Sample records for lab cloud property

  1. STORMVEX: The Storm Peak Lab Cloud Property Validation Experiment Science and Operations Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mace, J; Matrosov, S; Shupe, M; Lawson, P; Hallar, G; McCubbin, I; Marchand, R; Orr, B; Coulter, R; Sedlacek, A; Avallone, L; Long, C

    2010-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    During the Storm Peak Lab Cloud Property Validation Experiment (STORMVEX), a substantial correlative data set of remote sensing observations and direct in situ measurements from fixed and airborne platforms will be created in a winter season, mountainous environment. This will be accomplished by combining mountaintop observations at Storm Peak Laboratory and the airborne National Science Foundation-supported Colorado Airborne Multi-Phase Cloud Study campaign with collocated measurements from the second ARM Mobile Facility (AMF2). We describe in this document the operational plans and motivating science for this experiment, which includes deployment of AMF2 to Steamboat Springs, Colorado. The intensive STORMVEX field phase will begin nominally on 1 November 2010 and extend to approximately early April 2011.

  2. Storm Peak Lab Cloud Property Validation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  3. X-1 ROEBELING ET AL.: SEVIRI & AVHRR CLOUD PROPERTY RETRIEVALS Cloud property retrievals for climate monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stoffelen, Ad

    Generation (METEOSAT-8) and the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) onboard the National Oceanic a consistent and high quality dataset of SEVIRI and AVHRR retrieved cloud properties for climate research studies. Clouds strongly modulate the energy balance of the Earth and its atmosphere through

  4. 2011 CLOuDS Campaign | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

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  5. User:GregZiebold/Lab Cloud | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown of Ladoga,planning methodologies and tools | Open EnergyCalpakGateway testCloud

  6. JLab Property Management Best Practices | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Property Management Best Practices Nearly every employee at JLab is a property custodian. A property custodian is responsible for the proper use, control, physical protection and...

  7. Investigating the Radiative Impact Clouds Using Retrieved Properties to Classify Cloud Type

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hogan, Robin

    of Reading, RG6 6AL, UK Abstract. Active remote sensing allows cloud properties such as ice and liquid water remote sensing, Cloud categorization, Cloud properties, Radiative impact. PACS: 92.60. Vb. INTRODUCTION in a radiation scheme which can simulate the radiation budget and heating rates throughout the atmospheric

  8. Study of ice cloud properties using infrared spectral data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garrett, Kevin James

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The research presented in this thesis involves the study of ice cloud microphysical and optical properties using both hyperspectral and narrowband infrared spectral data. First, ice cloud models are developed for the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding...

  9. Study of ice cloud properties using infrared spectral data 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garrett, Kevin James

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The research presented in this thesis involves the study of ice cloud microphysical and optical properties using both hyperspectral and narrowband infrared spectral data. First, ice cloud models are developed for the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding...

  10. Property:Lab Test | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  11. Cloud Property Retrieval Products for Graciosa Island, Azores

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Dong, Xiquan

    The motivation for developing this product was to use the Dong et al. 1998 method to retrieve cloud microphysical properties, such as cloud droplet effective radius, cloud droplets number concentration, and optical thickness. These retrieved properties have been used to validate the satellite retrieval, and evaluate the climate simulations and reanalyses. We had been using this method to retrieve cloud microphysical properties over ARM SGP and NSA sites. We also modified the method for the AMF at Shouxian, China and some IOPs, e.g. ARM IOP at SGP in March, 2000. The ARSCL data from ARM data archive over the SGP and NSA have been used to determine the cloud boundary and cloud phase. For these ARM permanent sites, the ARSCL data was developed based on MMCR measurements, however, there were no data available at the Azores field campaign. We followed the steps to generate this derived product and also include the MPLCMASK cloud retrievals to determine the most accurate cloud boundaries, including the thin cirrus clouds that WACR may under-detect. We use these as input to retrieve the cloud microphysical properties. Due to the different temporal resolutions of the derived cloud boundary heights product and the cloud properties product, we submit them as two separate netcdf files.

  12. A 3D STOCHASTIC CLOUD MODEL FOR INVESTIGATING THE RADIATIVE PROPERTIES OF INHOMOGENEOUS CIRRUS CLOUDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hogan, Robin

    A 3D STOCHASTIC CLOUD MODEL FOR INVESTIGATING THE RADIATIVE PROPERTIES OF INHOMOGENEOUS CIRRUS, Berkshire, United Kingdom 1 INTRODUCTION The importance of ice clouds on the earth's radiation budget for quantifying this effect, and several such models exist for boundary layer clouds, such as those of Cahalan et

  13. CLOUD DROPLET NUCLEATION AND ITS CONNECTION TO AEROSOL PROPERTIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the uncertainty of the indirect effect arises from incomplete ability to describe changes in cloud properties. Keywords - Climate. aerosols. clouds, radiation INTRODUcnON In recent years awareness has increased of enhancement of scanering of radiation by aerosols in clear (cloud-free) air; a portion of the scattered

  14. Cloud Properties and Radiative Heating Rates for TWP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Comstock, Jennifer

    2013-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A cloud properties and radiative heating rates dataset is presented where cloud properties retrieved using lidar and radar observations are input into a radiative transfer model to compute radiative fluxes and heating rates at three ARM sites located in the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) region. The cloud properties retrieval is a conditional retrieval that applies various retrieval techniques depending on the available data, that is if lidar, radar or both instruments detect cloud. This Combined Remote Sensor Retrieval Algorithm (CombRet) produces vertical profiles of liquid or ice water content (LWC or IWC), droplet effective radius (re), ice crystal generalized effective size (Dge), cloud phase, and cloud boundaries. The algorithm was compared with 3 other independent algorithms to help estimate the uncertainty in the cloud properties, fluxes, and heating rates (Comstock et al. 2013). The dataset is provided at 2 min temporal and 90 m vertical resolution. The current dataset is applied to time periods when the MMCR (Millimeter Cloud Radar) version of the ARSCL (Active Remotely-Sensed Cloud Locations) Value Added Product (VAP) is available. The MERGESONDE VAP is utilized where temperature and humidity profiles are required. Future additions to this dataset will utilize the new KAZR instrument and its associated VAPs.

  15. Cloud Properties and Radiative Heating Rates for TWP

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Comstock, Jennifer

    A cloud properties and radiative heating rates dataset is presented where cloud properties retrieved using lidar and radar observations are input into a radiative transfer model to compute radiative fluxes and heating rates at three ARM sites located in the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) region. The cloud properties retrieval is a conditional retrieval that applies various retrieval techniques depending on the available data, that is if lidar, radar or both instruments detect cloud. This Combined Remote Sensor Retrieval Algorithm (CombRet) produces vertical profiles of liquid or ice water content (LWC or IWC), droplet effective radius (re), ice crystal generalized effective size (Dge), cloud phase, and cloud boundaries. The algorithm was compared with 3 other independent algorithms to help estimate the uncertainty in the cloud properties, fluxes, and heating rates (Comstock et al. 2013). The dataset is provided at 2 min temporal and 90 m vertical resolution. The current dataset is applied to time periods when the MMCR (Millimeter Cloud Radar) version of the ARSCL (Active Remotely-Sensed Cloud Locations) Value Added Product (VAP) is available. The MERGESONDE VAP is utilized where temperature and humidity profiles are required. Future additions to this dataset will utilize the new KAZR instrument and its associated VAPs.

  16. Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Flexible hydropower: boosting energy December 16, 2014 New hydroelectric resource for Northern New Mexico supplies clean energy to homes, businesses and the Lab We know a lot of...

  17. Computing and Partitioning Cloud Feedbacks Using Cloud Property Histograms. Part I: Cloud Radiative Kernels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hartmann, Dennis

    radiative forcing. The global and annual mean model-simulated cloud feedback is dominated by contributions to a hypothetical cloudless but other- wise identical planet, the global and annual mean effect of clouds at the top is how cloud radiative effects will change as the planet warms because of long-lived greenhouse gases

  18. TGRS-2010-00092.R1 1 Abstract--Cloud properties were retrieved by applying the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dong, Xiquan

    cover (~59%) is divided equally between liquid and ice clouds. Global mean cloud effective heights , respectively, for liquid clouds and 8.3 km, 12.7, 52.2 µm, and 230 gm-2 for ice clouds. Cloud droplet effective radiation processes requires determination of cloud property distributions and the radiation budget

  19. Cloud Scavenging Effects on Aerosol Radiative and Cloud-nucleating Properties - Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ogren, John A.; Sheridan, Patrick S.; Andrews, Elisabeth

    2009-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The optical properties of aerosol particles are the controlling factors in determining direct aerosol radiative forcing. These optical properties depend on the chemical composition and size distribution of the aerosol particles, which can change due to various processes during the particles’ lifetime in the atmosphere. Over the course of this project we have studied how cloud processing of atmospheric aerosol changes the aerosol optical properties. A counterflow virtual impactor was used to separate cloud drops from interstitial aerosol and parallel aerosol systems were used to measure the optical properties of the interstitial and cloud-scavenged aerosol. Specifically, aerosol light scattering, back-scattering and absorption were measured and used to derive radiatively significant parameters such as aerosol single scattering albedo and backscatter fraction for cloud-scavenged and interstitial aerosol. This data allows us to demonstrate that the radiative properties of cloud-processed aerosol can be quite different than pre-cloud aerosol. These differences can be used to improve the parameterization of aerosol forcing in climate models.

  20. ARM - Field Campaign - Colorado: The Storm Peak Lab Cloud Property

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  1. Development of advanced cloud parameterizations to examine air quality, cloud properties, and cloud-radiation feedback in mesoscale models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, In Young

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The distribution of atmospheric pollutants is governed by dynamic processes that create the general conditions for transport and mixing, by microphysical processes that control the evolution of aerosol and cloud particles, and by chemical processes that transform chemical species and form aerosols. Pollutants emitted into the air can undergo homogeneous gas reactions to create a suitable environment for the production by heterogeneous nucleation of embryos composed of a few molecules. The physicochemical properties of preexisting aerosols interact with newly produced embryos to evolve by heteromolecular diffusion and coagulation. Hygroscopic particles wig serve as effective cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), while hydrophobic particles will serve as effective ice-forming nuclei. Clouds form initially by condensation of water vapor on CCN and evolve in a vapor-liquid-solid system by deposition, sublimation, freezing, melting, coagulation, and breakup. Gases and aerosols that enter the clouds undergo aqueous chemical processes and may acidity hydrometer particles. Calculations for solar and longwave radiation fluxes depend on how the respective spectra are modified by absorbers such as H{sub 2}O, CO{sub 2}, O{sub 3}, CH{sub 4}, N{sub 2}O, chlorofruorocarbons, and aerosols. However, the flux calculations are more complicated for cloudy skies, because the cloud optical properties are not well defined. In this paper, key processes such as tropospheric chemistry, cloud microphysics parameterizations, and radiation schemes are reviewed in terms of physicochemical processes occurring, and recommendations are made for the development of advanced modules applicable to mesoscale models.

  2. Cloud and Aerosol Properties, Precipitable Water, and Profiles of Temperature and Water Vapor from MODIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    Cloud and Aerosol Properties, Precipitable Water, and Profiles of Temperature and Water Vapor from such as cloud mask, atmos- pheric profiles, aerosol properties, total precipitable water, and cloud properties vapor amount, aerosol particles, and the subsequently formed clouds [9]. Barnes et al. [2] provide

  3. Tropical Cloud Properties and Radiative Heating Profiles

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Mather, James

    We have generated a suite of products that includes merged soundings, cloud microphysics, and radiative fluxes and heating profiles. The cloud microphysics is strongly based on the ARM Microbase value added product (Miller et al., 2003). We have made a few changes to the microbase parameterizations to address issues we observed in our initial analysis of the tropical data. The merged sounding product is not directly related to the product developed by ARM but is similar in that it uses the microwave radiometer to scale the radiosonde column water vapor. The radiative fluxes also differ from the ARM BBHRP (Broadband Heating Rate Profile) product in terms of the radiative transfer model and the sampling interval.

  4. Using Radar, Lidar, and Radiometer measurements to Classify Cloud Type and Study Middle-Level Cloud Properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Zhien

    2010-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The project is mainly focused on the characterization of cloud macrophysical and microphysical properties, especially for mixed-phased clouds and middle level ice clouds by combining radar, lidar, and radiometer measurements available from the ACRF sites. First, an advanced mixed-phase cloud retrieval algorithm will be developed to cover all mixed-phase clouds observed at the ACRF NSA site. The algorithm will be applied to the ACRF NSA observations to generate a long-term arctic mixed-phase cloud product for model validations and arctic mixed-phase cloud processes studies. To improve the representation of arctic mixed-phase clouds in GCMs, an advanced understanding of mixed-phase cloud processes is needed. By combining retrieved mixed-phase cloud microphysical properties with in situ data and large-scale meteorological data, the project aim to better understand the generations of ice crystals in supercooled water clouds, the maintenance mechanisms of the arctic mixed-phase clouds, and their connections with large-scale dynamics. The project will try to develop a new retrieval algorithm to study more complex mixed-phase clouds observed at the ACRF SGP site. Compared with optically thin ice clouds, optically thick middle level ice clouds are less studied because of limited available tools. The project will develop a new two wavelength radar technique for optically thick ice cloud study at SGP site by combining the MMCR with the W-band radar measurements. With this new algorithm, the SGP site will have a better capability to study all ice clouds. Another area of the proposal is to generate long-term cloud type classification product for the multiple ACRF sites. The cloud type classification product will not only facilitates the generation of the integrated cloud product by applying different retrieval algorithms to different types of clouds operationally, but will also support other research to better understand cloud properties and to validate model simulations. The ultimate goal is to improve our cloud classification algorithm into a VAP.

  5. Study of cloud properties from single-scattering, radiative forcing, and retrieval perspectives 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Yong-Keun

    2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation reports on three different yet related topics in light scattering computation, radiative transfer simulation, and remote sensing implementation, regarding the cloud properties and the retrieval of cloud properties from satellite...

  6. Remote Sensing: Cloud Properties P Yang, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX, USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baum, Bryan A.

    and the effective particle size. Global cloud observations based on satellite measurements serve many uses of supercooled water and ice particles. Water and ice clouds interact with solar radiation differently and have are analyzed routinely for global cloud macrophysical properties such as cloud height, phase (water, ice

  7. Properties of High-Redshift Lyman Alpha Clouds II. Statistical Properties of the Clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    William H. Press; George B. Rybicki

    1993-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Curve of growth analysis, applied to the Lyman series absorption ratios deduced in our previous paper, yields a measurement of the logarithmic slope of distribution of \\Lya\\ clouds in column density $N$. The observed exponential distribution of the clouds' equivalent widths $W$ is then shown to require a broad distribution of velocity parameters $b$, extending up to 80 km s$^{-1}$. We show how the exponential itself emerges in a natural way. An absolute normalization for the differential distribution of cloud numbers in $z$, $N$, and $b$ is obtained. By detailed analysis of absorption fluctuations along the line of sight we are able to put upper limits on the cloud-cloud correlation function $\\xi$ on several megaparsec length scales. We show that observed $b$ values, if thermal, are incompatible, in several different ways, with the hypothesis of equilibrium heating and ionization by a background UV flux. Either a significant component of $b$ is due to bulk motion (which we argue against on several grounds), or else the clouds are out of equilibrium, and hotter than is implied by their ionization state, a situation which could be indicative of recent adiabatic collapse.

  8. Cloud optical and microphysical properties derived from ground-based and satellite sensors over

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Zhanqing

    Cloud optical and microphysical properties derived from ground-based and satellite sensors over of cloud optical and microphysical properties were made at Taihu, a highly polluted site in the central Yangtze Delta region, during a research campaign from May 2008 to December 2009. Cloud optical depth (COD

  9. Dust properties inside molecular clouds from coreshine modeling and observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lefèvre, Charlène; Juvela, Mika; Paladini, Roberta; Lallement, Rosine; Marshall, D J; Andersen, Morten; Bacmann, Aurore; Mcgee, Peregrine M; Montier, Ludovic; Noriega-Crespo, Alberto; Pelkonen, V -M; Ristorcelli, Isabelle; Steinacker, Jürgen

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Context. Using observations to deduce dust properties, grain size distribution, and physical conditions in molecular clouds is a highly degenerate problem. Aims. The coreshine phenomenon, a scattering process at 3.6 and 4.5 $\\mu$m that dominates absorption, has revealed its ability to explore the densest parts of clouds. We want to use this effect to constrain the dust parameters. The goal is to investigate to what extent grain growth (at constant dust mass) inside molecular clouds is able to explain the coreshine observations. We aim to find dust models that can explain a sample of Spitzer coreshine data. We also look at the consistency with near-infrared data we obtained for a few clouds. Methods. We selected four regions with a very high occurrence of coreshine cases: Taurus-Perseus, Cepheus, Chameleon and L183/L134. We built a grid of dust models and investigated the key parameters to reproduce the general trend of surface bright- nesses and intensity ratios of both coreshine and near-infrared observation...

  10. On the Microphysical Properties of Ice Clouds as Inferred from the Polarization of Electromagnetic Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cole, Benjamin

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Uncertainties associated with the microphysical and radiative properties of ice clouds remain an active research area because of the importance these clouds have in atmospheric radiative transfer problems and the energy balance of the Earth...

  11. On the Microphysical Properties of Ice Clouds as Inferred from the Polarization of Electromagnetic Waves 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cole, Benjamin

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Uncertainties associated with the microphysical and radiative properties of ice clouds remain an active research area because of the importance these clouds have in atmospheric radiative transfer problems and the energy balance of the Earth...

  12. On the Feasibility of Precisely Measuring the Properties of a Precipitating Cloud with a Weather Radar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Runnels, R.C.

    In this paper the results of an investigation are presented that are concerned with the feasibility of employing a weather radar to make precise measurements of the properties of a precipitating cloud. A schematic cloud is proposed as a model...

  13. Cluster analysis of cloud properties : a method for diagnosing cloud-climate feedbacks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gordon, Neil D.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    represent cloud effects on gridbox mean visible radiationclouds and the resulting effect on the balance of radiationrepresent cloud effects on grid-box-mean visible radiation

  14. Effects of spatial and temporal variations in aerosol properties on mean cloud albedo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in quantifying the effects of cloud on radiation budget and aerosol indirect effects on global scaleEffects of spatial and temporal variations in aerosol properties on mean cloud albedo Jian Wang1 effect on mean cloud albedo, was investigated using data collected at Pt. Reyes, California, during

  15. Quantifying uncertainties of cloud microphysical property retrievals with a perturbation method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    to their modification effects on global radiation balance and atmospheric water cycle. However, representation of clouds Radiation Measurement (ARM) facility, whose primary goal is to carry out long-term observations of cloudsQuantifying uncertainties of cloud microphysical property retrievals with a perturbation method

  16. Microphysical Properties of Clouds with Low Liquid Water Paths: An Update from Clouds with Low Optical (Water) Depth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turner, D.D.; Flynn, C.; Long, C.; McFarlane, S.; Vogelmann, A.; Johnson, K.; Miller, M.; Chiu, C.; Marshak, A.; Wiscombe, W.; Clough, S.A.; Heck, P.; Minnis, P.; Liljegren, J.; Min, Q.; O'Hirok, W.; Wang, Z.

    2005-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Clouds play a critical role in the modulation of the radiative transfer in the atmosphere, and how clouds interact with radiation is one of the primary uncertainties in global climate models (GCMs). To reduce this uncertainty, the U.S. Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program collects an immense amount of data from its Climate Research Facilities (CRFs); these data include observations of radiative fluxes, cloud properties from active and passive remote sensors, upper atmospheric soundings, and other observations. The program's goal is to use these coincident, longterm observations to improve the parameterization of radiative transfer in clear and cloudy atmospheres in GCMs.

  17. Rheology in the Teaching Lab: Properties of Starch Suspensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joel A. Groman; James G. Miller; Jonathan I. Katz

    2014-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    In everyday life we encounter many complex fluids, from shear-thinning paint and toothpaste to shear-thickening starch suspensions. The study of their properties offers an opportunity for students to relate sophisticated physical concepts to their everyday experience. Modern rheology uses expensive equipment impractical for the teaching laboratory. Here we describe a rudimentary rheometer suitable for student laboratories that can demonstrate and quantify discontinuous shear thickening, the most dramatic property of complex fluids, and use it to measure the properties of starch suspensions.

  18. Radiative and microphysical properties of Arctic stratus clouds from multiangle downwelling infrared radiances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shupe, Matthew

    climate is strongly influenced by an extensive and persistent pattern of cloud cover [Francis, 1997 properties can have significant effects on long- wave radiation, which dominates the radiation energy budgetRadiative and microphysical properties of Arctic stratus clouds from multiangle downwelling

  19. Radiative Effects of Dust Aerosols, Natural Cirrus Clouds and Contrails: Broadband Optical Properties and Sensitivity Studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yi, Bingqi

    2013-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation aims to study the broadband optical properties and radiative effects of dust aerosols and ice clouds. It covers three main topics: the uncertainty of dust optical properties and radiative effects from the dust particle shape...

  20. Radiative Effects of Dust Aerosols, Natural Cirrus Clouds and Contrails: Broadband Optical Properties and Sensitivity Studies 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yi, Bingqi

    2013-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation aims to study the broadband optical properties and radiative effects of dust aerosols and ice clouds. It covers three main topics: the uncertainty of dust optical properties and radiative effects from the dust particle shape...

  1. Continuous Profiles of Cloud Microphysical Properties for the Fixed Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jensen, M; Jensen, K

    2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program defined a specific metric for the third quarter of Fiscal Year 2006 to produce and refine a one-year continuous time series of cloud microphysical properties based on cloud radar measurements for each of the fixed ARM sites. To accomplish this metric, we used a combination of recently developed algorithms that interpret radar reflectivity profiles, lidar backscatter profiles, and microwave brightness temperatures into the context of the underlying cloud microphysical structure.

  2. Aircraft Observations of Sub-cloud Aerosol and Convective Cloud Physical Properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Axisa, Duncan

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This research focuses on aircraft observational studies of aerosol-cloud interactions in cumulus clouds. The data were collected in the summer of 2004, the spring of 2007 and the mid-winter and spring of 2008 in Texas, central Saudi Arabia...

  3. The Radiative, Cloud, and Thermodynamic Properties of the Major Tropical Western Pacific Cloud Regimes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jakob, Christian

    's surface. Other effects include the release and consumption of latent heat related to phase changes in the tropical western Pacific (TWP). A cluster analysis is applied to 2 yr of daytime-only data from the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) to identify four major cloud regimes in the TWP region

  4. Retrievals of mixed-phase cloud properties during the National Polar-Orbiting Operational Environmental

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liou, K. N.

    Retrievals of mixed-phase cloud properties during the National Polar-Orbiting Operational/Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) to retrieve pixel-level mixed-phase cloud optical thicknesses Satellite Observations Validation Project (C3VP), were analyzed. The performance of the mixed-phase

  5. Cloud properties and associated radiative heating rates in the tropical western Pacific

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cloud properties and associated radiative heating rates in the tropical western Pacific James H set of atmospheric remote sensing instruments at sites around the world, including three radiative fluxes and heating rates. Maxima in cloud occurrence are found in the boundary layer and the upper

  6. A06: Analysis of GRAPE data The effects of anthropogenic aerosols on cloud microphysical properties.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oxford, University of

    the radiative balance of the atmosphere. This effect is known as the `first direct radiative forcing'[4 of this warming is to reduce the upward movement of moisture and in turn reduce the cloud cover[5]. This `semiA06: Analysis of GRAPE data The effects of anthropogenic aerosols on cloud microphysical properties

  7. FINAL REPORT: An Investigation of the Microphysical, Radiative, and Dynamical Properties of Mixed-Phase Clouds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shupe, Matthew D

    2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This final report summarizes the major accomplishments and products resulting from a three-year grant funded by the DOE, Office of Science, Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program titled: An Investigation of the Microphysical, Radiative, and Dynamical Properties of Mixed-Phase Clouds. Accomplishments are listed under the following subcategories: Mixed-phase cloud retrieval method development; Mixed-phase cloud characterization; ARM mixed-phase cloud retrieval review; and New ARM MICROBASE product. In addition, lists are provided of service to the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program, data products provided to the broader research community, and publications resulting from this grant.

  8. Lab White Paper Hitachi Unified Compute Platform (UCP)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaudhuri, Surajit

    Architectures for Private Clouds By Kerry Dolan, Lab Analyst February 2014 This ESG Lab White Paper Reference Architecture for Private Clouds 2 © 2014 by The Enterprise Strategy Group, Inc. All Rights? ....................................................................................................................... 4 Microsoft Private Cloud Fast Track

  9. High Cloud Properties from Three Years of MODIS Terra and Aqua Collection-4 Data over the Tropics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baum, Bryan A.

    High Cloud Properties from Three Years of MODIS Terra and Aqua Collection-4 Data over the Tropics) ABSTRACT This study surveys the optical and microphysical properties of high (ice) clouds over the Tropics on the gridded level-3 cloud products derived from the measurements acquired by the Moderate Resolution Imaging

  10. Microphysical Properties of Single and Mixed-Phase Arctic Clouds Derived from AERI Observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turner, David D.

    2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel new approach to retrieve cloud microphysical properties from mixed-phase clouds is presented. This algorithm retrieves cloud optical depth, ice fraction, and the effective size of the water and ice particles from ground-based, high-resolution infrared radiance observations. The theoretical basis is that the absorption coefficient of ice is stronger than that of liquid water from 10-13 mm, whereas liquid water is more absorbing than ice from 16-25 um. However, due to strong absorption in the rotational water vapor absorption band, the 16-25 um spectral region becomes opaque for significant water vapor burdens (i.e., for precipitable water vapor amounts over approximately 1 cm). The Arctic is characterized by its dry and cold atmosphere, as well as a preponderance of mixed-phase clouds, and thus this approach is applicable to Arctic clouds. Since this approach uses infrared observations, cloud properties are retrieved at night and during the long polar wintertime period. The analysis of the cloud properties retrieved during a 7 month period during the Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic (SHEBA) experiment demonstrates many interesting features. These results show a dependence of the optical depth on cloud phase, differences in the mode radius of the water droplets in liquid-only and mid-phase clouds, a lack of temperature dependence in the ice fraction for temperatures above 240 K, seasonal trends in the optical depth with the clouds being thinner in winter and becoming more optically thick in the late spring, and a seasonal trend in the effective size of the water droplets in liquid-only and mixed-phase clouds that is most likely related to aerosol concentration.

  11. Cluster analysis of cloud properties : a method for diagnosing cloud-climate feedbacks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gordon, Neil D.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to temperature. Thus a k-means clustering algorithm is usedto group cloud regimes. K-means is also an effective toollays out a method whereby a k-means clustering algorithm is

  12. Cloud-Driven Changes in Aerosol Optical Properties - Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ogren, John A.; Sheridan, Patrick S.; Andrews, Elisabeth

    2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The optical properties of aerosol particles are the controlling factors in determining direct aerosol radiative forcing. These optical properties depend on the chemical composition and size distribution of the aerosol particles, which can change due to various processes during the particles’ lifetime in the atmosphere. Over the course of this project we have studied how cloud processing of atmospheric aerosol changes the aerosol optical properties. A counterflow virtual impactor was used to separate cloud drops from interstitial aerosol and parallel aerosol systems were used to measure the optical properties of the interstitial and cloud-scavenged aerosol. Specifically, aerosol light scattering, back-scattering and absorption were measured and used to derive radiatively significant parameters such as aerosol single scattering albedo and backscatter fraction for cloud-scavenged and interstitial aerosol. This data allows us to demonstrate that the radiative properties of cloud-processed aerosol can be quite different than pre-cloud aerosol. These differences can be used to improve the parameterization of aerosol forcing in climate models.

  13. The impact of explicit cloud boundary information on ice cloud microphysical property retrievals from infrared radiances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephens, Graeme L.

    from infrared radiances Steven J. Cooper, Tristan S. L'Ecuyer, and Graeme L. Stephens Department inclusion of explicit cloud boundary information from complementary sensors as well as providing a suite of diagnostic tools for evaluating the dominant sources of uncertainty in all retrieved quantities. Errors

  14. Retrieval of cloud properties using SCIAMACHY on ENVISAT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuligowski, Bob

    ;2 AGENDA 1. Rationale 2. SCIAMACHY and its calibration 3. Algorithms 4. SCIMACHY cloud retrievals 5 Synthetic Aperture Radar (ASAR), operating at C-band, ASAR ensures continuity with the image mode (SAR;13 VICARIOUS CALIBRATION USING MERIS #12;14 MERIS on ENVISAT spacecraft /1.03.2002-present/ · Instrument bands

  15. The Microbase Value-Added Product: A Baseline Retrieval of Cloud Microphysical Properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunn, M; Johnson, K; Jensen, M

    2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility baseline cloud microphysical properties (MICROBASE) value-added product (VAP). MICROBASE uses a combination of millimeter-wavelength cloud radar, microwave radiometer, and radiosonde observations to estimate the vertical profiles of the primary microphysical parameters of clouds including the liquid/ice water content and liquid/ice cloud particle effective radius. MICROBASE is a baseline algorithm designed to apply to most conditions and locations using a single set of parameterizations and a simple determination of water phase based on temperature. This document provides the user of this product with guidelines to assist in determining the accuracy of the product under certain conditions. Quality control flags are designed to identify outliers and indicate instances where the retrieval assumptions may not be met. The overall methodology is described in this report through a detailed description of the input variables, algorithms, and output products.

  16. Solar differential rotation and properties of magnetic clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Georgieva; B. Kirov; E. Gavruseva; J. Javaraiah

    2005-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The most geoeffective solar drivers are magnetic clouds - a subclass of coronal mass ejections (CME's) distinguished by the smooth rotation of the magnetic field inside the structure. The portion of CME's that are magnetic clouds is maximum at sunspot minimum and mimimum at sunspot maximum. This portion is determined by the amount of helicity carried away by CME's which in turn depends on the amount of helicity transferred from the solar interior to the surface, and on the surface differential rotation. The latter can increase or reduce, or even reverse the twist of emerging magnetic flux tubes, thus increasing or reducing the helicity in the corona, or leading to the violation of the hemispheric helicity rule, respectively. We investigate the CME's associated with the major geomagnetic storms in the last solar cycle whose solar sources have been identified, and find that in 10 out of 12 cases of violation of the hemispheric helicity rule or of highly geoeffective CME's with no magnetic field rotation, they originate from regions with "anti-solar" type of surface differential rotation.

  17. Evaluating Global Aerosol Models and Aerosol and Water Vapor Properties Near Clouds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richard A. Ferrare; David D. Turner

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Project goals: (1) Use the routine surface and airborne measurements at the ARM SGP site, and the routine surface measurements at the NSA site, to continue our evaluations of model aerosol simulations; (2) Determine the degree to which the Raman lidar measurements of water vapor and aerosol scattering and extinction can be used to remotely characterize the aerosol humidification factor; (3) Use the high temporal resolution CARL data to examine how aerosol properties vary near clouds; and (4) Use the high temporal resolution CARL and Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) data to quantify entrainment in optically thin continental cumulus clouds.

  18. The Properties of Early-type Stars in the Magellanic Clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christopher J. Evans

    2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The past decade has witnessed impressive progress in our understanding of the physical properties of massive stars in the Magellanic Clouds, and how they compare to their cousins in the Galaxy. I summarise new results in this field, including evidence for reduced mass-loss rates and faster stellar rotational velocities in the Clouds, and their present-day compositions. I also discuss the stellar temperature scale, emphasizing its dependence on metallicity across the entire upper-part of the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram.

  19. DOE/SC-ARM-10-021 STORMVEX: The Storm Peak Lab Cloud Property Validation Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisitingContract Management Fermi SitePARTOffice ofHale Plan24,7,INL is aSC8 CARES:91

  20. Investigation of Thin Cirrus Cloud Optical and Microphysical Properties on the Basis of Satellite Observations and Fast Radiative Transfer Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Chenxi

    2013-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation focuses on the global investigation of optically thin cirrus cloud optical thickness (tau) and microphysical properties, such as, effective particle size (D_(eff)) and ice crystal habits (shapes), based on the global satellite...

  1. Dissertation Lab Dissertation Lab (D-Lab)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Arlington, University of

    Dissertation Lab TLB 5/1/2012 Dissertation Lab (D-Lab) May 29-May 31, 2012 Carlisle Suite, 2nd Floor University Center What is Dissertation Lab (D-Lab)? The Office of Graduate Studies Student Services offers D-Lab to help students progress through the difficult process of writing their dissertation

  2. Using MSG-SEVIRI Cloud Physical Properties and Weather Radar Observations for the Detection of Cb/TCu Clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmeits, Maurice

    . The presence of associated severe weather can be rel- evant to, for example, the transport industry, tourism, the energy supply industry, the construction industry, and farmers. The Cb and TCu clouds may pose a serious Society #12;wind shear, heavy precipitation, and lightning, that is associated with these clouds. Also

  3. Global ice cloud observations: radiative properties and statistics from moderate-resolution imaging spectroradiometer measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyer, Kerry Glynne

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Ice clouds occur quite frequently, yet so much about these clouds is unknown. In recent years, numerous investigations and field campaigns have been focused on the study of ice clouds, all with the ultimate goal of gaining a better understanding...

  4. Evaluating Global Aerosol Models and Aerosol and Water Vapor Properties Near Clouds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turner, David, D.; Ferrare, Richard, A.

    2011-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The 'Evaluating Global Aerosol Models and Aerosol and Water Vapor Properties Near Clouds' project focused extensively on the analysis and utilization of water vapor and aerosol profiles derived from the ARM Raman lidar at the Southern Great Plains ARM site. A wide range of different tasks were performed during this project, all of which improved quality of the data products derived from the lidar or advanced the understanding of atmospheric processes over the site. These activities included: upgrading the Raman lidar to improve its sensitivity; participating in field experiments to validate the lidar aerosol and water vapor retrievals; using the lidar aerosol profiles to evaluate the accuracy of the vertical distribution of aerosols in global aerosol model simulations; examining the correlation between relative humidity and aerosol extinction, and how these change, due to horizontal distance away from cumulus clouds; inferring boundary layer turbulence structure in convective boundary layers from the high-time-resolution lidar water vapor measurements; retrieving cumulus entrainment rates in boundary layer cumulus clouds; and participating in a field experiment that provided data to help validate both the entrainment rate retrievals and the turbulent profiles derived from lidar observations.

  5. Validation of Cloud Properties Derived from GOES-9 Over the ARM TWP Region

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsing Maps toValidatingCloud Properties Derived from GOES-9

  6. OAK 270 - The use of Lidar/radiometer (LIRAD) in the ARM program to obtain optical properties and microphysics of high and midlevel clouds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C.M.R. Platt; R.T. Austin; S.A. Young; and G.L. Stephens

    2002-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

    OAK 270 - The use of Lidar/Radiometer (LIRAD) in the ARM program to obtain optical properties and microphysics of high and midlevel clouds

  7. Cloud Services Cloud Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cloud Services Cloud Services In 2012 UCD IT Services launched an exciting new set of cloud solutions called CloudEdu, which includes cloud servers, cloud storage, cloud hosting and cloud network. The CloudEdu package includes a consultancy service in design, deployment, management and utilisation

  8. A Novel Retrieval Algorithm for Cloud Optical Properties from the Atmopsheric Radiation Measurement Program's Two-Channel Narrow-Field-of-View Radiometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiscombe, Warren J.; Marshak, A.; Chiu, J.-Y. C.; Knyazikhin, Y.; Barnard, James C.; Luo, Yi

    2005-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Cloud optical depth is the most important of all cloud optical properties, and vital for any cloud-radiation parameterization. To estimate cloud optical depth, the atmospheric science community has widely used ground-based flux measurements from either broadband or narrowband radiometers in the past decade. However, this type of technique is limited to overcast conditions and, at best, gives us an "effective" cloud optical depth instead of its "local" value. Unlike flux observations, monochromatic narrow-field-of-view (NFOV) radiance measurements contain information of local cloud properties, but unfortunately, the use of radiance to interpret optical depth suffers from retrieval ambiguity. We have pioneered an algorithm to retrieve cloud optical depth in a fully three-dimensional cloud situation using new Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) ground-based passive two-channel (673 and 870 nm) NFOV measurements. The underlying principle of the algorithm is that these two channels have similar cloud properties but strong spectral contrast in surface reflectance. This algorthm offers the first opportunity to illustrate cloud evolution with high temporal resolution retrievals. A combination of two-channel NFOV radiances with multi-filter rotating shadowband radiometer (MFRSR) fluxes for the retrieval of cloud optical properties is also discussed.

  9. THE MASS DISTRIBUTION AND ASSEMBLY OF THE MILKY WAY FROM THE PROPERTIES OF THE MAGELLANIC CLOUDS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Busha, Michael T.; Marshall, Philip J.; Wechsler, Risa H. [Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Physics Department, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Klypin, Anatoly [Astronomy Department, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM 88003 (United States); Primack, Joel, E-mail: mbusha@physik.uzh.ch, E-mail: pjm@slac.stanford.edu, E-mail: rwechsler@stanford.edu, E-mail: aklypin@nmsu.edu, E-mail: joel@ucsc.edu [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)

    2011-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a new measurement of the mass of the Milky Way (MW) based on observed properties of its largest satellite galaxies, the Magellanic Clouds (MCs), and an assumed prior of a {Lambda}CDM universe. The large, high-resolution Bolshoi cosmological simulation of this universe provides a means to statistically sample the dynamical properties of bright satellite galaxies in a large population of dark matter halos. The observed properties of the MCs, including their circular velocity, distance from the center of the MW, and velocity within the MW halo, are used to evaluate the likelihood that a given halo would have each or all of these properties; the posterior probability distribution function (PDF) for any property of the MW system can thus be constructed. This method provides a constraint on the MW virial mass, 1.2{sup +0.7}{sub -0.4} (stat.){sup +0.3}{sub -0.3} (sys.) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 12} M{sub Sun} (68% confidence), which is consistent with recent determinations that involve very different assumptions. In addition, we calculate the posterior PDF for the density profile of the MW and its satellite accretion history. Although typical satellites of 10{sup 12} M{sub Sun} halos are accreted over a wide range of epochs over the last 10 Gyr, we find a {approx}72% probability that the MCs were accreted within the last Gyr, and a 50% probability that they were accreted together.

  10. Modelling Cloud Computing Infrastructure Marianne Hickey and Maher Rahmouni,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Modelling Cloud Computing Infrastructure Marianne Hickey and Maher Rahmouni, HP Labs, Long Down, and shared vocabularies. Keywords: Modelling, Cloud Computing, RDF, Ontology, Rules, Validation 1 Introduction There is currently a shift towards cloud computing, which changes the model of provision

  11. Anomalous magnetosheath properties during Earth passage of an interplanetary magnetic cloud

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farrugia, C.J. [Univ. of Malta, Msida (Malta)] [Univ. of Malta, Msida (Malta); Erkaev, N.V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Krasnoyarsk (Russian Federation)] [Russian Academy of Sciences, Krasnoyarsk (Russian Federation); Burlaga, L.F. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States)] [and others] [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States); and others

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work the authors present a model for the behavior of the magnetosheath during the passage of the earth thru an interplanetary magnetic cloud. They study the variation of plasma flow and field values as a result of this encounter. The unique feature of such encounters is that they present substantial changes in the solar wind conditions along the bow shock and magnetopause for periods of 1 to 2 days. The mach number upstream of the bow shock can be as low as 3, compared to normal value of 8 to 10. The mach number and magnetic shear across the magnetopause have a major impact on the magnetosheath properties. The authors use the encounter of January 14-15, 1988, as a basis for their model, and apply ideal MHD equations, by means of a boundary layer technique, to study changes in field and plasma flow patterns.

  12. Development and testing of parameterizations for continental and tropical ice cloud microphysical and radiative properties in GCM and mesoscale models. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heymsfield, A.

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall purpose of this research was to exploit measurements in clouds sampled during several field programs, especially from experiments in tropical regions, in a four-component study to develop and validate cloud parameterizations for general circulation models, emphasizing ice clouds. The components were: (1) parameterization of basic properties of mid- and upper-tropospheric clouds, such as condensed water content, primarily with respect to cirrus from tropical areas; (2) the second component was to develop parameterizations which express cloud radiative properties in terms of basic cloud microphysical properties, dealing primarily with tropical oceanic cirrus clouds and continental thunderstorm anvils, but also including altocumulus clouds; (3) the third component was to validate the parameterizations through use of ground-based measurements calibrated using existing and planned in-situ measurements of cloud microphysical properties and bulk radiative properties, as well as time-resolved data collected over extended periods of time; (4) the fourth component was to implement the parameterizations in the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) community climate model (CCM) II or in the NOAA-GFDL model (by L. Donner GFDL) and to perform sensitivity studies.

  13. Retrieval of optical and microphysical properties of ice clouds using Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) data 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kinney, Jacqueline Anne

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The research presented here retrieves the cloud optical thickness and particle effective size of cirrus clouds using surface radiation measurements obtained during the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) field campaign. The algorithm used...

  14. Evaluation of AIRS cloud properties using MPACE data Xuebao Wu,1,2,3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Jun

    024400. 1. Introduction [2] Clouds play an important role in the Earth's regional and global radiation pressure (CTP) and effective cloud amount (ECA) are determined from AIRS CO2 absorption channels between the anticipated changes in trace gases, aerosols, or other factors associated with global change. Cloud parameters

  15. Ground-based All-sky Mid-infrared and Visible Imagery for Purposes of Characterizing Cloud Properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klebe, Dimitri; Blatherwick, R. D.; Morris, Victor R.

    2014-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the All Sky Infrared Visible Analyzer (ASIVA), a multi-purpose visible and infrared sky imaging and analysis instrument whose primary functionality is to provide radiometrically calibrated imagery in the mid-infrared (mid-IR) atmospheric window. This functionality enables the determination of diurnal hemispherical cloud fraction (HCF) and estimates of sky/cloud temperature from which one can derive estimates of cloud emissivity and cloud height. This paper describes the calibration methods and performance of the ASIVA instrument with particular emphasis on data products being developed for the meteorological community. Data presented here were collected during a field campaign conducted at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) Climate Research Facility from May 21 to July 27, 2009. The purpose of this campaign was to determine the efficacy of IR technology in providing reliable nighttime HCF data. Significant progress has been made in the analysis of the campaign data over the past several years and the ASIVA has proven to be an excellent instrument for determining HCF as well as several other important cloud properties.

  16. Evolutionary Stages and Disk Properties of Young Stellar Objects in the Perseus Cloud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Hong-Xin; Fang, Min; Yuan, Hai-Bo; Zhao, Yinghe; Chang, Ruixiang; Jiang, Xuejian; Liu, Xiao-Wei; Luo, A-Li; Ma, Hongjun; Shao, Zhengyi; Wang, Xiaolong

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigated the evolutionary stages and disk properties of 211 Young stellar objects (YSOs) across the Perseus cloud by modeling the broadband optical to mid-infrared (IR) spectral energy distribution (SED). By exploring the relationships among the turnoff wave bands lambda_turnoff (longward of which significant IR excesses above the stellar photosphere are observed), the excess spectral index alpha_excess at lambda = 5.8 microns, whereas the median fractional dust luminosities L_dust/L_star tend to decrease with lambda_turnoff. This points to an inside-out disk clearing of small dust grains. Moreover, a positive correlation between alpha_excess and R_in was found at alpha_excess > ~0 and R_in > ~10 $\\times$ the dust sublimation radius R_sub, irrespective of lambda_turnoff, L_dust/L_star and disk flaring. This suggests that the outer disk flaring either does not evolve synchronously with the inside-out disk clearing or has little influence on alpha_excess shortward of 24 microns. About 23% of our YSO disk...

  17. At this meeting: Oral presentation: Cloud Properties From (A)ATSR (Caroline Poulsen)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oxford, University of

    sensors including radars, an infrared and microwave sounder unit, and microwave radiometer integrated vertically over each layer separated by cloud base. This strategy makes it possible to evaluate. Recent progress in satellite sensor technology, exempli- fied by hyperspectral sounders and cloud

  18. The Radiative Properties of Small Clouds: Multi-Scale Observations and Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feingold, Graham [NOAA ESRL; McComiskey, Allison [CIRES, University of Colorado

    2013-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Warm, liquid clouds and their representation in climate models continue to represent one of the most significant unknowns in climate sensitivity and climate change. Our project combines ARM observations, LES modeling, and satellite imagery to characterize shallow clouds and the role of aerosol in modifying their radiative effects.

  19. Verifiable Resource Accounting for Cloud Computing Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maniatis, Petros

    Verifiable Resource Accounting for Cloud Computing Services Vyas Sekar Intel Labs Petros Maniatis Intel Labs ABSTRACT Cloud computing offers users the potential to reduce operating and capital expenses cause providers to incorrectly attribute resource consumption to customers or im- plicitly bear

  20. Use of airs and modis thermal infrared channels to retrieve ice cloud properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yost, Christopher Rogers

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study, we use thermal infrared channels to retrieve the optical thickness and effective particle radius of ice clouds. A physical model is used in conjunction with Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) temperature and water vapor profiles...

  1. Use of airs and modis thermal infrared channels to retrieve ice cloud properties 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yost, Christopher Rogers

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study, we use thermal infrared channels to retrieve the optical thickness and effective particle radius of ice clouds. A physical model is used in conjunction with Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) temperature and water vapor profiles...

  2. Global Distribution and Climate Forcing of Marine Organic Aerosol - Part 2: Effects on Cloud Properties and Radiative Forcing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gantt, Brett; Xu, Jun; Meskhidze, N.; Zhang, Yang; Nenes, Athanasios; Ghan, Steven J.; Liu, Xiaohong; Easter, Richard C.; Zaveri, Rahul A.

    2012-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of simulations with the Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (CAM5) with a 7-mode Modal Aerosol Model were conducted to assess the changes in cloud microphysical properties and radiative forcing resulting from marine organic aerosols. Model simulations show that the anthropogenic aerosol indirect forcing (AIF) predicted by CAM5 is decreased in absolute magnitude by up to 0.09 Wm{sup -2} (7 %) when marine organic aerosols are included. Changes in the AIF from marine organic aerosols are associated with small global increases in low-level incloud droplet number concentration and liquid water path of 1.3 cm{sup -3} (1.5 %) and 0.22 gm{sup -2} (0.5 %), respectively. Areas especially sensitive to changes in cloud properties due to marine organic aerosol include the Southern Ocean, North Pacific Ocean, and North Atlantic Ocean, all of which are characterized by high marine organic emission rates. As climate models are particularly sensitive to the background aerosol concentration, this small but non-negligible change in the AIF due to marine organic aerosols provides a notable link for ocean-ecosystem marine low-level cloud interactions and may be a candidate for consideration in future earth system models.

  3. FINAL REPORT FOR THE DOE/ARM PROJECT TITLED Representation of the Microphysical and Radiative Properties of Ice Clouds in SCMs and GCMs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mitchell, David L.

    2005-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The broad goal of this research is to improve climate prediction through better representation of cirrus cloud microphysical and radiative properties in global climate models (GCMs). Clouds still represent the greatest source of uncertainty in climate prediction, and the representation of ice clouds is considerably more challenging than liquid water clouds. While about 40% of cloud condensate may be in the form of ice by some estimates, there have been no credible means of representing the ice particle size distribution and mass removal rates from ice clouds in GCMs. Both factors introduce large uncertainties regarding the global net flux, the latter factor alone producing a change of 10 W/m2 in the global net flux due to plausible changes in effective ice particle fallspeed. In addition, the radiative properties of ice crystals themselves are in question. This research provides GCMs with a credible means of representing the full (bimodal) ice particle size distribution (PSD) in ice clouds, including estimates of the small crystal (D < 65 microns) mode of the PSD. It also provides realistic estimates of mass sedimentation rates from ice clouds, which have a strong impact on their ice contents and radiative properties. This can be done through proper analysis of ice cloud microphysical data from ARM and other field campaigns. In addition, this research tests the ice cloud radiation treatment developed under two previous ARM projects by comparing it against laboratory measurements of ice cloud extinction efficiency and by comparing it with explicit theoretical calculations of ice crystal optical properties. The outcome of this project includes two PSD schemes for ice clouds; one appropriate for mid-latitude cirrus clouds and another for tropical anvil cirrus. Cloud temperature and ice water content (IWC) are the inputs for these PSD schemes, which are based on numerous PSD observations. The temperature dependence of the small crystal mode of the PSD for tropical anvils is opposite to that of mid-latitude cirrus, and this results in very different radiative properties for these two types of cirrus at temperatures less than about 50 C for a given ice water path. In addition, the representative PSD fall velocity is strongly influenced by the small crystal mode, and for temperatures less than 52 C, this fall velocity for mid-latitude cirrus is 2-8 times greater than for tropical anvil cirrus. Finally, the treatment of ice cloud optical properties was found to agree with laboratory measurements and exact theory within 15% for any given wavelength, PSD and ice particle shape. This treatment is analytical, formulated in terms of the PSD and ice particle shape properties. It thus provides the means for explicitly coupling the ice cloud microphysical and radiative properties, and can treat any combination of ice particle shape. It is very inexpensive regarding computer time. When these three deliverables were incorporated into the GCM at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) under another project, it was found that the sunlight reflected and the amount of upwelling heat absorbed by cirrus clouds depended strongly on the PSD scheme used (i.e. mid-latitude or tropical anvil). This was largely due to the fall velocities associated with the two PSD schemes, although the PSD shape was also important.

  4. Retrieval of optical and microphysical properties of ice clouds using Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kinney, Jacqueline Anne

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    is based on a method proposed by Yang et al. (2005). The research examines single-layer ice clouds in the midlatitude and polar regions. The retrieved information in the midlatitudes is then verified using retrievals from the Moderate-resolution Imaging...

  5. Study of cloud properties from single-scattering, radiative forcing, and retrieval perspectives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Yong-Keun

    2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    radiances at the top-of-atmosphere under clear-sky conditions on the basis of the data acquired by the Cloud and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) instrument onboard the NASA Terra satellite platform. Based on the comparison of the observed broadband...

  6. Lab Validation Workload Performance Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaudhuri, Surajit

    data center technology products for companies of all types and sizes. ESG Lab reports are not meant areas needing improvement. ESG Lab's expert third-party perspective is based on our own hands-on testing.....................................................................................................................................................15 All trademark names are property of their respective companies. Information contained

  7. Sunlight Changes Aerosols in Clouds | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sunlight Changes Aerosols in Clouds Sunlight Changes Aerosols in Clouds Released: October 20, 2011 Scientists show how sunlight alters optical, chemical properties of atmospheric...

  8. Electron-Cloud Build-Up: Summary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Furman, M.A.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Properties In?uencing Electron Cloud Phenomena,” Appl. Surf.Dissipation of the Electron Cloud,” Proc. PAC03 (Portland,is no signi?cant electron-cloud under nominal operating

  9. The effects of small ice crystals on the infrared radiative properties of cirrus clouds. Semiannual status report, 1 October 1989-31 March 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Takano, Y.; Liou, K.N.; Asano, S.; Heymsfield, A.; Minnis, P.

    1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To be successful in the development of satellite retrieval methodologies for the determination of cirrus cloud properties, fundamental scattering and absorption data on nonspherical ice crystals that are found in cirrus clouds must be available. Recent aircraft observations (Platt et al.) reveal that there is a large amount of small ice particles, on the order of 10 micron, in cirrus clouds. Thus it is important to explore the potential differences in the scattering and absorption properties of ice crystals with respect to their sizes and shapes. In this study the effects of nonspherical small ice crystals on the infrared radiative properties of cirrus clouds are investigated using light scattering properties of spheroidal particles. In Section 2, using the anomalous diffraction theory for spheres and results from the exact spheroid scattering program, efficient parameterization equations are developed for calculations of the scattering and absorption properties for small ice crystals. Parameterization formulas are also developed for large ice crystals using results computed from the geometric ray-tracing technique and the Fraunhofer diffraction theory for spheroids and hexagonal crystals. This is presented in Section 3. Finally, applications to the satellite remote sensing are described in Section 4.

  10. Detecting Cirrus-Overlapping-Water Clouds and Retrieving their Optical Properties Using MODIS Data

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration wouldDECOMPOSITIONPortalToDepthandCirrus-Overlapping-Water Clouds and

  11. TechLab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    TechLab Inside the Museum Exhibitions Norris Bradbury Museum Lobby Defense Gallery Research Gallery History Gallery TechLab Virtual Exhibits invisible utility element TechLab...

  12. Investigation of the Dynamical, Macrophysical and Radiative Properties of High Clouds Combining Satellite Observations and Climate Model Simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Yue

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation investigates three topics concerning high clouds: 1) convectively coupled equatorial wave (CCEW) signals derived from cloud top temperature (CTT) and cirrus optical thickness retrieved from satellite observations; 2) investigation...

  13. Using multi-angle, multispectral photo-polarimetry of the NASA Glory mission to constrain optical properties of aerosols and clouds: Results from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Using multi-angle, multispectral photo-polarimetry of the NASA Glory mission to constrain optical Sensor (APS) for the determination of aerosol and cloud properties and a Total Irradiance Monitor (TIM (IFOV)instrument. The APS sensor will provide high-precision measurements of the total and polarized

  14. Sensitivity of photolysis frequencies and key tropospheric oxidants in a global model to cloud vertical distributions and optical properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Hongyu

    in the tropical upper troposphere. We find that the radiative impact of clouds on global photolysis frequencies(O1 D), J(NO2)) due to the radiative effects of clouds in June are about 0.0% (0.4%, 0.9%), 0.8% (1Sensitivity of photolysis frequencies and key tropospheric oxidants in a global model to cloud

  15. Study of Ice Cloud Properties from Synergetic Use of Satellite Observations and Modeling Capabilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, Yu

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The dissertation first investigates the single-scattering properties of inhomogeneous ice crystals containing air bubbles. Specifically, a combination of the ray-tracing technique and the Monte Carlo method is used to simulate the scattering...

  16. Study of Ice Cloud Properties from Synergetic Use of Satellite Observations and Modeling Capabilities 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, Yu

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    -12 hexagonal plates. The scattering properties of an individual aggregate ice particle are computed using the discrete dipole approximation or an Improved Geometric Optics Method, depending upon the size parameter. The aggregate model provides an accurate...

  17. The close binary properties of massive stars in the Milky Way and low-metallicity Magellanic Clouds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moe, Maxwell; Di Stefano, Rosanne, E-mail: mmoe@cfa.harvard.edu [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, MS-10, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to understand the rates and properties of Type Ia and Type Ib/c supernovae, X-ray binaries, gravitational wave sources, and gamma-ray bursts as a function of galactic environment and cosmic age, it is imperative that we measure how the close binary properties of O- and B-type stars vary with metallicity. We have studied eclipsing binaries with early B main-sequence primaries in three galaxies with different metallicities: the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds (LMC and SMC, respectively) and the Milky Way (MW). The observed fractions of early B stars that exhibit deep eclipses 0.25 < ?m (mag) < 0.65 and orbital periods 2 < P (days) < 20 in the MW, LMC, and SMC span a narrow range of (0.7-1.0)%, which is a model-independent result. After correcting for geometrical selection effects and incompleteness toward low-mass companions, we find for early B stars in all three environments (1) a close binary fraction of (22 ± 5)% across orbital periods 2 < P (days) < 20 and mass ratios q = M {sub 2}/M {sub 1} > 0.1, (2) an intrinsic orbital period distribution slightly skewed toward shorter periods relative to a distribution that is uniform in log P, (3) a mass-ratio distribution weighted toward low-mass companions, and (4) a small, nearly negligible excess fraction of twins with q > 0.9. Our fitted parameters derived for the MW eclipsing binaries match the properties inferred from nearby, early-type spectroscopic binaries, which further validates our results. There are no statistically significant trends with metallicity, demonstrating that the close binary properties of massive stars do not vary across metallicities –0.7 < log(Z/Z {sub ?}) < 0.0 beyond the measured uncertainties.

  18. First observations of tracking clouds using scanning ARM cloud radars

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Borque, Paloma; Giangrande, Scott; Kollias, Pavlos

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tracking clouds using scanning cloud radars can help to document the temporal evolution of cloud properties well before large drop formation (‘‘first echo’’). These measurements complement cloud and precipitation tracking using geostationary satellites and weather radars. Here, two-dimensional (2-D) Along-Wind Range Height Indicator (AW-RHI) observations of a population of shallow cumuli (with and without precipitation) from the 35-GHz scanning ARM cloud radar (SACR) at the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM) program Southern Great Plains (SGP) site are presented. Observations from the ARM SGP network of scanning precipitation radars are used to provide the larger scale context of the cloud fieldmore »and to highlight the advantages of the SACR to detect the numerous, small, non-precipitating cloud elements. A new Cloud Identification and Tracking Algorithm (CITA) is developed to track cloud elements. In CITA, a cloud element is identified as a region having a contiguous set of pixels exceeding a preset reflectivity and size threshold. The high temporal resolution of the SACR 2-D observations (30 sec) allows for an area superposition criteria algorithm to match cloud elements at consecutive times. Following CITA, the temporal evolution of cloud element properties (number, size, and maximum reflectivity) is presented. The vast majority of the designated elements during this cumulus event were short-lived non-precipitating clouds having an apparent life cycle shorter than 15 minutes. The advantages and disadvantages of cloud tracking using an SACR are discussed.« less

  19. First observations of tracking clouds using scanning ARM cloud radars

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Borque, Paloma [McGill Univ., Montreal, QC (Canada); Giangrande, Scott [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Kollias, Pavlos [McGill Univ., Montreal, QC (Canada)

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tracking clouds using scanning cloud radars can help to document the temporal evolution of cloud properties well before large drop formation (‘‘first echo’’). These measurements complement cloud and precipitation tracking using geostationary satellites and weather radars. Here, two-dimensional (2-D) Along-Wind Range Height Indicator (AW-RHI) observations of a population of shallow cumuli (with and without precipitation) from the 35-GHz scanning ARM cloud radar (SACR) at the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM) program Southern Great Plains (SGP) site are presented. Observations from the ARM SGP network of scanning precipitation radars are used to provide the larger scale context of the cloud field and to highlight the advantages of the SACR to detect the numerous, small, non-precipitating cloud elements. A new Cloud Identification and Tracking Algorithm (CITA) is developed to track cloud elements. In CITA, a cloud element is identified as a region having a contiguous set of pixels exceeding a preset reflectivity and size threshold. The high temporal resolution of the SACR 2-D observations (30 sec) allows for an area superposition criteria algorithm to match cloud elements at consecutive times. Following CITA, the temporal evolution of cloud element properties (number, size, and maximum reflectivity) is presented. The vast majority of the designated elements during this cumulus event were short-lived non-precipitating clouds having an apparent life cycle shorter than 15 minutes. The advantages and disadvantages of cloud tracking using an SACR are discussed.

  20. Atmosphere and Ocean: Earth's Heat Engine: GFD Lab notes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atmosphere and Ocean: Earth's Heat Engine: GFD Lab notes 18 May 2012 UW Hon220c Energy' of water vapor, CO2 and cloud, makes us much warmer than a Marsian (almost no atmosphere. -550C average 2002 clouds, snow, ice, deserts are bright absorbing areas are dark

  1. The effect of ice crystal surface roughness on the retrieval of ice cloud microphysical and optical properties 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, Yu

    2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    on the retrieval of ice cloud effective particle size, optical thickness and cloud-top temperature. Three particle surface conditions, smooth, moderately rough and deeply rough, are considered in the visible and near-infrared channels (0.65 and 3.75 Ã...

  2. Lab Astrophysics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > The Energy MaterialsFeatured Videos >> spaceTutorialsLab

  3. The Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening a solidSynthesis of 2Dand WaterThe Future isThe IronThe Lab The

  4. Cloud Computing and Distributed Systems Laboratory DEPT. OF COMPUTER SCIENCE AND SOFTWARE ENGINEERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Melbourne, University of

    Cloud Computing and Distributed Systems Laboratory DEPT. OF COMPUTER SCIENCE AND SOFTWARE ENGINEERING THE UNIVERSITY OF MELBOURNE, AUSTRALIA The Cloud Computing and Distributed Systems (CLOUDS in 2008 by the CLOUDS lab at the University of Melbourne, facilitates the realization of the above vision

  5. A survey on vehicular cloud computing Md Whaiduzzaman a,n

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Melbourne, University of

    A survey on vehicular cloud computing Md Whaiduzzaman a,n , Mehdi Sookhak a , Abdullah Gani a , Rajkumar Buyya b a Mobile Cloud Computing Research Lab, Faculty of Computer Science & Information control Intelligent transportation systems Cloud computing Vehicular cloud computing a b s t r a c

  6. PHOTOMETRIC AND SPECTROSCOPIC PROPERTIES OF NOVAE IN THE LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shafter, A. W. [Department of Astronomy, San Diego State University, San Diego, CA 92182 (United States)

    2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The photometric and spectroscopic properties of the 43 known LMC nova candidates are summarized and reviewed. Of these, photometric data sufficient to establish decline rates are available for 29 novae, while spectroscopic data sufficient to establish the spectroscopic classes are available for 18 systems. Half of the 18 novae belong to the Fe II class, with the remaining nine belonging to either the He/N or the Fe IIb classes. As seen in previous nova studies of M31 and M33, the He/N and Fe IIb novae have on average faster photometric developments than do their Fe II counterparts. Overall, the available photometry confirms earlier studies, and shows conclusively that LMC novae have faster rates of decline than do novae in the Galaxy and M31. It appears that the increased fraction of faster, He/N and Fe IIb novae observed in the LMC compared with M31 is almost certainly the result of differences in the underlying stellar population between the two galaxies. We propose that the younger population seen in the LMC compared with M31's bulge (where most of the novae are found), produces progenitor binaries with higher average white dwarf masses. The higher mean white dwarf mass not only produces a larger fraction of fast, He/N novae compared with M31, but also results in a relatively large recurrent nova population.

  7. Lab Validation Microsoft Windows Server 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaudhuri, Surajit

    data center technology products for companies of all types and sizes. ESG Lab reports are not meant areas needing improvement. ESG Lab's expert third-party perspective is based on our own hands-on testing.....................................................................................................................................................22 All trademark names are property of their respective companies. Information contained

  8. Lab Validation Microsoft Windows Server 2012 with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaudhuri, Surajit

    data center technology products for companies of all types and sizes. ESG Lab reports are not meant areas needing improvement. ESG Lab's expert third-party perspective is based on our own hands-on testing.....................................................................................................................................................16 All trademark names are property of their respective companies. Information contained

  9. THE BLAST SURVEY OF THE VELA MOLECULAR CLOUD: DYNAMICAL PROPERTIES OF THE DENSE CORES IN VELA-D

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olmi, Luca [Physics Department, University of Puerto Rico, Rio Piedras Campus, Box 23343, UPR station, San Juan (Puerto Rico); Angles-Alcazar, Daniel [Department of Physics, University of Arizona, 1118 E. Fourth Street, P.O. Box 210081, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); De Luca, Massimo [LERMA-LRA, UMR 8112 du CNRS, Observatoire de Paris, Ecole Normale Superieure, UPMC and UCP, 24 rue Lhomond, 75231 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Elia, Davide [Istituto di Fisica dello Spazio Interplanetario-INAF, via Fosso del Cavaliere 100, I-00133 Roma (Italy); Giannini, Teresa; Lorenzetti, Dario [Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma-INAF, Via Frascati 33, I-00040 Monteporzio Catone, Roma (Italy); Massi, Fabrizio [Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri-INAF, Largo E. Fermi 5, I-50125, Firenze (Italy); Martin, Peter G. [Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 60 St. George Street, Toronto, ON M5S 3H8 (Canada); Strafella, Francesco, E-mail: olmi.luca@gmail.co, E-mail: olmi@arcetri.astro.i [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita del Salento, CP 193, I-73100 Lecce (Italy)

    2010-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The Vela-D region, according to the nomenclature given by Murphy and May, of the star-forming complex known as the Vela molecular ridge (VMR), has recently been analyzed in detail by Olmi, who studied the physical properties of 141 pre- and proto-stellar cold dust cores, detected by the Balloon-borne Large-Aperture Submillimeter Telescope (BLAST) during a much larger (55 deg{sup 2}) Galactic plane survey encompassing the whole VMR. This survey's primary goal was to identify the coldest dense dust cores possibly associated with the earliest phases of star formation. In this work, the dynamical state of the Vela-D cores is analyzed. Comparison to dynamical masses of a sub-sample of the Vela-D cores estimated from the {sup 13}CO survey of Elia is complicated by the fact that the {sup 13}CO linewidths are likely to trace the lower density intercore material, in addition to the dense gas associated with the compact cores observed by BLAST. In fact, the total internal pressure of these cores, if estimated using the {sup 13}CO linewidths, appears to be higher than the cloud ambient pressure. If this were the case, then self-gravity and surface pressure would be insufficient to bind these cores and an additional source of external confinement (e.g., magnetic field pressure) would be required. However, if one attempts to scale down the {sup 13}CO linewidths, according to the observations of high-density tracers in a small sample of sources, then most proto-stellar cores would be effectively gravitationally bound.

  10. The effect of ice crystal surface roughness on the retrieval of ice cloud microphysical and optical properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, Yu

    2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of the surface roughness of ice crystals is not routinely accounted for in current cloud retrieval algorithms that are based on pre-computed lookup libraries. In this study, we investigate the effect of ice crystal surface roughness...

  11. Final Technical Report for "Ice nuclei relation to aerosol properties: Data analysis and model parameterization for IN in mixed-phase clouds"� (DOE/SC00002354)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul J. DeMott, Anthony J. Prenni; Sonia M. Kreidenweis

    2012-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Clouds play an important role in weather and climate. In addition to their key role in the hydrologic cycle, clouds scatter incoming solar radiation and trap infrared radiation from the surface and lower atmosphere. Despite their importance, feedbacks involving clouds remain as one of the largest sources of uncertainty in climate models. To better simulate cloud processes requires better characterization of cloud microphysical processes, which can affect the spatial extent, optical depth and lifetime of clouds. To this end, we developed a new parameterization to be used in numerical models that describes the variation of ice nuclei (IN) number concentrations active to form ice crystals in mixed-phase (water droplets and ice crystals co-existing) cloud conditions as these depend on existing aerosol properties and temperature. The parameterization is based on data collected using the Colorado State University continuous flow diffusion chamber in aircraft and ground-based campaigns over a 14-year period, including data from the DOE-supported Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment. The resulting relationship is shown to more accurately represent the variability of ice nuclei distributions in the atmosphere compared to currently used parameterizations based on temperature alone. When implemented in one global climate model, the new parameterization predicted more realistic annually averaged cloud water and ice distributions, and cloud radiative properties, especially for sensitive higher latitude mixed-phase cloud regions. As a test of the new global IN scheme, it was compared to independent data collected during the 2008 DOE-sponsored Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC). Good agreement with this new data set suggests the broad applicability of the new scheme for describing general (non-chemically specific) aerosol influences on IN number concentrations feeding mixed-phase Arctic stratus clouds. Finally, the parameterization was implemented into a regional cloud-resolving model to compare predictions of ice crystal concentrations and other cloud properties to those observed in two intensive case studies of Arctic stratus during ISDAC. Our implementation included development of a prognostic scheme of ice activation using the IN parameterization so that the most realistic treatment of ice nuclei, including their budget (gains and losses), was achieved. Many cloud microphysical properties and cloud persistence were faithfully reproduced, despite a tendency to under-predict (by a few to several times) ice crystal number concentrations and cloud ice mass, in agreement with some other studies. This work serves generally as the basis for improving predictive schemes for cloud ice crystal activation in cloud and climate models, and more specifically as the basis for such a scheme to be used in a Multi-scale Modeling Format (MMF) that utilizes a connected system of cloud-resolving models on a global grid in an effort to better resolve cloud processes and their influence on climate.

  12. Generated using version 3.0 of the official AMS LATEX template Computing and Partitioning Cloud Feedbacks using Cloud1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hartmann, Dennis

    by adjusting the change in cloud radiative forcing for non-cloud22 related effects as in Soden et al. (2008 planet, the global and annual mean effect40 of clouds at the top of atmosphere (TOA) is to increase Feedbacks using Cloud1 Property Histograms.2 Part I: Cloud Radiative Kernels3 Mark D. Zelinka Department

  13. Cloud Computing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pete Beckman and Ian Foster

    2009-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Chicago Matters: Beyond Burnham (WTTW). Chicago has become a world center of "cloud computing." Argonne experts Pete Beckman and Ian Foster explain what "cloud computing" is and how you probably already use it on a daily basis.

  14. Cloud Computing and Distributed Systems Laboratory and the Cloudbus Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buyya, Rajkumar

    .0 software and filed an international Patent (PCT) application. · Members of CLOUDS Lab have authored 57 at international conferences held in Germany, Australia, China, India, and Brazil. · The Lab successfully hostedD students) from USA, Spain, India, Malaysia, and Brazil. · Received "2009 Outstanding Paper Award" from IEEE

  15. Retrieval of Cloud Microphysical Properties from MODIS and AIRS JUN LI,* HUNG-LUNG HUANG,* CHIAN-YI LIU,* PING YANG, TIMOTHY J. SCHMIT,# HELI WEI,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Jun

    ). Because clouds have such a large effect on the earth's radiation budget, even small changes), and effective cloud amount during both the daytime and the nighttime, as well as cloud particle size (CPS radiative transfer model for AIRS that accounts for cloud scattering and absorption is described

  16. 6 Enterprise information risk management: Dealing with cloud computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pym, David J.

    6 Enterprise information risk management: Dealing with cloud computing Adrian Baldwin HP Labs for the enterprise risk and security management lifecycle. Specifically, the economies of scale that large providers federated assurance for the cloud. 6.1 Introduction Managing IT risks remains a significant challenge

  17. Instrument Development Lab | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fabrication Circuit boards Component integration Custom enclosures Microfabrication 3D Printing Facilities and equipment Fully equipped electronics development lab Equipment...

  18. Jefferson Lab awards upgrade contracts | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12 InvestigationLabNewLabLabbeginawards upgrade

  19. Workshop on Distributed Cloud Computing Dresden, Germany

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmid, Stefan

    DCC 2013 Workshop on Distributed Cloud Computing Dresden, Germany December 9-12, 2013 (Submission Pan Hui, HKUST, Hong Kong Wolfgang Kellerer, TU Munich, Germany Ruben Montero, Uni Complutense de Waterloo, Canada Marco Canini, T-Labs & TU Berlin, Germany Paolo Costa, MSR & Imperial College, UK Xiaoming

  20. Proof of Concept: Cloud Condensation Nucleus Counter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delene, David J.

    North Dakota project. The solid circle is the mean value, the horizontal line is the 50th percentile Price High Price #12;Research Applications · One commercially available cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) counter. · Available since 2002 · Sold over 100 Units, Mostly Labs · Price is Approximately $70

  1. Analysis of Cloud-resolving Simulations of a Tropical Mesoscale Convective System Observed during TWP-ICE: Vertical Fluxes and Draft Properties in Convective and Stratiform Regions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mrowiec, Agnieszka A.; Rio, Catherine; Fridlind, Ann; Ackerman, Andrew; Del Genio, Anthony D.; Pauluis, Olivier; Varble, Adam; Fan, Jiwen

    2012-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze three cloud-resolving model simulations of a strong convective event observed during the TWP-ICE campaign, differing in dynamical core, microphysical scheme or both. Based on simulated and observed radar reflectivity, simulations roughly reproduce observed convective and stratiform precipitating areas. To identify the characteristics of convective and stratiform drafts that are difficult to observe but relevant to climate model parameterization, independent vertical wind speed thresholds are calculated to capture 90% of total convective and stratiform updraft and downdraft mass fluxes. Convective updrafts are fairly consistent across simulations (likely owing to fixed large-scale forcings and surface conditions), except that hydrometeor loadings differ substantially. Convective downdraft and stratiform updraft and downdraft mass fluxes vary notably below the melting level, but share similar vertically uniform draft velocities despite differing hydrometeor loadings. All identified convective and stratiform downdrafts contain precipitation below ~10 km and nearly all updrafts are cloudy above the melting level. Cold pool properties diverge substantially in a manner that is consistent with convective downdraft mass flux differences below the melting level. Despite differences in hydrometeor loadings and cold pool properties, convective updraft and downdraft mass fluxes are linearly correlated with convective area, the ratio of ice in downdrafts to that in updrafts is ~0.5 independent of species, and the ratio of downdraft to updraft mass flux is ~0.5-0.6, which may represent a minimum evaporation efficiency under moist conditions. Hydrometeor loading in stratiform regions is found to be a fraction of hydrometeor loading in convective regions that ranges from ~10% (graupel) to ~90% (cloud ice). These findings may lead to improved convection parameterizations.

  2. Arctic Mixed-Phase Cloud Properties Derived from Surface-Based Sensors at SHEBA MATTHEW D. SHUPE AND SERGEY Y. MATROSOV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shupe, Matthew

    , cloud-top liquid layer from which ice particles formed and fell, although deep, multilayered mixed-phase. These values are all larger than those found in single-phase ice clouds at SHEBA. Vertically resolved cloud phases can coexist is in question. A re- view of model parameterizations shows the lower tem- perature

  3. Cloud Properties Working Group Low Clouds Update

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t zManufacturing:DOE NationalCommittee of

  4. Generated using version 3.0 of the official AMS LATEX template Computing and Partitioning Cloud Feedbacks using Cloud1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hartmann, Dennis

    Generated using version 3.0 of the official AMS LATEX template Computing and Partitioning Cloud Feedbacks using Cloud1 Property Histograms.2 Part II: Attribution to the Nature of Cloud Changes3 Mark D-103 Livermore, CA 94551 E-mail: zelinka1@llnl.gov 1 #12;ABSTRACT7 Cloud radiative kernels

  5. Using Radar, Lidar and Radiometer Data from NSA and SHEBA to Quantify Cloud Property Effects on the Surface Heat Budget in the Arctic

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Janet Intrieri; Mathhew Shupe

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cloud and radiation data from two distinctly different Arctic areas are analyzed to study the differences between coastal Alaskan and open Arctic Ocean region clouds and their respective influence on the surface radiation budget. The cloud and radiation datasets were obtained from (1) the DOE North Slope of Alaska (NSA) facility in the coastal town of Barrow, Alaska, and (2) the SHEBA field program, which was conducted from an icebreaker frozen in, and drifting with, the sea-ice for one year in the Western Arctic Ocean. Radar, lidar, radiometer, and sounding measurements from both locations were used to produce annual cycles of cloud occurrence and height, atmospheric temperature and humidity, surface longwave and shortwave broadband fluxes, surface albedo, and cloud radiative forcing. In general, both regions revealed a similar annual trend of cloud occurrence fraction with minimum values in winter (60-75%) and maximum values during spring, summer and fall (80-90%). However, the annual average cloud occurrence fraction for SHEBA (76%) was lower than the 6-year average cloud occurrence at NSA (92%). Both Arctic areas also showed similar annual cycle trends of cloud forcing with clouds warming the surface through most of the year and a period of surface cooling during the summer, when cloud shading effects overwhelm cloud greenhouse effects. The greatest difference between the two regions was observed in the magnitude of the cloud cooling effect (i.e., shortwave cloud forcing), which was significantly stronger at NSA and lasted for a longer period of time than at SHEBA. This is predominantly due to the longer and stronger melt season at NSA (i.e., albedo values that are much lower coupled with Sun angles that are somewhat higher) than the melt season observed over the ice pack at SHEBA. Longwave cloud forcing values were comparable between the two sites indicating a general similarity in cloudiness and atmospheric temperature and humidity structure between the two regions.

  6. be explained by the indirect aerosol cloud effect. The use of a parcel model to determine the cloud droplet number concentration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reiners, Peter W.

    cloud properties and their effect on the surface radiation budget: selected cases from FIRE ACE. Jbe explained by the indirect aerosol cloud effect. The use of a parcel model to determine the cloud droplet number concentration enables us to separate the effects of the cloud LWP and cloud droplet number

  7. Lab Leadership | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > The Energy MaterialsFeatured Videos >> spaceTutorialsLabLab News

  8. LAB #8 Numerical Methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2005-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Page 1. LAB #8. Numerical Methods. Goal: The purpose of this lab is to explain how computers numerically ... Also you will examine what .... (7) Now consider the differential equation ... 3-exp(2*y)+sqrt(t)/y; (Don't forget the “;” at the end.).

  9. Pre-Cloud Aerosol, Cloud Droplet Concentration, and Cloud Condensation Nuclei from the VAMOS Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere Land Study (VOCALS) Field Campaign First Quarter 2010 ASR Program Metric Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kleinman, LI; Springston, SR; Daum, PH; Lee, Y-N; Sedlacek, AJ; Senum, G; Wang, J

    2011-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In this, the first of a series of Program Metric Reports, we (1) describe archived data from the DOE G-1 aircraft, (2) illustrate several relations between sub-cloud aerosol, CCN, and cloud droplets pertinent to determining the effects of pollutant sources on cloud properties, and (3) post to the data archive an Excel spreadsheet that contains cloud and corresponding sub-cloud data.

  10. Cloud Resource Orchestration: A Data-Centric Approach Changbin Liu Yun Mao Jacobus Van der Merwe Mary Fernndez

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Kathleen

    Cloud Resource Orchestration: A Data-Centric Approach Changbin Liu Yun Mao Jacobus Van der Merwe Mary Fernández AT&T Labs - Research University of Pennsylvania ABSTRACT Cloud computing provides users virtualization of the underlying physical infrastructure. However, the scale and highly dynamic nature of cloud

  11. Lab Breakthrough: Microelectronic Photovoltaics | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Lab Breakthrough: Microelectronic Photovoltaics Lab Breakthrough: Microelectronic Photovoltaics June 7, 2012 - 9:31am Addthis Sandia developed tiny glitter-sized photovoltaic (PV)...

  12. National Labs | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Lab Day Fact Sheets Secretary Ernest Moniz learns about the Labs' work in high performance computing and additive manufacturing. | Photo courtesy of Sarah Gerrity, Energy...

  13. VALIDATION OF CLOUD LIQUID WATER PATH RETRIEVALS FROM SEVIRI ON METEOSAT-8 USING CLOUDNET OBSERVATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haak, Hein

    on global cloud statistics and radiation budget #12;(Feijt et al., 2003). With the launch of Meteosat Second effective radius and Cloud Liquid Water Path (CLWP) over Europe. The CloudNET research project, supported forecast models. The radiative behavior of clouds depends predominantly on cloud properties

  14. The study of cirrus clouds using airborne and satellite data 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyer, Kerry Glynne

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    (AVIRIS) and the Moderate-resolution Infrared Spectroradiometer (MODIS), scientists now have an unprecedented ability to study cirrus clouds. To aid in the understanding of such clouds, a significant study of cirrus radiative properties has been undertaken...

  15. HPC CLOUD APPLIED TO LATTICE OPTIMIZATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Changchun; Nishimura, Hiroshi; James, Susan; Song, Kai; Muriki, Krishna; Qin, Yong

    2011-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    As Cloud services gain in popularity for enterprise use, vendors are now turning their focus towards providing cloud services suitable for scientific computing. Recently, Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (EC2) introduced the new Cluster Compute Instances (CCI), a new instance type specifically designed for High Performance Computing (HPC) applications. At Berkeley Lab, the physicists at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) have been running Lattice Optimization on a local cluster, but the queue wait time and the flexibility to request compute resources when needed are not ideal for rapid development work. To explore alternatives, for the first time we investigate running the Lattice Optimization application on Amazon's new CCI to demonstrate the feasibility and trade-offs of using public cloud services for science.

  16. Jefferson Lab Search

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12 InvestigationLabNew SafetyLabJefferson LabWins

  17. Jefferson Lab Visitor's Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12 InvestigationLabNewLabLab To ReceiveUser

  18. Ames Lab 101: Single Crystal Growth

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Schlagel, Deborah

    2014-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Ames Laboratory scientist Deborah Schlagel talks about the Lab's research in growing single crystals of various metals and alloys. The single crystal samples are vital to researchers' understanding of the characteristics of a materials and what gives these materials their particular properties.

  19. Cloud Computing Adam Barker

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    St Andrews, University of

    Cloud Computing 1 Adam Barker #12;Overview · Introduction to Cloud computing · Enabling technologies · Di erent types of cloud: IaaS, PaaS and SaaS · Cloud terminology · Interacting with a cloud: management consoles · Launching an instance · Connecting to an instance · Running your application · Clouds

  20. Berkeley Lab - ARRA - Home

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Facility August 18, 2011 Tools and Toys for Builders: New Test Center for Low-Energy Buildings July 19, 2011 Moving Data at the Speed of Science: Berkeley Lab Lays Foundation...

  1. Jefferson Lab Virtual Tour

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2013-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Take a virtual tour of the campus of Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. You can see inside our two accelerators, three experimental areas, accelerator component fabrication and testing areas, high-performance computing areas and laser labs.

  2. Jefferson Lab Virtual Tour

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2014-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Take a virtual tour of the campus of Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. You can see inside our two accelerators, three experimental areas, accelerator component fabrication and testing areas, high-performance computing areas and laser labs.

  3. Geological Hazards Labs Spring 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Po

    Geological Hazards Labs Spring 2010 TA: En-Jui Lee (http://www.gg.uwyo.edu/ggstudent/elee8/site - An Indispensible Tool in Hazard Planning 3 26/1; 27/1 Lab 2: Geologic Maps - Mapping the Hazards 4 2/2; 3/2 Lab 3: Population - People at Risk 5 9/2; 10/2 Lab 4: Plate Tectonics - Locating Geologic Hazards 6 16/2; 17/2 Lab 5

  4. Mineral ID Self-Instruction Lab Name _________________________ Geology 100 Harbor Section

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harbor, David

    Mineral ID Self-Instruction Lab Name _________________________ Geology 100 ­ Harbor Section Your goal for this lab is to become familiar with the physical properties used to identify minerals. Physical properties are determined by the chemical and crystalline properties of the given mineral. However

  5. Lecture Ch. 8 Cloud Classification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Russell, Lynn

    clouds Middle clouds Grayish, block the sun, sometimes patchy Sharp outlines, rising, bright white1 Lecture Ch. 8 · Cloud Classification ­ Descriptive approach to clouds · Drop Growth and Precipitation Processes ­ Microphysical characterization of clouds · Complex (i.e. Real) Clouds ­ Examples

  6. Cloud Controlling Factors --Low Clouds BJORN STEVENS,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stevens, Bjorn

    Cloud Controlling Factors -- Low Clouds BJORN STEVENS, Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic) clouds is reviewed, with an emphasis on factors that may be expected to change in a changing climate of low-cloud control- ling processes are offered: these include renewing our focus on theory, model

  7. Cloud Controlling Factors --Low Clouds BJORN STEVENS,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stevens, Bjorn

    Cloud Controlling Factors -- Low Clouds BJORN STEVENS, Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic conspire to determine the statistics and cli- matology of layers of shallow (boundary layer) clouds of low-cloud control- ling processes are offered: these include renewing our focus on theory, model

  8. Cloud Tracking in Cloud-Resolving Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plant, Robert

    Cloud Tracking in Cloud-Resolving Models RMetS Conference 4th September 2007 Bob Plant Department of Meteorology, University of Reading, UK #12;Introduction Obtain life cycle statistics for clouds in CRM simulations What is the distribution of cloud lifetimes? What factors determine the lifetime of an individual

  9. Acoustic clouds: standing sound waves around a black hole analogue

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carolina L. Benone; Luis C. B. Crispino; Carlos Herdeiro; Eugen Radu

    2015-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Under certain conditions sound waves in fluids experience an acoustic horizon with analogue properties to those of a black hole event horizon. In particular, a draining bathtub-like model can give rise to a rotating acoustic horizon and hence a rotating black hole (acoustic) analogue. We show that sound waves, when enclosed in a cylindrical cavity, can form stationary waves around such rotating acoustic black holes. These acoustic perturbations display similar properties to the scalar clouds that have been studied around Kerr and Kerr-Newman black holes; thus they are dubbed acoustic clouds. We make the comparison between scalar clouds around Kerr black holes and acoustic clouds around the draining bathtub explicit by studying also the properties of scalar clouds around Kerr black holes enclosed in a cavity. Acoustic clouds suggest the possibility of testing, experimentally, the existence and properties of black hole clouds, using analog models.

  10. Acoustic clouds: standing sound waves around a black hole analogue

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benone, Carolina L; Herdeiro, Carlos; Radu, Eugen

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Under certain conditions sound waves in fluids experience an acoustic horizon with analogue properties to those of a black hole event horizon. In particular, a draining bathtub-like model can give rise to a rotating acoustic horizon and hence a rotating black hole (acoustic) analogue. We show that sound waves, when enclosed in a cylindrical cavity, can form stationary waves around such rotating acoustic black holes. These acoustic perturbations display similar properties to the scalar clouds that have been studied around Kerr and Kerr-Newman black holes; thus they are dubbed acoustic clouds. We make the comparison between scalar clouds around Kerr black holes and acoustic clouds around the draining bathtub explicit by studying also the properties of scalar clouds around Kerr black holes enclosed in a cavity. Acoustic clouds suggest the possibility of testing, experimentally, the existence and properties of black hole clouds, using analog models.

  11. Cloud Security by Max Garvey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tolmach, Andrew

    Cloud Security Survey by Max Garvey #12;Cloudy Cloud is Cloudy What is the cloud? On Demand Service Network access Resource pooling Elasticity of Resources Measured Service #12;Cloud Types/Variants Iaa Cloud Public Cloud Hybrid Cloud combination. Private cloud with overflow going to public cloud. #12

  12. Science Education Lab | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del Sol HomeFacebook Twitter Principalfuel cells" Find Science DMZ CaseScienceLab

  13. Observations of Stratocumulus Clouds and Their Effect on the Eastern Pacific Surface Heat Budget along 208S

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuter, Sandra

    of cloud properties and drizzle statistics, and the effect of stratocumulus clouds on surface radiationObservations of Stratocumulus Clouds and Their Effect on the Eastern Pacific Surface Heat Budget gradients in boundary layer and cloud vertical structure, surface radiation and cloud radiative forcing

  14. Jefferson Lab Public Affairs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12 InvestigationLabNew SafetyLab The accelerator

  15. Jefferson Lab Public Affairs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12 InvestigationLabNew SafetyLab The acceleratorWeb

  16. Jefferson Lab Public Affairs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12 InvestigationLabNew SafetyLab The

  17. Jefferson Lab Publications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12 InvestigationLabNew SafetyLab TheElectronic

  18. Lab celebrates Earth Day

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron 9 5 - -/e),,s -Lab SubcontractoractiveLab

  19. THE MASS-LOSS RETURN FROM EVOLVED STARS TO THE LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD. II. DUST PROPERTIES FOR OXYGEN-RICH ASYMPTOTIC GIANT BRANCH STARS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sargent, Benjamin A.; Meixner, M.; Gordon, Karl D. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Srinivasan, S. [Institut d'Astrophysique de Paris, 98 bis, Boulevard Arago, Paris 75014 (France); Kemper, F.; Woods, Paul M. [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, Alan Turing Building, School of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Tielens, A. G. G. M. [Leiden Observatory, P.O. Box 9513, NL-2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Speck, A. K. [Physics and Astronomy Department, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States); Matsuura, M. [Institute of Origins, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Bernard, J.-Ph. [Centre d'Etude Spatiale des Rayonnements, 9 Av. du Colonel Roche, BP 44346, 31028 Toulouse Cedex 4 (France); Hony, S. [Laboratoire AIM, CEA/DSM-CNRS-Universite Paris Diderot DAPNIA/Service d'Astrophysique Bat. 709, CEA-Saclay F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Indebetouw, R. [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, P.O. Box 400325, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); Marengo, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); Sloan, G. C., E-mail: sargent@stsci.ed [Department of Astronomy, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States)

    2010-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We model multi-wavelength broadband UBVIJHK{sub s} and Spitzer IRAC and MIPS photometry and Infrared Spectrograph spectra from the SAGE and SAGE-Spectroscopy observing programs of two oxygen-rich asymptotic giant branch (O-rich AGB) stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) using radiative transfer (RT) models of dust shells around stars. We chose a star from each of the bright and faint O-rich AGB populations found by earlier studies of the SAGE sample in order to derive a baseline set of dust properties to be used in the construction of an extensive grid of RT models of the O-rich AGB stars found in the SAGE surveys. From the bright O-rich AGB population, we chose HV 5715, and from the faint O-rich AGB population we chose SSTISAGE1C J052206.92-715017.6 (SSTSAGE052206). We found the complex indices of refraction of oxygen-deficient silicates from Ossenkopf et al. and a power law with exponential decay grain size distribution like what Kim et al. used but with {gamma} of -3.5, a {sub min} of 0.01 {mu}m, and a {sub 0} of 0.1 {mu}m to be reasonable dust properties for these models. There is a slight indication that the dust around the faint O-rich AGB may be more silica-rich than that around the bright O-rich AGB. Simple models of gas emission suggest a relatively extended gas envelope for the faint O-rich AGB star modeled, consistent with the relatively large dust shell inner radius for the same model. Our models of the data require the luminosity of SSTSAGE052206 and HV 5715 to be {approx}5100 L {sub sun} and {approx}36,000 L {sub sun}, respectively. This, combined with the stellar effective temperatures of 3700 K and 3500 K, respectively, that we find best fit the optical and near-infrared data, suggests stellar masses of {approx}3 M {sub sun} and {approx}7 M {sub sun}. This, in turn, suggests that HV 5715 is undergoing hot-bottom burning and that SSTSAGE052206 is not. Our models of SSTSAGE052206 and HV 5715 require dust shells of inner radius {approx}17 and {approx}52 times the stellar radius, respectively, with dust temperatures there of 900 K and 430 K, respectively, and with optical depths at 10 {mu}m through the shells of 0.095 and 0.012, respectively. The models compute the dust mass-loss rates for the two stars to be 2.0 x 10{sup -9} M{sub sun} yr{sup -1} and 2.3 x 10{sup -9} M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}, respectively. When a dust-to-gas mass ratio of 0.002 is assumed for SSTSAGE052206 and HV 5715, the dust mass-loss rates imply total mass-loss rates of 1.0 x 10{sup -6} M{sub sun} yr{sup -1} and 1.2 x 10{sup -6} M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}, respectively. These properties of the dust shells and stars, as inferred from our models of the two stars, are found to be consistent with properties observed or assumed by detailed studies of other O-rich AGB stars in the LMC and elsewhere.

  20. Stratus cloud structure from MM-radar transects and satellite images: scaling properties and artifact detection with semi-discrete wavelet analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, A. B. (Anthony B.); Petrov, N. P. (Nikola P.); Clothiaux, E. E. (Eugene E.); Marshak, A. (Alexander)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Spatial and/or temporal variabilities of clouds is of paramount importance for at least two in tensely researched sub-problems in global and regional climate modeling: (1) cloud-radiation interaction where correlations can trigger 3D radiative transfer effects; and (2) dynamical cloud modeling where the goal is to realistically reproduce the said correlations. We propose wavelets as a simple yet powerful way of quantifying cloud variability. More precisely, we use 'semi-discrete' wavelet transforms which, at least in the present statistical applications, have advantages over both its continuous and discrete counterparts found in the bulk of the wavelet literature. With the particular choice of normalization we adopt, the scale-dependence of the variance of the wavelet coefficients (i.e,, the wavelet energy spectrum) is always a better discriminator of transition from 'stationary' to 'nonstationary' behavior than conventional methods based on auto-correlation analysis, second-order structure function (a.k.a. the semi-variogram), or Fourier analysis. Indeed, the classic statistics go at best from monotonically scale- or wavenumber-dependent to flat at such a transition; by contrast, the wavelet spectrum changes the sign of its derivative with respect to scale. We apply 1D and 2D semi-discrete wavelet transforms to remote sensing data on cloud structure from two sources: (1) an upward-looking milli-meter cloud radar (MMCR) at DOE's climate observation site in Oklahoma deployed as part of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Progrm; and (2) DOE's Multispectral Thermal Imager (MTI), a high-resolution space-borne instrument in sunsynchronous orbit that is described in sufficient detail for our present purposes by Weber et al. (1999). For each type of data, we have at least one theoretical prediction - with empirical validation already in existence - for a power-law relation for wavelet statistics with respect to scale. This is what is expected in physical (i.e., finite scaling range) fractal phenomena. In particular, we find long-range correlations in cloud structure coming from the important nonstationary regime. More surprisingly, we also uncover artifacts the data that are traceable either to instrumental noise (in the satellite data) or to smoothing assumptions (in the MMCR data processing). Finally, we discuss the potentially damaging ramifications the smoothing artifact can have on both cloud-radiation and cloud-modeling studies using MMCR data.

  1. Ames Lab 101: Magnetic Refrigeration

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Pecharsky, Vitalij

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Vitalij Pecharsky, distinguished professor of materials science and engineering, discusses his research in magnetic refrigeration at Ames Lab.

  2. Ames Lab 101: Magnetic Refrigeration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pecharsky, Vitalij

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Vitalij Pecharsky, distinguished professor of materials science and engineering, discusses his research in magnetic refrigeration at Ames Lab.

  3. Cloud Computing og availability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christensen, Henrik Bærbak

    Cloud Computing og availability Projekt i pålidelighed Henrik Lavdal - 20010210 Søren Bardino Kaa - 20011654 Gruppe 8 19-03-2010 #12;Cloud Computing og availability Side 2 af 28 Indholdsfortegnelse as a Service (SaaS) ...................................................................9 Availability i cloud

  4. Ad hoc cloud computing 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGilvary, Gary Andrew

    2014-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Commercial and private cloud providers offer virtualized resources via a set of co-located and dedicated hosts that are exclusively reserved for the purpose of offering a cloud service. While both cloud models appeal to ...

  5. Atmospheric State, Cloud Microphysics and Radiative Flux

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Mace, Gerald

    Atmospheric thermodynamics, cloud properties, radiative fluxes and radiative heating rates for the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. The data represent a characterization of the physical state of the atmospheric column compiled on a five-minute temporal and 90m vertical grid. Sources for this information include raw measurements, cloud property and radiative retrievals, retrievals and derived variables from other third-party sources, and radiative calculations using the derived quantities.

  6. MECHANICAL TEST LAB CAPABILITIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MECHANICAL TEST LAB CAPABILITIES · Static and cyclic testing (ASTM and non-standard) · Impact drop testing · Slow-cycle fatigue testing · High temperature testing to 2500°F · ASTM/ Boeing/ SACMA standard testing · Ability to design and fabricate non-standard test fixtures and perform non-standard tests

  7. On Demand Surveillance Service in Vehicular Cloud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weng, Jui-Ting

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Toward Vehicular Service Cloud . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4.2 Open Mobile Cloud Requirement . . . . .3.1 Mobile Cloud

  8. Ice cloud single-scattering property models with the full phase matrix at wavelengths from 0.2 to 100 mm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baum, Bryan A.

    W. Dayton Street, Madison, WI 53706, United States b Texas A&M University, College Station, TX February 2014 Available online 11 March 2014 Keywords: Ice clouds Light scattering Remote sensing Radiative agreement between solar and infrared optical thicknesses. Finally, spectral results are presented

  9. A Near-Global Climatology of Single-Layer and Overlapped Clouds and Their Optical Properties Retrieved from Terra/MODIS Data Using a New Algorithm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Zhanqing

    Retrieved from Terra/MODIS Data Using a New Algorithm FU-LUNG CHANG Earth System Science Interdisciplinary Center, University of Maryland, College Park, College Park, Maryland ZHANQING LI Earth System Science) trapping longwave radiation in the earth­atmosphere system. Unlike many low clouds that have a cooling

  10. Atmosphere Sciences Instrumentation Lab

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delene, David J.

    dimensional wind field. #12;Mass Flow Controller Tim Logan · Mass Flow Controller regulates the flow of air frequency, using a combination reflecting-refracting imaging system · Worked with the PCASP, doing. Additional heat is removed due to vaporization of liquid water when in cloud. Difference in energy

  11. CLOuDS: 2012 Workshop | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t z C o . C l a r k CCLEAN ENERGY JOBS ANDCLOuDS: 2012

  12. Cloud Computing For Bioinformatics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferrara, Katherine W.

    Cloud Computing For Bioinformatics EC2 and AMIs #12;Quick-starting an EC2 instance (let's get our feet wet!) Cloud Computing #12;Cloud Computing: EC2 instance Quick Start · On EC2 console, we can click on Launch Instance · This will let us get up and going quickly #12;Cloud Computing: EC2 instance

  13. Study of Electron Cloud for MEIC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. Ahmed, J.D. Dolph, G.A. Krafft, T. Satogata, B.C. Yunn

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Medium Energy Electron Ion Collider (MEIC) at Jefferson Lab has been envisioned as a future high energy particle accelerator beyond the 12 GeV upgrade of the existing Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF). Synchrotron radiation from the closely spaced proton bunches in MEIC can generate photoelectrons inside the vacuum chamber and cause secondary emission due to multipacting in the presence of beam's electric field. This phenomenon can lead to fast build up of electron density, known as electron cloud effect - resulting into beam instability coupled to multi-bunches in addition to a single bunch. For MEIC, the estimated threshold value of the electron-cloud density is approximately 5 x 10{sup 12} m{sup -3}. In this paper, we would like to report the self-consistent simulation studies of electron cloud formation for MEIC. The code has been benchmarked against the published data of electron cloud effects observed in LHC. Our first simulations predict increase of electron clouds with the increase of repetition rate. The detailed simulations are under progress and will be reported.

  14. Cirrus cloud formation and the role of heterogeneous ice nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Froyd, Karl D.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Composition, size, and phase are key properties that define the ability of an aerosol particle to initiate ice in cirrus clouds. Properties of cirrus ice nuclei (IN) have not been well constrained due to a lack of systematic ...

  15. Guidelines for Vocal Tract Development Lab (VT Lab) team members to access the VT Lab WebSpace via the VT Lab website

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vorperian, Houri K.

    Guidelines for Vocal Tract Development Lab (VT Lab) team members to access the VT Lab WebSpace via the VT Lab website The VTLab WebSpace is a new and improved mechanism for VT lab team members to share files. We are replacing the former Member Login section of our website with MyWeb Space (developed by Do

  16. Tri-Lab Resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron Spin Transition in2,EHSS A-Z Site MapTrends, Discovery, &Tri-Lab

  17. Lab announces security changes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |Is Your Home asLCLS Experimental RunProcedureofUWVoluntaryLab

  18. Jefferson Lab Human Resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12 InvestigationLab Group Gets 10JeffersonHuman Resources

  19. Jefferson Lab Human Resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12 InvestigationLab Group Gets 10JeffersonHuman

  20. Jefferson Lab Human Resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12 InvestigationLab Group Gets 10JeffersonHumanAppraisal

  1. Jefferson Lab Human Resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12 InvestigationLab Group Gets 10JeffersonHumanAppraisalHR

  2. Jefferson Lab Human Resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12 InvestigationLab Group Gets

  3. Jefferson Lab Human Resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12 InvestigationLab Group GetsDiversity Council Emeritus

  4. Jefferson Lab Human Resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12 InvestigationLab Group GetsDiversity Council

  5. Jefferson Lab Human Resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12 InvestigationLab Group GetsDiversity CouncilHow we're

  6. Jefferson Lab Human Resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12 InvestigationLab Group GetsDiversity CouncilHow

  7. Jefferson Lab Human Resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12 InvestigationLab Group GetsDiversity CouncilHowJLab

  8. Jefferson Lab Human Resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12 InvestigationLab Group GetsDiversity

  9. Jefferson Lab Human Resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12 InvestigationLab Group GetsDiversityQuestions about

  10. Jefferson Lab Human Resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12 InvestigationLab Group GetsDiversityQuestions

  11. Jefferson Lab Human Resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12 InvestigationLab Group GetsDiversityQuestionsEmployee

  12. Jefferson Lab Human Resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12 InvestigationLab Group

  13. Jefferson Lab Human Resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12 InvestigationLab GroupHuman Resources Human Resources

  14. Jefferson Lab Human Resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12 InvestigationLab GroupHuman Resources Human Resources

  15. Jefferson Lab Human Resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12 InvestigationLab GroupHuman Resources Human

  16. Jefferson Lab Human Resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12 InvestigationLab GroupHuman Resources Human print

  17. Jefferson Lab Human Resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12 InvestigationLab GroupHuman Resources Human

  18. Jefferson Lab Human Resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12 InvestigationLab GroupHuman Resources HumanAppraisal

  19. Jefferson Lab Information Resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12 InvestigationLab GroupHuman Resources

  20. Jefferson Lab Leadership Council

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12 InvestigationLab GroupHumanLaser Twinkles in Rare

  1. About the Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWP TWP Related LinksATHENA could reduceCustomerEIA's RSS,UsAboutLab

  2. Lab announces Venture Acceleration

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron 9 5 - -/e),,s -Lab Subcontractoractive in

  3. Archaeology on Lab Land

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProductsAlternativeOperational Management » History »DeptArchaeology on Lab

  4. Open House | Jefferson Lab

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)IntegratedSpeeding access toTest and Evaluation |quasicrystals65 (9/12)Jefferson Lab

  5. Policymakers | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)IntegratedSpeeding accessPeptoidLabPhysicsPits |Regulations Policy andConstruction

  6. AMERICA'S NATIONAL LABS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76) (See theDoctoral20ALSNews Vol.AMERICA'S NATIONAL LABS by

  7. Friends of Berkeley Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Environmental Assessments (EA)Budget(DANCE)Frequently AskedofFriends of Berekeley Lab

  8. TechLab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening a solidSynthesis of 2D AlloysTrails News Home | ORNL |TechLab

  9. 3D Atmospheric Radiative Transfer for Cloud System-Resolving Models: Forward Modelling and Observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howard Barker; Jason Cole

    2012-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Utilization of cloud-resolving models and multi-dimensional radiative transfer models to investigate the importance of 3D radiation effects on the numerical simulation of cloud fields and their properties.

  10. Retrieval of Cloud Phase Using the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer Data during the Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spangenberg, D.; Minnis, P.; Shupe, M.; Uttal, T.; Poellot, M.

    2005-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Improving climate model predictions over Earth's polar regions requires a comprehensive knowledge of polar cloud microphysics. Over the Arctic, there is minimal contrast between the clouds and background snow surface, making it difficult to detect clouds and retrieve their phase from space. Snow and ice cover, temperature inversions, and the predominance of mixed-phase clouds make it even more difficult to determine cloud phase. Also, since determining cloud phase is the first step toward analyzing cloud optical depth, particle size, and water content, it is vital that the phase be correct in order to obtain accurate microphysical and bulk properties. Changes in these cloud properties will, in turn, affect the Arctic climate since clouds are expected to play a critical role in the sea ice albedo feedback. In this paper, the IR trispectral technique (IRTST) is used as a starting point for a WV and 11-{micro}m brightness temperature (T11) parameterization (WVT11P) of cloud phase using MODIS data. In addition to its ability to detect mixed-phase clouds, the WVT11P also has the capability to identify thin cirrus clouds overlying mixed or liquid phase clouds (multiphase ice). Results from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) MODIS phase model (AMPHM) are compared to the surface-based cloud phase retrievals over the ARM North Slope of Alaska (NSA) Barrow site and to in-situ data taken from University of North Dakota Citation (CIT) aircraft which flew during the Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (MPACE). It will be shown that the IRTST and WVT11P combined to form the AMPHM can achieve a relative high accuracy of phase discrimination compared to the surface-based retrievals. Since it only uses MODIS WV and IR channels, the AMPHM is robust in the sense that it can be applied to daytime, twilight, and nighttime scenes with no discontinuities in the output phase.

  11. Name: ____________________ Stream Profile Lab 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Name: ____________________ Stream Profile Lab 1 LAB 4. Stream Profiles and Mass Balance: Supply vs hillslope diffusion experiments. We will now examine a slightly more complicated profile-evolution model on longitudinal channel profile shapes. The Questions: I. Why do streams generally have concave profiles

  12. E ngineering& S ystems Lab

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corporation,Motorola,andincooperationwith Siemens Automotive and Detroit Diesel Corporation. S oftware E ngineering& N etwork S ystems Lab-time systems ­ fault tolerance and security ­ formal methods, code generation ­ compilation Transformations ·Test Case generation 6 S oftware E ngineering& N etwork S ystems Lab OutlineOutline Introduction

  13. COMPUTATIONAL MODELING OF ELECTRON CLOUD FOR MEIC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. Ahmed, B. Yunn, J. Dolph, T. Satogata, G.A. Krafft

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This work is the continuation of [4] our earlier studies on electron cloud (EC) simulations for the medium energy electron-ion collider (MEIC) envisioned at Jefferson Lab beyond the 12 GeV upgrade of CEBAF. In this paper, we study the EC saturation density with various MEIC operational parameters. The details of the study shows saturation of line density 1.7 nC/m and tune shift per unit length 4.9 x 10{sup -7} m{sup -1}.

  14. RISK ASSESSMENT CLOUD COMPUTING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    SECURITY RESEARCH PRIVACY RISK ASSESSMENT AMC DATA FISMA CLOUD COMPUTING MOBILE DEVICES OPERATIONS application hosted in the cloud · Alaska DHHS fined $1.7M ­ Portable device stolen from vehicle · Mass Eye

  15. Berkeley Lab Compact Accelerator Sets World Record

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Berkeley Lab Particle Accelerator Sets World Record Berkeley Lab Particle Accelerator Sets World Record Simulations at NERSC Help Validate Experimental Laser-Plasma Design December...

  16. The effect of specular reflection on spaceborne lidar measurements of ice clouds ROBIN J. HOGAN # AND ANTHONY J. ILLINGWORTH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hogan, Robin

    The effect of specular reflection on spaceborne lidar measurements of ice clouds ROBIN J. HOGAN echo in terms of cloud radiative properties problematic, so is of concern for spaceborne cloud lidar which have among their primary aims the global measurement of ice clouds. The NASA Calipso li­ dar

  17. XSEDE Cloud Survey Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    XSEDE Cloud Survey Report David Lifka, Cornell Center for Advanced Computing Ian Foster, ANL, ANL and The University of Chicago A National Science Foundation-sponsored cloud user survey was conducted from September 2012 to April 2013 by the XSEDE Cloud Integration Investigation Team to better

  18. Research Cloud Computing Recommendations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qian, Ning

    Research Cloud Computing Recommendations SRCPAC December 3, 2014 #12;Mandate and Membership SRCPAC convened this committee in Sept 2014 to investigate the role that cloud computing should play in our & Academic Affairs (Social Work) #12;Questions discussed · What cloud resources are available? · Which kinds

  19. Jefferson Lab Scientist Wins 2011 Lawrence Award | Jefferson Lab

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12 InvestigationLabNew SafetyLabJefferson LabWins

  20. Jefferson Lab Weekly Briefs - July 15, 2015 | Jefferson Lab

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12 InvestigationLabNewLabLab ToTravel|Jefferson

  1. Jefferson Lab Work Officially Begins (Inside Business) | Jefferson Lab

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12 InvestigationLabNewLabLab

  2. Jefferson Lab awards several contracts (Daily Press) | Jefferson Lab

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12 InvestigationLabNewLabLabbegin whilePhysics

  3. Jefferson Lab awards upgrade contracts (Inside Business) | Jefferson Lab

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12 InvestigationLabNewLabLabbegin

  4. Jefferson Lab begins $310 million upgrade (Daily Press) | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12 InvestigationLabNewLabLabbeginawards

  5. LabVIEW Core 2 Course | Jefferson Lab

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron 9 5 - -/e),,s -LabgrantsLab team makesLab'sLabVIEW

  6. Characterization of Tri-lab Tantalum Plate.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buchheit, Thomas E.; Cerreta, Ellen K.; Deibler, Lisa Anne; Chen, Shu-Rong; Michael, Joseph R.

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides a detailed characterization Tri-lab Tantalum (Ta) plate jointly purchased from HCStark Inc. by Sandia, Los Alamos and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories. Data in this report was compiled from series of material and properties characterization experiments carried out at Sandia (SNL) and Los Alamos (LANL) Laboratories through a leveraged effort funded by the C2 campaign. Results include microstructure characterization detailing the crystallographic texture of the material and an increase in grain size near the end of the rolled plate. Mechanical properties evaluations include, compression cylinder, sub-scale tension specimen, micohardness and instrumented indentation testing. The plate was found to have vastly superior uniformity when compare with previously characterized wrought Ta material. Small but measurable variations in microstructure and properties were noted at the end, and at the top and bottom edges of the plate.

  7. SmartLabs Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit with form HistoryRistmaSinosteel Corporation JumpShines afterSmartSmartLabs Inc

  8. Evaluation of Cloud-resolving and Limited Area Model Intercomparison Simulations using TWP-ICE Observations. Part 1: Deep Convective Updraft Properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Varble, A. C.; Zipser, Edward J.; Fridlind, Ann; Zhu, Ping; Ackerman, Andrew; Chaboureau, Jean-Pierre; Collis, Scott M.; Fan, Jiwen; Hill, Adrian; Shipway, Ben

    2014-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Ten 3D cloud-resolving model (CRM) simulations and four 3D limited area model (LAM) simulations of an intense mesoscale convective system observed on January 23-24, 2006 during the Tropical Warm Pool – International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) are compared with each other and with observed radar reflectivity fields and dual-Doppler retrievals of vertical wind speeds in an attempt to explain published results showing a high bias in simulated convective radar reflectivity aloft. This high bias results from ice water content being large, which is a product of large, strong convective updrafts, although hydrometeor size distribution assumptions modulate the size of this bias. Snow reflectivity can exceed 40 dBZ in a two-moment scheme when a constant bulk density of 100 kg m-3 is used. Making snow mass more realistically proportional to area rather than volume should somewhat alleviate this problem. Graupel, unlike snow, produces high biased reflectivity in all simulations. This is associated with large amounts of liquid water above the freezing level in updraft cores. Peak vertical velocities in deep convective updrafts are greater than dual-Doppler retrieved values, especially in the upper troposphere. Freezing of large rainwater contents lofted above the freezing level in simulated updraft cores greatly contributes to these excessive upper tropospheric vertical velocities. Strong simulated updraft cores are nearly undiluted, with some showing supercell characteristics. Decreasing horizontal grid spacing from 900 meters to 100 meters weakens strong updrafts, but not enough to match observational retrievals. Therefore, overly intense simulated updrafts may partly be a product of interactions between convective dynamics, parameterized microphysics, and large-scale environmental biases that promote different convective modes and strengths than observed.

  9. Jefferson Lab Weekly Briefs March 25, 2015 | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    was planned for the months of March and April. Physics Jefferson Lab Published Journal Articles March 16-20 S. Pisano et al. (CLAS Collaboration). "Single and double spin...

  10. Neutron Transversity at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jian-Ping Chen; Xiaodong Jiang; Jen-chieh Peng; Lingyan Zhu

    2005-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Nucleon transversity and single transverse spin asymmetries have been the recent focus of large efforts by both theorists and experimentalists. On-going and planned experiments from HERMES, COMPASS and RHIC are mostly on the proton or the deuteron. Presented here is a planned measurement of the neutron transversity and single target spin asymmetries at Jefferson Lab in Hall A using a transversely polarized {sup 3}He target. Also presented are the results and plans of other neutron transverse spin experiments at Jefferson Lab. Finally, the factorization for semi-inclusive DIS studies at Jefferson Lab is discussed.

  11. Jefferson Lab Users Group News

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12 InvestigationLabNewLabLab To ReceiveUser

  12. Chemical and Petroleum Engineering Key and Lab Space Agreement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calgary, University of

    Chemical and Petroleum Engineering Key and Lab Space Agreement Key Holder Information Last Name and Petroleum Engineering remain the property of the Department. I agree to pay a deposit for the keys/Graduate Student Study space that has been assigned. Keys Any keys issued to me from the Department of Chemical

  13. Cloud Effects on Radiative Heating Rate Profiles over Darwin using ARM and A-train Radar/Lidar Observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thorsen, Tyler J.; Fu, Qiang; Comstock, Jennifer M.

    2013-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Observations of clouds from the ground-based U.S. Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program (ARM) and satellite-based A-train are used to compute cloud radiative forcing profiles over the ARM Darwin, Australia site. Cloud properties are obtained from both radar (the ARM Millimeter Cloud Radar (MMCR) and the CloudSat satellite in the A-train) and lidar (the ARM Micropulse lidar (MPL) and the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) satellite in the A-train) observations. Cloud microphysical properties are taken from combined radar and lidar retrievals for ice clouds and radar only or lidar only retrievals for liquid clouds. Large, statistically significant differences of up to 1.43 K/day exist between the mean ARM and A-train net cloud radiative forcing profiles. The majority of the difference in cloud radiative forcing profiles is shown to be due to a large difference in the cloud fraction above 12 km. Above this altitude the A-train cloud fraction is significantly larger because more clouds are detected by CALIPSO than by the ground-based MPL. It is shown that the MPL is unable to observe as many high clouds as CALIPSO due to being more frequently attenuated and a poorer sensitivity even in otherwise clear-sky conditions. After accounting for cloud fraction differences and instrument sampling differences due to viewing platform we determined that differences in cloud radiative forcing due to the retrieved ice cloud properties is relatively small. This study demonstrates that A-train observations are better suited for the calculation cloud radiative forcing profiles. In addition, we find that it is necessary to supplement CloudSat with CALIPSO observations to obtain accurate cloud radiative forcing profiles since a large portion of clouds at Darwin are detected by CALIPSO only.

  14. NYC MEDIA LAB 2 Metrotech Center, 10

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aronov, Boris

    Justin Hendrix Named Executive Director of NYC Media Lab NEW YORK, New York ­ NYC Media Lab is pleased, testing, and commercializing new digital media business concepts. Prior to this role, Hendrix directed ! About NYC Media Lab NYC Media Lab connects companies seeking to advance new media technologies

  15. Recap: Energy Efficiency at the National Labs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Learn how the Energy Department's National Labs are helping consumers and businesses save energy and money.

  16. SURA Rewards Inventors | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    at Johns Hopkins University, helped develop three inventions during his summer internship at Jefferson Lab. A ceremony was held at 1 p.m. October 30, 1997, in the CEBAF...

  17. Precision mechatronics lab robot development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rogers, Adam Gregory

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    based mobile robot. The principal goal of this work was the demonstration of the Precision Mechatronics Lab (PML) robot. This robot should be capable of traversing any known distance while maintaining a minimal position error. An optical correction...

  18. Precision mechatronics lab robot development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rogers, Adam Gregory

    2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    based mobile robot. The principal goal of this work was the demonstration of the Precision Mechatronics Lab (PML) robot. This robot should be capable of traversing any known distance while maintaining a minimal position error. An optical correction...

  19. State of the Lab 2012

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    King, Alex

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ames Laboratory Director Alex King delivers the annual State of the Lab address on Thursday, May 17, 2012, the 65th Anniversary of the founding of The Ames Laboratory. This video contains highlights from the address.

  20. Working inside the Cloud: Developing a Cloud Computing Infrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krause, Rolf

    UROP 2012 Working inside the Cloud: Developing a Cloud Computing Infrastructure Cloud computing and live-migration of running VM. USI participates to the development of the first European Cloud computing for a motivated student that will have a chance to improve his/her knowledge on Cloud computing, Java and/or Ruby

  1. Simulation of the Extinction Efficiency, the Absorption Efficiency and the Asymmetry Factor of Ice Crystals and Relevant Applications to the Study of Cirrus Cloud Radiative Properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Kai

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The single-scattering properties of six non-spherical ice crystals, droxtals, plates, solid columns, hollow columns, aggregates and 6-branch bullet rosettes are simulated. The anomalous diffraction theory (ADT) is applied to the simulation...

  2. Dynamic Cloud Resource Reservation via Cloud Brokerage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Baochun

    Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Toronto Department of Electrical@eecg.toronto.edu, liang@utoronto.ca Abstract--Infrastructure-as-a-Service clouds offer diverse pric- ing options

  3. Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment TWP-ICE Cloud and rain characteristics in the Australian Monsoon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    May, P.T., Jakob, C., and Mather, J.H.

    2004-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The impact of oceanic convection on its environment and the relationship between the characteristics of the convection and the resulting cirrus characteristics is still not understood. An intense airborne measurement campaign combined with an extensive network of ground-based observations is being planned for the region near Darwin, Northern Australia, during January-February, 2006, to address these questions. The Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) will be the first field program in the tropics that attempts to describe the evolution of tropical convection, including the large scale heat, moisture, and momentum budgets, while at the same time obtaining detailed observations of cloud properties and the impact of the clouds on the environment. The emphasis will be on cirrus for the cloud properties component of the experiment. Cirrus clouds are ubiquitous in the tropics and have a large impact on their environment but the properties of these clouds are poorly understood. A crucial product from this experiment will be a dataset suitable to provide the forcing and testing required by cloud-resolving models and parameterizations in global climate models. This dataset will provide the necessary link between cloud properties and the models that are attempting to simulate them.

  4. Parameterizing Size Distribution in Ice Clouds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeSlover, Daniel; Mitchell, David L.

    2009-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    PARAMETERIZING SIZE DISTRIBUTIONS IN ICE CLOUDS David L. Mitchell and Daniel H. DeSlover ABSTRACT An outstanding problem that contributes considerable uncertainty to Global Climate Model (GCM) predictions of future climate is the characterization of ice particle sizes in cirrus clouds. Recent parameterizations of ice cloud effective diameter differ by a factor of three, which, for overcast conditions, often translate to changes in outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) of 55 W m-2 or more. Much of this uncertainty in cirrus particle sizes is related to the problem of ice particle shattering during in situ sampling of the ice particle size distribution (PSD). Ice particles often shatter into many smaller ice fragments upon collision with the rim of the probe inlet tube. These small ice artifacts are counted as real ice crystals, resulting in anomalously high concentrations of small ice crystals (D < 100 µm) and underestimates of the mean and effective size of the PSD. Half of the cirrus cloud optical depth calculated from these in situ measurements can be due to this shattering phenomenon. Another challenge is the determination of ice and liquid water amounts in mixed phase clouds. Mixed phase clouds in the Arctic contain mostly liquid water, and the presence of ice is important for determining their lifecycle. Colder high clouds between -20 and -36 oC may also be mixed phase but in this case their condensate is mostly ice with low levels of liquid water. Rather than affecting their lifecycle, the presence of liquid dramatically affects the cloud optical properties, which affects cloud-climate feedback processes in GCMs. This project has made advancements in solving both of these problems. Regarding the first problem, PSD in ice clouds are uncertain due to the inability to reliably measure the concentrations of the smallest crystals (D < 100 µm), known as the “small mode”. Rather than using in situ probe measurements aboard aircraft, we employed a treatment of ice cloud optical properties formulated in terms of PSD parameters in combination with remote measurements of thermal radiances to characterize the small mode. This is possible since the absorption efficiency (Qabs) of small mode crystals is larger at 12 µm wavelength relative to 11 µm wavelength due to the process of wave resonance or photon tunneling more active at 12 µm. This makes the 12/11 µm absorption optical depth ratio (or equivalently the 12/11 µm Qabs ratio) a means for detecting the relative concentration of small ice particles in cirrus. Using this principle, this project tested and developed PSD schemes that can help characterize cirrus clouds at each of the three ARM sites: SGP, NSA and TWP. This was the main effort of this project. These PSD schemes and ice sedimentation velocities predicted from them have been used to test the new cirrus microphysics parameterization in the GCM known as the Community Climate Systems Model (CCSM) as part of an ongoing collaboration with NCAR. Regarding the second problem, we developed and did preliminary testing on a passive thermal method for retrieving the total water path (TWP) of Arctic mixed phase clouds where TWPs are often in the range of 20 to 130 g m-2 (difficult for microwave radiometers to accurately measure). We also developed a new radar method for retrieving the cloud ice water content (IWC), which can be vertically integrated to yield the ice water path (IWP). These techniques were combined to determine the IWP and liquid water path (LWP) in Arctic clouds, and hence the fraction of ice and liquid water. We have tested this approach using a case study from the ARM field campaign called M-PACE (Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment). This research led to a new satellite remote sensing method that appears promising for detecting low levels of liquid water in high clouds typically between -20 and -36 oC. We hope to develop this method in future research.

  5. Spectral signature of ice clouds in the far-infrared region: Single-scattering calculations and radiative sensitivity study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baum, Bryan A.

    , a parameterization of the bulk scattering properties is developed. The radiative properties of ice cloudsSpectral signature of ice clouds in the far-infrared region: Single-scattering calculations the spectral signature of ice clouds in the far-infrared (far-IR) spectral region from 100 to 667 cmÃ?1 (15

  6. P2.11 AN ANNUAL CYCLE OF ARCTIC CLOUD MICROPHYSICS Matthew D. Shupe*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shupe, Matthew

    to classify cloud scenes as all- ice, all-liquid, mixed-phase, or precipitating so that the appropriate ice/snow-covered surfaces. Several studies have demonstrated the importance of specific cloud microphysical properties on cloud-radiation and ice-albedo feedback mechanisms; these in turn have bearing

  7. Aerosolcloudprecipitation interactions. Part 1. The nature and sources of cloud-active aerosols

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rutledge, Steven

    Aerosol­cloud­precipitation interactions. Part 1. The nature and sources of cloud-active aerosols M Available online 13 March 2008 Keywords: aerosol precipitation CCN emissions clouds Atmospheric aerosol the chemical composition of aerosols, their microphysical properties, and the factors that enable them to act

  8. Characterizing synoptic and cloud variability in the Northern Atlantic using self-organizing maps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fish, Carly Sue

    2014-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    . . . . . . . . . . . 16 4 Results 19 4.1 June . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 4.2 January . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 4.3 Joint variability of cloud fraction with vertical motion and EIS... heights using the same contour limits and intervals. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 LIST OF FIGURES vii 4.9 Cloud properties for four patterns in January. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 4.10 Joint PDFs of cloud fraction and EIS...

  9. Indian Summer Monsoon Drought 2009: Role of Aerosol and Cloud Microphysics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hazra, Anupam; Taraphdar, Sourav; Halder, Madhuparna; Pokhrel, S.; Chaudhari, H. S.; Salunke, K.; Mukhopadhyay, P.; Rao, S. A.

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cloud dynamics played a fundamental role in defining Indian summer monsoon (ISM) rainfall during drought in 2009. The anomalously negative precipitation was consistent with cloud properties. Although, aerosols inhibited the growth of cloud effective radius in the background of sparse water vapor, their role is secondary. The primary role, however, is played by the interactive feedback between cloud microphysics and dynamics owing to reduced efficient cloud droplet growth, lesser latent heating release and shortage of water content. Cloud microphysical processes were instrumental for the occurrence of ISM drought 2009.

  10. Lab 9 LabVIEW and GPIB LabVIEW (National Instruments)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glashausser, Charles

    Automatic data acquisition DAC 01010 Actuator, Heater... control Power amplifiers LabVIEW GPIB GPIB #12 Toolbar Retain Wire Values Button Step Function Buttons #12;Block Diagram Window Front Panel Window

  11. An Autonomous Reliabilit Cloud Comput

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buyya, Rajkumar

    An Autonomous Reliabilit Ami Cloud Comput Department of Computing and Informa Abstract--Cloud computing paradigm allo based access to computing and storages s Internet. Since with advances of Cloud. Keywords- Cloud computing; SLA negotiat I. INTRODUCTION Cloud computing has transferred the services

  12. Satellite-based remote sensing of cirrus clouds: hyperspectral radiative transfer modeling, analysis of uncertainties in in-situ cloud extinction measurements and intercomparison of cirrus retrievals from a-train instruments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Zhibo

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    of uncertainties in the FSSP (Forward Scattering Spectrometer Probe) measurement of cloud extinction by small ice particles. First, the single-scattering properties of small ice particles in cirrus clouds are derived and compared to those of equivalent spheres...

  13. Nonlinear Hydromagnetic Wave Support of a Stratified Molecular Cloud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Kudoh; S. Basu

    2003-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We perform numerical simulations of nonlinear MHD waves in a gravitationally stratified molecular cloud that is bounded by a hot and tenuous external medium. We study the relation between the strength of the turbulence and various global properties of a molecular cloud, within a 1.5-dimensional approximation. Under the influence of a driving source of Alfvenic disturbances, the cloud is lifted up by the pressure of MHD waves and reaches a steady-state characterized by oscillations about a new time-averaged equilibrium state. The nonlinear effect results in the generation of longitudinal motions and many shock waves; however, the wave kinetic energy remains predominantly in transverse, rather than longitudinal, motions. There is an approximate equipartition of energy between the transverse velocity and fluctuating magnetic field (aspredicted by small-amplitude theory) in the region of the stratified cloud which contains most of the mass; however, this relation breaks down in the outer regions, particularly near the cloud surface, where the motions have a standing-wave character. This means that the Chandrasekhar-Fermi formula applied to molecular clouds must be significantly modified in such regions. Models of an ensemble of clouds show that, for various strengths of the input energy, the velocity dispersion in the cloud $\\sigma \\propto Z^{0.5}$, where $Z$ is a characteristic size of the cloud.Furthermore, $\\sigma$ is always comparable to the mean Alfven velocity of the cloud, consistent with observational results.

  14. Intercomparison of the Cloud Water Phase among Global Climate Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Komurcu, Muge; Storelvmo, Trude; Tan, Ivy; Lohmann, U.; Yun, Yuxing; Penner, Joyce E.; Wang, Yong; Liu, Xiaohong; Takemura, T.

    2014-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Mixed-phase clouds (clouds that consist of both cloud droplets and ice crystals) are frequently present in the Earth’s atmosphere and influence the Earth’s energy budget through their radiative properties, which are highly dependent on the cloud water phase. In this study, the phase partitioning of cloud water is compared among six global climate models (GCMs) and with Cloud and Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization retrievals. It is found that the GCMs predict vastly different distributions of cloud phase for a given temperature, and none of them are capable of reproducing the spatial distribution or magnitude of the observed phase partitioning. While some GCMs produced liquid water paths comparable to satellite observations, they all failed to preserve sufficient liquid water at mixed-phase cloud temperatures. Our results suggest that validating GCMs using only the vertically integrated water contents could lead to amplified differences in cloud radiative feedback. The sensitivity of the simulated cloud phase in GCMs to the choice of heterogeneous ice nucleation parameterization is also investigated. The response to a change in ice nucleation is quite different for each GCM, and the implementation of the same ice nucleation parameterization in all models does not reduce the spread in simulated phase among GCMs. The results suggest that processes subsequent to ice nucleation are at least as important in determining phase and should be the focus of future studies aimed at understanding and reducing differences among the models.

  15. The characterization of particle clouds using optical imaging techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bruce, Elizabeth J. (Elizabeth Jane), 1972-

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Optical imaging techniques can be used to provide a better understanding of the physical properties of particle clouds. The purpose of this thesis is to design, perform and evaluate a set of experiments using optical imaging ...

  16. Clouds up close | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    interactions that affect clouds and thus improve climate projections. Contact Heng Xiao Pacific Northwest National Laboratory 902 Battelle Blvd., PO Box 999 MSIN: K9-30...

  17. Finance Idol Word Cloud

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This word cloud represents the topics discussed during the Big and Small Ideas: How to Lower Solar Financing Costs breakout session at the SunShot Grand Challenge.

  18. SURFACE CLOUD RADIATIVE FORCING, CLOUD FRACTION AND CLOUD ALBEDO: THEIR RELATIONSHIP AND MULTISCALE VARIATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that have been used to quantify the effect of clouds on radiation budget in both modeling and observationalSURFACE CLOUD RADIATIVE FORCING, CLOUD FRACTION AND CLOUD ALBEDO: THEIR RELATIONSHIP AND MULTISCALE/Atmospheric Sciences Division Brookhaven National Laboratory P.O. Box, Upton, NY www.bnl.gov ABSTRACT Cloud-radiation

  19. Simulation of the Extinction Efficiency, the Absorption Efficiency and the Asymmetry Factor of Ice Crystals and Relevant Applications to the Study of Cirrus Cloud Radiative Properties 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Kai

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    in an overestimation of downward infrared (IR) fluxes and upward solar fluxes, and an underestimation of upward IR fluxes and downward solar fluxes. The errors of the fluxes and heating rates based on two sets of single-scattering properties are caused mainly...

  20. #LabChat Recap: Solutions through Supercomputing | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Addthis Related Articles LabChat Recap: The Future of Biofuels LabChat Recap: What is Dark Energy LabChat Recap: Innovations Driving More Efficient Vehicles...

  1. PSCloud: A Durable Context-Aware Personal Storage Cloud Sobir Bazarbayev, Matti Hiltunen, Kaustubh Joshi,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Kathleen

    &T Labs Research Abstract Personal content from mobile devices is often irre- placeable, yet current's mo- bile devices, home servers, and cloud storage accounts to create a single unified personal of the user's devices. This represents a signifi- cant challenge given the increasing volume of a person

  2. Sandia Energy - Cloud Computing Services

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cloud Computing Services Home Stationary Power Safety, Security & Resilience of Energy Infrastructure Grid Modernization Cyber Security for Electric Infrastructure Cloud Computing...

  3. Profiling clouds' inner life | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    life Released: May 29, 2014 Subgrid modeling pinpoints cloud transformation to uncover true reflective power An accurate understanding of clouds over the ocean is important for...

  4. CONTRIBUTED Green Cloud Computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tucker, Rod

    to manage energy consumption across the entire information and communications technology (ICT) sector. While considers both public and private clouds, and includes energy consumption in switching and transmission to energy consumption and cloud computing seems to be an alternative to office-based computing. By Jayant

  5. Toward Securing Sensor Clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    · 32 GB microSDHC storage 2 Image from http://hothardware.com/News/Leaked-Motorola-DROID-X-2-Daytona Computer Mini Computer External Storage External Storage Router Router Router Router Cloud Computing Cloud: micro surveys, amber alerts 4 #12;Router Router Router Router Mini Computer Mini Computer Mini Computer

  6. Tripleclouds: An Efficient Method for Representing Horizontal Cloud Inhomogeneity in 1D Radiation Schemes by Using Three Regions at Each Height

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hogan, Robin

    that a mere 4% increase in global cloud cover could counter- act the warming caused by a doubling of carbon the effect of in- homogeneity on the radiative properties of high cloud. They used cloud radar data to inferTripleclouds: An Efficient Method for Representing Horizontal Cloud Inhomogeneity in 1D Radiation

  7. A High Resolution Hydrometer Phase Classifier Based on Analysis of Cloud Radar Doppler Spectra.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luke,E.; Kollias, P.

    2007-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The lifecycle and radiative properties of clouds are highly sensitive to the phase of their hydrometeors (i.e., liquid or ice). Knowledge of cloud phase is essential for specifying the optical properties of clouds, or else, large errors can be introduced in the calculation of the cloud radiative fluxes. Current parameterizations of cloud water partition in liquid and ice based on temperature are characterized by large uncertainty (Curry et al., 1996; Hobbs and Rangno, 1998; Intriery et al., 2002). This is particularly important in high geographical latitudes and temperature ranges where both liquid droplets and ice crystal phases can exist (mixed-phase cloud). The mixture of phases has a large effect on cloud radiative properties, and the parameterization of mixed-phase clouds has a large impact on climate simulations (e.g., Gregory and Morris, 1996). Furthermore, the presence of both ice and liquid affects the macroscopic properties of clouds, including their propensity to precipitate. Despite their importance, mixed-phase clouds are severely understudied compared to the arguably simpler single-phase clouds. In-situ measurements in mixed-phase clouds are hindered due to aircraft icing, difficulties distinguishing hydrometeor phase, and discrepancies in methods for deriving physical quantities (Wendisch et al. 1996, Lawson et al. 2001). Satellite-based retrievals of cloud phase in high latitudes are often hindered by the highly reflecting ice-covered ground and persistent temperature inversions. From the ground, the retrieval of mixed-phase cloud properties has been the subject of extensive research over the past 20 years using polarization lidars (e.g., Sassen et al. 1990), dual radar wavelengths (e.g., Gosset and Sauvageot 1992; Sekelsky and McIntosh, 1996), and recently radar Doppler spectra (Shupe et al. 2004). Millimeter-wavelength radars have substantially improved our ability to observe non-precipitating clouds (Kollias et al., 2007) due to their excellent sensitivity that enables the detection of thin cloud layers and their ability to penetrate several non-precipitating cloud layers. However, in mixed-phase clouds conditions, the observed Doppler moments are dominated by the highly reflecting ice crystals and thus can not be used to identify the cloud phase. This limits our ability to identify the spatial distribution of cloud phase and our ability to identify the conditions under which mixed-phase clouds form.

  8. Lab Breakthroughs | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > The Energy MaterialsFeatured Videos >> spaceTutorialsLabLab

  9. Lab transitions employee giving campaigns

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron 9 5 - -/e),,s -LabgrantsLab team makes uniqueLab

  10. July 2012July 2012 Cloud Computing and Virtualization:Cloud Computing and Virtualization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Jiangchuan (JC)

    July 2012July 2012 Cloud Computing and Virtualization:Cloud Computing and Virtualization/26/2633 Recent: CloudRecent: Cloud The fast growth of cloud computing Cloud file storage/synchronization services Google entries about cloud computing: 184,000,000 #12;July 2012July 2012 44/26/2644 Our CloudOur Cloud 7

  11. INFERENCE OF INHOMOGENEOUS CLOUDS IN AN EXOPLANET ATMOSPHERE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Demory, Brice-Olivier; De Wit, Julien; Lewis, Nikole; Zsom, Andras; Seager, Sara [Department of Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)] [Department of Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Fortney, Jonathan [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)] [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Knutson, Heather; Desert, Jean-Michel [Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)] [Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Heng, Kevin [Center for Space and Habitability, University of Bern, Sidlerstrasse 5, CH-3012, Bern (Switzerland)] [Center for Space and Habitability, University of Bern, Sidlerstrasse 5, CH-3012, Bern (Switzerland); Madhusudhan, Nikku [Department of Physics and Department of Astronomy, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Department of Astronomy, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States); Gillon, Michael [Institut d'Astrophysique et de Géophysique, Université de Liège, Allée du 6 Août, 17, Bat. B5C, B-4000 Liège 1 (Belgium)] [Institut d'Astrophysique et de Géophysique, Université de Liège, Allée du 6 Août, 17, Bat. B5C, B-4000 Liège 1 (Belgium); Barclay, Thomas [NASA Ames Research Center, M/S 244-30, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States)] [NASA Ames Research Center, M/S 244-30, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Parmentier, Vivien [Laboratoire J.-L. Lagrange, UMR 7293, Université de Nice-Sophia Antipolis, CNRS, Observatoire de la Côte d'Azur B.P. 4229, F-06304 Nice Cedex 4 (France)] [Laboratoire J.-L. Lagrange, UMR 7293, Université de Nice-Sophia Antipolis, CNRS, Observatoire de la Côte d'Azur B.P. 4229, F-06304 Nice Cedex 4 (France); Cowan, Nicolas B., E-mail: demory@mit.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, F165, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States)

    2013-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We present new visible and infrared observations of the hot Jupiter Kepler-7b to determine its atmospheric properties. Our analysis allows us to (1) refine Kepler-7b's relatively large geometric albedo of Ag = 0.35 ± 0.02, (2) place upper limits on Kepler-7b thermal emission that remains undetected in both Spitzer bandpasses and (3) report a westward shift in the Kepler optical phase curve. We argue that Kepler-7b's visible flux cannot be due to thermal emission or Rayleigh scattering from H{sub 2} molecules. We therefore conclude that high altitude, optically reflective clouds located west from the substellar point are present in its atmosphere. We find that a silicate-based cloud composition is a possible candidate. Kepler-7b exhibits several properties that may make it particularly amenable to cloud formation in its upper atmosphere. These include a hot deep atmosphere that avoids a cloud cold trap, very low surface gravity to suppress cloud sedimentation, and a planetary equilibrium temperature in a range that allows for silicate clouds to potentially form in the visible atmosphere probed by Kepler. Our analysis does not only present evidence of optically thick clouds on Kepler-7b but also yields the first map of clouds in an exoplanet atmosphere.

  12. When Clouds become Green: the Green Open Cloud Architecture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    of a new original energy-efficient Cloud infrastructure called Green Open Cloud. Keywords. Energy with the support of energy-efficient frameworks dedicated to Cloud architectures. Virtualization is a key feature of the energy-aware Cloud infras- tructure that we propose. The conclusion and future works are reviewed

  13. AEROSOL, CLOUDS, AND CLIMATE CHANGE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SCHWARTZ, S.E.

    2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Earth's climate is thought to be quite sensitive to changes in radiative fluxes that are quite small in absolute magnitude, a few watts per square meter, and in relation to these fluxes in the natural climate. Atmospheric aerosol particles exert influence on climate directly, by scattering and absorbing radiation, and indirectly by modifying the microphysical properties of clouds and in turn their radiative effects and hydrology. The forcing of climate change by these indirect effects is thought to be quite substantial relative to forcing by incremental concentrations of greenhouse gases, but highly uncertain. Quantification of aerosol indirect forcing by satellite- or ground-based remote sensing has proved quite difficult in view of inherent large variation in the pertinent observables such as cloud optical depth, which is controlled mainly by liquid water path and only secondarily by aerosols. Limited work has shown instances of large magnitude of aerosol indirect forcing, with local instantaneous forcing upwards of 50 W m{sup 66}-2. Ultimately it will be necessary to represent aerosol indirect effects in climate models to accurately identify the anthropogenic forcing at present and over secular time and to assess the influence of this forcing in the context of other forcings of climate change. While the elements of aerosol processes that must be represented in models describing the evolution and properties of aerosol particles that serve as cloud condensation particles are known, many important components of these processes remain to be understood and to be represented in models, and the models evaluated against observation, before such model-based representations can confidently be used to represent aerosol indirect effects in climate models.

  14. State of the Lab Address

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    King, Alex

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In his third-annual State of the Lab address, Ames Laboratory Director Alex King called the past year one of "quiet but strong progress" and called for Ames Laboratory to continue to build on its strengths while responding to changing expectations for energy research.

  15. Program of Study Lab Facilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Andrew

    Program of Study Lab Facilities Financial Aid Applying Individuals in all areas of private of commercial, on- profit and government settings. While the market-place demand for students with graduate courses taught within Business, Computer Science, Education, Electrical and Computer Engineering

  16. ABBGroup-1-High voltage lab

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Basse, Nils Plesner

    oscillations are due to travelling waves in the heating volume. #12;©ABBGroup-9- 3-Sep-07 2. High voltage phase interrupts the injected current, it is stressed by the transient recovery voltage (TRV) oscillating©ABBGroup-1- 3-Sep-07 High voltage lab Research on high voltage gas circuit breakers Nils P. Basse

  17. CHEMICAL HYGIENE LAB SPECIFIC INFORMATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bigelow, Stephen

    1 CHEMICAL HYGIENE PLAN (CHP) LAB SPECIFIC INFORMATION & STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES (SOPs____________________19 #12;3 Introduction 12/4/2013 This is the Chemical Hygiene Plan (CHP) for the Materials Research University of California at Santa Barbara Spectroscopy Department Chemical Hygiene Plan NMR and EPR

  18. CHEMICAL HYGIENE LAB SPECIFIC INFORMATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sideris, Thomas C.

    1 CHEMICAL HYGIENE PLAN (CHP) LAB SPECIFIC INFORMATION & STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES (SOPs____________________19 #12;3 Introduction 12/4/2013 This is the Chemical Hygiene Plan (CHP) for the Materials Research Hygiene Plan NMR and EPR Laboratory Form Version 8/6/98 1. General Laboratory Information Laboratory Name

  19. CHEMICAL HYGIENE LAB SPECIFIC INFORMATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bigelow, Stephen

    1 CHEMICAL HYGIENE PLAN (CHP) LAB SPECIFIC INFORMATION & STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES (SOPs______________________19 #12;3 Introduction 10/23/09 This is the Chemical Hygiene Plan (CHP) for the Materials Research Department Chemical Hygiene Plan NMR Laboratory Form Version 8/6/98 1. General Laboratory Information

  20. OIL ANALYSIS LAB TRIVECTOR ANALYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OIL ANALYSIS LAB TRIVECTOR ANALYSIS This test method is a good routine test for the overall condition of the oil, the cleanliness, and can indicate the presence of wear metals that could be coming of magnetic metal particles within the oil. This may represent metals being worn from components (i

  1. EES 1001 Lab 9 Groundwater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, X. Rong

    EES 1001 ­ Lab 9 Groundwater Water that seeps into the ground, and is pulled down by gravity is groundwater. The water table is the top of the saturated zone, and is the target for well drillers that want to pump out the groundwater. *About those voids... Porosity is the volume of void space in a sediment

  2. W. FIFTH AVE. RADIATION LAB

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    W. FIFTH AVE. NASA SPACE RADIATION LAB 958 ENERGY EFFICIENCY & CONSERVATION DIVISION THOMSON RD. E WASTE MANAGEMENT FACILITY INSTRUMENTATION 901906 750 801 701 703 815 933 912 923 925 911 938 939 902 197 Matter Physics & Materials Science Dept. 480 J5 Medical Research Center 490 H7 National Synchrotron Light

  3. Attribution Analysis of Cloud Feedback

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Chen

    2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    -term global warming. If the EIS-low cloud fraction relationship holds under global warming, it is likely that the tropical low cloud fraction change is non-negative. Climate models without significant negative low cloud fraction change suggest that the cloud...

  4. Convective Cloud Lifecycles Lunchtime seminar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plant, Robert

    Convective Cloud Lifecycles Lunchtime seminar 19th May 2009 Bob Plant Department of Meteorology, University of Reading, UK #12;Introduction Obtain life cycle statistics for clouds in CRM simulations Why Conclusions Convective Cloud Lifecycles ­ p.1/3 #12;Why bother? Convective Cloud Lifecycles ­ p.2/3 #12;Some

  5. evolution genetics lab GENE 4230L: MECHANISMSAND INFERENCES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jonathan

    evolution genetics lab GENE 4230L: MECHANISMSAND INFERENCES OFEVOLUTIONARYPROCESSES Fall2006, 12 Selection 1. Aug. 28 Lab 4. Measuring Natural Selection 2. Aug. 30 LABOR DAY Sep. 4 Lab 5. Evolution. 30 Lab 20. Phylogenetics part 2 Nov. 1 Lab 21. Evolution of Development Nov. 6 Lab 22. Catch

  6. A13B-0215: Case study of the 9 April 2009 `brown' cloud: Observations of unusually high cloud droplet concentrations in Saudi Arabia, David J Delene, University of North Dakota (delene@aero.und.edu; http://aerosol.atmos.und.edu)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delene, David J.

    ' cloud: Observations of unusually high cloud droplet concentrations in Saudi Arabia, David J Delene Arabia show a color change, from white during the time of low droplet number concentration, to brown by the cloud is investigated and the changes in cloud properties are documented. Conclusions The 'brown' ice

  7. Long-term impacts of aerosols on vertical development of cloud and precipitation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li Z.; Liu Y.; Niu, F.; Fan, J.; Rosenfeld, D.; Ding, Y.

    2011-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Aerosols alter cloud density and the radiative balance of the atmosphere. This leads to changes in cloud microphysics and atmospheric stability, which can either suppress or foster the development of clouds and precipitation. The net effect is largely unknown, but depends on meteorological conditions and aerosol properties. Here, we examine the long-term impact of aerosols on the vertical development of clouds and rainfall frequencies, using a 10-year dataset of aerosol, cloud and meteorological variables collected in the Southern Great Plains in the United States. We show that cloud-top height and thickness increase with aerosol concentration measured near the ground in mixed-phase clouds-which contain both liquid water and ice-that have a warm, low base. We attribute the effect, which is most significant in summer, to an aerosol-induced invigoration of upward winds. In contrast, we find no change in cloud-top height and precipitation with aerosol concentration in clouds with no ice or cool bases. We further show that precipitation frequency and rain rate are altered by aerosols. Rain increases with aerosol concentration in deep clouds that have a high liquid-water content, but declines in clouds that have a low liquid-water content. Simulations using a cloud-resolving model confirm these observations. Our findings provide unprecedented insights of the long-term net impacts of aerosols on clouds and precipitation.

  8. Interannual Variations of Arctic Cloud Types

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hochberg, Michael

    Sciences #12;Changes in Arctic Climate What is the role of cloud cover in Arctic climate change? What is the Cloud Radiative Effect (CRE) in the Arctic? #12;CRE depends on season, cloud type CRE ­ whether clouds specifically chosen to include nighttime obs Total cloud cover and nine cloud types: - High cloud (cirriform

  9. Interannual Variations of Arctic Cloud Types

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hochberg, Michael

    Declining September sea-ice extent #12;Clouds & Changes in Arctic Climate What is the role of cloud cover in Arctic climate change? What is the Cloud Radiative Effect (CRE) in the Arctic? #12;CRE Defined CRE nighttime obs Total cloud cover and nine cloud types: - High cloud (cirriform) - Middle Clouds: Altocumulus

  10. Lab suppliers receive Department of Energy awards

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron 9 5 - -/e),,s -Labgrants DecisionLabLabLabLabLab

  11. Polytropes: Implications for Molecular Clouds and Dark Matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christopher F. McKee

    2000-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Polytropic models are reasonably successful in acounting for the observed features of molecular clouds. Multi-pressure polytropes include the various pressure components that are important in molecular clouds, whereas composite polytropes provide a representation for the core halo structure. Small, very dense (n~10^{11} cm^{-3}) molecular clouds have been proposed as models for both dark matter and for extreme scattering events. Insofar as the equation of state in these clouds can be represented by a single polytropic relation (pressure varies as a power of the density), such models conflict with observation. It is possible to contrive composite polytropes that do not conflict with observation, but whether the thermal properties of the clouds are consistent with such structure remains to be determined.

  12. Case study of the 9 April 2009 `brown' cloud: Observations and modeling of convective clouds in Saudi Arabia, David J Delene and Jeffrey S Tilley, University of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delene, David J.

    Case study of the 9 April 2009 `brown' cloud: Observations and modeling of convective clouds indicated a color change in the accumulated ice. Specifically, the ice color changed from white, during concentrations observed (as well as other changes in the convective cloud properties that were documented

  13. December 15, 2014 LAB COMMISSION MEETING MINUTES

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Commission to Review the Effectiveness of the National Energy Laboratories (Commission) was convened for its fifth meeting at 10:00 AM on December 15, 2014. Commission Co-Chair Jared Cohon led the meeting. The meeting included two panels: (1) authors of recent reports about the DOE National Labs and (2) a national lab contractor panel. The report authors summarized their respective reports, highlighting concerns related to the relationship between DOE and the labs, research funding and strategy stove-piping, weak links between the labs and market, an inconsistent economic development mission, the difficulty small firms have in accessing labs, the labs’ lack of regional engagement, and DOE and congressional micromanagement of the labs. The lab contractor representatives responded to questions posed by the commissioners related to lab management and the relationship with DOE. Additionally, Patricia Falcone spoke of the important role of the labs in the science and technology enterprise and Alan Leshner talked about the labs and their relationship with the scientific community. Christopher Paine presented his views on transforming the weapons complex. The next meeting will be held February 24 at the Hilton at Mark Center in VA.

  14. Assessment of Heliosat-4 surface solar irradiance derived on the basis of SEVIRI-APOLLO cloud products

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Assessment of Heliosat-4 surface solar irradiance derived on the basis of SEVIRI-APOLLO cloud are crucial for the assessment of SSI. The APOLLO cloud product provided by DLR includes abundant information about the cloud physical and optical properties. The performances of Heliosat-4 when using APOLLO

  15. Dynamic Effects on the Tropical Cloud Radiative Forcing and Radiation Budget JIAN YUAN, DENNIS L. HARTMANN, AND ROBERT WOOD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, Robert

    Dynamic Effects on the Tropical Cloud Radiative Forcing and Radiation Budget JIAN YUAN, DENNIS L to isolate the effect of large-scale dynamics on the observed radiation budget and cloud properties the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) show that the net radiative effect of clouds on the earth

  16. Evaluation of the aerosol indirect effect in marine stratocumulus clouds: Droplet number, size, liquid water path, and radiative impact

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Russell, Lynn

    Evaluation of the aerosol indirect effect in marine stratocumulus clouds: Droplet number, size stratocumulus clouds in the northeastern Pacific Ocean were analyzed to determine the effect of aerosol particles on cloud microphysical and radiative properties. Seven nighttime and two daytime cases were

  17. Migrating enterprise storage applications to the cloud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vrable, Michael Daniel

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2.1 Cloud Providers . . . . . . . . . . . .2.1.1 Cloud Storage . . . . . . . . .2.1.2 Cloud Computation . . . . . . 2.2 Enterprise Storage

  18. A developer's survey on different cloud platforms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doan, Dzung

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1 Introduction Cloud computing is a computing paradigm inFor this reason, cloud computing has also been describedparallel processing. Cloud computing can be contrasted with

  19. The Giant Molecular Cloud Environments of Infrared Dark Clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hernandez, Audra K

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the GMC environments surrounding 10 IRDCs, based on 13CO molecular line emission from the Galactic Ring Survey. Using a range of physical scales, we measure the physical properties of the IRDCs and their surrounding molecular material extending out to radii, R, of 30pc. By comparing different methods for defining cloud boundaries and for deriving mass surface densities, Sigma, and velocity dispersions, sigma, we settled on a preferred "CE,tau,G" method of "Connected Extraction" in position-velocity space along with Gaussian fitting to opacity-corrected line profiles for velocity dispersion and mass estimation. We examine how cloud definition affects measurements of the magnitude and direction of line of sight velocity gradients and velocity dispersions, including the associated dependencies on size scale. CE,tau,G-defined IRDCs and GMCs show velocity gradient versus size relations that scale approximately as dv_0/ds~s^(-1/2) and velocity dispersion versus size relations sigma~s^(1/2), which are consi...

  20. Radiator Labs | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection Radiation Protection Regulations: TheCompetition » Radiator Labs

  1. Scientific Labs | Neutron Science | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiationImplementingnpitcheResearch BriefsTenney,ScienceScientificScientific Labs SHARE

  2. Lovelock black holes in a string cloud background

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tae-Hun Lee; Dharmanand Baboolal; Sushant G. Ghosh

    2015-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an exact static, spherically symmetric black hole solution to the third order Lovelock gravity with a string cloud background in seven dimensions for the special case when the second and third order Lovelock coefficients are related via $\\tilde{\\alpha}^2_2=3\\tilde{\\alpha}_3\\;(\\equiv\\alpha^2)$. Further, we examine thermodynamic properties of this black hole to obtain exact expressions for mass, temperature, entropy and also perform the thermodynamic stability analysis. We see that a string cloud background makes a profound influence on horizon structure, thermodynamic properties and the stability of black holes. Interestingly the entropy of the black hole is unaffected due to a string cloud background. However, the critical solution for thermodynamic stability is being affected by a string cloud background.

  3. Influence of clouds and diffuse radiation on ecosystem-atmosphere CO 2 and CO 18 O exchanges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    cover, radiation, meteorological and water isotope data tohere, radiation, cloud property, and aerosol data wereData were obtained from the Atmospheric Radiation

  4. Aerosols and clouds in chemical transport models and climate models.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lohmann,U.; Schwartz, S. E.

    2008-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Clouds exert major influences on both shortwave and longwave radiation as well as on the hydrological cycle. Accurate representation of clouds in climate models is a major unsolved problem because of high sensitivity of radiation and hydrology to cloud properties and processes, incomplete understanding of these processes, and the wide range of length scales over which these processes occur. Small changes in the amount, altitude, physical thickness, and/or microphysical properties of clouds due to human influences can exert changes in Earth's radiation budget that are comparable to the radiative forcing by anthropogenic greenhouse gases, thus either partly offsetting or enhancing the warming due to these gases. Because clouds form on aerosol particles, changes in the amount and/or composition of aerosols affect clouds in a variety of ways. The forcing of the radiation balance due to aerosol-cloud interactions (indirect aerosol effect) has large uncertainties because a variety of important processes are not well understood precluding their accurate representation in models.

  5. What Goes Up Must Come Down: The Lifecycle of Convective Clouds (492nd Brookhaven Lecture)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jensen, Michael [BNL Environmental Sciences

    2014-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Some clouds look like cotton balls and others like anvils. Some bring rain, some snow and sleet, and others, just shade. But, whether big and billowy or dark and stormy, clouds affect far more than the weather each day. Armed with measurements of clouds’ updrafts and downdrafts—which resemble airflow in a convection oven—and many other atmospheric interactions, scientists from Brookhaven Lab and other institutions around the world are developing models that are crucial for understanding Earth’s climate and forecasting future climate change. During his lecture, Dr. Jensen provides an overview of the importance of clouds in the Earth’s climate system before explaining how convective clouds form, grow, and dissipate. His discussion includes findings from the Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E), a major collaborative experiment between U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and NASA scientists to document precipitation, clouds, winds, and moisture in 3-D for a holistic view of convective clouds and their environment.

  6. Thin Cloud Length Scales Using CALIPSO and CloudSat Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Solbrig, Jeremy E.

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Thin clouds are the most difficult cloud type to observe. The recent availability of joint cloud products from the active remote sensing instruments aboard CloudSat and the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite (CALIPSO) facilitates...

  7. Is the Sun Embedded in a Typical Interstellar Cloud?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. C. Frisch

    2008-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The physical properties and kinematics of the partially ionized interstellar material near the Sun are typical of warm diffuse clouds in the solar vicinity. The interstellar magnetic field at the heliosphere and the kinematics of nearby clouds are naturally explained in terms of the S1 superbubble shell. The interstellar radiation field at the Sun appears to be harder than the field ionizing ambient diffuse gas, which may be a consequence of the low opacity of the tiny cloud surrounding the heliosphere. The spatial context of the Local Bubble is consistent with our location in the Orion spur.

  8. Simulations of Arctic Mixed-Phase Clouds in Forecasts with CAM3 and AM2 for M-PACE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xie, Shaocheng; Boyle, James; Klein, Stephen A.; Liu, Xiaohong; Ghan, Steven J.

    2008-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Simulations of mixed-phase clouds in short-range forecasts with the National Center for Atmospheric Research Community Atmosphere Model version 3 (CAM3) and the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL) climate model (AM2) for the Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (M-PACE) are performed under the DOE CCPP-ARM Parameterization Testbed (CAPT), which initializes the climate models with analysis data produced from numerical weather prediction (NWP) centers. It is shown that CAM3 significantly underestimates the observed boundary layer mixed-phase clouds and cannot realistically simulate the variations with temperature and cloud height of liquid water fraction in the total cloud condensate based an oversimplified cloud microphysical scheme. In contrast, AM2 reasonably reproduces the observed boundary layer clouds while its clouds contain much less cloud condensate than CAM3 and the observations. Both models underestimate the observed cloud top and base for the boundary layer clouds. The simulation of the boundary layer mixed-phase clouds and their microphysical properties is considerably improved in CAM3 when a new physically based cloud microphysical scheme is used. The new scheme also leads to an improved simulation of the surface and top of the atmosphere longwave radiative fluxes in CAM3. It is shown that the Bergeron-Findeisen process, i.e., the ice crystal growth by vapor deposition at the expense of coexisting liquid water, is important for the models to correctly simulate the characteristics of the observed microphysical properties in mixed-phase clouds. Sensitivity tests show that these results are not sensitive to the analysis data used for model initializations. Increasing model horizontal resolution helps capture the subgrid-scale features in Arctic frontal clouds but does not help improve the simulation of the single-layer boundary layer clouds. Ice crystal number density has large impact on the model simulated mixed-phase clouds and their microphysical properties and needs to be accurately represented in climate models.

  9. Ice Heating Up Cold Clouds | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ice Heating Up Cold Clouds Ice Heating Up Cold Clouds Released: October 04, 2011 In a heated battle, ice crystals win the competition for cloud water vapor The mighty cloud ice...

  10. Cloud Based Applications and Platforms (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brodt-Giles, D.

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Presentation to the Cloud Computing East 2014 Conference, where we are highlighting our cloud computing strategy, describing the platforms on the cloud (including Smartgrid.gov), and defining our process for implementing cloud based applications.

  11. Detector development for Jefferson Lab's 12GeV Upgrade

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Qiang, Yi [JLAB] (ORCID:0000000170267841)

    2015-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Jefferson Lab will soon finish its highly anticipated 12 GeV Upgrade. With doubled maximum energy, Jefferson Lab’s Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) will enable a new experimental program with substantial discovery potential, addressing important topics in nuclear, hadronic and electroweak physics. In order to take full advantage of the high energy, high luminosity beam, new detectors are being developed, designed and constructed to fit the needs of different physics topics. The paper will give an overview of various new detector technologies to be used for 12 GeV experiments. It will then focus on the development of two solenoid-based spectrometers, the GlueX and SoLID spectrometers. The GlueX experiment in Hall D will study the complex properties of gluons through exotic hybrid meson spectroscopy. The GlueX spectrometer, a hermetic detector package designed for spectroscopy and the associated partial wave analysis, is currently in the final stage of construction. Hall A, on the other hand, is developing the SoLID spectrometer to capture the 3D image of the nucleon from semi-inclusive processes and to study the intrinsic properties of quarks through mirror symmetry breaking. Such a spectrometer will have the capability to handle very high event rates while still maintaining a large acceptance in the forward region.

  12. Detector development for Jefferson Lab's 12GeV Upgrade

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Qiang, Yi

    2015-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Jefferson Lab will soon finish its highly anticipated 12 GeV Upgrade. With doubled maximum energy, Jefferson Lab’s Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) will enable a new experimental program with substantial discovery potential, addressing important topics in nuclear, hadronic and electroweak physics. In order to take full advantage of the high energy, high luminosity beam, new detectors are being developed, designed and constructed to fit the needs of different physics topics. The paper will give an overview of various new detector technologies to be used for 12 GeV experiments. It will then focus on the development of two solenoid-based spectrometers,more »the GlueX and SoLID spectrometers. The GlueX experiment in Hall D will study the complex properties of gluons through exotic hybrid meson spectroscopy. The GlueX spectrometer, a hermetic detector package designed for spectroscopy and the associated partial wave analysis, is currently in the final stage of construction. Hall A, on the other hand, is developing the SoLID spectrometer to capture the 3D image of the nucleon from semi-inclusive processes and to study the intrinsic properties of quarks through mirror symmetry breaking. Such a spectrometer will have the capability to handle very high event rates while still maintaining a large acceptance in the forward region.« less

  13. Ice Formation in Arctic Mixed-Phase Clouds: Insights from a 3-D Cloud-Resolving Model with Size-Resolved Aerosol and Cloud Microphysics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fan, Jiwen; Ovtchinnikov, Mikhail; Comstock, Jennifer M.; McFarlane, Sally A.; Khain, Alexander

    2009-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The single-layer mixed-phase clouds observed during the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program’s Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (MPACE) are simulated with a 3-dimensional cloud-resolving model the System for Atmospheric Modeling (SAM) coupled with an explicit bin microphysics scheme and a radar-lidar simulator. Two possible ice enhancement mechanisms – activation of droplet evaporation residues by condensation-followed-by-freezing and droplet freezing by contact freezing inside-out, are scrutinized by extensive comparisons with aircraft and radar and lidar measurements. The locations of ice initiation associated with each mechanism and the role of ice nuclei (IN) in the evolution of mixed-phase clouds are mainly addressed. Simulations with either mechanism agree well with the in-situ and remote sensing measurements on ice microphysical properties but liquid water content is slightly underpredicted. These two mechanisms give very similar cloud microphysical, macrophysical, dynamical, and radiative properties, although the ice nucleation properties (rate, frequency and location) are completely different. Ice nucleation from activation of evaporation nuclei is most efficient near cloud top areas concentrated on the edges of updrafts, while ice initiation from the drop freezing process has no significant location preference (occurs anywhere that droplet evaporation is significant). Both enhanced nucleation mechanisms contribute dramatically to ice formation with ice particle concentration of 10-15 times higher relative to the simulation without either of them. The contribution of ice nuclei (IN) recycling from ice particle evaporation to IN and ice particle concentration is found to be very significant in this case. Cloud can be very sensitive to IN initially and form a nonquilibrium transition condition, but become much less sensitive as cloud evolves to a steady mixed-phase condition. The parameterization of Meyers et al. [1992] with the observed MPACE IN concentration is able to predict the observed mixed-phase clouds reasonably well. This validation may facilitate the application of this parameterization in the cloud and climate models to simulate Arctic clouds.

  14. Lab hosts multi-lab cyber security games

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |Is Your Home asLCLS ExperimentalFive R&D awards formuonLab hosts

  15. Jefferson Lab Hosts Science Poster Session | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  16. Jefferson Lab Hosts Science Poster Session | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12 InvestigationLab Group Gets 10

  17. Jefferson Lab Laser Twinkles in Rare Color | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  18. Jefferson Lab Names Chief Technology Officer | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  19. Jefferson Lab Names New Safety Director | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  20. Jefferson Lab News - Jefferson Lab Achieves Critical Milestone Toward

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  1. Jefferson Lab Plans Open House for May 19 | Jefferson Lab

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  2. Jefferson Lab, ODU team up for center | Jefferson Lab

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  3. Grad. Students Sought for Lab Tour Program | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist.NewofGeothermal Heat PumpJorgeAtlGrad. Students Sought for Lab

  4. Jefferson Lab Vehicle Fleet Do's and Don'ts | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Jefferson Lab Vehicle Fleet Do's and Don'ts In addition to safe driving, Jefferson Lab Fleet vehicle drivers are responsible for the proper use, maintenance and protection of their...

  5. Attribution Analysis of Cloud Feedback 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Chen

    2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Uncertainty on cloud feedback is the primary contributor to the large spread of equilibrium climate sensitivity (ECS) in climate models. In this study, we compare the short-term cloud feedback in climate models with observations, and evaluate...

  6. Modeling Incoherent Electron Cloud Effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benedetto, E.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    electron-cloud effects and synchrotron radiation can lead toelectron-cloud effects and synchrotron radiation can lead tocloud phenomena in positrons storage rings the effect of syn- chrotron radiation

  7. Secure Cloud Computing With Brokered Trusted

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) ·Audio ·QualComm 7201 528MHZ ·64MB Ram ·MicroSD Slow Storage ·Currently NO SIM CHIPS Monday, March 29 External Storage External Storage Router Router Router Router Cloud Computing Cloud Computing Cloud Storage External Storage Router Router Router Router Cloud Computing Cloud Computing Cloud Computing Tower

  8. Back to School at the National Labs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Learn how one Energy Department internship program is providing students with hands-on experience performing cutting edge research at the National Labs.

  9. Lab Breakthrough: Desiccant Enhanced Evaporative Air Conditioning...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Desiccant Enhanced Evaporative Air Conditioning Lab Breakthrough: Desiccant Enhanced Evaporative Air Conditioning May 29, 2012 - 5:22pm Addthis This breakthrough combines desiccant...

  10. Page 1 of 2 THERMO Lab Information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liebling, Michael

    Plan update. (http://optoelectronics.ece.ucsb.edu/thermoelectrics-and-high-efficiency-photovoltaics://optoelectronics.ece.ucsb.edu/thermoelectrics-and-high-efficiency-photovoltaics-lab By signing below, you

  11. Lab supercomputer finds new home at UNM

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  12. Evaluating cloud retrieval algorithms with the ARM BBHRP framework

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mlawer,E.; Dunn,M.; Mlawer, E.; Shippert, T.; Troyan, D.; Johnson, K. L.; Miller, M. A.; Delamere, J.; Turner, D. D.; Jensen, M. P.; Flynn, C.; Shupe, M.; Comstock, J.; Long, C. N.; Clough, S. T.; Sivaraman, C.; Khaiyer, M.; Xie, S.; Rutan, D.; Minnis, P.

    2008-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Climate and weather prediction models require accurate calculations of vertical profiles of radiative heating. Although heating rate calculations cannot be directly validated due to the lack of corresponding observations, surface and top-of-atmosphere measurements can indirectly establish the quality of computed heating rates through validation of the calculated irradiances at the atmospheric boundaries. The ARM Broadband Heating Rate Profile (BBHRP) project, a collaboration of all the working groups in the program, was designed with these heating rate validations as a key objective. Given the large dependence of radiative heating rates on cloud properties, a critical component of BBHRP radiative closure analyses has been the evaluation of cloud microphysical retrieval algorithms. This evaluation is an important step in establishing the necessary confidence in the continuous profiles of computed radiative heating rates produced by BBHRP at the ARM Climate Research Facility (ACRF) sites that are needed for modeling studies. This poster details the continued effort to evaluate cloud property retrieval algorithms within the BBHRP framework, a key focus of the project this year. A requirement for the computation of accurate heating rate profiles is a robust cloud microphysical product that captures the occurrence, height, and phase of clouds above each ACRF site. Various approaches to retrieve the microphysical properties of liquid, ice, and mixed-phase clouds have been processed in BBHRP for the ACRF Southern Great Plains (SGP) and the North Slope of Alaska (NSA) sites. These retrieval methods span a range of assumptions concerning the parameterization of cloud location, particle density, size, shape, and involve different measurement sources. We will present the radiative closure results from several different retrieval approaches for the SGP site, including those from Microbase, the current 'reference' retrieval approach in BBHRP. At the NSA, mixed-phase clouds and cloud with a low optical depth are prevalent; the radiative closure studies using Microbase demonstrated significant residuals. As an alternative to Microbase at NSA, the Shupe-Turner cloud property retrieval algorithm, aimed at improving the partitioning of cloud phase and incorporating more constrained, conditional microphysics retrievals, also has been evaluated using the BBHRP data set.

  13. Opaque cloud detection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Roskovensky, John K. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2009-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of detecting clouds in a digital image comprising, for an area of the digital image, determining a reflectance value in at least three discrete electromagnetic spectrum bands, computing a first ratio of one reflectance value minus another reflectance value and the same two values added together, computing a second ratio of one reflectance value and another reflectance value, choosing one of the reflectance values, and concluding that an opaque cloud exists in the area if the results of each of the two computing steps and the choosing step fall within three corresponding predetermined ranges.

  14. Posters Cloud Microphysical and Radiative Properties Measured

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible forPortsmouth/Paducah Project Office PressPostdoctoraldecadal observations71 Posters117

  15. Cloud Properties Working Group Break Out Session

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  16. ARM Cloud Properties Working Group: Meeting Logistics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  17. Zenith Radiance Retrieval of Cloud Properties

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  18. National Labs | Department of Energy

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated CodesTransparency VisitSilver Toyota1 JulyScienceScientistsNational Labs

  19. Lab Write-Up: Rubric

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(FactDepartment ofLetter Report:40PM toLED Lighting5-15Trade |VesselLPOD Name: Lab

  20. Lab Subcontractor Consortium provides grants

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  1. National Labs | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO2:Introduction toManagement ofConverDyn NOPRNancy SutleyNational Labs Commission

  2. Solar Labs | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ |RippeyInformationSodaAtlas (PACADecker MackSolar Labs

  3. At A Glance | Jefferson Lab

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWP TWPAlumni AlumniFederalAshley BoyleAn overhead view of Jefferson Lab.

  4. Element Labs | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualPropertyd8c-a9ae-f8521cbb8489 No revision| OpenElectromagnetic Profiling TechniquesLabs Jump

  5. Green Labs and EH&S, Nov. 2013 ___________________ Lab Recycling Guide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    Green Labs and EH&S, Nov. 2013 ___________________ Lab Recycling Guide Non-contaminated, clean lab plastic containers and conical tubes may be recycled. To be accepted, containers must be clean, triple. Recycling bin located: PSB Loading Dock Alcohol cans and metal shipping containers may be recycled

  6. TEAM MEMBERS INSPECTED LAB Oct 2014 Suhare Adam Greg Silverberg Cruft Lab

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    INSPECTION TEAM TEAM CHAIR MEMBER TEAM MEMBERS INSPECTED LAB LOCATIONS LAB SAFETY OFFICERS TEAM 1 Oct 2014 Suhare Adam Greg Silverberg Cruft Lab Hau (Eric Brandin) Electronics Shop (Al Takeda) TEAM 2/Tamas Szalay) Capasso (Alan She) Stubbs (Peter Doherty) TEAM 3 Nov 2014 Mike Gerhardt Zach Gault Paul Loschak

  7. Command Line Tools Cloud Computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferrara, Katherine W.

    Command Line Tools Cloud Computing #12;Everybody (or nearly everybody) loves GUI. AWS Command Line of advanced features. After surviving the cloud computing class till now, Your are almost a command line guru! You need AWS command line tools, ec2-api-tools, to maximize the power of AWS cloud computing. Plugging

  8. 8, 96979729, 2008 FRESCO+ cloud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ACPD 8, 9697­9729, 2008 FRESCO+ cloud retrieval algorithm P. Wang et al. Title Page Abstract Chemistry and Physics Discussions FRESCO+: an improved O2 A-band cloud retrieval algorithm for tropospheric on behalf of the European Geosciences Union. 9697 #12;ACPD 8, 9697­9729, 2008 FRESCO+ cloud retrieval

  9. 3, 33013333, 2003 Cirrus cloud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ACPD 3, 3301­3333, 2003 Cirrus cloud occurrence as function of ambient relative humidity J. Str and Physics Discussions Cirrus cloud occurrence as function of ambient relative humidity: A comparison¨om (johan@itm.su.se) 3301 #12;ACPD 3, 3301­3333, 2003 Cirrus cloud occurrence as function of ambient

  10. Cloud Formation, Evolution and Destruction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Estalella, Robert

    Chapter 4 Cloud Formation, Evolution and Destruction We now begin to trace the journey towards a star. How long does this take? The answer is surprisingly short: a good many clouds already contain new stars and these stars tend to be young. The typical cloud cannot spend long, if any time at all

  11. 5, 60136039, 2005 FRESCO cloud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ACPD 5, 6013­6039, 2005 FRESCO cloud algorithm N. Fournier et al. Title Page Abstract Introduction cloud information over deserts from SCIAMACHY O2 A-band N. Fournier 1 , P. Stammes 1 , M. de Graaf 1 , R, 6013­6039, 2005 FRESCO cloud algorithm N. Fournier et al. Title Page Abstract Introduction Conclusions

  12. NIST Cloud Computing Reference Architecture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perkins, Richard A.

    NIST Cloud Computing Reference Architecture Recommendations of the National Institute of Standards Publication 500-292 #12;i NIST Special Publication 500-292 NIST Cloud Computing Reference Architecture, John Messina, Lee Badger and Dawn Leaf Information Techonology Laboratory Cloud Computing Program

  13. Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  14. Microphysical Effects Determine Macrophysical Response for Aerosol Impacts on Deep Convective Clouds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fan, Jiwen; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Rosenfeld, Daniel; Chen, Qian; Li, Zhanqing; Zhang, Jinqiang; Yan, Hongru

    2013-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Deep convective clouds (DCCs) play a crucial role in the general circulation and energy and hydrological cycle of our climate system. Anthropogenic and natural aerosol particles can influence DCCs through changes in cloud properties, precipitation regimes, and radiation balance. Modeling studies have reported both invigoration and suppression of DCCs by aerosols, but none has fully quantified aerosol impacts on convection life cycle and radiative forcing. By conducting multiple month-long cloud-resolving simulations with spectral-bin cloud microphysics that capture the observed macro- and micro-physical properties of summer convective clouds in the tropics and mid-latitudes, this study provides the first comprehensive look at how aerosols affect cloud cover, cloud top height (CTH), and radiative forcing. Observations validate these simulation results. We find that microphysical aerosol effects contribute predominantly to increased cloud cover and CTH by inducing larger amount of smaller but longer lasting ice particles in the stratiform/anvils of DCCs with dynamical aerosol effects contributing at most ~ 1/4 of the total increase of cloud cover. The overall effect is a radiative warming in the atmosphere (3 to 5 W m-2) with strong surface cooling (-5 to -8 W m-2). Herein we clearly identified mechanisms more important than and additional to the invigoration effects hypothesized previously that explain the consistent signatures of increased cloud tops area and height by aerosols in DCCs revealed by observations.

  15. The Formation of the Oort Cloud in Open Cluster Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nathan A. Kaib; Thomas Quinn

    2008-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the influence of an open cluster environment on the formation and current structure of the Oort cloud. To do this, we have run 19 different simulations of the formation of the Oort Cloud for 4.5 Gyrs. In each simulation, the solar system spends its first 100 Myrs in a different open cluster environment before transitioning to its current field environment. We find that, compared to forming in the field environment, the inner Oort Cloud is preferentially loaded with comets while the Sun resides in the open cluster and that most of this material remains locked in the interior of the cloud for the next 4.4 Gyrs. In addition, the outer Oort Cloud trapping efficiencies we observe in our simulations are lower than previous formation models by about a factor of 2, possibly implying an even more massive early planetesimal disk. Furthermore, some of our simulations reproduce the orbits of observed extended scattered disk objects, which may serve as an observational constraint on the Sun's early environment. Depending on the particular open cluster environment, the properties of the inner Oort Cloud and extended scattered disk can vary widely. On the other hand, the outer portions of the Oort Cloud in each of our simulations are all similar.

  16. Stratocumulus Clouds ROBERT WOOD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, Robert

    by latent heating in updrafts and cooling in downdrafts. Turbulent eddies and evaporative cooling drives, stratification of the STBL, and in some cases cloud breakup. Feedbacks between radiative cooling, precipitation- way interactions may be a key driver of aerosol concentrations over the remote oceans. Aerosol

  17. advanced lab frame: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sciences Websites Summary: , David Wessel, and Kathy Yelick UC Berkeley Par Lab End-of-Project Party May 30, 2013 12;BERKELEY PAR LAB Par Lab Timeline 2 Initial Meetings...

  18. astd field lab: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sciences Websites Summary: , David Wessel, and Kathy Yelick UC Berkeley Par Lab End-of-Project Party May 30, 2013 12;BERKELEY PAR LAB Par Lab Timeline 2 Initial Meetings...

  19. advances lab astrophysics: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sciences Websites Summary: , David Wessel, and Kathy Yelick UC Berkeley Par Lab End-of-Project Party May 30, 2013 12;BERKELEY PAR LAB Par Lab Timeline 2 Initial Meetings...

  20. acid bacteria lab: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sciences Websites Summary: , David Wessel, and Kathy Yelick UC Berkeley Par Lab End-of-Project Party May 30, 2013 12;BERKELEY PAR LAB Par Lab Timeline 2 Initial Meetings...

  1. animal diagnostic lab: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sciences Websites Summary: , David Wessel, and Kathy Yelick UC Berkeley Par Lab End-of-Project Party May 30, 2013 12;BERKELEY PAR LAB Par Lab Timeline 2 Initial Meetings...

  2. DATE : NVLAP LAB CODE: CONSTRUCTION MATERIALS TESTING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Short Title ADMIXTURES _____ 02/A35 ASTM C233 Testing Air-Entraining Admixtures for Concrete _____ 02/A MATERIALS TESTING APPLICATION (REV. 2014-08-25) PAGE 2 OF 10 #12;DATE : NVLAP LAB CODE: CONCRETE _____ 02/ADATE : NVLAP LAB CODE: CONSTRUCTION MATERIALS TESTING TEST METHOD SELECTION LIST Instructions

  3. Multimedia Statistical Labs & Toolkit (TILE) Deborah Nolan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nolan, Deborah

    Multimedia Statistical Labs & Toolkit (TILE) Deborah Nolan University of California, Department@research.bell-labs.com 1. Introduction The potential for multimedia to enhance the statistics curriculum is clear, but how to develop instructional materials that take advantage of the riches that multimedia has to offer

  4. Electronics I 4 cr with Lab

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carver, Jeffrey C.

    ECE 332 Electronics I 4 cr with Lab ECE 370 Signals & Systems 3 cr co ECE 225 Electric Circuits 3 106 - 4 cr General Physics with Calculus CS 116 - 1 cr Intro to Comp. Program. Lab co MATH 227 4 cr cr Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering -- Department of Physics and Astromony

  5. The DVCS program at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Niccolai, Silvia [Institut de Physique Nucleaire, Orsay, France

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent promising results, obtained at Jefferson Lab, on cross sections and asymmetries for DVCS and their link to the Generalized Parton Distributions are the focus of this paper. The extensive experimental program to measure DVCS with the 12-GeV-upgraded CEBAF in three experimental Halls (A, B, C) of Jefferson Lab, will also be presented.

  6. Wireshark Lab: SSL Version: 2.0

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Enyue "Annie"

    Wireshark Lab: SSL Version: 2.0 © 2007 J.F. Kurose, K.W. Ross. All Rights Reserved Computer Networking: A Top- down Approach, 4 th edition. In this lab, we'll investigate the Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) protocol, focusing on the SSL records sent over a TCP connection. We'll do so by analyzing a trace

  7. CHEMICAL HYGIENE PLAN LAB SPECIFIC INFORMATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bigelow, Stephen

    CHEMICAL HYGIENE PLAN (CHP) LAB SPECIFIC INFORMATION & STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES (SOPs/23/09 This is the Chemical Hygiene Plan (CHP) for the Materials Research Laboratory (MRL) Spectroscopy Facility. All labs Chemical Hygiene Plan NMR Laboratory Form Version 8/6/98 1. General Laboratory Information Laboratory Name

  8. Office of Educational Programs Solar Energy Lab

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Homes, Christopher C.

    Office of Educational Programs Solar Energy Lab Overview Kaitlin Thomassen Target student audience: High School Regents Physics High School AP Physics #12;Solar Energy Lab: Goals Highlight research Solar Farm & Northeast Solar Energy Research Center (NSERC) Scientists and engineers will research

  9. 2014 PMEL Lab Review 1 Background

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    integrated into ESGF software stack to provide discovery, exploration and download of subsets #12;2014 PMEL submission in development for version 4 #12;2014 PMEL Lab Review 17 Isn't this the PMEL lab lifecycle ·minimizes effort required by researchers ·Greatly improves access for users Do it in a wa

  10. n CAPABILITY STATEMENT Intelligent Transport Systems Lab

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liley, David

    collaborative research programs with the following institutions and organisations: VicRoads ARRB ITSL is open Lab (ITSL) isVictoria's first dedicated traffic analysis research Lab established in April 2012 and Australia facilitate and foster excellent, industry relevant and cross-disciplinary research in Australia

  11. The dynamics and high-energy emission of conductive gas clouds in supernova-driven galactic superwinds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Marcolini; D. K. Strickland; A. D'Ercole; T. M. Heckman; C. G. Hoopes

    2005-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we present high-resolution hydrodynamical models of warm ionized clouds embedded in a superwind, and compare the OVI and soft X-ray properties to the existing observational data. These models include thermal conduction, which we show plays an important role in shaping both the dynamics and radiative properties of the resulting wind/cloud interaction. Heat conduction stabilizes the cloud by inhibiting the growth of K-H and R-T instabilities, and also generates a shock wave at the cloud's surface that compresses the cloud. This dynamical behaviour influences the observable properties. We find that while OVI emission and absorption always arises in cloud material at the periphery of the cloud, most of the soft X-ray arises in the region between the wind bow shock and the cloud surface, and probes either wind or cloud material depending on the strength of conduction and the relative abundances of the wind with respect to the cloud. In general only a small fraction (thermal conduction, in particular in terms of the OVI-to-X-ray luminosity ratio, but cloud life times are uncomfortably short (thermal conductivity and found that even when we reduced conduction by a factor of 25 that the simulations retained the beneficial hydrodynamical stability and low O{\\sc vi}-to-X-ray luminosity ratio found in the Spitzer-level conductive models, while also having reduced evaporation rates.

  12. Berkeley Lab's Bill Collins talks about Modeling the Changing...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Berkeley Lab's Bill Collins talks about Modeling the Changing Earth System: Prospects and Challenges. From the 2014 NERSC User's Group Meeting Berkeley Lab's Bill Collins talks...

  13. Jefferson Lab's Science Education Website Helps Students Prepare...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Jefferson Lab's Science Education Website Helps Students Prepare for Upcoming Standards of Learning Tests April 12, 2004 Usage of Jefferson Lab's Science Education website is...

  14. Integrated Virtual Lab in Supporting Heavy Duty Engine and Vehicle...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Virtual Lab in Supporting Heavy Duty Engine and Vehicle Emission Rulemaking Integrated Virtual Lab in Supporting Heavy Duty Engine and Vehicle Emission Rulemaking Presentation...

  15. Jefferson Lab Contract to be Awarded to Jefferson Science Associates...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Jefferson Lab Contract to be Awarded to Jefferson Science Associates, LLC for Management and Operation of World-Class Office of Science Laboratory Jefferson Lab Contract to be...

  16. ASC at the Labs | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Our Programs Defense Programs Future Science & Technology Programs Advanced Simulation and Computing and Institutional R&D Programs ASC at the Labs ASC at the Labs The...

  17. President Obama Visits the Argonne National Research Lab to Talk...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    President Obama Visits the Argonne National Research Lab to Talk About American Energy Security President Obama Visits the Argonne National Research Lab to Talk About American...

  18. National Lab Day Fact Sheets | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Lab Day Fact Sheets Secretary Ernest Moniz learns about the Labs' work in high performance computing and additive manufacturing. | Photo courtesy of Sarah Gerrity, Energy...

  19. MOU signed between CIAE and Jefferson National Lab, USA. (China...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    https:www.jlab.orgnewsarticlesmou-signed-between-ciae-and-jefferson-national-lab-usa-china-nuclear-industry-news-ge... MOU signed between CIAE and Jefferson National Lab, USA....

  20. Energy Department Announces New Lab Program to Accelerate Commercializ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lab Program to Accelerate Commercialization of Clean Energy Technologies Energy Department Announces New Lab Program to Accelerate Commercialization of Clean Energy Technologies...

  1. Energy Department, Oak Ridge National Lab Officials to Celebrate...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Department, Oak Ridge National Lab Officials to Celebrate First of its Kind Carbon Fiber Facility Energy Department, Oak Ridge National Lab Officials to Celebrate First of its Kind...

  2. Particle Measurement Methodology: Comparison of On-road and Lab...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Measurement Methodology: Comparison of On-road and Lab Diesel Particle Size Distributions Particle Measurement Methodology: Comparison of On-road and Lab Diesel Particle Size...

  3. EA-1852: Cloud County Community College Wind Energy Project,...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    2: Cloud County Community College Wind Energy Project, Cloud County, Kansas EA-1852: Cloud County Community College Wind Energy Project, Cloud County, Kansas Summary This EA...

  4. Environmental control of cloud-to-ground lightning polarity in severe storms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buffalo, Kurt Matthew

    2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    polarity of severe storms by directly affecting their structural, dynamical, and microphysical properties, which in turn directly control cloud electrification and CG flash polarity. A more specific hypothesis, which has been supported by past............................................................................... 23 a. Thunderstorm electrification ................................................ 23 1) Charging mechanisms and typical charge structure ... 23 2) Cloud-to-ground lightning flash................................. 27 3...

  5. MAGIC: Marine ARM GPCI Investigation of Clouds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewis, ER; Wiscombe, WJ; Albrecht, BA; Bland, GL; Flagg, CN; Klein, SA; Kollias, P; Mace, G; Reynolds, RM; Schwartz, SE; Siebesma, AP; Teixeira, J; Wood, R; Zhang, M

    2012-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The second Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Mobile Facility (AMF2) will be deployed aboard the Horizon Lines cargo container ship merchant vessel (M/V) Spirit for MAGIC, the Marine ARM GPCI1 Investigation of Clouds. The Spirit will traverse the route between Los Angeles, California, and Honolulu, Hawaii, from October 2012 through September 2013 (except for a few months in the middle of this time period when the ship will be in dry dock). During this field campaign, AMF2 will observe and characterize the properties of clouds and precipitation, aerosols, and atmospheric radiation; standard meteorological and oceanographic variables; and atmospheric structure. There will also be two intensive observational periods (IOPs), one in January 2013 and one in July 2013, during which more detailed measurements of the atmospheric structure will be made.

  6. SLAC All Access: Laser Labs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Minitti, Mike; Woods Mike

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    From supermarket checkouts to video game consoles, lasers are ubiquitous in our lives. Here at SLAC, high-power lasers are critical to the cutting-edge research conducted at the laboratory. But, despite what you might imagine, SLAC's research lasers bear little resemblance to the blasters and phasers of science fiction. In this edition of All Access we put on our safety goggles for a peek at what goes on inside some of SLAC's many laser labs. LCLS staff scientist Mike Minitti and SLAC laser safety officer Mike Woods detail how these lasers are used to study the behavior of subatomic particles, broaden our understanding of cosmic rays and even unlock the mysteries of photosynthesis.

  7. SLAC All Access: Laser Labs

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Minitti, Mike; Woods Mike

    2014-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    From supermarket checkouts to video game consoles, lasers are ubiquitous in our lives. Here at SLAC, high-power lasers are critical to the cutting-edge research conducted at the laboratory. But, despite what you might imagine, SLAC's research lasers bear little resemblance to the blasters and phasers of science fiction. In this edition of All Access we put on our safety goggles for a peek at what goes on inside some of SLAC's many laser labs. LCLS staff scientist Mike Minitti and SLAC laser safety officer Mike Woods detail how these lasers are used to study the behavior of subatomic particles, broaden our understanding of cosmic rays and even unlock the mysteries of photosynthesis.

  8. Jefferson Lab's Trim Card II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trent Allison; Sarin Philip; C. Higgins; Edward Martin; William Merz

    2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Jefferson Lab's Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) uses Trim Card I power supplies to drive approximately 1900 correction magnets. These trim cards have had a long and illustrious service record. However, some of the employed technology is now obsolete, making it difficult to maintain the system and retain adequate spares. The Trim Card II is being developed to act as a transparent replacement for its aging predecessor. A modular approach has been taken in its development to facilitate the substitution of sections for future improvements and maintenance. The resulting design has been divided into a motherboard and 7 daughter cards which has also allowed for parallel development. The Trim Card II utilizes modern technologies such as a Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) and a microprocessor to embed trim card controls and diagnostics. These reprogrammable devices also provide the versatility to incorporate future requirements.

  9. CloudAnalyst: A CloudSim-based Visual Modeller for Analysing Cloud Computing Environments and Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calheiros, Rodrigo N.

    CloudAnalyst: A CloudSim-based Visual Modeller for Analysing Cloud Computing Environments and Applications Bhathiya Wickremasinghe1 , Rodrigo N. Calheiros2 , and Rajkumar Buyya1 1 The Cloud Computing and Distributed Systems (CLOUDS) Laboratory Department of Computer Science and Software Engineering The University

  10. CloudSat Overview CloudSat will provide, from space, the first global survey of cloud profiles and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on the radiative and water budgets of clouds are broadly referred to as indirect aerosol effects. The aerosol processes and their accumulated effects on the global scale. 2. Mission Description CloudSat is plannedCloudSat Overview CloudSat will provide, from space, the first global survey of cloud profiles

  11. The 4th Generation Light Source at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephen Benson; George Biallas; James Boyce; Donald Bullard; James Coleman; David Douglas; H. Dylla; Richard Evans; Pavel Evtushenko; Albert Grippo; Christopher Gould; Joseph Gubeli; David Hardy; Carlos Hernandez-Garcia; Kevin Jordan; John Klopf; Steven Moore; George Neil; Thomas Powers; Joseph Preble; Daniel Sexton; Michelle D. Shinn; Christopher Tennant; Richard Walker; Shukui Zhang; Gwyn Williams

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A number of "Grand Challenges" in Science have recently been identified in reports from The National Academy of Sciences, and the U.S. Dept. of Energy, Basic Energy Sciences. Many of these require a new generation of linac-based light source to study dynamical and non-linear phenomena in nanoscale samples. In this paper we present a summary of the properties of such light sources, comparing them with existing sources, and then describing in more detail a specific source at Jefferson Lab. Importantly, the JLab light source has developed some novel technology which is a critical enabler for other new light sources.

  12. A New Two-Moment Bulk Stratiform Cloud Microphysics Scheme in the Community Atmosphere Model, Version 3 (CAM3). Part II: Single-Column and Global Results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gettelman, Andrew

    on climate by modifying the cloud radiative properties, that is, indirect aerosol effects (Twomey 1977 as the hydrological cycle. Thus, clouds are critical in maintaining the global energy balance. For example change (Bony et al. 2006). The effects of aerosols on cloud particles may also have a significant impact

  13. The Ability of MM5 to Simulate Ice Clouds: Systematic Comparison between Simulated and Measured Fluxes and Lidar/Radar Profiles at the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Protat, Alain

    distribution are critical to the global radiative effect of ice clouds. One of the main uncertainties. To quantify the effect of these clouds onto climate and weather systems, their global coverage, altitude, tem effect. Both macrophysical and microphysical properties of ice clouds regulate this equilibrium

  14. A Catalog of HI Clouds in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Kim; E. Rosolowsky; Y. Lee; Y. Kim; Y. C. Jung; M. A. Dopita; B. G. Elmegreen; K. C. Freeman; R. J. Sault; M. J. Kesteven; D. McConnell; Y. -H. Chu

    2007-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A 21 cm neutral hydrogen interferometric survey of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) combined with the Parkes multi-beam HI single-dish survey clearly shows that the HI gas is distributed in the form of clumps or clouds. The HI clouds and clumps have been identified using a thresholding method with three separate brightness temperature thresholds ($T_b$). Each catalog of HI cloud candidates shows a power law relationship between the sizes and the velocity dispersions of the clouds roughly following the Larson Law scaling $\\sigma_v \\propto R^{0.5}$, with steeper indices associated with dynamically hot regions. The clouds in each catalog have roughly constant virial parameters as a function mass suggesting that that the clouds are all in roughly the same dynamical state, but the values of the virial parameter are significantly larger than unity showing that turbulent motions dominate gravity in these clouds. The mass distribution of the clouds is a power law with differential indices between -1.6 and -2.0 for the three catalogs. In contrast, the distribution of mean surface densities is a log-normal distribution.

  15. Jefferson Lab Visitor's Center - Driving in Virginia

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12 InvestigationLabNewLabLab To ReceiveUserDriving

  16. Jefferson Lab Visitor's Center - Schedule a Tour

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12 InvestigationLabNewLabLab To

  17. Jefferson Lab Visitor's Center - Travel Accommodations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12 InvestigationLabNewLabLab ToTravel

  18. Broken and inhomogeneous cloud impact on satellite cloud particle effective radius and cloudphase retrievals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stoffelen, Ad

    on the particle size distribution, height, and thermo- dynamic phase of clouds. Water and ice clouds have parameterizations is the global dis- tribution of cloud thermodynamic phase, i.e., whether a cloud is composed on satellitederived cloud particle effective radius (re) and cloud phase (CPH) for broken and overcast inhomogeneous

  19. Labs21 Environmental Performance Criteria: Toward 'LEED (trademark) for Labs'

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mathew, Paul; Sartor, Dale; Lintner, William; Wirdzek, Phil

    2002-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Laboratory facilities present a unique challenge for energy efficient and sustainable design, with their inherent complexity of systems, health and safety requirements, long-term flexibility and adaptability needs, energy use intensity, and environmental impacts. The typical laboratory is about three to five times as energy intensive as a typical office building and costs about three times as much per unit area. In order to help laboratory stakeholders assess the environmental performance of their laboratories, the Labs21 program, sponsored by the US Environmental Protection Agency and the US Department of Energy, is developing the Environmental Performance Criteria (EPC), a point-based rating system that builds on the LEED(TM) rating system. Currently, LEED(TM) is the primary tool used to rate the sustainability of commercial buildings. However, it lacks some attributes essential to encouraging the application of sustainable design principles to laboratory buildings. Accordingly, the EPC has additions and modifications to the prerequisites and credits in each of the six sections of LEED(TM). It is being developed in a consensus-based approach by a diverse group of architects, engineers, consulting experts, health & safety personnel and facilities personnel. This report describes the EPC version 2.0, highlighting the underlying technical issues, and describes implications for the development of a LEED version for Laboratories.

  20. Study of Mechanisms of Aerosol Indirect Effects on Glaciated Clouds: Progress during the Project Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2013-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This 3-year project has studied how aerosol pollution influences glaciated clouds. The tool applied has been an 'aerosol-cloud model'. It is a type of Cloud-System Resolving Model (CSRM) modified to include 2-moment bulk microphysics and 7 aerosol species, as described by Phillips et al. (2009, 2013). The study has been done by, first, improving the model and then performing sensitivity studies with validated simulations of a couple of observed cases from ARM. These are namely the Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) over the tropical west Pacific and the Cloud and Land Surface Interaction Campaign (CLASIC) over Oklahoma. During the project, sensitivity tests with the model showed that in continental clouds, extra liquid aerosols (soluble aerosol material) from pollution inhibited warm rain processes for precipitation production. This promoted homogeneous freezing of cloud droplets and aerosols. Mass and number concentrations of cloud-ice particles were boosted. The mean sizes of cloud-ice particles were reduced by the pollution. Hence, the lifetime of glaciated clouds, especially ice-only clouds, was augmented due to inhibition of sedimentation and ice-ice aggregation. Latent heat released from extra homogeneous freezing invigorated convective updrafts, and raised their maximum cloud-tops, when aerosol pollution was included. In the particular cases simulated in the project, the aerosol indirect effect of glaciated clouds was twice than of (warm) water clouds. This was because glaciated clouds are higher in the troposphere than water clouds and have the first interaction with incoming solar radiation. Ice-only clouds caused solar cooling by becoming more extensive as a result of aerosol pollution. This 'lifetime indirect effect' of ice-only clouds was due to higher numbers of homogeneously nucleated ice crystals causing a reduction in their mean size, slowing the ice-crystal process of snow production and slowing sedimentation. In addition to the known indirect effects (glaciation, riming and thermodynamic), new indirect effects were discovered and quantified due to responses of sedimentation, aggregation and coalescence in glaciated clouds to changing aerosol conditions. In summary, the change in horizontal extent of the glaciated clouds ('lifetime indirect effects'), especially of ice-only clouds, was seen to be of higher importance in regulating aerosol indirect effects than changes in cloud properties ('cloud albedo indirect effects').

  1. September 1997 Coord `97 Lucent Technologies Bell Labs Innovations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perry, Dewayne E.

    1 September 1997 Coord `97 Lucent Technologies Bell Labs Innovations Software Architecture and its Hill NJ 07974 dep@research.bell-labs.com www.bell-labs.com/~dep/ September 1997 Coord `97 Lucent Engineering · Issues of Emerging Significance September 1997 Coord `97 Lucent Technologies Bell Labs

  2. Polluting of Winter Convective Clouds upon Transition from Ocean Inland Over Central California: Contrasting Case Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosenfeld, Daniel; Chemke, Rei; Prather, Kimberly; Suski, Kaitlyn; Comstock, Jennifer M.; Schmid, Beat; Tomlinson, Jason M.; Jonsson, Haf

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In-situ aircraft measurements of aerosol chemical and cloud microphysical properties were conducted during the CalWater campaign in February and March 2011 over the Sierra Nevada Mountains and the coastal waters of central California. The main objective was to elucidate the impacts of aerosol properties on clouds and precipitation forming processes. In order to accomplish this, we compared contrasting cases of clouds that ingested aerosols from different sources. The results showed that clouds containing pristine oceanic air had low cloud drop concentrations and started to develop rain 500 m above their base. This occurred both over the ocean and over the Sierra Nevada, mainly in the early morning when the radiatively cooled stable continental boundary layer was decoupled from the cloud base. Supercooled rain dominated the precipitation that formed in growing convective clouds in the pristine air, up to the -21°C isotherm level. A contrasting situation was documented in the afternoon over the foothills of the Sierra Nevada, when the clouds ingested high pollution aerosol concentrations produced in the Central Valley. This led to slow growth of the cloud drop effective radius with height and suppressed and even prevented the initiation of warm rain while contributing to the development of ice hydrometeors in the form of graupel. Our results show that cloud condensation and ice nuclei were the limiting factors that controlled warm rain and ice processes, respectively, while the unpolluted clouds in the same air mass produced precipitation quite efficiently. These findings provide the motivation for deeper investigations into the nature of the aerosols seeding clouds.

  3. Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE): Cloud and Rain Characteristics in the Australian Monsoon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PT May; C Jakob; JH Mather

    2004-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The impact of oceanic convection on its environment and the relationship between the characteristics of the convection and the resulting cirrus characteristics is still not understood. An intense airborne measurement campaign combined with an extensive network of ground-based observations is being planned for the region near Darwin, Northern Australia, during January-February, 2006, to address these questions. The Tropical Warm Pool – International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) will be the first field program in the tropics that attempts to describe the evolution of tropical convection, including the large scale heat, moisture, and momentum budgets, while at the same time obtaining detailed observations of cloud properties and the impact of the clouds on the environment. The emphasis will be on cirrus for the cloud properties component of the experiment. Cirrus clouds are ubiquitous in the tropics and have a large impact on their environment but the properties of these clouds are poorly understood. A crucial product from this experiment will be a dataset suitable to provide the forcing and testing required by cloud-resolving models and parameterizations in global climate models. This dataset will provide the necessary link between cloud properties and the models that are attempting to simulate them. The experiment is a collaboration between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program, the Bureau of Meteorology (BoM), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the European Commission DG RTD-1.2, and several United States, Australian, Canadian, and European Universities. This experiment will be undertaken over a 4-week period in early 2006. January and February corresponds to the wet phase of the Australia monsoon. This season has been selected because, despite Darwin’s coastal location, the convection that occurs over and near Darwin at this time is largely of maritime origin with a large fetch over water. Based on previous experiments, the convection appears typical of maritime convection with widespread convection that has complex organization, but is not as deep or as intense as continental or coastal convection. Therefore, it is expected that the convection and cloud characteristics will be representative of conditions typical for wide areas of the tropics.

  4. Berkeley Lab Creates Superfast Search Engine

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Scientists at the Energy Department's Berkeley Lab developed a new approach to searching massive databases that can increase speeds by 10 to 100 times that of large commercial database software.

  5. John E. Hasse, Geospatial Research Lab,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ap Executive Summary July 2010 John E. Hasse, Geospatial Research Lab Geospatial Research Laboratory Department of Geography Rowan University 201 Mullica Hill Road Glassboro by John Reiser, GIS specialist for the Rowan Geospatial Research Laboratory. http

  6. Lab experiences for teaching undergraduate dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lilienkamp, Katherine A. (Katherine Ann), 1969-

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis describes several projects developed to teach undergraduate dynamics and controls. The materials were developed primarily for the class 2.003 Modeling Dynamics and Control I. These include (1) a set of ActivLab ...

  7. Curnputr:r Labs. C:unficlential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mojzsis, Stephen J.

    #12;Curnputr:r Labs. Concurrent C:unficlential . 33-34 ...... 18-19 ., C) ...... JL. ........ 35 ................................................................... 98 Engineering............................................................. 100 Journalism .............................................................. 7, 12, 14 High School Concurrent Registration ............................. 36 Immunization

  8. Security Lab Series Introduction to Cryptography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tao, Lixin

    ......................................................................................7 4.2 Symmetric Key Encryption/Decryption with GPG/Decryption .....................................................11 4.3.1 Basic Concepts of PGP (GPG) Digital Certificates and Public Key Ciphers...............11 4.3.2 A Detailed Lab Guide for GPG

  9. Ames Lab 101: Rare-Earth Magnets

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    McCallum, Bill

    2012-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Senior Scientist, Bill McCallum, briefly discusses rare-earth magnets and their uses and how Ames Lab is research new ways to save money and energy using magnets.

  10. Security Lab Series Introduction to Web Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tao, Lixin

    Security Lab Series Introduction to Web Technologies Prof. Lixin Tao Pace University http...........................................................................................................................................1 1.1 Web ArchitectureScript..................................................................................16 4.6 Creating Your First JavaServer Page Web Application

  11. Getting Started Computing at the AI Lab

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stacy, Christopher C.

    1982-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes the computing facilities at M.I.T. Artificial Intelligence Laboratory, and explains how to get started using them. It is intended as an orientation document for newcomers to the lab, and will be ...

  12. BEAMS Lab at MIT: Status report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liberman, Rosa G.

    The Biological Engineering Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (BEAMS) Lab at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology is a facility dedicated to incorporating AMS into life sciences research. As such, it is focused exclusively ...

  13. The Dynamical Structure and Evolution of Giant Molecular Clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christopher F. McKee

    1999-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Giant molecular clouds (GMCs) are the sites of star formation in the Galaxy. Many of their properties can be understood in terms of a model in which the GMCs and the star-forming clumps within them are in approximate pressure equilibrium, with turbulent motions treated as a separate pressure component.

  14. A Survey on Cloud Provider Security

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Survey on Cloud Provider Security Measures Alex Pucher, Stratos Dimopoulos Abstract Cloud take advantage of this model already, but security and privacy concerns limit the further adoption agencies and start offering security certifications and separate tightly controlled "government" cloud

  15. Cicada: Predictive Guarantees for Cloud Network Bandwidth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LaCurts, Katrina

    2014-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    In cloud-computing systems, network-bandwidth guarantees have been shown to improve predictability of application performance and cost. Most previous work on cloud-bandwidth guarantees has assumed that cloud tenants know ...

  16. DIRSIG Cloud Modeling Capabilities; A Parametric Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salvaggio, Carl

    1 DIRSIG Cloud Modeling Capabilities; A Parametric Study Kristen Powers powers:................................................................................................................... 13 Calculation of Sensor Reaching Radiance Truth Values for Cloudless & Stratus Cloud Scenes and Atmospheric Database Creation for Stratus Cloud Scene & Calculation of Associated Sensor Reaching Radiance

  17. Magellan: experiences from a Science Cloud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramakrishnan, Lavanya

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2010. From Clusters To Clouds: xCAT 2 Is Out Of The Bag.Cost of Doing Science on the Cloud: The Montage Example. Incost of doing science on the cloud: the montage example. In

  18. The Cloud Computing and Other Variables

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borjon-Kubota, Martha Estela

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    12. Fragments in Six 13. Cloud Computing 14. Phase 15.Note 48. Devoured vi Cloud Computing and other Variables I.moment. Lasts hours. Cloud Computing Just there Over the

  19. The Magellan Final Report on Cloud Computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coghlan, Susan

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    4.3.1 Cloud Computing Attractive Features . 4.3.2A berkeley view of cloud computing. Technical Report UCB/matching computations on cloud computing platforms and hpc

  20. How Common are the Magellanic Clouds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Lulu; Gerke, Brian F.; Wechsler, Risa H.; Behroozi, Peter S.; Busha, Michael T.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC

    2011-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce a probabilistic approach to the problem of counting dwarf satellites around host galaxies in databases with limited redshift information. This technique is used to investigate the occurrence of satellites with luminosities similar to the Magellanic Clouds around hosts with properties similar to the Milky Way in the object catalog of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Our analysis uses data from SDSS Data Release 7, selecting candidate Milky-Way-like hosts from the spectroscopic catalog and candidate analogs of the Magellanic Clouds from the photometric catalog. Our principal result is the probability for a Milky-Way-like galaxy to host N{sub sat} close satellites with luminosities similar to the Magellanic Clouds. We find that 81 percent of galaxies like the Milky Way have no such satellites within a radius of 150 kpc, 11 percent have one, and only 3.5 percent of hosts have two. The probabilities are robust to changes in host and satellite selection criteria, background-estimation technique, and survey depth. These results demonstrate that the Milky Way has significantly more satellites than a typical galaxy of its luminosity; this fact is useful for understanding the larger cosmological context of our home galaxy.

  1. Embracing the Cloud for Better Cyber Security

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shue, Craig A [ORNL; Lagesse, Brent J [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The future of cyber security is inextricably tied to the future of computing. Organizational needs and economic factors will drive computing outcomes. Cyber security researchers and practitioners must recognize the path of computing evolution and position themselves to influence the process to incorporate security as an inherent property. The best way to predict future computing trends is to look at recent developments and their motivations. Organizations are moving towards outsourcing their data storage, computation, and even user desktop environments. This trend toward cloud computing has a direct impact on cyber security: rather than securing user machines, preventing malware access, and managing removable media, a cloud-based security scheme must focus on enabling secure communication with remote systems. This change in approach will have profound implications for cyber security research efforts. In this work, we highlight existing and emerging technologies and the limitations of cloud computing systems. We then discuss the cyber security efforts that would support these applications. Finally, we discuss the implications of these computing architecture changes, in particular with respect to malware and social engineering.

  2. Using cloud resolving model simulations of deep convection to inform cloud parameterizations in large-scale models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klein, Stephen A.; Pincus, Robert; Xu, Kuan-man

    2003-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Cloud parameterizations in large-scale models struggle to address the significant non-linear effects of radiation and precipitation that arise from horizontal inhomogeneity in cloud properties at scales smaller than the grid box size of the large-scale models. Statistical cloud schemes provide an attractive framework to self-consistently predict the horizontal inhomogeneity in radiation and microphysics because the probability distribution function (PDF) of total water contained in the scheme can be used to calculate these non-linear effects. Statistical cloud schemes were originally developed for boundary layer studies so extending them to a global model with many different environments is not straightforward. For example, deep convection creates abundant cloudiness and yet little is known about how deep convection alters the PDF of total water or how to parameterize these impacts. These issues are explored with data from a 29 day simulation by a cloud resolving model (CRM) of the July 1997 ARM Intensive Observing Period at the Southern Great Plains site. The simulation is used to answer two questions: (a) how well can the beta distribution represent the PDFs of total water relative to saturation resolved by the CRM? (b) how can the effects of convection on the PDF be parameterized? In addition to answering these questions, additional sections more fully describe the proposed statistical cloud scheme and the CRM simulation and analysis methods.

  3. Effects of Ocean Ecosystem on Marine Aerosol-Cloud Interaction

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Meskhidze, Nicholas; Nenes, Athanasios

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using satellite data for the surface ocean, aerosol optical depth (AOD), and cloud microphysical parameters, we show that statistically significant positive correlations exist between ocean ecosystem productivity, the abundance of submicron aerosols, and cloud microphysical properties over different parts of the remote oceans. The correlation coefficient for remotely sensed surface chlorophyllaconcentration ([Chl-a]) and liquid cloud effective radii over productive areas of the oceans varies between?0.2and?0.6. Special attention is given to identifying (and addressing) problems from correlation analysis used in the previous studies that can lead to erroneous conclusions. A new approach (using the difference between retrieved AOD and predicted seamore »salt aerosol optical depth,AODdiff) is developed to explore causal links between ocean physical and biological systems and the abundance of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) in the remote marine atmosphere. We have found that over multiple time periods, 550?nmAODdiff(sensitive to accumulation mode aerosol, which is the prime contributor to CCN) correlates well with [Chl-a] over the productive waters of the Southern Ocean. Since [Chl-a] can be used as a proxy of ocean biological productivity, our analysis demonstrates the role of ocean ecology in contributing CCN, thus shaping the microphysical properties of low-level marine clouds.« less

  4. UNDERSTANDING TRENDS ASSOCIATED WITH CLOUDS IN IRRADIATED EXOPLANETS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heng, Kevin [University of Bern, Center for Space and Habitability, Sidlerstrasse 5, CH-3012 Bern (Switzerland); Demory, Brice-Olivier, E-mail: kevin.heng@csh.unibe.ch, E-mail: demory@mit.edu [Department of Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2013-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Unlike previously explored relationships between the properties of hot Jovian atmospheres, the geometric albedo and the incident stellar flux do not exhibit a clear correlation, as revealed by our re-analysis of Q0-Q14 Kepler data. If the albedo is primarily associated with the presence of clouds in these irradiated atmospheres, a holistic modeling approach needs to relate the following properties: the strength of stellar irradiation (and hence the strength and depth of atmospheric circulation), the geometric albedo (which controls both the fraction of starlight absorbed and the pressure level at which it is predominantly absorbed), and the properties of the embedded cloud particles (which determine the albedo). The anticipated diversity in cloud properties renders any correlation between the geometric albedo and the stellar flux weak and characterized by considerable scatter. In the limit of vertically uniform populations of scatterers and absorbers, we use an analytical model and scaling relations to relate the temperature-pressure profile of an irradiated atmosphere and the photon deposition layer and to estimate whether a cloud particle will be lofted by atmospheric circulation. We derive an analytical formula for computing the albedo spectrum in terms of the cloud properties, which we compare to the measured albedo spectrum of HD 189733b by Evans et al. Furthermore, we show that whether an optical phase curve is flat or sinusoidal depends on whether the particles are small or large as defined by the Knudsen number. This may be an explanation for why Kepler-7b exhibits evidence for the longitudinal variation in abundance of condensates, while Kepler-12b shows no evidence for the presence of condensates despite the incident stellar flux being similar for both exoplanets. We include an 'observer's cookbook' for deciphering various scenarios associated with the optical phase curve, the peak offset of the infrared phase curve, and the geometric albedo.

  5. 3, 44614488, 2003 Cloud particle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    effects. On one hand, clouds reflect the incoming solar radiation and thus cool the Earth significant effect on the radiation balance (Wielicki et al, 1996; Mitchell, 1989) due to two competing-Atmosphere system. On the other hand, clouds absorb longwave thermal radiation coming from the surface and then re

  6. Natelson Lab abbreviated safety procedures For full, detailed discussion of lab safety, see Natelson Lab Safety Manual and Chemical Hygiene Plan.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Natelson, Douglas

    Natelson Lab Safety Manual and Chemical Hygiene Plan. An additional resource is "Prudent Practices-348-2485 (Based in part on 2012 Tour Lab chemical hygiene plan) Updated, September, 2013 #12;Major Medical

  7. Dissertation Lab (D-Lab) May 21, 22, and 23, 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Arlington, University of

    Dissertation Lab (D-Lab) May 21, 22, and 23, 2013 Rady Room, 6th Floor Nedderman Hall What through the difficult process of writing their dissertation. Over the course of three days, D participants with the structure and motivation to overcome typical roadblocks in the dissertation process. Our

  8. Clemson University Plant Problem Clinic, Nematode Assay Lab and Molecular Plant Pathogen Detection Lab

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Steven J.

    Clemson University Plant Problem Clinic, Nematode Assay Lab and Molecular Plant Pathogen Detection Lab Annual Report for 2012 The Plant Problem Clinic serves the people of South Carolina through the Clinic. Plant pathogens, insect pests and weeds can significantly reduce plant growth

  9. Cite this: Lab Chip, 2013, 13, 3929 Lab-on-CMOS integration of microfluidics and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mason, Andrew

    Cite this: Lab Chip, 2013, 13, 3929 Lab-on-CMOS integration of microfluidics and electrochemical* and Andrew J. Mason This paper introduces a CMOS­microfluidics integration scheme for electrochemical of the carrier, leaving a flat and smooth surface for integrating microfluidic structures. A model device

  10. Dynamical modeling of the Deep Impact dust ejecta cloud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tanyu Bonev; Nancy Ageorges; Stefano Bagnulo; Luis Barrera; Hermann B{ö}hnhardt; Olivier Hainaut; Emmanuel Jehin; Hans-Ullrich K{ä}ufl; Florian Kerber; Gaspare LoCurto; Jean Manfroid; Olivier Marco; Eric Pantin; Emanuela Pompei; Ivo Saviane; Fernando Selman; Chris Sterken; Heike Rauer; Gian Paolo Tozzi; Michael Weiler

    2007-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The collision of Deep Impact with comet 9P/Tempel 1 generated a bright cloud of dust which dissipated during several days after the impact. The brightness variations of this cloud and the changes of its position and shape are governed by the physical properties of the dust grains. We use a Monte Carlo model to describe the evolution of the post-impact dust plume. The results of our dynamical simulations are compared to the data obtained with FORS2, the FOcal Reducer and low dispersion Spectrograph for the VLT of the European Southern Observatory (ESO), to derive the particle size distribution and the total amount of material contained in the dust ejecta cloud.

  11. Platform for Hybrid Cloud Technical White Paper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaudhuri, Surajit

    Platform for Hybrid Cloud Technical White Paper Published: September 2013 (updated) Applies to: SQL Server and Windows Azure Summary: Cloud computing brings a new paradigm shift in computing in the cloud with greater scale and flexibility. Microsoft SQL Server runs very well in the cloud environment

  12. Cloud Computing An enterprise perspective Raghavan Subramanian

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rajamani, Sriram K.

    Cloud Computing ­ An enterprise perspective Raghavan Subramanian Infosys Technologies Limited #12;2Infosys Confidential Overview of cloud computing? Cloud computing* Computing in which dynamically scalable of cloud computing 1. On-demand self-service 2. Ubiquitous network access 3. Location independent resource

  13. IBM Software Solution Brief Safeguarding the cloud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    IBM Software Solution Brief Safeguarding the cloud with IBM Security solutions Maintain visibility and control with proven security solutions for public, private and hybrid clouds Highlights Address cloud internal and external users, data, applications and workloads as they move to and from the cloud Regain

  14. 7, 1711717146, 2007 Dependence of cloud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ACPD 7, 17117­17146, 2007 Dependence of cloud fraction and cloud height on temperature T. Wagner et a Creative Commons License. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Discussions Dependence of cloud fraction and cloud top height on surface temperature derived from spectrally resolved UV/vis satellite observations T

  15. Draft NISTIR 80061 NIST Cloud Computing2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Draft NISTIR 80061 NIST Cloud Computing2 Forensic Science Challenges NIST Cloud Computing Forensic Computing11 Forensic Science Challenges 12 NIST Cloud Computing Forensic Science Working Group13 Information challenges77 faced by experts when responding to incidents that have occurred in a cloud-computing ecosystem

  16. Cloud Data Management (CDM) Yunpeng Chai

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    /W performance / Parallelism No/ Simple SQL operations 12 /26 Survey of CDM Cloud Storage: Architecture: Master#12;Cloud Data Management (CDM) Yunpeng Chai 2 /26 Outline Motivation of CDM Survey of CDM IBM SUR Cloud China Mobile National Health Care #12;9 /26 Outline Motivation of CDM Survey of CDM IBM SUR Cloud

  17. 6, 43414373, 2006 Cloud-borne aerosol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Discussions Impact of cloud-borne aerosol representation on aerosol direct and indirect effects S. J. Ghan of aerosols employ a variety of rep- resentations of such cloud-borne particles. Here we use a global aerosol- ulated aerosol, cloud and radiation fields to various approximations to the representa- tion of cloud

  18. Cloud radar Doppler spectra in drizzling stratiform clouds: 2. Observations and microphysical modeling of drizzle evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cloud radar Doppler spectra in drizzling stratiform clouds: 2. Observations and microphysical I, the influence of cloud microphysics and dynamics on the shape of cloud radar Doppler spectra in warm stratiform clouds was discussed. The traditional analysis of radar Doppler moments was extended

  19. Vision: Cloud-Powered Sight for All Showing the Cloud What You See

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhong, Lin

    Vision: Cloud-Powered Sight for All Showing the Cloud What You See Paramvir Bahl Matthai Philipose argue that for computers to do more for us, we need to show the cloud what we see and embrace cloud General Terms Algorithms, Design, Human Factors, Languages, Performance, Security Keywords Camera, cloud

  20. CLOUD, DRIZZLE, AND TURBULENCE OBSERVATIONS IN MARINE STRATOCUMULUS CLOUDS IN THE AZORES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CLOUD, DRIZZLE, AND TURBULENCE OBSERVATIONS IN MARINE STRATOCUMULUS CLOUDS IN THE AZORES Jasmine at the Azores provided a unique, long-term record (May 2009 to December 2010) of cloud observations in a regime dominated by low-level stratiform clouds. First, a comprehensive cloud classification scheme that utilizes

  1. Cloud Futures Workshop 2010 Cloud Computing Support for Massively Social Gaming Alexandru Iosup

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iosup, Alexandru

    1 Cloud Futures Workshop 2010 ­ Cloud Computing Support for Massively Social Gaming Alexandru Iosup Pierre (Vrije U.). Cloud Computing Support for Massively Social Gaming (Rain for the Thirsty) #12;Cloud Futures Workshop 2010 ­ Cloud Computing Support for Massively Social Gaming 2 Intermezzo: Tips on how

  2. Changes in Cloud Cover and Cloud Types Over the Ocean from Surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hochberg, Michael

    Total cloud cover 54 68 Clear sky (frequency) 22 3 #12;Low Clouds & Solar Radiation Low clouds scatterChanges in Cloud Cover and Cloud Types Over the Ocean from Surface Observations, 1954-2008 Ryan This produces a weak net warming effect in the atmosphere, since more radiation comes in, and less goes out

  3. Decomposing aerosol cloud radiative effects into cloud cover, liquid water path and Twomey components

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel, Rosenfeld

    Decomposing aerosol cloud radiative effects into cloud cover, liquid water path and Twomey interactions radiative effects, i.e., the cloud cover, liquid water path (LWP) and cloud drop radius (Twomey negative radiative forcing on the global scale, mainly due to the cloud cover effect. © 2013 Elsevier B

  4. A Survey of Changes in Cloud Cover and Cloud Types over Land from Surface Observations, 197196

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hochberg, Michael

    of their effects on solar radiation, terrestrial radiation, and precipitation. These effects depend on cloud height, and the season of the year and time of day. The effect of clouds on the earth's radiation budget, the "cloud to be a useful classification in studies of cloud processes (Houze 1993). The climatic effects of clouds further

  5. Parameterizations of Cloud Microphysics and Indirect Aerosol Effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo [NASA/GSFC] [NASA/GSFC

    2014-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    1. OVERVIEW Aerosols and especially their effect on clouds are one of the key components of the climate system and the hydrological cycle [Ramanathan et al., 2001]. Yet, the aerosol effect on clouds remains largely unknown and the processes involved not well understood. A recent report published by the National Academy of Science states "The greatest uncertainty about the aerosol climate forcing - indeed, the largest of all the uncertainties about global climate forcing - is probably the indirect effect of aerosols on clouds [NRC, 2001]." The aerosol effect on clouds is often categorized into the traditional "first indirect (i.e., Twomey)" effect on the cloud droplet sizes for a constant liquid water path [Twomey, 1977] and the "semi-direct" effect on cloud coverage [e.g., Ackerman et al., 2000]. Enhanced aerosol concentrations can also suppress warm rain processes by producing a narrow droplet spectrum that inhibits collision and coalescence processes [e.g., Squires and Twomey, 1961; Warner and Twomey, 1967; Warner, 1968; Rosenfeld, 1999]. The aerosol effect on precipitation processes, also known as the second type of aerosol indirect effect [Albrecht, 1989], is even more complex, especially for mixed-phase convective clouds. Table 1 summarizes the key observational studies identifying the microphysical properties, cloud characteristics, thermodynamics and dynamics associated with cloud systems from high-aerosol continental environments. For example, atmospheric aerosol concentrations can influence cloud droplet size distributions, warm-rain process, cold-rain process, cloud-top height, the depth of the mixed phase region, and occurrence of lightning. In addition, high aerosol concentrations in urban environments could affect precipitation variability by providing an enhanced source of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). Hypotheses have been developed to explain the effect of urban regions on convection and precipitation [van den Heever and Cotton, 2007 and Shepherd, 2005]. Recently, a detailed spectral-bin microphysical scheme was implemented into the Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (GCE) model. Atmospheric aerosols are also described using number density size-distribution functions. A spectral-bin microphysical model is very expensive from a computational point of view and has only been implemented into the 2D version of the GCE at the present time. The model is tested by studying the evolution of deep tropical clouds in the west Pacific warm pool region and summertime convection over a mid-latitude continent with different concentrations of CCN: a low "clean" concentration and a high "dirty" concentration. The impact of atmospheric aerosol concentration on cloud and precipitation will be investigated. 2. MODEL DESCRIPTION AND CASE STUDIES 2.1 GCE MODEL The model used in this study is the 2D version of the GCE model. Modeled flow is anelastic. Second- or higher-order advection schemes can produce negative values in the solution. Thus, a Multi-dimensional Positive Definite Advection Transport Algorithm (MPDATA) has been implemented into the model. All scalar variables (potential temperature, water vapor, turbulent coefficient and all five hydrometeor classes) use forward time differencing and the MPDATA for advection. Dynamic variables, u, v and w, use a second-order accurate advection scheme and a leapfrog time integration (kinetic energy semi-conserving method). Short-wave (solar) and long-wave radiation as well as a subgrid-scale TKE turbulence scheme are also included in the model. Details of the model can be found in Tao and Simpson (1993) and Tao et al. (2003). 2.2 Microphysics (Bin Model) The formulation of the explicit spectral-bin microphysical processes is based on solving stochastic kinetic equations for the size distribution functions of water droplets (cloud droplets and raindrops), and six types of ice particles: pristine ice crystals (columnar and plate-like), snow (dendrites and aggregates), graupel and frozen drops/hail. Each type is described by a special size distribution function containing 33 categories (bin

  6. Mixed phase clouds, cloud electrification and remote sensing.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chylek, P. (Petr); Borel, C. C. (Christoph C.); Klett, James

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Most of hypothesis trying to explain charge separation in thunderstorm clouds require presence of ice and supercooled water. Thus the existence of ice or at least mixed phase regions near cloud tops should be a necessary (but not a sufficient) condition for development of lightning. We show that multispectral satellite based instruments, like the DOE MTI (Multispectral Thermal Imager) or NASA MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer), using the near infrared and visible spectral bands are able to distinguish between water, ice and mixed phase cloud regions. An analysis of the MTI images of mixed phase clouds - with spatial resolution of about 20 m - shows regions of pure water, pure ice as well as regions of water/ice mixtures. We suggest that multispectral satellite instruments may be useful for a short time forecast of lightning probabilities.

  7. Cloud and Star Formation in Disk Galaxy Models with Feedback

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rahul Shetty; Eve C. Ostriker

    2008-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We include feedback in global hydrodynamic simulations in order to study the star formation properties, and gas structure and dynamics, in models of galactic disks. We extend previous models by implementing feedback in gravitationally bound clouds: momentum is injected at a rate proportional to the star formation rate. This mechanical energy disperses cloud gas back into the surrounding ISM, truncating star formation in a given cloud, and raising the overall level of ambient turbulence. Propagating star formation can however occur as expanding shells collide, enhancing the density and triggering new cloud and star formation. By controlling the momentum injection per massive star and the specific star formation rate in dense gas, we find that the negative effects of high turbulence outweigh the positive ones, and in net feedback reduces the fraction of dense gas and thus the overall star formation rate. The properties of the large clouds that form are not, however, very sensitive to feedback, with cutoff masses of a few million solar masses, similar to observations. We find a relationship between the star formation rate surface density and the gas surface density with a power law index ~2 for our models with the largest dynamic range, consistent with theoretical expectations for our model of disk flaring. We point out that the value of the "Kennicutt-Schmidt" index depends on the thickness of the disk. With our simple feedback prescription (a single combined star formation event per cloud), we find that global spiral patterns are not sustained; less correlated feedback and smaller scale turbulence appear to be necessary for spiral patterns to persist.

  8. From the warm magnetized atomic medium to molecular clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Hennebelle; R. Banerjee; E. Vazquez-Semadeni; R. Klessen; E. Audit

    2008-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

    {It has recently been proposed that giant molecular complexes form at the sites where streams of diffuse warm atomic gas collide at transonic velocities.} {We study the global statistics of molecular clouds formed by large scale colliding flows of warm neutral atomic interstellar gas under ideal MHD conditions. The flows deliver material as well as kinetic energy and trigger thermal instability leading eventually to gravitational collapse.} {We perform adaptive mesh refinement MHD simulations which, for the first time in this context, treat self-consistently cooling and self-gravity.} {The clouds formed in the simulations develop a highly inhomogeneous density and temperature structure, with cold dense filaments and clumps condensing from converging flows of warm atomic gas. In the clouds, the column density probability density distribution (PDF) peaks at $\\sim 2 \\times 10^{21} \\psc$ and decays rapidly at higher values; the magnetic intensity correlates weakly with density from $n \\sim 0.1$ to $10^4 \\pcc$, and then varies roughly as $n^{1/2}$ for higher densities.} {The global statistical properties of such molecular clouds are reasonably consistent with observational determinations. Our numerical simulations suggest that molecular clouds formed by the moderately supersonic collision of warm atomic gas streams.}

  9. Investigation of Microphysical Parameterizations of Snow and Ice in Arctic Clouds during M-PACE through ModelObservation Comparisons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Solomon, Amy

    Investigation of Microphysical Parameterizations of Snow and Ice in Arctic Clouds during M the microphysical properties of Arctic mixed-phase stratocumulus. Intensive measurements taken during the Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (M

  10. A transitioning Arctic surface energy budget: the impacts of solar zenith angle, surface albedo and cloud radiative forcing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brooks, Ian M.

    A transitioning Arctic surface energy budget: the impacts of solar zenith angle, surface albedo surface and sea-ice energy budgets were measured near 87.5°N during the Arctic Summer Cloud Ocean Study regimes, characterized by varying cloud, thermody- namic and solar properties. An initial warm, melt

  11. Recent results in DIS from Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Gaskell

    2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent results in Deep Inelastic processes measured at Jefferson Lab are presented. In addition to the inclusive reactions typically discussed in the context of Deep Inelastic (electron) Scattering, particular emphasis is given to Deep Exclusive and semi#19;inclusive reactions. Jefferson Lab has made significant contributions to the understanding of the partonic structure of the nucleon at large x, and with its first dedicated measurements is already providing important contributions to understanding the three-dimensional structure of the nucleon via constraints on Generalized Parton Distributions (GPDs) and Transverse Momentum Distributions (TMDs).

  12. Jefferson Lab Public Affairs: Electronic Media

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12 InvestigationLabNew SafetyLab TheElectronic Media

  13. Lab completes Recovery Act-funded demolition

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron 9 5 - -/e),,s -Lab SubcontractoractiveLabRecovery

  14. Lab scientists recognized for their achievements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron 9 5 - -/e),,s -Labgrants DecisionLabLab scientists

  15. Lab's 70th Anniversary lecture series

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron 9 5 - -/e),,s -LabgrantsLab team makesLab's 70th

  16. Application of Stochastic Radiative Transfer Theory to the ARM Cloud-Radiative Parameterization Problem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dana E. Veron

    2012-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This project had two primary goals: (1) development of stochastic radiative transfer as a parameterization that could be employed in an AGCM environment, and (2) exploration of the stochastic approach as a means for representing shortwave radiative transfer through mixed-phase layer clouds. To achieve these goals, climatology of cloud properties was developed at the ARM CART sites, an analysis of the performance of the stochastic approach was performed, a simple stochastic cloud-radiation parameterization for an AGCM was developed and tested, a statistical description of Arctic mixed phase clouds was developed and the appropriateness of stochastic approach for representing radiative transfer through mixed-phase clouds was assessed. Significant progress has been made in all of these areas and is detailed in the final report.

  17. Jefferson Lab Upgrade OK'd (photonics.com) | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12 InvestigationLabNewLabLab To Receive

  18. Jefferson Lab creates better way to discover breast cancer | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12 InvestigationLabNewLabLabbeginawardsJefferson

  19. Biomass Company Sets Up Shop in High School Lab | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Biomass Company Sets Up Shop in High School Lab Biomass Company Sets Up Shop in High School Lab March 30, 2010 - 2:45pm Addthis Stephen Graff Former Writer & editor for Energy...

  20. Jere Chase Ocean Engineering Lab, Durham, NH Directions & Parking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jere Chase Ocean Engineering Lab, Durham, NH Directions & Parking Jere Chase Ocean Engineering Lab of the University of New Hampshire. Parking is available at the Jere A. Chase Ocean Engineering Building. Directions

  1. Ventilation Effectiveness Research at UT-Typer Lab Houses

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Ventilation Effectiveness Research at UT-Tyler Lab Houses Source Of Outside Air, Distribution, Filtration Armin Rudd Twin (almost) Lab Houses at UT-Tyler House 2: Unvented attic,...

  2. Biomarkers Core Lab Price List Does NOT Include

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grishok, Alla

    v3102014 Biomarkers Core Lab Price List Does NOT Include Kit Cost PURCHASED by INVESTIGATOR/1/2013 Page 1 of 5 #12;Biomarkers Core Lab Price List Does NOT Include Kit Cost PURCHASED by INVESTIGATOR

  3. Nano Research Facility Lab Safety Manual Nano Research Facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subramanian, Venkat

    1 Nano Research Facility Lab Safety Manual Nano Research Facility: Weining Wang Office: Brauer---chemical, biological, or radiological. Notify the lab manager, Dr. Yujie Xiong at 5-4530. Eye Contact: Promptly flush

  4. Six NN High School Students Win Jefferson Lab Externships | Jefferson...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NN High School Students Win Jefferson Lab Externships March 23, 2001 Six Newport News 11th graders have won paid, six-week externships at Jefferson Lab. The six youth were...

  5. Jefferson Lab hosts 22 teams for Virginia High School Science...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of the Jefferson Lab Science Bowl logo. Jefferson Lab hosts 22 teams for Virginia High School Science Bowl on Feb. 12 February 1, 2005 Some of the brightest young minds in the...

  6. Maximum containment : the most controversial labs in the world

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bruzek, Alison K. (Allison Kim)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2002, following the September 11th attacks and the anthrax letters, the United States allocated money to build two maximum containment biology labs. Called Biosafety Level 4 (BSL-4) facilities, these labs were built to ...

  7. Los Alamos National Lab staff benchmark Y-12 sustainability programs...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Los Alamos National Lab ... Los Alamos National Lab staff benchmark Y-12 sustainability programs Posted: June 27, 2013 - 3:53pm OAK RIDGE, Tenn. - Staff from Los Alamos National...

  8. Legendary Tuskegee Airmen to Speak at Jefferson Lab's Black History...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lab's Black History Month Event February 3, 2004 Three members of the legendary, World War II era Tuskegee Airmen will speak at Jefferson Lab's Black History Month celebration at...

  9. Feb. 9 Event at Jefferson Lab Features Chemistry Demonstrations...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Feb. 9 Event at Jefferson Lab Features Chemistry Demonstrations Set to Pop Music NEWPORT NEWS, Va., Feb. 2, 2010 - Jefferson Lab's Feb. 9 Science Series event will feature members...

  10. JLab Posts OSHA Form 300 for 2014 | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    about environment, safety and health programs at Jefferson Lab, please visit the ESH&Q Division webpage: http:www.jlab.orgehs Click on the following for Jefferson Lab's...

  11. Understanding and Improving CRM and GCM Simulations of Cloud Systems with ARM Observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Xiaoqing

    2014-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The works supported by this ASR project lay the solid foundation for improving the parameterization of convection and clouds in the NCAR CCSM and the climate simulations. We have made a significant use of CRM simulations and ARM observations to produce thermodynamically and dynamically consistent multi-year cloud and radiative properties; improve the GCM simulations of convection, clouds and radiative heating rate and fluxes using the ARM observations and CRM simulations; and understand the seasonal and annual variation of cloud systems and their impacts on climate mean state and variability. We conducted multi-year simulations over the ARM SGP site using the CRM with multi-year ARM forcing data. The statistics of cloud and radiative properties from the long-term CRM simulations were compared and validated with the ARM measurements and value added products (VAP). We evaluated the multi-year climate simulations produced by the GCM with the modified convection scheme. We used multi-year ARM observations and CRM simulations to validate and further improve the trigger condition and revised closure assumption in NCAR GCM simulations that demonstrate the improvement of climate mean state and variability. We combined the improved convection scheme with the mosaic treatment of subgrid cloud distributions in the radiation scheme of the GCM. The mosaic treatment of cloud distributions has been implemented in the GCM with the original convection scheme and enables the use of more realistic cloud amounts as well as cloud water contents in producing net radiative fluxes closer to observations. A physics-based latent heat (LH) retrieval algorithm was developed by parameterizing the physical linkages of observed hydrometeor profiles of cloud and precipitation to the major processes related to the phase change of atmospheric water.

  12. Model analysis of the anthropogenic aerosol effect on clouds over East Asia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, Yi; Zhang, Meigen; Liu, Xiaohong; Zhao, Chun

    2012-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A coupled meteorology and aerosol/chemistry model WRF-Chem (Weather Research and Forecast model coupled with Chemistry) was used to conduct a pair of simulations with present-day (PD) and preindustrial (PI) emissions over East Asia to examine the aerosol indirect effect on clouds. As a result of an increase in aerosols in January, the cloud droplet number increased by 650 cm{sup -3} over the ocean and East China, 400 cm{sup -3} over Central and Southwest China, and less than 200 cm{sup -3} over North China. The cloud liquid water path (LWP) increased by 40-60 g m{sup -2} over the ocean and Southeast China and 30 g m{sup -2} over Central China; the LWP increased less than 5 g m{sup -2} or decreased by 5 g m{sup -2} over North China. The effective radius (Re) decreased by more than 4 {mu}m over Southwest, Central, and Southeast China and 2 {mu}m over North China. In July, variations in cloud properties were more uniform; the cloud droplet number increased by approximately 250-400 cm{sup -3}, the LWP increased by approximately 30-50 g m{sup -2}, and Re decreased by approximately 3 {mu}m over most regions of China. In response to cloud property changes from PI to PD, shortwave (SW) cloud radiative forcing strengthened by 30 W m{sup -2} over the ocean and 10 W m{sup -2} over Southeast China, and it weakened slightly by approximately 2-10 W m{sup -2} over Central and Southwest China in January. In July, SW cloud radiative forcing strengthened by 15 W m{sup -2} over Southeast and North China and weakened by 10 W m{sup -2} over Central China. The different responses of SW cloud radiative forcing in different regions was related to cloud feedbacks and natural variability.

  13. Cloud Computing and Validation of Expandable In Silico Livers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ropella, Glen EP; Hunt, C Anthony

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    benefit analysis of cloud computing versus desktop grids.as: Ropella and Hunt: Cloud computing and validation ofCloud computing and validation of expandable in silico

  14. BERKELEY PAR LABBERKELEY PAR LAB Where we ended up

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    , David Wessel, and Kathy Yelick UC Berkeley Par Lab End-of-Project Party May 30, 2013 #12;BERKELEY PAR

  15. Title: Networking the Cloud: Enabling Enterprise Computing and Storage Cloud computing has been changing how enterprises run and manage their IT systems. Cloud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Title: Networking the Cloud: Enabling Enterprise Computing and Storage Abstract: Cloud computing has been changing how enterprises run and manage their IT systems. Cloud computing platforms provide introduction on Cloud Computing. We propose a Virtual Cloud Pool abstraction to logically unify cloud

  16. Berkeley Lab's Cool Your School Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ivan Berry

    2012-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Cool Your School is a series of 6th-grade, classroom-based, science activities rooted in Berkeley Lab's cool-surface and cool materials research and aligned with California science content standards. The activities are designed to build knowledge, stimulate curiosity, and carry the conversation about human-induced climate change, and what can be done about it, into the community.

  17. UM Taubman College Metals Lab Handbook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Papalambros, Panos

    of welding technologies including MIG, TIG, stick welding as well as high and low temperature brazing and tool introductions are scheduled at the beginning of each semester. Welding tutorials are provided for unsupervised use. #12;5 Welding Tutorials and Tool Introductions A major goal of the Metals Lab is to empower

  18. Aruna Ravinagarajan System Energy Efficiency Lab

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Deli

    scheduler needs toThe task scheduler needs to manage energy consumptionmanage energy consumption energy harvesting Operating with severe energy constraints Too much data to continually transmit Energy Efficiency Lab 12 Execution Time Constraint Given a time limit, what is the highest level of data

  19. Reproductive Hazards in the Lab Reproductive Hazards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    Reproductive Hazards in the Lab Reproductive Hazards The term reproductive hazard refers to agents healthy children. Reproductive hazards may have harmful effects on libido, sexual behavior, or sperm the effects of reproductive hazards may be reversible for the parent, the effects on the fetus or offspring

  20. SSSSSSSS LLLLSemiconductor System LabSemiconductor System LabSemiconductor System LabSemiconductor System Lab Jaeseo Lee, Gigabit Optical Interface IC Design 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yoo, Hoi-Jun

    range Wide Bandwidth Low Noise amplifier is required!! 60~80dB 1) providing dc level restoration 2Semiconductor System Lab Design Goal · Gain range : 60~80dB (1k ~ 10k) · Wide bandwidth · Low Noise · CMOS · Motivation · Transimpedance Amplifier (TIA) ­ Why TIA? ­ Noise Source ­ TIA Noise & Design Solution

  1. Heart Physiology Lab Part 1: Pulse Rate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loughry, Jim

    Heart Physiology Lab Part 1: Pulse Rate Measure your pulse in each of the following conditions (in in the class. You may use Table 1 in the Heart Physiology Worksheet for this, if you wish. Once you have all of the class averages for each measurement. You may use Graph 1 in the Heart Physiology Worksheet for this

  2. GMT: Texas Map Lab 9 Part 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith-Konter, Bridget

    ), and the grid lines and title (-B), just like you practiced with the pscoast command in previous labs. ·Enter window, type: startxwin.bat. Use the white "X" window that appears to type in the remaining commands;3 Create a new GMT command file · Use the text editor nedit to create a file named make

  3. Berkeley Lab's Cool Your School Program

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Ivan Berry

    2013-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Cool Your School is a series of 6th-grade, classroom-based, science activities rooted in Berkeley Lab's cool-surface and cool materials research and aligned with California science content standards. The activities are designed to build knowledge, stimulate curiosity, and carry the conversation about human-induced climate change, and what can be done about it, into the community.

  4. Lab Five & Six Building & Editing Geodatabase

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hung, I-Kuai

    coverages, shapefiles, CAD drawings, INFO tables, and DBF tables. File geodatabase works across platforms boundary shapefile by digitizing. Now with the topological data model, coverage, you can easily build or using Calculate Geometry in a shapefile in Lab 4. In geodatabases, area is given automatically. However

  5. Steam Sterilization Cycles for Lab Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    Steam Sterilization Cycles for Lab Applications Presented by Gary Butler STERIS Life Sciences August 2009 #12;Early Steam Sterilizers Koch Upright Sterilizer · First Pressurized Sterilizer · First OPERATING END (NO PRINTER) PRIMARY OPERATING END WITH PRINTER SAFETY VALVE CHAMBER PRESSURE GAUGE Steam

  6. LEGO Engineer and RoboLab: Teaching Engineering with LabVIEW from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and construction. The Control Lab Interface connects to the computer through a serial port and controls LEGO motors to offer. College seniors went on to build a computer-controlled milling machine with three degrees

  7. National Lab Day: How the National Labs Keep Moving America Forward...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    their support for the National Lab system. | Photo by Sarah Gerrity, Energy Department. Panel Discussion 2 of 9 Panel Discussion From left: Clark Gellings, a Fellow at the Electric...

  8. Nano Fab Lab, Stockholm Sweden The Albanova Nano Fabrication Facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haviland, David

    Nano Fab Lab, Stockholm Sweden The Albanova Nano Fabrication Facility Nano technology for basic research and small commercial enterprises Director: Prof. David Haviland #12;Nano Fab Lab, Stockholm Sweden Nano-Lab Philosophy · Nanometer scale patterning and metrology · Broad spectrum of user research

  9. BERKELEY LAB Bringing Science Solutions to the World

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BERKELEY LAB Bringing Science Solutions to the World lbl.gov #12;Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's science is a global enterprise. From the Lab's site in the hills overlooking the University of California Berkeley campus, to locations across the continent and around the world, Berkeley Lab scientists

  10. Geology 460:301 Fall 2007 Mineralogy Lab

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geology 460:301 Fall 2007 Mineralogy Lab Professor Jeremy Delaney Teaching Assistant: Alissa Henza Science by Cornelius Klein (22nd edition) Introduction to Optical Mineralogy by William Nesse Grading Policy: Lab is 33% of your Mineralogy grade. This 33% is made up of: Labs: 70% Quizzes: 5% Final Exam: 25

  11. Behind the Scenes at Berkeley Lab - The Mechanical Fabrication Facility

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Wells, Russell; Chavez, Pete; Davis, Curtis; Bentley, Brian

    2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Part of the Behind the Scenes series at Berkeley Lab, this video highlights the lab's mechanical fabrication facility and its exceptional ability to produce unique tools essential to the lab's scientific mission. Through a combination of skilled craftsmanship and precision equipment, machinists and engineers work with scientists to create exactly what's needed - whether it's measured in microns or meters.

  12. DATE: NVLAP LAB CODE: INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY SECURITY TESTING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DATE: NVLAP LAB CODE: INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY SECURITY TESTING TEST METHOD SELECTION LIST;DATE: NVLAP LAB CODE: INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY SECURITY TESTING TEST METHOD SELECTION LIST for reasons outside the scope of this document. #12;DATE: NVLAP LAB CODE: INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY SECURITY

  13. Forsgsanlg Ris Danmarks Tekniske Hjskole Kemiafdelingen Lab. for Bygningsmaterialer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forsøgsanlæg Risø Danmarks Tekniske Højskole Kemiafdelingen Lab. for Bygningsmaterialer Risø-M-1863 MEKANISKE EGENSKABER O o i) ir \\}. Danmarks Tekniske Højskole ^\\ Lab. for Bygningsmaterialer af Kåre Hastrup-550-0395-8 #12;FORSØGSANLÆG RISØ DANMARKS TEKNISKE HØJSKOLE KEMIAFDELINGEN LAB. FOR BYGNINGSMATERIALER RISØ

  14. Lab Home A and B Construction Specifications and Alterations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Appendix A ­ Lab Home A and B Construction Specifications and Alterations #12;A.1 Appendix A -Lab Home A and B Construction Specifications and Alterations A.1 Lab Home A Construction Specifications walls that are replaced or constructed shall be taped, finished and painted in the original wall color

  15. Behind the Scenes at Berkeley Lab - The Mechanical Fabrication Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wells, Russell; Chavez, Pete; Davis, Curtis; Bentley, Brian

    2013-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Part of the Behind the Scenes series at Berkeley Lab, this video highlights the lab's mechanical fabrication facility and its exceptional ability to produce unique tools essential to the lab's scientific mission. Through a combination of skilled craftsmanship and precision equipment, machinists and engineers work with scientists to create exactly what's needed - whether it's measured in microns or meters.

  16. DEVELOPMENT OF IMPROVED TECHNIQUES FOR SATELLITE REMOTE SENSING OF CLOUDS AND RADIATION USING ARM DATA, FINAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Minnis, Patrick [NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA

    2013-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    During the period, March 1997 – February 2006, the Principal Investigator and his research team co-authored 47 peer-reviewed papers and presented, at least, 138 papers at conferences, meetings, and workshops that were supported either in whole or in part by this agreement. We developed a state-of-the-art satellite cloud processing system that generates cloud properties over the Atmospheric Radiation (ARM) surface sites and surrounding domains in near-real time and outputs the results on the world wide web in image and digital formats. When the products are quality controlled, they are sent to the ARM archive for further dissemination. These products and raw satellite images can be accessed at http://cloudsgate2.larc.nasa.gov/cgi-bin/site/showdoc?docid=4&cmd=field-experiment-homepage&exp=ARM and are used by many in the ARM science community. The algorithms used in this system to generate cloud properties were validated and improved by the research conducted under this agreement. The team supported, at least, 11 ARM-related or supported field experiments by providing near-real time satellite imagery, cloud products, model results, and interactive analyses for mission planning, execution, and post-experiment scientific analyses. Comparisons of cloud properties derived from satellite, aircraft, and surface measurements were used to evaluate uncertainties in the cloud properties. Multiple-angle satellite retrievals were used to determine the influence of cloud structural and microphysical properties on the exiting radiation field.

  17. Constraints on Stirring and Dissipation of MHD Turbulence in Molecular Clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shantanu Basu; Chigurupati Murali

    2001-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss constraints on the rates of stirring and dissipation of MHD turbulence in molecular clouds. Recent MHD simulations suggest that turbulence in clouds decays rapidly, thus providing a significant source of energy input, particularly if driven at small scales by, for example, bipolar outflows. We quantify the heating rates by combining the linewidth-size relations, which describe global cloud properties, with numerically determined dissipation rates. We argue that, if cloud turbulence is driven on small internal scales, the $^{12}$CO flux (enhanced by emission from weakly supersonic shocks) will be much larger than observed; this, in turn, would imply excitation temperatures significantly above observed values. We reach two conclusions: (1) small-scale driving by bipolar outflows cannot possibly account for cloud support and yield long-lived clouds, unless the published MHD dissipation rates are seriously overestimated; (2) driving on large scales (comparable to the cloud size) is much more viable from an energetic standpoint, and if the actual net dissipation rate is only slightly lower than what current MHD simulations estimate, then the observationally inferred lifetimes and apparent virial equilibrium of molecular clouds can be explained.

  18. The Evolution of Cloud Computing in ATLAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Ryan P.; The ATLAS collaboration; Love, Peter; Leblanc, Matthew Edgar; Di Girolamo, Alessandro; Paterson, Michael; Gable, Ian; Sobie, Randall; Field, Laurence

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ATLAS experiment has successfully incorporated cloud computing technology and cloud resources into its primarily grid-based model of distributed computing. Cloud R&D activities continue to mature and transition into stable production systems, while ongoing evolutionary changes are still needed to adapt and refine the approaches used, in response to changes in prevailing cloud technology. In addition, completely new developments are needed to handle emerging requirements. This work will describe the overall evolution of cloud computing in ATLAS. The current status of the VM management systems used for harnessing IAAS resources will be discussed. Monitoring and accounting systems tailored for clouds are needed to complete the integration of cloud resources within ATLAS' distributed computing framework. We are developing and deploying new solutions to address the challenge of operation in a geographically distributed multi-cloud scenario, including a system for managing VM images across multiple clouds, ...

  19. Using Surface Remote Sensors to Derive Radiative Characteristics of Mixed-Phase Clouds: An Example from M-PACE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    de Boer, Gijs; Collins, William D.; Menon, Surabi; Long, Charles N.

    2011-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Measurements from ground-based cloud radar, high spectral resolution lidar and microwave radiometer are used in conjunction with a column version of the Rapid Radiative Transfer Model (RRTMG) and radiosonde measurements to derive the surface radiative properties under mixed-phase cloud conditions. These clouds were observed during the United States Department of Energy (US DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Mixed-Phase Arctic Clouds Experiment (M-PACE) between September and November of 2004. In total, sixteen half hour time periods are reviewed due to their coincidence with radiosonde launches. Cloud liquid (ice) water paths are found to range between 11.0-366.4 (0.5-114.1) gm-2, and cloud physical thicknesses fall between 286-2075 m. Combined with temperature and hydrometeor size estimates, this information is used to calculate surface radiative flux densities using RRTMG, which are demonstrated to generally agree with measured flux densities from surface-based radiometric instrumentation. Errors in longwave flux density estimates are found to be largest for thin clouds, while shortwave flux density errors are generally largest for thicker clouds. A sensitivity study is performed to understand the impact of retrieval assumptions and uncertainties on derived surface radiation estimates. Cloud radiative forcing is calculated for all profiles, illustrating longwave dominance during this time of year, with net cloud forcing generally between 50 and 90 Wm-2.

  20. Cirrus cloud-temperature interactions over a tropical station, Gadanki from lidar and satellite observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S, Motty G, E-mail: mottygs@gmail.com; Satyanarayana, M., E-mail: mottygs@gmail.com; Krishnakumar, V., E-mail: mottygs@gmail.com; Dhaman, Reji k., E-mail: mottygs@gmail.com [Department of Optoelectronics, University of Kerala, Kariavattom, Trivandrum-695 581, Kerala (India)

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The cirrus clouds play an important role in the radiation budget of the earth's atmospheric system and are important to characterize their vertical structure and optical properties. LIDAR measurements are obtained from the tropical station Gadanki (13.5{sup 0} N, 79.2{sup 0} E), India, and meteorological indicators derived from Radiosonde data. Most of the cirrus clouds are observed near to the tropopause, which substantiates the strength of the tropical convective processes. The height and temperature dependencies of cloud height, optical depth, and depolarization ratio were investigated. Cirrus observations made using CALIPSO satellite are compared with lidar data for systematic statistical study of cirrus climatology.