performance assessment (Mann 1998) was issued, considerable additional data on waste form behavior and site-specific soil geotechnical properties have been collected. In addition, the 2001 ILAW PA will benefit from improved computer models and the experience gained from the previous performance assessment. However, the scenarios (that is, the features, events, and processes analyzed in the Performance assessment) for the next PA are very similar to the ones in the 1998 PA.

  3. Technical Approach for Determining Key Parameters Needed for Modeling the Performance of Cast Stone for the Integrated Disposal Facility Performance Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yabusaki, Steven B.; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Rockhold, Mark L.; Wang, Guohui; Westsik, Joseph H.

    2015-03-30

    Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) and its contractors at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) are conducting a development program to develop / refine the cementitious waste form for the wastes treated at the ETF and to provide the data needed to support the IDF PA. This technical approach document is intended to provide guidance to the cementitious waste form development program with respect to the waste form characterization and testing information needed to support the IDF PA. At the time of the preparation of this technical approach document, the IDF PA effort is just getting started and the approach to analyze the performance of the cementitious waste form has not been determined. Therefore, this document looks at a number of different approaches for evaluating the waste form performance and describes the testing needed to provide data for each approach. Though the approach addresses a cementitious secondary aqueous waste form, it is applicable to other waste forms such as Cast Stone for supplemental immobilization of Hanford LAW. The performance of Cast Stone as a physical and chemical barrier to the release of contaminants of concern (COCs) from solidification of Hanford liquid low activity waste (LAW) and secondary wastes processed through the Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) is of critical importance to the Hanford Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF) total system performance assessment (TSPA). The effectiveness of cementitious waste forms as a barrier to COC release is expected to evolve with time. PA modeling must therefore anticipate and address processes, properties, and conditions that alter the physical and chemical controls on COC transport in the cementitious waste forms over time. Most organizations responsible for disposal facility operation and their regulators support an iterative hierarchical safety/performance assessment approach with a general philosophy that modeling provides the critical link between the short-term understanding from laboratory and field tests, and the prediction of repository performance over repository time frames and scales. One common recommendation is that experiments be designed to permit the appropriate scaling in the models. There is a large contrast in the physical and chemical properties between the Cast Stone waste package and the IDF backfill and surrounding sediments. Cast Stone exhibits low permeability, high tortuosity, low carbonate, high pH, and low Eh whereas the backfill and native sediments have high permeability, low tortuosity, high carbonate, circumneutral pH, and high Eh. These contrasts have important implications for flow, transport, and reactions across the Cast Stone – backfill interface. Over time with transport across the interface and subsequent reactions, the sharp geochemical contrast will blur and there will be a range of spatially-distributed conditions. In general, COC mobility and transport will be sensitive to these geochemical variations, which also include physical changes in porosity and permeability from mineral reactions. Therefore, PA modeling must address processes, properties, and conditions that alter the physical and chemical controls on COC transport in the cementitious waste forms over time. Section 2 of this document reviews past Hanford PAs and SRS Saltstone PAs, which to date have mostly relied on the lumped parameter COC release conceptual models for TSPA predictions, and provides some details on the chosen values for the lumped parameters. Section 3 provides more details on the hierarchical modeling strategy and processes and mechanisms that control COC release. Section 4 summarizes and lists the key parameters for which numerical values are needed to perform PAs. Section 5 provides brief summaries of the methods used to measure the needed parameters and references to get more details.

  4. PV Derived Data for Predicting Performance; NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marion, Bill

    2015-09-14

    A method is described for providing solar irradiance data for modeling PV performance by using measured PV performance data and back-solving for the unknown direct normal irradiance (DNI) and diffuse horizontal irradiance (DHI), which can then be used to model the performance of PV systems of any size, PV array tilt, or PV array azimuth orientation. Ideally situated for using the performance data from PV modules with micro-inverters, the PV module operating current is used to determine the global tilted irradiance (GTI), and a separation model is then used to determine the DNI and DHI from the GTI.

  5. Assessment of Load and Energy Reduction Techniques (ALERT) Retrocommissioning Case Study of Two National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Sites 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luskay, L.; Haasl, T.; Schwab, J.; Beattie, D.

    2003-01-01

    are 231,924 kWh, 51,550 therms, and $28,920 annual energy savings. Implementation costs were estimated at $56,380, which would result in a 1.9 year average payback. It cost approximately $0.09 per square foot to perform the ALERT RCx assessment. Of the 33...

  6. Using after-action review based on automated performance assessment to enhance training effectiveness.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stevens-Adams, Susan Marie; Gieseler, Charles J.; Basilico, Justin Derrick; Abbott, Robert G.; Forsythe, James Chris

    2010-09-01

    Training simulators have become increasingly popular tools for instructing humans on performance in complex environments. However, the question of how to provide individualized and scenario-specific assessment and feedback to students remains largely an open question. In this work, we follow-up on previous evaluations of the Automated Expert Modeling and Automated Student Evaluation (AEMASE) system, which automatically assesses student performance based on observed examples of good and bad performance in a given domain. The current study provides a rigorous empirical evaluation of the enhanced training effectiveness achievable with this technology. In particular, we found that students given feedback via the AEMASE-based debrief tool performed significantly better than students given only instructor feedback on two out of three domain-specific performance metrics.

  7. Performance of a feasibility study for remediation of WAG 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kubarewicz, J.; Pfeffer, J. [CH2M Hill, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Garland, S.B. II [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Riddle, S.P. [USDOE Oak Ridge Field Office, TN (United States); Branscom, K.S. [Radian Corp., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1992-10-01

    This paper describes the process of preparing a feasibility study (FS) for remediation of a low-level radioactive waste (LLW) disposal site at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). ORNL conducts research and development and is one of three DOE-owned facilities on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6 is located in Melton Valley, approximately 2 miles southwest of the plant in Roane County, Tennessee. WAG 6 includes Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 6, which is still used for shallow land burial of LLW and nonradioactive materials and was the primary focus of the FS. SWSA 6 covers 68 acres, 19 of which contain wastes such as low-level radioactive liquids, solids, sludges, asbestos, and biological and associated laboratory wastes. During the first 15 years of operation, the site also received chemical wastes, but since 1986, it has been used only for LLW. Until 1986, wastes were placed in unlined trenches and auger holes, but since then, wastes have been disposed in greater confinement disposal silos, lined pipe wells and auger holes, and above-ground tumulus units. A list of the sitewide alternatives initially developed for WAG 6 remediation is presented. The alternatives combined capping, structural stabilization (dynamic compaction/grouting), waste consolidation, and groundwater collection/treatment components. In situ vitrification was also considered for areas with significant long-life source inventories.

  8. Navistar eStar Vehicle Performance Evaluation - Cumulative; Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-10-01

    The Fleet Test and Evaluation Team at the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory is evaluating and documenting the performance of electric and plug-in hybrid electric drive systems in medium duty trucks across the nation. U.S. companies participating in this evaluation project received funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act to cover part of the cost of purchasing these vehicles. Through this project, Navistar will build and deploy all-electric medium-duty trucks. The trucks will be deployed in diverse climates across the country. This cumulative report covers the project from initiation through the second quarter of 2013.

  9. Total system performance assessment - 1995: An evaluation of the potential Yucca Mountain Repository

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-11-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is currently investigating the feasibility of permanently disposing the nation`s commercial high-level radioactive wastes (in the form of spent fuel from the over 100 electric power-generating nuclear reactors across the U.S.) and a portion of the defense high-level radioactive wastes (currently stored at federal facilities around the country) in the unsaturated tuffaceous rocks at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Quantitative predictions based on the most current understanding of the processes and parameters potentially affecting the long-term behavior of the disposal system are used to assess the ability of the site and its associated engineered designs to meet regulatory objectives set forward by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The evaluation of the ability of the overall system to meet the performance objectives specified in the applicable regulatory standards has been termed total system performance assessment (TSPA). The aim of any total system performance assessment is to be as complete and reasonably conservative as possible and to assure that the descriptions of the predictive models and parameters are sufficient to ascertain their accuracy. Total system performance assessments evolve with time. As additional site and design information is generated, performance assessment analyses can be revised to become more representative of the expected conditions and remove some of the conservative assumptions necessitated by the incompleteness of site and design data. Previous iterations of total system performance assessment of the Yucca Mountain site and associated engineered barriers have been conducted in 1991 and 1993. These analyses have been documented in Barnard, Eslinger, Wilson and Andrews.

  10. National Renewable Energy Laboratory Renewable Energy Opportunity Assessment for USAID Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watson, Andrea; Bracho, Ricardo; Romero, Rachel; Mercer, Megan

    2015-11-13

    The United States Agency for International Development (USAID) Enhancing Capacity for Low Emission Development Strategies (EC-LEDS) program is designing its second phase of assistance to the Government of Mexico (GOM). In preparation for program design, USAID has asked the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to assist in identifying options for enabling renewable energy in Mexico and reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in the energy sector. The NREL team conducted a literature review and consulted with over 20 Mexican agencies and organizations during a two-week temporary duty assignment (TDY) to Mexico to identify gaps, opportunities, and program theme areas for Mexico.

  11. Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Radiological Control Performance Indicator Report - First Quarter, Calendar Year 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hinckley, F.L.

    1999-05-01

    This Performance Indicator Report is provided in accordance with Article 133 of the INEEL Radiological Control Manual. The INEEL collective occupational radiation deep dose is 63.034 person-rem year to date, compared to a goal of 83.1 person-rem. During the fourth quarter, all areas experienced deletions of work resulting from the Maintenance Stand Down. This reduction in work is a primary factor in the difference in the year end dose and the ALARA goal. The work will be completed during CY-99. Beginning in CY-98, a numeric Radiological Performance Index (RPI) is being used to compare radiological performance. The RPI takes into consideration frequency and severity of events such as skin contaminations, clothing contaminations, spills, exposures to radiation exceeding limits, and positive internal dose. The RPI measures the cost of these events in cents per hour of radiological work performed. To make the RPI meaningful, tables have been prepared to show the facility that contributes to the values used. The data are compared on a quarterly basis to the prior year to show measurable performance.

  12. Exposure assessment of Electromagnetic Fields from Wireless Computer Networks (Wi-Fi); Phase 1 Laboratory Measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haddadi, Hamed

    Exposure assessment of Electromagnetic Fields from Wireless Computer Networks (Wi-Fi); Phase 1 networks, the most popular Wi-Fi devices used in the schools were identified. The regulatory standards bisecting the screen and keyboard. The maximum electric field strength recorded at 1 m varied from 719 mVm-1

  13. Preliminary performance assessment for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, December 1992. Volume 5, Uncertainty and sensitivity analyses of gas and brine migration for undisturbed performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-08-01

    Before disposing of transuranic radioactive waste in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), the United States Department of Energy (DOE) must evaluate compliance with applicable long-term regulations of the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Sandia National Laboratories is conducting iterative performance assessments (PAs) of the WIPP for the DOE to provide interim guidance while preparing for a final compliance evaluation. This volume of the 1992 PA contains results of uncertainty and sensitivity analyses with respect to migration of gas and brine from the undisturbed repository. Additional information about the 1992 PA is provided in other volumes. Volume 1 contains an overview of WIPP PA and results of a preliminary comparison with 40 CFR 191, Subpart B. Volume 2 describes the technical basis for the performance assessment, including descriptions of the linked computational models used in the Monte Carlo analyses. Volume 3 contains the reference data base and values for input parameters used in consequence and probability modeling. Volume 4 contains uncertainty and sensitivity analyses with respect to the EPA`s Environmental Standards for the Management and Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel, High-Level and Transuranic Radioactive Wastes (40 CFR 191, Subpart B). Finally, guidance derived from the entire 1992 PA is presented in Volume 6. Results of the 1992 uncertainty and sensitivity analyses indicate that, conditional on the modeling assumptions and the assigned parameter-value distributions, the most important parameters for which uncertainty has the potential to affect gas and brine migration from the undisturbed repository are: initial liquid saturation in the waste, anhydrite permeability, biodegradation-reaction stoichiometry, gas-generation rates for both corrosion and biodegradation under inundated conditions, and the permeability of the long-term shaft seal.

  14. Performance assessment for a hypothetical low-level waste disposal facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, C.S.; Rohe, M.J.; Ritter, P.D.

    1997-01-01

    Disposing of low-level waste (LLW) is a concern for many states throughout the United States. A common disposal method is below-grade concrete vaults. Performance assessment analyses make predictions of contaminant release, transport, ingestion, inhalation, or other routes of exposure, and the resulting doses for various disposal methods such as the below-grade concrete vaults. Numerous assumptions are required to simplify the processes associated with the disposal facility to make predictions feasible. In general, these assumptions are made conservatively so as to underestimate the performance of the facility. The objective of this report is to describe the methodology used in conducting a performance assessment for a hypothetical waste facility located in the northeastern United States using real data as much as possible. This report consists of the following: (a) a description of the disposal facility and site, (b) methods used to analyze performance of the facility, (c) the results of the analysis, and (d) the conclusions of this study.

  15. Performance assessment for continuing and future operations at Solid Waste Storage Area 6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    This radiological performance assessment for the continued disposal operations at Solid Waste Storage Area 6 (SWSA 6) on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) has been prepared to demonstrate compliance with the requirements of the US DOE. The analysis of SWSA 6 required the use of assumptions to supplement the available site data when the available data were incomplete for the purpose of analysis. Results indicate that SWSA 6 does not presently meet the performance objectives of DOE Order 5820.2A. Changes in operations and continued work on the performance assessment are expected to demonstrate compliance with the performance objectives for continuing operations at the Interim Waste Management Facility (IWMF). All other disposal operations in SWSA 6 are to be discontinued as of January 1, 1994. The disposal units at which disposal operations are discontinued will be subject to CERCLA remediation, which will result in acceptable protection of the public health and safety.

  16. Differences in span task performance recorded in a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) simulator compared to a standard laboratory condition 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harcourt-Brown, Sally

    2006-01-01

    Forty-eight participants completed a working memory span task in a functional magnetic imaging (fMRI) simulator and laboratory. Differences in performance between the two conditions were investigated. The trends in the ...

  17. Performance assessment for continuing and future operations at solid waste storage area 6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-09-01

    This revised performance assessment (PA) for the continued disposal operations at Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 6 on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) has been prepared to demonstrate compliance with the performance objectives for low-level radioactive waste (LLW) disposal contained in the US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5820.2A. This revised PA considers disposal operations conducted from September 26, 1988, through the projects lifetime of the disposal facility.

  18. Process for selecting NEAMS applications for access to Idaho National Laboratory high performance computing resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael Pernice

    2010-09-01

    INL has agreed to provide participants in the Nuclear Energy Advanced Mod- eling and Simulation (NEAMS) program with access to its high performance computing (HPC) resources under sponsorship of the Enabling Computational Technologies (ECT) program element. This report documents the process used to select applications and the software stack in place at INL.

  19. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Corrective Action Plan in response to Tiger Team assessment. Volume 2, Revision 5

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuliasha, Michael A.

    1991-08-23

    This report presents a complete response to the Tiger Team assessment that was conducted to Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Operations Office (ORO) from October 2, 1990, through November 30, 1990. The action plans have undergone both a discipline review and a cross-cutting review with respect to root cause. In addition, the action plans have been integrated with initiatives being pursued across Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., in response to Tiger Team findings at other DOE facilities operated by Energy Systems. The root cause section is complete and describes how ORNL intends to address the root cause of the findings identified during the assessment. This report is concerned with reactors safety and health findings, responses, and planned actions. Specific areas include: organization and administration; quality verification; operations; maintenance; training and certification; auxiliary systems; emergency preparedness; technical support; nuclear criticality safety; security/safety interface; experimental activities; site/facility safety review; radiological protection; personnel protection; fire protection; management findings, responses, and planned actions; self-assessment findings, responses, and planned actions; and summary of planned actions, schedules, and costs.

  20. Idaho National Engineering Laboratory code assessment of the Rocky Flats transuranic waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-07-01

    This report is an assessment of the content codes associated with transuranic waste shipped from the Rocky Flats Plant in Golden, Colorado, to INEL. The primary objective of this document is to characterize and describe the transuranic wastes shipped to INEL from Rocky Flats by item description code (IDC). This information will aid INEL in determining if the waste meets the waste acceptance criteria (WAC) of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The waste covered by this content code assessment was shipped from Rocky Flats between 1985 and 1989. These years coincide with the dates for information available in the Rocky Flats Solid Waste Information Management System (SWIMS). The majority of waste shipped during this time was certified to the existing WIPP WAC. This waste is referred to as precertified waste. Reassessment of these precertified waste containers is necessary because of changes in the WIPP WAC. To accomplish this assessment, the analytical and process knowledge available on the various IDCs used at Rocky Flats were evaluated. Rocky Flats sources for this information include employee interviews, SWIMS, Transuranic Waste Certification Program, Transuranic Waste Inspection Procedure, Backlog Waste Baseline Books, WIPP Experimental Waste Characterization Program (headspace analysis), and other related documents, procedures, and programs. Summaries are provided of: (a) certification information, (b) waste description, (c) generation source, (d) recovery method, (e) waste packaging and handling information, (f) container preparation information, (g) assay information, (h) inspection information, (i) analytical data, and (j) RCRA characterization.

  1. Options assessment report: Treatment of nitrate salt waste at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robinson, Bruce Alan; Stevens, Patrice Ann

    2015-09-16

    This report documents the methodology used to select a method of treatment for the remediated nitrate salt (RNS) and unremediated nitrate salt (UNS) waste containers at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The method selected should treat the containerized waste in a manner that renders the waste safe and suitable for transport and final disposal in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) repository, under specifications listed in the WIPP Waste Acceptance Criteria (DOE/CBFO, 2013). LANL recognized that the results must be thoroughly vetted with the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) and the a modification to the LANL Hazardous Waste Facility Permit is a necessary step before implementation of this or any treatment option. Likewise, facility readiness and safety basis approvals must be received from the Department of Energy (DOE). This report presents LANL's preferred option, and the documentation of the process for reaching the recommended treatment option for RNS and UNS waste, and is presented for consideration by NMED and DOE.

  2. Assessing Data Deduplication Trade-offs from an Energy and Performance Perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Butt, Ali R.

    Assessing Data Deduplication Trade-offs from an Energy and Performance Perspective Lauro Beltr systems. This paper evaluates the energy trade-offs brought by data dedupli- cation in distributed storage. From an energy perspective, data deduplication enables a trade-off between the energy consumed

  3. Towards Smart Grids: Performing Case studies with a Risk-based Security Assessment Methodology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vuik, Kees

    Towards Smart Grids: Performing Case studies with a Risk- based Security Assessment Methodology grid operation in the future, additional measures are needed to stabilise the electrical power system. One may think of: · inclusion of "smart components", such as phase-shifting transformers (PSTs

  4. RAE 2001 -UoA66 Drama, Dance and Performing Arts -Overview Report 1. Research assessed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abrahams, I. David

    rise in quality. The submissions overall demonstrated an impressive diversity of types of research1 RAE 2001 - UoA66 Drama, Dance and Performing Arts - Overview Report 1. Research assessed colleges offering degree courses. The largest department submitted over forty researchers, the smallest sub

  5. A Framework for Reliability and Performance Assessment of Wind Energy Conversion Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liberzon, Daniel

    penetration of wind-based generation. According to the U.S. Department of Energy, achieving 20% of wind power hinder the widespread penetration of wind-based power generation [2]. These are i) the impact of wind1 A Framework for Reliability and Performance Assessment of Wind Energy Conversion Systems

  6. Performance assessment for continuing and future operations at solid waste storage area 6. Appendices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-09-01

    This appendix provides the radionuclide inventory data used for the Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 6 Performance Assessment (PA). The uncertainties in the radionuclide inventory data are also provided, along with the descriptions of the methods used to estimate the uncertainties.

  7. 2005-01-1396 Design under Uncertainty and Assessment of Performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Papalambros, Panos

    . INTRODUCTION Improving the fuel efficiency of medium-sized trucks (Class 6) has significant dual1 2005-01-1396 Design under Uncertainty and Assessment of Performance Reliability of a Dual-Use Medium Truck with Hydraulic-Hybrid Powertrain and Fuel Cell Auxiliary Power Unit Michael Kokkolaras1

  8. A Bi-Criteria Measure to Assess Supply Chain Network Performance for Critical Needs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagurney, Anna

    needs may be defined as those products and supplies that are essential to hu- man health and lifeA Bi-Criteria Measure to Assess Supply Chain Network Performance for Critical Needs Under Capacity and Demand Disruptions Qiang Qiang Management Division Pennsylvania State University Great Valley School

  9. Scenarios for the Hanford Immobilized Low-Activity Waste (ILAW) performance assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MANN, F.M.

    1999-03-17

    Scenarios describing representative exposure cases associated with the disposal of low activity waste from the Hanford Waste Tanks have been defined. These scenarios are based on guidance from the Department of Energy, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, and previous Hanford waste disposal performance assessments.

  10. Initial demonstration of the NRC`s capability to conduct a performance assessment for a High-Level Waste Repository

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Codell, R.; Eisenberg, N.; Fehringer, D.; Ford, W.; Margulies, T.; McCartin, T.; Park, J.; Randall, J.

    1992-05-01

    In order to better review licensing submittals for a High-Level Waste Repository, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission staff has expanded and improved its capability to conduct performance assessments. This report documents an initial demonstration of this capability. The demonstration made use of the limited data from Yucca Mountain, Nevada to investigate a small set of scenario classes. Models of release and transport of radionuclides from a repository via the groundwater and direct release pathways provided preliminary estimates of releases to the accessible environment for a 10,000 year simulation time. Latin hypercube sampling of input parameters was used to express results as distributions and to investigate model sensitivities. This methodology demonstration should not be interpreted as an estimate of performance of the proposed repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. By expanding and developing the NRC staff capability to conduct such analyses, NRC would be better able to conduct an independent technical review of the US Department of Energy (DOE) licensing submittals for a high-level waste (HLW) repository. These activities were divided initially into Phase 1 and Phase 2 activities. Additional phases may follow as part of a program of iterative performance assessment at the NRC. The NRC staff conducted Phase 1 activities primarily in CY 1989 with minimal participation from NRC contractors. The Phase 2 activities were to involve NRC contractors actively and to provide for the transfer of technology. The Phase 2 activities are scheduled to start in CY 1990, to allow Sandia National Laboratories to complete development and transfer of computer codes and the Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses (CNWRA) to be in a position to assist in the acquisition of the codes.

  11. FY09 recycling opportunity assessment for Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCord, Samuel Adam

    2010-07-01

    This Recycling Opportunity Assessment (ROA) is a revision and expansion of the FY04 ROA. The original 16 materials are updated through FY08, and then 56 material streams are examined through FY09 with action items for ongoing improvement listed for most. In addition to expanding the list of solid waste materials examined, two new sections have been added to cover hazardous waste materials. Appendices include energy equivalencies of materials recycled, trends and recycle data, and summary tables of high, medium, and low priority action items.

  12. Review of the Consequence Assessment Proram at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, April 2012

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i nAandSummary From: v2.7|Energy ResponseCall:BeyondConsequence Assessment

  13. Performance Assessment and Recommendations for Rejuvenation of a Permeable Reactive Barrier: Cotter Corporation’s Cañon City, Colorado, Uranium Mill

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Performance Assessment and Recommendations for Rejuvenation of a Permeable Reactive Barrier: Cotter Corporation’s Canon City, Colorado, Uranium Mill (April 2005)

  14. Options Assessment Report: Treatment of Nitrate Salt Waste at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robinson, Bruce Alan; Stevens, Patrice Ann

    2015-12-17

    This report documents the methodology used to select a method of treatment for the remediated nitrate salt (RNS) and unremediated nitrate salt (UNS) waste containers at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The method selected should treat the containerized waste in a manner that renders the waste safe and suitable for transport and final disposal in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) repository, under specifications listed in the WIPP Waste Acceptance Criteria (DOE/CBFO, 2013). LANL recognizes that the results must be thoroughly vetted with the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) and that a modification to the LANL Hazardous Waste Facility Permit is a necessary step before implementation of this or any treatment option. Likewise, facility readiness and safety basis approvals must be received from the Department of Energy (DOE). This report presents LANL’s preferred option, and the documentation of the process for reaching the recommended treatment option for RNS and UNS waste, and is presented for consideration by NMED and DOE.

  15. Environmental assessment for effluent reduction, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-09-11

    The Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to eliminate industrial effluent from 27 outfalls at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The Proposed Action includes both simple and extensive plumbing modifications, which would result in the elimination of industrial effluent being released to the environment through 27 outfalls. The industrial effluent currently going to about half of the 27 outfalls under consideration would be rerouted to LANL`s sanitary sewer system. Industrial effluent from other outfalls would be eliminated by replacing once-through cooling water systems with recirculation systems, or, in a few instances, operational changes would result in no generation of industrial effluent. After the industrial effluents have been discontinued, the affected outfalls would be removed from the NPDES Permit. The pipes from the source building or structure to the discharge point for the outfalls may be plugged, or excavated and removed. Other outfalls would remain intact and would continue to discharge stormwater. The No Action alternative, which would maintain the status quo for LANL`s outfalls, was also analyzed. An alternative in which industrial effluent would be treated at the source facilities was considered but dismissed from further analysis because it would not reasonably meet the DOE`s purpose for action, and its potential environmental effects were bounded by the analysis of the Proposed Action and the No Action alternatives.

  16. ANNUAL SUMMARY OF THE INTEGRATED DISPOSAL FACILITY PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT FOR 2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MANN, F M

    2005-02-09

    As required by the US. Department of Energy (DOE) order on radioactive waste management (DOE 1999a) and as implemented by the ''Maintenance Plan for the Hanford Immobilized Low-Activity Tank Waste Performance Assessment'' (Mann 2004), an annual summary of the adequacy of the Hanford Immobilized Low-Activity Tank Waste Performance Assessment (ILAW PA) is necessary in each year in which a performance assessment is not issued. A draft version of the 2001 ILAW PA was sent to the DOE Headquarters (DOE/HQ) in April 2001 for review and approval. The DOE approved (DOE 2001) the draft version of the 2001 ILAW PA and issued a new version of the Hanford Site waste disposal authorization statement (DAS). Based on comments raised during the review, the draft version was revised and the 2001 ILAW PA was formally issued (Mann et al. 2001). The DOE (DOE 2003a) has reviewed the final 2001 ILAW PA and concluded that no changes to the DAS were necessary. Also as required by the DOE order, annual summaries have been generated and approved. The previous annual summary (Mann 2003b) noted the change of mission from ILAW disposal to the disposal of a range of solid waste types, including ILAW. DOE approved the annual summary (DOE 2003c), noting the expanded mission. Considering the results of data collection and analysis, the conclusions of the 2001 ILAW PA remain valid as they pertain to ILAW disposal. The new data also suggest that impacts from the disposal of the other solid waste will be lower than initially estimated in the ''Integrated Disposal Facility Risk Assessment'' (Mann 2003a). A performance assessment for the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF) will be issued in the summer of 2005.

  17. Laboratory Report on Performance Evaluation of Key Constituents during Pre-Treatment of High Level Waste Direct Feed

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huber, Heinz J.

    2013-06-24

    The analytical capabilities of the 222-S Laboratory are tested against the requirements for an optional start up scenario of the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant on the Hanford Site. In this case, washed and in-tank leached sludge would be sent directly to the High Level Melter, bypassing Pretreatment. The sludge samples would need to be analyzed for certain key constituents in terms identifying melter-related issues and adjustment needs. The analyses on original tank waste as well as on washed and leached material were performed using five sludge samples from tanks 241-AY-102, 241-AZ-102, 241-AN-106, 241-AW-105, and 241-SY-102. Additionally, solid phase characterization was applied to determine the changes in mineralogy throughout the pre-treatment steps.

  18. Historical Background on Assessment the Performance of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rechard, R.P.

    1999-06-01

    In 1979, six years after selecting the Delaware Basin as a potential disposal area, Congress authorized the US Department of Energy to build the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, New Mexico, as a research and development facility for the safe management, storage, and disposal of waste contaminated with transuranic radioisotopes. In 1998, 19 years after authorization and 25 years after site selection, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) certified that the WIPP disposal system complied with its regulations. The EPA's decision was primarily based on the results from a performance assessment conducted in 1996. This performance assessment was the culmination of four preliminary performance assessments conducted between 1989 and 1992. This report provides a historical setting and context for how the performance of the deep geologic repository at the WIPP was analyzed. Also included is background on political forces acting on the project. For example, the federal requirement to provide environmental impact statements and negotiated agreements with the State of New Mexico influenced the type of scientific areas that were investigated and the engineering analysis prior to 1989 for the WIPP.

  19. Environmental Assessment for the proposed Induction Linac System Experiments in Building 51B at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-08-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA), (DOE/EA-1087) evaluating the proposed action to modify existing Building 51B at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) to install and conduct experiments on a new Induction Linear Accelerator System. LBNL is located in Berkeley, California and operated by the University of California (UC). The project consists of placing a pre-fabricated building inside Building 51B to house a new 10 MeV heavy ion linear accelerator. A control room and other support areas would be provided within and directly adjacent to Building 51B. The accelerator system would be used to conduct tests, at reduced scale and cost, many features of a heavy-ion accelerator driver for the Department of Energy`s inertial fusion energy program. Based upon information and analyses in the EA, the DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969. Therefore, an Environmental Impact Statement is not required. This report contains the Environmental Assessment, as well as the Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

  20. Management Challenges in Developing Performance Assessments and Effectively Communicating Their Results - 13612

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, Steve; Mahoney, Mark [Savannah River Remediations LLC, Building 705-1C, Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)] [Savannah River Remediations LLC, Building 705-1C, Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    The end of the Cold War has left a legacy of approximately 37 million gallons of radioactive waste in the aging waste tanks at the Department of Energy's Savannah River Site (SRS). A robust program is in place to remove waste from these tanks, treat the waste to separate into a relatively small volume of high level waste and a large volume of low-level waste, and to actively dispose of the low-level waste on-site and close the cleaned waste tanks and associated ancillary structures. To support performance-based, risk-informed decision making, performance assessments have been developed for the low-level waste disposal facility and for the SRS Tank Farms. Although these performance assessments share many similar features, the nature of the hazards and associated containments differ. As a management team, we are challenged to effectively communicate both the similarities and differences of these performance assessments, how they should be used to support sound decision making for treatment, disposal and waste tank cleaning decisions, and in defending their respective assumptions to the regulatory community and the public but, equally important, to our own corporate decision makers and operations personnel. Effective development and defense of these performance assessments, and effective interpretation and communication of the results are key to making cost-effective, pragmatic decisions for the safe disposal of the low-level waste and stabilization and operational closure of the cleaned tanks and associated structures. This paper will focus on the importance and challenges in communicating key attributes, conclusions and operational implications within a company. (authors)

  1. Optical Characterization Laboratory (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-10-01

    This fact sheet describes the purpose, lab specifications, applications scenarios, and information on how to partner with NREL's Optical Characterization Laboratory at the Energy Systems Integration Facility. The Optical Characterization Laboratory at NREL's Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF) conducts optical characterization of large solar concentration devices. Concentration solar power (CSP) mirror panels and concentrating solar systems are tested with an emphasis is on measurement of parabolic trough mirror panels. The Optical Characterization Laboratory provides state-of-the-art characterization and testing capabilities for assessing the optical surface quality and optical performance for various CSP technologies including parabolic troughs, linear Fresnel, dishes, and heliostats.

  2. Summary of Conceptual Models and Data Needs to Support the INL Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility Performance Assessment and Composite Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A. Jeff Sondrup; Annette L. Schafter; Arthur S. Rood

    2010-09-01

    An overview of the technical approach and data required to support development of the performance assessment, and composite analysis are presented for the remote handled low-level waste disposal facility on-site alternative being considered at Idaho National Laboratory. Previous analyses and available data that meet requirements are identified and discussed. Outstanding data and analysis needs are also identified and summarized. The on-site disposal facility is being evaluated in anticipation of the closure of the Radioactive Waste Management Complex at the INL. An assessment of facility performance and of the composite performance are required to meet the Department of Energy’s Low-Level Waste requirements (DOE Order 435.1, 2001) which stipulate that operation and closure of the disposal facility will be managed in a manner that is protective of worker and public health and safety, and the environment. The corresponding established procedures to ensure these protections are contained in DOE Manual 435.1-1, Radioactive Waste Management Manual (DOE M 435.1-1 2001). Requirements include assessment of (1) all-exposure pathways, (2) air pathway, (3) radon, and (4) groundwater pathway doses. Doses are computed from radionuclide concentrations in the environment. The performance assessment and composite analysis are being prepared to assess compliance with performance objectives and to establish limits on concentrations and inventories of radionuclides at the facility and to support specification of design, construction, operation and closure requirements. Technical objectives of the PA and CA are primarily accomplished through the development of an establish inventory, and through the use of predictive environmental transport models implementing an overarching conceptual framework. This document reviews the conceptual model, inherent assumptions, and data required to implement the conceptual model in a numerical framework. Available site-specific data and data sources are then addressed. Differences in required analyses and data are captured as outstanding data needs.

  3. Systematic variations in strip-out factors used in the assessment of plutonium and americium lung burdens at Los Alamos National Laboratory 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Myers, Steven Charles

    1992-01-01

    in partial fulfillment of the requirements fo the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1992 Major Subject: Health Physics SYSTEMATIC VARIATIONS IN STRIP-OUT FACTORS USED IN THE ASSESSMENT OF PLUTONIUM AND AMERICIUM LUNG BURDENS AT LOS ALAMOS NATIONAL... Variations in Strip-Out Factors Used in the Assessment of Plutonium and Americium Lung Burdens at Los Alamos National Laboratory. (December 1992) Steven Charles Myers, B. A. , State University of New York College at Buffalo; M. Ed. , State University...

  4. Life-Cycle Assessment of Highway Pavement Alternatives in Aspects of Economic, Environmental, and Social Performance 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mao, Zhuting

    2012-10-19

    Life Cycle Assessment LTPP Long-Term Pavement Performance NEPA National Environmental Policy Act NSF National Science Foundation PCC Portland Cement Concrete POTW Publicly Owned Treatment Works RCRA Resource Conservation and Recovery Act... Damnjanovic, for their guidance and support throughout the course of this research. Thanks also to my friends and colleagues and the department faculty and staff for making my time at Texas A&M University a great experience. Finally, thanks to my mother...

  5. Performance Assessment Modeling and Sensitivity Analyses of Generic Disposal System Concepts.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sevougian, S. David; Freeze, Geoffrey A.; Gardner, William Payton; Hammond, Glenn Edward; Mariner, Paul

    2014-09-01

    directly, rather than through simplified abstractions. It also a llows for complex representations of the source term, e.g., the explicit representation of many individual waste packages (i.e., meter - scale detail of an entire waste emplacement drift). This report fulfills the Generic Disposal System Analysis Work Packa ge Level 3 Milestone - Performance Assessment Modeling and Sensitivity Analyses of Generic Disposal System Concepts (M 3 FT - 1 4 SN08080 3 2 ).

  6. Compilation of Quality Assurance Documentation for Analyses Performed for the Resumption of Transient Testing Environmental Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Annette L. Schafer; A. Jeffrey Sondrup

    2013-11-01

    This is a companion document to the analyses performed in support of the environmental assessment for the Resumption of Transient Fuels and Materials Testing. It is provided to allow transparency of the supporting calculations. It provides computer code input and output. The basis for the calculations is documented separately in INL (2013) and is referenced, as appropriate. Spreadsheets used to manipulate the code output are not provided.

  7. A CONCEPT TO ASSESS THE PERFORMANCE OF A PERMAFROST MODEL RUN FULLY COUPLED WITH A CLIMATE MODEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moelders, Nicole

    A CONCEPT TO ASSESS THE PERFORMANCE OF A PERMAFROST MODEL RUN FULLY COUPLED WITH A CLIMATE MODEL APPROVED: Dean, College of Natural Science and Mathematics Dean of the Graduate School Date #12;A CONCEPT TO ASSESS THE PERFORMANCE OF A PERMAFROST MODEL RUN FULLY COUPLED WITH A CLIMATE MODEL A DISSERTATION

  8. Approved Module Information for BHM347, 2014/5 Module Title/Name: Assessment Performance & Reward Module Code: BHM347

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neirotti, Juan Pablo

    Approved Module Information for BHM347, 2014/5 Module Title/Name: Assessment Performance & Reward Module Code: BHM347 School: Aston Business School Module Type: Standard Module New Module? No Module Practitioners: Recruitment and Selection (including Selection Assessment) Performance Measurement Management

  9. Assessing the Costs and Benefits of the Superior Energy Performance Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Therkelsen, Peter; McKane, Aimee; Sabouini, Ridah; Evans, Tracy

    2013-07-01

    Industrial companies are seeking to manage energy consumption and costs, mitigate risks associated with energy, and introduce transparency into reports of their energy performance achievements. Forty industrial facilities are participating in the U.S. DOE supported Superior Energy Performance (SEP) program in which facilities implement an energy management system based on the ISO 50001 standard, and pursue third-party verification of their energy performance improvements. SEP certification provides industrial facilities recognition for implementing a consistent, rigorous, internationally recognized business process for continually improving energy performance and achievement of established energy performance improvement targets. This paper focuses on the business value of SEP and ISO 50001, providing an assessment of the costs and benefits associated with SEP implementation at nine SEP-certified facilities across a variety of industrial sectors. These cost-benefit analyses are part of the U.S. DOE?s contribution to the Global Superior Energy Performance (GSEP) partnership, a multi-country effort to demonstrate, using facility data, that energy management system implementation enables companies to improve their energy performance with a greater return on investment than business-as-usual (BAU) activity. To examine the business value of SEP certification, interviews were conducted with SEP-certified facilities. The costs of implementing the SEP program, including internal facility staff time, are described and a marginal payback of SEP certification has been determined. Additionally, more qualitative factors with regard to the business value and challenges related to SEP and ISO 50001 implementation are summarized.

  10. Assessment and accountability: factors that influence the participation and performance of students with an emotional disturbance on a statewide accountability assessment in math 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harvey, Kimberly Temple

    2009-05-15

    Disturbance (ED) who experience poor school outcomes. This study examined the participation and performance of students with ED on a regular statewide accountability assessment in math and examined the relationship between student and school level factors...

  11. Environmental Assessment for the High Explosives Wastewater Treatment Facility, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-08-03

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has identified a need to improve the management of wastewater resulting from high explosives (HE) research and development work at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). LANL`s current methods off managing HE-contaminated wastewater cannot ensure that discharged HE wastewater would consistently meet the Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) standards for wastewater discharge. The DOE needs to enhance He wastewater management to e able to meet both present and future regulatory standards for wastewater discharge. The DOE also proposes to incorporate major pollution prevention and waste reduction features into LANL`s existing HE production facilities. Currently, wastewater from HE processing buildings at four Technical Areas (TAs) accumulates in sumps where particulate HE settles out and barium is precipitated. Wastewater is then released from the sumps to the environment at 15 permitted outfalls without treatment. The released water may contain suspended and dissolved contaminants, such as HE and solvents. This Environmental Assessment (EA) analyzes two alternatives, the Proposed Action and the Alternative Action, that would meet the purpose and need for agency action. Both alternatives would treat all HE process wastewater using sand filters to remove HE particulates and activated carbon to adsorb organic solvents and dissolved HE. Under either alternative, LANL would burn solvents and flash dried HE particulates and spent carbon following well-established procedures. Burning would produce secondary waste that would be stored, treated, and disposed of at TA-54, Area J. This report contains the Environmental Assessment, as well as the Finding of No Significant Impact and Floodplain Statement of Findings for the High Explosives Wastewater Treatment Facility.

  12. Probabilistic structural seismic performance assessment methodology and application to an actual bridge-foundation -ground system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Yuyi

    2006-01-01

    methods for seismic safety assessments of nuclear powerthe context of seismic safety assessments of nuclear power

  13. Performance Evaluation of Lower-Energy Energy Storage Alternatives for Full-Hybrid Vehicles; NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gonder, J.; Cosgrove, J.; Pesaran, A.

    2014-02-11

    Automakers have been mass producing hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) for well over a decade, and the technology has proven to be very effective at reducing per-vehicle fuel use. However, the incremental cost of HEVs such as the Toyota Prius or Ford Fusion Hybrid remains several thousand dollars higher than the cost of comparable conventional vehicles, which has limited HEV market penetration. The b b b b battery energy storage device is typically the component with the greatest contribution toward this cost increment, so significant cost reductions/performance improvements to the energy storage system (ESS) can correspondingly improve the vehicle-level cost/benefit relationship. Such an improvement would in turn lead to larger HEV market penetration and greater aggregate fuel savings. The United States Advanced Battery Consortium (USABC) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Energy Storage Program managers asked the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to collaborate with a USABC Workgroup and analyze the trade-offs between vehicle fuel economy and reducing the decade-old minimum energy requirement for power-assist HEVs. NREL’s analysis showed that significant fuel savings could still be delivered from an ESS with much lower energy storage than the previous targets, which prompted USABC to issue a new set of lower-energy ESS (LEESS) targets that could be satisfied by a variety of technologies. With support from DOE, NREL has developed an HEV test platform for in-vehicle performance and fuel economy validation testing of the hybrid system using such LEESS devices. This presentation describes development of the vehicle test platform, and laboratory as well as in-vehicle evaluation results with alternate energy storage configurations as compared to the production battery system. The alternate energy storage technologies considered include lithium-ion capacitors -- i.e., asymmetric electrochemical energy storage devices possessing one electrode with battery-type characteristics (lithiated graphite) and one with ultracapacitor-type characteristics (carbon) -- and electrochemical double-layer capacitors.

  14. Guidebook for performance assessment parameters used in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant compliance certification application. Volume 2: Appendices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howarth, S.M.; Martell, M.A.; Weiner, R.; Lattier, C.

    1998-06-01

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Compliance Certification Application (CCA) Performance Assessment (PA) Parameter Database and its ties to supporting information evolved over the course of two years. When the CCA was submitted to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in October 1996, information such as identification of parameter value or distribution source was documented using processes established by Sandia National Laboratories WIPP Quality Assurance Procedures. Reviewers later requested additional supporting documentation, links to supporting information, and/or clarification for many parameters. This guidebook is designed to document a pathway through the complex parameter process and help delineate flow paths to supporting information for all WIPP CCA parameters. In addition, this report is an aid for understanding how model parameters used in the WIPP CCA were developed and qualified. To trace the source information for a particular parameter, a dual-route system was established. The first route uses information from the Parameter Records package as it existed when the CCA calculations were run. The second route leads from the EPA Parameter Database to additional supporting information.

  15. Technology Performance Exchange

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2015-09-01

    To address the need for accessible, high-quality data, the Department of Energy has developed the Technology Performance Exchange (TPEx). TPEx enables technology suppliers, third-party testing laboratories, and other entities to share product performance data. These data are automatically transformed into a format that technology evaluators can easily use in their energy modeling assessments to inform procurement decisions.

  16. Modeling and Quantification of Team Performance in Human Reliability Analysis for Probabilistic Risk Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeffrey C. JOe; Ronald L. Boring

    2014-06-01

    Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) and Human Reliability Assessment (HRA) are important technical contributors to the United States (U.S.) Nuclear Regulatory Commission’s (NRC) risk-informed and performance based approach to regulating U.S. commercial nuclear activities. Furthermore, all currently operating commercial NPPs in the U.S. are required by federal regulation to be staffed with crews of operators. Yet, aspects of team performance are underspecified in most HRA methods that are widely used in the nuclear industry. There are a variety of "emergent" team cognition and teamwork errors (e.g., communication errors) that are 1) distinct from individual human errors, and 2) important to understand from a PRA perspective. The lack of robust models or quantification of team performance is an issue that affects the accuracy and validity of HRA methods and models, leading to significant uncertainty in estimating HEPs. This paper describes research that has the objective to model and quantify team dynamics and teamwork within NPP control room crews for risk informed applications, thereby improving the technical basis of HRA, which improves the risk-informed approach the NRC uses to regulate the U.S. commercial nuclear industry.

  17. Analysis report for WIPP colloid model constraints and performance assessment parameters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mariner, Paul E.; Sassani, David Carl

    2014-03-01

    An analysis of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) colloid model constraints and parameter values was performed. The focus of this work was primarily on intrinsic colloids, mineral fragment colloids, and humic substance colloids, with a lesser focus on microbial colloids. Comments by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) concerning intrinsic Th(IV) colloids and Mg-Cl-OH mineral fragment colloids were addressed in detail, assumptions and data used to constrain colloid model calculations were evaluated, and inconsistencies between data and model parameter values were identified. This work resulted in a list of specific conclusions regarding model integrity, model conservatism, and opportunities for improvement related to each of the four colloid types included in the WIPP performance assessment.

  18. Incorporating long-term climate change in performance assessment for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swift, P.N. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Baker, B.L. [Technadyne Engineering Consultants, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Economy, K. [Ecodynamics Research Associates, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Garner, J.W. [Applied Physics, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Helton, J.C. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); Rudeen, D.K. [New Mexico Engineering Research Institute, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1994-03-01

    The United States Department of Energy (DOE) is developing the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in southeastern New Mexico for the disposal of transuranic wastes generated by defense programs. Applicable regulations (40 CFR 191) require the DOE to evaluate disposal-system performance for 10,000 yr. Climatic changes may affect performance by altering groundwater flow. Paleoclimatic data from southeastern New Mexico and the surrounding area indicate that the wettest and coolest Quaternary climate at the site can be represented by that at the last glacial maximum, when mean annual precipitation was approximately twice that of the present. The hottest and driest climates have been similar to that of the present. The regularity of global glacial cycles during the late Pleistocene confirms that the climate of the last glacial maximum is suitable for use as a cooler and wetter bound for variability during the next 10,000 yr. Climate variability is incorporated into groundwater-flow modeling for WIPP PA by causing hydraulic head in a portion of the model-domain boundary to rise to the ground surface with hypothetical increases in precipitation during the next 10,000 yr. Variability in modeled disposal-system performance introduced by allowing had values to vary over this range is insignificant compared to variability resulting from other causes, including incomplete understanding of transport processes. Preliminary performance assessments suggest that climate variability will not affect regulatory compliance.

  19. AN ASSESSMENT OF THE BRAYTON CYCLE FOR HIGH PERFORMANCE POWER PLANTS R. Schleicher A. R. Raffray C. P. Wong

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    AN ASSESSMENT OF THE BRAYTON CYCLE FOR HIGH PERFORMANCE POWER PLANTS R. Schleicher A. R. Raffray C and the risk associated with oil lubricated bearings. 2 Interest in nuclear CCGTs was revived in the 1990s

  20. Performance Evaluation of HYCOM-GOM for Hydrokinetic Resource Assessment in the Florida Strait

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neary, Vincent S; Gunawan, Budi; Ryou, Albert S

    2012-06-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DoE) is assessing and mapping the potential off-shore ocean current hydrokinetic energy resources along the U.S. coastline, excluding tidal currents, to facilitate market penetration of water power technologies. This resource assessment includes information on the temporal and three-dimensional spatial distribution of the daily averaged power density, and the overall theoretical hydrokinetic energy production, based on modeled historical simulations spanning a 7-year period of record using HYCOM-GOM, an ocean current observation assimilation model that generates a spatially distributed three-dimensional representation of daily averaged horizontal current magnitude and direction time series from which power density time series and their statistics can be derived. This study ascertains the deviation of HYCOM-GOM outputs, including transport (flow) and power density, from outputs based on three independent observation sources to evaluate HYCOM-GOM performance. The three independent data sources include NOAA s submarine cable data of transport, ADCP data at a high power density location, and HF radar data in the high power density region of the Florida Strait. Comparisons with these three independent observation sets indicate discrepancies with HYCOM model outputs, but overall indicate that the HYCOM-GOM model can provide an adequate assessment of the ocean current hydrokinetic resource in high power density regions like the Florida Strait. Additional independent observational data, in particular stationary ADCP measurements, would be useful for expanding this model performance evaluation study. ADCP measurements are rare in ocean environments not influenced by tides, and limited to one location in the Florida Strait. HF radar data, although providing great spatial coverage, is limited to surface currents only.

  1. E AREA LOW LEVEL WASTE FACILITY DOE 435.1 PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilhite, E

    2008-03-31

    This Performance Assessment for the Savannah River Site E-Area Low-Level Waste Facility was prepared to meet requirements of Chapter IV of the Department of Energy Order 435.1-1. The Order specifies that a Performance Assessment should provide reasonable assurance that a low-level waste disposal facility will comply with the performance objectives of the Order. The Order also requires assessments of impacts to water resources and to hypothetical inadvertent intruders for purposes of establishing limits on radionuclides that may be disposed near-surface. According to the Order, calculations of potential doses and releases from the facility should address a 1,000-year period after facility closure. The point of compliance for the performance measures relevant to the all pathways and air pathway performance objective, as well as to the impact on water resources assessment requirement, must correspond to the point of highest projected dose or concentration beyond a 100-m buffer zone surrounding the disposed waste following the assumed end of active institutional controls 100 years after facility closure. During the operational and institutional control periods, the point of compliance for the all pathways and air pathway performance measures is the SRS boundary. However, for the water resources impact assessment, the point of compliance remains the point of highest projected dose or concentration beyond a 100-m buffer zone surrounding the disposed waste during the operational and institutional control periods. For performance measures relevant to radon and inadvertent intruders, the points of compliance are the disposal facility surface for all time periods and the disposal facility after the assumed loss of active institutional controls 100 years after facility closure, respectively. The E-Area Low-Level Waste Facility is located in the central region of the SRS known as the General Separations Area. It is an elbow-shaped, cleared area, which curves to the northwest, situated immediately north of the Mixed Waste Management Facility. The E-Area Low-Level Waste Facility is comprised of 200 acres for waste disposal and a surrounding buffer zone that extends out to the 100-m point of compliance. Disposal units within the footprint of the low-level waste facilities include the Slit Trenches, Engineered Trenches, Component-in-Grout Trenches, the Low-Activity Waste Vault, the Intermediate-Level Vault, and the Naval Reactor Component Disposal Area. Radiological waste disposal operations at the E-Area Low-Level Waste Facility began in 1994. E-Area Low-Level Waste Facility closure will be conducted in three phases: operational closure, interim closure, and final closure. Operational closure will be conducted during the 25-year operation period (30-year period for Slit and Engineered Trenches) as disposal units are filled; interim closure measures will be taken for some units. Interim closure will take place following the end of operations and will consist of an area-wide runoff cover along with additional grading over the trench units. Final closure of all disposal units in the E-Area Low-Level Waste Facility will take place at the end of the 100-year institutional control period and will consist of the installation of an integrated closure system designed to minimize moisture contact with the waste and to serve as a deterrent to intruders. Radiological dose to human receptors is analyzed in this PA in the all-pathways analysis, the inadvertent intruder analysis and the air pathway analysis, and the results are compared to the relevant performance measures. For the all-pathways analysis, the performance measure of relevance is a 25-mrem/yr EDE to representative members of the public, excluding dose from radon and its progeny in air. For the inadvertent intruder, the applicable performance measures are 100-mrem/yr EDE and 500 mrem/yr EDE for chronic and exposure scenarios, respectively. The relevant performance measure for the air pathway is 10-mrem/yr EDE via the air pathway, excluding dose from radon and its progeny in air. Protecti

  2. Performance Assessment of Single Electrode-Supported Solid Oxide Cells Operating in the Steam Electrolysis Mode

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    X. Zhang; J. E. O'Brien; R. C. O'Brien; N. Petigny

    2011-11-01

    An experimental study is under way to assess the performance of electrode-supported solid-oxide cells operating in the steam electrolysis mode for hydrogen production. Results presented in this paper were obtained from single cells, with an active area of 16 cm{sup 2} per cell. The electrolysis cells are electrode-supported, with yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) electrolytes ({approx}10 {mu}m thick), nickel-YSZ steam/hydrogen electrodes ({approx}1400 {mu}m thick), and modified LSM or LSCF air-side electrodes ({approx}90 {mu}m thick). The purpose of the present study is to document and compare the performance and degradation rates of these cells in the fuel cell mode and in the electrolysis mode under various operating conditions. Initial performance was documented through a series of voltage-current (VI) sweeps and AC impedance spectroscopy measurements. Degradation was determined through long-term testing, first in the fuel cell mode, then in the electrolysis mode. Results generally indicate accelerated degradation rates in the electrolysis mode compared to the fuel cell mode, possibly due to electrode delamination. The paper also includes details of an improved single-cell test apparatus developed specifically for these experiments.

  3. Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for the Laboratory's Environmental Programs directorate and includes work such as environmental engineering design, regulatory support, risk assessment and reporting. - 2 -...

  4. Performance assessment of wood, metal and composite baseball bats Mahesh M. Shenoy, Lloyd V. Smith *, John T. Axtell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Lloyd V.

    Performance assessment of wood, metal and composite baseball bats Mahesh M. Shenoy, Lloyd V. Smith the durability of wood bats and is shown to have a minimal eect on its hitting performance. The utility of using is real, as rookie players often require numerous seasons to adjust to wood bats. This adjust- ment has

  5. IRRADIANCE MAPS APPLIED FOR THE PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT OF PV SYSTEMS -A CASE STUDY FOR THE GERMAN FEDERAL STATE OF SAXONY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinemann, Detlev

    IRRADIANCE MAPS APPLIED FOR THE PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT OF PV SYSTEMS - A CASE STUDY FOR THE GERMAN and the month by month check of a PV system's performance, methods based on irradiance maps published by weather DWD or the data bank of hourly irradiance data with continuous spatial coverage prepared

  6. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON NANOTECHNOLOGY, VOL. 4, NO. 6, NOVEMBER 2005 715 Assessment of High-Frequency Performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Javey, Ali

    IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON NANOTECHNOLOGY, VOL. 4, NO. 6, NOVEMBER 2005 715 Assessment of High-Frequency to explore the high-frequency performance potential of carbon nantube field-effect transistors (CNTFETs density gives a large improvement of high-frequency performance when tubes are widely spaced and parasitic

  7. AN ASSESSMENT OF THE BRAYTON CYCLE FOR HIGH PERFORMANCE POWER PLANTS R. Schleicher A. R. Raffray C. P. Wong

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raffray, A. René

    AN ASSESSMENT OF THE BRAYTON CYCLE FOR HIGH PERFORMANCE POWER PLANTS R. Schleicher A. R. Raffray C examines in detail these parameters and proposes near-term values for fusion power plant studies based of helium CCGTs to fusion power plants. This paper explores fusion plant performance that could be achieved

  8. PORFLOW MODELING FOR A PRELIMINARY ASSESSMENT OF THE PERFORMANCE OF NEW SALTSTONE DISPOSAL UNIT DESIGNS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, F.

    2012-08-06

    At the request of Savannah River Remediation (SRR), SRNL has analyzed the expected performance obtained from using seven 32 million gallon Saltstone Disposal Units (SDUs) in the Z-Area Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF) to store future saltstone grout. The analysis was based on preliminary SDU final design specifications. The analysis used PORFLOW modeling to calculate the release of 20 radionuclides from an SDU and transport of the radionuclides and daughters through the vadose zone. Results from this vadose zone analysis were combined with previously calculated releases from existing saltstone vaults and FDCs and a second PORFLOW model run to calculate aquifer transport to assessment points located along a boundary 100 m from the nearest edge of the SDF sources. Peak concentrations within 12 sectors spaced along the 100 m boundary were determined over a period of evaluation extending 20,000 years after SDF closure cap placement. These peak concentrations were provided to SRR to use as input for dose calculations.

  9. Assessment of SFR fuel pin performance codes under advanced fuel for minor actinide transmutation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bouineau, V.; Lainet, M.; Chauvin, N.; Pelletier, M.

    2013-07-01

    Americium is a strong contributor to the long term radiotoxicity of high activity nuclear waste. Transmutation by irradiation in nuclear reactors of long-lived nuclides like {sup 241}Am is, therefore, an option for the reduction of radiotoxicity and residual power packages as well as the repository area. In the SUPERFACT Experiment four different oxide fuels containing high and low concentrations of {sup 237}Np and {sup 241}Am, representing the homogeneous and heterogeneous in-pile recycling concepts, were irradiated in the PHENIX reactor. The behavior of advanced fuel materials with minor actinide needs to be fully characterized, understood and modeled in order to optimize the design of this kind of fuel elements and to evaluate its performances. This paper assesses the current predictability of fuel performance codes TRANSURANUS and GERMINAL V2 on the basis of post irradiation examinations of the SUPERFACT experiment for pins with low minor actinide content. Their predictions have been compared to measured data in terms of geometrical changes of fuel and cladding, fission gases behavior and actinide and fission product distributions. The results are in good agreement with the experimental results, although improvements are also pointed out for further studies, especially if larger content of minor actinide will be taken into account in the codes. (authors)

  10. Estimation of natural ground water recharge for the performance assessment of a low-level waste disposal facility at the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rockhold, M.L.; Fayer, M.J.; Kincaid, C.T.; Gee, G.W.

    1995-03-01

    In 1994, the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) initiated the Recharge Task, under the PNL Vitrification Technology Development (PVTD) project, to assist Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) in designing and assessing the performance of a low-level waste (LLW) disposal facility for the US Department of Energy (DOE). The Recharge Task was established to address the issue of ground water recharge in and around the LLW facility and throughout the Hanford Site as it affects the unconfined aquifer under the facility. The objectives of this report are to summarize the current knowledge of natural ground water recharge at the Hanford Site and to outline the work that must be completed in order to provide defensible estimates of recharge for use in the performance assessment of this LLW disposal facility. Recharge studies at the Hanford Site indicate that recharge rates are highly variable, ranging from nearly zero to greater than 100 mm/yr depending on precipitation, vegetative cover, and soil types. Coarse-textured soils without plants yielded the greatest recharge. Finer-textured soils, with or without plants, yielded the least. Lysimeters provided accurate, short-term measurements of recharge as well as water-balance data for the soil-atmosphere interface and root zone. Tracers provided estimates of longer-term average recharge rates in undisturbed settings. Numerical models demonstrated the sensitivity of recharge rates to different processes and forecast recharge rates for different conditions. All of these tools (lysimetry, tracers, and numerical models) are considered vital to the development of defensible estimates of natural ground water recharge rates for the performance assessment of a LLW disposal facility at the Hanford Site.

  11. The Impact of Performance Feedback on School Psychologists' Roles and SLD Assessments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stomel, Danielle Eryn

    2015-01-01

    for all three schools during the performance feedback phase.consultation and performance feedback. School PsychologyThe Impact of Performance Feedback on School Psychologists’

  12. NERSC 2011: High Performance Computing Facility Operational Assessment for the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Antypas, Katie

    2013-01-01

    NERSC 2011 High Performance Computing Facility Operationalby providing high-performance computing, information, data,s deep knowledge of high performance computing to overcome

  13. US DOE-EM On-Site Disposal Cell Working Group - Fostering Communication On Performance Assessment Challenges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seitz, Roger R. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Suttora, Linda C. [U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Site Restoration, Germantown, MD (United States); Phifer, Mark [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States)

    2014-03-01

    On-site disposal cells are in use and being considered at several U.S. Department of Energy (USDOE) sites as the final disposition for large amounts of waste associated with cleanup of contaminated areas and facilities. These facilities are typically developed with regulatory oversight from States and/or the US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) in addition to USDOE. The facilities are developed to meet design standards for disposal of hazardous waste as well as the USDOE performance based standards for disposal of radioactive waste. The involvement of multiple and different regulators for facilities across separate sites has resulted in some differences in expectations for performance assessments and risk assessments (PA/RA) that are developed for the disposal facilities. The USDOE-EM Office of Site Restoration formed a working group to foster improved communication and sharing of information for personnel associated with these Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) disposal cells and work towards more consistent assumptions, as appropriate, for technical and policy considerations related to performance and risk assessments in support of a Record of Decision and Disposal Authorization Statement. The working group holds teleconferences, as needed, focusing on specific topics of interest. The topics addressed to date include an assessment of the assumptions used for performance assessments and risk assessments (PA/RAs) for on-site disposal cells, requirements and assumptions related to assessment of inadvertent intrusion, DOE Manual 435.1-1 requirements, and approaches for consideration of the long-term performance of liners and covers in the context of PAs. The working group has improved communication among the staff and oversight personnel responsible for onsite disposal cells and has provided a forum to identify and resolve common concerns.

  14. Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1979 to the DOE Assistant Secretary for Environment. Part 5. Environmental assessment, control, health, and safety

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baalman, R.W.; Dotson, C.W. (eds.)

    1980-02-01

    Part 5 of the 1979 Annual Report to the Department of Energy Assistant Secretary for the Environment presents Pacific Northwest Laboratory's progress on work performed for the Office of Technology Impacts, the Office of Environmental Compliance and Overview, and the Office of Health and Environmental Research. The report is in four sections, corresponding to the program elements: technology impacts, environmental control engineering, operational and environmental compliance, and human health studies. In each section, articles describe progress made during FY 1979 on individual projects.

  15. A Multi-Methods Approach to HRA and Human Performance Modeling: A Field Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacques Hugo; David I Gertman

    2012-06-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) is a research reactor at the Idaho National Laboratory is primarily designed and used to test materials to be used in other, larger-scale and prototype reactors. The reactor offers various specialized systems and allows certain experiments to be run at their own temperature and pressure. The ATR Canal temporarily stores completed experiments and used fuel. It also has facilities to conduct underwater operations such as experiment examination or removal. In reviewing the ATR safety basis, a number of concerns were identified involving the ATR canal. A brief study identified ergonomic issues involving the manual handling of fuel elements in the canal that may increase the probability of human error and possible unwanted acute physical outcomes to the operator. In response to this concern, that refined the previous HRA scoping analysis by determining the probability of the inadvertent exposure of a fuel element to the air during fuel movement and inspection was conducted. The HRA analysis employed the SPAR-H method and was supplemented by information gained from a detailed analysis of the fuel inspection and transfer tasks. This latter analysis included ergonomics, work cycles, task duration, and workload imposed by tool and workplace characteristics, personal protective clothing, and operational practices that have the potential to increase physical and mental workload. Part of this analysis consisted of NASA-TLX analyses, combined with operational sequence analysis, computational human performance analysis (CHPA), and 3D graphical modeling to determine task failures and precursors to such failures that have safety implications. Experience in applying multiple analysis techniques in support of HRA methods is discussed.

  16. High Performance Computing Facility Operational Assessment, FY 2010 Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bland, Arthur S Buddy; Hack, James J; Baker, Ann E; Barker, Ashley D; Boudwin, Kathlyn J.; Kendall, Ricky A; Messer, Bronson; Rogers, James H; Shipman, Galen M; White, Julia C

    2010-08-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL's) Cray XT5 supercomputer, Jaguar, kicked off the era of petascale scientific computing in 2008 with applications that sustained more than a thousand trillion floating point calculations per second - or 1 petaflop. Jaguar continues to grow even more powerful as it helps researchers broaden the boundaries of knowledge in virtually every domain of computational science, including weather and climate, nuclear energy, geosciences, combustion, bioenergy, fusion, and materials science. Their insights promise to broaden our knowledge in areas that are vitally important to the Department of Energy (DOE) and the nation as a whole, particularly energy assurance and climate change. The science of the 21st century, however, will demand further revolutions in computing, supercomputers capable of a million trillion calculations a second - 1 exaflop - and beyond. These systems will allow investigators to continue attacking global challenges through modeling and simulation and to unravel longstanding scientific questions. Creating such systems will also require new approaches to daunting challenges. High-performance systems of the future will need to be codesigned for scientific and engineering applications with best-in-class communications networks and data-management infrastructures and teams of skilled researchers able to take full advantage of these new resources. The Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility (OLCF) provides the nation's most powerful open resource for capability computing, with a sustainable path that will maintain and extend national leadership for DOE's Office of Science (SC). The OLCF has engaged a world-class team to support petascale science and to take a dramatic step forward, fielding new capabilities for high-end science. This report highlights the successful delivery and operation of a petascale system and shows how the OLCF fosters application development teams, developing cutting-edge tools and resources for next-generation systems.

  17. EA-1968: Site-Wide Environmental Assessment of the U.S. Department of Energy National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) South Table Mountain (STM) Campus, Golden, Colorado

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    DOE is preparing a Site-Wide Environmental Assessment to analyze the potential environmental impacts of possible site operations and improvements over the next five to ten years at DOE’s STM campus of NREL and nearby leased support facilities in Golden, Colorado. This proposed action would support DOE’s mission to research, develop, and deploy energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies and would consist of: • Research, routine laboratory, and site operation enhancements • New building construction and modifications of existing buildings • Infrastructure and utilities upgrades and enhancements

  18. Final assessment of MOX fuel performance experiment with Japanese PWR specification fuel in the HBWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fujii, Hajime; Teshima, Hideyuki; Kanasugi, Katsumasa; Kosaka, Yuji; Arakawa, Yasushi

    2007-07-01

    In order to obtain high burn-up MOX fuel irradiation performance data, SBR and MIMAS MOX fuel rods with Pu-fissile enrichment of about 6 wt% had been irradiated in the HBWR from 1995 to 2006. The peak burn-up of MOX pellet achieved 72 GWd/tM. In this test, fuel centerline temperature, rod internal pressure, stack length and cladding length were measured for MOX fuel and UO{sub 2} fuel as reference. MOX fuel temperature is confirmed to have no significant difference in comparison with UO{sub 2}, taking into account of adequate thermal conductivity degradation due to PuO{sub 2} addition and burn-up development. And the measured fuel temperature agrees well with FINE code calculation up to high burn-up region. Fission gas release of MOX is possibly greater than UO{sub 2} based on temperature and pressure assessment. No significant difference is confirmed between SBR and MIMAS MOX on FGR behavior. MOX fuel swelling rate agrees well with solid swelling rate in the literature. Cladding elongation data shows onset of PCMI in high power region. (authors)

  19. Review of radionuclide source terms used for performance-assessment analyses; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnard, R.W.

    1993-06-01

    Two aspects of the radionuclide source terms used for total-system performance assessment (TSPA) analyses have been reviewed. First, a detailed radionuclide inventory (i.e., one in which the reactor type, decay, and burnup are specified) is compared with the standard source-term inventory used in prior analyses. The latter assumes a fixed ratio of pressurized-water reactor (PWR) to boiling-water reactor (BWR) spent fuel, at specific amounts of burnup and at 10-year decay. TSPA analyses have been used to compare the simplified source term with the detailed one. The TSPA-91 analyses did not show a significant difference between the source terms. Second, the radionuclides used in source terms for TSPA aqueous-transport analyses have been reviewed to select ones that are representative of the entire inventory. It is recommended that two actinide decay chains be included (the 4n+2 ``uranium`` and 4n+3 ``actinium`` decay series), since these include several radionuclides that have potentially important release and dose characteristics. In addition, several fission products are recommended for the same reason. The choice of radionuclides should be influenced by other parameter assumptions, such as the solubility and retardation of the radionuclides.

  20. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: PHEV and EV Battery Performance and Cost Assessment

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Argonne National Laboratory at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about PHEV and EV...

  1. OVERVIEW OF THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY AND NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT APPROACHES: CEMENTITIOUS BARRIERS PARTNERSHIP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Langton, C.; Burns, H.

    2009-05-29

    Engineered barriers including cementitious barriers are used at sites disposing or contaminated with low-level radioactive waste to enhance performance of the natural environment with respect to controlling the potential spread of contaminants. Drivers for using cementitious barriers include: high radionuclide inventory, radionuclide characteristics (e.g., long half-live, high mobility due to chemical form/speciation, waste matrix properties, shallow water table, and humid climate that provides water for leaching the waste). This document comprises the first in a series of reports being prepared for the Cementitious Barriers Partnership. The document is divided into two parts which provide a summary of: (1) existing experience in the assessment of performance of cementitious materials used for radioactive waste management and disposal and (2) sensitivity and uncertainty analysis approaches that have been applied for assessments. Each chapter is organized into five parts: Introduction, Regulatory Considerations, Specific Examples, Summary of Modeling Approaches and Conclusions and Needs. The objective of the report is to provide perspective on the state of the practice for conducting assessments for facilities involving cementitious barriers and to identify opportunities for improvements to the existing approaches. Examples are provided in two contexts: (1) performance assessments conducted for waste disposal facilities and (2) performance assessment-like analyses (e.g., risk assessments) conducted under other regulatory regimes. The introductory sections of each section provide a perspective on the purpose of performance assessments and different roles of cementitious materials for radioactive waste management. Significant experience with assessments of cementitious materials associated with radioactive waste disposal concepts exists in the US Department of Energy Complex and the commercial nuclear sector. Recently, the desire to close legacy facilities has created a need to assess the behavior of cementitious materials for applications in environmental remediation and decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) applications. The ability to assess the use and benefits of cementitious materials for these applications can significantly affect decisions related to cleanup activities. For example the need for costly remedial actions may not be necessary if existing or new cementitious barriers were adequately represented. The sections dealing with regulatory considerations include summaries of the different regulations that are relevant for various applications involving cementitious materials. A summary of regulatory guidance and/or policies pertaining to performance assessment of cementitious materials and sensitivity and uncertainty analyses is also provided in the following chapters. Numerous examples of specific applications are provided in each report. The examples are organized into traditional waste disposal applications (performance assessments), applications related to environmental remediation and D&D, and reactor and spent fuel related assessments. Sections that discuss specific facilities or sites contain: (1) descriptions of the role of the cementitious barriers or sensitivity/uncertainty analysis, (2) parameter assumptions and conceptual models, and (3) a relative discussion of the significance in the context of the assessment. Examples from both the U.S. Department of Energy Sites and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission are provided to illustrate the variety of applications and approaches that have been used. In many cases, minimal credit was taken for cementitious barriers. However, in some of those cases, benefits of being able to take credit for barriers were identified. The examples included: (1) disposal facilities (vaults, trenches, tank closures, cementitious waste forms and containers, etc.), (2) environmental remediation (old disposal facilities), (3) reactor and large structure decommissioning, and (4) spent fuel pools. These examples were selected to provide a perspective on the various ne

  2. A Preliminary Performance Assessment for Salt Disposal of High-Level Nuclear Waste - 12173

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Joon H.; Clayton, Daniel; Jove-Colon, Carlos; Wang, Yifeng [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2012-07-01

    A salt repository is one of the four geologic media currently under study by the U.S. DOE Office of Nuclear Energy to support the development of a long-term strategy for geologic disposal of commercial used nuclear fuel (UNF) and high-level radioactive waste (HLW). The immediate goal of the generic salt repository study is to develop the necessary modeling tools to evaluate and improve the understanding of the repository system response and processes relevant to long-term disposal of UNF and HLW in a salt formation. The current phase of this study considers representative geologic settings and features adopted from previous studies for salt repository sites. For the reference scenario, the brine flow rates in the repository and underlying interbeds are very low, and transport of radionuclides in the transport pathways is dominated by diffusion and greatly retarded by sorption on the interbed filling materials. I-129 is the dominant annual dose contributor at the hypothetical accessible environment, but the calculated mean annual dose is negligibly small. For the human intrusion (or disturbed) scenario, the mean mass release rate and mean annual dose histories are very different from those for the reference scenario. Actinides including Pu-239, Pu-242 and Np-237 are major annual dose contributors, and the calculated peak mean annual dose is acceptably low. A performance assessment model for a generic salt repository has been developed incorporating, where applicable, representative geologic settings and features adopted from literature data for salt repository sites. The conceptual model and scenario for radionuclide release and transport from a salt repository were developed utilizing literature data. The salt GDS model was developed in a probabilistic analysis framework. The preliminary performance analysis for demonstration of model capability is for an isothermal condition at the ambient temperature for the near field. The capability demonstration emphasizes key attributes of a salt repository that are potentially important to the long-term safe disposal of UNF and HLW. The analysis presents and discusses the results showing repository responses to different radionuclide release scenarios (undisturbed and human intrusion). For the reference (or nominal or undisturbed) scenario, the brine flow rates in the repository and underlying interbeds are very low, and transport of radionuclides in the transport pathways is dominated by diffusion and greatly retarded by sorption on the interbed filling materials. I-129 (non-sorbing and unlimited solubility with a very long half-life) is the dominant annual dose contributor at the hypothetical accessible environment, but the calculated mean annual dose is negligibly small that there is no meaningful consequence for the repository performance. For the human intrusion (or disturbed) scenario analysis, the mean mass release rate and mean annual dose histories are very different from those for the reference scenario analysis. Compared to the reference scenario, the relative annual dose contributions by soluble, non-sorbing fission products, particularly I-129, are much lower than by actinides including Pu-239, Pu-242 and Np-237. The lower relative mean annual dose contributions by the fission product radionuclides are due to their lower total inventory available for release (i.e., up to five affected waste packages), and the higher mean annual doses by the actinides are the outcome of the direct release of the radionuclides into the overlying aquifer having high water flow rates, thereby resulting in an early arrival of higher concentrations of the radionuclides at the biosphere drinking water well prior to their significant decay. The salt GDS model analysis has also identified the following future recommendations and/or knowledge gaps to improve and enhance the confidence of the future repository performance analysis. - Repository thermal loading by UNF and HLW, and the effect on the engineered barrier and near-field performance. - Closure and consolidation of salt rocks by creep d

  3. Laboratory-Scale Burning and Characterizing of Composite Solid Propellant for Studying Novel Nanoparticle Synthesis Methods 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allen, Tyler Winston

    2013-04-29

    . During the past several years, the research team has refined laboratory-scale techniques for quickly and reliably assessing the mixing and performance of composite propellants with catalytic nanoparticle additives. This thesis also documents some...

  4. Geochemical Data Package for Performance Assessment Calculations Related to the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaplan, D

    2006-02-28

    The Savannah River Site disposes of certain types of radioactive waste within subsurface-engineered facilities. One of the tools used to establish the capacity of a given site to safely store radioactive waste (i.e., that a site does not exceed its Waste Acceptance Criteria) is the Performance Assessment (PA). The objective of this document is to provide the geochemical values for the PA calculations. This work is being conducted as part of the on-going maintenance program that permits the PA to periodically update existing calculations when new data becomes available. Because application of values without full understanding of their original purpose may lead to misuse, this document also provides the geochemical conceptual model, approach used for selecting the values, the justification for selecting data, and the assumptions made to assure that the conceptual and numerical geochemical models are reasonably conservative (i.e., reflect conditions that will tend to predict the maximum risk to the hypothetical recipient). The geochemical parameters describe transport processes for 38 elements (>90 radioisotopes) potentially occurring within eight disposal units (Slit Trenches, Engineered Trenches, Low Activity Waste (LAW) Vault, Intermediate Level (ILV) Vaults, TRU-Pad-1, Naval Reactor Waste Pads, Components-in-Grout Trenches, and Saltstone Facility). This work builds upon well-documented work from previous PA calculations (McDowell-Boyer et al. 2000). The new geochemical concepts introduced in this data package are: (1) In the past, solubility products were used only in a few conditions (element existing in a specific environmental setting). This has been expanded to >100 conditions. (2) Radionuclide chemistry in cementitious environments is described through the use of both the Kd and apparent solubility concentration limit. Furthermore, the solid phase is assumed to age during the assessment period (thousands of years), resulting in three main types of controlling solid phases, each possessing a unique set of radionuclide sorption parameters (Kd and solubility concentration limit). (3) A large amount of recent site-specific sorption research has been conducted since the last PA (McDowell-Boyer et al. 2000). These new data have replaced previous Kd values derived from literature values, thus reducing uncertainty and improving accuracy. Finally, because this document will be used by future PA calculations and external acceptance of the document will eventually be required, this document was extensively reviewed. The review process, including the internal review, site review, and external review process is described.

  5. In-Situ Testing and Performance Assessment of a Redesigned WIPP Panel Closure - 13192

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klein, Thomas; Patterson, Russell; Camphouse, Chris; Herrick, Courtney; Kirchner, Thomas; Malama, Bwalya; Zeitler, Todd; Kicker, Dwayne

    2013-07-01

    There are two primary regulatory requirements for Panel Closures at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), the nation's only deep geologic repository for defense related Transuranic (TRU) and Mixed TRU waste. The Federal requirement is through 40 CFR 191 and 194, promulgated by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The state requirement is regulated through the authority of the Secretary of the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) under the New Mexico Hazardous Waste Act (HWA), New Mexico Statutes Annotated (NMSA) 1978, chap. 74-4-1 through 74-4-14, in accordance with the New Mexico Hazardous Waste Management Regulations (HWMR), 20.4.1 New Mexico Annotated Code (NMAC). The state regulations are implemented for the operational period of waste emplacement plus 30 years whereas the federal requirements are implemented from the operational period through 10,000 years. The 10,000 year federal requirement is related to the adequate representation of the panel closures in determining long-term performance of the repository. In Condition 1 of the Final Certification Rulemaking for 40 CFR Part 194, the EPA required a specific design for the panel closure system. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) has requested, through the Planned Change Request (PCR) process, that the EPA modify Condition 1 via its rulemaking process. The DOE has also requested, through the Permit Modification Request (PMR) process, that the NMED modify the approved panel closure system specified in Permit Attachment G1. The WIPP facility is carved out of a bedded salt formation 655 meters below the surface of southeast New Mexico. Condition 1 of the Final Certification Rulemaking specifies that the waste panels be closed using Option D which is a combination of a Salado mass concrete (SMC) monolith and an isolation/explosion block wall. The Option D design was also accepted as the panel closure of choice by the NMED. After twelve years of waste handling operations and a greater understanding of the waste and the behavior of the underground salt formation, the DOE has established a revised panel closure design. This revised design meets both the short-term NMED Permit requirements for the operational period, and also the Federal requirements for long-term repository performance. This new design is simpler, easier to construct and has less of an adverse impact on waste disposal operations than the originally approved Option D design. The Panel Closure Redesign is based on: (1) the results of in-situ constructability testing performed to determine run-of-mine salt reconsolidation parameters and how the characteristics of the bedded salt formation affect these parameters and, (2) the results of air flow analysis of the new design to determine that the limit for the migration of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) will be met at the compliance point. Waste panel closures comprise a repository feature that has been represented in WIPP performance assessment (PA) since the original Compliance Certification Application of 1996. Panel closures are included in WIPP PA models principally because they are a part of the disposal system, not because they play a substantive role in inhibiting the release of radionuclides to the outside environment. The 1998 rulemaking that certified WIPP to receive transuranic waste placed conditions on the panel closure design to be implemented in the repository. The revised panel closure design, termed the Run-of-Mine (ROM) Panel Closure System (ROMPCS), is comprised of 30.48 meters of ROM salt with barriers at each end. The ROM salt is generated from ongoing mining operations at the WIPP and may be compacted and/or moistened as it is emplaced in a panel entry. The barriers consist of bulkheads, similar to those currently used in the panels as room closures. A WIPP performance assessment has been completed that incorporates the ROMPCS design into the representation of the repository, and compares repository performance to that achieved with the approved Option D design. Several key physical process

  6. Annual report of the Environmental Restoration Monitoring and Assessment Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory for FY 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clapp, R.B.

    1992-09-01

    This report summarizes the salient features of the annual efforts of the investigations and monitoring, conducted to support the Environmental Restoration (ER) Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The results presented can be used to develop a conceptual understanding of the key contaminants and the sources, fluxes, and processes affecting their distribution and movement. This information forms a basis for prioritizing sites and for selecting, implementing, and evaluating remedial actions. Groundwater, soils, sediments, and surface water monitoring results are described.

  7. Performance Assessment Transport Modeling of Uranium at the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site at the Nevada National Security Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Radioactive Waste

    2010-10-12

    Following is a brief summary of the assumptions that are pertinent to the radioactive isotope transport in the GoldSim Performance Assessment model of the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site, with special emphasis on the water-phase reactive transport of uranium, which includes depleted uranium products.

  8. Supply Chain Performance Assessment and Supplier and Component Importance Identification General Competitive Multitiered Supply Chain Network Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagurney, Anna

    Supply Chain Performance Assessment and Supplier and Component Importance Identification competitive supply chain network game theory model, which includes the supplier tier. The firms components from one or more suppliers, who also are capacitated. The firms compete in a Cournot-Nash fashion

  9. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON APPLIED SUPERCONDUCTIVITY, VOL. 14, NO. 2, JUNE 2004 1519 Tcs Tests and Performance Assessment of the ITER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hampshire, Damian

    racetrack coil is wound in double pancakes in the grooves of stainless steel radial plates using dual and Performance Assessment of the ITER Toroidal Field Model Coil (Phase II) R. Zanino, M. Bagnasco, G. Dittrich, W of Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Germany: in Phase I, completed in 2001, the coil was tested in its self-field, while

  10. Performance-Based Seismic Demand Assessment of Concentrically Braced Steel Frame Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Chui-Hsin

    2010-01-01

    66 Figure 5.4 Process of evaluating seismic performanceResults Figure 5.4 Process of evaluating seismic performanceiterative process continued until adequate seismic perform-

  11. Context-aware Cloud Service Selection based on Comparison and Aggregation of User Subjective Assessment and Objective Performance Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Ling

    Context-aware Cloud Service Selection based on Comparison and Aggregation of User Subjective of cloud services, it is usually hard for potential cloud consumers to select the most suitable cloud service. In prior studies, cloud service selection is usually based on either objective performance

  12. Performance Assessment Program for the Savannah River Site Liquid Waste Facilities - 13610

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosenberger, Kent H.

    2013-07-01

    The Liquid Waste facilities at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) are operated by Liquid Waste Operations contractor Savannah River Remediation LLC (SRR). A separate Performance Assessment (PA) is prepared to support disposal operations at the Saltstone Disposal Facility and closure evaluations for the two liquid waste tank farm facilities at SRS, F-Tank Farm and H-Tank Farm. A PA provides the technical basis and results to be used in subsequent documents to demonstrate compliance with the pertinent requirements identified in operations and closure regulatory guidance. The Saltstone Disposal Facility is subject to a State of South Carolina industrial solid waste landfill permit and the tank farms are subject to a state industrial waste water permit. The three Liquid Waste facilities are also subject to a Federal Facility Agreement approved by the State, DOE and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Due to the regulatory structure, a PA is a key technical document reviewed by the DOE, the State of South Carolina and the EPA. As the waste material disposed of in the Saltstone Disposal Facility and the residual material in the closed tank farms is also subject to reclassification prior to closure via a waste determination pursuant to Section 3116 of the Ronald W. Reagan National Defense Authorization Act of Fiscal Year 2005, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is also a reviewing agency for the PAs. Pursuant to the Act, the NRC also has a continuing role to monitor disposal actions to assess compliance with stated performance objectives. The Liquid Waste PA program at SRS represents a continual process over the life of the disposal and closure operations. When the need for a PA or PA revision is identified, the first step is to develop a conceptual model to best represent the facility conditions. The conceptual model will include physical dimensions of the closed system, both the engineered and natural system, and modeling input parameters associated with the modeled features, both initial values (at the time of facility closure) and degradation rates/values. During the development of the PA, evaluations are conducted to reflect not only the results associated with the best available information at the time but also to evaluate potential uncertainties and sensitivities associated with the modeled system. While the PA will reflect the modeled system results from the best available information, it will also identify areas for future work to reduce overall PA uncertainties moving forward. DOE requires a PA Maintenance Program such that work continues to reduce model uncertainties, thus bolstering confidence in PA results that support regulatory decisions. This maintenance work may include new Research and Development activities or modeling as informed by previous PA results and other new information that becomes available. As new information becomes available, it is evaluated against previous PAs and appropriate actions are taken to ensure continued confidence in the regulatory decisions. Therefore, the PA program is a continual process that is not just the development of a PA but seeks to incorporate new information to reduce overall model uncertainty and provide continuing confidence in regulatory decisions. (author)

  13. Enhancing RESRAD-OFFSITE for Low Level Waste Disposal Facility Performance Assessment

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Abstract: The RESRAD-OFFSITE code was developed to evaluate the radiological dose and excess cancer risk to an individual who is exposed while located within or outside the area of initial (primary) contamination. The primary contamination, which is the source of all releases modeled by the code, is assumed to be a layer of soil. The code considers the release of contamination from the source to the atmosphere, to surface runoff, and to groundwater. The radionuclide leaching was modeled as a first order (without transport) release using radionuclide distribution coefficient and infiltration rate calculated from water balance (precipitation, surface runoff, evapotranspiration, etc.). Recently, a new source term model was added the RESRAD-OFFSITE code so that it can be applied to the evaluation of Low Level Waste (LLW) disposal facility performance assessment. This new improved source term model include (1) first order with transport, (2) equilibrium desorption (rinse) release, and (3) uniform release (constant dissolution). With these new source release options, it is possible to simulate both uncontainerized (soil) contamination and containerized (waste drums) contamination. A delay time in the source release was also added to the code. This allows modeling the LLW container degradation as a function of time. The RESRAD-OFFSITE code also allows linking to other codes using improved flux and concentration input options. Additional source release model such as diffusion release may be added later. In addition, radionuclide database with 1252 radionuclides (ICRP 107) and the corresponding dose coefficients (DCFPAK 3.02) and the Department of Energy’s new gender- and age-averaged Reference Person dose coefficients (DOE-STD-1196-2011) which is based on the US census data will be added to the next version of RESRAD-OFFSITE code

  14. Assessing the Predictive Capability of the LIFEIV Nuclear Fuel Performance Code using Sequential Calibration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stull, Christopher J.; Williams, Brian J.; Unal, Cetin

    2012-07-05

    This report considers the problem of calibrating a numerical model to data from an experimental campaign (or series of experimental tests). The issue is that when an experimental campaign is proposed, only the input parameters associated with each experiment are known (i.e. outputs are not known because the experiments have yet to be conducted). Faced with such a situation, it would be beneficial from the standpoint of resource management to carefully consider the sequence in which the experiments are conducted. In this way, the resources available for experimental tests may be allocated in a way that best 'informs' the calibration of the numerical model. To address this concern, the authors propose decomposing the input design space of the experimental campaign into its principal components. Subsequently, the utility (to be explained) of each experimental test to the principal components of the input design space is used to formulate the sequence in which the experimental tests will be used for model calibration purposes. The results reported herein build on those presented and discussed in [1,2] wherein Verification & Validation and Uncertainty Quantification (VU) capabilities were applied to the nuclear fuel performance code LIFEIV. In addition to the raw results from the sequential calibration studies derived from the above, a description of the data within the context of the Predictive Maturity Index (PMI) will also be provided. The PMI [3,4] is a metric initiated and developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory to quantitatively describe the ability of a numerical model to make predictions in the absence of experimental data, where it is noted that 'predictions in the absence of experimental data' is not synonymous with extrapolation. This simply reflects the fact that resources do not exist such that each and every execution of the numerical model can be compared against experimental data. If such resources existed, the justification for numerical models would be reduced considerably. The authors note that the PMI is primarily intended to provide a high-level, quantitative description of year-to-year (or version-to-version) improvements in numerical models, where these descriptions can be used as a means of justifying funding requests to support further model development research. It is in this context that the present report should be considered: the availability of data from experimental tests should be viewed as a time-dependent variable, where experiments are added to the calibration suite as resources become available. For the present report, the experimental data is of course already available (permitting demonstration of the proposed methodology). Furthermore, the authors are not proposing this methodology as the answer to the question of how to allocate resources for experimental tests, and readers are directed to [5] and the references contained in Section 1 of [5] for additional information on the subject. However, the strength of this methodology is that it offers a means by which to select the sequence of experiments in a pre-arranged experimental campaign (a situation for which the methods discussed in [5] are less appropriate). The report is organized as follows. Section 2 describes the methodology employed to formulate the sequences of experiments for the calibrations performed for this study. Section 3 then presents the results associated with two sequences; supplementary results are provided in the Appendix. The report then concludes in Section 4 with a brief summary.

  15. Navistar eStar Vehicle Performance Evalution - 2nd Quarter 2013; Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-10-01

    The Fleet Test and Evaluation Team at the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory is evaluating and documenting the performance of electric and plug-in hybrid electric drive systems in medium duty trucks across the nation. U.S. companies participating in this evaluation project received funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act to cover part of the cost of purchasing these vehicles. Through this project, Navistar will build and deploy all-electric medium-duty trucks. The trucks will be deployed in diverse climates across the country. This report covers the second quarter of 2013.

  16. Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory Science Research Review March 18-20, 2008. Quality: Assess the quality of the laboratory's research and development. Assess whether appropriate." · How does the quality of the laboratory's research and development rank among Research and Development

  17. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY 2009 for Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, Todd C.

    2010-01-01

    Brookhaven national Laboratory, Upton, NY, USA. AFRD-Berkeley National Laboratory,” LBNL Report LBNL 2670-E,performed in the laboratory and in-situ at-wavelength,”

  18. When Is the Simple Radiotoxicity Approach Useful for Advanced Fuel Cycle System Assessments Given the Existence of Complex Performance Dose Assessments?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steven J. Piet

    2013-01-01

    Engineers often face the general question of which approximations are appropriate for a given analytical task. In particular, when is a simpler model useful if a more complex model also exists? This paper explores this question in the domain of radiotoxicity relative to geologic disposal performance dose assessments. Criterion 1 requires that the simpler approach, radiotoxicity, must be calculated correctly. The concept of ingestion radiotoxic inventories is analogous to the inventory of toxic chemicals in other industries. From a decision analysis perspective, it is also somewhat analogous to the nuclear reactor safety concept of “passive safety.” This paper explains some of the issues in calculating radiotoxicity, motivated by the author’s observations of errors in the literature: not accounting for radioactive progeny, misunderstanding natural “ore,” and focusing on transuranic (TRU) isotopes without adequate attention to actinide decay products. For example, Th/233U fuel cycles do have lower amounts of TRU isotopes than U/239Pu fuel cycles, but that does not necessarily mean lower long-term hazard. Criterion 2 requires that the uncertainties in the more complex approach, performance dose assessments, must raise issues for the assessments’ intended purposes—in which case, radiotoxic inventory may be of assistance until those issues are resolved. Performance dose assessments were developed for, and are legally the way to show, compliance with regulations, but the uncertainties are large. Less obvious is the degree to which dose assessments are applicable to other purposes—comparing fuel cycle options prior to site selection and showing the safety of a fuel cycle and waste management approach to the public. In the last sense especially, performance dose assessments are analogous to probabilistic risk assessments for nuclear reactor safety. The United States lacks a selected consensus site, selected fuel cycle approach (direct disposal versus recycling), and selected waste form. Thus, the paper does not intend to discuss all the issues with performance dose assessments but rather intends to focus on only those performance dose uncertainties that raise issues when comparing fuel cycles. Uncertainties associated with whether a generic geological environment is attractive or a specific location meets requirements are beyond the scope of this paper. Ingestion radiotoxicity correlates with heat, gamma, and inhalation radiotoxicity. Thus, options that are relatively high in ingestion radiotoxicity tend to be high in other parameters. Therefore, reduction in ingestion radiotoxicity means both that the potential source term for release is lower but also that one driving force for release (heat) is also lower. However, the most important time frames differ as heat is mainly an issue in decades and centuries after reactor discharge, but ingestion radiotoxicity is mainly an issue during longer time periods. Ingestion radiotoxicity points to the importance of actinides in long-term waste management, followed by specific fission products such as 99Tc, 129I, 93Zr, 135Cs, and 79Se.

  19. Independent Oversight Review, Los Alamos National Laboratory...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Los Alamos National Laboratory - April 2012 Independent Oversight Review, Los Alamos National Laboratory - April 2012 April 2012 Review of the Consequence Assessment Program at the...

  20. Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) waste Integrated Performance and Safety Codes (IPSC) : gap analysis for high fidelity and performance assessment code development.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Joon H.; Siegel, Malcolm Dean; Arguello, Jose Guadalupe, Jr.; Webb, Stephen Walter; Dewers, Thomas A.; Mariner, Paul E.; Edwards, Harold Carter; Fuller, Timothy J.; Freeze, Geoffrey A.; Jove-Colon, Carlos F.; Wang, Yifeng

    2011-03-01

    This report describes a gap analysis performed in the process of developing the Waste Integrated Performance and Safety Codes (IPSC) in support of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Campaign. The goal of the Waste IPSC is to develop an integrated suite of computational modeling and simulation capabilities to quantitatively assess the long-term performance of waste forms in the engineered and geologic environments of a radioactive waste storage or disposal system. The Waste IPSC will provide this simulation capability (1) for a range of disposal concepts, waste form types, engineered repository designs, and geologic settings, (2) for a range of time scales and distances, (3) with appropriate consideration of the inherent uncertainties, and (4) in accordance with rigorous verification, validation, and software quality requirements. The gap analyses documented in this report were are performed during an initial gap analysis to identify candidate codes and tools to support the development and integration of the Waste IPSC, and during follow-on activities that delved into more detailed assessments of the various codes that were acquired, studied, and tested. The current Waste IPSC strategy is to acquire and integrate the necessary Waste IPSC capabilities wherever feasible, and develop only those capabilities that cannot be acquired or suitably integrated, verified, or validated. The gap analysis indicates that significant capabilities may already exist in the existing THC codes although there is no single code able to fully account for all physical and chemical processes involved in a waste disposal system. Large gaps exist in modeling chemical processes and their couplings with other processes. The coupling of chemical processes with flow transport and mechanical deformation remains challenging. The data for extreme environments (e.g., for elevated temperature and high ionic strength media) that are needed for repository modeling are severely lacking. In addition, most of existing reactive transport codes were developed for non-radioactive contaminants, and they need to be adapted to account for radionuclide decay and in-growth. The accessibility to the source codes is generally limited. Because the problems of interest for the Waste IPSC are likely to result in relatively large computational models, a compact memory-usage footprint and a fast/robust solution procedure will be needed. A robust massively parallel processing (MPP) capability will also be required to provide reasonable turnaround times on the analyses that will be performed with the code. A performance assessment (PA) calculation for a waste disposal system generally requires a large number (hundreds to thousands) of model simulations to quantify the effect of model parameter uncertainties on the predicted repository performance. A set of codes for a PA calculation must be sufficiently robust and fast in terms of code execution. A PA system as a whole must be able to provide multiple alternative models for a specific set of physical/chemical processes, so that the users can choose various levels of modeling complexity based on their modeling needs. This requires PA codes, preferably, to be highly modularized. Most of the existing codes have difficulties meeting these requirements. Based on the gap analysis results, we have made the following recommendations for the code selection and code development for the NEAMS waste IPSC: (1) build fully coupled high-fidelity THCMBR codes using the existing SIERRA codes (e.g., ARIA and ADAGIO) and platform, (2) use DAKOTA to build an enhanced performance assessment system (EPAS), and build a modular code architecture and key code modules for performance assessments. The key chemical calculation modules will be built by expanding the existing CANTERA capabilities as well as by extracting useful components from other existing codes.

  1. Risk assessment of the retrieval of transuranic waste: Pads 1, 2, and 4, Technical Area-54, Area G, Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilbert, K.A.; Lyon, B.F.; Hutchison, J.; Holmes, J.A.; Legg, J.L.; Simek, M.P.; Travis, C.C.; Wollert, D.A.

    1995-05-01

    The Risk Assessment for the Retrieval of Transuranic Waste is a comparative risk assessment of the potential adverse human health effects resulting from exposure to contaminants during retrieval and post-retrieval aboveground storage operations of post-1970 earthen-covered transuranic waste. Two alternatives are compared: (1) Immediate Retrieval and (2) Delayed Retrieval. Under the Immediate Retrieval Alternative, retrieval of the waste is assumed to begin immediately, Under the Delayed Retrieval Alternative, retrieval is delayed 10 years. The current risk assessment is on Pads 1, 2, and 4, at Technical Area-54, Area-G, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Risks are assessed independently for three scenarios: (1) incident-free retrieval operations, (2) incident-free storage operations, and (3) a drum failure analysis. The drum failure analysis evaluates container integrity under both alternatives and assesses the impacts of potential drum failures during retrieval operations. Risks associated with a series of drum failures are potentially severe for workers, off-site receptors, and general on-site employees if retrieval is delayed 10 years and administrative and engineering controls remain constant. Under the Delayed Retrieval Alternative, an average of 300 drums out of 16,647 are estimated to fail during retrieval operations due to general corrosion, while minimal drums are predicted to fail under the Immediate Retrieval Alternative. The results of the current study suggest that, based on risk, remediation of Pads 1, 2, and 4 at LANL should not be delayed. Although risks from incident-free operations in the Delayed Retrieval Alternative are low, risks due to corrosion and drum failures are potentially severe.

  2. Statistical model based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) in clinical CT systems: Experimental assessment of noise performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Ke; Tang, Jie; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2014-04-15

    Purpose: To reduce radiation dose in CT imaging, the statistical model based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) method has been introduced for clinical use. Based on the principle of MBIR and its nonlinear nature, the noise performance of MBIR is expected to be different from that of the well-understood filtered backprojection (FBP) reconstruction method. The purpose of this work is to experimentally assess the unique noise characteristics of MBIR using a state-of-the-art clinical CT system. Methods: Three physical phantoms, including a water cylinder and two pediatric head phantoms, were scanned in axial scanning mode using a 64-slice CT scanner (Discovery CT750 HD, GE Healthcare, Waukesha, WI) at seven different mAs levels (5, 12.5, 25, 50, 100, 200, 300). At each mAs level, each phantom was repeatedly scanned 50 times to generate an image ensemble for noise analysis. Both the FBP method with a standard kernel and the MBIR method (Veo{sup ®}, GE Healthcare, Waukesha, WI) were used for CT image reconstruction. Three-dimensional (3D) noise power spectrum (NPS), two-dimensional (2D) NPS, and zero-dimensional NPS (noise variance) were assessed both globally and locally. Noise magnitude, noise spatial correlation, noise spatial uniformity and their dose dependence were examined for the two reconstruction methods. Results: (1) At each dose level and at each frequency, the magnitude of the NPS of MBIR was smaller than that of FBP. (2) While the shape of the NPS of FBP was dose-independent, the shape of the NPS of MBIR was strongly dose-dependent; lower dose lead to a “redder” NPS with a lower mean frequency value. (3) The noise standard deviation (?) of MBIR and dose were found to be related through a power law of ????(dose){sup ??} with the component ? ? 0.25, which violated the classical ????(dose){sup ?0.5} power law in FBP. (4) With MBIR, noise reduction was most prominent for thin image slices. (5) MBIR lead to better noise spatial uniformity when compared with FBP. (6) A composite image generated from two MBIR images acquired at two different dose levels (D1 and D2) demonstrated lower noise than that of an image acquired at a dose level of D1+D2. Conclusions: The noise characteristics of the MBIR method are significantly different from those of the FBP method. The well known tradeoff relationship between CT image noise and radiation dose has been modified by MBIR to establish a more gradual dependence of noise on dose. Additionally, some other CT noise properties that had been well understood based on the linear system theory have also been altered by MBIR. Clinical CT scan protocols that had been optimized based on the classical CT noise properties need to be carefully re-evaluated for systems equipped with MBIR in order to maximize the method's potential clinical benefits in dose reduction and/or in CT image quality improvement.

  3. Dormant storage reliability assessments-data based

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merren, G.T.

    1981-01-01

    A relatively large amount of data pertaining to the performance of certain electronic parts after long periods of dormant storage has been collected and analyzed by the Reliability Department of Sandia National Laboratories. The failure models used by Sandia are presented and reliability assessments for selected electronic parts derived from these models and the measured performance data are provided. These data based assessments are compared to similar assessments derived from handbook calculations using the general data and models provided in the handbooks.

  4. Capturing Implicit Policy from NCLB Test Type Assignments: Analysis of Characteristics and Performance of Students Taking Alternate Assessments Based on Modified Achievement Standards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cho, Hyun-Jeong; Kingston, Neal M.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the learner characteristics and performance scores of students in the 2009 alternate assessment-modified achievement standard for one Midwestern state. Comparing performance differences by disability ...

  5. Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact: Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Wildland Fire Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2003-04-25

    The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) is a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)-managed reservation occupying about 890 square miles in southeastern Idaho. The INEEL lies within the upper Snake River Plain sagebrush steppe ecosystem. Much of the sagebrush steppe ecosystem throughout the west has been segmented and lost to development and agriculture. The remaining sagebrush steppe ecosystem and the habitat it provides is threatened with irreversible conversion to non-native annual weeds by rangeland management practices in combination with the natural fire process. The sagebrush steppe of the INEEL is now threatened and DOE must evaluate its management role and alternatives available to preserve this important component of the western ecosystem.

  6. Performing Energy Security Assessments: A How-To Guide for Federal Facility Managers

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Guide describes the best practices and recommended process for federal facility managers to prepare for the following sections of a facility’s energy security plan: vulnerability assessments, energy preparedness and operations plans, and remedial action plans.

  7. Assessing performance : an analytical framework for the San José McEnery Convention Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Kai-yan, M.C.P. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2007-01-01

    This study first outlines three major factors that limit the assessments of convention centers: high uncertainty in the convention industry, complex institutional structures and operational priorities, and plethora of ...

  8. Performance of the Los Alamos National Laboratory spallation-driven solid-deuterium ultra-cold neutron source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saunders, A.; Makela, M.; Bagdasarova, Y.; Boissevain, J.; Bowles, T. J.; Currie, S. A.; Hill, R. E.; Hogan, G.; Morris, C. L.; Mortensen, R. N.; Ramsey, J.; Seestrom, S. J.; Sondheim, W. E.; Teasdale, W.; Wang, Z. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544 (United States); Back, H. O.; Broussard, L. J.; Hoagland, J.; Holley, A. T.; Pattie, R. W. Jr. [Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States); and others

    2013-01-15

    In this paper, we describe the performance of the Los Alamos spallation-driven solid-deuterium ultra-cold neutron (UCN) source. Measurements of the cold neutron flux, the very low energy neutron production rate, and the UCN rates and density at the exit from the biological shield are presented and compared to Monte Carlo predictions. The cold neutron rates compare well with predictions from the Monte Carlo code MCNPX and the UCN rates agree with our custom UCN Monte Carlo code. The source is shown to perform as modeled. The maximum delivered UCN density at the exit from the biological shield is 52(9) UCN/cc with a solid deuterium volume of {approx}1500 cm{sup 3}.

  9. Performance Assessment of Suture Type in Juvenile Chinook Salmon Surgically Implanted with Acoustic Transmitters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deters, Katherine A.; Brown, Richard S.; Carter, Kathleen M.; Boyd, James W.

    2009-02-27

    The objective of this study was to determine the best overall suture material to close incisions from the surgical implantation of Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) acoustic microtransmitters in subyearling Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha. The effects of seven suture materials, four surgeons, and two water temperatures on suture retention, incision openness, tag retention, tissue inflammation, and tissue ulceration were quantified. The laboratory study, conducted by researchers at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, supports a larger effort under way for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District, aimed at determining the suitability of acoustic telemetry for estimating short- and longer-term (30-60 days) juvenile-salmonid survival at Columbia and Snake River dams and through the lower Columbia River.

  10. Assessing the role of mini-applications in predicting key performance characteristics of scientific and engineering applications

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Barrett, R. F.; Crozier, P. S.; Doerfler, D. W.; Heroux, M. A.; Lin, P. T.; Thornquist, H. K.; Trucano, T. G.; Vaughan, C. T.

    2014-09-28

    Computational science and engineering application programs are typically large, complex, and dynamic, and are often constrained by distribution limitations. As a means of making tractable rapid explorations of scientific and engineering application programs in the context of new, emerging, and future computing architectures, a suite of miniapps has been created to serve as proxies for full scale applications. Each miniapp is designed to represent a key performance characteristic that does or is expected to significantly impact the runtime performance of an application program. In this paper we introduce a methodology for assessing the ability of these miniapps to effectively representmore »these performance issues. We applied this methodology to four miniapps, examining the linkage between them and an application they are intended to represent. Herein we evaluate the fidelity of that linkage. This work represents the initial steps required to begin to answer the question, ''Under what conditions does a miniapp represent a key performance characteristic in a full app?''« less

  11. Linking RESRAD-OFFSITE and HYDROGEOCHEM Model for Performance Assessment of Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Facility - 13429

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Wen-Sheng [Hydrotech Research Institute, National Taiwan University, Taiwan (China)] [Hydrotech Research Institute, National Taiwan University, Taiwan (China); Yu, Charley; Cheng, Jing-Jy; Kamboj, Sunita; Gnanapragasam, Emmanuel [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)] [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Liu, Chen-Wuing [Department of Bioenvironmental Systems Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Bioenvironmental Systems Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taiwan (China); Li, Ming-Hsu [Institute of Hydrological and Oceanic Sciences, National Central University, Taiwan (China)] [Institute of Hydrological and Oceanic Sciences, National Central University, Taiwan (China)

    2013-07-01

    Performance assessments are crucial steps for the long-term radiological safety requirements of low-level waste (LLW) disposal facility. How much concentration of radionuclides released from the near-field to biosphere and what radiation exposure levels of an individual can influence on the satisfactory performance of the LLW disposal facility and safety disposal environment. Performance assessment methodology for the radioactive waste disposal consists of the reactive transport modeling of safety-concerned radionuclides released from the near-field to the far-field, and the potential exposure pathways and the movements of radionuclides through the geosphere, biosphere and man of which the accompanying dose. Therefore, the integration of hydrogeochemical transport model and dose assessment code, HYDROGEOCHEM code and RESRAD family of codes is imperative. The RESRAD family of codes such as RESRAD-OFFSITE computer code can evaluate the radiological dose and excess cancer risk to an individual who is exposed while located within or outside the area of initial (primary) contamination. The HYDROGEOCHEM is a 3-D numerical model of fluid flow, thermal, hydrologic transport, and biogeochemical kinetic and equilibrium reactions in saturated and unsaturated media. The HYDROGEOCHEM model can also simulate the crucial geochemical mechanism, such as the effect of redox processes on the adsorption/desorption, hydrogeochemical influences on concrete degradation, adsorption/desorption of radionuclides (i.e., surface complexation model) between solid and liquid phase in geochemically dynamic environments. To investigate the safety assessment of LLW disposal facility, linking RESRAD-OFFSITE and HYDROGEOCHEM model can provide detailed tools of confidence in the protectiveness of the human health and environmental impact for safety assessment of LLW disposal facility. (authors)

  12. Statement of Work (SOW) for FY 2001 to FY 2006 for the Hanford Low Activity Tank Waste Performance Assessment Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PUIGH, R.J.

    2000-07-25

    This document describes the tasks included in the Hanford Low-Activity Tank Waste Performance Assessment activity though the close of the project in 2028. Near-term (2001-2006) tasks are described in detail, while tasks further in the future are simply grouped by year. The major tasks are displayed in the table provided. The major goals of the performance assessment activity are to provide the technical basis for the Department of Energy to continue to authorize the construction of disposal facilities, the onsite disposal of immobilized low-activity Hanford tank waste in those facilities, and the closure of the disposal facilities. Other significant goals are to provide the technical basis for the setting of the specifications of the immobilized waste and to support permitting of the disposal facilities.

  13. Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1980 to the DOE Assistant Secretary for Environment. Part 5. Environmental assessment, control, health and safety

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baalman, R.W.; Hays, I.D. (eds.)

    1981-02-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory's (PNL) 1980 annual report to the DOE Assistant Secretary for Environment describes research in environment, health, and safety conducted during fiscal year 1980. Part 5 includes technology assessments for natural gas, enhanced oil recovery, oil shale, uranium mining, magnetic fusion energy, solar energy, uranium enrichment and industrial energy utilization; regional analysis studies of environmental transport and community impacts; environmental and safety engineering for LNG, oil spills, LPG, shale oil waste waters, geothermal liquid waste disposal, compressed air energy storage, and nuclear/fusion fuel cycles; operational and environmental safety studies of decommissioning, environmental monitoring, personnel dosimetry, and analysis of criticality safety; health physics studies; and epidemiological studies. Also included are an author index, organization of PNL charts and distribution lists of the annual report, along with lists of presentations and publications. (DLS)

  14. Environmental assessment for the proposed construction and operation of a Genome Sequencing Facility in Building 64 at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-04-01

    This document is an Environmental Assessment (EA) for a proposed project to modify 14,900 square feet of an existing building (Building 64) at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) to operate as a Genome Sequencing Facility. This EA addresses the potential environmental impacts from the proposed modifications to Building 64 and operation of the Genome Sequencing Facility. The proposed action is to modify Building 64 to provide space and equipment allowing LBL to demonstrate that the Directed DNA Sequencing Strategy can be scaled up from the current level of 750,000 base pairs per year to a facility that produces over 6,000,000 base pairs per year, while still retaining its efficiency.

  15. Performance assessments at ETH Zrich: Information for lecturers and students of the Bachelor and Master programmes Environmental Sciences (D-USYS); Translated from the German original

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischlin, Andreas

    of Environmental Sciences Peter Frischknecht #12;Performance assessments at ETH Zürich: Information for lecturersPerformance assessments at ETH Zürich: Information for lecturers and students of the Bachelor and Master programmes Environmental Sciences (D-USYS); Translated from the German original

  16. ISET Journal of Earthquake Technology, Paper No. 449, Vol. 41, No. 2-4, June-December 2004, pp. 233-247 SEISMIC PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT OF REINFORCED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gupta, Vinay Kumar

    representative buildings according to displacement-based seismic design methodologies, as recommended by FEMA-273 the building partially inoperative. KEYWORDS: Performance-Based Design, Seismic Assessment, Masonry Infilled-247 SEISMIC PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT OF REINFORCED CONCRETE STRUCTURES WITH MASONRY INFILLED PANELS: THE CASE

  17. Environmental Assessment for Leasing Land for the Siting, Construction and Operation of a Commercial AM Radio Antenna at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2000-02-16

    The United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to lease approximately 3 acres of land at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) on the southeast tip of Technical Area (TA) 54 for the siting, construction and operation of an AM radio broadcasting antenna. This Environmental Assessment (EA) has been developed in order to assess the environmental effects of the Proposed Action and No Action alternative. The Proposed Action includes the lease of land for the siting, construction and operation of an AM radio broadcasting antenna in TA-54, just north of Pajarito Road and State Highway 4. The No Action Alternative was also considered. Under the No Action Alternative, DOE would not lease land on LANL property for the siting and operation of an AM radio broadcasting antenna; the DOE would not have a local station for emergency response use; and the land would continue to be covered in native vegetation and serve as a health and safety buffer zone for TA-54 waste management activities. Other potential sites on LANL property were evaluated but dismissed for reasons such as interference with sensitive laboratory experiments. Potential visual, health, and environmental effects are anticipated to be minimal for the Proposed Action. The radio broadcasting antenna would be visible against the skyline from some public areas, but would be consistent with other man-made objects in the vicinity that partially obstruct viewsheds (e.g. meteorological tower, power lines). Therefore, the net result would be a modest change of the existing view. Electromagnetic field (EMF) emissions from the antenna would be orders or magnitude less than permissible limits. The proposed antenna construction would not affect known cultural sites, but is located in close proximity to two archaeological sites. Construction would be monitored to ensure that the associated road and utility corridor would avoid cultural sites.

  18. Floodplain Assessment for the Proposed Engineered Erosion Controls at TA-72 in Lower Sandia Canyon, Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hathcock, Charles D.

    2012-08-27

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is preparing to implement engineering controls in Sandia Canyon at Technical Area (TA) 72. Los Alamos National Security (LANS) biologists conducted a floodplain determination and this project is located within a 100-year floodplain. The proposed project is to rehabilitate the degraded channel in lower Sandia Canyon where it crosses through the outdoor firing range at TA-72 to limit the loss of sediment and dissipate floodwater leaving LANL property (Figure 1). The proposed construction of these engineered controls is part of the New Mexico Environment Department's (NMED) approved LANL Individual Storm Water Permit. The purpose of this project is to install storm water controls at Sandia Watershed Site Monitoring Area 6 (S-SMA-6). Storm water controls will be designed and installed to meet the requirements of NPDES Permit No. NM0030759, commonly referred to as the LANL Individual Storm Water Permit (IP). The storm water control measures address storm water mitigation for the area within the boundary of Area of Concern (AOC) 72-001. This action meets the requirements of the IP for S-SMA-6 for storm water controls by a combination of: preventing exposure of upstream storm water and storm water generated within the channel to the AOC and totally retaining storm water falling outside the channel but within the AOC.

  19. Review of Methods Related to Assessing Human Performance in Nuclear Power Plant Control Room Simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katya L Le Blanc; Ronald L Boring; David I Gertman

    2001-11-01

    With the increased use of digital systems in Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) control rooms comes a need to thoroughly understand the human performance issues associated with digital systems. A common way to evaluate human performance is to test operators and crews in NPP control room simulators. However, it is often challenging to characterize human performance in meaningful ways when measuring performance in NPP control room simulations. A review of the literature in NPP simulator studies reveals a variety of ways to measure human performance in NPP control room simulations including direct observation, automated computer logging, recordings from physiological equipment, self-report techniques, protocol analysis and structured debriefs, and application of model-based evaluation. These methods and the particular measures used are summarized and evaluated.

  20. Assessing selected technologies and operational strategies for improving the environmental performance of future aircraft

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mahashabde, Anuja (Anuja Anil)

    2006-01-01

    The aviation industry is expected to grow at a rate of 4-5% in the next 20 years. Such a growth rate may have important impacts on local air quality, climate change and community noise. This work assesses selected technologies ...

  1. Durability Assessment of an Arch Dam using Inverse Analysis with Neural Networks and High Performance Computing.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coutinho, Alvaro L. G. A.

    Durability Assessment of an Arch Dam using Inverse Analysis with Neural Networks and High de Brasília diannemv@guarany.cpd.unb.br Abstract: In the present work, an analysis of the Funil dam, a double curvature arch dam placed in the state of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, is presented. The considered

  2. PHENIX CDR update: An experiment to be performed at the Brookhaven National Laboratory relativistic heavy ion collider. Revision

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-11-01

    The PHENIX Conceptual Design Report Update (CDR Update) is intended for use together with the Conceptual Design Report (CDR). The CDR Update is a companion document to the CDR, and it describes the collaboration`s progress since the CDR was submitted in January 1993. Therefore, this document concentrates on changes, refinements, and decisions that have been made over the past year. These documents together define the baseline PHENIX detector that the collaboration intends to build for operation at RHIC startup. In this chapter the current status of the detector and its motivation are briefly described. In Chapters 2 and 3 the detector and the physics performance are more fully developed. In Chapters 4 through 13 the details of the present design status, the technology choices, and the construction costs and schedules are presented. The physics goals of PHENIX collaboration have remained exactly as they were described in the CDR. Primary among these is the detection of a new phase of matter, the quark-gluon plasma (QGP), and the measurement of its properties. The PHENIX experiment will measure many of the best potential QGP signatures to see if any or all of these physics variables show anomalies simultaneously due to the formation of the QGP.

  3. Performance assessment for the disposal of low-level waste in the 200 West Area Burial Grounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wood, M.I.; Khaleel, R.; Rittmann, P.D.; Lu, A.H.; Finfrock, S.H.; DeLorenzo, T.H. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Serne, R.J.; Cantrell, K.J. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1995-06-01

    This document reports the findings of a performance assessment (PA) analysis for the disposal of solid low-level radioactive waste (LLW) in the 200 West Area Low-Level Waste Burial Grounds (LLBG) in the northwest corner of the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site. This PA analysis is required by US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5820.2A (DOE 1988a) to demonstrate that a given disposal practice is in compliance with a set of performance objectives quantified in the order. These performance objectives are applicable to the disposal of DOE-generated LLW at any DOE-operated site after the finalization of the order in September 1988. At the Hanford Site, DOE, Richland Operations Office (RL) has issued a site-specific supplement to DOE Order 5820.2A, DOE-RL 5820.2A (DOE 1993), which provides additiona I ce objectives that must be satisfied.

  4. Independent Oversight Review, National Energy Technology Laboratory...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Laboratory - May 2014 More Documents & Publications Enterprise Assessments Review, West Valley Demonstration Project - December 2014 Enterprise Assessments Review of the East...

  5. Assessment of innovative fuel designs for high performance light water reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carpenter, David Michael

    2006-01-01

    To increase the power density and maximum allowable fuel burnup in light water reactors, new fuel rod designs are investigated. Such fuel is desirable for improving the economic performance light water reactors loaded with ...

  6. Double-shell tank integrity assessments ultrasonic test equipment performance test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pfluger, D.C.

    1996-09-26

    A double-shell tank (DST) inspection (DSTI) system was performance tested over three months until August 1995 at Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, completing a contract initiated in February 1993 to design, fabricate, and test an ultrasonic inspection system intended to provide ultrasonic test (UT) and visual data to determine the integrity of 28 DSTs at Hanford. The DSTs are approximately one-million-gallon underground radioactive-waste storage tanks. The test was performed in accordance with a procedure (Jensen 1995) that included requirements described in the contract specification (Pfluger 1995). This report documents the results of tests conducted to evaluate the performance of the DSTI system against the requirements of the contract specification. The test of the DSTI system also reflects the performance of qualified personnel and operating procedures.

  7. Can Emergency Physicians Perform Common Carotid Doppler Flow Measurements to Assess Volume Responsiveness?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stolz, Lori A.; Mosier, Jarrod M.; Gross, Austin M.; Douglas, Matthew J.; Blavais, Michael; Adhikari, Srikar

    2015-01-01

    as means, medians, or proportions as appropriate, along withpreviously performed. The proportion of participants in the80.0% (24/30), while the proportion of non-participants that

  8. Environmental Public Health Performance Standards Environmental Health Program Self-assessment Instrument (Version 2)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Environmental Public Health Performance Standards Environmental Health Program Self Budget of Public Health Department or Parent Agency:_________________ Total Environmental Health Program Budget:______________ Proportion of Environmental Health Budget from #12;_____ (1) service fees _____ (2

  9. Seismic Performance Assessment and Probabilistic Repair Cost Analysis of Precast Concrete Cladding Systems for Multistory Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hunt, Jeffrey Patrick

    2010-01-01

    Nov. 8- 9. Arnold, C. 2008. Seismic Safety of the BuildingTab Connections for Gravity and Seismic Loads. Steel Tips,and Brown, A.T. 1995a. Seismic Performance of Architectural

  10. Daresbury Laboratory STFC Daresbury Laboratory is renowned for its

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daresbury Laboratory STFC Daresbury Laboratory is renowned for its world leading scientific computing. T he Laboratory is part of the Sci ­Tech Daresbury Campus near Warrington in Cheshire to perform cutting-edge research. Key activities Daresbury Laboratory is a hub for pioneering scientific

  11. Sandia National Laboratories: Products and Services

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Products and Services What Sandia National Laboratories Buys National Security & Pulsed Power Supports... Defense Systems & Assessments Electronic Systems Integrated Military...

  12. Oak Ridge Reservation Needs Assessment

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Needs Assessment for former Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Y-12 Nuclear Security Complex production workers.

  13. Performance assessment of the direct disposal in unsaturated tuff or spent nuclear fuel and high-level waste owned by USDOE: Volume 2, Methodology and results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rechard, R.P. [ed.

    1995-03-01

    This assessment studied the performance of high-level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel in a hypothetical repository in unsaturated tuff. The results of this 10-month study are intended to help guide the Office of Environment Management of the US Department of Energy (DOE) on how to prepare its wastes for eventual permanent disposal. The waste forms comprised spent fuel and high-level waste currently stored at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) and the Hanford reservations. About 700 metric tons heavy metal (MTHM) of the waste under study is stored at INEL, including graphite spent nuclear fuel, highly enriched uranium spent fuel, low enriched uranium spent fuel, and calcined high-level waste. About 2100 MTHM of weapons production fuel, currently stored on the Hanford reservation, was also included. The behavior of the waste was analyzed by waste form and also as a group of waste forms in the hypothetical tuff repository. When the waste forms were studied together, the repository was assumed also to contain about 9200 MTHM high-level waste in borosilicate glass from three DOE sites. The addition of the borosilicate glass, which has already been proposed as a final waste form, brought the total to about 12,000 MTHM.

  14. Assessment of H-Coal process developments: impact on the performance and economics of a proposed commercial plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Talib, A.; Gray, D.; Neuworth, M.

    1984-01-01

    This report assesses the performance of the H-Coal process, a catalytic direct liquefaction process, at a process development and large pilot-plant scale of operation. The assessment focused on the evaluation of operating results from selected long-term successful process development unit (PDU) and pilot plant runs made on Illinois No. 6 coal. The pilot plant has largely duplicated the product yield structure obtained during the PDU runs. Also, the quality of products, particularly liquid products, produced during the pilot plant run is quite comparable to that produced during the PDU runs. This confirms the scalability of the H-Coal ebullated-bed reactor system from a PDU-scale, 3 tons of coal per day, to a large pilot scale, 220 tons of coal per day, plant. The minor product yield differences, such as higher yields of C/sub 3/, C/sub 4/, and naphtha fractions, and lower yields of distillate oils obtained during pilot plant runs as compared to the PDU runs, will not impact the projected technical and economic performance of a first-of-a-kind commercial H-Coal plant. Thus, the process yield and operating data collected during the PDU operations provided an adequate basis for projecting the technical and economic performance of the proposed H-Coal commercial plant. 18 references, 9 figures, 56 tables.

  15. Re-Assessing Green Building Performance: A Post Occupancy Evaluation of 22 GSA Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fowler, Kimberly M.; Rauch, Emily M.; Henderson, Jordan W.; Kora, Angela R.

    2010-06-01

    2nd report on the performance of GSA's sustainably designed buildings. The purpose of this study was to provide an overview of measured whole building performance as it compares to GSA and industry baselines. The PNNL research team found the data analysis illuminated strengths and weaknesses of individual buildings as well as the portfolio of buildings. This section includes summary data, observations that cross multiple performance metrics, discussion of lessons learned from this research, and opportunities for future research. The summary of annual data for each of the performance metrics is provided in Table 25. The data represent 1 year of measurements and are not associated with any specific design features or strategies. Where available, multiple years of data were examined and there were minimal significant differences between the years. Individually focused post occupancy evaluation (POEs) would allow for more detailed analysis of the buildings. Examining building performance over multiple years could potentially offer a useful diagnostic tool for identifying building operations that are in need of operational changes. Investigating what the connection is between the building performance and the design intent would offer potential design guidance and possible insight into building operation strategies. The 'aggregate operating cost' metric used in this study represents the costs that were available for developing a comparative industry baseline for office buildings. The costs include water utilities, energy utilities, general maintenance, grounds maintenance, waste and recycling, and janitorial costs. Three of the buildings that cost more than the baseline in Figure 45 have higher maintenance costs than the baseline, and one has higher energy costs. Given the volume of data collected and analyzed for this study, the inevitable request is for a simple answer with respect to sustainably designed building performance. As previously stated, compiling the individual building values into single metrics is not statistically valid given the small number of buildings, but it has been done to provide a cursory view of this portfolio of sustainably designed buildings. For all metrics except recycling cost per rentable square foot and CBE survey response rate, the averaged building performance was better than the baseline for the GSA buildings in this study.

  16. Evaluation of Side Stream Filtration Technology at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyd, Brian K.

    2014-08-01

    This technology evaluation was performed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and Oak Ridge National Laboratory on behalf of the Federal Energy Management Program. The objective was to quantify the benefits side stream filtration provides to a cooling tower system. The evaluation assessed the performance of an existing side stream filtration system at a cooling tower system at Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s Spallation Neutron Source research facility. This location was selected because it offered the opportunity for a side-by-side comparison of a system featuring side stream filtration and an unfiltered system.

  17. Towards Adaptive Educational Assessments: Predicting Student Performance using Temporal Stability and Data Analytics in Learning Management Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thakur, Gautam [ORNL] [ORNL; Olama, Mohammed M [ORNL] [ORNL; McNair, Wade [ORNL] [ORNL; Sukumar, Sreenivas R [ORNL] [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    Data-driven assessments and adaptive feedback are becoming a cornerstone research in educational data analytics and involve developing methods for exploring the unique types of data that come from the educational context. For example, predicting college student performance is crucial for both the students and educational institutions. It can support timely intervention to prevent students from failing a course, increasing efficacy of advising functions, and improving course completion rate. In this paper, we present our efforts in using data analytics that enable educationists to design novel data-driven assessment and feedback mechanisms. In order to achieve this objective, we investigate temporal stability of students grades and perform predictive analytics on academic data collected from 2009 through 2013 in one of the most commonly used learning management systems, called Moodle. First, we have identified the data features useful for assessments and predicting student outcomes such as students scores in homework assignments, quizzes, exams, in addition to their activities in discussion forums and their total Grade Point Average(GPA) at the same term they enrolled in the course. Second, time series models in both frequency and time domains are applied to characterize the progression as well as overall projections of the grades. In particular, the model analyzed the stability as well as fluctuation of grades among students during the collegiate years (from freshman to senior) and disciplines. Third, Logistic Regression and Neural Network predictive models are used to identify students as early as possible who are in danger of failing the course they are currently enrolled in. These models compute the likelihood of any given student failing (or passing) the current course. The time series analysis indicates that assessments and continuous feedback are critical for freshman and sophomores (even with easy courses) than for seniors, and those assessments may be provided using the predictive models. Numerical results are presented to evaluate and compare the performance of the developed models and their predictive accuracy. Our results show that there are strong ties associated with the first few weeks for coursework and they have an impact on the design and distribution of individual modules.

  18. ASSESSING PERFORMANCE OF ANIMAL WELFARE ORGANIZATIONS TO IMPROVE PHILANTHROPIC DECISION-MAKING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farrell, Anthony P.

    that many participants felt the sector would benefit from the use of more quantitative and qualitative-MAKING by Leanne Katherine McConnachie B.A., The University of Victoria, 1988 A thesis submitted in partial in an in-depth qualitative study to establish which performance criteria best determine the effectiveness

  19. Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact: The National Compact Stellarator Experiment at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2002-10-25

    If the United States is to meet the energy needs of the future, it is essential that new technologies emerge to compensate for dwindling supplies of fossil fuels, the eventual depletion of fissionable uranium used in present-day nuclear reactors, and the limitations of solar, hydro and wind alternatives. Fusion energy, the power source of the sun and other stars, has the potential to become a major source of energy for the future. Power from fusion would provide substantially reduced environmental impacts as compared with current forms of energy generation. Thus, the United States and other countries around the world continue to pursue development of fusion energy as one of a number of potential power sources for the long term. Fusion research, using various machine configurations, has been proceeding since the early 1950's, and significant progress has been achieved in performance and in understanding of the underlying physics. For most of this period, fusion machines called stellarators and tokamaks, which are toroidal (doughnut-shaped) devices, have been most frequently used to conduct experiments for producing controlled nuclear fusion. It is now desirable to take a next step in the fusion development program, by providing an experimental device to investigate the attractiveness of a compact stellarator as the basis for a fusion power reactor. This concept has the potential to build upon advances in understanding of stellarators and tokamaks, and to combine the best features of both. The goal is to build a compact stellarator that would be smaller than conventional stellarators and operate more efficiently than previous tokamaks. Such a device would broaden our understanding of magnetic fusion science while contributing to the development of a potentially attractive fusion reactor solution that may have cost advantages over other fusion concepts.

  20. The Laboratory Performance Appraisal Process and Performance...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Technology Program Management ... 16 3.1 Provide Effective and Efficient Strategic Planning and Stewardship of Scientific Capabilities and Program Vision...

  1. The Laboratory Performance Appraisal Process and Performance...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    efforts are counter-productive to the interests of the Department. Notable Outcomes PSO: Effectively implement DOE Order 422.1, Conduct of Operations. This implementation...

  2. The human toxicity potential and a strategy for evaluating model performance in life-cycle impact assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKone, Thomas E.; Hertwich, Edgar G.

    2001-01-01

    within the framework of life cycle assessment of products.in the Journal of Life Cycle Assessment Research SupportedIntroduction Life cycle assessment (LCA) requires

  3. PVGIS approach for assessing the performances of the first PV grid-connected power plant in Morocco

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barhdadi, Abdelfettah

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we apply the PVGIS method for estimating the performance of the first grid-connected PV micro-power plant in Morocco. PVGIS approach provides analysis and assessment of in-site solar energy resources and predicts with good accuracy the potential of PV systems in term of electricity production. We find that annual total power generation of the micro-power is slightly higher than that initially expected at the installation stage and actually measured. The yearly predicted and measured power production values agree to about 2 %. However, individual monthly production can have larger discrepancy.

  4. Performance assessment of the In-Well Vapor-Stripping System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gilmore, T.J.; White, M.D.; Spane, F.A. Jr.

    1996-10-01

    In-well vapor stripping is a remediation technology designed to preferentially extract volatile organic compounds dissolved in groundwater by converting them to a vapor phase and then treating the vapor. This vapor-stripping system is distinctly different from the more traditional in situ air-sparging concept. In situ sparging takes place in the aquifer formation; in-well vapor stripping takes place within the well casing. The system was field demonstrated at Edwards Air Force Base, California; the first-time demonstration of this technology in the United States. Installation and testing of the system were completed in late 1995, and the demonstration was operated nearly continuously for 6 months (191 days) between January 16 and July 25, 1996. Postdemonstration hydrochemical sampling continued until September 1996. The demonstration was conducted by collaborating researchers from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (a) and Stanford University as part of an interim cleanup action at the base. Edwards Air Force Base and its environmental subcontractor, Earth Technology Corporation, as well as EG&G Environmental, holders of the commercial rights to the technology, were also significant contributors to the demonstration.

  5. A Prototype Performance Assessment Model for Generic Deep Borehole Repository for High-Level Nuclear Waste - 12132

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Joon H.; Arnold, Bill W.; Swift, Peter N.; Hadgu, Teklu; Freeze, Geoff; Wang, Yifeng

    2012-07-01

    A deep borehole repository is one of the four geologic disposal system options currently under study by the U.S. DOE to support the development of a long-term strategy for geologic disposal of commercial used nuclear fuel (UNF) and high-level radioactive waste (HLW). The immediate goal of the generic deep borehole repository study is to develop the necessary modeling tools to evaluate and improve the understanding of the repository system response and processes relevant to long-term disposal of UNF and HLW in a deep borehole. A prototype performance assessment model for a generic deep borehole repository has been developed using the approach for a mined geological repository. The preliminary results from the simplified deep borehole generic repository performance assessment indicate that soluble, non-sorbing (or weakly sorbing) fission product radionuclides, such as I-129, Se-79 and Cl-36, are the likely major dose contributors, and that the annual radiation doses to hypothetical future humans associated with those releases may be extremely small. While much work needs to be done to validate the model assumptions and parameters, these preliminary results highlight the importance of a robust seal design in assuring long-term isolation, and suggest that deep boreholes may be a viable alternative to mined repositories for disposal of both HLW and UNF. (authors)

  6. Environmental assessment for the resiting, construction, and operation of the Environmental and Molecular Sciences Laboratory at the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-07-01

    This environmental assessment (EA) presents estimated environmental impacts from the resiting, construction, and operation of the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Environmental and Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL), which is proposed to be constructed and operated on land near the south boundary of the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. The EMSL, if constructed, would be a modern research facility in which experimental, theoretical, and computational techniques can be focused on environmental restoration problems, such as the chemical and transport behavior of complex mixtures of contaminants in the environment. The EMSL design includes approximately 18,500 square meters (200,000 square feet) of floor space on a 12-hectare (30-acre) site. The proposed new site is located within the city limits of Richland in north Richland, at the south end of DOE`s 300 Area, on land to be deeded to the US by the Battelle Memorial Institute. Approximately 200 persons are expected to be employed in the EMSL and approximately 60 visiting scientists may be working in the EMSL at any given time. State-of-the-art equipment is expected to be installed and used in the EMSL. Small amounts of hazardous substances (chemicals and radionuclides) are expected to be used in experimental work in the EMSL.

  7. Status Update on Action 2c: Criteria Review and Approach Document (CRAD) for Performing Assessments of Activity-level Work Planning and Control

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Slide Presentation by Bradley K. Davy, Director, Office of Worker Safety and Health Assistance, HS. Criteria Review and Approach Document (CRAD) for Performing Assessments of Activity- Level Work Planning and Control. DOE CRAD Development Approach.

  8. Pacific Gas and Electric Company's Compressed Air Management Program: A Performance Assessment Approach to Improving Industrial Compressed Air System Operation and Maintenance 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qualmann, R. L.; Zeller, W.; Baker, M.

    2002-01-01

    The Compressed Air Management Program (CAMP) provides Pacific Gas and Electric's (PG&E's) large industrial customers with measurement-based performance assessments of their compressed air systems. Under this program, the customer's system...

  9. Assessing Soil Vapor Extraction Remediation Performance and Closure: A Review - 12188

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Truex, M.J.; Carroll, K.C.; Oostrom, M. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Soil vapor extraction (SVE) is a baseline remediation approach for volatile contaminants. While SVE is generally effective for removal of contaminants from higher permeability portions of the vadose zone, contamination in low-permeability zones can persist due to mass transfer processes that limit the removal effectiveness. Thus, a diminishing rate of contaminant extraction over time is typically observed, yet contamination may remain in low-permeability zones. Under these conditions, SVE performance needs to be evaluated to determine whether the system should be optimized, terminated, or transitioned to another technology to replace or augment SVE. Methodologies have been developed to quantify SVE performance over time and to evaluate the impact of persistent vadose zone contamination sources on groundwater quality. Recently, these methods have applied mass flux/discharge concepts to quantify contaminant source strength. Methods include field measurement techniques using the SVE system to quantify source strength and predictive analyses with analytical and numerical models to evaluate the impact of the contaminant source on groundwater. (authors)

  10. Performance assessment for the geological disposal of Deep Burn spent fuel using TTBX

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van den Akker, B.P.; Ahn, J. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    The behavior of Deep Burn Modular High Temperature Reactor Spent Fuel (DBSF) is investigated in the Yucca Mountain geological repository (YMR) with respect to the annual dose (Sv/yr) delivered to the Reasonably Maximally Exposed Individual (RMEI) from the transport of radionuclides released from the graphite waste matrix. Transport calculations are performed with a novel computer code, TTBX which is capable of modeling transport pathways that pass through heterogeneous geological formations. TTBX is a multi-region extension of the existing single region TTB transport code. Overall the peak annual dose received by the RMEI is seen to be four orders of magnitude lower than the regulatory threshold for exposure, even under pessimistic scenarios. A number of factors contribute to the favorable performance of DBSF. A reduction of one order of magnitude in the peak annual dose received by the RMEI is observed for every order of magnitude increase in the waste matrix lifetime, highlighting the importance of the waste matrix durability and suggesting graphite's utility as a potential waste matrix for the disposal of high-level waste. Furthermore, we see that by incorporating a higher fidelity far-field model the peak annual dose calculated to be received by the RMEI is reduced by two orders of magnitude. By accounting for the heterogeneities of the far field we have simultaneously removed unnecessary conservatisms and improved the fidelity of the transport model. (authors)

  11. Waste Form Release Calculations for the 2005 Integrated Disposal Facility Performance Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bacon, Diana H.; McGrail, B PETER.

    2005-07-26

    A set of reactive chemical transport calculations was conducted with the Subsurface Transport Over Reactive Multiphases (STORM) code to evaluate the long-term performance of a representative low-activity waste glass in a shallow subsurface disposal system located on the Hanford Site. Two-dimensional simulations were run until the waste form release rates reached a quasi-stationary-state, usually after 2,000 to 4,000 yr. The primary difference between the waste form release simulations for the 2001 ILAW PA, and the simulations described herein, is the number of different materials considered. Whereas the previous PA considered only LAWABP1 glass, the current PA also describes radionuclide release from three different WTP glasses (LAWA44, LAWB45 and LAWC22), two different bulk vitrification glasses (6-tank composite and S-109), and three different grout waste forms (containing Silver Iodide, Barium Iodide and Barium Iodate). All WTP and bulk vitrification glasses perform well. However, the radionuclide release from the salt in the cast refractory surrounding the bulk vitrification waste packages is 2 to 170 times higher than the glass release rate, depending on the water recharge rate. Iodine-129 release from grouted waste forms is highly sensitive to the solubility of the iodine compound contained in the grout. The normalized iodine release rate from grout containing barium iodate is a factor of 10 higher than what the normalized release rate would be if the iodine were contained in LAWA44 glass.

  12. Contract 98, Appendix F self-assessment report for Fiscal Year 2003

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Albert , Rich

    2003-10-15

    This report summarizes the Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory internal assessment of Laboratory operational and administrative performance in key support functions for Fiscal Year (FY) 2003. The report provides documentation of ongoing performance-based management and oversight processes required by the Department of Energy (DOE) to monitor, measure, and evaluate Berkeley Lab work.

  13. Assessment of transition fuel cycle performance with and without a modified-open fuel cycle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feng, B.; Kim, T. K.; Taiwo, T. A.

    2012-07-01

    The impacts of a modified-open fuel cycle (MOC) option as a transition step from the current once-through cycle (OTC) to a full-recycle fuel cycle (FRC) were assessed using the nuclear systems analysis code DANESS. The MOC of interest for this study was mono-recycling of plutonium in light water reactors (LWR-MOX). Two fuel cycle scenarios were evaluated with and without the MOC option: a 2-stage scenario with a direct path from the current fleet to the final FRC, and a 3-stage scenario with the MOC option as a transition step. The FRC reactor (fast reactor) was assumed to deploy in 2050 for both scenarios, and the MOC reactor in the 3-stage scenario was assumed to deploy in 2025. The last LWRs (using either UOX or MOX fuels) come online in 2050 and are decommissioned by 2110. Thus, the FRC is achieved after 2110. The reprocessing facilities were assumed to be available 2 years prior to the deployment of the MOC and FRC reactors with maximum reprocessing capacities of 2000 tHM/yr and 500 tHM/t for LWR-UOX and LWR-MOX used nuclear fuels (UNFs), respectively. Under a 1% nuclear energy demand growth assumption, both scenarios were able to sustain a full transition to the FRC without delay. For the 3-stage scenario, the share of LWR-MOX reactors reaches a peak of 15% of installed capacity, which resulted in 10% lower cumulative uranium consumption and SWU requirements compared to the 2-stage scenario during the transition period. The peak UNF storage requirement decreases by 50% in the 3-stage scenario, largely due to the earlier deployment of the reprocessing plants to support the MOC fuel cycle. (authors)

  14. Wireless Transmission of Monitoring Data out of an Underground Repository: Results of Field Demonstrations Performed at the HADES Underground Laboratory - 13589

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schroeder, T.J.; Rosca-Bocancea, E.; Hart, J.

    2013-07-01

    As part of the European 7. framework project MoDeRn, Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group (NRG) performed experiments in order to demonstrate the feasibility of wireless data transmission through the subsurface over large distances by low frequency magnetic fields in the framework of the geological disposal of radioactive waste. The main objective of NRG's contribution is to characterize and optimize the energy use of this technique within the specific context of post-closure monitoring of a repository. For that, measurements have been performed in the HADES Underground Research Laboratory (URL) located at Mol, Belgium, at 225 m depth. The experimental set-up utilizes a loop antenna for the transmitter that has been matched to the existing infrastructure of the HADES. Between 2010 and 2012 NRG carried out several experiments at the HADES URL in order to test the technical set-up and to characterize the propagation behavior of the geological medium and the local background noise pattern. Transmission channels have been identified and data transmission has been demonstrated at several frequencies, with data rates up to 10 bit/s and bit error rates <1%. A mathematical model description that includes the most relevant characteristics of the transmitter, transmission path, and receiver has been developed and applied to analyze possible options to optimize the set-up. With respect to the energy-efficiency, results so far have shown that data transmission over larger distances through the subsurface is a feasible option. To support the conclusions on the energy need per bit of transmitted data, additional experiments are foreseen. (authors)

  15. Performance assessment of CsI(Tl) screens on various substrates for X-ray imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, Zhaodong; Zhang, Hongkai; Zhao, Bozhen; Qin, Xiubo; Wei, Cunfeng; Liu, Yu; Wei, Long

    2015-01-01

    Thallium-doped cesium iodide (CsI(Tl)) screens are widely used in X-ray imaging devices because of the columnar structure of CsI(Tl) layer, but few reports focus on the optical role of the substrate in the screen system. In this paper, four substrates including fused silica (SiO2), silver-film coated SiO2, graphite (C) and fiber optic plate (FOP) are used to fabricate CsI(Tl) screens by thermal evaporation. Their imaging performance is evaluated by relative light output (RLO), modulation transfer function (MTF), normalized noise power spectrum (NNPS) and noise equivalent quanta (NEQ). The results reveal that although CsI(Tl) film on graphite plate yields images with the lowest light output, it presents relatively higher spatial resolution and better signal-to-noise characteristics. However, films on SiO2 plate obtain low MTF but high NNPS curves, whether or not coated with silver film. Furthermore, scintillation screens on FOP have bright images with low NNPS and high NEQ, but have the lowest MTF. By controll...

  16. Performance Indicators for Uranium Bioremediation in the Subsurface: Basis and Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Long, Philip E.; Yabusaki, Steven B.

    2006-12-29

    The purpose of this letter report is to identify performance indicators for in situ engineered bioremediation of subsurface uranium (U) contamination. This report focuses on in situ treatment of groundwater by biostimulation of extant in situ microbial populations (see http://128.3.7.51/NABIR/generalinfo/primers_guides/03_NABIR_primer.pdf for background information on bioremediation of metals and radionuclides). The treatment process involves amendment of the subsurface with an electron donor such as acetate, lactate, ethanol or other organic compound such that in situ microorganisms mediate the reduction of U(VI) to U(IV). U(VI) precipitates as uraninite or other insoluble U phase. Uranium is thus immobilized in place by such processes and is subject to reoxidation that may remobilize the reduced uranium. Related processes include augmenting the extant subsurface microbial populations, addition of electron acceptors, and introduction of chemically reducing materials such as zero-valent Fe. While metrics for such processes may be similar to those for in situ biostimulation, these related processes are not directly in the scope of this letter report.

  17. Development of an object-oriented simulation code for repository performance assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsujimoto, Keiichi; Ahn, J.

    1999-07-01

    As understanding for mechanisms of radioactivity confinement by a deep geologic repository improves at the individual process level, it has become imperative to evaluate consequences of individual processes to the performance of the whole repository system. For this goal, the authors have developed a model for radionuclide transport in, and release from, the repository region by incorporating multiple-member decay chains and multiple waste canisters. A computer code has been developed with C++, an object-oriented language. By utilizing the feature that a geologic repository consists of thousands of objects of the same kind, such as the waste canister, the repository region is divided into multiple compartments and objects for simulation of radionuclide transport. Massive computational tasks are distributed over, and executed by, multiple networked workstations, with the help of parallel virtual machine (PVM) technology. Temporal change of the mass distribution of 28 radionuclides in the repository region for the time period of 100 million yr has been successfully obtained by the code.

  18. Laboratory Activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Christopher F.; Serne, R. Jeffrey

    2008-01-17

    This chapter summarizes the laboratory activities performed by PNNL’s Vadose Zone Characterization Project in support of the Tank Farm Vadose Zone Program, led by CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. The results of these studies are contained in numerous reports (Lindenmeier et al. 2002; Serne et al. 2002a, 2002b, 2002c, 2002d, 2002e; Lindenmeier et al. 2003; Serne et al. 2004a, 2004b; Brown et al. 2005, 2006a, 2007; Serne et al. 2007) and have generated much of the data reported in Chapter 22 (Geochemistry-Contaminant Movement), Appendix G (Geochemistry-Contaminant Movement), and Cantrell et al. (2007, SST WMA Geochemistry Data Package – in preparation). Sediment samples and characterization results from PNNL’s Vadose Zone Characterization Project are also shared with other science and technology (S&T) research projects, such as those summarized in Chapter 12 (Associated Science Activities).

  19. LABORATORY SAFETY CHECKLIST LABORATORY: DATE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fleming, Andrew J.

    LABORATORY SAFETY CHECKLIST LABORATORY: DATE: RESPONSIBLE OFFICER: INSPECTION BY: Boxes/A indicates the item does not apply to this laboratory. 1 HAZARD IDENTIFICATION /x/NA Comments 1 in the laboratory? 1.2 Are current copies available of: (a) permits for notifiable or prohibited carcinogens, (b

  20. Facility Environmental Vulnerability Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Hoesen, S.D.

    2001-07-09

    From mid-April through the end of June 2001, a Facility Environmental Vulnerability Assessment (FEVA) was performed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The primary goal of this FEVA was to establish an environmental vulnerability baseline at ORNL that could be used to support the Laboratory planning process and place environmental vulnerabilities in perspective. The information developed during the FEVA was intended to provide the basis for management to initiate immediate, near-term, and long-term actions to respond to the identified vulnerabilities. It was expected that further evaluation of the vulnerabilities identified during the FEVA could be carried out to support a more quantitative characterization of the sources, evaluation of contaminant pathways, and definition of risks. The FEVA was modeled after the Battelle-supported response to the problems identified at the High Flux Beam Reactor at Brookhaven National Laboratory. This FEVA report satisfies Corrective Action 3A1 contained in the Corrective Action Plan in Response to Independent Review of the High Flux Isotope Reactor Tritium Leak at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, submitted to the Department of Energy (DOE) ORNL Site Office Manager on April 16, 2001. This assessment successfully achieved its primary goal as defined by Laboratory management. The assessment team was able to develop information about sources and pathway analyses although the following factors impacted the team's ability to provide additional quantitative information: the complexity and scope of the facilities, infrastructure, and programs; the significantly degraded physical condition of the facilities and infrastructure; the large number of known environmental vulnerabilities; the scope of legacy contamination issues [not currently addressed in the Environmental Management (EM) Program]; the lack of facility process and environmental pathway analysis performed by the accountable line management or facility owner; and poor facility and infrastructure drawings. The assessment team believes that the information, experience, and insight gained through FEVA will help in the planning and prioritization of ongoing efforts to resolve environmental vulnerabilities at UT-Battelle--managed ORNL facilities.

  1. Assessment of display performance for medical imaging systems: Executive summary of AAPM TG18 report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Samei, Ehsan; Badano, Aldo; Chakraborty, Dev [Duke Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Departments of Radiology, Physics, and Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, DUMC 3302, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States) and FDA, CDRH (United States)] [and others

    2005-04-01

    Digital imaging provides an effective means to electronically acquire, archive, distribute, and view medical images. Medical imaging display stations are an integral part of these operations. Therefore, it is vitally important to assure that electronic display devices do not compromise image quality and ultimately patient care. The AAPM Task Group 18 (TG18) recently published guidelines and acceptance criteria for acceptance testing and quality control of medical display devices. This paper is an executive summary of the TG18 report. TG18 guidelines include visual, quantitative, and advanced testing methodologies for primary and secondary class display devices. The characteristics, tested in conjunction with specially designed test patterns (i.e., TG18 patterns), include reflection, geometric distortion, luminance, the spatial and angular dependencies of luminance, resolution, noise, glare, chromaticity, and display artifacts. Geometric distortions are evaluated by linear measurements of the TG18-QC test pattern, which should render distortion coefficients less than 2%/5% for primary/secondary displays, respectively. Reflection measurements include specular and diffuse reflection coefficients from which the maximum allowable ambient lighting is determined such that contrast degradation due to display reflection remains below a 20% limit and the level of ambient luminance (L{sub amb}) does not unduly compromise luminance ratio (LR) and contrast at low luminance levels. Luminance evaluation relies on visual assessment of low contrast features in the TG18-CT and TG18-MP test patterns, or quantitative measurements at 18 distinct luminance levels of the TG18-LN test patterns. The major acceptable criteria for primary/secondary displays are maximum luminance of greater than 170/100 cd/m{sup 2}, LR of greater than 250/100, and contrast conformance to that of the grayscale standard display function (GSDF) of better than 10%/20%, respectively. The angular response is tested to ascertain the viewing cone within which contrast conformance to the GSDF is better than 30%/60% and LR is greater than 175/70 for primary/secondary displays, or alternatively, within which the on-axis contrast thresholds of the TG18-CT test pattern remain discernible. The evaluation of luminance spatial uniformity at two distinct luminance levels across the display faceplate using TG18-UNL test patterns should yield nonuniformity coefficients smaller than 30%. The resolution evaluation includes the visual scoring of the CX test target in the TG18-QC or TG18-CX test patterns, which should yield scores greater than 4/6 for primary/secondary displays. Noise evaluation includes visual evaluation of the contrast threshold in the TG18-AFC test pattern, which should yield a minimum of 3/2 targets visible for primary/secondary displays. The guidelines also include methodologies for more quantitative resolution and noise measurements based on MTF and NPS analyses. The display glare test, based on the visibility of the low-contrast targets of the TG18-GV test pattern or the measurement of the glare ratio (GR), is expected to yield scores greater than 3/1 and GRs greater than 400/150 for primary/secondary displays. Chromaticity, measured across a display faceplate or between two display devices, is expected to render a u{sup '},v{sup '} color separation of less than 0.01 for primary displays. The report offers further descriptions of prior standardization efforts, current display technologies, testing prerequisites, streamlined procedures and timelines, and TG18 test patterns.

  2. An introduction to the mechanics of performance assessment using examples of calculations done for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant between 1990 and 1992. Revision

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rechard, R.P.

    1996-06-01

    This document provides an overview of the processes used to access the performance of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The quantitative metrics used in the performance-assessment (PA) process are those put forward in the Environmental Protection Agency`s Environmental Standards for the Management and Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel, HIgh-LEvel and transuranic radioactive Wastes (40 CFR 191).

  3. LBNO-DEMO: Large-scale neutrino detector demonstrators for phased performance assessment in view of a long-baseline oscillation experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Agostino; B. Andrieu; R. Asfandiyarov; D. Autiero; O. Bésida; F. Bay; R. Bayes; A. M. Blebea-Apostu; A. Blondel; M. Bogomilov; S. Bolognesi; S. Bordoni; A. Bravar; M. Buizza-Avanzini; F. Cadoux; D. Caiulo; M. Calin; M. Campanelli; C. Cantini; L. Chaussard; D. Chesneanu; N. Colino; P. Crivelli; I. De Bonis; Y. Déclais; J. Dawson; C. De La Taille; P. Del Amo Sanchez; A. Delbart; S. Di Luise; D. Duchesneau; F. Dulucq; J. Dumarchez; I. Efthymiopoulos; S. Emery; T. Enqvist; L. Epprecht; T. Esanu; D. Franco; D. Franco; M. Friend; V. Galymov; A. Gendotti; C. Giganti; I. Gil-Botella; M. C Gomoiu; P. Gorodetzky; A. Haesler; T. Hasegawa; S. Horikawa; M. Ieva; A. Jipa; Y. Karadzhov; I. Karpikov; A. Khotjantsev; A. Korzenev; D. Kryn; Y. Kudenko; P. Kuusiniemi; I. Lazanu; J. -M. Levy; K. Loo; T. Lux; J. Maalampi; R. M. Margineanu; J. Marteau; C. Martin; G. Martin-Chassard; E. Mazzucato; A. Mefodiev; O. Mineev; B. Mitrica; S. Murphy; T. Nakadaira; M. Nessi; K. Nikolics; L. Nita; E. Noah; P. Novella; G. A. Nuijten; T. Ovsiannikova; C. Palomares; T. Patzak; E. Pennacchio; L. Periale; H. Pessard; B. Popov; M. Ravonel; M. Rayner; C. Regenfus; C. Ristea; O. Ristea; A. Robert; A. Rubbia; K. Sakashita; F. Sanchez; R. Santorelli; E. Scantamburlo; F. Sergiampietri; D. Sgalaberna; M. Slupecki; F. J. P. Soler; D. L. Stanca; A. Tonazzo; W. H. Trzaska; R. Tsenov; G. Vankova-Kirilova; F. Vannucci; G. Vasseur; A. Verdugo; T. Viant; S. Wu; N. Yershov; L. Zambelli; M. Zito

    2014-09-14

    In June 2012, an Expression of Interest for a long-baseline experiment (LBNO) has been submitted to the CERN SPSC. LBNO considers three types of neutrino detector technologies: a double-phase liquid argon (LAr) TPC and a magnetised iron detector as far detectors. For the near detector, a high-pressure gas TPC embedded in a calorimeter and a magnet is the baseline design. A mandatory milestone is a concrete prototyping effort towards the envisioned large-scale detectors, and an accompanying campaign of measurements aimed at assessing the detector associated systematic errors. The proposed $6\\times 6\\times 6$m$^3$ DLAr is an industrial prototype of the design discussed in the EoI and scalable to 20 kton or 50~kton. It is to be constructed and operated in a controlled laboratory and surface environment with test beam access, such as the CERN North Area (NA). Its successful operation and full characterisation will be a fundamental milestone, likely opening the path to an underground deployment of larger detectors. The response of the DLAr demonstrator will be measured and understood with an unprecedented precision in a charged particle test beam (0.5-20 GeV/c). The exposure will certify the assumptions and calibrate the response of the detector, and allow to develop and to benchmark sophisticated reconstruction algorithms, such as those of 3-dimensional tracking, particle ID and energy flow in liquid argon. All these steps are fundamental for validating the correctness of the physics performance described in the LBNO EoI.

  4. Use of groundwater lifetime expectancy for the performance assessment of a deep geologic waste repository: 1. Theory, illustrations, and implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cornaton, F J; Normani, S D; Sudicky, E A; Sykes, J F

    2011-01-01

    Long-term solutions for the disposal of toxic wastes usually involve isolation of the wastes in a deep subsurface geologic environment. In the case of spent nuclear fuel, if radionuclide leakage occurs from the engineered barrier, the geological medium represents the ultimate barrier that is relied upon to ensure safety. Consequently, an evaluation of radionuclide travel times from a repository to the biosphere is critically important in a performance assessment analysis. In this study, we develop a travel time framework based on the concept of groundwater lifetime expectancy as a safety indicator. Lifetime expectancy characterizes the time that radionuclides will spend in the subsurface after their release from the repository and prior to discharging into the biosphere. The probability density function of lifetime expectancy is computed throughout the host rock by solving the backward-in-time solute transport adjoint equation subject to a properly posed set of boundary conditions. It can then be used to defi...

  5. Preliminary Performance Assessment for the Waste Management Area C at the Hanford Site in Southeast Washington - 15331

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bergeron, Marcel P.; Singleton, Kristin M.; Eberlein, Susan J.

    2015-01-07

    A performance assessment (PA) of Single-Shell Tank (SST) Waste Management Area C (WMA C) located at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site in southeastern Washington is being conducted to satisfy the requirements of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (HFFACO), as well as other Federal requirements and State-approved closure plans and permits. The WMP C PA assesses the fate, transport, and impacts of radionuclides and hazardous chemicals within residual wastes left in tanks and ancillary equipment and facilities in their assumed closed configuration and the subsequent risks to humans into the far future. The part of the PA focused on radiological impacts is being developed to meet the requirements for a closure authorization under DOE Order 435.1 that includes a waste incidental to reprocessing determination for residual wastes remaining in tanks, ancillary equipment, and facilities. An additional part of the PA will evaluate human health and environmental impacts from hazardous chemical inventories in residual wastes remaining in WMA C tanks, ancillary equipment, and facilities needed to meet the requirements for permitted closure under RCRA.

  6. Assessment of Structural Resistance of building 4862 to Earthquake and Tornado Forces [SEC 1 and 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    METCALF, I.L.

    1999-12-06

    This report presents the results of work done for Hanford Engineering Laboratory under contract Y213-544-12662. LATA performed an assessment of building 4862 resistance to earthquake and tornado forces.

  7. Enterprise Assessments, Lessons Learned from Targeted Reviews...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    - November 2013 Enterprise Assessments Targeted Review, Argonne National Laboratory - November 2014 Enterprise Assessments Review, West Valley Demonstration Project - December...

  8. Determination of argon concentration and assessment of the durability of high-performance insulating glass units filled with argon gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elmahdy, A.H.; Yusuf, S.A. [National Research Council of Canada, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)

    1995-12-31

    The use of heavy gases or gas mixtures in the cavity of sealed insulating glass (IG) units instead of air presents a challenge to the glazing industry and researchers to develop test procedures to assess the durability of the units and to determine the gas concentration inside the cavity. The main issue is to obtain gas samples at different time spans from the same unit without affecting the integrity of the edge seal. A laboratory test method to determine argon gas concentration in IG units was developed. The method is based on the use of gas chromatographic techniques. Oxygen, argon, and nitrogen are separated at subambient temperature ({minus}30 C). Gas sampling was possible by means of a self-healing plug made of a thermoplastic rubber and commercially available at a very low cost. A large number of IG units filled with an argon/air mixture were fitted with the special plug and tested for the durability of the edge seal according to the CAN/CGSB 12.8, Insulating Glass Units, standard (CGSB 1990). Test results showed that all the units tested contained less argon than the amount of 95% or higher claimed by the manufacturers at the time of assembly. Most of the tested units retained the argon gas, allowing for normal gas loss due to gas diffusion through the edge seal which varies between 1% and 5%, following the accelerated aging, high humidity, and volatile (fogging) tests. The test procedure to determine argon gas concentration in IG units is being reviewed by Canadian and American standards organizations for use in the certification of IG units.

  9. Ray Bair | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    science, computational and laboratory research Large scale applications of high performance computing and communications News DOE creates new Center for Computational Materials...

  10. Regional issue identification and assessment: study methodology. First annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    The overall assessment methodologies and models utilized for the first project under the Regional Issue Identification and Assessment (RIIA) program are described. Detailed descriptions are given of the methodologies used by lead laboratories for the quantification of the impacts of an energy scenario on one or more media (e.g., air, water, land, human and ecology), and by all laboratories to assess the regional impacts on all media. The research and assessments reflected in this document were performed by the following national laboratories: Argonne National Laboratory; Brookhaven National Laboratory; Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory; Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory; Oak Ridge National Laboratory; and Pacific Northwest Laboratory. This report contains five chapters. Chapter 1 briefly describes the overall study methodology and introduces the technical participants. Chapter 2 is a summary of the energy policy scenario selected for the RIIA I study and Chapter 3 describes how this scenario was translated into a county-level siting pattern of energy development. The fourth chapter is a detailed description of the individual methodologies used to quantify the environmental and socioeconomic impacts of the scenario while Chapter 5 describes how these impacts were translated into comprehensive regional assessments for each Federal Region.

  11. An Updated Performance Assessment For A New Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Facility In West Texas - 12192

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dornsife, William P.; Kirk, J. Scott; Shaw, Chris G. [Waste Control Specialists LLC, Andrews, Texas (United States)

    2012-07-01

    This Performance Assessment (PA) submittal is an update to the original PA that was developed to support the licensing of the Waste Control Specialists LLC Low-Level Radioactive Waste (LLRW) disposal facility. This update includes both the Compact Waste Facility (CWF) and the Federal Waste Facility (FWF), in accordance with Radioactive Material License (RML) No. R04100, License Condition (LC) 87. While many of the baseline assumptions supporting the initial license application PA were incorporated in this update, a new transport code, GoldSim, and new deterministic groundwater flow codes, including HYDRUS and MODFLOWSURFACT{sup TM}, were employed to demonstrate compliance with the performance objectives codified in the regulations and RML No. R04100, LC 87. A revised source term, provided by the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality staff, was used to match the initial 15 year license term. This updated PA clearly confirms and demonstrates the robustness of the characteristics of the site's geology and the advanced engineering design of the disposal units. Based on the simulations from fate and transport models, the radiation doses to members of the general public and site workers predicted in the initial and updated PA were a small fraction of the criterion doses of 0.25 mSv and 50 mSv, respectively. In a comparison between the results of the updated PA against the one developed in support of the initial license, both clearly demonstrated the robustness of the characteristics of the site's geology and engineering design of the disposal units. Based on the simulations from fate and transport models, the radiation doses to members of the general public predicted in the initial and updated PA were a fraction of the allowable 25 mrem/yr (0.25 m sievert/yr) dose standard for tens-of-thousands of years into the future. Draft Texas guidance on performance assessment (TCEQ, 2004) recommends a period of analysis equal to 1,000 years or until peak doses from the more mobile radionuclides occur. The EPA National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants limits radionuclide doses through the air pathway to 10 mrem/yr. Gaseous radionuclide doses from the CWF and the FWF, due to decomposition gases, are a small fraction of the dose limit. The radon flux from the CWF and FWF were compared to the flux limit of 20 pCi/m{sup 2}-s from 40 CFR 192. Because of the thick cover system, the calculated radon flux was a very small fraction of the limit. (authors)

  12. 2011 Annual Planning Summary for National Energy Technology Laboratory...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) 2011 Annual Planning Summary for National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) The ongoing and projected Environmental Assessments and...

  13. Los Alamos National Security, LLC Los Alamos National Laboratory...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Security, LLC Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Voluntary Protection Program (VPP) Assessment Los Alamos National Security, LLC Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Voluntary...

  14. Pollution prevention opportunity assessment for organization 1700.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerard, Morgan Evan

    2007-06-01

    This Pollution Prevention Opportunity Assessment (PPOA) was conducted for Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico Organization 1700 in June, 2006. The primary purpose of this PPOA is to provide recommendations to assist Organization 1700 in reducing the generation of waste and improving the efficiency of their processes and procedures. This report contains a summary of the information collected, analyses performed and recommended options for implementation. The Sandia National Laboratories Pollution Prevention staff will continue to work with Organization 1700 to implement the recommendations.

  15. F-Tank Farm Performance Assessment Updates through the Special Analysis Process at Savannah River Site - 12169

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Layton, Mark H. [Savannah River Remediation, LLC (United States)

    2012-07-01

    The F-Area Tank Farm (FTF) is owned by the U.S. Department of Energy and operated by Savannah River Remediation, LLC (SRR), Liquid Waste Operations contractor at DOE's Savannah River Site (SRS). The FTF is in the north-central portion of the SRS and occupies approximately 22 acres within F-Area. The FTF is an active radioactive waste storage facility consisting of 22 carbon steel waste tanks and ancillary equipment such as transfer lines, evaporators and pump tanks. An FTF Performance Assessment (PA) was prepared to support the eventual closure of the FTF underground radioactive waste tanks and ancillary equipment. The PA provides the technical basis and results to be used in subsequent documents to demonstrate compliance with the pertinent requirements identified below for final closure of FTF. The FTank Farm is subject to a state industrial waste water permit and Federal Facility Agreement. Closure documentation will include an F-Tank Farm Closure Plan and tank-specific closure modules utilizing information from the performance assessment. For this reason, the State of South Carolina and the Environmental Protection Agency must be involved in the performance assessment review process. The residual material remaining after tank cleaning is also subject to reclassification prior to closure via a waste determination pursuant to Section 3116 of the Ronald W. Reagan National Defense Authorization Act of Fiscal Year 2005. The projected waste tank inventories in the FTF PA provide reasonably bounding FTF inventory projections while taking into account uncertainties in the effectiveness of future tank cleaning technologies. As waste is removed from the FTF waste tanks, the residual contaminants will be sampled and the remaining residual inventory is characterized. In this manner, tank specific data for the tank inventories at closure will be available to supplement the waste tank inventory projections currently used in the FTF PA. For FTF, the new tank specific data will be evaluated through the Special Analysis process. The FTF Special Analyses process will be utilized to evaluate information regarding the final residual waste that will be grouted in place in the FTF Tanks and assess the potential impact the new inventory information has on the FTF PA assumptions and results. The Special Analysis can then be used to inform decisions regarding FTF tank closure documents. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the Special Analysis process and share insights gained while implementing this process. An example of an area of interest in the revision process is balancing continuous improvement versus configuration control of agreed upon methodologies. Other subjects to be covered include: 1) defining the scope of the revisions included in the Special Analysis, 2) determining which PA results should be addressed in the Special Analysis, and 3) deciding whether the Special Analysis should utilize more qualitative or quantitative assessments. For the SRS FTF, an FTF PA has been prepared to provide the technical basis and results to be used in subsequent documents to demonstrate compliance with the pertinent requirements for final closure of FTF. The FTF Special Analyses process will be utilized to evaluate the impact new information has on the FTF PA assumptions and results. The Special Analysis can then be used to inform decisions regarding FTF tank closure documents. In preparing SAs, it is crucial that the scope of the SA be well defined within the SA, since the specific scope will vary from SA to SA. Since the SAs are essentially addendums to the PA, the SA scope should utilize the PA as the baseline from which the SA scope is defined. The SA needs to focus on evaluating the change associated with the scope, and not let other changes interfere with the ability to perform that evaluation by masking the impact of the change. In preparing the SA, it is also important to let the scope determine whether the Special Analysis should utilize more qualitative or quantitative assessments and also which results from the PA should be addresse

  16. Laboratory and Field Performance of Buried Steel-Reinforced High Density Polyethylene (SRHDPE) Pipes in a Ditch Condition under a Shallow Cover

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khatri, Deep Kumar

    2014-05-31

    during installation and loadings, and (6) the highest measured strains recorded in steel and plastic during the installation and loadings in all the tests were within the permissible values. The laboratory tests however have some limitations. For example...

  17. Appendix PA: Performance Assessment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L O O D SFederal Facility Agreement andMON-2014 WIPP for the

  18. Advances in Performance Assessment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room News Publications Traditional Knowledge KiosksAboutHelp

  19. ACCOUNTING FOR A VITRIFIED PLUTONIUM WASTE FORM IN THE YUCCA MOUNTAIN REPOSITORY TOTAL SYSTEM PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT (TSPA)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marra, J

    2007-02-12

    A vitrification technology utilizing a lanthanide borosilicate (LaBS) glass appears to be a viable option for dispositioning excess weapons-useable plutonium that is not suitable for processing into mixed oxide (MOX) fuel. A significant effort to develop a glass formulation and vitrification process to immobilize plutonium was completed in the mid-1990s to support the Plutonium Immobilization Program (PIP). Further refinement of the vitrification process was accomplished as part of the Am/Cm solution vitrification project. The LaBS glass formulation was found to be capable of immobilizing in excess of 10 wt% Pu and to be very tolerant of the impurities accompanying the plutonium material streams. Thus, this waste form would be suitable for dispositioning plutonium owned by the Department of Energy-Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) that may not be well characterized and may contain high levels of impurities. The can-in-canister technology demonstrated in the PIP could be utilized to dispose of the vitrified plutonium in the federal radioactive waste repository. The can-in-canister technology involves placing small cans of the immobilized Pu form into a high level waste (HLW) glass canister fitted with a rack to hold the cans and then filling the canister with HLW glass. Testing was completed to demonstrate that this technology could be successfully employed with little or no impact to current Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) operation and that the resulting canisters were essentially equivalent to the present HLW glass canisters to be dispositioned in the federal repository. The performance of wastes in the repository and, moreover, the performance of the entire repository system is being evaluated by the Department of Energy-Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (DOE-RW) using a Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) methodology. Technical bases documents (e.g., Analysis/Modeling Reports (AMR)) that address specific issues regarding waste form performance are being used to develop process models as input to the TSPA analyses. In this report, models developed in five AMRs for waste forms currently slated for disposition in the repository are evaluated for their applicability to waste forms with plutonium immobilized in LaBS glass using the can-in-canister technology. Those AMRs address: high-level waste glass degradation; radionuclide inventory; in-package chemistry; dissolved concentration limits of radioactive elements; and colloid-associated radionuclide concentrations. Based on evaluation of how the models treated HLW glass and similarities in the corrosion behaviors of borosilicate HLW glasses and LaBS glass, the models in the AMRs were deemed to be directly applicable to the disposition of excess weapons-useable plutonium. The evaluations are summarized.

  20. Nuclear power plant cable materials : review of qualification and currently available aging data for margin assessments in cable performance.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Celina, Mathias Christopher; Gillen, Kenneth Todd; Lindgren, Eric Richard

    2013-05-01

    A selective literature review was conducted to assess whether currently available accelerated aging and original qualification data could be used to establish operational margins for the continued use of cable insulation and jacketing materials in nuclear power plant environments. The materials are subject to chemical and physical degradation under extended radiationthermal- oxidative conditions. Of particular interest were the circumstances under which existing aging data could be used to predict whether aged materials should pass loss of coolant accident (LOCA) performance requirements. Original LOCA qualification testing usually involved accelerated aging simulations of the 40-year expected ambient aging conditions followed by a LOCA simulation. The accelerated aging simulations were conducted under rapid accelerated aging conditions that did not account for many of the known limitations in accelerated polymer aging and therefore did not correctly simulate actual aging conditions. These highly accelerated aging conditions resulted in insulation materials with mostlyinert' aging processes as well as jacket materials where oxidative damage dropped quickly away from the air-exposed outside jacket surface. Therefore, for most LOCA performance predictions, testing appears to have relied upon heterogeneous aging behavior with oxidation often limited to the exterior of the cable cross-section - a situation which is not comparable with the nearly homogenous oxidative aging that will occur over decades under low dose rate and low temperature plant conditions. The historical aging conditions are therefore insufficient to determine with reasonable confidence the remaining operational margins for these materials. This does not necessarily imply that the existing 40-year-old materials would fail if LOCA conditions occurred, but rather that unambiguous statements about the current aging state and anticipated LOCA performance cannot be provided based on original qualification testing data alone. The non-availability of conclusive predictions for the aging conditions of 40-year-old cables implies that the same levels of uncertainty will remain for any re-qualification or extended operation of these cables. The highly variable aging behavior of the range of materials employed also implies that simple, standardized aging tests are not sufficient to provide the required aging data and performance predictions for all materials. It is recommended that focused studies be conducted that would yield the material aging parameters needed to predict aging behaviors under low dose, low temperature plant equivalent conditions and that appropriately aged specimens be prepared that would mimic oxidatively-aged 40- to 60- year-old materials for confirmatory LOCA performance testing. This study concludes that it is not sufficient to expose materials to rapid, high radiation and high temperature levels with subsequent LOCA qualification testing in order to predictively quantify safety margins of existing infrastructure with regard to LOCA performance. We need to better understand how cable jacketing and insulation materials have degraded over decades of power plant operation and how this aging history relates to service life prediction and the performance of existing equipment to withstand a LOCA situation.

  1. Role of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in the Laboratory to Laboratory Nuclear Materials Protection, Control and Accounting (MPC&A) Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blasy, J.A.; Koncher, T.R.; Ruhter, W.D.

    1995-05-02

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is participating in a US Department of Energy sponsored multi-laboratory cooperative effort with the Russian Federation nuclear institutes to reduce risks of nuclear weapons proliferation by strengthening systems of nuclear materials protection, control, and accounting in both countries. This program is called the Laboratory-to-Laboratory Nuclear Materials Protection, Control, and Accounting (MPC&A) Program and it is designed to complement other US-Russian MPC&A programs such as the government-to-govermment (NunnLugar) programs. LLNL`s role in this program has been to collaborate with various Russian institutes in several areas. One of these is integrated safeguards and security planning and analysis, including the performing of vulnerability assessments. In the area of radiation measurements LLNL is cooperating with various institutes on gamma-ray measurement and analysis techniques for plutonium and uranium accounting. LLNL is also participating in physical security upgrades including entry control and portals.

  2. EARTHQUAKE PREPAREDNESS FOR LABORATORIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polly, David

    EARTHQUAKE PREPAREDNESS FOR LABORATORIES By: Christopher E. Kohler (Environmental Health and Safety, principal investigators, lab supervisors, and lab personnel assess their areas of responsibility to determine safety procedures and use this information to mitigate situations that may pose a problem in case

  3. Hanford Immobilized Low Activity Waste (ILAW) Performance Assessment 2001 Version [Formerly DOE/RL-97-69] [SEC 1 & 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MANN, F.M.

    2000-08-01

    The Hanford Immobilized Low-Activity Waste Performance Assessment examines the long-term environmental and human health effects associated with the planned disposal of the vitrified low-activity fraction of waste presently contained in Hanford Site tanks. The tank waste is the byproduct of separating special nuclear materials from irradiated nuclear fuels over the past 50 years. This waste is stored in underground single- and double-shell tanks. The tank waste is to be retrieved, separated into low-activity and high-level fractions, and then immobilized by vitrification. The US. Department of Energy (DOE) plans to dispose of the low-activity fraction in the Hanford Site 200 East Area. The high-level fraction will be stored at the Hanford Site until a national repository is approved. This report provides the site-specific long-term environmental information needed by the DOE to modify the current Disposal Authorization Statement for the Hanford Site that would allow the following: construction of disposal trenches; and filling of these trenches with ILAW containers and filler material with the intent to dispose of the containers.

  4. TSPA 1991: An initial total-system performance assessment for Yucca Mountain; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnard, R.W.; Wilson, M.L.; Dockery, H.A.; Kaplan, P.G.; Eaton, R.R.; Bingham, F.W. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gauthier, J.H.; Robey, T.H. [Spectra Research Inst., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1992-07-01

    This report describes an assessment of the long-term performance of a repository system that contains deeply buried highly radioactive waste; the system is assumed to be located at the potential site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The study includes an identification of features, events, and processes that might affect the potential repository, a construction of scenarios based on this identification, a selection of models describing these scenarios (including abstraction of appropriate models from detailed models), a selection of probability distributions for the parameters in the models, a stochastic calculation of radionuclide releases for the scenarios, and a derivation of complementary cumulative distribution functions (CCDFs) for the releases. Releases and CCDFs are calculated for four categories of scenarios: aqueous flow (modeling primarily the existing conditions at the site, with allowances for climate change), gaseous flow, basaltic igneous activity, and human intrusion. The study shows that models of complex processes can be abstracted into more simplified representations that preserve the understanding of the processes and produce results consistent with those of more complex models.

  5. National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    on the Pajarito Plateau topic of inaugural lecture at Los Alamos National Laboratory January 4, 2013 Lecture series begins yearlong commemoration of 70th anniversary LOS...

  6. Energy Systems Integration Laboratory (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-10-01

    This fact sheet describes the purpose, lab specifications, applications scenarios, and information on how to partner with NREL's Energy Systems Integration Laboratory at the Energy Systems Integration Facility. The Energy Systems Integration Laboratory at NREL's Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF) provides a flexible, renewable-ready platform for research, development, and testing of state-of-the-art hydrogen-based and other energy storage systems. The main focus of the laboratory is assessment of the technical readiness, performance characterization, and research to help industry move these systems towards optimal renewable-based production and efficient utilization of hydrogen. Research conducted in the Energy Systems Integration Laboratory will advance engineering knowledge and market deployment of hydrogen technologies to support a growing need for versatile distributed electricity generation, applications in microgrids, energy storage for renewables integration, and home and station-based hydrogen vehicle fueling. Research activities are targeted to improve the technical readiness of the following: (1) Low and high temperature electrolyzers, reformers and fuel cells; (2) Mechanical and electrochemical compression systems; (3) Hydrogen storage; (4) Hydrogen vehicle refueling; and (5) Internal combustion or turbine technology for electricity production. Examples of experiments include: (1) Close- and direct-coupling of renewable energy sources (PV and wind) to electrolyzers; (2) Performance and efficiency validation of electrolyzers, fuel cells, and compressors; (3) Reliability and durability tracking and prediction; (4) Equipment modeling and validation testing; (5) Internal combustion or turbine technology for electricity production; and (6) Safety and code compliance.

  7. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Regional Laboratory System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : Division of Environmental Science and Assessment Laboratory Branch John Bourbon, Director bourbonU.S. Environmental Protection Agency Regional Laboratory System EPA Regional Laboratories the Conversation on Environmentalism and Working for Environmental Justice

  8. * Work performed under the auspices of the USDOE by Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory under Contract No. DE-AC02-Startup of the Experimental Physics Industrial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Energy National Laboratories. EPICS is actively supported through an international collaboration made up was freely available from the ÒGNU ProjectÓ and other sources. This was important in order to remain within open, · extensible, · capable of running on Unix, · runs on computers from competing suppliers, · users

  9. NREL GHP [Geothermal Heat Pump] Showcase: GHP Installation and Intensive in situ and Performance Monitoring at NREL's Solar Radiation and Research Laboratory; Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, E. R.

    2010-07-01

    This document provides an overview of the geothermal heat pump (GHP) showcase at NREL and how it will help the SRRL site move forward with the goal of being a model of sustainability within the NREL campus, providing an effective demonstration of GHP systems and needed space conditioning for laboratory expansion.

  10. Independent Oversight Review, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    October 2012 Independent Oversight Review, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory - October 2012 October 2012 Review of the Department of Energy Office of Science Assessment of the...

  11. Independent Oversight Review, Los Alamos National Laboratory...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    September 2011 Independent Oversight Review, Los Alamos National Laboratory - September 2011 September 2011 Review of the Facility Centered Assessment of the Los Alamos National...

  12. PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT 2009 EPA WIPP RECERTIFICATION FACT SHEET United States Environmental Protection Agency | Office of Air and Radiation (6608J) | June 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT 2009 EPA WIPP RECERTIFICATION FACT SHEET United States Environmental Protection Agency | Office of Air and Radiation (6608J) | June 2009 http://www.epa.gov/radiation/wipp the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) to the accessible environment over a 10,000-year period. The WIPP PA

  13. A user's guide to the GoldSim/BLT-MS integrated software package:a low-level radioactive waste disposal performance assessment model.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knowlton, Robert G.; Arnold, Bill Walter; Mattie, Patrick D.

    2007-03-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia), a U.S. Department of Energy National Laboratory, has over 30 years experience in the assessment of radioactive waste disposal and at the time of this publication is providing assistance internationally in a number of areas relevant to the safety assessment of radioactive waste disposal systems. In countries with small radioactive waste programs, international technology transfer program efforts are often hampered by small budgets, schedule constraints, and a lack of experienced personnel. In an effort to surmount these difficulties, Sandia has developed a system that utilizes a combination of commercially available software codes and existing legacy codes for probabilistic safety assessment modeling that facilitates the technology transfer and maximizes limited available funding. Numerous codes developed and endorsed by the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and codes developed and maintained by United States Department of Energy are generally available to foreign countries after addressing import/export control and copyright requirements. From a programmatic view, it is easier to utilize existing codes than to develop new codes. From an economic perspective, it is not possible for most countries with small radioactive waste disposal programs to maintain complex software, which meets the rigors of both domestic regulatory requirements and international peer review. Therefore, revitalization of deterministic legacy codes, as well as an adaptation of contemporary deterministic codes, provides a credible and solid computational platform for constructing probabilistic safety assessment models. This document is a reference users guide for the GoldSim/BLT-MS integrated modeling software package developed as part of a cooperative technology transfer project between Sandia National Laboratories and the Institute of Nuclear Energy Research (INER) in Taiwan for the preliminary assessment of several candidate low-level waste repository sites. Breach, Leach, and Transport-Multiple Species (BLT-MS) is a U.S. NRC sponsored code which simulates release and transport of contaminants from a subsurface low-level waste disposal facility. GoldSim is commercially available probabilistic software package that has radionuclide transport capabilities. The following report guides a user through the steps necessary to use the integrated model and presents a successful application of the paradigm of renewing legacy codes for contemporary application.

  14. Environmental Assessment for Lease of Land for the Development of a Research Park at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico - Final Document

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    1997-10-07

    As part of its initiative to fulfill its responsibilities to provide support for the incorporated County of Los Alamos (the County) as an Atomic Energy Community, while simultaneously fulfilling its obligations to enhance the self-sufficiency of the County under authority of the Atomic Energy Community Act of 1955 and the Defense Authorization Act, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to lease undeveloped land in Los Alamos, New Mexico, to the County for private sector use as a research park. The Proposed Action is intended to accelerate economic development activities within the County by creating regional employment opportunities through offering federal land for private sector lease and use. As a result of the proposed land lease, any government expenditures for providing infrastructure to the property would be somewhat supplemented by tenant purchase of Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) expertise in research and development activities. The presence of a research park within LANL boundaries is expected to allow private sector tenants of the park to be able to quickly and efficiently call upon LANL scientific expertise and facility and equipment capabilities as part of their own research operations and LANL research personnel, in turn, would be challenged in areas complementary to their federally funded research. In this way a symbiotic relationship would be enjoyed by both parties while simultaneously promoting economic development for the County through new job opportunities at the Research Park and at LANL, new indirect support opportunities for the community at large, and through payment of the basic building space leases. A ''sliding-scale'' approach (DOE 1993) is the basis for the analysis of effects in this Environmental Assessment (EA). That is, certain aspects of the Proposed Action have a greater potential for creating adverse environmental effects than others; therefore, they are discussed in greater detail in this EA than those aspects of the action that have little potential for effect. The Proposed Action would result in an increase of as many as 1,500 new direct jobs and, as many as 2,565 indirect jobs could be created from the development of a research park. Lease of the tract would not reduce the size of LANL or change its site boundary. However, approximately 30 ac (12 ha) of a 60-ac (24-ha) tract would be changed from an undeveloped to a developed status. Under the No Action Alternative, no transfer or lease of Federal lands would occur. LANL would not have the benefit of its research personnel working on a variety of complementary research efforts beyond their federally funded responsibilities. No new jobs would be created from proposed development activities. Undeveloped lands would remain in their current condition. Two hypothetical accidents were analyzed that evaluated a potential chemical release and radiological doses to the public from hypothetical accidents at the proposed Research Park. Neither accident scenario resulted in potentially serious health effects for workers or the public at the proposed Research Park. The cumulative effects of the Proposed Action as well as reasonably foreseeable related actions could result in potential adverse health effects. Environmental effects would be limited to the loss of a small amount of wildlife habitat. Additional economic development would be expected to occur.

  15. Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Safety Conscious Work Environmen...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Safety Conscious Work Environment (SCWE) Self-Assessment Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Safety Conscious Work Environment (SCWE) Self-Assessment The documents included in...

  16. Laboratory issues statement on Los Alamos historical document...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Historical document retrieval and assessment report Laboratory issues statement on Los Alamos Historical Document Retrieval and Assessment report This is an important document, and...

  17. An introduction to the mechanics of performance assessment using examples of calculations done for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant between 1990 and 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rechard, R.P.

    1995-10-01

    This document provides an overview of the process used to assess the performance of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), a proposed repository for transuranic wastes that is located in southeastern New Mexico. The quantitative metrics used in the performance-assessment (PA) process are those put forward in the Environmental Protection Agency`s Environmental Standards for the Management and Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel, High-Level and Transuranic Radioactive flasks (40 CFR 191). Much has been written about the individual building blocks that comprise the foundation of PA theory and practice, and that WIPP literature is well cited herein. However, the present approach is to provide an accurate, well documented overview of the process, from the perspective of the mechanical steps used to perform the actual PA calculations. Specifically, the preliminary stochastic simulations that comprise the WIPP PAs of 1990, 1991. and 1992 are summarized.

  18. 4 ESS (trademark) switch electromagnetic-pulse assessment. Volume 2. Task 3 laboratory testing of the 4 ESS Switch. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-12-01

    The 4ESS Switch was subjected to test sequences representative of electromagnetic stresses following a high-altitude nuclear blast. These laboratory tests revealed some potential equipment sensitivities requiring only minor modifications. With these modifications implemented, the 4 ESS Switch demonstrated considerable robustness in servicing calls following current injection stress. (jhd)

  19. Outcome 4. The graduates will have the ability to use techniques, skills and modern petroleum & natural gas engineering tools. The assessment is performed with respect to the key abilities that the students are expected to acquire in specific courses that

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    & natural gas engineering tools. The assessment is performed with respect to the key abilities. Utilize various software for solving production engineering problems PNGE 332 Gas-liquid equilibrium

  20. Characterization, propagation and analysis of aleatory and epistemic uncertainty in the 2008 performance assessment for the proposed repository for radioactive waste at Yucca Mountain, Nevada.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Helton, Jon Craig; Sallaberry, Cedric M.; Hansen, Clifford W.

    2010-10-01

    The 2008 performance assessment (PA) for the proposed repository for high-level radioactive waste at Yucca Mountain (YM), Nevada, illustrates the conceptual structure of risk assessments for complex systems. The 2008 YM PA is based on the following three conceptual entities: a probability space that characterizes aleatory uncertainty; a function that predicts consequences for individual elements of the sample space for aleatory uncertainty; and a probability space that characterizes epistemic uncertainty. These entities and their use in the characterization, propagation and analysis of aleatory and epistemic uncertainty are described and illustrated with results from the 2008 YM PA.

  1. UC Assurance Plan For Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory July2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chernowski, John

    2007-07-09

    This Division ES&H Self-Assessment Manual describes how the Laboratory administers a division self-assessment program that conforms to the institutional requirements promulgated in the 'LBNL Environment, Safety and Health Self-Assessment Program' (LBNL/PUB-5344, latest revision). The institutional program comprises all appraisal and reporting activities that identify environmental, safety, and health deficiencies and associated corrective actions. It is designed to meet U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requirements for self-assessment. Self-assessment is a continuous process of information gathering and evaluation. A division selfassessment program should describe methods for gathering and documenting information, and methods to analyze these performance data to identify trends and root causes and their corrections.

  2. Approach and strategy for performing ecological risk assessments for the U.S. Department of Energy`s Oak Ridge Reservation: 1994 revision

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suter, G.W. II; Sample, B.E.; Jones, D.S.; Ashwood, T.L.

    1994-08-01

    This report provides guidance for planning and performing ecological risk assessments on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). The tiered approach to ecological risk assessment has been implemented, generic conceptual models have been developed, and a general approach for developing ecological assessment endpoints and measurement endpoints has been agreed upon. The document also includes changes in terminology to agree with the terminology in the US Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) framework for ecological risk assessment. Although ecological risks are equal in regulatory importance to human health risks, formal procedures for ecological risk assessment are poorly developed. This report will provide specific guidance and promote the use of consistent approaches for ecological risk assessments at individual sites on the ORR. The strategy discussed in this report is consistent with the overall strategy for site management and Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) compliance and with relevant EPA guidance. The general approach and strategy presented herein was developed for the ORR, but it should be applicable to other complex CERCLA sites that possess significant ecological resources.

  3. Visgraf Laboratory IMPA Visgraf Laboratory IMPA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Figueiredo, Luiz Henrique

    1 Visgraf Laboratory ­ IMPA Visgraf Laboratory ­ IMPA Visgraf Laboratory ­ IMPA CNMAC 99 CNMAC 99 jonas@impa.br @impa.br Visgraf Laboratory ­ IMPA Visgraf Laboratory ­ IMPA Rio de Janeiro Rio de Janeiro www.visgraf.impa.br www.visgraf.impa.br Visgraf Laboratory ­ IMPA Visgraf Laboratory ­ IMPA Visgraf

  4. Annual report of the Environmental Restoration Monitoring and Assessment Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory for FY 1992. Environmental Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clapp, R.B.

    1992-09-01

    This report summarizes the salient features of the annual efforts of the investigations and monitoring, conducted to support the Environmental Restoration (ER) Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The results presented can be used to develop a conceptual understanding of the key contaminants and the sources, fluxes, and processes affecting their distribution and movement. This information forms a basis for prioritizing sites and for selecting, implementing, and evaluating remedial actions. Groundwater, soils, sediments, and surface water monitoring results are described.

  5. Assessment of the Impact of a New Guanidine Suppressor In NGS on F/H Laboratory Analyses For DWPF and Saltstone MCU Transfers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bannochie, C. J.

    2013-04-29

    Implementation of the Next Generation Solvent (NGS) in the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) will now proceed with a new suppressor compound, 1,2,3-tris(3,7-dimethyloctyl)guanidine (TiDG), replacing the originally planned suppressor for NGS, 1,3-dicyclohexyl-2-(11-methyldodecyl) guanidine (DCiTG). The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was tasked with evaluating the potential impact to F/H Laboratory analyses supporting the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) used to qualify transfers of MCU Strip Effluent (SE) into the facility and the Saltstone WAC used to qualify transfers of Tank 50 containing Decontaminated Salt Solution (DSS) from MCU into Saltstone. This assigned scope is covered by a Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP). Previous impact evaluations were conducted when the DCiTG suppressor was planned for NGS and concluded that there was no impact to either the determination of MCU SE pH nor the analysis of Isopar® L carryover in the MCU SE and DSS streams. SRNL reported on this series of cross-check studies between the SRNL and F/H Laboratories. The change in suppressor from DCiTG to TiDG in the NGS should not impact the measurement of Isopar® L or pH in SE or DSS necessary to satisfy DWPF and Saltstone WAC (Tank 50) criteria, respectively. A statistical study of the low bias observed in Isopar® L measurements in both SRNL and F/H Laboratories may be necessary now that the final NGS composition is fixed in order to quantify the low bias so that a proper correction can be applied to measurements critical to the DWPF and Saltstone WACs. Depending upon the final DWPF WAC requirement put in place for SE pH, it could become necessary to implement an alternative ICP-AES measurement of boron. The current blended solvent system testing in SRNL should address any impacts to Isopar® L carryover into either the DSS or the SE. It is recommended that SRNL monitor the current blended solvent work underway with simulants in SRNL as well as any DWPF CPC testing done with the new SE stream to ascertain whether any need develops that could result in modification of any currently planned F/H Laboratory testing protocols.

  6. Ames Laboratory Argonne National Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that advance knowl- edge and provide the foundation for American innovation. From unlocking atomic energy's electric vehicles, solar panels, and wind turbines, the National Labs have pushed the boundaries Energy Technology Laboratory Morgantown, West Virginia Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania Albany, Oregon National

  7. Targeting Net Zero Energy at Fort Carson: Assessment and Recommendations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, K.; Markel, T.; Simpson, M.; Leahey, J.; Rockenbaugh, C.; Lisell, L.; Burman, K.; Singer, M.

    2011-10-01

    The U.S. Army's Fort Carson installation was selected to serve as a prototype for net zero energy assessment and planning. NREL performed the comprehensive assessment to appraise the potential of Fort Carson to achieve net zero energy status through energy efficiency, renewable energy, and electric vehicle integration. This report summarizes the results of the assessment and provides energy recommendations. This study is part of a larger cross-laboratory effort that also includes an assessment of renewable opportunities at seven other DoD Front Range installations, a microgrid design for Fort Carson critical loads and an assessment of regulatory and market-based barriers to a regional secure smart grid.

  8. Enterprise Assessments Review of the East Tennessee Technology...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    National Energy Technology Laboratory - May 2014 Enterprise Assessments Review, West Valley Demonstration Project - December 2014 Enterprise Assessments Review, Sandia...

  9. Enterprise Assessments Operational Awareness Record, Argonne...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    March 2015 Operational Awareness Record for Oversight of Argonne National Laboratory and New Brunswick Laboratory The Office of Nuclear Safety and Environmental Assessments, within...

  10. operated for the U.S. Department of Energy under solely for use in work performed under OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    PENETRANT INSPECTED. ASME SECTION IX. NO CODE STAMP REQUIRED. 2 1. WELDING TO BE PERFORMED IN ACCORDANCE. INTERPRET DIMENSIONS AND TOLERANCES PER ASME Y14.5M 3. MACHINED FINISH 125 MICRO- INCHES RMS 4

  11. Laboratories for the 21st Century

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Laboratories for the 21st Century (Labs21) is a voluntary partnership program dedicated to improving the environmental performance of U.S. laboratories. The program is a joint initiative between...

  12. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 1995 site environmental report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balgobin, D.; Javandel, I.; Lackner, G.; Smith, C.; Thorson, P.; Tran, H.

    1996-07-01

    The 1995 Site Environmental Report summarizes environmental activities at the Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) for the 1995 calendar year. The report strives to present environmental data in a manner that characterizes the performance and compliance status of the environmental management programs. The report also discusses significant highlights and plans of these programs. Topics discussed include: environmental monitoring, environmental compliance programs, air quality, water quality, ground water protection, sanitary sewer monitoring, soil and sediment quality, vegetation and foodstuffs monitoring, and special studies which include preoperational monitoring of building 85 and 1995 sampling results, radiological dose assessment, and quality assessment.

  13. FY2010 ANNUAL REVIEW E-AREA LOW-LEVEL WASTE FACILITY PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT AND COMPOSITE ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Butcher, T.; Swingle, R.; Crapse, K.; Millings, M.; Sink, D.

    2011-01-01

    The E-Area Low-Level Waste Facility (ELLWF) consists of a number of disposal units described in the Performance Assessment (PA)(WSRC, 2008b) and Composite Analysis (CA)(WSRC, 1997; WSRC, 1999): Low-Activity Waste (LAW) Vault, Intermediate Level (IL) Vault, Trenches (Slit Trenches [STs], Engineered Trenches [ETs], and Component-in-Grout [CIG] Trenches), and Naval Reactor Component Disposal Areas (NRCDAs). This annual review evaluates the adequacy of the approved 2008 ELLWF PA along with the Special Analyses (SAs) approved since the PA was issued. The review also verifies that the Fiscal Year (FY) 2010 low-level waste (LLW) disposal operations were conducted within the bounds of the PA/SA baseline, the Savannah River Site (SRS) CA, and the Department of Energy (DOE) Disposal Authorization Statement (DAS). Important factors considered in this review include waste receipts, results from monitoring and research and development (R&D) programs, and the adequacy of controls derived from the PA/SA baseline. Sections 1.0 and 2.0 of this review are a summary of the adequacy of the PA/SA and CA, respectively. An evaluation of the FY2010 waste receipts and the resultant impact on the ELLWF is summarized in Section 3.1. The results of the monitoring program, R&D program, and other relevant factors are found in Section 3.2, 3.3 and 3.4, respectively. Section 4.0 contains the CA annual determination similarly organized. SRS low-level waste management is regulated under DOE Order 435.1 (DOE, 1999a) and is authorized under a DAS as a federal permit. The original DAS was issued by the DOE-Headquarters (DOE-HQ) on September 28, 1999 (DOE, 1999b) for the operation of the ELLWF and the Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF). The 1999 DAS remains in effect for the regulation of the SDF. Those portions of that DAS applicable to the ELLWF were superseded by revision 1 of the DAS on July 15, 2008 (DOE, 2008b). The 2008 PA and DAS were officially implemented by the facility on October 31, 2008 and are the authorization documents for this FY2010 Annual Review. Department of Energy Headquarters approval of the 2008 DAS was subject to numerous conditions specified in the document. Two of those conditions are to update the ELLWF closure plan and monitoring plan to align with the conceptual model analyzed in the PA. Both of these conditions were met with the issuance of the PA Monitoring Plan (Millings, 2009a) and the Closure Plan (Phifer et al, 2009a). The PA Monitoring Plan was approved by DOE on July 22, 2009 and the Closure Plan was approved by DOE on May 21, 2009. Both will be updated as needed to remain consistent with the PA. The DAS also specifies that the maintenance plan include activities to resolve each of the secondary issues identified in the DOEHQ review of the 2008 PA that were not completely addressed either with supplemental material provided to the review team or in final revisions to the PA. These outstanding issues were originally documented in the 2008 update of the PA/CA Maintenance Plan (WSRC, 2008a) and in subsequent PA/CA Maintenance Plans (most recently SRNS, 2010a) as required and are actively being worked.

  14. Towards direct potable reuse with forward osmosis: Technical assessment of long-term process performance at the pilot scale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    performance at the pilot scale Nathan T. Hancock a , Pei Xu a , Molly J. Roby a , Juan D. Gomez b , Tzahi Y. Cath a,n a Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, 1500 Illinois Street, Colorado School the performance of forward osmosis (FO) at the pilot scale to achieve simultaneous seawater desalination

  15. EE 448 Laboratory Preface Laboratory Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, Ratnesh

    EE 448 Laboratory Preface Laboratory Introduction -1- EE 448 Preface 2/26/2007 Laboratory Introduction #12;EE 448 Laboratory Preface Laboratory Introduction -2- I. INTRODUCTION The electric machinery laboratory provides students with the opportunity to examine and experiment with different types

  16. Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1985 to the DOE Office of the Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety and Health. Part 5. Overview and assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faust, L.G.

    1986-02-01

    This volume is progress on work performed for the Office of Nuclear Safety, the Office of Operational Safety, and for the Office of Environmental Analysis for each project. Separate abstracts have been prepared for individual projects. ACR

  17. Laboratory 12 Control Systems Laboratory ECE3557 Laboratory 12

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laboratory 12 Control Systems Laboratory ECE3557 Laboratory 12 State Feedback Controller for Position Control of a Flexible Link 12.1 Objective The objective of this laboratory is to design a full of the combined system (i.e., servomotor and flexible link) introduced in the Laboratory 9 (refer to [1

  18. Laboratory 10 Control Systems Laboratory ECE3557 Laboratory 10

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laboratory 10 Control Systems Laboratory ECE3557 Laboratory 10 State Feedback Controller for Position Control of a DC Servo 10.1 Objective The objective of this laboratory is to position the gears, we will use the state space model of the DC servo introduced in the laboratory 3 (refer to [1

  19. Idaho National Laboratory Integrated Safety Management System 2011 Effectiveness Review and Declaration Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farren Hunt

    2011-12-01

    Idaho National Laboratory (INL) performed an annual Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS) effectiveness review per 48 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 970.5223-1, 'Integration of Environment, Safety and Health into Work Planning and Execution.' The annual review assessed Integrated Safety Management (ISM) effectiveness, provided feedback to maintain system integrity, and helped identify target areas for focused improvements and assessments for fiscal year (FY) 2012. The information presented in this review of FY 2011 shows that the INL has performed many corrective actions and improvement activities, which are starting to show some of the desired results. These corrective actions and improvement activities will continue to help change culture that will lead to better implementation of defined programs, resulting in moving the Laboratory's performance from the categorization of 'Needs Improvement' to the desired results of 'Effective Performance.'

  20. BS IE Program Educational Outcomes, Key Abilities, and Performance Indicators for ABET assessment B. Gopalakrishnan, IMSE, 04/11/13

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    , manufacturing systems, computer programming and simulation, production systems, human factors and ergonomics feasible processes and then apply process performance evaluation to pick up the optimal process parts. Students will be able to apply Ashby Plots for materials evaluations comparing strength

  1. Data Packages for the Hanford Immobilized Low Activity Tank Waste Performance Assessment 2001 Version [SEC 1 THRU 5

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MANN, F.M.

    2000-03-02

    Data package supporting the 2001 Immobilized Low-Activity Waste Performance Analysis. Geology, hydrology, geochemistry, facility, waste form, and dosimetry data based on recent investigation are provided. Verification and benchmarking packages for selected software codes are provided.

  2. Assessment and Prediction of the Thermal Performance of a Centralized Latent Heat Thermal Energy Storage Utilizing Artificial Neural Network 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    El-Sawi, A.; Haghighat, F.; Akbari, H.

    2013-01-01

    A simulation tool is developed to analyze the thermal performance of a centralized latent heat thermal energy storage system (LHTES) using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). The LHTES system is integrated with a mechanical ventilation system...

  3. Assessment of pulverized-coal-fired combustor performance. Seventh quarterly technical progress report, April 1-June 30, 1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richter, W.; Clark, W.; Payne, R.

    1982-08-01

    There are substantial economic incentives to explore the possibility of converting boilers and other industrial processes from natural gas or oil to pulverized-fuel firing; however, such a change can have a considerable impact on the thermal performance of the system, due mainly to: fuel specific adiabatic flame temperatures; different flow and combustion patterns in the furnace; differences in the type and concentration of radiative species, especially particles, in the combustion products; and ash deposition on heat transfer surfaces. This program is concerned with the provision of a technology base to expedite the conversion of industrial processes from oil and gas to coal and other pulverized fuels. It addresses primarily the impact of fuel type on the thermal performance of a combustor. The program incorporates two experimental tasks and is constructed around an analytical task (Task 1) which will identify and upgrade a family of computer programs required to undertake thermal performance analysis studies. These analytical tools will thus be used to predict the effects of parameters such as fuel type and furnace variables on combustor performance, and to identify those properties which have a major impact on thermal performance. The second task uses a combustion reactor to screen the key variable identified in Task 1 and to provide data on the properties of coal particulate matter which affect heat transfer performance. Verification of the engineering analytical approach will be provided by measurements made in a pilot-scale furnace in the third task.

  4. Analytical laboratory quality audits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelley, William D.

    2001-06-11

    Analytical Laboratory Quality Audits are designed to improve laboratory performance. The success of the audit, as for many activities, is based on adequate preparation, precise performance, well documented and insightful reporting, and productive follow-up. Adequate preparation starts with definition of the purpose, scope, and authority for the audit and the primary standards against which the laboratory quality program will be tested. The scope and technical processes involved lead to determining the needed audit team resources. Contact is made with the auditee and a formal audit plan is developed, approved and sent to the auditee laboratory management. Review of the auditee's quality manual, key procedures and historical information during preparation leads to better checklist development and more efficient and effective use of the limited time for data gathering during the audit itself. The audit begins with the opening meeting that sets the stage for the interactions between the audit team and the laboratory staff. Arrangements are worked out for the necessary interviews and examination of processes and records. The information developed during the audit is recorded on the checklists. Laboratory management is kept informed of issues during the audit so there are no surprises at the closing meeting. The audit report documents whether the management control systems are effective. In addition to findings of nonconformance, positive reinforcement of exemplary practices provides balance and fairness. Audit closure begins with receipt and evaluation of proposed corrective actions from the nonconformances identified in the audit report. After corrective actions are accepted, their implementation is verified. Upon closure of the corrective actions, the audit is officially closed.

  5. Maintenance Plan for the Performance Assessments and Composite Analyses for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the NTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vefa Yucel

    2007-01-03

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Manual M 435.1-1 requires that performance assessments (PAs) and composite analyses (CAs) for low-level waste (LLW) disposal facilities be maintained by the field offices. This plan describes the activities performed to maintain the PA and the CA for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMSs) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). This plan supersedes the Maintenance Plan for the Performance Assessments and Composite Analyses for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the Nevada Test Site (DOE/NV/11718--491-REV 1, dated September 2002). The plan is based on U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 435.1 (DOE, 1999a), DOE Manual M 435.1-1 (DOE, 1999b), the DOE M 435.1-1 Implementation Guide DOE G 435.1-1 (DOE, 1999c), and the Maintenance Guide for PAs and CAs (DOE, 1999d). The plan includes a current update on PA/CA documentation, a revised schedule, and a section on Quality Assurance.

  6. Sandia National Laboratories: About Sandia: Environmental Responsibili...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Environment, Safety & Health Policy Policy Statement It is the policy of Sandia National Laboratories to perform work in a safe and environmentally responsible manner by committing...

  7. Environmental assessment for the demonstration of uranium-atomic vapor laser isotope separation (U-AVLIS) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-05-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Nuclear Energy, proposes to use full-scale lasers and separators to demonstrate uranium enrichment as part of the national Uranium-Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (U-AVLIS) Program. Demonstration of uranium enrichment is planned to be conducted in Building 490 of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), near Livermore, California in 1991 and 1992. The collective goal of the U-AVLIS Program is to develop and demonstrate an integrated technology for low-cost enrichment of uranium for nuclear reactor fuel. Alternatives to the proposed LLNL demonstration activity are no action, use of alternative LLNL facilities, and use of an alternative DOE site. This EA describes the existing LLNL environment and surroundings that could be impacted by the proposed action. Potential impacts to on- site and off-site environments predicted during conduct of the Uranium Demonstration System (UDS) at LLNL and alternative actions are reported in this EA. The analysis covers routine activities and potential accidents. 81 refs., 8 figs., 6 tabs.

  8. Speaking the Truth in Maritime Risk Assessment Several major risk studies have been performed in recent years in the maritime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    performed in recent years in the maritime transportation domain. These studies have had significant impact Mexico and Canada, 95 percent of foreign trade and 25 percent of domestic trade depends on maritime accidents in maritime transportation. The consequences of these accidents ranged from severe environmental

  9. Diagnosis and Assessment of Adult Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder: Symptom Severity and Performance on Cognitive and Achievement Testing 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sowell, Morgan M

    2014-11-11

    are a hallmark of ADHD in children and adults. This research study looks at the relationship of a common inhibitory control measure Conners' Continuous Performance Test - II (CCPT-II) and its relationship to self and observer reports of ADHD symptoms...

  10. A Performance Assessment of Express on the iPSC/2 and iPSC/860 Hypercube Computers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krovi, Venkat

    a teraflop computing speed, this trend is like­ ly to continue [12]. However, the advances in software (Com­ puter Aided Software Engineering) tools, parallelizing compilers, debuggers, and performance, NY Jaehyung Yang and Arif Ghafoor School of Electrical Engineering Purdue University, West Lafayette

  11. Assessing the Performance of LED-Based Flashlights Available in the Kenyan Off-Grid Lighting Market

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tracy, Jennifer; Jacobson, Arne; Mills, Evan

    2010-03-02

    Low cost rechargeable flashlights that use LED technology are increasingly available in African markets. While LED technology holds promise to provide affordable, high quality lighting services, the widespread dissemination of low quality products may make it difficult to realize this potential. This study includes performance results for three brands of commonly available LED flashlights that were purchased in Kenya in 2009. The performance of the flashlights was evaluated by testing five units for each of the three brands. The tests included measurements of battery capacity, time required to charge the battery, maximum illuminance at one meter, operation time and lux-hours from a fully charged battery, light distribution, and color rendering. All flashlights tested performed well below the manufacturers? rated specifications; the measured battery capacity was 30-50percent lower than the rated capacity and the time required to fully charge the battery was 6-25percent greater than the rated time requirement. Our analysis further shows that within each brand there is considerable variability in each performance indicator. The five samples within a single brand varied from each other by as much as 22percent for battery capacity measurements, 3.6percent for the number of hours required for a full charge, 23percent for maximum initial lux, 38percent for run time, 11percent for light distribution and by as much as 200percent for color rendering. Results obtained are useful for creating a framework for quality assurance of off-grid LED products and will be valuable for informing consumers, distributors and product manufacturers about product performance.

  12. Natural resource booms and Third World development: Assessing the subsectoral impacts of the Nigerian petroleum boom on agricultural export performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Banks, S.M.

    1991-01-01

    Linear and quadratic expansion model formulations are developed to assess the relative complexity of booming-non-booming sector interactions. Specific attention is given to the extent to which the growth rates of Nigerian agricultural exports have changed over time as: (a) the volume of oil exports, and (b) the growth rate of oil exports are allowed to vary over a set of hypothetical values which reflect Nigerian oil-boom realities. Four important conclusions emerge: (a) the quadratic expansion model most accurately captures Nigerian oil-agricultural exports are most clearly influenced by the oil boom; (c) the growth rate of capital-intensive agricultural exports are initially stimulated, and later stagnated by the oil boom, while the growth rate of subsidized labor intensive agricultural exports are first stagnated and then stimulated by the oil boom; and (d) the expansion method provides a useful alternative means of exploring theoretical and applied issues related to the Dutch Disease paradigm. the implications of the findings for agricultural and petroleum policy in Nigeria are assessed, and a research agenda for further booming-non-booming sector investigations is proposed.

  13. Laboratory Director

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesse Bergkamp Graduate studentScience (SC) Directed ResearchLaboratory

  14. Donner Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submit theCovalentLaboratory |Sector Full reportTown2008Donald Raby Donald_ -

  15. Design/installation and structural integrity assessment of Bethel Valley low-level waste collection and transfer system upgrade for Building 3092 (Central Off-Gas Scrubber Facility) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-01-01

    This document describes and assesses planned modifications to be made to the Building 3092 Central Off-Gas Scrubber Facility of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The modifications are made in responsible to the requirements of 40CFR264 Subpart J, relating to environmental protection requirements for buried tank systems. The modifications include the provision of a new scrubber recirculation tank in a new, below ground, lines concrete vault, replacing and existing recirculation sump that does not provide double containment. A new buried, double contained pipeline is provided to permit discharge of spent scrubber recirculation fluid to the Central Waste Collection Header. The new vault, tank, and discharge line are provided with leak detection and provisions to remove accumulated liquid. New scrubber recirculation pumps, piping, and accessories are also provided. This assessment concludes that the planned modifications comply with applicable requirements of 40CFR264 Subpart J, as set forth in Appendix F to the Federal Facility Agreement, Docket No. 89-04-FF, covering the Oak Ridge Reservation.

  16. Materials Capability Review Los Alamos National Laboratory May 4-7, 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor, Antoniette J

    2009-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) uses external peer review to measure and continuously improve the quality of its science, technology and engineering (STE). LANL uses capability reviews to assess the STE quality and institutional integration and to advise Laboratory Management on the current and future health of the STE. Capability reviews address the STE integration that LANL uses to meet mission requirements. STE capabilities are define to cut across directorates providing a more holistic view of the STE quality, integration to achieve mission requirements, and mission relevance. The scope of these capabilities necessitate that there will be significant overlap in technical areas covered by capability reviews (e.g ., materials research and weapons science and engineering). In addition, LANL staff may be reviewed in different capability reviews because of their varied assignments and expertise. LANL plans to perform a complete review of the Laboratory's STE capabilities (hence staff) in a three-year cycle. The principal product of an external review is a report that includes the review committee's assessments, commendations, and recommendations for STE. The Capability Review Committees serve a dual role of providing assessment of the Laboratory's technical contributions and integration towards its missions and providing advice to Laboratory Management. The assessments and advice are documented in reports prepared by the Capability Review Committees that are delivered to the Director and to the Principal Associate Director for Science, Technology and Engineering (PADSTE). This report will be used by Laboratory Management for STE assessment and planning. The report is also provided to the Department of Energy (DOE) as part of LANL's Annual Performance Plan and to the Los Alamos National Security (LANS) LLC's Science and Technology Committee (STC) as part of its responsibilities to the LANS Board of Governors. LANL has defined fourteen STE capabilities. Table 1 lists the five STE capabilities that LANL Management (Director, PADSTE, technical Associate Directors) have identified for review in Fiscal Year (FY) 2009.

  17. NATIONAL LABORATORY

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    a modified United Nations Test for Oxidizing Solids protocol. * 2010 burn-rate tests at New Mexico Tech performed on two types of surrogates of the buried Rocky Flats salt...

  18. ORGANISATIONAL CHART 2009 Laboratory: Research, Development and Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .A. Papazoglou Energy Technologies & Environmental Impacts A. Stubos Transport Phenomena in Porous Media A Assessment of Electrical Generation Systems SYSTEMS RELIABILITY & INDUSTRIAL SAFETY LABORATORY I in Tokamak Machines N. Tsois PLASMA PHYSICS LABORATORY N. Tsois Thermal Solar Collectors & Systems V

  19. Tribology Laboratory | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservationBio-Inspired SolarAbout / TransformingTransuranic SolicitationTribology Laboratory

  20. SIMPLIFIED PREDICTIVE MODELS FOR CO? SEQUESTRATION PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT RESEARCH TOPICAL REPORT ON TASK #3 STATISTICAL LEARNING BASED MODELS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mishra, Srikanta; Schuetter, Jared

    2014-11-01

    We compare two approaches for building a statistical proxy model (metamodel) for CO? geologic sequestration from the results of full-physics compositional simulations. The first approach involves a classical Box-Behnken or Augmented Pairs experimental design with a quadratic polynomial response surface. The second approach used a space-filling maxmin Latin Hypercube sampling or maximum entropy design with the choice of five different meta-modeling techniques: quadratic polynomial, kriging with constant and quadratic trend terms, multivariate adaptive regression spline (MARS) and additivity and variance stabilization (AVAS). Simulations results for CO? injection into a reservoir-caprock system with 9 design variables (and 97 samples) were used to generate the data for developing the proxy models. The fitted models were validated with using an independent data set and a cross-validation approach for three different performance metrics: total storage efficiency, CO? plume radius and average reservoir pressure. The Box-Behnken–quadratic polynomial metamodel performed the best, followed closely by the maximin LHS–kriging metamodel.

  1. Laboratory microfusion capability study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to elucidate the issues involved in developing a Laboratory Microfusion Capability (LMC) which is the major objective of the Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) program within the purview of the Department of Energy's Defense Programs. The study was initiated to support a number of DOE management needs: to provide insight for the evolution of the ICF program; to afford guidance to the ICF laboratories in planning their research and development programs; to inform Congress and others of the details and implications of the LMC; to identify criteria for selection of a concept for the Laboratory Microfusion Facility and to develop a coordinated plan for the realization of an LMC. As originally proposed, the LMC study was divided into two phases. The first phase identifies the purpose and potential utility of the LMC, the regime of its performance parameters, driver independent design issues and requirements, its development goals and requirements, and associated technical, management, staffing, environmental, and other developmental and operational issues. The second phase addresses driver-dependent issues such as specific design, range of performance capabilities, and cost. The study includes four driver options; the neodymium-glass solid state laser, the krypton fluoride excimer gas laser, the light-ion accelerator, and the heavy-ion induction linear accelerator. The results of the Phase II study are described in the present report.

  2. PV Performance and Reliability Validation Capabilities at Sandia...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PV Performance and Reliability Validation Capabilities at Sandia National Laboratories PV Performance and Reliability Validation Capabilities at Sandia National Laboratories This...

  3. Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1981 to the DOE Office of the Assistant Secretary for Environmental Protection, Safety and Emergency Preparedness. Part 5. Environmental and occupational protection, assessment, and engineering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glass, W.A.

    1982-02-01

    This report describes research in environment, health, and safety conducted during fiscal year 1981. The five parts of the report are oriented to particular segments of the program. Parts 1 to 4 report on research performed for the DOE Office of Health and Environmental Research in the Office of Energy Research. Part 5 reports progress on all research performed for the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Environmental Protection, Safety and Emergency Preparedness. The parts are: Part 1: Biomedical Sciences under Program Manager, H. Drucker; Part 2: Ecological Sciences, under Program Manager, B.E. Vaughan; Part 3: Atmospheric Sciences under Program Manager, C.E. Elderkin; Part 4: Physical Sciences under Program Manager, J.M. Nielsen; and Part 5: Environmental and Occupational Protection, Assessment, and Engineering under Program Managers, D.L. Hessel, S. Marks, and W.A. Glass.

  4. Consequence Assessment

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-08-21

    This volume focuses on the process of performing timely initial assessments necessary to support critical first decisions and the continuous process of refining those initial assessments as more information and resources become available. Canceled by DOE G 151.1-4.

  5. Inter-comparison of Computer Codes for TRISO-based Fuel Micro-Modeling and Performance Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brian Boer; Chang Keun Jo; Wen Wu; Abderrafi M. Ougouag; Donald McEachren; Francesco Venneri

    2010-10-01

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP), the Deep Burn Pebble Bed Reactor (DB-PBR) and the Deep Burn Prismatic Block Reactor (DB-PMR) are all based on fuels that use TRISO particles as their fundamental constituent. The TRISO particle properties include very high durability in radiation environments, hence the designs reliance on the TRISO to form the principal barrier to radioactive materials release. This durability forms the basis for the selection of this fuel type for applications such as Deep Bun (DB), which require exposures up to four times those expected for light water reactors. It follows that the study and prediction of the durability of TRISO particles must be carried as part of the safety and overall performance characterization of all the designs mentioned above. Such evaluations have been carried out independently by the performers of the DB project using independently developed codes. These codes, PASTA, PISA and COPA, incorporate models for stress analysis on the various layers of the TRISO particle (and of the intervening matrix material for some of them), model for fission products release and migration then accumulation within the SiC layer of the TRISO particle, just next to the layer, models for free oxygen and CO formation and migration to the same location, models for temperature field modeling within the various layers of the TRISO particle and models for the prediction of failure rates. All these models may be either internal to the code or external. This large number of models and the possibility of different constitutive data and model formulations and the possibility of a variety of solution techniques makes it highly unlikely that the model would give identical results in the modeling of identical situations. The purpose of this paper is to present the results of an inter-comparison between the codes and to identify areas of agreement and areas that need reconciliation. The inter-comparison has been carried out by the cooperating institutions using a set of pre-defined TRISO conditions (burnup levels, temperature or power levels, etc.) and the outcome will be tabulated in the full length paper. The areas of agreement will be pointed out and the areas that require further modeling or reconciliation will be shown. In general the agreement between the codes is good within less than one order of magnitude in the prediction of TRISO failure rates.

  6. Energy Storage Laboratory (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-10-01

    This fact sheet describes the purpose, lab specifications, applications scenarios, and information on how to partner with NREL's Energy Storage Laboratory at the Energy Systems Integration Facility. At NREL's Energy Storage Laboratory in the Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF), research focuses on the integration of energy storage systems (both stationary and vehicle-mounted) and interconnection with the utility grid. Focusing on battery technologies, but also hosting ultra-capacitors and other electrical energy storage technologies, the laboratory will provide all resources necessary to develop, test, and prove energy storage system performance and compatibility with distributed energy systems. The laboratory will also provide robust vehicle testing capability, including a drive-in environmental chamber, which can accommodate commercial-sized hybrid, electric, biodiesel, ethanol, compressed natural gas, and hydrogen fueled vehicles. The Energy Storage Laboratory is designed to ensure personnel and equipment safety when testing hazardous battery systems or other energy storage technologies. Closely coupled with the research electrical distribution bus at ESIF, the Energy Storage Laboratory will offer megawatt-scale power testing capability as well as advanced hardware-in-the-loop and model-in-the-loop simulation capabilities. Some application scenarios are: The following types of tests - Performance, Efficiency, Safety, Model validation, and Long duration reliability. (2) Performed on the following equipment types - (a) Vehicle batteries (both charging and discharging V2G); (b) Stationary batteries; (c) power conversion equipment for energy storage; (d) ultra- and super-capacitor systems; and (e) DC systems, such as commercial microgrids.

  7. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Ames Laboratory, Ames, Iowa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-03-01

    This report presents the preliminary findings of the first phase of the environmental Survey of the United States Department of Energy's (DOE) Ames Laboratory, conducted April 18 through 22, 1988. The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Individual team members are being supplied by private contractors. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with the Ames Laboratory. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. This phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations carried on at the Ames Laboratory, and interviews with site personnel. The Survey team developed a Sampling and Analysis (S A) Plan to assist in further assessing certain of the environmental problems identified during its on-site activities. The S A plan is being developed by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. When S A is completed, the results will be incorporated into the Ames Laboratory Environmental Survey findings for inclusion in the Environmental Survey Summary Report. 60 refs., 13 figs., 20 tabs.

  8. Structural health monitoring activities at National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farrar, C.R.; Doebling, S.W. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); James, G.H.; Simmermacher, T. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1997-09-01

    Sandia National Laboratories and Los Alamos National Laboratory have on-going programs to assess damage in structures and mechanical systems from changes in their dynamic characteristics. This paper provides a summary of how both institutes became involved with this technology, their experience in this field and the directions that their research in this area will be taking in the future.

  9. Ris National Laboratory Wind Energy Department

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Risø National Laboratory Postprint Wind Energy Department Year 2006 Paper: www.risoe.dk/rispubl/art/2006_96.pdf Wind resource assessment from C-band SAR Merete Bruun Christiansen a, Wolfgang Koch b, Jochen Horstmann b, Charlotte Bay Hasager a, Morten Nielsen a a Risø National Laboratory, Wind Energy

  10. International perspectives on mitigating laboratory biorisks.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pinard, William J.; Salazar, Carlos A.

    2010-11-01

    The International Perspectives on Mitigating Laboratory Biorisks workshop, held at the Renaissance Polat Istanbul Hotel in Istanbul, Republic of Turkey, from October 25 to 27, 2010, sought to promote discussion between experts and stakeholders from around the world on issues related to the management of biological risk in laboratories. The event was organized by Sandia National Laboratories International Biological Threat Reduction program, on behalf of the US Department of State Biosecurity Engagement Program and the US Department of Defense Cooperative Biological Engagement Program. The workshop came about as a response to US Under Secretary of State Ellen O. Tauscher's statements in Geneva on December 9, 2009, during the Annual Meeting of the States Parties to the Biological Weapons Convention (BWC). Pursuant to those remarks, the workshop was intended to provide a forum for interested countries to share information on biorisk management training, standards, and needs. Over the course of the meeting's three days, participants discussed diverse topics such as the role of risk assessment in laboratory biorisk management, strategies for mitigating risk, measurement of performance and upkeep, international standards, training and building workforce competence, and the important role of government and regulation. The meeting concluded with affirmations of the utility of international cooperation in this sphere and recognition of positive prospects for the future. The workshop was organized as a series of short presentations by international experts on the field of biorisk management, followed by breakout sessions in which participants were divided into four groups and urged to discuss a particular topic with the aid of a facilitator and a set of guiding questions. Rapporteurs were present during the plenary session as well as breakout sessions and in particular were tasked with taking notes during discussions and reporting back to the assembled participants a brief summary of points discussed. The presentations and breakout sessions were divided into five topic areas: 'Challenges in Biorisk Management,' 'Risk Assessment and Mitigation Measures,' 'Biorisk Management System Performance,' 'Training,' and 'National Oversight and Regulations.' The topics and questions were chosen by the organizers through consultation with US Government sponsors. The Chattham House Rule on non-attribution was in effect during question and answer periods and breakout session discussions.

  11. Independent Oversight Activity Report, Los Alamos National Laboratory...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and issues in the development and implementation of the Los Alamos National Laboratory industrial hygiene worker exposure assessment program. Independent Oversight Activity...

  12. Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Analytical Laboratory...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    2 Technology Readiness Assessment for the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Analytical Laboratory, Balance of Facilities and LAW Waste Vitrification Facilities L....

  13. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Analysis of Waste Isolation Pilot...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    event. This document corresponds to Appendix C: Analysis Integrated Summary Report of the Technical Assessment Team Report. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Analysis of Waste...

  14. Uncertainty and sensitivity analysis in the 2008 performance assessment for the proposed repository for high-level radioactive waste at Yucca Mountain, Nevada.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Helton, Jon Craig; Sallaberry, Cedric M.; Hansen, Clifford W.

    2010-05-01

    Extensive work has been carried out by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in the development of a proposed geologic repository at Yucca Mountain (YM), Nevada, for the disposal of high-level radioactive waste. As part of this development, an extensive performance assessment (PA) for the YM repository was completed in 2008 [1] and supported a license application by the DOE to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for the construction of the YM repository [2]. This presentation provides an overview of the conceptual and computational structure of the indicated PA (hereafter referred to as the 2008 YM PA) and the roles that uncertainty analysis and sensitivity analysis play in this structure.

  15. Laboratory 11 Control Systems Laboratory ECE3557 Laboratory 11

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for Position Control of a Flexible Joint 11.1 Objective The objective of this laboratory is to design a full in this laboratory is illustrated. For this laboratory, the servo is used in the high gear ratio configuration (refer = 2.6 · Km: one of the motor torque constants. Km = 0.00767 · Kg: gear ratio of the motor

  16. Approach and strategy for performing ecological risk assessments for the US Department of Energy`s Oak Ridge Reservation: 1995 revision

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suter, G.W. II; Sample, B.E.; Jones, D.S.; Ashwood, T.L.; Loar, J.M.

    1995-09-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide guidance for planning and performing ecological risk assessments (ERAs) on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). It is the third such document prepared for this purpose. The first ecorisk strategy document described the ERA process and presented a tiered approach to ERAs appropriate to complex sites. The first revision was necessitated by the considerable progress that has been made by the parties to the Federal Facilities Agreement (FFA) for the ORR in resolving specific issues relating to ERA as a result of a series of data quality objectives (DQOs) meetings. The tiered approach to ERAs as recommended in the first document was implemented, generic conceptual models were developed, and a general approach for developing ecological assessment endpoints and measurement endpoints was agreed upon. This revision is necessitated by comments from the US Environmental Protection Agency`s Region IV and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) which clarified and modified the positions taken during the DQO process. In particular, support for the collection of data that would support ERAs for all OUs on the ORR have been withdrawn. Therefore, the work plan developed to fill the reservation-wide data needs identified in the DQO process has also been withdrawn, and portions that are still relevant have been incorporated into this document. The reader should be aware that this guidance is complex and lengthy because it attempts to cover all the reasonable contingencies that were considered to be potentially important to the FFA parties.

  17. Application of Probabilistic Performance Assessment Modeling for Optimization of Maintenance Studies for Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Sites at the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crowe, B.; Yucel, V.; Rawlinson, S.; Black, P.; Carilli, J.; DiSanza, F.

    2002-02-25

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration of the Nevada Operations Office (NNSA/NV) operates and maintains two active facilities on the Nevada Test Site (NTS) that dispose defense-generated low-level radioactive waste (LLW), mixed radioactive waste, and ''classified waste'' in shallow trenches and pits. The operation and maintenance of the LLW disposal sites are self-regulated by the DOE under DOE Order 435.1. This Order requires formal review of a performance assessment (PA) and composite analysis (CA; assessment of all interacting radiological sources) for each LLW disposal system followed by an active maintenance program that extends through and beyond the site closure program. The Nevada disposal facilities continue to receive NTS-generated LLW and defense-generated LLW from across the DOE complex. The PA/CAs for the sites have been conditionally approved and the facilities are now under a formal maintenance program that requires testing of conceptual models, quantifying and attempting to reduce uncertainty, and implementing confirmatory and long-term background monitoring, all leading to eventual closure of the disposal sites. To streamline and reduce the cost of the maintenance program, the NNSA/NV is converting the deterministic PA/CAs to probabilistic models using GoldSim, a probabilistic simulation computer code. The output of probabilistic models will provide expanded information supporting long-term decision objectives of the NTS disposal sites.

  18. Oak Ridge National Laboratory 5-1 5. Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    science, energy, high-performance computing, systems biology, and national security. ORNL partnersOak Ridge National Laboratory 5-1 5. Oak Ridge National Laboratory ORNL is the largest science and energy national laboratory in the DOE system. ORNL's scientific programs focus on materials, neutron

  19. Oak Ridge National Laboratory 5-1 5. Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    science, energy, high-performance computing, systems biology, and national security. ORNL partners1 Oak Ridge National Laboratory 5-1 5. Oak Ridge National Laboratory ORNL is the largest science and energy national laboratory in the DOE system. ORNL's scientific programs focus on materials, neutron

  20. Enterprise Assessments Targeted Review of the Safety-Significant...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Targeted Review of the Safety-Significant Systems at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Radiochemical Processing Laboratory - July 2015 Enterprise Assessments Targeted...