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1

Fundamental Research on Percussion Drilling: Improved rock mechanics analysis, advanced simulation technology, and full-scale laboratory investigations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the research efforts on the DOE supported research project Percussion Drilling (DE-FC26-03NT41999), which is to significantly advance the fundamental understandings of the physical mechanisms involved in combined percussion and rotary drilling, and thereby facilitate more efficient and lower cost drilling and exploration of hard-rock reservoirs. The project has been divided into multiple tasks: literature reviews, analytical and numerical modeling, full scale laboratory testing and model validation, and final report delivery. Literature reviews document the history, pros and cons, and rock failure physics of percussion drilling in oil and gas industries. Based on the current understandings, a conceptual drilling model is proposed for modeling efforts. Both analytical and numerical approaches are deployed to investigate drilling processes such as drillbit penetration with compression, rotation and percussion, rock response with stress propagation, damage accumulation and failure, and debris transportation inside the annulus after disintegrated from rock. For rock mechanics modeling, a dynamic numerical tool has been developed to describe rock damage and failure, including rock crushing by compressive bit load, rock fracturing by both shearing and tensile forces, and rock weakening by repetitive compression-tension loading. Besides multiple failure criteria, the tool also includes a damping algorithm to dissipate oscillation energy and a fatigue/damage algorithm to update rock properties during each impact. From the model, Rate of Penetration (ROP) and rock failure history can be estimated. For cuttings transport in annulus, a 3D numerical particle flowing model has been developed with aid of analytical approaches. The tool can simulate cuttings movement at particle scale under laminar or turbulent fluid flow conditions and evaluate the efficiency of cutting removal. To calibrate the modeling efforts, a series of full-scale fluid hammer drilling tests, as well as single impact tests, have been designed and executed. Both Berea sandstone and Mancos shale samples are used. In single impact tests, three impacts are sequentially loaded at the same rock location to investigate rock response to repetitive loadings. The crater depth and width are measured as well as the displacement and force in the rod and the force in the rock. Various pressure differences across the rock-indentor interface (i.e. bore pressure minus pore pressure) are used to investigate the pressure effect on rock penetration. For hammer drilling tests, an industrial fluid hammer is used to drill under both underbalanced and overbalanced conditions. Besides calibrating the modeling tool, the data and cuttings collected from the tests indicate several other important applications. For example, different rock penetrations during single impact tests may reveal why a fluid hammer behaves differently with diverse rock types and under various pressure conditions at the hole bottom. On the other hand, the shape of the cuttings from fluid hammer tests, comparing to those from traditional rotary drilling methods, may help to identify the dominant failure mechanism that percussion drilling relies on. If so, encouraging such a failure mechanism may improve hammer performance. The project is summarized in this report. Instead of compiling the information contained in the previous quarterly or other technical reports, this report focuses on the descriptions of tasks, findings, and conclusions, as well as the efforts on promoting percussion drilling technologies to industries including site visits, presentations, and publications. As a part of the final deliveries, the 3D numerical model for rock mechanics is also attached.

Michael S. Bruno

2005-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

2

LABORATORY INVESTIGATIONS ON THE HYDRAULIC AND THERMOMECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF FRACTURED CRYSTALLINE ROCKS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

INVESTIGATIONS ON THE HYDRAULIC AND THERMOMECHANICALdetermination of the hydraulic p r o p e r t i e s of f r ainfluence of thermal and hydraulic stresses. The success of

Witherspoon, P.A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Laboratory investigation of...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Laboratory investigation of steam adsorption in geothermal reservoir rocks Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us | Admin Log On HomeBasic...

4

Rock physics at Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Rock physics refers to the study of static and dynamic chemical and physical properties of rocks and to phenomenological investigations of rocks reacting to man-made forces such as stress waves and fluid injection. A bibliography of rock physics references written by LASL staff members is given. Listing is by surname of first author. (RWR)

Not Available

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

A LABORATORY INVESTIGATION OF STEAM ADSORPTION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A LABORATORY INVESTIGATION OF STEAM ADSORPTION IN GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ROCKS OF STANFORD UNIVERSITY, if any, liquid. Yet to satisfy material bal- ance constraints, another phase besides steam must be present. If steam adsorption occurring in significant amounts is not accounted for, the reserves

Stanford University

6

Prehistoric Rock Structures of the Idaho National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

Over the past 13,500 years, human populations have lived in and productively utilized the natural resources offered by the cold desert environment of the northeastern Snake River Plain in eastern Idaho. Within an overall framework of hunting and gathering, groups relied on an intimate familiarity with the natural world and developed a variety of technologies to extract the resources that they needed to survive. Useful items were abundant and found everywhere on the landscape. Even the basaltic terrain and the rocks, themselves, were put to productive use. This paper presents a preliminary classification scheme for rock structures built on the Idaho National Laboratory landscape by prehistoric aboriginal populations, including discussions of the overall architecture of the structures, associated artifact assemblages, and topographic placement. Adopting an ecological perspective, the paper concludes with a discussion of the possible functions of these unique resources for the desert populations that once called the INL home.

Brenda R Pace

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Direct laboratory tensile testing of select yielding rock bolt systems  

SciTech Connect

Yielding rock bolt support systems have been developed to accommodate ground movement in shifting ground such as in coal operations; in creeping ground such as salt, trona, and potash; and in swelling ground associated with some clays. These systems, designed to remain intact despite ground movement, should enhance mine safety and help contain costs in areas where rebolting of rigid non-yielding systems is typically required. Four such systems were tested in straight tensile pulls in the laboratory. They include the Slip Nut System from Dywidag Systems International USA, Inc., Ischebeck`s bolt mounted Titan Load Indicator, Rocky Mountain Bolt Company`s Yielding Cable Bolt, and a rock bolt installed variation of the yielding steel post developed by RE/SPEC Inc. The first two systems are currently marketed products and the latter two are prototype systems. Each system responds to load and displacement by yielding in an unique manner. All are designed to yield at predetermined loads. A description of each system and its yield function is provided. Each system was tested over its prescribed yield range in a test machine. At least five tests were performed on each system. Each system yielded and continued to provide support according to its design. Each shows promise for ground control use in shifting or creeping rock. This work helps to illustrate the comparative differences in performance between these specialized systems and the applications where they may be most useful.

VandeKraats, J.D.; Watson, S.O.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Hot dry rock venture risks investigation:  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study assesses a promising resource in central Utah as the potential site of a future commerical hot dry rock (HDR) facility for generating electricity. The results indicate that, if the HDR reservoir productivity equals expectations based on preliminary results from research projects to date, a 50 MWe HDR power facility at Roosevelt Hot Springs could generate power at cost competitive with coal-fired plants. However, it is imperative that the assumed productivity be demonstrated before funds are committed for a commercial facility. 72 refs., 39 figs., 38 tabs.

Not Available

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Source Parameter Investigation of the 1993 Rock Valley Earthquake Sequence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Close portable recordings of the RockValley earthquake sequence con#rm the unusually shallow 2 km average hypocentral depths, and provide data for an investigation of the source parameters. Stress drops are estimated using both a spectral #tting technique that #rst corrects for attenuation, and a deconvolution technique that inherently accounts for attenuation. The shallow depths suggest a relatively low level of shear stress acting on the RockValley fault, and allow an estimation of seismic e#ciencies. The data allow the possibility of large stress drops, on the order of 100 bars, implying seismic e#ciencies much greater than 0.1. This has important implications for the unresolved issue of the strength of faults in general. A dependence of stress drop with seismic moment remains unresolvable with this data. However, the possibility of partial stress drops and non-linear responses does exist. A seismic survey designed speci#cally for the purpose of measuring attenuation could resolve t...

Gordon Shields; Gordon Shields

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Environmental investigations associated with the LASL hot dry rock geothermal energy development project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) is currently evaluating the feasibility of extracting thermal energy from hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal reservoirs. An overview of the environmental studies that LASL has conducted relative to its HDR Geothermal Energy Development Project is presented. Because HDR geothermal technology is a new field of endeavor, environmental guidelines have not been established. It is anticipated that LASL's research will lead to the techniques necessary to mitigate undesirable environmental impacts in future HDR developments. To date, results of environmental investigations have been positive in that no undesirable environmental impacts have been found.

Rea, K.H.

1977-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Seismic reconnaissance of the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory's Dry Hot Rock Geothermal Project area  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Active seismic methods using high-explosive sources and nondestructive energy sources were used to determine seismic velocities, signal detectability, and subsurface geologic structure in the vicinity of the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory's (LASL) Dry Hot Rock Geothermal Project area. Positions of several faults have been determined. A synthetic seismogram has been created that shows good agreement with recorded reflection records taken near exploratory borehole GT-2.

Kintzinger, P.R.; West, F.G.

1976-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Laboratory and Field Measurements of Electrical Resistivity to Determine Saturation and Detect Fractures in a Heated Rock Mass  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Laboratory measurements of the electrical resistivity of intact and fractured representative geothermal reservoir rocks were performed to investigate the resistivity contrast caused by active boiling and to infer saturation and fracture location in a large-scale field test. Measurements were performed to simulate test conditions with confining pressures up to 100 bars and temperatures to 145 C. Measurements presented are a first step toward making the search for fractures using electrical methods quantitatively. Intact samples showed a gradual resistivity increase when pore pressure was decreased below the phase-boundary pressure of free water, while fractured samples show a larger resistivity change at the onset of boiling. The resistivity change is greatest for samples with the most exposed surface area. Analysis of a field test provided the opportunity to evaluate fracture detection using electrical methods at a large scale. Interpretation of electrical resistance tomography (ERT) images of resistivity contrasts, aided by laboratory derived resistivity-saturation-temperature relationships, indicates that dynamic saturation changes in a heated rock mass are observable and that fractures experiencing drying or resaturation can be identified. The same techniques can be used to locate fractures in geothermal reservoirs using electrical field methods.

Roberts, J J; Ramirez, A; Carlson, S; Ralph, W; Bonner, B P

2001-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

13

Laboratory Investigation of an Ultralow NOx  

1115 Proceedings of the Combustion Institute, Volume 29, 2002/pp. 1115–1121 LABORATORY INVESTIGATION OF AN ULTRALOW NO x PREMIXED COMBUSTION CONCEPT ...

14

First measurement of low intensity fast neutron background from rock at the Boulby Underground Laboratory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A technique to measure low intensity fast neutron flux has been developed. The design, calibrations, procedure for data analysis and interpretation of the results are discussed in detail. The technique has been applied to measure the neutron background from rock at the Boulby Underground Laboratory, a site used for dark matter and other experiments, requiring shielding from cosmic ray muons. The experiment was performed using a liquid scintillation detector. A 6.1 litre volume stainless steel cell was filled with an in-house made liquid scintillator loaded with Gd to enhance neutron capture. A two-pulse signature (proton recoils followed by gammas from neutron capture) was used to identify the neutron events from much larger gamma background from PMTs. Suppression of gammas from the rock was achieved by surrounding the detector with high-purity lead and copper. Calibrations of the detector were performed with various gamma and neutron sources. Special care was taken to eliminate PMT afterpulses and correlated background events from the delayed coincidences of two pulses in the Bi-Po decay chain. A four month run revealed a neutron-induced event rate of 1.84 +- 0.65 (stat.) events/day. Monte Carlo simulations based on the GEANT4 toolkit were carried out to estimate the efficiency of the detector and the energy spectra of the expected proton recoils. From comparison of the measured rate with Monte Carlo simulations the flux of fast neutrons from rock was estimated as (1.72 +- 0.61 (stat.) +- 0.38 (syst.))*10^(-6) cm^(-2) s^(-1) above 0.5 MeV.

E. Tziaferi; M. J. Carson; V. A. Kudryavtsev; R. Lerner; P. K. Lightfoot; S. M. Paling; M. Robinson; N. J. C. Spooner

2006-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

15

Accident Investigation at the Idaho National Laboratory Engineering  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Accident Investigation at the Idaho National Laboratory Engineering Accident Investigation at the Idaho National Laboratory Engineering Demonstration Facility, February 2013 Accident Investigation at the Idaho National Laboratory Engineering Demonstration Facility, February 2013 On Monday, February 12, 2013, a principal investigator at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Engineering Demonstration Facility (IEDF) was testing the system configuration of experimental process involving liquid sodium carbonate. An unanticipated event occurred that resulted in the ejection of the 900° C liquid sodium carbonate from the system. The ejected liquid came into contact with the principal investigator and caused multiple second and third degree burn injuries to approximately 10 percent of his body. The Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) Site Lead for

16

Investigations of Near-Field Thermal-Hydrologic-Mechanical-Chemical Models for Radioactive Waste Disposal in Clay/Shale Rock  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Clay/shale has been considered as potential host rock for geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste throughout the world, because of its low permeability, low diffusion coefficient, high retention capacity for radionuclides, and capability to self-seal fractures. For example, Callovo-Oxfordian argillites at the Bure site, France (Fouche et al., 2004), Toarcian argillites at the Tournemire site, France (Patriarche et al., 2004), Opalinus Clay at the Mont Terri site, Switzerland (Meier et al., 2000), and Boom clay at the Mol site, Belgium (Barnichon and Volckaert, 2003) have all been under intensive scientific investigation (at both field and laboratory scales) for understanding a variety of rock properties and their relationships to flow and transport processes associated with geological disposal of radioactive waste. Figure 1-1 presents the distribution of clay/shale formations within the USA.

Liu, H.H.; Li, L.; Zheng, L.; Houseworth, J.E.; Rutqvist, J.

2011-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

17

Black Carbon Soot Impact on Snow Albedo: A Laboratory Investigation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Black Carbon Soot Impact on Snow Albedo: A Laboratory Investigation Speaker(s): Odelle Hadley Date: August 13, 2009 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3075 This presentation examines the...

18

Laboratory Investigations in Support of Carbon Dioxide-Limestone...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MA 01854 617-253-6595 eeadams@mit.edu Laboratory InvestIgatIons In support of Carbon DIoxIDe-LImestone sequestratIon In the oCean Background Many approaches have been proposed...

19

Transport and seismoelectric properties of porous permeable rock : numerical modeling and laboratory measurements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The objective of this thesis is to better understand the transport and seismoelectric (SE) properties of porous permeable rock. Accurate information of rock transport properties, together with pore geometry, can aid us to ...

Zhan, Xin, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

LANL: Facility Focus, MST-6 Materials Surface Science Investigations Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

07-018 Spring 2007 07-018 Spring 2007 T he MST-6 Materials Surface Science Investigations Laboratory is home to a one-of-a-kind integrated instrument for surface science and materials research, allowing scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory the unique opportunity to perform coordinated research using ultra-high vacuum surface measurements, in situ reactions, and materials synthesis tools. Housed in the Materials Science Laboratory, the surface science instrument features an ultra-clean integrated system for surface analysis and in situ surface modification, thin film deposition, and surface gas reactions. This integrated system is used for analytical surface science; materials electronic

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "laboratory investigations rock" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Seismic and Acoustic Investigations of Rock Fall Initiation, Processes, and Mechanics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

systems  and  rock  fall  source  and  impact  areas,  it  possible  to  a   rock   fall   source   area   in   the  possible  to  a  rock   fall  source  area.    There  are  

Zimmer, Valerie Louise

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Black Carbon Soot Impact on Snow Albedo: A Laboratory Investigation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Black Carbon Soot Impact on Snow Albedo: A Laboratory Investigation Black Carbon Soot Impact on Snow Albedo: A Laboratory Investigation Speaker(s): Odelle Hadley Date: August 13, 2009 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3075 This presentation examines the changing cryosphere and specifically the role of black carbon on the reflectivity of snow. Small amounts of black carbon in snow purportedly contribute to a reduction in snow albedo, contributing to regional climate change and early onset of melting. Our current research focuses on the connection between black carbon and albedo reduction. This presentation will describe our laboratory experiments wherein we make and characterize pure and contaminated snow and assess the black carbon snow albedo reduction as a function of black carbon mixing ratio and snow grain size. Experimental results are compared to verify or

23

COLUMBIA RADIATION LABORATORY RESEARCH INVESTIGATION DIRECTED TOWARD EXTENDING  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

iVP-^"^^? iVP-^"^^? COLUMBIA RADIATION LABORATORY RESEARCH INVESTIGATION DIRECTED TOWARD EXTENDING THE USEFUL RANGE OF THE ELECTROMAGNETIC SPECTRUM Special Technical Report Signal Corps Contract DA-36-039 SC-64630 DA Project No. 3-99-10-022 SC Project No. 102B U. S. Army Laboratory Procurement Office Signal Corps Supply Agency Fort Monmouth, New Jersey The Trustees of Columbia University in the City of New York Box 6, Low Memorial Library New York 27, New York March 1, 1956 DISCLAIMER Portions of this document may be illegible in electronic image products. Images are produced from the best available original document. COLUMBIA RADIATION LABORATORY Collected Papers on the AAASER (Microwave Amplification by Stimulated Emission of Radiation) Special Technical Report

24

The nature of fire-cracked rock: new insights from ethnoarchaeological and laboratory experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fire-cracked rock (FCR) is the archaeological by-product of the systemic use of hot rocks for cooking and heating purposes. As a record of various cooking and heating facilities, FCR has substantial potential for addressing research questions on past settlement and subsistence systems. To be able to address these questions requires reliable methods that can identify or infer how a given FCR was used. A series of ethnoarchaeological replication experiments are conducted in order to improve the understanding of the geothennodynamics of FCR production. FCR from two experimental data sets are cut to expose flat surfaces that are inspected for thermal-weathering characteristics under low-power magnification. Analytical results indicate that rock structure and the length of heat application have the most control over thermal weathering. The five most important rock structure characteristics are (1) strength of the bond between grains/crystals, (2) degree of porosity, (3) grain/crystal mineralogy, (4) presence of discontinuities, and (5) grain size; thin section analysis can identify these characteristics for any rock sample. The length of heat application varies dependent on the type of cooking or heating facility, for instance, a typical earth oven remains hot for a longer duration than a typical stone-boil facility; multiple uses of a rock in a facility also increases the sum total of heat application. In broad terms, experimental tests indicate igneous rock types withstand thermal weathering better than metamorphic or sedimentary rock types. Ethnoarchaeological results are applied to six archaeological FCR features, and provide new insights on the use-history of five of the features. Microscopic observations of archaeological FCR also all for the re-evaluation of the current model which explains the occurrence of various FCR shape types within features.

Jackson, Michael A

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Seismic and Acoustic Investigations of Rock Fall Initiation, Processes, and Mechanics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

38 th  U.S.   Rock  Mechanics  Symposium.  1321-­?1333.  38 th  U.S.  Rock  Mechanics  Symposium,  1313-­?1320.  Introduction   to   Rock   Mechanics.   John   Wiley   and  

Zimmer, Valerie Louise

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Remedial investigation of the High-Explosives (HE) Process Area, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Site 300  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the results of a Remedial Investigation (RI) to define the extent of high explosives (HE) compounds and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) found in the soil, rocks, and ground water of the HE Process Area of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (LLNL) Site 300 Facility. The report evaluates potential public health environmental risks associated with these compounds. Hydrogeologic information available before February 15, 1990, is included; however, chemical analyses and water-level data are reported through March 1990. This report is intended to assist the California Regional Water Quality Control Board (RWQCB)--Central Valley Region and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in evaluating the extent of environmental contamination of the LLNL HE Process Area and ultimately in designing remedial actions. 90 refs., 20 figs., 7 tabs.

Crow, N.B.; Lamarre, A.L.

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Laboratory Investigations of Low-Swirl Injectors Operating With Syngases  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Investigations of Low-Swirl Injectors Operating With Syngases Investigations of Low-Swirl Injectors Operating With Syngases Title Laboratory Investigations of Low-Swirl Injectors Operating With Syngases Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2008 Authors Cheng, Robert K., and David Littlejohn Journal Proceedings of the Combustion Institute Type of Article Conference Paper: ASME Turbo Expo 2008: Power for Land Sea and Air Abstract The low-swirl injector (LSI) is a lean premixed combustion technology that has the potential for adaptation to fuel-flexible gas turbines operating on a variety of fuels. The objective of this study is to gain a fundamental understanding of the effect of syngas on the LSI flame behavior, the emissions and the flowfield characteristics for its adaptation to the combustion turbines in IGCC clean coal power plants. The experiments were conducted in two facilities. Open laboratory flames generated by a full size (6.35 cm) LSI were used to investigate the lean-blow off limits, emissions, and the flowfield characteristics. Verification of syngas operation at elevated temperatures and pressures were performed with a reduced scale (2.54 cm) LSI in a small pressurized combustion channel. The results show that the basic LSI design is amenable to burning syngases with up to 60% H2. Syngases with high H2 concentration have lower lean blow-off limits. From PIV measurements, the flowfield similarity behavior and the turbulent flame speeds of syngases flames are consistent with those observed in hydrocarbon and pure or diluted hydrogen flames. The NOx emissions from syngas flames show log-linear dependency on the adiabatic flame temperature and are comparable to those reported for the gaseous fuels reported previously. Successful firing of the reduced-scale LSI at 330 < T < 446o F and 8 atm verified the operability of this concept at gas turbine conditions.

28

A LABORATORY INVESTIGATION OF THE FLUORINATION OF CRUDE URANIUM TETRAFLUORIDE  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Ore concentrates were converted directly to crude uranium tetrafluoride by hydrogen reduction aad hydrofluorination in fluidized-bed reactors. Small- scale laboratory experiments demonstrated that this process can be extended to the production of crude uranium hexafluoride through fluorination of the uranium tetrafluoride in a fluidized bed. The satisfactory temperature range for the reaction lies between 300 and 600 deg C. At 450 deg C the fluorine utilization is between 50 and 80%. With excess fluorine, over 99% of the uranium is volatilized from the solid material. The fluidization characteristics of certain materials are improved by the addition of an inert solid diluent to the bed. (auth) .

Sandus, O.; Steunenberg, R.K.

1957-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Quality assurance plan for the Close Support Laboratory for the remedial investigation at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

The primary purpose of the Close Support Laboratory (CSL) is to provide rapid radiological screening of investigation-derived samples before they are shipped to off-site laboratories for more detailed analyses. Analyses for volatile organic compounds and miscellaneous water quality parameters are also performed at the CSL. CSL data are also used to select samples for off-site laboratory analysis, for rapid qualitative and quantitative determinations, and for other processes when off-site analysis is not needed and/or is impractical. This plan specifies methods of implementing analytical and radiological protocols and procedures for the documentation, handling, control, and analysis of samples and describes the levels of authority and responsibility for laboratory operation. Specific quality control methods used by the CSL for individual analyses are described in project procedures.

Not Available

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

An Investigation of Laboratory-Grown "Ice Spikes"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have investigated the formation of 10-50 mm long ``ice spikes'' that sometimes appear on the free surface of water when it solidifies. By freezing water under different conditions, we measured the probability of ice spike formation as a function of: 1) the air temperature in the freezing chamber, 2) air motion in the freezing chamber (which promotes evaporative cooling), 3) the quantity of dissolved salts in the water, and 4) the size, shape, and composing material of the freezing vessel. We found that the probability of ice spike formation is greatest when the air temperature is near -7 C, the water is pure, and the air in the freezing chamber is moving. Even small quantities of dissolved solids greatly reduce the probability of ice spike formation. Under optimal conditions, approximately half the ice cubes in an ordinary ice cube tray will form ice spikes. Guided by these observations, we have examined the Bally-Dorsey model for the formation of ice spikes. In this model, the density change during solidification forces supercooled water up through a hollow ice tube, where it freezes around the rim to lengthen the tube. We propose that any dissolved solids in the water will tend to concentrate at the tip of a growing ice spike and inhibit its growth. This can qualitatively explain the observation that ice spikes do not readily form using water containing even small quantities of dissolved solids.

K. G. Libbrecht; K. Lui

2003-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

31

Geophysical investigation: New Production Reactor Complex, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Seismic crosshole and downhole velocity measurements were performed for two borehole arrays approximately 300 feet deep in conjunction with verticality measurements and geophysical logging of borehole WO-2 (to a depth of 4,960 feet) at the NPR site of the INEL. Past studies show that the site area is covered by a thin layer of soil which overlies numerous basalt flows interrupted by sandy and clayey interbeds. Compressional and shear wave velocities computed for these arrays revealed low velocity zones at the following elevation ranges for crosshole array No. 1: 4,893 feet to 4,873 feet (basalt rubble zone) and 4,705 feet to 4,686 feet (sediment interbed). Corresponding elevation ranges for crosshole array No. 2 include: 4,830 feet to 4,815 feet (sediment interbed), 4,785 feet to 4,765 feet (highly vesicular and fractured basalt), 4,715 feet to 4,705 feet (basalt rubble zone), and 4,672 feet to 4,667 feet (sediment interbed). In general, crosshole velocity data correlated between arrays with velocity differences possibly explained by localized lithologic changes. Due to scatter in the downhole velocity data, only velocity averages were computed. However, these downhole velocities correlated to the approximate mean crosshole velocity values and therefore independent confirmed the crosshole data. Geophysical logging of well WO-2 included natural gamma, neutron, and compensated density logs to a depth of 4,960 feet at which a viscous borehole fluid inhibited further investigation. Second runs of small sections of these logs were repeated satisfactorily for confirmation of certain anomalous areas.

Filipkowski, F.; Blackey, M.; Davies, D.; Levine, E.N.; Murphy, V. [Weston Geophysical Corp., Westboro, MA (US)

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Underwriters Laboratories now accepting certification investigation requests for E85 fuel dispensing equipment  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

MEDIA CONTACT: Joe Hirschmugl Global Media Relations Supervisor Underwriters Laboratories Phone: +1 847 830-1404 E-mail: Joseph.F.Hirschmugl@us.ul.com PRESS RELEASE FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Underwriters Laboratories Announces Development of Certification Requirements for E85 Dispensers Now Accepting Product Submittals for Certification Investigation NORTHBROOK, Ill. Oct. 16, 2007 - Underwriters Laboratories (UL), North America's leading safety testing and certification organization, announced the establishment of safety requirements for E85 fuel dispensing equipment, and is now accepting submittals for certification investigations. The establishment of safety requirements follows the completion of UL's comprehensive research program to investigate potential safety concerns associated with dispensing

33

Laboratory investigation of the impact of lateral spreading on buoyancy flux in a river plume  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We investigate the relationship between lateral spreading and mixing in stratified gravity currents by comparing laterally confined and unconfined currents in a series of laboratory experiments. The vertical turbulent buoyancy flux is determined ...

Yeping Yuan; Alexander R. Horner-Devine

34

Office of Enforcement WEA-2009-04 Investigation at Argonne National Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

April 30, 2009 April 30, 2009 CERTIFIED MAIL RETURN RECEIPT REQUESTED Dr. Robert Rosner President, UChicago Argonne, LLC Director, Argonne National Laboratory 9700 South Cass Avenue Argonne, Illinois 60439 WEA-2009-04 Dear Dr. Rosner: This letter refers to the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Health, Safety and Security's Office of Enforcement investigation into the facts and circumstances surrounding the March 3, 2008, incident at the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) that resulted in the release of arsenic oxide into a laboratory room, and the March 11, 2008, incident that resulted in an overexposure of a laboratory researcher to carbon monoxide. The results of the on-site investigation were provided to UChicago Argonne, LLC (UChicago Argonne) in an

35

Laboratory investigations of steam pressure-transient behavior in porous materials  

SciTech Connect

Transient flow of noncondensable gas in porous materials has been thoroughly investigated, and good agreement between the gas-flow equation and experiments has been reported in the petroleum-engineering literature. This theory has been widely used in computer simulations of pressure-transient behavior in vapor-dominated geothermal steam reservoirs. However, few laboratory experiments involving steam flow in porous materials have been reported. In order to test the applicability of the gas-flow theory to steam flow, they developed a laboratory system to investigate the transient flow of steam through unconsolidated porous materials. Pressure-transient experiments were carried out by imposing a step change in gas pressure at one end of a cylinder of porous material, and measuring the pressure as a function of time at the other end.

Herkelrath, W.N.; Moench, A.F.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Laboratory Investigation into the Contribution of Contaminants to Ground Water from Equipment Materials Used in Sampling  

SciTech Connect

Benzene contamination was detected in well water samples from the Ogallala Aquifer beneath and adjacent to the Department of Energy's Pantex Plant near Amarillo, Texas. This study assessed whether or not the materials used in multilevel sampling equipment at this site could have contributed to the contaminants found in well water samples. As part of this investigation, laboratory testing of the sample equipment material was conducted. Results from the laboratory test indicated three different materials from two types of multilevel samplers did, in fact, contribute volatile and semivolatile organic compounds to the ground water samples from static leach tests that were conducted during an eight week period. The nylon-11 tubing contributed trace concentrations of benzene (1.37 ?g/L) and relatively high concentrations of the plasticizer N-butylbenzenesulfonamide (NBSA) (764 mg/L) to the water; a urethane-coated nylon well liner contributed relatively high concentrations of toluene (278 ?g/L) and trace amounts of NBSA; and a sampling port spacer material made of nylon/polypropylene/polyester-composite contributed trace amounts of toluene and NBSA. While the concentrations of benzene and toluene measured in the laboratory tests were below the concentrations measured in actual ground water samples, the concentrations of organics from these equipment materials were sufficient to render the results reported for the ground water samples suspect.

Gilmore, Tyler J.; Mitroshkov, Alexandre V.; Dresel, P Evan; Sklarew, Debbie S.

2004-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

37

ASSEMBLAGES ON WASTE ROCK  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: Natural regeneration on waste rock was investigated at the old Wangaloa coal mine, south-east Otago. A 450-m long waste rock stack had been created 40–50 years ago, and has had little anthropogenic intervention since. The stack is made up of a gradient of three main waste rock types, defined as ‘silt-rich’, ‘mixed’, and ‘quartz-rich’, which reflect different proportions of loess siltstone and quartz gravel conglomerate. Plant species assemblages were quantified in four 5-m 2 quadrats in each waste rock type. Invertebrates were heat extracted from substrate cores (7 cm diameter; depth 5 cm) collected from quadrats over an eight-week period in spring 2003. Ordination analysis showed statistically distinct plant and invertebrate assemblages had arisen on each waste rock type. Revegetation patterns were dominated by native, woody individuals on all waste rock types, particularly manuka (Leptospermum scoparium) and kanuka (Kunzea ericoides). Plant cover on ‘silt-rich ’ waste rock was four-fold that on ‘quartz-rich ’ waste rock. Total numbers of invertebrates were highest on ‘quartz-rich’ waste rock, but richness greatest on ‘silt-rich ’ waste rock. Collembola dominated the fauna but their numbers were proportionally greatest in poorly vegetated areas. Further work is required to explain the absence of plants and invertebrates from local areas of waste rock. ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

C. G. Rufaut; S. Hammit; D. Craw; S. G. Clearwater

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

The remedial investigation/feasibility study process at Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems), manages and operates the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, Tennessee, under a cost-plus-award-fee contract administered by the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Oak Ridge Operations Office (Operations Office). Energy Systems` environmental restoration program is responsible for eliminating or reducing the risk posed by inactive and surplus sites and facilities that have been contaminated with radioactive, hazardous, or mixed wastes. The remedial investigation and feasibility study (RI/FS) is being conducted as part of Energy Systems` environmental restoration program. The objective of the audit was to determine if the proposed interim source control action identified in the ``Proposed Plan for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Waste Area Grouping 6 Interim Remedial Action`` had been adequately justified. The audit disclosed that the proposed source control interim remedial action, three flexible membrane caps estimated to cost $140 million for waste area grouping 6, was not adequately justified. We recommended that DOE justify the proposed action before agreeing to proceed. The Manager, Oak Ridge Operations Office, generally concurred with the audit recommendations.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Laboratory investigation of the performance of a Holden engine operating on liquified petroleum gas  

SciTech Connect

A laboratory investigation into the relative performances of an engine when operated on both liquified petroleum gas (LPG) and petrol showed that the engine operated at higher termal efficiency on LPG and also that it would operate satisfactorily at leaner air-fuel mixtures on this fuel. Engine performance was less affected by retarded ignition for LPG than for petrol. Furthermore a large increase in dwell angle from the recommended setting had no significant effect on LPG performance. The LPG carburettor when installed in its normal configuration maintained an essentially constant mixture strength with no part throttle leaning of mixtures to give better efficiency nor corresponding full throttle enrichment to give best engine torque.

Webb, N.

1979-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Cultural Resource Investigations for a Multipurpose Haul Road on the Idaho National Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U. S. Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office is considering options for construction of a multipurpose haul road to transport materials and wastes between the Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) and other Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Site facilities. The proposed road will be closed to the public and designed for limited year-round use. Two primary options are under consideration: a new route south of the existing T-25 power line road and an upgrade to road T-24. In the Spring of 2010, archaeological field surveys and initial coordination and field reconnaissance with representatives from the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes were completed to identify any resources that may be adversely affected by the proposed road construction and to develop recommendations to protect any listed or eligible for listing on the National Register of Historic Places. The investigations showed that 24 archaeological resources and one historic marker are located in the area of potential effects for road construction and operation south of the T-25 powerline road and 27archaeological resources are located in the area of potential effects for road construction and operation along road T-24. Generalized tribal concerns regarding protection of natural resources were also documented in both road corridors. This report outlines recommendations for additional investigations and protective measures that can be implemented to minimize adverse impacts to the identified resources.

Brenda R. Pace; Cameron Brizzee; Hollie Gilbert; Clayton Marler; Julie Braun Williams

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "laboratory investigations rock" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Stable isotope investigation of fluids and water-rock interaction in the Roosevelt Hot Springs thermal area, Utah  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Carbon-hydrogen-oxygen isotope compositions have been measured in regional cold waters, geothermal fluids, and hydrothermally altered rocks from the Roosevelt Hot Springs geothermal area. These data have been used, in conjunction with other geological and geochemical data from this geothermal system, to place some limits on the origin of geothermal fluids and reservoir carbon, the fluid recharge area, physical-chemical environment of hydrothermal alteration, and relative permeability of the geothermal system. The similarity of hydrogen isotope compositions of local meteoric water and geothermal reservoir fluid indicate that the geothermal fluids are virtually entirely of surface derivation. An isotopically reasonable source area would be the Mineral Mountains directly to the east of the Roosevelt system. Hydrothermal calcite appears to be in isotopic equilibrium with the deep reservoir fluid. The deltaC/sup 13/ values of deep calcites and T- pH-f0/sub 2/ conditions of the reservoir defined by measured temperature, fluid chemistry, and alteration mineralogy fix the delta/sup 13/C value of the geothermal system to -5 to -6.5% (PDB). These values do not unambiguously define any one source or process, however. There is a relatively small increase in /sup 18/O of geothermal fluids relative to their cold surface water precursors and significant /sup 18/O depletion accompanying hydrothermal alteration of the granitic host rock. These isotopic shifts indicate a high ratio of geothermal fluid to altered rock for the geothermal system, implying relatively rapid (geologically) recirculation rates and significant permeability of the geothermal system.

Bowman, J.R.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

LABORATORY INVESTIGATIONS OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON FORMATION AND DESTRUCTION IN THE CIRCUMSTELLAR OUTFLOWS OF CARBON STARS  

SciTech Connect

The formation and destruction mechanisms of interstellar dust analogs formed from a variety of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) and hydrocarbon molecular precursors are studied in the laboratory. We used the newly developed facility COSmIC, which simulates interstellar and circumstellar environments, to investigate both PAHs and species that include the cosmically abundant atoms O, N, and S. The species generated in a discharge plasma are detected, monitored, and characterized in situ using highly sensitive techniques that provide both spectral and ion mass information. We report here the first series of measurements obtained in these experiments which focus on the characterization of the most efficient molecular precursors in the chemical pathways that eventually lead to the formation of carbonaceous grains in the stellar envelopes of carbon stars. We compare and discuss the relative efficiencies of the various molecular precursors that lead to the formation of the building blocks of carbon grains. We discuss the most probable molecular precursors in terms of size and structure and the implications for the expected growth and destruction processes of interstellar carbonaceous dust.

Contreras, Cesar S.; Salama, Farid, E-mail: cesar.contreras@nasa.gov, E-mail: Farid.Salama@nasa.gov [Space Science and Astrobiology Division, NASA-Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States)

2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

43

Laboratory Investigations of low-swirl injectors operating with syngases - article no. 011502  

SciTech Connect

The low-swirl injector (LSI) is a lean premixed combustion technology that has the potential for adaptation to fuel-flexible gas turbines operating on a variety of fuels. The objective of this study is to gain a fundamental understanding of the effect of syngas on the LSI flame behavior, the emissions, and the flowfield characteristics for adaptation to the combustion turbines in integrated gasification combined cycle clean coal power plants. The experiments were conducted in two facilities. Open atmospheric laboratory flames generated by a full size (6.35 cm) LSI were used to investigate the lean blow-off limits, emissions, and the flowfield characteristics. Verification of syngas operation at elevated temperatures and pressures were performed with a reduced scale (2.54 cm) LSI in a small pressurized combustion channel. The results show that the basic LSI design is amenable to burning syngases with up to 60% H{sub 2}. Syngases with high H{sub 2} concentration have lower lean blow-off limits. From particle image velocimetry measurements, the flowfield similarity behavior and the turbulent flame speeds of syngases flames are consistent with those observed in hydrocarbon and pure or diluted hydrogen flames. The NOx emissions from syngas flames show log-linear dependency on the adiabatic flame temperature and are comparable to those reported for the gaseous fuels reported previously. Successful firing of the reduced-scale LSI at 450 K

Littlejohn, D.; Cheng, R.K.; Noble, D.R.; Lieuwen, T. [University of California Berkeley, Berkeley, CA (United States). Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

44

Site safety plan for Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory CERCLA investigations at site 300. Revision 2  

SciTech Connect

Various Department of Energy Orders incorporate by reference, health and safety regulations promulgated by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA). One of the OSHA regulations, 29 CFR 1910.120, Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response, requires that site safety plans are written for activities such as those covered by work plans for Site 300 environmental investigations. Based upon available data, this Site Safety Plan (Plan) for environmental restoration has been prepared specifically for the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Site 300, located approximately 15 miles east of Livermore, California. As additional facts, monitoring data, or analytical data on hazards are provided, this Plan may need to be modified. It is the responsibility of the Environmental Restoration Program and Division (ERD) Site Safety Officer (SSO), with the assistance of Hazards Control, to evaluate data which may impact health and safety during these activities and to modify the Plan as appropriate. This Plan is not `cast-in-concrete.` The SSO shall have the authority, with the concurrence of Hazards Control, to institute any change to maintain health and safety protection for workers at Site 300.

Kilmer, J.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Rock-Water Interactions In Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Systems- Field...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon Rock-Water Interactions In Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Systems- Field Investigations Of In Situ...

46

Laboratory Investigations of Cloud Nuclei from Combustion of Space Shuttle Propellant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Small quantities of solid rocket motor propellant, of the type to launch the Space Shuttle, were burned at ambient pressure in the laboratory to provide aerosol samples for characterization. A portion of each sample was injected into an ...

Edward E. Hindman II; Dennis M. Garvey; Gerhard Langer; F. Kirk Odencrantz; Gerald L. Gregory

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

The Melting Layer: A Laboratory Investigation of Ice Particle Melt and Evaporation near 0°C  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Melting, freezing, and evaporation of individual and aggregates of snow crystals are simulated in the laboratory under controlled temperature, relative humidity, and air velocity. Crystals of selected habit are grown on a vertical filament and ...

R. G. Oraltay; J. Hallett

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

A PROCESS FOR CONTROLLING INSOLUBLE URANIUM IN ORE CONCENTRATES I. LABORATORY INVESTIGATION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A process has been developed for converting nitricacid-insoluble uranium in ore concentrates into soluble form. Ore concentrates are treated with a reducing agent such ss carbon monoxide or hydrogen at temperatures or 670 to 730 C. In the laboratory, retention times nsoluble uranium vary inversely with the concentration or the reducing agent. Laboratory studies leading to the development of the process are reported. (auth)

Lang, G.P.; Nelson, E.N.; Kuhlman, C.W.

1959-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Supplemental investigations in support of environmental assessments by the Idaho INEL Oversight Program at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

This document reports on the status of supplemental investigations in support of environmental assessments by the Idaho INEL Oversight Program at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Included is information on hydrology studies in wells open through large intervals, unsaturated zone contamination and transport processes, surface water-groundwater interactions, regional groundwater flow, and independent testing of air quality data.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Laboratory {open_quotes}proof of principle{close_quotes} investigation for the acoustically enhanced remediation technology  

SciTech Connect

This document describes a three phase program of Weiss Associates which investigates the systematics of using acoustic excitation fields (AEFs) to enhance the in-situ remediation of contaminated soil and ground water under both saturated and unsaturated conditions. The focus in this particular paper is a laboratory proof of principle investigation. The field deployment and engineering viability of acoustically enhanced remediation technology is also examined.

Iovenitti, J.L.; Spencer, J.W.; Hill, D.G. [and others

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Hot rocks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Four kilometers down below the orange earth of Australia¿s Cooper Basin lies some of the hottest nonvolcanic rock in the world¿rock that the geothermal industry had never seriously considered using to make electricity. But next month Geodynamics, an ...

S. Upson

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Preconditioning concepts in polymer flooding in high-salinity reservoirs; Laboratory investigations and case histories  

SciTech Connect

In polymer-flood field projects with partially hydrolized polyacrylamide (PH PAA) solutions, the authors applied two methods of preconditioning: a preflush with fresh water and the use of a relatively small slug of a less-salt-sensitive polymer. Results of laboratory work that led to an improved preconditioning concept with polymer are described. Case histories of two projects with two different preconditioning processes are presented and discussed in detail.

Volz, H.; Maltin, B.K. (RWE-DEA AG (DE)); Sohn, W.O.

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Report on the Scope of the Accident Investigation of the Tristan Fire at the DOE Brookhaven National Laboratory, IG-0386  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4/93) 4/93) United States Government Department of Energy memorandum DATE: MARCH 15, 1996 REPLY TO ATTN OF: IG-1 SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Report on lSummary Results of the Inspection of Issues Regarding the Scope of the Accident Investigation of the TRISTAN Fire at the Brookhaven National Laboratoryn TO: The Secretary BACKGROUND: The subject final report is provided to inform you of our findings and recommendations concerning our review of issues regarding the scope of the accident investigation of a March 31, 1994, fire at the Terrific Reactor Isotope Separator To Analyze Nuclides (TRISTAN) experiment at the Department of Energy (DOE) Brookhaven National Laboratory

54

Laboratory and field-based investigations of subsurface geochemical processes in seafloor hydrothermal systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis presents the results of four discrete investigations into processes governing the organic and inorganic chemical composition of seafloor hydrothermal fluids in a variety of geologic settings. Though Chapters 2 ...

Reeves, Eoghan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Preferential flow paths and heat pipes: Results from laboratory experiments on heat-driven flow in natural and artificial rock fractures  

SciTech Connect

Water flow in fractures under the conditions of partial saturation and thermal drive may lead to fast flow along preferential localized pathways and heat pipe conditions. Water flowing in fast pathways may ultimately contact waste packages at Yucca Mountain and transport radionuclides to the accessible environment. Sixteen experiments were conducted to visualize liquid flow in glass fracture models, a transparent epoxy fracture replica, and a rock/replica fracture assembly. Spatially resolved thermal monitoring was performed in seven of these experiments to evaluate heat-pipe formation. Depending on the fracture apertures and flow conditions, various flow regimes were observed including continuous rivulet flow for high flow rates, intermittent rivulet flow and drop flow for intermediate flow rates, and film flow for low flow rates and wide apertures. These flow regimes were present in both fracture models and in the replica of a natural fracture. Heat-pipe conditions indicated by low thermal gradients were observed in five experiments. Conditions conducive to heat-pipe formation include an evaporation zone, condensation zone, adequate space for vapor and liquid to travel, and appropriate fluid driving forces. In one of the two experiments where heat pipe conditions were not observed, adequate space for liquid-vapor counterflow was not provided. Heat pipe conditions were not established in the other, because liquid flow was inadequate to compensate for imbibition and the quantity of heat contained within the rock.

Kneafsey, T.J.; Pruess, K. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). Earth Sciences Div.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Air quality investigations of the Sandia National Laboratories Sol se Mete Aerial Cable Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The air quality implications of the test and evaluation activities at the Sandia National Laboratories Sol se Mete Aerial Cable Facility are examined. All facets of the activity that affect air quality are considered. Air contaminants produced directly include exhaust products of rocket motors used to accelerate test articles, dust and gas from chemical explosives, and exhaust gases from electricity generators in the test arenas. Air contaminants produced indirectly include fugitive dust and exhaust contaminants from vehicles used to transport personnel and material to the test area, and effluents produced by equipment used to heat the project buildings. Both the ongoing program and the proposed changes in the program are considered. Using a reliable estimate of th maximum annual testing level, the quantities of contaminants released by project activities ar computed either from known characteristics of test items or from EPA-approved emission factors Atmospheric concentrations of air contaminants are predicted using EPA dispersion models. The predicted quantities and concentrations are evaluated in relation to Federal, New Mexico, an Bernalillo County air quality regulations and the human health and safety standards of the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists.

Gutman, W.M.; Silver, R.J. [New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces, NM (United States). Physical Science Lab.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Los Alamos hot-dry-rock project: recent results  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A new deeper reservoir is presently being investigated at the Laboratory's Fenton Hill Hot Dry Rock (HDR) site. The region surrounding the lower of two inclined boreholes, directionally-drilled to about 4 km in hot crystalline rock, has been pressurized in a sequence of injection tests. Based primarily on the measurements made by two close-in microseismic detectors, two similar volumetric reservoir regions have been developed by massive hydraulic fracturing, but with no significant hydraulic communication with the upper borehole as yet.

Brown, D.W.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Biological investigations of the Sandia National Laboratories Sol se Mete Aerial Cable Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides results of a comprehensive biological field survey performed on the Sandia National Laboratories Aerial Cable Facility, at the east end of Kirtland Air Force Base (KAFB), Bernalillo County, New Mexico. This survey was conducted late September through October, 1991. ACF occupies a 440-acre tract of land withdrawn by the US Forest Service (USFS) for use by KAFB, and in turn placed under operational control of SNL by the Department of Energy (DOE). All land used by SNL for ACF is part of a 15,851-acre tract of land withdrawn by the US Forest Service. In addition, a number of different organizations use the 15,851-acre area. The project area used by SNL encompasses portions of approximately six sections (3,840 acres) of US Forest Service land located within the foothills of the west side of the Manzano Mountains (East Mesa). The biological study area is used by the KAFB, the US Department of Interior, and SNL. This area includes: (1) Sol se Mete Springs and Canyon, (2) East Anchor Access Road, (3) East Anchor Site, (4) Rocket Sled Track, (5) North Arena, (6) East Instrumentation Site and Access Road, (7) West Anchor Access Road, (8) West Anchor Site, (9) South Arena, (10) Winch Sites, (11) West Instrumentation Sites, (12) Explosive Assembly Building, (13) Control Building, (14) Lurance Canyon Road and vicinity. Although portions of approximately 960 acres of withdrawn US Forest Service land have been altered, only 700 acres have been disturbed by activities associated with ACF; approximately 2,880 acres consist of natural habitat. Absence of grazing by livestock and possibly native ungulates, and relative lack of human disturbance have allowed this area to remain in a more natural vegetative state relative to the condition of private range lands throughout New Mexico. This report evaluates threatened and endangered species found on ACF, as well as a comprehensive assessment of biological habitats.

Sullivan, R.M.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Laboratory investigation of chemical and physical properties of soot-containing aerosols  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Soot particles released from fossil fuel combustion and biomass burning have a large impact on the regional/global climate by altering the atmospheric radiative properties and by serving as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). However, the exact forcing is affected by the mixing of soot with other aerosol constituents, such as sulfuric acid. In this work, experimental studies have been carried out focusing on three integral parts: (1) heterogeneous uptake of sulfuric acid on soot; (2) hygroscopic growth of H2SO4-coated soot aerosols; (3) effect of H2SO4 coating on scattering and extinction properties of soot particles. A low-pressure laminar-flow reactor, coupled to ion driftchemical ionization mass spectrometry (ID-CIMS) detection, is used to study uptake coefficients of H2SO4 on combustion soot. The results suggest that uptake of H2SO4 takes place efficiently on soot particles, representing an important route to convert hydrophobic soot to hydrophilic aerosols. A tandem differential mobility analyzing (TDMA) system is employed to determine the hygroscopicity of freshly generated soot in the presence of H2SO4 coating. It is found that fresh soot particles are highly hydrophobic, while coating of H2SO4 significantly facilitates water uptake on soot even at sub-saturation relative humidities. The results indicate that aged soot particles in the atmosphere can potentially be an efficient source of CCN. Scattering and extinction coefficient measurements of the soot-H2SO4 mixed particles are conducted using a threewavelength Nephelometer and a multi-path extinction cell. Coating of H2SO4 is found to increase the single scattering albedo (SSA) of soot particles which has impact on the aerosol direct radiative effect. Other laboratory techniques such as transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FTIR) are utilized to examine the morphology and chemical composition of the soot-H2SO4 particles. This work provides critical information concerning the heterogeneous interaction of soot and sulfuric acid, and how their mixing affects the hygroscopic and optical properties of soot. The results will improve our ability to model and assess the soot direct and indirect forcing and hence enhance our understanding of the impact of anthropogenic activities on the climate.

Zhang, Dan

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Proceedings of the scientific visit on crystalline rock repository development.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A scientific visit on Crystalline Rock Repository Development was held in the Czech Republic on September 24-27, 2012. The visit was hosted by the Czech Radioactive Waste Repository Authority (RAWRA), co-hosted by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), and supported by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The purpose of the visit was to promote technical information exchange between participants from countries engaged in the investigation and exploration of crystalline rock for the eventual construction of nuclear waste repositories. The visit was designed especially for participants of countries that have recently commenced (or recommenced) national repository programmes in crystalline host rock formations. Discussion topics included repository programme development, site screening and selection, site characterization, disposal concepts in crystalline host rock, regulatory frameworks, and safety assessment methodology. Interest was surveyed in establishing a %E2%80%9Cclub,%E2%80%9D the mission of which would be to identify and address the various technical challenges that confront the disposal of radioactive waste in crystalline rock environments. The idea of a second scientific visit to be held one year later in another host country received popular support. The visit concluded with a trip to the countryside south of Prague where participants were treated to a tour of the laboratory and underground facilities of the Josef Regional Underground Research Centre.

Mariner, Paul E.; Hardin, Ernest L.; Miksova, Jitka [RAWRA, Czech Republic

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "laboratory investigations rock" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Determination of permeability of granitic rocks in GT-2 from hydraulic fracturing data  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory is currently conducting a study to determine the feasibility to extract geothermal energy from dry hot rock. The investigated concept calls for the creation of a hydraulic fracture in hot, impermeable rock. Heat will be exchanged subsequently at the fracture surface between the rock and a circulating fluid. The successful creation of hydraulic fractures in the granitic section of exploratory holes GT-1 and GT-2 yielded sufficient data to calculate the average permeability of the rock next to a fracture by means of the mathematical model. The calculated permeabilities were found to be in the microdarcy range and proved the granitic rock penetrated by GT-1 and GT-2 to be sufficiently impermeable to test the above concept. (auth)

Delisle, G.

1975-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

LABORATORY INVESTIGATIONS IN SUPPORT OF CARBON DIOXIDE-LIMESTONE SEQUESTRATION IN THE OCEAN  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This semi-annual progress reports includes further findings on CO{sub 2}-in-Water (C/W) emulsions stabilized by fine particles. In previous reports we described C/W emulsions using pulverized limestone (CaCO{sub 3}), flyash, and a pulverized magnesium silicate mineral, lizardite, Mg{sub 3}Si{sub 2}O{sub 5}(OH){sub 4}, which has a similar composition as the more abundant mineral, serpentine. All these materials formed stable emulsions consisting of droplets of liquid or supercritical CO{sub 2} coated with a sheath of particles dispersed in water. During this semi-annual period we experimented with pulverized beach sand (10-20 {micro}m particle diameter). Pulverized sand produced an emulsion similar to the previously used materials. The globules are heavier than water, thus they accumulate at the bottom of the water column. Energy Dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis revealed that the sand particles consisted mainly of SiO{sub 2}. Sand is one of the most abundant materials on earth, so the economic and energy penalties of using it for ocean sequestration consist mainly of the cost of transporting the sand to the user, the capital and operating costs of the pulverizer, and the energy expenditure for mining, shipping and grinding the sand. Most likely, sand powder would be innocuous to marine organisms if released together with CO{sub 2} in the deep ocean. We examined the effects of methanol (MeOH) and monoethanolamine (MEA) on emulsion formation. These solvents are currently used for pre- and post-combustion capture of CO{sub 2}. A fraction of the solvents may be captured together with CO{sub 2}. A volume fraction of 5% of these solvents in a mix of CO{sub 2}/CaCO{sub 3}/H{sub 2}O had no apparent effect on emulsion formation. Previously we have shown that a 3.5% by weight of common salt (NaCl) in water, simulating seawater, also had no appreciable effect on emulsion formation. We investigated the formation of inverted emulsions, where water droplets coated with pulverized materials are dispersed in liquid or supercritical CO{sub 2}. This is a Water-in-CO{sub 2} emulsion (W/C) stabilized by particles. For a W/C emulsion it is necessary to employ hydrophobic particles, where the particles are primarily wetted by CO{sub 2}. We used the following hydrophobic particles: carbon black, coal dust, and Teflon. All materials were either obtained as fine particles or ground to 10-20 {micro}m size. All these hydrophobic particles produced a stable W/C emulsion.

Dan Golomb; Eugene Barry; David Ryan; Carl Lawton; Peter Swett; Huishan Duan; Matthew Woodcock

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Remedial investigation work plan for the Groundwater Operable Unit at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Remedial Investigation (RI) Work Plan has been developed as part of the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) investigation of the Groundwater Operable Unit (GWOU) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) located near Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The first iteration of the GWOU RI Work Plan is intended to serve as a strategy document to guide the ORNL GWOU RI. The Work Plan provides a rationale and organization for groundwater data acquisition, monitoring, and remedial actions to be performed during implementation of environmental restoration activities associated with the ORNL GWOU. It Is important to note that the RI Work Plan for the ORNL GWOU is not a prototypical work plan. The RI will be conducted using annual work plans to manage the work activities, and task reports will be used to document the results of the investigations. Sampling and analysis results will be compiled and reported annually with a review of data relative to risk (screening level risk assessment review) for groundwater. This Work Plan outlines the overall strategy for the RI and defines tasks which are to be conducted during the initial phase of investigation. This plan is presented with the understanding that more specific addenda to the plan will follow.

Not Available

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

RCRA Facility investigation report for Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the borehole geophysical logging performed at selected monitoring wells at waste area grouping (WAG) 6 of Oak Ridge National Laboratory in support of the WAG 6 Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Facility Investigation (RFI). It identifies the locations and describes the methods, equipment used in the effort, and the results of the activity. The actual logs for each well logged are presented in Attachment 1 through 4 of the TM. Attachment 5 provide logging contractor service literature and Attachment 6 is the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Procedure for Control of a Nuclear Source Utilized in Geophysical logging. The primary objectives of the borehole geophysical logging program were to (1) identify water-bearing fractured bedrock zones to determine the placement of the screen and sealed intervals for subsequent installation, and (2) further characterize local bedrock geology and hydrogeology and gain insight about the deeper component of the shallow bedrock aquifer flow system. A secondary objective was to provide stratigraphic and structural correlations with existing logs for Hydraulic Head Monitoring Station (HHMS) wells, which display evidence of faulting.

Not Available

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Data base management plan for the remedial investigation/feasibility study at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

This Data Base Management (DBM) Plan has been prepared for use by Bechtel National, Inc. (Bechtel) and its subcontractors in the performance of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) program activities. The RI/FS program is being performed under subcontract to Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems), the contractor operating ORNL for the Department of Energy. This DBM Plan defines the procedures and protocol to be followed in developing and maintaining the data base used by Bechtel and its subcontractors for RI/FS activities at ORNL; describes the management controls, policies, and guidelines to be followed; and identifies responsible positions and their Energy Systems functions. The Bechtel RI/FS data base will be compatible with the Oak Ridge Environmental Information System and will include data obtained from field measurements and laboratory and engineering analyses. Personnel health and safety information, document control, and project management data will also be maintained as part of the data base. The computerized data management system is being used to organize the data according to application and is capable of treating data from any given site as a variable entity. The procedures required to implement the DBM Plan are cross-referenced to specific sections of the plan.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Remedial investigation report on Waste Area Grouping 5 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 1: Technical summary  

SciTech Connect

A remedial investigation (RI) was performed to support environmental restoration activities for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 5 at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The WAG 5 RI made use of the observational approach, which concentrates on collecting only information needed to assess site risks and support future cleanup work. This information was interpreted and is presented using the framework of the site conceptual model, which relates contaminant sources and release mechanisms to migration pathways and exposure points that are keyed to current and future environmental risks for both human and ecological receptors. The site conceptual model forms the basis of the WAG 5 remedial action strategy and remedial action objectives. The RI provided the data necessary to verify this model and allows recommendations to be made to accomplish those objectives.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Cultural Resource Investigation for the Materials and Fuels Complex Wastewater System Upgrade at the Idaho National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) located in Bingham County at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) in southeastern Idaho is considering several alternatives to upgrade wastewater systems to meet future needs at the facility. In April and May of 2010, the INL Cultural Resource Management Office conducted archival searches, archaeological field surveys, and coordination with the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes to identify cultural resources that may be adversely affected by the proposed construction and to provide recommendations to protect any resources listed or eligible for listing on the National Register of Historic Places. These investigations showed that one National Register-eligible archaeological site is located on the boundary of the area of potential effects for the wastewater upgrade. This report outlines protective measures to help ensure that this resource is not adversely affected by construction.

Brenda R. Pace; Julie B raun Williams; Hollie Gilbert; Dino Lowrey; Julie Brizzee

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Investigating Sources of Toxicity in Stormwater: Algae Mortality in Runoff Upstream of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

A source evaluation case study is presented for observations of algae toxicity in an intermittent stream passing through the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory near Livermore, California. A five-step procedure is discussed to determine the cause of water toxicity problems and to determine appropriate environmental management practices. Using this approach, an upstream electrical transfer station was identified as the probable source of herbicides causing the toxicity. In addition, an analytical solution for solute transport in overland flow was used to estimate the application level of 40 Kg/ha. Finally, this source investigation demonstrates that pesticides can impact stream water quality regardless of application within levels suggested on manufacturer labels. Environmental managers need to ensure that pesticides that could harm aquatic organisms (including algae) not be used within close proximity to streams or storm drainages and that application timing should be considered for environmental protection.

Campbell, C G; Folks, K; Mathews, S; Martinelli, R

2003-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

69

Remedial investigation report on Waste Area Group 5 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 1: Technical summary  

SciTech Connect

A remedial investigation (RI) was performed to support environmental restoration activities for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 5 at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The WAG 5 RI made use of the observational approach, which concentrates on collecting only information needed to assess site risks and support future cleanup work. This information was interpreted and is presented using the framework of the site conceptual model, which relates contaminant sources and release mechanisms to migration pathways and exposure points that are keyed to current and future environmental risks for both human and ecological receptors. The site conceptual model forms the basis of the WAG 5 remedial action strategy and remedial action objectives. The RI provided the data necessary to verify this model and allows recommendations to be made to accomplish those objectives.

NONE

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

A radiological and chemical investigation of the 7500 Area Contamination Site at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A radiological and chemical investigation of the 7500 Area Contamination Site at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was conducted intermittently from February 1992 through May 1992. The investigation was performed by the Measurement Applications and Development Group of the Health and Safety Research Division of ORNL at the request of the US Department of Energy`s Oak Ridge Operations Office and the ORNL Environmental Restoration Program. Results of this investigation indicate that the source of radioactive contamination at the point of the contamination incident is from one of the underground abandoned lines. The contamination in soil is likely the result of residual contamination from years of waste transport and maintenance operations (e.g., replacement of degraded joints, upgrading or replacement of entire pipelines, and associated landscaping activities). However, because (1) there is currently an active LLW line positioned in the same subsurface trench with the abandoned lines and (2) the physical condition of the abandoned lines may be brittle, this inquiry could not determine which abandoned line was responsible for the subsurface contamination. Soil sampling at the location of the contamination incident and along the pipeline route was performed in a manner so as not to damage the active LLW line and abandoned lines. Recommendations for corrective actions are included.

Williams, J.K.; Foley, R.D.; Tiner, P.F.; Hatmaker, T.L.; Uziel, M.S.; Swaja, R.E.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Laboratory Investigations of a Low-swirl Injector withH2 and CH4 at Gas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Investigations of a Low-swirl Injector withH2 and CH4 at Gas Investigations of a Low-swirl Injector withH2 and CH4 at Gas Turbine Conditions Title Laboratory Investigations of a Low-swirl Injector withH2 and CH4 at Gas Turbine Conditions Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2009 Authors Cheng, Robert K., David Littlejohn, P. A. Strakey, and T. Sidwell Journal Science Direct Abstract Laboratory experiments were conducted at gas turbine and atmospheric conditions (0.101 < P0 < 0.810 MPa, 298 < T0 < 580K, 18 < U0 < 60 m/s) to characterize the overall behaviors and emissions of the turbulent premixed flames produced by a low-swirl injector (LSI) for gas turbines. The objective was to investigate the effects of hydrogen on the combustion processes for the adaptation to gas turbines in an IGCC power plant. The experiments at high pressures and temperatures showed that the LSI can operate with 100% H2 at up to f = 0.5 and has a slightly higher flashback tolerance than an idealized high-swirl design. With increasing H2 fuel concentration, the lifted LSI flame begins to shift closer to the exit and eventually attaches to the nozzle rim and assumes a different shape at 100% H2. The STP experiments show the same phenomena. The analysis of velocity data from PIV shows that the stabilization mechanism of the LSI remains unchanged up to 60% H2. The change in the flame position with increasing H2 concentration is attributed to the increase in the turbulent flame speed. The NOx emissions show a log linear dependency on the adiabatic flame temperature and the concentrations are similar to those obtained previously in a LSI prototype developed for natural gas. These results show that the LSI exhibits the same overall behaviors at STP and at gas turbine conditions. Such insight will be useful for scaling the LSI to operate at IGCC conditions.

72

Los Alamos hot dry rock geothermal project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The greatest potential for geothermal energy is the almost unlimited energy contained in the vast regions of hot, but essentially impermeable, rock within the first six or seven km of the Earth's crust. For the past five years, the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory has been investigating and developing a practical, economical and environmentally acceptable method of extracting this energy. By early 1978, a 10 MW (thermal) heat extraction experiment will be in operation. In the Los Alamos concept, a man-made geothermal reservoir is formed by drilling into a region of suitably hot rock, and then creating within the rock a very large surface for heat transfer by large-scale hydraulic-fracturing techniques. After a circulation loop is formed by drilling a second hole to intersect the fractured region, the heat contained in this reservoir is brought to the surface by the buoyant closed-loop circulation of water. The water is kept liquid throughout the loop by pressurization, thereby increasing the rate of heat transport up the withdrawal hole compared to that possible with steam.

Brown, D.W.; Pettitt, R.A.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Investigating Sequestration Potential of Carbonate Rocks during Tertiary Recovery from a Billion Barrel Oil Field, Weyburn, Saskatchewan: the Geoscience Framework (IEA Weyburn CO2 Monitoring Project)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sequestration Potential of Carbonate Rocks during Tertiary Sequestration Potential of Carbonate Rocks during Tertiary Recovery from a Billion Barrel Oil Field, Weyburn, Saskatchewan: the Geoscience Framework (IEA Weyburn CO 2 Monitoring and Storage Project) G. Burrowes (Geoffrey_Burrowes@pancanadian.ca; 403-290-2796) PanCanadian Resources 150 - 9 th Avenue S.W., P.O. Box 2850 Calgary, Alberta, Canada T2P 2S5 C. Gilboy (cgilboy@sem.gov.sk.ca; 306-787-2573) Petroleum Geology Branch, Saskatchewan Energy and Mines 201 Dewdney Avenue East Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada S4N 4G3 Introduction In Western Canada the application of CO 2 injection for enhanced, 'tertiary' oil recovery is a relatively recent addition to the arsenal available to reservoir engineers. The first successful application of CO 2 as a miscible fluid in Western Canada began in 1984 at Joffre Field, a

74

Exploration for hot dry rock geothermal resources in the Midcontinent USA. Hot dry rock conceptual models for exploration, HDR test site investigations, and the Illinois Deep Drill Hole Project. Volume 2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Three potential sources of HDR, each covering approximately a 2/sup 0/ x 2/sup 0/ area, were identified and subjected to preliminary evaluation with ad hoc exploration strategies. In the Mississippi Embayment test site, lateral thermal conductivity variations and subcrustal heat sources may be involved in producing abnormally high subsurface temperatures. Studies indicate that enhanced temperatures are associated primarily with basement rift features where vertical displacement of aquifers and faults cause the upward migration of hot waters leading to anomalously high, local, upper crustal temperatures. The Western Nebraska test site is a potential low temperature HDR source also related, at least in part, to groundwater movement. There appear to be much more widespread possibilities for similar HDR sites in the Great Plains area. The Southeast Michigan test site was selected for study because of the possible presence of radiogenic plutons overlain by a thickened sedimentary blanket. There is no direct information on the presence of abnormally high temperatures in this area, but the study does show that a combination of gravity and magnetic anomaly mapping with regional geological information derived from sparse drill holes in the Phanerozoic rocks is useful on a widespread basis for focusing on local areas for detailed evaluation.

Hinze, W.J.; Braile, L.W.; von Frese, R.R.B.; Lidiak, E.G.; Denison, R.E.; Keller, G.R.; Roy, R.F.; Swanberg, C.A.; Aiken, C.L.V.; Morgan, P.

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

FY 1995 remedial investigation work plan for Waste Area Grouping 2 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

Field activities to support the remedial investigation (RI) of Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 2 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) include characterization of the nature and extent of contamination in WAG 2, specifically to support risk-based remediation decisions. WAG 2 is the major drainage system downgradient of other WAGs containing significant sources of contamination at ORNL. The RI of WAG 2 is developed in three phases: Phase 1, initial scoping characterization to determine the need for early action; Phase 2, interim activities during remediation of upgradient WAGs to evaluate potential changes in the contamination status of WAG 2 that would necessitate reevaluation of the need for early action; and Phase 3, completion of the RI process following remediation of upslope WAGs. Specifically, Phase 2 activities are required to track key areas to determine if changes have occurred in WAG 2 that would require (1) interim remedial action to protect human health and the environment or (2) changes in remedial action plans and schedules for WAG2 because of changing contaminant release patterns in upslope WAGs or because of the effects of interim remedial or removal actions in other WAGs. This report defines activities to be conducted in FY 1995 for completion of the Phase 1 RI and initiation of limited Phase 2 field work.

Watkins, D.R.; Herbes, S.E. [eds.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Laboratory Investigations of a Low-Swirl Injector with H2 and CH4 at Gas Turbine Conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Laboratory experiments were conducted at gas turbine and atmospheric conditions (0.101 flames produced by a low-swirl injector (LSI) for gas turbines. The objective was to investigate the effects of hydrogen on the combustion processes for the adaptation to gas turbines in an IGCC power plant. The experiments at high pressures and temperatures showed that the LSI can operate with 100% H{sub 2} at up to {phi} = 0.5 and has a slightly higher flashback tolerance than an idealized high-swirl design. With increasing H{sub 2} fuel concentration, the lifted LSI flame begins to shift closer to the exit and eventually attaches to the nozzle rim and assumes a different shape at 100% H{sub 2}. The STP experiments show the same phenomena. The analysis of velocity data from PIV shows that the stabilization mechanism of the LSI remains unchanged up to 60% H{sub 2}. The change in the flame position with increasing H{sub 2} concentration is attributed to the increase in the turbulent flame speed. The NO{sub x} emissions show a log linear dependency on the adiabatic flame temperature and the concentrations are similar to those obtained previously in a LSI prototype developed for natural gas. These results show that the LSI exhibits the same overall behaviors at STP and at gas turbine conditions. Such insight will be useful for scaling the LSI to operate at IGCC conditions.

Cheng, R. K.; Littlejohn, D.; Strakey, P.A.; Sidwell, T.

2008-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

77

Phase I remedial investigation report of Waste Area Grouping 2 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the activities and findings of the first phase of a three-phase remedial investigation (RI) of Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 2 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, and updates the scope and strategy for WAG-2-related efforts. WAG 2 contains White Oak Creek (WOC) and its tributaries downstream of the ORNL main plant area, White Oak Lake, White Oak Creek Embayment on the Clinch River, and the associated floodplain and subsurface environment. Water, sediment, soil, and biota in WAG 2 are contaminated and continue to receive contaminants from upgradient WAGs. This report includes field activities completed through October 1992. The remediation of WAG 2 is scheduled to follow the cessation of contaminant input from hydrologically upgradient WAGs. While upgradient areas are being remediated, the strategy for WAG 2 is to conduct a long-term monitoring and investigation program that takes full advantage of WAG 2`s role as an integrator of contaminant fluxes from other ORNL WAGs and focuses on four key goals: (1) Implement, in concert with other programs, long-term, multimedia environmental monitoring and tracking of contaminants leaving other WAGs, entering WAG 2, and being transported off-site. (2) Provide a conceptual framework to integrate and develop information at the watershed-level for pathways and processes that are key to contaminant movement, and so support remedial efforts at ORNL. (3) Provide periodic updates of estimates of potential risk (both human health and ecological) associated with contaminants accumulating in and moving through WAG 2 to off-site areas. (4) Support the ORNL Environmental Restoration Program efforts to prioritize, remediate, and verify remedial effectiveness for contaminated sites at ORNL, through long-term monitoring and continually updated risk assessments.

Miller, D.E. [ed.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Geothermal programs at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has a number of geothermal programs supported through two offices in the Department of Energy: the Office of Renewable Technologies, Geothermal Technologies Division, and the Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Engineering, Mathematics and Geosciences. Within these programs, we are carrying out research in injection monitoring, optical instrumentation for geothermal wells, seismic imaging methods, geophysical and drilling investigations of young volcanic systems in California, and fundamental studies of the rock and mineral properties.

Kasameyer, P.W.; Younker, L.W.

1987-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

79

Establishment of Stress-Permeabilty relationship of fractured rock mass by numerical modeling  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Accepted for publication in International Journal of Rock Mechanics & Mining Sciences Accepted for publication in International Journal of Rock Mechanics & Mining Sciences Stress-Dependent Permeability of Fractured Rock Masses: A Numerical Study Ki-Bok Min *1 , J Rutqvist 2 , Chin-Fu Tsang 2 , and Lanru Jing 1 1 Engineering Geology and Geophysics Research Group, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Stockholm, Sweden 2 Earth Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Berkeley, CA, USA * corresponding author. Tel.: +46-8-790-7919; fax: +46-8-790-6810. E-mail address: kibok@kth.se (Ki-Bok Min) 1 Abstract We investigate the stress-dependent permeability issue in fractured rock masses considering the effects of nonlinear normal deformation and shear dilation of fractures using a two-dimensional

80

Geochemical Data on Waters, Gases, Scales, and Rocks from the Dixie Valley  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geochemical Data on Waters, Gases, Scales, and Rocks from the Dixie Valley Geochemical Data on Waters, Gases, Scales, and Rocks from the Dixie Valley Region, Nevada (1996-1999) Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Geochemical Data on Waters, Gases, Scales, and Rocks from the Dixie Valley Region, Nevada (1996-1999) Abstract This report tabulates an extensive geochemical database on waters, gases, scales,rocks, and hot-spring deposits from the Dixie Valley region, Nevada. The samples fromwhich the data were obtained were collected and analyzed during 1996 to 1999. Thesedata provide useful information for ongoing and future investigations on geothermalenergy, volcanism, ore deposits, environmental issues, and groundwater quality in thisregion. Authors Los Alamos National Laboratory and NM Published

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "laboratory investigations rock" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Seismological investigation of crack formation in hydraulic rock fracturing experiments and in natural geothermal environments. Progress report, September 1, 1980-August 31, 1981  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress is reported on the following: interpretation of seismic data from hydraulic fracturing experiments at the Fenton Hill Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Site, interpretation of 3-D velocity anomalies in the western US with special attention to geothermal areas, theoretical and observational studies of scattering and attenuation of high-frequency seismic waves, theoretical and observational studies of volcanic tremors in relation to magma transport mechanisms, and deployment and maintenance of 9 event-recorders around Mt. St. Helens. Abstracts of papers submitted for publication are included. (MHR)

Aki, K.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Seismological investigation of crack formation in hydraulic rock fracturing experiments and in natural geothermal environments. Progress report, September 1, 1979-August 31, 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress is reported in the following research areas: a synthesis of seismic experiments at the Fenton Hill Hot-Dry-Rock System; attenuation of high-frequency shear waves in the lithosphere; a new kinematic source model for deep volcanic tremors; ground motion in the near-field of a fluid-driven crack and its interpretation in the study of shallow volcanic tremor; low-velocity bodies under geothermal areas; and operation of event recorders in Mt. St. Helens and Newberry Peak with preliminary results from them. (MHR)

Aki, K.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Laboratory Investigations of a Low-Swirl Injector with H2 and CH4 at Gas Turbine Conditions  

SciTech Connect

Laboratory experiments were conducted at gas turbine and atmospheric conditions (0.101 < P{sub 0} < 0.810 MPa, 298 < T{sub 0} < 580K, 18 < U{sub 0} < 60 m/s) to characterize the overall behaviors and emissions of the turbulent premixed flames produced by a low-swirl injector (LSI) for gas turbines. The objective was to investigate the effects of hydrogen on the combustion processes for the adaptation to gas turbines in an IGCC power plant. The experiments at high pressures and temperatures showed that the LSI can operate with 100% H{sub 2} at up to {phi} = 0.5 and has a slightly higher flashback tolerance than an idealized high-swirl design. With increasing H{sub 2} fuel concentration, the lifted LSI flame begins to shift closer to the exit and eventually attaches to the nozzle rim and assumes a different shape at 100% H{sub 2}. The STP experiments show the same phenomena. The analysis of velocity data from PIV shows that the stabilization mechanism of the LSI remains unchanged up to 60% H{sub 2}. The change in the flame position with increasing H{sub 2} concentration is attributed to the increase in the turbulent flame speed. The NO{sub x} emissions show a log linear dependency on the adiabatic flame temperature and the concentrations are similar to those obtained previously in a LSI prototype developed for natural gas. These results show that the LSI exhibits the same overall behaviors at STP and at gas turbine conditions. Such insight will be useful for scaling the LSI to operate at IGCC conditions.

Cheng, R. K.; Littlejohn, D.; Strakey, P.A.; Sidwell, T.

2008-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

84

ACOUSTICAL IMAGING AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF SOFT ROCK AND MARINE SEDIMENTS  

SciTech Connect

The research during this project has concentrated on developing a correlation between rock deformation mechanisms and their acoustic velocity signature. This has included investigating: (1) the acoustic signature of drained and undrained unconsolidated sands, (2) the acoustic emission signature of deforming high porosity rocks (in comparison to their low porosity high strength counterparts), (3) the effects of deformation on anisotropic elastic and poroelastic moduli, and (4) the acoustic tomographic imaging of damage development in rocks. Each of these four areas involve triaxial experimental testing of weak porous rocks or unconsolidated sand and involves measuring acoustic properties. The research is directed at determining the seismic velocity signature of damaged rocks so that 3-D or 4-D seismic imaging can be utilized to image rock damage. These four areas of study are described in the report: (1) Triaxial compression experiments have been conducted on unconsolidated Oil Creek sand at high confining pressures. (2) Initial experiments on measuring the acoustic emission activity from deforming high porosity Danian chalk were accomplished and these indicate that the AE activity was of a very low amplitude. (3) A series of triaxial compression experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of induced stress on the anisotropy developed in dynamic elastic and poroelastic parameters in rocks. (4) Tomographic acoustic imaging was utilized to image the internal damage in a deforming porous limestone sample. Results indicate that the deformation damage in rocks induced during laboratory experimentation can be imaged tomographically in the laboratory. By extension the results also indicate that 4-D seismic imaging of a reservoir may become a powerful tool for imaging reservoir deformation (including imaging compaction and subsidence) and for imaging zones where drilling operation may encounter hazardous shallow water flows.

Thurman E. Scott, Jr.; Younane Abousleiman

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Proceedings of the International Symposium on Dynamics of Fluids in Fractured Rocks: Concepts and Recent Advances  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This publication contains extended abstracts of papers presented at the International Symposium ''Dynamics of Fluids in Fractured Rocks: Concepts and Recent Advances'' held at Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory on February 10-12, 1999. This Symposium is organized in Honor of the 80th Birthday of Paul A. Witherspoon, who initiated some of the early investigations on flow and transport in fractured rocks at the University of California, Berkeley, and at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. He is a key figure in the development of basic concepts, modeling, and field measurements of fluid flow and contaminant transport in fractured rock systems. The technical problems of assessing fluid flow, radionuclide transport, site characterization, modeling, and performance assessment in fractured rocks remain the most challenging aspects of subsurface flow and transport investigations. An understanding of these important aspects of hydrogeology is needed to assess disposal of nu clear wastes, development of geothermal resources, production of oil and gas resources, and remediation of contaminated sites. These Proceedings of more than 100 papers from 12 countries discuss recent scientific and practical developments and the status of our understanding of fluid flow and radionuclide transport in fractured rocks. The main topics of the papers are: Theoretical studies of fluid flow in fractured rocks; Multi-phase flow and reactive chemical transport in fractured rocks; Fracture/matrix interactions; Hydrogeological and transport testing; Fracture flow models; Vadose zone studies; Isotopic studies of flow in fractured systems; Fractures in geothermal systems; Remediation and colloid transport in fractured systems; and Nuclear waste disposal in fractured rocks.

Faybishenko, B. (ed.)

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Proceedings of the International Symposium on Dynamics of Fluids in Fractured Rocks: Concepts and Recent Advances  

SciTech Connect

This publication contains extended abstracts of papers presented at the International Symposium ''Dynamics of Fluids in Fractured Rocks: Concepts and Recent Advances'' held at Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory on February 10-12, 1999. This Symposium is organized in Honor of the 80th Birthday of Paul A. Witherspoon, who initiated some of the early investigations on flow and transport in fractured rocks at the University of California, Berkeley, and at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. He is a key figure in the development of basic concepts, modeling, and field measurements of fluid flow and contaminant transport in fractured rock systems. The technical problems of assessing fluid flow, radionuclide transport, site characterization, modeling, and performance assessment in fractured rocks remain the most challenging aspects of subsurface flow and transport investigations. An understanding of these important aspects of hydrogeology is needed to assess disposal of nu clear wastes, development of geothermal resources, production of oil and gas resources, and remediation of contaminated sites. These Proceedings of more than 100 papers from 12 countries discuss recent scientific and practical developments and the status of our understanding of fluid flow and radionuclide transport in fractured rocks. The main topics of the papers are: Theoretical studies of fluid flow in fractured rocks; Multi-phase flow and reactive chemical transport in fractured rocks; Fracture/matrix interactions; Hydrogeological and transport testing; Fracture flow models; Vadose zone studies; Isotopic studies of flow in fractured systems; Fractures in geothermal systems; Remediation and colloid transport in fractured systems; and Nuclear waste disposal in fractured rocks.

Faybishenko, B. (ed.)

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Seismological investigation of crack formation in hydraulic rock fracturing experiments and in natural geothermal environments. Progress report, September 1, 1978-August 31, 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An interpretation theory based on the fluid-filled crack model of geothermal systems is being developed and tested against a variety of data from various geothermal areas. Progress is reported on the following subjects: (1) analysis and interpretation of seismic data obtained from the bore holes at the LASL Hot Dry Rock geothermal site. (2) Collection, analysis and interpretation of data on deep volcanic tremors at the USGS Hawaii Volcano Observatory. (3) Development of a new method for determining seismic attenuation at frequencies higher than 1HZ, and initiation of a cooperative work with Mexican seismologists on the attenuation measurements at various geothermal areas in Baja, California using the method. (4) Installation of 3-component digital event-recorders at four stations in the Newberry Peak volcano, Oregon. (5) Developing a computer program for calculating seismic motion generated by the vibration of fluid-filled crack in a layered medium.

Aki, K.

1979-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Supplemental investigations in support of environmental assessments by the Idaho INEL Oversight Program at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Status report, June 30, 1992  

SciTech Connect

This document reports on the status of supplemental investigations in support of environmental assessments by the Idaho INEL Oversight Program at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Included is information on hydrology studies in wells open through large intervals, unsaturated zone contamination and transport processes, surface water-groundwater interactions, regional groundwater flow, and independent testing of air quality data.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Definition: Rock Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sampling Sampling Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Rock Sampling Systematic rock sampling can be used to characterize a geothermal reservoir. The physical and chemical properties of rock samples provide important information for determining whether a power generation or heat utilization facility can be developed. Some general rock properties can be measured by visual inspection, but detailed properties require laboratory techniques. View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition A core sample is a cylindrical section of (usually) a naturally occurring substance. Most core samples are obtained by drilling with special drills into the substance, for example sediment or rock, with a hollow steel tube called a core drill. The hole made for the core sample is called the "core hole". A variety of core samplers exist to sample

90

Seismological investigation of crack formation in hydraulic rock fracturing experiments and in natural geothermal environments. Progress report, September 1, 1977--August 31, 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

New seismological methods were developed for determining the structure of a geothermal energy source region by the use of data from both active and passive experiments. Technical papers were published on four topics, namely: a field experiment at Kilauea Iki, source models of volcanic tremors, microearthquake source spectra, and a numerical study of elastic wave diffraction by fluid-filled cracks. In addition, papers were submitted for publication on a statistical synthesis of source mechanism of seismic events in Kilauea Iki and the observation of a temporal variation in the attenuation of earthquake coda in central California. The following subjects were worked on: (1) interpretation of seismic data from the LASL Hot Dry Rock system; (2) analyisis of volcanic tremor data from the U.S.G.S. Hawaiian seismic network; (3) frequency dependence and three-dimensional distribution of seismic attenuation in central Japan; (4) experimental study of seismic scattering by a penny-shaped crack; (5) development of a microprocessor system for the treatment of the data from digital event recorders.

Aki, K.

1978-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Corrosion inhibitor squeeze technique: laboratory adsorption-desorption studies  

SciTech Connect

Success of corrosion control in oil-well tubing by inhibitor squeeze technique depends on adsorption of inhibitor on reservoir rock and its slow desorption into produced fluids. This article describes laboratory investigations of adsorption-desorption phenomena. An analytical technique was developed for determination of corrosion inhibitor in the range of 0-25 ppm. Adsorptive capacities and adsorption characteristics of rock minerals found in reservoir formations were measured using several inhibitors. Irreversible chemisorption as well as reversible physical adsorption was observed, and significance of each is discussed. Desorption of inhibitor from consolidated sandstone was the type desired for protecting oil-well tubing. (20 refs.)

Kerver, J.K.; Morgan, F.A. III

1965-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

RCRA Facility Investigation report for Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 2, Sections 4 through 9: Environmental Restoration Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents compiled information concerning a facility investigation of waste area group 6(WAG-6), of the solid waste management units (SWMU`s) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The WAG is a shallow ground disposal area for low-level radioactive wastes and chemical wastes. The report contains information on hydrogeological data, contaminant characterization, radionuclide concentrations, risk assessment and baseline human health evaluation including a toxicity assessment, and a baseline environmental evaluation.

Not Available

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Hot dry rock energy project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A proof-of-concept experimental project by the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory endeavors to establish the feasibility of exploitation of the thermal energy contained in the earth's crust where such energy and a transporting fluid have not been juxtaposed in nature. A region of high heat flow and apparently unfaulted basement rock formation was selected. Two boreholes, drilled to a total depth of about 3 km (10,000 ft) and penetrating about 2.5 km (7500 ft) into the Precambrian formation, to a rock temperature of 200/sup 0/C, have been connected at depth by a hydraulically fractured zone to form the heat extraction surface. Energy was extracted at a rate of 3.2 MW(t) with water temperature of 132/sup 0/C during a 96-h preliminary circulating test run performed late in September 1977. This paper traces the progress of the project, summarizes procedures and salient events, and references detailed reports and specialized topics.

Hendron, R.H.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Rock-Water Interactions In Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Systems- Field  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Rock-Water Interactions In Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Systems- Field Investigations Of In Situ Geochemical Behavior Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Rock-Water Interactions In Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Systems- Field Investigations Of In Situ Geochemical Behavior Details Activities (5) Areas (2) Regions (0) Abstract: Two hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal energy reservoirs have been created by hydraulic fracturing of Precambrian granitic rock between two wells on the west flank of the Valles Caldera in the Jemez Mountains of northern New Mexico. Heat is extracted by injecting water into one well,

95

Proceedings of the Combustion Institute, Volume 29, 2002/pp. 11151121 LABORATORY INVESTIGATION OF AN ULTRALOW NOx PREMIXED  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by the Office of Industrial Technology of the U.S. Department of Energy for year 2020, a new approach was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Industrial Technology, and the California Institute INVESTIGATION OF AN ULTRALOW NOx PREMIXED COMBUSTION CONCEPT FOR INDUSTRIAL BOILERS DAVID LITTLEJOHN,1 ADRIAN J

Knowles, David William

96

RCRA Facility Investigation report for Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

WAG 6 comprises a shallow land burial facility used for disposal of low-level radioactive wastes (LLW) and, until recently, chemical wastes. As such, the site is subject to regulation under RCRA and the Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA). To comply with these regulations, DOE, in conjunction with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC), developed a strategy for closure and remediation of WAG 6 by 1997. A key component of this strategy was to complete an RFI by September 1991. The primary objectives of the RFI were to evaluate the site's potential human health and environmental impacts and to develop a preliminary list of alternatives to mitigate these impacts. The WAG 6 one of three solid waste management units evaluated Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) existing waste disposal records and sampling data and performed the additional sampling and analysis necessary to: describe the nature and extent of contamination; characterize key contaminant transport pathways; and assess potential risks to human health and the environment by developing and evaluating hypothetical receptor scenarios. Estimated excess lifetime cancer risks as a result for exposure to radionuclides and chemicals were quantified for each hypothetical human receptor. For environmental receptors, potential impacts were qualitatively assessed. Taking into account regulatory requirements and base line risk assessment results, preliminary site closure and remediation objectives were identified, and a preliminary list of alternatives for site closure and remediation was developed.

Not Available

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

High-volume, high-value usage of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) by- products in underground mines: Phase 1, Laboratory investigations. Quarterly report, April--June 1995  

SciTech Connect

The kinetics study which is investigating hydration reactions of the ADM by-product (Subtask 2.2) was continued this quarter. This study further aided in gaining information on mineral precipitation and dissolution reactions during hydration of the ADM materials. The information is of importance for a comprehensive understanding of the factors that control strength and long-term stability during aging of FGD materials. The decision was made by Addington, Inc., DOE, and the University of Kentucky that the originally selected mine site for the emplacement demonstration must be changed, mainly for safety reasons. Mine selection will be a priority for the next quarter (Jul--Sep, 1995). Another activity during this reporting period was related to Subtask 4.3, the selection and testing of the transport system for the FGD material. A laboratory-scale pneumatic emplacement test unit (ETU) for dry FGD materials was built at the CAER to generate data so that a final selection of the field demonstration technology can be made. A dry pneumatic system was chosen for laboratory testing because the equipment and expertise available at the CAER matched this sort of technology best. While the design of the laboratory system was based on shotcrete technology, the physical properties of the emplaced FGD material is expected to be similar for other transport techniques, either pneumatic or hydraulic. In other words, the selection of a dry pneumatic transport system for laboratory testing does not necessarily imply that a scaled-up version will be used for the field demonstration. The ETU is a convenient means of producing samples for subsequent chemical and physical testing by a representative emplacement technology. Ultimately, the field demonstration technology will be chosen based on the laboratory data and the suitability of locally available equipment.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Mechanical and acoustic properties of weakly cemented granular rocks  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents the results of laboratory measurements on the mechanical and acoustic properties of weakly cemented granular rock. Artificial rock samples were fabricated by cementing sand and glass beads with sodium silicate binder. During uniaxial compression tests, the rock samples showed stress-strain behavior which was more similar to that of soils than competent rocks, exhibiting large permanent deformations with frictional slip. The mechanical behavior of the samples approached that of competent rocks as the amount of binder was increased. For very weak samples, acoustic waves propagating in these rocks showed very low velocities of less than 1000 m/sec for compressional waves. A borehole made within this weakly cemented rock exhibited a unique mode of failure that is called ''anti-KI mode fracture'' in this paper. The effect of cementation, grain type, and boundary conditions on this mode of failure was also examined experimentally.

Nakagawa, S.; Myer, L.R.

2001-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

99

TWO-DIMENSIONAL MODELING OF LASER SPALLATION DRILLING OF ROCKS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DIMENSIONAL MODELING OF LASER SPALLATION DRILLING OF ROCKS DIMENSIONAL MODELING OF LASER SPALLATION DRILLING OF ROCKS P532 Zhiyue Xu, Yuichiro Yamashita 1 , and Claude B. Reed Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439, USA 1 Now with Kyushu University, Japan Abstract High power lasers can weaken, spall, melt and vaporize natural earth materials with thermal spallation being the most energy efficient rock removal mechanism. Laser rock spallation is a very complex phenomenon that depends on many factors. Computer numerical modeling would provides great tool to understand the fundamental of this complex phenomenon, which is crucial to the success of its applications. Complexity of modeling laser rock spallation is due to: 1) rock is a porous media, to which traditional theories of heat transfer and rock mechanics can not be directly

100

Site investigation report for Waste Area Grouping 4 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Volume 2, Appendixes: Environmental Restoration Program  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the UltraSonic Ranging and Data Systems (USRADS) survey conducted for radiological characterization of approximately 5 acres located at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 4. The survey was conducted by Chemrad Tennessee Corporation under subcontract No. 7908-RS-00902 to CDM Federal Programs Corporation. The field survey began June 23, 1994 (Chemrad survey team was unable to actually enter field until June 24 awaiting sign-off of CDM plans by MMES) and was terminated on June 29, 1994. The designated survey area is located on the DOE X-10 facility and South of the main X-10 building complex. The entire north boundary of the site is adjacent to SWSA 4, with the Bath Tubbing Trench Seep Area (BTT) actually being a part of that SWSA (See Figure 1). Approximately one-third of the designated area was actually surveyed. The BTT area slopes moderately eastward toward a small stream in the WAG 4 area. The area is open and had recently been trimmed for the survey. The balance of the designated survey area lies along the small stream within WAG 4 and is densely wooded with heavy underbrush. The area had not been cleared or brushed. Survey reference points for the BTT area mere directly tied into the X-10 coordinate system while the t bale,ice of the designated survey area mere tied into an existing relative metric grid system. The designated area was surveyed for radiological characterization using near-surface gamma and beta detectors as well as an energy independent dosimeter. This report describes the survey method and presents the survey findings.

NONE

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "laboratory investigations rock" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Investigations on loop antenna excited whistler waves in a cylindrical plasma based on laboratory experiments and simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Experimental investigations and simulations of loop antenna excited whistler waves in a cylindrical low temperature plasma are presented. Experiments are performed in the VINETA [Franck et al., Plasma Sources Sci. Technol. 14, 226 (2005)] device and simulations are generated using IPF-FD3D [C. Lechte, IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. 37, 1099 (2009)], an implementation of the Yee-algorithm. A good agreement of the experiment and the simulation is found. The simulation is used to predict the spatial structure of the wave, the dominant source of the electric field, the relative contribution of electron, and displacement current as well as parallel and perpendicular currents to the magnetic field of the wave.

Pfannmoeller, J. P. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Assoziation, Greifswald (Germany); Lechte, C. [Institut fuer Plasmaforschung, Stuttgart (Germany); Grulke, O.; Klinger, T. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Assoziation, Greifswald (Germany); Ernst-Moritz-Arndt Universitaet, Greifswald (Germany)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

102

Remedial investigation plan for Waste Area Grouping 1 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee: Responses to regulator comments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document, ES/ER-6 D2, is a companion document to ORNL/RAP/Sub-87/99053/4 R1, Remedial Investigation Plan for ORNL Waste Area Grouping 1, dated August 1989. This document lists comments received from the Environmental Protection Agency, Region 4 (EPA) and the Tennessee Department of Health and Environment (TDHE) and responses to each of these comments. As requested by EPA, a revised Remedial Investigation (RI) Plan for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 1 will not be submitted. The document is divided into two Sections and Appendix. Section I contains responses to comments issued on May 22, 1990, by EPA's Region 4 program office responsible for implementing the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). Section 2 contains responses to comments issued on April 7, 1989, by EPA's program office responsible for implementing the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA); these comments include issues raised by the TDHE. The Appendix contains the attachments referenced in a number of the responses. 35 refs.

Not Available

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Laser Spallation of Rocks for Oil Well Drilling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LASER SPALLATION OF ROCKS FOR OIL WELL DRILLING Zhiyue Xu 1 , Claude B. Reed 1 , Richard Parker 2 , Ramona Graves 3 1 Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439, USA 2 Parker...

104

Remedial investigation report on the Melton Valley watershed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 3: Appendix C  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Melton Valley watershed presents a multifaceted management and decision-making challenge because of the very heterogeneous conditions that exist with respect to contaminant type, disposal unit age, mode of disposal, release mechanism, and potential risk-producing pathways. The investigation presented here has assembled relevant site data in the geographic context with the intent of enabling program managers and decision-makers to understand site conditions and evaluate the necessity, relative priority, and scope of potential remedial actions. The industrial and recreational exposure scenarios are used to provide a risk assessment reference context to evaluate levels of contamination in surface water, groundwater, soil, and sediment within each subbasin of the Melton Valley watershed. All available analytical results for the media of interest that could be qualified for use in the risk assessment were screened to determine carcinogenic risk values and noncarcinogenic hazard indexes and to identify the chemicals of concern (COCs) for each evaluated media in each subbasin.

NONE

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

URANIUM IN ALKALINE ROCKS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

District, Teller County, Colorado," U.S. Geol. Survey Bull.Jamestown District, Colorado," Econ. Geol. , v. 68, pp 1247-Rocks at Powderhorn, Colorado; Economic Geology, Vol. 60,

Murphy, M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Radiation Laboratory, University of Notre Dame. Quarterly report, April 1, 1977--June 30, 1977. [One paragraph summaries of various investigations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Investigations in progress include: ionization potentials of H/sub 2/O from molecular orbital and valence bond wavefunctions; early events in pulse-irradiated polar liquids; epithermal trapping of electrons; range of photoionized electrons in high-mobility liquids using field-dependent mobility; scattering of exciton by the impurity; model molecular orbital studies of the chemisorption of atomic hydrogen and oxygen on aluminium surfaces; laser induced fluorescence and the geometry of the excited states of tetra-methyl cyclobutanedione; fluorescence studies of hydrogen adduct and raman studies of radical anion; energy transfer studies between electronically excited atoms and ground state molecules; kinetics and chemically induced electron polarization (CIDP) of transient radicals in solution by modulation ESR spectroscopy, CIDP of t-butyl radicals in solutions; ESR spectra of phosphate, sulfate, and hydroxyl radical adducts to unsaturated carboxylic acids; high-field conduction in thin-film alkali halides; electron reactions in the gas phase; interaction of triplet biradicals with ground state molecular oxygen; reactions of Cl/sub 2//sup -/ radicals with organic compounds; oxidation of Ni(II) macrocyclic complexes by OH radicals; photochemical reactions of Cu(II) complexes with macrocyclic ligands; fast reaction kinetics in fatty acid soap aggregates; the dynamics of probe molecules in a micelle environment; the effect of a micellar phase on the state and dynamics of some excited state charge transfer complexes; and conformation studies of fluorescent copolymers in aqueous solutions. Abstracts of reports published this quarter are provided. (LK)

Not Available

1977-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

107

Remedial investigation report on Waste Area Grouping 5 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 3, Appendix B, Technical findings and conclusions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Remedial Investigation Report on Waste Area Grouping, (NVAG) 5 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory was prepared in accordance with requirements under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) for reporting, the results of a site chacterization for public review. This work was performed under Work Breakdown Structure 1.4.12.6.1.05.40.02 (Activity Data Sheet 3305, ``WAG 5``). Publication of this document meets a Federal Facility Agreement milestone of March 31, 1995. This document provides the Environmental Restoration Program with information about the results of investigations performed at WAG 5. It includes information on risk assessments that have evaluated long-term impacts to human health and the environment. Information provided in this document forms the basis for decisions regarding, the need for subsequent remediation work at WAG 5.

NONE

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Session: Hard Rock Penetration  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This session at the Geothermal Energy Program Review X: Geothermal Energy and the Utility Market consisted of five presentations: ''Hard Rock Penetration - Summary'' by George P. Tennyson, Jr.; ''Overview - Hard Rock Penetration'' by James C. Dunn; ''An Overview of Acoustic Telemetry'' by Douglas S. Drumheller; ''Lost Circulation Technology Development Status'' by David A. Glowka; ''Downhole Memory-Logging Tools'' by Peter Lysne.

Tennyson, George P. Jr.; Dunn, James C.; Drumheller, Douglas S.; Glowka, David A.; Lysne, Peter

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Combined seismic and hydraulic method of modeling flow in fractured low permeability rocks  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Modeling flow of ground water in hard rocks where a network of fractures provides the dominant flow paths is a major problem. This paper summarizes a program of investigations currently underway in this laboratory to characterize the geometry of fractured rocks and develop methods of handling flow in such systems. Numerical models have been developed to investigate flow behavior in two- and three-dimensional fracture networks. The results demonstrate the insights that can be gained from modeling studies of fractured rocks. A key problem is gathering the necessary data on fracture geometry. Investigations have been started to determine how vertical seismic profiling (VSP) might be improved and applied to this problem. A VSP experiment in The Geysers geothermal field in northern California, where fracture orientation is known, produced shear wave splitting and velocity anisotropy in agreement with theory. The results suggest the potential application of 3-component, multi-source VSP data in determining fracture orientation and average spacing. We believe a combination of seismic and hydraulic methods can greatly enhance an understanding of fluid flow and transport in low permeability rock systems where fractures provide the dominant paths. 40 refs, 16 figs., 4 tabs.

Witherspoon, P.A.; Long, J.C.S.; Majer, E.L.; Myer, L.R.

1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

National Laboratories  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laboratories Los Alamos National Laboratory (the Laboratory) is one of 17 National Laboratories in the United States and is one of the two located in New Mexico. The Laboratory has...

111

Rock-ravintolatoiminta : elävää rock-musiikkia ravintolaympäristössä; Rock venue activity : live rock music in the restaurant setting.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Työn tavoitteena oli tutkia rock-ravintolatoimintaa ja elävää rock-musiikkia ravintolaympäristössä ravintolan, artistin ja asiakkaan näkökulmasta. Tutkimuksessa pyrittiin selvittämään rock-ravintolayrittämisen toimintatapoja ja kartoittamaan alan tämän hetkistä tilaa.… (more)

Väyliö, Jari

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Photo of the Week: Laser Beats Rock | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Laser Beats Rock Laser Beats Rock Photo of the Week: Laser Beats Rock April 8, 2013 - 5:28pm Addthis On August 5, 2012, the Curiosity rover touched down on the surface of Mars. The ChemCam instrument package, developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory, is a device mounted on the Mars Curiosity rover that uses two remote sensing instruments: the Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectrometer (LIBS) and a Remote Micro-Imager (RMI). The LIBS fires a powerful laser that determines chemical compositions of rock and soil samples, while the RMI takes photos of the samples within the rover's vicinity. In this photo, the ChemCam is being prepared in the clean room prior to the launch of NASA's Mars Science Laboratory mission. Learn more about the ChemCam. | Photo courtesy of Los Alamos National Laboratory.

113

NREL Uses Computing Power to Investigate Tidal Power (Fact Sheet), Innovation: The Spectrum of Clean Energy Innovation, NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Uses Computing Power to Uses Computing Power to Investigate Tidal Power Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) have applied their knowledge of wind flow and turbulence to simulations of underwater tidal turbines. Inspired by similar simulations of wind turbine arrays, NREL researchers used their wind expertise, a supercomputer, and large-eddy simulation to study how the placement of turbines affects the power production of an underwater tidal turbine array. As tides ebb and flow, they create water currents that carry a significant amount of kinetic energy. To capture this energy, several companies are developing and deploying devices known as horizontal-axis tidal turbines, which resemble small wind turbines. These devices can be arranged in an array of multiple turbines to maximize the energy extracted in tidal

114

Environmental, safety, and health plan for the remedial investigation of Waste Area Grouping 10, Operable Unit 3, at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document outlines the environmental, safety, and health (ES&H) approach to be followed for the remedial investigation of Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 10 at Oak at Ridge National Laboratory. This ES&H Plan addresses hazards associated with upcoming Operable Unit 3 field work activities and provides the program elements required to maintain minimal personnel exposures and to reduce the potential for environmental impacts during field operations. The hazards evaluation for WAG 10 is presented in Sect. 3. This section includes the potential radiological, chemical, and physical hazards that may be encountered. Previous sampling results suggest that the primary contaminants of concern will be radiological (cobalt-60, europium-154, americium-241, strontium-90, plutonium-238, plutonium-239, cesium-134, cesium-137, and curium-244). External and internal exposures to radioactive materials will be minimized through engineering controls (e.g., ventilation, containment, isolation) and administrative controls (e.g., procedures, training, postings, protective clothing).

Not Available

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Laboratory investigation of an advanced geothermal primary heat exchanger (APEX). Final report 2146:08, 30 June 1975 to 31 August 1976  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The research program conducted to investigate the feasibility of using a recirculating bed material, fluidized by geothermal brine, to reduce or eliminate fouling in an Advanced Geothermal Primary Heat Exchanger (APEX) is described. The research effort combined theoretical analyses and laboratory experimentation to evaluate and characterize the concept. Technical feasibility was established by testing the effectiveness of the bed material in preventing the fouling of a heat exchanger tube in which simulated geothermal fluid was circulated. Economic feasibility was assessed through analysis in which potential cost savings resulting from the use of the APEX concept in a hypothetical 30 MW electrical power plant were determined in comparison with conventional tube-in-shell heat exchangers.

Not Available

1976-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

116

Rock-brine chemical interactions. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results of experimental interaction of powdered volcanic rock with aqueous solutions are presented at temperatures from 200 to 400/sup 0/C, 500 to 1000 bars fluid pressure, with reaction durations of approximately 30 days under controlled laboratory conditions. The aim of this research is to develop data on the kinetics and equilibria of rock solution interactions that will provide insight into the complex geochemical processes attending geothermal reservoir development, stimulation, and reinjection. The research was done in the Stanford Hydrothermal Lab using gold cell equipment of the Dickson design. This equipment inverts the solution rock mixture several times a minute to ensure thorough mixing. Solution samples were periodically withdrawn without interruption of the experimental conditions. The data from these experiments suggests a path dependent series of reactions by which geothermal fluids might evolve from meteoric or magmatic sources.

Not Available

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Oldest Rock on Earth  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Canada." and "Some of the oldest surface rock can be found in the Canadian Shield, Australia, Africa and in other more specific places around the world. The ages of...

118

Rock bed heat accumulators. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The principal objectives of the research program on rock bed heat accumulators (or RBHA) are: (1) to investigate the technical and economic feasibility of storing large amounts of thermal energy (in the tens of MWt range) at high temperature (up to 500/sup 0/C) over extended periods of time (up to 6 months) using native earth or rock materials; (2) to conduct studies to establish the performance characteristics of large rock bed heat accumulators at various power and temperature levels compatible with thermal conversion systems; and (3) to assess the materials and environmental problems associated with the operation of such large heat accumulators. Results of the study indicate that rock bed heat accumulators for seasonal storage are both technically and economically feasible, and hence could be exploited in various applications in which storage plays an essential role such as solar power and total energy systems, district and cogeneration heating systems.

Riaz, M.

1977-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Aquifer stability investigations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The study of compressed air energy storage (CAES) in porous rock reservoirs is carried out within the Reservoir Stability Studies Program at Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The goal of the study is to establish criteria for long-term stability of aquifer CAES reservoirs. These criteria are intended to be guidelines and check lists that utilities and architect-engineering firms may use to evaluate reservoir stability at candidate CAES sites. These criteria will be quantitative where possible, qualitative where necessary, and will provide a focal point for CAES relevant geotechnical knowledge, whether developed within this study or available from petroleum, mining or other geotechnical practices using rock materials. The Reservoir Stability Studies Program had four major activities: a state-of-the-art survey to establish preliminary stability criteria and identify areas requiring research and development; numerical modeling; laboratory testing to provide data for use in numerical models and to investigate fundamental rock mechanics, thermal, fluid, and geochemical response of aquifer materials; and field studies to verify the feasibility of air injection and recovery under CAES conditions in an aquifer, to validate and refine the stability criteria, and to evaluate the accuracy and adequacy of the numerical and experimental methodologies developed in previous work. Three phases of study, including preliminary criteria formulation, numerical model development, and experimental assessment of CAES reservoir materials have been completed. Present activity consists of construction and operation of the aquifer field test, and associated numerical and experimental work in support of that activity. Work is presently planned to be complete by 1983 at the end of the field test. At that time the final stability criteria for aquifers will be issued. Attached here also are preliminary criteria for aquifers.

Allen, R.D.; Doherty, T.J.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Remedial investigation report on Waste Area Grouping 5 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 2 -- Appendix A: Characterization methods and data summary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document provides the Environmental Restoration Program with information about the results of investigations performed at Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 5. It includes information on risk assessments that have evaluated long-term impacts to human health and the environment. Information provided in this document forms the basis for decisions regarding the need for subsequent remediation work at WAG 5. This appendix presents background regulatory and technical information regarding the solid waste management units (SWMUs) at WAG 5 to address requirements established by the Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) for the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). The US Department of Energy (DOE) agreed to conduct remedial investigations (RIs) under the FFA at various sites at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), including SWMUs and other areas of concern on WAG 5. The appendix gives an overview of the regulatory background to provide the context in which the WAG 5 RI was planned and implemented and documents how historical sources of data, many of which are SWMU-specific, were evaluated and used.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "laboratory investigations rock" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

White Oak Creek Watershed: Melton Valley Area Remedial Investigation Report, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee: Volume 3 Appendix C  

SciTech Connect

This report provides details on the baseline ecological risk assessment conducted in support of the Remedial Investigation (RI) Report for the Melton Valley areas of the White Oak Creek watershed (WOCW). The RI presents an analysis meant to enable the US Department of Energy (DOE) to pursue a series of remedial actions resulting in site cleanup and stabilization. The ecological risk assessment builds off of the WOCW screening ecological risk assessment. All information available for contaminated sites under the jurisdiction of the US Department of Energy`s Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act Federal Facilities Agreement within the White Oak Creek (WOC) RI area has been used to identify areas of potential concern with respect to the presence of contamination posing a potential risk to ecological receptors within the Melton Valley area of the White Oak Creek watershed. The risk assessment report evaluates the potential risks to receptors within each subbasin of the watershed as well as at a watershed-wide scale. The WOC system has been exposed to contaminant releases from Oak Ridge National Laboratory and associated operations since 1943 and continues to receive contaminants from adjacent waste area groupings.

NONE

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Waste Management Plan for the Remedial Investigation of Waste Area Grouping 10, Operable Unit 3, at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Waste Management Plan (WMP) supplements the Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) Project WMP and defines the criteria and methods to be used for managing and characterizing waste generated during activities associated with the RI of 23 wells near the Old Hydrofracture Facility (OHF). These wells are within the Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 5 area of contamination (AOC) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Field activities for the limited RI of Operable Unit (OU) 3 of WAG 10 will involve sampling and measurement of various environmental media (e.g., liquids and gases). Many of these activities will occur in areas known to be contaminated with radioactive materials or hazardous chemical substances, and it is anticipated that contaminated solid and liquid wastes and noncontaminated wastes will be generated as a result of these activities. On a project-wide basis, handling of these waste materials will be accomplished in accordance with the RI/FS Project WMP and the procedures referenced throughout the plan.

Not Available

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

High-volume, high-value usage of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) by-products in underground mines - Phase I: Laboratory investigations. Quarterly report, October 1993--December 1993  

SciTech Connect

This project proposes to use pneumatically or hydraulically emplaced dry-flue gas desulfurization (FGD) by-products to backfill the adits left by highwall mining. Backfilling highwall mine adits with dry-FGD materials is technically attractive. The use of an active highwall mine would allow the dry-FGD material to be brought in using the same transportation network used to move the coal out, eliminating the need to recreated the transportation infrastructure, thereby saving costs. Activities during the period included the negotiations leading to the final cooperative agreement for the project and the implementation of the necessary instruments at the University of Kentucky to administer the project. Early in the negotiations, a final agreement on a task structure was reached and a milestone plan was filed. A review was initiated of the original laboratory plan as presented in the proposal, and tentative modifications were developed. Selection of a mine site was made early; the Pleasant Valley mine in Greenup County was chosen. Several visits were made to the mine site to begin work on the hydrologic monitoring plan. The investigation of the types of permits needed to conduct the project was initiated. Considerations concerning the acceptance and implementation of technologies led to the choice of circulating fluidized bed ash as the primary material for the study. Finally, the membership of a Technical Advisory Committee for the study was assembled.

Not Available

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Investigation of the Degradation Mechanisms of a Variety of Organic Photovoltaic Devices by Combination of Imaging Techniques - The ISOS-3 Inter-Laboratory Collaboration  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The investigation of degradation of seven distinct sets (with a number of individual cells of n {>=} 12) of state of the art organic photovoltaic devices prepared by leading research laboratories with a combination of imaging methods is reported. All devices have been shipped to and degraded at Riso DTU up to 1830 hours in accordance with established ISOS-3 protocols under defined illumination conditions. Imaging of device function at different stages of degradation was performed by laser-beam induced current (LBIC) scanning; luminescence imaging, specifically photoluminescence (PLI) and electroluminescence (ELI); as well as by lock-in thermography (LIT). Each of the imaging techniques exhibits its specific advantages with respect to sensing certain degradation features, which will be compared and discussed here in detail. As a consequence, a combination of several imaging techniques yields very conclusive information about the degradation processes controlling device function. The large variety of device architectures in turn enables valuable progress in the proper interpretation of imaging results -- hence revealing the benefits of this large scale cooperation in making a step forward in the understanding of organic solar cell aging and its interpretation by state-of-the-art imaging methods.

Rosch, R.; Tanenbaum, D. M.; Jrgensen, M.; Seeland, M.; Barenklau, M.; Hermenau, M.; Voroshazi, E.; Lloyd, M. T.; Galagan, Y.; Zimmermann, B.; Wurfel, U.; Hosel, M.; Dam, H. F.; Gevorgyan, S. A.; Kudret, S.; Maes, W.; Lutsen, L.; Vanderzande, D.; Andriessen, R.; Teran-Escobar, G.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Investigation of the Degradation Mechanisms of a Variety of Organic Photovoltaic Devices by Combination of Imaging Techniques—the ISOS-3Inter-laboratory Collaboration  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The investigation of degradation of seven distinct sets (with a number of individual cells of n {ge} 12) of state of the art organic photovoltaic devices prepared by leading research laboratories with a combination of imaging methods is reported. All devices have been shipped to and degraded at Risoe DTU up to 1830 hours in accordance with established ISOS-3 protocols under defined illumination conditions. Imaging of device function at different stages of degradation was performed by laser-beam induced current (LBIC) scanning; luminescence imaging, specifically photoluminescence (PLI) and electroluminescence (ELI); as well as by lock-in thermography (LIT). Each of the imaging techniques exhibits its specific advantages with respect to sensing certain degradation features, which will be compared and discussed here in detail. As a consequence, a combination of several imaging techniques yields very conclusive information about the degradation processes controlling device function. The large variety of device architectures in turn enables valuable progress in the proper interpretation of imaging results - hence revealing the benefits of this large scale cooperation in making a step forward in the understanding of organic solar cell aging and its interpretation by state-of-the-art imaging methods.

Germack D.; Rosch, R.; Tanenbaum, D.M.; Jorgensen, M.; Seeland, M.; Barenklau, M.; Hermenau, M.; Voroshazi, E.; Lloyd, M.T.; Galagan, Y.; Zimmermann, B.; Wurfel, U.; Hosel, M.; Dam, H.F.; Gevorgyan, S.A.; Kudret, S.; Maes, W.; Lutsen, L.; Vanderzande, D.; Andriessen, R.; Teran-Escobar, G.; Lira-Cantu, M.; Rivaton, A.; Uzunoglu, G.Y.; Andreasen, B.; Madsen, M.V.; Norrman, K.; Hoppe, H.; Krebs, F.C.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Field sampling and analysis plan for the remedial investigation of Waste Area Grouping 2 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program  

SciTech Connect

This field sampling and analysis (S & A) plan has been developed as part of the Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) remedial investigation (RI) of Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 2 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) located in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The S & A plan has been written in support of the remedial investigation (RI) plan for WAG 2 (ORNL 1990). WAG 2 consists of White Oak Creek (WOC) and its tributaries downstream of the ORNL main plant area, White Oak Lake (WOL), White Oak Creek embayment (WOCE) on the Clinch River, and the associated floodplain and subsurface environment (Fig. 1.1). The WOC system is the surface drainage for the major ORNL WAGs and has been exposed to a diversity of contaminants from operations and waste disposal activities in the WOC watershed. WAG 2 acts as a conduit through which hydrologic fluxes carry contaminants from upgradient areas to the Clinch River. Water, sediment, soil, and biota in WAG 2 are contaminated and continue to receive contaminants from upgradient WAGs. This document describes the following: an overview of the RI plan, background information for the WAG 2 system, and objectives of the S & A plan; the scope and implementation of the first 2 years of effort of the S & A plan and includes recent information about contaminants of concern, organization of S & A activities, interactions with other programs, and quality assurance specific to the S & A activities; provides details of the field sampling plans for sediment, surface water, groundwater, and biota, respectively; and describes the sample tracking and records management plan.

Boston, H.L.; Ashwood, T.L.; Borders, D.M.; Chidambariah, V.; Downing, D.J.; Fontaine, T.A.; Ketelle, R.H.; Lee, S.Y.; Miller, D.E.; Moore, G.K.; Suter, G.W.; Tardiff, M.F.; Watts, J.A.; Wickliff, D.S.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Drilling Large Diameter Holes in Rocks Using Multiple Laser Beams  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Drilling Large Diameter Holes in Rocks Using Multiple Laser Beams (504) Drilling Large Diameter Holes in Rocks Using Multiple Laser Beams (504) Richard Parker,. Parker Geoscience Consulting, LLC, Arvada, Colorado, USA; Zhiyue Xu and Claude Reed, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois, USA; Ramona Graves, Department of Petroleum Engineering, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, Colorado, USA; Brian Gahan and Samih Batarseh, Gas Technology Institute, Des Plaines, Illinois, USA ABSTRACT Studies on drilling petroleum reservoir rocks with lasers show that modern infrared lasers have the capability to spall (thermally fragment), melt and vaporize natural earth materials with the thermal spallation being the most efficient rock removal mechanism. Although laser irradiance as low as 1000 W/cm 2 is sufficient to spall rock, firing the

128

Flow dynamics and potential for Biodegradation of Organic Contaminants in Fractured Rock Vadose Zones  

SciTech Connect

We present an experimental approach for investigating the potential for bioremediation of volatile organic chemicals (VOCs) in fractured-rock vadose zones. This approach is based on the coupling of fluid flow dynamics and biotransformation processes. Fluid flow and distribution within fracture networks may be a significant factor in the ability of microorganisms to degrade VOCs, as they affect the availability of substrate, moisture and nutrients. Biological activity can change liquid surface tension and generate biofilms that may change the nettability of solid surfaces, locally alter fracture permeability and redirect infiltrating liquids. Our approach has four components: (1) establishing a conceptual model for fluid and contaminant distribution in the geologic matrix of interest; (2) physical and numerical experiments of liquid seepage in the fracture plane; (3) non-destructive monitoring of biotransformations on rock surfaces at the micron-scale; and, (4) integration of flow and biological activity in natural rock ''geocosms''. Geocosms are core-scale flow cells that incorporate some aspects of natural conditions, such as liquid seepage in the fracture plane and moisture content. The experimental work was performed with rock samples and indigenous microorganisms from the site of the US Department of Energy's Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), located in a basalt flow basin where VOC contamination threatens the Snake River Aquifer. The insights gained from this approach should contribute to the design of techniques to monitor and stimulate naturally occurring biological activity and control the spread of organic contaminants.

Geller, J.T.; Holman, H.-Y.; Su, T.-S.; Liou, M.S.; Conrad, M.S.; Pruess, K.; Hunter-Devera, J.C.

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Experimental Estimation Of Energy Damping During Free Rocking Of Unreinforced Masonry Walls. First Results  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents an ongoing experimental program on unreinforced masonry walls undergoing free rocking. Aim of the laboratory campaign is the estimation of kinetic energy damping exhibited by walls released with non-zero initial conditions of motion. Such energy damping is necessary for dynamic modelling of unreinforced masonry local mechanisms. After a brief review of the literature on this topic, the main features of the laboratory tests are presented. The program involves the experimental investigation of several parameters: 1) unit material (brick or tuff), 2) wall aspect ratio (ranging between 14.5 and 7.1), 3) restraint condition (two-sided or one-sided rocking), and 4) depth of the contact surface between facade and transverse walls (one-sided rocking only). All walls are single wythe and the mortar is pozzuolanic. The campaign is still in progress. However, it is possible to present the results on most of the mechanical properties of mortar and bricks. Moreover, a few time histories are reported, already indicating the need to correct some of the assumptions frequent in the literature.

Sorrentino, Luigi; Masiani, Renato; Benedetti, Stefano [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Strutturale e Geotecnica, Sapienza Universita di Roma, via Antonio Gramsci, 53-00197 Roma (Italy)

2008-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

130

Borehole temperature survey analysis hot dry rock geothermal reservoir  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) has been actively investigating the potential for extracting geothermal energy from hot dry rock. A man-made geothermal reservoir has been formed at the Fenton Hill Test Site in northern New Mexico. The 10-MW (thermal) prototype energy extraction circulation loop has been completed and has been continuously operating since January 28 of this year. The performance of the Phase I 1000-h circulation experiment would establish technological assessment of the particular hot dry rock geothermal reservoir. The major parameters of interest include equipment operations, geochemistry, water loss, and reservoir thermal drawdown. Temperature measurements were used extensively as one method to study the man-made geothermal reservoir. The temperature probe is one of the less complex wellbore survey tools that is readily fielded to allow on-line analysis of changing conditions in the hydraulic-fracture system. Several downhole temperature instruments have been designed and fabricated for use in the GT-2/EE-1 wellbores.

Dennis, B.R.; Murphy, H.D.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Rock Harbor UNITED STATES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Passage Conglomerate Bay Five Finger Bay Lane Cove Stockly Bay Lake Ojibway Siskiwit River Creek Little River Washington Moskey M cCargoe Cove Robinson Bay Amygdaloid Channel Pickerel Cove Chippewa Harbor Crystal Cove Belle Isle Canoe Rocks Caribou Island Saginaw Point Tookers Island The Palisades Raspberry

132

The Landscape of Klamath Basin Rock Art  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Lines: Ethnographic Sources and Rock Art Interpretationwhen applying these sources toward rock art interpretation.information source for developing rock art interpretations.

David, Robert James

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Microwave assisted hard rock cutting  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for the sequential fracturing and cutting of subsurface volume of hard rock (102) in the strata (101) of a mining environment (100) by subjecting the volume of rock to a beam (25) of microwave energy to fracture the subsurface volume of rock by differential expansion; and , then bringing the cutting edge (52) of a piece of conventional mining machinery (50) into contact with the fractured rock (102).

Lindroth, David P. (Apple Valley, MN); Morrell, Roger J. (Bloomington, MN); Blair, James R. (Inver Grove Heights, MN)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Experimentally determined rock-fluid interactions applicable to a natural hot-dry-rock geothermal system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The field program cnsists of experiments in which hot rock of low permeability is hydraulically fractured between two wellbores. Water is circulated from one well to the other through the fractured hot rock. Our field experiments are designed to test reservoir engineering parameters such as heat-extraction rates, water-loss rates, flow characteristics including impedance and buoyancy, seismic activity, and fluid chemistry. Laboratory experiments were designed to provide information on the mineral-water reactivity encountered during the field program. Two experimental circulation systems tested the rates of dissolution and alteration during dynamic flow. Solubility of rock in agitated systems was studied. Moreover, pure minerals, samples of the granodiorite from the actual reservoir, and Tijeras Canyon granite have been reacted with distilled water and various solutions of NaCl, NaOH, and Na/sub 2/CO/sub 3/. The results of these experimental systems are compared to the observations made in field experiments done within the hot dry rock reservoir at a depth of approximately 3 km where the initial rock temperature was 150 to 200/sup 0/C.

Charles, R.W.; Grigsby, C.O.; Holley, C.E. Jr.; Tester, J.W.; Blatz, L.A.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Laboratory Reagents  

SciTech Connect

Replaced by WMH-310, Section 4.17. This document outlined the basic methodology for preparing laboratory reagents used in the 222-S Standards Laboratory. Included were general guidelines for drying, weighing, transferring, dissolving, and diluting techniques common when preparing laboratory reagents and standards. Appendix A contained some of the reagents prepared by the laboratory.

CARLSON, D.D.

1999-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

136

Session: Hot Dry Rock  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This session at the Geothermal Energy Program Review X: Geothermal Energy and the Utility Market consisted of four presentations: ''Hot Dry Rock - Summary'' by George P. Tennyson, Jr.; ''HDR Opportunities and Challenges Beyond the Long Term Flow Test'' by David V. Duchane; ''Start-Up Operations at the Fenton Hill HDR Pilot Plant'' by Raymond F. Ponden; and ''Update on the Long-Term Flow Testing Program'' by Donald W. Brown.

Tennyson, George P. Jr.; Duchane, David V.; Ponden, Raymond F.; Brown, Donald W.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

A Phased Array Approach to Rock Blasting  

SciTech Connect

A series of laboratory-scale simultaneous two-hole shots was performed in a rock simulant (mortar) to record the shock wave interference patterns produced in the material. The purpose of the project as a whole was to evaluate the usefulness of phased array techniques of blast design, using new high-precision delay technology. Despite high-speed photography, however, we were unable to detect the passage of the shock waves through the samples to determine how well they matched the expected interaction geometry. The follow-up mine-scale tests were therefore not conducted. Nevertheless, pattern analysis of the vectors that would be formed by positive interference of the shockwaves from multiple charges in an ideal continuous, homogeneous, isotropic medium indicate the potential for powerful control of blast design, given precise characterization of the target rock mass.

Leslie Gertsch; Jason Baird

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Definition: Rock Density | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

in crustal rocks. Rock density is a physical characteristic that is governed by the chemical composition (in situ minerals) and pore spaces of a specific rock or rock type.1...

139

Virtual Laboratories  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

At the frontier of most areas in science, computer simulations play a central role. The traditional division of natural science into experimental and theoretical investigations is now completely outdated. Instead, theory, simulation, and experimentation form three equally essential aspects, each with its own unique flavor and challenges. Yet, education in computational science is still lagging far behind, and the number of text books in this area is minuscule compared to the many text books on theoretical and experimental science. As a result, many researchers still carry out simulations in a haphazard way, without properly setting up the computational equivalent of a well equipped laboratory. The art of creating such a virtual laboratory, while providing proper extensibility and documentation, is still in its infancy. A new approach is described here, Open Knowledge, as an extension of the notion of Open Source software. Besides open source code, manuals, and primers, an open knowledge project provides simulated dialogues between code developers, thus sharing not only the code, but also the motivations behind the code.

Piet Hut

2006-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

140

Rapid excavation by rock melting (LASL Subterrene Program). Status report, September 1973--June 1976  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Research was directed at establishing the technical and economic feasibility of excavation systems based upon the rock-melting (Subterrene) concept. A series of electrically powered, small-diameter prototype melting penetrators was developed and tested. Research activities include optimizing penetrator configurations, designing high-performance heater systems, and improving refractory metals technology. The properties of the glass linings that are automatically formed on the melted holes have been investigated for a variety of rocks and soils. Thermal and fluid-mechanics analyses of the melt flows were conducted with the objective of optimizing penetrator designs. Field tests and demonstrations of the prototype devices continue to be performed in a wide range of rock and soil types. Primary emphasis was placed on the development of a penetrator designed for more economical extraction of geothermal energy and of small-diameter penetrators which can be utilized in support of geothermal energy exploration programs. Optimization of well design, the trade-off of advance rate with operating life, the advantages of using the melt-glass hole casing for well-bore seal-off, rig automation, and the benefits which result from the insensitivity of rock melting to formation temperatures and geologic variations were also studied. Subsystem hardware development was directed toward resolution of critical technical questions related to penetrators for dense rock, debris handling, electrical heater configuration, and establishing penetrator life. Laboratory experiments and field tests provide data for final system design optimizations and indicate proof of applicability of the concept to a geothermal well hole-forming system. A field test unit to form relatively shallow vertical holes for heat flow surveys in support of geothermal exploration studies has been designed, fabricated, and field tested.

Hanold, R.J. (comp.)

1977-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "laboratory investigations rock" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Session: Hot Dry Rock  

SciTech Connect

This session at the Geothermal Energy Program Review X: Geothermal Energy and the Utility Market consisted of four presentations: ''Hot Dry Rock - Summary'' by George P. Tennyson, Jr.; ''HDR Opportunities and Challenges Beyond the Long Term Flow Test'' by David V. Duchane; ''Start-Up Operations at the Fenton Hill HDR Pilot Plant'' by Raymond F. Ponden; and ''Update on the Long-Term Flow Testing Program'' by Donald W. Brown.

Tennyson, George P. Jr.; Duchane, David V.; Ponden, Raymond F.; Brown, Donald W.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Columbia River Channel Improvement Project Rock Removal Blasting: Monitoring Plan  

SciTech Connect

This document provides a monitoring plan to evaluate take as outlined in the National Marine Fisheries Service 2002 Biological Opinion for underwater blasting to remove rock from the navigation channel for the Columbia River Channel Improvement Project. The plan was prepared by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), Portland District.

Carlson, Thomas J.; Johnson, Gary E.

2010-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

143

Rock Sampling At Coso Geothermal Area (1995) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Rock Sampling At Coso Geothermal Area (1995) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Rock Sampling At Coso Geothermal Area (1995) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Rock Sampling Activity Date 1995 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Geologic controls on the geometry of the upwelling plume were investigated using petrographic and analytical analyses of reservoir rock and vein material. References Lutz, S.J.; Moore, J.N. ; Copp, J.F. (1 June 1995) Lithology and alteration mineralogy of reservoir rocks at Coso Geothermal Area,

144

Rock Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rock Sampling Rock Sampling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Rock Sampling Details Activities (13) Areas (13) Regions (1) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Field Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Field Sampling Parent Exploration Technique: Field Sampling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock samples are used to define lithology. Field and lab analyses can be used to measure the chemical and isotopic constituents of rock samples. Stratigraphic/Structural: Provides information about the time and environment which formed a particular geologic unit. Microscopic rock textures can be used to estimate the history of stress and strain, and/or faulting. Hydrological: Isotope geochemistry can reveal fluid circulation of a geothermal system.

145

Mapping of hydrothermally altered rocks by the EO-1 Hyperion sensor, Northern Danakil Depression, Eritrea  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An EO-1 Hyperion scene was used to identify and map hydrothermally altered rocks and a Precambrian metamorphic sequence at and around the Alid volcanic dome, at the northern Danakil Depression, Eritrea. Mapping was coupled with laboratory analyses, including ...

Ronen Gersman; Eyal Ben-Dor; Michael Beyth; Dov Avigad; Michael Abraha; Alem Kibreab

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Overview: Hard Rock Penetration  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Hard Rock Penetration program is developing technology to reduce the costs of drilling and completing geothermal wells. Current projects include: lost circulation control, rock penetration mechanics, instrumentation, and industry/DOE cost shared projects of the Geothermal Drilling organization. Last year, a number of accomplishments were achieved in each of these areas. A new flow meter being developed to accurately measure drilling fluid outflow was tested extensively during Long Valley drilling. Results show that this meter is rugged, reliable, and can provide useful measurements of small differences in fluid inflow and outflow rates. By providing early indications of fluid gain or loss, improved control of blow-out and lost circulation problems during geothermal drilling can be expected. In the area of downhole tools for lost circulation control, the concept of a downhole injector for injecting a two-component, fast-setting cementitious mud was developed. DOE filed a patent application for this concept during FY 91. The design criteria for a high-temperature potassium, uranium, thorium logging tool featuring a downhole data storage computer were established, and a request for proposals was submitted to tool development companies. The fundamental theory of acoustic telemetry in drill strings was significantly advanced through field experimentation and analysis. A new understanding of energy loss mechanisms was developed.

Dunn, J.C.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Overview - Hard Rock Penetration  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Hard Rock Penetration program is developing technology to reduce the costs of drilling and completing geothermal wells. Current projects include: lost circulation control, rock penetration mechanics, instrumentation, and industry/DOE cost shared projects of the Geothermal Drilling Organization. Last year, a number of accomplishments were achieved in each of these areas. A new flow meter being developed to accurately measure drilling fluid outflow was tested extensively during Long Valley drilling. Results show that this meter is rugged, reliable, and can provide useful measurements of small differences in fluid inflow and outflow rates. By providing early indications of fluid gain or loss, improved control of blow-out and lost circulation problems during geothermal drilling can be expected. In the area of downhole tools for lost circulation control, the concept of a downhole injector for injecting a two-component, fast-setting cementitious mud was developed. DOE filed a patent application for this concept during FY 91. The design criteria for a high-temperature potassium, uranium, thorium logging tool featuring a downhole data storage computer were established, and a request for proposals was submitted to tool development companies. The fundamental theory of acoustic telemetry in drill strings was significantly advanced through field experimentation and analysis. A new understanding of energy loss mechanisms was developed.

Dunn, James C.

1992-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

148

Overview: Hard Rock Penetration  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Hard Rock Penetration program is developing technology to reduce the costs of drilling and completing geothermal wells. Current projects include: lost circulation control, rock penetration mechanics, instrumentation, and industry/DOE cost shared projects of the Geothermal Drilling organization. Last year, a number of accomplishments were achieved in each of these areas. A new flow meter being developed to accurately measure drilling fluid outflow was tested extensively during Long Valley drilling. Results show that this meter is rugged, reliable, and can provide useful measurements of small differences in fluid inflow and outflow rates. By providing early indications of fluid gain or loss, improved control of blow-out and lost circulation problems during geothermal drilling can be expected. In the area of downhole tools for lost circulation control, the concept of a downhole injector for injecting a two-component, fast-setting cementitious mud was developed. DOE filed a patent application for this concept during FY 91. The design criteria for a high-temperature potassium, uranium, thorium logging tool featuring a downhole data storage computer were established, and a request for proposals was submitted to tool development companies. The fundamental theory of acoustic telemetry in drill strings was significantly advanced through field experimentation and analysis. A new understanding of energy loss mechanisms was developed.

Dunn, J.C.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Gage for measuring displacements in rock samples  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gage for measuring diametral displacement within a rock sample for use in a rock mechanics laboratory and in the field, comprises a support ring housing a linear variable differential transformer, a mounting screw, and a leaf spring. The mounting screw is adjustable and defines a first point of contact with the rock sample. The leaf spring has opposite ends fixed to the inner periphery of the mounting ring. An intermediate portion of the leaf spring projecting radially inward from the ring is formed with a dimple defining a second point of contact with the sample. The first and second points of contact are diametrically opposed to each other. The LVDT is mounted in the ring with its axis parallel to the line of measurement and its core rod received in the dimple of the leaf spring. Any change in the length of the line between the first and second support points is directly communicated to the LVDT. The leaf spring is rigid to completely support lateral forces so that the LVDT is free of all load for improved precision.

Holcomb, David J. (Albuquerque, NM); McNamee, Michael J. (Albuquerque, NM)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Gage for measuring displacements in rock samples  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gage for measuring diametral displacement within a rock sample for use in a rock mechanics laboratory and in the field, comprises a support ring housing a linear variable differential transformer (LVDT), a mounting screw, and a leaf spring. The mounting screw is adjustable and defines a first point of contact with the rock sample. The leaf spring has opposite ends fixed to the inner periphery of the mounting ring. An intermediate portion of the leaf spring projecting radially inward from the ring is formed with a dimple defining a second point of contact with the sample. The first and second points of contact are diametrically opposed to each other. The LVDT is mounted in the ring with its axis parallel to the line of measurement and its core rod received in the dimple of the leaf spring. Any change in the length of the line between the first and second support points is directly communicated to the LVDT. The leaf spring is rigid to completely support lateral forces so that the LVDT is free of all load for improved precision.

Holcomb, D.J.; McNamee, M.J.

1985-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

151

Rock Art in the Public Trust: Managing Prehistoric Rock Art on Federal Land  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Archaic North America. ? In Handbook of Rock Art Research,Rock Art Analysis. ? In Handbook of Archaeological Methods,Rock Art Analysis,? in Handbook of Archaeological Methods,

Hale, John Patrick

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Energy from hot dry rock  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Program is described. The system, operation, results, development program, environmental implications, resource, economics, and future plans are discussed. (MHR)

Hendron, R.H.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

A Coupled Model for Natural Convection and Condensation in Heated Subsurface Enclosures Embedded in Fractured Rock  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Mass Transfer in Yucca Mountain Drifts,” Proceedings ofMD- 000001 REV 00, Yucca Mountain Project Report, Bechtelthe fractured rock at Yucca Mountain have been investigated

Halecky, N.; Birkholzer, J.T.; Webb, S.W.; Peterson, P.F.; Bodvarsson, G.S.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Workshop on hydrology of crystalline basement rocks  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This workshop covered the following subjects: measurements in relatively shallow boreholes; measurement and interpretation of data from deep boreholes; hydrologic properties of crystalline rocks as interpreted by geophysics and field geology; rock mechanics related to hydrology of crystalline rocks; the possible contributions of modeling to the understanding of the hydrology of crystalline rocks; and geochemical interpretations of the hydrology of crystalline rocks. (MHR)

Davis, S.N. (comp.)

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

The Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

existing programs in climate change science and infrastructure. The Laboratory has a 15- year history in climate change science. The Climate, Ocean and Sea Ice Modeling (COSIM)...

156

Carbonation Mechanism of Reservoir Rock by Supercritical Carbon Dioxide  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Carbonation Mechanism of Reservoir Rock by Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Carbonation Mechanism of Reservoir Rock by Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Geothermal Lab Call Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Carbonation Mechanism of Reservoir Rock by Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Project Type / Topic 1 Laboratory Call for Submission of Applications for Research, Development and Analysis of Geothermal Technologies Project Type / Topic 2 Supercritical Carbon Dioxide / Reservoir Rock Chemical Interactions Project Description Supercritical CO2 is currently becoming a more common fluid for extracting volatile oil and fragrance compounds from various raw materials that are used in perfumery. Furthermore, its use as a heat transmission fluid is very attractive because of the greater uptake capability of heat from hot reservoir rock, compared with that of water. However, one concern was the reactivity of CO2 with clay and rock minerals in aqueous and non-aqueous environments. So if this reaction leads to the formation of water-soluble carbonates, such formation could be detrimental to the integrity of wellbore infrastructure.

157

Thermal conductivity of rocks associated with energy extraction from hot dry rock geothermal systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Results of thermal conductivity measurements are given for 14 drill core rock samples taken from two exploratory HDR geothermal wellbores (maximum depth of 2929 m (9608 ft) drilled into Precambrian granitic rock in the Jemez Mountains of northern New Mexico. These samples have been petrographically characterized and in general represent fresh competent Precambrian material of deep origin. Thermal conductivities, modal analyses, and densities are given for all core samples studied under dry and water-saturated conditions. Additional measurements are reported for several sedimentary rocks encountered in the upper 760 m (2500 ft) of that same region. A cut-bar thermal conductivity comparator and a transient needle probe were used for the determinations with fused quartz and Pyroceram 9606 as the standards. The maximum temperature range of the measurements was from the ice point to 250/sup 0/C. The measurements on wet, water-saturated rock were limited to the temperature range below room temperature. Conductivity values of the dense core rock samples were generally within the range from 2 to 2.9 W/mK at 200/sup 0/C. Excellent agreement was achieved between these laboratory measurements of thermal conductivity and those obtained by in situ measurements used in the HDR wellbores. By using samples of sufficient thickness to provide a statistically representative heat flow path, no difference between conductivity values and their temperature coefficients for orthogonal directions (heat flow parallel or perpendicular to core axis) was observed. This isotropic behavior was even found for highly foliated gneissic specimens. Estimates of thermal conductivity based on a composite dispersion analysis utilizing pure minerallic phase conductivities and detailed modal analyses usually agreed to within 9 percent of the experimental values.

Sibbitt, W.L.; Dodson, J.G.; Tester, J.W.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Materials Science & Technology, MST: Los Alamos National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Investigations Laboratory Mechanical testing and modeling in MST Sigma Complex Los Alamos National Laboratory's Materials Science and Technology Division provides...

159

Exploration methods for hot dry rock. Report of the panel held June 22, 1976  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The geological and geophysical characteristics of hot dry rock (HDR) necessary for an effective exploration program were discussed. The type of HDR project discussed, that being developed by the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL), would utilize hydraulic fracturing to develop a large surface area in rock of low permeability, 10/sup -6/ darcys, and at temperatures greater than 200/sup 0/C. A better definition of the thermal regime in the crust and mantle at reconnaissance (hundreds to tens of kilometers) and exploration (tens of kilometers to 1 km) scales is needed. Geophysical methods capable of deep investigation would be used with the near-surface geologic information to extrapolate conditions at the depth of interest. Detection of HDR per se may be difficult because the contrast in physical properties of HDR and other rock is not always unambiguous, but boundaries between rock environments can be delineated. When patterns and coincidence of various types of geophysical anomalies and geologic maps are used, the probability of the detection of HDR is greatly increased, especially when a consistent picture is described. Various geophysical methods are required to detect these anomalies: (a) electromagnetic techniques can map deep electrically conductive structures, which to some extent can be used to infer isotherms. (b) Bouguer gravity maps corrected for regional topography are found to correlate with large silicic intrusive bodies, which are often associated with high heat flow. (c) isotherms and open crack systems at depth can be inferred from seismic wave attenuations, dispersions, and delay times. (d) heat flow measurements are useful as a primary tool and as a check on the results of other methods. Abstracts for individual presentations by the twelve panel members are included. 111 references.

West, F.G.; Shankland, T.J. (comps.)

1977-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

NEW GUN CAPABILITY WITH INTERCHANGABLE BARRELS TO INVESTIGATE LOW VELOCITY IMPACT REGIMES AT THE LAWRENCE LIVERMORE NATIONAL LABORATORY HIGH EXPLOSIVES APPLICATIONS FACILITY  

SciTech Connect

A new gas gun capability is being activated at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories located in the High Explosives Applications Facility (HEAF). The single stage light gas (dry air, nitrogen, or helium) gun has interchangeable barrels ranging from 25.4 mm to 76.2 mm in diameter with 1.8 meters in length and is being fabricated by Physics Applications, Inc. Because it is being used for safety studies involving explosives, the gun is planned for operation inside a large enclosed firing tank, with typical velocities planned in the range of 10-300 m/s. Three applications planned for this gun include: low velocity impact of detonator or detonator/booster assemblies with various projectile shapes, the Steven Impact test that involves impact initiation of a cased explosive target, and the Taylor impact test using a cylindrical explosive sample impacted onto a rigid anvil for fracture studies of energetic materials. A highlight of the gun features, outline on work in progress for implementing this capability, and discussion of the planned areas of research will be included.

Vandersall, K S; Behn, A; Gresshoff, M; Jr., L F; Chiao, P I

2009-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "laboratory investigations rock" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Selection of liquid-level monitoring method for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory inactive liquid low-level waste tanks, remedial investigation/feasibility study  

SciTech Connect

Several of the inactive liquid low-level waste (LLLW) tanks at Oak Ridge National Laboratory contain residual wastes in liquid or solid (sludge) form or both. A plan of action has been developed to ensure that potential environmental impacts from the waste remaining in the inactive LLLW tank systems are minimized. This document describes the evaluation and selection of a methodology for monitoring the level of the liquid in inactive LLLW tanks. Criteria are established for comparison of existing level monitoring and leak testing methods; a preferred method is selected and a decision methodology for monitoring the level of the liquid in the tanks is presented for implementation. The methodology selected can be used to continuously monitor the tanks pending disposition of the wastes for treatment and disposal. Tanks that are empty, are scheduled to be emptied in the near future, or have liquid contents that are very low risk to the environment were not considered to be candidates for installing level monitoring. Tanks requiring new monitoring equipment were provided with conductivity probes; tanks with existing level monitoring instrumentation were not modified. The resulting data will be analyzed to determine inactive LLLW tank liquid level trends as a function of time.

Not Available

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

RCRA Facility Investigation report for Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 1, Sections 1 through 3: Environmental Restoration Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

WAG 6 comprises a shallow land burial facility used for disposal of low-level radioactive wastes (LLW) and, until recently, chemical wastes. As such, the site is subject to regulation under RCRA and the Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA). To comply with these regulations, DOE, in conjunction with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC), developed a strategy for closure and remediation of WAG 6 by 1997. A key component of this strategy was to complete an RFI by September 1991. The primary objectives of the RFI were to evaluate the site`s potential human health and environmental impacts and to develop a preliminary list of alternatives to mitigate these impacts. The WAG 6 one of three solid waste management units evaluated Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) existing waste disposal records and sampling data and performed the additional sampling and analysis necessary to: describe the nature and extent of contamination; characterize key contaminant transport pathways; and assess potential risks to human health and the environment by developing and evaluating hypothetical receptor scenarios. Estimated excess lifetime cancer risks as a result for exposure to radionuclides and chemicals were quantified for each hypothetical human receptor. For environmental receptors, potential impacts were qualitatively assessed. Taking into account regulatory requirements and base line risk assessment results, preliminary site closure and remediation objectives were identified, and a preliminary list of alternatives for site closure and remediation was developed.

Not Available

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Shotgun cartridge rock breaker  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A rock breaker uses shotgun cartridges or other firearm ammunition as the explosive charge at the bottom of a drilled borehole. The breaker includes a heavy steel rod or bar, a gun with a firing chamber for the ammunition which screws onto the rod, a long firing pin running through a central passage in the rod, and a firing trigger mechanism at the external end of the bar which strikes the firing pin to fire the cartridge within the borehole. A tubular sleeve surround the main body of the rod and includes slits the end to allow it to expand. The rod has a conical taper at the internal end against which the end of the sleeve expands when the sleeve is forced along the rod toward the taper by a nut threaded onto the external end of the rod. As the sleeve end expands, it pushes against the borehole and holds the explosive gasses within, and also prevents the breaker from flying out of the borehole. The trigger mechanism includes a hammer with a slot and a hole for accepting a drawbar or drawpin which, when pulled by a long cord, allows the cartridge to be fired from a remote location.

Ruzzi, Peter L. (Eagan, NM); Morrell, Roger J. (Bloomington, MN)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

High-volume, high-value usage of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) by-products in underground mines: Phase 1 -- Laboratory investigations. Quarterly report, July--September 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Efforts primarily focused on Subtask 2.2, Chemical and Mineralogical Characterization and Subtask 4.3, Selection and Testing of Transport System. As part of Subtask 2.2, samples were collected from the Freeman United Crown Mine III FBC disposal facility representing a verity of ages and weathering. A laboratory scale transport system has been built at the CAER to evaluate the potential of pneumatic transport for flue gas desulfurization material (FGDM) emplacement and to provide essential data for the mine emplacement demonstration as part of the Subtask 4.3 effort. The system is modeled after shotcreting systems and has the advantage that the material can be remotely placed without the need for forms. The test program is focusing on determining the pneumatic conditions necessary to maximize the strength of the emplaced FGDM under anticipated mine curing conditions while minimizing dust formation. Work on Subtask 4.1, Mine Selection, also proceeded during the quarter. A new mine site, located in the south-central section of the Pikeville quadrangle, Pike County, Kentucky, was examined for the field study. The proposed fill site is in the Middle Pennsylvanian Breathitt Formation Middle Amburgy coal bed, a coal previously mined by Costain elsewhere on the property. Efforts on Subtask 4.2, Hydrologic Monitoring Plan, focused primarily on theoretical issues concerning the effects of the mining and backfill activity on the ground water and surface water due to uncertainties in the location of the final field site. There are three major concerns about the effects of the mining activity: changes in the ground water flow field, changes in ground water quality, and consequential induced changes on stream flow.

NONE

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Remedial investigation/feasibility study Work Plan and addenda for Operable Unit 4-12: Central Facilities Area Landfills II and III at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

This document is divided into two main sections -- the Work Plan and the addenda. The Work Plan describes the regulatory history and physical setting of Operable Unit 4-12, previous sampling activities, and data. It also identifies a preliminary conceptual model, preliminary remedial action alternatives, and preliminary applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements. In addition, the Work Plan discusses data gaps and data quality objectives for proposed remedial investigation activities. Also included are tasks identified for the remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) and a schedule of RI/FS activities. The addenda include details of the proposed field activities (Field Sampling Plan), anticipated quality assurance activities (Quality Assurance Project Plan), policies and procedures to protect RI/FS workers and the environment during field investigations (Health and Safety Plan), and policies, procedures, and activities that the Department of Energy will use to involve the public in the decision-making process concerning CFA Landfills II and III RI/FS activities (Community Relations Plan).

Keck, K.N.; Stormberg, G.J.; Porro, I.; Sondrup, A.J.; McCormick, S.H.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Vehicle Research Laboratory - FEERC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Vehicle Research Laboratory Vehicle Research Laboratory Expertise The overall FEERC team has been developed to encompass the many disciplines necessary for world-class fuels, engines, and emissions-related research, with experimental, analytical, and modeling capabilities. Staff members specialize in areas including combustion and thermodynamics, emissions measurements, analytical chemistry, catalysis, sensors and diagnostics, dynamometer cell operations, engine controls and control theory. FEERC engineers have many years of experience in vehicle research, chassis laboratory development and operation, and have developed specialized systems and methods for vehicle R&D. Selected Vehicle Research Topics In-use investigation of Lean NOx Traps (LNTs). Vehicle fuel economy features such as lean operation GDI engines,

167

Rock Density | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Rock Density Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Rock Density Details Activities (2) Areas (2) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Lab Analysis Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Rock Lab Analysis Parent Exploration Technique: Rock Lab Analysis Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Density of different lithologic units. Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Thermal: Cost Information Low-End Estimate (USD): 10.001,000 centUSD 0.01 kUSD 1.0e-5 MUSD 1.0e-8 TUSD / sample

168

Post Rock | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rock Rock Jump to: navigation, search Name Post Rock Facility Post Rock Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Wind Capital Group Developer Wind Capital Group Energy Purchaser Westar Energy Location Ellsworth KS Coordinates 38.87269233°, -98.33059788° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.87269233,"lon":-98.33059788,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

169

Lithology and alteration mineralogy of reservoir rocks at Coso Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lithology and alteration mineralogy of reservoir rocks at Coso Geothermal Lithology and alteration mineralogy of reservoir rocks at Coso Geothermal Area, California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Lithology and alteration mineralogy of reservoir rocks at Coso Geothermal Area, California Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Coso is one of several high-temperature geothermal systems associated with recent volcanic activity in the Basin and Range province. Chemical and fluid inclusion data demonstrate that production is from a narrow, asymmetric plume of thermal water that originates from a deep reservoir to the south and then flows laterally to the north. Geologic controls on the geometry of the upwelling plume were investigated using petrographic and analytical analyses of reservoir rock and vein material.

170

ROCK PROPERTIES MODEL ANALYSIS MODEL REPORT  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this Analysis and Model Report (AMR) is to document Rock Properties Model (RPM) 3.1 with regard to input data, model methods, assumptions, uncertainties and limitations of model results, and qualification status of the model. The report also documents the differences between the current and previous versions and validation of the model. The rock properties models are intended principally for use as input to numerical physical-process modeling, such as of ground-water flow and/or radionuclide transport. The constraints, caveats, and limitations associated with this model are discussed in the appropriate text sections that follow. This work was conducted in accordance with the following planning documents: WA-0344, ''3-D Rock Properties Modeling for FY 1998'' (SNL 1997, WA-0358), ''3-D Rock Properties Modeling for FY 1999'' (SNL 1999), and the technical development plan, Rock Properties Model Version 3.1, (CRWMS M&O 1999c). The Interim Change Notice (ICNs), ICN 02 and ICN 03, of this AMR were prepared as part of activities being conducted under the Technical Work Plan, TWP-NBS-GS-000003, ''Technical Work Plan for the Integrated Site Model, Process Model Report, Revision 01'' (CRWMS M&O 2000b). The purpose of ICN 03 is to record changes in data input status due to data qualification and verification activities. These work plans describe the scope, objectives, tasks, methodology, and implementing procedures for model construction. The constraints, caveats, and limitations associated with this model are discussed in the appropriate text sections that follow. The work scope for this activity consists of the following: (1) Conversion of the input data (laboratory measured porosity data, x-ray diffraction mineralogy, petrophysical calculations of bound water, and petrophysical calculations of porosity) for each borehole into stratigraphic coordinates; (2) Re-sampling and merging of data sets; (3) Development of geostatistical simulations of porosity; (4) Generation of derivative property models via linear coregionalization with porosity; (5) Post-processing of the simulated models to impart desired secondary geologic attributes and to create summary and uncertainty models; and (6) Conversion of the models into real-world coordinates. The conversion to real world coordinates is performed as part of the integration of the RPM into the Integrated Site Model (ISM) 3.1; this activity is not part of the current analysis. The ISM provides a consistent volumetric portrayal of the rock layers, rock properties, and mineralogy of the Yucca Mountain site and consists of three components: (1) Geologic Framework Model (GFM); (2) RPM, which is the subject of this AMR; and (3) Mineralogic Model. The interrelationship of the three components of the ISM and their interface with downstream uses are illustrated in Figure 1. Figure 2 shows the geographic boundaries of the RPM and other component models of the ISM.

Clinton Lum

2002-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

171

Hot Dry Rock at Fenton Hill, USA  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Project began in the early 1970's with the objective of developing a technology to make economically available the large ubiquitous thermal energy of the upper earth crust. The program, operated by the Los Alamos National Laboratory, has been funded by the Department of Energy (and its predecessors) and for a few years with participation by West Germany and Japan. An energy reservoir was accessed by drilling and hydraulically fracturing in the Precambrian basement rock at Fenton Hill, outside the Valles Caldera of north-central New Mexico. Water was circulated through the reservoir (Phase 1, 1978--1980) producing up to 5 MWt at 132/degree/C. A second (Phase 2) reservoir has been established with a deeper pair of holes and an initial flow test completed producing about 10 MWt at 190/degree/C. These accomplishments have been supported and paralleled by developments in drilling, well completion and instrumentation hardware. Acoustic or microseismic fracture mapping and geochemistry studies in addition to hydraulic and thermal data contribute to reservoir analyses. Studies of some of the estimated 430,000 quads of HDR resources in the United States have been made with special attention focused on sites most advantageous for early development. 17 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

Hendron, R.H.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Los Alamos National Laboratory top  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

top top science news of 2012 December 20, 2012 Scientific advances that caught the world's interest LOS ALAMOS, NEW MEXICO, December 20, 2012-In 2012 Los Alamos National Laboratory made its scientific mark in a wide variety of areas, and the stories that caught the public's attention and that of the science community reflect those broad capabilities. Top science stories for the year traveled from the canyons of Mars to the high desert forests of New Mexico, from cosmic particles to the structure of proteins and enzymes. Computer models of wildfires, and nuclear magnetic resonance signatures of plutonium, it all was fascinating for those following Los Alamos' science news. - 2 - Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity rover and ChemCam 2:12 ChemCam rock laser for the Mars Science Laboratory

173

High-volume, high-value usage of Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) by-products in underground mines Phase 1: Laboratory investigations. Quarterly report, July 1994--September 1994  

SciTech Connect

During the quarter a second series of samples were collected and partially characterized chemically and mineralogically. The samples were collected at the disposal site operated by Freeman United Coal Co. The second collection was necessary because of deterioration due to hydration of the original samples. A study of the hydration characteristics was completed during the quarter. Important reactions included the immediate formation of ettringite and portlandite. The hydration and transformation was found to be a slow process. A second phase of gypsum formation from ettringite deterioration was identified. The slow hydration of anhydrite with its resultant swell is a potential problem which will be addressed further. Geotechnical characterization, during the quarter included completion of the preliminary characterization, analysis of the findings, experimentation with sample preparation for the final characterization/mix design, and design of the final experimental program. The analysis of the coals collected during the core drilling and hydrologic planning were completed. Also during the quarter a meeting was held with representatives of the shotcrete industry to discuss transport systems for emplacement. The pros and cons of pneumatic and hydraulic systems were discussed and plans formulated for further investigations.

NONE

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Hot Dry Rock - Summary  

SciTech Connect

Hot Dry Rock adds a new flexibility to the utilization of geothermal energy. Almost always the approach has been to limit that utilization to places where there is a natural source of water associated with a source of heat. Actually, the result was that steam was mined. Clearly there are much larger heat resources available which lack natural water to transport that energy to the surface. Also, as is found in hydrothermal fields being mined for steam, the water supply finally gets used up. There is a strong motive in the existing capital investment to revitalize those resources. Techniques for introducing, recovering and utilizing the water necessary to recover the heat from below the surface of the earth is the subject of this session. Implicit in that utilization is the ability to forecast with reasonable accuracy the busbar cost of that energy to the utility industry. The added element of supplying the water introduces costs which must be recovered while still supplying energy which is competitive. Hot Dry Rock technology can supply energy. That has been proved long since. The basic barrier to its use by the utility industry has been and remains proof to the financial interests that the long term cost is competitive enough to warrant investment in a technology that is new to utility on-grid operations. As the opening speaker for this session states, the test that is underway will ''simulate the operations of a commercial facility in some ways, but it will not show that energy from HDR can be produced at a variety of locations with different geological settings''. Further, the Fenton Hill system is a research facility not designed for commercial production purposes, but it can give indications of how the system must be changed to provide economic HDR operations. And so it is that we must look beyond the long term flow test, at the opportunities and challenges. Proving that the huge HDR resources can be accessed on a worldwide scale must involve the construction of additional sites, preferably to the specifications of the now Federal geothermal community. These facilities will have to be engineered to produce and market energy at competitive prices. At the same time, we must not rest on our technological laurels, though they be many. Design and operational techniques have been conceived which could lead to improved economics and operations for HDR. These must be pursued and where merit is found, vigorously pursued. Accelerated research and development ought to include revolutionary drilling techniques, reservoir interrogation, and system modeling to assure the competitiveness and geographical diversity of applications of HDR. Much of this work will be applicable to the geothermal industry in general. More advanced research ought to include such innovations as the utilization of other operating fluids. Supercritical carbon dioxide and the ammonia/water (Kalina) cycle have been mentioned. But even as the near and more distant outlook is examined, today's work was reported in the HDR session. The start-up operations for the current test series at the Fenton Hill HDR Pilot Plant were described. The surface plant is complete and initial operations have begun. While some minor modifications to the system have been required, nothing of consequence has been found to impede operations. Reliability, together with the flexibility and control required for a research system were shown in the system design, and demonstrated by the preliminary results of the plant operations and equipment performance. Fundamental to the overall success of the HDR energy resource utilization is the ability to optimize the pressure/flow impedance/time relationships as the reservoir is worked. Significant new insights are still being developed out of the data which will substantially affect the operational techniques applied to new systems. However, again, these will have to be proved to be general and not solely specific to the Fenton Hill site. Nevertheless, high efficiency use of the reservoir without unintended reservoir grow

Tennyson, George P. Jr.

1992-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

175

Isotopic Analysis- Rock | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Isotopic Analysis- Rock Isotopic Analysis- Rock Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Isotopic Analysis- Rock Details Activities (13) Areas (11) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Lab Analysis Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Rock Lab Analysis Parent Exploration Technique: Rock Lab Analysis Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Water rock interaction Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Thermal: Dictionary.png Isotopic Analysis- Rock: Isotopes are atoms of the same element that have different numbers of neutrons. An isotopic analysis looks at a particular isotopic element(s) in a given system, while the conditions which increase/decrease the number of neutrons are well understood and measurable.

176

Adsorption of water vapor on reservoir rocks  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress is reported on: adsorption of water vapor on reservoir rocks; theoretical investigation of adsorption; estimation of adsorption parameters from transient experiments; transient adsorption experiment -- salinity and noncondensible gas effects; the physics of injection of water into, transport and storage of fluids within, and production of vapor from geothermal reservoirs; injection optimization at the Geysers Geothermal Field; a model to test multiwell data interpretation for heterogeneous reservoirs; earth tide effects on downhole pressure measurements; and a finite-difference model for free surface gravity drainage well test analysis.

Not Available

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Laboratory Access | Sample Preparation Laboratories  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Access Access Planning Ahead Planning Ahead Please complete the Beam Time Request (BTR) and Support Request forms thourgh the User Portal. Thorough chemical and sample information must be included in your BTR. Support Request forms include a list of collaborators that require laboratory access and your group's laboratory equipment requests. Researcher safety is taken seriously at SLAC. Please remember that radioactive materials, nanomaterials, and biohazardous materials have additional safety requirements. Refer to the SSRL or LCLS Safety Offices for further guidance. Upon Arrival Upon Arrival Once you arrive you must complete training and access forms before accessing the Sample Preparation Laboratories (SPL). All Sample Prep Lab doors are locked with access key codes. Once your SPL

178

Fracture Surface Area Effects on Fluid Extraction and the Electrical Resistivity of Geothermal Reservoir Rocks  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Laboratory measurements of the electrical resistivity of fractured analogue geothermal reservoir rocks were performed to investigate the resistivity contrast caused by active boiling and to determine the effects of variable fracture dimensions and surface area on water extraction. Experiments were performed at confining pressures up to 10 h4Pa (100 bars) and temperatures to 170 C. Fractured samples show a larger resistivity change at the onset of boiling than intact samples. Monitoring the resistivity of fractured samples as they equilibrate to imposed pressure and temperature conditions provides an estimate of fluid migration into and out of the matrix. Measurements presented are an important step toward using field electrical methods to quantitatively search for fractures, infer saturation, and track fluid migration in geothermal reservoirs.

Roberts, J J; Detwiler, R L; Ralph, W; Bonner, B

2002-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

179

Commercial potential of natural gas storage in lined rock caverns (LRC)  

SciTech Connect

The geologic conditions in many regions of the United States will not permit the development of economical high-deliverability gas storage in salt caverns. These regions include the entire Eastern Seaboard; several northern states, notably Minnesota and Wisconsin; many of the Rocky Mountain States; and most of the Pacific Northwest. In late 1997, the United States Department of Energy (USDOE) Federal Energy Technology Center engaged Sofregaz US to investigate the commercialization potential of natural gas storage in Lined Rock Caverns (LRC). Sofregaz US teamed with Gaz de France and Sydkraft, who had formed a consortium, called LRC, to perform the study for the USDOE. Underground storage of natural gas is generally achieved in depleted oil and gas fields, aquifers, and solution-mined salt caverns. These storage technologies require specific geologic conditions. Unlined rock caverns have been used for decades to store hydrocarbons - mostly liquids such as crude oil, butane, and propane. The maximum operating pressure in unlined rock caverns is limited, since the host rock is never entirely impervious. The LRC technology allows a significant increase in the maximum operating pressure over the unlined storage cavern concept, since the gas in storage is completely contained with an impervious liner. The LRC technology has been under development in Sweden by Sydkraft since 1987. The development process has included extensive technical studies, laboratory testing, field tests, and most recently includes a storage facility being constructed in southern Sweden (Skallen). The LRC development effort has shown that the concept is technically and economically viable. The Skallen storage facility will have a rock cover of 115 meters (375 feet), a storage volume of 40,000 cubic meters (250,000 petroleum barrels), and a maximum operating pressure of 20 MPa (2,900 psi). There is a potential for commercialization of the LRC technology in the United States. Two regions were studied in some detail - the Northeast and the Southeast. The investment cost for an LRC facility in the Northeast is approximately $182 million and $343 million for a 2.6-billion cubic foot (bcf) working gas facility and a 5.2-bcf working gas storage facility, respectively. The relatively high investment cost is a strong function of the cost of labor in the Northeast. The labor union-related rules and requirements in the Northeast result in much higher underground construction costs than might result in Sweden, for example. The LRC technology gas storage service is compared to other alternative technologies. The LRC technology gas storage service was found to be competitive with other alternative technologies for a variety of market scenarios.

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Homesteading on the Pajarito Plateau Homesteading on the Pajarito Plateau topic of inaugural lecture at Los Alamos National Laboratory January 4, 2013 Lecture series begins yearlong commemoration of 70th anniversary LOS ALAMOS, NEW MEXICO, Jan. 3, 2013-In commemoration of its 70th anniversary, Los Alamos National Laboratory kicks off a yearlong lecture series on Wednesday, Jan. 9, at 5:30 p.m. with a presentation about homesteading on the Pajarito Plateau at the Bradbury Science Museum, 1350 Central Avenue, Los Alamos. - 2 - The inaugural lecture is based on a book by local writers Dorothy Hoard, Judy Machen and Ellen McGehee about the area's settlement between 1887 and 1942. On hikes across the Pajarito Plateau, Hoard envisioned the Los Alamos area before modern roads and bridges made transportation much easier. The trails she walked

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "laboratory investigations rock" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

RCRA Facility investigation report for Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 6, Technical memorandums 06-13, 06-14, and 06-15: Environmental Restoration Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the borehole geophysical logging performed at selected monitoring wells at waste area grouping (WAG) 6 of Oak Ridge National Laboratory in support of the WAG 6 Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Facility Investigation (RFI). It identifies the locations and describes the methods, equipment used in the effort, and the results of the activity. The actual logs for each well logged are presented in Attachment 1 through 4 of the TM. Attachment 5 provide logging contractor service literature and Attachment 6 is the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Procedure for Control of a Nuclear Source Utilized in Geophysical logging. The primary objectives of the borehole geophysical logging program were to (1) identify water-bearing fractured bedrock zones to determine the placement of the screen and sealed intervals for subsequent installation, and (2) further characterize local bedrock geology and hydrogeology and gain insight about the deeper component of the shallow bedrock aquifer flow system. A secondary objective was to provide stratigraphic and structural correlations with existing logs for Hydraulic Head Monitoring Station (HHMS) wells, which display evidence of faulting.

Not Available

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Energy extraction characteristics of hot dry rock geothermal systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The LASL Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Project is investigating methods to extract energy at useful temperatures and rates from naturally heated crustal rock in locations where the rock does not spontaneously yield natural steam or hot water at a rate sufficient to support commercial utilization. Several concepts are discussed for application to low and high permeability formations. The method being investigated first is intended for use in formations of low initial permeability. It involves producing a circulation system within the hot rock by hydraulic fracturing to create a large crack connecting two drilled holes, then operating the system as a closed pressurized-water heat-extration loop. With the best input assumptions that present knowledge provides, the fluid-flow and heat-exchange calculations indicate that unpumped (buoyant) circulation through a large hydraulic fracture can maintain a commercially useful rate of heat extraction throughout a usefully long system life. With a power cycle designed for the temperature of the fluid produced, total capital investment and generating costs are estimated to be at least competitive with those of fossil-fuel-fired and nuclear electric plants. This paper discusses the potential of the hot dry rock resource, various heat extraction concepts, prediction of reservoir performance, and economic factors, and summarizes recent progress in the LASL field program.

Tester, J.W.; Smith, M.C.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Rock Lab Analysis | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rock Lab Analysis Rock Lab Analysis Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Rock Lab Analysis Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Lab Analysis Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Rock Lab Analysis Parent Exploration Technique: Lab Analysis Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Core and cuttings analysis is done to define lithology. Water rock interaction. Can determine detailed information about rock composition and morphology. Density of different lithologic units. Rapid and unambiguous identification of unknown minerals.[1] Stratigraphic/Structural: Core analysis can locate faults or fracture networks. Oriented core can give additional important information on anisotropy. Historic structure and deformation of land.

184

Department of Energy National Laboratories  

Idaho National Laboratory SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory Department of Energy National Laboratories. Laboratory or Facility Website ...

185

Type A Accident Investigation Board report on the January 17, 1996, electrical accident with injury in Technical Area 21 Tritium Science and Fabrication Facility Los Alamos National Laboratory. Final report  

SciTech Connect

An electrical accident was investigated in which a crafts person received serious injuries as a result of coming into contact with a 13.2 kilovolt (kV) electrical cable in the basement of Building 209 in Technical Area 21 (TA-21-209) in the Tritium Science and Fabrication Facility (TSFF) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). In conducting its investigation, the Accident Investigation Board used various analytical techniques, including events and causal factor analysis, barrier analysis, change analysis, fault tree analysis, materials analysis, and root cause analysis. The board inspected the accident site, reviewed events surrounding the accident, conducted extensive interviews and document reviews, and performed causation analyses to determine the factors that contributed to the accident, including any management system deficiencies. Relevant management systems and factors that could have contributed to the accident were evaluated in accordance with the guiding principles of safety management identified by the Secretary of Energy in an October 1994 letter to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board and subsequently to Congress.

NONE

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Prospects for the commercial development of hot dry rock geothermal energy in New Mexico  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A vast store of energy is available to the world in the form of hot dry rock (HDR) which exists almost everywhere beneath the surface of the earth. The Los Alamos National Laboratory has developed technology to mine the heat from HDR by using techniques developed in the petroleum industry. In practice, an artificial reservoir is created in the hot rock and water is circulated through the reservoir to extract the thermal energy and bring it to the surface. There are virtually no adverse environmental effects from an HDR plant when the system is operated in a closed-loop mode with the process water continually recirculated. An experimental plant at Fenton Hill, NM is now undergoing long-term testing to demonstrate that energy can be obtained from HDR on a sustained basis with operational procedures which are readily adaptable to industry. Significant HDR resources exist in the state of New Mexico. Resources in the Valles Caldera, Zuni Uplift, and Rio Grande Rift have been evaluated in detail. Studies indicate that it should be possible to economically develop high grade HDR resources with technology available today. As advanced concepts for developing and operating HDR systems are investigated, even more widespread utilization of the technology will be commercially feasible.

Duchane, D.V.; Goff, F.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Mechanical properties of rocks at high temperatures and pressures: Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During the final year of the grant, we have investigated (1) why the strengths of rocks decrease with increasing temperature and in the presence of water through study of the fracture process in Westerly granite and Sioux quartzite specimens deformed in extension (some in true tension), (2) frictional strengths of rocks at high temperatures, (3) the stability of boreholes in fractured rock, and (4) slip in biotite single crystals (in that biotite is probably the weakest and most ductile of the common constituents of crystalline rocks.

Friedman, M.; Bauer, S.J.; Chester, F.M.; Handin, J.; Hopkins, T.W.; Johnson, B.; Kronenberg, A.K.; Mardon, D.; Russell, J.E.

1987-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

188

Laser Rock Perforation Demo - The NE Multimedia Collection  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

rock perforation demo High power laser beam can be used in oil well completion application for perforating oil reservoir rock and increasing rock's permeability for high oil...

189

Practices of information and secrecy in a punk rock subculture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

By examining the information practices of a punk-rock subculture, we investigate the limits of social media systems, particularly limits exposed by practices of secrecy. Looking at the exchange of information about "underground" shows, we use qualitative ... Keywords: information practices, secrecy, social network sites, subcultures

Jessica Lingel; Aaron Trammell; Joe Sanchez; Mor Naaman

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

PARKER-HEADGATE ROCK & PARKER-GILA  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PARKER-HEADGATE ROCK & PARKER-GILA 161-kV TRANSMISSION LINE Cross Arm Repair and Helicopter Staging Areas Figure 1. Project Location Project Location j PARKER-HEADGATE ROCK &...

191

Deriving the shape factor of a fractured rock matrix  

SciTech Connect

Fluid flow from a fractured rock matrix was investigated for accurately predicting oil recovery from fractured reservoirs. To relate the oil rate with rock geometry and average rock matrix pressure, a shape factor is used in the mathematical model of fractured reservoirs. The shape factor in the transfer function was derived by solving the three-dimensional diffusivity equation of a rock matrix block under unsteady-state production, in contrast to the quasi-steady-state condition assumed by most previous studies denoted in the literature. The diffusivity equation in the x, y, and z coordinate was solved in four cases by assuming different boundary conditions of (1) constant fracture pressure; (2) constant flow rate; (3) constant fracture pressure followed by linearly declining fracture pressure; and (4) linearly declining fracture pressure followed by constant fracture pressure. Shape factor values are high at the initial depletion stage under an unsteady-state condition. When the fracture pressure is constant, the shape factor converges to {pi}{sup 2}/L{sup 2}, 2{pi}{sup 2}/L{sup 2}, and 3{pi}{sup 2}/L{sup 2} for one-, two-, and three-dimensional rock matrix, respectively, at the dimensionless time ({tau}) of about 0.1. When the flow rate between the rock matrix and the fracture is constant, the fracture pressure varies with location on the rock surface. Based on the average fracture pressure, the shape factor decreases with production time until a {tau} value of 0.1 is reached. The boundary conditions of constant fracture pressure followed by a constant decline in fracture pressure are equivalent to the condition of a constant fracture pressure followed by a period of constant flow rate.

Chang, Ming-Ming

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Idaho National Laboratory - Reports  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reports Reports Idaho National Laboratory Review Reports 2013 Review of Radiation Protection Program Implementation at the Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project of the Idaho Site, April 2013 Review of the Facility Representative Program at the Idaho Site, March 2013 Activity Reports 2013 Accident Investigation at the Idaho National Laboratory Engineering Demonstration Facility, February 2013 Review Reports 2012 Review of Radiation Protection Program Implementation at the Idaho Site, November 2012 Assessment of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Idaho Cleanup Project Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project, November 2012 Review of Site Preparedness for Severe Natural Phenomena Events at the Idaho National Laboratory, July 2012 Review of the Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project - Integrated Waste Treatment Unit Federal Operational Readiness Review, June 2012

193

Laboratory Activities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This chapter summarizes the laboratory activities performed by PNNL’s Vadose Zone Characterization Project in support of the Tank Farm Vadose Zone Program, led by CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. The results of these studies are contained in numerous reports (Lindenmeier et al. 2002; Serne et al. 2002a, 2002b, 2002c, 2002d, 2002e; Lindenmeier et al. 2003; Serne et al. 2004a, 2004b; Brown et al. 2005, 2006a, 2007; Serne et al. 2007) and have generated much of the data reported in Chapter 22 (Geochemistry-Contaminant Movement), Appendix G (Geochemistry-Contaminant Movement), and Cantrell et al. (2007, SST WMA Geochemistry Data Package – in preparation). Sediment samples and characterization results from PNNL’s Vadose Zone Characterization Project are also shared with other science and technology (S&T) research projects, such as those summarized in Chapter 12 (Associated Science Activities).

Brown, Christopher F.; Serne, R. Jeffrey

2008-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

194

Relative Permeability of Fractured Rock  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Contemporary understanding of multiphase flow through fractures is limited. Different studies using synthetic fractures and various fluids have yielded different relative permeability-saturation relations. This study aimed to extend the understanding of multiphase flow by conducting nitrogen-water relative permeability experiments on a naturally-fractured rock from The Geysers geothermal field. The steady-state approach was used. However, steady state was achieved only at the endpoint saturations. Several difficulties were encountered that are attributed to phase interference and changes in fracture aperture and surface roughness, along with fracture propagation/initiation. Absolute permeabilities were determined using nitrogen and water. The permeability values obtained change with the number of load cycles. Determining the absolute permeability of a core is especially important in a fractured rock. The rock may change as asperities are destroyed and fractures propagate or st rain harden as the net stresses vary. Pressure spikes occurred in water a solute permeability experiments. Conceptual models of an elastic fracture network can explain the pressure spike behavior. At the endpoint saturations the water relative permeabilities obtained are much less than the nitrogen gas relative permeabilities. Saturations were determined by weighing and by resistivity calculations. The resistivity-saturation relationship developed for the core gave saturation values that differ by 5% from the value determined by weighing. Further work is required to complete the relative permeability curve. The steady-state experimental approach encountered difficulties due to phase interference and fracture change. Steady state may not be reached until an impractical length of time. Thus, unsteady-state methods should be pursued. In unsteady-state experiments the challenge will be in quantifying rock fracture change in addition to fluid flow changes.

Mark D. Habana

2002-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

195

Dispersivity as an oil reservoir rock characteristic  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The main objective of this research project is to establish dispersivity, {alpha}{sub d}, as an oil reservoir rock characteristic and to use this reservoir rock property to enhance crude oil recovery. A second objective is to compare the dispersion coefficient and the dispersivity of various reservoir rocks with other rock characteristics such as: porosity, permeability, capillary pressure, and relative permeability. The dispersivity of a rock was identified by measuring the physical mixing of two miscible fluids, one displacing the other in a porous medium. 119 refs., 27 figs., 12 tabs.

Menzie, D.E.; Dutta, S.

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Strategic Laboratory Leadership Program | Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Erik Gottschalk (F); Devin Hodge (A); Jeff Chamberlain (A); Brad Ullrick (A); Bill Rainey (J). Image courtesy of Argonne National Laboratory. Strategic Laboratory Leadership...

197

Fluid-rock interaction: A reactive transport approach  

SciTech Connect

Fluid-rock interaction (or water-rock interaction, as it was more commonly known) is a subject that has evolved considerably in its scope over the years. Initially its focus was primarily on interactions between subsurface fluids of various temperatures and mostly crystalline rocks, but the scope has broadened now to include fluid interaction with all forms of subsurface materials, whether they are unconsolidated or crystalline ('fluid-solid interaction' is perhaps less euphonious). Disciplines that previously carried their own distinct names, for example, basin diagenesis, early diagenesis, metamorphic petrology, reactive contaminant transport, chemical weathering, are now considered to fall under the broader rubric of fluid-rock interaction, although certainly some of the key research questions differ depending on the environment considered. Beyond the broadening of the environments considered in the study of fluid-rock interaction, the discipline has evolved in perhaps an even more important way. The study of water-rock interaction began by focusing on geochemical interactions in the absence of transport processes, although a few notable exceptions exist (Thompson 1959; Weare et al. 1976). Moreover, these analyses began by adopting a primarily thermodynamic approach, with the implicit or explicit assumption of equilibrium between the fluid and rock. As a result, these early models were fundamentally static rather than dynamic in nature. This all changed with the seminal papers by Helgeson and his co-workers (Helgeson 1968; Helgeson et al. 1969) wherein the concept of an irreversible reaction path was formally introduced into the geochemical literature. In addition to treating the reaction network as a dynamically evolving system, the Helgeson studies introduced an approach that allowed for the consideration of a multicomponent geochemical system, with multiple minerals and species appearing as both reactants and products, at least one of which could be irreversible. Helgeson's pioneering approach was given a more formal kinetic basis (including the introduction of real time rather than reaction progress as the independent variable) in subsequent studies (Lasaga 1981; Aagaard and Helgeson 1982; Lasaga 1984). The reaction path approach can be used to describe chemical processes in a batch or closed system (e.g., a laboratory beaker), but such systems are of limited interest in the Earth sciences where the driving force for most reactions is transport. Lichtner (1988) clarified the application of the reaction path models to water-rock interaction involving transport by demonstrating that they could be used to describe pure advective transport through porous media. By adopting a reference frame which followed the fluid packet as it moved through the medium, the reaction progress variable could be thought of as travel time instead. Multi-component reactive transport models that could treat any combination of transport and biogeochemical processes date back to the early 1980s. Berner and his students applied continuum reactive transport models to describe processes taking place during the early diagenesis of marine sediments (Berner 1980). Lichtner (1985) outlined much of the basic theory for a continuum model for multicomponent reactive transport. Yeh and Tripathi (1989) also presented the theoretical and numerical basis for the treatment of reactive contaminant transport. Steefel and Lasaga (1994) presented a reactive flow and transport model for nonisothermal, kinetically-controlled water-rock interaction and fracture sealing in hydrothermal systems based on simultaneous numerical solution of both reaction and transport This chapter begins with a review of the important transport processes that affect or even control fluid-rock interaction. This is followed by a general introduction to the governing equations for reactive transport, which are broadly applicable to both qualitative and quantitative interpretations of fluid-rock interactions. This framework is expanded through a discussion of specific topics that are the f

Steefel, C.; Maher, K.

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Nonclassical transport processes in geologic media: Review of field and laboratory observations and basic physical concepts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present an overview of the problem of solute transport in unsaturated heterogeneous media. We first review field and laboratory observations that demonstrate nonclassical flow and transport behavior. The main physical principles causing anomalous transport regimes in fractured rock media are identified. The basic factors and physical concepts needed to describe anomalous transport in saturated and unsaturated fractured rock are discussed in detail.

Bolshov, L.; Kondratenko, P.; Pruess, K.; Semenov, V.

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

NETL: News Release - DOE Transfers Steel Casting Technology to Rock Island  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

31, 2007 31, 2007 DOE Transfers Steel Casting Technology to Rock Island Arsenal Army Facility to Produce Improved Armor in War on Terrorism WASHINGTON, DC - A steel casting technology developed by the U.S. Department of Energy has been transferred to the U.S. Army's Rock Island Arsenal to manufacture improved armor for vehicles used in the global war on terrorism. MORE INFO Learn more about NETL's cooperative research with the Army The Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) provided the Rock Island Arsenal with process guidelines, parameters, expertise, and patterns to set up and operate a facility for making steel castings using an NETL-developed process called loose-bonded sand, lost-foam technology. The facilities at the arsenal, in Rock Island, Ill.,

200

Limitations of rock mechanics in energy-resource recovery and development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Rock-mechanics problems which limit energy-resource recovery and development are assessed. The most serious limitations were found in the fields of geothermal exploration, mining and in-situ recovery, nuclear-waste disposal, oil and gas recovery, underground storage, and under-ocean tunneling. Recommendations include research to determine and predict porosity, permeability, and fluid flow in situ; research to develop better methods for determining and obtaining shallow and deep in situ stresses; research to improve the ability to map fracture patterns, particularly major fractures and faults, at depth; research to improve the understanding of rock-fragmentation processes for increasing the effectiveness of drilling and excavation systems; research to increase understanding of the relation of laboratory-measured quantities to in situ conditions; and research to provide the thermophysical and thermomechanical properties of rock, including fractured rock. (JRD)

Not Available

1978-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "laboratory investigations rock" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Development Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall objective of the Hot Dry Rock (HDR) Geothermal Energy Development Program is to determine the technical and economic feasibility of HDR as a significant energy source and to provide a basis for its timely commercial development. Principal operational tasks are those activities required to enable a decision to be made by FY86 on the ultimate commercialization of HDR. These include development and analyis of a 20- to 50-MW Phase II HDR reservoir at Site 1 (Fenton Hill) with the potential construction of a pilot electric generating station, Phase III; selection of a second site with subsequent reservoir development and possible construction of a direct heat utilization pilot plant of at least 30 MW thermal thereon; the determination of the overall domestic HDR energy potential; and the evaluation of 10 or more target prospect areas for future HDR plant development by commercial developers. Phase I of the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory's Fenton Hill project was completed. Phase I evaluated a small subterranean system comprised of two boreholes connected at a depth of 3 km by hydraulic fracturing. A closed-loop surface system has been constructed and tests involving round-the-clock operation have yielded promising data on heat extraction, geofluid chemistry, flow impedance, and loss of water through the underground reservoir between the two holes, leading to cautions optimism for the future prospects of private-sector HDR power plants. (MHR)

Franke, P.R.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Tests of US rock salt for long-term stability of CAES reservoirs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is a report on laboratory tests to assess the effects of compressed air energy storage (CAES) on rock salt within the US. The project included a conventional laboratory test phase, with triaxial test machines, and a bench-scale test phase performed in salt mines in southern Louisiana. Limited numerical modeling also was performed to serve as a guide in selecting test layouts and for interpreting test data.

Gehle, R.M.; Thoms, R.L.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Hot Dry Rock; Geothermal Energy  

SciTech Connect

The commercial utilization of geothermal energy forms the basis of the largest renewable energy industry in the world. More than 5000 Mw of electrical power are currently in production from approximately 210 plants and 10 000 Mw thermal are used in direct use processes. The majority of these systems are located in the well defined geothermal generally associated with crustal plate boundaries or hot spots. The essential requirements of high subsurface temperature with huge volumes of exploitable fluids, coupled to environmental and market factors, limit the choice of suitable sites significantly. The Hot Dry Rock (HDR) concept at any depth originally offered a dream of unlimited expansion for the geothermal industry by relaxing the location constraints by drilling deep enough to reach adequate temperatures. Now, after 20 years intensive work by international teams and expenditures of more than $250 million, it is vital to review the position of HDR in relation to the established geothermal industry. The HDR resource is merely a body of rock at elevated temperatures with insufficient fluids in place to enable the heat to be extracted without the need for injection wells. All of the major field experiments in HDR have shown that the natural fracture systems form the heat transfer surfaces and that it is these fractures that must be for geothermal systems producing from naturally fractured formations provide a basis for directing the forthcoming but, equally, they require accepting significant location constraints on HDR for the time being. This paper presents a model HDR system designed for commercial operations in the UK and uses production data from hydrothermal systems in Japan and the USA to demonstrate the reservoir performance requirements for viable operations. It is shown that these characteristics are not likely to be achieved in host rocks without stimulation processes. However, the long term goal of artificial geothermal systems developed by systematic engineering procedures at depth may still be attained if high temperature sites with extensive fracturing are developed or exploited. [DJE -2005

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Protocol for laboratory research on degradation, interaction, and fate of wastes disposed by deep-well injection: Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this research investigation was to develop a laboratory protocol for use in determining degradation, interaction, and fate of organic wastes disposed in deep subsurface reservoirs via disposal wells. Knowledge of the ultimate fate of deep-well disposed wastes is important because provisions of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) require that by August 1988, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) must show that the disposal of specified wastes by deep-well injection is safe to human health and the environment, or the practice must be stopped. The National Institute for Petroleum and Energy Research (NIPER) developed this protocol primarily by transferring some of its expertise and knowledge of laboratory protocol relevant to improved recovery of petroleum. Phenol, because it is injected into deep, subsurface reservoirs for disposal, was selected for study by the EPA. Phenol is one waste product that has been injected into the Frio formation; therefore, a decision was made to use phenol and sedimentary rock from the Frio formation for a series of laboratory experiments to demonstrate the protocol. This study investigates the adsorption properties of a specific reservoir rock which is representative of porous sedimentary geologic formations used as repositories for hazardous organic wastes. The developed protocol can be used to evaluate mobility, adsorption, and degradation of an organic hazardous waste under simulated subsurface reservoir conditions. 22 refs., 13 figs., 16 tabs.

Collins, A.G.; Crocker, M.E.

1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

ARGONNE NATIONAL LABORATORY is....  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Scattering June 12-18, 2010 - Argonne National Laboratory June 19-26, 2010 - Oak Ridge National Laboratory Argonne National Laboratory is a U.S. Department of Energy laboratory...

206

Federal hot dry rock geothermal energy development program: an overview  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The formulation and evolution of the Federal Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Development Program at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory are traced. Program motivation is derived from the enormous potential of the resource. Accomplishments to date, including the establishment and evaluation of the 5-MW/sub t/ Phase 1 reservoir at Fenton Hill, NM and various instrument and equipment developments, are discussed. Future plans presented include (1) establishment of a 20- to 50-MW/sub t/ Phase 2 reservoir at Fenton Hill that will be used to demonstrate longevity and, eventually, electric power production and (2) the selection of a second site at which a direct thermal application will be demonstrated.

Nunz, G.J.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Reservoir modeling of the Phase II Hot Dry Rock System  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Phase II system has been created with a series of hydraulic fracturing experiments at the Fenton Hill Hot Dry Rock site. Experiment 2032, the largest of the fracturing operations, involved injecting 5.6 million gallons (21,200m/sup 3/) of water into wellbore EE-2 over the period December 6-9, 1983. The experiment has been modeled using geothermal simulator FEHM developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The modeling effort has produced strong evidence of a large highly fractured reservoir. Two long term heat extraction schemes for the reservoir are studied with the model.

Zyvoloski, G.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

State Laboratory Contacts IL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

State Laboratory Contact Information IL. Idaho. ... State of Iowa Metrology Laboratory Ellsworth Community College 1100 College Ave. ...

2013-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

209

Experimental Estimation Of Energy Damping During Free Rocking Of Unreinforced Masonry Walls. First Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents an ongoing experimental program on unreinforced masonry walls undergoing free rocking. Aim of the laboratory campaign is the estimation of kinetic energy damping exhibited by walls released with non?zero initial conditions of motion. Such energy damping is necessary for dynamic modelling of unreinforced masonry local mechanisms. After a brief review of the literature on this topic

Luigi Sorrentino; Renato Masiani; Stefano Benedetti

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Capabilities for measuring physical and chemical properties of rocks at high pressure  

SciTech Connect

The Experimental Geophysics Group of the Earth Sciences Department at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has experimental equipment that measures a variety of physical properties and phase equilibria and kinetics on rocks and minerals at extreme pressures (to 500 GPa) and temperatures (from 10 to 2800 K). These experimental capabilities are described in this report in terms of published results, photographs, and schematic diagrams.

Durham, W.B. (comp.)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

DOE hot dry rock program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydraulic fracturing has been used to create and subsequently to enlarge the first hot dry rock heat-extraction loop at Fenton Hill, New Mexico. Encouraging results prompted the DOE to expand this project into a program of national scope. The elements of that Program and their present status are discussed. Emphasis is given the ongoing Fenton Hill Project where techniques and information developed in the existing research system will soon be used to produce a multiply-fractured engineering system in hotter rock at the same site. Recent results from research loop operation and progress in constructing the engineering system are reported. Although acoustic mapping and system geometry indicate that the primary hydraulic fractures are essentially vertical, relatively low fracturing pressure and absence of a sharp breakdown suggest that at Fenton Hill fracture initiation occurs by reopening of old natural fractures rather than by initiation of new ones. Flow patterns and temperature behavior suggest opening of additional old fractures as the loop is operated. Except where the hot fluid leaves the crack system to enter the production well, flow impedances are very low without either artificial propping or inflation by pressurization.

Nunz, G.J.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Protected Polycrystalline Diamond Compact Bits For Hard Rock Drilling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two bits were designed. One bit was fabricated and tested at Terra-Tek's Drilling Research Laboratory. Fabrication of the second bit was not completed due to complications in fabrication and meeting scheduled test dates at the test facility. A conical bit was tested in a Carthage Marble (compressive strength 14,500 psi) and Sierra White Granite (compressive strength 28,200 psi). During the testing, Hydraulic Horsepower, Bit Weight, Rotation Rate, were varied for the Conical Bit, a Varel Tricone Bit and Varel PDC bit. The Conical Bi did cut rock at a reasonable rate in both rocks. Beneficial effects from the near and through cutter water nozzles were not evident in the marble due to test conditions and were not conclusive in the granite due to test conditions. At atmospheric drilling, the Conical Bit's penetration rate was as good as the standard PDC bit and better than the Tricone Bit. Torque requirements for the Conical Bit were higher than that required for the Standard Bits. Spudding the conical bit into the rock required some care to avoid overloading the nose cutters. The nose design should be evaluated to improve the bit's spudding characteristics.

Robert Lee Cardenas

2000-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

213

Definition: Rock Lab Analysis | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

to core recovered from boreholes. They typically involve measuring the physical and chemical properties of the rock. Physical properties include density, elastic modulus, seismic...

214

Rock Energy Cooperative (Illinois) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cooperative (Illinois) Jump to: navigation, search Name Rock Energy Cooperative Place Illinois Utility Id 16196 References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File220101...

215

ROCK DEFORMATION 2010 GORDON RESEARCH CONFERENCE, AUGUST 8-13, 2010  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Creep in the crust and mantle is commonly considered a steady-state process. This view prevails despite the fact that earthquakes do not represent steady-state and at the base of the seismogenic zone, for example, the stresses that drive creep must vary with the earthquake cycle. The contribution of transient versus steady-state behavior is not easy to determine from naturally-deformed brittle or plastic rocks and our view of steady-state depends on whether we consider geological or shorter time-scales. Perhaps we avoid a non steady-state picture because we lack appropriate descriptive or quantitative tools. The aim of the 2010 Gordon Research Conference (GRC) in rock deformation is to explore what we know about non steady-state deformation and how we might advance our understanding through geological and geophysical field investigations, laboratory experiments and modeling. This will require an appraisal of the applicability of steady-state concepts as well as an exploration of transient behavior, in which processes and physical properties cycle between different states as might be the case during earthquake cycles, and transitions in behavior, where finite strain or changing environmental conditions lead to changes in processes and properties. Conference sessions will cover seven broad and interlinked topics. (1) What is steady state?; an appraisal of applicability of the steady-state concept in rock deformation. (2) Seismogenic Faulting and Brittle Fault Rocks; where transience in rates and conditions are accepted but not fully understood. (3) Episodic Creep During the Seismic Cycle; with a focus on processes in areas adjacent to the base of the seismogenic zone. (4) Creep in Zones of Stress and Temperature Cycling; considering deformation in real-world complex systems (5) Deformation, Metamorphism, and Fluids; exploring the interaction of diagenesis/metamorphism and thermal instabilities with deformation. (6) Mechanism and Microstructure Transitions During Deformation; quantifying evolution as a function of strain and associated with changes in deformation kinematics or conditions. (7) Mechanism and Microstructure Transitions Related to Mantle Geophysics; with a focus on the link between mechanisms affecting processes on geological time-scales on the time-scales associated with seismic wave propagation. The GRC on Rock Deformation aims to bring together researchers with diverse expertise, and to shape the scientific debate and provide inspiration for young researchers to fill the still extensive gaps in our knowledge of how the Earth deforms. The processes that will be discussed have wide applications in both basic and applied research. A key issue, of fundamental importance to our understanding of the Earth, for discussion at this meeting will be the transition from time-dependent (and distributed) rock deformation, including both high temperature creep and brittle creep, to episodic (and more localized) events. Such transitions have both a scientific and a socio-economic impact since they control the precursory phases of important geohazards such as earthquake rupture and volcanic eruptions, and also influence effective recovery of hydrocarbon and geothermal energy resources, and the integrity of long-term storage facilities for hazardous waste.

David Prior

2010-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

216

A New Apparatus For Long-Term Petrophysical Investigations On...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

system allows investigations with highly saline formation fluids. Rock permeability, electrical conductivity as well as compressional- and shear-wave velocities can be...

217

Schmid et al. Inclusion Behavior in Deforming Rocks Inclusion Behavior in Deforming Rocks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Schmid et al. Inclusion Behavior in Deforming Rocks Inclusion Behavior in Deforming Rocks Dani Podladchikov, PGP, University of Oslo, Norway Intro 1 #12;Schmid et al. Inclusion Behavior in Deforming Rocks Motivation 2 The single most useful thing to understand! #12;Schmid et al. Inclusion Behavior in Deforming

Cesare, Bernardo

218

High-Velocity Rocks Final Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of our research was to develop and demonstrate seismic data-acquisition and data-processing technologies that allow geothermal prospects below high-velocity rock outcrops to be evaluated. To do this, we acquired a 3-component seismic test line across an area of exposed high-velocity rocks in Brewster County, Texas, where there is high heat flow and surface conditions mimic those found at numerous geothermal prospects. Seismic contractors have not succeeded in creating good-quality seismic data in this area for companies who have acquired data for oil and gas exploitation purposes. Our test profile traversed an area where high-velocity rocks and low-velocity sediment were exposed on the surface in alternating patterns that repeated along the test line. We verified that these surface conditions cause non-ending reverberations of Love waves, Rayleigh waves, and shallow critical refractions to travel across the earth surface between the boundaries of the fast-velocity and slow-velocity material exposed on the surface. These reverberating surface waves form the high level of noise in this area that does not allow reflections from deep interfaces to be seen and utilized. Our data-acquisition method of deploying a box array of closely spaced geophones allowed us to recognize and evaluate these surface-wave noise modes regardless of the azimuth direction to the surface anomaly that backscattered the waves and caused them to return to the test-line profile. With this knowledge of the surface-wave noise, we were able to process these test-line data to create P-P and SH-SH images that were superior to those produced by a skilled seismic data-processing contractor. Compared to the P-P data acquired along the test line, the SH-SH data provided a better detection of faults and could be used to trace these faults upward to the boundaries of exposed surface rocks. We expanded our comparison of the relative value of S-wave and P-wave seismic data for geothermal applications by inserting into this report a small part of the interpretation we have done with 3C3D data across Wister geothermal field in the Imperial Valley of California. This interpretation shows that P-SV data reveal faults (and by inference, also fractures) that cannot be easily, or confidently, seen with P-P data, and that the combination of P-P and P-SV data allows VP/VS velocity ratios to be estimated across a targeted reservoir interval to show where an interval has more sandstone (the preferred reservoir facies). The conclusion reached from this investigation is that S-wave seismic technology can be invaluable to geothermal operators. Thus we developed a strong interest in understanding the direct-S modes produced by vertical-force sources, particularly vertical vibrators, because if it can be demonstrated that direct-S modes produced by vertical-force sources can be used as effectively as the direct-S modes produced by horizontal-force sources, geothermal operators can acquire direct-S data across many more prospect areas than can be done with horizontal-force sources, which presently are limited to horizontal vibrators. We include some of our preliminary work in evaluating direct-S modes produced by vertical-force sources.

Hardage, Bob A; DeAngelo, Michael V; Ermolaeva, Elena; Hardage, Bob A; Remington, Randy; Sava, Diana; Wagner, Donald; Wei, Shuijion

2013-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

219

Industrial applications of hot dry rock geothermal energy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geothermal resources in the form of naturally occurring hot water or steam have been utilized for many years. While these hydrothermal resources are found in many places, the general case is that the rock at depth is hot, but does not contain significant amounts of mobile fluid. An extremely large amount of geothermal energy is found around the world in this hot dry rock (HDR). Technology has been under development for more than twenty years at the Los Alamos National Laboratory in the United States and elsewhere to develop the technology to extract the geothermal energy from HDR in a form useful for electricity generation, space heating, or industrial processing. HDR technology is especially attractive for industrial applications because of the ubiquitous distribution of the HDR resource and the unique aspects of the process developed to recover it. In the HDR process, as developed at Los Alamos, water is pumped down a well under high pressure to open up natural joints in hot rock and create an artificial geothermal reservoir. Energy is extracted by circulating water through the reservoir. Pressurized hot water is returned to the surface through the production well, and its thermal energy is extracted for practical use. The same water is then recirculated through the system to mine more geothermal heat. Construction of a pilot HDR facility at Fenton Hill, NM, USA, has recently been completed by the Los Alamos National Laboratory. It consists of a large underground reservoir, a surface plant, and the connecting wellbores. This paper describes HDR technology and the current status of the development program. Novel industrial applications of geothermal energy based on the unique characteristics of the HDR energy extraction process are discussed.

Duchane, D.V.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Industrial applications of hot dry rock geothermal energy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geothermal resources in the form of naturally occurring hot water or steam have been utilized for many years. While these hydrothermal resources are found in many places, the general case is that the rock at depth is hot, but does not contain significant amounts of mobile fluid. An extremely large amount of geothermal energy is found around the world in this hot dry rock (HDR). Technology has been under development for more than twenty years at the Los Alamos National Laboratory in the United States and elsewhere to develop the technology to extract the geothermal energy from HDR in a form useful for electricity generation, space heating, or industrial processing. HDR technology is especially attractive for industrial applications because of the ubiquitous distribution of the HDR resource and the unique aspects of the process developed to recover it. In the HDR process, as developed at Los Alamos, water is pumped down a well under high pressure to open up natural joints in hot rock and create an artificial geothermal reservoir. Energy is extracted by circulating water through the reservoir. Pressurized hot water is returned to the surface through the production well, and its thermal energy is extracted for practical use. The same water is then recirculated through the system to mine more geothermal heat. Construction of a pilot HDR facility at Fenton Hill, NM, USA, has recently been completed by the Los Alamos National Laboratory. It consists of a large underground reservoir, a surface plant, and the connecting wellbores. This paper describes HDR technology and the current status of the development program. Novel industrial applications of geothermal energy based on the unique characteristics of the HDR energy extraction process are discussed.

Duchane, D.V.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "laboratory investigations rock" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

NATIONAL ENERGY TECHNOLOGY LABORATORY  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 1 Cover image: NETL researcher Corinne Disenhof examines a basalt thin section under a geoscience laboratory petrographic microscope. NETL is investigating the effects of microbes on basalt during carbon sequestration, and petrography is one of several analysis methods being used. Others include scanning electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction. Mission Advancing energy options to fuel our economy, strengthen our security, and improve our environment. 2 Contents 2011 Letter from the Director ___________________________ 4 Advanced Power Systems __________________________ 6 Clean Energy ____________________________________ 24 Oil & Natural Gas ________________________________ 40 A Legacy of Benefit: The Return on Federal Research at NETL ______________

222

The hot dry rock geothermal energy program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The paper presents a simplified description of the Department of Energy's Hot-Dry-Rock program conducted at Fenton Hill, New Mexico. What a hot-dry-rock resource is and what the magnitude of the resource is are also described.

Smith, M.C.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Proceedings of hot dry rock geothermal workshop  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Abstracts of 38 papers are included on the following subjects: rock mechanics, part 1: hydraulic fracturing; fracture imaging and borehole surveying; fluid flow-pressure analyses; rock mechanics, part 2: hydraulic fracturing and thermal cracking; geochemistry; heat extraction modeling; and economics and energy conversion. (MHR)

Elsner, D.B. (comp.)

1978-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

PDC Bit Testing at Sandia Reveals Influence of Chatter in Hard-Rock Drilling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Polycrystalline diamond compact (PDC) bits have yet to be routinely applied to drilling the hard-rock formations characteristic of geothermal reservoirs. Most geothermal production wells are currently drilled with tungsten-carbide-insert roller-cone bits. PDC bits have significantly improved penetration rates and bit life beyond roller-cone bits in the oil and gas industry where soft to medium-hard rock types are encountered. If PDC bits could be used to double current penetration rates in hard rock geothermal well-drilling costs could be reduced by 15 percent or more. PDC bits exhibit reasonable life in hard-rock wear testing using the relatively rigid setups typical of laboratory testing. Unfortunately, field experience indicates otherwise. The prevailing mode of failure encountered by PDC bits returning from hard-rock formations in the field is catastrophic, presumably due to impact loading. These failures usually occur in advance of any appreciable wear that might dictate cutter replacement. Self-induced bit vibration, or ''chatter'', is one of the mechanisms that may be responsible for impact damage to PDC cutters in hard-rock drilling. Chatter is more severe in hard-rock formations since they induce significant dynamic loading on the cutter elements. Chatter is a phenomenon whereby the drillstring becomes dynamically unstable and excessive sustained vibrations occur. Unlike forced vibration, the force (i.e., weight on bit) that drives self-induced vibration is coupled with the response it produces. Many of the chatter principles derived in the machine tool industry are applicable to drilling. It is a simple matter to make changes to a machine tool to study the chatter phenomenon. This is not the case with drilling. Chatter occurs in field drilling due to the flexibility of the drillstring. Hence, laboratory setups must be made compliant to observe chatter.

RAYMOND,DAVID W.

1999-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

225

2008 Rock Deformation GRC - Conference August 3-8, 2008  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The GRC on Rock Deformation highlights the latest research in brittle and ductile rock mechanics from experimental, field and theoretical perspectives. The conference promotes a multi-disciplinary forum for assessing our understanding of rock strength and related physical properties in the Earth. The theme for the 2008 conference is 'Real-time Rheology'. Using ever-improving geophysical techniques, our ability to constrain the rheological behavior during earthquakes and post-seismic creep has improved significantly. Such data are used to investigate the frictional behavior of faults, processes responsible for strain localization, the viscosity of the lower crust, and viscous coupling between the crust and mantle. Seismological data also provide information on the rheology of the lower crust and mantle through analysis of seismic attenuation and anisotropy. Geologists are improving our understanding of rheology by combining novel analyses of microstructures in naturally deformed rocks with petrologic data. This conference will bring together experts and students in these research areas with experimentalists and theoreticians studying the same processes. We will discuss and assess where agreement exists on rheological constraints derived at different length/time scales using different techniques - and where new insight is required. To encompass the elements of these topics, speakers and discussion leaders with backgrounds in geodesy, experimental rock deformation, structural geology, earthquake seismology, geodynamics, glaciology, materials science, and mineral physics will be invited to the conference. Thematic sessions will be organized on the dynamics of earthquake rupture, the rheology of the lower crust and coupling with the upper mantle, the measurement and interpretation of seismic attenuation and anisotropy, the dynamics of ice sheets and the coupling of reactive porous flow and brittle deformation for understanding geothermal and chemical properties of the shallow crust that are important for developing ideas in CO2 sequestration, geothermal and petrochemical research and the mechanics of shallow faults.

James G. Hirth

2009-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

226

Eagle Rock Geothermal Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Eagle Rock Geothermal Facility Eagle Rock Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Eagle Rock Geothermal Facility General Information Name Eagle Rock Geothermal Facility Facility Eagle Rock Sector Geothermal energy Location Information Location The Geysers, California Coordinates 38.826770222484°, -122.80002593994° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.826770222484,"lon":-122.80002593994,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

227

Sealing performance of bentonite and bentonite/crushed rock borehole plugs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study includes a systematic investigation of the sealing performance of bentonite and bentonite/crushed rock plugs. American Colloid C/S granular bentonite and crushed Apache Leap tuff have been mixed to prepare samples for laboratory flow testing. Bentonite weight percent and crushed tuff gradation are the major variables studied. The sealing performance assessments include high injection pressure flow tests, polyaxial flow tests, high temperature flow tests, and piping tests. The results indicate that a composition to yield a permeability lower than 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}8} cm/s would have at least 25% bentonite by weight mixed with well-graded crushed rock. Hydraulic properties of the mixture plugs may be highly anisotropic if significant particle segregation occurs during sample installation and compaction. Temperature has no significant effect on the sealing performance within the test range from room temperature to 600{degree}C. Piping damage to the sealing performance is small if the maximum hydraulic gradient does not exceed 120 and 280 for samples with a bentonite content of 25 and 35%, respectively. The hydraulic gradients above which flow of bentonite may take place are deemed critical. Analytical work includes the introduction of bentonite occupancy percentage and water content at saturation as two major parameters for plug design. A permeability model is developed for the prediction of permeability in clays, especially in view of the difficulties in obtaining this property experimentally. A piping model is derived based on plastic flow theory. This piping model permits the estimation of critical hydraulic gradients at which flow of bentonite takes place. The model can also be used to define the maximum allowable pore diameter of a protective filter layer.

Ouyang, S.; Daemen, J.J.K. [Arizona Univ., Tucson, AZ (United States). Dept. of Mining and Geological Engineering

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Laboratory Equipment & Supplies | Sample Preparation Laboratories  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Equipment & Supplies Equipment & Supplies John Bargar, SSRL Scientist Equipment is available to serve disciplines from biology to material science. All laboratories contain the following standard laboratory equipment: pH meters with standard buffers, analytical balances, microcentrifuges, vortex mixers, ultrasonic cleaning baths, magnetic stirrers, hot plates, and glassware. Most laboratories offer ice machines and cold rooms. Specialty storage areas for samples include a -80 freezer, argon and nitrogen glove boxes, radiation contamination areas, inert atmosphere chambers, and cold rooms. For specific information please see: Equipment Inventory Checkout Equipment & Supplies To view equipment inventory by laboratory, refer to the following pages: Biology Chemistry & Material Science Laboratory 1 Inventory

229

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0, 2012 0, 2012 CX-009310: Categorical Exclusion Determination Optimization of Reservoir Storage Capacity in Different Depositional Environments (Rock Sampling) CX(s) Applied: B3.1 Date: 08/30/2012 Location(s): Multiple Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory August 30, 2012 CX-009309: Categorical Exclusion Determination Unraveling the Role of Transport, Electrocatalysis, and Surface Science in the SOFC Cathode ORR CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 08/30/2012 Location(s): Multiple Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory August 29, 2012 CX-008916: Categorical Exclusion Determination Development of a Scientific Plan for a Hydrate-Focused Marine Drilling, Logging and Coring Program CX(s) Applied: A1, A9 Date: 08/29/2012 Location(s): Washington, DC Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

230

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

30, 2012 30, 2012 CX-009314: Categorical Exclusion Determination Roof Replacement and Fall Arrest System Installation CX(s) Applied: B1.15, B2.5 Date: 08/30/2012 Location(s): West Virginia Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory August 30, 2012 CX-009313: Categorical Exclusion Determination Advanced Methane Hydrate Reservoir Modeling Using Rock Physics Techniques CX(s) Applied: A1, A9 Date: 08/30/2012 Location(s): Texas Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory August 30, 2012 CX-009312: Categorical Exclusion Determination Pecan Street Smart Grid Extension Service CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 08/30/2012 Location(s): Texas Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory August 30, 2012 CX-009311: Categorical Exclusion Determination Optimization of Reservoir Storage Capacity in Different Depositional

231

Proceedings of the second NATO-CCMS information meeting on dry hot rock geothermal energy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A summary is presented of the second and last NATO-CCMS (North Atlantic Treaty Organization--Committee on Challenges of Modern Society) Geothermal Pilot Study Information Meeting on Dry Hot Rock Geothermal Energy. Only summaries of the formal presentations are included. Overviews of the Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA) and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) geothermal projects are included with emphasis on the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Development Project. Reports of developments in nine foreign countries and on geothermal projects in US universities are also presented.

Mortensen, J.J. (comp.)

1977-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

FRACTURE DETECTION IN CRYSTALLINE ROCK USING ULTRASONIC SHEAR WAVES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the piezoelectric source plate and the rock surface. With aThe S^j sources were bonded to the rock surface with a fast-^ source plate was epoxied in position on the rock specimen.

Waters, K.H.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

BATT Fabrication Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Scientist working in battery lab BATT Fabrication Laboratory The BATT Fab Lab (Batteries for Advanced Transportation Technologies Fabrication Laboratory) conducts battery cell...

234

BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY - Energy  

Laboratory Plan FY 2010-2019 June2,2010 BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY Accelerating Innovation Alane for Hydrogen Storage and Delivery June 2012

235

ARM - Laboratory Partners  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Archive Data Management Facility Data Quality Program Engineering Support External Data Center Laboratory Partners Nine DOE national laboratories share the responsibility of...

236

Sandia National Laboratories: Locations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

around the world. Sandia's executive management offices and larger laboratory complex are located in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Our second principal laboratory is located...

237

EML: Environmental Measurements Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Security and Privacy Notices History of the Environmental Measurements Laboratory The Manhattan ProjectAtomic Energy Commission (1942 1975) Our Laboratory traces its roots...

238

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Lawrence Livermore National Laboratorys (LLNL) primary mission is research and development in support of national security. As a...

239

New Brunswick Laboratory - Reports  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reports New Brunswick Laboratory Activity Reports 2012 Operational Awareness Oversight of the New Brunswick Laboratory, July 2012 Activity Reports 2011 Orientation Visit to the New...

240

A Study of Hydraulic Fracturing Initiation in Transversely Isotropic Rocks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydraulic fracturing of transverse isotropic reservoirs is of major interest for reservoir stimulation and in-situ stress estimation. Rock fabric anisotropy not only causes in-situ stress anisotropy, but also affects fracture initiation from the wellbore. In this study a semi-analytical method is used to investigate these effects with particular reference to shale stimulation. Using simplifying assumptions, equations are derived for stress distribution around the wellbore's walls. The model is then used to study the fracture initiation pressure variations with anisotropy. A sensitivity analysis is carried out on the impact of Young's modulus and Poisson's ration, on the fracture initiation pressure. The results are useful in designing hydraulic fractures and also can be used to develop information about in-situ rock properties using failure pressure values observed in the field. Finally, mechanical and permeability anisotropy are measured using Pulse Permeameter and triaxial tests on Pierre shale.

Serajian, Vahid

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "laboratory investigations rock" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Previous work conducted in the laboratory demonstrated optimal control of refrigerant flow and airflow for a breadboard CVSHP (Miller 1987a). This previous work was continued in the present study by investigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;Previous work conducted in the laboratory demonstrated optimal control of refrigerant flow optimal refrigerant flow and airflow control settings. Previous studies by Tanaka and Yamanaka (1982 pump were replaced with fine metering hand valves having variable flow area for both heating

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

242

Some approaches to rock mass hydrofracture theory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new engineering method has been developed at the Leningrad Mining Institute for defining hot dry rock hydrofracturing parameters. It reflects the structural features of a real jointed rock mass, its gravity-tectonic components of the stress tensor and volume character of deformations, taking into account the inertial effects of hydrodynamics in the non-Darcy zone of radial fluid flow near the injection well, and conversion of the heat energy extracted from hot rock by circulating water partly into filtration-flow additional pressure. Results of calculations are compared to field experiments at Fenton Hill, NM, and are used for the first HDR circulation systems in the USSR.

Dyadkin, Yuri, D.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Oak Ridge National Laboratory - Laboratory Directed Research...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Seed Money Fund Overview The Seed Money Fund of the ORNL LDRD program supports innovative ideas that have the potential of enhancing the Laboratory's core scientific and technical...

244

About Berkeley Lab: Laboratory Director, Associate Laboratory...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2009, replacing former laboratory Director Steve Chu, who was sworn in as U.S. Energy Secretary. Before becoming interim director, Alivisatos was the deputy director of Berkeley...

245

Sandia National Laboratories: Research: Laboratory Directed Research...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Encouraging creative research to innovate solutions for our nation's greatest challenges. National laboratories have been entrusted with the role of serving as incubators for...

246

Annual Report Alfvn Laboratory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is plasma research using small-scale laboratory experiments, where low-density plasmas are generated

Haviland, David

247

National Renewable Energy Laboratory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

National Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future ponsorship Format Reversed Color:White rtical Format Reversed-A ertical Format Reversed-B National Renewable Energy Laboratory National Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future National Renewable Energy Laboratory

248

Laboratory Management (Quality) Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Laboratory Management (Quality) Systems. NISTIR 7028 Type Evaluation Quality Manual Template. This NISTIR has been ...

2012-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

249

State Laboratory Contacts AC  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

State Laboratory Contact Information AC. Alabama. Mailing Address, ... PDF. Alaska. Mailing Address, Contact Information. Alaska ...

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Laboratory. ... A 600 MHz Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectrometer. Analytical Data Compilation Reference Materials. ...

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Rock compressibility, compaction, and subsidence in a high-porosity Chalk Reservoir  

SciTech Connect

A case study of the North Sea Valhall chalk reservoir demonstrates the significant impact that rock compressibility can have on field performance. Porosity reduction, reservoir interval compaction, and seabed subsidence have been observed in conjunction with reservoir pressure depletion. Full-diameter samples from a recently cut core of the unconsolidated high-porosity chalk were subjected to a series of uniaxial-strain experiments to determine compaction and PV compressibility. The laboratory measurements were corrected to field stress rates and pressure, and porosity-dependent rock-compressibility curves were developed. The uniaxial compaction data were used both in a reservoir model to recognize the significant additional reservoir energy resulting from the lithic drive of large-scale rock compaction and in a subsidence model to predict the impact of reservoir depletion on seabed displacements.

Ruddy, I. (Amoco Norway Oil Co. (US)); Andersen, M.A.; Pattillo, P.D.; Bishiawi, M. (Amoco Production Co., Tulsa, OK (USA)); Foged, N. (Danish Geotechnical Inst. (US))

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Rock Sampling At Seven Mile Hole Area (Larson, Et Al., 2009) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Seven Mile Hole Area (Larson, Et Al., 2009) Seven Mile Hole Area (Larson, Et Al., 2009) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Rock Sampling At Seven Mile Hole Area (Larson, Et Al., 2009) Exploration Activity Details Location Seven Mile Hole Area Exploration Technique Rock Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes The distribution of hydrothermally altered rocks was mapped over about 1 km2 in the Sevenmile Hole area. Two to four kilogram hand samples located by a handheld GPS were collected from many outcrops for laboratory analyses References Peter B. Larson, Allison Phillips, David John, Michael Cosca, Chad Pritchard, Allen Andersen, Jennifer Manion (2009) A Preliminary Study Of Older Hot Spring Alteration In Sevenmile Hole, Grand Canyon Of The

253

Department of Energy National Laboratories  

Office of Science laboratory National Nuclear Security Administration laboratory Office of Fossil Energy laboratory Office of Energy Efficiency and ...

254

National Laboratories - Energy Innovation Portal  

Name Address City, State; Ames Laboratory: Ames Laboratory: Ames, IA: Argonne National Laboratory: 9700 S. Cass Avenue: Argonne, IL: Brookhaven ...

255

Evidence for the existence of a stable, highly fluidized-pressurized region of deep, jointed crystalline rock from Fenton Hill hot dry rock test data  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

It has been demonstrated several times at Los Alamos National Laboratory`s Fenton Hill hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal test site, that large volumes of naturally jointed Precambrian crystalline rock can be stably maintained at pressures considerably above the least principal earth stress in the surrounding rock mass. In particular, for the deeper, larger, and tighter of the two HDR reservoirs tested at this site in the Jemez Mountains of north-central New Mexico, testing was carried out for a cumulative period of 11 months without evidence of fracture extension at the boundaries of the pressure-stimulated region, even though a very high reservoir inlet circulating pressure of 27.3 MPa (3960 psi) above hydrostatic was maintained throughout the testing, considerably in excess of the least principal stress in the surrounding rock mass of about 10 MPa above hydrostatic at a depth of 3500 m. The author reviews and summarizes information concerning the earth stresses at depth and the test data relative to the containment of pressurized fluid, particularly the data showing the declining rate of water loss and the absence of microseismicity--the two principal indicators of a stable, pressurized reservoir region. The author then provides a coherent and concise evaluation of this and other evidence supporting his assertion that one can indeed maintain large volumes of jointed rock at pressures considerably in excess of the least principal earth stress. In addition, a discussion is presented concerning the initial state of stress at depth beneath Fenton Hill and then possible changes to the stress state resulting from the very large volumes of injected high-pressure water and the accompanying shear displacements--and shear dilation--associated with these pressurizations.

Brown, D.W.

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Rock of Ages | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

of Ages of Ages Jump to: navigation, search Name Rock of Ages Facility Rock of Ages Sector Wind energy Facility Type Small Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Rock of Ages Energy Purchaser Rock of Ages Location Graniteville VT Coordinates 44.14668574°, -72.48180896° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.14668574,"lon":-72.48180896,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

257

Definition: Isotopic Analysis- Rock | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Isotopic Analysis- Rock Isotopic Analysis- Rock Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Isotopic Analysis- Rock Isotopes are atoms of the same element that have different numbers of neutrons. An isotopic analysis looks at a particular isotopic element(s) in a given system, while the conditions which increase/decrease the number of neutrons are well understood and measurable.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition References ↑ http://wwwrcamnl.wr.usgs.gov/isoig/isopubs/itchch2.html Ret LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. rieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Definition:Isotopic_Analysis-_Rock&oldid=687702" Category: Definitions What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties

258

Purdue Hydrogen Systems Laboratory  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Hydrogen Systems Laboratory in a unique partnership between Purdue University's main campus in West Lafayette and the Calumet campus was established and its capabilities were enhanced towards technology demonstrators. The laboratory engaged in basic research in hydrogen production and storage and initiated engineering systems research with performance goals established as per the USDOE Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies Program. In the chemical storage and recycling part of the project, we worked towards maximum recycling yield via novel chemical selection and novel recycling pathways. With the basic potential of a large hydrogen yield from AB, we used it as an example chemical but have also discovered its limitations. Further, we discovered alternate storage chemicals that appear to have advantages over AB. We improved the slurry hydrolysis approach by using advanced slurry/solution mixing techniques. We demonstrated vehicle scale aqueous and non-aqueous slurry reactors to address various engineering issues in on-board chemical hydrogen storage systems. We measured the thermal properties of raw and spent AB. Further, we conducted experiments to determine reaction mechanisms and kinetics of hydrothermolysis in hydride-rich solutions and slurries. We also developed a continuous flow reactor and a laboratory scale fuel cell power generation system. The biological hydrogen production work summarized as Task 4.0 below, included investigating optimal hydrogen production cultures for different substrates, reducing the water content in the substrate, and integrating results from vacuum tube solar collector based pre and post processing tests into an enhanced energy system model. An automated testing device was used to finalize optimal hydrogen production conditions using statistical procedures. A 3 L commercial fermentor (New Brunswick, BioFlo 115) was used to finalize testing of larger samples and to consider issues related to scale up. Efforts continued to explore existing catalytic methods involving nano catalysts for capture of CO2 from the fermentation process.

Jay P Gore; Robert Kramer; Timothee L Pourpoint; P. V. Ramachandran; Arvind Varma; Yuan Zheng

2011-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

259

Thermal Storage Materials Laboratory (Fact Sheet), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory), Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Storage Materials Storage Materials Laboratory may include: * CSP technology developers * Utilities * Certification laboratories * Government agencies * Universities * Other National laboratories Contact Us If you are interested in working with NREL's Thermal Storage Materials Laboratory, please contact: ESIF Manager Carolyn Elam Carolyn.Elam@nrel.gov 303-275-4311 Thermal Storage Materials Laboratory The Thermal Storage Materials Laboratory at NREL's Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF) investigates materials that can be used as high-temperature heat transfer fluids or thermal energy storage media in concentrating solar power (CSP) plants. Research objectives include the discovery and evaluation of

260

LABORATORY VI ELECTRICITY FROM MAGNETISM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LABORATORY VI ELECTRICITY FROM MAGNETISM Lab VI - 1 In the previous problems you explored by electric currents. This lab will carry that investigation one step further, determining how changing magnetic fields can give rise to electric currents. This is the effect that allows the generation

Minnesota, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "laboratory investigations rock" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

National Laboratories - Energy Innovation Portal  

Name Address City, State; Ames Laboratory: Ames Laboratory: Ames, IA: Argonne National Laboratory: 9700 S. Cass Avenue: Argonne, IL: Brookhaven National Laboratory

262

Alteration Patterns In Volcanic Rocks Within An East-West Traverse Through  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Patterns In Volcanic Rocks Within An East-West Traverse Through Patterns In Volcanic Rocks Within An East-West Traverse Through Central Nicaragua Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Alteration Patterns In Volcanic Rocks Within An East-West Traverse Through Central Nicaragua Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: The volcanic rocks investigated in a cross-section between the Pacific and Atlantic coasts of Nicaragua - with the exception of Recent and some Pleistocene lavas - are incipiently to strongly altered. Alteration patterns on different scales can be discerned in the Tertiary sequences: (i) a regional burial diagenesis or very low-grade burial metamorphism at the low-temperature end of the zeolite facies (mordenite subfacies) with an inferred thermal gradient of < 50°C/km, grading into (ii) a geothermal

263

COMPUTER SYSTEMS LABORATORY STANFORD ELECTRONICS LABORATORIES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Data 2.1 Performance and Utilization Data 2.2 Failure Data 5 5 6 3. Preliminary Analysis 3.1 Load Profiles 3.2 Failure Profiles 7 3.3 Analysis and Discussion of Preliminary Results Some ReliabilityCOMPUTER SYSTEMS LABORATORY I I STANFORD ELECTRONICS LABORATORIES DEPARTMENT OF ElECTRiCAl

Stanford University

264

Simulation of rock blasting with the SHALE code  

SciTech Connect

The SHALE code and its special features for simulating rock blasting are described. SHALE first simulates the detonation of the explosive and then follows the effect of the resulting shocks and stress waves on the surrounding rock. A general description is given for SHALE as a finite-difference stress-wave-propagation code, followed by a brief discussion of numerical methods, and a section on the treatment of the explosive. The constitutive model in SHALE is the BCM (Bedded Crack Model), which describes the response of the rock, including fracture. The use of SHALE is illustrated in a discussion of the basic phenomenology of crater blasting, as seen in simulations of field experiments in oil shale. Predicted peak surface velocities are found to agree with field measurements. Comparisons between predicted fracture and observed craters give insight into the relative roles played by shock waves and the high-pressure-explosive product gases. The two-dimensional version of SHALE is being documented and will be available for use by other investigators. A three-dimensional version is planned.

Adams, T.F.; Demuth, R.B.; Margolin, L.G.; Nichols, B.D.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Progress of the US Hot-Dry-Rock Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

While other geologic environments and possible heat-extraction methods are recognized, the US Hot Dry Rock (HDR) Program has so far concentrated on the use of hydraulic fracturing to create flow passages and heat-transfer surface between two wells drilled into hot crystalline rock of low initial permeability. A recirculating pressurized-water loop has been used at Fenton Hill, New Mexico, to extract heat at rates up to 5MW(t) from a system of this type in granitic rock at a depth of 2600 m. The two wells for a larger, deeper, hotter system have now been drilled at the same location. They will be connected during 1982 by a set of hydraulic fractures, and the resulting heat-extraction loop is expected to yield the engineering experience and performance data required to demonstrate the commercial usefulness of such systems. Meanwhile, an evaluation of the HDR resource base of the United States is continuing, together with detailed investigation of local areas that appear especially promisng either for future heat-extraction experiments or for eventual commercial development.

Smith, M.C.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

High temperature water adsorption on The Geysers rocks  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In order to measure water retention by geothermal reservoir rocks at the actual reservoir temperature, the ORNL high temperature isopiestic apparatus was adapted for adsorption measurements. The quality of water retained by rock samples taken from three different wells of The Geysers geothermal reservoir was measured at 150{sup degree}C, 200{sup degree}C, and 250{sup degree}C as a function of pressure in the range 0.00 {<=}p/p{sub degree} {<=} 0.98, where p{sub degree} is the saturated water vapor pressure. Both adsorption (increasing pressure) and desorption (decreasing pressure) runs were made in order to investigate the nature and the extent of the hysteresis. Additionally, low temperature gas adsorption analyses were performed on the same rock samples. Nitrogen or krypton adsorption and desorption isotherms at 77 K were used to obtain BET specific surface areas, pore volumes and their distributions with respect to pore sizes. Mercury intrusion porosimetry was also used to obtain similar information extending to very large pores (macropores). A correlation is sought between water adsorption, the surface properties, and the mineralogical and petrological characteristics of the solids.

Gruszkiewicz, M.S.; Horita, J.; Simonson, J.M.; Mesmer, R.E.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Experimental verification of the load-following potential of a Hot Dry Rock geothermal reservoir  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A recent 6-day flow experiment conducted at the Los Alamos National Laboratory's Fenton Hill Hot Dry Rock (HDR) test site in north-central New Mexico has verified that an HDR reservoir has the capability for a significant, and very rapid, increase in power output upon demand. The objective of this cyclic load-following experiment was to investigate the performance of the reservoir in a nominal high-backpressure (2200 psi) baseload operating condition upon which was superimposed greatly increased power production for a 4-hour period each day. In practice, this enhanced production was accomplished by dropping the production well backpressure from the preexisting level of 2200 psi down to about 500 psi to rapidly drain the fluid stored in the pressure-dilated joints surrounding the production well. During the last cycle of this six-cycle test, the mean production conditions were 146.6 gpm for 4 hours at a temperature of 189°C followed by 92.4 gpm for 20 hours at a temperature of 183°C. These flow and temperature values indicate a flow enhancement of 59%, and a power enhancement of 65% during the high-production period. The time required to increase the reservoir power output from the baseload to the peaking rate was about 2 minutes.

Brown, Donald

1996-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

268

Talk explores Laboratory's 50 years of space research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Talk explores Laboratory's 50 years of space research Talk explores Laboratory's 50 years of space research Talk explores Laboratory's 50 years of space research The talk, titled "Los Alamos National Laboratory's 50 Years in Space," will highlight the Laboratory's significant discoveries and events in the field. October 3, 2013 Laboratory fellow and astrophysicist Ed Fenimore, and Laboratory planetary scientist and principal investigator of the ChemCam team Roger Wiens, will talk about Los Alamos National Laboratory's 50 years of space research and exploration. Laboratory fellow and astrophysicist Ed Fenimore, and Laboratory planetary scientist and principal investigator of the ChemCam team Roger Wiens, will talk about Los Alamos National Laboratory's 50 years of space research and exploration.

269

Use of explosives in deep rock mining: in situ energy and mineral recovery  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Chemical explosives may become a key element in many of the in situ energy and mineral recovery methods under development. The potential role of explosives in deep rock mining for resource recovery is discussed. Several energy and mineral recovery programs described are an outgrowth of the Plowshare Program and Explosives R and D conducted as part of the AEC/ERDA mission at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. Several important aspects of the use of explosives in deep rock mining are reviewed. First, the status of knowledge of deep rock fracturing to create permeability underground is discussed. Completely contained blasting has not been a widely applied tool used in the mining industry. It is concluded that data available on deep rock fracture is minimal and that the mechanisms that control the processes must be understood before technical and economic feasibility can be established. The unusual problems in the selection of an explosive or blasting agent for deep rock applications including emphasis on the functioning at depth and safety aspects are also discussed. Finally, a brief review of similar activities within the U.S. is given.

Finger, M.; Larson, D.

1976-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

270

Peer Review of the Hot Dry Rock Project at Fenton Hill, New Mexico  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report briefly describes the history of the hot dry rock experiment project conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy and Los Alamos National Laboratory at Fenton Hill, New Mexico, from about 1971 through 1995. The authors identify the primary lessons learned and techniques developed during the course of the Fenton Hill project, and summarize the extent to which these technologies have been transferred to the U.S. geothermal industry.

None

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Investigation of the feasibility of deep microborehole drilling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent advances in sensor technology, microelectronics, and telemetry technology make it feasible to produce miniature wellbore logging tools and instrumentation. Microboreholes are proposed for subterranean telemetry installations, exploration, reservoir definition, and reservoir monitoring this assumes that very small diameter bores can be produced for significantly lower cost using very small rigs. A microborehole production concept based on small diameter hydraulic or pneumatic powered mechanical drilling, assemblies deployed on coiled tubing is introduced. The concept is evaluated using, basic mechanics and hydraulics, published theories on rock drilling, and commercial simulations. Small commercial drill bits and hydraulic motors were selected for laboratory scale demonstrations. The feasibility of drilling deep, directional, one to two-inch diameter microboreholes has not been challenged by the results to date. Shallow field testing of prototype systems is needed to continue the feasibility investigation.

Dreesen, D.S. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Cohen, J.H. [Maurer Engineering, Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Capacitive discharge firing system for providing acoustic sources in the hot dry rock geothermal energy development project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The development of a capacitive discharge firing unit designed to initiate electrically exploded foil slapper detonators in a subsurface, high-pressure (5000 psi), high-temperature (> 200/sup 0/C) environment is described. The unit is used to conduct acoustic ranging experiments in deep boreholes (approx. = 10,000 ft) in the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory Geothermal Hot Dry Rock experiment.

Patterson, W.W.; Deam, D.R.; MacDonald, H.J.; Rochester, R.H.

1979-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Leading Testing Laboratories  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Fax: 86-20-6196-8925 E-Mail: york.li@ledtestlab.com Send E-Mail to Laboratory: Leading Testing Laboratories ... [22/S14] EPA Integral LED Lamps v ...

2013-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

274

Laboratory Proficiency Testing Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

AOCS provides a Laboratory Proficiency Program (LPP). Formerly the Smalley Check Sample Program LPP is a collaborative proficiency testing service for oil and fat related commodities, oilseeds, oilseed meals, and edible fats. Laboratory Proficiency Testing

275

Mound Laboratory: Analytical Capability  

SciTech Connect

The Monsanto Research Corporation, Mound Laboratory Analytical Capability report is intended to fulfill a customer need for basic information concerning Mound Laboratory's analytical instrumentation and techniques.

Hendrickson, E. L.

1955-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Simulation of water transport in heated rock salt  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper summarizes computer simulation studies on water transport in German rock salt. Based on JOCKWERS experimental investigations on water content and water liberation, the object of these studies was to select a water transport model, that matches the water inflow which was measured in some heater experiments in the Asse Salt Mine. The main result is, that an evaporation front model, with Knudsen-type vapor transport combined with fluid transport by thermal expansion of the adsorbed water layers in the non evaporated zone, showed the best agreement with experimental evidence.

Schlich, M.; Jockwer, N.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

State Laboratory Contacts DH  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

State Laboratory Contact Information DH. District of Columbia. ... Lab Closed See State Director's List. No Certificate. Delaware. ...

2013-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

278

Lisheng Safety Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lisheng Safety Laboratory. NVLAP Lab Code: 200882-0. Address and Contact Information: Electronic & Lighting (Xiamen) Co. Ltd. No. ...

2013-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

279

State Laboratory Contacts M  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Maine Department of Agriculture Metrology Laboratory Div. QA&R 28 Station House Road Augusta, ME 04333, 333 Cony Rd. ...

2013-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

280

Price Sound Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Price Sound Laboratory. NVLAP Lab Code: 200874-0. Address and Contact Information: 638 RALEIGH STREET WINNIPEG ...

2013-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "laboratory investigations rock" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Savannah River National Laboratory  

At a glance Remote Electrical Throw Device Engineers at the Savannah River National Laboratory ... sufficient manufacturing capacity, established dist ...

282

Engineering Laboratory Homepage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... and InfrastructureDisaster-Resilient Buildings, Infrastructure, and ... of the Manufacturing Engineering Laboratory. ... Net-Zero Energy Residential Test ...

2013-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

283

National Renewable Energy Laboratory  

National Renewable Energy Laboratory Technology Transfer Marine Corps Taps NREL to Help Replace Aging Steam Plant with Efficient Biomass Cogeneration

284

Laboratory Coordinating Council  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The nation's network of DOE Laboratories and Facilities hold an extensive store of research and development expertise and unique equipment developed for their various missions. The Laboratory Coordinating Council (LCC) gives US industry access to a ``virtual'' laboratory that can be tailored to meet the specific requirements of almost any research project. Established in 1995, the LCC responds to the major process industries' R and D needs with the capabilities of 16 DOE Laboratories and Facilities.

Chum, H.

1998-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

285

Silica Deposition in Field and Laboratory Thermal Tests of Yucca Mountain Tuff  

SciTech Connect

A field thermal test was conducted by the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project to observe changes in the Topopah Spring Tuff middle nonlithophysal zone geohydrologic system due to thermal loading. A laboratory-scale crushed-tuff hydrothermal column test was used to investigate the tuff as a potential construction material within a nuclear-waste repository. Results of similar column tests have been cited as indications that silica deposition would plug the rock fractures above a repository and create unfavorable drainage conditions. Data from field and laboratory tests are used here to predict the magnitude of fracture sealing. For the crushed-tuff column test, a one-meter-high column was packed with crushed tuff to a porosity of about 50%. Water filling the lowermost 10 cm of the column was boiled and the vapor condensed at the top of the column, percolating down to the boiling zone. After 100 days, intergranular pore space in the saturated portion of the column was almost filled with amorphous silica. The Drift Scale Test at Yucca Mountain is a heating test in the unsaturated zone. It consists of a four-year heating phase, now complete, followed by a four-year cooling phase. Heaters in a 60-m-long drift and in the adjacent rock have heated the drift walls to 200 C. As the rock was heated, fluids naturally present in the rock migrated away from the heat sources. A boiling zone now separates an inner dry-out zone from an outer condensation zone. A heat-pipe region exists in the outer margin of the boiling zone above the heated drift. Amorphous silica coatings up to a few micrometers thick were deposited in this region. Deposits were observed in less than 10% of the fractures in the heat pipe region. Drift-scale test results yield a silica deposition rate of about 250 {micro}m/1000 years in 10% of the fractures in the heat-pipe region. We did not calculate deposition rates from our column test, but a rate of 9.1 mm/1000 years in all fractures of the heat-pipe region is predicted by Sun and Rimstidt (2002) from the results of a similar test. We believe the rate based on field-test observations is a better prediction because the field test more closely resembles the expected environment in a repository. Rates based on column-test results may be reasonable for local zones of preferred fluid flow.

S.S. Levy; S.J. Chipera; M.G. Snow

2002-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

286

Deep drilling technology for hot crystalline rock  

SciTech Connect

The development of Hot Dry Rock (HDR) geothermal systems at the Fenton Hill, New Mexico site has required the drilling of four deep boreholes into hot, Precambrian granitic and metamorphic rocks. Thermal gradient holes, four observation wells 200 m (600 ft) deep, and an exploration core hole 800 m (2400 ft) deep guided the siting of the four deep boreholes. Results derived from the exploration core hole, GT-1 (Granite Test No. 1), were especially important in providing core from the granitic rock, and establishing the conductive thermal gradient and heat flow for the granitic basement rocks. Essential stratigraphic data and lost drilling-fluid zones were identified for the volcanic and sedimentary rocks above the contact with the crystalline basement. Using this information drilling strategies and well designs were then devised for the planning of the deeper wells. The four deep wells were drilled in pairs, the shallowest were planned and drilled to depths of 3 km in 1975 at a bottom-hole temperature of nearly 200/sup 0/C. These boreholes were followed by a pair of wells, completed in 1981, the deepest of which penetrated the Precambrian basement to a vertical depth of 4.39 km at a temperature of 320/sup 0/C.

Rowley, J.C.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Cytogenetic Biodosimetry Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cytogenetic Biodosimetry Laboratory Cytogenetic Biodosimetry Laboratory Blood samples are shipped at room temperature to the laboratory. White blood cells, lymphocytes, are cultured under sterile conditions in an incubator for 48 hours using a standard growth medium. Culture tubes are centrifuged, and cells are re-suspended in a weak salt solution, which allows the chromosomes to separate and spread evenly on slides.

288

Division of Laboratory Sciences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;#12;Division of Laboratory Sciences U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Centers and Prevention National Center for Environmental Health Division of Laboratory Sciences Atlanta, Georgia 30341're also working in concert with state public health laboratories, providing training, proficiency testing

289

Argonne Tribology Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tribology Laboratory Tribology Laboratory CemeCon coating chamber CemeCon coating chamber Engineers in Argonne's Tribology Laboratory conduct research on advanced tribological systems (surface engineered materials, lubricants, fuels, and fuel/lubricant additives) for use in aggressive environments (for example, where two surfaces are rubbing together). The Laboratory is equipped with a full range of coating development, friction and wear testing, and characterization facilities. Evaluation of Coatings and Systems The Tribology Laboratory evaluates high performance coatings primarily intended to protect engine-component surfaces that undergo sliding and rolling contact in advanced transportation systems. Also tested are systems powered by diesel and gasoline engines, as well as

290

Leadership | Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Message from the Director Board of Governors Organization Chart Argonne Distinguished Fellows Emeritus Scientists & Engineers History Discoveries Prime Contract Contact Us Leadership Argonne integrates world-class science, engineering, and user facilities to deliver innovative research and technologies. We create new knowledge that addresses the scientific and societal needs of our nation. Eric D. Isaacs Eric D. Isaacs, Director, Argonne National Laboratory Director, Argonne National Laboratory Argonne National Laboratory Eric D. Isaacs, a prominent University of Chicago physicist, is President of UChicago Argonne, LLC, and Director of Argonne National Laboratory. Mark Peters Mark Peters, Deputy Lab Director for Programs Deputy Laboratory Director for Programs

291

Argonne National Laboratory - Reports  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reports Reports Argonne National Laboratory Activity Reports 2012 Operational Awareness Oversight of the Argonne National Laboratory Alpha-Gamma Hot Cell Facility, July 2012 Review Reports 2011 Review of the Argonne National Laboratory Alpha-Gamma Hot Cell Facility Readiness Assessment (Implementation Verification Review Sections), November 2011 Nuclear Safety Enforcement Regulatory Assistance Review of UChicago Argonne, LLC at the Argonne National Laboratory, October 3, 2011 Activity Reports 2011 Orientation Visit to the Argonne National Laboratory, August 2011 Review Reports 2005 Independent Oversight Inspection of Environment, Safety and Health Programs at Argonne National Laboratory, Summary Report, Vol. 1, May, 2005 Independent Oversight Inspection of Environment, Safety, and Health Programs at the Argonne National Laboratory, Technical Appendices, Volume II, May 2005

292

Laboratory Computing Resource Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Computing DOE Logo Computing DOE Logo Search BIO ... Search Argonne Home > BIO home > Laboratory Computing Resource Center BIO Home Page About BIO News Releases Research Publications People Contact Us Organization Chart Site Index Inside BIO BIO Safety About Argonne Argonne National Laboratory Logo Laboratory Computing Resource Center In 2002 Argonne National Laboratory established the Laboratory Computing Project to enable and promote the use of high-performance computing (HPC) across the Laboratory in support of its varied research missions. The Laboratory Computing Resource Center (LCRC) was established, and in April 2003 LCRC began full operations with ArgonneÂ’s first teraflops computing cluster, Jazz. In 2010 Jazz was replaced by Fusion, with a peak performance of 30 teraflops (and still growing). We just acquired Blues which will a performance of 100 teraflops.

293

Photovoltaic technology development at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the following investigations being pursued under photovoltaic technology development at Sandia National Laboratories: photovoltaic systems technology; concentrator technology; concentrator arrays and tracking structures; concentrator solar cell development; system engineering; subsystem development; and test and applications.

1981-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

294

Rock melting tool with annealer section  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A rock melting penetrator is provided with an afterbody that rapidly cools a molten geological structure formed around the melting tip of the penetrator to the glass transition temperature for the surrounding molten glass-like material. An annealing afterbody then cools the glass slowly from the glass transition temperature through the annealing temperature range to form a solid self-supporting glass casing. This allows thermally induced strains to relax by viscous deformations as the molten glass cools and prevents fracturing of the resulting glass liner. The quality of the glass lining is improved, along with its ability to provide a rigid impermeable casing in unstable rock formations.

Bussod, Gilles Y. (Santa Fe, NM); Dick, Aaron J. (Oakland, CA); Cort, George E. (Montrose, CO)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Category:Little Rock, AR | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AR AR Jump to: navigation, search Go Back to PV Economics By Location Media in category "Little Rock, AR" The following 16 files are in this category, out of 16 total. SVFullServiceRestaurant Little Rock AR Entergy Arkansas Inc.png SVFullServiceRestauran... 71 KB SVHospital Little Rock AR Entergy Arkansas Inc.png SVHospital Little Rock... 69 KB SVLargeHotel Little Rock AR Entergy Arkansas Inc.png SVLargeHotel Little Ro... 70 KB SVLargeOffice Little Rock AR Entergy Arkansas Inc.png SVLargeOffice Little R... 71 KB SVMediumOffice Little Rock AR Entergy Arkansas Inc.png SVMediumOffice Little ... 68 KB SVMidriseApartment Little Rock AR Entergy Arkansas Inc.png SVMidriseApartment Lit... 70 KB SVOutPatient Little Rock AR Entergy Arkansas Inc.png SVOutPatient Little Ro...

296

Laboratory Simulation of Tidal Rectification over Seamounts: Homogeneous Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The problem of the oscillatory motion of a homogeneous, rotating fluid in the vicinity of an isolated topographic feature is investigated in the laboratory and numerically. The laboratory experiments are conducted by fixing a cosine-squared body ...

Don L. Boyer; Gabriel Chabert d'Hieres; Henri Didelle; Jacques Verron; Rui-Rong Chen; Lijun Tao

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

An asixymmetric diffusion experiment for the determination of diffusion and sorption coefficients of rock samples  

SciTech Connect

Diffusion anisotropy is a critical property in predicting migration of substances in sedimentary formations with very low permeability. The diffusion anisotropy of sedimentary rocks has been evaluated mainly from laboratory diffusion experiments, in which the directional diffusivities are separately estimated by through-diffusion experiments using different rock samples, or concurrently by in-diffusion experiments in which only the tracer profile in a rock block is measured. To estimate the diffusion anisotropy from a single rock sample, this study proposes an axisymmetric diffusion test, in which tracer diffuses between a cylindrical rock sample and a surrounding solution reservoir. The tracer diffusion between the sample and reservoir can be monitored from the reservoir tracer concentrations, and the tracer profile could also be obtained after dismantling the sample. Semi-analytical solutions are derived for tracer concentrations in both the reservoir and sample, accounting for an anisotropic diffusion tensor of rank two as well as the dilution effects from sampling and replacement of reservoir solution. The transient and steady-state analyses were examined experimentally and numerically for different experimental configurations, but without the need for tracer profiling. These experimental configurations are tested for in- and out-diffusion experiments using Koetoi and Wakkanai mudstones and Shirahama sandstone, and are scrutinized by a numerical approach to identify favorable conditions for parameter estimation. The analysis reveals the difficulty in estimating diffusion anisotropy; test configurations are proposed for enhanced identifiability of diffusion anisotropy. Moreover, it is demonstrated that the axisymmetric diffusion test is efficient in obtaining the sorption parameter from both steady-state and transient data, and in determining the effective diffusion coefficient if isotropic diffusion is assumed. Moreover, measuring reservoir concentrations in an axisymmetric diffusion experiment coupled with tracer profiling may be a promising approach to estimate of diffusion anisotropy of sedimentary rocks.

Takeda, M.; Hiratsuka, T.; Ito, K.; Finsterle, S.

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

MULTI-ATTRIBUTE SEISMIC/ROCK PHYSICS APPROACH TO CHARACTERIZING FRACTURED RESERVOIRS  

SciTech Connect

This project consists of three key interrelated Phases, each focusing on the central issue of imaging and quantifying fractured reservoirs, through improved integration of the principles of rock physics, geology, and seismic wave propagation. This report summarizes the results of Phase I of the project. The key to successful development of low permeability reservoirs lies in reliably characterizing fractures. Fractures play a crucial role in controlling almost all of the fluid transport in tight reservoirs. Current seismic methods to characterize fractures depend on various anisotropic wave propagation signatures that can arise from aligned fractures. We are pursuing an integrated study that relates to high-resolution seismic images of natural fractures to the rock parameters that control the storage and mobility of fluids. Our goal is to go beyond the current state-of-the art to develop and demonstrate next generation methodologies for detecting and quantitatively characterizing fracture zones using seismic measurements. Our study incorporates 3 key elements: (1) Theoretical rock physics studies of the anisotropic viscoelastic signatures of fractured rocks, including up scaling analysis and rock-fluid interactions to define the factors relating fractures in the lab and in the field. (2) Modeling of optimal seismic attributes, including offset and azimuth dependence of travel time, amplitude, impedance and spectral signatures of anisotropic fractured rocks. We will quantify the information content of combinations of seismic attributes, and the impact of multi-attribute analyses in reducing uncertainty in fracture interpretations. (3) Integration and interpretation of seismic, well log, and laboratory data, incorporating field geologic fracture characterization and the theoretical results of items 1 and 2 above. The focal point for this project is the demonstration of these methodologies in the Marathon Oil Company Yates Field in West Texas.

Gary Mavko

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Preliminary Notice of Violation, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory -  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Lawrence Livermore National Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory - EA-2000-12 Preliminary Notice of Violation, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory - EA-2000-12 September 27, 2000 Preliminary Notice of Violation issued to the University of California related to Authorization Basis Issues at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, (EA-2000-12) This letter refers to the Department of Energy's (DOE) investigation of the facts and circumstances concerning Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) maintenance and adherence to documents, which form the Authorization Basis (AB) for the Laboratory's nuclear facilities. Preliminary Notice of Violation, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory - EA-2000-12 More Documents & Publications Enforcement Letter, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory - November 5,

300

Going green earns Laboratory gold  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Going green earns Laboratory gold Going green earns Laboratory gold The Laboratory's newest facility is its first to achieve both the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "laboratory investigations rock" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Vehicle Technologies Office: National Laboratories  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

National Laboratories to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: National Laboratories on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: National Laboratories on...

302

Laboratory program helps small businesses  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lab helps small businesses Laboratory program helps small businesses The free program, run jointly by Los Alamos and Sandia National Laboratories, leverages the laboratories'...

303

Rim Rock Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rim Rock Wind Farm Rim Rock Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Rim Rock Wind Farm Facility Rim Rock Wind Farm Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner NaturEner Developer NaturEner Energy Purchaser San Diego Gas & Electric Location Glacier and Toole Counties MT Coordinates 48.779564°, -112.061291° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":48.779564,"lon":-112.061291,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

304

Storage capacity in hot dry rock reservoirs  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for extracting thermal energy, in a cyclic manner, from geologic strata which may be termed hot dry rock. A reservoir comprised of hot fractured rock is established and water or other liquid is passed through the reservoir. The water is heated by the hot rock, recovered from the reservoir, cooled by extraction of heat by means of heat exchange apparatus on the surface, and then re-injected into the reservoir to be heated again. Water is added to the reservoir by means of an injection well and recovered from the reservoir by means of a production well. Water is continuously provided to the reservoir and continuously withdrawn from the reservoir at two different flow rates, a base rate and a peak rate. Increasing water flow from the base rate to the peak rate is accomplished by rapidly decreasing backpressure at the outlet of the production well in order to meet periodic needs for amounts of thermal energy greater than a baseload amount, such as to generate additional electric power to meet peak demands. The rate of flow of water provided to the hot dry rock reservoir is maintained at a value effective to prevent depletion of the liquid inventory of the reservoir. 4 figs.

Brown, D.W.

1997-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

305

Transfer of hot dry rock technology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Development Program has focused worldwide attention on the facts that natural heat in the upper part of the earth's crust is an essentially inexhaustible energy resource which is accessible almost everywhere, and that practical means now exist to extract useful heat from the hot rock and bring it to the earth's surface for beneficial use. The Hot Dry Rock Program has successfully constructed and operated a prototype hot, dry rock energy system that produced heat at the temperatures and rates required for large-scale space heating and many other direct uses of heat. The Program is now in the final stages of constructing a larger, hotter system potentially capable of satisfying the energy requirements of a small, commercial, electrical-generating power plant. To create and understand the behavior of such system, it has been necessary to develop or support the development of a wide variety of equipment, instruments, techniques, and analyses. Much of this innovative technology has already been transferred to the private sector and to other research and development programs, and more is continuously being made available as its usefulness is demonstrated. This report describes some of these developments and indicates where this new technology is being used or can be useful to industry, engineering, and science.

Smith, M.C.

1985-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Hot-dry-rock geothermal resource 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The work performed on hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal resource evaluation, site characterization, and geophysical exploration techniques is summarized. The work was done by region (Far West, Pacific Northwest, Southwest, Rocky Mountain States, Midcontinent, and Eastern) and limited to the conterminous US.

Heiken, G.; Goff, F.; Cremer, G. (ed.)

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Segmentation of cracks in shale rock  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper the use of morphological connected filters are studied for segmenting sheet- and thread-like cracks in images of shale rock. A volume formed from a stack of 2-D X-ray images is processed using 3-D attributes. The shape-preserving property ...

Erik R. Urbach; Marina Pervukhina; Leanne Bischof

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

STANFORD ROCK PHYSICS BOREHOLE GEOPHYSICS PROJECT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TABLE OF CONTENTS A: Rock Physics and Geology. Pressure-solution models and the velocity......................................................... A3 Pressure trends of compressional-and shear-wave velocities measured measured in sands to 20 MPA.....................................................C3 Properties of pore fluids at very high pressures from equations of state. Walls & Dvorkin

Nur, Amos

309

Storage capacity in hot dry rock reservoirs  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of extracting thermal energy, in a cyclic manner, from geologic strata which may be termed hot dry rock. A reservoir comprised of hot fractured rock is established and water or other liquid is passed through the reservoir. The water is heated by the hot rock, recovered from the reservoir, cooled by extraction of heat by means of heat exchange apparatus on the surface, and then re-injected into the reservoir to be heated again. Water is added to the reservoir by means of an injection well and recovered from the reservoir by means of a production well. Water is continuously provided to the reservoir and continuously withdrawn from the reservoir at two different flow rates, a base rate and a peak rate. Increasing water flow from the base rate to the peak rate is accomplished by rapidly decreasing backpressure at the outlet of the production well in order to meet periodic needs for amounts of thermal energy greater than a baseload amount, such as to generate additional electric power to meet peak demands. The rate of flow of water provided to the hot dry rock reservoir is maintained at a value effective to prevent depletion of the liquid

Brown, Donald W. (Los Alamos, NM)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

FY 2005 Laboratory Table  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Congressional Budget Congressional Budget Request Laboratory Tables Preliminary Department of Energy FY 2005 Congressional Budget Request Office of Management, Budget and Evaluation/CFO February 2004 Laboratory Tables Preliminary Department of Energy Department of Energy FY 2005 Congressional Budget FY 2005 Congressional Budget Request Request Office of Management, Budget and Evaluation/CFO February 2004 Laboratory Tables Laboratory Tables Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Preliminary Preliminary The numbers depicted in this document represent the gross level of DOE budget authority for the years displayed. include both the discretionary and mandatory funding in the budget. balances, deferrals, rescissions, or other adjustments appropria ted as offsets to the DOE appropriations by the Congress.

311

Brookhaven National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

checking the document effective date on the PS Training website. Brookhaven National Laboratory Photon Sciences Directorate Subject: Photon Sciences TECH PROC LN2 Manual Fill...

312

Brookhaven National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

reminder to persons whose area will be inspected (i.e. Cognizant Space Managers) Brookhaven National Laboratory Photon Sciences Directorate Subject: ENVIRONMENTAL, SAFETY AND...

313

Brookhaven National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

current version by checking the document effective date on the PS Training website. Brookhaven National Laboratory Photon Sciences Directorate Subject: Photon Sciences ELEC PPE -...

314

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Skip to Main Content U.S. Department of Energy Search PNNL Search PNNL Home About Research Publications Jobs News Contacts Featured Research...

315

NATIONAL ENERGY TECHNOLOGY LABORATORY  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NATIONAL ENERGY TECHNOLOGY LABORATORY In 2011, the Office of Fossil Energy evaluated the realized and estimated benefits provided by its programs. Implemented by NETL, these...

316

News | Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

News Argo exascale architecture Click on image to enlarge. Designing a new operating system for exascale architectures Full Story Argonne National Laboratory has been awarded a...

317

Sandia National Laboratories - Reports  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reports Sandia National Laboratories Review Reports 2013 Review of the Sandia Site Office Quality Assurance Assessment of the Manzano Nuclear Operations, January 2013 Activity...

318

Los Alamos National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

participants to respond to simulated hazardous materials emergencies involving a rail car, a clandestine laboratory, various modes of transportation, industrial piping...

319

Los Alamos National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2013 - Hours after a disaster declaration by Los Alamos County, Los Alamos National Laboratory officials on Friday described "millions" of dollars in damage to environmental...

320

Hollings Marine Laboratory Homepage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The Hollings Marine Laboratory (HML) is a ... the Nation's coastal environmental- and health-related problems ... s National Ocean Service, the National ...

2013-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "laboratory investigations rock" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

ARGONNE NATIONAL LABORATORY  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

National Laboratory wild@mcs.anl.gov ABSTRACT Code optimization in the high-performance computing realm has traditionally focused on reducing execution time. The problem, in...

322

Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oak Ridge National Laboratory Search Go Find People Contact Site Index Comments Home News News Releases Story Tips Features Contacts ORNL Review Magazine ORNL in the News...

323

Shared Intellect * Shared Laboratories...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

VOLUME 3, ISSUE 3 NETL-RUA 2013 SPRING MEETING: Growth Through Collaboration National Energy Technology Laboratory - Regional University Alliance (NETL-RUA) members joined...

324

National Renewable Energy Laboratory Environmental Performance...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

by five streams: Rock Creek, North Walnut Creek, South Walnut Creek, Woman Creek, and Coal Creek. Rock Creek flows eastward and is NREL Environmental Performance Report - 2007...

325

Esimation of field-scale thermal conductivities of unsaturated rocks from in-situ temperature data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

vicinity of the heat source, and rock temperature exceededand the dry rock near the heat source. The other differencesources, heat transfer takes place through the wet rock (see

Mukhopadhyay, Sumit; Tsang, Yvonne W.; Birkholzer, Jens T.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

SEARCH FOR UNDERGROUND OPENINGS FOR IN SITU TEST FACILITIES IN CRYSTALLINE ROCK  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Index Appendix 1. Sources of Information Rock properties -various sources, and list of mines in crystalline rock whichoz SOURCE EOLOGY INFORMATION MINERALOGY OF HOST ROCKS GULF

Wallenberg, H.A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Proceedings of the Second International Symposium on Dynamics of Fluids in Fractured Rock  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

toward the heat source, or into the rock underlying the heatcharacterizing DNAPL source zones in fractured rock at theby a point source injection in fractured rock with multiple

Faybishenko, Boris; Witherspoon, Paul A.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Anisotropic yielding of rocks at high temperatures and pressures  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Results to date are: All of the starting materials for the three year project have been collected. Included in our collection are relatively fine-grained, fresh, oriented blocks of schist, gneiss, and micaceous quartzite with well-defined foliations and lineations as well as granite blocks oriented with respect to the principal quarrying orientations, the rift, grain, and hardway. A suite of samples has also been collected from an exposed granite stock and surrounding country rocks in order to evaluate the strengths and distribution of fabrics which may be encountered while drilling. These fabrics appear to be directly related to the forceful emplacement of the pluton. The literature on the mechanics of intrusion has been reviewed with regard to strain gradients and foliation development associated with diapiric flow. This information will be used to evaluate flow of varying fabrics on yield criteria within and surrounding magma chambers. Twenty-three successful experiments have been performed on samples of gneiss cored along six different orientations at temperatures ranging from 25{degrees} to 700{degrees}C. These experiments include extension tests, unconfined compression tests, and compression tests performed at P{sub c} = 100 MPa. Theoretical yield conditions for anisotropic materials have been reviewed and the assumptions upon which they are based probed. These yield conditions will ultimately be used to fit our data on gneiss, and the other foliated rocks under investigation. Two abstracts have been published and oral presentations made at the 1987 Fall Meeting of the American Geophysical Union, based upon our previous DOE-sponsored work on tensile fracturing of quartzite and related work on semi-brittle deformation of granitic rocks. 21 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs.

Kronenberg, A.K.; Russell, J.E.; Handin, J.; Gottschalk, R.R.; Shea, W.T.

1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Status and prospects for hot dry rock (HDR) in the United States  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The vast majority of accessible geothermal energy exists in the form of heat stored in dry rock at depth. For nearly the last two decades, the Los Alamos National Laboratory has been engaged in a program to develop the technology to mine the thermal energy in this hot dry rock (HDR). The world's first heat mine was developed and operated at Fenton Hill, N.M. in the 1970's by using drilling and hydraulic fracturing techniques to create an artificial reservoir in hot rock and subsequently circulating water through this reservoir to mine the heat from the rock. Over the last ten years, a much larger, deeper, and hotter heat mine has been constructed at Fenton Hill and a permanent energy extraction plant has been built on the surface. A long-term testing program has recently begun to evaluate the potential for sustained energy extraction from the large Fenton Hill heat mine. This paper summarizes the history of HDR research and development at Los Alamos, reports the initial results of the long-term testing program at Fenton Hill, and discusses the possible future course of HDR technology.

Brown, D.; Duchane, D.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Fumonisin Laboratory Proficiency Testing Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lab Proficiency Testing service for B1, B2, B3,and total Fumonisin in corn meal samples. Fumonisin Laboratory Proficiency Testing Program Laboratory Proficiency Program (LPP) aocs applicants certified chemist chemists Lab laboratories Laboratory methods

331

Effects of temperature and humidity variations on the stability of coal mine roof rocks. Final report  

SciTech Connect

A high degree of correlation between strain developed in samples of roof rock and humidity changes was obtained in the laboratory. The strain developed across bedding planes was greater than strain developed parallel to bedding. In tests conducted underground, strain values were much lower and the data more scattered for similar humidity variations. Roof rock specimens reacted to a 10 pct change in humidity throughout a 7 to 10 day period before stabilizing, which seems to rule out daily humidity cycles as a factor in roof deterioration and indicates seasonal variations as a major cause. Very low annual temperature variations were recorded in active sections of the mine. At a 6 F annual variation developed strain would be only 10.5 microinches per inch, far below the strain magnitude for humidity variations and probably too low to be a factor in problems of roof deterioration. Laboratory strain tests on drill core samples were shown to be indicators of moisture sensitivity of roof rock, but neither chemical nor physical properties of the samples correlated with the strain data. (Portions of this document are not fully legible.)

Haynes, C.D.

1975-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

The design and construction of a hot dry rock pilot plant  

SciTech Connect

The geothermal energy program at the Los Alamos National Laboratory is directed toward demonstrating the potential of the hot dry rock (HDR) technology as an alternate energy source. Since the inception of the program, scientists and engineers have perfected drilling and fracturing techniques to create underground reservoirs for the purpose of tapping the potential heat energy from the hot rock in the earth. One of the achievements to date has been the creation of a reservoir at the Laboratory's test site at Fenton Hill, New Mexico. This reservoir, located at a depth of 12,000 feet below the surface of the earth, has an estimated fluid capacity of one million gallons within the large volume of fractured rock. To evaluate the thermal power potential of this reservoir, preparations are currently underway to conduct a test which will entail the circulation of fluid through the reservoir by the injection of water at high pressures. A major part of the preparations involves the building of a demonstration pilot plant. The process concept poses a number of unique technical challenges with regard to the design and construction of the equipment and facilities. This paper reviews the system design and operating features of this plant. 3 refs., 4 figs.

Ponden, R.F.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Sizing of a hot dry rock reservoir from a hydraulic fracturing experiment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hot dry rock (HDR) reservoirs do not lend themselves to the standard methods of reservoir sizing developed in the petroleum industry such as the buildup/drawdown test. In a HDR reservoir the reservoir is created by the injection of fluid. This process of hydraulic fracturing of the reservoir rock usually involves injection of a large volume (5 million gallons) at high rates (40BPM). A methodology is presented for sizing the HDR reservoir created during the hydraulic fracturing process. The reservoir created during a recent fracturing experiment is sized using the techniques presented. This reservoir is then investigated for commercial potential by simulation of long term power production. 5 refs., 7 figs.

Zyvoloski, G.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Little Rock, Arkansas Small Business IT Security Workshop  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Twitter, Facebook & Blogs Free Workshop helps Small Business Owners Reduce Cyber Threats LITTLE ROCK--The US ...

2013-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

335

CRC handbook of physical properties of rocks. Volume III  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This book presents topics on: Density of rocks and minerals, includes histograms of density ranges; elastic constants of minerals, elastic moduli, thermal properties; inelastic properties, strength and rheology for rocks and minerals, rock mechanics and friction, and stress-strain relations; radioactivity, decay constants and heat production of isotope systems in geology; seismic attenuation, in rocks, minerals, and the earth, with application to oil exploration and terrestrial studies; and index.

Carmichael, R.S.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Material Measurement Laboratory Professional Research ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... at the NIST, Gaithersburg Laboratories in Gaithersburg ... NIST Hollings Marine Laboratory (HML) in ... sponsoring institution of higher education and be ...

2013-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

337

FY 2010 Laboratory Table  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Laboratory Tables Laboratory Tables Preliminary May 2009 Office of Chief Financial Officer FY 2010 Congressional Budget Request Laboratory Tables Preliminary The numbers depicted in this document represent the gross level of DOE budget authority for the years displayed. The figures include both the discretionary and mandatory funding in the budget. They do not consider revenues/receipts, use of prior year balances, deferrals, rescissions, or other adjustments appropriated as offsets to the DOE appropriations by the Congress. Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Laboratory / Facility Index FY 2010 Congressional Budget Page 1 of 3 (Dollars In Thousands) 2:08:56PM Department Of Energy 5/4/2009 Page Number FY 2008 Appropriation FY 2009 Appropriation FY 2010 Request Laboratory Table 1 1 $1,200

338

SANDIA NATIONAL LABORATORIES  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Impacts on Sandia and the Nation Impacts on Sandia and the Nation 2 SANDIA NATIONAL LABORATORIES 3 LDRD Impacts on Sandia and the Nation For further information, contact: Wendy R. Cieslak Senior Manager, Science, Technology, and Engineering Strategic Initiatives wrciesl@sandia.gov (505) 844-8633 or Henry R. Westrich LDRD Program Manager hrwestr@sandia.gov 505-844-9092 LDRD Impacts on Sandia and the Nation ABOUT THE COVER: Images from some of the case studies in this brochure: a near-UV light- emitting diode (LED), a cell membrane, a NISAC model, synthetic aperture radar (SAR) image of Washington, D.C. LABORATORY DIRECTED RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT 4 SANDIA NATIONAL LABORATORIES 5 LDRD Impacts on Sandia and the Nation Sandia National Laboratories' Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program:

339

Laboratory Protection Division, Brookhaven National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Points of Contact Points of Contact Organization Chart (pdf) Groups Emergency Services Emergency Management Security Operations BNL Site Access Main Gate Access Forms Welcome to the... Laboratory Protection Division (LP) Mission Statement: To serve and protect Brookhaven National Laboratory's staff, guests, and interests from the undesirable consequences of unwanted events by providing preparedness, assessment, engineering, and immediate response services for all types of security and non-security related emergencies. Protect DOE special nuclear materials, classified matter, sensitive information, and property against theft, diversion, or destruction; prevent the sabotage of programs that could result in significant scientific or financial impact; prevent the malevolent release of hazardous materials including radiological, chemical, and infectious agents or other criminal acts protecting people, property, and national security, providing a safe and secure environment for employees, the public, and the environment.

340

A digital rock density map of New Zealand  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Digital geological maps of New Zealand (QMAP) are combined with 9256 samples with rock density measurements from the national rock catalogue PETLAB and supplementary geological sources to generate a first digital density model of New Zealand. This digital ... Keywords: Crust, Database, Density, Geological mapping, Gravimetry, Rock types

Robert Tenzer; Pascal Sirguey; Mark Rattenbury; Julia Nicolson

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "laboratory investigations rock" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Characterization of hot dry rock geothermal energy extraction systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The engineering of heat exchange systems by which geothermal heat can be efficiently extracted from hot impermeable rocks is studied. The system currently under investigation at Fenton Hill, New Mexico consists of a network of large fractures created through the hydraulic pressurization of a well penetrating hot basement rocks and subsequently intersected by a second well drilled to form a flow-thru system. Cool water pumped into the fractures through one well, once heated in the reservoir, returns to the surface through the second well, is cooled, and then recirculated. While much is known about the performance parameters of the fracture network from short-term flow tests, little is understood concerning the spatial dimensions and geometrical relationship of individual fractures comprising the network. Ultimately, the success one has in estimating the long-term performance of such a system where commercialization is an issue, and in engineering future systems with optimal performance, depends on the success in characterizing the flow-thru fracture networks. To date only nonconventional application of oil field logging techniques and acoustic emissions studies have been used in the characterization of the fracture network.

Albright, J.N.; Newton, C.A.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Rock River Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wind Farm Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Rock River Wind Farm Facility Rock River Wind Farm Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Shell Wind Energy Developer SeaWest Energy Purchaser PacifiCorp Location Arlington and Carbon Counties WY Coordinates 41.6996°, -107.003° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.6996,"lon":-107.003,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

343

Rapid excavation by rock melting. LASL subterrene program, December 31, 1972--September 1, 1973  

SciTech Connect

Research is continuing on establishing the technical and economic feasibility of excavation systems based upon the rockmelting (Subterrene) concept. A series of electrically powered, small-diameter prototype melting penetrators have been developed and tested. Research activities include optimizing penetrator configurations, designing high-performance heater systems, and improving refractory-metals technology. The properties of the glass linings that are automatically formed on the melted holes are being investigated for a wide variety of rocks and soils. Thermal and fluid-mechanics analyses of the melt flows are being conducted with the objective of optimizing penetraton designs. Initial economic models of the rock-melting concept extended to large tunnelers are being developed. Field tests and demonstrations of the prototype devices continue to be performed in a wide range of rock and soil types. The conceptual design of the electrically powered, self-propelled, remotely guided, horizontal tunnel-alignment prospecting system (Geoprospector) has been initiated. Such a device will also find applications in energy transmission, i.e., utility and pipeline installations. The long-term goal of the research is to develop the technology and prototype hardware that will ultimately lead to large tunneling devices, with improved advance rates and reduced tunnel project costs. The rockmelting concept includes elements that will result in innovative solutions to the three major functional areas of tunneling: rock disintegration, materials handling, and hole-support linings. The proposed excavation method, which is relatively insensitive to variations in rock formation, produces a liquid melt that can be chilled to a glass and formed into a dense, strong, firmly attached hole lining. Unique applications to large automated tunneling systems, ultradeep coring for geoscience research, and hot-rock penetration for geothermal energy development are being investigated, (auth)

Hanold, R.J.

1973-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Low Pore Connectivity in Natural Rock  

SciTech Connect

As repositories for CO? and radioactive waste, as oil and gas reservoirs, and as contaminated sites needing remediation, rock formations play a central role in energy and environmental management. The connectivity of the rock's porespace strongly affects fluid flow and solute transport. This work examines pore connectivity and its implications for fluid flow and chemical transport. Three experimental approaches (imbibition, tracer concentration profiles, and imaging) were used in combination with network modeling. In the imbibition results, three types of imbibition slope [log (cumulative imbibition) vs. log (imbibition time)] were found: the classical 0.5, plus 0.26, and 0.26 transitioning to 0.5. The imbibition slope of 0.26 seen in Indiana sandstone, metagraywacke, and Barnett shale indicates low pore connectivity, in contrast to the slope of 0.5 seen in the well-connected Berea sandstone. In the tracer profile work, rocks exhibited different distances to the plateau porosity, consistent with the pore connectivity from the imbibition tests. Injection of a molten metal into connected pore spaces, followed by 2-D imaging of the solidified alloy in polished thin sections, allowed direct assessment of pore structure and lateral connection in the rock samples. Pore-scale network modeling gave results consistent with measurements, confirming pore connectivity as the underlying cause of both anomalous behaviors: imbibition slope not having the classical value of 0.5, and accessible porosity being a function of distance from the edge. A poorly connected porespace will exhibit anomalous behavior in fluid flow and chemical transport, such as a lower imbibition slope (in air–water system) and diffusion rate than expected from classical behavior.

Hu, Qinhong; Ewing, Robert P.; Dultz, Stefan

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

345

Rock Sampling At U.S. West Region (Krohn, Et Al., 1993) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

U.S. West Region (Krohn, Et Al., 1993) U.S. West Region (Krohn, Et Al., 1993) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Rock Sampling At U.S. West Region (Krohn, Et Al., 1993) Exploration Activity Details Location U.S. West Region Exploration Technique Rock Sampling Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Over 30 disseminated gold or hot-spring deposits in the western U.S. were sampled for ammonium-bearing minerals during field reconnaissance studies (Figs. l and 2). Wholerock samples, approximately 3 cm across, were collected from primarily feldspathic or argillaceous lithologies and measured on a laboratory near-infrared spectrometer (Krohn and Altaner, 1987). References M. Dennis Krohn, Carol Kendall, John R. Evans, Terry L. Fries (1993)

346

Rock Sampling At The Needles Area (Kratt, Et Al., 2005) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

The Needles Area (Kratt, Et Al., 2005) The Needles Area (Kratt, Et Al., 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Rock Sampling At The Needles Area (Kratt, Et Al., 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location The Needles Area Exploration Technique Rock Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Over 2000 km2 of 5-m resolution Hymap hyperspectral data was acquired in 2004. Subsequent image processing and data analysis has identified reflectance spectra for alunite, kaolinite/halloysite, illite, gypsum, vegetation, and carbonate. A portable spectrometer is being used for in situ validation, along with laboratory measurements and x-ray diffraction analyses of samples collected in teh field. We are in the process of producing and validating mineral maps that will be used to narrow the scope

347

An evaluation of near-field host rock temperatures for a spent fuel repository  

SciTech Connect

A repository heat transfer analysis has been performed by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the US Department of Energy's Performance Assessment Scientific Support Program. The objective of this study was to evaluate the near-field thermal environmental conditions for a spent fuel repository system. A spent fuel logistics analysis was performed using a waste management system simulation model, WASTES-II, to evaluate the thermal characteristics of spent fuel received at the repository. A repository-scale thermal analysis was performed using a finite difference heat transfer code, TEMPEST, to evaluate the near-field host rock temperature. The calculated temporal and spatial distributions of near-field host rock temperatures provide input to the repository source term model in evaluations of engineered barrier system performance. 9 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

Altenhofen, M.K.; Lowery, P.S.

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Investigation on non-glass laser fusion targets: their fabrication, characterization, and transport. Charged Particle Research Laboratory report No. 2-81, progress report, June 1, 1980-January 31, 1981  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A summary is presented of the research progress made under LLNL Subcontract 8320003 for the period of June 1, 1980 through January 31, 1981. The main theme of the research has continued to be the development of techniques for fabricating, characterizing, and transporting laser fusion targets on a continuous basis. The target fabrication techniques are intended mainly for non-glass spherical shell targets, both cryogenic and non-cryogenic. Specifically, progress has been made in each of the following categories. (1) Investigation of liquid hydrogen behavior inside a spherical laser fusion target. (2) Development of automated target characterization scheme. (3) Study of cryogenic target fabrication scheme utilizing cold-gas-levitation and electric field positioning. (4) Development of a cryogenic target fabrication system based on target free-fall method. (5) Generation of hydrogen powder using electro-hydrodynamic spraying. (6) Study of target-charging techniques for application to contactless cryogenic target fabrication. (7) Development of hollow metal sphere production technique. A brief summary of the research progress made in each category is presented.

Kim, K.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Dynamic rock fragmentation: oil shale applications  

SciTech Connect

Explosive rock fragmentation techniques used in many resource recovery operations have in the past relied heavily upon traditions of field experience for their design. As these resources, notably energy resources, become less accessible, it becomes increasingly important that fragmentation techniques be optimized and that methods be developed to effectively evaluate new or modified explosive deployment schemes. Computational procedures have significant potential in these areas, but practical applications must be preceded by a thorough understanding of the rock fracture phenomenon and the development of physically sound computational models. This paper presents some of the important features of a rock fragmentation model that was developed as part of a program directed at the preparation of subterranean beds for in situ processing of oil shale. The model, which has been implemented in a two-dimensional Lagrangian wavecode, employs a continuum damage concept to quantify the degree of fracturing and takes into account experimental observations that fracture strength and fragment dimensions depend on tensile strain rates. The basic premises of the model are considered in the paper as well as some comparisons between calculated results and observations from blasting experiments.

Boade, R. R.; Grady, D. E.; Kipp, M. E.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Artificial geothermal reservoirs in hot volcanic rock  

SciTech Connect

S>Some recent results from the Los Alamos program in which hydraulic fracturing is used for the recovery of geothermal energy are discussed. The location is about 4 kilometers west and south of the ring fault of the enormous Jemez Caldera in the northcentral part of New Mexico. It is shown that geothermal energy may be extracted from hot rock that does not contain circulating hot water or steam and is relatively impermeable. A fluid is pumped at high pressure into an isolated section of a wellbore. If the well is cased the pipe in this pressurized region is perforated as it is in the petroleum industry, so that the pressure may be applied to the rock, cracking it. A second well is drilled a few hundred feet away from the first. Cold water is injected through the first pipe, circulates through the crack, and hot water returns to the surface through the second pipe. Results are described and circumstances are discussed under which artiflcial geothermal reservoirs might be created in the basaltic rock of Hawaii. (MCW)

Aamodt, R.L.

1974-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

351

Calculation of explosive rock breakage: oil shale  

SciTech Connect

Improved efficiency in explosive rock breakage becomes increasingly important as mining costs and the need to tap underground resources continue to grow. Industry has recognized this need for many years and has done a great deal in developing new products and new blasting techniques, generally by purely empirical means. One particular application that has received added attention within the past several years, and one that lends itself to a more objective theoretical study, is explosive fracture of oil shale for conventional and in situ fossil energy recovery. Numerical calculation of oil shale fracturization with commercial explosives has the potential to add to an objective understanding of the breakage process. Often, in such numerical studies, only one or two parts of the total problem are addressed with any degree of sophistication or completeness. Here an attempt is made to treat the entire problem, i.e., explosive characterization, constitutive behavior of intact rock, and a mathematical description of rock fracture. The final results are two-dimensional calculations of explosively induced fracture damage in oil shale.

Johnson, J.N.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Development Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During Fiscal Year 1987, emphasis in the Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Development Program was on preparations for a Long-Term Flow Test'' of the Phase II'' or Engineering'' hot dry rock energy system at Fenton Hill, New Mexico. A successful 30-day flow test of the system during FY86 indicated that such a system would produce heat at a temperature and rate that could support operation of a commercial electrical power plant. However, it did not answer certain questions basic to the economics of long-term operation, including the rate of depletion of the thermal reservoir, the rate of water loss from the system, and the possibility of operating problems during extended continuous operation. Preparations for a one-year flow test of the system to answer these and more fundamental questions concerning hot dry rock systems were made in FY87: design of the required surface facilities; procurement and installation of some of their components; development and testing of slimline logging tools for use through small-diameter production tubing; research on temperature-sensitive reactive chemical tracers to monitor thermal depletion of the reservoir; and computer simulations of the 30-day test, extended to modeling the planned Long-Term Flow Test. 45 refs., 34 figs., 5 tabs.

Smith, M.C.; Hendron, R.H.; Murphy, H.D.; Wilson, M.G.

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Development of hot dry rock resources  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The LASL Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Project is the only U.S. field test of this geothermal resource. In the LASL concept, a man-made geothermal reservoir would be formed by drilling a deep hole into relatively impermeable hot rock, creating a large surface area for heat transfer by fracturing the rock hydraulically, then drilling a second hole to intersect the fracture to complete the circulation loop. In 1974, the first hole was drilled to a depth of 2929 m (9610 ft) and a hydraulic fracture was produced near the bottom. In 1975, a second hole was directionally drilled to intersect the fracture. Although the desired intersection was not achieved, a connection was made through which water was circulated. After a year's study of the fracture system, drilling began again in April 1977 and an improved connection was achieved. In September of 1977 a 5 MW (thermal) heat extraction and circulation experiment was conducted for 100 h as a preliminary test of the concept. An 1800-h circulation experiment was concluded on April 13, 1978 to determine temperature-drawdown, permeation water loss and flow characteristics of the pressurized reservoir, to examine chemistry changes in the circulating fluid, and to monitor for induced seismic effects.

Pettitt, R.A.; Tester, J.W.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Seismic signal location program for the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory's dry hot rock geothermal project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During hydraulic fracturing, seismic signals produced as the fracture grows may be used to determine orientation, size, and shape of the fracture. This seismic signal location program has been written to utilize such signals, along with an experimentally determined seismic velocity model to help determine the fracture orientation, size, and shape.

Kintzinger, P.R.

1976-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Safeguards Laboratory (SL) | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Safeguards Laboratory Safeguards Laboratory May 30, 2013 The Safeguards Laboratory is a Department of Energy user facility equipped with a comprehensive set of field-deployable instrumentation for safeguards system development and personnel training. Mock-ups using industrial equipment and reference nuclear materials simulate real-world conditions for training, testing, and evaluations. The lab's openness and availability to the private sector enable development of new technologies that combat the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction. Applications Training and International Outreach Nondestructive Analysis Measurements Instrument Evaluations Integrated Safeguards Methodologies Measurement Technique Development Specifications Gamma and X-ray detection systems Handheld survey instruments

356

Sonication standard laboratory module  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A standard laboratory module for automatically producing a solution of cominants from a soil sample. A sonication tip agitates a solution containing the soil sample in a beaker while a stepper motor rotates the sample. An aspirator tube, connected to a vacuum, draws the upper layer of solution from the beaker through a filter and into another beaker. This beaker can thereafter be removed for analysis of the solution. The standard laboratory module encloses an embedded controller providing process control, status feedback information and maintenance procedures for the equipment and operations within the standard laboratory module.

Beugelsdijk, Tony (Los Alamos, NM); Hollen, Robert M. (Los Alamos, NM); Erkkila, Tracy H. (Los Alamos, NM); Bronisz, Lawrence E. (Los Alamos, NM); Roybal, Jeffrey E. (Santa Fe, NM); Clark, Michael Leon (Menan, ID)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

A Mechanism of Improved Oil Recovery by Low-Salinity Waterflooding in Sandstone Rock  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Injection of low-salinity water showed high potentials in improving oil recovery when compared to high-salinity water. However, the optimum water salinity and conditions are uncertain, due to the lack of understanding the mechanisms of fluid-rock interactions. The main objective of this study is to examine the potential and efficiency of low-salinity water in secondary and tertiary oil recovery for sandstone reservoirs. Similarly, this study aims to help in understanding the dominant mechanisms that aid in improving oil recovery by low-salinity waterflooding. Furthermore, the impact of cation type in injected brines on oil recovery was investigated. Coreflood experiments were conducted to determine the effect of water salinity and chemistry on oil recovery in the secondary and tertiary modes. The contact angle technique was used to study the impact of water salinity and composition on rock wettability. Moreover, the zeta potential at oil/brine and brine/rock interfaces was measured to explain the mechanism causing rock wettability alteration and improving oil recovery. Deionized water and different brines (from 500 to 174,000 mg/l), as well as single cation solutions were tested. Two types of crude oil with different properties and composition were used. Berea sandstone cores were utilized in the coreflood experiments. Coreflood tests indicated that injection of deionized water in the secondary mode resulted in significant oil recovery, up to 22% improvement, compared to seawater flooding. However, no more oil was recovered in the tertiary mode. In addition, injection of NaCl solution increased the oil recovery compared to injection of CaCl2 or MgCl2 at the same concentration. Contact angle results demonstrated that low-salinity water has an impact on the rock wettability; the more reduction in water salinity, the more a water-wet rock surface is produced. In addition, NaCl solutions made the rock more water-wet compared to CaCl2 or MgCl2 at the same concentration. Low-salinity water and NaCl solutions showed a highly negative charge at rock/brine and oil/brine interfaces by zeta potential measurements, which results in greater repulsive forces between the oil and rock surface. This leads to double-layer expansion and water-wet systems. These results demonstrate that the double-layer expansion is a primary mechanism of improving oil recovery when water chemical composition is manipulated.

Nasralla, Ramez

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Category:Rock Lab Analysis | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Category Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Category:Rock Lab Analysis Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermalpower.jpg Looking for the Rock Lab Analysis page? For detailed information on exploration techniques, click here. Category:Rock Lab Analysis Add.png Add a new Rock Lab Analysis Technique Pages in category "Rock Lab Analysis" The following 9 pages are in this category, out of 9 total. C Core Analysis Cuttings Analysis I Isotopic Analysis- Rock O Over Core Stress P Paleomagnetic Measurements Petrography Analysis R Rock Density X X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF)

359

Goa, India Permeability of Charnokite Rock at High Temperatures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ABSTRACT: Permeability at high temperature is a very important parameter to be considered for designing underground high level nuclear waste repository (HLW) in rock mass. The surrounding rock mass is exposed to heat radiated by HLW when it is buried underground and development or extension of micro-cracks takes place in the host rock due to rise in temperature. Keeping this in view, the permeability study was conducted for Charnokite rock at high temperatures in the range from room temperature, 30 to 200 o C. The cylindrical rock samples of 36mm diameter and 150mm in length were used as per the required size for the equipment permeameter, TEMCO, USA. Total thirty rock samples were tested at various temperatures using nitrogen gas as fluid. The permeability tests were conducted at confining pressure of around 4MPa in order to simulate the horizontal in situ stress conditions in Charnokite rock at the depth of 400m for construction of HLW repository. 1

R. D. Dwivedi; R. K. Goel; A. Swarup; V. V. R. Prasad; R. K. Bajpai; P. K. Narayan; V. Arumugam

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

FY 2006 Laboratory Table  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Laboratory Tables Laboratory Tables Preliminary Department of Energy FY 2006 Congressional Budget Request Office of Management, Budget and Evaluation/CFO February 2005 Laboratory Tables Preliminary Printed with soy ink on recycled paper The numbers depicted in this document represent the gross level of DOE budget authority for the years displayed. The figures include both the discretionary and mandatory funding in the budget. They do not consider revenues/receipts, uses of prior year balances, deferrals, rescissions, or other adjustments appropriated as offsets to the DOE appropriations by the Congress. Laboratory / Facility Index FY 2006 Congressional Budget Page 1 of 3 (Dollars In Thousands) 3:43:16PM Department Of Energy 1/27/2005 Page Number FY 2004 Comp/Approp FY 2005 Comp/Approp

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "laboratory investigations rock" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Fy 2009 Laboratory Table  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Laboratory Tables Laboratory Tables Preliminary February 2008 Office of Chief Financial Officer Department of Energy FY 2009 Congressional Budget Request Laboratory Tables Preliminary The numbers depicted in this document represent the gross level of DOE budget authority for the years displayed. The figures include both the discretionary and mandatory funding in the budget. They do not consider revenues/receipts, use of prior year balances, deferrals, rescissions, or other adjustments appropriated as offsets to the DOE appropriations by the Congress. Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Laboratory / Facility Index FY 2009 Congressional Budget Page 1 of 3 (Dollars In Thousands) 8:59:25AM Department Of Energy 1/30/2008 Page Number FY 2007 Appropriation FY 2008 Appropriation FY 2009

362

Savannah River National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Savannah River National Laboratory Savannah River National Laboratory srnl.doe.gov SRNL is a DOE National Laboratory operated by Savannah River Nuclear Solutions. At a glance Additive Manufacturing (3D Printing): Selectively Printed Conductive Pathways Researchers at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) have developed a rapid prototype conductive material that can be used for electrical shielding or circuit fabrication. Background Several rapid prototype technologies currently exist. A few of the technologies produce metallic parts, but the majority produce nonconductive parts made from various grades of plastic. In all of these technologies however, only conductive material or nonconductive material can be used within one part created. There is no known option for 3D printing conductive material for

363

Los Alamos National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

remembers former director Harold remembers former director Harold Agnew September 30, 2013 Manhattan Project pioneer was LANL director from 1970-1979 LOS ALAMOS, N.M., Sept. 30, 2013-Los Alamos National Laboratory Director Charlie McMillan today remembered Harold Agnew as a national treasure who transformed the Laboratory into what it is in the 21st century. "His contributions to the Laboratory made us the institution we are today," McMillan said. "It was his vision - decades ago - that recognized that national security science - 2 - brings value to a broad spectrum of breakthroughs. Los Alamos and the nation will be forever in Harold's debt." Agnew died at home on Sunday, Sept. 29, his family announced. He was the third director of Los Alamos National Laboratory, succeeding Robert

364

FY 2007 Laboratory Table  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Laboratory tables Laboratory tables preliminary Department of Energy FY 2007 Congressional Budget Request February 2006 Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Office of Chief Financial Officer Laboratory tables preliminary The numbers depicted in this document represent the gross level of DOE budget authority for the years displayed. The figures include both the discretionary and mandatory funding in the budget. They do not consider revenues/receipts, uses of prior year balances, deferrals, rescissions, or other adjustments appropriated as offsets to the DOE appropriations by the Congress. Laboratory / Facility Index FY 2007 Congressional Budget Page 1 of 3 (Dollars In Thousands) 12:10:40PM Department Of Energy 1/31/2006 Page Number FY 2005 Appropriation FY 2006 Appropriation FY 2007

365

Los Alamos National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

employees receive Pollution Prevention employees receive Pollution Prevention Awards April 23, 2013 Protecting environment, saving taxpayer dollars LOS ALAMOS, N.M., April 23, 2013-Nearly 400 Los Alamos National Laboratory employees on 47 teams received Pollution Prevention awards for protecting the environment and saving taxpayers more than $8 million. The employees were recognized at the Laboratory's annual Pollution Prevention Awards ceremony on Monday (April 22), Earth Day. "The Pollution Prevention Awards are the result of people taking the initiative to improve their own operations," said Pat Gallagher of the Laboratory's Environmental - 2 - Stewardship group. "These are clever, innovative, homegrown and home-owned ideas that save the Laboratory and taxpayers millions of dollars each year while reducing

366

FY 2011 Laboratory Table  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Laboratory Tables Laboratory Tables Department of Energy FY 2011 Congressional Budget Request DOE/CF-0055 March 2010 Office of Chief Financial Officer Laboratory Tables Printed with soy ink on recycled paper The numbers depicted in this document represent the gross level of DOE budget authority for the years displayed. The figures include both the discretionary and mandatory funding in the budget. They do not consider revenues/receipts, use of prior year balances, deferrals, rescissions, or other adjustments appropriated as offsets to the DOE appropriations by the Congress. Department of Energy FY 2011 Congressional Budget Request DOE/CF-0055 Laboratory / Facility Index FY 2011 Congressional Budget Page 1 of 3 (Dollars In Thousands) 6:24:57AM Department Of Energy 1/29/2010 Page

367

FY 2008 Laboratory Table  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Laboratory Table Laboratory Table Preliminary Department of Energy FY 2008 Congressional Budget Request February 2007 Office of Chief Financial Officer Laboratory Table Preliminary Printed with soy ink on recycled paper The numbers depicted in this document represent the gross level of DOE budget authority for the years displayed. The figures include both the discretionary and mandatory funding in the budget. They do not consider revenues/receipts, uses of prior year balances, deferrals, rescissions, or other adjustments appropriated as offsets to the DOE appropriations by the Congress. Laboratory / Facility Index FY 2008 Congressional Budget Page 1 of 3 (Dollars In Thousands) 6:51:02AM Department Of Energy 2/1/2007 Page Number FY 2006 Appropriation FY 2007 Request FY 2008 Request

368

Brookhaven National Laboratory, Office  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of 2006 the Office of Educational Programs (OEP) at the U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory launched the Open Space Stewardship Program as part of its Green...

369

Los Alamos National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to 150 million over five years LOS ALAMOS, N.M., May 14, 2013-Los Alamos National Laboratory has awarded a master task order agreement in which three small businesses will...

370

Los Alamos National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to 400 million over five years LOS ALAMOS, N.M., Sept. 23, 2013-Los Alamos National Laboratory has awarded master task order agreements to three small businesses for environmental...

371

Laboratory announces 2008 Fellows  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Kurt E. Sickafus recognized for contributions. December 4, 2008 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as...

372

Alamos National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Economic development in Northern New Mexico focus of new podcast from Los Alamos National Laboratory November 25, 2013 Podcast part of Lab's new multi-channel effort to better...

373

ASHRAE's Living Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

ASHRAE recently remodeled its headquarters building in Atlanta with the intention of making the building a LEED Gold building. As part of that renovation the building was enhanced with additional sensors and monitoring equipment to allow it to serve as a Living Laboratory for use by members and the general public to study the detailed energy use and performance of buildings. This article provides an overview of the Living Laboratory and its capabilities.

Jarnagin, Ronald E.; Brambley, Michael R.

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Organic matter characteristics of CenomanianTuronian source rocks: implications for petroleum and gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and shale source rocks . In: Petroleum Geochemistry and Source Rock Potential of Carbonate Rocks (Ed. by G of petroleum . In: Petroleum Geochemistry and Source Rock Potential of Carbonate Rocks (Ed. by G. Palacas of petroleum in Mesozoic reservoirs to carbonate source rocks of Jurassic Smackover Formation, southwestern

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

375

Los Alamos National Laboratory Environmental Report 2010 1-1 1.0 INTRODUCTION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Laboratory and the associated residential and commercial areas of Los Alamos and White Rock are located on the Pajarito Plateau, which consists of a series of finger-like mesas separated by deep east-to- west-oriented canyons cut by streams. Mesa tops range in elevation from approximately 7,800 ft on the flanks

376

Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Development Project. Annual report, fiscal year 1977  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The feasibility of extracting geothermal energy from hot dry rock in the earth's crust was investigated. The concept being investigated involves drilling a deep hole, creating an artificial geothermal reservoir at the bottom of the hole by hydraulic fracturing, and then intersecting the fracture with a second borehole. At the beginning of FY77, the downhole system was complete, but the impedance to the flow of fluid was too high to proceed confidently with the planned energy extraction demonstration. Therefore, in FY77 work focused on an intensive investigation of the characteristics of the downhole system and on the development of the necessary tools and techniques for understanding and improving it. Research results are presented under the following section headings: introduction and history; hot dry rock resource assessment and site selection; instrumentation and equipment development; drilling and fracturing; reservoir engineering; energy extraction system; environmental studies; project management and liaison; and, looking back and ahead. (JGB)

Not Available

1978-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Cumulative experience of the US Hot Dry Rock Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In over 20 years of research on the Hot Dry Rock (HDR) geothermal energy concept at Los Alamos National Laboratory, no obstacle has yet been found that would prevent its development as a major new energy source for the nation. To put the continuing development of the HDR concept in perspective, the most appropriate comparison is with fusion energy, the only other nonrenewable energy resource of the magnitude of HDR geothermal energy. In this context, research on fusion energy is currently so far from the demonstration stage that obstacles to its ultimate commercial development, such as induced radiation or neutron damage to structural materials, cannot yet be addressed from the standpoint of engineered solutions. For the commercialization of the HDR concept, on the other hand, we know what technical problems remain and are presently developing engineered solutions to address each of them. This document presents learned information on: the formation of HDR reservoirs; the structure of the deep precambrian basement; the mechanics of creating an HDR geothermal reservoir; peripheral water loss from deep HDR reservoirs; the determination of the size, orientation, and internal structure of the stimulated HDR region; and results from geochemical analyses and tracer testing.

Brown, D.W.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Cumulative experience of the US Hot Dry Rock Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In over 20 years of research on the Hot Dry Rock (HDR) geothermal energy concept at Los Alamos National Laboratory, no obstacle has yet been found that would prevent its development as a major new energy source for the nation. To put the continuing development of the HDR concept in perspective, the most appropriate comparison is with fusion energy, the only other nonrenewable energy resource of the magnitude of HDR geothermal energy. In this context, research on fusion energy is currently so far from the demonstration stage that obstacles to its ultimate commercial development, such as induced radiation or neutron damage to structural materials, cannot yet be addressed from the standpoint of engineered solutions. For the commercialization of the HDR concept, on the other hand, we know what technical problems remain and are presently developing engineered solutions to address each of them. This document presents learned information on: the formation of HDR reservoirs; the structure of the deep precambrian basement; the mechanics of creating an HDR geothermal reservoir; peripheral water loss from deep HDR reservoirs; the determination of the size, orientation, and internal structure of the stimulated HDR region; and results from geochemical analyses and tracer testing.

Brown, D.W.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

K-Ar dating of young volcanic rocks  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Potassium-Argon (K-Ar) age dates were determined for forty-two young geologic samples by the Laboratory of Isotope Geochemistry, Department of Geosciences, in the period February 1, 1986 to June 30, 1989. Under the terms of Department of Energy Grant No. FG07-86ID12622, The University of Arizona was to provide state-of-the-art K-Ar age dating services, including sample preparation, analytical procedures, and computations, for forty-two young geologic samples submitted by DOE geothermal researchers. We billed only for forty samples. Age dates were determined for geologic samples from five regions with geothermal potential: the Cascade Mountains (Oregon); the Cascade Mountains (Washington); Ascension Island, South Atlantic Ocean; Cerro Prieto, Mexico; and Las Azufres, Mexico. The ages determined varied from 5.92 m.a. to 0.62 m.a. The integration of K-Ar dates with geologic data and the interpretation in terms of geologic and geothermal significance has been reported separately by the various DOE geothermal researchers. Table 1 presents a detailed listing of all samples dated, general sample location, researcher, researcher's organization, rock type, age, and probable error (1 standard deviation). Additional details regarding the geologic samples may be obtained from the respective geothermal researcher. 1 tab.

Damon, P.E.; Shafiqullah, M.

1991-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

380

Hot dry rock: A versatile alternative energy technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hot dry rock (HDR) is the most abundant geothermal resource, and is found almost everywhere at depth. The technology to extract energy from HDR for practical use has been under development at the Los Alamos National Laboratory for more than twenty years. During the 1970`s, the possibility of mining the heat from HDR by circulating water through an engineered geothermal reservoir was first demonstrated on a small scale. Between 1980 and 1986 a larger, deeper, and hotter HDR reservoir was constructed. This large reservoir was subsequently mated to a permanent surface plant. A number of flow tests of this large HDR reservoir were conducted between 1991 and 1995. The results of these tests have indicated that it should be practical to operate an HDR heat mining facility to produce power on a sustained basis. An industry-led, government cost-shared project to produce and market energy generated from HDR is currently being put in place. That project should help demonstrate that HDR reservoirs can be operated to provide energy for long periods of time at rates sufficient to be commercially viable. In the longer run, additional applications of HDR technology such as water and waste treatment, and steam generation for oil field flooding may come into widespread use.

Duchane, D.V. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Earth and Environmental Sciences Div.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "laboratory investigations rock" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

MEDICAL LABORATORY SCIENCES The role of the medical laboratory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in Medical Laboratory Sciences and are eligible to sit for national certification examinations. Admission website, wichita.edu/chp under Medical Laboratory Sciences. The application requires a completed

382

Sandia National Laboratories: Sandia National Laboratories: Missions:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

About Nuclear Weapons at Sandia About Nuclear Weapons at Sandia Weapons Researcher World-class scientists and engineers come to Sandia to conduct breakthrough research in nuclear weapons. Sandia designs more than 6,300 parts of a modern nuclear weapon's 6,500 components. Our state-of-the-art laboratories facilitate large-scale testing and computer simulation. Sandia's work is of the highest consequence and those doing the work face awesome responsibilities. Unlike other national labs, which focus on the physics package, Sandia's work is to weaponize the physics package. Sandia must ensure that the other 95% of the weapon's parts work perfectly at every point of contact with the delivery systems. This requires the broadest competencies in engineering, with a deep science foundation. At the core of Sandia's nuclear weapons program is warhead systems

383

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents: Investigation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Investigation of high ice supersaturation in cirrus clouds using ARM data and an explicit cloud model Comstock, Jennifer Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Lin, Ruei-Fong NASA...

384

Accident Investigation Report Plutonium Contamination in the...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Accident Investigation Report Plutonium Contamination in the Zero Power Physics Reactor Facility at the Idaho National Laboratory, November 8, 2011 January 2012 Disclaimer...

385

DOE/EA-1331: Environmental Assessment for Remediation of Subsurface and Groundwater Contamination at the Rock Springs In Situ Oil Shale Retort Site (07/31/00)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

31 31 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT REMEDIATION OF SUBSURFACE AND GROUNDWATER CONTAMINATION AT THE ROCK SPRINGS IN SITU OIL SHALE RETORT SITE SWEETWATER COUNTY, WYOMING July 2000 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY NATIONAL ENERGY TECHNOLOGY LABORATORY ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT REMEDIATION OF SUBSURFACE AND GROUNDWATER CONTAMINATION AT THE ROCK SPRINGS IN SITU OIL SHALE RETORT SITE SWEETWATER COUNTY, WYOMING July 2000 Prepared by: U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory NEPA COMPLIANCE SUMMARY SHEET LEAD AGENCY U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) TITLE Environmental Assessment for Remediation of Subsurface and Groundwater Contamination at the Rock Springs In Situ Oil Shale Retort Test Site; Sweetwater County Wyoming. CONTACT Additional copies or information concerning the Environmental Assessment (EA) can

386

Sandia Laboratories energy programs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As one of the multiprogram laboratories of the Energy Research and Development Administration, Sandia Laboratories applies its resources to a number of nationally important programs. About 75 percent of these resources are applied to research and development for national security programs having to do primarily with nuclear weapons--the principal responsibility of the Laboratories. The remaining 25 percent are applied to energy programs and energy-related activities, particularly those requiring resources that are also used in nuclear weapon and other national security programs. Examples of such energy programs and activities are research into nuclear fusion, protection of nuclear materials from theft or diversion, and the disposal of radioactive waste. A number of technologies and disciplines developed for the weapon program are immediately applicable for the development of various energy sources. Instruments developed to detect, measure, and record the detonation of nuclear devices underground, now being used to support the development of in-situ processing of coal and oil shale, are examples. The purpose of this report is to provide an overview of these and other energy programs being conducted by these laboratories in the development of economical and environmentally acceptable alternative energy sources. Energy programs are undertaken when they require capabilities used at the Laboratories for the weapon program, and when they have no adverse effect upon that primary mission. The parallel operation of weapon and energy activities allows optimum use of facilities and other resources.

Lundergan, C.D.; Mead, P.L.; Gillespie, R.S. (eds.)

1977-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Data Review of the Hot Dry Rock Project at Fenton Hill, New Mexico  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report reviews the data collected during the hot dry rock experimental project conducted by the US Department of Energy and Los Alamos National Laboratory at Fenton Hill, New Mexico from about 1971 through 1995. Five main categories of data were reviewed: (1) geologic data; (2) flow test data; (3) reservoir modeling data; (4) chemical tracer data; and (5) seismic data. The review determines the important data sets from the project, determines where and how these data are stored, and evaluates whether further analyses of the data might be likely to yield additional information valuable to the geothermal industry or to the further development of enhanced geothermal systems.

GeothermEx, Inc.

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Inert and Reacting Tracers for Reservoir Sizing in Fractured, Hot Dry Rock Systems  

SciTech Connect

Flow characterization and volumetric sizing techniques using tracers in fractured hot dry rock reservoirs are discussed. Statistical methods for analyzing the residence time distribution (RTD) are presented. Tracer modal volumes and RTD shape are correlated with reservoir performance parameters such as active heat transfer area and dispersion levels. Chemically reactive tracers are proposed for mapping advance rates of cooled regions in HDR reservoirs, providing early warning of thermal drawdown. Important reaction rate parameters are identified for screening potential tracers. Current laboratory research and field work is reviewed.

Tester, J.W.; Robinson, B.A.; Ferguson, J.H.

1986-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

389

Evaluation of CAVIJET cavitating jets for deep-hole rock cutting  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A feasibility study has shown that the CAVIJET cavitating fluid jet method should be capable of successfully augmenting the cutting action of mechanical bits under deep-hole conditions. Increased rock cutting rates by existing cavitating jet nozzles can be anticipated with conventional rig pressures for hole depths of at least 1200 m (4000 ft) and possibly deeper. Improved rates of penetration, based on preliminary laboratory roller bit tests, should be achieved by simply substituting CAVIJET nozzles absorbing equivalent hydraulic power for conventional roller bit nozzles.

Conn, A.F.; Johnson, V.E. Jr.; Liu, H.L.; Frederick, G.S.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Electrical properties of geothermal reservoir rocks as indicators of porosity distribution  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Measurements of the electrical resistivity of metashales from borehole SB-15-D in The Geyers geothermal area at a variety of conditions in the laboratory provide information regarding the distribution of porosity as interpreted from observations of boiling as downstream pore pressure. Electrical resistivity measurements on core,with and without pore pressure control, to confining pressures up to 100 bars and temperatures between 20 and 150 C allow assessment of the separate and combined effects of confining pressure, pore pressure and temperature for rocks from this borehole.

Duba, A.; Roberts, J.; Bonner, B.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

FY 2012 Laboratory Table  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5 5 Department of Energy FY 2012 Congressional Budget Request Laboratory Tables y Preliminary February 2012 Office of Chief Financial Officer DOE/CF-0065 Department of Energy FY 2012 Congressional Budget Request Laboratory Tables P li i Preliminary h b d i d i hi d h l l f b d h i f h The numbers depicted in this document represent the gross level of DOE budget authority for the years displayed. The figures include both the discretionary and mandatory funding in the budget. They do not consider revenues/receipts, use of prior year balances, deferrals, rescissions, or other adjustments appropriated as offsets to the DOE appropriations by the Congress. February 2012 Office of Chief Financial Officer Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Laboratory / Facility Index FY 2012 Congressional Budget

392

Laboratory disputes citizens' lawsuit  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lab disputes ctizens' lawsuit Lab disputes ctizens' lawsuit Laboratory disputes citizens' lawsuit Lab officials expressed surprise to a lawsuit alleging noncompliance with the federal Clean Water Act filed today by citizens groups. February 7, 2008 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Contact James E. Rickman

393

FY 2013 Laboratory Table  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8 8 Department of Energy FY 2013 Congressional Budget Request Laboratory Tables y Preliminary February 2012 Office of Chief Financial Officer DOE/CF-0078 Department of Energy FY 2013 Congressional Budget Request Laboratory Tables P li i Preliminary h b d i d i hi d h l l f b d h i f h The numbers depicted in this document represent the gross level of DOE budget authority for the years displayed. The figures include both the discretionary and mandatory funding in the budget. They do not consider revenues/receipts, use of prior year balances, deferrals, rescissions, or other adjustments appropriated as offsets to the DOE appropriations by the Congress. February 2012 Office of Chief Financial Officer Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Laboratory / Facility Index FY 2013 Congressional Budget

394

Alamos National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

record neutron beam at Los record neutron beam at Los Alamos National Laboratory July 10, 2012 New method has potential to advance materials measurement LOS ALAMOS, New Mexico, July 10, 2012-Using a one-of-a-kind laser system at Los Alamos National Laboratory, scientists have created the largest neutron beam ever made by a short-pulse laser, breaking a world record. Neutron beams are usually made with particle accelerators or nuclear reactors and are commonly used in a wide variety of scientific research, particularly in advanced materials science. Using the TRIDENT laser, a unique and powerful 200 trillion-watt short-pulse laser, scientists from Los Alamos, the Technical University of Darmstadt, Germany, and Sandia National Laboratories focus high-intensity light on an ultra-thin plastic sheet

395

IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

History of the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) History of the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) You are here: DOE-ID Home > Inside ID > Brief History Site History The Idaho National Laboratory (INL), an 890-square-mile section of desert in southeast Idaho, was established in 1949 as the National Reactor Testing Station. Initially, the missions at the INL were the development of civilian and defense nuclear reactor technologies and management of spent nuclear fuel. Fifty-two reactors—most of them first-of-a-kind—were built, including the Navy’s first prototype nuclear propulsion plant. Of the 52 reactors, three remain in operation at the site. In 1951, the INL achieved one of the most significant scientific accomplishments of the century—the first use of nuclear fission to produce a usable quantity of electricity at the Experimental Breeder Reactor No.

396

National Energy Technology Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Design Standards for the NETL Logo Design Standards for the NETL Logo May 2013 The Logo Display of the NETL logo is critical because this symbol represents who we are - it's our signature. Consistent application of the logo is crucial to the success of our identity. As the primary identifier of the National Energy Technology Laboratory, it is essential that the logo's appearance is consistent throughout all of the Laboratory's communications. Over time, consistent and repeated use of the logo will establish a strengthened visual identity for the laboratory. To ensure consistency it is critical for every user of the logo, regardless of personal preference, to use it in accordance with the guidelines that follow. The height of the NETL logo is .75 times the length, a 3 by 4 ratio. This relationship is always the same, regardless of

397

Advanced Hydride Laboratory  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Metal hydrides have been used at the Savannah River Tritium Facilities since 1984. However, the most extensive application of metal hydride technology at the Savannah River Site is being planned for the Replacement Tritium Facility, a $140 million facility schedules for completion in 1990 and startup in 1991. In the new facility, metal hydride technology will be used to store, separate, isotopically purify, pump, and compress hydrogen isotopes. In support of the Replacement Tritium Facility, a $3.2 million, cold,'' process demonstration facility, the Advanced Hydride Laboratory began operation in November of 1987. The purpose of the Advanced Hydride Laboratory is to demonstrate the Replacement Tritium Facility's metal hydride technology by integrating the various unit operations into an overall process. This paper will describe the Advanced Hydride Laboratory, its role and its impact on the application of metal hydride technology to tritium handling.

Motyka, T.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

LANL: Materials Science Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Materials Science Laboratory (MSL) is Materials Science Laboratory (MSL) is an interdisciplinary facility dedicated to research on current materials and those of future interest. It is a 56,000 square-foot modern facility that can be easily reconfigured to accom- modate new processes and operations. It compris- es 27 laboratories, 15 support rooms, and 60 offices. The MSL supports many distinct materi- als research topics, grouped into four focus areas: mechanical behavior, materials processing, syn- thesis, and characterization. Research within the MSL supports programs of national interest in defense, energy, and the basic sciences. The MSL is a non-classified area in the Materials Science Complex in close proximity to classified and other non-classified materials research facilities. The Materials Science

399

SANDIA NATIONAL LABORATORIES  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NATIONAL LABORATORIES NATIONAL LABORATORIES SF 6432-CS (10-98) SECTION II STANDARD TERMS & CONDITIONS FOR COMMERCIAL SERVICES PROCURED ON A FIRM FIXED PRICE OR FIXED RATE BASIS THE FOLLOWING CLAUSES APPLY TO THIS CONTRACT AS INDICATED UNLESS SPECIFICALLY DELETED, OR EXCEPT TO THE EXTENT THEY ARE SPECIFICALLY SUPPLEMENTED OR AMENDED IN WRITING IN THE SIGNATURE PAGE OR SECTION I. CS10 - DEFINITIONS The following terms shall have the meanings set forth below for all purposes of this contract. (a) GOVERNMENT means the United States of America and includes the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) or any duly authorized representative thereof. (b) SANDIA means Sandia National Laboratories, operated by Sandia Corporation under Contract No. DE-ACO4-94AL-85000 with the U.S. Department of Energy.

400

Analytical laboratory quality audits  

SciTech Connect

Analytical Laboratory Quality Audits are designed to improve laboratory performance. The success of the audit, as for many activities, is based on adequate preparation, precise performance, well documented and insightful reporting, and productive follow-up. Adequate preparation starts with definition of the purpose, scope, and authority for the audit and the primary standards against which the laboratory quality program will be tested. The scope and technical processes involved lead to determining the needed audit team resources. Contact is made with the auditee and a formal audit plan is developed, approved and sent to the auditee laboratory management. Review of the auditee's quality manual, key procedures and historical information during preparation leads to better checklist development and more efficient and effective use of the limited time for data gathering during the audit itself. The audit begins with the opening meeting that sets the stage for the interactions between the audit team and the laboratory staff. Arrangements are worked out for the necessary interviews and examination of processes and records. The information developed during the audit is recorded on the checklists. Laboratory management is kept informed of issues during the audit so there are no surprises at the closing meeting. The audit report documents whether the management control systems are effective. In addition to findings of nonconformance, positive reinforcement of exemplary practices provides balance and fairness. Audit closure begins with receipt and evaluation of proposed corrective actions from the nonconformances identified in the audit report. After corrective actions are accepted, their implementation is verified. Upon closure of the corrective actions, the audit is officially closed.

Kelley, William D.

2001-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "laboratory investigations rock" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Historical Photographs: Brookhaven National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Brookhaven National Laboratory 1. Positron emitter detector (circa 1962) used to detect brain tumors at Brookhaven National Laboratory (252Kbytes) 2. Medical activities at...

402

National Laboratories - EERE Commercialization Office  

National Laboratories. The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) national laboratories play an important role in the development and commercialization of ...

403

Leadership Development | Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

include work-life balance, stress management and innovative solutions to career and gender issues. Photo Gallery: Strategic Laboratory Leadership Program Strategic Laboratory...

404

Biology Department - Brookhaven National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Deborah Stoner-Ma Brookhaven National Laboratory From: -5132011 Currently at: Stony Brook University Director of Chemical Laboratories Department of Chemistry Stony Brook...

405

CERTS Microgrid Laboratory Test Bed  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and John Stevens are with Sandia National Laboratories,of the Technical Staff at Sandia National Labs in the Energybefore taking a job with Sandia National Laboratories and

Lasseter, R. H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Lawrence Wos | Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Emeritus Lawrence Wos Larry Wos is an emeritus scientist in the Mathematics and Computer Science Division at Argonne National Laboratory; he joined the laboratory in February 1957....

407

Boulder Laboratories Building 1 Renovation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... fresh air for modern laboratory work, electrical ... of Building 1 at the NIST Boulder laboratories. ... conservation of water, energy, and construction ...

2012-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

408

DOE Laboratory Accreditation Program - Library  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Library DOE Laboratory Accreditation Program DOELAP Regulatory Basis 10 CFR 835.402, Individual Monitoring, as amended DOELAP Program Administration DOE-STD 1111-98, DOE Laboratory...

409

Community Relations, Brookhaven National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tour group Tour Program Meet the scientists who make the research at Brookhaven National Laboratory happen Brookhaven National Laboratory offers the unique opportunity for...

410

National Laboratories - EERE Commercialization Office  

National Laboratories. The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) national laboratories play an important role in the development and commercialization of new energy ...

411

Vehicle Technologies Office: National Laboratories  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

National Laboratories Several of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) national laboratories host multidisciplinary transportation research centers. A wide-range of cutting-edge...

412

CERTS Microgrid Laboratory Test Bed  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CERTS Microgrid Laboratory Test Bed Title CERTS Microgrid Laboratory Test Bed Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2010 Authors Lasseter, Robert H., Joseph H. Eto, Ben...

413

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL):  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

IPO Fact Sheet Strategic Diversity Program Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) works with other national laboratories to coordinate and integrate programmatic...

414

Building and Fire Research Laboratory Investigation of Active ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... individual HVAC zone on a quadrant-by-quadrant basis, were ... to loss of electrical power and/or damage to the HVAC shafts ...

2012-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

415

Investigating the Site of Newton's Laboratory in Trinity College, Cambridge  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

’s ‘Das Alche- mistenlaboratorium von Oberstockstall Ein Vor- bericht zum Stand des Forschungsprojekts’. Mitteilungen der Fachgruppe der ‘Geschichte der Chemie’ 7, 1992, 11–19.] 15. Edleston J. (1850). Correspondence of Sir Isaac Newton and Professor Cotes...

Spargo, P E

416

Laboratory investigations of effective flow behavior in unsaturated heterogeneous sands  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

National Priority List NRC U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission NUREG U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission

Wildenschild, Dorthe

417

Science @WIPP: Underground Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

WIPP WIPP Underground Laboratory Double Beta Decay Dark Matter Biology Repository Science Renewable Energy Underground Laboratory The deep geologic repository at WIPP provides an ideal environment for experiments in many scientific disciplines, including particle astrophysics, waste repository science, mining technology, low radiation dose physics, fissile materials accountability and transparency, and deep geophysics. The designation of the Carlsbad Department of Energy office as a "field" office has allowed WIPP to offer its mine operations infrastructure and space in the underground to researchers requiring a deep underground setting with dry conditions and very low levels of naturally occurring radioactive materials. Please contact Roger Nelson, chief scientist of the Department of

418

National Energy Technology Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CRTD-80 CRTD-80 National Energy Technology Laboratory Final Report Carbon Sequestration Project Review Meeting Greater Pittsburgh International Airport Hyatt Hotel September 26-29, 2005 Volume I: Meeting Summary and Recommendations José D. Figueroa NETL Project Manager and Meeting Coordinator D:\Project Files\EPD\RDS Sequestration Project Review Task\Volume 1\ASME Final Version Nov 28 2005\2005 Carbon Sequestration Project Review Meeting Final 11292005.doc National Energy Technology Laboratory Final Report Carbon Sequestration Project Review Meeting Greater Pittsburgh International Airport Hyatt Hotel September 26-29, 2005 Volume I: Meeting Summary and Recommendations José D. Figueroa NETL Project Manager and Meeting Coordinator

419

Sandia National Laboratories (SNL)  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) Current Projects with the Russian Federation Project Title: Development of Models of Energy Transfer in Nanostructured Materials. Russian Institute: Institute for Problems in Mechanical Engineering, Russian Academy of Sciences (IPME RAS), St. Petersburg. Brief Description: To develop modeling approaches and simulations to examine energy transport and transfer in materials with structural features at the nanoscale. Tasks include developing such a model for thin crystal structures subjected to short duration laser excitation, and using atomic-scale simulations to evaluate microscopic expressions for stress and heat flux in crystals containing defects such as vacancies, dislocations and bi-material interfaces.

420

Rock mechanics contributions from defense programs  

SciTech Connect

An attempt is made at illustrating the many contributions to rock mechanics from US defense programs, over the past 30-plus years. Large advances have been achieved in the technology-base area covering instrumentation, material properties, physical modeling, constitutive relations and numerical simulations. In the applications field, much progress has been made in understanding and being able to predict rock mass behavior related to underground explosions, cratering, projectile penetration, and defense nuclear waste storage. All these activities stand on their own merit as benefits to national security. But their impact is even broader, because they have found widespread applications in the non-defense sector; to name a few: the prediction of the response of underground structures to major earthquakes, the physics of the earth`s interior at great depths, instrumentation for monitoring mine blasting, thermo-mechanical instrumentation useful for civilian nuclear waste repositories, dynamic properties of earthquake faults, and transient large-strain numerical modeling of geological processes, such as diapirism. There is not pretense that this summary is exhaustive. It is meant to highlight success stories representative of DOE and DOD geotechnical activities, and to point to remaining challenges.

Heuze, F.E.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "laboratory investigations rock" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Hot dry rock geothermal heat extraction  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A man-made geothermal reservoir has been created at a depth of 2.7 km in hot, dry granite by hydraulic fracturing. The system was completed by directionally drilling a second well in close proximity with the top of the vertical fracture. In early 1978 heat was extracted from this reservoir for a period of 75 days. During this period thermal power was produced at an average rate of 4 MW(t). Theoretical analysis of th measured drawdown suggests a total fracture heat transfer area of 16,000 m/sup 2/. Viscous impedance to through-flow declined continuously so that at the end of the experiment this impedance was only one-fifth its initial value. Water losses to the surrounding rock formation also decreased continuously, and eventually this loss rate was less than 1% of the circulated flow rate. Geochemical analyses suggest that, with scale up of the heat transfer area and deeper, hotter reservoirs, hot dry rock reservoirs can ultimately produce levels of power on a commercial scale.

Murphy, H.D.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

The US Hot Dry Rock project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Hot Dry Rock geothermal energy project began in the early 1970's with the objective of developing a technology to make economically available the large ubiquitous thermal energy of the upper earth crust. The program has been funded by the Department of Energy (and its predecessors) and for a few years with participation by West Germany and Japan. An energy reservoir was accessed by drilling and hydraulically fracturing in the precambrian basement rock outside the Valles Caldera of north-central New Mexico. Water was circulated through the reservoir (Phase I, 1978-1980) producing up to 5 MWt at 132/sup 0/C. A second (Phase II) reservoir has been established with a deeper pair of holes and an initial flow test completed producing about 10 MWt at 190/sup 0/C. These accomplishments have been supported and paralleled by developments in drilling, well completion and instrumentation hardware. Acoustic or microseismic fracture mapping and geochemistry studies in addition to hydraulic and thermal data contribute to reservoir analyses. Studies of some of the estimated 430,000 quads of HDR resources in the United States have been made with special attention focused on sites most advantageous for early development.

Hendron, R.H.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Accelerator Laboratory AGN-201M Nuclear Reactor Laboratory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Laboratory Nuclear Power Institute (NPI) Nuclear Science Center (1MW Triga Reactor) (NSC) Nuclear SecurityAccelerator Laboratory AGN-201M Nuclear Reactor Laboratory Center for Large-scale Scientific Simulations (CLASS) Fuel Cycle and Materials Laboratory (FCML) Institute for National Security, Education

424

Hot-dry-rock geothermal-energy development program. Annual report, fiscal year 1981  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During fiscal year 1981, activities of the Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Development Program were concentrated in four principal areas: (1) data collection to permit improved estimates of the hot dry rock geothermal energy resource base of various regions of the United States and of the United States as a whole, combined with detailed investigations of several areas that appear particularly promising either for further energy extraction experiments or for future commercial development; (2) successful completion of a 9-month, continuous, closed-loop, recirculating flow test in the enlarged Phase I System at Fenton Hill, New Mexico - a pressurized-water heat-extraction loop developed in low-permeability granitic rock by hydraulic fracturing; (3) successful completion at a depth of 4084 m (13,933 ft) of well EE-3, the production well of a larger, deeper, and hotter, Phase II System at Fenton Hill. Well EE-3 was directionally drilled with control of both azimuth and inclination. Its inclined section is about 380 m (1250 ft) vertically above the injection well, EE-2, which was completed in FY80; and (4) supporting activities included new developments in downhole instrumentation and equipment, geochemical and geophysical studies, rock-mechanics and fluid-mechanics investigations, computer analyses and modeling, and overall system design. Under an International Energy Agency agreement, the New Energy Development Organization, representing the Government of Japan has joined Kernforschungsanlage-Juelich GmbH, representing the Federal Republic of Germany, and the US Department of Energy as an active participant in the Fenton Hill Hot Dry Rock Project.

Smith, M.C.; Ponder, G.M. (comps.)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Mining earth's heat: development of hot-dry-rock geothermal reservoirs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The energy-extraction concept of the Hot Dry Rock (HDR) Geothermal Program, as initially developed by the Los Alamos National Laboratory, is to mine this heat by creating a man-made reservoir in low-permeability, hot basement rock. This concept has been successfully proven at Fenton Hill in northern New Mexico by drilling two holes to a depth of approximately 3 km (10,000 ft) and a bottom temperature of 200/sup 0/C (392/sup 0/F), then connecting the boreholes with a large-diametervertical hydraulic fracture. Water is circulated down one borehole, heated by the hot rock, and rises up the second borehole to the surface where the heat is extracted and the cooled water is reinjected into the underground circulation loop. This system has operated for a cumulative 416 days during engineering and reservoir testing. An energy equivalent of 3 to 5 MW(t) was produced without adverse environmental problems. During one test, a generator was installed in the circulation loop and produced 60 kW of electricity. A second-generation system, recently drilled to 4.5 km (15,000 ft) and temperatures of 320/sup 0/C (608/sup 0/F), entails creating multiple, parallel fractures between a pair of inclined boreholes. This system should produce 5 to 10 MW(e) for 20 years. Significant contributions to underground technology have been made through the development of the program.

Pettitt, R.A.; Becker, N.M.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Paradox Basin source rock, southeastern Utah : organic geochemical characterization of Gothic and Chimney Rock units, Ismay and Desert Creek zones, within a sequence stratigraphic framework.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The Chimney Rock and Gothic units of the Pennsylvanian Paradox Formation have long been considered source rocks for the rich hydrocarbon fields of southeastern Utah.… (more)

Tischler, Keith Louris

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Infrared Thermography Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Infrared Thermography Laboratory Infrared Thermography Laboratory The Infrared Thermography Laboratory (IRLab) conducts detailed laboratory experiments on the thermal performance of windows and other insulated systems. During a typical experiment, a specimen is placed between two environmental chambers that simulate a long, cold night during winter. Besides generating informative thermal images, the experiments collect several types of quantitative data with high spatial resolution that are useful for understanding subtle details in the thermal performance and for validating computer simulations of heat and fluid flows. Thermography experiments in the IRLab use an infrared imager to produce qualitative thermal images, or thermograms, that help provide a visual interpretation of how heat is flowing through the specimen. The infrared thermograms are also taken and postprocessed to extract numerical data to perform quantitative thermography that produces a database of the distribution of surface temperatures on the warm side of various specimen. A traversing system is also used to measure the distribution of air temperatures and velocities near the specimen. Research results are presented at various technical conferences -- see our schedule of upcoming conferences. Technical papers on infrared thermography are available for downloading. The IRLab contains a machine tool shop area that supports fabrication efforts in the Building Technologies Department. Other types of research, such as Non-Destructive Evaluation, are also conducted in the IRLab.

428

ARGONNE NATIONAL LABORATORY  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

L e m o n t , I l l i n o i s ENVIRONMENTAL RADIOACTIVITY AT ARGONNE NATIONAL LABORATORY R e p o r t f o r t h e Y e a r 1954 W r i t t e n by J. Sedlet E x p e r i m e n t a l w...

429

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Science. Technology. Innovation. PNNL-SA-34741 Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is addressing cognition and learning to the development of student- centered, scenario-based training. PNNL's Pachelbel (PNNL) has developed a cognitive-based, student-centered approach to training that is being applied

430

Seepage into drifts in unsaturated fractured rock at Yucca Mountain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fractured Rock at Yucca Mountain Jens Birkholzer, Guomin Lrepository site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, as it is locatedclimate conditions at Yucca Mountain. The numerical study is

Birkholzer, Jens; Li, Guomin; Tsang, Chin-Fu; Tsang, Yvonne

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Carbonation Mechanism of Reservoir Rock by Supercritical Carbon...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Technologies Project Type Topic 2 Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Reservoir Rock Chemical Interactions Project Description Supercritical CO2 is currently becoming a more...

432

Rock Sampling At Yellowstone Region (Hellman & Ramsey, 2004)...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hot Springs And Associated Deposits In Yellowstone National Park Using Aster And Aviris Remote Sensing Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleRockSamplingAtYel...

433

Rock Sampling At San Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Warpinski...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

the target area, obtained rock samples for age dating and mineral chemistry, performed gravity and magnetic surveys, and integrated these results to identify potential drilling...

434

ROCK INSTRUMENTATION PROBLEMS EXPERIENCED DURING IN-SITU HEATER TESTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and R. Haught, Instrumentation evaluation, calibration, and27 - 30,1979. ROCK INSTRUMENTATION PROBLEMS EXPERIENCEDdiscussed here,l INSTRUMENTATION AND DATA ACQUISITION SYSTEM

Binnall, E.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Jazz and Blues Legends Rock the Northeast, Help Save Louisiana ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Jazz and Blues Legends Rock the Northeast, Help Save Louisiana's Coastal Wetlands. 6.8.2006 Neville Brothers, Dr. John and Mavis Staples Highlight the ...

436

Using Ornamental Rock Waste in the Manufacture of Pressed Brick ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... is a major producer of rock trimmest, with its production destined largely for export. ... Application of Electrospun Gas Diffusion Nanofibre-membranes in the ...

437

ROCK MASS CHARACTERIZATION FOR STORAGE OF NUCLEAR WASTE IN GRANITE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

effect of pressure on electrical resistivity of rocks. J..exceptionally high electrical resistivity and low waterwater content is the electrical resistivity which in igneous

Witherspoon, P.A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Isotopic Analysis- Rock At Long Valley Caldera Area (Smith &...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Isotopic Analysis- Rock At Long Valley Caldera Area (Smith & Suemnicht, 1991) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis-...

439

Next stages in HDR technology development. [Hot Dry Rock (HDR)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Twenty years of research and development have brought HDR heat mining technology from the purely conceptual stage to the establishment of an engineering-scale heat mine at Fenton Hill, NM. In April 1992, a long-term flow test (LTFT) of the HDR reservoir at Fenton Hill was begun. The test was carried out under steady-state conditions on a continuous basis for four months, but a major equipment failure in late July forced a temporary suspension of operations. Even this short test provided valuable information and extremely encouraging results as summarized below: There was no indication of thermal drawdown of the reservoir. There was evidence of increasing access to hot rock with time. Water consumption was in the rangki of 10--12%. Measured pumping costs were $0.003 per kilowatt of energy produced. Temperature logs conducted in the reservoir production zone during and after the flow test confirmed the fact that there was no decline in the average temperature of the fluid being produced from the reservoir. In fact, tracer testing showed that the fluid was taking more indirect pathways and thus contacting a greater amount of hot rock as the test progressed. Water usage quickly dropped to a level of 10--15 gallons per minute, an amount equivalent to about 10--12% of the injected fluid volume. At a conversion rate of 10--15%, these would translate to effective fuel costs'' of 2--3[cents] per kilowatt hour of electricity production potential. The completion of the LTFT will set the stage for commercialization of HDR but will not bring HDR technology to maturity. Relatively samples extensions of the current technology may bring significant improvements in efficiency, and these should be rapidly investigated. In the longer run, advanced operational concepts could further improve the efficiency of HDR energy extraction and may even offer the possibility of cogeneration schemes which solve both energy and water problems throughout the world.

Duchane, D.V.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Quasi-three dimensional ground-water modeling of the hydrologic influence of paleozoic rocks on the ground-water table at Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The proposed high-level radioactive waste repository site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, has created a need to understand the, ground-water system at the site. One of the important hydrologic characteristics is a steep gradient on the ground-water table north of the repository site. This study investigates the cause of the steep gradient, based on the possible influence by Paleozoic rocks under the Yucca Mountain area. A quasi-three dimensional, steady-state, finite-difference model of the groundwater flow system of the Yucca Mountain Site and vicinity, was developed using a manual trial-and-error calibration technique to model the ground-water table. The ground-water system in the model was divided into a two layers, which consist of Cenozoic volcanic rocks and Paleozoic carbonate rocks. The carbonate rocks were defined to be a confined aquifer. The model simulates vertical flow from the volcanic rocks to the underlying carbonate rocks in an area where the Eleana Formation, a Paleozoic clastic aquitard, is absent. The model requires a vertical hydrologic connection in a particular region and a large difference in hydraulic heads between the volcanic rocks and the carbonates to create the steep gradient north of the repository site. The regions of different hydraulic gradient on the water-table surface could be simulated by spatial variations of the horizontal hydraulic conductivity in the volcanic rocks.

Lee, Si-Yong

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "laboratory investigations rock" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

The Clearlake Hot Dry Rock geothermal project: Institutional policies, administrative issues, and technical tasks  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Clearlake Project is a three-party collaboration between the California Energy Commission, City of Clearlake, and Los Alamos National Laboratory. It aims to develop a deep hot, dry geothermal resource under the city. The project is funded by the Commission, and administered by the City. Technical operations are conducted by Laboratory staff and resources seconded from the Hot Dry Rock program. In addition to the normal geothermal exploration problems of predicting geological and geophysical properties of the subsurface, there are uncertainties as to what further material and environmental parameters are relevant, and how they might be measured. In addition to technical factors, policy objectives are an influence in choosing the most appropriate development scenario. 11 refs., 4 figs.

Burns, K.L.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

from Savannah River National Laboratory  

Issue: Depleted uranium present in shallow soils and sediments at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Site 300.

443

Safety Environmental Laboratories & Consulting Inc.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Safety Environmental Laboratories & Consulting Inc. NVLAP Lab Code: 200873-0. Address and Contact Information: 989 ...

2013-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

444

Biometrics Identity Management Agency Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biometrics Identity Management Agency Laboratory. NVLAP Lab Code: 200933-0. Address and Contact Information: 1000 ...

2013-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

445

NIST: Physical Measurement Laboratory - Research ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Fellowships: SURFing the Physical Measurement Laboratory ... Optical, Radiation, and Chemical Physics. ... involves PML's Quantum Physics Division. ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

446

Preliminary Notice of Violation, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory -  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Lawrence Livermore National Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory - EA-2003-04 Preliminary Notice of Violation, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory - EA-2003-04 September 3, 2003 Preliminary Notice of Violation issued to the University of California related to an Extremity Radiological Overexposure at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, (EA-2003-04) This letter refers to the recent investigation by the Department of Energy's Office of Price-Anderson Enforcement (OE) of the June 2002 extremity radiological overexposure event. Preliminary Notice of Violation, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory - EA-2003-04 More Documents & Publications Preliminary Notice of Violation, University of California - EA-2006-01 Preliminary Notice of Violation, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory -

447

Rock Mechanics and Enhanced Geothermal Systems: A DOE-sponsored Workshop to Explore Research Needs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This workshop on rock mechanics and enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) was held in Cambridge, Mass., on June 20-21 2003, before the Soil and Rock America 2003 International Conference at MIT. Its purpose was to bring together experts in the field of rock mechanics and geothermal systems to encourage innovative thinking, explore new ideas, and identify research needs in the areas of rock mechanics and rock engineering applied to enhanced geothermal systems. The agenda is shown in Appendix A. The workshop included experts in the fields of rock mechanics and engineering, geological engineering, geophysics, drilling, the geothermal energy production from industry, universities and government agencies, and laboratories. The list of participants is shown is Appendix B. The first day consisted of formal presentations. These are summarized in Chapter 1 of the report. By the end of the first day, two broad topic areas were defined: reservoir characterization and reservoir performance. Working groups were formed for each topic. They met and reported in plenary on the second day. The working group summaries are described in Chapter 2. The final session of the workshop was devoted to reaching consensus recommendations. These recommendations are given in Chapter 3. That objective was achieved. All the working group recommendations were considered and, in order to arrive at a practical research agenda usable by the workshop sponsors, workshop recommendations were reduced to a total of seven topics. These topics were divided in three priority groups, as follows. First-priority research topics (2): {sm_bullet} Define the pre-existing and time-dependent geometry and physical characteristics of the reservoir and its fracture network. That includes the identification of hydraulically controlling fractures. {sm_bullet} Characterize the physical and chemical processes affecting the reservoir geophysical parameters and influencing the transport properties of fractures. Incorporate those processes in reservoir simulators. Second-priority research topics (4): {sm_bullet} Implement and proof-test enhanced fracture detection geophysical methods, such as 3-D surface seismics, borehole seismics, and imaging using earthquake data. {sm_bullet} Implement and proof-test enhanced stress measurement techniques, such as borehole breakout analysis, tilt-meters, and earthquake focal mechanism analysis. {sm_bullet} Implement and proof-test high-temperature down-hole tools for short-term and long-term diagnostics, such as borehole imaging, geophone arrays, packers, and electrical tools.

Francois Heuze; Peter Smeallie; Derek Elsworth; Joel L. Renner

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory - Reports  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Review Reports 2013 Independent Oversight Review of the Fire Protection Program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, September 2013 Independent Oversight Review of Preparedness for Severe Natural Phenomena Events at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, July 2013 Activity Reports 2013 Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Operational Drill at the B332 Plutonium Facility, February 2013 Activity Reports 2012 Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Site Lead Planning Activities, October 2012 Review Reports 2011 Review of Integrated Safety Management System Effectiveness at the Livermore Site Office, October 2011 Review of Integrated Safety Management System Effectiveness at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, September 2011

449

THERMO-HYDRO-MECHANICAL MODELING OF WORKING FLUID INJECTION AND THERMAL ENERGY EXTRACTION IN EGS FRACTURES AND ROCK MATRIX  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Development of enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) will require creation of a reservoir of sufficient volume to enable commercial-scale heat transfer from the reservoir rocks to the working fluid. A key assumption associated with reservoir creation/stimulation is that sufficient rock volumes can be hydraulically fractured via both tensile and shear failure, and more importantly by reactivation of naturally existing fractures (by shearing), to create the reservoir. The advancement of EGS greatly depends on our understanding of the dynamics of the intimately coupled rock-fracture-fluid-heat system and our ability to reliably predict how reservoirs behave under stimulation and production. Reliable performance predictions of EGS reservoirs require accurate and robust modeling for strongly coupled thermal-hydrological-mechanical (THM) processes. Conventionally, these types of problems have been solved using operator-splitting methods, usually by coupling a subsurface flow and heat transport simulators with a solid mechanics simulator via input files. An alternative approach is to solve the system of nonlinear partial differential equations that govern multiphase fluid flow, heat transport, and rock mechanics simultaneously, using a fully coupled, fully implicit solution procedure, in which all solution variables (pressure, enthalpy, and rock displacement fields) are solved simultaneously. This paper describes numerical simulations used to investigate the poro- and thermal- elastic effects of working fluid injection and thermal energy extraction on the properties of the fractures and rock matrix of a hypothetical EGS reservoir, using a novel simulation software FALCON (Podgorney et al., 2011), a finite element based simulator solving fully coupled multiphase fluid flow, heat transport, rock deformation, and fracturing using a global implicit approach. Investigations are also conducted on how these poro- and thermal-elastic effects are related to fracture permeability evolution.

Robert Podgorney; Chuan Lu; Hai Huang

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Brookhaven National Laboratory - Long Island Regional Science...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Plasma Physics Laboratory SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility Laboratory Policy and Evaluation Safety, Security and...

451

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Regional Science Bowl ...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Plasma Physics Laboratory SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility Laboratory Policy and Evaluation Safety, Security and...

452

Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque | National Nuclear Security...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Laboratories, the laboratories responsible for the development, testing, and production of specialized nonnuclear components. Laboratories: The NNSA Sandia National...

453

Rock Rapids Municipal Utility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rapids Municipal Utility Rapids Municipal Utility Jump to: navigation, search Name Rock Rapids Municipal Utility Place Iowa Utility Id 16206 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Commercial Power (Single-Phase) Commercial Commercial Power (Three-Phase) Commercial Residential Power Residential Average Rates Residential: $0.0807/kWh Commercial: $0.0633/kWh Industrial: $0.0899/kWh

454

Hot dry rock Phase II reservoir engineering  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Early attempts to hydraulically fracture and connect two wells drilled at the Hot Dry Rock site at Fenton Hill in New Mexico failed. Microearthquakes triggered by hydraulic fracturing indicated that the fracture zones grew in unexpected directions. Consequently one of the wells was sidetracked at a depth of 2.9 km; was redrilled into the zones of most intense microseismic activity; and a flow connection was achieved. Hydraulic communication was improved by supplemental fracturing using recently developed high temperature and high pressure open hole packers. Preliminary testing indicates a reservoir with stimulated joint volume which already surpasses that attained in the earlier phase I reservoir after several years of development. 12 refs., 6 figs.

Murphy, H.D.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Hot Dry Rock Overview at Los Alamos  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Hot Dry Rock (HDR) geothermal energy program is a renewable energy program that can contribute significantly to the nation's balanced and diversified energy mix. Having extracted energy from the first Fenton Hill HDR reservoir for about 400 days, and from the second reservoir for 30 days in a preliminary test, Los Alamos is focusing on the Long Term Flow Test and reservoir studies. Current budget limitations have slowed preparations thus delaying the start date of that test. The test is planned to gather data for more definitive reservoir modeling with energy availability or reservoir lifetime of primary interest. Other salient information will address geochemistry and tracer studies, microseismic response, water requirements and flow impedance which relates directly to pumping power requirements. During this year of ''preparation'' we have made progress in modeling studies, in chemically reactive tracer techniques, in improvements in acoustic or microseismic event analysis.

Berger, Michael; Hendron, Robert H.

1989-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

456

The National Storage Laboratory: Overview and status  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The National Storage Laboratory (NSL) was organized to investigate, demonstrate, and commercialize high-performance hardware and software storage technologies that promise to remove network computing bottlenecks and provide critically needed new storage systems functionality. This paper briefly outlines the goals, collaboration and current status of the NSL.

Watson, R.W.; Coyne, R.

1994-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

457

Geometry and material choices govern hard-rock drilling performance of PDC drag cutters.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories has partnered with industry on a multifaceted, baseline experimental study that supports the development of improved drag cutters for advanced drill bits. Different nonstandard cutter lots were produced and subjected to laboratory tests that evaluated the influence of selected design and processing parameters on cutter loads, wear, and durability pertinent to the penetration of hard rock with mechanical properties representative of formations encountered in geothermal or deep oil/gas drilling environments. The focus was on cutters incorporating ultrahard PDC (polycrystalline diamond compact) overlays (i.e., diamond tables) on tungsten-carbide substrates. Parameter variations included changes in cutter geometry, material composition, and processing conditions. Geometric variables were the diamond-table thickness, the cutting-edge profile, and the PDC/substrate interface configuration. Material and processing variables for the diamond table were, respectively, the diamond particle size and the sintering pressure applied during cutter fabrication. Complementary drop-impact, granite-log abrasion, linear cutting-force, and rotary-drilling tests examined the response of cutters from each lot. Substantial changes in behavior were observed from lot to lot, allowing the identification of features contributing major (factor of 10+) improvements in cutting performance for hard-rock applications. Recent field demonstrations highlight the advantages of employing enhanced cutter technology during challenging drilling operations.

Wise, Jack LeRoy

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

S ARGONNE NATIONAL LABORATORY  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ARGONNE NATIONAL LABORATORY ARGONNE NATIONAL LABORATORY 19 ON CLOSED SHEIIS IN NUCLEI. II Maria G. Mayer April., 1949 Feenberg (1) ' (2) and Nordlkeim (3) have used the spins and magnetic moments of the even-odd nuclei to determine the angular momentum of the eigenfunction of the odd particle. The tabulations given by them indi- cate that spin orbit coupling favors the state of higher total angular momentum, If - strong spin.orbit coupling' increasing with angular mom- entum is assumed, a level assignment encounters a very few contradictions. with experimental facts and requires no major crossing of the levels from those of a square well potential. The magic numbers O, 82, and 126 occur at the' place of the spin-orbit splitting of levels of high angular momen- tum, Table 1 contains in column two in order

459

Safety | Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Safety Safety Biosafety Safety Safety is integral to Argonne's scientific research and engineering technology mission. As a leading U.S. Department of Energy multi-program research laboratory, our obligation to the American people demands that we conduct our research and operations safely and responsibly. As a recognized leader in safety, we are committed to making ethical decisions that provide a safe and