National Library of Energy BETA

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  1. Ing Arvid Nesheim | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Name: Ing Arvid Nesheim Address: Hoymyrmarka 123A Place: Vollen Zip: 1391 Region: Norway Sector: Marine and Hydrokinetic Phone Number: 47 951 08 439 Website: www.anwsite.com...

  2. Biography U. Düsterloh Degree: PD Dr.- Ing. habil. Institution...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    U. Dsterloh Degree: PD Dr.- Ing. habil. Institution: Clausthal University of Technology. Chair: chair for waste disposal technologies and geomechanics. 1982- 1988 field of study:...

  3. STEM-ing the Tide | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    STEM-ing the Tide STEM-ing the Tide September 29, 2010 - 4:29pm Addthis Ali Zaidi Special Assistant to the Secretary of Energy Yesterday, the MacArthur Foundation rolled out its latest class of "geniuses" - 23 Americans who stand out because of their creativity and enterprise. Each recipient of the honor (and the $500,000 prize) has made an extraordinary contribution. One of those recipients is Amir Abo-Shaeer, an engineer in the aerospace and telecommunications industries who decided

  4. Biography U. DĂŒsterloh Degree: PD Dr.- Ing. habil. Institution: Clausthal University of Technology.

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    U. DĂŒsterloh Degree: PD Dr.- Ing. habil. Institution: Clausthal University of Technology. Chair: chair for waste disposal technologies and geomechanics. 1982- 1988 field of study: mining engineer 1989- 1993 PhD work - geomechanical investigations on the stability of salt caverns for waste disposal. 2009 Habilitation - proof of stability and integrity of underground excavations in saliniferous formations with special regard to lab tests. 1989 - 2012 chief engineer at Clausthal University of

  5. ENERGISE-ing Solutions to Scale Up Distributed Solar

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    If a utility pole falls in a forest and no energy company employee is around to hear it, does it make a sound? Currently, the answer is no. The Energy Department’s SunShot Initiative is trying to fix this problem to alleviate issues for both utilities and their customers.

  6. Total Space Heat-

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey: Energy End-Use Consumption Tables Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration...

  7. Total Space Heat-

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Revised: December, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings...

  8. --No Title--

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Intensity (thousand Btusquare foot) Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other...

  9. Total Space Heat-

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings*...

  10. --No Title--

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Major Fuel Consumption (trillion Btu) Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other...

  11. --No Title--

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Electricity Consumption (trillion Btu) Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other...

  12. Q&A: FORGE-ing Ahead to Clean, Low-Cost Geothermal Energy | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... to move on to phase two, which would include permitting and site characterization work. ... Additional research planned within FORGE may include innovative drilling techniques, well ...

  13. Computer systems and methods for visualizStolte; Chris ing data

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stolte, Chris; Hanrahan, Patrick

    2013-01-29

    A method for forming a visual plot using a hierarchical structure of a dataset. The dataset comprises a measure and a dimension. The dimension consists of a plurality of levels. The plurality of levels form a dimension hierarchy. The visual plot is constructed based on a specification. A first level from the plurality of levels is represented by a first component of the visual plot. A second level from the plurality of levels is represented by a second component of the visual plot. The dataset is queried to retrieve data in accordance with the specification. The data includes all or a portion of the dimension and all or a portion of the measure. The visual plot is populated with the retrieved data in accordance with the specification.

  14. CANTON LAKESHORE CANTON E BEST CON NEAUT GIDD INGS EAST N ELLSWORT

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... WAT SON -DU HRIN G EVERGREEN KELLY HILL RED BRUSH WEILER SVILLE MEAD VI LLE LAM AR TINE ROSS LEET SDALE RPD-R ICHLAND -4 CROWS RUN WAT TSVILLE S GLADE R UN WIN ESBU RG HAT CH CORN ...

  15. Protective interior wall and attach8ing means for a fusion reactor vacuum vessel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Phelps, Richard D.; Upham, Gerald A.; Anderson, Paul M.

    1988-01-01

    An array of connected plates mounted on the inside wall of the vacuum vessel of a magnetic confinement reactor in order to provide a protective surface for energy deposition inside the vessel. All fasteners are concealed and protected beneath the plates, while the plates themselves share common mounting points. The entire array is installed with torqued nuts on threaded studs; provision also exists for thermal expansion by mounting each plate with two of its four mounts captured in an oversize grooved spool. A spool-washer mounting hardware allows one edge of a protective plate to be torqued while the other side remains loose, by simply inverting the spool-washer hardware.

  16. OGLE-ing the Magellanic system: stellar populations in the Magellanic Bridge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skowron, D. M.; Jacyszyn, A. M.; Udalski, A.; Szyma?ski, M. K.; Skowron, J.; Poleski, R.; Koz?owski, S.; Kubiak, M.; Pietrzy?ski, G.; Soszy?ski, I.; Mróz, P.; Pietrukowicz, P.; Ulaczyk, K.; Wyrzykowski, ?.

    2014-11-10

    We report the discovery of a young stellar bridge that forms a continuous connection between the Magellanic Clouds. This finding is based on number density maps for stellar populations found in data gathered by OGLE-IV that fully cover over 270 deg{sup 2} of the sky in the Magellanic Bridge area. This is the most extensive optical survey of this region to date. We find that the young population is present mainly in the western half of the MBR, which, together with the newly discovered young population in the eastern Bridge, form a continuous stream of stars connecting both galaxies along ? ? –73.5 deg. The young population distribution is clumped, with one of the major densities close to the SMC and the other fairly isolated and located approximately mid-way between the Clouds, which we call the OGLE island. These overdensities are well matched by H I surface density contours, although the newly found young population in the eastern Bridge is offset by ?2 deg north from the highest H I density contour. We observe a continuity of red clump stars between the Magellanic Clouds which represent an intermediate-age population. Red clump stars are present mainly in the southern and central parts of the Magellanic Bridge, below its gaseous part, and their presence is reflected by a strong deviation from the radial density profiles of the two galaxies. This may indicate either a tidal stream of stars, or that the stellar halos of the two galaxies overlap. On the other hand, we do not observe such an overlap within an intermediate-age population represented by the top of the red giant branch and the asymptotic giant branch stars. We also see only minor mixing of the old populations of the Clouds in the southern part of the Bridge, represented by the lowest part of the red giant branch.

  17. CANTON LAKESHORE CANTON E BEST CON NEAUT GIDD INGS EAST N ELLSWORT

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Liquids Reserve Class No 2001 liquids reserves 0.1 - 10 Mbbl 10.1 - 100 Mbbl 100.1 - 1,000 Mbbl 1,000.1 - 10,000 Mbbl Appalachian Basin Boundary C a n a d a U S A OH PA MI NY Lake ...

  18. CANTON LAKESHORE CANTON E BEST CON NEAUT GIDD INGS EAST N ELLSWORT

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas Reserve Class No 2001 gas reserves 0.1 - 10 MMCF 10.1 - 100 MMCF 100.1 - 1,000 MMCF 1,000.1 - 10,000 MMCF 10,000.1 - 100,000 MMCF > 100,000 MMCF Appalachian Basin Boundary C a ...

  19. CANTON LAKESHORE CANTON E BEST CON NEAUT GIDD INGS EAST N ELLSWORT

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    MCKEESPORT COR AOPOLIS-MOON REDHAW ST. CLAIR SC ROGGSFIELD FRANKLIN -OAK FOREST RIMERSBURG RENNERD AL E GREENVILL E PAT MOS CRABTR EE BLAC K ASH ROYALT ON N BAKERSTOWN QUEEN ROU GH RUN LUCAS BLAC K H ILL CRESTON WAT TSVILLE WADSWORTH -NORT H OAKLAN D HOM EWORT H UNIT Y ESSELBRUN ALAMED A PAR K-CROOKED RU CHERRY GROVE FRENC HTOWN ST EWART RUN MILL C REEK GLENF IELD-MOU NT NEBO HICKORY E HARRISVILLE E LEST ER GRIGGS CORNERS EN GLAN D WEST VIL LE LAKE BAILEY LAKE OAKFORD BR UNSWICK N HOR ACE

  20. CANTON LAKESHORE CANTON E BEST CON NEAUT GIDD INGS EAST N ELLSWORT

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas Reserve Class No 2001 gas reserves 0.1 - 10 MMCF 10.1 - 100 MMCF 100.1 - 1,000 MMCF 1,000.1 - 10,000 MMCF 10,000.1 - 100,000 MMCF > 100,000 MMCF Appalachian Basin Boundary C a n a d a U S A OH PA MI NY Lake Erie Lake St. Claire Total Total Total Number Liquid Gas BOE of Reserves Reserves Reserves Basin Fields (Mbbl) (MMcf) (Mbbl) Appalachian 3354 79,141 9,550,156 1,670,834 2001 Proved Reserves for Entire Applachian Basin WV Appalachian Basin, OH-PA (Panel 2 of 7) Oil and Gas Fields By

  1. CANTON LAKESHORE CANTON E BEST CON NEAUT GIDD INGS EAST N ELLSWORT

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Liquids Reserve Class No 2001 liquids reserves 0.1 - 10 Mbbl 10.1 - 100 Mbbl 100.1 - 1,000 Mbbl 1,000.1 - 10,000 Mbbl Appalachian Basin Boundary C a n a d a U S A OH PA MI NY Lake Erie Lake St. Claire Total Total Total Number Liquid Gas BOE of Reserves Reserves Reserves Basin Fields (Mbbl) (MMcf) (Mbbl) Appalachian 3354 79,141 9,550,156 1,670,834 2001 Proved Reserves for Entire Applachian Basin WV Appalachian Basin, OH-PA (Panel 2 of 7) Oil and Gas Fields By 2001 Liquids

  2. --No Title--

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    End Use for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Total Major Fuel Consumption (trillion Btu) Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration...

  3. Released: September, 2008

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Consumption (trillion Btu)" ,"Total ","Space Heat- ing","Cool- ing","Venti- lation","Water Heat- ing","Light- ing","Cook- ing","Refrig- eration","Office Equip- ment","Com-...

  4. Revised: December, 2008

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (thousand Btusquare foot) " ,"Total ","Space Heat- ing","Cool- ing","Venti- lation","Water Heat- ing","Light- ing","Cook- ing","Refrig- eration","Office Equip- ment","Com-...

  5. --No Title--

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Energy Intensity (kWhsquare foot) Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other...

  6. --No Title--

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other...

  7. Total Space Heat-

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Survey: Energy End-Use Consumption Tables Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other...

  8. Evaluation of the carbon content of aerosols from the burn- ing of biomass in the Brazilian Amazon using thermal, op- tical and thermal-optical analysis methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soto-Garcia, Lydia L.; Andreae, Meinrat O.; Andreae, Tracey W.; taxo, Paulo Ar-; Maenhaut, Willy; Kirchstetter, Thomas; Novakov, T.; Chow, Judith C.; Mayol-Bracero, Olga L.

    2011-06-03

    Aerosol samples were collected at a pasture site in the Amazon Basin as part of the project LBA-SMOCC-2002 (Large-Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia - Smoke Aerosols, Clouds, Rainfall and Climate: Aerosols from Biomass Burning Perturb Global and Regional Climate). Sampling was conducted during the late dry season, when the aerosol composition was dominated by biomass burning emissions, especially in the submicron fraction. A 13-stage Dekati low-pressure impactor (DLPI) was used to collect particles with nominal aerodynamic diameters (D{sub p}) ranging from 0.03 to 0.10 m. Gravimetric analyses of the DLPI substrates and filters were performed to obtain aerosol mass concentrations. The concentrations of total, apparent elemental, and organic carbon (TC, EC{sub a}, and OC) were determined using thermal and thermal-optical analysis (TOA) methods. A light transmission method (LTM) was used to determine the concentration of equivalent black carbon (BC{sub e}) or the absorbing fraction at 880 nm for the size-resolved samples. During the dry period, due to the pervasive presence of fires in the region upwind of the sampling site, concentrations of fine aerosols (D{sub p} < 2.5 {mu}m: average 59.8 {mu}g m{sup -3}) were higher than coarse aerosols (D{sub p} > 2.5 {mu}m: 4.1 {mu}g m{sup -3}). Carbonaceous matter, estimated as the sum of the particulate organic matter (i.e., OC x 1.8) plus BC{sub e}, comprised more than 90% to the total aerosol mass. Concentrations of EC{sub a} (estimated by thermal analysis with a correction for charring) and BCe (estimated by LTM) averaged 5.2 {+-} 1.3 and 3.1 {+-} 0.8 {mu}g m{sup -3}, respectively. The determination of EC was improved by extracting water-soluble organic material from the samples, which reduced the average light absorption {angstrom} exponent of particles in the size range of 0.1 to 1.0 {mu}m from > 2.0 to approximately 1.2. The size-resolved BC{sub e} measured by the LTM showed a clear maximum between 0.4 and 0.6 m in diameter. The concentrations of OC and BC{sub e} varied diurnally during the dry period, and this variation is related to diurnal changes in boundary layer thickness and in fire frequency.

  9. --No Title--

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    . Electricity Consumption (kWh) by End Use for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing...

  10. --No Title--

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    E3A. Electricity Consumption (Btu) by End Use for All Buildings, 2003 Total Electricity Consumption (trillion Btu) Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing...

  11. --No Title--

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    (trillion Btu) District Heat Energy Intensity (thousand Btusquare foot) Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All...

  12. Released: June 2006

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2. Water Heating Equipment, Number of Buildings and Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, ... ,"All Build- ings*","Build- ings with Water Heating","Type of Water Heating ...

  13. Revised: December, 2008

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    by End Use for All Buildings, 2003" ," Major Fuel Energy Intensity (thousand Btusquare foot) " ,"Total ","Space Heat- ing","Cool- ing","Venti- lation","Water Heat-...

  14. U.S. Department of Energy

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... than an HRP-certified individual is not ing: ing HRP duties is denied both escorted and ... Contractor means subcontractors at all tiers and any industrial, educational, commercial, ...

  15. Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey: Energy End-Use Consumption Tables Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing...

  16. --No Title--

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    (billion cubic feet) Natural Gas Energy Intensity (cubic feetsquare foot) Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing...

  17. --No Title--

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    (trillion Btu) Natural Gas Energy Intensity (thousand Btusquare foot) Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing...

  18. Released: September, 2008

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    E3A. Electricity Consumption (Btu) by End Use for All Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Electricity Consumption (trillion Btu)" ,"Total ","Space Heat- ing","Cool- ing","Venti-...

  19. Released: September, 2008

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    . Electricity Consumption (Btu) by End Use for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Electricity Consumption (trillion Btu)" ,"Total ","Space Heat- ing","Cool- ing","Venti-...

  20. --No Title--

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    E4. Electricity Consumption (Btu) Intensities by End Use for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Electricity Energy Intensity (thousand Btusquare foot) Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti-...

  1. --No Title--

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    E4A. Electricity Consumption (Btu) Intensities by End Use for All Buildings, 2003 Electricity Energy Intensity (thousand Btusquare foot) Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti-...

  2. --No Title--

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    (million gallons) Fuel Oil Energy Intensity (gallonssquare foot) Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All...

  3. --No Title--

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Btu) District Heat Energy Intensity (thousand Btusquare foot) Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All...

  4. --No Title--

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Btu) Natural Gas Energy Intensity (thousand Btusquare foot) Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All...

  5. --No Title--

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    cubic feet) Natural Gas Energy Intensity (cubic feetsquare foot) Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All...

  6. Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All Buildings* ... 1,870 1,276...

  7. --No Title--

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    (trillion Btu) Fuel Oil Energy Intensity (thousand Btusquare foot) Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All...

  8. Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Energy Consumption Survey: Energy End-Use Consumption Tables Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All...

  9. Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All Buildings* ... 1,602 1,397...

  10. Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All Buildings ... 2,037...

  11. --No Title--

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    A. Major Fuel Consumption (Btu) Intensities by End Use for All Buildings, 2003 Major Fuel Energy Intensity (thousand Btusquare foot) Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation...

  12. Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Tables Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All Buildings* ... 634 578 46 1 Q 116.4 106.3...

  13. Released: September, 2008

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    A. Electricity Consumption (kWh) Intensities by End Use for All Buildings, 2003" ,"Electricity Energy Intensity (kWhsquare foot)" ,"Total ","Space Heat- ing","Cool- ing","Venti-...

  14. Released: September, 2008

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    . Electricity Consumption (kWh) by End Use for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh)" ,"Total ","Space Heat- ing","Cool- ing","Venti-...

  15. Released: September, 2008

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    A. Electricity Consumption (kWh) by End Use for All Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh)" ,"Total ","Space Heat- ing","Cool- ing","Venti- lation","Water...

  16. --No Title--

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    . Electricity Consumption (kWh) Intensities by End Use for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Electricity Energy Intensity (kWhsquare foot) Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation...

  17. b34.xls

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    in 2007 All Build- ings* Not Heated 1 to 50 Percent Heated 51 to 99 Percent Heated 100 Percent Heated All Build- ings* Not Heated 1 to 50 Percent Heated 51 to 99 Percent Heated 100 ...

  18. Browse by Discipline -- E-print Network Subject Pathways: Computer...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Ulm, Universitt - Fakultt fr Mathematik und Wirtschaftswissenschaften Universidad de la Repblica, Instituto de Matemtica y Estadstica "Prof. Ing. Rafael Laguardia" ...

  19. DSQ Summer 2010 - 1Sept10_FINAL

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ... by the Krell Institute Focus on High Energy Density Research Defense Science ... limit- ing factors, including power consumption and architec- tural and programming ...

  20. North Dakota - Seds - U.S. Energy Information Administration...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... Environment Greenhouse gas data, voluntary report- ing, electric power plant emissions. ... The data sources and estimation procedures are described in the technical notes. We ...

  1. National Security Science | Los National Alamos Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    New Supercomputing Fellowship 21st Century Deterrence Revolutionizing Deepwater Drilling Ultraconductus: Innovative Electrical Conductors Th-ING: A Sustainable Energy Source ...

  2. Welcome to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    and train- ing programs, and pursue new renewable energy and energy efficiency opportunities. ... and deep expertise in business and energy development and federal Indian law. ...

  3. Energy Assessment Helps Kaiser Aluminum Save Energy and Improve...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... At Kaiser Aluminum, energy efficiency is a high priority in keep- ing with the company's emphasis on Lean Manufacturing and Six Sigma methodologies. The Save Energy Now assessment ...

  4. LA-11569-M Manual UC-15

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Under high pressure, the crystals melt to form a clear colorless liquid. When heated to ... fluorescent spectra, a number of elements interfere through quench- ing or enhancement. ...

  5. B

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The slanted rotor allows the turbine to self-start without any external devices. This passive-control system offers power generation without the noise, clutch- ing,...

  6. Increasing U.S. Manufacturing Competitiveness The Clean Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    has the capability for multiple configurations. Photo credit Dennis Schroeder NREL Objectives of CEMI Days include the ... R&D and manufactur- ing decisions * Seek candid input and ...

  7. May 2002

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    collateral damage that destroys normal lung tissue followed by scar tissue develop- ment. ... Typical components of such a plan include engineering controls (physically separat- ing ...

  8. Building America Case Study: Lancaster County Career and Technology...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Through a unique vocational school program, high school students in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, are gaining hands-on construction experience in build- ing high performance ...

  9. Visit the National Academies Press online, the authoritative...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ... The result is a better quality of life and economic competitiveness. NOTE: CVD, chemical ... Recently developed plasma-based systems for destroy- ing chemical or biological hazards ...

  10. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Buffalo District Office 1776 Niagara...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... of the follow- ing criteria are met (per NCP ... Although the overall management approach for the treated waste (landfill disposal) ... to an asymptotic level which is close to ...

  11. Released: June 2006

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3. Cooking Energy Sources, Number of Buildings and Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)",,,,,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Build- ings*","Build- ings with Cooking","Cooking Energy Sources (more than one may apply)",,,"All Build- ings*","Build- ings with Cooking","Cooking Energy Sources (more than one may apply)" ,,,"Elec- tricity","Natural

  12. Energy C

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    www.aiche.orgcep September 2014 CEP Energy C ompanies are seeing impressive returns and becom- ing more competitive after implementing the ISO 50001 energy-management system...

  13. ,"Total District Heat Consumption (trillion Btu)",,,,,"District...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Heat Consumption (trillion Btu)",,,,,"District Heat Energy Intensity (thousand Btusquare foot)" ,"Total ","Space Heating","Water Heating","Cook- ing","Other","Total ","Space...

  14. ,"Total Natural Gas Consumption (trillion Btu)",,,,,"Natural...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas Consumption (trillion Btu)",,,,,"Natural Gas Energy Intensity (thousand Btusquare foot)" ,"Total ","Space Heating","Water Heating","Cook- ing","Other","Total ","Space...

  15. ,"Total Natural Gas Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas Consumption (billion cubic feet)",,,,,"Natural Gas Energy Intensity (cubic feetsquare foot)" ,"Total ","Space Heating","Water Heating","Cook- ing","Other","Total ","Space...

  16. Chapter 5: Lighting, HVAC, and Plumbing

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Linear fluorescent lamps are classified by tube diameter, ... Proper light- ing levels lead to less energy-intensive ... and Plumbing A rainwater harvesting system on the Chesapeake ...

  17. appguideformatWeb.pub

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Wind- mills in pre-industrial Europe were used for many things, including irrigation or ... use can use appliances, such as light- ing and refrigeration, schools can use ...

  18. Microsoft Word - 41999R08_Final.doc

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... For hammer drilling tests, an industrial fluid hammer is used to drill under both ... cuttings transport w ith constant mud flow ing rate 13 Calculate elastoplastic stresses ...

  19. I

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... t o the classification of the land use, such as residential, commercial and industrial. ... Normally, the static longitudinal 1oad.ing selected is sufficiently conservative to ...

  20. Microsoft Word - doe_preamble_04.doc

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Demmel, W. J. "Applied Numerical Linear Algebra". Society for Industrial and Applied ... Their work demonstrates that the use of standard upscal- ing procedures can be ...

  1. EGG-GTH-5775 J

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... 16. K. K. McKelvey and M. Brooke, The Industrial Cooling Tower, Elsevier Publishing Co., ... 1977. Cooling Tower Institute, Cool ing Tower Performance Curves, 1967. Cooling ...

  2. oazb2b2.tmp

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Cast Secondary Standards ferrite in each standard was controlled through modi&ing the ... Kotecki, D.J., 1995, "Standards and industrial methods for ferrite measurement", Welding ...

  3. Comprehensive Metabolomic, Lipidomic and Microscopic Profiling...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... This may be due to their high starting concentration in the yeast extract contain- ing ... Discussion The yeast Y. lipolytica is a popular species for industrial microbiology and ...

  4. Feed-Pump Hydraulic Performance and Design Improvement, Phase...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Variable speed, yesno Pximp Normal Mini- Design & Operat- mum Guarantee ing Oper- Point ... and wrote design handbooks and computer programs for use by Industrial organizations. ...

  5. sxi1110.tmp

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Kotecki, D.J., 1995, "Standards and industrial methods for ferrite measurement", Welding ... of calibration of instruments for ing cooling. measuring, by magnetic attraction ...

  6. New Framework Transforms FAST Wind Turbine Modeling Tool (Fact...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    released an expanded version of its FAST wind turbine computer-aided engineer- ing tool under ... mooring quasi-static behaviors of floating offshore wind turbines; and full ...

  7. --No Title--

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3. Cooking Energy Sources, Number of Buildings and Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Number of Buildings (thousand) Total Floorspace (million square feet) All Build- ings*...

  8. Why Sandia?

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sandia? Sandia was doing cyber before the term cyberspace existed. Today, with cybersecurity a daunting - and rapidly grow- ing - national security problem, Sandia is applying...

  9. Energy Emergency Energy Emergency Preparedness Quarterly Preparedness...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... support- ing the event and then coordinated their evaluations with the USSS and the venue's electric utility provider. DOE deployed to the Multi-agency Coordination Center (MACC) ...

  10. Revised: December, 2008

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    E4. Electricity Consumption (Btu) Intensities by End Use for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Electricity Energy Intensity (thousand Btusquare foot)" ,"Total ","Space Heat- ing","Cool-...

  11. Released: September, 2008

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    E4A. Electricity Consumption (Btu) Intensities by End Use for All Buildings, 2003" ,"Electricity Energy Intensity (thousand Btusquare foot)" ,"Total ","Space Heat- ing","Cool-...

  12. Modifications and Optimization of the Organic Rankine Cycle

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... ORCs can be used in waste heat recovery applications for a broad range of industries, including metals and minerals manufacturing, refneries, chemical process- ing plants, concrete ...

  13. Education and Outreach

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ing materials and an equipment kit was published in Spring 2011. This two-week module for high school chemistry, ... proceedings and journal articles, technical ...

  14. Evince Technology | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Evince Technology Jump to: navigation, search Name: Evince Technology Place: United Kingdom Sector: Efficiency, Wind energy Product: String representation "Evince has pion ... ing...

  15. FEMP Outdoor Solid State Lighting Intiative: Resources for Outdoor...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Fact Sheet - The Consortium shares technical information and experi- ences related to LED street and area light- ing ...

  16. --No Title--

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    2. Water Heating Equipment, Number of Buildings and Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Number of Buildings (thousand) Total Floorspace (million square feet) All Build- ings*...

  17. 1992 CBECS BC

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    A57. Energy Conservation Features, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1992 Building Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Number of Buildings (thousand) Total Floorspace (million square feet) RSE Row Factor All Buildings Any Conser- vation Features Build- ing Shell HVAC Light- ing Other All Buildings Any Conser- vation Features Build- ing Shell HVAC Light- ing Other 0.8 0.8 0.8 0.9 1.0 1.9 0.8 0.9 0.9 0.9 1.2 1.7 All Buildings ................................... 4,806 4,357 4,223 2,604 1,178 264

  18. ch_1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982, as amended, determined that a geological repository ... obtain- ing representative con- stituent samples from the large volumes of mixed ...

  19. Evaluating Color Rendition Using IES TM-30-15

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Developing new measures for evaluating color render- ing has been a goal of lighting researchers-and the broader lighting industry-for decades. The utility of the Commission...

  20. 110th Congress 2D Session H.R. 5746

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES APRIL 9, 2008 Mr. LARSON of Connecticut (for himself, Mr. DENT, Mr. WYNN, Mr. INGLIS of South Carolina, Ms. DELAURO, Mr. DOYLE, Mr. HOLDEN, Mr. ...

  1. Microsoft PowerPoint - 2012 3rd Qtr Package.ppt [Compatibility...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Commission uses zero-based budgeting for j stif ing the R&D b dget abo e a p esc ibed le el and Reliabilit Cente ed Maintenance justifying the R&D budget above a...

  2. A I K E N

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (SRNL) is continu- ing its impressive record for safety. SRNL's safety record for 2014 once again places the laboratory as the safety leader in the U.S. Department of Energy's...

  3. BPA-2013-01131-FOIA Request

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    am r equesting the contact information for your Director of Contract ing and Director of Human ResourcesCapital. I would like to have the following information: Name Specify...

  4. Microsoft Word - DMC-FinalReport.doc

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... data, (ii) a process model for predict-ing the effects of key operating and design ... unbalanced partition data for a bank of industrial dense medium cyclones. 56 3.3.2 DMC ...

  5. METALLURGICAL EVALUATION OF CAST DUPLEX STAINLESS STEELS AND...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... small nitrogen of paramount importance. 4 ing of DSS 4.1. Welding Metallurgy As welding ... on the HAZ structure since multipass welding is a requirement in industrial practice. ...

  6. Microsoft Word - Final Report DE-NT0005308 7-25-12 yc

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... is often the limiting factor in most industrial cooling water applications, as the ... Here the heat transfer rate measured from the cool- ing water side was used. The value of ...

  7. 41737 Final

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Temperatures, SHRH1RH2, F Commission- ing Year Fuel Country Misumi 1000 3568 1112 ... Guard house * Runoff water pump house * Industrial waste treatment building 5.4 Plant ...

  8. RPP-RPT-42583 Revision

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... rigging safety training on April 22, 2003 from a manufacturer of industrial rigging. ... techniciflns inst.alled bolt*s and torqued them, complet.ing installation of the limiter. ...

  9. Department of Energy Projects Win 36 R&D 100 Awards for 2011

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Th-ING, Thorium Is Now Green: This technology is a straightforward, cost-effective, and safe method to produce thorium that may help make thorium become a practical and reliable ...

  10. Los Alamos National Laboratory earns

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    when heated, and a better way to produce thorium, an elemental sustainable energy ... making it both effective and practical.Thorium Is Now Green Th-ING was developed by ...

  11. Released: September, 2008

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    E6. Electricity Consumption (kWh) Intensities by End Use for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Electricity Energy Intensity (kWhsquare foot)" ,"Total ","Space Heat- ing","Cool-...

  12. Community Energy Strategic Planning - Step 5

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Speaking Points: * Be sure to present goal and strategy ideas to stakeholders, and use ... momentum for implemenIng the plan. 3 Speaking Points: WHAT: Informed by the results of ...

  13. algorithms

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    1 are estimated us- ing the conventional MCMC (C-MCMC) with 60,000 model executions (red-solid lines), the linear, quadratic, and cubic surrogate systems with 9226, 4375, 3765...

  14. b35.xls

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Cooled 1 to 50 Percent Cooled 51 to 99 Percent Cooled 100 Percent Cooled All Build- ings* Not Cooled 1 to 50 Percent Cooled 51 to 99 Percent Cooled 100 Percent Cooled All ...

  15. b36.xls

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Not Lit a 1 to 50 Percent Lit 51 to 99 Percent Lit 100 Percent Lit All Build- ings* Not Lit a 1 to 50 Percent Lit 51 to 99 Percent Lit 100 Percent Lit All Buildings* ...

  16. Plasma

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    They include the second or higher harmonic scenario, or the scenario involv- ing ion-ion ... This is partially because the m1 harmonic is left-handed in the vicinity of the ...

  17. I&

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... is particular reason. 4. The present storage is safe as far as q hazard at the fence surroxnd- ing those t-co buildings. 5. Samples of roan -ir were t&en to deter+ne if any ...

  18. Benjamin Phillips | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Benjamin Phillips - SRA International Most Recent Q&A: FORGE-ing Ahead to Clean, Low-Cost Geothermal Energy July 17 Gigawatts of Geothermal: JASON Study Highlights Huge Potential for EGS February 2

  19. Paperwork Reduction Act Submission (OMB 83-I)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... 17. Statistical methods 18. Agen cy contact (person who can bes t ans we r qu es tion s reg ard ing the c on ten t of this Does this information collection employ statistical ...

  20. Nuclear Materials Research and Technology/Los Alamos National...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... The DC-ARC-AES capability is also be- ing upgraded to a CID (charge injection device) ... J. A. Lloyd, W. L. Manner and M. T. Paffett, "Methanol Adsorption and Reactivity at U and ...

  1. I RADIOLOGICAL SCOPING SURVEY OF FO,RMER MONSANTO' FACILITIES

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Department of Energy Conducted by: %diation Safety Branch Of&e of Environmental Management ggtb Air Base W ing U.S. Departmtnt of the Air Force In Cooperation W ith: Southwest ...

  2. A SANDIA TECHNOLOGY BULLETIN I_ Aucll_t

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... For example, the surface mesh of an automobile for a computer simulation of a crash can take an analyst six to eight weeks to generate -- significantly limit- ing the pace of ...

  3. Annual Report to Congress on Federal Government Energy Management...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Energy Management Contact Mr. Henry J. Valiulis Director of Supply and Service U.S. ... Lownd es 500 kV Sw itch House McGregor Chapel 16 1 kV Switch Ho use Miller 161 kV Switch ...

  4. Dynamic Operations Wayfinding System (DOWS) for Nuclear Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boring, Ronald Laurids; Ulrich, Thomas Anthony; Lew, Roger Thomas

    2015-08-01

    A novel software tool is proposed to aid reactor operators in respond- ing to upset plant conditions. The purpose of the Dynamic Operations Wayfind- ing System (DOWS) is to diagnose faults, prioritize those faults, identify paths to resolve those faults, and deconflict the optimal path for the operator to fol- low. The objective of DOWS is to take the guesswork out of the best way to combine procedures to resolve compound faults, mitigate low threshold events, or respond to severe accidents. DOWS represents a uniquely flexible and dy- namic computer-based procedure system for operators.

  5. Released: June 2006

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4. Percent of Floorspace Heated, Number of Buildings and Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)",,,,,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Build- ings*","Not Heated","1 to 50 Percent Heated","51 to 99 Percent Heated","100 Percent Heated","All Build- ings*","Not Heated","1 to 50 Percent Heated","51 to 99 Percent Heated","100 Percent

  6. Released: June 2006

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    5. Percent of Floorspace Cooled, Number of Buildings and Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)",,,,,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Build- ings*","Not Cooled","1 to 50 Percent Cooled","51 to 99 Percent Cooled","100 Percent Cooled","All Build- ings*","Not Cooled","1 to 50 Percent Cooled","51 to 99 Percent Cooled","100 Percent

  7. Improved DC Gun Insulator Assembly

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sah, R.; Dudas, A.; Neubauer, M. L.; Poelker, M.; Surles-Law, K. E.L.

    2010-05-23

    Many user fa­cil­i­ties such as syn­chrotron ra­di­a­tion light sources and free elec­tron lasers re­quire ac­cel­er­at­ing struc­tures that sup­port elec­tric fields of 10-100 MV/m, es­pe­cial­ly at the start of the ac­cel­er­a­tor chain where ce­ram­ic in­su­la­tors are used for very high gra­di­ent DC guns. These in­su­la­tors are dif­fi­cult to man­u­fac­ture, re­quire long com­mis­sion­ing times, and often ex­hib­it poor re­li­a­bil­i­ty. Two tech­ni­cal ap­proach­es to solv­ing this prob­lem will be in­ves­ti­gat­ed. First­ly, in­vert­ed ce­ram­ics offer so­lu­tions for re­duced gra­di­ents be­tween the elec­trodes and ground. An in­vert­ed de­sign will be pre­sent­ed for 350 kV, with max­i­mum gra­di­ents in the range of 5-10 MV/m. Sec­ond­ly, novel ce­ram­ic man­u­fac­tur­ing pro­cess­es will be stud­ied, in order to pro­tect triple junc­tion lo­ca­tions from emis­sion, by ap­ply­ing a coat­ing with a bulk re­sis­tiv­i­ty. The pro­cess­es for cre­at­ing this coat­ing will be op­ti­mized to pro­vide pro­tec­tion as well as be used to coat a ce­ram­ic with an ap­pro­pri­ate gra­di­ent in bulk re­sis­tiv­i­ty from the vac­u­um side to the air side of an HV stand­off ce­ram­ic cylin­der. Ex­am­ple in­su­la­tor de­signs are being com­put­er mod­elled, and in­su­la­tor sam­ples are being man­u­fac­tured and test­ed

  8. Build-

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    0. Cooling Equipment, Number of Buildings for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)" ,"All Build- ings*","Cooled Build- ings","Cooling Equipment (more than one may apply)" ,,,"Resid- ential- Type Central Air Condi- tioners","Heat Pumps","Indiv- idual Air Condi- tioners","District Chilled Water","Central Chillers","Pack- aged Air Condi- tioning Units","Swamp

  9. Build-

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1. Cooling Equipment, Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Build- ings*","Cooled Build- ings","Cooling Equipment (more than one may apply)" ,,,"Resid- ential- Type Central Air Condi- tioners","Heat Pumps","Indiv- idual Air Condi- tioners","District Chilled Water","Central Chillers","Pack- aged Air Condi- tioning Units","Swamp

  10. Memorial Lew Kowarski

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-04-25

    Le DG J.Adams et d'autres intervenants rendent hommage à L.Kowarski (1907-1979), un des pionniers du Cern en 1952, né à St.Petersbourg et physicien, chimiste et ingénieur. Depuis sa retraite en 1972, il se consacra à l'enseignement et est conseiller des Nations Unies.

  11. ATOMIC ENERGY COMMISSION Refer to File No. AEGR-1 The CommandinS...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... at the fence surro-ad- ing those t-i:0 buildinzs. 5. Sa@es of room air were taken to detetine ir' any radon, ?, radioactive 32s fmm the disin?.egai.tix of radium, x3s cresent. ...

  12. NCBECS C&E 1979

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    U9UJU;9AOO "S'D 0098-393 (303) S9903 'O'Q 'uoi6urysBM 6uip|ing J0| peso|6ua si LLIJOJ 02-13' Moiaq iB8

  13. Outline

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Chris Scruton, as well as the contributions of our industrial partners including Mr. ... Cu rin g Ch am b e rs Co llat io n Pack ag in g Co at ing s D rye r Sep arat o r Tile M ac ...

  14. D= DOE/RG-0067

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ... Effects of d i rect el e c t r i c f i elds , n o i s e , sex and age on maz e learn ing ... n i neteen Mas s achusetts towns i n M i dd l esex , E s sex , and Worc ester Count i es . ...

  15. BPA_winery_incentives_4-20-09.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    High Pressure Sodium (HPS) lighting was retro ted to high er orman e and gl ol i ing insulation was intalled Ste i helle Wine states an e e t to see a sim le a a on their energ ill...

  16. The AmAzing Journey of Columbia River Salmon B O N N E V I L

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 WAiTing To hATch 1 reneWing The cycLe 10 reTurn ing To spAWning grounds 9 cLimbing fish LAdders 8 sWimming upsTreAm 7 Living in The oceAn 6 yolk sac redd alevin 3 Five...

  17. Waiting

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    riding to the sea entering the estuary Living in the ocean sWimming upstream cLimbing fish Ladders return ing to spaWning grounds reneWing the cycLe 5 4 3 2 1 10 9 8 7 6 1...

  18. " Level: National Data;" " ...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ...ing",0,26.8,1.1,37.4,46.5,72.4,50.6,72.4,61.1,17.3 311221," Wet Corn Milling",0,0,0,0,"X","X",0,"X","X","X" 31131," Sugar Manufacturing",0,0,0,"X",0,"X","X","X","X","X" 3114," ...

  19. PRECIPITATION OF URANIUM PEROXIDE OF LOW FLUORIDE CONTENT FROM SOLUTIONS CONTAINING FLUORIDES

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    King, E.J.; Clark, H.M.

    1958-08-12

    S>A method is described for the preparation of fluoride free uraniunn peroxide precipitates, even though the solution from which the precipitation is made is contaminated with fluorides. This is accomplished by add ing aluminum ions to the solution, where they complex any fluoride present and prevent its precipitation with the uramum peroxide.

  20. Question of the Week: How Will You Landscape for Energy Efficiency? |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy Will You Landscape for Energy Efficiency? Question of the Week: How Will You Landscape for Energy Efficiency? April 9, 2009 - 11:31am Addthis On Tuesday, Elizabeth wrote about some resources that will help you landscape with an eye to energy efficiency. Now that spring is here, I know many of your are just itching to get outside and work on your landscaping. How will you landscape for energy efficiency? Each Thursday, you have the chance to share your thoughts on a topic

  1. High-Assurance Software: LDRD Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hulette, Geoffrey Compton

    2014-06-01

    This report summarizes our work on methods for developing high-assurance digital systems. We present an approach for understanding and evaluating trust issues in digital systems, and for us- ing computer-checked proofs as a means for realizing this approach. We describe the theoretical background for programming with proofs based on the Curry-Howard correspondence, connect- ing the field of logic and proof theory to programs. We then describe a series of case studies, intended to demonstrate how this approach might be adopted in practice. In particular, our stud- ies elucidate some of the challenges that arise with this style of certified programming, including induction principles, generic programming, termination requirements, and reasoning over infinite state spaces.

  2. NREL-Led Team Improves and Accelerates Battery Design (Fact Sheet), Innovation Impact: Transportation, NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    FS-6A42-60650 * November 2013 NREL prints on paper that contains recycled content. NREL-Led Team Improves and Accelerates Battery Design The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is leading some of the best minds from U.S. auto manufacturers, battery developers, and automotive simulation tool developers in a $20 million project to accelerate the development of battery packs and thus the wider adoption of electric-drive vehicles. The Computer-Aided Engineer- ing for Electric Drive Vehicle

  3. Management Control Cover

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Assess- ing Natural Resource Damage at Rocky Flats OAS-M-06-02 November 2005 REPORT ON MANAGEMENT CONTROLS OVER ASSESSING NATURAL RESUORCE DAMAGE AT ROCKY FLATS TABLE OF CONTENTS Natural Resource Damage Assessment at Rocky Flats Details of Finding 1 Recommendation and Comments 3 Appendices Objective, Scope, and Methodology 5 Prior Audit Reports 6 Management Comments 7 NATURAL RESURCE DAMAGE ASSESSMENT AT ROCKY FLATS Page 1 Details of Finding Natural Resource The Rocky Flats Project Office

  4. Word Pro - Untitled1

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    chemical compounds composed of carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen. The series of molecules vary in chain length and are composed of a hydrocarbon plus a hydroxyl group: CH 3 -(CH 2 )n-OH (e.g., metha- nol, ethanol, and tertiary butyl alcohol). See Fuel Ethanol. Alternative Fuel: Alternative fuels, for transportation applications, include the following: methanol; denatured ethanol, and other alcohols; fuel mixtures contain- ing 85 percent or more by volume of methanol, denatured ethanol, and other

  5. Environmental Assessment Q&A Fact Sheet

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    DOE has prepared a Draft Environmental Assessment for Conducting Astrophysics and Other Basic Science Experiments at the WIPP Site. This document examines the potential environmental consequences from conducting particular types of scientific experiments in an area of the WIPP underground called the experiment gallery. The environmental assess- ment also looks at the potential cumulative impacts of conducting experiments and operat- ing WIPP as a transuranic waste repository. This fact sheet

  6. Global Illumination for Fun and Profit

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Anisotropic Ellipsoidal Smoothing of Volume Data Bai Xue 1 , Nelson Max 1,2 , Cristina Siegerist 2 1 University of California, Davis 2 Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory ABSTRACT: ing the sharp edges between them [2, 3, 4, 5]. They are appropriate for removing noise before edge detection. However, they are not as useful for filling gaps in surface-like high density regions. We developed a simple filter specifically tailored for this purpose. Briefly, we predicted the surface normal direction, and then

  7. Introduction

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1992, the President of the United States placed a moratorium on underground nuclear weapons testing. As a result, alternate experimental methods for certifying the nation's nuclear weapons stockpile were implemented. Among these experimental methods was the Joint Actinide Shock Physics Experimental Research (JASPER) Facility, located at the Nevada National Security Site. JASPER plays an integral role in the certification of the nation's nuclear weapons stockpile by provid- ing a method to

  8. Roberta Poloni | Center for Gas SeparationsRelevant to Clean Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Technologies | Blandine Jerome Roberta Poloni Previous Next List Poloni Roberta Poloni Formerly: Postdoctoral Researcher, Department of Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering University of California, Berkeley Presently: Postoctoral Researcher, Laboratoire de Science et Ingéniérie des Matériaux et Procédés, Institut Polytechnique de Grenoble, France Ph.D. in Physics, University of Lyon-1, France BS in Physics, Camerino, Italy EFRC research: Detailed studies on the CO2 locations in

  9. Technical Sessions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Analysis of Cloud Radiative Forcing and Feedback in a Climate General Circulation Model A. Lacis NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Institute for Space Studies New York, NY 10025 and diffuse transmission as a function of solar zenith angle, optical depth, cloud particle size, and single scatter- ing albedo. These results will replace the current approach which uses the "Single Gauss Point" doubling algorithm to obtain cloud radiative properties. However, the stack of homogeneous layers

  10. American Recovery & Reinvestment Act Newsletter - Issue 19

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    With all of the Oak Ridge Office Environ- mental Management (EM) program's $755 million in American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funds obligated to 36 proj- ects, the division is now focused on successfully completing the site's remaining work by September 2011. The past 20 months have seen a noticeable transformation in Oak Ridge's skyline following the demolition of several build- ings used in the Manhattan Project and the Cold War. More significant changes are coming in the months ahead as

  11. American Recovery & Reinvestment Act Newsletter - Issue 24

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Moving 2.4 million tons of uranium mill tail- ings away from the Colorado River is only one of the activi- ties the Moab Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project accomplished with $108 million from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. The Moab Project has achieved numerous accomplishments in Recovery Act-funded efforts to help move the tailings safely and efficiently to a permanent disposal facility near Crescent Junction, 30 miles north of the Moab site. The Recovery Act funded the

  12. U.S. Department of Energy Wind and Water Power Program Funding in the United States: Conventional Hydropower Projects, FY 2008 … FY 2010

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Testing, Manufacturing, and Component Development Projects for Utility-Scale and Distributed Wind Energy Fiscal Years 2006 - 2014 WIND PROGRAM 1 The Wind Program's research and development (R&D) projects are financed through several primary sources of funding: Congressional appropriations and Congressionally Directed Projects (CDPs). Congressional appropriations determine the operat- ing budgets for each EERE program. Program-funded R&D projects are typically awarded to recipients as

  13. ch_5

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    44 Environmental Consequences 5.2.7 WATER RESOURCES This section presents potential water resource impacts from implement- ing the proposed waste processing alternatives described in Chapter 3. Section 5.2.14 dis- cusses potential impacts to INEEL water resources from accidents or unusual natural phe- nomena such as earth- quakes. Appendix C.9 discusses potential long- term impacts to INEEL water resources from facility closure. Because the Minimum INEEL Processing Alternative would involve

  14. ch_6

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    0 6.0 Sta Sta tutes tutes , , Regula Regula tions tions , , Consulta Consulta tions tions , , and Other and Other Requir Requir ements ements 6-1 DOE/EIS-0287 This chapter discusses the consultations and coordination the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has had with various agen- cies during the preparation of this Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). This chapter also analyzes the complex regulatory issues that arise when consider- ing the various alternatives discussed pre- viously. When

  15. A Quarterly Update on Joint UK NDA/US DOE Activities and Initiatives

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Quarterly Update on Joint UK NDA/US DOE Activities and Initiatives Issue 9: Winter 2014 The third Plutonium Management Infor- mation Exchange Workshop was held in Sellafield on October 1 & 2. Attendees included staff from UK NDA, UK Na- tional Nuclear Laboratory, Sellafield Ltd, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Savan- nah River National Laboratory and the University of Manchester although atten- dance from DOE HQ was precluded by the US Government shutdown. The meet- ing covered a wide range

  16. Electron Temperature Fluctuations During Magnetic Reconnection

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fluctuations During Magnetic Reconnection in the Reversed-Field Pinch by Cale P. Kasten Undergraduate thesis submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Bachelor of Science (Engineering Physics) at the UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN - MADISON April 5, 2011 Abstract Electron temperature correlates to the dominant m = 0, n = 1 edge-resonant tear- ing mode during sawtooth events in the Madison Symmetric Torus reversed-field pinch. Using a high-repetition-rate Thomson scattering

  17. UCRL-JC-1197l5 PREPRINT HUMAN HEALTH RISKS FROM TNT, RDX, and HMX

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    97l5 PREPRINT HUMAN HEALTH RISKS FROM TNT, RDX, and HMX IN ENVIRONMENTAL MEDIA AND CONSIDERATION OF THE U.S. REGULATORY ENVIRONMENT Jeffrey I. Daniels John P. Knezovich This paper was pre ared for submittal to the Luxembourg, Luxembourg November 14-16,1994 Procee ap ings Demil '94 December 1994 Thisis apreprintof apaperintendedfor publicationin a journal orproceedings. Since changes may be made before publication, this preprint is made available with the understanding that it will not be cited

  18. Guest Speaker: Jeff Thompson, PhD

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Growing America's Energy Future The emerging U.S. bioenergy industry provides a secure and growing supply of transportation fuels, biopower, and bioproducts from a range of biomass resources. Abundant, renewable bioenergy can help secure America's energy future, reducing our dependence on foreign oil and ensur- ing American prosperity while protecting the environment. Bioenergy can also help mitigate growing concerns about climate change by having an impact in decreasing green- house gas

  19. DOE Responses to EAC Work Products - June 2014 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    June 2014 DOE Responses to EAC Work Products - June 2014 This memo from Assistant Secretary for Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Patricia Hoffman to the Electricity Advisory Committee provides the Department of Energy's response to the EAC's analyses and recommendations made in late 2013. The memo and included documentation address EAC recommendations on the following topics: Recommendations for DOE Action regarding Resiliency, October 2013 Recommendations for DOE Action regard ing

  20. Evaluating Membrane Processes for Air Conditioning, Highlights in Research and Development (Fact Sheet), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NREL compiles state-of-the-art review on membrane processes for air conditioning to identify future research opportunities. Researchers are pursuing alternatives to conventional heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) practices, especially cool- ing and dehumidification, because of high energy use, environmentally harmful refrigerants, and a need for better humidity control. Advancements in membrane technology enable new possibilities in this area. Membranes are traditionally used for

  1. Growing Americas Energy Future

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Growing America's Energy Future The emerging U.S. bioenergy industry provides a secure and growing supply of transportation fuels, biopower, and bioproducts from a range of biomass resources. Abundant, renewable bioenergy can help secure America's energy future, reducing our dependence on foreign oil and ensur- ing American prosperity while protecting the environment. Bioenergy can also help mitigate growing concerns about climate change by having an impact in decreasing green- house gas

  2. OMB Burden Disclosure Statement

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    71.1 OMB Control Number (09/2012) (Classification) OMB Burden Disclosure Statement 1910-1800 Public reporting burden for this collection of information is estimated to average 10 (minutes) per response, including the time for reviewing instructions, searching exist ing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and completing and reviewing the collection of information. Send comme nts regarding this estimate or any other aspect of this information, including suggestions for

  3. TEMPLATE FOR A PUBLICATION IN THE INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF DISTRIBUTED ENERGY RESOURCESŽ

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    STRUCTURED OPTIMIZATION FOR PARAMETER SELECTION OF FREQUENCY-WATT GRID SUPPORT FUNCTIONS FOR WIDE-AREA DAMPING Jason Neely, Jay Johnson , Raymond Byrne, Ryan T. Elliott Sandia National Laboratories P.O. Box 5800 MS1033, Albuquerque, NM, USA 87185 Phone 1-505-845-7677, Fax 1-505-284-6078 E-mail: jneely@sandia.gov Keywords: distributed energy resources, advanced grid functions, wide-area damp- ing, inter-area oscillations, energy storage applications ABSTRACT Deployment of distributed renewable

  4. untitled

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    this year's edition of the Lab News Labs Accomplishments. This publication is one important way many of the Labs' technical and operational achievements are noted. Once again our accomplishments are top- notch, and they speak to the high cal- iber of our people and partners. It has been my privilege to lead this laboratory this past year, which included an opportunity for the management team to reexamine and rearticulate our intent as we move forward. The result- ing Strategic Plan describes our

  5. Bioscience

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    es as high-noise environments and instrumentation sensitivity and dynamic range. A foundation goal is to improve how manmade systems intersect with the subsurface. Strategies include study- ing subsurface fluid flow, biological effects on geo- processes in the deep subsurface, and rapid, silent and environmentally friendly drilling systems. Researchers also are working to reliably predict atmo- spheric and surface phenomena by developing explor- atory tools such as climate models and

  6. AFDC Update Volume 5, Issue 2, Summer 1996

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Drivers of Federal fleet vehi- cles report that their alternative fuel vehicles (AFVs) are approach- ing the performance and reliability they expect from gasoline vehicles. That finding is part of the latest report recently released by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's AFV light-duty vehicle data collection effort. Although NREL is well known for its alternative fuel emissions data, its latest report, Alternative Fuel Light-Duty Vehicles,

  7. AFFIDAVIT FOR SURVIVING RELATIVE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Federal fleet vehi- cles report that their alternative fuel vehicles (AFVs) are approach- ing the performance and reliability they expect from gasoline vehicles. That finding is part of the latest report recently released by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's AFV light-duty vehicle data collection effort. Although NREL is well known for its alternative fuel emissions data, its latest report, Alternative Fuel Light-Duty Vehicles,

  8. Doing Business with DOE's Solid-State Lighting Program

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Doing Business with DOE's Solid-State Lighting Program Solid-state lighting (SSL) is an emerging technology that promises to make a significant impact on solving our nation's energy and environmental challenges. With the promise of being more than ten times as effcient as incandescent lighting and twice as effcient as fuorescent light- ing, SSL products using light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) will mean "greener" homes and businesses that use

  9. Measurement of Muon Neutrino and Antineutrino Induced Single Neutral Pion Production Cross Sections

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Measurement of Muon Neutrino and Antineutrino Induced Single Neutral Pion Production Cross Sections Colin E. Anderson 2011 Elucidating the nature of neutrino oscillation continues to be a goal in the vanguard of the ef- forts of physics experiment. As neutrino oscillation searches seek an increasingly elusive sig- nal, a thorough understanding of the possible backgrounds becomes ever more important. Measurements of neutrino-nucleus interaction cross sections are key to this understand- ing.

  10. ASC-eNews-September-2009.indd

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    2 SAND #2009-7125 W September 2009 The Meisner Minute Editorial by Bob Meisner This past quarter brought with it significant change and progress. In May, Michael Strayer and I formed the Exascale Initiative Steering Committee (EISC) that recognizes the need for ASC and the Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research in the Office of Science to collaborate if we are to be successful at achieving exascale comput- ing by the end of next decade. The committee is comprised of representatives

  11. : Frsnk K. Pittman, Director, Division of Waste Management

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    . _J NOV 13 1973 , : Frsnk K. Pittman, Director, Division of Waste Management snd. Transportation, HQ DECONTAMINAl!ING AND DECOWSSIONING OF AEC FACILITIES (YOUR TWX, a/29/73 1 SR has only one facility which has been decontaminated and decommissioned for unconditional release. The Sylvsnia- Corning Plant at Hicksville, Long Island, New York, was released in 1965 tG the Sylvania Corp. Cleanup was accomplished by steaming and washing the con- tsminated sectionof buildings 1 & 2, bringing

  12. Wind Vision Chapter 4: The Wind Vision Roadmap: A Pathway Forward

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    4 2 4 The Wind Vision Roadmap: A Pathway Forward Summary Chapter 4 and Appendix M provide a detailed roadmap of technical, economic, and institu- tional actions by the wind industry, the wind research community, and others to optimize wind's potential contribution to a cleaner, more reliable, low-carbon, domestic energy generation portfolio, utilizing U.S. manu- facturing and a U.S. workforce. The roadmap is intended to be the beginning of an evolv- ing, collaborative, and necessarily dynamic

  13. From the tiny atom to

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    From the tiny atom to the supernovae Atom-split it for nuclear energy Fermi-leader of the team that produced the first self-sustain- ing controlled nuclear chain reaction; contributed to ending WWII Calutron-invented by E. O. Lawrence; for maximum pro- ductivity, critical sensitive adjustments were provided by the 'Calutron Girls' Seaborg-Chairman of the Atomic Energy Commission 1961-1971; discovered many elements Buckyball-Buckminsterfullerene; 60 carbon atoms in the shape of a soccer ball;

  14. UCRL-JC-146203

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    US. Department of Energy ,- Preprint UCRL-JC-146203 Toward Robust Climate Basel in ing : 0 bject ive Assessment of Climate Change Using Widely Distributed ' Miniaturized Sensors for Accurate World-Wide Geophysical Measurements E. Teller, C. Leith, G. Canavan, J. Marion, L. Wood Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory This article was submitted to 26" International Symposium on Planetary Emergencies, Erice, Italy, August 20-24, 2001 November 13,2001 Approved for public release; further

  15. ARMresearch_highlights.indd

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Radiosonde Comparisons Improve Humidity Data * Computing Radiative Transfer More Effectively * For Ice Particles, Size and Shape Do Matter * The Fade Fac- tor: Modeled vs. Measured DNSI CONTENTS December 2003 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program ARM CONTENTS Tropical Radiosonde Comparisons Improve Past and Present Humidity Data The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program's Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) site is an excellent environment for research focused on improv- ing the

  16. Community Connections: April 2014

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    April 2014 Community Connections: Your link to news and opportunities from Los Alamos National Laboratory Latest Issue:May 2016 all issues All Issues » submit IN THIS ISSUE Local companies learn about resources for success Resource Roundtable explores opportunities close to home Winners announced for Second Annual STEM Challenge Students looked into the future RoboRAVE brings robot fever to Northern New Mexico Local rally captures the a-MAZE-ing excitement New app takes Lab's volunteer efforts

  17. David W Johnson | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    W Johnson Principal Research Physicist, Head, ITER Fabrication David Johnson is a principal research physicist with broad experience in techniques and instrumentation for measur- ing the characteristics of magnetic fusion plasmas. He has specific expertise in laser Thomson scattering systems, and has installed and operated such systems on many fusion devices around the world. He managed a division of plasma diagnostic experts for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) and National Spherical

  18. Sub-picosecond optical switching with a negative index metamaterial

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect SciTech Connect Search Results Journal Article: Sub-picosecond optical switching with a negative index metamaterial Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Sub-picosecond optical switching with a negative index metamaterial Development of all-optical signal processing, eliminating the performance and cost penalties of optical-electrical-optical conversion, is important for continu,ing advances in Terabits/sec (Tb/s) communications.' Optical

  19. simd051.tmp

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    s OXIDATIVE ALTERATION OF SPENT FUEL IN A SILICA-RICH s $, ENVIRONMENT: SEMfAEM INVESTIGATION AND GEOCHEMICAL MODELING Q$$$J (fph?tm Yifeng Wang*, Huifang XU** ' ~ ~q @ * Sandia National Laboratories, 4100 National Parks Highway, Carlsbad, New Mexico 88220. E-mail: ywang@sandia.gov **Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, The University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131. E-mail: hfku@J.mrn.edu ABSTRACT Correctly identi~ing the possible alteration products and accurately

  20. LED Watch: Is Your Design Already Out of Date?

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    lED WATCH James Brodrick IS YOUR DESIGN AlREADY OUt Of DAtE? Some ideas for guarding against lED obsolescence L ast year, the Burden Museum in Troy, NY, switched over to all-LED light- ing with the help of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Gateway demonstration program. By the time the conversion was implemented, 14 months had elapsed since specification, so a number of changes had to be made. One of the specified products had been withdrawn from the market because it had been having field

  1. LED Watch: Unlocking the Full Potential of Indoor Systems

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    LD+A June 2015 www.ies.org Lighting control has long held the potential to deliver significant energy sav- ings by adjusting the amount of light to the real-time needs of a particular space and its occupants. But while myriad prod- ucts for controlling light have been com- mercially available for quite some time, their deployment and resulting energy savings have been limited. SSL products are poised to be the catalyst that unlocks that potential. SSL technology offers an unprecedented ability

  2. I T E L I N E S S A

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A publication for all members of the NNSA/NSO family Issue 118 July/August 2006 National Security T National Security T echnologies chart echnologies chart s s a fresh course for the future a fresh course for the future N ational Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec) President and General Manager Steve Younger is excited - not only about chart- ing a fresh course for the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and its associat- ed facilities - but about providing new opportunities and forging a stronger partnership

  3. Porous Polymer Networks: Synthesis, Porosity, and Applications in Gas

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Storage/Separation | Center for Gas SeparationsRelevant to Clean Energy Technologies | Blandine Jerome Porous Polymer Networks: Synthesis, Porosity, and Applications in Gas Storage/Separation Previous Next List Weigang Lu, Daqiang Yuan, Dan Zhao, Christine Inge Schilling, Oliver Plietzsch, Thierry Muller, Stefan BrĂ€se, Johannes Guenther, Janet BlĂŒmel, Rajamani Krishna, Zhen Li, and Hong-Cai Zhou, Chem. Mater., 2010, 22 (21), pp 5964-5972 DOI: 10.1021/cm1021068 Abstract Image Abstract:

  4. PERFO RMANC E EVALU ATION AND MEASU REMEN T PLAN Incentiv

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PERFO RMANC E EVALU ATION AND MEASU REMEN T PLAN Incentiv e B - Award Fee DESIGN, CONSTR UCTION, AND COMMIS SIONING OF THE HANFOR D TANK WASTE TREATM ENT AND IMMOBIL IZATION PLANT Issued By: Kevin W. Smith CONTRA CT NO. DE-AC27 -01RV141 36 Evaluation Period 2016 January 1, 2016, to December 31, 2016 Bechte l Nationa l, Inc. Richland , WA Rev. 1 - Effective February 9, 2016 Accepted By: m ~ ~ JJ. ~c~ Margaret<f McCullough Manager, DOE Office of River Protection Fee-Determin ing Official

  5. ch_5

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    25 DOE/EIS-0287 Idaho HLW & FD EIS 5.3 Facility Disposition Impacts Section 5.3 presents a discussion of potential impacts associated with the disposition of exist- ing HLW management facilities at INEEL and disposition of new facilities that would be built in support of the proposed waste processing alternatives. The discussion includes (1) the potential impacts of short-term actions in dispo- sitioning new and existing HLW management facilities, (2) the potential long-term impacts from the

  6. factsheet: National Prototype Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Distributed Wind Capacity Nearing 1 GW Distributed wind cumulative capacity has reached a total of 906 MW from nearly 74,000 wind turbines. In 2014, 23 states added 63.6 MW of new distributed wind capacity, represent- ing nearly 1,700 units and $170 million in investment. 2014 a Mixed Year for Distributed Wind The market for distributed wind systems using large-scale turbines (greater than 1 MW) showed signs of a recovery after low capacity additions in 2013. The markets for distributed wind

  7. BWXTymes, October 2004: Y-12 newsletter

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Loudon $31,600 Blount $15,600 Knox $260,300 Anderson $208,600 Roane $67,800 OCTOBER 2004 Out with the old and in with the new A newsletter for the employees and friends of the Y-12 National Security Complex Y-12's 2004 United Way campaign was a resounding success, raising more than $650,000 for local charitable organiza- tions. Included in this amount was a corpo- rate contribution of $40,000. Special events dur- ing the drive included a book fair, a silent online auction, a bake sale, a

  8. New SPOs Ready for Duty

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SPOs Ready for Duty 'We-Lead' ing the Way WSI-Nevada graduates new class of Security Police Officers for the NNSS. Contractors awarded DOE honor for superior safety. NNSS management embraces leadership as path to future. See page 7. See pages 4-5. "Father of Stockpile Stewardship" Reis Pays Visit to NNSS Dr. Victor H. Reis recalls with certainty the details from 1993 when he was waiting to become Assistant Secretary of Defense Programs for the U.S. Department of Energy. President

  9. LANL: AOT & LANSCE The PULSE July 2010

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    0 Los Alamos National Laboratory * Est. 1943 The Pulse-Newsletter of the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center and Accelerator Operations and Technology Division I N S I D E 2 Lacerda takes on Lansce Leadership roLe Mark iii outperforM- ing siMuLations 4 heads up! feature: Lansce and aot division MeMbers recognized with poLLution prevention awards Mark III spallation neutron target completed On June 9, shortly after 5 a.m., the frst proton beam hit the new "Mark III" spallation neutron

  10. DOE ISM REVIEW TEAM PRE-VISIT

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    BE THE FACE OF CLIMATE CHANGE W elcom ing Rem arks Adam Cohen, Chief Operating Officer Native Am erican Dance To Honor the Earth Emelie Jeffries and Company 2012 PPPL Green M achine Aw ards Presentation Adam Cohen, COO Native Dance To Honor The Earth. PRINCETON PLASMA PHYSICS LABORATORY Be A Face of Climate Change Presents Earth Week 2013 at RavensWing Productions presents The Four Directions Native American Dancers To dance is to pray, to pray is to heal, to heal is to give, to give is to live,

  11. In com:ectio;l with Letter Contract $10

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    In com:ectio;l with Letter Contract $10. X-44-153 eng-7 dabed 23 Eay .,.,~1945, please be advised that code symbols till be used therein in place of the nar.e or .formAae of tjle Sgecx1 ."c naterials. Tine codes for these symbols al-0 as follow: unit - 2 t,cns .A - Slack uranium oxide (U302). 3 - iiranium dioxide ('202) 0:1 a purity suitable.lor direct use L. in subsequent uranim ,~etal ;roducblon. ,s??ip:~ing containers shaii be,li;nited Eoieiy.to cmpany labels arid labels using said code

  12. SUBJIHX:

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    : SUBJIHX: ?%w P ~.~i~~~~~ I' - 6*:&b d-h tQ @ i -" i" 1 s..?F?ew% ,~~~.~~~~,~ ,l Aesisrtmxt ?Xrarctmr for DATE Jitx;;r 6, I.955 l' lmPmfiQn, mv3.sion of R&w Materials 060. G, Marvin, Qirsctor for PrfXess Developnsnt 4: :.- p, J. Picario, stz.uction and n - f',_' h j::... ; Supply Branch, Division of Raw Materials -T 17 -L, 3c &j 0 DATA BE RESTORATION, ABANJIONMENT OR SELLING BU%3ING AND CERTAIN . " L) CURRIES ON FBCPEB'E OFU. S. PHOSPHO~C PRCDUCTS, EAST TAMPA, --

  13. RoboRAVE brings robot fever to Northern New Mexico

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    RoboRAVE brings robot fever to Northern New Mexico Community Connections: Your link to news and opportunities from Los Alamos National Laboratory Latest Issue:May 2016 all issues All Issues » submit RoboRAVE brings robot fever to Northern New Mexico Local rally captures the a-MAZE-ing excitement April 1, 2014 Ignacio Garcia-Gon readies his robot at the RoboRAVE Rally. Ignacio Garcia-Gon readies his robot at the RoboRAVE Rally. Contact Community Programs Office Director Kurt Steinhaus Email

  14. GLADY CASSIT Y VANDALIA MURPHY CR EEK BU CKHN-CENT URY CLAY

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    GLADY CASSIT Y VANDALIA MURPHY CR EEK BU CKHN-CENT URY CLAY GLENVILLE N MINNORA JARVISVILLE FAR MINGTON PH ILIPPI BELIN GT ON WAYN ESBUR G PR UNT Y GLENVILLE S CAVE RUN TAYLOR DRAIN ROSEDALE ST MPT-N RMNT-SHK WESTON-JAN E LEW SWN DL-WID EN VADIS STANL EY DEKALB UNION TALLM AN SVILL E ASPINALL-FIN ST ER ZOLLARSVILLE WILBU R RAMSEY HEATER S BR IDGEPORT-PRUNT YTOWN ALEXAND ER LILLY FORK SH ERMAN HIRAM ST FK-BLST N CK BU RNS CH APEL S BR WN -LUM BER PORT CON INGS PR ATT BOSWELL REVEL ELK C REEK

  15. S A V A N N A H R I V E R S I T E

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Excerpts from "Strengthening Energy Security through Federal Partnerships" 67 ENE RGY The Military Engineer * No. 676 The need to shrink depen dence on fos- sil fuels is not a new conce pt in the na- tion's energy discus sion, nor is the need to invest in clean, renew able energy . But the challe nge of how to deliver solar, bioma ss, wind, wave, geothe rmal and other power genera tion techno logies in a cost effecti ve, large-s cale mann er-an d meet the chang - ing energy deman ds of

  16. S A V A N N A H R I V E R S I T E

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Overview and Assets Enterprise * SRS is a Department of Energy (DOE) industrial complex in South Carolina cover- ing 310 square miles. Enterprise * SRS is the descendant of the Savannah River Plant, es- tablished in the early 1950s to produce materials for America's nuclear weapons program. The Site was renamed the Savannah River Site in 1989 as the Cold War came to an end and cleanup of the Cold War legacy became a more prominent part of the mission. Enterprise*SRS is now committed to using our

  17. Getting started

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Getting started Getting started First Steps You can log in to Genepool using SSH (Secure Shell) with the following command from any UNIX, Linux, FreeBSD, etc. command shell or terminal: ssh -l username genepool.nersc.gov There are several SSH-capable clients available for Windows, Mac, and UNIX/Linux machines. NERSC does not support or recommend any particular client. By ssh'ing to genepool.nersc.gov, you will access one of the seven genepool login nodes. These login nodes are situated behind a

  18. Mr. John Kiel

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Kiel ing , Acting Chief Hazardous Waste Bureau De p artm ent of En e rgy Carlsbad Field Office P. O. Box 3090 Carlsbad. New Mexico 8822 1 NOV 2 1 2011 New M exico Environment Department 2905 Rodeo Park Drive East. Building 1 Santa Fe . New Mexico 87505-6303 Subject: Notification of Class 1 Permit Modifica tions to the Hazardous Waste Facility Permit , Number: NM4890139088-TSDF Dea r Mr. Kielin g: Enclosed are til e following Class 1 Permit Modification Notificatio ns: * Editorial Correction to

  19. U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE NATlONAL BUREAU OF STANDARDS Hr. Robert S. Uallclgh

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    lpx- . :b"mn;,Cw2' UN &D SdTEi GovERNMEhT . (Ptor. by A.3. i5o-SC) A~emorandzbm - U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE NATlONAL BUREAU OF STANDARDS Hr. Robert S. Uallclgh To : AsrocIated Director AdmInIstration DATE: Harch 22, 1968 Through: Dr. Uayne W. Welnkc ChaInan, Radiation Safety Comlttee In regy refer to: 500.02 FROM : Abraham Schwebcl Chief, Health Physics Section . . SUBJECT: Release of bulldIngs at Van Ness Street after decontamination ! From the early 19201s tII1 1952, the

  20. b

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    b ., '.\ 1'. :.So+ material8, + :slag, raste.Ume and,graphite~bbtained im the :. pro&otion of.metal at Iora',State, Coll&$d$ing the early period.of operation' in.&942~aad~sarly'l943 mere~disoarded &n.an area~called the Imw+ State College :,dump instead of being:aaved,fbr:recpvery.operations(.;,~~.'~e ,&nner of 1943 it WELE realLzed~'by this 'offics~thst.'cormidera~le~.~arii~-bssrlng mater&al, mu Lpiobably present,in this'dump .and:should.be recovered.. ,b,~the Pall of

  1. NGDS User Centered Design Meeting the Needs of the Geothermal Community

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyd, Suzanne; Zheng, Sam; Patten, Kim; Blackman, Harold

    2013-10-01

    In order to ensure the widest and greatest utility of IT and software projects designed for geothermal reservoir engineer- ing the full consideration of end users’ task and workflow needs must be evaluated. This paper describes the user-centered design (UCD) approach taken in the development of a user interface (UI) solution for the National Geothermal Data System (NGDS). This development process has been research based, highly collabora- tive, and incorporates state-of-the-art practices to ensure a quality user experience. Work is continuing on the interface, including future usability tests to further refine the interfaces as the overall system is developed.

  2. B1487(01)Quarks FM.i-xvi

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Committee on the Physics of the Universe Board on Physics and Astronomy Division on Engineering and Physical Sciences THE NATIONAL ACADEMIES PRESS Washington, D.C. www.nap.edu Quarks Eleven Science Questions for the New Century with the Cosmos Connecting THE NATIONAL ACADEMIES PRESS 500 Fifth Street, N.W. Washington, DC 20001 NOTICE: The project that is the subject of this report was approved by the Govern- ing Board of the National Research Council, whose members are drawn from the councils of

  3. Humain behavior

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-04-25

    Le Dr.Muriel James est ingénieur, conseiller/consultant dans plusieurs commissions (p.ex.justice criminelle au Japon) et universités et est l'auteur de nombreux livres (11) traduits dans plusieurs langues. Le plus connu de ses ouvrages est "Born to win". Dans son exposé elle se réfÚre à son livre "O.K.Boss" et parle d'un modÚle spécifique du comportement humain et de ses qualités essentielles qui est la base de son travail.

  4. GLOBAL CLIMATE CHANGE: SOME IMPLICATIONS, OPPORTUNITIES. AND CHALLENGES FOR U.S. FORESTRY

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    GLADY CASSIT Y VANDALIA MURPHY CR EEK BU CKHN-CENT URY CLAY GLENVILLE N MINNORA JARVISVILLE FAR MINGTON PH ILIPPI BELIN GT ON WAYN ESBUR G PR UNT Y GLENVILLE S CAVE RUN TAYLOR DRAIN ROSEDALE ST MPT-N RMNT-SHK WESTON-JAN E LEW SWN DL-WID EN VADIS STANL EY DEKALB UNION TALLM AN SVILL E ASPINALL-FIN ST ER ZOLLARSVILLE WILBU R RAMSEY HEATER S BR IDGEPORT-PRUNT YTOWN ALEXAND ER LILLY FORK SH ERMAN HIRAM ST FK-BLST N CK BU RNS CH APEL S BR WN -LUM BER PORT CON INGS PR ATT BOSWELL REVEL ELK C REEK

  5. US5375149.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    USOO5375149A Umted States Patent [19] [11] Patent Number: 5,375,149 Fisch et al. [45] Date of Patent: Dec. 20, 1994 [54] APPARATUS AND METHOD FOR Primary Examiner-Daniel D. Wasil EXTRACI'ING POWER FROM ENERGETIC Attorney, Agent, or Firm-Daniel D. Park; Thomas G. IONS PRODUCED IN NUCLEAR FUSION Anderson; William R. Moser [75] Inventors: Nathaniel J. Fisch, Princeton, N.J.; [57] ABSTRACI' Jean M' Rax' Paris' France An apparatus and method of extracting power from [73] Assignee: The United States

  6. Word Pro - S3

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    49 Table 3.1 Petroleum Overview (Thousand Barrels per Day) Field Production a Renew- able Fuels and Oxy- genates f Process- ing Gain g Trade Stock Change j Adjust- ments c,k Petroleum Products Supplied Crude Oil b,c NGPL e Total c Im- ports h Ex- ports Net Imports i 48 States d Alaska Total 1950 Average .................. 5,407 0 5,407 499 5,906 NA 2 850 305 545 -56 -51 6,458 1955 Average .................. 6,807 0 6,807 771 7,578 NA 34 1,248 368 880 (s) -37 8,455 1960 Average ..................

  7. ARQ99fall.pgm

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Actinide Research In This Issue 1 In Situ FTIR inspec- tion Is a Convenient New Tool for Analyz- ing and Viewing Samples 4 Neutron Diffraction Gives Pu Melting - Point Information 6 NMT Launches a Science Leadership Council 8 NMT Charters New Group for Pits 11 Publications and Invited Talks 12 Newsmakers 3rd quarter 1999 N u c l e a r M a t e r i a l s R e s e a r c h a n d T e c h n o l o g y In Situ FTIR Inspection Is a Convenient New Tool for Analyzing and Viewing Samples Fourier

  8. factsheet.indd

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Distributed Wind Capacity Nearing 1 GW Distributed wind cumulative capacity has reached a total of 906 MW from nearly 74,000 wind turbines. In 2014, 23 states added 63.6 MW of new distributed wind capacity, represent- ing nearly 1,700 units and $170 million in investment. 2014 a Mixed Year for Distributed Wind The market for distributed wind systems using large-scale turbines (greater than 1 MW) showed signs of a recovery after low capacity additions in 2013. The markets for distributed wind

  9. Apr2003z

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    February 2004 A newsletter for the employees and friends of the Y-12 National Security Complex BWXT Y-12 received more than $21 million in fiscal 2003 for managing the Y-12 Nuclear Security Complex. The company received high marks in most categories, earning $21,188,511 out of a total possible $22,940,552. "Overall, BWXT Y-12 made significant improvements at the Y-12 plant, continu- ing the positive momentum generated in the last couple of years," Bill Brumley, head of the National

  10. B61-12 Life Extension Program Radar Drop Tests Completed Successfully |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the Physics of the Universe Board on Physics and Astronomy Division on Engineering and Physical Sciences THE NATIONAL ACADEMIES PRESS Washington, D.C. www.nap.edu Quarks Eleven Science Questions for the New Century with the Cosmos Connecting THE NATIONAL ACADEMIES PRESS 500 Fifth Street, N.W. Washington, DC 20001 NOTICE: The project that is the subject of this report was approved by the Govern- ing Board of the National Research Council, whose members are drawn from the councils of the National

  11. Jas

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sh ort w av e Radiat iv e T rans f e r in t h e M ul t is cal e M ode l l ing Fram e w ork Jas on Col e 1 H ow ard Bark e r 2 M arat K h airout dinov 3 Dav id Randal l 4 1 Univ e rs it y of Brit is h Col um bia 2 M e t e orol ogical Se rv ice of Canada 3 St ony Brook Univ e rs it y 4 Col orado St at e Univ e rs it y 1. I nt roduct ion 3. Re s ul t s 2. Expe rim e nt Se t up CSRM Sys t e m f or At m os ph e ric M ode l l ing v e rs ion 6.6.5 (SAM v 6.6.5) * 2D w it h axis orie nt e d w e s t -e

  12. Post Retort, Pre Hydro-treat Upgrading of Shale Oil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gordon, John

    2012-09-30

    Various oil feedstocks, including oil from oil shale, bitumen from tar sands, heavy oil, and refin- ery streams were reacted with the alkali metals lithium or sodium in the presence of hydrogen or methane at elevated temperature and pressure in a reactor. The products were liquids with sub- stantially reduced metals, sulfur and nitrogen content. The API gravity typically increased. Sodi- um was found to be more effective than lithium in effectiveness. The solids formed when sodium was utilized contained sodium sulfide which could be regenerated electrochemically back to so- dium and a sulfur product using a "Nasicon", sodium ion conducting membrane. In addition, the process was found to be effective reducing total acid number (TAN) to zero, dramatically reduc- ing the asphaltene content and vacuum residual fraction in the product liquid. The process has promise as a means of eliminating sulfur oxide and carbon monoxide emissions. The process al- so opens the possibility of eliminating the coking process from upgrading schemes and upgrad- ing without using hydrogen.

  13. Cyclone-cyclone Interactions through the Ocean Pathway

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balaguru, Karthik; Taraphdar, Sourav; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Foltz, Gregory R.; Knaff, John A.

    2014-10-16

    The intense SST (Sea Surface Temperature) cooling caused by hurricane-induced mixing is restored at timescales on the order of weeks(1) and thus may persist long enough to influence a later hurricane passing over it. Though many studies have evaluated the effects of SST cool-ing induced by a hurricane on its own intensification(2, 3), none has looked at its effect on later storms. Using an analysis of observations and numerical model simulations, we demonstrate that hurricanes may influence the intensity of later hurricanes that pass over their linger-ing wakes. On average, when hurricanes encounter cold wakes, they experience SSTs that are ~0.4oC lower than when they do not encounter wakes and consequently decay(intensify) at a rate that is nearly three times faster(slower). In the region of warm SSTs (* 26.5oC) where the most intense and damaging hurricanes tend to occur, the percentage of hurricanes that encounter lingering cold wakes increases with hurricane frequency and was found to be as high as 40%. Furthermore, we estimate that the cumulative power dissipated(4) by the most energetic hurricanes has been reduced by as much as ~7% in a season through this effect. As the debate on changes in Atlantic hurricane activity associated with global warming(5) continues, the negative feedback between hurricane frequency and intensity resulting from hurricane-hurricane interactions through the ocean pathway deserves attention.

  14. Classifier-Guided Sampling for Complex Energy System Optimization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Backlund, Peter B.; Eddy, John P.

    2015-09-01

    This report documents the results of a Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) effort enti tled "Classifier - Guided Sampling for Complex Energy System Optimization" that was conducted during FY 2014 and FY 2015. The goal of this proj ect was to develop, implement, and test major improvements to the classifier - guided sampling (CGS) algorithm. CGS is type of evolutionary algorithm for perform ing search and optimization over a set of discrete design variables in the face of one or more objective functions. E xisting evolutionary algorithms, such as genetic algorithms , may require a large number of o bjecti ve function evaluations to identify optimal or near - optimal solutions . Reducing the number of evaluations can result in significant time savings, especially if the objective function is computationally expensive. CGS reduce s the evaluation count by us ing a Bayesian network classifier to filter out non - promising candidate designs , prior to evaluation, based on their posterior probabilit ies . In this project, b oth the single - objective and multi - objective version s of the CGS are developed and tested on a set of benchm ark problems. As a domain - specific case study, CGS is used to design a microgrid for use in islanded mode during an extended bulk power grid outage.

  15. High Power Coax Window

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neubauer, M. L.; Dudas, A.; Sah, R.; Elliott, T. S.; Rimmer, R. A.; Stirbet, M. S.

    2010-05-23

    A su­per­con­duct­ing RF (SRF) power cou­pler ca­pa­ble of han­dling 500 kW CW RF power is re­quired for pre­sent and fu­ture stor­age rings and linacs. There are over 35 cou­pler de­signs for SRF cav­i­ties rang­ing in fre­quen­cy from 325 to 1500 MHz. Cou­pler win­dows vary from cylin­ders to cones to disks, and RF power cou­plers are lim­it­ed by the abil­i­ty of ce­ram­ic win­dows to with­stand the stress­es due to heat­ing and me­chan­i­cal flex­ure. We pro­pose a novel ro­bust co-ax­i­al SRF cou­pler de­sign which uses com­pressed win­dow tech­nol­o­gy. This tech­nol­o­gy will allow the use of high­ly ther­mal­ly con­duc­tive ma­te­ri­als for cryo­genic win­dows. Using com­pressed win­dow tech­niques on disk co-ax­i­al win­dows will make sig­nif­i­cant im­prove­ments in the power han­dling of SRF cou­plers. We pre­sent the bench test re­sults of two win­dow as­sem­blies back to back, as well as in­di­vid­u­al win­dow VSWR in EIA3.125 coax. A vac­u­um test as­sem­bly was made and the win­dows baked out at 155C. The pro­cess­es used to build win­dows is scal­able to larg­er di­am­e­ter coax and to high­er power lev­els.

  16. F in al T echn ical R e p o r t for D E -F G 0 2 -0 5 E R 5

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    al T echn ical R e p o r t for D E -F G 0 2 -0 5 E R 5 4 8 3 1 L ab oratory S tu d ie s o f D y n a m o s R eport subm itted: November 6, 2014 Principal Investigator: Professor Cary Forest G rant Period: July 15, 2005 to July 14, 2014 Institution: Board of Regents of the University of W isconsin System th a t the same type of circuit may be achieved in a flowing conduct- ing fluid such as a liquid m etal in the case of planetary dynamos or a plasm a in the case of astrophysical dynamos. The

  17. TeamWorks10-14-04

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    14, 2004 By the Numbers WIPP hosts DOE Deputy Secretary Kyle McSlarrow Transportation and disposal statistics are available on pages 3 and 4. D E P A R T M E N T O F E N E R G Y U N I T E D S T A T ES O F A M E R I C A TeamWorks TeamWorks TRU A biweekly e-newsletter for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant team n Tuesday, October 12, WIPP employees who gathered to welcome DOE Deputy Secretary Kyle McSlarrow on his first visit to the facility were treated to an encouraging announcement regard- ing the

  18. Use of Continuous Integration Tools for Application Performance Monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vergara Larrea, Veronica G [ORNL; Joubert, Wayne [ORNL; Fuson, Christopher B [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    High performance computing systems are becom- ing increasingly complex, both in node architecture and in the multiple layers of software stack required to compile and run applications. As a consequence, the likelihood is increasing for application performance regressions to occur as a result of routine upgrades of system software components which interact in complex ways. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of continuous integration tools for application performance monitoring on HPC systems. In addition, this paper also describes a prototype system for application perfor- mance monitoring based on Jenkins, a Java-based continuous integration tool. The monitoring system described leverages several features in Jenkins to track application performance results over time. Preliminary results and lessons learned from monitoring applications on Cray systems at the Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility are presented.

  19. LANL: AOT & LANSCE The Pulse September 2012

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 Los Alamos National Laboratory * Est. 1943 The Pulse-Newsletter of the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center and Accelerator Operations and Technology Division 2 From Alex's Desk 3 Development oF high pressure-temperA- ture Cell to stuDy interFACe proCesses 4 role oF elAstiC benD- ing stress on mAgne- tism oF A mAngAnite thin Film stuDieD by polArizeD neutron reFleCtometry 5 heADs up! 6 From the Desk: know your worker sAFety AnD seCurity teAm rep Quiz Biennial national neutron scattering

  20. Ne

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ne utrino s o urce π + 8 GeV p Be source of Îœ ” source of Îœ e background source of Îœ e background source of Îœ e background source of Îœ ” Κ + π     ï€ ï€«ï€ ïź     e  ï€ ï€«ï€ ïź  ï€«ï€ ïź e Κ     ï€ ï€«ï€ ïź  Κ   e    ï€«ï€ ïź e Κ  L  e    ï€«ï€ ïź e ● Knowing the production cross sections for m esons produced at the target is critical for determ ing

  1. Technology Solutions Case Study: Insulated Siding Retrofit in a Cold Climate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2015-05-01

    In this study, the U.S. Department of Energy’s team Building America Partner¬ship for Improved Residential Construction (BA-PIRC) worked with Kinsley Construction Company to evaluate the real-world performance of insulated sid¬ing when applied to an existing home. A 1960s home was selected for analysis. It is located in a cold climate (zone 6) where the addition of insulated siding and a carefully detailed water-resistive barrier have the potential to offer significant benefits. In particular, the team quantified building airtightness and heating energy use as a function of outdoor temperatures before and after the installa¬tion of the insulated siding.

  2. Primordial nucleosynthesis: A cosmological point of view

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mathews, G. J.; Kusakabe, M.; Cheoun, M.-K.

    2014-05-09

    Primordial nucleosynthesis remains as one of the pillars of modern cosmology. It is the test-ing ground upon which all cosmological models must ultimately rest. It is our only probe of the universe during the first few minutes of cosmic expansion and in particular during the important radiation-dominated epoch. These lectures review the basic equations of space-time, cosmology, and big bang nucleosynthesis. We will then review the current state of observational constraints on primordial abundances along with the key nuclear reactions and their uncertainties. We summarize which nuclear measure-ments are most crucial during the big bang. We also review various cosmological models and their constraints. In particular, we summarize the constraints that big bang nucleosynthesis places upon the possible time variation of fundamental constants, along with constraints on the nature and origin of dark matter and dark energy, long-lived supersymmetric particles, gravity waves, and the primordial magnetic field.

  3. Temperature detection in a gas turbine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lacy, Benjamin; Kraemer, Gilbert; Stevenson, Christian

    2012-12-18

    A temperature detector includes a first metal and a second metal different from the first metal. The first metal includes a plurality of wires and the second metal includes a wire. The plurality of wires of the first metal are connected to the wire of the second metal in parallel junctions. Another temperature detector includes a plurality of resistance temperature detectors. The plurality of resistance temperature detectors are connected at a plurality of junctions. A method of detecting a temperature change of a component of a turbine includes providing a temperature detector include ing a first metal and a second metal different from the first metal connected to each other at a plurality of junctions in contact with the component; and detecting any voltage change at any junction.

  4. TIDAL TURBULENCE SPECTRA FROM A COMPLIANT MOORING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomson, Jim; Kilcher, Levi; Richmond, Marshall C.; Talbert, Joe; deKlerk, Alex; Polagye, Brian; Guerra, Maricarmen; Cienfuegos, Rodrigo

    2013-06-13

    A compliant mooring to collect high frequency turbulence data at a tidal energy site is evaluated in a series of short demon- stration deployments. The Tidal Turbulence Mooring (TTM) improves upon recent bottom-mounted approaches by suspend- ing Acoustic Doppler Velocimeters (ADVs) at mid-water depths (which are more relevant to tidal turbines). The ADV turbulence data are superior to Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) data, but are subject to motion contamination when suspended on a mooring in strong currents. In this demonstration, passive stabilization is shown to be sufficient for acquiring bulk statistics of the turbulence, without motion correction. With motion cor- rection (post-processing), data quality is further improved; the relative merits of direct and spectral motion correction are dis- cussed.

  5. Re

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Re s pons e of a CSRM t o V arying M agnit ude s of Sh ort w av e M ont e Carl o Radiat iv e Trans f e r Nois e Jas on Col e 1 H ow ard Bark e r 2 M arat K h airout dinov 3 Dav id Randal l 3 1 Univ e rs it y of Brit is h Col um bia 2 M e t e orol ogical Se rv ice of Canada 3 Col orado St at e Univ e rs it y 1. I nt roduct ion 4. Re s ul t s (TO GA/ COARE) 2. Expe rim e nt Se t up CSRM Sys t e m f or At m os ph e ric M ode l l ing v e rs ion 6.5 (SAM v 6.5) 2D w it h axis orie nt e d w e s t -e

  6. Slide 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Jonathan A. Dowell DOE-RL Assistant Manager for River and Plateau S a fe a n d E ff e c ti v e C le a n u p th a t P ro te c ts th e C o lu m b ia R iv e r  Re du ce s the Ac tiv e Sit e Fo otp rin t of Cle an up to 75 Sq ua re Mi les (58 6 to 75 )  Sig nif ica ntl y Re du ce s Lo ng -Te rm Mo rtg ag e Co sts  At Co mp let ion , Sh ifts Em ph as is an d Re so urc es to Fu ll Sc ale Cle an up of the Ce ntr al Pla tea u (75 sq ua re mi les )  Re du ce s Co sts by "R igh t Siz ing

  7. A

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    t I s s u e 62 Copublished by the IEEE CS and the AIP 1521-9615/07/$25.00 ©2007 IEEE Computing in SCienCe & engineering How Big Can You THink? CHallenges aT THe FronTier By Dimitri Kusnezov W hen I was a postdoc, a frIend told me the famIlIar anecdote of how a theoretIcal physIcIst approaches research: faced wIth the problem of understandIng a table's stabIlIty, theorIsts fIrst analyze Its stabIlIty wIth one leg and an InfInIte number of legs, and then spend the rest of theIr careers

  8. Access to a New Plasma Edge State with High Density and Pressures using Quiescent H-mode

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Solomon, Wayne M.; Snyder, P. B.; Burrell, K. H.; Fenstermacher, M. E.; Garofalo, A. M.; Grierson, B. A.; Loarte, A.; McKee, G. R.; Nazikian, R; Osborne, T. H.

    2014-07-01

    A path to a new high performance regime has been discovered in tokamaks that could improve the attractiveness of a fusion reactor. Experiments on DIII-D using a quiescent H-mode edge have navigated a valley of improved edge peeling-ballooning stability that opens up with strong plasma shaping at high density, leading to a doubling of the edge pressure over standard edge localized mode (ELM)ing H-mode at these parameters. The thermal energy confinement time increases both as a result of the increased pedestal height and improvements in the core transport and reduced low-k turbulence. Calculations of the pedestal height and width as a function of density using constraints imposed by peeling-ballooning and kinetic-ballooning theory are in quantitative agreement with the measurements.

  9. Frontiers in Geoscience Colloquium

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1, 2 016 3:00pm - 4 :00pm Physics A uditorium ( TA---3, B ldg 2 15) People, F orests & F ires i n t he J emez M ountains & S outhwest: M ulK--- Century P erspecKves f rom T ree R ings, F ire S cars a nd A rchaeology Thomas W . S wetnam Regents' P rofessor o f D endrochronology, E meritus Laboratory o f T ree---Ring R esearch, U niversity o f A rizona Climate v aria+ons h ave b een i mportant d rivers o f w ildfire occurrence i n p onderosa p ine f orests a cross w estern N orth A merica

  10. jqmIb#; OF No SKNIFJCAHT IWAm

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ,#,]\ ' J : U .s. lkpv-tmnt of I!herpy jqmIb#; OF No SKNIFJCAHT IWAm fkme&~I AdAm at the AcldM.lddle Pueblo CarWOn siti, kt3 A!Yx.xi, New Mcxlca me Depfwtmcnt of lhergy txul prepnred an CnVl~rlncntal Mbe88ment (I%) QI the proposed remedial action at the I' omcr md:oactlve uaatr treatment plant site (TA-45), Acld/%dc!le f' wt~lo Canyon, k~:: Alaws, New Mcrlco. Eb3ed on the fIndIng of the EA, which ti avatlahle to the public m request, the kputnent of Energy tm detct' mlmd that the pmpnsed

  11. Intrinsic Uncertainties in Modeling Complex Systems.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooper, Curtis S; Bramson, Aaron L.; Ames, Arlo L.

    2014-09-01

    Models are built to understand and predict the behaviors of both natural and artificial systems. Because it is always necessary to abstract away aspects of any non-trivial system being modeled, we know models can potentially leave out important, even critical elements. This reality of the modeling enterprise forces us to consider the prospective impacts of those effects completely left out of a model - either intentionally or unconsidered. Insensitivity to new structure is an indication of diminishing returns. In this work, we represent a hypothetical unknown effect on a validated model as a finite perturba- tion whose amplitude is constrained within a control region. We find robustly that without further constraints, no meaningful bounds can be placed on the amplitude of a perturbation outside of the control region. Thus, forecasting into unsampled regions is a very risky proposition. We also present inherent difficulties with proper time discretization of models and representing in- herently discrete quantities. We point out potentially worrisome uncertainties, arising from math- ematical formulation alone, which modelers can inadvertently introduce into models of complex systems. Acknowledgements This work has been funded under early-career LDRD project %23170979, entitled %22Quantify- ing Confidence in Complex Systems Models Having Structural Uncertainties%22, which ran from 04/2013 to 09/2014. We wish to express our gratitude to the many researchers at Sandia who con- tributed ideas to this work, as well as feedback on the manuscript. In particular, we would like to mention George Barr, Alexander Outkin, Walt Beyeler, Eric Vugrin, and Laura Swiler for provid- ing invaluable advice and guidance through the course of the project. We would also like to thank Steven Kleban, Amanda Gonzales, Trevor Manzanares, and Sarah Burwell for their assistance in managing project tasks and resources.

  12. Delayed Fission Gamma-ray Characteristics of Th-232 U-233 U-235 U-238 and Pu-239

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lane, Taylor; Parma, Edward J.

    2015-08-01

    Delayed fission gamma-rays play an important role in determining the time dependent ioniz- ing dose for experiments in the central irradiation cavity of the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR). Delayed gamma-rays are produced from both fission product decay and from acti- vation of materials in the core, such as cladding and support structures. Knowing both the delayed gamma-ray emission rate and the time-dependent gamma-ray energy spectrum is nec- essary in order to properly determine the dose contributions from delayed fission gamma-rays. This information is especially important when attempting to deconvolute the time-dependent neutron, prompt gamma-ray, and delayed gamma-ray contribution to the response of a diamond photo-conducting diode (PCD) or fission chamber in time frames of milliseconds to seconds following a reactor pulse. This work focused on investigating delayed gamma-ray character- istics produced from fission products from thermal, fast, and high energy fission of Th-232, U-233, U-235, U-238, and Pu-239. This work uses a modified version of CINDER2008, a transmutation code developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory, to model time and energy dependent photon characteristics due to fission. This modified code adds the capability to track photon-induced transmutations, photo-fission, and the subsequent radiation caused by fission products due to photo-fission. The data is compared against previous work done with SNL- modified CINDER2008 [ 1 ] and experimental data [ 2 , 3 ] and other published literature, includ- ing ENDF/B-VII.1 [ 4 ]. The ability to produce a high-fidelity (7,428 group) energy-dependent photon fluence at various times post-fission can improve the delayed photon characterization for radiation effects tests at research reactors, as well as other applications.

  13. Healthhazard evaluation report HETA 84-075-1634, Hydra-Matic Division of General Motors, Ypsilanti, Michigan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniels, W.J.; Orris, P.

    1985-11-01

    Environmental and breathing-zone samples were analyzed for total particulates, trace metals, glycol ethers, and other organic materials at Hydra/Matic, a division of General Motors, in Ypsilanti, Michigan in March, 1984 and March, 1985. The evaluation was requested confidentially to investigate employee exposures to machine coolants and additives used in the centerless grinding operation. The central coolant system had been contaminated by sewage and high concentrations of chemicals had reportedly been added to the system to prevent bacterial growth. Questionnaire interviews were conducted with 75 employees. Eye irritation, sinus congestion, rhinitis, daily cough, upper respiratory infections, and skin complaints such as frequent dryness, itching, rash, and pimples were reported. All concentrations of chemical agents were below their relevant standards or not detectable. The authors note that no airborne contaminant that would pose a health hazard has been identified. Recommendations include properly maintaining the coolant system and individual machines, training employees in proper work practices for use with cutting fluids, and making barrier creams and protective clothing available.

  14. Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 90-232-2138, Schulte Corporation, Cincinnati, Ohio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Venable, H.L.; Kawamoto, M.M.

    1991-09-01

    In response to a confidential request from employees of the Schulte Corporation (SIC-3496), Cincinnati, Ohio, an evaluation was undertaken of complaints of chest tightness, itching, metallic taste in the mouth, and discharge of black dust from the noses of workers in the machine shop of the facility. The facility was involved in the manufacturing and shipping of epoxy coated steel wire shelving. Total dust samples taken in the breathing zone of the workers ranged from 0.49 to 4.78mg/cu m, well below the permissible limits. Respirable dust samples ranged from 0.05 to 0.43mg/cu m. Exposures to nitrogen oxides were well below acceptable limits. Aldehydes were not detected in samples evaluating exposure to two resistance welders. The NIOSH ceiling level of 0.1 part per million for ozone (10028156) was exceeded near welders. Six workers interviewed reported symptoms including black nasal discharge, headaches, sore throat, cough, hoarseness of voice, metallic taste and chest tightness. There was a potential ergonomic problem due to repetitive wrist motion. The authors conclude that a potential hazard from ozone exposure existed. The authors recommend measures to reduce exposures and development of a program for the prevention of cumulative trauma.

  15. Health hazard evaluation report HETA 85-060-1670, City of Norwood, Norwood, Ohio. [Toner powder exposure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruhe, R.L.; Bennett, D.

    1986-02-01

    Following a request from the Health Commissioner of Norwood, Ohio, employee exposure to toner powder used in Norwood Senior High Media Center photocopying machine was investigated. Personal and area air samples for total particulates were collected on preweighed filters and total sample weights determined. Indicator tube sampling was done for carbon monoxide and ozone. Medical interviews were conducted with three media center workers to elicit work related symptomatology. Exposure to total particulate ranged from less than the detection limit to 0.02 mg/m/sup 3/. Carbon monoxide and ozone were nondetectable. Two employees reported no symptoms associated with work. After operating the copy machine for 3 weeks, the third employee developed hives on both hands progressing to the earlobes and right cheek. Her condition improved on weekends. She also had a cough and shortness of breath when working with the duplicator. No positive response to patch testing was seen, but the employee developed cough, tearing eyes, and itching 2 hours after patch application. The authors conclude that one employee suffered an allergic reaction precipitated by materials inhaled in the duplicator area. It is recommended that this employee not use this machine, and improved ventilation be provided for the entire media center.

  16. Epidemiological-environmental study of diesel bus garage workers: acute effects of NO/sub 2/ and respirable particulate on the respiratory system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gamble, J.; Jones, W.; Minshall, S.

    1987-02-01

    Personal samples of nitrogen dioxide (NO/sub 2/) and respirable particulate (RP) were collected over the shift on 232 workers in four diesel bus garages. Response was assessed by an acute respiratory questionnaire and before and after shift spirometry. Measures of exposure to NO/sub 2/ and RP were associated with work-related symptoms of cough; itching, burning, or watering eyes; difficult or labored breathing; chest tightness; and wheeze. The prevalence of burning eyes, headaches, difficult or labored breathing, nausea, and wheeze experienced at work were higher in the diesel bus garage workers than in a comparison population of battery workers, while the prevalence of headaches was reduced. Mean reductions in forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume in 1 sec (FEV1), peak flow, and flows at 50 and 75% of FVC were not obviously different from zero. There was no detectable association of exposure to NO/sub 2/ or respirable particulate and acute reductions in pulmonary function. Workers who often had respiratory work-related symptoms generally had a slightly greater mean acute reduction in FEV1 and FEF50 than did those who did not have these symptoms, but these differences were not statistically significant.

  17. Mechanical-biological waste treatment and the associated occupational hygiene in Finland

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tolvanen, Outi K. . E-mail: outolvan@bytl.jyu.fi; Haenninen, Kari I.

    2006-07-01

    A special feature of waste management in Finland has been the emphasis on the source separation of kitchen biowaste (catering waste); more than two-thirds of the Finnish population participates in this separation. Source-separated biowaste is usually treated by composting. The biowaste of about 5% of the population is handled by mechanical-biological treatment. A waste treatment plant at Mustasaari is the only plant in Finland using digestion for kitchen biowaste. For the protection of their employees, the plant owners commissioned a study on environmental factors and occupational hygiene in the plant area. During 1998-2000 the concentrations of dust, microbes and endotoxins and noise levels were investigated to identify possible problems at the plant. Three different work areas were investigated: the pre-processing and crushing hall, the bioreactor hall and the drying hall. Employees were asked about work-related health problems. Some problems with occupational hygiene were identified: concentrations of microbes and endotoxins may increase to levels harmful to health during waste crushing and in the bioreactor hall. Because employees complained of symptoms such as dry cough and rash or itching appearing once or twice a month, it is advisable to use respirator masks (class P3) during dusty working phases. The noise level in the drying hall exceeded the Finnish threshold value of 85 dBA. Qualitatively harmful factors for the health of employees are similar in all closed waste treatment plants in Finland. Quantitatively, however, the situation at the Mustasaari treatment plant is better than at some Finnish dry waste treatment plants. Therefore is reasonable to conclude that mechanical sorting, which produces a dry waste fraction for combustion and a biowaste fraction for anaerobic treatment, is in terms of occupational hygiene better for employees than combined aerobic treatment and dry waste treatment.

  18. Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sujit Banerjee

    2005-12-15

    Contaminants present in paper recycling mills can degrade product properties and can also lead to substantial downtime. Of these, adhesive material such as hot melts and pressure sensitive adhesives are especially troublesome. These are known as Ă?ÂąĂ?Â?Ă?Â? stickies Ă?ÂąĂ?Â?Ă? and their handling and re- moval requires process equipment such as screens and cleaners as well as chemical additives. In the preceding phase of the project we demonstrated that firing an underwater spark in a tank of stock reduces the tack of the stickies and reduces their impact. The present phase was to demon- strate the technology in full-scale trials, address any issues that might arise, and commercialize the process. Trials were run at the Appleton papers mill in West Carrollton, OH, the Graphics Packag- ing mill at Kalamazoo, MI, Stora Enso mills at Duluth, MN, and Wisconsin Rapids, WI, and the Jackson Paper mill at Sylva, NC. It was shown that the sparker not only detackified stickies but also increased the efficiency of their removal by centrifugal cleaners, improved the effectiveness of dissolved air flotation, and increased the efficiency of flotation deinking. It is estimated that the sparker improves the efficiency of hydrocyclone cleaner, deinking cells and dissolved and dispersed air flotation units by 10-15%. This translates to a corresponding energy benefit in operating these units. The technology has been licensed to Eka Chemicals, a division of Akzo Nobel.

  19. Design Molecular Recognition Materials for Chiral Sensors, Separtations and Catalytic Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jia, S.; Nenoff, T.M.; Provencio, P.; Qiu, Y.; Shelnutt, J.A.; Thoma, S.G.; Zhang, J.

    1998-11-01

    The goal is the development of materials that are highly sensitive and selective for chid chemicals and biochemical (such as insecticides, herbicides, proteins, and nerve agents) to be used as sensors, catalysts and separations membranes. Molecular modeling methods are being used to tailor chiral molecular recognition sites with high affinity and selectivity for specified agents. The work focuses on both silicate and non-silicate materials modified with chirally-pure fictional groups for the catalysis or separations of enantiomerically-pure molecules. Surfactant and quaternary amine templating is being used to synthesize porous frameworks, containing mesopores of 30 to 100 angstroms. Computer molecukw modeling methods are being used in the design of these materials, especially in the chid surface- modi~ing agents. Molecular modeling is also being used to predict the catalytic and separations selectivities of the modified mesoporous materials. The ability to design and synthesize tailored asymmetric molecular recognition sites for sensor coatings allows a broader range of chemicals to be sensed with the desired high sensitivity and selectivity. Initial experiments target the selective sensing of small molecule gases and non-toxic model neural compounds. Further efforts will address designing sensors that greatly extend the variety of resolvable chemical species and forming a predictive, model-based method for developing advanced sensors.

  20. Understanding aging in pentaerythritol tetranitrate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Geoffrey W; Sandstrom, Mary M; Giambra, Anna M; Archuleta, Jose G; Monroe, Deidre C

    2009-01-01

    Pentaerythritol Tetranitrate (PETN) powder is commonly used in detonators because of its sensitivity and explosive power. PETN detonation is largely determined by the average PETN particle size. This is an issue for aging and storage of weapons because PETN has a relatively high vapor pressure and its average particle size changes due to thermal energy input from the environment. PETN aging is a well known problem although the mechanism is not well understood. It is important to understand PETN aging so that predictive models can be constructed that will benefit stockpile surveillance and lifetime extension programs. PETN particles are known to coarsen over time at relatively low temperatures. Particle coarsening requires mass redistribution since decomposition causes powders to become finer as PETN mass is lost. Two possible mechanisms for mass redistribution are vapor phase transfer via sublimation-redeposition and solid-state mass transfer through surface diffusion. In this work we have examined PETN powders us ing permeability, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and optical microscopy based particle analysis. The results of these measurements lead us to a suggested coarsening mechanism that we reproduce with rudimentary simulations. The physical mechanisms used in the simulations are then used to create an empirical model of the coarsening that may be used to make predictions of PETN aging. In the future we will be measuring the vapor pressures and other physical properties of our powders to be able to make predictions using simulations.

  1. Probing the f-state configuration of URu2Si2 with U LIII-edge resonant x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Medling, S. A.; Booth, C. H.; Tobin, J. G.; Baumbach, R. E.; Bauer, E. D.; Sokaras, D.; Nordlund, D.; Weng, T. C.

    2015-09-05

    It has often been said that the most interesting ph- syics occurs when competing interactions are of nearly the same magnitude. Such a situation is surely oc- curing at URu2Si2’s so-called “hidden-order transition”, which garners its name from the missing entropy at a 17.5 K phase transition relative to that expected for a conventional antiferromagnetic phase transition, de- spite the presence of only a very small ordered mag- netic moment.? Despite this discrepancy being identi- fied in 1985, the identification of the order parameter remains elusive, although progress toward understand- ing this transition has been steady since that time, and URu2Si2 remains an important research subject today.? The work described below provides measures of the 5f orbital occupancy and itinerancy using resonant x-ray emission spectroscopy (RXES) at the U LIII absorption edge and measuring U L 1 emission that potentially acts as a dividing line between different classes of “hidden- order” theories.

  2. Steal Tree: Low-Overhead Tracing of Work Stealing Schedulers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lifflander, Jonathan; Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Kale, Laxmikant

    2013-06-16

    Work stealing is a popular approach to scheduling task-parallel programs. The flexibility inherent in work stealing when dealing with load imbalance results in seemingly irregular computation structures, complicating the study of its runtime behavior. In this paper, we present an approach to efficiently trace async-finish parallel programs scheduled using work stealing. We identify key properties that allow us to trace the execution of tasks with low time and space overheads. We also study the usefulness of the proposed schemes in supporting algorithms for data-race detection and retentive steal- ing presented in the literature. We demonstrate that the perturbation due to tracing is within the variation in the execution time with 99% confidence and the traces are concise, amounting to a few tens of kilobytes per thread in most cases. We also demonstrate that the traces enable significant reductions in the cost of detecting data races and result in low, stable space overheads in supporting retentive stealing for async-finish programs.

  3. Laboratory Testing of Bulk Vitrified Low-Activity Waste Forms to Support the 2005 Integrated Disposal Facility Performance Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pierce, Eric M.; McGrail, B. Peter; Bagaasen, Larry M.; Rodriguez, Elsa A.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Geiszler, Keith N.; Baum, Steven R.; Reed, Lunde R.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Schaef, Herbert T.

    2006-06-30

    The purpose of this report is to document the results from laboratory testing of the bulk vitri-fied (BV) waste form that was conducted in support of the 2005 integrated disposal facility (IDF) performance assessment (PA). Laboratory testing provides a majority of the key input data re-quired to assess the long-term performance of the BV waste package with the STORM code. Test data from three principal methods, as described by McGrail et al. (2000a; 2003a), are dis-cussed in this testing report including the single-pass flow-through test (SPFT) and product con-sistency test (PCT). Each of these test methods focuses on different aspects of the glass corrosion process. See McGrail et al. (2000a; 2003a) for additional details regarding these test methods and their use in evaluating long-term glass performance. In addition to evaluating the long-term glass performance, this report discusses the results and methods used to provided a recommended best estimate of the soluble fraction of 99Tc that can be leached from the engineer-ing-scale BV waste package. These laboratory tests are part of a continuum of testing that is aimed at improving the performance of the BV waste package.

  4. Laboratory Testing of Bulk Vitrified Low-Activity Waste Forms to Support the 2005 Integrated Disposal Facility Performance Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pierce, Eric M.; McGrail, B. Peter; Bagaasen, Larry M.; Rodriguez, Elsa A.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Geiszler, Keith N.; Baum, Steven R.; Reed, Lunde R.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Schaef, Herbert T.

    2005-03-31

    The purpose of this report is to document the results from laboratory testing of the bulk vitri-fied (BV) waste form that was conducted in support of the 2005 integrated disposal facility (IDF) performance assessment (PA). Laboratory testing provides a majority of the key input data re-quired to assess the long-term performance of the BV waste package with the STORM code. Test data from three principal methods, as described by McGrail et al. (2000a; 2003a), are dis-cussed in this testing report including the single-pass flow-through test (SPFT) and product con-sistency test (PCT). Each of these test methods focuses on different aspects of the glass corrosion process. See McGrail et al. (2000a; 2003a) for additional details regarding these test methods and their use in evaluating long-term glass performance. In addition to evaluating the long-term glass performance, this report discusses the results and methods used to provided a recommended best estimate of the soluble fraction of 99Tc that can be leached from the engineer-ing-scale BV waste package. These laboratory tests are part of a continuum of testing that is aimed at improving the performance of the BV waste package.

  5. D0 Cryogenic System Superconducting Solenoid Platform I/O

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Markley, D.; /Fermilab

    1997-10-09

    The Dzero detector is scheduled for a major upgrade between 1996 and 1999. This note describes the specifications and configuration of the physical Input/Output devices and instrumentation of the 2 Tesla Superconducting Solenoid. The Solenoid and the VLPC cryostats both reside on the detector platform and are cooled by the Dzero Helium Refrigerator. The cryogenic process control s for these two components will be an extension of the TI565 programmable logic controller system used for other Dzero cryogenic controls. Two Input/Output Bases will be installed on the Dzero detector platform near the cryo corner. These I/O bases will handle all the sensor input and process control output devices from the Solenoid and VLPC cryostats. Having the I/O bases installed on the detector platform makes the connecting cabl ing to the platform much easier . All the instruments are wired directly to the I/O base. The bases have only one communications network cabl e that must be routed off the platform to the South side of the Dzero building.

  6. High Accuracy Transistor Compact Model Calibrations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hembree, Charles E.; Mar, Alan; Robertson, Perry J.

    2015-09-01

    Typically, transistors are modeled by the application of calibrated nominal and range models. These models consists of differing parameter values that describe the location and the upper and lower limits of a distribution of some transistor characteristic such as current capacity. Correspond- ingly, when using this approach, high degrees of accuracy of the transistor models are not expected since the set of models is a surrogate for a statistical description of the devices. The use of these types of models describes expected performances considering the extremes of process or transistor deviations. In contrast, circuits that have very stringent accuracy requirements require modeling techniques with higher accuracy. Since these accurate models have low error in transistor descriptions, these models can be used to describe part to part variations as well as an accurate description of a single circuit instance. Thus, models that meet these stipulations also enable the calculation of quantifi- cation of margins with respect to a functional threshold and uncertainties in these margins. Given this need, new model high accuracy calibration techniques for bipolar junction transis- tors have been developed and are described in this report.

  7. Nuclear structure beyond the neutron drip line. The lowest energy states in 9He via their T=5/2 isobaric analogs in 9Li

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Uberseder, E.; Rogachev, G. V.; Goldberg, V. Z.; Koshchiy, E.; Roeder, B. T.; Alcorta, M.; Chubarian, G.; Davids, B.; Fu, C.; Hooker, J.; et al

    2016-03-01

    The level structure of the very neutron rich and unbound 9He nucleus has been the subject of significant experimental and theoretical study. Many recent works have claimed that the two lowest energy 9He states exist with spins Jπ=1/2+and Jπ=1/2-and widths on the order of 100–200 keV. These find-ings cannot be reconciled with our contemporary understanding of nuclear structure. Our present work is the first high-resolution study with low statistical uncertainty of the relevant excitation energy range in the 8He+n system, performed via a search for the T =5/2 isobaric analog states in 9Li populated through 8He+p elastic scattering. Moreover, themore » present data show no indication of any narrow structures. Instead, we find evidence for a broad Jπ=1/2+state in 9He located approximately 3 MeV above the neutron decay threshold.« less

  8. Karst characterization in a semi-arid region using gravity, seismic, and resistivity geophysical techniques.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnhart, Kevin Scott

    2013-10-01

    We proposed to customize emerging in situ geophysical monitoring technology to generate time-series data during sporadic rain events in a semi-arid region. Electrodes were to be connected to wireless %5Cnodes%22 which can be left in the eld for many months. Embedded software would then increase sampling frequency during periods of rainfall. We hypothesized that this contrast between no-volume ow in karst passageways dur- ing dry periods and partial- or saturated-volume ow during a rain event is detectable by these Wireless Sensor Network (WSN) geophysical nodes, we call this a Wireless Resistivity Network (WRN). The development of new methodologies to characterize semi-arid karst hydrology is intended to augment Sandia National Laboratorys mission to lead e orts in energy technologies, waste disposal and climate security by helping to identify safe and secure regions and those that are at risk. Development and initial eld testing identi ed technological barriers to using WRNs for identifying semi-arid karst, exposing R&D which can be targeted in the future. Gravity, seismic, and resis- tivity surveys elucidated how each technique might e ectively be used to characterize semi-arid karst. This research brings to light the importance and challenges with char- acterizing semi-arid karst through a multi-method geophysical study. As there have been very few studies with this emphasis, this study has expanded the body of practical experience needed to protect the nations water and energy security interests.

  9. Literature Survey Concerning the Feasibility of Remedial Leach for Select Phase I Caverns

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weber, Paula D.; Flores, Karen A.; Lord, David L.

    2015-09-01

    Bryan Mound 5 ( BM5 ) and West Hackberry 9 ( WH9 ) have the potential to create a significant amount of new storage space should the caverns be deemed "leach - ready". This study discusses the original drilling history of the caverns, surrounding geology, current stability, and, based on this culmination of data, makes a preliminary assessment of the leach potential for the cavern. The risks associated with leaching BM5 present substantial problems for the SPR . The odd shape and large amount of insoluble material make it difficult to de termine whether a targeted leach would have the desired effect and create useable ullage or further distort the shape with preferential leaching . T he likelihood of salt falls and damaged or severed casing string is significant . In addition, a targeted le ach would require the relocation of approximately 27 MMB of oil . Due to the abundance of unknown factors associated with this cavern, a targeted leach of BM5 is not recommended. A targeted leaching of the neck of WH 9 could potentially eliminate or diminis h the mid - cavern ledge result ing in a more stable cavern with a more favorable shape. A better understanding of the composition of the surrounding salt and a less complicated leaching history yields more confidence in the ability to successfully leach this region. A targeted leach of WH9 can be recommended upon the completion of a full leach plan with consideration of the impacts upon nearby caverns .

  10. 7 Ć Resolution in Protein 2-Dimentional-Crystal X-Ray Diffraction at Linac Coherent Light Source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pedrini, Bill; Tsai, Ching-Ju; Capitani, Guido; Padeste, Celestino; Hunter, Mark; Zatsepin, Nadia A.; Barty, Anton; Benner, Henry; Boutet, Sebastien; Feld, Geoffrey K.; Hau-Riege, Stefan; Kirian, Rick; Kupitz, Christopher; Messerschmidt, Marc; Ogren, John I.; Pardini, Tommaso; Segelke, Brent; Williams, Garth J.; Spence , John C.; Abela, Rafael; Coleman, Matthew A.; Evans, James E.; Schertler, Gebhard; Frank, Matthias; Li, Xiao-Dan

    2014-06-09

    Membrane proteins arranged as two-dimensional (2D) crystals in the lipid en- vironment provide close-to-physiological structural information, which is essential for understanding the molecular mechanisms of protein function. X-ray diffraction from individual 2D crystals did not represent a suitable investigation tool because of radiation damage. The recent availability of ultrashort pulses from X-ray Free Electron Lasers (X-FELs) has now provided a mean to outrun the damage. Here we report on measurements performed at the LCLS X-FEL on bacteriorhodopsin 2D crystals mounted on a solid support and kept at room temperature. By merg- ing data from about a dozen of single crystal diffraction images, we unambiguously identified the diffraction peaks to a resolution of 7 °A, thus improving the observable resolution with respect to that achievable from a single pattern alone. This indicates that a larger dataset will allow for reliable quantification of peak intensities, and in turn a corresponding increase of resolution. The presented results pave the way to further X-FEL studies on 2D crystals, which may include pump-probe experiments at subpicosecond time resolution.

  11. Ant Colony Optimization for Mapping, Scheduling and Placing in Reconfigurable Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferrandi, Fabrizio; Lanzi, Pier Luca; Pilato, Christian; Sciuto, Donatella; Tumeo, Antonino

    2013-06-24

    Modern heterogeneous embedded platforms, com- posed of several digital signal, application specific and general purpose processors, also include reconfigurable devices support- ing partial dynamic reconfiguration. These devices can change the behavior of some of their parts during execution, allowing hardware acceleration of more sections of the applications. Never- theless, partial dynamic reconfiguration imposes severe overheads in terms of latency. For such systems, a critical part of the design phase is deciding on which processing elements (mapping) and when (scheduling) executing a task, but also how to place them on the reconfigurable device to guarantee the most efficient reuse of the programmable logic. In this paper we propose an algorithm based on Ant Colony Optimization (ACO) that simultaneously executes the scheduling, the mapping and the linear placing of tasks, hiding reconfiguration overheads through prefetching. Our heuristic gradually constructs solutions and then searches around the best ones, cutting out non-promising areas of the design space. We show how to consider the partial dynamic reconfiguration constraints in the scheduling, placing and mapping problems and compare our formulation to other heuristics that address the same problems. We demonstrate that our proposal is more general and robust, and finds better solutions (16.5% in average) with respect to competing solutions.

  12. Using Performance Tools to Support Experiments in HPC Resilience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Naughton, III, Thomas J; Boehm, Swen; Engelmann, Christian; Vallee, Geoffroy R

    2014-01-01

    The high performance computing (HPC) community is working to address fault tolerance and resilience concerns for current and future large scale computing platforms. This is driving enhancements in the programming environ- ments, specifically research on enhancing message passing libraries to support fault tolerant computing capabilities. The community has also recognized that tools for resilience experimentation are greatly lacking. However, we argue that there are several parallels between performance tools and resilience tools . As such, we believe the rich set of HPC performance-focused tools can be extended (repurposed) to benefit the resilience community. In this paper, we describe the initial motivation to leverage standard HPC per- formance analysis techniques to aid in developing diagnostic tools to assist fault tolerance experiments for HPC applications. These diagnosis procedures help to provide context for the system when the errors (failures) occurred. We describe our initial work in leveraging an MPI performance trace tool to assist in provid- ing global context during fault injection experiments. Such tools will assist the HPC resilience community as they extend existing and new application codes to support fault tolerances.

  13. Voltage control in pulsed system by predict-ahead control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Payne, Anthony N.; Watson, James A.; Sampayan, Stephen E.

    1994-01-01

    A method and apparatus for predict-ahead pulse-to-pulse voltage control in a pulsed power supply system is disclosed. A DC power supply network is coupled to a resonant charging network via a first switch. The resonant charging network is coupled at a node to a storage capacitor. An output load is coupled to the storage capacitor via a second switch. A de-Q-ing network is coupled to the resonant charging network via a third switch. The trigger for the third switch is a derived function of the initial voltage of the power supply network, the initial voltage of the storage capacitor, and the present voltage of the storage capacitor. A first trigger closes the first switch and charges the capacitor. The third trigger is asserted according to the derived function to close the third switch. When the third switch is closed, the first switch opens and voltage on the node is regulated. The second trigger may be thereafter asserted to discharge the capacitor into the output load.

  14. Voltage control in pulsed system by predict-ahead control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Payne, A.N.; Watson, J.A.; Sampayan, S.E.

    1994-09-13

    A method and apparatus for predict-ahead pulse-to-pulse voltage control in a pulsed power supply system is disclosed. A DC power supply network is coupled to a resonant charging network via a first switch. The resonant charging network is coupled at a node to a storage capacitor. An output load is coupled to the storage capacitor via a second switch. A de-Q-ing network is coupled to the resonant charging network via a third switch. The trigger for the third switch is a derived function of the initial voltage of the power supply network, the initial voltage of the storage capacitor, and the present voltage of the storage capacitor. A first trigger closes the first switch and charges the capacitor. The third trigger is asserted according to the derived function to close the third switch. When the third switch is closed, the first switch opens and voltage on the node is regulated. The second trigger may be thereafter asserted to discharge the capacitor into the output load. 4 figs.

  15. Peeking Network States with Clustered Patterns

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Jinoh; Sim, Alex

    2015-10-20

    Network traffic monitoring has long been a core element for effec- tive network management and security. However, it is still a chal- lenging task with a high degree of complexity for comprehensive analysis when considering multiple variables and ever-increasing traffic volumes to monitor. For example, one of the widely con- sidered approaches is to scrutinize probabilistic distributions, but it poses a scalability concern and multivariate analysis is not gen- erally supported due to the exponential increase of the complexity. In this work, we propose a novel method for network traffic moni- toring based on clustering, one of the powerful deep-learning tech- niques. We show that the new approach enables us to recognize clustered results as patterns representing the network states, which can then be utilized to evaluate “similarity” of network states over time. In addition, we define a new quantitative measure for the similarity between two compared network states observed in dif- ferent time windows, as a supportive means for intuitive analysis. Finally, we demonstrate the clustering-based network monitoring with public traffic traces, and show that the proposed approach us- ing the clustering method has a great opportunity for feasible, cost- effective network monitoring.

  16. Ag(I) Ion Functionalized Porous Organic Polymers As a New Platform for Highly Selective Adsorption of Ethylene over Ethane

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LI, Baiyan; Zhang, Yiming; Ma, Dingxuan; Wu, Zili; Ma, Shengqian

    2014-01-01

    We report herein a strategy of incorporating air stable Ag(I) ions into water stable, high surface area porous organic polymer (POP) affording significant increase in ethylene uptake capacity and extremely high Qst for ethylene (over 100 kJ/mol at low ethylene load-ing) as illustrated in the context of Ag(I) ion functionalized PAF-1, PAF-1-SO3Ag. IAST calculations using single-component-isotherm data and equimolar ethylene/ethane ratio at 296 K reveal PAF-1-SO3Ag shows exceptionally high ethylene/ethane adsorption selectivi-ty (Sads: 27 to 125), far surpassing benchmark zeolite and any other MOF reported in literature. This alongside excellent water/air stability, high ethylene uptake capacity, and mild regeneration requirements make PAF-1-SO3Ag hold promise for adsorption-based eth-ylene/ethane separations, paving a way to develop Ag(I) ion function-alized POPs as a new platform for highly selective adsorption of eth-ylene over ethane.

  17. Introduction of ?-Complexation into Porous Aromatic Framework for Highly Selective Adsorption of Ethylene over Ethane

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Baiyan; Zhang, Yiming; Krishna, Rajamani; Yao, Kexin; Han, Yu; Wu, Zili; Ma, Dingxuan; Shi, Zhan; Pham, Tony; Space, Brian; Liu, Jian; Thallapally, Praveen K.; Liu, Jun; Matthew, Chrzanowski; Ma, Shengqian

    2014-06-05

    We report herein a strategy of incorporating air stable Ag(I) ions into water stable, high surface area porous organic polymer (POP) affording significant increase in ethylene uptake capacity and extremely high Qst for ethylene (over 100 kJ/mol at low ethylene load-ing) as illustrated in the context of Ag(I) ion functionalized PAF-1, PAF-1-SO3Ag. IAST calculations using single-component-isotherm data and equimolar ethylene/ethane ratio at 296 K reveal PAF-1-SO3Ag shows exceptionally high ethylene/ethane adsorption selectivi-ty (Sads: 27 to 125), far surpassing benchmark zeolite and any other MOF reported in literature. This alongside excellent water/air stability, high ethylene uptake capacity, and mild regeneration requirements make PAF-1-SO3Ag hold promise for adsorption-based eth-ylene/ethane separations, paving a way to develop Ag(I) ion function-alized POPs as a new platform for highly selective adsorption of eth-ylene over ethane.

  18. Estimating the maximum potential revenue for grid connected electricity storage : arbitrage and regulation.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Byrne, Raymond Harry; Silva Monroy, Cesar Augusto.

    2012-12-01

    The valuation of an electricity storage device is based on the expected future cash ow generated by the device. Two potential sources of income for an electricity storage system are energy arbitrage and participation in the frequency regulation market. Energy arbitrage refers to purchasing (stor- ing) energy when electricity prices are low, and selling (discharging) energy when electricity prices are high. Frequency regulation is an ancillary service geared towards maintaining system frequency, and is typically procured by the independent system operator in some type of market. This paper outlines the calculations required to estimate the maximum potential revenue from participating in these two activities. First, a mathematical model is presented for the state of charge as a function of the storage device parameters and the quantities of electricity purchased/sold as well as the quantities o ered into the regulation market. Using this mathematical model, we present a linear programming optimization approach to calculating the maximum potential revenue from an elec- tricity storage device. The calculation of the maximum potential revenue is critical in developing an upper bound on the value of storage, as a benchmark for evaluating potential trading strate- gies, and a tool for capital nance risk assessment. Then, we use historical California Independent System Operator (CAISO) data from 2010-2011 to evaluate the maximum potential revenue from the Tehachapi wind energy storage project, an American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA) energy storage demonstration project. We investigate the maximum potential revenue from two di erent scenarios: arbitrage only and arbitrage combined with the regulation market. Our analysis shows that participation in the regulation market produces four times the revenue compared to arbitrage in the CAISO market using 2010 and 2011 data. Then we evaluate several trading strategies to illustrate how they compare to the maximum potential revenue benchmark. We conclude with a sensitivity analysis with respect to key parameters.

  19. Analysis of Multi-Arm Caliper Data for the U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roberts, Barry L.

    2015-03-01

    The U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) has an increasing reliance on mul t i - arm caliper surveys to assess the integrity of casing for cavern access wells and to determine priorities for casing remediation. Multi - arm caliper (MAC) surveys provide a view of well casing deformation by reporting radial measurements of the inner cas ing wall as the tool is drawn through the casing. Over the last several years the SPR has collected a large number of modern MAC surveys. In total, these surveys account for over 100 million individual measurements. The surveys were collected using diff ering survey vendors and survey hardware. This has resulted in a collection of disparate data sets which confound attempts to make well - to - well or time - dependent evaluations. In addition, the vendor supplied MAC interpretations often involve variables wh ich are not well defined or which may not be applicable to casings for cavern access wells. These factors reduce the usability of these detailed data sets. In order to address this issue and provide an independent analysis of multi - arm caliper survey data, Sandia National Labs has developed processing techniques and analysis variables which allow for the comparison of MAC survey data regardless of the source of the survey data. These techniques use the raw radial arm information and newly developed analysis variables to assess the casing status and provide a means for well - to - well and time - dependent analyses. Well - to - well and t ime - dependent investigation of the MAC survey data provide s information to prioritize well remediation activities and identify wells with integrity issues. This paper presents the challenges in using disparate MAC survey data, techniques developed to address these challenges and some o f the insights gained from these new techniques.

  20. A double-double/double-single computation package

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2004-12-01

    The DDFUNIDSFUN software permits a new or existing Fortran-90 program to utilize double-double precision (approx. 31 digits) or double-single precision (approx. 14 digits) arithmetic. Double-double precision is required by a rapidly expandirtg body of scientific computations in physics and mathematics, for which the conventional 64-bit IEEE computer arithmetic (about 16 decimal digit accuracy) is not sufficient. Double-single precision permits users of systems that do not have hardware 64-bit IEEE arithmetic (such as some game systems)more » to perform arithmetic at a precision nearly as high as that of systems that do. Both packages run significantly faster Than using multiple precision or arbitrary precision software for this purpose. The package includes an extensive set of low-level routines to perform high-precision arithmetic, including routines to calculate various algebraic and transcendental functions, such as square roots, sin, ccc, exp, log and others. In addition, the package includes high-level translation facilities, so that Fortran programs can utilize these facilities by making only a few changes to conventional Fortran programs. In most cases, the only changes that are required are to change the type statements of variables that one wishes to be treated as multiple precision, plus a few other minor changes. The DDFUN package is similar in functionality to the double-double part of the GD package, which was previously written at LBNL. However, the DDFUN package is written exclusively in Fortran-90, thus avoidIng difficulties that some users experience when using GD, which includes both Fortran-90 and C++ code.« less

  1. Electromagnetic Reciprocity.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aldridge, David F.

    2014-11-01

    A reciprocity theorem is an explicit mathematical relationship between two different wavefields that can exist within the same space - time configuration. Reciprocity theorems provi de the theoretical underpinning for mod ern full waveform inversion solutions, and also suggest practical strategies for speed ing up large - scale numerical modeling of geophysical datasets . In the present work, several previously - developed electromagnetic r eciprocity theorems are generalized to accommodate a broader range of medi um, source , and receiver types. Reciprocity relations enabling the interchange of various types of point sources and point receivers within a three - dimensional electromagnetic model are derived. Two numerical modeling algorithms in current use are successfully tested for adherence to reciprocity. Finally, the reciprocity theorem forms the point of departure for a lengthy derivation of electromagnetic Frechet derivatives. These mathe matical objects quantify the sensitivity of geophysical electromagnetic data to variatio ns in medium parameters, and thus constitute indispensable tools for solution of the full waveform inverse problem. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS Sandia National Labor atories is a multi - program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the US Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE - AC04 - 94AL85000. Signif icant portions of the work reported herein were conducted under a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and CARBO Ceramics Incorporated. The author acknowledges Mr. Chad Cannan and Mr. Terry Pa lisch of CARBO Ceramics, and Ms. Amy Halloran, manager of SNL's Geophysics and Atmospheric Sciences Department, for their interest in and encouragement of this work. Special thanks are due to Dr . Lewis C. Bartel ( recently retired from Sandia National Labo ratories and now a geophysical consultant ) and Dr. Chester J. Weiss (recently rejoined with Sandia National Laboratories) for many stimulating (and reciprocal!) discussions regar ding the topic at hand.

  2. A decision-support system for sustainable urban metabolism in Europe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gonzalez, Ainhoa; Donnelly, Alison; Jones, Mike; Chrysoulakis, Nektarios; Lopes, Myriam

    2013-01-15

    Urban metabolism components define the energy and material exchanges within a city and, therefore, can provide valuable information on the environmental quality of urban areas. Assessing the potential impact of urban planning alternatives on urban metabolism components (such as energy, water, carbon and pollutants fluxes) can provide a quantitative estimation of their sustainability performance. Urban metabolism impact assessment can, therefore, contribute to the identification of sustainable urban structures with regards, for example, to building types, materials and layout, as well as to location and capacity of transportation and infrastructural developments. In this way, it enables the formulation of planning and policy recommendations to promote efficient use of resources and enhance environmental quality in urban areas. The European FP7 project BRIDGE (sustainaBle uRban plannIng Decision support accountinG for urban mEtabolism) has developed a decision-support system (DSS) that systematically integrates urban metabolism components into impact assessment processes with the aim of accurately quantifying the potential effects of proposed planning interventions. The DSS enables integration of multiple spatial and non-spatial datasets (e.g. physical flows of energy and material with variables of social and economic change) in a systematic manner to obtain spatially defined assessment results and to thus inform planners and decision-makers. This multi-criteria approach also enables incorporation of stakeholders' perceptions in order to prioritise decisive assessment criteria. This paper describes the methodological framework used to develop the DSS and critically examines the results of its practical application in five European cities. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Urban metabolism in sustainability assessment of planning alternatives. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer European FP7 project applied to 5 real life case studies across Europe. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Decision support system enables incorporating scientific knowledge into planning. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Scale, data availability and stakeholder representativeness limit its application.

  3. Low-Cost Illumination-Grade LEDs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Epler, John

    2013-08-31

    Solid State Lighting is a cost-effective, energy-conserving technology serving a rapidly expand- ing multi-billion dollar market. This program was designed to accelerate this lighting revolution by reducing the manufacturing cost of Illumination-Grade LEDs. The technical strategy was to investigate growth substrate alternatives to standard planar sapphire, select the most effective and compatible option, and demonstrate a significant increase in Lumen/$ with a marketable LED. The most obvious alternate substrate, silicon, was extensively studied in the first two years of the program. The superior thermal and mechanical properties of Si were expected to improve wavelength uniformity and hence color yield in the manufacture of high-power illumination- grade LEDs. However, improvements in efficiency and epitaxy uniformity on standard c-plane sapphire diminished the advantages of switching to Si. Furthermore, the cost of sapphire decreased significantly and the cost of processing Si devices using our thin film process was higher than expected. We concluded that GaN on Si was a viable technology but not a practical option for Philips Lumileds. Therefore in 2012 and 2013, we sought and received amendments which broadened the scope to include other substrates and extended the time of execution. Proprietary engineered substrates, off-axis (non-c-plane) sapphire, and c-plane patterned sapphire substrates (PSS) were all investigated in the final 18 months of this program. Excellent epitaxy quality was achieved on all three candidates; however we eliminated engineered substrates and non-c-plane sapphire because of their higher combined cost of substrate, device fabrication and packaging. Ultimately, by fabricating a flip-chip (FC) LED based upon c-plane PSS we attained a 42% reduction in LED manufacturing cost relative to our LUXEON Rebel product (Q1-2012). Combined with a flux gain from 85 to 102 Lm, the LUXEON Q delivered a 210% increase in Lm/$ over this time period. The technology was commercialized in our LUXEON Q product in Sept., 2013. Also, the retention of the sapphire increased the robustness of the device, enabling sales of low-cost submount-free chips to lighting manufacturers. Thus, blue LED die sales were initiated in the form of a PSS-FC in February, 2013.

  4. Cost Effective Recovery of Low-TDS Frac Flowback Water for Re-use

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Claire Henderson; Harish Acharya; Hope Matis; Hareesh Kommepalli; Brian Moore; Hua Wang

    2011-03-31

    The project goal was to develop a cost-effective water recovery process to reduce the costs and envi-ronmental impact of shale gas production. This effort sought to develop both a flowback water pre-treatment process and a membrane-based partial demineralization process for the treatment of the low-Total Dissolved Solids (TDS) portion of the flowback water produced during hydrofracturing operations. The TDS cutoff for consideration in this project is < 35,000 {approx} 45,000 ppm, which is the typical limit for economic water recovery employing reverse osmosis (RO) type membrane desalination processes. The ultimate objective is the production of clean, reclaimed water suitable for re-use in hydrofracturing operations. The team successfully compiled data on flowback composition and other attributes across multiple shale plays, identified the likely applicability of membrane treatment processes in those shales, and expanded the proposed product portfolio to include four options suitable for various reuse or discharge applications. Pretreatment technologies were evaluated at the lab scale and down-selected based upon their efficacy in removing key contaminants. The chosen technologies were further validated by performing membrane fouling studies with treated flowback water to demonstrate the technical feasibility of flowback treatment with RO membranes. Process flow schemes were constructed for each of the four product options based on experimental performance data from actual flowback water treatment studies. For the products requiring membrane treatment, membrane system model-ing software was used to create designs for enhanced water recovery beyond the typical seawater desalination benchmark. System costs based upon vendor and internal cost information for all process flow schemes were generated and are below target and in line with customer expectations. Finally, to account for temporal and geographic variability in flowback characteristics as well as local disposal costs and regulations, a parametric value assessment tool was created to assess the economic attractiveness of a given flowback recovery process relative to conventional disposal for any combination of anticipated flowback TDS and local disposal cost. It is concluded that membrane systems in combination with appropriate pretreatment technologies can provide cost-effective recovery of low-TDS flow-back water for either beneficial reuse or safe surface discharge.

  5. DOE/EPRI Electricity Storage Handbook in Collaboration with NRECA.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huff, Georgianne; Huff, Georgianne; Akhil, Abbas Ali; Akhil, Abbas Ali; Kaun, Benjamin C; Kaun, Benjamin C; Rastler, Dan M.; Rastler, Dan M.; Chen, Stella Bingqing; Chen, Stella Bingqing; Cotter, Andrew L.; Cotter, Andrew L.; Bradshaw, Dale T.; Bradshaw, Dale T.; Gauntlett, William D.; Gauntlett, William D.; Currier, Aileen B.; Currier, Aileen B.

    2015-02-01

    Th e Electricity Storage Handbook (Handbook) is a how - to guide for utility and rural cooperative engineers, planners , and decision makers to plan and implement energy storage projects . The H andbook also serves as an information resource for investors and venture capitalists , providing the latest develo pments in technologies and tools to guide their evaluation s of energy storage opportunities . It includes a comprehensive database of the cost of current storage systems in a wide variety of electric utility and customer services, along with interconnection schematics . A list of significant past and present energy storage projects is provided for a practical perspective . Th is Handbook, jointly sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy and the Electric Power Research Institute in collaboration with the National Rural Electric Cooperative Associ ation , is published in electronic form at www.sandia.gov/ess . This Handbook is best viewed online. iii Rev. 1, September 2014 DOE/EPRI Electricity Storage Handbook in Collaboration with NRECA Revision Log Comments, inquiries, corrections, and suggestions can be submitted via the website www.sandia.gov/ess/ , beginning August 1 , 2013. REVISION LOG Rev . Number Date Purpose of Revision Document Number Name or Org. Rev. 0 July 2013 Update and revise the 2003 EPRI - DOE Handbook of Energy Storage for Transmission and Distribution Applications to provide how - to information for various stakeholders. SAND2013 - 5131 DOE (SNL), EPRI, NRECA Rev. 1 Sept. 2014 Chapter 2: * Added information highlighting thermal storage solution. Chapter 3: * Added subchapter highlighting tools available to use to evaluate a Storage solution from a model ing and simulation standpoint. * Added new Subsections 3.3.1 through 3.3.6 . Chapter 4: * With respect to the "AC battery" system: o Added a reference to the patent #4,894,764. o Added a picture of an AC battery . * Added information about KIUC and the RFI and RFP. Appendix A: * Added information regarding ES models and tools. Appendix B: * Expanded on three energy and power cost components. o Calculation of the sum of the energy and power components. o How these costs are highly system dependent and do not scale linear ly. * Expanded on d eri vation of the Total Plant Cost (TPC) and referenced costs that are components of the TPC. * Added explanation of equipment costs . Appendix F: * Added introductory text. Appendix G: * Added reference to AC battery patent . * Removed Hawaii battery projects information. SAND201 5 - XXXX iv Rev. 1, September 201

  6. A SEARCH FOR THE HIGGS BOSON AND A SEARCH FOR DARK-MATTER PARTICLE WITH JETS AND MISSING TRANSVERSE ENERGY AT COLLIDER DETECTOR AT FERMILAB

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Qiuguang

    2013-01-01

    Finding the standard model Higgs boson and discovering beyond-standard model physics phenomena have been the most important goals for the high-energy physics in the last decades. In this thesis, we present two such searches. First is the search for the low mass standard model Higgs boson produced in association with a vector boson; second is the rst search for a dark-matter candidate (D) produced in association with a top quark (t) in particle colliders. We search in events with energetic jets and large missing transverse energy { a signature characterized by complicated backgrounds { in data collected by the CDF detector with proton-antiproton collisions at p s = 1:96 TeV. We discuss the techniques that have been developed for background modeling, for discriminating signal from background, and for reducing background resulting from detector e ects. In the Higgs search, we report the 95% con dence level upper limits on the pro- duction cross section across masses of 90 to 150 GeV/c2. The expected limits are improved by an average of 14% relative to the previous analysis. The Large Hadron Collider experiments reported a Higgs-like particle with mass of 125 GeV/c2 by study- ing the data collected in year 2011/12. At a Higgs boson mass of 125 GeV/c2, our observed (expected) limit is 3.06 (3.33) times the standard model prediction, corre- sponding to one of the most sensitive searches to date in this nal state. In the dark matter search, we nd the data are consistent with the standard model prediction, thus set 95% con dence level upper limits on the cross section of the process p p ! t + D as a function of the mass of the dark-matter candidate. The xviii upper limits are approximately 0.5 pb for a dark-matter particle with masses in the range of 0 􀀀 150 GeV/c2.

  7. Parallel In Situ Indexing for Data-intensive Computing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Jinoh; Abbasi, Hasan; Chacon, Luis; Docan, Ciprian; Klasky, Scott; Liu, Qing; Podhorszki, Norbert; Shoshani, Arie; Wu, Kesheng

    2011-09-09

    As computing power increases exponentially, vast amount of data is created by many scientific re- search activities. However, the bandwidth for storing the data to disks and reading the data from disks has been improving at a much slower pace. These two trends produce an ever-widening data access gap. Our work brings together two distinct technologies to address this data access issue: indexing and in situ processing. From decades of database research literature, we know that indexing is an effective way to address the data access issue, particularly for accessing relatively small fraction of data records. As data sets increase in sizes, more and more analysts need to use selective data access, which makes indexing an even more important for improving data access. The challenge is that most implementations of in- dexing technology are embedded in large database management systems (DBMS), but most scientific datasets are not managed by any DBMS. In this work, we choose to include indexes with the scientific data instead of requiring the data to be loaded into a DBMS. We use compressed bitmap indexes from the FastBit software which are known to be highly effective for query-intensive workloads common to scientific data analysis. To use the indexes, we need to build them first. The index building procedure needs to access the whole data set and may also require a significant amount of compute time. In this work, we adapt the in situ processing technology to generate the indexes, thus removing the need of read- ing data from disks and to build indexes in parallel. The in situ data processing system used is ADIOS, a middleware for high-performance I/O. Our experimental results show that the indexes can improve the data access time up to 200 times depending on the fraction of data selected, and using in situ data processing system can effectively reduce the time needed to create the indexes, up to 10 times with our in situ technique when using identical parallel settings.

  8. Betting on the Future: The authors compare natural gas forecaststo futures buys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

    2006-01-20

    On December 12, 2005, the reference case projections from Annual Energy Outlook 2006 (AEO 2006) were posted on the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) web site. We at LBNL have in the past compared the EIA's reference case long-term natural gas price forecasts from the AEO series to contemporaneous natural gas prices that can be locked in through the forward market. The goal is better understanding fuel price risk and the role that renewables play in mitigating such risk. As such, we were curious to see how the latest AEO gas price forecast compares to the NYMEX natural gas futures strip. Below is a discussion of our findings. As a refresher, our past work in this area has found that over the past five years, forward natural gas contracts (with prices that can be locked in--.g., gas futures, swaps, and physical supply) have traded at a premium relative to contemporaneous long-term reference case gas price forecasts from the EIA. As such, we have concluded that, over the past five years at least, levelized cost comparisons of fixed-price renewable generation with variable price gas-fired generation have yielded results that are ''biased'' in favor of gas-fired generation, presuming that long-term price stability is valued. In this article we update our past analysis to include the latest long-term gas price forecast from the EIA, as contained in AEO 2006. For the sake of brevity, we do not rehash information (on methodology, potential explanations for the premiums, etc.) contained in our earlier reports on this topic. As was the case in the past five AEO releases (AEO 2001-AEO 2005), we once again find that the AEO 2006 reference case gas price forecast falls well below where NYMEX natural gas futures contracts were trading at the time the EIA finalized its gas price forecast. In fact, the NYMEX-AEO 2006 reference case comparison yields by far the largest premium--$2.3/MMBtu levelized over five years--that we have seen over the last six years. In other words, on average, one would have had to pay $2.3/MMBtu more than the AEO 2006 reference case natural gas price forecast in order to lock in natural gas prices over the coming five years. Fixed-price generation (like certain forms of renewable generation) obviously need not bear this added cost, and moreover can provide price stability for terms well in excess of five years

  9. Submerged Medium Voltage Cable Systems at Nuclear Power Plants. A Review of Research Efforts Relevant to Aging Mechanisms and Condition Monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Jason; Bernstein, Robert; White, II, Gregory Von; Glover, Steven F.; Neely, Jason C.; Pena, Gary; Williamson, Kenneth Martin; Zutavern, Fred J.; Gelbard, Fred

    2015-03-01

    In a submerged environment, power cables may experience accelerated insulation degradation due to water - related aging mechanisms . Direct contact with water or moisture intrusion in the cable insulation s ystem has been identified in the literature as a significant aging stressor that can affect performance and lifetime of electric cables . Progressive reduction of the dielectric strength is commonly a result of water treeing which involves the development of permanent hydrophilic structures in the insulation coinciding with the absorption of water into the cable . Water treeing is a phenomenon in which dendritic microvoids are formed in electric cable insulation due to electrochemic al reactions , electromechanical forces , and diffusion of contaminants over time . These reactions are caused by the combined effect s of water presence and high electrical stress es in the material . Water tree growth follow s a tree - like branching pattern , i ncreasing in volume and length over time . Although these cables can be "dried out," water tree degradation , specifically the growth of hydrophilic regions, is believed to be permanent and typically worsens over time. Based on established research , water treeing or water induced damage can occur in a variety of electric cables including XLPE, TR - XLPE and other insulating materials, such as EPR and butyl rubber . Once water trees or water induced damage form, the dielectric strength of an insulation materia l will decrease gradually with time as the water trees grow in length, which could eventually result in failure of the insulating material . Under wet conditions or i n submerged environments , several environmental and operational parameters can influence w ater tree initiation and affect water tree growth . These parameters include voltage cycling, field frequency, temperature, ion concentration and chemistry, type of insula tion material , and the characteristics of its defects. In this effort, a review of academic and industrial literature was performed to identify : 1) findings regarding the degradation mechanisms of submerged cabling and 2) condition monitoring methods that may prove useful in predict ing the remaining lifetime of submerged medium voltage p ower cables . The re search was conducted by a multi - disciplinary team , and s ources includ ed official NRC reports, n ational l aboratory reports , IEEE standards, conference and journal proceedings , magazine articles , PhD dissertations , and discussions with experts . The purpose of this work was to establish the current state - of - the - art in material degradation modeling and cable condition monitoring techniques and to identify research gaps . Subsequently, future areas of focus are recommended to address these research gaps and thus strengthen the efficacy of the NRC's developing cable condition monitoring program . Results of this literature review and details of the test ing recommendations are presented in this report . FOREWORD To ensure the safe, re liable, and cost - effective long - term operation of nuclear power plants, many systems, structures, and components must be continuously evaluated. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has identified that cables in submerged environments are of concern, particularly as plants are seeking license renewal. To date, there is a lack of consensus on aging and degradation mechanisms even though the area of submerged cables has been extensively studied. Consequently, the ability to make lifetime predictions for submerged cable does not yet exist. The NRC has engaged Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) to lead a coordinated effort to help elucidate the aging and degradation of cables in submerged environments by collaborating with cable manufacturers, utilities, universities, and other government agencies. A team of SNL experts was assembled from the laboratories including electrical condition monitoring, mat erial science, polymer degradation, plasma physics, nuclear systems, and statistics. An objective of this research program is to perform a l iterature r eview to gather a body of knowledge on prior research projects, technical papers, and literature related to cable degradation in a submerged environment. In addition, the information gathered from the literature review will be employed to gain insights for developing an aging coefficient, and to determine which condition monitoring techniques are capable of tracking cable degradation in a submerged environment. Moreover, the information gathered from the l iterature r eview will also be used to determine which approach or approaches are best suited to develop test methods for accelerated aging and condition m onitoring of medium voltage cables. In summary of this initial effort, s ignificant work has been performed on submerged cable insulation degradation; however, there is a lack of uniform theories and acceptance of chemical and physical pathways. This lack of fundamental understanding is coupled with the inability to make predictive statements about material performance in wet or submerged environments. S elect condition monitoring methods known to the industry are discussed in this report and a dditional co ndition monitoring methods were added in this effort based on recommendations from the Nuclear Energy Standards Coordinating Collaborative and available literature. This NUREG review provides additional clarity on the use of condition monitoring methods t o detect water - related damage to medium voltage cable and new methods and approaches proposed in academia and industry. In order t o ensure continued improvement in the efficacy of a cable condition monitoring program, continued research and development (R&D) efforts are necessary. R&D efforts should complement operations, iteratively improving condition monitoring policies, procedures and outcomes. Ideally, field and laboratory data enable improved understanding of material science which in turn inform s the development of new or improved condition monitoring methods and lifetime models. Finally, these improved methods and models aid in the refinement of condition monitoring policies and procedures.

  10. Enhanced vector borne disease surveillance of California Culex mosquito populations reveals spatial and species-specific barriers of infection.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    VanderNoot, Victoria A.; Curtis, Deanna Joy; Koh, Chung-Yan; Brodsky, Benjamin H; Lane, Todd

    2014-08-01

    Monitor i ng in f ectio n s in v ect o rs su c h as m osquit o es, s a nd fl i es, tsetse fl i es, a nd ticks to i denti f y hu m a n path o gens m a y s e r v e as a n ear l y w arn i ng det e ction system t o dir e ct loc a l g o v er n ment dise a se pr e v en t i v e m easu r e s . One major hurdle i n de t ection is the abi l i t y to scre e n l arge n u mbers of v e c t ors for h uman patho g ens w i thout t h e u s e of ge n o t y pe - s p ecific m o lecu l ar tec h nique s . N e x t genera t ion s equ e nc i ng (NG S ) pr o v i des a n unbi a sed p latfo r m capab l e of identi f y i ng k n o w n a n d unk n o w n p ath o ge n s circula t ing w i thin a v e ctor p opul a tion, but utili z ing t h is te c h nolo g y i s tim e - con s u ming a n d cos t l y for v ecto r -b o rne disease su r v e illan c e pr o gra m s. T o addr e s s this w e d e v e lop e d cos t -eff e ct i v e Ilumina(r) R NA- S eq l i bra r y p r epara t ion m e thodol o gies i n con j u n ction w i t h an automa t ed c ompu t at i onal a n a l y sis pipel i n e to ch a racter i ze t h e microbial popula t ions c ircula t i n g in Cu l e x m o squit o e s (Cul e x qui n quef a s c iatu s , C ul e x quinq u efasc i atus / pip i ens co m pl e x h y bri d s, and C u l e x ta r salis ) t hroug h out Californ i a. W e assembled 2 0 n o vel a n d w e l l -do c ume n ted a r b o v i ruses repres e nting mem b e rs of B u n y a v ir i da e , F l a v i virid a e, If a virida e , Meson i v i rida e , Nid o v iri d ae, O rtho m y x o virid a e, Pa r v o v iri d ae, Re o virid a e, R h a b d o v i rid a e, T y m o v iri d ae, a s w ell as s e v e r al u n assi g n e d v irus e s . In addit i o n, w e m app e d mRNA s pecies to d i vergent s peci e s of t r y panos o ma a nd pl a s modium eu k a r yotic parasit e s and cha r a c terized t he p r oka r yot i c microb i al c o mposit i on to i d enti f y bacteri a l tran s c r ipts der i v ed from wolba c hia, clo s tridi u m, m y c oplas m a, fusoba c terium and c am p y l o bacter bac t er i al spec i e s . W e utilized the s e mic r obial transcri p tomes pre s e nt in g e ogra p hical l y defined Cul e x po p ul a tions to defi n e spatial and m osqui t o specie s -spec i fic ba r r iers of i n fecti o n. T he v i r ome and microbi o me c o mpos i tion id e ntified in e ach mosqui t o p o ol pr o v i ded suf f icient resolut i on to dete r m i ne both the mosq u ito species and the g e o graphic regi o n in Californ i a w h e re t h e mosqui t o po o l orig i n ated. T his d a ta pr o v i des ins i ght in t o the compl e x i t y of microb i al spec i es cir c ulati n g in med i cal l y i mport a nt Culex mosqui t oes a nd t h eir potent i al im p act o n t he tran s missi o n of v ector-b o rne human / veter i na r y p a t hogens in C a liforn i a.

  11. Materials at LANL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor, Antoinette J

    2010-01-01

    Exploring the physics, chemistry, and metallurgy of materials has been a primary focus of Los Alamos National Laboratory since its inception. In the early 1940s, very little was known or understood about plutonium, uranium, or their alloys. In addition, several new ionic, polymeric, and energetic materials with unique properties were needed in the development of nuclear weapons. As the Laboratory has evolved, and as missions in threat reduction, defense, energy, and meeting other emerging national challenges have been added, the role of materials science has expanded with the need for continued improvement in our understanding of the structure and properties of materials and in our ability to synthesize and process materials with unique characteristics. Materials science and engineering continues to be central to this Laboratory's success, and the materials capability truly spans the entire laboratory - touching upon numerous divisions and directorates and estimated to include >1/3 of the lab's technical staff. In 2006, Los Alamos and LANS LLC began to redefine our future, building upon the laboratory's established strengths and promoted by strongly interdependent science, technology and engineering capabilities. Eight Grand Challenges for Science were set forth as a technical framework for bridging across capabilities. Two of these grand challenges, Fundamental Understanding of Materials and Superconductivity and Actinide Science. were clearly materials-centric and were led out of our organizations. The complexity of these scientific thrusts was fleshed out through workshops involving cross-disciplinary teams. These teams refined the grand challenge concepts into actionable descriptions to be used as guidance for decisions like our LDRD strategic investment strategies and as the organizing basis for our external review process. In 2008, the Laboratory published 'Building the Future of Los Alamos. The Premier National Security Science Laboratory,' LA-UR-08-1541. This document introduced three strategic thrusts that crosscut the Grand Challenges and define future laboratory directions and facilities: (1) Information Science and Technology enabl ing integrative and predictive science; (2) Experimental science focused on materials for the future; and (3) Fundamental forensic science for nuclear, biological, and chemical threats. The next step for the Materials Capability was to develop a strategic plan for the second thrust, Materials for the Future. within the context of a capabilities-based Laboratory. This work has involved extending our 2006-2007 Grand Challenge workshops, integrating materials fundamental challenges into the MaRIE definition, and capitalizing on the emerging materials-centric national security missions. Strategic planning workshops with broad leadership and staff participation continued to hone our scientific directions and reinforce our strength through interdependence. By the Fall of 2008, these workshops promoted our primary strength as the delivery of Predictive Performance in applications where Extreme Environments dominate and where the discovery of Emergent Phenomena is a critical. These planning efforts were put into action through the development of our FY10 LDRD Strategic Investment Plan where the Materials Category was defined to incorporate three central thrusts: Prediction and Control of Performance, Extreme Environments and Emergent Phenomena. As with all strategic planning, much of the benefit is in the dialogue and cross-fertilization of ideas that occurs during the process. By winter of 2008/09, there was much agreement on the evolving focus for the Materials Strategy, but there was some lingering doubt over Prediction and Control of Performance as one of the three central thrusts, because it overarches all we do and is, truly, the end goal for materials science and engineering. Therefore, we elevated this thrust within the overarching vision/mission and introduce the concept of Defects and Interfaces as a central thrust that had previously been implied but not clearly articulated.

  12. Near-zero emissions combustor system for syngas and biofuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yongho, Kim; Rosocha, Louis

    2010-01-01

    A multi-institutional plasma combustion team was awarded a research project from the DOE/NNSA GIPP (Global Initiative for Prolifereation Prevention) office. The Institute of High Current Electronics (Tomsk, Russia); Leonardo Technologies, Inc. (an American-based industrial partner), in conjunction with the Los Alamos National Laboratory are participating in the project to develop novel plasma assisted combustion technologies. The purpose of this project is to develop prototypes of marketable systems for more stable and cleaner combustion of syngas/biofuels and to demonstrate that this technology can be used for a variety of combustion applications - with a major focus on contemporary gas turbines. In this paper, an overview of the project, along with descriptions of the plasma-based combustors and associated power supplies will be presented. Worldwide, it is recognized that a variety of combustion fuels will be required to meet the needs for supplying gas-turbine engines (electricity generation, propulsion), internal combustion engines (propulsion, transportation), and burners (heat and electricity generation) in the 21st Century. Biofuels and biofuel blends have already been applied to these needs, but experience difficulties in modifications to combustion processes and combustor design and the need for flame stabilization techniques to address current and future environmental and energy-efficiency challenges. In addition, municipal solid waste (MSW) has shown promise as a feedstock for heat and/or electricity-generating plants. However, current combustion techniques that use such fuels have problems with achieving environmentally-acceptable air/exhaust emissions and can also benefit from increased combustion efficiency. This project involves a novel technology (a form of plasma-assisted combustion) that can address the above issues. Plasma-assisted combustion (PAC) is a growing field that is receiving worldwide attention at present. The project is focused on research necessary to develop a novel, high-efficiency, low-emissions (near-zero, or as low as reasonably achievable), advanced combustion technology for electricity and heat production from biofuels and fuels derived from MSW. For any type of combustion technology, including the advanced technology of this project, two problems of special interest must be addressed: developing and optimizing the combustion chambers and the systems for igniting and sustaining the fuel-burning process. For MSW in particular, there are new challenges over gaseous or liquid fuels because solid fuels must be ground into fine particulates ({approx} 10 {micro}m diameter), fed into the advanced combustor, and combusted under plasma-assisted conditions that are quite different than gaseous or liquid fuels. The principal idea of the combustion chamber design is to use so-called reverse vortex gas flow, which allows efficient cooling of the chamber wall and flame stabilization in the central area of the combustor (Tornado chamber). Considerable progress has been made in design ing an advanced, reverse vortex flow combustion chamber for biofuels, although it was not tested on biofuels and a system that could be fully commercialized has never been completed.

  13. Distributed Sensor Coordination for Advanced Energy Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tumer, Kagan

    2013-07-31

    The ability to collect key system level information is critical to the safe, efficient and reli- able operation of advanced energy systems. With recent advances in sensor development, it is now possible to push some level of decision making directly to computationally sophisticated sensors, rather than wait for data to arrive to a massive centralized location before a decision is made. This type of approach relies on networked sensors (called “agents” from here on) to actively collect and process data, and provide key control deci- sions to significantly improve both the quality/relevance of the collected data and the as- sociating decision making. The technological bottlenecks for such sensor networks stem from a lack of mathematics and algorithms to manage the systems, rather than difficulties associated with building and deploying them. Indeed, traditional sensor coordination strategies do not provide adequate solutions for this problem. Passive data collection methods (e.g., large sensor webs) can scale to large systems, but are generally not suited to highly dynamic environments, such as ad- vanced energy systems, where crucial decisions may need to be reached quickly and lo- cally. Approaches based on local decisions on the other hand cannot guarantee that each agent performing its task (maximize an agent objective) will lead to good network wide solution (maximize a network objective) without invoking cumbersome coordination rou- tines. There is currently a lack of algorithms that will enable self-organization and blend the efficiency of local decision making with the system level guarantees of global decision making, particularly when the systems operate in dynamic and stochastic environments. In this work we addressed this critical gap and provided a comprehensive solution to the problem of sensor coordination to ensure the safe, reliable, and robust operation of advanced energy systems. The differentiating aspect of the proposed work is in shift- ing the focus towards “what to observe” rather than “how to observe” in large sensor networks, allowing the agents to actively determine both the structure of the network and the relevance of the information they are seeking to collect. In addition to providing an implicit coordination mechanism, this approach allows the system to be reconfigured in response to changing needs (e.g., sudden external events requiring new responses) or changing sensor network characteristics (e.g., sudden changes to plant condition). Outcome Summary: All milestones associated with this project have been completed. In particular, private sensor objective functions were developed which are aligned with the global objective function, sensor effectiveness has been improved by using “sensor teams,” system efficiency has been improved by 30% using difference evaluation func- tions, we have demonstrated system reconfigurability for 20% changes in system con- ditions, we have demonstrated extreme scalability of our proposed algorithm, we have demonstrated that sensor networks can overcome disruptions of up to 20% in network conditions, and have demonstrated system reconfigurability to 20% changes in system conditions in hardware-based simulations. This final report summarizes how each of these milestones was achieved, and gives insight into future research possibilities past the work which has been completed. The following publications support these milestones [6, 8, 9, 10, 16, 18, 19].

  14. Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peter McIntyre

    2006-08-16

    This document presents an annual report on our long-term R&D grant for development of new technology for future colliders. The organizing theme of our development is to develop a compact high-field collider dipole, utilizing wind-and-react Nb3Sn coil fabrication, stress man-agement, conductor optimization, bladder preload, and flux plate suppression of magnetization multipoles . The development trail for this new technology began over four years ago with the successful testing of TAMU12, a NbTi model in which we put to a first test many of the construction details of the high-field design. We have built TAMU2, a mirror-geometry dipole containing a single coil module of the 3-module set required for the 14 Tesla design. This first Nb3Sn model was built using ITER conductor which carries much less current than high-performance conductor but enables us to prove in practice our reaction bake and impregnation strategies with ‘free’ su-perconductor. TAMU2 has been shipped to LBNL for testing. Work is beginning on the con-struction of TAMU3, which will contain two coil modules of the 14 Tesla design. TAMU3 has a design field of 13.5 Tesla, and will enable us to fully evaluate the issues of stress management that will be important to the full design. With the completion of TAMU2 and the construction of TAMU3 the Texas A&M group ‘comes of age’ in the family of superconducting magnet R&D laboratories. We have completed the phase of developing core technologies and fixtures and entered the phase of building and testing a succession of TAMU3 model dipoles that each build incrementally upon a proven core design. TAMU3 provides a testbed in which we can build a succession of model dipoles in which each new model uses one new winding module coupled with one module from the previ-ous model, and uses all of the same structural elements in successive models. This incremental development should enable us to keep to a minimum the time between the completion and test-ing of successive models. Each new model will incorporate a particular design element that we wish to evaluate: first the basic TAMU3 structure, then substitute one pancake using high-performance superconductor (3,000 A/mm2 @ 12 T, 4.2 K), then substitute one pancake using mixed-strand cable, then insert a steel nose to reduce the peak field in the end region of a single-pancake coil. While we are building and testing this succession of TAMU3 models we will de-velop the tooling and evaluate strategies for flaring the ends of the center double-pancake coil needed for.TAMU4. TAMU4 is a full implementation of the design, culminating in 14 Tesla performance. Pending the proposed increase of budget from the present 3-year-flat budget and providing that the tests of each model dipole do not lead to substantial modifications of the de-sign, the time to build and test each succeeding model could be ~9 months. During the present funding year we made a sequence of innovations that have major poten-tial benefit for the commissioning of LHC, upgrade of its luminosity, and its long-term future: • An electrode assembly, suitable for integration within the existing LHC dipoles, ca-pable of killing the electron cloud effect – an effect that threatens to limit the lumi-nosity that could be attained in LHC; • A Nb3Sn structured cable, which makes it possible to design very high gradient quadrupoles for upgrade of the interaction regions of LHC to enhance its luminosity; • A Nb3Sn/NbTi levitated-pole dipole for use in the D1 bends that combine and sepa-rate the beams at the intersection regions. The levitated-pole design uniquely solves the problems of radiation damage and heating from particles swept from the beam. • A hybrid dipole technology, in which inner windings of Bi-2212 are integrated in a Nb3Sn block-coil dipole to push to 24 Tesla, opening the possibility of a future trip-ler upgrade of LHC .

  15. Water Security Toolkit User Manual Version 1.2.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klise, Katherine A.; Siirola, John Daniel; Hart, David; Hart, William E.; Phillips, Cynthia A.; Haxton, Terranna; Murray, Regan; Janke, Robert; Taxon, Thomas; Laird, Carl; Seth, Arpan; Hackebeil, Gabriel; McGee, Shawn; Mann, Angelica

    2014-08-01

    The Water Security Toolkit (WST) is a suite of open source software tools that can be used by water utilities to create response strategies to reduce the impact of contamination in a water distribution network . WST includes hydraulic and water quality modeling software , optimizati on methodologies , and visualization tools to identify: (1) sensor locations to detect contamination, (2) locations in the network in which the contamination was introduced, (3) hydrants to remove contaminated water from the distribution system, (4) locations in the network to inject decontamination agents to inactivate, remove, or destroy contaminants, (5) locations in the network to take grab sample s to help identify the source of contamination and (6) valves to close in order to isolate contaminate d areas of the network. This user manual describes the different components of WST , along w ith examples and case studies. License Notice The Water Security Toolkit (WST) v.1.2 Copyright c 2012 Sandia Corporation. Under the terms of Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000, there is a non-exclusive license for use of this work by or on behalf of the U.S. government. This software is distributed under the Revised BSD License (see below). In addition, WST leverages a variety of third-party software packages, which have separate licensing policies: Acro Revised BSD License argparse Python Software Foundation License Boost Boost Software License Coopr Revised BSD License Coverage BSD License Distribute Python Software Foundation License / Zope Public License EPANET Public Domain EPANET-ERD Revised BSD License EPANET-MSX GNU Lesser General Public License (LGPL) v.3 gcovr Revised BSD License GRASP AT&T Commercial License for noncommercial use; includes randomsample and sideconstraints executable files LZMA SDK Public Domain nose GNU Lesser General Public License (LGPL) v.2.1 ordereddict MIT License pip MIT License PLY BSD License PyEPANET Revised BSD License Pyro MIT License PyUtilib Revised BSD License PyYAML MIT License runpy2 Python Software Foundation License setuptools Python Software Foundation License / Zope Public License six MIT License TinyXML zlib License unittest2 BSD License Utilib Revised BSD License virtualenv MIT License Vol Common Public License vpykit Revised BSD License Additionally, some precompiled WST binary distributions might bundle other third-party executables files: Coliny Revised BSD License (part of Acro project) Dakota GNU Lesser General Public License (LGPL) v.2.1 PICO Revised BSD License (part of Acro project) i Revised BSD License Redistribution and use in source and binary forms, with or without modification, are permitted provided that the following conditions are met: * Redistributions of source code must retain the above copyright notice, this list of conditions and the following disclaimer. * Redistributions in binary form must reproduce the above copyright notice, this list of conditions and the following disclaimer in the documentation and/or other materials provided with the distribution. * Neither the name of Sandia National Laboratories nor Sandia Corporation nor the names of its con- tributors may be used to endorse or promote products derived from this software without specific prior written permission. THIS SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED BY THE COPYRIGHT HOLDERS AND CONTRIBUTORS %22AS IS%22 AND ANY EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WARRANTIES, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE IM- PLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE ARE DISCLAIMED. IN NO EVENT SHALL SANDIA CORPORATION BE LIABLE FOR ANY DIRECT, INDIRECT, INCIDENTAL, SPECIAL, EXEMPLARY, OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES (INCLUD- ING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, PROCUREMENT OF SUBSTITUTE GOODS OR SERVICES; LOSS OF USE, DATA, OR PROFITS; OR BUSINESS INTERRUPTION) HOWEVER CAUSED AND ON ANY THEORY OF LIABILITY, WHETHER IN CONTRACT, STRICT LIABILITY, OR TORT (INCLUDING NEGLIGENCE OR OTHERWISE) ARISING IN ANY WAY OUT OF THE USE OF THIS SOFTWARE, EVEN IF ADVISED OF THE POSSIBILITY OF SUCH DAMAGE. ii Acknowledgements This work was supported by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency through its Office of Research and Development (Interagency Agreement %23 DW8992192801). The material in this document has been subject to technical and policy review by the U.S. EPA, and approved for publication. The views expressed by individual authors, however, are their own, and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Mention of trade names, products, or services does not convey official U.S. EPA approval, endorsement, or recommendation. The Water Security Toolkit is an extension of the Threat Ensemble Vulnerability Assessment-Sensor Place- ment Optimization Tool (TEVA-SPOT), which was also developed with funding from the U.S. Environ- mental Protection Agency through its Office of Research and Development (Interagency Agreement %23 DW8992192801). The authors acknowledge the following individuals for their contributions to the devel- opment of TEVA-SPOT: Jonathan Berry (Sandia National Laboratories), Erik Boman (Sandia National Laboratories), Lee Ann Riesen (Sandia National Laboratories), James Uber (University of Cincinnati), and Jean-Paul Watson (Sandia National Laboratories). iii Acronyms ATUS American Time-Use Survey BLAS Basic linear algebra sub-routines CFU Colony-forming unit CVAR Conditional value at risk CWS Contamination warning system EA Evolutionary algorithm EDS Event detection system EPA U.S. Environmental Protection Agency EC Extent of Contamination ERD EPANET results database file GLPK GNU Linear Programming Kit GRASP Greedy randomized adaptive sampling process HEX Hexadecimal HTML HyperText markup language INP EPANET input file LP Linear program MC Mass consumed MILP Mixed integer linear program MIP Mixed integer program MSX Multi-species extension for EPANET NFD Number of failed detections NS Number of sensors NZD Non-zero demand PD Population dosed PE Population exposed PK Population killed TAI Threat assessment input file TCE Tailed-conditioned expectation TD Time to detection TEC Timed extent of contamination TEVA Threat ensemble vulnerability assessment TSB Tryptic soy broth TSG Threat scenario generation file TSI Threat simulation input file VAR Value at risk VC Volume consumed WST Water Security Toolkit YML YAML configuration file format for WST iv Symbols Notation Definition Example %7B , %7D set brackets %7B 1,2,3 %7D means a set containing the values 1,2, and 3. [?] is an element of s [?] S means that s is an element of the set S . [?] for all s = 1 [?] s [?] S means that the statement s = 1 is true for all s in set S . P summation P n i =1 s i means s 1 + s 2 + * * * + s n . %5C set minus S %5C T means the set that contains all those elements of S that are not in set T . %7C given %7C is used to define conditional probability. P ( s %7C t ) means the prob- ability of s occurring given that t occurs. %7C ... %7C cardinality Cardinality of a set is the number of elements of the set. If set S = %7B 2,4,6 %7D , then %7C S %7C = 3. v