Sample records for laboratory distributed active

  1. Sandia National Laboratories: European Distributed Energies Research...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SMART Grid, Solar Sandia National Laboratories, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and European Distributed Energies Research Laboratories (DERlab) have organized a...

  2. Sandia National Laboratories: renewable energy and distributed...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SMART Grid, Solar Sandia National Laboratories, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and European Distributed Energies Research Laboratories (DERlab) have organized a...

  3. Independent Activity Report, Sandia National Laboratories - September...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    September 2012 Operational Awareness Oversight of Sandia National Laboratories HIAR SNL-2012-09-13 This Independent Activity Report documents an operational awareness activity...

  4. Mobile Robotics Activities in DOE Laboratories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ron Lujan; Jerry Harbour; John T. Feddema; Sharon Bailey; Jacob Barhen; David Reister

    2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper will briefly outline major activities in Department of Energy (DOE) Laboratories focused on mobile platforms, both Unmanned Ground Vehicles (UGV’s) as well as Unmanned Air Vehicles (UAV’s). The activities will be discussed in the context of the science and technology construct used by the DOE Technology Roadmap for Robotics and Intelligent Machines (RIM)1 published in 1998; namely, Perception, Reasoning, Action, and Integration. The activities to be discussed span from research and development to deployment in field operations. The activities support customers in other agencies. The discussion of "perception" will include hyperspectral sensors, complex patterns discrimination, multisensor fusion and advances in LADAR technologies, including real-world perception. "Reasoning" activities to be covered include cooperative controls, distributed systems, ad-hoc networks, platform-centric intelligence, and adaptable communications. The paper will discuss "action" activities such as advanced mobility and various air and ground platforms. In the RIM construct, "integration" includes the Human-Machine Integration. Accordingly the paper will discuss adjustable autonomy and the collaboration of operator(s) with distributed UGV’s and UAV’s. Integration also refers to the applications of these technologies into systems to perform operations such as perimeter surveillance, large-area monitoring and reconnaissance. Unique facilities and test beds for advanced mobile systems will be described. Given that this paper is an overview, rather than delve into specific detail in these activities, other more exhaustive references and sources will be cited extensively.

  5. Laboratories for the 21st Century Best Practices: Onsite Distributed Generation Systems For Laboratories

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Guide describes general information on implementing onsite distributed generation systems in laboratory environments.

  6. Independent Activity Report, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    January 2012 January 2012 Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Orientation Visit HIAR-PNNL-2012-01-11 This Independent Activity Report documents an operational awareness...

  7. Independent Activity Report, Oak Ridge National Laboratory -...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    October 2011 Operational Awareness Tour of Building 3525 Irradiated Fuels Examination Hot Cell Laboratory HIAR OR-2011-10-21 This Independent Activity Report documents an...

  8. Independent Activity Report, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    technicians, and the Alameda County Fire Department to a fire in a fume hood containing a depleted uranium part. Independent Activity Report, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory...

  9. Lessons Learned by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Activity...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Learned by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Activity-level Work Planning & Control Lessons Learned by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Activity-level Work...

  10. Sandia National Laboratories: Distribution Grid Integration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Distribution Grid Integration Recent Sandia Secure, Scalable Microgrid Advanced Controls Research Accomplishments On March 3, 2015, in Capabilities, Distribution Grid Integration,...

  11. Sandia National Laboratories: Distribution Grid Integration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Distribution Grid Integration ECIS-Princeton Power Systems, Inc.: Demand Response Inverter On March 19, 2013, in DETL, Distribution Grid Integration, Energy, Energy Surety,...

  12. Sandia National Laboratories: Distribution Grid Integration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Second Annual Electric Power Research InstituteSandia Photovoltaic Systems Symposium On April 15, 2014, in Concentrating Solar Power, Distribution Grid Integration, Energy,...

  13. Sandia National Laboratories: Distributed Grid Integration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Distributed Grid Integration Federal Electric Regulatory Commission Revised Its Small Generator Interconnection Procedure and Small Generator Interconnection Agreement On March 4,...

  14. Sandia National Laboratories: Distribution Grid Integration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Supply Transformation Needed On February 20, 2013, in DETL, Distribution Grid Integration, Energy, Energy Assurance, Energy Surety, Grid Integration, Infrastructure...

  15. Sandia National Laboratories: Distribution Grid Integration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Its Phase 1 Operational Demonstration in Late January On April 5, 2013, in Distribution Grid Integration, Energy Assurance, Energy Assurance, Energy Surety, Grid Integration,...

  16. Independent Activity Report, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Laboratory - March 2011 March 2011 Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program Effectiveness Review HIAR-LLNL-2011-03-25 This...

  17. Independent Oversight Activity Report, Los Alamos National Laboratory...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    in the development and implementation of the Los Alamos National Laboratory industrial hygiene worker exposure assessment program. Independent Oversight Activity Report, Los Alamos...

  18. Independent Activity Report, Los Alamos National Laboratory ...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    2012 Independent Oversight Review, Los Alamos National Laboratory Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Facility - January 2012 Independent Oversight Review, Los Alamos Site...

  19. NOAA Air Resources Laboratory Monthly Activity Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with GSD's Homeland Security Project. The Earth System Research Laboratory's Global Systems Division (GSD's Homeland Security Project 2. Wildfire Smoke Forecasts 3. HYSPLIT Modifications for NOAA's Homeland Security Change Science Program (CCSP) Synthesis and Assessment Product (SAP) 3.2 10. Air Quality Forecast Model

  20. Argonne National Laboratory has been actively involved in the development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kemner, Ken

    Argonne National Laboratory has been actively involved in the development of advanced batteries at Argonne and named it the National Battery Test Laboratory (NBTL), for the purpose of conducting in these early days of the battery program, Argonne was internationally respected for its advanced battery work

  1. Analysis Activities at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation on PNNL’s analysis activities to the DOE Systems Analysis Workshop held in Washington, D.C. July 28-29, 2004.

  2. Analysis Activities at National Renewable Energy Laboratory

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation on NREL’s analysis activities to the DOE Systems Analysis Workshop held in Washington, D.C. July 28-29, 2004.

  3. Analysis Activities at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation on Lawrence Livermore’s analysis activities to the DOE Systems Analysis Workshop held in Washington, D.C. July 28-29, 2004.

  4. Analysis Activities at Sandia National Laboratory

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation on SNL’s analysis activities to the DOE Systems Analysis Workshop held in Washington, D.C. July 28-29, 2004.

  5. Analysis Activities at Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation on Argonne’s analysis activities to the DOE Systems Analysis Workshop held in Washington, D.C. July 28-29, 2004.

  6. Onsite Distributed Generation Systems For Laboratories, Laboratories for the 21st Century: Best Practices (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This guide provides general information on implementing onsite distributed generation systems in laboratory environments. Specific technology applications, general performance information, and cost data are provided to educate and encourage laboratory energy managers to consider onsite power generation or combined heat and power (CHP) systems for their facilities. After conducting an initial screening, energy managers are encouraged to conduct a detailed feasibility study with actual cost and performance data for technologies that look promising. Onsite distributed generation systems are small, modular, decentralized, grid-connected, or off-grid energy systems. These systems are located at or near the place where the energy is used. These systems are also known as distributed energy or distributed power systems. DG technologies are generally considered those that produce less than 20 megawatts (MW) of power. A number of technologies can be applied as effective onsite DG systems, including: (1) Diesel, natural gas, and dual-fuel reciprocating engines; (2) Combustion turbines and steam turbines; (3) Fuel cells; (4) Biomass heating; (5) Biomass combined heat and power; (6) Photovoltaics; and (7) Wind turbines. These systems can provide a number of potential benefits to an individual laboratory facility or campus, including: (1) High-quality, reliable, and potentially dispatchable power; (2) Low-cost energy and long-term utility cost assurance, especially where electricity and/or fuel costs are high; (3) Significantly reduced greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Typical CHP plants reduce onsite GHG by 40 to 60 percent; (4) Peak demand shaving where demand costs are high; (5) CHP where thermal energy can be used in addition to electricity; (6) The ability to meet standby power needs, especially where utility-supplied power is interrupted frequently or for long periods and where standby power is required for safety or emergencies; and (7) Use for standalone or off-grid systems where extending the grid is too expensive or impractical. Because they are installed close to the load, DG systems avoid some of the disadvantages of large, central power plants, such as transmission and distribution losses over long electric lines.

  7. Argonne National Laboratory: Laboratory Directed Research and Development FY 1993 program activities. Annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1993-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The purposes of Argonne`s Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program are to encourage the development of novel concepts, enhance the Laboratory`s R&D capabilities, and further the development of its strategic initiatives. Projects are selected from proposals for creative and innovative R&D studies which are not yet eligible for timely support through normal programmatic channels. Among the aims of the projects supported by the Program are establishment of engineering ``proof-of-principle`` assessment of design feasibility for prospective facilities; development of an instrumental prototype, method, or system; or discovery in fundamental science. Several of these projects are closely associated with major strategic thrusts of the Laboratory as described in Argonne`s Five Year Institutional Plan, although the scientific implications of the achieved results extend well beyond Laboratory plans and objectives. The projects supported by the Program are distributed across the major programmatic areas at Argonne as indicated in the Laboratory LDRD Plan for FY 1993.

  8. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program Activities for FY 2008.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Looney,J.P.; Fox, K.

    2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is a multidisciplinary laboratory that maintains a primary mission focus the physical sciences, energy sciences, and life sciences, with additional expertise in environmental sciences, energy technologies, and national security. It is managed by Brookhaven Science Associates, LLC, (BSA) under contract with the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE). BNL's Fiscal year 2008 budget was $531.6 million. There are about 2,800 employees, and another 4,300 guest scientists and students who come each year to use the Laboratory's facilities and work with the staff. The BNL Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program reports its status to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) annually in March, as required by DOE Order 413.2B, 'Laboratory Directed Research and Development,' April 19, 2006, and the Roles, Responsibilities, and Guidelines for Laboratory Directed Research and Developlnent at the Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration Laboratories dated June 13, 2006. Accordingly, this is our Annual Report in which we describe the Purpose, Approach, Technical Progress and Results, and Specific Accomplishments of all LDRD projects that received funding during Fiscal Year 2008. BNL expended $12 million during Fiscal Year 2008 in support of 69 projects. The program has two categories, the annual Open Call LDRDs and Strategic LDRDs, which combine to meet the overall objectives of the LDRD Program. Proposals are solicited annually for review and approval concurrent with the next fiscal year, October 1. For the open call for proposals, an LDRD Selection Committee, comprised of the Associate Laboratory Directors (ALDs) for the Scientific Directorates, an equal number of scientists recommended by the Brookhaven Council, plus the Assistant Laboratory Director for Policy and Strategic Planning, review the proposals submitted in response to the solicitation. The Open Can LDRD category emphasizes innovative research concepts with limited management filtering to encourage the creativity of individual researchers. The competition is open to all BNL staff in programmatic, scientific, engineering, and technical support areas. Researchers submit their project proposals to the Assistant Laboratory Director for Policy and Strategic Planning. A portion of the LDRD budget is held for the Strategic LDRD (S-LDRD) category. Projects in this category focus on innovative R&D activities that support the strategic agenda of the Laboratory. The Laboratory Director entertains requests or articulates the need for S-LDRD funds at any time. Strategic LDRD Proposals also undergo rigorous peer review; the approach to review is tailored to the size and scope of the proposal. These Projects are driven by special opportunities, including: (1) Research project(s) in support of Laboratory strategic initiatives as defined and articulated by the Director; (2) Research project(s) in support of a Laboratory strategic hire; (3) Evolution of Program Development activities into research and development activities; and (4) ALD proposal(s) to the Director to support unique research opportunities. The goals and objectives of BNL's LDRD Program can be inferred fronl the Program's stated purposes. These are to (1) encourage and support the development of new ideas and technology, (2) promote the early exploration and exploitation of creative and innovative concepts, and (3) develop new 'fundable' R&D projects and programs. The emphasis is clearly articulated by BNL to be on supporting exploratory research 'which could lead to new programs, projects, and directions' for the Laboratory. We explicitly indicate that research conducted under the LDRD Program should be highly innovative, and an element of high risk as to success is acceptable. To be one of the premier DOE National Laboratories, BNL must continuously foster groundbreaking scientific research. At Brookhaven National Laboratory one such method is through its LDRD Program. This discretionary research and d

  9. Argonne National Laboratory Annual Report of Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program Activities for FY 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1995-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The purposes of Argonne's Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program are to encourage the development of novel concepts, enhance the Laboratory's R and D capabilities, and further the development of its strategic initiatives. Projects are selected from proposals for creative and innovative R and D studies which are not yet eligible for timely support through normal programmatic channels. Among the aims of the projects supported by the Program are establishment of engineering proof-of-principle; assessment of design feasibility for prospective facilities; development of an instrumental prototype, method, or system; or discovery in fundamental science. Several of these projects are closely associated with major strategic thrusts of the Laboratory as described in Argonne's Five-Year Institutional Plan, although the scientific implications of the achieved results extend well beyond Laboratory plans and objectives. The projects supported by the Program are distributed across the major programmatic areas at Argonne as indicated in the Laboratory's LDRD Plan for FY 1994. Project summaries of research in the following areas are included: (1) Advanced Accelerator and Detector Technology; (2) X-ray Techniques for Research in Biological and Physical Science; (3) Nuclear Technology; (4) Materials Science and Technology; (5) Computational Science and Technology; (6) Biological Sciences; (7) Environmental Sciences: (8) Environmental Control and Waste Management Technology; and (9) Novel Concepts in Other Areas.

  10. A forward microphysical model to predict the size-distribution parameters of laboratory generated (mimic)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oxford, University of

    A forward microphysical model to predict the size- distribution parameters of laboratory generated Interactions ­ Condensational Growth and Coagulation, Submitted for Indian Aerosol Science and Technology Microphysical Model for the UTLS (FAMMUS) is applied to predict the size-distribution parameters of laboratory

  11. Sandia National Laboratories: PNM Distributed Energy Solar Power...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PNM Distributed Energy Solar Power Program Mesa del Sol Project Is Finalist for International Smart Grid Action Network 2014 Award of Excellence On July 31, 2014, in Distribution...

  12. Energy-efficiency testing activities of the Mobile Energy Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parker, G.B.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes energy-efficiency testing activities during the first and second quarters of fiscal year 1990 applying the Mobile Energy Laboratory (MEL) testing capabilities. Four MELs, developed by the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), are administered by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for energy testing and program support functions at federal facilities. The using agencies principally fund MEL applications, while DOE/FEMP funds program administration and capability enhancement activities. This report fulfills the requirements established in the MEL Use Plan (PNL-6861) for semiannual reporting on energy-efficiency testing activities using the MEL capabilities. The MEL Use Committee, formally established in 1989, developed the MEL Use Plan and meets semiannually to establish priorities for energy-efficient testing applications using the MEL capabilities.

  13. Lesson Learned by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Activity-level Work Planning and Control

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Slide Presentation by Donna J. Governor, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Lessons Learned by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Activity-Level Work Planning & Control.

  14. Argonne National Laboratory annual report of Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program Activities FY 2009.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Office of the Director

    2010-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    I am pleased to submit Argonne National Laboratory's Annual Report on its Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) activities for fiscal year 2009. Fiscal year 2009 saw a heightened focus by DOE and the nation on the need to develop new sources of energy. Argonne scientists are investigating many different sources of energy, including nuclear, solar, and biofuels, as well as ways to store, use, and transmit energy more safely, cleanly, and efficiently. DOE selected Argonne as the site for two new Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) - the Institute for Atom-Efficient Chemical Transformations and the Center for Electrical Energy Storage - and funded two other EFRCs to which Argonne is a major partner. The award of at least two of the EFRCs can be directly linked to early LDRD-funded efforts. LDRD has historically seeded important programs and facilities at the lab. Two of these facilities, the Advanced Photon Source and the Center for Nanoscale Materials, are now vital contributors to today's LDRD Program. New and enhanced capabilities, many of which relied on LDRD in their early stages, now help the laboratory pursue its evolving strategic goals. LDRD has, since its inception, been an invaluable resource for positioning the Laboratory to anticipate, and thus be prepared to contribute to, the future science and technology needs of DOE and the nation. During times of change, LDRD becomes all the more vital for facilitating the necessary adjustments while maintaining and enhancing the capabilities of our staff and facilities. Although I am new to the role of Laboratory Director, my immediate prior service as Deputy Laboratory Director for Programs afforded me continuous involvement in the LDRD program and its management. Therefore, I can attest that Argonne's program adhered closely to the requirements of DOE Order 413.2b and associated guidelines governing LDRD. Our LDRD program management continually strives to be more efficient. In addition to meeting all reporting requirements during fiscal year 2009, our LDRD Office continues to enhance its electronic systems to streamline the LDRD management process. You will see from the following individual project reports that Argonne's researchers have once again done a superb job pursuing projects at the forefront of their respective fields and have contributed significantly to the advancement of Argonne's strategic thrusts. This work has not only attracted follow-on sponsorship in many cases, but is also proving to be a valuable basis upon which to continue realignment of our strategic portfolio to better match the Laboratory's Strategic Plan.

  15. LABORATORY DIRECTED RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM ACTIVITIES FOR FY2002.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    FOX,K.J.

    2002-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Brookhaven National (BNL) Laboratory is a multidisciplinary laboratory that carries out basic and applied research in the physical, biomedical, and environmental sciences, and in selected energy technologies. It is managed by Brookhaven Science Associates, LLC, under contract with the U. S. Department of Energy. BNL's total annual budget has averaged about $450 million. There are about 3,000 employees, and another 4,500 guest scientists and students who come each year to use the Laboratory's facilities and work with the staff. The BNL Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program reports its status to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) annually in March, as required by DOE Order 4 1 3.2A, ''Laboratory Directed Research and Development,'' January 8, 2001, and the LDRD Annual Report guidance, updated February 12, 1999. The LDRD Program obtains its funds through the Laboratory overhead pool and operates under the authority of DOE Order 413.2A. The goals and objectives of BNL's LDRD Program can be inferred from the Program's stated purposes. These are to (1) encourage and support the development of new ideas and technology, (2) promote the early exploration and exploitation of creative and innovative concepts, and (3) develop new ''fundable'' R&D projects and programs. The emphasis is clearly articulated by BNL to be on supporting exploratory research ''which could lead to new programs, projects, and directions'' for the Laboratory. As one of the premier scientific laboratories of the DOE, BNL must continuously foster groundbreaking scientific research. At Brookhaven National Laboratory one such method is through its LDRD Program. This discretionary research and development tool is critical in maintaining the scientific excellence and long-term vitality of the Laboratory. Additionally, it is a means to stimulate the scientific community and foster new science and technology ideas, which becomes a major factor in achieving and maintaining staff excellence and a means to address national needs within the overall mission of the DOE and BNL. The LDRD Annual Report contains summaries of all research activities funded during Fiscal Year 2002. The Project Summaries with their accomplishments described in this report reflect the above. Aside from leading to new fundable or promising programs and producing especially noteworthy research, the LDRD activities have resulted in numerous publications in various professional and scientific journals and presentations at meetings and forums. All Fy 2002 projects are listed and tabulated in the Project Funding Table. Also included in this Annual Report in Appendix A is a summary of the proposed projects for FY 2003. The BNL LDRD budget authority by DOE in FY 2002 was $7 million. The actual allocation totaled $6.7 million. The following sections in this report contain the management processes, peer review, and the portfolio's relatedness to BNL's mission, initiatives and strategic plans. Also included is a metric of success indicators.

  16. Validation of a Hot Water Distribution Model Using Laboratory and Field Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Backman, C.; Hoeschele, M.

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Characterizing the performance of hot water distribution systems is a critical step in developing best practice guidelines for the design and installation of high performance hot water systems. Developing and validating simulation models is critical to this effort, as well as collecting accurate input data to drive the models. In this project, the ARBI team validated the newly developed TRNSYS Type 604 pipe model against both detailed laboratory and field distribution system performance data. Validation efforts indicate that the model performs very well in handling different pipe materials, insulation cases, and varying hot water load conditions. Limitations of the model include the complexity of setting up the input file and long simulation run times. In addition to completing validation activities, this project looked at recent field hot water studies to better understand use patterns and potential behavioral changes as homeowners convert from conventional storage water heaters to gas tankless units. Based on these datasets, we conclude that the current Energy Factor test procedure overestimates typical use and underestimates the number of hot water draws. This has implications for both equipment and distribution system performance. Gas tankless water heaters were found to impact how people use hot water, but the data does not necessarily suggest an increase in usage. Further study in hot water usage and patterns is needed to better define these characteristics in different climates and home vintages.

  17. Cloud Computing and Distributed Systems Laboratory DEPT. OF COMPUTER SCIENCE AND SOFTWARE ENGINEERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Melbourne, University of

    Cloud Computing and Distributed Systems Laboratory DEPT. OF COMPUTER SCIENCE AND SOFTWARE ENGINEERING THE UNIVERSITY OF MELBOURNE, AUSTRALIA The Cloud Computing and Distributed Systems (CLOUDS in 2008 by the CLOUDS lab at the University of Melbourne, facilitates the realization of the above vision

  18. Independent Activity Report, Los Alamos National Laboratory- November 2010

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Los Alamos National Laboratory Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Replacement Project Orientation Visit

  19. Current Reactor Physics Benchmark Activities at the Idaho National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John D. Bess; Margaret A. Marshall; Mackenzie L. Gorham; Joseph Christensen; James C. Turnbull; Kim Clark

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPhEP) [1] and the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) [2] were established to preserve integral reactor physics and criticality experiment data for present and future research. These valuable assets provide the basis for recording, developing, and validating our integral nuclear data, and experimental and computational methods. These projects are managed through the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development Nuclear Energy Agency (OECD-NEA). Staff and students at the Department of Energy - Idaho (DOE-ID) and INL are engaged in the development of benchmarks to support ongoing research activities. These benchmarks include reactors or assemblies that support Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) research, space nuclear Fission Surface Power System (FSPS) design validation, and currently operational facilities in Southeastern Idaho.

  20. Heat Pipe Solar Receiver Development Activities at Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adkins, D.R.; Andraka, C.E.; Moreno, J.B.; Moss, T.A.; Rawlinson, K.S.; Showalter, S.K.

    1999-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the past decade, Sandia National Laboratories has been involved in the development of receivers to transfer energy from the focus of a parabolic dish concentrator to the heater tubes of a Stirling engine. Through the isothermal evaporation and condensation of sodium. a heat-pipe receiver can efficiently transfer energy to an engine's working fluid and compensate for irregularities in the flux distribution that is delivered by the concentrator. The operation of the heat pipe is completely passive because the liquid sodium is distributed over the solar-heated surface by capillary pumping provided by a wick structure. Tests have shown that using a heat pipe can boost the system performance by twenty percent when compared to directly illuminating the engine heater tubes. Designing heat pipe solar receivers has presented several challenges. The relatively large area ({approximately}0.2 m{sup 2}) of the receiver surface makes it difficult to design a wick that can continuously provide liquid sodium to all regions of the heated surface. Selecting a wick structure with smaller pores will improve capillary pumping capabilities of the wick, but the small pores will restrict the flow of liquid and generate high pressure drops. Selecting a wick that is comprised of very tine filaments can increase the permeability of the wick and thereby reduce flow losses, however, the fine wick structure is more susceptible to corrosion and mechanical damage. This paper provides a comprehensive review of the issues encountered in the design of heat pipe solar receivers and solutions to problems that have arisen. Topics include: flow characterization in the receiver, the design of wick systems. the minimization of corrosion and dissolution of metals in sodium systems. and the prevention of mechanical failure in high porosity wick structures.

  1. Independent Activity Report, Sandia National Laboratories- August 2011

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Sandia National Laboratories Emergency Action Levels and Associated Consequence Analyses [HIAR-SNL-2011-08-25

  2. Independent Activity Report, Oak Ridge National Laboratory- October 2011

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Operational Awareness Tour of Building 3525 Irradiated Fuels Examination Hot Cell Laboratory [HIAR OR-2011-10-21

  3. Merit Review of BER Activities at the DOE Laboratories | U.S...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Laboratories BER announces research opportunities on the Office of Science Grants web site. The site includes a description of the research activity and the required process...

  4. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory activity report for 1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robinson, S.; Cantwell, K. [eds.

    1988-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    During 1987, SSRL achieved many significant advances and reached several major milestones utilizing both SPEAR and PEP as synchrotron radiation sources as described in this report. Perhaps the following two are worthy of particular mention: (1) SPEAR reached an all time high of 4,190 delivered user-shifts during calendar year 1987, highlights of the many scientific results are given; (2) during a 12 day run in December of 1987, PEP was operated in a low emittance mode (calculated emittance 6.4 nanometer-radians) at 7.1 GeV with currents up to 33 mA. A second undulator beam line on PEP was commissioned during this run and used to record many spectra showing the extremely high brightness of the radiation. PEP is now by far the highest brightness synchrotron radiation source in the world. The report is divided into the following sections: (1) laboratory operations; (2) accelerator physics programs; (3) experimental facilities; (4) engineering division; (5) conferences and workshops; (6) SSRL organization; (7) experimental progress reports; (8) active proposals; (9) SSRL experiments and proposals by institution; and (10) SSRL publications.

  5. Independent Activity Report, Sandia National Laboratory- February 2011

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Sandia Site Office Effectiveness Review of Sandia National Laboratory's Closure of WP&C Corrective Actions [HIAR-SNL-2011-02-18

  6. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program Activities for FY 2007.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newman,L.

    2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is a multidisciplinary laboratory that carries out basic and applied research in the physical, biomedical, and environmental sciences, and in selected energy technologies. It is managed by Brookhaven Science Associates, LLC, (BSA) under contract with the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE). BNL's Fiscal year 2007 budget was $515 million. There are about 2,600 employees, and another 4,500 guest scientists and students who come each year to use the Laboratory's facilities and work with the staff. The BNL Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program reports its status to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) annually in March, as required by DOE Order 413.2B, 'Laboratory Directed Research and Development', April 19, 2006, and the Roles, Responsibilities, and Guidelines for Laboratory Directed Research and Development at the Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration Laboratories dated June 13, 2006. In accordance this is our Annual Report in which we describe the Purpose, Approach, Technical Progress and Results, and Specific Accomplishments of all LDRD projects that received funding during Fiscal Year 2007. The goals and objectives of BNL's LDRD Program can be inferred from the Program's stated purposes. These are to (1) encourage and support the development of new ideas and technology, (2) promote the early exploration and exploitation of creative and innovative concepts, and (3) develop new 'fundable' R&D projects and programs. The emphasis is clearly articulated by BNL to be on supporting exploratory research 'which could lead to new programs, projects, and directions' for the Laboratory. We explicitly indicate that research conducted under the LDRD Program should be highly innovative, and an element of high risk as to success is acceptable. In the solicitation for new proposals for Fiscal Year 2007 we especially requested innovative new projects in support of RHIC and the Light Source and any of the Strategic Initiatives listed at the LDRD web site. These included support for NSLS-II, RHIC evolving to a quantum chromo dynamics (QCD) lab, nanoscience, translational and biomedical neuroimaging, energy and, computational sciences. As one of the premier scientific laboratories of the DOE, BNL must continuously foster groundbreaking scientific research. At Brookhaven National Laboratory one such method is through its LDRD Program. This discretionary research and development tool is critical in maintaining the scientific excellence and long-term vitality of the Laboratory. Additionally, it is a means to stimulate the scientific community and foster new science and technology ideas, which becomes a major factor in achieving and maintaining staff excellence and a means to address national needs within the overall mission of the DOE and BNL.

  7. Active Aerodynamic Blade Distributed Flap Control Design Procedure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Active Aerodynamic Blade Distributed Flap Control Design Procedure for Load Reduction on the UpWind 5MW Wind Turbine David G. Wilson , Brian R. Resor , Dale E. Berg ...

  8. Argonne National Laboratory Annual Report of Laboratory Directed Research and Development program activities FY 2010.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    (Office of The Director)

    2012-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    As a national laboratory Argonne concentrates on scientific and technological challenges that can only be addressed through a sustained, interdisciplinary focus at a national scale. Argonne's eight major initiatives, as enumerated in its strategic plan, are Hard X-ray Sciences, Leadership Computing, Materials and Molecular Design and Discovery, Energy Storage, Alternative Energy and Efficiency, Nuclear Energy, Biological and Environmental Systems, and National Security. The purposes of Argonne's Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program are to encourage the development of novel technical concepts, enhance the Laboratory's research and development (R and D) capabilities, and pursue its strategic goals. projects are selected from proposals for creative and innovative R and D studies that require advance exploration before they are considered to be sufficiently developed to obtain support through normal programmatic channels. Among the aims of the projects supported by the LDRD Program are the following: establishment of engineering proof of principle, assessment of design feasibility for prospective facilities, development of instrumentation or computational methods or systems, and discoveries in fundamental science and exploratory development.

  9. Argonne National Laboratory Annual Report of Laboratory Directed Research and Development program activities FY 2011.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    (Office of The Director)

    2012-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    As a national laboratory Argonne concentrates on scientific and technological challenges that can only be addressed through a sustained, interdisciplinary focus at a national scale. Argonne's eight major initiatives, as enumerated in its strategic plan, are Hard X-ray Sciences, Leadership Computing, Materials and Molecular Design and Discovery, Energy Storage, Alternative Energy and Efficiency, Nuclear Energy, Biological and Environmental Systems, and National Security. The purposes of Argonne's Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program are to encourage the development of novel technical concepts, enhance the Laboratory's research and development (R and D) capabilities, and pursue its strategic goals. projects are selected from proposals for creative and innovative R and D studies that require advance exploration before they are considered to be sufficiently developed to obtain support through normal programmatic channels. Among the aims of the projects supported by the LDRD Program are the following: establishment of engineering proof of principle, assessment of design feasibility for prospective facilities, development of instrumentation or computational methods or systems, and discoveries in fundamental science and exploratory development.

  10. Development of laboratory and process sensors to monitor particle size distribution of industrial slurries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pendse, H.P.

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we present a novel measurement technique for monitoring particle size distributions of industrial colloidal slurries based on ultrasonic spectroscopy and mathematical deconvolution. An on-line sensor prototype has been developed and tested extensively in laboratory and production settings using mineral pigment slurries. Evaluation to date shows that the sensor is capable of providing particle size distributions, without any assumptions regarding their functional form, over diameters ranging from 0.1 to 100 micrometers in slurries with particle concentrations of 10 to 50 volume percents. The newly developed on-line sensor allows one to obtain particle size distributions of commonly encountered inorganic pigment slurries under industrial processing conditions without dilution.

  11. Analysis Activities at Fossil Energy/ National Energy Technology Laboratory

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation on NETL’s analysis activities to the DOE Systems Analysis Workshop held in Washington, D.C. July 28-29, 2004.

  12. Analysis Activities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The Future of1Albuquerque, NMPerformance |Should KnowCompressor |Laboratory |Oak

  13. Reporting Unethical or Illegal Activity | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reporting Unethical or Illegal Activity Doing What's Right How we work is as important at the work we do High standards are more than a slogan or catch phrase - they represent the...

  14. Summary of failure analysis activities at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cowgill, M.G.; Czajkowski, C.J.; Franz, E.M.

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Brookhaven National Laboratory has for many years conducted examinations related to the failures of nuclear materials and components. These examinations included the confirmation of root cause analyses, the determination of the causes of failure, identification of the species that accelerate corrosion, and comparison of the results of nondestructive examinations with those obtained by destructive examination. The results of those examinations, which had previously appeared in various formats (formal and informal reports, journal articles, etc.), have been collected together and summarized in the present report. The report is divided into sections according to the general subject matter (for example, corrosion, fatigue, etc.). Each section presents summaries of the information contained in specific reports and publications, all of which are fully identified as to title, authors, report number or journal reference, date of publication, and FIN number under which the work was performed.

  15. Soil water and particle size distribution influence laboratory-generated PM10 Nicholaus M. Madden a,*, Randal J. Southard a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmad, Sajjad

    Soil water and particle size distribution influence laboratory-generated PM10 Nicholaus M. Madden a Soil particle size distribution Soil water content a b s t r a c t Management of soils to reduce earlier work of predicting tillage-generated dust emissions based on soil properties. We focus

  16. A laboratory study of the activities of dried rumen microorganisms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harbers, Leniel Henry

    1958-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . cal pro? ceases vere made in this study to determine the ~ ~ activity of dried rumen microorganisms. . 'ellulose d1- gestion vas studied by employing a yurified cellulose preparation as a substrate and determination of the changes in concentration... the conditions of these experiments. There vere~ hovevsr~ bacteria present in the dr1ed rumen preparations vhich vere capable of hydro- lysing carboxymethyl cellulose. A method of detsrming "cellulose d1gestion" using a soluble cellulose derivative as a...

  17. activation energy distribution: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    activation energy distribution First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Photoelectron energy...

  18. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory. Activity report for 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cantwell, K. [ed.

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For SSRL operations, 1988 was a year of stark contrasts. The first extended PEP parasitic running since the construction of our two beam lines on that storage ring took place in November and December. Four experiments discussed below, were performed and detailed operational procedures which allowed synchrotron radiation an high energy users to coexist were established. SSRL anticipates that there will be significant amounts of beam time when PEP is run again for high energy physics. On the other hand, activity on SPEAR consisted of brief parasitic running on the VUV lines in December when the ring was operated at 1.85 GeV for colliding beam experiments. There was no dedicated SPEAR running throughout the entire calendar year. This is the first time since dedicated SPEAR operation was initiated in 1980 that there was no such running. The decision was motivated by both cost and performance factors, as discussed in Section 1 of this report. Fortunately, SLAC and SSRL have reached an agreement on SPEAR and PEP dedicated time charges which eliminates the cost volatility which was so important in the cancellation of the June-July dedicated SPEAR run. As discussed in Section 2, the 3 GeV SPEAR injector construction is proceeding on budget and on schedule. The injector will overcome the difficulties associated with the SLC-era constraint of only two injections per day. SSR and SLAC have also embarked on a program to upgrade SPEAR to achieve high reliability and performance. As a consequence, SSRL`s users may anticipate a highly effective SPEAR by 1991, at the latest. At that time, SPEAR is expected to be fully dedicated to synchrotron radiation research and operated by SSRL. Also contained in this report is a discussion of the improvements to SSRL`s experimental facilities and highlights of the experiments of the past year.

  19. Laboratory directed research and development. FY 1991 program activities: Summary report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The purposes of Argonne`s Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program are to encourage the development of novel concepts, enhance the Laboratory`s R&D capabilities, and further the development of its strategic initiatives. Among the aims of the projects supported by the Program are establishment of engineering ``proof-of-principle``; development of an instrumental prototype, method, or system; or discovery in fundamental science. Several of these project are closely associated with major strategic thrusts of the Laboratory as described in Argonne`s Five Year Institutional Plan, although the scientific implications of the achieved results extend well beyond Laboratory plans and objectives. The projects supported by the Program are distributed across the major programmatic areas at Argonne. Areas of emphasis are (1) advanced accelerator and detector technology, (2) x-ray techniques in biological and physical sciences, (3) advanced reactor technology, (4) materials science, computational science, biological sciences and environmental sciences. Individual reports summarizing the purpose, approach, and results of projects are presented.

  20. Quality assurance guidance for laboratory assessment plates in support of EM environmental sampling and analysis activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is one of several guidance documents developed to support the EM (DOE Environmental Restoration and Waste Management) Analytical Services program. Its purpose is to introduce assessment plates that can be used to conduct performance assessments of an organization`s or project`s ability to meet quality goals for analytical laboratory activities. These assessment plates are provided as non-prescriptive guidance to EM-support organizations responsible for collection of environmental data for remediation and waste management programs at DOE facilities. The assessments evaluate objectively all components of the analytical laboratory process to determine their proper selection and use.

  1. Strontium distribution coefficients of surficial sediment samples from the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liszewski, M.J.; Miller, K.E. [Geological Survey, Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Rosentreter, J.J. [Idaho State Univ., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Strontium distribution coefficients (K{sub d}`s) were measured for 20 surficial sediment samples collected from selected sites at the Idaho national Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The measurements were made to help assess the variability of strontium K{sub d}`s found at the INEL as part of an ongoing investigation of strontium chemical transport properties of surficial and interbedded sediments at the INEL. The investigation is being conducted by the US Geological Survey and Idaho State University in cooperation with the US Department of Energy. Batch experimental techniques wee used to determine K{sub d}`s of surficial sediments using a synthesized aqueous solution representative of wastewater in waste disposal ponds at the INEL. Strontium K{sub d}`s of the 20 surficial sediments ranged from 36 {+-} 1 to 275 {+-} 6 milliliters per gram. These results indicate significant variability in the strontium sorptive capacities of surficial sediments at the INEL. Some of this variability can be attributed to physical and chemical properties of the sediment itself; however, the remainder of the variability may be due to compositional changes in the equilibrated solutions after being mixed with the sediment.

  2. EMISSION MEASURE DISTRIBUTION AND HEATING OF TWO ACTIVE REGION CORES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tripathi, Durgesh [Inter-University Centre for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Post Bag 4, Ganeshkhind, Pune 411 007 (India); Klimchuk, James A. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Mason, Helen E., E-mail: durgesh@iucaa.ernet.in [Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, University of Cambridge, Wilberforce Road, Cambridge CB3 0WA (United Kingdom)

    2011-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Using data from the Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer aboard Hinode, we have studied the coronal plasma in the core of two active regions. Concentrating on the area between opposite polarity moss, we found emission measure distributions having an approximate power-law form EM{proportional_to}T{sup 2.4} from log T = 5.5 up to a peak at log T = 6.55. We show that the observations compare very favorably with a simple model of nanoflare-heated loop strands. They also appear to be consistent with more sophisticated nanoflare models. However, in the absence of additional constraints, steady heating is also a viable explanation.

  3. Property:EIA/861/ActivityDistribution | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation,PillarPublicationType JumpDOEInvolve Jumpallowed valuesActivityDistribution Jump

  4. Sandia National Laboratories: Photovoltaics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PV Facilities On November 10, 2010, in Photovoltaic System Evaluation Laboratory Distributed Energy Technologies Laboratory Microsystems and Engineering Sciences Applications...

  5. Sandia National Laboratories: Facilities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laboratory (PSEL) National Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) Test Bed Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies (CINT) Distributed Energy Technologies Laboratory...

  6. Development of laboratory and process sensors to monitor particle size distribution of industrial slurries (including shape characterization). Final technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pendse, H.P.; Goetz, P.J.; Sharma, A.; Han, W; Bliss, T.C.

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall goal of the Particle Size Distribution (PSD) sensor projects was to develop and commercialize a sensor system capable of particle analysis, in terms of size distributions, using concentrated suspensions at high solids concentrations. The early research was focused on application of ultrasonic spectroscopy of inorganic pigment slurries (e.g. titanium dioxide) commonly encountered on paper industry. During the project prototypes were tested in both academic and industrial laboratories. Work also involved successful field tests of the on-line prototype at a pigment manufacturing facility. Pen Kem continued the work at its cost beyond the initial funded period from March `92 to September `94. The first project (DE- FC05-88CE40684), which began in September 1988, culminated in a commercial laboratory instrument, Pen Kem AcoustoPhor {trademark} 8000, put on the market in June 1993. The follow-on project was aimed at investigation of shape and orientation effects on ultrasonic spectroscopy. A new cooperative agreement was awarded in September 1994 (DE-FC05-94CE40005) to develop shape characterization capabilities deemed critical by the clay industry. This follow-on project achieved following successes: A theoretical model was developed to account for the effects of size-dependent aspect ratios of spheroid particles under different orientations on ultrasound attenuation spectra of concentrated slurries. The theoretical model was confirmed by laboratory tests on kaolin slurries. An algorithm was developed to simulate evolution of particle orientation fields in simple squeezing flows.

  7. SEQUESTRATION OF METALS IN ACTIVE CAP MATERIALS: A LABORATORY AND NUMERICAL EVALUATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dixon, K.; Knox, A.

    2012-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Active capping involves the use of capping materials that react with sediment contaminants to reduce their toxicity or bioavailability. Although several amendments have been proposed for use in active capping systems, little is known about their long-term ability to sequester metals. Recent research has shown that the active amendment apatite has potential application for metals contaminated sediments. The focus of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of apatite in the sequestration of metal contaminants through the use of short-term laboratory column studies in conjunction with predictive, numerical modeling. A breakthrough column study was conducted using North Carolina apatite as the active amendment. Under saturated conditions, a spike solution containing elemental As, Cd, Co, Se, Pb, Zn, and a non-reactive tracer was injected into the column. A sand column was tested under similar conditions as a control. Effluent water samples were periodically collected from each column for chemical analysis. Relative to the non-reactive tracer, the breakthrough of each metal was substantially delayed by the apatite. Furthermore, breakthrough of each metal was substantially delayed by the apatite compared to the sand column. Finally, a simple 1-D, numerical model was created to qualitatively predict the long-term performance of apatite based on the findings from the column study. The results of the modeling showed that apatite could delay the breakthrough of some metals for hundreds of years under typical groundwater flow velocities.

  8. International Council for Laboratory Animal Science: International activities. Institute of Laboratory Animal Resources annual report, 1993--1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In late 1987, the Interagency Research Animal Committee (IRAC) requested that the Institute of Laboratory Animal Resources (ILAR), National Research Council (NRC), National Academy of Sciences, reestablish US national membership in the International Council for Laboratory Animal Science (ICLAS). The ICLAS is the only worldwide organization whose goal is to foster the humane use of animals in medical research and testing. ILAR`s Mission Statement reflects its commitment to producing highly respected documents covering a wide range of scientific issues, including databases in genetic stocks, species specific management guides, guidelines for humane care of animals, and position papers on issues affecting the future of the biological sciences. As such, ILAR is recognized nationally and internationally as an independent, scientific authority in the development of animal sciences in biomedical research.

  9. activity size distributions: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of nutrients increased Mazumder, Asit 33 A COMPOSITE SOURCE MODEL WITH FRACTAL SUBEVENT SIZE DISTRIBUTION Geosciences Websites Summary: A COMPOSITE SOURCE MODEL WITH FRACTAL...

  10. activity size distribution: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of nutrients increased Mazumder, Asit 33 A COMPOSITE SOURCE MODEL WITH FRACTAL SUBEVENT SIZE DISTRIBUTION Geosciences Websites Summary: A COMPOSITE SOURCE MODEL WITH FRACTAL...

  11. Distribution of Chromium Contamination and Microbial Activity in Soil Aggregates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tokunaga, Tetsu K.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Distribution of Chromium Contamination and Microbialand predict the fate of Cr contamination. Typical methods ofOur previous work on Cr contamination was done using such

  12. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Facilities Division- Optimizing Activity-level Work Planning and Control Lessons Learned

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presenter: Ken Fletcher, Deputy Division Director for Facilities, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

  13. A Completely Integrated Approach to Developing, Implementing, Evaluating Distributed Active

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wedde, Horst F.

    -critical systems, (such as nuclear power plants, distributed cooperation of autonomous robots in Outer Space a distributed testbed for database application systems in safety-critical real-time environments. Given that safety/ reliability requirements and real- time constraints are in conflict there cannot be a closed form

  14. Strontium Distribution Coefficients of Surficial and Sedimentary Interbed Samples from the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Idaho

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. J. Liszewski (USGS); J. J. Rosentreter (ISU); K. E. Miller (USGS); R. C. Bartholomay (USGS)

    1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The transport and fate of waste constituents in geologic media is dependent on physical and chemical processes that govern the distribution of constituents between the solid, geologic, stationary phase and an aqueous, mobile phase. This distribution often is quantified, at thermodynamic equilibrium by an empirically determined parameter called the distribution coefficient (Kd). Kd's can be used effectively to summarize the chemical factors that affect transport efficiency of ground-water constituents. Strontium distribution coefficients (Kd's) were measured for 21 surficial and 17 sedimentary interbed samples collected from sediment cores from selected sites at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) to help assess the variability of strontium Kd's at the INEEL as part of an ongoing investigation of strontium chemical-transport properties. Batch experimental techniques were used to determine strontium Kd's of the sediments. Measured strontium Kd's of th e surficial and interbedded sediments ranged from 26{+-}1 to 328{+-}41 milliliters per gram. These results indicate significant variability in the strontium sorptive capacities of surficial and interbedded sediments at the INEEL. Some of this variability can be attributed to physical and chemical properties of the sediment; other variability may be due to compositional changes in the equilibrated solutions after being mixed with the sediment.

  15. Idaho National Laboratory Cultural Resource Management Office FY 2010 Activity Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hollie K. Gilbert; Clayton F. Marler; Christina L. Olson; Brenda R. Pace; Julie Braun Williams

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Site is home to vast numbers and a wide variety of important cultural resources representing at least a 13,500 year span of human land use in the region. As a federal agency, the Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID) has legal responsibility for the management and protection of the resources and has contracted these responsibilities to Battelle Energy Alliance (BEA). The BEA professional staff is committed to maintaining a cultural resource management program that accepts the challenge of preserving INL cultural resources in a manner reflecting their importance in local, regional, and national history. This report summarizes activities performed by the INL Cultural Resource Management Office (CRMO) staff during fiscal year 2010. This work is diverse, far-reaching and though generally confined to INL cultural resource compliance, also includes a myriad of professional and voluntary community activities. This document is intended to be informative to both internal and external stakeholders and to serve as a planning tool for future INL cultural resource management work.

  16. Idaho National Laboratory Cultural Resource Management Office FY 2011 Activity Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Julie Braun Williams; Brenda R. Pace; Hollie K. Gilbert; Christina L. Olson

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Site is home to vast numbers and a wide variety of important cultural resources representing at least a 13,500 year span of human land use in the region. As a federal agency, the Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID) has legal responsibility for the management and protection of the resources and has contracted these responsibilities to Battelle Energy Alliance (BEA). The BEA professional staff is committed to maintaining a cultural resource management program that accepts the challenge of preserving INL cultural resources in a manner reflecting their importance in local, regional, and national history. This report is intended as a stand-alone document that summarizes activities performed by the INL Cultural Resource Management Office (CRMO) staff during fiscal year 2011. This work is diverse, far-reaching and though generally confined to INL cultural resource compliance, also includes a myriad of professional and voluntary community activities. This document is intended to be informative to both internal and external stakeholders, serve as a planning tool for future INL cultural resource management work, and meet an agreed upon legal requirement.

  17. Sandia National Laboratories: IRED

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SMART Grid, Solar Sandia National Laboratories, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and European Distributed Energies Research Laboratories (DERlab) have organized a...

  18. active distribution networks: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    activity. Specifically, the degree of an individual is entirely random - following a "maximum entropy attachment" model - except for its mean value which depends...

  19. Strontium Distribution Coefficients of Basalt and Sediment Infill Samples from the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Idaho

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. N. Pace; R. C. Bartholomay (USGS); J. J. Rosentreter (ISU)

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Geological Survey and Idaho State University, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy, are conducting a study to determine and evaluate strontium distribution coefficients (Kds) of subsurface materials at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The purpose of this study is to aid in assessing the variability of strontium Kds at the INEEL as part of an ongoing investigation of chemical transport of strontium-90 in the Snake River Plain aquifer. Batch experimental techniques were used to determine Kds of six basalt core samples, five samples of sediment infill of vesicles and fractures, and six standard material samples. Analyses of data from these experiments indicate that the Kds of the sediment infill samples are significantly larger than those of the basalt samples. Quantification of such information is essential of furthering the understanding of transport processes of strontium-90 in the Snake River Plain aquifer and in similar environments.

  20. Laboratory studies of radionuclide distributions between selected groundwaters and geologic media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erdal, B.R. (ed.)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Extensive studies of the behavior of plutonium and americium in pH 8 groundwaters were made, particularly with respect to container sorption, filtering, and centrifugation. Significant improvements in the method used for measuring sorption ratios for these elements were developed, and their sorption-desorption ratios on argillite and tuff were measured. Effects of particle size, temperature, sampling location, mineralogy, and time were investigated for these elements. The chemical composition of the water was found to be a major factor that governs sorption behavior for some elements. Studies of the sorption of strontium, cesium, barium, cerium, europium, uranium, and americium on Hainesville salt dome materials were made under aerobic and anoxic (< 0.2 ppm oxygen) conditions using two synthetic groundwaters: one represented the Wilcox aquifer in the Hainesville region and the second was a dilute brine. Studies of the sorption of strontium, cesium, barium, cerium, europium, and uranium(VI) on granite and argillite were made under anoxic (< 0.2 ppm oxygen) conditions and the results were compared to earlier measurements made under aerobic conditions. The sorption of uranium(VI) on argillite under atmospheric conditions was investigated. Measurements of migration rates in crushed granite, argillite, and tuff were made and compared with batch results. Infiltration experiments involving the forced injection of activity into intact and fractured cores were also performed. Microautoradiographic techniques were used to detect specific sorption sites. This latter technique was also used to characterize the sorption of plutonium and neptunium on polished thin-sections of alluvium, granite, tuff, and argillite and to assess the amount of aggregation that occurred. Additional physical and chemical characterizations of the materials used in these studies were made, and new analytical techniques were developed.

  1. Naval Civil Engineering Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Naval Civil Engineering Laboratory Personnel from the Power Systems Department have participated in numerous distribution equipment research, development, demonstration, testing,...

  2. Draft Strategic Laboratory Missions Plan. Volume II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume described in detail the Department`s research and technology development activities and their funding at the Department`s laboratories. It includes 166 Mission Activity Profiles, organized by major mission area, with each representing a discrete budget function called a Budget and Reporting (B & R) Code. The activities profiled here encompass the total research and technology development funding of the laboratories from the Department. Each profile includes a description of the activity and shows how the funding for that activity is distributed among the DOE laboratories as well as universities and industry. The profiles also indicate the principal laboratories for each activity, as well as which other laboratories are involved. The information in this volume is at the core of the Strategic Laboratory Mission Plan. It enables a reader to follow funds from the Department`s appropriation to a specific activity description and to specific R & D performing institutions. This information will enable the Department, along with the Laboratory Operations Board and Congress, to review the distribution of R & D performers chosen to execute the Department`s missions.

  3. Energy-efficiency testing activities of the Mobile Energy Laboratory - Semiannual Report: April 1, 1990, Through September 30, 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parker, G.B.; Currie, J.W.

    1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes energy-efficiency testing activities applying the Mobile Energy Laboratory (MEL) testing capabilities during the third and fourth quarters of fiscal year (FY) 1990. The MELs, developed by the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), are administered by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and the Naval Energy and Environmental Support Activity (NEESA) for energy testing and energy conservation program support functions at federal facilities. MELs are equipped for the on-site evaluation of energy use efficiency. The using agencies principally fund MEL applications, while DOE/FEMP funds program administration and capability enhancement activities. This report fulfills the requirements established in Section 8 of the MEL Use Plan (PNL-6861) for semiannual reporting on energy-efficiency testing activities using the MEL capabilities. The MEL Use Committee, formally established in 1989, developed the MEL Use Plan and meets semiannually to establish priorities for energy-efficient testing applications using the MEL capabilities. This report describes the testing, test results, and suggested courses of action.

  4. Developing the Next Generation of International Safeguards and Nonproliferation Experts: Highlights of Select Activities at the National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reed, J; Mathews, C; Kirk, B; Lynch, P; Doyle, J; Meek, E; Pepper, S; Metcalf, R

    2010-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    With many safeguards experts in the United States at or near retirement age, and with the growing and evolving mission of international safeguards, attracting and educating a new generation of safeguards experts is an important element of maintaining a credible and capable international safeguards system. The United States National Laboratories, with their rich experience in addressing the technical and policy challenges of international safeguards, are an important resource for attracting, educating, and training future safeguards experts. This presentation highlights some of the safeguards education and professional development activities underway at the National Laboratories. These include university outreach, summer courses, internships, mid-career transition, knowledge retention, and other projects. The presentation concludes with thoughts on the challenge of interdisciplinary education and the recruitment of individuals with the right balance of skills and backgrounds are recruited to meet tomorrow's needs.

  5. Oil and Gas CDT Gas hydrate distribution on tectonically active continental

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henderson, Gideon

    Oil and Gas CDT Gas hydrate distribution on tectonically active continental margins: Impact on gas. Gregory F. Moore, University of Hawaii (USA) http://www.soest.hawaii.edu/moore/ Key Words Gas Hydrates, Faults, Fluid Flow, gas prospectivity Overview Fig. 1. Research on gas hydrates is often undertaken

  6. Sub-THz Beam-forming using Near-field Coupling of Distributed Active Radiator Arrays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hajimiri, Ali

    91125, USA Abstract -- The paper demonstrates Distributed Active Radiator (DAR) arrays as a novel way for mutually locking multiple DARs to beam-form and generate high EIRP. As proofs of concept, 2x1 and 2x2 arrays of DARs, mutually synchronized through near-field coupling, are implemented in 65nm bulk CMOS

  7. Small-Signal Stability Assessment of Active Distribution Networks with Dynamic Loads

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pota, Himanshu Roy

    the flow of power and the voltage profiles of the system and these profiles are different for different types of loads [3]. In addition to the power flow at and around N. K. Roy, H. R. Pota, and T. F. OrchiSmall-Signal Stability Assessment of Active Distribution Networks with Dynamic Loads N. K. Roy

  8. Engineering of Multi-Agent Systems to Effectuate Distributed Data Mining Activities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abidi, Syed Sibte Raza

    Engineering of Multi-Agent Systems to Effectuate Distributed Data Mining Activities Syed Zahid healthcare enterprise. When adopting this view, a set of data access and mining issues can be addressed using, Dalhousie University, Halifax B3H 1W5, CANADA Abstract The proliferation of healthcare data has resulted

  9. Semi-distributed lumped model of a karst system under active1 management2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    system27 28 Keywords29 Impulse response30 Groundwater flow modeling31 Groundwater level fluctuations32 Pumping33 Introduction34 Numerical models for karst aquifers usually fall within two main categories1 Semi-distributed lumped model of a karst system under active1 management2 Bernard LADOUCHE1

  10. Report on my activities at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, April-July 1985

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Covey, C.

    1985-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The report discusses the author's activities at LLNL while working on general circulation model studies of ''nuclear winter''. The activities included developing modifications to the radiation code representing absorption of sunlight by smoke, and combining the GCM with GRANTOUR so that smoke could be advected and removed by GCM-computed meteorology. (ACR)

  11. A report on IPv6 deployment activities and issues at Sandia National Laboratories:FY2007.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tolendino, Lawrence F.; Eldridge, John M.; Hu, Tan Chang; Maestas, Joseph H.

    2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Internet Protocol version 4 (IPv4) has been a mainstay of the both the Internet and corporate networks for delivering network packets to the desired destination. However, rapid proliferation of network appliances, evolution of corporate networks, and the expanding Internet has begun to stress the limitations of the protocol. Internet Protocol version 6 (IPv6) is the replacement protocol that overcomes the constraints of IPv4. As the emerging Internet network protocol, SNL needs to prepare for its eventual deployment in international, national, customer, and local networks. Additionally, the United States Office of Management and Budget has mandated that IPv6 deployment in government network backbones occurs by 2008. This paper explores the readiness of the Sandia National Laboratories network backbone to support IPv6, the issues that must be addressed before a deployment begins, and recommends the next steps to take to comply with government mandates. The paper describes a joint work effort of the Sandia National Laboratories ASC WAN project team and members of the System Analysis & Trouble Resolution, the Communication & Network Systems, and Network System Design & Implementation Departments.

  12. Comparison of parameter sensitivities between a laboratory and field scale model of uranium transport in a dual domain, distributed-rate reactive system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greskowiak, Janek; Prommer, Henning; Liu, Chongxuan; Post, Vincent; Ma, Rui; Zheng, Chunmiao; Zachara, John M.

    2010-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A laboratory-derived conceptual and numerical model for U(VI) transport at the Hanford 300A site, Washington, USA, was applied to a range of field-scale scenarios of different complexity to systematically evaluate model parameter sensitivities. The model, originally developed from column experiment data, included distributed-rate surface complexation kinetics of U(VI), aqueous speciation, and physical non-equilibrium transport processes. A rigorous parameter sensitivity analysis was carried out with respect to different state variables: concentrations, mass fluxes, total mass and spatial moments of dissolved U(VI) for laboratory systems, and various simulation scenarios that represented the field-scale characteristics at the Hanford 300A site. The field-scenarios accounted for transient groundwater flow and variable geochemical conditions driven by frequent water level changes of the nearby Columbia River. Simulations indicated that the transient conditions significantly affected U(VI) plume migration at the site. The parameter sensitivities were largely similar between the laboratory and field scale systems. Where differences existed, they were shown to result from differing degrees of U(VI) adsorption disequilibrium caused by hydraulic or hydrogeochemical conditions. Adorption disequilibrium was found to differ (i) between short duration peak flow events at the field scale and much longer flow events in the laboratory, (ii) for changing groundwater chemical compositions due to river water intrusion, and (iii) for different sampling locations at the field scale. Parameter sensitivities were also found to vary with respect to the different investigated state variables. An approach is demonstrated that elucidates the most important parameters of a laboratory-scale model that must constrained in both the laboratory and field for meaningful field application.

  13. SELECTING THE BEST POINT OF CONNECTION FOR SHUNT ACTIVE FILTERS IN MULTI-BUS POWER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Catholic University of Chile (Universidad Católica de Chile)

    and reliability. The selection of the active filter point of connection in multi-bus power distribution systems to the power distribution system, the point of connection must be carefully selected so the generated harmonic components flow to the nonlinear loads and do not propagate through the distribution system. In this paper

  14. A 2.7-kW, 29-MHz Class-E/Fodd with a Distributed Active Transformer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    91125 Abstract -- A Class-E/Fodd high power amplifier (PA) using the distributed active transformer (DAT-efficiency power amplifier (PA) is a key component for various applications in the HF and VHF bands the PA needs a power-combining structure. The distributed active transformer (DAT) has been proposed

  15. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Institutional Plan, FY 1997--FY 2002

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Three major initiatives are described, which are proposed to strengthen ORNL`s ability to support the missions of the Department: neutron science, functional genomics, and distributed computing at teraflop speeds. The laboratory missions, strategic plan, scientific and technical programs, enterprise activities, laboratory operations, and resource projections are also described.

  16. TIME INTEGRATED MEASUREMENTS OF THE ACTIVITY-WEIGHTED SIZE DISTRIBUTION OF RADON PROGENY by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    William C. Tetley P. E; Daniel R. Westcott; Bruce A. Cununings

    The dose to the lung is dependent on the size distribution as well as the concentration of radon progeny. The principal indicator of particle size is the diffusion coefficient. The diffusion coefficient of radon progeny is the most important parameter in determining whether the particle will deposit its alpha energy in the tracheobronchial region of the respiratory tract. Due to the importance of the size distribution of progeny when characterizing health effects, a detector was developed that exploits the difference in diffusion coefficients to provide integrated measurements of the activity-weighted size distribution. Several radon chamber tests were performed in which the diffusion coefficient and unattached fraction of radon progeny were varied by the use of trace gasses and aerosol particles. The technical feasibility of this new detector design was demonstrated in all cases.

  17. Data base management activities for the Remedial Action Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratories (ORNL)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hook, L.A.; Voorhees, L.D.; Gentry, M.J.; Faulkner, M.A.; Shaakir-Ali, J.A.; Newman, K.A.; McCord, R.A.; Goins, L.F.; Owen, P.T.

    1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Remedial Action Program (RAP) was established in 1985 in response to state and federal regulations requiring comprehensive control over facility discharges and cleanup of contaminated sites. A computerized Data and Information Management System (DIMS) was developed for RAP to (1) provide a centralized repository for data pertinent to RAP and (2) provide support for the investigations and assessments leading to the long-term remediation of contaminated facilities and sites. The current status of DIMS and its role in supporting RAP during 1989 are described. The DIMS consists of three components: (1) the Numeric Data Base, (2) the Bibliographic Data Base, and (3) the Records Control Data Base. This report addresses all three data bases, but focuses on the contents of the Numeric Data Base. Significant progress was made last year with the geographic information system (GIS) and ARC/INFO, which can be interfaced with SAS/GRAPH to provide combined mapping and statistical graphic products. Several thematic layers of GIS data for the Oak Ridge Reservation are now available. 18 refs., 8 figs., 19 tabs.

  18. Food and Drug Administration process validation activities to support 99Mo production at Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDonald, M.J.; Bourcier, S.C.; Talley, D.G.

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Prior to 1989 {sup 99}Mo was produced in the US by a single supplier, Cintichem Inc., Tuxedo, NY. Because of problems associated with operating its facility, in 1989 Cintichem elected to decommission the facility rather than incur the costs for repair. The demise of the {sup 99}Mo capability at Cintichem left the US totally reliant upon a single foreign source, Nordion International, located in Ottawa Canada. In 1992 the DOE purchased the Cintichem {sup 99}Mo Production Process and Drug Master File (DMF). In 1994 the DOE funded Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) to produce {sup 99}Mo. Although Cintichem produced {sup 99}Mo and {sup 99m}Tc generators for many years, there was no requirement for process validation which is now required by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). In addition to the validation requirement, the requirements for current Good manufacturing Practices were codified into law. The purpose of this paper is to describe the process validation being conducted at SNL for the qualification of SNL as a supplier of {sup 99}Mo to US pharmaceutical companies.

  19. A Model-Driven Architecture for Highly Distributed, Data-Intensive Systems Jet Propulsion Laboratory, May 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mattmann, Chris

    from unstructured and semi-structure information (ii) Scalable, secure, federated search (iii The Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) has been researching and building data intensive systems for highly for both solar system and earth exploration, these systems have a number of critical architectural

  20. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory 1991 activity report. Facility developments January 1991--March 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cantwell, K.; St. Pierre, M. [eds.

    1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    SSRL is a national facility supported primarily by the Department of Energy for the utilization of synchrotron radiation for basic and applied research in the natural sciences and engineering. It is a user-oriented facility which welcomes proposals for experiments from all researchers. The synchrotron radiation is produced by the 3.5 GeV storage ring, SPEAR, located at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). SPEAR is a fully dedicated synchrotron radiation facility which operates for user experiments 7 to 9 months per year. SSRL currently has 24 experimental stations on the SPEAR storage ring. There are 145 active proposals for experimental work from 81 institutions involving approximately 500 scientists. There is normally no charge for use of beam time by experimenters. This report summarizes the activity at SSRL for the period January 1, 1991 to December 31, 1991 for research. Facility development through March 1992 is included.

  1. Annual report on surveillance and maintenance activities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, fiscal year 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In fiscal year (FY) 1995, the sites and facilities from both the Remedial Action (RA) and Decontamination and Decommissioning (D and D) programs were combined to form the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Environmental Restoration (ER) Surveillance and Maintenance (S and M) Program. Surveillance and Maintenance activities were conducted throughout FY 1996 at the RA facilities. Overall, the RA S and M Program consists of approximately 650 acres that include 14 waste area groupings with approximately 200 sites. These sites include 46 major facilities, several leak and contaminated soil sites, 38 inactive tanks, approximately 50 environmental study areas and approximately 2,973 wells and boreholes. Site inspections were conducted at established frequencies on appropriate sites in the RA S and M Program in accordance with the established S and M FY 1996 Incentive Task Order (ITO).

  2. Summary of activities of the life cycle costing workshop conducted by the Environmental Restoration Program of Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A five-day life cycle workshop was conducted by the Environmental Restoration (FR) Program of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to develop appropriate remediation scenarios for each Waste Area Grouping (WAG) at ORNL and to identify associated data needs (e.g., remedial investigations, special studies, and technology demonstrations) and required interfaces. Workshop participants represented the Department of Energy, Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Bechtel National, Radian Corporation, EBASCO Corporation, and M-K Ferguson. The workshop was used to establish a technical basis for remediation activities at each WAG. The workshop results are documented in this report and provide the baseline for estimating the technical scope for each WAG. The scope and associated budgets and schedules will be summarized in baseline reports for each WAG, which, in turn, will be compiled into an overall strategy document for ORNL ER.

  3. The Use of Chemical and Physical Properties for Characterization of Strontium Distribution Coefficients at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Idaho

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. J. Rosentreter; R. Nieves; J. Kalivas; J. P. Rousseau; R. C. Bartholomay

    1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Geological Survey and Idaho State University, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy, conducted a study to determine strontium distribution coefficients (Kds) of surficial sediments at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). Batch experimental techniques were used to determine experimental Kds of 20 surficial-sediment samples from the INEEL. The Kds describe the distribution of a solute between the solution and solid phase. A best-fit model was obtained using a four-variable data set consisting of surface area, manganese oxide concentration, specific conductance, and pH. Application of the model to an independent split of the data resulted in an average relative error of prediction of 20 percent and a correlation coefficient of 0.921 between predicted and observed strontium Kds. Chemical and physical characteristics of the solution and sediment that could successfully predict the Kd values were identified. Prediction variable select ion was limited to variables which are either easily determined or have available tabulated characteristics. The selection criterion could circumvent the need for time- and labor-intensive laboratory experiments and provide an alternate faster method for estimating strontium Kds.

  4. FY 1994 annual summary report of the surveillance and maintenance activities for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Environmental Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Environmental Restoration (ER) Surveillance and Maintenance (S and M) Program was initiated to manage former waste management and environmental research sites contaminated with radioactive materials and/or hazardous chemicals. The S and M Program is responsible for managing designated sites/facilities from the end of their operating lives until final disposition or site stabilization. To effectively manage and perform the various S and M Program responsibilities, five summary-level work breakdown structure (WBS) elements have been established: S and M Preliminary Investigations, Special Projects, Routine S and M, Inactive Groundwater Wells, and Project Management. Routine S and M activities were conducted as scheduled throughout fiscal years (FY) 1994 at applicable inactive waste management (WM) and other contaminated areas. Overall, the ER S and M Program maintains 47 facilities, performs vegetation maintenance on approximately 230 acres, maintains 54 inactive tanks, and provides overall site management on over 700 acres. In addition to the routine S and M activities, detailed site inspections were conducted at established frequencies on appropriate sites in the ER S and M Program. This document provides a summary of the FY 1994 ORNL ER S and M Program accomplishments.

  5. Particle Size Distribution Data From Existing Boreholes at the Immobilized Low-Activity Waste Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Valenta, Michelle M.; Martin, Maria B.; Moreno, Jorge R.; Ferri, Rosalie M.; Horton, Duane G.; Reidel, Stephen P.

    2000-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides particle size distribution data for samples near the Immobilized Low-Activity Waste (ILAW) Site that were archived in the Hanford Geotechnical Sample Library. Seventy-nine sediment samples were analyzed from four boreholes. Samples were collected from every ten feet in the boreholes. Eightly percent of the samples were classified as slightly gravelly sand. Fifteen percent were classified as gravelly sand, gravelly silty sand, or sandy gravels. These data indicate that the particle size of the sediment is consistent across the ILAW site and is dominated by sand in the upper part of the Hanford formation with more gravel rich units in the lower part.

  6. Laboratory Evaporation Testing Of Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Low Activity Waste Off-Gas Condensate Simulant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adamson, Duane J.; Nash, Charles A.; McCabe, Daniel J.; Crawford, Charles L.; Wilmarth, William R.

    2014-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Low Activity Waste (LAW) vitrification facility will generate an aqueous condensate recycle stream, LAW Off-Gas Condensate, from the off-gas system. The baseline plan for disposition of this stream is to send it to the WTP Pretreatment Facility, where it will be blended with LAW, concentrated by evaporation and recycled to the LAW vitrification facility again. Alternate disposition of this stream would eliminate recycling of problematic components, and would enable de-coupled operation of the LAW melter and the Pretreatment Facilities. Eliminating this stream from recycling within WTP would also decrease the LAW vitrification mission duration and quantity of canistered glass waste forms. This LAW Off-Gas Condensate stream contains components that are volatile at melter temperatures and are problematic for the glass waste form. Because this stream recycles within WTP, these components accumulate in the Condensate stream, exacerbating their impact on the number of LAW glass containers that must be produced. Approximately 32% of the sodium in Supplemental LAW comes from glass formers used to make the extra glass to dilute the halides to be within acceptable concentration ranges in the LAW glass. Diverting the stream reduces the halides in the recycled Condensate and is a key outcome of this work. Additionally, under possible scenarios where the LAW vitrification facility commences operation prior to the WTP Pretreatment facility, identifying a disposition path becomes vitally important. This task examines the impact of potential future disposition of this stream in the Hanford tank farms, and investigates auxiliary evaporation to enable another disposition path. Unless an auxiliary evaporator is used, returning the stream to the tank farms would require evaporation in the 242-A evaporator. This stream is expected to be unusual because it will be very high in corrosive species that are volatile in the melter (chloride, fluoride, sulfur), will have high ammonia, and will contain carryover particulates of glass-former chemicals. These species have potential to cause corrosion of tanks and equipment, precipitation of solids, release of ammonia gas vapors, and scale in the tank farm evaporator. Routing this stream to the tank farms does not permanently divert it from recycling into the WTP, only temporarily stores it prior to reprocessing. Testing is normally performed to demonstrate acceptable conditions and limits for these compounds in wastes sent to the tank farms. The primary parameter of this phase of the test program was measuring the formation of solids during evaporation in order to assess the compatibility of the stream with the evaporator and transfer and storage equipment. The origin of this LAW Off-Gas Condensate stream will be the liquids from the Submerged Bed Scrubber (SBS) and the Wet Electrostatic Precipitator (WESP) from the LAW facility melter offgas system. The stream is expected to be a dilute salt solution with near neutral pH, and will likely contain some insoluble solids from melter carryover. The soluble components are expected to be mostly sodium and ammonium salts of nitrate, chloride, and fluoride. This stream has not been generated yet, and, thus, the composition will not be available until the WTP begins operation, but a simulant has been produced based on models, calculations, and comparison with pilot-scale tests. This report discusses results of evaporation testing of the simulant. Two conditions were tested, one with the simulant at near neutral pH, and a second at alkaline pH. The neutral pH test is comparable to the conditions in the Hanford Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) evaporator, although that evaporator operates at near atmospheric pressure and tests were done under vacuum. For the alkaline test, the target pH was based on the tank farm corrosion control program requirements, and the test protocol and equipment was comparable to that used for routine evaluation of feed compatibility studies for the 242-A evaporator. One of the

  7. CAN A LONG NANOFLARE STORM EXPLAIN THE OBSERVED EMISSION MEASURE DISTRIBUTIONS IN ACTIVE REGION CORES?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mulu-Moore, Fana M.; Winebarger, Amy R. [NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, VP 62, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Warren, Harry P., E-mail: fanamariam.mulumoore@nasa.gov [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

    2011-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    All theories that attempt to explain the heating of the high-temperature plasma observed in the solar corona are based on short bursts of energy. The intensities and velocities measured in the cores of quiescent active regions, however, can be steady over many hours of observation. One heating scenario that has been proposed to reconcile such observations with impulsive heating models is the 'long nanoflare storm', where short-duration heating events occur infrequently on many sub-resolution strands; the emission of the strands is then averaged together to explain the observed steady structures. In this Letter, we examine the emission measure distribution predicted for such a long nanoflare storm by modeling an arcade of strands in an active region core. Comparisons of the computed emission measure distributions with recent observations indicate that the long nanoflare storm scenario implies greater than five times more 1 MK emission than is actually observed for all plausible combinations of loop lengths, heating rates, and abundances. We conjecture that if the plasma had 'super coronal' abundances, the model may be able to match the observations at low temperatures.

  8. The naval Research Laboratory has been actively involved in research in unmanned and autonomous systems since its opening in 1923. From one of the first unmanned

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    systems since its opening in 1923. From one of the first unmanned ground vehicles to the developmentThe naval Research Laboratory has been actively involved in research in unmanned and autonomous of more than 200 prototype air, ground, underwater, and space platforms, and from smart sensors to smart

  9. Laboratory and Field Testing of Commercially Available Detectors for the Identification of Chemicals of Interest in the Nuclear Fuel Cycle for the Detection of Undeclared Activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carla Miller; Mary Adamic; Stacey Barker; Barry Siskind; Joe Brady; Warren Stern; Heidi Smartt; Mike McDaniel; Mike Stern; Rollin Lakis

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Traditionally, IAEA inspectors have focused on the detection of nuclear indicators as part of infield inspection activities. The ability to rapidly detect and identify chemical as well as nuclear signatures can increase the ability of IAEA inspectors to detect undeclared activities at a site. Identification of chemical indicators have been limited to use in the analysis of environmental samples. Although IAEA analytical laboratories are highly effective, environmental sample processing does not allow for immediate or real-time results to an IAEA inspector at a facility. During a complementary access inspection, under the Additional Protocol, the use of fieldable technologies that can quickly provide accurate information on chemicals that may be indicative of undeclared activities can increase the ability of IAEA to effectively and efficiently complete their mission. The Complementary Access Working Group (CAWG) is a multi-laboratory team with members from Brookhaven National Laboratory, Idaho National Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory, and Sandia National Laboratory. The team identified chemicals at each stage of the nuclear fuel cycle that may provide IAEA inspectors with indications that proliferation activities may be occurring. The group eliminated all indicators related to equipment, technology and training, developing a list of by-products/effluents, non-nuclear materials, nuclear materials, and other observables. These proliferation indicators were prioritized based on detectability from a conduct of operations (CONOPS) perspective of a CA inspection (for example, whether an inspector actually can access the S&O or whether it is in process with no physical access), and the IAEA’s interest in the detection technology in conjunction with radiation detectors. The list was consolidated to general categories (nuclear materials from a chemical detection technique, inorganic chemicals, organic chemicals, halogens, and miscellaneous materials). The team then identified commercial off the shelf (COTS) chemical detectors that may detect the chemicals of interest. Three chemical detectors were selected and tested both in laboratory settings and in field operations settings at Idaho National Laboratory. The instruments selected are: Thermo Scientific TruDefender FT (FTIR), Thermo Scientific FirstDefender RM (Raman), and Bruker Tracer III SD (XRF). Functional specifications, operability, and chemical detectability, selectivity, and limits of detection were determined. Results from the laboratory and field tests will be presented. This work is supported by the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative, Office of Nonproliferation and International Security, National Nuclear Security Administration.

  10. Sandia National Laboratories: high PV penetration levels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SMART Grid, Solar Sandia National Laboratories, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and European Distributed Energies Research Laboratories (DERlab) have organized a...

  11. Sandia National Laboratories: Fifth International Conference...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SMART Grid, Solar Sandia National Laboratories, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and European Distributed Energies Research Laboratories (DERlab) have organized a...

  12. Laboratory compaction of cohesionless sands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delphia, John Girard

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on the maximum dry unit weight during compaction. Three different laboratory compaction methods were used: 1) Standard Proctor', 2) Modified Proctor; and 3) Vibrating hammer. The effects of the grain size distribution, particle shape and laboratory compaction...

  13. Laboratory studies of radionuclide distributions between selected groundwaters and geologic media. Annual report, October 1, 1978-September 30, 1979

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erdal, B.R. (comp.)

    1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Extensive studies of the behavior of plutonium and americium in pH approx. = 8 groundwaters were made, particularly with respect to container sorption, filtering, and centrifugation. Significant improvements in the method used for measuring sorption ratios for these elements were developed, and their sorption-desorption ratios on argillite and tuff were measured. Effects of particle size, temperature, sampling location, mineralogy, and time were investigated for these elements. The chemical composition of the water was found to be a major factor that governs sorption behavior. Studies of the sorption of strontion, cesium, barium, cerium, europium, uranium, and americium on Hainesville salt dome materials were made under aerobic and anoxic (<0.2 ppM oxygen) conditions using two synthetic groundwaters: one represented the Wilcox aquifer in the Hainesville region and the second was a dilute brine. Studies of the sorption of strontium, cesium, barium, cerium, europium, and uranium(VI) on granite and argillite were made under anoxic (<0.2 ppM oxygen) conditions and the results were compared to earlier measurements made under aerobic conditions. The sorption of uranium(VI) on argillite under atmospheric conditions was investigated. Measurements of migration rates in crushed granite, argillite, and tuff were made and compared with batch results. Infiltration experiments involving the forced injection of activity into intact and fractured cores were also performed. Microautoradiographic techniques were used to detect specific sorption sites. This latter technique was also used to characterize the sorption of plutonium and neptunium on polished thin-sections of alluvium, granite, tuff, and argillite and to assess the amount of aggregation that occurred. Additional physical and chemical characterizations of the materials used in these studies were made, and new analytical techniques were developed.

  14. Annual summary report on the surveillance and maintenance activities for the Oak Rige National Laboratory Environmental Restoration Program for fiscal year 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Annual Summary Report on the Surveillance and Maintenance Activities for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Environmental Restoration Program for Fiscal Year 1995 was prepared to communicate the accomplishments of the Program during fiscal year 1995. This work was performed under work breakdown structure element 1.4.12.6.1.14.20 (activity data sheet 3314, ``Remedial Action Surveillance and Maintenance``). Publication of this document meets the Life Cycle Baseline milestone date of November 30, 1995. This document provides the accomplishments for both the Remedial Action and Decontamination and Decommissioning Surveillance and Maintenance programs.

  15. The production and distribution of food is one of the most important economic activities in the world. The

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carleton University

    produced and to respond to issues such as irradiation of foods, genetically modified foods, food in cell physiology and biochemistry, genetics and organic chemistry. A Principles of Nutrition (FOOD 2001The production and distribution of food is one of the most important economic activities

  16. The effects of practice distribution upon the regional oscillatory activity in visuomotor learning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Studer, Bettina; Koeneke, Susan; Blum, Julia; Jancke, Lutz

    2010-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    , provided the original work is properly cited. motor learning. So far, explanations of the proposed superiority of distributed practice schedules were pri- marily based on practical considerations (e.g. attention demands, fatigue). The neural underpinnings... an explanation for this incon- sistency with the findings of most previous studies. The superiority of distributed over massed practice has pre- dominately been shown in simple motor tasks in which the temporal distribution of training sessions led to bet- ter...

  17. Decommissioning of Active Ventilation Systems in a Nuclear R and D Facility to Prepare for Building Demolition (Whiteshell Laboratories Decommissioning Project, Canada) - 13073

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilcox, Brian; May, Doug; Howlett, Don; Bilinsky, Dennis [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Ara Mooradian Way, Pinawa, Manitoba (Canada)] [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Ara Mooradian Way, Pinawa, Manitoba (Canada)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Whiteshell Laboratories (WL) is a nuclear research establishment owned by the Canadian government and operated by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) since the early 1960's. WL is currently under a decommissioning license and the mandate is to remediate the nuclear legacy liabilities in a safe and cost effective manner. The WL Project is the first major nuclear decommissioning project in Canada. A major initiative underway is to decommission and demolish the main R and D Laboratory complex. The Building 300 R and D complex was constructed to accommodate laboratories and offices which were mainly used for research and development associated with organic-cooled reactors, nuclear fuel waste management, reactor safety, advanced fuel cycles and other applications of nuclear energy. Building 300 is a three storey structure of approximately 16,000 m{sup 2}. In order to proceed with building demolition, the contaminated systems inside the building have to be characterized, removed, and the waste managed. There is a significant focus on volume reduction of radioactive waste for the WL project. The active ventilation system is one of the significant contaminated systems in Building 300 that requires decommissioning and removal. The active ventilation system was designed to manage hazardous fumes and radioactivity from ventilation devices (e.g., fume hoods, snorkels and glove boxes) and to prevent the escape of airborne hazardous material outside of the laboratory boundary in the event of an upset condition. The system includes over 200 ventilation devices and 32 active exhaust fan units and high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters. The strategy to remove the ventilation system was to work from the laboratory end back to the fan/filter system. Each ventilation duct was radiologically characterized. Fogging was used to minimize loose contamination. Sections of the duct were removed by various cutting methods and bagged for temporary storage prior to disposition. Maintenance of building heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) balancing was critical to ensure proper airflow and worker safety. Approximately 103 m{sup 3} of equipment and materials were recovered or generated by the project. Low level waste accounted for approximately 37.4 m{sup 3}. Where possible, ducting was free released for metal recycling. Contaminated ducts were compacted into B-1000 containers and stored in a Shielded Modular Above-Ground Storage Facility (SMAGS) on the WL site awaiting final disposition. The project is divided into three significant phases, with Phases 1 and 2 completed. Lessons learned during the execution of Phases 1 and 2 have been incorporated into the current ventilation removal. (authors)

  18. Active electron energy distribution function control in direct current discharge using an auxiliary electrode

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schweigert, I. V. [Institute of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation) [Institute of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); George Washington University, Washington, DC 20052 (United States); Kaganovich, I. D. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ 08543 (United States)] [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ 08543 (United States); Demidov, V. I. [West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States) [West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); St. Petersburg State University, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The electron energy distribution functions are studied in the low voltage dc discharge with a constriction, which is a diaphragm with an opening. The dc discharge glows in helium and is sustained by the electron current emitted from a heated cathode. We performed kinetic simulations of dc discharge characteristics and electron energy distribution functions for different gas pressures (0.8 Torr-4 Torr) and discharge current of 0.1 A. The results of these simulations indicate the ability to control the shape of the electron energy distribution functions by variation of the diaphragm opening radius.

  19. Fuel Cell Technologies Office Launches National Laboratory Tech...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Technologies Office Launches National Laboratory Tech-to-Market Activities Fuel Cell Technologies Office Launches National Laboratory Tech-to-Market Activities November 3, 2014 -...

  20. Annual report of decommissioning and remedial action S&M activities for the Environmental Management Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Surveillance and Maintenance (S&M) Program performs a variety of activities to ensure that sites and facilities within its responsibility remain in a safe condition and in compliance with applicable regulations. All S&M Program activities during fiscal year (FY) 1997 were accomplished safely, with no health and safety incidents, no lost work days, and no environmental noncompliances. In addition, all activities were performed within schedule thresholds and under budget. Many remedial action (RA) sites and decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) facilities are inspected and maintained by the S&M Program. RA sites encompass approximately 650 acres and 33 D&D facilities, including 4 inactive reactors. During FY 1997, routine, preventative, and emergency maintenance activities were performed as needed at these sites and facilities. Stabilization activities were also performed to reduce risks and reduce future S&M costs. Major activities at the RA sites during FY 1997 included maintaining proper liquid levels in surface impoundments and inactive -liquid low-level waste storage tanks as well as installing a new cover at the tumulus pads in Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6, planting trees in the First Creek Riparian Corridor, and performing over 900 well inspections. Postremediation monitoring was conducted at the 3001 Canal, Core Hole 8, the WAG 6 Resource Conservation and Recovery caps, and WAG 5 Seeps C and D; groundwater monitoring was performed in WAGs 4, 5, and 6 and at the 3001 Canal Well. At ORNL D&D facilities, significant accomplishments included contaminated lead brick removal, asbestos abatement, contaminated equipment and debris removal, and radiologically contaminated area painting.

  1. Analysis Activities at Idaho National Engineering & Environmental...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Analysis Activities at Idaho National Engineering & Environmental Laboratory Analysis Activities at Idaho National Engineering & Environmental Laboratory Presentation on INEENL's...

  2. Data Sharing Report for the Quantification of Removable Activity in Various Surveillance and Maintenance Facilities at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge TN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    King, David A

    2013-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Office of Environmental Management (OR-EM) requested that Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU), working under the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) contract, provide technical and independent waste management planning support using American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) funds. Specifically, DOE OR-EM requested that ORAU plan and implement a sampling and analysis campaign targeting potential removable radiological contamination that may be transferrable to future personal protective equipment (PPE) and contamination control materials—collectively referred to as PPE throughout the remainder of this report—used in certain URS|CH2M Oak Ridge, LLC (UCOR) Surveillance and Maintenance (S&M) Project facilities at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Routine surveys in Bldgs. 3001, 3005, 3010, 3028, 3029, 3038, 3042, 3517, 4507, and 7500 continuously generate PPE. The waste is comprised of Tyvek coveralls, gloves, booties, Herculite, and other materials used to prevent worker exposure or the spread of contamination during routine maintenance and monitoring activities. This report describes the effort to collect and quantify removable activity that may be used by the ORNL S&M Project team to develop radiation instrumentation “screening criteria.” Material potentially containing removable activity was collected on smears, including both masselin large-area wipes (LAWs) and standard paper smears, and analyzed for site-related constituents (SRCs) in an analytical laboratory. The screening criteria, if approved, may be used to expedite waste disposition of relatively clean PPE. The ultimate objectives of this effort were to: 1) determine whether screening criteria can be developed for these facilities, and 2) provide process knowledge information for future site planners. The screening criteria, if calculated, must be formally approved by Federal Facility Agreement parties prior to use for ORNL S&M Project PPE disposal at the Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF). ORAU executed the approved sampling and analysis plan (SAP) (DOE 2013) while closely coordinating with ORNL S&M Project personnel and using guidelines outlined in the Waste Handling Plan for Surveillance and Maintenance Activities at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, DOE/OR/01-2565&D2 (WHP) (DOE 2012). WHP guidelines were followed because the PPE waste targeted by this SAP is consistent with that addressed under the approved Waste Lot (WL) 108.1 profile for disposal at EMWMF—this PPE is a “future waste stream” as defined in the WHP. The SAP presents sampling strategy and methodology, sample selection guidelines, and analytical guidelines and requirements necessary for characterizing future ORNL S&M Project PPE waste. This report presents a review of the sample and analysis methods including data quality objectives (DQOs), required deviations from the original design, summary of field activities, radiation measurement data, analytical laboratory results, a brief presentation of results, and process knowledge summaries.

  3. Sandia National Laboratories: SAND2012-9810W

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SMART Grid, Solar Sandia National Laboratories, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and European Distributed Energies Research Laboratories (DERlab) have organized a...

  4. Observations of the Behavior and Distribution of Fish in Relation to the Columbia River Navigation Channel and Channel Maintenance Activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlson, Thomas J.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Johnson, R. L.; Mueller, Robert P.; Weiland, Mark A.; Johnson, P. N.

    2001-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is a compilation of 7 studies conducted for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers between 1995 and 1998 which used hydroacoustic methods to study the behavior of migrating salmon in response to navigation channel maintenance activities in the lower Columbia River near river mile 45. Differences between daytime and nighttime behavior and fish densities were noted. Comparisons were made of fish distribution across the river (in the channel, channel margin or near shore) and fish depth upstream and downstream of dikes, dredges, and pile driving areas.

  5. Fiscal years 1993 and 1994 decontamination and decommissioning activities photobriefing book for the Argonne National Laboratory-East Site, Technology Development Division, Decontamination and Decommissioning Projects Department

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This photobriefing book describes the ongoing decontamination and decommissioning projects at the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL)-East Site near Lemont, Illinois. The book is broken down into three sections: introduction, project descriptions, and summary. The introduction elates the history and mission of the Decontamination and Decommissioning (D and D) Projects Department at ANL-East. The second section describes the active ANL-East D and D projects, giving a project history and detailing fiscal year (FY) 1993 and FY 1994 accomplishments and FY 1995 goals. The final section summarizes the goals of the D and D Projects Department and the current program status. The D/D projects include the Experimental Boiling Water Reactor, Chicago Pile-5 Reactor, that cells, and plutonium gloveboxes. 73 figs.

  6. Summary of activities of the life cycle costing workshop conducted by the Environmental Restoration Program of Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Enviromental Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A five-day life cycle workshop was conducted by the Environmental Restoration (FR) Program of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to develop appropriate remediation scenarios for each Waste Area Grouping (WAG) at ORNL and to identify associated data needs (e.g., remedial investigations, special studies, and technology demonstrations) and required interfaces. Workshop participants represented the Department of Energy, Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Bechtel National, Radian Corporation, EBASCO Corporation, and M-K Ferguson. The workshop was used to establish a technical basis for remediation activities at each WAG. The workshop results are documented in this report and provide the baseline for estimating the technical scope for each WAG. The scope and associated budgets and schedules will be summarized in baseline reports for each WAG, which, in turn, will be compiled into an overall strategy document for ORNL ER.

  7. DATA SHARING REPORT CHARACTERIZATION OF POPULATION 7: PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT, DRY ACTIVE WASTE, AND MISCELLANEOUS DEBRIS, SURVEILLANCE AND MAINTENANCE PROJECT OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY OAK RIDGE, TENNESSEE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harpenau, Evan M

    2013-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Office of Environmental Management (EM-OR) requested that Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU), working under the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) contract, provide technical and independent waste management planning support under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). Specifically, DOE EM-OR requested that ORAU plan and implement a sampling and analysis campaign targeting certain URS|CH2M Oak Ridge, LLC (UCOR) surveillance and maintenance (S&M) process inventory waste. Eight populations of historical and reoccurring S&M waste at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) have been identified in the Waste Handling Plan for Surveillance and Maintenance Activities at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, DOE/OR/01-2565&D2 (WHP) (DOE 2012) for evaluation and processing to determine a final pathway for disposal. Population 7 (POP 7) consists of 56 containers of aged, low-level and potentially mixed S&M waste that has been staged in various locations around ORNL. Several of these POP 7 containers primarily contain personal protective equipment (PPE) and dry active waste (DAW), but may contain other miscellaneous debris. This data sharing report addresses the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) specified waste in a 13-container subpopulation (including eight steel boxes, three 55-gal drums, one sealand, and one intermodal) that lacked sufficient characterization data for possible disposal at the Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF) using the approved Waste Lot (WL) 108.1 profile.

  8. Final Report for DE-SC0002298 Agency Number: DE-PS02-09ER09-01 An Advanced Network and distributed Storage Laboratory (ANDSL) for Data Intensive Science

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Livny, Miron [Computer Sciences Department, University of Wisconsin - Madison

    2014-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The original intent of this project was to build and operate an Advanced Network and Distributed Storage Laboratory (ANDSL) for Data Intensive Science that will prepare the Open Science Grid (OSG) community for a new generation of wide area communication capabilities operating at a 100Gb rate. Given the significant cut in our proposed budget we changed the scope of the ANDSL to focus on the software aspects of the laboratory – workload generators and monitoring tools and on the offering of experimental data to the ANI project. The main contributions of our work are twofold: early end-user input and experimental data to the ANI project and software tools for conducting large scale end-to-end data placement experiments.

  9. Distribution of Correspondence

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1996-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Defines correct procedures for distribution of correspondence to the Naval Reactors laboratories. Does not cancel another directive. Expired 8-30-97.

  10. This document is a pre-print of the final paper: D. Wu, F. Tang, J. M. Guerrero, J. C. Vasquez, G. Chen, L. Sun, "Autonomous active and reactive power distribution strategy in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vasquez, Juan Carlos

    . Chen, L. Sun, "Autonomous active and reactive power distribution strategy in islanded microgrids," IEEE Power Distribution Strategy in Islanded Microgrids Dan Wu1 , Fen Tang2 , Josep M. Guerrero1 , Juan C distribution is adaptively controlled according to the active power distribution among energy storage systems

  11. LABORATORY OPTIMIZATION TESTS OF TECHNETIUM DECONTAMINATION OF HANFORD WASTE TREATMENT PLANT LOW ACTIVITY WASTE OFF-GAS CONDENSATE SIMULANT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor-Pashow, K.; Nash, C.; McCabe, D.

    2014-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Low Activity Waste (LAW) vitrification facility will generate an aqueous condensate recycle stream (LAW Off-Gas Condensate) from the off-gas system. The baseline plan for disposition of this stream is to send it to the WTP Pretreatment Facility, where it will be blended with LAW, concentrated by evaporation and recycled to the LAW vitrification facility again. Alternate disposition of this stream would eliminate recycling of problematic components, and would enable de-coupled operation of the LAW melter and the Pretreatment Facilities. Eliminating this stream from recycling within WTP would also decrease the LAW vitrification mission duration and quantity of glass waste. This LAW Off-Gas Condensate stream contains components that are volatile at melter temperatures and are problematic for the glass waste form. Because this stream recycles within WTP, these components accumulate in the Condensate stream, exacerbating their impact on the number of LAW glass containers that must be produced. Approximately 32% of the sodium in Supplemental LAW comes from glass formers used to make the extra glass to dilute the halides to acceptable concentrations in the LAW glass, and diverting the stream reduces the halides in the recycled Condensate and is a key outcome of this work. Additionally, under possible scenarios where the LAW vitrification facility commences operation prior to the WTP Pretreatment facility, identifying a disposition path becomes vitally important. This task examines the potential treatment of this stream to remove radionuclides and subsequently disposition the decontaminated stream elsewhere, such as the Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF), for example. The treatment process envisioned is very similar to that used for the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) that has been operating for years at the Savannah River Site (SRS), and focuses on using mature radionuclide removal technologies that are also compatible with longterm tank storage and immobilization methods. For this new application, testing is needed to demonstrate acceptable treatment sorbents and precipitating agents and measure decontamination factors for additional radionuclides in this unique waste stream. The origin of this LAW Off-Gas Condensate stream will be the liquids from the Submerged Bed Scrubber (SBS) and the Wet Electrostatic Precipitator (WESP) from the LAW melter off-gas system. The stream is expected to be a dilute salt solution with near neutral pH, and will likely contain some insoluble solids from melter carryover. The soluble components are expected to be mostly sodium and ammonium salts of nitrate, chloride, and fluoride. This stream has not been generated yet and will not be available until the WTP begins operation, but a simulant has been produced based on models, calculations, and comparison with pilot-scale tests. One of the radionuclides that is volatile and expected to be in greatest abundance in this LAW Off-Gas Condensate stream is Technetium-99 ({sup 99}Tc). Technetium will not be removed from the aqueous waste in the Hanford WTP, and will primarily end up immobilized in the LAW glass by repeated recycle of the off-gas condensate into the LAW melter. Other radionuclides that are low but are also expected to be in measurable concentration in the LAW Off-Gas Condensate are {sup 129}I, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 241}Pu, and {sup 241}Am. These are present due to their partial volatility and some entrainment in the off-gas system. This report discusses results of optimized {sup 99}Tc decontamination testing of the simulant. Testing examined use of inorganic reducing agents for {sup 99}Tc. Testing focused on minimizing the quantity of sorbents/reactants added, and minimizing mixing time to reach the decontamination targets in this simulant formulation. Stannous chloride and ferrous sulfate were tested as reducing agents to determine the minimum needed to convert soluble pertechnetate to the insoluble technetium dioxide. The reducing agents were tried with and without sorbents.

  12. Laboratory Studies of Processing of Carbonaceous Aerosols by Atmospheric Oxidants/Hygroscopicity and CCN Activity of Secondary & Processed Primary Organic Aerosols

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ziemann, P.J.; Arey, J.; Atkinson, R.; Kreidenweis, S.M.; Petters, M.D.

    2012-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The atmosphere is composed of a complex mixture of gases and suspended microscopic aerosol particles. The ability of these particles to take up water (hygroscopicity) and to act as nuclei for cloud droplet formation significantly impacts aerosol light scattering and absorption, and cloud formation, thereby influencing air quality, visibility, and climate in important ways. A substantial, yet poorly characterized component of the atmospheric aerosol is organic matter. Its major sources are direct emissions from combustion processes, which are referred to as primary organic aerosol (POA), or in situ processes in which volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are oxidized in the atmosphere to low volatility reaction products that subsequent condense to form particles that are referred to as secondary organic aerosol (SOA). POA and VOCs are emitted to the atmosphere from both anthropogenic and natural (biogenic) sources. The overall goal of this experimental research project was to conduct laboratory studies under simulated atmospheric conditions to investigate the effects of the chemical composition of organic aerosol particles on their hygroscopicity and cloud condensation nucleation (CCN) activity, in order to develop quantitative relationships that could be used to more accurately incorporate aerosol-cloud interactions into regional and global atmospheric models. More specifically, the project aimed to determine the products, mechanisms, and rates of chemical reactions involved in the processing of organic aerosol particles by atmospheric oxidants and to investigate the relationships between the chemical composition of organic particles (as represented by molecule sizes and the specific functional groups that are present) and the hygroscopicity and CCN activity of oxidized POA and SOA formed from the oxidation of the major classes of anthropogenic and biogenic VOCs that are emitted to the atmosphere, as well as model hydrocarbons. The general approach for this project was to carry out reactions of representative anthropogenic and biogenic VOCs and organic particles with ozone (O3), and hydroxyl (OH), nitrate (NO3), and chlorine (Cl) radicals, which are the major atmospheric oxidants, under simulated atmospheric conditions in large-volume environmental chambers. A combination of on-line and off-line analytical techniques were used to monitor the chemical and physical properties of the particles including their hygroscopicity and CCN activity. The results of the studies were used to (1) improve scientific understanding of the relationships between the chemical composition of organic particles and their hygroscopicity and CCN activity, (2) develop an improved molecular level theoretical framework for describing these relationships, and (3) establish a large database that is being used to develop parameterizations relating organic aerosol chemical properties and SOA sources to particle hygroscopicity and CCN activity for use in regional and global atmospheric air quality and climate models.

  13. Sandia National Laboratories: Geomechanics Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    including studies of coupled effects Extrapolation of laboratory measurements to field conditions In situ stress measurements and evaluation of in situ boundary conditions...

  14. Laboratory Scoping Tests Of Decontamination Of Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Low Activity Waste Off-Gas Condensate Simulant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor-Pashow, Kathryn M.; Nash, Charles A.; Crawford, Charles L.; McCabe, Daniel J.; Wilmarth, William R.

    2014-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Low Activity Waste (LAW) vitrification facility will generate an aqueous condensate recycle stream (LAW Off-Gas Condensate) from the off-gas system. The baseline plan for disposition of this stream is to send it to the WTP Pretreatment Facility, where it will be blended with LAW, concentrated by evaporation and recycled to the LAW vitrification facility again. Alternate disposition of this stream would eliminate recycling of problematic components, and would enable de-coupled operation of the LAW melter and the Pretreatment Facilities. Eliminating this stream from recycling within WTP would also decrease the LAW vitrification mission duration and quantity of glass waste. This LAW Off-Gas Condensate stream contains components that are volatile at melter temperatures and are problematic for the glass waste form. Because this stream recycles within WTP, these components accumulate in the Condensate stream, exacerbating their impact on the number of LAW glass containers that must be produced. Approximately 32% of the sodium in Supplemental LAW comes from glass formers used to make the extra glass to dilute the halides to acceptable concentrations in the LAW glass, and diverting the stream reduces the halides in the recycled Condensate and is a key outcome of this work. Additionally, under possible scenarios where the LAW vitrification facility commences operation prior to the WTP Pretreatment facility, identifying a disposition path becomes vitally important. This task seeks to examine the potential treatment of this stream to remove radionuclides and subsequently disposition the decontaminated stream elsewhere, such as the Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF), for example. The treatment process envisioned is very similar to that used for the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) that has been operating for years at the Savannah River Site (SRS), and focuses on using mature radionuclide removal technologies that are also compatible with longterm tank storage and immobilization methods. For this new application, testing is needed to demonstrate acceptable treatment sorbents and precipitating agents and measure decontamination factors for additional radionuclides in this unique waste stream. The origin of this LAW Off-Gas Condensate stream will be the liquids from the Submerged Bed Scrubber (SBS) and the Wet Electrostatic Precipitator (WESP) from the LAW melter off-gas system. The stream is expected to be a dilute salt solution with near neutral pH, and will likely contain some insoluble solids from melter carryover. The soluble components are expected to be mostly sodium and ammonium salts of nitrate, chloride, and fluoride. This stream has not been generated yet and will not be available until the WTP begins operation, but a simulant has been produced based on models, calculations, and comparison with pilot-scale tests. One of the radionuclides that is volatile and expected to be in high concentration in this LAW Off-Gas Condensate stream is Technetium-99 ({sup 99}Tc). Technetium will not be removed from the aqueous waste in the Hanford WTP, and will primarily end up immobilized in the LAW glass by repeated recycle of the off-gas condensate into the LAW melter. Other radionuclides that are also expected to be in appreciable concentration in the LAW Off-Gas Condensate are {sup 129}I, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 137}Cs, and {sup 241}Am. This report discusses results of preliminary radionuclide decontamination testing of the simulant. Testing examined use of Monosodium Titanate (MST) to remove {sup 90}Sr and actinides, inorganic reducing agents for {sup 99}Tc, and zeolites for {sup 137}Cs. Test results indicate that excellent removal of {sup 99}Tc was achieved using Sn(II)Cl{sub 2} as a reductant, coupled with sorption onto hydroxyapatite, even in the presence of air and at room temperature. This process was very effective at neutral pH, with a Decontamination Factor (DF) >577 in two hours. It was less effective at alkaline pH. Conversely, removal of the cesium was more effective at alka

  15. Model-based benchmarking with application to laboratory buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Federspiel, Clifford Ph.D.; Zhang, Qiang; Arens, Edward Ph.D

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    hydraulic elevators more than buildings with counterweighted elevators. Efficient air distribution VAV laboratories will use considerably less energy

  16. Carbon Characterization Laboratory Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Swank; William Windes; D.C. Haggard; David Rohrbaugh; Karen Moore

    2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The newly completed Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Carbon Characterization Laboratory (CCL) is located in Lab-C20 of the Idaho National Laboratory Research Center. This laboratory was established under the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project to support graphite research and development activities. The CCL is designed to characterize and test carbon-based materials such as graphite, carbon-carbon composites, and silicon-carbide composite materials. The laboratory is fully prepared to measure material properties for nonirradiated carbon-based materials. Plans to establish the laboratory as a radiological facility within the next year are definitive. This laboratory will be modified to accommodate irradiated materials, after which it can be used to perform material property measurements on both irradiated and nonirradiated carbon-based material. Instruments, fixtures, and methods are in place for preirradiation measurements of bulk density, thermal diffusivity, coefficient of thermal expansion, elastic modulus, Young’s modulus, Shear modulus, Poisson ratio, and electrical resistivity. The measurement protocol consists of functional validation, calibration, and automated data acquisition.

  17. 1.Physics Department, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO 2. National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO 3. United Solar Ovonic, LLC Troy, MI, United States THERMAL ACTIVATION OF DEEP OXYGEN DEFECT FORMATION AND HYDROGEN EFFUSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    was partially supported by a DOE grant through United Solar Ovonics, Inc., under the Solar America Initiative1.Physics Department, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO 2. National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO 3. United Solar Ovonic, LLC Troy, MI, United States BACKGROUND THERMAL ACTIVATION OF DEEP

  18. Implementing waste minimization at an active plutonium processing facility: Successes and progress at technical area (TA) -55 of the Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balkey, J.J.; Robinson, M.A.; Boak, J.

    1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory has ongoing national security missions that necessitate increased plutonium processing. The bulk of this activity occurs at Technical Area -55 (TA-55), the nations only operable plutonium facility. TA-55 has developed and demonstrated a number of technologies that significantly minimize waste generation in plutonium processing (supercritical CO{sub 2}, Mg(OH){sub 2} precipitation, supercritical H{sub 2}O oxidation, WAND), disposition of excess fissile materials (hydride-dehydride, electrolytic decontamination), disposition of historical waste inventories (salt distillation), and Decontamination & Decommissioning (D&D) of closed nuclear facilities (electrolytic decontamination). Furthermore, TA-55 is in the process of developing additional waste minimization technologies (molten salt oxidation, nitric acid recycle, americium extraction) that will significantly reduce ongoing waste generation rates and allow volume reduction of existing waste streams. Cost savings from reduction in waste volumes to be managed and disposed far exceed development and deployment costs in every case. Waste minimization is also important because it reduces occupational exposure to ionizing radiation, risks of transportation accidents, and transfer of burdens from current nuclear operations to future generations.

  19. Social Activities | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    part of a diverse community of fellow scientists, engineers and support staff who enjoy working and playing - together. Argonne clubs range from special interest groups to sports...

  20. Technical Report Computer Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haddadi, Hamed

    for criminal activity. One general attack route to breach the security is to carry out physical attack afterTechnical Report Number 829 Computer Laboratory UCAM-CL-TR-829 ISSN 1476-2986 Microelectronic report is based on a dissertation submitted January 2009 by the author for the degree of Doctor

  1. ARGONNE NATIONAL LABORATORY 9700 South Cass Avenue

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Friedlander, Michael P.

    ARGONNE NATIONAL LABORATORY 9700 South Cass Avenue Argonne, Illinois 60439 A Filter Active and Computer Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, {leyffer,tmunson}@mcs.anl.gov 1 #12;2 Michael

  2. Energy Systems Integration Laboratory (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This fact sheet describes the purpose, lab specifications, applications scenarios, and information on how to partner with NREL's Energy Systems Integration Laboratory at the Energy Systems Integration Facility. The Energy Systems Integration Laboratory at NREL's Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF) provides a flexible, renewable-ready platform for research, development, and testing of state-of-the-art hydrogen-based and other energy storage systems. The main focus of the laboratory is assessment of the technical readiness, performance characterization, and research to help industry move these systems towards optimal renewable-based production and efficient utilization of hydrogen. Research conducted in the Energy Systems Integration Laboratory will advance engineering knowledge and market deployment of hydrogen technologies to support a growing need for versatile distributed electricity generation, applications in microgrids, energy storage for renewables integration, and home and station-based hydrogen vehicle fueling. Research activities are targeted to improve the technical readiness of the following: (1) Low and high temperature electrolyzers, reformers and fuel cells; (2) Mechanical and electrochemical compression systems; (3) Hydrogen storage; (4) Hydrogen vehicle refueling; and (5) Internal combustion or turbine technology for electricity production. Examples of experiments include: (1) Close- and direct-coupling of renewable energy sources (PV and wind) to electrolyzers; (2) Performance and efficiency validation of electrolyzers, fuel cells, and compressors; (3) Reliability and durability tracking and prediction; (4) Equipment modeling and validation testing; (5) Internal combustion or turbine technology for electricity production; and (6) Safety and code compliance.

  3. Study of Generalized Parton Distributions and Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering on the nucleon with the CLAS and CLAS12 detectors at the Jefferson Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baptiste Guegan

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The exclusive leptoproduction of a real photon is considered to be the "cleanest" way to access the Generalized Parton Distribution (GPD). This process is called Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering (DVCS) lN {yields} lN{gamma} , and is sensitive to all the four GPDs. Measuring the DVCS cross section is one of the main goals of this thesis. In this thesis, we present the work performed to extract on a wide phase-space the DVCS cross-section from the JLab data at a beam energy of 6 GeV.

  4. About Industrial Distributed Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Advanced Manufacturing Office's (AMO's) Industrial Distributed Energy activities build on the success of predecessor DOE programs on distributed energy and combined heat and power (CHP) while...

  5. Smart Grid Integration Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wade Troxell

    2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The initial federal funding for the Colorado State University Smart Grid Integration Laboratory is through a Congressionally Directed Project (CDP), DE-OE0000070 Smart Grid Integration Laboratory. The original program requested in three one-year increments for staff acquisition, curriculum development, and instrumentation â?? all which will benefit the Laboratory. This report focuses on the initial phase of staff acquisition which was directed and administered by DOE NETL/ West Virginia under Project Officer Tom George. Using this CDP funding, we have developed the leadership and intellectual capacity for the SGIC. This was accomplished by investing (hiring) a core team of Smart Grid Systems engineering faculty focused on education, research, and innovation of a secure and smart grid infrastructure. The Smart Grid Integration Laboratory will be housed with the separately funded Integrid Laboratory as part of CSUâ??s overall Smart Grid Integration Center (SGIC). The period of performance of this grant was 10/1/2009 to 9/30/2011 which included one no cost extension due to time delays in faculty hiring. The Smart Grid Integration Laboratoryâ??s focus is to build foundations to help graduate and undergraduates acquire systems engineering knowledge; conduct innovative research; and team externally with grid smart organizations. Using the results of the separately funded Smart Grid Workforce Education Workshop (May 2009) sponsored by the City of Fort Collins, Northern Colorado Clean Energy Cluster, Colorado State University Continuing Education, Spirae, and Siemens has been used to guide the hiring of faculty, program curriculum and education plan. This project develops faculty leaders with the intellectual capacity to inspire its students to become leaders that substantially contribute to the development and maintenance of Smart Grid infrastructure through topics such as: (1) Distributed energy systems modeling and control; (2) Energy and power conversion; (3) Simulation of electrical power distribution system that integrates significant quantities of renewable and distributed energy resources; (4) System dynamic modeling that considers end-user behavior, economics, security and regulatory frameworks; (5) Best practices for energy management IT control solutions for effective distributed energy integration (including security with the underlying physical power systems); (6) Experimental verification of effects of various arrangements of renewable generation, distributed generation and user load types along with conventional generation and transmission. Understanding the core technologies for enabling them to be used in an integrated fashion within a distribution network remains is a benefit to the future energy paradigm and future and present energy engineers.

  6. Observation and Control for Debugging Distributed Computations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garg, Vijay

    Observation and Control for Debugging Distributed Computations Vijay K. Garg \\Lambda Parallel and Distributed Systems Laboratory, Electrical and Computer Engineering Department The University of Texas for observing and controlling a distributed computation and its applications to distributed debugging

  7. Observation and Control for Debugging Distributed Computations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garg, Vijay

    Observation and Control for Debugging Distributed Computations Vijay K. Garg Parallel and Distributed Systems Laboratory, Electrical and Computer Engineering Department The University of Texas for observing and controlling a distributed computation and its applications to distributed debugging

  8. Measurement of Activation Reaction Rate Distributions in a Lead Assembly Bombarded with 500-MeV Protons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Takada, Hiroshi; Meigo, Shin-ichro; Sasa, Toshinobu; Tsujimoto, Kazufumi; Yasuda, Hideshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (Japan)

    2000-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Reaction rate distributions of various activation detectors such as the {sup nat}Ni(n,x){sup 58}Co, {sup 197}Au(n,2n){sup 196}Au, and {sup 197}Au(n,4n){sup 194}Au reactions were measured to study the production and the transport of spallation neutrons in a lead assembly bombarded with protons of 500 MeV. The measured data were analyzed with the nucleon-meson transport code NMTC/JAERI combined with the MCNP4A code using the nuclide production cross sections based on the JENDL Dosimetry File and those calculated with the ALICE-F code. It was found that the NMTC/JAERI-MCNP4A calculations agreed well with the experiments for the low-energy-threshold reaction of {sup nat}Ni(n,x){sup 58}Co. With the increase of threshold energy, however, the calculation underestimated the experiments, especially above 20 MeV. The reason for the disagreement can be attributed to the underestimation of the neutron yield in the tens of mega-electron-volt regions by the NMTC/JAERI code.

  9. YUCCA Mountain Project - Argonne National Laboratory, Annual Progress Report, FY 1997 for activity WP 1221 unsaturated drip condition testing of spent fuel and unsaturated dissolution tests of glass.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bates, J. K.; Buck, E. C.; Emery, J. W.; Finch, R. J.; Finn, P. A.; Fortner, J.; Hoh, J. C.; Mertz, C.; Neimark, L. A.; Wolf, S. F.; Wronkiewicz, D. J.

    1998-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This document reports on the work done by the Nuclear Waste Management Section of the Chemical Technology Division of Argonne National Laboratory in the period of October 1996 through September 1997. Studies have been performed to evaluate the behavior of nuclear waste glass and spent fuel samples under the unsaturated conditions (low-volume water contact) that are likely to exist in the Yucca Mountain environment being considered as a potential site for a high-level waste repository. Tests with actinide-doped waste glasses, in progress for over 11 years, indicate that the transuranic element release is dominated by colloids that continuously form and span from the glass surface. The nature of the colloids that form in the glass and spent fuel testing programs is being investigated by dynamic light scattering to determine the size distribution, by autoradiography to determine the chemistry, and by zeta potential to measure the electrical properties of the colloids. Tests with UO{sub 2} have been ongoing for 12 years. They show that the oxidation of UO{sub 2} occurs rapidly, and the resulting paragenetic sequence of secondary phases forming on the sample surface is similar to that observed for uranium found in natural oxidizing environments. The reaction of spent fuel samples in conditions similar to those used with UO{sub 2} have been in progress for over six years, and the results suggest that spent fuel forms many of the same alteration products as UO{sub 2}. With spent fuel, the bulk of the reaction occurs via a through-grain reaction process, although grain boundary attack is sufficient to have reacted all of the grain boundary regions in the samples. New test methods are under development to evaluate the behavior of spent fuel samples with intact cladding: the rate at which alteration and radionuclide release occurs when water penetrates fuel sections and whether the reaction causes the cladding to split. Alteration phases have been formed on fine grains of UO{sub 2} in contact with small volumes of water within a several month period when the radiolysis product H{sub 2}O{sub 2} is added to the groundwater solution. The test setup has been mocked up for operation with spent fuel in the hot-cell.

  10. This collection of activities is based on a weekly series of space science problems distributed to thousands of teachers during 2005-2006 school year. They were

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ..................................................... Solar storm timeline. ........................................................... Solar energy in space#12;This collection of activities is based on a weekly series of space science problems distributed satellites to work in space, and to provide insight into the basic phenomena of the Sun-Earth system

  11. SULI at Ames Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A video snapshot of the Science Undergraduate Laboratory Internship (SULI) program at Ames Laboratory.

  12. Muon-Induced Background Study for Underground Laboratories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. -M. Mei; A. Hime

    2005-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We provide a comprehensive study of the cosmic-ray muon flux and induced activity as a function of overburden along with a convenient parameterization of the salient fluxes and differential distributions for a suite of underground laboratories ranging in depth from $\\sim$1 to 8 km.w.e.. Particular attention is given to the muon-induced fast neutron activity for the underground sites and we develop a Depth-Sensitivity-Relation to characterize the effect of such background in experiments searching for WIMP dark matter and neutrinoless double beta decay.

  13. DER Certification Laboratory Pilot, Accreditation Plan, and Interconnection Agreement Handbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Key, T.; Sitzlar, H. E.; Ferraro, R.

    2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the first steps toward creating the organization, procedures, plans and tools for distributed energy resources (DER) equipment certification, test laboratory accreditation, and interconnection agreements. It covers the activities and accomplishments during the first period of a multiyear effort. It summarizes steps taken to outline a certification plan to assist in the future development of an interim plan for certification and accreditation activities. It also summarizes work toward a draft plan for certification, a beta Web site to support communications and materials, and preliminary draft certification criteria.

  14. An overview of the facilities, activities, and developments at the University of North Texas Ion Beam Modification and Analysis Laboratory (IBMAL)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rout, Bibhudutta; Dhoubhadel, Mangal S.; Poudel, Prakash R.; Kummari, Venkata C.; Pandey, Bimal; Deoli, Naresh T.; Lakshantha, Wickramaarachchige J.; Mulware, Stephen J.; Baxley, Jacob; Manuel, Jack E.; Pacheco, Jose L.; Szilasi, Szabolcs; Weathers, Duncan L.; Reinert, Tilo; Glass, Gary A.; Duggan, Jerry L.; McDaniel, Floyd D. [Ion Beam Modification and Analysis Laboratory, University of North Texas, Department of Physics, 1155 Union Circle 311427, Denton, Texas 76203 (United States)

    2013-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The Ion Beam Modification and Analysis Laboratory (IBMAL) at the University of North Texas includes several accelerator facilities with capabilities of producing a variety of ion beams from tens of keV to several MeV in energy. The four accelerators are used for research, graduate and undergraduate education, and industrial applications. The NEC 3MV Pelletron tandem accelerator has three ion sources for negative ions: He Alphatross and two different SNICS-type sputter ion sources. Presently, the tandem accelerator has four high-energy beam transport lines and one low-energy beam transport line directly taken from the negative ion sources for different research experiments. For the low-energy beam line, the ion energy can be varied from {approx}20 to 80 keV for ion implantation/modification of materials. The four post-acceleration beam lines include a heavy-ion nuclear microprobe; multi-purpose PIXE, RBS, ERD, NRA, and broad-beam single-event upset; high-energy ion implantation line; and trace-element accelerator mass spectrometry. The NEC 3MV single-ended Pelletron accelerator has an RF ion source mainly for hydrogen, helium and heavier inert gases. We recently installed a capacitive liner to the terminal potential stabilization system for high terminal voltage stability and high-resolution microprobe analysis. The accelerator serves a beam line for standard RBS and RBS/C. Another beamline for high energy focused ion beam application using a magnetic quadrupole lens system is currently under construction. This beam line will also serve for developmental work on an electrostatic lens system. The third accelerator is a 200 kV Cockcroft-Walton accelerator with an RF ion source. The fourth accelerator is a 2.5 MV Van de Graaff accelerator, which was in operation for last several decades is currently planned to be used mainly for educational purpose. Research projects that will be briefly discussed include materials synthesis/modification for photonic, electronic, and magnetic applications, surface sputtering and micro-fabrication of materials, development of high-energy ion microprobe systems, and educational and outreach activities.

  15. Savannah River Laboratory monthly report, July 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferrell, J.M. [comp.

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This document details monthly activities at the Savannah River Laboratory. Topics addressed are reactor operation; tritium facilities and production; separation operations; environmental concerns; and waste management. (FI)

  16. Savannah River Laboratory monthly report, July 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferrell, J.M. (comp.)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document details monthly activities at the Savannah River Laboratory. Topics addressed are reactor operation; tritium facilities and production; separation operations; environmental concerns; and waste management. (FI)

  17. Enterprise Assessments Targeted Review, Argonne National Laboratory...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    November 2014 Review of the Radiological Controls Activity-Level Implementation at the Argonne National Laboratory Nuclear Facilities. The Office of Nuclear Safety and...

  18. Independent Oversight Review, Los Alamos National Laboratory...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    2013 Independent Oversight Review, Los Alamos National Laboratory Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Facility - January 2012 Independent Activity Report, Los Alamos Site Office...

  19. Savannah River Laboratory monthly report, August 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferrell, J.M. [comp.

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This document details monthly activities at the Savannah River Laboratory. Topics addressed are reactor operation, tritium facilities and production; separation operations; environmental concerns; and waste management. (FI)

  20. Savannah River Laboratory monthly report, August 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferrell, J.M. (comp.)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document details monthly activities at the Savannah River Laboratory. Topics addressed are reactor operation, tritium facilities and production; separation operations; environmental concerns; and waste management. (FI)

  1. Savannah River Laboratory monthly report, September 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferrell, J.M. (comp.)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document details monthly activities at the Savannah River Laboratory. Topics addressed are reactor operation, tritium facilities and production; separation operations; environmental concerns; and waste management. (FI)

  2. Savannah River Laboratory monthly report, September 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferrell, J.M. [comp.

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This document details monthly activities at the Savannah River Laboratory. Topics addressed are reactor operation, tritium facilities and production; separation operations; environmental concerns; and waste management. (FI)

  3. Load forecasting for active distribution networks Simone Paoletti, Member, IEEE, Marco Casini, Member, IEEE, Antonio Giannitrapani, Member, IEEE,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giannitrapani, Antonello

    opportunity for solving network constraints and supporting the development of renewable energy sources through- creased accessibility of renewable energy resources to end users have triggered new concepts Distribution network with full integration of Demand and distributed energy RESourceS and its target

  4. Laboratory Applications

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(FactDepartment ofLetter Report:40PM toLED Lighting5-15TradeLaboratories

  5. Laboratory Directors

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |Is Your Home asLCLSLaboratory Directors Laboratory Directors A

  6. Laboratory Operations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron 9 5 - -/e),,sand CERN 73-11 Laboratory I |

  7. Research programs at the Department of Energy National Laboratories. Volume 2: Laboratory matrix

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For nearly fifty years, the US national laboratories, under the direction of the Department of Energy, have maintained a tradition of outstanding scientific research and innovative technological development. With the end of the Cold War, their roles have undergone profound changes. Although many of their original priorities remain--stewardship of the nation`s nuclear stockpile, for example--pressing budget constraints and new federal mandates have altered their focus. Promotion of energy efficiency, environmental restoration, human health, and technology partnerships with the goal of enhancing US economic and technological competitiveness are key new priorities. The multiprogram national laboratories offer unparalleled expertise in meeting the challenge of changing priorities. This volume aims to demonstrate each laboratory`s uniqueness in applying this expertise. It describes the laboratories` activities in eleven broad areas of research that most or all share in common. Each section of this volume is devoted to a single laboratory. Those included are: Argonne National Laboratory; Brookhaven National Laboratory; Idaho National Engineering Laboratory; Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory; Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory; Los Alamos National Laboratory; National Renewable Energy Laboratory; Oak Ridge National Laboratory; Pacific Northwest Laboratory; and Sandia National Laboratories. The information in this volume was provided by the multiprogram national laboratories and compiled at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory.

  8. Energy Storage Laboratory (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This fact sheet describes the purpose, lab specifications, applications scenarios, and information on how to partner with NREL's Energy Storage Laboratory at the Energy Systems Integration Facility. At NREL's Energy Storage Laboratory in the Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF), research focuses on the integration of energy storage systems (both stationary and vehicle-mounted) and interconnection with the utility grid. Focusing on battery technologies, but also hosting ultra-capacitors and other electrical energy storage technologies, the laboratory will provide all resources necessary to develop, test, and prove energy storage system performance and compatibility with distributed energy systems. The laboratory will also provide robust vehicle testing capability, including a drive-in environmental chamber, which can accommodate commercial-sized hybrid, electric, biodiesel, ethanol, compressed natural gas, and hydrogen fueled vehicles. The Energy Storage Laboratory is designed to ensure personnel and equipment safety when testing hazardous battery systems or other energy storage technologies. Closely coupled with the research electrical distribution bus at ESIF, the Energy Storage Laboratory will offer megawatt-scale power testing capability as well as advanced hardware-in-the-loop and model-in-the-loop simulation capabilities. Some application scenarios are: The following types of tests - Performance, Efficiency, Safety, Model validation, and Long duration reliability. (2) Performed on the following equipment types - (a) Vehicle batteries (both charging and discharging V2G); (b) Stationary batteries; (c) power conversion equipment for energy storage; (d) ultra- and super-capacitor systems; and (e) DC systems, such as commercial microgrids.

  9. Laboratory Waste | Sample Preparation Laboratories

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |Is Your Home asLCLSLaboratory Directors LaboratoryPlanning

  10. Geoscience Laboratory | Sample Preparation Laboratories

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Environmental AssessmentsGeoffrey CampbelllongApplyingGeorge T.Geoscience Laboratory

  11. Sandia National Laboratories: energy transmission and distribution

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    grid relies on power transmission from the production source-be it a coal-fired plant, solar array, or wind farm-to the consumer. Long-distance transmission results in...

  12. Sandia National Laboratories Distributive Power Initiative (DPI...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Large Format Carbon Enhanced VRLA Battery Test Results EESAT 2009 Funded by the Energy Storage Systems Program of the U.S. Department Of Energy (DOEESS) through Sandia National...

  13. Sandia National Laboratories: distributed energy resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Microgrid, Modeling & Analysis, News, News & Events, Partnership, Renewable Energy, SMART Grid, Systems Analysis, Systems Engineering Mayor Says New System Will 'Keep Everyone...

  14. Distributed Energy Research Center | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Pilot-fuel Multi-fuel Capability (Opportunity Fuels) Agilent Micro Gas Chromatograph Turbo Charging Capability Optical Diagnostics Combustion Imaging (AVL Visioscope) Optical...

  15. Sandia National Laboratories: Distribution Grid Integration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Biofuels Biofuels Publications Biochemical Conversion Program Lignocellulosic Biomass Microalgae Thermochemical Conversion Sign up for our E-Newsletter Required.gif?3.21 Email...

  16. Sandia National Laboratories: Distribution Modeling Workshop...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Biofuels Biofuels Publications Biochemical Conversion Program Lignocellulosic Biomass Microalgae Thermochemical Conversion Sign up for our E-Newsletter Required.gif?3.21 Email...

  17. Sandia National Laboratories Distributive Power Initiative (DPI...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    System (NDS) Problem National Distress System (NDS) Problem Supplying Fuel to the propane generators is expensive especially when the fuel has to be chartered by helicopter....

  18. Sandia National Laboratories Distributive Power Initiative (DPI)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin ofEnergy atLLC - FE DKT. 10-160-LNG -Energy Proposed PenaltyLarge Format Carbon

  19. Environmental | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Environmental Management Program at the Ames Laboratory includes Waste Management, Pollution Prevention, Recycling, Cultural Resources, and the Laboratory's Environmental...

  20. Laboratory directed research and development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The purposes of Argonne's Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program are to encourage the development of novel concepts, enhance the Laboratory's R D capabilities, and further the development of its strategic initiatives. Among the aims of the projects supported by the Program are establishment of engineering proof-of-principle''; development of an instrumental prototype, method, or system; or discovery in fundamental science. Several of these project are closely associated with major strategic thrusts of the Laboratory as described in Argonne's Five Year Institutional Plan, although the scientific implications of the achieved results extend well beyond Laboratory plans and objectives. The projects supported by the Program are distributed across the major programmatic areas at Argonne. Areas of emphasis are (1) advanced accelerator and detector technology, (2) x-ray techniques in biological and physical sciences, (3) advanced reactor technology, (4) materials science, computational science, biological sciences and environmental sciences. Individual reports summarizing the purpose, approach, and results of projects are presented.

  1. Idaho National Laboratory’s Greenhouse Gas FY08 Baseline

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jennifer D. Morton

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A greenhouse gas (GHG) inventory is a systematic attempt to account for the production and release of certain gasses generated by an institution from various emission sources. The gasses of interest are those which have become identified by climate science as related to anthropogenic global climate change. This document presents an inventory of GHGs generated during fiscal year (FY) 2008 by Idaho National Laboratory (INL), a Department of Energy (DOE)-sponsored entity, located in southeastern Idaho. Concern about the environmental impact of GHGs has grown in recent years. This, together with a desire to decrease harmful environmental impacts, would be enough to encourage the calculation of a baseline estimate of total GHGs generated at INL. Additionally, INL has a desire to see how its emissions compare with similar institutions, including other DOE national laboratories. Executive Order 13514 requires that federal agencies and institutions document reductions in GHG emissions in the future, and such documentation will require knowledge of a baseline against which reductions can be measured. INL's FY08 GHG inventory was calculated according to methodologies identified in federal GHG guidance documents using operational control boundaries. It measures emissions generated in three Scopes: (1) INL emissions produced directly by stationary or mobile combustion and by fugitive emissions, (2) the share of emissions generated by entities from which INL purchased electrical power, and (3) indirect or shared emissions generated by outsourced activities that benefit INL (occur outside INL's organizational boundaries but are a consequence of INL's activities). This inventory found that INL generated a total of 113,049 MT of CO2-equivalent emissions during FY08. The following conclusions were made from looking at the results of the individual contributors to INL's baseline GHG inventory: (1) Electricity (including the associated transmission and distribution losses) is the largest contributor to INL's GHG inventory, with over 50% of the CO2e emissions; (2) Other sources with high emissions were stationary combustion (facility fuels), waste disposal (including fugitive emissions from the onsite landfill and contracted disposal), mobile combustion (fleet fuels), employee commuting, and business air travel; and (3) Sources with low emissions were wastewater treatment (onsite and contracted), fugitive emissions from refrigerants, and business ground travel (in personal and rental vehicles). This report details the methods behind quantifying INL's GHG inventory and discusses lessons learned on better practices by which information important to tracking GHGs can be tracked and recorded. It is important to note that because this report differentiates between those portions of INL that are managed and operated by the Battelle Energy Alliance (BEA) and those managed by other contractors, it includes only that large proportion of Laboratory activities overseen by BEA. It is assumed that other contractors will provide similar reporting for those activities they manage, where appropriate.

  2. Remote Sensing Laboratory - RSL

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2015-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the primary resources supporting homeland security is the Remote Sensing Laboratory, or RSL. The Laboratory creates advanced technologies for emergency response operations, radiological incident response, and other remote sensing activities. RSL emergency response teams are on call 24-hours a day, and maintain the capability to deploy domestically and internationally in response to threats involving the loss, theft, or release of nuclear or radioactive material. Such incidents might include Nuclear Power Plant accidents, terrorist incidents involving nuclear or radiological materials, NASA launches, and transportation accidents involving nuclear materials. Working with the US Department of Homeland Security, RSL personnel equip, maintain, and conduct training on the mobile detection deployment unit, to provide nuclear radiological security at major national events such as the super bowl, the Indianapolis 500, New Year's Eve celebrations, presidential inaugurations, international meetings and conferences, just about any event where large numbers of people will gather.

  3. Remote Sensing Laboratory - RSL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2014-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the primary resources supporting homeland security is the Remote Sensing Laboratory, or RSL. The Laboratory creates advanced technologies for emergency response operations, radiological incident response, and other remote sensing activities. RSL emergency response teams are on call 24-hours a day, and maintain the capability to deploy domestically and internationally in response to threats involving the loss, theft, or release of nuclear or radioactive material. Such incidents might include Nuclear Power Plant accidents, terrorist incidents involving nuclear or radiological materials, NASA launches, and transportation accidents involving nuclear materials. Working with the US Department of Homeland Security, RSL personnel equip, maintain, and conduct training on the mobile detection deployment unit, to provide nuclear radiological security at major national events such as the super bowl, the Indianapolis 500, New Year's Eve celebrations, presidential inaugurations, international meetings and conferences, just about any event where large numbers of people will gather.

  4. Power Systems Integration Laboratory (Fact Sheet), NREL (National...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    from fundamental research to applications engineering. Partners at the ESIF's Power Systems Integration Laboratory may include: * Manufacturers of distributed generation and...

  5. Site Environmental Report for 2010 Sandia National Laboratories, California.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larsen, Barbara L.

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) is a government-owned/contractor-operated laboratory. Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, manages and operates the laboratory for the Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). The NNSA Sandia Site Office administers the contract and oversees contractor operations at the site. This Site Environmental Report for 2010 was prepared in accordance with DOE Order 231.1A (DOE 2004a). The report provides a summary of environmental monitoring information and compliance activities that occurred at SNL/CA during calendar year 2010. General site and environmental program information is also included. The Site Environmental Report is divided into ten chapters. Chapter 1, the Executive Summary, highlights compliance and monitoring results obtained in 2010. Chapter 2 provides a brief introduction to SNL/CA and the existing environment found on site. Chapter 3 summarizes SNL/CA's compliance activities with the major environmental requirements applicable to site operations. Chapter 4 presents information on environmental management, performance measures, and environmental programs. Chapter 5 presents the results of monitoring and surveillance activities in 2010. Chapter 6 discusses quality assurance. Chapters 7 through 9 provide supporting information for the report and Chapter 10 is the report distribution list.

  6. Site environmental report for 2009 : Sandia National Laboratories, California.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larsen, Barbara L.

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) is a government-owned/contractor-operated laboratory. Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, operates the laboratory for the Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). The NNSA Sandia Site Office oversees operations at the site, using Sandia Corporation as a management and operating contractor. This Site Environmental Report for 2009 was prepared in accordance with DOE Order 231.1A (DOE 2004a). The report provides a summary of environmental monitoring information and compliance activities that occurred at SNL/CA during calendar year 2009. General site and environmental program information is also included. The Site Environmental Report is divided into ten chapters. Chapter 1, the Executive Summary, highlights compliance and monitoring results obtained in 2009. Chapter 2 provides a brief introduction to SNL/CA and the existing environment found on site. Chapter 3 summarizes SNL/CA's compliance activities with the major environmental requirements applicable to site operations. Chapter 4 presents information on environmental management, performance measures, and environmental programs. Chapter 5 presents the results of monitoring and surveillance activities in 2009. Chapter 6 discusses quality assurance. Chapters 7 through 9 provide supporting information for the report and Chapter 10 is the report distribution list.

  7. A Report on the Activities, Publications, and Pending Research of DHS/DOD Sponsored Post-doctoral Research Associate at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stanley, Floyd E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tandon, Lav [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Since beginning at Los Alamos National Laboratory in February of 2012, I have been working as a DHS./DNDO Postdoctoral Research Associate under the mentorship of Lav Tandon and Khalil Spencer (NA-22 and mass spectrometry). The focus of my efforts, in addition to pursuing needed training and qualifications, has been the application of various instrumental approaches (e.g. Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometry; TIMS) to a range of systems of interest in materials characterization and nuclear forensics. Research to be pursued in the coming months shall include the continued use of such approaches to advance current methods for: modified total evaporation, monitoring critical minor isotope systems, and chronometry. Each of the above points will be discussed.

  8. Independent Activity Report, Hanford Plutonium Finishing Plant...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    National Laboratory - January 2014 Independent Activity Report, Richland Operations Office - April 2013 Independent Activity Report, Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant - July...

  9. 3D Temperature distribution and numerical modeling of heat transfers in an active fault zone: Eugene Island 330, Offshore Louisiana.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guerin, Gilles

    productive reservoirs of the EI330 oil field. #12;126 4.2 Introduction The Eugene Island 330 (EI330) oil sensitive to the movement of strong seismic events such as oil/water and gas/oil contacts on the scale for the dynamics of active oil fields. Here, Plio- Pleistocene sandstone reservoirs are supplied with mature

  10. Relationship of adiposity to the population distribution of plasma triglyceride concentrations in vigorously active men and women

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Paul T.

    2002-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Context and Objective: Vigorous exercise, alcohol and weight loss are all known to increase HDL-cholesterol, however, it is not known whether these interventions raise low HDL as effectively as has been demonstrated for normal HDL. Design: Physician-supplied medical data from 7,288 male and 2,359 female runners were divided into five strata according to their self-reported usual running distance, reported alcohol intake, body mass index (BMI) or waist circumference. Within each stratum, the 5th, 10th, 25th, 50th, 75th, 90th, and 95th percentiles for HDL-cholesterol were then determined. Bootstrap resampling of least-squares regression was applied to determine the cross-sectional relationships between these factors and each percentile of the HDL-cholesterol distribution. Results: In both sexes, the rise in HDL-cholesterol per unit of vigorous exercise or alcohol intake was at least twice as great at the 95th percentile as at the 5th percentile of the HDL-distribution. There was also a significant graded increase in the slopes relating exercise (km run) and alcohol intake to HDL between the 5th and the 95th percentile. Men's HDL-cholesterol decreased in association with fatness (BMI and waist circumference) more sharply at the 95th than at the 5th percentile of the HDL-distribution. Conclusions: Although exercise, alcohol and adiposity were all related to HDL-cholesterol, the elevation in HDL per km run or ounce of alcohol consumed, and reduction in HDL per kg of body weight (men only), was least when HDL was low and greatest when HDL was high. These cross-sectional relationships support the hypothesis that men and women who have low HDL-cholesterol will be less responsive to exercise and alcohol (and weight loss in men) as compared to those who have high HDL-cholesterol.

  11. Sandia National Laboratories: Nuclear Energy Systems Laboratory...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laboratory (NESL) Transient Nuclear Fuels Testing Radiation Effects Sciences Solar Electric Propulsion Nuclear Energy Safety Technologies Experimental Testing...

  12. Sandia National Laboratories: Nuclear Energy Systems Laboratory...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laboratory (NESL) Transient Nuclear Fuels Testing Radiation Effects Sciences Solar Electric Propulsion Nuclear Energy Safety Technologies Experimental Testing Phenomenological...

  13. Electrical Model Development and Validation for Distributed Resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simoes, M. G.; Palle, B.; Chakraborty, S.; Uriarte, C.

    2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project focuses on the development of electrical models for small (1-MW) distributed resources at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Distributed Energy Resources Test Facility.

  14. Ames Laboratory Ames, Iowa Argonne National Laboratory Argonne...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Laboratory Los Alamos, New Mexico National Energy Technology Laboratory Morgantown, West Virginia Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania Albany, Oregon National Renewable Energy Laboratory...

  15. Final Environmental Assessment for the Proposed Consolidation of Certain Dynamic Experimentation Activities at the Two-Mile Mesa Complex Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2003-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) requires Federal agency officials to consider the environmental consequences of their proposed actions before decisions are made. In complying with NEPA, the United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), follows the Council on Environmental Quality regulations (40 CFR 1500-1508) and DOE's NEPA implementing procedures (10 CFR 1021). The purpose of an environmental assessment (EA) is to provide Federal decision makers with sufficient evidence and analysis to determine whether to prepare an environmental impact statement (EIS) or issue a Finding of No Significant Impact. Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is a national security laboratory located at Los Alamos, New Mexico, that comprises about 40 square miles (mi{sup 2}) (103.6 square kilometers [km{sup 2}]) of buildings, structures, and forested land (Figure 1). It is administered by NNSA for the Federal government and is managed and operated under contract by the University of California (UC). The NNSA must make a decision whether to consolidate and construct new facilities for the Dynamic Experimentation Division (DX) to create a central core area of facilities, including offices, laboratories, and other support structures, at LANL's Two-Mile Mesa Complex, which comprises portions of Technical Area (TA) 6, TA-22, and TA-40. This Proposed Action would involve constructing new buildings; consolidating existing operations and offices; enhancing utilities, roads, and security infrastructure; and demolishing or removing older buildings, structures, and transportables at various technical areas used by DX (Figure 2). This EA has been prepared to assess the potential environmental consequences of this proposed construction, operational consolidation, and demolition project. The objectives of this EA are to (1) describe the underlying purpose and need for NNSA action; (2) describe the Proposed Action and identify and describe any reasonable alternatives that satisfy the purpose and need for agency action; (3) describe baseline environmental conditions at LANL; (4) analyze the potential indirect, direct, and cumulative effects to the existing environment from implementation of the Proposed Action, and (5) compare the effects of the Proposed Action with the No Action Alternative and other reasonable alternatives. For the purposes of compliance with NEPA, reasonable alternatives are identified as being those that meet NNSA's purpose and need for action by virtue of timeliness, appropriate technology, and applicability to LANL. The EA process provides NNSA with environmental information that can be used in developing mitigative actions, if necessary, to minimize or avoid adverse effects to the quality of the human environment and natural ecosystems should NNSA decide to proceed with implementing the Proposed Action at LANL. Ultimately, the goal of NEPA, and this EA, is to aid NNSA officials in making decisions based on an understanding of environmental consequences and in taking actions that protect, restore, and enhance the environment.

  16. Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory Annual Report: Fiscal Year 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foster, Nancy S.; Showalter, Mary Ann

    2007-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the activities and research performed at the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, a Department of Energy national scientific user facility at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, during Fiscal Year 2006.

  17. Sandia National Laboratories: Federal Laboratory Consortium Regional...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    active layer. Schematic of the enzymatically active membrane's active layer. Electricity-generating plants, especially coal-fired plants, and other industrial activities...

  18. In vivo distribution of recombinant interleukin-2-activated autologous lymphocytes administered by intra-arterial infusion in patients with renal cell carcinoma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morita, T.; Yonese, Y.; Minato, N.

    1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recombinant interleukin-2 (RIL 2)-activated autologous peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) were infused directly into the renal arteries of 3 patients with renal cell carcinoma, and the in vivo distribution of the infused cells was investigated. In vitro studies to define the optimal culture conditions indicated that maximal lymphokine-activated killer activity was observed at around 10-20 days in culture, as judged by the cytotoxicity against fresh allogenic tumor cells. Maximal expression of the interleukin-2 receptor was also obtained at around 10 days. PBL collected by leukopheresis from each patient were thus cultured for 10 days with RIL 2, labeled with /sup 111/In-oxine, and then infused directly into the renal artery of the affected kidney via a catheter. Radioactivity in the infused side of the kidneys increased immediately after the infusion but then gradually decreased. Radioactivity in the lungs also rapidly increased within the first hour but then cleared gradually, whereas that in the liver and spleen tended to increase steadily. Nevertheless, at 48 hours, the infused side of the kidneys retained levels of radioactivity comparable to those seen in the liver and spleen, while the levels seen in the lungs were already close to background levels. The radioactivity in the areas corresponding to tumors remained consistently higher than that in the normal parts of the affected kidneys. The direct comparison of the radioactivity distribution pattern with the macroscopic appearance of surgically resected kidneys indicated that the accumulation of radioactivity was indeed selectively associated with the tumor tissues in the kidneys, except for a case in which the tumor was quite necrotic and hypovascular.

  19. Supplement analysis for continued operation of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore. Volume 2: Comment response document

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy (DOE), prepared a draft Supplement Analysis (SA) for Continued Operation of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore (SNL-L), in accordance with DOE`s requirements for implementation of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) (10 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] Part 1021.314). It considers whether the Final Environmental Impact Statement and Environmental Impact Report for Continued Operation of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore (1992 EIS/EIR) should be supplement3ed, whether a new environmental impact statement (EIS) should be prepared, or no further NEPA documentation is required. The SA examines the current project and program plans and proposals for LLNL and SNL-L, operations to identify new or modified projects or operations or new information for the period from 1998 to 2002 that was not considered in the 1992 EIS/EIR. When such changes, modifications, and information are identified, they are examined to determine whether they could be considered substantial or significant in reference to the 1992 proposed action and the 1993 Record of Decision (ROD). DOE released the draft SA to the public to obtain stakeholder comments and to consider those comments in the preparation of the final SA. DOE distributed copies of the draft SA to those who were known to have an interest in LLNL or SNL-L activities in addition to those who requested a copy. In response to comments received, DOE prepared this Comment Response Document.

  20. Smart Power Laboratory (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This fact sheet describes the purpose, lab specifications, applications scenarios, and information on how to partner with NREL's Smart Power Laboratory at the Energy Systems Integration Facility. Research at NREL's Smart Power Laboratory in the Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF) focuses on the development and integration of smart technologies including the integration of distributed and renewable energy resources through power electronics and smart energy management for building applications. The 5,300 sq. ft. laboratory is designed to be highly flexible and configurable, essential for a large variety of smart power applications that range from developing advanced inverters and power converters to testing residential and commercial scale meters and control technologies. Some application scenarios are: (1) Development of power converters for integration of distributed and renewable energy resources; (2) Development of advanced controls for smart power electronics; (3) Testing prototype and commercially available power converters for electrical interconnection and performance, advanced functionality, long duration reliability and safety; and (4) Hardware-in-loop development and testing of power electronics systems in smart distribution grid models.

  1. Remedial site evaluation report for the waste area grouping 10 wells associated with the new hydrofracture facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 2: Field activities and well summaries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Four hydrofracture sites at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) were used for development, demonstration, and disposal from 1959 to 1984. More than 10 million gal of waste grout mix was disposed of via hydrofracture. Various types of wells were installed to monitor the hydrofracture operations. The primary goal of this remedial investigation was to gather information about the wells in order to recommend the type and best method of final disposition for the wells. Evaluations were performed to determine the integrity of well castings, confirm construction details for each well, evaluate the extent of contamination, assist in planning for future activities, and determine the suitability of the wells for future temporary site monitoring.

  2. Water Heaters and Hot Water Distribution Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutz, Jim

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Transportation Water Heaters and Hot Water DistributionLaboratory). 2008. Water Heaters and Hot Water Distributionfor instantaneous gas water heaters; and pressure loss

  3. National Renewable Energy Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    National Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future ponsorship Format Reversed Color:White rtical Format Reversed-A ertical Format Reversed-B National Renewable Energy Laboratory National Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future National Renewable Energy Laboratory

  4. Manufacturing Laboratory (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This fact sheet describes the purpose, lab specifications, applications scenarios, and information on how to partner with NREL's Manufacturing Laboratory at the Energy Systems Integration Facility. The Manufacturing Laboratory at NREL's Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF) focuses on developing methods and technologies that will assist manufacturers of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies, as well as other renewable energy technologies, to scale up their manufacturing capabilities to volumes that meet DOE and industry targets. Specifically, the manufacturing activity is currently focused on developing and validating quality control techniques to assist manufacturers of low temperature and high temperature fuel cells in the transition from low to high volume production methods for cells and stacks. Capabilities include initial proof-of-concept studies through prototype system development and in-line validation. Existing diagnostic capabilities address a wide range of materials, including polymer films, carbon and catalyst coatings, carbon fiber papers and wovens, and multi-layer assemblies of these materials, as well as ceramic-based materials in pre- or post-fired forms. Work leading to the development of non-contact, non-destructive techniques to measure critical dimensional and functional properties of fuel cell and other materials, and validation of those techniques on the continuous processing line. This work will be supported by materials provided by our partners. Looking forward, the equipment in the laboratory is set up to be modified and extended to provide processing capabilities such as coating, casting, and deposition of functional layers, as well as associated processes such as drying or curing. In addition, continuous processes are used for components of organic and thin film photovoltaics (PV) as well as battery technologies, so synergies with these important areas will be explored.

  5. Low radiative efficiency accretion at work in active galactic nuclei: the nuclear spectral energy distribution of NGC4565

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Chiaberge; R. Gilli; F. D. Macchetto; W. B. Sparks

    2006-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We derive the spectral energy distribution (SED) of the nucleus of the Seyfert galaxy NGC4565. Despite its classification as a Seyfert2, the nuclear source is substantially unabsorbed. The absorption we find from Chandra data (N_H=2.5 X 10^21 cm^-2) is consistent with that produced by material in the galactic disk of the host galaxy. HST images show a nuclear unresolved source in all of the available observations, from the near-IR H band to the optical U band. The SED is completely different from that of Seyfert galaxies and QSO, as it appears basically ``flat'' in the IR-optical region, with a small drop-off in the U-band. The location of the object in diagnostic planes for low luminosity AGNs excludes a jet origin for the optical nucleus, and its extremely low Eddington ratio L_o/L_Edd indicates that the radiation we observe is most likely produced in a radiatively inefficient accretion flow (RIAF). This would make NGC4565 the first AGN in which an ADAF-like process is identified in the optical. We find that the relatively high [OIII] flux observed from the ground cannot be all produced in the nucleus. Therefore, an extended NLR must exist in this object. This may be interpreted in the framework of two different scenarios: i) the radiation from ADAFs is sufficient to give rise to high ionization emission-line regions through photoionization, or ii) the nuclear source has recently ``turned-off'', switching from a high-efficiency accretion regime to the present low-efficiency state.

  6. Sandia National Laboratories: Sandia National Laboratories

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in Hosted by Sandia National Laboratories and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Inverter reliability drives project life cycle costs and plant performance. This...

  7. Argonne National Laboratory | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Argonne National Laboratory Slip sliding away Graphene and diamonds prove a slippery combination Read More ACT-SO winners Argonne mentors students for the next generation of...

  8. Materials Design Laboratory | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Design Laboratory, scheduled for completion in FY 2020, is designed to meet U.S. Green Building Council Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Gold...

  9. Distributed H{sub 2} Supply for Fuel Cell Utility Vehicles Year 6 - Activity 3.5 - Development fo a National Center for Hydrogen Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Almlie, Jay

    2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) has developed a high-pressure hydrogen production system that reforms a liquid organic feedstock and water at operating pressures up to 800 bar (~12,000 psig). The advantages of this system include the elimination of energy-intensive hydrogen compression, a smaller process footprint, and the elimination of gaseous or liquid hydrogen transport. This system could also potentially enable distributed hydrogen production from centralized coal. Processes have been investigated to gasify coal and then convert the syngas into alcohol or alkanes. These alcohols and alkanes could then be easily transported in bulk to distributed high-pressure water-reforming (HPWR)-based systems to deliver hydrogen economically. The intent of this activity was to utilize the EERC’s existing HPWR hydrogen production process, previously designed and constructed in a prior project phase, as a basis to improve operational and production performance of an existing demonstration unit. Parameters to be pursued included higher hydrogen delivery pressure, higher hydrogen production rates, and the ability to refill within a 5-minute time frame.

  10. Power Systems Integration Laboratory (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This fact sheet describes the purpose, lab specifications, applications scenarios, and information on how to partner with NREL's Power Systems Integration Laboratory at the Energy Systems Integration Facility. At NREL's Power Systems Integration Laboratory in the Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF), research focuses on developing and testing large-scale distributed energy systems for grid-connected, stand-alone, and microgrid applications. The laboratory can accommodate large power system components such as inverters for photovoltaic (PV) and wind systems, diesel and natural gas generators, battery packs, microgrid interconnection switchgear, and vehicles. Closely coupled with the research electrical distribution bus at the ESIF, the Power Systems Integration Laboratory will offer power testing capability of megawatt-scale DC and AC power systems, as well as advanced hardware-in-the-loop and model-in-the-loop simulation capabilities. Thermal heating and cooling loops and fuel also allow testing of combined heating/cooling and power systems (CHP).

  11. 137Cs Activities and 135Cs/137Cs Isotopic Ratios at Idaho National Laboratory: A Case Study in Environmental Nuclear Forensic Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mathew S Snow; Morgan Kelley; Darin C. Snyder; James E. Delmore; Sue B. Clark

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract is still in progress. Below is the current outline: -Some statement regarding how Cs can be useful for nuclear forensic analysis of environmental samples. -Then some other statement stating how the SDA provides an excellent case study for such an analysis. -137Cs concentration patterns suggest that the 137Cs came from localized releases in the near vicinity of the SDA, while observations of thermal 135Cs/137Cs ratios suggests some contribution from thermal fission product waste buried within the SDA. -137Cs activity patterns, combined with 135Cs/137Cs ratios, known Cs environmental chemistry, and historical data, suggest the Cs was most likely released from Pit 9 and Trench 48 during the 1969 flood. -Knowledge of the release event and excavations narrows the possible window for waste disposed of at SDA to 5 months (Trench 48) to 1.2 years (Pit 9). -Only 3 waste generators disposed of waste during this timeframe, however, as Rocky Flats Site did not generate any appreciable 137Cs waste, and as best estimates suggest that the INL disposed 2000 times as much non-actinide waste at the SDA than off-site processes, INL related operations are determined to be the most likely contributor to the observed Cs contamination. -While 135Cs/137Cs ratios have the potential to reveal information regarding the reactor design and operating conditions which led to the fission event, the large number of different INL reactors which most likely contributed to waste within Trench 48 and Pit 9, combined with evidence of a mixture of thermal and fast fission product Cs (most likely originating from global + regional fallout) precludes the ability to further refine the 135Cs/137Cs ratios. -However, at other sites which do not contain such large quantities of highly diverse contamination, secondary nuclide monitors which have similar environmental mobilities to Cs (such as Pu or Sr) might enable correction for the quantity of fallout within samples.

  12. Idaho National Laboratory’s FY09 & FY10 Greenhouse Gas Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jennifer D. Morton

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A greenhouse gas (GHG) inventory is a systematic approach to account for the production and release of certain gases generated by an institution from various emission sources. The gases of interest are those that climate science has identified as related to anthropogenic global climate change. This document presents an inventory of GHGs generated during fiscal year (FY) 2009 and 2010 by Idaho National Laboratory (INL), a Department of Energy (DOE)-sponsored entity, located in southeastern Idaho. In recent years, concern has grown about the environmental impact of GHGs. This, together with a desire to decrease harmful environmental impacts, would be enough to encourage the calculation of an inventory of the total GHGs generated at INL. Additionally, INL has a desire to see how its emissions compare with similar institutions, including other DOE national laboratories. Executive Order 13514 requires that federal agencies and institutions document reductions in GHG emissions. INL's GHG inventory was calculated according to methodologies identified in federal GHG guidance documents using operational control boundaries. It measures emissions generated in three scopes: (1) INL emissions produced directly by stationary or mobile combustion and by fugitive emissions, (2) the share of emissions generated by entities from which INL purchased electrical power, and (3) indirect or shared emissions generated by outsourced activities that benefit INL (occur outside INL's organizational boundaries, but are a consequence of INL's activities). This inventory found that INL generated 103,590 and 102,413 MT of CO2-equivalent emissions during FY09 and FY10, respectively. The following conclusions were made from looking at the results of the individual contributors to INL's FY09 and FY10 GHG inventories: (1) Electricity (including the associated transmission and distribution losses) is the largest contributor to INL's GHG inventory, with over 50% of the CO2e emissions; (2) Other sources with high emissions were stationary combustion (facility fuels), waste disposal (including fugitive emissions from the onsite landfill and contracted disposal), mobile combustion (fleet fuels), employee commuting, and business air travel; and (3) Sources with low emissions were wastewater treatment (onsite and contracted), fugitive emissions from refrigerants, and business ground travel (in personal and rental vehicles). This report details the methods behind quantifying INL's GHG inventory and discusses lessons learned on better practices by which information important to tracking GHGs can be tracked and recorded. It is important to note that because this report differentiates between those portions of INL that are managed and operated by the Battelle Energy Alliance (BEA) and those managed by other contractors, it includes only that large proportion of Laboratory activities overseen by BEA. It is assumed that other contractors will provide similar reporting for those activities they manage, where appropriate.

  13. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Operated by Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) operated by Battelle Memorial Institute. Battelle has a unique contract

  14. Argonne National Laboratory's Nondestructive

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kemner, Ken

    Argonne National Laboratory's Nondestructive Evaluation Technologies NDE #12;Over45yearsexperienceinNondestructiveEvaluation... Argonne National Laboratory's world-renowned researchers have a proven the safe operationof advanced nuclear reactors. Argonne's World-Class Nondestructive Evaluation

  15. Mentoring | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    As one of the largest laboratories in the nation for science and engineering research, Argonne National Laboratory is home to some of the most prolific and well-renowned scientists...

  16. Employment at National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    E. S. Peterson; C. A. Allen

    2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Scientists enter the National Laboratory System for many different reasons. For some, faculty positions are scarce, so they take staff-scientist position at national laboratories (i.e. Pacific Northwest, Idaho, Los Alamos, and Brookhaven). Many plan to work at the National Laboratory for 5 to 7 years and then seek an academic post. For many (these authors included), before they know it it’s 15 or 20 years later and they never seriously considered leaving the laboratory system.

  17. Sandia National Laboratories: Photovoltaic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in Computational Modeling & Simulation, Energy, Facilities, News, News & Events, Photovoltaic, Photovoltaic Systems Evaluation Laboratory (PSEL), Renewable Energy, Solar, Solar...

  18. LABORATORY NEW HIRE NOTICE: LABORATORY DELAYED OPENING OR CLOSURE...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    LABORATORY NEW HIRE NOTICE: LABORATORY DELAYED OPENING OR CLOSURE DUE TO INCLEAMENT WEATHER During the winter months, the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) may at times...

  19. Airborne chemical baseline evaluation of the 222-S laboratory complex

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bartley, P., Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The 222-S Laboratory complex stores and uses over 400 chemicals. Many of these chemicals are used in laboratory analysis and some are used for maintenance activities. The majority of laboratory analysis chemicals are only used inside of fume hoods or glove boxes to control both chemical and radionuclide airborne concentrations. This evaluation was designed to determine the potential for laboratory analysis chemicals at the 222-S Laboratory complex to cause elevated airborne chemical concentrations under normal conditions. This was done to identify conditions and activities that should be subject to airborne chemical monitoring in accordance with the Westinghouse Hanford Company Chemical Hygiene Plan.

  20. EA-0856: Construction and Operation of a Human Genome Laboratory at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Berkeley, California

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal to construct and operate a new laboratory for consolidation of current and future activities of the Human Genome Center at the U.S....

  1. 60 years of great science [Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This issue highlights Oak Ridge National Laboratory's contributions in more than 30 areas of research and related activities during the past 60 years and provides glimpses of current activities that are carrying on this heritage.

  2. NOAA Air Resources Laboratory Quarterly Activity Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    's petrochemical facilities 1 km to 8 km distant. Such episodes produced sharp increases in all three species

  3. NOAA Air Resources Laboratory Quarterly Activity Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Measurement Platform (LAMP) Proposal 14. EPA Roadside Sound Barrier Tracer Study Special Operations and dispersion modeling system to reflect the state of the science. He led the successful transfer of HYSPLIT

  4. Sandia National Laboratories: Past Market Transformation Activities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Biofuels Biofuels Publications Biochemical Conversion Program Lignocellulosic Biomass Microalgae Thermochemical Conversion Sign up for our E-Newsletter Required.gif?3.21 Email...

  5. Independent Activity Report, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory -

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently Asked Questions for DOEthe RankingReform atSolar Energy Awareness in El-

  6. Independent Activity Report, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory -

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(Fact Sheet),EnergyImprovement of theResponses to2012 | DepartmentFebruary

  7. Laboratory for Characterization of Irradiated Graphite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karen A. Moore

    2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The newly completed Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Carbon Characterization Laboratory (CCL) is located in Labs C19 and C20 of the Idaho National Laboratory Research Center (IRC). The CCL was established under the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project to support graphite and ceramic composite research and development activities. The research is in support of the Advanced Graphite Creep (AGC) experiment — a major material irradiation experiment within the NGNP Graphite program. The CCL is designed to characterize and test low activated irradiated materials such as high purity graphite, carbon-carbon composites, and silicon-carbide composite materials. The laboratory is fully capable of characterizing material properties for both irradiated and nonirradiated materials.

  8. 2006 Site Environmental Report brookhaven national laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that is distributed to various U.S. Department of Energy sites, local libraries, and local regulators and stakeholders of the summary and CD, please write or call: Brookhaven National Laboratory Environmental and Waste Management constructed Center for Functional Nanomaterials, the planned National Synchrotron Light Source II project

  9. Los Alamos National Laboratory solar program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reisfeld, S.K.; Neeper, D.A.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Progress is reported for passive solar tasks performed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory during FY 1982. Results on test cell experiments for the 1981-1982 winter are reported, as are Class A performance monitoring, passive cooling, both residential and commercial economic cooling assessments, and thermal effects of distributed mass in passive buildings.

  10. Ris National Laboratory Systems Analysis Department

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .meibom@risoe.dk VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, juha.kiviluoma@vtt.fi University of Stuttgart, IER, rbHLERP* , Risoe National Laboratory, peter.meibom@risoe.dk -XKD .LYLOXRPD, VTT Technical Research Centre to power consumption including transmission and distribution losses. Wind power production varies

  11. Hardware Development of a Laboratory-Scale Microgrid Phase 2: Operation and Control of a Two-Inverter Microgrid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Illindala, M. S.; Piagi, P.; Zhang, H.; Venkataramanan, G.; Lasseter, R. H.

    2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the activities of the second year of a three-year project to develop control software for microsource distributed generation systems. In this phase, a laboratory-scale microgrid was expanded to include: (1) Two emulated distributed resources; (2) Static switchgear to allow rapid disconnection and reconnection; (3) Electronic synchronizing circuitry to enable transient-free grid interconnection; (4) Control software for dynamically varying the frequency and voltage controller structures; and (5) Power measurement instrumentation for capturing transient waveforms at the interconnect during switching events.

  12. GASIFICATION FOR DISTRIBUTED GENERATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ronald C. Timpe; Michael D. Mann; Darren D. Schmidt

    2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A recent emphasis in gasification technology development has been directed toward reduced-scale gasifier systems for distributed generation at remote sites. The domestic distributed power generation market over the next decade is expected to be 5-6 gigawatts per year. The global increase is expected at 20 gigawatts over the next decade. The economics of gasification for distributed power generation are significantly improved when fuel transport is minimized. Until recently, gasification technology has been synonymous with coal conversion. Presently, however, interest centers on providing clean-burning fuel to remote sites that are not necessarily near coal supplies but have sufficient alternative carbonaceous material to feed a small gasifier. Gasifiers up to 50 MW are of current interest, with emphasis on those of 5-MW generating capacity. Internal combustion engines offer a more robust system for utilizing the fuel gas, while fuel cells and microturbines offer higher electric conversion efficiencies. The initial focus of this multiyear effort was on internal combustion engines and microturbines as more realistic near-term options for distributed generation. In this project, we studied emerging gasification technologies that can provide gas from regionally available feedstock as fuel to power generators under 30 MW in a distributed generation setting. Larger-scale gasification, primarily coal-fed, has been used commercially for more than 50 years to produce clean synthesis gas for the refining, chemical, and power industries. Commercial-scale gasification activities are under way at 113 sites in 22 countries in North and South America, Europe, Asia, Africa, and Australia, according to the Gasification Technologies Council. Gasification studies were carried out on alfalfa, black liquor (a high-sodium waste from the pulp industry), cow manure, and willow on the laboratory scale and on alfalfa, black liquor, and willow on the bench scale. Initial parametric tests evaluated through reactivity and product composition were carried out on thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) equipment. These tests were evaluated and then followed by bench-scale studies at 1123 K using an integrated bench-scale fluidized-bed gasifier (IBG) which can be operated in the semicontinuous batch mode. Products from tests were solid (ash), liquid (tar), and gas. Tar was separated on an open chromatographic column. Analysis of the gas product was carried out using on-line Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). For selected tests, gas was collected periodically and analyzed using a refinery gas analyzer GC (gas chromatograph). The solid product was not extensively analyzed. This report is a part of a search into emerging gasification technologies that can provide power under 30 MW in a distributed generation setting. Larger-scale gasification has been used commercially for more than 50 years to produce clean synthesis gas for the refining, chemical, and power industries, and it is probable that scaled-down applications for use in remote areas will become viable. The appendix to this report contains a list, description, and sources of currently available gasification technologies that could be or are being commercially applied for distributed generation. This list was gathered from current sources and provides information about the supplier, the relative size range, and the status of the technology.

  13. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory 1994 site environmental report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 1994 Site Environmental Report summarizes environmental activities at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) for the calendar year (CY) 1994. The report strives to present environmental data in a manner that characterizes the performance and compliance status of the Laboratory`s environmental management programs when measured against regulatory standards and DOE requirements. The report also discusses significant highlight and planning efforts of these programs. The format and content of the report are consistent with the requirements of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program.

  14. Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    In this issue's cover story, "Rethinking the Unthinkable," Houston T. Hawkins, a retired Air Force colonel and a Laboratory senior fellow, points out that since Vladimir Putin...

  15. Sandia National Laboratories: AMI

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Manufacturing Initiative (AMI) is a multiple-year, 3-way collaboration among TPI Composites, Iowa State University, and Sandia National Laboratories. The goal of this...

  16. Sandia National Laboratories: Photovoltaics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2013 Inverter Reliability Workshop On May 31, 2013, in Hosted by Sandia National Laboratories and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Inverter reliability drives project...

  17. Sandia National Laboratories: photovoltaic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    photovoltaic Microsystems Enabled Photovoltaics (MEPV) On April 14, 2011, in About MEPV Flexible MEPV MEPV Publications MEPV Awards Researchers at Sandia National Laboratories are...

  18. News | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Researchers from Argonne National Laboratory modeled several scenarios to add more solar power to the electric grid, using real-world data from the southwestern power...

  19. Sandia National Laboratories: SPI

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Conference, the Department of Energy (DOE), the Electric Power Research Instisute (EPRI), Sandia National Laboratories, ... Last Updated: September 10, 2012 Go To Top ...

  20. Sandia National Laboratories: Workshops

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Geoscience, Climate and Consequence Effect at Sandia National Laboratories presented on "Hydraulic Fracturing: Role of Government-Sponsored R&D." Marianne's presentation was part...

  1. nfang | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ames Laboratory Research Projects: Chemical Analysis of Nanodomains Education: Ph.D., the University of British Columbia, Canada, 2006 B.S. from Xiamen University, China, 1998...

  2. Sandia National Laboratories: Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laboratories on a new concentrated solar power (CSP) installation with thermal energy storage. The CSP storage project combines Areva's modular Compact Linear Fresnel...

  3. Sandia National Laboratories: publications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laboratories, August 2010. 2009 Adrian R. Chavez, Position Paper: Protecting Process Control Systems against Lifecycle Attacks Using Trust Anchors Sandia National ... Page 1...

  4. Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the first results of joint work by scientists from Lawrence Berkeley, Pacific Northwest, Savannah River, and Los Alamos national laboratories at the Savannah River Site to model...

  5. Sandia National Laboratories: Infrastructure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Center for SCADA Security Assets On August 25, 2011, in Sandia established its SCADA Security Development Laboratory in 1998. Its purpose was to analyze vulnerabilities in...

  6. Sandia National Laboratories: solar

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Interactive Tour Operated by Sandia National Laboratories for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the National Solar Thermal Test Facility (NSTTF) is the only test facility...

  7. National Laboratory Photovoltaics Research

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE supports photovoltaic (PV) research and development and facilities at its national laboratories to accelerate progress toward achieving the SunShot Initiative's technological and economic...

  8. Sandia National Laboratories: Geothermal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Geothermal Sandia Wins DOE Geothermal Technologies Office Funding Award On December 15, 2014, in Advanced Materials Laboratory, Capabilities, Energy, Facilities, Geothermal,...

  9. Sandia National Laboratories: PV

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2014 Sandia Corporation | Questions & Comments | Privacy & Security U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Sandia National Laboratories is a...

  10. Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    23, 2013-Nearly 400 Los Alamos National Laboratory employees on 47 teams received Pollution Prevention awards for protecting the environment and saving taxpayers more than 8...

  11. Sandia National Laboratories: HRSAM

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) announce the publication of two new Hydrogen Fueling Infrastructure Research and Station Technology (H2FIRST) reports on...

  12. Sandia National Laboratories: Solar

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Testing Center (PV RTC), Photovoltaic Systems Evaluation Laboratory (PSEL), Renewable Energy, Solar, Solar Newsletter, SunShot, Systems Analysis A research team that included...

  13. Sandia National Laboratories: NASA

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    National Laboratories (partnering with Northrup Grumman Aerospace Systems and the University of Michigan) has developed a solar electric propulsion concept capable of a wide...

  14. Facilities | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Some of the nation's most powerful and sophisticated facilities for energy research Argonne National Laboratory is home to some of the nation's most powerful and sophisticated...

  15. ARGONNE NATIONAL LABORATORY May

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ARGONNE NATIONAL LABORATORY May 9, 1994 Light Source Note: LS234 Comparison of the APS and UGIMAG Helmholtz Coil Systems David W. Carnegie Accelerator Systems Division Advanced...

  16. Licensing | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (TDC) Division negotiates and manages license agreements on behalf of UChicago Argonne, LLC, which operates Argonne National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy....

  17. Procurement | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Procurement More than 150 attend second joint Argonne-Fermilab small business fairSeptember 2, 2014 On Thursday, Aug. 28, Illinois' two national laboratories - Argonne and Fermi...

  18. Exercise Design Laboratory

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Emergency Operations Training Academy (EOTA), NA 40.2, Readiness and Training, Albuquerque, NM is pleased to announce the EXR231, Exercise Design Laboratory course

  19. Sandia National Laboratories: Partnership

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Armstrong using deep level optical spectroscopy to investigate defects in the m-plane GaN. Jim is a professor ... Vermont and Sandia National Laboratories Announce Energy...

  20. National Renewable Energy Laboratory: 35 Years of Innovation (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This brochure about NREL is a national version that can be distributed to visitors and any other interested parties. It provides general information about laboratory, its mission, and operations.

  1. Energy Systems High Pressure Test Laboratory (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This fact sheet describes the purpose, lab specifications, applications scenarios, and information on how to partner with NREL's Energy Systems High Pressure Test Laboratory at the Energy Systems Integration Facility. The purpose of the Energy Systems High Pressure Test Laboratory at NREL's Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF) is to provide space where high pressure hydrogen components can be safely tested. High pressure hydrogen storage is an integral part of energy storage technology for use in fuel cell and in other distributed energy scenarios designed to effectively utilize the variability inherent with renewable energy sources. The high pressure storage laboratory is co-located with energy storage activities such as ultra-capacitors, super conducting magnetic flywheel and mechanical energy storage systems laboratories for an integrated approach to system development and demonstration. Hazards associated with hydrogen storage at pressures up to 10,000 psi include oxygen displacement, combustion, explosion, and pressurization of room air due to fast release and physical hazards associated with burst failure modes. A critical understanding of component failure modes is essential in developing reliable, robust designs that will minimize failure risk beyond the end of service life. Development of test protocol for accelerated life testing to accurately scale to real world operating conditions is essential for developing regulations, codes and standards required for safe operation. NREL works closely with industry partners in providing support of advanced hydrogen technologies. Innovative approaches to product design will accelerate commercialization into new markets. NREL works with all phases of the product design life cycle from early prototype development to final certification testing. High pressure tests are performed on hydrogen components, primarily for the validation of developing new codes and standards for high pressure hydrogen applications. The following types of tests can be performed: Performance, Component and system level efficiency, Strength of materials and hydrogen compatibility, Safety demonstration, Model validation, and Life cycle reliability.

  2. The Influence of a CO2 Pricing Scheme on Distributed Energy Resources in California's Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2003), “Distributed Energy Resources Customer AdoptionGas-Fired Distributed Energy Resource Characterizations,”National Renewable Energy Resource Laboratory, Golden, CO,

  3. Distributed Energy Resources On-Site Optimization for Commercial Buildings with Electric and Thermal Storage Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas-Fired Distributed Energy Resource Characterizations”,National Renewable Energy Resource Laboratory, Golden, CO,Edwards, “Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption

  4. THE DEEP SWIRE FIELD. IV. FIRST PROPERTIES OF THE SUB-mJy GALAXY POPULATION: REDSHIFT DISTRIBUTION, AGN ACTIVITY, AND STAR FORMATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strazzullo, Veronica; Pannella, Maurilio; Owen, Frazer N.; Wang, Wei-Hao [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 1003 Lopezville Rd., Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); Bender, Ralf [Universitaets-Sternwarte, Scheinerstrasse 1, Munich D-81679 (Germany); Morrison, Glenn E. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Shupe, David L., E-mail: vstrazzu@nrao.ed [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, California Institute of Technology, 100-22, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2010-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a study of a 20 cm selected sample in the Deep Spitzer Wide-area InfraRed Extragalactic Legacy Survey Very Large Array Field, reaching a 5{sigma} limiting flux density at the image center of S{sub 1.4{sub GHz}} {approx} 13.5 {mu}Jy. In a 0.6 x 0.6 deg{sup 2} field, we are able to assign an optical/IR counterpart to 97% of the radio sources. Up to 11 passbands from the NUV to 4.5 {mu}m are then used to sample the spectral energy distribution (SED) of these counterparts in order to investigate the nature of the host galaxies. By means of an SED template library and stellar population synthesis models, we estimate photometric redshifts, stellar masses, and stellar population properties, dividing the sample into three sub-classes of quiescent, intermediate, and star-forming galaxies. We focus on the radio sample in the redshift range 0.3 < z < 1.3 where we estimate to have a redshift completeness higher than 90% and study the properties and redshift evolution of these sub-populations. We find that, as expected, the relative contributions of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and star-forming galaxies to the {mu}Jy population depend on the flux density limit of the sample. At all flux levels, a significant population of 'green-valley' galaxies is observed. While the actual nature of these sources is not definitely understood, the results of this work may suggest that a significant fraction of faint radio sources might be composite (and possibly transition) objects, thus a simple 'AGN versus star-forming' classification might not be appropriate to fully understand what faint radio populations really are.

  5. 1MIT Lincoln Laboratory MIT Lincoln Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clancy, Ted

    · About the Laboratory ­ Overview ­ Research Areas ­ Demographics · The MQP program ­ Logistics Primary Field Sites White Sands Missile Range Socorro, New Mexico Reagan Test Site Kwajalein, Marshall ­ Demographics · The MQP program ­ Logistics ­ Admission ­ Summer & Full-time Employment · Past Projects #12;9MIT

  6. Laboratory Director PRINCETON PLASMA PHYSICS LABORATORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

    .C. Zarnstorff Deputy Director for Operations A.B. Cohen Laboratory Management Council Research Council Associate Diagnostics D.W. Johnson Electrical Systems C. Neumeyer Lab Astrophysics M. Yamada, H. Ji Projects: MRX, MRI Science Education A. Post-Zwicker Quality Assurance J.A. Malsbury Tech. Transfer Patents & Publications L

  7. DATA RECOVERY EFFORTS AT IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY, OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY, AND SAVANNAH RIVER NATIONAL LABORATORY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richard Metcalf; Saleem Salaymeh; Michael Ehinger

    2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract was already submitted. Could not find the previous number. Would be fine with attaching/update of old number. Abstract Below: Modern nuclear facilities will have significant process monitoring capability for their operators. These systems will also be used for domestic safeguards applications, which has led to research over new diversion-detection algorithms. Curiously missing from these efforts are verification and validation data sets. A tri-laboratory project to locate the existing data sets and recover their data has yielded three major potential sources of data. The first is recovery of the process monitoring data of the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant, which now has a distributable package for algorithm developers. The second data set is extensive sampling and process data from Savannah River National Laboratory’s F- and H-canyon sites. Finally, high fidelity data from the start-up tests at the Barnwell Reprocessing Facility is in recovery. This paper details the data sets and compares their relative attributes.

  8. Commercial Fisheries Biological Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , and tidal estuaries with bottom types ranging from soft mud to hard sand and rock. The Laboratory has grown research laboratories, an experimental shell- fish hatchery, administrative offices, a combined library freezer, and quick freezer. The library is limited to publications that have a direct bearing on current

  9. LABORATORY I: GEOMETRIC OPTICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Lab I - 1 LABORATORY I: GEOMETRIC OPTICS In this lab, you will solve several problems related to the formation of optical images. Most of us have a great deal of experience with the formation of optical images this laboratory, you should be able to: · Describe features of real optical systems in terms of ray diagrams

  10. Technical Report Computer Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haddadi, Hamed

    the opportunity to consider a physical attack, with very little to lose. We thus set out to analyse the deviceTechnical Report Number 592 Computer Laboratory UCAM-CL-TR-592 ISSN 1476-2986 Unwrapping J. Murdoch Technical reports published by the University of Cambridge Computer Laboratory are freely

  11. Reservoir Characterization Research Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    Reservoir Characterization Research Laboratory for Carbonate Studies Executive Summary for 2014 Outcrop and Subsurface Characterization of Carbonate Reservoirs for Improved Recovery of Remaining/Al 0.00 0.02 0.04 Eagle Ford Fm #12;#12; Reservoir Characterization Research Laboratory Research Plans

  12. Radiation and Health Technology Laboratory Capabilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goles, Ronald W.; Johnson, Michelle Lynn; Piper, Roman K.; Peters, Jerry D.; Murphy, Mark K.; Mercado, Mike S.; Bihl, Donald E.; Lynch, Timothy P.

    2003-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Radiological Standards and Calibrations Laboratory, a part of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)(a) performs calibrations and upholds reference standards necessary to maintain traceability to national standards. The facility supports U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) programs at the Hanford Site, programs sponsored by DOE Headquarters and other federal agencies, radiological protection programs at other DOE and commercial nuclear sites and research and characterization programs sponsored through the commercial sector. The laboratory is located in the 318 Building of the Hanford Site's 300 Area. The facility contains five major exposure rooms and several laboratories used for exposure work preparation, low-activity instrument calibrations, instrument performance evaluations, instrument maintenance, instrument design and fabrication work, thermoluminescent and radiochromic Dosimetry, and calibration of measurement and test equipment (M&TE). The major exposure facilities are a low-scatter room used for neutron and photon exposures, a source well room used for high-volume instrument calibration work, an x-ray facility used for energy response studies, a high-exposure facility used for high-rate photon calibration work, a beta standards laboratory used for beta energy response studies and beta reference calibrations and M&TE laboratories. Calibrations are routinely performed for personnel dosimeters, health physics instrumentation, photon and neutron transfer standards alpha, beta, and gamma field sources used throughout the Hanford Site, and a wide variety of M&TE. This report describes the standards and calibrations laboratory.

  13. Distribution Integrity Management Plant (DIMP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gonzales, Jerome F. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is the distribution integrity management plan (Plan) for the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Natural Gas Distribution System. This Plan meets the requirements of 49 CFR Part 192, Subpart P Distribution Integrity Management Programs (DIMP) for the LANL Natural Gas Distribution System. This Plan was developed by reviewing records and interviewing LANL personnel. The records consist of the design, construction, operation and maintenance for the LANL Natural Gas Distribution System. The records system for the LANL Natural Gas Distribution System is limited, so the majority of information is based on the judgment of LANL employees; the maintenance crew, the Corrosion Specialist and the Utilities and Infrastructure (UI) Civil Team Leader. The records used in this report are: Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA) 7100.1-1, Report of Main and Service Line Inspection, Natural Gas Leak Survey, Gas Leak Response Report, Gas Leak and Repair Report, and Pipe-to-Soil Recordings. The specific elements of knowledge of the infrastructure used to evaluate each threat and prioritize risks are listed in Sections 6 and 7, Threat Evaluation and Risk Prioritization respectively. This Plan addresses additional information needed and a method for gaining that data over time through normal activities. The processes used for the initial assessment of Threat Evaluation and Risk Prioritization are the methods found in the Simple, Handy Risk-based Integrity Management Plan (SHRIMP{trademark}) software package developed by the American Pipeline and Gas Agency (APGA) Security and Integrity Foundation (SIF). SHRIMP{trademark} uses an index model developed by the consultants and advisors of the SIF. Threat assessment is performed using questions developed by the Gas Piping Technology Company (GPTC) as modified and added to by the SHRIMP{trademark} advisors. This Plan is required to be reviewed every 5 years to be continually refined and improved. Records for all piping system installed after the effective date of this Plan will be captured and retained in the UI records documentation system. Primary Utility Asbuilts are maintained by Utilities Mapping (UMAP) and additional records are maintained on the N drive. Engineering Change Notices (ECNs) are stored on the N drive under configuration management and kept up by Utilities and Infrastructure Division Office (UI-DO). Records include, at a minimum, the location where new piping and appurtenances are installed and the material of which they are constructed.

  14. active living environment: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and physical activity environment audit tools Keinan, Alon 146 Developing solutions for sustainable living-the Urban Living Laboratory: The world's largest 'living laboratory'...

  15. Poland - Economic and Financial Benefits of Distributed Generation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of Distributed Generation Small-Scale, Gas-Fired CHP AgencyCompany Organization Argonne National Laboratory Sector Energy Topics Background analysis Website http:...

  16. Sonication standard laboratory module

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Beugelsdijk, Tony (Los Alamos, NM); Hollen, Robert M. (Los Alamos, NM); Erkkila, Tracy H. (Los Alamos, NM); Bronisz, Lawrence E. (Los Alamos, NM); Roybal, Jeffrey E. (Santa Fe, NM); Clark, Michael Leon (Menan, ID)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A standard laboratory module for automatically producing a solution of cominants from a soil sample. A sonication tip agitates a solution containing the soil sample in a beaker while a stepper motor rotates the sample. An aspirator tube, connected to a vacuum, draws the upper layer of solution from the beaker through a filter and into another beaker. This beaker can thereafter be removed for analysis of the solution. The standard laboratory module encloses an embedded controller providing process control, status feedback information and maintenance procedures for the equipment and operations within the standard laboratory module.

  17. Uniform Distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    randomly and equally likely a point in that interval), the uniform distribution ... Roughly speaking, this means that from any distribution we can create the uniform.

  18. Reservoir CharacterizationReservoir Characterization Research LaboratoryResearch Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    Reservoir CharacterizationReservoir Characterization Research LaboratoryResearch Laboratory at Austin Austin, Texas 78713Austin, Texas 78713--89248924 #12;Reservoir Characterization Research Laboratory for Carbonate Studies Research Plans for 2012 Outcrop and Subsurface Characterization of Carbonate

  19. ISO 14001 IMPLEMENTATION AT A NATIONAL LABORATORY.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BRIGGS,S.L.K.

    2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    After a tumultuous year discovering serious lapses in environment, safety and health management at Brookhaven National Laboratory, the Department of Energy established a new management contract. It called for implementation of an IS0 14001 Environmental Management System and registration of key facilities. Brookhaven Science Associates, the managing contractor for the Laboratory, designed and developed a three-year project to change culture and achieve the goals of the contract. The focus of its efforts were to use IS0 14001 to integrate environmental stewardship into all facets of the Laboratory's mission, and manage its programs in a manner that protected the ecosystem and public health. A large multidisciplinary National Laboratory with over 3,000 employees and 4,000 visiting scientists annually posed significant challenges for IS0 14001 implementation. Activities with environmental impacts varied from regulated industrial waste generation, to soil activation from particle accelerator operations, to radioactive groundwater contamination from research reactors. A project management approach was taken to ensure project completion on schedule and within budget. The major work units for the Environmental Management System Project were as follows: Institutional EMS Program Requirements, Communications, Training, Laboratory-wide Implementation, and Program Assessments. To minimize costs and incorporate lessons learned before full-scale deployment throughout the Laboratory, a pilot process was employed at three facilities. Brookhaven National Laboratory has completed its second year of the project in the summer of 2000, successfully registering nine facilities and self-declaring conformance in all remaining facilities. Project controls, including tracking and reporting progress against a model, have been critical to the successful implementation. Costs summaries are lower than initial estimates, but as expected legal requirements, training, and assessments are key cost centers. Successes to date include the pilot process, heightened employee awareness, registration of the first DOE National Laboratory facility, line ownership of the program, and senior management commitment.

  20. Sandia National Laboratories: EFRC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    region where sunlight is most concentrated and to which ... Overview On November 11, 2010, in Sandia National Laboratories is home to one of the 46 multi-million dollar Energy...

  1. Sandia National Laboratories: Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy, Wind Energy ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. - Sandia National Laboratories and Kirtland Air Force Base may soon share a wind farm that will provide as much as one-third of the...

  2. Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Site OverviewThe Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) was established in 1947 by the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) (predecessor to U.S. Department of Energy [DOE]). Formerly Camp Upton, a U.S....

  3. Sandia National Laboratories: Infrastructure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    10, 2012, in Images Videos Energy Storage Image Gallery Energy Storage B-Roll Videos Battery Abuse Testing Laboratory (BATLab) Abuse Testing B-Roll BatLab 894 B-Roll Cell...

  4. Biosafety | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Safety Biosafety Biosafety Links Biosafety Contacts Biosafety Office Argonne National Laboratory 9700 S. Cass Ave. Bldg. 202, Room B333 Argonne, IL 60439 USA 630-252-5191 Committee...

  5. Safety | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Safety Argonne National Laboratory and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) are very concerned about the well-being of all employees. Students at the undergraduate and graduate...

  6. Idaho National Laboratory

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    McCarthy, Kathy

    2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    INL is the leading laboratory for nuclear R&D. Nuclear engineer Dr. Kathy McCarthy talks aobut the work there and the long-term benefits it will provide.

  7. Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    HISTORYThe Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) site is approximately 27 miles southwest of downtown Chicago in DuPage County, Illinois.  The 1,500 acre ANL site is completely surrounded by the 2,240...

  8. Argonne's Laboratory computing center - 2007 annual report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bair, R.; Pieper, G. W.

    2008-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Argonne National Laboratory founded the Laboratory Computing Resource Center (LCRC) in the spring of 2002 to help meet pressing program needs for computational modeling, simulation, and analysis. The guiding mission is to provide critical computing resources that accelerate the development of high-performance computing expertise, applications, and computations to meet the Laboratory's challenging science and engineering missions. In September 2002 the LCRC deployed a 350-node computing cluster from Linux NetworX to address Laboratory needs for mid-range supercomputing. This cluster, named 'Jazz', achieved over a teraflop of computing power (1012 floating-point calculations per second) on standard tests, making it the Laboratory's first terascale computing system and one of the 50 fastest computers in the world at the time. Jazz was made available to early users in November 2002 while the system was undergoing development and configuration. In April 2003, Jazz was officially made available for production operation. Since then, the Jazz user community has grown steadily. By the end of fiscal year 2007, there were over 60 active projects representing a wide cross-section of Laboratory expertise, including work in biosciences, chemistry, climate, computer science, engineering applications, environmental science, geoscience, information science, materials science, mathematics, nanoscience, nuclear engineering, and physics. Most important, many projects have achieved results that would have been unobtainable without such a computing resource. The LCRC continues to foster growth in the computational science and engineering capability and quality at the Laboratory. Specific goals include expansion of the use of Jazz to new disciplines and Laboratory initiatives, teaming with Laboratory infrastructure providers to offer more scientific data management capabilities, expanding Argonne staff use of national computing facilities, and improving the scientific reach and performance of Argonne's computational applications. Furthermore, recognizing that Jazz is fully subscribed, with considerable unmet demand, the LCRC has framed a 'path forward' for additional computing resources.

  9. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Waste Management Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Waste Management Plan is to compile and to consolidate information annually on how the ORNL Waste Management Program is conducted, which waste management facilities are being used to manage wastes, what forces are acting to change current waste management systems, what activities are planned for the forthcoming fiscal year (FY), and how all of the activities are documented.

  10. EIS-0028: Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratories- Livermore Sites, Livermore, CA

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The statement assesses the potential impacts associated with current operation of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratories , Livermore, adjacent sites. This includes the impacts from postulated accidents associated with the activities. Various effluents including radioactive ones are released to the environment. However, a continuing comprehensive monitoring program is carried out to assist in the control of hazardous effluents. Alternatives considered to current operation of the laboratories include: (1) shutdown and decommissioning, (2) total or partial relocation, (3) scaling down those operations having greatest impact , and (4) wider use of alternate technologies having reduced impact .

  11. NETL R&D Activities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laboratory, Office of Research and Development (ORD) Research Activities within the Coal and Coal-biomass Liquids Program The Coal and Coal-Biomass to Liquids program focuses...

  12. Laboratory Equipment & Supplies | Sample Preparation Laboratories

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |Is Your Home asLCLSLaboratory Directors Laboratory Directors

  13. Laboratory Directed Research and Development

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2015-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    To establish Department of Energy (DOE) requirements for laboratory directed research and development (LDRD) while providing the laboratory director broad flexibility for program implementation

  14. Los Alamos National Laboratory Institutes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    research interests are important to the Laboratory. Sponsoring, partnering with, and funding university professors and students in areas that are important to meet Laboratory...

  15. Laboratory Directed Research and Development annual report, fiscal year 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy Order 413.2(a) establishes DOE`s policy and guidelines regarding Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) at its multiprogram laboratories. As described in 413.2, LDRD is research and development of a creative and innovative nature which is selected by the Laboratory Director or his or her designee, for the purpose of maintaining the scientific and technological vitality of the Laboratory and to respond to scientific and technological opportunities in conformance with the guidelines in this Order. DOE Order 413.2 requires that each laboratory submit an annual report on its LDRD activities to the cognizant Secretarial Officer through the appropriate Operations Office Manager. The report provided in this document represents Pacific Northwest National Laboratory`s LDRD report for FY 1997.

  16. CONTROL TESTING OF THE UK NATIONAL NUCLEAR LABORATORY'S RADBALL TECHNOLOGY AT SAVANNAH RIVER NATIONAL LABORATORY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farfan, E.

    2009-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The UK National Nuclear Laboratory (NNL) has developed a remote, non-electrical, radiation-mapping device known as RadBall (patent pending), which offers a means to locate and quantify radiation hazards and sources within contaminated areas of the nuclear industry. To date, the RadBall has been deployed in a number of technology trials in nuclear waste reprocessing plants at Sellafield in the UK. The trials have demonstrated the successful ability of the RadBall technology to be deployed and retrieved from active areas. The positive results from these initial deployment trials and the anticipated future potential of RadBall have led to the NNL partnering with the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to further underpin and strengthen the technical performance of the technology. RadBall consists of a colander-like outer shell that houses a radiation-sensitive polymer sphere. It has no power requirements and can be positioned in tight or hard-to reach places. The outer shell works to collimate radiation sources and those areas of the polymer sphere that are exposed react, becoming increasingly less transparent, in proportion to the absorbed dose. The polymer sphere is imaged in an optical-CT scanner which produces a high resolution 3D map of optical attenuation coefficients. Subsequent analysis of the optical attenuation maps provides information on the spatial distribution and strength of the sources in a given area forming a 3D characterization of the area of interest. This study completed at SRNL addresses key aspects of the testing of the RadBall technology. The first set of tests was performed at Savannah River Nuclear Solutions Health Physics Instrument Calibration Laboratory (HPICL) using various gamma-ray sources and an x-ray machine with known radiological characteristics. The objective of these preliminary tests was to identify the optimal dose and collimator thickness. The second set of tests involved a highly contaminated hot cell. The objective of this part of the testing was to characterize a hot cell with unknown radiation sources. The RadBall calibration experiments and hot cell deployment completed at SRNL were successful in that for each trial, the technology was able to locate the radiation sources. The NNL believe that the ability of RadBall to be remotely deployed with no electrical supplies into difficult to access areas of plant and locate and quantify radiation hazards is a unique radiation mapping service. The NNL consider there to be significant business potential associated with this innovative technology.

  17. Air Distribution Effectiveness for Different Mechanical Ventilation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LBNL-62700 Air Distribution Effectiveness for Different Mechanical Ventilation Systems Max H Effectiveness for Different Mechanical Ventilation Systems Max H. Sherman and Iain S. Walker Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, USA ABSTRACT The purpose of ventilation is to dilute indoor contaminants

  18. Materials Characterization Laboratory (Fact Sheet), NREL (National...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Materials Characterization Laboratory may include: * PEMFC industry * Certification laboratories * Universities * Other National laboratories Contact Us If you are interested in...

  19. Sandia National Laboratories: Photovoltaics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Past Market Transformation Activities On April 4, 2012, in Current activates have built upon past efforts, most notably the Solar American Cities (now Communities) program in...

  20. Sandia National Laboratories: photovoltaic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    photovoltaic Past Market Transformation Activities On April 4, 2012, in Current activates have built upon past efforts, most notably the Solar American Cities (now Communities)...

  1. Research in Energy Systems Integration at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Research in Energy Systems Integration at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory Speaker: Dr, renewable energy, and distributed energy resources. These efforts have started new industries Renewable Energy Laboratory in Golden, CO, where he leads a group that performs research in distributed

  2. Ames Laboratory site environmental report, calendar year 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the environmental status of Ames Laboratory for calendar year 1995. It includes descriptions of the Laboratory site, its mission, the status of its compliance with applicable environmental regulations, its planning and activities to maintain compliance, and a comprehensive review of its environmental protection, surveillance and monitoring programs.

  3. Los Alamos National Laboratory Institutional Plan, FY 1983-FY 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The report is broken down into the following sections: director's overview; laboratory role and mission; description of the laboratory; scientific and technical activities; technology transfer program; personnel resources; university and industry interactions; site and facilities development; and resource projections and analyses. (GHT)

  4. Analytical Chemistry Laboratory progress report for FY 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, D. W.; Boparai, A. S.; Bowers, D. L.; Graczyk, D. G.

    2000-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the activities of the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (ACL) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) for Fiscal Year (FY) 1999 (October 1998 through September 1999). This annual progress report, which is the sixteenth in this series for the ACL, describes effort on continuing projects, work on new projects, and contributions of the ACL staff to various programs at ANL.

  5. Analytical Chemistry Laboratory progress report for FY 1998.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boparai, A. S.; Bowers, D. L.; Graczyk, D. G.; Green, D. W.; Lindahl, P. C.

    1999-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the activities of the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (ACL) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) for Fiscal Year (FY) 1998 (October 1997 through September 1998). This annual progress report, which is the fifteenth in this series for the ACL, describes effort on continuing projects, work on new projects, and contributions of the ACL staff to various programs at ANL.

  6. Survey and analysis of materials research and development at selected federal laboratories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reed, J.E.; Fink, C.R.

    1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents the results of an effort to transfer existing, but relatively unknown, materials R and D from selected federal laboratories to industry. More specifically, recent materials-related work at seven federal laboratories potentially applicable to improving process energy efficiency and overall productiviy in six energy-intensive manufacturing industries was evaluated, catalogued, and distributed to industry representatives to gauge their reaction. Laboratories surveyed include: Air Force Wright Aeronautical Laboratories Material Laboratory (AFWAL). Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), National Aeronautics and Space Administration Marshall Flight Center (NASA Marshall), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), and Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). Industries included in the effort are: aluminum, cement, paper and allied products, petroleum, steel and textiles.

  7. Advanced Hydride Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Motyka, T.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Metal hydrides have been used at the Savannah River Tritium Facilities since 1984. However, the most extensive application of metal hydride technology at the Savannah River Site is being planned for the Replacement Tritium Facility, a $140 million facility schedules for completion in 1990 and startup in 1991. In the new facility, metal hydride technology will be used to store, separate, isotopically purify, pump, and compress hydrogen isotopes. In support of the Replacement Tritium Facility, a $3.2 million, cold,'' process demonstration facility, the Advanced Hydride Laboratory began operation in November of 1987. The purpose of the Advanced Hydride Laboratory is to demonstrate the Replacement Tritium Facility's metal hydride technology by integrating the various unit operations into an overall process. This paper will describe the Advanced Hydride Laboratory, its role and its impact on the application of metal hydride technology to tritium handling.

  8. Advanced Hydride Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Motyka, T.

    1989-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Metal hydrides have been used at the Savannah River Tritium Facilities since 1984. However, the most extensive application of metal hydride technology at the Savannah River Site is being planned for the Replacement Tritium Facility, a $140 million facility schedules for completion in 1990 and startup in 1991. In the new facility, metal hydride technology will be used to store, separate, isotopically purify, pump, and compress hydrogen isotopes. In support of the Replacement Tritium Facility, a $3.2 million, ``cold,`` process demonstration facility, the Advanced Hydride Laboratory began operation in November of 1987. The purpose of the Advanced Hydride Laboratory is to demonstrate the Replacement Tritium Facility`s metal hydride technology by integrating the various unit operations into an overall process. This paper will describe the Advanced Hydride Laboratory, its role and its impact on the application of metal hydride technology to tritium handling.

  9. Sandia National Laboratories: Photovoltaics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Utility Operations and Programs On April 4, 2012, in Utilities need to understand how solar generating technologies will behave on their systems (transmission and distribution) as...

  10. Sandia National Laboratories: DETL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Solar Newsletter, Systems Analysis Sandians Mathew Lave and Joshua Stein ( both in the Photovoltaics and Distributed Systems Dept.) along with Jan Kleissl (University of...

  11. Sandia National Laboratories: NSTTF

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Solar dishes can be used for the high-temperature portions of ... Concentrated Photovoltaics On September 26, 2012, in SNL's Photovoltaic and Distributed Systems...

  12. Sandia National Laboratories: PV

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Photovoltaic Technology and Tour of PV Test Facilities On February 12, 2013, in The Photovoltaics and Distributed Systems Integration Department at Sandia National...

  13. Sandia National Laboratories: IEA

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Solar Newsletter, SunShot, Systems Analysis Sandia researcher Joshua Stein (in Sandia's Photovoltaic & Distributed Systems Integration Dept.) highlighted novel PV array...

  14. Sandia National Laboratories: FERC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Commission Revised Its Small Generator Interconnection Procedure and Small Generator Interconnection Agreement On March 4, 2014, in Distribution Grid Integration, Energy, Grid...

  15. Sandia National Laboratories: SGIP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Commission Revised Its Small Generator Interconnection Procedure and Small Generator Interconnection Agreement On March 4, 2014, in Distribution Grid Integration, Energy, Grid...

  16. Sandia National Laboratories: DGI

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Commission Revised Its Small Generator Interconnection Procedure and Small Generator Interconnection Agreement On March 4, 2014, in Distribution Grid Integration, Energy, Grid...

  17. Sandia National Laboratories: Partnership

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Operational Demonstration in Late January On April 5, 2013, in Distribution Grid Integration, Energy Assurance, Energy Assurance, Energy Surety, Grid Integration,...

  18. Sandia National Laboratories: NEDO

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NEDO Mesa del Sol Project Is Finalist for International Smart Grid Action Network 2014 Award of Excellence On July 31, 2014, in Distribution Grid Integration, Energy, Energy...

  19. Sandia National Laboratories: Microgrid

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Supply Transformation Needed On February 20, 2013, in DETL, Distribution Grid Integration, Energy, Energy Assurance, Energy Surety, Grid Integration, Infrastructure...

  20. Sandia National Laboratories: Facilities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    InstituteSandia Photovoltaic Systems Symposium On April 15, 2014, in Concentrating Solar Power, Distribution Grid Integration, Energy, Facilities, Grid Integration, News,...

  1. Sandia National Laboratories: PV

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ECIS-Princeton Power Systems, Inc.: Demand Response Inverter On March 19, 2013, in DETL, Distribution Grid Integration, Energy, Energy Surety, Facilities, Grid Integration,...

  2. Sandia National Laboratories: DRI

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    DRI ECIS-Princeton Power Systems, Inc.: Demand Response Inverter On March 19, 2013, in DETL, Distribution Grid Integration, Energy, Energy Surety, Facilities, Grid Integration,...

  3. High Temperature Materials Laboratory third annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tennery, V.J.; Foust, F.M.

    1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The High Temperature Materials Laboratory has completed its third year of operation as a designated DOE User Facility at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Growth of the user program is evidenced by the number of outside institutions who have executed user agreements since the facility began operation in 1987. A total of 88 nonproprietary agreements (40 university and 48 industry) and 20 proprietary agreements (1 university, 19 industry) are now in effect. Sixty-eight nonproprietary research proposals (39 from university, 28 from industry, and 1 other government facility) and 8 proprietary proposals were considered during this reporting period. Research projects active in FY 1990 are summarized.

  4. Argonne National Laboratory is a U.S. Department of Energy laboratory managed by UChicago Argonne, LLC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kemner, Ken

    Argonne National Laboratory is a U.S. Department of Energy laboratory managed by UChicago Argonne Generation Nuclear Plant Argonne's Nuclear Engineering Division is actively participating in the development, thermal-hydraulics, structural mechanics, safety, and fuel cycle technologies. Argonne also contributes

  5. Digital Technology Group Computer Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    Digital Technology Group 1/20 Computer Laboratory Digital Technology Group Computer Laboratory William R Carson Building on the presentation by Francisco Monteiro Matlab #12;Digital Technology Group 2/20 Computer Laboratory Digital Technology Group Computer Laboratory The product: MATLAB® - The Language

  6. National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    procedure lists all the items Handbook 150 requires be covered in a management review. The records do and Management Reviews #12;National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program Pre-assessment... · A laboratory;National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program Pre-assessment... · A laboratory's management review

  7. Laboratory to demolish excavation enclosures at Material Disposal...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Excavation Enclosures At MDA B Laboratory to demolish excavation enclosures at Material Disposal Area B near DP Road Pre-demolition activities are beginning this week and the work...

  8. Laboratory to demolish excavation enclosures at Material Disposal...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Excavation enclosures at MDA B Laboratory to demolish excavation enclosures at Material Disposal Area B near DP road Pre-demolition activities are beginning this week and the work...

  9. Laboratory, Valles Caldera sponsor

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron 9 5 - -/e),,sand CERN 73-11 LaboratoryLaboratory,

  10. LABORATORY III POTENTIAL ENERGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    LABORATORY III POTENTIAL ENERGY Lab III - 1 In previous problems, you have been introduced to the concepts of kinetic energy, which is associated with the motion of an object, and internal energy, which is associated with the internal structure of a system. In this section, you work with another form of energy

  11. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Science. Technology. Innovation. PNNL-SA-34741 Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is addressing cognition and learning to the development of student- centered, scenario-based training. PNNL's Pachelbel (PNNL) has developed a cognitive-based, student-centered approach to training that is being applied

  12. Radiochemical Radiochemical Processing Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in development, scale- up and deployment of first-of-a-kind processes to solve environmental problems in the fundamental chemistry of 4 RPL: RadiochemicalProcessingLaboratory Researchers design, build and operate small-scale-liquid suspensions. Developing Radiochemical Processes at All Scales Among the key features of the RPL are extensive

  13. Energy Systems Laboratory Groundbreaking

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Hill, David; Otter, C.L.; Simpson, Mike; Rogers, J.W.;

    2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    INL recently broke ground for a research facility that will house research programs for bioenergy, advanced battery systems, and new hybrid energy systems that integrate renewable, fossil and nuclear energy sources. Here's video from the groundbreaking ceremony for INL's new Energy Systems Laboratory. You can learn more about CAES research at http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  14. National Laboratory Contacts

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Several of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) national laboratories host multidisciplinary transportation research centers. A wide-range of cutting-edge transportation research occurs at these facilities, funded by both DOE and cooperative research and development agreements (CRADAs) with industry

  15. LABORATORY IV OSCILLATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    some of these laboratory problems before your lecturer addresses this material. It is very important, a stopwatch, a balance, a set of weights, and a computer with a video analysis application written in Lab with basic physics principles, show how you get an equation that gives the solution to the problem for each

  16. Nevis Laboratories Columbia University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Detector 27 4 Data Selection 40 5 Majorana Neutrino Search Results 75 6 General Neutrino Search Results 79#12; Nevis Laboratories Columbia University Physics Department Irvington­on­Hudson, New York Search for an O(100 GeV ) Mass Right­Handed Electron Neutrino at the HERA Electron­Proton Collider Using the ZEUS

  17. ECOLOGY LABORATORY BIOLOGY 341

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vonessen, Nikolaus

    Page 1 ECOLOGY LABORATORY BIOLOGY 341 Fall Semester 2008 Bighorn Sheep Rams at Bison Range National ecological data; and 3) oral and written communication skills. Thus, these ecology labs, and statistical analyses appropriate for ecological data. A major goal of this class will be for you to gain

  18. Laboratory for Atmospheric and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mojzsis, Stephen J.

    . Along with this growth came a new building on campus and a new name: the Laboratory for Atmospheric of the Sun to the outermost fringes of the solar system. With LASP's continuing operations role in the planet traditional and stable approach based on federal agency funding of research grant

  19. FUTURE LOGISTICS LIVING LABORATORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heiser, Gernot

    FUTURE LOGISTICS LIVING LABORATORY Delivering Innovation The Future Logistics Living Lab that will provide logistics solutions for the future. The Living Lab is a demonstration, exhibition and work space by a group of logistics companies, research organisations, universities, and IT providers that includes NICTA

  20. Radiochemical Radiochemical Processing Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -cycle applications. These proficiencies include extensive experience with U.S. Department of Energy tank waste.S. Department of Energy Hanford Site in south-central Washington State, the Radiochemical Processing Laboratory) thermogravimetric and calorimetric analysis microscopy (visible light, SEM, TEM, AFM) gas and thermal ionization

  1. Nuclear Forensics at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Podlesak, David W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Steiner, Robert E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Burns, Carol J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; LaMont, Stephen P. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tandon, Lav [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The overview of this presentation is: (1) Introduction to nonproliferation efforts; (2) Scope of activities at Los Alamos National Laboratory; (3) Facilities for radioanalytical work at LANL; (4) Radiochemical characterization capabilities; and (5) Bulk chemical and materials analysis capabilities. Some conclusions are: (1) Analytical chemistry measurements on plutonium and uranium matrices are critical to numerous defense and non-defense programs including safeguards accountancy verification measurements; (2) Los Alamos National Laboratory operates capable actinide analytical chemistry and material science laboratories suitable for nuclear material forensic characterization; (3) Actinide analytical chemistry uses numerous means to validate and independently verify that measurement data quality objectives are met; and (4) Numerous LANL nuclear facilities support the nuclear material handling, preparation, and analysis capabilities necessary to evaluate samples containing nearly any mass of an actinide (attogram to kilogram levels).

  2. A prototype Distributed Audit System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Banning, D.L. [Sparta, Inc., El Segundo, CA (United States)

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Security auditing systems are used to detect and assess unauthorized or abusive system usage. Historically, security audits were confined to a single computer system. Recent work examines ways of extending auditing to include heterogeneous groups of computers (distributed system). This paper describes the design and prototype development of a Distributed Audit System (DAS) which was developed with funding received from Lawrence Livermore Laboratory and through the Master`s thesis effort performed by the author at California State University, Long Beach. The DAS is intended to provide collection, transfer, and control of audit data on distributed, heterogeneous hosts.

  3. Carbon Characterization Laboratory Readiness to Receive Irradiated Graphite Samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karen A. Moore

    2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Carbon Characterization Laboratory (CCL) is located in Labs C19 and C20 of the Idaho National Laboratory Research Center. The CCL was established under the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project to support graphite and ceramic composite research and development activities. The research conducted in this laboratory will support the Advanced Graphite Creep experiments—a major series of material irradiation experiments within the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Graphite program. The CCL is designed to characterize and test low activated irradiated materials such as high purity graphite, carbon-carbon composites, silicon-carbide composite, and ceramic materials. The laboratory is fully capable of characterizing material properties for both irradiated and nonirradiated materials. Major infrastructural modifications were undertaken to support this new radiological facility at Idaho National Laboratory. Facility modifications are complete, equipment has been installed, radiological controls and operating procedures have been established and work management documents have been created to place the CCL in readiness to receive irradiated graphite samples.

  4. Stirling engine research at national and university laboratories in Japan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hane, G.J.; Hutchinson, R.A.

    1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) reviewed research projects that are related to the development of Stirling engines and that are under way at Japanese national laboratories and universities. The research and development focused on component rather than on whole engine development. PNL obtained the information from a literature review and interviews conducted at the laboratories and universities. The universities have less equipment available and operate with smaller staffs for research than do the laboratories. In particular, the Mechanical Engineering Laboratory and the Aerospace Laboratory conduct high-quality component and fundamental work. Despite having less equipment, some of the researchers at the universities conduct high-quality fundamental research. As is typical in Japan, several of the university professors are very active in consulting and advisory capacities to companies engaged in Stirling engine development, and also with government and association advisory and technical committees. Contacts with these professors and selective examination of their research are good ways to keep abreast of Japanese Stirling developments.

  5. EA-1404: Actinide Chemistry and Repository Science Laboratory, Carlsbad, New Mexico

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts for the proposal to construct and operate an Actinide Chemistry and Repository Science Laboratory to support chemical research activities related to the...

  6. Idaho National Laboratory’s Greenhouse Gas FY08 Baseline

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jennifer D. Morton

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A greenhouse gas (GHG) inventory is a systematic attempt to account for the production and release of certain gasses generated by an institution from various emission sources. The gasses of interest are those which have become identified by climate science as related to anthropogenic global climate change. This document presents an inventory of GHGs generated during fiscal year (FY) 2008 by Idaho National Laboratory (INL), a Department of Energy (DOE)-sponsored entity, located in southeastern Idaho. Concern about the environmental impact of GHGs has grown in recent years. This, together with a desire to decrease harmful environmental impacts, would be enough to encourage the calculation of a baseline estimate of total GHGs generated at the INL. Additionally, the INL has a desire to see how its emissions compare with similar institutions, including other DOE-sponsored national laboratories. Executive Order 13514 requires that federally-sponsored agencies and institutions document reductions in GHG emissions in the future, and such documentation will require knowledge of a baseline against which reductions can be measured. INL’s FY08 GHG inventory was calculated according to methodologies identified in Federal recommendations and an as-yet-unpublished Technical and Support Document (TSD) using operational control boundary. It measures emissions generated in three Scopes: (1) INL emissions produced directly by stationary or mobile combustion and by fugitive emissions, (2) the share of emissions generated by entities from which INL purchased electrical power, and (3) indirect or shared emissions generated by outsourced activities that benefit INL (occur outside INL’s organizational boundaries but are a consequence of INL’s activities). This inventory found that INL generated a total of 114,256 MT of CO2-equivalent emissions during fiscal year 2008 (FY08). The following conclusions were made from looking at the results of the individual contributors to INL’s baseline GHG inventory: • Electricity is the largest contributor to INL’s GHG inventory, with over 50% of the net anthropogenic CO2e emissions • Other sources with high emissions were stationary combustion, fugitive emissions from the onsite landfill, mobile combustion (fleet fuels) and the employee commute • Sources with low emissions were contracted waste disposal, wastewater treatment (onsite and contracted) and fugitive emissions from refrigerants. This report details the methods behind quantifying INL’s GHG inventory and discusses lessons learned on better practices by which information important to tracking GHGs can be tracked and recorded. It is important to stress that the methodology behind this inventory followed guidelines that have not yet been formally adopted. Thus, some modification of the conclusions may be necessary as additional guidance is received. Further, because this report differentiates between those portions of the INL that are managed and operated by the Battelle Energy Alliance (BEA) and those managed by other contractors, it includes only that large proportion of Laboratory activities overseen by BEA. It is assumed that other contractors will provide similar reporting for those activities they manage, where appropriate.

  7. Distribution of the 83Rb/83mKr activity on vacuum evaporated samples examined with the Timepix position sensitive detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Venos; J. Jakubek; O. Dragoun; S. Pospisil

    2007-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Properties of vacuum evaporated 83Rb/83mKr sources of low-energy conversion electrons, which are under development for monitoring the energy scale stability of the Karlsruhe Tritium Neutrino experiment KATRIN, were examined by the Timepix pixel detector exhibiting the position resolution of at least 55 microm. No distinct local inhomogeneities in the surface distribution of 83Rb/83mKr were observed. The source diameter derived from the recorded image agrees within 5 % with that expected from evaporation geometry. More precise determination of the actual source diameter is complicated by Compton scattered electrons caused by 83Rb gamma-rays.

  8. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory:

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillips, C.A. (ed.)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper discusses progress on experiments at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. The projects and areas discussed are: Principal Parameters Achieved in Experimental Devices, Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor, Princeton Large Torus, Princeton Beta Experiment, S-1 Spheromak, Current-Drive Experiment, X-ray Laser Studies, Theoretical Division, Tokamak Modeling, Spacecraft Glow Experiment, Compact Ignition Tokamak, Engineering Department, Project Planning and Safety Office, Quality Assurance and Reliability, and Administrative Operations.

  9. Risk management at Argonne National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hill, D.J.; Hislop, R.D.

    1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The only facility at Argonne National Laboratory which is classified as high hazard is EBR-II. A Level I Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA), including external events, has been completed for EBR-II. There were several objectives for this project; to provide a quantitative estimate of the risk associated with the operation of EBR-II, to provide a framework for managerial decision-making for the management of risk at the facility, and to provide insights into the nature of the risk of EBR-II that can be applied in the design of future LMRS. Other ANL facilities do not have complete probabilistic assessments. Despite this fact, Risk Management is an essential part of ANL`s approach to safety and operations. Risk management at Argonne National Laboratory is not limited to accelerator or nuclear facilities. It is also an integral part of construction activities. The Advanced Photon Source, a major construction project at the Laboratory, utilizes a variety of risk assessment techniques to identify potential construction loss exposures and to develop measures to eliminate them. Over the past 15 years, in excess of 15,000 pages of regulatory requirements pertaining to environment safety and health have been printed in the Federal Register. Not all of these are applicable to Argonne National Laboratory all of the time, but as a highly-visible, nationally-funded facility, compliance with those that are applicable must be above reproach. Therefore, risk management is also a very important part of construction activities at ANL. This paper will give examples of these activities, such as, the EBR-II PRA, risk-based analyses of Fuel Cycle Facility Safety Systems, reliability studies of the Access Control Interlock System for the Advanced Photon Source and management approaches for controlling risk during the construction activities at APS.

  10. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Summer Employment Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, A J

    2002-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This document will serve as a summary of my work activities as a summer employee for the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The intent of this document is to provide an overview of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) project, to explain the role of the department that I am working for, and to discuss my specific assigned tasks and their impact on the NIF project as a whole.

  11. Brookhaven National Laboratory presentation 2007 Peer Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Homes, Christopher C.

    and milestones FY2007 activities and progress (total $300K): CRADA with AMSC: thick (>2 µµµµm) MOD films ($100K = 2 MA/cm2) CRADA Goal: >600 A/cm #12;Brookhaven National Laboratory presentation 2007 Peer Review layers: performance statistics Milestone 1 (CRADA), completed: 2 MA/cm2 level achieved for 2 µµµµm triple

  12. Laboratories to Explore, Explain VLBACHANDRA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory Sandia National Laboratory Stone and Webster The Boeing Company on FIRE and fusion science accessible and up to date. A steady stream of about 150 visitors per week log

  13. Laboratory Directed Research and Development

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2001-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    To establish the Department's, including the NNSA's, requirements for laboratory-directed research and development (LDRD) while providing the laboratory director broad flexibility for program implementation. Cancels DOE O 413.2. Canceled by DOE O 413.2B.

  14. Laboratory Directed Research and Development

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2006-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The Order establishes DOE requirements and responsibilities for laboratory directed research and development while providing laboratory directors with broad flexibility for program implementation. Cancels DOE O 413.2A. Admin Chg 1, 1-31-11.

  15. ITP Industrial Distributed Energy: Distributed Energy Program...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ITP Industrial Distributed Energy: Distributed Energy Program Project Profile: Verizon Central Office Building ITP Industrial Distributed Energy: Distributed Energy Program Project...

  16. Grid Computing and Distributed Systems Laboratory and the Gridbus Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buyya, Rajkumar

    provisional patent heralding a pathway for its commercialisation. · Members of GRIDS Lab have authored over 35 in the organisation of conferences (CCGrid 2007, Rio, Brazil and e-Science 2007, Bangalore, India), (b) serving

  17. Cloud Computing and Distributed Systems Laboratory and the Cloudbus Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buyya, Rajkumar

    .0 software and filed an international Patent (PCT) application. · Members of CLOUDS Lab have authored 57 at international conferences held in Germany, Australia, China, India, and Brazil. · The Lab successfully hostedD students) from USA, Spain, India, Malaysia, and Brazil. · Received "2009 Outstanding Paper Award" from IEEE

  18. Sandia National Laboratories: ESTT

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Renewable Energy, Solar, Solar Newsletter Jim Pacheco (now in the Active Response and Denial Dept.) received an Entrepreneurial Spirit Award for his participation in Sandia's...

  19. Los Alamos National Laboratory

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    for national defense and homeland security programs; and U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) waste management activities. The Plutonium Facility at Technical Area 55 (TA-55) is...

  20. Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Hybrid System for Distributed Power Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faress Rahman; Nguyen Minh

    2004-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the work performed by Hybrid Power Generation Systems, LLC (HPGS) during the July 2003 to December 2003 reporting period under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT40779 for the U. S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL) entitled ''Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Hybrid System for Distributed Power Generation''. The main objective of this project is to develop and demonstrate the feasibility of a highly efficient hybrid system integrating a planar Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) and a micro-turbine. In addition, an activity included in this program focuses on the development of an integrated coal gasification fuel cell system concept based on planar SOFC technology. Also, another activity included in this program focuses on the development of SOFC scale up strategies.

  1. Internship Opportunities | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science Undergraduate Laboratory Internship Community College Internships Cooperative Education Student Research Participation Program Lee Teng Fellowship Temporary Employment...

  2. CERTS Microgrid Laboratory Test Bed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lasseter, R. H.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Roy, Nancy Jo Lewis, “CERTS Microgrid Laboratory Test Bed Report:Appendix K,” http://certs.lbl.gov/CERTS_P_

  3. Sandia National Laboratories: Systems Analysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Photovoltaic, Photovoltaic Systems Evaluation Laboratory (PSEL), Renewable Energy, Solar, Solar Newsletter, Systems Analysis The PV Performance Modeling Collaborative (PVPMC)...

  4. Sandia National Laboratories: Phenomenological Modeling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laboratory (NESL) Transient Nuclear Fuels Testing Radiation Effects Sciences Solar Electric Propulsion Nuclear Energy Safety Technologies Experimental Testing...

  5. Sandia National Laboratories: photovoltaic analysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in Computational Modeling & Simulation, Energy, Facilities, News, News & Events, Photovoltaic, Photovoltaic Systems Evaluation Laboratory (PSEL), Renewable Energy, Solar, Solar...

  6. Created: July, 2014 Laboratory Safety Design Guide Section 3 Laboratory Ventilation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Queitsch, Christine

    Created: July, 2014 Laboratory Safety Design Guide Section 3 ­ Laboratory Ventilation 3-1 Section 3 LABORATORY VENTILATION Contents A. Scope .................................................................................................................3-2 B. General Laboratory Ventilation

  7. Humidity requirements in WSCF Laboratories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, R.A.

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this paper is to develop and document a position on Relative Humidity (RH) requirements in the WSCF Laboratories. A current survey of equipment vendors for Organic, Inorganic and Radiochemical laboratories indicate that 25% - 80% relative humidity may meet the environmental requirements for safe operation and protection of all the laboratory equipment.

  8. Bio-Derived Liquids to Hydrogen Distributed Reforming Working...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Laboratory Investigation of Reaction Networks and Active Sites in Bio-Ethanol Steam Reforming over Cobalt Based Catalysts, Umit Ozkan, Ohio State University Hydrogen...

  9. CERTS Microgrid Laboratory Test Bed

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lasseter, R. H.; Eto, J. H.; Schenkman, B.; Stevens, J.; Volkmmer, H.; Klapp, D.; Linton, E.; Hurtado, H.; Roy, J.

    2010-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    CERTS Microgrid concept captures the emerging potential of distributed generation using a system approach. CERTS views generation and associated loads as a subsystem or a 'microgrid'. The sources can operate in parallel to the grid or can operate in island, providing UPS services. The system can disconnect from the utility during large events (i.e. faults, voltage collapses), but may also intentionally disconnect when the quality of power from the grid falls below certain standards. CERTS Microgrid concepts were demonstrated at a full-scale test bed built near Columbus, Ohio and operated by American Electric Power. The testing fully confirmed earlier research that had been conducted initially through analytical simulations, then through laboratory emulations, and finally through factory acceptance testing of individual microgrid components. The islanding and resynchronization method met all Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Standard 1547 and power quality requirements. The electrical protection system was able to distinguish between normal and faulted operation. The controls were found to be robust under all conditions, including difficult motor starts and high impedance faults.

  10. National Laboratory Dorene Price

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : price@bnl.gov ACTIVATED ALUMINUM HYDRIDE HYDROGEN STORAGE COMPOSITIONS AND USES THEREOF Brookhaven alanates doped with such metal catalysts. Hydrogen is one part of a balanced, strategic portfolio of energy for the U.S. Department of Energy. An activated aluminum hydride (AlH3 ) composition to control

  11. Purdue Hydrogen Systems Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jay P Gore; Robert Kramer; Timothee L Pourpoint; P. V. Ramachandran; Arvind Varma; Yuan Zheng

    2011-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hydrogen Systems Laboratory in a unique partnership between Purdue University's main campus in West Lafayette and the Calumet campus was established and its capabilities were enhanced towards technology demonstrators. The laboratory engaged in basic research in hydrogen production and storage and initiated engineering systems research with performance goals established as per the USDOE Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies Program. In the chemical storage and recycling part of the project, we worked towards maximum recycling yield via novel chemical selection and novel recycling pathways. With the basic potential of a large hydrogen yield from AB, we used it as an example chemical but have also discovered its limitations. Further, we discovered alternate storage chemicals that appear to have advantages over AB. We improved the slurry hydrolysis approach by using advanced slurry/solution mixing techniques. We demonstrated vehicle scale aqueous and non-aqueous slurry reactors to address various engineering issues in on-board chemical hydrogen storage systems. We measured the thermal properties of raw and spent AB. Further, we conducted experiments to determine reaction mechanisms and kinetics of hydrothermolysis in hydride-rich solutions and slurries. We also developed a continuous flow reactor and a laboratory scale fuel cell power generation system. The biological hydrogen production work summarized as Task 4.0 below, included investigating optimal hydrogen production cultures for different substrates, reducing the water content in the substrate, and integrating results from vacuum tube solar collector based pre and post processing tests into an enhanced energy system model. An automated testing device was used to finalize optimal hydrogen production conditions using statistical procedures. A 3 L commercial fermentor (New Brunswick, BioFlo 115) was used to finalize testing of larger samples and to consider issues related to scale up. Efforts continued to explore existing catalytic methods involving nano catalysts for capture of CO2 from the fermentation process.

  12. Commercialization of Los Alamos National Laboratory technologies via small businesses. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brice, R.; Cartron, D.; Rhyne, T.; Schulze, M.; Welty, L.

    1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the past decade, numerous companies have been formed to commercialize research results from leading U.S. academic and research institutions. Emerging small businesses in areas such as Silicon Valley, Boston`s Route 128 corridor, and North Carolina`s Research Triangle have been especially effective in moving promising technologies from the laboratory bench to the commercial marketplace--creating new jobs and economic expansion in the process. Unfortunately, many of the U.S. national laboratories have not been major participants in this technology/commercialization activity, a result of a wide variety of factors which, until recently, acted against successful commercialization. This {open_quotes}commercialization gap{close_quotes} exists partly due to a lack, within Los Alamos in particular and the DOE in general, of in-depth expertise and experience in such business areas as new business development, securities regulation, market research and the determination of commercial potential, the identification of entrepreneurial management, marketing and distribution, and venture capital sources. The immediate consequence of these factors is the disappointingly small number of start-up companies based on technologies from Los Alamos National Laboratory that have been attempted, the modest financial return Los Alamos has received from these start-ups, and the lack of significant national recognition that Los Alamos has received for creating and commercializing these technologies.

  13. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses the following topics: principal parameters achieved in experimental devices fiscal year 1990; tokamak fusion test reactor; compact ignition tokamak; Princeton beta experiment- modification; current drive experiment-upgrade; international collaboration; x-ray laser studies; spacecraft glow experiment; plasma processing: deposition and etching of thin films; theoretical studies; tokamak modeling; international thermonuclear experimental reactor; engineering department; project planning and safety office; quality assurance and reliability; technology transfer; administrative operations; PPPL patent invention disclosures for fiscal year 1990; graduate education; plasma physics; graduate education: plasma science and technology; science education program; and Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory reports fiscal year 1990.

  14. gangh | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron4 Self-Scrubbing:,, , ., Decembergangh Ames Laboratory Profile Gang Han

  15. garberc | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron4 Self-Scrubbing:,, , ., Decembergangh Ames Laboratory Profile Gang

  16. jbobbitt | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron4 Self-Scrubbing:,, , (Energy Informationjbobbitt Ames Laboratory Profile

  17. jboschen | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron4 Self-Scrubbing:,, , (Energy Informationjbobbitt Ames Laboratory

  18. kmbryden | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron4 Self-Scrubbing:,, , (Energy9 Evaluation of thekmbryden Ames Laboratory

  19. nalms | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron4 Self-Scrubbing:,, , (Energy97 UpperJointmoveLINQnalms Ames Laboratory

  20. rluyendi | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron4 Self-Scrubbing:,, ,Development ofrluyendi Ames Laboratory Profile Rudi

  1. rmalmq | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron4 Self-Scrubbing:,, ,Development ofrluyendi Ames Laboratory Profile

  2. rodgers | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron4 Self-Scrubbing:,, ,Development ofrluyendi Ames Laboratory

  3. rofox | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron4 Self-Scrubbing:,, ,Development ofrluyendi Ames LaboratoryComparisons

  4. seliger | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron4 Self-Scrubbing:,, ,Development1 Comparison ofseliger Ames Laboratory

  5. FY 2008 Laboratory Table

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic Plan| Department of.pdf6-OPAMDepartment ofAppropriationBudgetLaboratory Table

  6. FY 2011 Laboratory Table

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

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  7. Laboratory Organization Chart

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  8. Laboratory announces 2008 Fellows

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  9. Laboratory Shuttle Bus Routes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  10. Laboratory disputes citizens' lawsuit

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  11. Sandia National Laboratories: Agreements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  12. Sandia National Laboratories: Careers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  13. Sandia National Laboratories: Locations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  14. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

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  15. amdavis | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsingWhatY-12Zero Energyamdavis Ames Laboratory Profile

  16. andresg | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsingWhatY-12Zero Energyamdavis Amesandresg Ames Laboratory

  17. cbenetti | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron4 Self-Scrubbing:,, , ., ..., ,+ . :, ,. .,3cbenetti Ames Laboratory

  18. constant | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron4 Self-Scrubbing:,, , ., ..., ,+ . :,2013constant Ames Laboratory Profile

  19. Sandia Site Office Assessment of Activity-Levell Work Planning...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    of Activity-Level Work Planning and Control at Sandia National Laboratories New Mexico (SNL) Dates of Activity : 02142011 - 02182011 Report Preparer: Patricia Williams...

  20. Year 2000 assessment report, Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weir, D.

    1998-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to advise managers on the status of Year 2000 readiness at the Laboratory and provide a summary of critical issues to be addressed in order to ensure that the Year 2000 date rollover will not disrupt Laboratory Operations. The Laboratory`s Year 2000 council members are in the first phase of Year 2000 plans: gathering data and assessing the status of their divisions or programs. This first snapshot of the Laboratory Year 2000 readiness assessment is expected to grow and change over time as more refined assessments, plans, and schedules are developed and as more information becomes available. Here are findings to date: (1) Embedded systems` status not known. (2) Preliminary cost estimates for Year 2000 repairs, testing, and implementation are estimated to be at least $5.9 million, not including embedded systems. (3) The Laboratory is required to make unavoidable purchases of Year 2000-compliant products. (4) The Year 2000 short-term issue forces some long-term transition plans to be set aside. (5) The Laboratory is at risk for the following consequences if they can`t demonstrate an active Year 2000 program: risk of system failures; potential funding freezes by the OMB and DOE; legal liabilities; and risk to the UC contract. (6) The deadline for this project is immutable. (7) DOE is continually increasing reporting requirements, expanding from only DOE mission-essential to all operations. (7) DOE audit criticizes the Laboratory`s mission-essential systems planning.

  1. Independent Oversight Review, Los Alamos National Laboratory...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    National Laboratory - November 2013 Independent Oversight Review, Los Alamos National Laboratory - November 2013 November 2013 Review of the Los Alamos National Laboratory...

  2. National Laboratory Liaisons | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Laboratory Liaisons National Laboratory Liaisons The following U.S. Department of Energy national laboratory liaisons serve as primary contacts for the Federal Energy...

  3. Independent Oversight Review, Argonne National Laboratory - November...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Argonne National Laboratory - November 2011 Independent Oversight Review, Argonne National Laboratory - November 2011 November 2011 Review of the Argonne National Laboratory...

  4. Waste processing cost recovery at Los Alamos National Laboratory--analysis and recommendations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Booth, Steven Richard [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Los Alamos National Laboratory is implementing full cost recovery for waste processing in fiscal year 2009 (FY2009), after a transition year in FY2008. Waste processing cost recovery has been implemented in various forms across the nuclear weapons complex and in corporate America. The fundamental reasoning of sending accurate price signals to waste generators is economically sound, and leads to waste minimization and reduced waste expense over time. However, Los Alamos faces significant implementation challenges because of its status as a government-owned, contractor-operated national scientific institution with a diverse suite of experimental and environmental cleanup activities, and the fact that this represents a fundamental change in how waste processing is viewed by the institution. This paper describes the issues involved during the transition to cost recovery and the ultimate selection of the business model. Of the six alternative cost recovery models evaluated, the business model chosen to be implemented in FY2009 is Recharge Plus Generators Pay Distributed Direct. Under this model, all generators who produce waste must pay a distributed direct share associated with their specific waste type to use a waste processing capability. This cost share is calculated using the distributed direct method on the fixed cost only, i.e., the fixed cost share is based on each program's forecast proportion of the total Los Alamos volume forecast of each waste type. (Fixed activities are those required to establish the waste processing capability, i.e., to make the process ready, permitted, certified, and prepared to handle the first unit ofwaste. Therefore, the fixed cost ends at the point just before waste begins 'to be processed. The activities to actually process the waste are considered variable.) The volume of waste actually sent for processing is charged a unit cost based solely on the variable cost of disposing of that waste. The total cost recovered each year is the total distributed direct shares from generators plus the unit cost times actual volumes processed.

  5. Distributed DBMS Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Yangjun

    Distributed DBMS Outline Introduction What is a distributed DBMS Problems Current state-of-affairs Background Distributed DBMS Architecture Distributed Database Design Semantic Data Control Distributed Query Processing Distributed Transaction Management Parallel Database Systems Distributed Object DBMS

  6. Three-dimensional structure of magnetic reconnection in a laboratory C. D. Cothran, M. Landreman, and M. R. Brown

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Michael R.

    ) laboratory plasma at the Swarthmore Spheromak Experiment. An array of 600 magnetic probes which resolve ion of partial spheromak merging events. Counter-helicityspheromaksmergerapidly,andreconnection activity clearly Electromagnetics: Optics; KEYWORDS: magneticreconnection,magnetohydrodynamics,plasma,laboratory, spheromak, ssx

  7. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory 2007 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chrzanowski, P; Walter, K

    2008-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's many outstanding accomplishments in 2007 are a tribute to a dedicated staff, which is shaping the Laboratory's future as we go through a period of transition and transformation. The achievements highlighted in this annual report illustrate our focus on the important problems that affect our nation's security and global stability, our application of breakthrough science and technology to tackle those problems, and our commitment to safe, secure, and efficient operations. In May 2007, the Department of Energy (DOE) awarded Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC (LLNS), a new public-private partnership, the contract to manage and operate the Laboratory starting in October. Since its inception in 1952, the Laboratory had been managed by the University of California (UC) for the DOE's National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) and predecessor organizations. UC is one of the parent organizations that make up LLNS, and UC's presence in the new management entity will help us carry forward our strong tradition of multidisciplinary science and technology. 'Team science' applied to big problems was pioneered by the Laboratory's co-founder and namesake, Ernest O. Lawrence, and has been our hallmark ever since. Transition began fully a year before DOE's announcement. More than 1,600 activities had to be carried out to transition the Laboratory from management by a not-for-profit to a private entity. People, property, and procedures as well as contracts, formal agreements, and liabilities had to be transferred to LLNS. The pre-transition and transition teams did a superb job, and I thank them for their hard work. Transformation is an ongoing process at Livermore. We continually reinvent ourselves as we seek breakthroughs that impact emerging national needs. An example is our development in the late 1990s of a portable instrument that could rapidly detect DNA signatures, research that started with a view toward the potential threat of terrorist use of biological weapons. As featured in our annual report, activities in this area have grown to many important projects contributing to homeland security and disease prevention and control. At times transformation happens in large steps. Such was the case when nuclear testing stopped in the early 1990s. As one of the nation's nuclear weapon design laboratories, Livermore embarked on the Stockpile Stewardship Program. The objectives are to ensure the safety, security, and reliability of the nation's nuclear weapons stockpile and to develop a science-based, thorough understanding of the performance of nuclear weapons. The ultimate goal is to sustain confidence in an aging stockpile without nuclear testing. Now is another time of major change for the Laboratory as the nation is resizing its nuclear deterrent and NNSA begins taking steps to transform the nuclear weapons complex to meet 21st-century national security needs. As you will notice in the opening commentary to each section of this report, the Laboratory's senior management team is a mixture of new and familiar faces. LLNS drew the best talent from its parent organizations--Bechtel National, UC, Babcock & Wilcox, the Washington Group Division of URS, and Battelle--to lead the Laboratory. We are honored to take on the responsibility and see a future with great opportunities for Livermore to apply its exceptional science and technology to important national problems. We will work with NNSA to build on the successful Stockpile Stewardship Program and transform the nation's nuclear weapons complex to become smaller, safer, more secure, and more cost effective. Our annual report highlights progress in many relevant areas. Laboratory scientists are using astonishing computational capabilities--including BlueGene/L, the world's fastest supercomputer with a revolutionary architecture and over 200,000 processors--to gain key insights about performance of aging nuclear weapons. What we learn will help us sustain the stockpile without nuclear testing. Preparations are underway to start experiments at

  8. Los Alamos National Laboratory's

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    takes part in Blue Star Museums program May 16, 2012 Free admission for active duty military, their family members LOS ALAMOS, New Mexico, May 16, 2012-Los Alamos National...

  9. Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    strategy for long-term environmental sustainability March 1, 2013 Blueprint for planning work activities with the environment in mind LOS ALAMOS, N.M., March 1, 2013-The Department...

  10. Sandia National Laboratories and ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and the University of New Mexico is developing an ultra-thin, enzymatically active membrane that combines high CO2 permeability, high CO2 selectivity, and low fabrication costs,...

  11. Normal Distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    User

    NORMAL DlSTRlBUTION TABLE. Entries represent the area under the standardized normal distribution from -w to z, Pr(Z

  12. Low Energy Accelerator Laboratory Technical Area 53, Los Alamos National Laboratory. Environmental assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Environmental Assessment (EA) analyzes the potential environmental impacts that would be expected to occur if the Department of Energy (DOE) were to construct and operate a small research and development laboratory building at Technical Area (TA) 53 at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Los Alamos, New Mexico. DOE proposes to construct a small building to be called the Low Energy Accelerator Laboratory (LEAL), at a previously cleared, bladed, and leveled quarter-acre site next to other facilities housing linear accelerator research activities at TA-53. Operations proposed for LEAL would consist of bench-scale research, development, and testing of the initial section of linear particle accelerators. This initial section consists of various components that are collectively called an injector system. The anticipated life span of the proposed development program would be about 15 years.

  13. Creating the laboratory`s future; A strategy for Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ``Creating The Laboratory`s Future`` describes Livermore`s roles and responsibilities as a Department of Energy (DOE) national laboratory and sets the foundation for decisions about the Laboratory`s programs and operations. It summarizes Livermore`s near-term strategy, which builds on recent Lab achievements and world events affecting their future. It also discusses their programmatic and operational emphases and highlights program areas that the authors believe can grow through application of Lab science and technology. Creating the Laboratory`s Future reflects their very strong focus on national security, important changes in the character of their national security work, major efforts are under way to overhaul their administrative and operational systems, and the continuing challenge of achieving national consensus on the role of the government in energy, environment, and the biosciences.

  14. NOTE: This graph charts the pH level of the water leaving active chemical drain neutralization system in the Natural Science and Engineering Cleanroom laboratory on the UTD campus. It also monitors the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Jeong-Bong

    NOTE: This graph charts the pH level of the water leaving active chemical drain neutralization 6 8 10 12 14 pHDeviation(8-pH) pHatDischargeTank Date NSERL Back Dock Chemical Neutralization p

  15. Independent Oversight Activity Report, Pacific Northwest National...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Activity Report, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory - January 2014 February 2014 PNNL Corrective Actions from the Independent Oversight Review of the Office of Science...

  16. DISTRIBUTED DATA MANAGEMENT: UNSOLVED PROBLEMS AND NEW ISSUES*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Özsu, M. Tamer

    -1- DISTRIBUTED DATA MANAGEMENT: UNSOLVED PROBLEMS AND NEW ISSUES* M. Tamer Özsu GTE Laboratories Chesnay France patrickv@madonna.inria.fr ABSTRACT Distributed database technology is expected to have, expectations are that distributed database management systems will by and large replace centralized ones within

  17. A CompilerBased Approach to Distributing Sequential Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Läufer, Konstantin

    A Compiler­Based Approach to Distributing Sequential Programs C. Sashidhar & Sol Shatz Concurrent Software Systems Laboratory University of Illinois at Chicago Extended Abstract Development of distributed and testing. While a number of advances have been made, there remain many obstacles to making distributed

  18. Postirradiation Testing Laboratory (327 Building)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kammenzind, D.E.

    1997-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A Standards/Requirements Identification Document (S/RID) is the total list of the Environment, Safety and Health (ES and H) requirements to be implemented by a site, facility, or activity. These requirements are appropriate to the life cycle phase to achieve an adequate level of protection for worker and public health and safety, and the environment during design, construction, operation, decontamination and decommissioning, and environmental restoration. S/RlDs are living documents, to be revised appropriately based on change in the site`s or facility`s mission or configuration, a change in the facility`s life cycle phase, or a change to the applicable standards/requirements. S/RIDs encompass health and safety, environmental, and safety related safeguards and security (S and S) standards/requirements related to the functional areas listed in the US Department of Energy (DOE) Environment, Safety and Health Configuration Guide. The Fluor Daniel Hanford (FDH) Contract S/RID contains standards/requirements, applicable to FDH and FDH subcontractors, necessary for safe operation of Project Hanford Management Contract (PHMC) facilities, that are not the direct responsibility of the facility manager (e.g., a site-wide fire department). Facility S/RIDs contain standards/requirements applicable to a specific facility that are the direct responsibility of the facility manager. S/RlDs are prepared by those responsible for managing the operation of facilities or the conduct of activities that present a potential threat to the health and safety of workers, public, or the environment, including: Hazard Category 1 and 2 nuclear facilities and activities, as defined in DOE 5480.23. Selected Hazard Category 3 nuclear, and Low Hazard non-nuclear facilities and activities, as agreed upon by RL. The Postirradiation Testing Laboratory (PTL) S/RID contains standards/ requirements that are necessary for safe operation of the PTL facility, and other building/areas that are the direct responsibility of the specific facility manager. The specific DOE Orders, regulations, industry codes/standards, guidance documents and good industry practices that serve as the basis for each element/subelement are identified and aligned with each subelement.

  19. Laboratory Measurements of Sea Salt Aerosol Refractive Index

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oxford, University of

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 1.2.3 Complex Refractive Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 1.2.4 Size Distribution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 1.3.5 Coagulation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 1.4 Sea Salt AerosolsLaboratory Measurements of Sea Salt Aerosol Refractive Index Thesis submitted for the degree

  20. Sandia National Laboratories: Sandia Battery Abuse Testing Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sandia Battery Abuse Testing Laboratory Sandia Transportation-Energy Research Project Funded as a Part of DOE's "EV Everywhere" Funding Program On January 21, 2014, in...

  1. Sandia National Laboratories: Grand Challenge Laboratory-Directed...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Grand Challenge Laboratory-Directed Research and Development project Recent Sandia Secure, Scalable Microgrid Advanced Controls Research Accomplishments On March 3, 2015, in...

  2. Analytical chemistry laboratory. Progress report for FY 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, D.W.; Boparai, A.S.; Bowers, D.L. [and others

    1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to summarize the activities of the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (ACL) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) for Fiscal Year (FY) 1997 (October 1996 through September 1997). This annual progress report is the fourteenth in this series for the ACL, and it describes continuing effort on projects, work on new projects, and contributions of the ACL staff to various programs at ANL.

  3. Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dogliani, Harold O [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2011-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the briefing is to describe general laboratory technical capabilities to be used for various groups such as military cadets or university faculty/students and post docs to recruit into a variety of Los Alamos programs. Discussed are: (1) development and application of high leverage science to enable effeictive, predictable and reliability outcomes; (2) deter, detect, characterize, reverse and prevent the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction and their use by adversaries and terrorists; (3) modeling and simulation to define complex processes, predict outcomes, and develop effective prevention, response, and remediation strategies; (4) energetic materials and hydrodynamic testing to develop materials for precise delivery of focused energy; (5) materials cience focused on fundamental understanding of materials behaviors, their quantum-molecular properties, and their dynamic responses, and (6) bio-science to rapidly detect and characterize pathogens, to develop vaccines and prophylactic remedies, and to develop attribution forensics.

  4. Routine environmental audit of Ames Laboratory, Ames, Iowa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document contains the findings identified during the routine environmental audit of Ames Laboratory, Ames, Iowa, conducted September 12--23, 1994. The audit included a review of all Ames Laboratory operations and facilities supporting DOE-sponsored activities. The audit`s objective is to advise the Secretary of Energy, through the Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety and Health, as to the adequacy of the environmental protection programs established at Ames Laboratory to ensure the protection of the environment, and compliance with Federal, state, and DOE requirements.

  5. Site environmental report for 2008 Sandia National Laboratories, California.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larsen, Barbara L.

    2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) is a government-owned/contractor operated laboratory. Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, operates the laboratory for the Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). The NNSA Sandia Site Office oversees operations at the site, using Sandia Corporation as a management and operating contractor. This Site Environmental Report for 2008 was prepared in accordance with DOE Order 231.1A (DOE 2004a). The report provides a summary of environmental monitoring information and compliance activities that occurred at SNL/CA during calendar year 2008. General site and environmental program information is also included.

  6. Site environmental report for 2004 Sandia National Laboratories, California.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larsen, Barbara L. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA)

    2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) is a government-owned/contractor-operated laboratory. Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, operates the laboratory for the Department of Energy's (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration. The DOE Sandia Site Office oversees operations at the site, using Sandia Corporation as a management and operating contractor. This Site Environmental Report for 2004 was prepared in accordance with DOE Order 231.1A. The report provides a summary of environmental monitoring information and compliance activities that occurred at SNL/CA during calendar year 2004. General site and environmental program information is also included.

  7. Site environmental report for 2006 Sandia National Laboratories, California.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larsen, Barbara L.

    2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) is a government-owned/contractor-operated laboratory. Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, operates the laboratory for the Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). The NNSA Sandia Site Office oversees operations at the site, using Sandia Corporation as a management and operating contractor. This Site Environmental Report for 2006 was prepared in accordance with DOE Order 231.1A (DOE 2004a). The report provides a summary of environmental monitoring information and compliance activities that occurred at SNL/CA during calendar year 2006. General site and environmental program information is also included.

  8. Site environmental report for 2005 Sandia National Laboratories, California.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larsen, Barbara L.

    2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) is a government-owned/contractor-operated laboratory. Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, operates the laboratory for the Department of Energy's (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). The DOE/NNSA Sandia Site Office (SSO) oversees operations at the site, using Sandia Corporation as a management and operating contractor. This Site Environmental Report for 2005 was prepared in accordance with DOE Order 231.1A. The report provides a summary of environmental monitoring information and compliance activities that occurred at SNL/CA during calendar year 2005. General site and environmental program information is also included.

  9. Site environmental report for 2003 Sandia National Laboratories, California.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larsen, Barbara L.

    2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) is a government-owned/contractor-operated laboratory. Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, operates the laboratory for the Department of Energy's (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration. The DOE Sandia Site Office oversees operations at the site, using Sandia Corporation as a management and operating contractor. This Site Environmental Report for 2003 was prepared in accordance with DOE Order 231.1A. The report provides a summary of environmental monitoring information and compliance activities that occurred at SNL/CA during calendar year 2003. General site and environmental program information is also included.

  10. National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Energy Systems Integration...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Energy Systems Integration Facility Overview National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Energy Systems Integration Facility Overview This...

  11. Argonne National Laboratory Scientists Invent Breakthrough Technique...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Argonne National Laboratory Scientists Invent Breakthrough Technique in Nanotechnology Argonne National Laboratory Scientists Invent Breakthrough Technique in Nanotechnology March...

  12. Isotopes facilities deactivation project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eversole, R.E.

    1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The production and distribution of radioisotopes for medical, scientific, and industrial applications has been a major activity at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) since the late 1940s. As the demand for many of these isotopes grew and their sale became profitable, the technology for the production of the isotopes was transferred to private industry, and thus, many of the production facilities at ORNL became underutilized. In 1989, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) instructed ORNL to identify and prepare various isotopes production facilities for safe shutdown. In response, ORNL identified 19 candidate facilities for shutdown and established the Isotopes Facilities Shutdown Program. In 1993, responsibility for the program was transitioned from the DOE Office of Nuclear Energy to the DOE Office of Environmental Management and Uranium Enrichment Operation`s Office of Facility Transition and Management. The program was retitled the Isotopes Facilities Deactivation Project (IFDP), and implementation responsibility was transferred from ORNL to the Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc. (LMES), Environmental Restoration (ER) Program.

  13. Whole-building systems integration laboratory survey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crawley, D.B. (American Consulting Engineers Council, Washington, DC (USA). Research and Management Foundation)

    1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report was prepared for the Pacific Northwest Laboratory as a subcontracted activity by the Research Management Foundation of the American Consulting Engineers Council. The objective of the survey reported herein was to independently assess the need for a Building System Integration Laboratory from the viewpoint of academicians in the field of building science. The subcontractor-developed questionnaire was sent to 200 professors of architecture and engineering at US universities. In view of this diverse population, the 10% rate of return on the questionnaire was considered acceptable. Although the responses probably do not reflect an unbiased summary of the collective perceptions of the original population surveyed, they do provide a valid insight into the interests and concerns of the academic community with respect to building sciences issues.

  14. A U.S. and China Regional Analysis of Distributed Energy Resources in Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, Wei

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    www.epa.gov/cleanenergy/energy-resources/egrid. [24] Wang,Gas-Fired Distributed Energy Resource Characterizations.CO: National Renewable Energy Resource Laboratory Report TP-

  15. Brookhaven National Laboratory Institutional Plan FY2001--FY2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, S.

    2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Brookhaven National Laboratory is a multidisciplinary laboratory in the Department of Energy National Laboratory system and plays a lead role in the DOE Science and Technology mission. The Laboratory also contributes to the DOE missions in Energy Resources, Environmental Quality, and National Security. Brookhaven strives for excellence in its science research and in facility operations and manages its activities with particular sensitivity to environmental and community issues. The Laboratory's programs are aligned continuously with the goals and objectives of the DOE through an Integrated Planning Process. This Institutional Plan summarizes the portfolio of research and capabilities that will assure success in the Laboratory's mission in the future. It also sets forth BNL strategies for our programs and for management of the Laboratory. The Department of Energy national laboratory system provides extensive capabilities in both world class research expertise and unique facilities that cannot exist without federal support. Through these national resources, which are available to researchers from industry, universities, other government agencies and other nations, the Department advances the energy, environmental, economic and national security well being of the US, provides for the international advancement of science, and educates future scientists and engineers.

  16. Idaho National Laboratory Cultural Resource Management Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Julie Braun Williams

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As a federal agency, the U.S. Department of Energy has been directed by Congress, the U.S. president, and the American public to provide leadership in the preservation of prehistoric, historic, and other cultural resources on the lands it administers. This mandate to preserve cultural resources in a spirit of stewardship for the future is outlined in various federal preservation laws, regulations, and guidelines such as the National Historic Preservation Act, the Archaeological Resources Protection Act, and the National Environmental Policy Act. The purpose of this Cultural Resource Management Plan is to describe how the Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office will meet these responsibilities at Idaho National Laboratory in southeastern Idaho. The Idaho National Laboratory is home to a wide variety of important cultural resources representing at least 13,500 years of human occupation in the southeastern Idaho area. These resources are nonrenewable, bear valuable physical and intangible legacies, and yield important information about the past, present, and perhaps the future. There are special challenges associated with balancing the preservation of these sites with the management and ongoing operation of an active scientific laboratory. The Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office is committed to a cultural resource management program that accepts these challenges in a manner reflecting both the spirit and intent of the legislative mandates. This document is designed for multiple uses and is intended to be flexible and responsive to future changes in law or mission. Document flexibility and responsiveness will be assured through regular reviews and as-needed updates. Document content includes summaries of Laboratory cultural resource philosophy and overall Department of Energy policy; brief contextual overviews of Laboratory missions, environment, and cultural history; and an overview of cultural resource management practices. A series of appendices provides important details that support the main text.

  17. Idaho National Laboratory Cultural Resource Management Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lowrey, Diana Lee

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As a federal agency, the U.S. Department of Energy has been directed by Congress, the U.S. president, and the American public to provide leadership in the preservation of prehistoric, historic, and other cultural resources on the lands it administers. This mandate to preserve cultural resources in a spirit of stewardship for the future is outlined in various federal preservation laws, regulations, and guidelines such as the National Historic Preservation Act, the Archaeological Resources Protection Act, and the National Environmental Policy Act. The purpose of this Cultural Resource Management Plan is to describe how the Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office will meet these responsibilities at the Idaho National Laboratory. This Laboratory, which is located in southeastern Idaho, is home to a wide variety of important cultural resources representing at least 13,500 years of human occupation in the southeastern Idaho area. These resources are nonrenewable; bear valuable physical and intangible legacies; and yield important information about the past, present, and perhaps the future. There are special challenges associated with balancing the preservation of these sites with the management and ongoing operation of an active scientific laboratory. The Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office is committed to a cultural resource management program that accepts these challenges in a manner reflecting both the spirit and intent of the legislative mandates. This document is designed for multiple uses and is intended to be flexible and responsive to future changes in law or mission. Document flexibility and responsiveness will be assured through annual reviews and as-needed updates. Document content includes summaries of Laboratory cultural resource philosophy and overall Department of Energy policy; brief contextual overviews of Laboratory missions, environment, and cultural history; and an overview of cultural resource management practices. A series of appendices provides important details that support the main text.

  18. Idaho National Laboratory Cultural Resource Management Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lowrey, Diana Lee

    2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As a federal agency, the U.S. Department of Energy has been directed by Congress, the U.S. president, and the American public to provide leadership in the preservation of prehistoric, historic, and other cultural resources on the lands it administers. This mandate to preserve cultural resources in a spirit of stewardship for the future is outlined in various federal preservation laws, regulations, and guidelines such as the National Historic Preservation Act, the Archaeological Resources Protection Act, and the National Environmental Policy Act. The purpose of this Cultural Resource Management Plan is to describe how the Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office will meet these responsibilities at the Idaho National Laboratory. This Laboratory, which is located in southeastern Idaho, is home to a wide variety of important cultural resources representing at least 13,500 years of human occupation in the southeastern Idaho area. These resources are nonrenewable; bear valuable physical and intangible legacies; and yield important information about the past, present, and perhaps the future. There are special challenges associated with balancing the preservation of these sites with the management and ongoing operation of an active scientific laboratory. The Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office is committed to a cultural resource management program that accepts these challenges in a manner reflecting both the spirit and intent of the legislative mandates. This document is designed for multiple uses and is intended to be flexible and responsive to future changes in law or mission. Document flexibility and responsiveness will be assured through annual reviews and as-needed updates. Document content includes summaries of Laboratory cultural resource philosophy and overall Department of Energy policy; brief contextual overviews of Laboratory missions, environment, and cultural history; and an overview of cultural resource management practices. A series of appendices provides important details that support the main text.

  19. Sandia National Laboratories: wind manufacturing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    at the Wind Energy Manufacturing Laboratory-a joint effort of researchers from TPI Composites, a Scottsdale, Arizona-based company that operates a turbine blade factory in...

  20. Two Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    event in Albuquerque LOS ALAMOS, N.M., March 26, 2015-Los Alamos National Laboratory's Nuclear Material Control and Accountability Group and the Quality and Performance...

  1. Sandia National Laboratories: Sandia partnerships

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy, News, Partnership, Renewable Energy, Wind Energy Researchers at the Wind Energy Manufacturing Laboratory-a joint effort of researchers from TPI Composites, a Scottsdale,...

  2. GUIDELINES FOR SAFE LABORATORY PRACTICES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haller, Gary L.

    University's Chemical Hygiene Plan (CHP). The CHP was written to comply with the Occupational Safety in Laboratories (29 CFR 1910.1450)). The CHP is the most detailed

  3. Sandia National Laboratories: Renewable Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    10, 2012, in Concentrating Solar Power, EC, National Solar Thermal Test Facility, Renewable Energy Dr. David Danielson visited Sandia National Laboratories and toured the National...

  4. Smart Grid | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Researchers from Argonne National Laboratory modeled several scenarios to add more solar power to the electric grid, using real-world data from the southwestern power...

  5. Sandia National Laboratories: System Impacts

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in Hosted by Sandia National Laboratories and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Inverter reliability drives project life cycle costs and plant performance. This...

  6. Sandia National Laboratories: Inverter Reliability

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in Hosted by Sandia National Laboratories and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Inverter reliability drives project life cycle costs and plant performance. This...

  7. Sandia National Laboratories: Component Reliability

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in Hosted by Sandia National Laboratories and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Inverter reliability drives project life cycle costs and plant performance. This...

  8. Sandia National Laboratories: Carbon Capture

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    from improved climate models to performance models for underground waste storage to 3D printing and digital rock physics. Marianne Walck (Director ... Federal Laboratory...

  9. Paul Kearns | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    at the Golden Field Office, Golden, Colorado, and manager of the National Renewable and Environmental Laboratory and Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI) Area Office. Closer to...

  10. Sandia National Laboratories: Solar Newsletter

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy, Solar, Solar Newsletter A team from Sandia National Laboratories' (SNL) National Solar Thermal Test Facility (NSTTF) recently won a first place Excellence Award in the...

  11. Sandia National Laboratories: Energy Security

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    States. I&C systems monitor the safe, reliable and secure generation and delivery of electricity and could have potential cyber vulnerabilities. At Sandia National Laboratories,...

  12. Sandia National Laboratories: solar power

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Interactive Tour Operated by Sandia National Laboratories for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the National Solar Thermal Test Facility (NSTTF) is the only test facility...

  13. Thomas Wallner | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Omnivorous Engine Argonne National Laboratory's Omnivorous Engine Browse by Topic Energy Energy efficiency Vehicles Alternative fuels Automotive engineering Biofuels Diesel Fuel...

  14. Aymeric Rousseau | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    School in La Rochelle, France in 1997. After working for PSA Peugeot Citroen in the Hybrid Electric Vehicle research department, he joined Argonne National Laboratory in 1999...

  15. Sandia National Laboratories: Solar Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in Concentrating Solar Power, Customers & Partners, Energy, News, Partnership, Renewable Energy, Solar Areva Solar is collaborating with Sandia National Laboratories on a new...

  16. Sandia National Laboratories: Solar Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Interactive Tour Operated by Sandia National Laboratories for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the National Solar Thermal Test Facility (NSTTF) is the only test facility...

  17. Sandia National Laboratories: Solar Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Air Force Research Laboratory Testing On August 17, 2012, in Concentrating Solar Power, Energy, Facilities, National Solar Thermal Test Facility, News, Renewable Energy, Solar...

  18. Sandia National Laboratories: Renewable Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    News, News & Events, Photovoltaic, Photovoltaic Systems Evaluation Laboratory (PSEL), Renewable Energy, Solar, Solar Newsletter, SunShot Sandia's Kenneth Armijo (in the...

  19. Sandia National Laboratories: Renewable Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2014, in Computational Modeling & Simulation, Energy, News, News & Events, Partnership, Renewable Energy, Water Power Sandia and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL)...

  20. Sandia National Laboratories: Renewable Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sales On February 25, 2015, in Energy, News, News & Events, Partnership, Photovoltaic, Renewable Energy, Solar, Systems Analysis A Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL)...

  1. Sandia National Laboratories: Solar Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2014 Sandia Corporation | Questions & Comments | Privacy & Security U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Sandia National Laboratories is a...

  2. Sandia National Laboratories: Semiconductor Revolution

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    National Laboratories and Chief Scientist of the Energy Frontier Research Center for Solid-State Lighting Science Date: March 31, 2010 Event: Lecture at Albuquerque Academy...

  3. Beyond Laboratories, Beyond Being Green

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    and Construction of High Performance, Low Energy Laboratories What is Labs21? * Genesis: Ann Arbor, Michigan ESPC * A joint EPADOE partnership program to improve the energy and...

  4. Sandia National Laboratories: thermal management

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    management 2013 Inverter Reliability Workshop On May 31, 2013, in Hosted by Sandia National Laboratories and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Inverter reliability...

  5. Sandia National Laboratories: Solar Newsletter

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Testing Center (PV RTC), Photovoltaic Systems Evaluation Laboratory (PSEL), Renewable Energy, Solar, Solar Newsletter, SunShot, Systems Analysis A research team that included...

  6. Sandia National Laboratories: Solar Newsletter

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    News & Events, Photovoltaic, Photovoltaic Systems Evaluation Laboratory (PSEL), Renewable Energy, Solar, Solar Newsletter, SunShot Sandia's Kenneth Armijo (in the Photovoltaic &...

  7. News Room | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    News Room Argonne Associate Laboratory Director for Energy and Global Security Mark Peters, left, signs a memorandum of understanding with Nadya Bliss, director of the Global...

  8. Media Contacts | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Media Contacts Christopher J. Kramer Argonne National Laboratory Christopher J. Kramer is the manager of media relations and external affairs for Argonne. Contact him at...

  9. Internal Applicants | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Argonne National Laboratory Argonne Login Service Please log in to continue Username * Enter your ANL domain account username. Password * Enter the password that accompanies your...

  10. Ray Bair | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    science, computational and laboratory research Large scale applications of high performance computing and communications News FLC awards researchers for transfer of engine...

  11. Sandia National Laboratories: Carbon Management

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (SO2), nitrous oxides (NOx), mercury, and fine particulate matter. Carbon dioxide (CO2) is always a byproduct of combustion. ... Geomechanics Laboratory On April 7, 2011,...

  12. Sandia National Laboratories: advanced materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laboratory, Concentrating Solar Power, Energy, Energy Storage, Facilities, National Solar Thermal Test Facility, News, News & Events, Renewable Energy, Solar, Systems Engineering...

  13. Sandia National Laboratories: Solar Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MEPV Publications MEPV Awards Researchers at Sandia National Laboratories are pioneering solar photovoltaic (PV) technologies that are cheaper to produce and easier to install...

  14. Sandia National Laboratories: News & Events

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Photovoltaic, Photovoltaic Systems Evaluation Laboratory (PSEL), Renewable Energy, Solar, Solar Newsletter, SunShot The state of the art in PV system monitoring is relatively...

  15. Sandia National Laboratories: materials technology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sandia Researchers Win CSP:ELEMENTS Funding Award On June 4, 2014, in Advanced Materials Laboratory, Concentrating Solar Power, Energy, Energy Storage, Facilities, National...

  16. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Science. Technology. Innovation. PNNL's innovative -Learning approach enriches the learning experience by problem-solving aims to use real-world contexts that require the learner to actively apply knowledge. PNNL and enable the training application to respond effectively and adapt to the learner's performance. PNNL

  17. Preventing Laboratory FiresPreventing Laboratory Fires AgendaAgenda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    June 2006fire June 2006 #12;Hamilton HallHamilton Hall September 1992September 1992 Explosion Rm. 619Behlen Explosion 2002Explosion 2002 Explosion in ventilationExplosion in ventilation hood, no fire orhood, no firePreventing Laboratory FiresPreventing Laboratory Fires #12;AgendaAgenda Flash over VideoFlash over

  18. Sandia National Laboratories

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del Sol Home DistributionTransportation Safety HomeWaterNanoscale EffectsXyce(tm) 4.0.2

  19. Sandia National Laboratories conducts

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del Sol Home DistributionTransportation Safety HomeWaterNanoscaleProject

  20. Document management guidelines for distributed project networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hameri, A P; Hřimyr, Nils-Joar

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper provides the project engineer with guidelines or a checklist on tasks that must be considered, defined and documented before the project can successfully implement a document management system in geographically distributed project environment. Topics ranging from configuration management, approval process, document types, user administration and document naming are covered. The underlying cases of the paper are that of CERN (European Laboratory for Particle Physics) and its latest accelerator project, together with the Nordisk Industrifond -funded Connecting Distributed Competencies (NI#: 98082) project, with a focus on distributed shipbuilding processes. Keywords: distributed project management, product data management, networking, document management, virtual workspaces

  1. Linking Accelerating Laboratory Test with Outdoor Performance Results for a Model Epoxy Coating System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    located in Gaithersburg, MD. Panel temperature and ambient RH of the outdoor exposure and the solar of this type of polymeric material. 2 #12;INTRODUCTION Attempts at linking field and laboratory exposure of the specimens,5 differences in the spectral emission distributions of the sun and laboratory light sources

  2. DISTRIBUTED DATABASES INTRODUCTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Chengfei

    D DISTRIBUTED DATABASES INTRODUCTION The development of network and data communication tech- nology distributed database management. Naturally, the decen- tralized approach reflects the distributed aspects in the definition of a distributed database exist. First, a distributed database is distributed

  3. Bernstein instability driven by thermal ring distribution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoon, Peter H., E-mail: yoonp@umd.edu [Institute for Physical Science and Technology, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States); School of Space Research, Kyung Hee University, Yongin-Si, Gyeonggi-Do 446-701 (Korea, Republic of); Hadi, Fazal; Qamar, Anisa [Institute of Physics and Electronics, University of Peshawar, Peshawar 25000 (Pakistan)

    2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The classic Bernstein waves may be intimately related to banded emissions detected in laboratory plasmas, terrestrial, and other planetary magnetospheres. However, the customary discussion of the Bernstein wave is based upon isotropic thermal velocity distribution function. In order to understand how such waves can be excited, one needs an emission mechanism, i.e., an instability. In non-relativistic collision-less plasmas, the only known Bernstein wave instability is that associated with a cold perpendicular velocity ring distribution function. However, cold ring distribution is highly idealized. The present Brief Communication generalizes the cold ring distribution model to include thermal spread, so that the Bernstein-ring instability is described by a more realistic electron distribution function, with which the stabilization by thermal spread associated with the ring distribution is demonstrated. The present findings imply that the excitation of Bernstein waves requires a sufficiently high perpendicular velocity gradient associated with the electron distribution function.

  4. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Institutional Plan FY 1994--1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Institutional Plan provides an overview of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory mission, strategic plan, scientific initiatives, research programs, environment and safety program plans, educational and technology transfer efforts, human resources, and facilities needs. For FY 1994-1999 the Institutional Plan reflects significant revisions based on the Laboratory`s strategic planning process. The Strategic Plan section identifies long-range conditions that will influence the Laboratory, as well as potential research trends and management implications. The Initiatives section identifies potential new research programs that represent major long-term opportunities for the Laboratory, and the resources required for their implementation. The Scientific and Technical Programs section summarizes current programs and potential changes in research program activity. The Environment, Safety, and Health section describes the management systems and programs underway at the Laboratory to protect the environment, the public, and the employees. The Technology Transfer and Education programs section describes current and planned programs to enhance the nation`s scientific literacy and human infrastructure and to improve economic competitiveness. The Human Resources section identifies LBL staff diversity and development program. The section on Site and Facilities discusses resources required to sustain and improve the physical plant and its equipment. The new section on Information Resources reflects the importance of computing and communication resources to the Laboratory. The Resource Projections are estimates of required budgetary authority for the Laboratory`s ongoing research programs. The Institutional Plan is a management report for integration with the Department of Energy`s strategic planning activities, developed through an annual planning process.

  5. COMPARATIVE MEDICINE LABORATORY ANIMAL FACILITIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krovi, Venkat

    5.A.6 COMPARATIVE MEDICINE LABORATORY ANIMAL FACILITIES STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE for REPORTING PHYSICAL PLANT AND ENVIRONMENTAL CONDITIONS ABNORMALITIES AT THE COMPARATIVE MEDICINE LABORATORY ANIMAL investigator to keep her/him informed of the progress or resolution of the problem. #12;

  6. User Manual Frick Chemistry Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torquato, Salvatore

    the atrium connects the laboratory wing with the administrative offices. This provides a light-filled space to make the new Frick Chemistry Laboratory (and the surrounding natural sciences neighborhood) one technologies that reduce energy demand and con- serve water. The design and construction teams have implemented

  7. Hybrid & Hydrogen Vehicle Research Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Dongwon

    Hybrid & Hydrogen Vehicle Research Laboratory www.vss.psu.edu/hhvrl Joel R. Anstrom, Director 201 The Pennsylvania Transportation Institute Hybrid and Hydrogen Vehicle Research Laboratory will contribute to the advancement of hybrid and hydrogen vehicle technology to promote the emerging hydrogen economy by providing

  8. Laboratory Directed Research and Development

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2006-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The order establishes DOE requirements for laboratory directed research and development (LDRD) while providing the laboratory director broad flexibility for program implementation. Cancels DOE O 413.3A. Admin Chg 1, dated 1-31-11, cancels DOE O 413.3B. Certified 7-14-2011.

  9. National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program NVLAP Assessor Training NIST Handbook 150 ISO/IEC ­ September 24, 2013 2 ISO/IEC 17025:2005 #12;National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program General or electronic documentation of facts or events Sources: ISO /IEC Directives, Part 2, 2004 ISO/IEC 17000

  10. Statistical Laboratory & Department of Statistics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    by the American Statistical Association. Dean Isaacson and Mark Kaiser were instrumental in garnering a NationalStatistical Laboratory & Department of Statistics Annual Report July 1, 2002 to June 30, 2003 IOWA Chair of the Department of Statistics and Director of the Statistical Laboratory in November, 2002. Dean

  11. Decommissioning of surplus facilities at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stout, D.S.

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Decommissioning Buildings 3 and 4 South at Technical Area 21, Los Alamos National Laboratory, involves the decontamination, dismantlement, and demolition of two enriched-uranium processing buildings containing process equipment and ductwork holdup. The Laboratory has adopted two successful management strategies to implement this project: Rather than characterize an entire site, upfront, investigators use the ``observational approach,`` in which they collect only enough data to begin decommissioning activities and then determine appropriate procedures for further characterization as the work progresses. Project leaders augment work packages with task hazard analyses to fully define specific tasks and inform workers of hazards; all daily work activities are governed by specific work procedures and hazard analyses.

  12. Los Alamos National Laboratory computer benchmarking, 1983

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griffin, J.H.; Simmons, M.L.

    1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Evaluating the performance of computing machinery is an ongoing effort of the Computer Research and Applications Group of the Los Alamos National Laboratory. This report summarizes the results of benchmarking activities performed between October 1982 and September 1983. Compilation and execution times as well as megaflop rates for a set of benchmark codes are reported. Tests were performed on the following computers: Cray Research, Inc. (CRI) Cray-1S; Control Data Corporation (CDC) 7600, Cyber 825, and Cyber 205; Digital Equipment Corporation (DEC) VAX 11/780 and VAX 11/782.

  13. Measurement uncertainty from In-Situ gamma spectroscopy of nonhomogeneous containers and from Laboratory Assay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bronson, F. [CHP, Canberra Industries, Meriden CT (United States); Atrashkevich, V. [Stroiteley, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During a D and D or ER process containers of radioactive waste are normally generated. The activity can commonly be determined by gamma spectroscopy, but frequently the measurement conditions are not conducive to precise sample-detector geometries, and usually the radioactive material is not in a homogeneous distribution. What is the best method to accurately assay these containers - sampling followed by laboratory analysis, or in-situ spectroscopy? What is the uncertainty of the final result? To help answer these questions, the Canberra tool ISOCS Uncertainty Estimator [IUE] was used to mathematically simulate and evaluate several different measurement scenarios and to estimate the uncertainty of the measurement and the sampling process. Several representative containers and source distributions were mathematically defined and evaluated to determine the in-situ measurement uncertainty due to the sample non-uniformity. In the First example a typical field situation requiring the measurement of 200-liter drums was evaluated. A sensitivity analysis was done to show which parameters contributed the most to the uncertainty. Then an efficiency uncertainty calculation was performed. In the Second example, a group of 200-liter drums with various types of non-homogeneous distributions was created, and them measurements were simulated with different detector arrangements to see how the uncertainty varied. In the Third example, a truck filled with non-uniform soil was first measured with multiple in-situ detectors to determine the measurement uncertainty. Then composite samples were extracted and the sampling uncertainty computed for comparison to the field measurement uncertainty. (authors)

  14. Urea/Ammonia Distribution Optimization in an SCR Emission Control...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    P-20 UreaAmmonia Distribution Optimization in an SCR Emission Control System Through the Use of CFD Analysis Gi-Heon Kim, Matthew Thornton National Renewable Energy Laboratory...

  15. Arctic Energy Technology Development Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Charles Chamberlin; Robert Chaney; Gang Chen; Godwin Chukwu; James Clough; Steve Colt; Anthony Covescek; Robert Crosby; Abhijit Dandekar; Paul Decker; Brandon Galloway; Rajive Ganguli; Catherine Hanks; Rich Haut; Kristie Hilton; Larry Hinzman; Gwen Holdman; Kristie Holland; Robert Hunter; Ron Johnson; Thomas Johnson; Doug Kame; Mikhail Kaneveskly; Tristan Kenny; Santanu Khataniar; Abhijeet Kulkami; Peter Lehman; Mary Beth Leigh; Jenn-Tai Liang; Michael Lilly; Chuen-Sen Lin; Paul Martin; Pete McGrail; Dan Miller; Debasmita Misra; Nagendra Nagabhushana; David Ogbe; Amanda Osborne; Antoinette Owen; Sharish Patil; Rocky Reifenstuhl; Doug Reynolds; Eric Robertson; Todd Schaef; Jack Schmid; Yuri Shur; Arion Tussing; Jack Walker; Katey Walter; Shannon Watson; Daniel White; Gregory White; Mark White; Richard Wies; Tom Williams; Dennis Witmer; Craig Wollard; Tao Zhu

    2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Arctic Energy Technology Development Laboratory was created by the University of Alaska Fairbanks in response to a congressionally mandated funding opportunity through the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), specifically to encourage research partnerships between the university, the Alaskan energy industry, and the DOE. The enabling legislation permitted research in a broad variety of topics particularly of interest to Alaska, including providing more efficient and economical electrical power generation in rural villages, as well as research in coal, oil, and gas. The contract was managed as a cooperative research agreement, with active project monitoring and management from the DOE. In the eight years of this partnership, approximately 30 projects were funded and completed. These projects, which were selected using an industry panel of Alaskan energy industry engineers and managers, cover a wide range of topics, such as diesel engine efficiency, fuel cells, coal combustion, methane gas hydrates, heavy oil recovery, and water issues associated with ice road construction in the oil fields of the North Slope. Each project was managed as a separate DOE contract, and the final technical report for each completed project is included with this final report. The intent of this process was to address the energy research needs of Alaska and to develop research capability at the university. As such, the intent from the beginning of this process was to encourage development of partnerships and skills that would permit a transition to direct competitive funding opportunities managed from funding sources. This project has succeeded at both the individual project level and at the institutional development level, as many of the researchers at the university are currently submitting proposals to funding agencies, with some success.

  16. Pacific Northwest Laboratory

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem Not Found Item Not Foundenhancer activity than histone30518 PREPRINTTHIRDPRRC

  17. The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our InstagramStructureProposedPAGESafetyTed DonatARM ProgramWeek Day(active tab)

  18. The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our InstagramStructureProposedPAGESafetyTed DonatARM ProgramWeek Day(active

  19. The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our InstagramStructureProposedPAGESafetyTed DonatARM ProgramWeek Day(activeWeek Day

  20. The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our InstagramStructureProposedPAGESafetyTed DonatARM ProgramWeek Day(activeWeek Day