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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "l-1 hp sodium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

HP-CAT  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home Advanced Photon Source Advanced Photon Source User Activity Report HP-CAT, High Pressure Science Sector Collaborative Access Team This CAT is currently in a...

2

HP Hands Fergie  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the most recent installment of HP's "Hands" campaign, the Digital Dutchess herself takes fans on a glamorous tour of her personal computer. Motion Theory teamed with Goodby, Silverstein & Partners to bring Fergie's many ideas to life.

Jodie Schell

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Sodium  

SciTech Connect

Some of the properties of sodium are reviewed, particularly its properties which make it useful as a FBR coolant. The FFTF and other sodium research facilities at HEDL are described. (DLC)

1979-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

4

HP scalable computing architecture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The HP V-Class server family provides up to 32 processors and 32 GB of memory in a single cabinet. Scalable Computing Architecture technology allows multiple V-Class cabinets to be interconnected, forming a single cache coherent non-uniform memory architecture ...

Randy Wright; Arun Kumar

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

U-274: HP Network Node Manager I (NNMi) for HP-UX, Linux, Solaris...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4: HP Network Node Manager I (NNMi) for HP-UX, Linux, Solaris, and Windows, Remote Disclosure of Information U-274: HP Network Node Manager I (NNMi) for HP-UX, Linux, Solaris, and...

6

U-274: HP Network Node Manager I (NNMi) for HP-UX, Linux, Solaris, and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4: HP Network Node Manager I (NNMi) for HP-UX, Linux, Solaris, 4: HP Network Node Manager I (NNMi) for HP-UX, Linux, Solaris, and Windows, Remote Disclosure of Information U-274: HP Network Node Manager I (NNMi) for HP-UX, Linux, Solaris, and Windows, Remote Disclosure of Information October 4, 2012 - 6:00am Addthis PROBLEM: HP Network Node Manager I (NNMi) for HP-UX, Linux, Solaris, and Windows, Remote Disclosure of Information PLATFORM: HP Network Node Manager I (NNMi) v9.20 for HP-UX, Linux, Solaris, and Windows. ABSTRACT: Vulnerabilities can be exploited by malicious people to cause a DoS (Denial of Service) and potentially compromise a vulnerable system. reference LINKS: HP Security Bulletin: c03507708 SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1027605 Security Focus: 524302 CVE-2012-3267 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: High Discussion: A potential security vulnerability has been identified with HP Network Node

7

Hewlett Packard Company HP | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hewlett Packard Company HP Hewlett Packard Company HP Jump to: navigation, search Name Hewlett-Packard Company (HP) Place Palo Alto, California Zip 94304 Sector Solar Product US-based personal and corporate computer manufacturer, software developer, and IT infrastructure company and owner of SunPower Corporation; designer, manufacturer and installer of solar powered electricity systems. References Hewlett-Packard Company (HP)[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Hewlett-Packard Company (HP) is a company located in Palo Alto, California . References ↑ "Hewlett-Packard Company (HP)" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Hewlett_Packard_Company_HP&oldid=346506

8

T-570: HP Security Bulletin - HP-UX Running OpenSSL, Remote Execution of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0: HP Security Bulletin - HP-UX Running OpenSSL, Remote 0: HP Security Bulletin - HP-UX Running OpenSSL, Remote Execution of Arbitrary Code, Denial of Service (DoS), Authentication Bypass T-570: HP Security Bulletin - HP-UX Running OpenSSL, Remote Execution of Arbitrary Code, Denial of Service (DoS), Authentication Bypass March 4, 2011 - 3:05pm Addthis PROBLEM: Potential Security Impact: Remote execution of arbitrary code, Denial of Service (DoS), authentication bypass. PLATFORM: HP-UX B.11.11, B.11.23, B.11.31 running OpenSSL before vA.00.09.08q. ABSTRACT: A potential security vulnerability has been identified with HP-UX OpenSSL. This vulnerability could be exploited remotely to execute arbitrary code or create a Denial of Service (DoS) or an authentication bypass. reference LINKS: Net-Security Advisory: HPSBUX02638

9

T-570: HP Security Bulletin - HP-UX Running OpenSSL, Remote Execution of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

70: HP Security Bulletin - HP-UX Running OpenSSL, Remote 70: HP Security Bulletin - HP-UX Running OpenSSL, Remote Execution of Arbitrary Code, Denial of Service (DoS), Authentication Bypass T-570: HP Security Bulletin - HP-UX Running OpenSSL, Remote Execution of Arbitrary Code, Denial of Service (DoS), Authentication Bypass March 4, 2011 - 3:05pm Addthis PROBLEM: Potential Security Impact: Remote execution of arbitrary code, Denial of Service (DoS), authentication bypass. PLATFORM: HP-UX B.11.11, B.11.23, B.11.31 running OpenSSL before vA.00.09.08q. ABSTRACT: A potential security vulnerability has been identified with HP-UX OpenSSL. This vulnerability could be exploited remotely to execute arbitrary code or create a Denial of Service (DoS) or an authentication bypass. reference LINKS: Net-Security Advisory: HPSBUX02638

10

T-608: HP Virtual Server Environment Lets Remote Authenticated...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8: HP Virtual Server Environment Lets Remote Authenticated Users Gain Elevated Privileges T-608: HP Virtual Server Environment Lets Remote Authenticated Users Gain Elevated...

11

T-623: HP Business Availability Center Input Validation Hole...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3: HP Business Availability Center Input Validation Hole Permits Cross-Site Scripting Attacks T-623: HP Business Availability Center Input Validation Hole Permits Cross-Site...

12

HP Ex Parte Memo on Proposed Rulemaking for Battery Chargers...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Other Agencies You are here Home HP Ex Parte Memo on Proposed Rulemaking for Battery Chargers and External Power Supplies HP Ex Parte Memo on Proposed Rulemaking for...

13

U-013: HP Data Protector Multiple Unspecified Vulnerabilities | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3: HP Data Protector Multiple Unspecified Vulnerabilities 3: HP Data Protector Multiple Unspecified Vulnerabilities U-013: HP Data Protector Multiple Unspecified Vulnerabilities October 18, 2011 - 9:00am Addthis PROBLEM: HP Data Protector Multiple Unspecified Vulnerabilities. PLATFORM: HP Data Protector Notebook Extension 6.20; HP Data Protector for Personal Computers 7.0 ABSTRACT: Multiple vulnerabilities were reported in HP Data Protector. A remote user can execute arbitrary code on the target system. reference LINKS: HP Security Document ID: c03054543 SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1026195 Secunia Advisory: SA46468 CVE-2011-3156 CVE-2011-3157 CVE-2011-3158 CVE-2011-3159 CVE-2011-3160 CVE-2011-3161 CVE-2011-3162 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: High Discussion: Potential security vulnerabilities has been identified with HP Data Protector Notebook Extension. These vulnerabilities could be remotely

14

1-HP clueweb09-en0003-31-18762 0 0 1-HP clueweb09 ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 73-30313 0 0 4-HP clueweb09-en0000-99-23325 0 0 4-NAME Altoona_Curve 2 1 4-NAME american_hockey_league 2 2 4-NAME Amtrak 2 3 4 ...

2009-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

15

HP Angle Light 4x3 Blue  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. 1 © Copyright 2010 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. Garett Montgomery DVLabs, TippingPoint 18May2010 SCADA: THREAT LANDSCAPE © Copyright 2010 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. 2 GARETT MONTGOMERY - US Navy: Electronics Technician (Communications) - Network Security at Naval Postgraduate School - Masters Degree in Information Assurance * CISSP, CWSP, GSNA, SnortCP, C|EH, etc. - Security Researcher at TippingPoint DVLabs * Focusing on SCADA * TippingPoint is a leading provider of Intrusion Prevention Systems (IPS). * www.tippingpoint.com * HP purchased TippingPoint as part of 3com acquisition, April 2010. * http://www.hp.com/hpinfo/newsroom/press/2009/091111xa.html © Copyright 2010 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.

16

On L 1 L 2 ???M 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The well-known inequality L 1 L 2 ???M 2 connecting the coefficients of self- and mutual inductances for a pair of coupled circuits is derived by analytical methods

Edwin A. Power

1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

T-623: HP Business Availability Center Input Validation Hole Permits  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3: HP Business Availability Center Input Validation Hole 3: HP Business Availability Center Input Validation Hole Permits Cross-Site Scripting Attacks T-623: HP Business Availability Center Input Validation Hole Permits Cross-Site Scripting Attacks May 16, 2011 - 3:05pm Addthis PROBLEM: A vulnerability was reported in HP Business Availability Center. A remote user can conduct cross-site scripting attacks. PLATFORM: HP Business Availability Center software 8.06 and prior versions ABSTRACT: The software does not properly filter HTML code from user-supplied input before displaying the input. reference LINKS: SecurityTracker Alert ID:1025535 HP Knowledge Base CVE-2011-1856 Secunia ID: SA44569 HP Document ID:c02823184 | ESB-2011.0525 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: High Discussion: A remote user can cause arbitrary scripting code to be executed by the

18

U-052: HP Protect Tools Device Access Manager Unspecified Bug Lets Remote  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2: HP Protect Tools Device Access Manager Unspecified Bug Lets 2: HP Protect Tools Device Access Manager Unspecified Bug Lets Remote Users Deny Service and Execute Arbitrary Code U-052: HP Protect Tools Device Access Manager Unspecified Bug Lets Remote Users Deny Service and Execute Arbitrary Code December 6, 2011 - 7:00am Addthis PROBLEM: HP Protect Tools Device Access Manager Unspecified Bug Lets Remote Users Deny Service and Execute Arbitrary Code. PLATFORM: HP Protect Tools Device Access Manager for Windows earlier than v.6.1.0.1 running on the following HP PCs: HP EliteBook 2560p Notebook PC HP EliteBook 2760p Notebook PC HP EliteBook 8460p Notebook PC HP EliteBook 8460w Mobile Workstation HP EliteBook 8560p Notebook PC HP EliteBook 8560w Mobile Workstation HP EliteBook 8760w Mobile Workstation HP ProBook 4230s Notebook PC

19

U-052: HP Protect Tools Device Access Manager Unspecified Bug Lets Remote  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2: HP Protect Tools Device Access Manager Unspecified Bug Lets 2: HP Protect Tools Device Access Manager Unspecified Bug Lets Remote Users Deny Service and Execute Arbitrary Code U-052: HP Protect Tools Device Access Manager Unspecified Bug Lets Remote Users Deny Service and Execute Arbitrary Code December 6, 2011 - 7:00am Addthis PROBLEM: HP Protect Tools Device Access Manager Unspecified Bug Lets Remote Users Deny Service and Execute Arbitrary Code. PLATFORM: HP Protect Tools Device Access Manager for Windows earlier than v.6.1.0.1 running on the following HP PCs: HP EliteBook 2560p Notebook PC HP EliteBook 2760p Notebook PC HP EliteBook 8460p Notebook PC HP EliteBook 8460w Mobile Workstation HP EliteBook 8560p Notebook PC HP EliteBook 8560w Mobile Workstation HP EliteBook 8760w Mobile Workstation HP ProBook 4230s Notebook PC

20

U-238: HP Service Manager Input Validation Flaw Permits Cross...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9.21, 9.30 ABSTRACT: Cross-site scripting (XSS) vulnerability in HP Service Manager Web Tier 7.11, 9.21, and 9.30, and HP Service Center Web Tier 6.28, allows remote attackers...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "l-1 hp sodium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

From: Mulveny, Jennifer [mailto:jennifer.mulveny@hp.com]  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Friday, April 13, 2012 11:33 AM Friday, April 13, 2012 11:33 AM To: Exparte Communications Cc: Watt, Steve Subject: HP Ex Parte Memo on Proposed Rulemaking for Battery Chargers and External Power Supplies This following notes summarize the discussion that HP held via teleconference with the Department of Energy on April 10, 2012. Hewlett-Packard Company (HP) appreciates the opportunity to comment on the new DOE rulemaking for Battery Chargers and External Power Supplies. Thank you for taking the time to speak with us. HP believes that existing voluntary Market Access Requirements, such as EPEAT and ENERGY STAR, are the most effective mechanism for improving energy efficiency of IT products, but we understand the approach of regulating mandatory minimum efficiencies to address poor performing products. HP is a

22

From: Mulveny, Jennifer [mailto:jennifer.mulveny@hp.com]  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tuesday, April 17, 2012 4:04 PM Tuesday, April 17, 2012 4:04 PM To: Mulveny, Jennifer; Exparte Communications Cc: Watt, Steve; Kido, Michael Subject: RE: HP Ex Parte Memo on Proposed Rulemaking for Battery Chargers and External Power Supplies This following notes summarize the discussion that HP held via teleconference with the Department of Energy on April 10, 2012. Hewlett-Packard Company (HP) appreciates the opportunity to comment on the new DOE rulemaking for Battery Chargers and External Power Supplies. Thank you for taking the time to speak with us. HP believes that existing voluntary Market Access Requirements, such as EPEAT and ENERGY STAR, are the most effective mechanism for improving energy efficiency of IT products, but we understand the approach of regulating mandatory minimum efficiencies to address poor performing products. HP is a

23

Perlick: ENERGY STAR Referral (HP72ROO-S) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

HP72ROO-S) Perlick: ENERGY STAR Referral (HP72ROO-S) February 8, 2011 DOE referred Perlick refrigerator HP72ROO-S to EPA, brand manager of the ENERGY STAR program, for appropriate...

24

Perlick: ENERGY STAR Referral (HP48RO-S) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

HP48RO-S) Perlick: ENERGY STAR Referral (HP48RO-S) February 8, 2011 DOE referred Perlick refrigerator HP48RO-S to EPA, brand manager of the ENERGY STAR program, for appropriate...

25

U-095: HP Data Protector Media Operations Lets Remote Users Execute...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5: HP Data Protector Media Operations Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code U-095: HP Data Protector Media Operations Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code February 3, 2012 -...

26

V-144: HP Printers Let Remote Users Access Files on the Printer |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4: HP Printers Let Remote Users Access Files on the Printer 4: HP Printers Let Remote Users Access Files on the Printer V-144: HP Printers Let Remote Users Access Files on the Printer April 29, 2013 - 12:27am Addthis PROBLEM: HP Printers Let Remote Users Access Files on the Printer PLATFORM: HP Color LaserJet 3000 Q7534A HP Color LaserJet 3800 Q5981A HP Color LaserJet 4700 Q7492A HP Color LaserJet 4730 Multifunction Printer CB480A HP Color LaserJet 4730 Multifunction Printer CB480A HP Color LaserJet 5550 Q3714A HP Color LaserJet 9500 Multifunction Printer C8549A HP Color LaserJet CM6030 Multifunction Printer CE664A HP Color LaserJet CM6040 Multifunction Printer Q3939A HP Color LaserJet CP3505 CB442A HP Color LaserJet CP3525 CC469A HP Color LaserJet CP4005 CB503A HP Color LaserJet CP6015 Q3932A HP Color LaserJet Enterprise CP4025 CC490A

27

l1 regularization in infinite dimensional feature spaces  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we discuss the problem of fitting l1 regularized prediction models in infinite (possibly non-countable) dimensional feature spaces. Our main contributions are: a. Deriving a generalization of l1 regularization ...

Saharon Rosset; Grzegorz Swirszcz; Nathan Srebro; Ji Zhu

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

U-203: HP Photosmart Bug Lets Remote Users Deny Service | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

03: HP Photosmart Bug Lets Remote Users Deny Service 03: HP Photosmart Bug Lets Remote Users Deny Service U-203: HP Photosmart Bug Lets Remote Users Deny Service July 2, 2012 - 8:00am Addthis PROBLEM: HP Photosmart Bug Lets Remote Users Deny Service PLATFORM: HP Photosmart Wireless e-All-in-One Printer series - B110 HP Photosmart e-All-in-One Printer series - D110 HP Photosmart Plus e-All-in-One Printer series - B210 HP Photosmart eStation All-in-One Printer series - C510 HP Photosmart Ink Advantage e-All-in-One Printer series - K510 HP Photosmart Premium Fax e-All-in-One Printer series - C410 ABSTRACT: A vulnerability was reported in HP Photosmart. A remote user can cause denial of service conditions. Reference LINKS: The Vendor's Advisory SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1027213 CVE-2012-2017 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: High Discussion:

29

U-137: HP Performance Manager Unspecified Bug Lets Remote Users Execute  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7: HP Performance Manager Unspecified Bug Lets Remote Users 7: HP Performance Manager Unspecified Bug Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Codes U-137: HP Performance Manager Unspecified Bug Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Codes March 30, 2012 - 9:15am Addthis PROBLEM: HP Performance Manager Unspecified Bug Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Codes PLATFORM: HP-UX B.11.31 HP-UX B.11.23 ABSTRACT: A remote user can execute arbitrary code on the target system. REFERENCE LINKS: HP Support Document ID: c03255321 SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1026869 CVE-2012-0127 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: High Discussion: A potential security vulnerability has been identified with HP Performance Manager running on HP-UX, Linux, Solaris, and Windows. The vulnerability could be exploited remotely to execute arbitrary code and to create a Denial of Service (DoS).

30

T-608: HP Virtual Server Environment Lets Remote Authenticated Users Gain  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8: HP Virtual Server Environment Lets Remote Authenticated 8: HP Virtual Server Environment Lets Remote Authenticated Users Gain Elevated Privileges T-608: HP Virtual Server Environment Lets Remote Authenticated Users Gain Elevated Privileges April 22, 2011 - 7:47am Addthis PROBLEM: A vulnerability was reported in HP Virtual Server Environment. A remote authenticated user can obtain elevated privileges on the target system. PLATFORM: HP Virtual Server Environment prior to v6.3 ABSTRACT: A potential security vulnerability has been identified in HP Virtual Server Environment for Windows. The vulnerability could be exploited remotely to elevate privileges. reference LINKS: HP Document ID: c02749050 SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1025429 CVE-2011-1724 HP Insight Software media set 6.3 HP Technical Knowledge Base Discussion: System management and security procedures must be reviewed frequently to

31

U-229: HP Network Node Manager i Input Validation Flaw Permits Cross-Site  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9: HP Network Node Manager i Input Validation Flaw Permits 9: HP Network Node Manager i Input Validation Flaw Permits Cross-Site Scripting Attacks U-229: HP Network Node Manager i Input Validation Flaw Permits Cross-Site Scripting Attacks August 7, 2012 - 7:00am Addthis PROBLEM: HP Network Node Manager i Input Validation Flaw Permits Cross-Site Scripting Attacks PLATFORM: HP Network Node Manager I (NNMi) v8.x, v9.0x, v9.1x, v9.20 for HP-UX, Linux, Solaris, and Windows ABSTRACT: Potential security vulnerabilities have been identified with HP Network Node Manager i (NNMi) for HP-UX, Linux, Solaris, and Windows. The vulnerabilities could be remotely exploited resulting in cross site scripting (XSS). Reference LINKS: HP Document ID: c03405705 SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1027345 Bugtraq ID: 54815 CVE-2012-2022 IMPACT ASSESSMENT:

32

U-208: HP Operations Agent Bugs Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

208: HP Operations Agent Bugs Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary 208: HP Operations Agent Bugs Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code U-208: HP Operations Agent Bugs Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code July 10, 2012 - 7:00am Addthis PROBLEM: HP Operations Agent Bugs Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code PLATFORM: HP Operations Agent for AIX, HP-UX, Linux, Solaris, and Windows prior to v11.03.12. ABSTRACT: Two vulnerabilities were reported in HP Operations Agent. A remote user can execute arbitrary code on the target system reference LINKS: The Vendor's Advisory SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1027225 CVE-2012-2019 CVE-2012-2020 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: High Discussion: Potential security vulnerabilities have been identified with HP Operations Agent for AIX, HP-UX, Linux, Solaris, and Windows. The vulnerabilities could be remotely exploited resulting in the execution of arbitrary code.

33

T-590: HP Diagnostics Input Validation Hole Permits Cross-Site Scripting  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0: HP Diagnostics Input Validation Hole Permits Cross-Site 0: HP Diagnostics Input Validation Hole Permits Cross-Site Scripting Attacks T-590: HP Diagnostics Input Validation Hole Permits Cross-Site Scripting Attacks March 29, 2011 - 3:05pm Addthis PROBLEM: HP Diagnostics Input Validation Hole Permits Cross-Site Scripting Attacks in ActiveSync Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code. PLATFORM: HP Diagnostics software: version(s) 7.5, 8.0 prior to 8.05.54.225 ABSTRACT: A potential security vulnerability has been identified in HP Diagnostics. The vulnerability could be exploited remotely resulting in cross site scripting (XSS). reference LINKS: HP Document ID: c02770512 SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1025255 CVE-2011-0892 Security Focus Document ID: c02770512 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: High Discussion: A vulnerability was reported in HP Diagnostics. A remote user can conduct

34

U-087: HP-UX update for Java | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7: HP-UX update for Java 7: HP-UX update for Java U-087: HP-UX update for Java January 24, 2012 - 7:00am Addthis PROBLEM: HP issued an update for Java in HP-UX to address multiple vulnerabilities. PLATFORM: HP-UX 11.x ABSTRACT: Multiple vulnerabilities can be exploited by malicious users to disclose certain information and by malicious people to disclose potentially sensitive information. reference LINKS: Secunia Advisory 47709 Secunia Advisory 46512 HP Support Document IMPACT ASSESSMENT: High Discussion: The vulnerabilities are reported in versions B.11.11, B.11.23, and B.11.31 running HP JDK and JRE 6.0.12 and prior. Vulnerabilities inlcude the ability to hijack a user's session, conduct DNS cache poisoning attacks, manipulate certain data, cause a DoS (Denial of Service), and compromise a

35

U-025: HP OpenView Network Node Manager Bugs Let Remote Users Execute  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

U-025: HP OpenView Network Node Manager Bugs Let Remote Users U-025: HP OpenView Network Node Manager Bugs Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code U-025: HP OpenView Network Node Manager Bugs Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code November 2, 2011 - 8:00am Addthis PROBLEM: HP OpenView Network Node Manager Bugs Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code. PLATFORM: HP OpenView Network Node Manager (OV NNM) v7.51, v7.53 running on HP-UX, Linux, Solaris, and Windows ABSTRACT: A remote user can execute arbitrary code on the target system. reference LINKS: HP Support Center Document ID: c03054052 SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1026260 CVE-2011-1365 CVE-2011-1366 CVE-2011-1367 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Medium Discussion: Several vulnerabilities were reported in HP OpenView Network Node Manager. A remote user can execute arbitrary code on the target system.

36

U-044: HP Operations Agent and Performance Agent Lets Local Users Access a  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

44: HP Operations Agent and Performance Agent Lets Local Users 44: HP Operations Agent and Performance Agent Lets Local Users Access a Restricted Directory U-044: HP Operations Agent and Performance Agent Lets Local Users Access a Restricted Directory November 23, 2011 - 8:00am Addthis PROBLEM: HP Operations Agent and Performance Agent Lets Local Users Access a Restricted Directory. PLATFORM: HP Operations Agent v11.00 and Performance Agent v4.73, v5.0 for AIX, HP-UX, Linux, and Solaris ABSTRACT: A local user can access a directory on the target system. reference LINKS: HP Security Bulletin Document ID: c03091656 CVE-2011-4160 SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1026345 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Medium Discussion: A vulnerability was reported in HP Operations Agent and Performance Agent. A local user can access data on the target system. A local user can gain

37

V-016: HP Performance Insight Bugs with Sybase Database Let Remote Users  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6: HP Performance Insight Bugs with Sybase Database Let Remote 6: HP Performance Insight Bugs with Sybase Database Let Remote Users Deny Service and Take Full Control of the Target System V-016: HP Performance Insight Bugs with Sybase Database Let Remote Users Deny Service and Take Full Control of the Target System November 5, 2012 - 6:00am Addthis PROBLEM: HP Performance Insight Bugs with Sybase Database Let Remote Users Deny Service and Take Full Control of the Target System PLATFORM: HP Performance Insight v5.31, v5.40 and v5.41 running on HP-UX, Solaris, Linux, and Windows and using Sybase as the database ABSTRACT: Two vulnerabilities were reported in HP Performance Insight. REFERENCE LINKS: HP Support Document ID: c03555488 SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1027719 CVE-2012-3269 CVE-2012-3270 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: High DISCUSSION:

38

T-643: HP OpenView Storage Data Protector Unspecified Code Execution  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

643: HP OpenView Storage Data Protector Unspecified Code 643: HP OpenView Storage Data Protector Unspecified Code Execution Vulnerability T-643: HP OpenView Storage Data Protector Unspecified Code Execution Vulnerability June 9, 2011 - 3:45pm Addthis PROBLEM: HP OpenView Storage Data Protector Unspecified Code Execution Vulnerability PLATFORM: Versions 6.0, 6.10, and 6.11 running on HP-UX, Solaris, Linux and Windows. ABSTRACT: A vulnerability has been reported in HP OpenView Storage Data Protector, which can be exploited by malicious people to compromise a vulnerable system. reference LINKS: Secunia Advisory SA44884 CVE-2011-1864 SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1025620 HP Document ID: c02712867 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: High Discussion: A vulnerability was reported in HP OpenView Storage Data Protector. A remote user can execute arbitrary code on the target system.

39

U-048: HP LaserJet Printers Unspecified Flaw Lets Remote Users Update  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8: HP LaserJet Printers Unspecified Flaw Lets Remote Users 8: HP LaserJet Printers Unspecified Flaw Lets Remote Users Update Firmware with Arbitrary Code U-048: HP LaserJet Printers Unspecified Flaw Lets Remote Users Update Firmware with Arbitrary Code November 30, 2011 - 8:15am Addthis PROBLEM: HP LaserJet Printers Unspecified Flaw Lets Remote Users Update Firmware with Arbitrary Code . PLATFORM: HP LaserJet Printers manufactured prior to 2009 ABSTRACT A remote user can upgrade the printer's firmware with arbitrary code. reference LINKS: SecurityTracker Alert ID:1026357 HP Security for Imaging and Printing HP Clarifies on Printer Security IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Low Discussion: A vulnerability was reported in some HP LaserJet Printers. A remote user can update the firmware with arbitrary code. A remote user can send a specially crafted print job or specially crafted data to the

40

U-214: HP Network Node Manager Java JDK / JRE Multiple Vulnerabilities |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

U-214: HP Network Node Manager Java JDK / JRE Multiple U-214: HP Network Node Manager Java JDK / JRE Multiple Vulnerabilities U-214: HP Network Node Manager Java JDK / JRE Multiple Vulnerabilities July 17, 2012 - 7:00am Addthis PROBLEM: HP Network Node Manager Java JDK / JRE Multiple Vulnerabilities PLATFORM: The vulnerabilities are reported in version 9.0x running on HP-UX, Linux, Solaris, and Windows. ABSTRACT: Vulnerabilities could be remotely exploited resulting in unauthorized information disclosure, modification, Denial of Service (DoS). reference LINKS: HP Support document ID: c03405642 Secunia Advisory SA49966 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: High Discussion: HP has acknowledged some vulnerabilities in HP Network Node Manager, which can be exploited by malicious, local users to disclose potentially sensitive information and by malicious people to disclose potentially

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "l-1 hp sodium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

U-158: HP NonStop Server Java Multiple Vulnerabilities | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8: HP NonStop Server Java Multiple Vulnerabilities 8: HP NonStop Server Java Multiple Vulnerabilities U-158: HP NonStop Server Java Multiple Vulnerabilities April 30, 2012 - 7:00am Addthis PROBLEM: HP NonStop Server Java Multiple Vulnerabilities PLATFORM: HP NonStop Server 6.x ABSTRACT: Multiple vulnerabilities have been reported in HP NonStop Server Reference links: Secunia Advisory SA48977 CVE-2011-3547 CVE-2011-3551 CVE-2011-3553 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: High Discussion: HP has acknowledged multiple vulnerabilities in HP NonStop Server, which can be exploited by malicious users to disclose sensitive information and by malicious people to disclose sensitive information, manipulate certain data, cause a DoS (Denial of Service), and compromise a vulnerable system. Impact: Successful exploitation of this vulnerability may allow remote manipulation

42

U-238: HP Service Manager Input Validation Flaw Permits Cross-Site  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8: HP Service Manager Input Validation Flaw Permits Cross-Site 8: HP Service Manager Input Validation Flaw Permits Cross-Site Scripting Attacks U-238: HP Service Manager Input Validation Flaw Permits Cross-Site Scripting Attacks August 17, 2012 - 7:00am Addthis PROBLEM: HP Service Manager Input Validation Flaw Permits Cross-Site Scripting Attacks PLATFORM: Version(s): 7.11, 9.21, 9.30 ABSTRACT: Cross-site scripting (XSS) vulnerability in HP Service Manager Web Tier 7.11, 9.21, and 9.30, and HP Service Center Web Tier 6.28, allows remote attackers to inject arbitrary web script or HTML via unspecified vectors. REFERENCE LINKS: www2.hp.com http://www.securitytracker.com/id/1027399 CVE-2012-3251 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Moderate Discussion: A vulnerability was reported in HP Service Manager. A remote user can conduct cross-site scripting attacks. The software does not properly filter

43

U-095: HP Data Protector Media Operations Lets Remote Users Execute  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5: HP Data Protector Media Operations Lets Remote Users Execute 5: HP Data Protector Media Operations Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code U-095: HP Data Protector Media Operations Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code February 3, 2012 - 1:33am Addthis PROBLEM: HP Data Protector Media Operations Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code PLATFORM: Windows (2003, XP, 2008), HP Data Protector Media Operations version 6.11 and earlier ABSTRACT: Remote execution of arbitrary code reference LINKS: SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1026626 HP Support Center Document ID: c03179046 CVE-2011-4791 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: High Discussion: A vulnerability was reported in HP Data Protector Media Operations. A remote user can execute arbitrary code on the target system. Information on CVSS is documented in HP Customer Notice: HPSN-2008-002. Impact:

44

U-214: HP Network Node Manager Java JDK / JRE Multiple Vulnerabilities |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4: HP Network Node Manager Java JDK / JRE Multiple 4: HP Network Node Manager Java JDK / JRE Multiple Vulnerabilities U-214: HP Network Node Manager Java JDK / JRE Multiple Vulnerabilities July 17, 2012 - 7:00am Addthis PROBLEM: HP Network Node Manager Java JDK / JRE Multiple Vulnerabilities PLATFORM: The vulnerabilities are reported in version 9.0x running on HP-UX, Linux, Solaris, and Windows. ABSTRACT: Vulnerabilities could be remotely exploited resulting in unauthorized information disclosure, modification, Denial of Service (DoS). reference LINKS: HP Support document ID: c03405642 Secunia Advisory SA49966 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: High Discussion: HP has acknowledged some vulnerabilities in HP Network Node Manager, which can be exploited by malicious, local users to disclose potentially sensitive information and by malicious people to disclose potentially

45

T-590: HP Diagnostics Input Validation Hole Permits Cross-Site Scripting  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0: HP Diagnostics Input Validation Hole Permits Cross-Site 0: HP Diagnostics Input Validation Hole Permits Cross-Site Scripting Attacks T-590: HP Diagnostics Input Validation Hole Permits Cross-Site Scripting Attacks March 29, 2011 - 3:05pm Addthis PROBLEM: HP Diagnostics Input Validation Hole Permits Cross-Site Scripting Attacks in ActiveSync Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code. PLATFORM: HP Diagnostics software: version(s) 7.5, 8.0 prior to 8.05.54.225 ABSTRACT: A potential security vulnerability has been identified in HP Diagnostics. The vulnerability could be exploited remotely resulting in cross site scripting (XSS). reference LINKS: HP Document ID: c02770512 SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1025255 CVE-2011-0892 Security Focus Document ID: c02770512 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: High Discussion: A vulnerability was reported in HP Diagnostics. A remote user can conduct

46

U-017: HP MFP Digital Sending Software Lets Local Users Obtain Potentially  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7: HP MFP Digital Sending Software Lets Local Users Obtain 7: HP MFP Digital Sending Software Lets Local Users Obtain Potentially Sensitive Information U-017: HP MFP Digital Sending Software Lets Local Users Obtain Potentially Sensitive Information October 24, 2011 - 12:30pm Addthis PROBLEM: HP MFP Digital Sending Software Lets Local Users Obtain Potentially Sensitive Information . PLATFORM: HP MFP Digital Sending Software v4.91.21 and all previous 4.9x versions ABSTRACT: A vulnerability was reported in HP MFP Digital Sending Software. A local user can obtain potentially sensitive information. reference LINKS: HP Advisory ID: c03052686 SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1026228 CVE-2011-3163 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Medium Discussion: A potential security vulnerability has been identified with HP MFP Digital Sending Software running on Windows. The vulnerability could result in

47

T-538: HP OpenView Storage Data Protector Bug Lets Remote Users Execute  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

T-538: HP OpenView Storage Data Protector Bug Lets Remote Users T-538: HP OpenView Storage Data Protector Bug Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code T-538: HP OpenView Storage Data Protector Bug Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code January 20, 2011 - 6:39am Addthis PROBLEM: HP OpenView Storage Data Protector Bug Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code. PLATFORM: HP OpenView Storage Data Protector v6.11 ABSTRACT: A vulnerability was reported in HP OpenView Storage Data Protector. A remote user can execute arbitrary code on the target system. reference LINKS: HP Security Bulletin SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1024983 CVE-2011-0273 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: High Discussion: A potential security vulnerability has been identified with HP OpenView Storage Data Protector. The vulnerability could be remotely exploited to execute arbitrary code.

48

U-238: HP Service Manager Input Validation Flaw Permits Cross-Site  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

38: HP Service Manager Input Validation Flaw Permits Cross-Site 38: HP Service Manager Input Validation Flaw Permits Cross-Site Scripting Attacks U-238: HP Service Manager Input Validation Flaw Permits Cross-Site Scripting Attacks August 17, 2012 - 7:00am Addthis PROBLEM: HP Service Manager Input Validation Flaw Permits Cross-Site Scripting Attacks PLATFORM: Version(s): 7.11, 9.21, 9.30 ABSTRACT: Cross-site scripting (XSS) vulnerability in HP Service Manager Web Tier 7.11, 9.21, and 9.30, and HP Service Center Web Tier 6.28, allows remote attackers to inject arbitrary web script or HTML via unspecified vectors. REFERENCE LINKS: www2.hp.com http://www.securitytracker.com/id/1027399 CVE-2012-3251 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Moderate Discussion: A vulnerability was reported in HP Service Manager. A remote user can conduct cross-site scripting attacks. The software does not properly filter

49

HP Ex Parte Memo on Proposed Rulemaking for Battery Chargers and External Power Supplies  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Hewlett-Packard Company (HP) appreciates the opportunity to comment on the new DOE rulemaking for Battery Chargers and External Power Supplies. Thank you for taking the time to speak with us. HP...

50

U-229: HP Network Node Manager i Input Validation Flaw Permits...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Network Node Manager I (NNMi) v8.x, v9.0x, v9.1x, v9.20 for HP-UX, Linux, Solaris, and Windows ABSTRACT: Potential security vulnerabilities have been identified with HP Network...

51

Quantum Process Tomography via L1-norm Minimization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For an initially well designed but imperfect quantum information system, the process matrix is almost sparse in an appropriate basis. Existing theory and associated computational methods (L1-norm minimization) for reconstructing sparse signals establish conditions under which the sparse signal can be perfectly reconstructed from a very limited number of measurements (resources). Although a direct extension to quantum process tomography of the L1-norm minimization theory has not yet emerged, the numerical examples presented here, which apply L1-norm minimization to quantum process tomography, show a significant reduction in resources to achieve a desired estimation accuracy over existing methods.

Robert L. Kosut

2008-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

52

Design and development of Stirling engines for stationary-power-generation applications in the 500- to 3000-hp range. Phase I final report  

SciTech Connect

The first phase of the design and development of Stirling engines for stationary power generation applications in the 373 kW (500 hp) to 2237 kW (3000 hp) range was completed. The tasks in Phase I include conceptual designs of large Stirling cycle stationary engines and program plan for implementing Phases II through V. Four different heater head designs and five different machine designs were prepared in sufficient detail to select a design recommended for development in the near future. A second order analysis was developed for examining the various loss mechanisms in the Stirling engine and for predicting the thermodynamic performance of these engines. The predicted engine thermal brake efficiency excluding combustion efficiency is approximately 42% which exceeds the design objective of 40%. The combustion system designs were prepared for both a clean fuel combustion system and a two-stage atmospheric fluidized bed combustion system. The calculated combustion efficiency of the former is 90% and of the latter is 80%. Heat transport systems, i.e., a heat exchanger for the clean fuel combustion system and a sodium heat pipe system for coal and other nonclean fuel combustion systems were selected. The cost analysis showed that for clean fuels combustion the proposed 2237 kW (3000 hp) system production cost is $478,242 or $214/kW ($159/hp) which is approximately 1.86 times the cost of a comparable size diesel engine. For solid coal combustion the proposed 2237 kW (3000 hp) system production cost is approximately $2,246,242 which corresponds to a cost to power capacity ratio of $1004/kW ($749/hp). The two-stage atmospheric fluidized bed combustion system represents 81% of the total cost; the engine represents 14% depending on the future price differential between coal and conventional clean fuels, a short payback period of the proposed Stirling cycle engine/FBC system may justify the initial cost. (LCL)

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Mao of HP-CAT Awarded Aminoff Prize in Crystallography  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mao of HP-CAT Awarded Aminoff Prize in Crystallography Mao of HP-CAT Awarded Aminoff Prize in Crystallography The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences has awarded David H. Mao of the Geophysical Laboratory the Gregori Aminoff Prize in Crystallography 2005 "for pioneering research of materials at ultrahigh pressures and temperatures." Dr. Mao is the Director of the High Pressure Collaborative Access Team, which manages the beamlines at Advanced Photon Source (APS) sector 16. Named after Gregori Aminoff, the pioneering Swedish crystallographer, the prize is given annually to recognized scientists, or to a group of no more than three persons of international distinction, who have made a major contribution to crystallography. David H. Mao showing a panoramic high-pressure diamond-anvil cell to Murray Gibson

54

L1B test results Jos de Kloe,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ADM-Aeolus L1B test results Jos de Kloe, L1B PM16 10-Mar-2009 #12;L2B-PM15, J. de Kloe, 11-Mar-2009 2 Test cases: Base Reference RMS (1) Academic Tests [with/without noise] (27) Sanity Tests (2) Realistic Tests [LITE data] (9) Mispointing Tests [CALIPSO data] (9) #12;L2B-PM15, J. de Kloe, 11-Mar-2009 3

Stoffelen, Ad

55

U-142: HP Onboard Administrator Bugs Let Remote Users Gain Access, Obtain  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

42: HP Onboard Administrator Bugs Let Remote Users Gain Access, 42: HP Onboard Administrator Bugs Let Remote Users Gain Access, Obtain Information, and Conduct URL Redirection Attacks U-142: HP Onboard Administrator Bugs Let Remote Users Gain Access, Obtain Information, and Conduct URL Redirection Attacks April 6, 2012 - 7:00am Addthis PROBLEM: HP Onboard Administrator Bugs Let Remote Users Gain Access, Obtain Information, and Conduct URL Redirection Attacks PLATFORM: HP Onboard Administrator (OA) up to and including v3.32 ABSTRACT: A remote user can obtain potentially sensitive information. reference LINKS: HP Support Document ID: c03263573 SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1026889 CVE-2012-0128, CVE-2012-0129, CVE-2012-0130 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: High Discussion: Several vulnerabilities were reported in HP Onboard Administrator. A remote

56

U-142: HP Onboard Administrator Bugs Let Remote Users Gain Access, Obtain  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2: HP Onboard Administrator Bugs Let Remote Users Gain Access, 2: HP Onboard Administrator Bugs Let Remote Users Gain Access, Obtain Information, and Conduct URL Redirection Attacks U-142: HP Onboard Administrator Bugs Let Remote Users Gain Access, Obtain Information, and Conduct URL Redirection Attacks April 6, 2012 - 7:00am Addthis PROBLEM: HP Onboard Administrator Bugs Let Remote Users Gain Access, Obtain Information, and Conduct URL Redirection Attacks PLATFORM: HP Onboard Administrator (OA) up to and including v3.32 ABSTRACT: A remote user can obtain potentially sensitive information. reference LINKS: HP Support Document ID: c03263573 SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1026889 CVE-2012-0128, CVE-2012-0129, CVE-2012-0130 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: High Discussion: Several vulnerabilities were reported in HP Onboard Administrator. A remote

57

U-204: HP Network Node Manager i Input Validation Hole Permits Cross-Site  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

204: HP Network Node Manager i Input Validation Hole Permits 204: HP Network Node Manager i Input Validation Hole Permits Cross-Site Scripting Attacks U-204: HP Network Node Manager i Input Validation Hole Permits Cross-Site Scripting Attacks July 3, 2012 - 7:00am Addthis PROBLEM: HP Network Node Manager i Input Validation Hole Permits Cross-Site Scripting Attacks PLATFORM: Version(s): 8.x, 9.0x, 9.1x ABSTRACT: Potential security vulnerabilities have been identified with HP Network Node Manager I (NNMi) for HP-UX, Linux, Solaris, and Windows. The vulnerabilities could be remotely exploited resulting in cross site scripting (XSS). reference LINKS: The Vendor's Advisory SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1027215 CVE-2012-2018 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Medium Discussion: A vulnerability was reported in HP Network Node Manager i. The software does not properly filter HTML code from user-supplied input before

58

U-071:HP Database Archiving Software Bugs Let Remote Users Execute  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1:HP Database Archiving Software Bugs Let Remote Users Execute 1:HP Database Archiving Software Bugs Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code U-071:HP Database Archiving Software Bugs Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code December 29, 2011 - 8:15am Addthis PROBLEM: HP Database Archiving Software Bugs Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code PLATFORM: HP Database Archiving Software v6.31 ABSTRACT: A remote user can execute arbitrary code on the target system. reference LINKS: HP Database Document ID: c03128302 SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1026467 CVE-2011-4163 CVE-2011-4164 CVE-2011-4165 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: High Discussion: Several vulnerabilities were reported in HP Database Archiving Software. A remote user can execute arbitrary code on the target system. Impact: A remote user can execute arbitrary code on the target system. Solution:

59

U-216: HP StorageWorks File Migration Agent Buffer Overflows Let Remote  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6: HP StorageWorks File Migration Agent Buffer Overflows Let 6: HP StorageWorks File Migration Agent Buffer Overflows Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code U-216: HP StorageWorks File Migration Agent Buffer Overflows Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code July 19, 2012 - 7:14am Addthis PROBLEM: HP StorageWorks File Migration Agent Buffer Overflows Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code PLATFORM: HP StorageWorks File Migration Agent ABSTRACT: Two vulnerabilities were reported in HP StorageWorks File Migration Agent. reference LINKS: SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1027281 ZDI-12-127 ZDI-12-126 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: High Discussion: The vulnerability allows remote attackers to execute arbitrary code on vulnerable installations of HP StorageWorks File Migration Agent. Authentication is not required to exploit this vulnerability. 1. (ZDI-12-127) The specific flaw exists within the HsmCfgSvc.exe service

60

U-216: HP StorageWorks File Migration Agent Buffer Overflows Let Remote  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

U-216: HP StorageWorks File Migration Agent Buffer Overflows Let U-216: HP StorageWorks File Migration Agent Buffer Overflows Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code U-216: HP StorageWorks File Migration Agent Buffer Overflows Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code July 19, 2012 - 7:14am Addthis PROBLEM: HP StorageWorks File Migration Agent Buffer Overflows Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code PLATFORM: HP StorageWorks File Migration Agent ABSTRACT: Two vulnerabilities were reported in HP StorageWorks File Migration Agent. reference LINKS: SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1027281 ZDI-12-127 ZDI-12-126 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: High Discussion: The vulnerability allows remote attackers to execute arbitrary code on vulnerable installations of HP StorageWorks File Migration Agent. Authentication is not required to exploit this vulnerability.

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61

U-204: HP Network Node Manager i Input Validation Hole Permits Cross-Site  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4: HP Network Node Manager i Input Validation Hole Permits 4: HP Network Node Manager i Input Validation Hole Permits Cross-Site Scripting Attacks U-204: HP Network Node Manager i Input Validation Hole Permits Cross-Site Scripting Attacks July 3, 2012 - 7:00am Addthis PROBLEM: HP Network Node Manager i Input Validation Hole Permits Cross-Site Scripting Attacks PLATFORM: Version(s): 8.x, 9.0x, 9.1x ABSTRACT: Potential security vulnerabilities have been identified with HP Network Node Manager I (NNMi) for HP-UX, Linux, Solaris, and Windows. The vulnerabilities could be remotely exploited resulting in cross site scripting (XSS). reference LINKS: The Vendor's Advisory SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1027215 CVE-2012-2018 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Medium Discussion: A vulnerability was reported in HP Network Node Manager i. The software does not properly filter HTML code from user-supplied input before

62

HP Ex Parte Memo on Proposed Rulemaking for Battery Chargers and External  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

HP Ex Parte Memo on Proposed Rulemaking for Battery Chargers and HP Ex Parte Memo on Proposed Rulemaking for Battery Chargers and External Power Supplies HP Ex Parte Memo on Proposed Rulemaking for Battery Chargers and External Power Supplies Hewlett-Packard Company (HP) appreciates the opportunity to comment on the new DOE rulemaking for Battery Chargers and External Power Supplies. Thank you for taking the time to speak with us. HP believes that existing voluntary Market Access Requirements, such as EPEAT and ENERGY STAR, are the most effective mechanism for improving energy efficiency of IT products, but we understand the approach of regulating mandatory minimum efficiencies to address poor performing products. HP_Ex_Parte_Memo.pdf More Documents & Publications HP Ex Parte Memo on Proposed Rulemaking for Battery Chargers and External

63

U-040: HP-UX System Administration Manager Lets Local Users Gain Elevated  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0: HP-UX System Administration Manager Lets Local Users Gain 0: HP-UX System Administration Manager Lets Local Users Gain Elevated Privileges U-040: HP-UX System Administration Manager Lets Local Users Gain Elevated Privileges November 17, 2011 - 8:00am Addthis PROBLEM: HP-UX System Administration Manager Lets Local Users Gain Elevated Privileges. PLATFORM: HP-UX B.11.11, B.11.23, B.11.31; running Enterprise Mobility Suite (EMS) prior to A.04.20.11.04_01 ABSTRACT: A local user can obtain elevated privileges on the target system. reference LINKS: HP Support Center Document ID: c03089106 CVE-2011-4159 SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1026331 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Medium Discussion: A vulnerability was reported in HP-UX System Administration Manager. A local user can obtain elevated privileges on the target system. A local user can gain full control of the target system.

64

U-040: HP-UX System Administration Manager Lets Local Users Gain Elevated  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

40: HP-UX System Administration Manager Lets Local Users Gain 40: HP-UX System Administration Manager Lets Local Users Gain Elevated Privileges U-040: HP-UX System Administration Manager Lets Local Users Gain Elevated Privileges November 17, 2011 - 8:00am Addthis PROBLEM: HP-UX System Administration Manager Lets Local Users Gain Elevated Privileges. PLATFORM: HP-UX B.11.11, B.11.23, B.11.31; running Enterprise Mobility Suite (EMS) prior to A.04.20.11.04_01 ABSTRACT: A local user can obtain elevated privileges on the target system. reference LINKS: HP Support Center Document ID: c03089106 CVE-2011-4159 SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1026331 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Medium Discussion: A vulnerability was reported in HP-UX System Administration Manager. A local user can obtain elevated privileges on the target system. A local user can gain full control of the target system.

65

U-071:HP Database Archiving Software Bugs Let Remote Users Execute  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1:HP Database Archiving Software Bugs Let Remote Users Execute 1:HP Database Archiving Software Bugs Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code U-071:HP Database Archiving Software Bugs Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code December 29, 2011 - 8:15am Addthis PROBLEM: HP Database Archiving Software Bugs Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code PLATFORM: HP Database Archiving Software v6.31 ABSTRACT: A remote user can execute arbitrary code on the target system. reference LINKS: HP Database Document ID: c03128302 SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1026467 CVE-2011-4163 CVE-2011-4164 CVE-2011-4165 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: High Discussion: Several vulnerabilities were reported in HP Database Archiving Software. A remote user can execute arbitrary code on the target system. Impact: A remote user can execute arbitrary code on the target system. Solution:

66

V-210: HP LaserJet Pro Printer Bug Lets Remote Users Access Data |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

V-210: HP LaserJet Pro Printer Bug Lets Remote Users Access Data V-210: HP LaserJet Pro Printer Bug Lets Remote Users Access Data V-210: HP LaserJet Pro Printer Bug Lets Remote Users Access Data August 3, 2013 - 2:37am Addthis PROBLEM: A vulnerability was reported in HP Printers. A remote user can obtain potentially sensitive information. PLATFORM: HP LaserJet Pro products ABSTRACT: A potential security vulnerability has been identified with certain HP LaserJet Pro printers. The vulnerability could be exploited remotely to gain unauthorized access to data. REFERENCE LINKS: SecurityTracker Alert ID 1028869 CVE-2013-4807 Vendor URL IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Medium DISCUSSION: The following models are affected: HP LaserJet Pro P1102w CE657A/CE658A HP LaserJet Pro P1606dn CE749A HP LaserJet Pro M1212nf MFP CE841A HP LaserJet Pro M1213nf MFP CE845A

67

U-135: HP WBEM Discloses Diagnostic Data to Remote and Local Users |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

35: HP WBEM Discloses Diagnostic Data to Remote and Local Users 35: HP WBEM Discloses Diagnostic Data to Remote and Local Users U-135: HP WBEM Discloses Diagnostic Data to Remote and Local Users March 28, 2012 - 7:00am Addthis PROBLEM: HP WBEM Discloses Diagnostic Data to Remote and Local Users PLATFORM: HP-UX 11.11, 11.23, and 11.31 ABSTRACT: Two vulnerabilities were reported in HP WBEM. A remote or local user can gain access to diagnostic data. REFERENCE LINKS: SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1026849 CVE-2012-0125 CVE-2012-0126 iIMPACT ASSESSMENT Medium Discussion: A potential security vulnerability has been identified with certain HP-UX WBEM components. The vulnerability could be exploited remotely in HP-UX 11.11 and HP-UX 11.23 to gain unauthorized access to diagnostic data. The vulnerability could be exploited locally in HP-UX 11.31 to gain

68

U-135: HP WBEM Discloses Diagnostic Data to Remote and Local Users |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5: HP WBEM Discloses Diagnostic Data to Remote and Local Users 5: HP WBEM Discloses Diagnostic Data to Remote and Local Users U-135: HP WBEM Discloses Diagnostic Data to Remote and Local Users March 28, 2012 - 7:00am Addthis PROBLEM: HP WBEM Discloses Diagnostic Data to Remote and Local Users PLATFORM: HP-UX 11.11, 11.23, and 11.31 ABSTRACT: Two vulnerabilities were reported in HP WBEM. A remote or local user can gain access to diagnostic data. REFERENCE LINKS: SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1026849 CVE-2012-0125 CVE-2012-0126 iIMPACT ASSESSMENT Medium Discussion: A potential security vulnerability has been identified with certain HP-UX WBEM components. The vulnerability could be exploited remotely in HP-UX 11.11 and HP-UX 11.23 to gain unauthorized access to diagnostic data. The vulnerability could be exploited locally in HP-UX 11.31 to gain

69

V-010: 3Com, HP, and H3C Switches SNMP Configuration Lets Remote Users Take  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

10: 3Com, HP, and H3C Switches SNMP Configuration Lets Remote 10: 3Com, HP, and H3C Switches SNMP Configuration Lets Remote Users Take Administrative Actions V-010: 3Com, HP, and H3C Switches SNMP Configuration Lets Remote Users Take Administrative Actions October 25, 2012 - 6:00am Addthis PROBLEM: 3Com, HP, and H3C Switches SNMP Configuration Lets Remote Users Take Administrative Actions PLATFORM: 3COM, and H3C Routers & Switches Specific products and model numbers is provided in the vendor's advisory. ABSTRACT: A vulnerability was reported in 3Com, HP, and H3C Switches. REFERENCE LINKS: HP Support document ID: c03515685 SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1027694 CVE-2012-3268 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: High DISCUSSION: A remote user with knowledge of the SNMP public community string can access potentially sensitive data (e.g., user names, passwords) in the

70

U-275: HP IBRIX X9000 Storage Discloses Information to Remote Users |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5: HP IBRIX X9000 Storage Discloses Information to Remote Users 5: HP IBRIX X9000 Storage Discloses Information to Remote Users U-275: HP IBRIX X9000 Storage Discloses Information to Remote Users October 5, 2012 - 6:00am Addthis PROBLEM: HP IBRIX X9000 Storage Discloses Information to Remote Users PLATFORM: Version(s): IBRIX X9000; 6.1.196, 6.1.210, 6.1.228, 6.1.243, 6.1.247, 6.1.249, 6.1.251 ABSTRACT: A potential security vulnerability has been identified with HP IBRIX X9000 Storage. The vulnerability could be remotely exploited to allow disclosure of information. reference LINKS: HP Security Bulletin: c03510876 SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1027590 CVE-2012-3266 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Medium Discussion: A remote user can create a specially crafted JLS-compressed image file that, when loaded by the target user, will trigger a heap overflow in the

71

V-166: HP-UX Directory Server Discloses Passwords to Remote Authenticated  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6: HP-UX Directory Server Discloses Passwords to Remote 6: HP-UX Directory Server Discloses Passwords to Remote Authenticated and Local Users V-166: HP-UX Directory Server Discloses Passwords to Remote Authenticated and Local Users May 29, 2013 - 12:32am Addthis PROBLEM: HP-UX Directory Server Discloses Passwords to Remote Authenticated and Local Users PLATFORM: Directory Server B.08.10.04 ABSTRACT: Two vulnerabilities were reported in HP-UX Directory Server. REFERENCE LINKS: HP Document ID: c03772083 SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1028593 CVE-2012-2678 CVE-2012-2746 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: High DISCUSSION: A local user can access the plaintext password in certain cases [CVE-2012-2678]. A remote authenticated user can can view the password for a target LDAP user when audit logging is enabled by reading the audit log [CVE-2012-2678].

72

T-588: HP Virtual SAN Appliance Stack Overflow | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

T-588: HP Virtual SAN Appliance Stack Overflow T-588: HP Virtual SAN Appliance Stack Overflow T-588: HP Virtual SAN Appliance Stack Overflow March 25, 2011 - 5:05pm Addthis PROBLEM: HP Virtual SAN Appliance Stack Overflow in 'hydra.exe' Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code. PLATFORM: HP StorageWorks P4000 Virtual SAN Appliance Software ABSTRACT: A vulnerability has been reported in HP StorageWorks P4000 Virtual SAN Appliance Software, which can be exploited by malicious people to compromise a vulnerable system. reference LINKS: Secunia advisory 34782 SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1025249 ZDI-11-111 Bugtraq ID: 47005 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: High Discussion: Hewlett-Packard Virtual SAN Appliance is prone to a remote buffer-overflow vulnerability. Attackers may exploit this issue to execute arbitrary code within the context of the affected application. Failed exploit attempts may result in

73

V-146: HP Service Manager Bugs Permit Cross-Site Scripting and Information  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6: HP Service Manager Bugs Permit Cross-Site Scripting and 6: HP Service Manager Bugs Permit Cross-Site Scripting and Information Disclosure Attacks V-146: HP Service Manager Bugs Permit Cross-Site Scripting and Information Disclosure Attacks May 1, 2013 - 12:43am Addthis PROBLEM: HP Service Manager Bugs Permit Cross-Site Scripting and Information Disclosure Attacks PLATFORM: Service Manager v9.31 Web Tier ABSTRACT: Two vulnerabilities were reported in HP Service Manager REFERENCE LINKS: HP Document ID: c03748875 SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1028496 CVE-2012-5222 CVE-2013-2321 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Medium DISCUSSION: A remote user can obtain potentially sensitive information [CVE-2012-5222]. Service Manager Web Tier does not properly filter HTML code from user-supplied input before displaying the input [CVE-2013-2321]. A remote

74

V-203: HP LoadRunner Multiple Bugs Let Remote Users Deny Service and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3: HP LoadRunner Multiple Bugs Let Remote Users Deny Service 3: HP LoadRunner Multiple Bugs Let Remote Users Deny Service and Execute Arbitrary Code V-203: HP LoadRunner Multiple Bugs Let Remote Users Deny Service and Execute Arbitrary Code July 26, 2013 - 3:31am Addthis PROBLEM: A remote user can execute arbitrary code on the target system. A remote user can cause denial of service conditions. PLATFORM: HP LoadRunner prior to 11.52 ABSTRACT: Multiple vulnerabilities were reported in HP LoadRunner. REFERENCE LINKS: Security Tracker Alert ID: 1028833 CVE-2013-2368 CVE-2013-2369 CVE-2013-2370 CVE-2013-4797 CVE-2013-4798 CVE-2013-4799 CVE-2013-4800 CVE-2013-4801 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Medium DISCUSSION: Potential security vulnerabilities have been identified with HP LoadRunner. The vulnerabilities could be remotely exploited to allow execution of code

75

U-117: Potential security vulnerability has been identified with certain HP  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7: Potential security vulnerability has been identified with 7: Potential security vulnerability has been identified with certain HP printers and HP digital senders U-117: Potential security vulnerability has been identified with certain HP printers and HP digital senders March 5, 2012 - 7:00am Addthis PROBLEM: The vulnerability could be exploited remotely to install unauthorized printer firmware. PLATFORM: Select HP printers and Digital Senders ABSTRACT: Remote attackers could execute arbitrary code by using a session on TCP port 9100 to upload a crafted firmware update. reference LINKS: Vendor Advisory CVE-2011-4161 Previous JC3 Advisory Bulletin IMPACT ASSESSMENT: High Discussion: The default configuration of the HP CM8060 Color MFP with Edgeline; Color LaserJet 3xxx, 4xxx, 5550, 9500, CMxxxx, CPxxxx, and Enterprise CPxxxx;

76

U-275: HP IBRIX X9000 Storage Discloses Information to Remote Users |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5: HP IBRIX X9000 Storage Discloses Information to Remote Users 5: HP IBRIX X9000 Storage Discloses Information to Remote Users U-275: HP IBRIX X9000 Storage Discloses Information to Remote Users October 5, 2012 - 6:00am Addthis PROBLEM: HP IBRIX X9000 Storage Discloses Information to Remote Users PLATFORM: Version(s): IBRIX X9000; 6.1.196, 6.1.210, 6.1.228, 6.1.243, 6.1.247, 6.1.249, 6.1.251 ABSTRACT: A potential security vulnerability has been identified with HP IBRIX X9000 Storage. The vulnerability could be remotely exploited to allow disclosure of information. reference LINKS: HP Security Bulletin: c03510876 SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1027590 CVE-2012-3266 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Medium Discussion: A remote user can create a specially crafted JLS-compressed image file that, when loaded by the target user, will trigger a heap overflow in the

77

V-218: HP Service Manager Unspecified Flaw Lets Remote Users Gain  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8: HP Service Manager Unspecified Flaw Lets Remote Users Gain 8: HP Service Manager Unspecified Flaw Lets Remote Users Gain Unauthorized Access V-218: HP Service Manager Unspecified Flaw Lets Remote Users Gain Unauthorized Access August 15, 2013 - 1:30am Addthis PROBLEM: A potential security vulnerability has been identified with HP Service Manager. The vulnerability could be exploited to allow remote unauthenticated access and elevation of privilege. PLATFORM: HP Service Manager v9.31, v9.30, v9.21, v7.11, v6.2.8 ABSTRACT: The vulnerabilities are reported in versions 9.31 and prior. REFERENCE LINKS: SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1028912 CVE-2013-4808 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: High DISCUSSION: A vulnerability was reported in HP Service Manager. A remote user can gain unauthorized access on the target system. IMPACT: User access via network

78

V-218: HP Service Manager Unspecified Flaw Lets Remote Users Gain  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8: HP Service Manager Unspecified Flaw Lets Remote Users Gain 8: HP Service Manager Unspecified Flaw Lets Remote Users Gain Unauthorized Access V-218: HP Service Manager Unspecified Flaw Lets Remote Users Gain Unauthorized Access August 15, 2013 - 1:30am Addthis PROBLEM: A potential security vulnerability has been identified with HP Service Manager. The vulnerability could be exploited to allow remote unauthenticated access and elevation of privilege. PLATFORM: HP Service Manager v9.31, v9.30, v9.21, v7.11, v6.2.8 ABSTRACT: The vulnerabilities are reported in versions 9.31 and prior. REFERENCE LINKS: SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1028912 CVE-2013-4808 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: High DISCUSSION: A vulnerability was reported in HP Service Manager. A remote user can gain unauthorized access on the target system. IMPACT: User access via network

79

U-010:HP Onboard Administrator Unspecified Flaw Lets Remote Users Gain  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0:HP Onboard Administrator Unspecified Flaw Lets Remote Users 0:HP Onboard Administrator Unspecified Flaw Lets Remote Users Gain Access U-010:HP Onboard Administrator Unspecified Flaw Lets Remote Users Gain Access October 13, 2011 - 8:15am Addthis PROBLEM: HP Onboard Administrator Unspecified Flaw Lets Remote Users Gain Access PLATFORM: Onboard Administrator (OA) 3.21 through 3.31 ABSTRACT: A remote user can gain access to the target system reference LINKS: HP Support document ID: c03048779 SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1026158 CVE-2011-3155 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Medium Discussion: A potential security vulnerability has been identified with HP Onboard Administrator (OA). The vulnerability could be exploited remotely to gain unauthorized access. Impact: A remote user can gain access to the target system. Solution: Onboard Administrator (OA) v3.32 is available.

80

Two from HP-CAT win Balzan Prize  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

HPCAT HPCAT Two from HP-CAT win Balzan Prize Russell J. Hemley and Ho-kwang (David) Mao (both Carnegie Institution of Washington/Carnegie/DOE Alliance Center and the High-Pressure Collaborative Access Team, APS sector 16) are recipients of the 2005 International Balzan Foundation Prize for Mineral Physics. The foundation, which is based in Milan, Italy, made the award "For the impressive impact of their joint work leading to fundamental breakthroughs, theoretical and experimental, in the field of minerals submitted to extreme physical conditions. They have operated as a highly effective team, characterized by twenty years of research contributions at the highest level. They have developed techniques which allow them to study the behaviour of a wide range of materials, such as hydrogen, the most abundant "mineral" in

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "l-1 hp sodium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Failure Analysis of Two 80 HP Multiport Boilers - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Failure Analysis of Two 80 HP Multiport Boilers ... microstructure and the scale collected suggested overheating of the boiler during service.

82

U-140: HP-UX Unspecified Flaw in DCE Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

U-140: HP-UX Unspecified Flaw in DCE Lets Remote Users Execute U-140: HP-UX Unspecified Flaw in DCE Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code U-140: HP-UX Unspecified Flaw in DCE Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code April 4, 2012 - 7:15am Addthis PROBLEM: A vulnerability was reported in HP-UX PLATFORM: Version(s): 11.11, 11.23; running DCE ABSTRACT: A remote user can execute arbitrary code on the target system. A remote user can send specially crafted data to execute arbitrary code on the target system. The code will run with the privileges of the target service. Reference LINKS: Vendor Advisory Security Tracker ID 1026885 CVE-2012-0131 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: High Discussion: A potential security vulnerability has been identified in HP-UX running DCE. The vulnerability could be exploited remotely to create a Denial of Service (DoS).

83

U-201: HP System Management Homepage Bugs Let Remote Users Deny Service |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1: HP System Management Homepage Bugs Let Remote Users Deny 1: HP System Management Homepage Bugs Let Remote Users Deny Service U-201: HP System Management Homepage Bugs Let Remote Users Deny Service June 28, 2012 - 7:00am Addthis PROBLEM: A vulnerability was reported in HP System Management Homepage. PLATFORM: Version(s): prior to 7.1.1 ABSTRACT: The vulnerabilities could be exploited remotely resulting in unauthorized access, disclosure of information, data modification, Denial of Service (DoS), and execution of arbitrary code. Reference links: Original Advisory Security Tracker ID 1027209 CVE-2012-2012, CVE-2012-2013, CVE-2012-2014 CVE-2012-2015, CVE-2012-2016 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Medium Discussion: A vulnerability was reported in HP System Management Homepage. A remote authenticated user can gain elevated privileges. A remote authenticated

84

Seven health physics calculator programs for the HP-41CV  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several user-oriented programs for the Hewlett-Packard HP-41CV are explained. The first program builds, stores, alters, and ages a list of radionuclides. This program only handles single- and double-decay chains. The second program performs convenient conversions for the six nuclides of concern in plutonium handling. The conversions are between mass, activity, and weight percents of the isotopes. The source can be aged and/or neutron generation rates can be computed. The third program is a timekeeping program that improves the process of manually estimating and tracking personnel exposure during high dose rate tasks by replacing the pencil, paper, and stopwatch method. This program requires a time module. The remaining four programs deal with computations of time-integrated air concentrations at various distances from an airborne release. Building wake effects, source depletion by ground deposition, and sector averaging can all be included in the final printout of the X/Q - Hanford and X/Q - Pasquill programs. The shorter versions of these, H/Q and P/Q, compute centerline or sector-averaged values and include a subroutine to facilitate dose estimation by entering dose factors and quantities released. The horizontal and vertical dispersion parameters in the Pasquill-Gifford programs were modeled with simple, two-parameter functions that agreed very well with the usual textbook graphs. 8 references, 7 appendices.

Rittmann, P.D.

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Types of Lighting in Commercial Buildings - Table L1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

L1. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Type for Non-Mall Buildings, 1995 L1. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Type for Non-Mall Buildings, 1995 Floorspace (million square feet) Total (Lit or Unlit) in All Buildings Total (Lit or Unlit) in Buildings With Any Lighting Lighted Area Only Area Lit by Each Type of Light Incan- descent Standard Fluor-escent Compact Fluor- escent High Intensity Discharge Halogen All Buildings*........................ 54,068 51,570 45,773 6,746 34,910 1,161 3,725 779 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000....................... 6,272 5,718 4,824 986 3,767 50 22 54 5,001 to 10,000.................... 7,299 6,667 5,728 1,240 4,341 61 169 45 10,001 to 25,000.................. 10,829 10,350 8,544 1,495 6,442 154 553 Q 25,001 to 50,000.................. 7,170 7,022 6,401 789 5,103 151 485 86

86

V-141: HP ElitePad 900 Secure Boot Bug Lets Local Users Boot to Other  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1: HP ElitePad 900 Secure Boot Bug Lets Local Users Boot to 1: HP ElitePad 900 Secure Boot Bug Lets Local Users Boot to Other Operating Systems V-141: HP ElitePad 900 Secure Boot Bug Lets Local Users Boot to Other Operating Systems April 24, 2013 - 1:06am Addthis PROBLEM: HP ElitePad 900 Secure Boot Bug Lets Local Users Boot to Other Operating Systems PLATFORM: HP ElitePad 900 with BIOS version vF.00 ABSTRACT: A vulnerability was reported in HP ElitePad 900 REFERENCE LINKS: HP Document ID: c03727435 SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1028461 CVE-2012-5218 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Medium DISCUSSION: The BIOS secure boot feature of the BIOS may not be enabled. A local user may be able to bypass the secure boot feature and boot an alternate operating system. IMPACT: A local user can may be able to boot to an alternate operating system. SOLUTION:

87

V-141: HP ElitePad 900 Secure Boot Bug Lets Local Users Boot to Other  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1: HP ElitePad 900 Secure Boot Bug Lets Local Users Boot to 1: HP ElitePad 900 Secure Boot Bug Lets Local Users Boot to Other Operating Systems V-141: HP ElitePad 900 Secure Boot Bug Lets Local Users Boot to Other Operating Systems April 24, 2013 - 1:06am Addthis PROBLEM: HP ElitePad 900 Secure Boot Bug Lets Local Users Boot to Other Operating Systems PLATFORM: HP ElitePad 900 with BIOS version vF.00 ABSTRACT: A vulnerability was reported in HP ElitePad 900 REFERENCE LINKS: HP Document ID: c03727435 SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1028461 CVE-2012-5218 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Medium DISCUSSION: The BIOS secure boot feature of the BIOS may not be enabled. A local user may be able to bypass the secure boot feature and boot an alternate operating system. IMPACT: A local user can may be able to boot to an alternate operating system. SOLUTION:

88

V-226: HP StoreOnce D2D Backup Systems Denial of Service Vulnerability |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6: HP StoreOnce D2D Backup Systems Denial of Service 6: HP StoreOnce D2D Backup Systems Denial of Service Vulnerability V-226: HP StoreOnce D2D Backup Systems Denial of Service Vulnerability August 24, 2013 - 3:45am Addthis PROBLEM: A vulnerability has been reported in HP StoreOnce D2D Backup Systems, which can be exploited by malicious people to cause a DoS (Denial of Service). PLATFORM: HP StoreOnce D2D Backup Systems 1.x, HP StoreOnce D2D Backup Systems 2.x ABSTRACT: The vulnerability is reported in versions 2.2.18 and prior and 1.2.18 and prior. REFERENCE LINKS: Secunia Advisory SA54598 CVE-2013-2353 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Moderate DISCUSSION: A vulnerability has been reported in HP StoreOnce D2D Backup Systems, which can be exploited by malicious people to cause a DoS (Denial of Service). The vulnerability is caused due to an unspecified error. No further

89

V-016: HP Performance Insight Bugs with Sybase Database Let Remote...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Performance Insight Bugs with Sybase Database Let Remote Users Deny Service and Take Full Control of the Target System V-016: HP Performance Insight Bugs with Sybase Database Let...

90

Optimization Online - pcaL1: An Implementation in R of Three ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Apr 16, 2012 ... Abstract: pcaL1 is a package for the R environment for finding principal components using methods based on the L1 norm. The principal...

91

Robust l1 principal component analysis and its bayesian variational inference  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We introduce a robust probabilistic L1-PCA model in which the conventional gaussian distribution for the noise in the observed data was replaced by the Laplacian distribution (or L1 distribution). Due to the heavy tail characteristics of the L1 distribution, ...

Junbin Gao

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Complexed Adsorbed HP1 HP1 L2 L7 L7 L7 L2 H3 H3 National Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Complexed Complexed Adsorbed HP1 HP1 L2 L7 L7 L7 L2 H3 H3 National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center 2011 Annual Report Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720-8148 This work was supported by the Director, Office of Science, Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231. National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center 2011 Annual Report The Year in Perspective Research News New Mathematical Method Reveals Where Genes Switch On or Off Small Particles Have Big Impact Detailed Model Changes View of Ancient Climate Change A Better Way to Find Extreme Weather Events in Climate Modeling Data Turning Grass into Gas for Less Bubbles Help Break Energy Storage Record for Lithium-Air Batteries

93

Effects of Ethanol and NAP on Cerebellar Expression of the Neural Cell Adhesion Molecule L1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The neural cell adhesion molecule L1 is critical for brain development and plays a role in learning and memory in the adult. Ethanol inhibits L1-mediated cell adhesion and neurite outgrowth in cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs), and these actions might underlie the cerebellar dysmorphology of fetal alcohol spectrum disorders. The peptide NAP potently blocks ethanol inhibition of L1 adhesion and prevents ethanol teratogenesis. We used quantitative RT-PCR and Western blotting of extracts of cerebellar slices, CGNs, and astrocytes from postnatal day 7 (PD7) rats to investigate whether ethanol and NAP act in part by regulating the expression of L1. Treatment of cerebellar slices with 20 mM ethanol, 10 212 M NAP, or both for 4 hours, 24 hours, and 10 days did not significantly affect L1 mRNA and protein levels. Similar treatment for 4 or 24 hours did not regulate L1 expression in primary cultures of CGNs and astrocytes, the predominant cerebellar cell types. Because ethanol also damages the adult cerebellum, we studied the effects of chronic ethanol exposure in adult rats. One year of binge drinking did not alter L1 gene and protein expression in extracts from whole cerebellum. Thus, ethanol does not alter L1 expression in the developing or adult cerebellum; more likely, ethanol disrupts L1 function by modifying its conformation

Devon M. Fitzgerald; Michael E. Charness; Kimberly A. Leite-morris; Suzhen Chen

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

U-265: HP SiteScope Bugs in SiteScope SOAP Feature Let Remote Users Obtain  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5: HP SiteScope Bugs in SiteScope SOAP Feature Let Remote Users 5: HP SiteScope Bugs in SiteScope SOAP Feature Let Remote Users Obtain Information and Execute Arbitrary Code U-265: HP SiteScope Bugs in SiteScope SOAP Feature Let Remote Users Obtain Information and Execute Arbitrary Code September 21, 2012 - 6:00am Addthis PROBLEM: HP SiteScope Bugs in SiteScope SOAP Feature Let Remote Users Obtain Information and Execute Arbitrary Code PLATFORM: HP SiteScope v11.10, v11.11, v11.12 for Windows, Linux and Solaris ABSTRACT: A vulnerability was reported in HP SiteScope. reference LINKS: HP Security Bulletin Document ID: c03489683 SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1027547 CVE-2012-3259 CVE-2012-3260 CVE-2012-3261 CVE-2012-3262 CVE-2012-3263 CVE-2012-3264 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Medium Discussion: A vulnerability was reported in HP SiteScope. A remote user can execute

95

U-265: HP SiteScope Bugs in SiteScope SOAP Feature Let Remote Users Obtain  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5: HP SiteScope Bugs in SiteScope SOAP Feature Let Remote Users 5: HP SiteScope Bugs in SiteScope SOAP Feature Let Remote Users Obtain Information and Execute Arbitrary Code U-265: HP SiteScope Bugs in SiteScope SOAP Feature Let Remote Users Obtain Information and Execute Arbitrary Code September 21, 2012 - 6:00am Addthis PROBLEM: HP SiteScope Bugs in SiteScope SOAP Feature Let Remote Users Obtain Information and Execute Arbitrary Code PLATFORM: HP SiteScope v11.10, v11.11, v11.12 for Windows, Linux and Solaris ABSTRACT: A vulnerability was reported in HP SiteScope. reference LINKS: HP Security Bulletin Document ID: c03489683 SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1027547 CVE-2012-3259 CVE-2012-3260 CVE-2012-3261 CVE-2012-3262 CVE-2012-3263 CVE-2012-3264 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Medium Discussion: A vulnerability was reported in HP SiteScope. A remote user can execute

96

Evaluation of 2 Percent CrMoWV HP/LP Rotor Gap Forging for Single Cylinder Steam Turbine Use  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There has been considerable industry interest in developing a single shaft rotor configuration that uses the same rotor in the high-pressure (HP) as well as the Low Pressure (LP) sections of a steam turbine. This report evaluates an HP/LP rotor forging for single cylinder steam turbines.

1998-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

97

HP-CAT to Lead the Way in New Research under NNSA Grante  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4th, 2003 4th, 2003 HP-CAT to Lead the Way in New Research under NNSA Grant The High Pressure Collaborative Access Team (HP-CAT) at APS sector 16 will be a primary location for research carried our under a new grant from the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). The $5.9-million, 2.75-year NNSA grant to the Geophysical Laboratory of the Carnegie Institution in Washington, D.C., under the Stewardship Science Academic Alliances program, will fund research into the behavior of materials under extreme pressure conditions at the Carnegie/Department of Energy Alliance Center (CDAC). The NNSA selected CDAC because of the leadership of its team in the development of new techniques and capabilities in high-pressure and high-temperature materials research. As principal investigator for the

98

ANL=OHS/HP=83=102 FORMERLY UTILIZED MEDIAEC SITES REMEDIAL ACTION PROGRAM  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

' DO E/EV=0005/40 ' DO E/EV=0005/40 ANL=OHS/HP=83=102 FORMERLY UTILIZED MEDIAEC SITES REMEDIAL ACTION PROGRAM RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY OF THE ALBANY METALLURGICAL RESEARCH CENTER UNITED STATES BUREAU OF MINES ALBANY, OREGON Q\OLO G/C G- 4& G HP-83-102 ARGONNE NATIONAL LABORATORY 9700 South Cass Avenue Argonne, Illinois 60439 FORMERLY UTILIZED MED/AEC SITES REMEDIAL ACTION PROGRAM RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY OF THE ALBANY METALLURGICAL RESEARCH CENTER

99

Overcoming the l1 non-embeddability barrier: algorithms for product metrics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A common approach for solving computational problems over a difficult metric space is to embed the "hard" metric into L1 which admits efficient algorithms and is thus considered an "easy" metric. This approach has proved successful ...

Alexandr Andoni; Piotr Indyk; Robert Krauthgamer

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Recovery of a sparse spike time series by L1 norm deconvolution  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An L1 norm minimization scheme is applied to the determination of the impulse response vector h of flaws detected in practical examples of ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation in CANDU nuclear reactors. For each problem, parametric programming ...

M.S. O'Brien; A.N. Sinclair; S.M. Kramer

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "l-1 hp sodium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Optimization Online - Augmented L1 and Nuclear-Norm Models with ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Jan 22, 2012 ... Augmented L1 and Nuclear-Norm Models with a Globally Linearly Convergent Algorithm. Ming-Jun Lai (mjlai ***at*** math.uga.edu) Wotao Yin...

102

METHOD FOR REMOVING SODIUM OXIDE FROM LIQUID SODIUM  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for removing sodium oxide from a fluent stream of liquid sodium by coldtrapping the sodium oxide. Apparatus utilizing this method is disclosed in United States Patent No. 2,745,552. Sodium will remain in a molten state at temperatures below that at which sodium oxide will crystallize out and form solid deposits, therefore, the contaminated stream of sodium is cooled to a temperature at which the solubility of sodium oxide in sodium is substantially decreased. Thereafter the stream of sodium is passed through a bed of stainless steel wool maintained at a temperature below that of the stream. The stream is kept in contact with the wool until the sodium oxide is removed by crystal growth on the wool, then the stream is reheated and returned to the system. This method is useful in purifying reactor coolants where the sodium oxide would otherwise deposit out on the walls and eventually plug the coolant tubes.

Bruggeman, W.H.; Voorhees, B.G.

1957-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Human Sodium Risks  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

comes from restaurants and it can be hard for a person to tell how much sodium is in restaurant foods. Brands of foods matter: Different brands of the same foods may have...

104

Sodium sulfur battery seal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This disclosure is directed to an improvement in a sodium sulfur battery construction in which a seal between various battery compartments is made by a structure in which a soft metal seal member is held in a sealing position by holding structure. A pressure applying structure is used to apply pressure on the soft metal seal member when it is being held in sealing relationship to a surface of a container member of the sodium sulfur battery by the holding structure. The improvement comprises including a thin, well-adhered, soft metal layer on the surface of the container member of the sodium sulfur battery to which the soft metal seal member is to be bonded.

Mikkor, Mati (Ann Arbor, MI)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Circuit design of a novel adaptable and reliable L1 data cache  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper proposes a novel adaptable and reliable L1 data cache design (Adapcache) with the unique capability of automatically adapting itself for different supply voltage levels and providing the highest reliability. Depending on the supply voltage ... Keywords: cache design, fault tolerance, low power design

Azam Seyedi; Gulay Yalcin; Osman S. Unsal; Adrian Cristal

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Stability Analysis of a New Extended L1 Controller with Experimental Validation on an Underwater Vehicle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Stability Analysis of a New Extended L1 Controller with Experimental Validation on an Underwater on an underwater vehicle subjected to a varying trajectory under several dis- turbances are then displayed. Moreover, experimental results are provided on an underwater vehicle in depth. The robot is expected

107

An L?1?1 axiomatization of the linear Archimedean continua as merely relational structures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have chosen the language L?1?1 in which to formulate the axioms of two systems of the linear Archimedean continua - the point-based system, SP, and the stretch-based system, SI - ... Keywords: Archimedean axiom, L_omega_1/omega_1, linear continuum, point-based, stretch-based axiomatization, trivial difference

Milo Arsenijevic; Miodrag Kapetanovic

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Sodium sulfur battery seal  

SciTech Connect

This invention is directed to a seal for a sodium sulfur battery in which a flexible diaphragm sealing elements respectively engage opposite sides of a ceramic component of the battery which separates an anode compartment from a cathode compartment of the battery.

Topouzian, Armenag (Birmingham, MI)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

SURVEY OF SODIUM PUMP TECHNOLOGY  

SciTech Connect

A review is presented of the current status of sodium pump development as related to nuclear power applications. A description is given of the design features and performance characteristics of the more important types of sodium and sodium-- potassium alloy (NaK) pumps. Some requirements for sodium pumps for future large liquid metal reactor systems are presented with some preliminary consideration of the potential of various pump types to meet these requirements. (auth)

Nixon, D.R.

1963-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

DOEIEV-0005/37 ANL=OHS/HP-83406 FORMERLY UTILIZED MEDIAEC SITES  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

//, .<.' //, .<.' I ' 1 TL\ t+, -- DOEIEV-0005/37 ANL=OHS/HP-83406 FORMERLY UTILIZED MEDIAEC SITES REMEDIAL ACTION PROGRAM RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY OF THE FORMER WATERTOWN ARSENAL PROPERTY SITE 34 AND SITE 41 WATERTOWN, MASSACHUSETTS o\o\-0 G /Q e-+ a+ -? q+ mii ' ( . % QL G+ OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY INViSiON Health Physics Section ARGONNE NATIONAL LABORATORY, ARGONNE, ILLINOIS Operated by THE UNIVERSITY O F CHICAGO for the U. S. DEPARTMENT O F ENERGY under Contract W=314 09.Eng-38 Argonne National Laboratory, with facilities in the states of Illinois and Idaho, is owned by the United States government, and operated by The University of Chicago under the provisions of a contract with the Department of Energy. r----- DISCLAIMER I This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an

111

DOE/EV-0005/26 ANL-OHS/HP-82-100  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

J-L.f!~: J-L.f!~: r*' c;,:i &3&j DOE/EV-0005/26 ANL-OHS/HP-82-100 i$; ' ,\ : -ed - *' J&&&g y FORMERLY UTILIZED MED/AEC SITES REMEDIAL ACTION PROGRAM RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY OF THE GEORGE HERBERT JONES CHEMICAL LABORATORY THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO CHICAGO, ILLINOIS June 1347, 1977 OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY DIVISION Health Physics Section ARGONNE NATIONAL LABORATORY, ARGONNE, ILLINOIS Prepared for the U. S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY under Contract W -31409-Eng=38 The facilities of Argonne National Laboratory are owned by the United States Government. Under the terms of a contract (W-31-109-Eng-38) among the U. S. Department of Energy, Argonne Universities Association and The University of Chicago, the University employs the staff and operates the Laboratory in

112

Test report for run-in acceptance testing of Project W-151 300 HP mixing pumps  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the results of a performance demonstration and operational checkout of three 300 HP mixer pumps in accordance with WHC-SD-WI51-TS-001 ``Mixer Pump Test Specification for Project W-151`` and Statement of Work 8K520-EMN-95-004 ``Mixer Pump Performance Demonstration at MASF`` in the 400 Area Maintenance and Storage Facility (MASF) building. Testing of the pumps was performed by Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) Engineering and funded by the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Project W-151. Testing began with the first pump on 04-01-95 and ended with the third pump on 11-01-96. Prior to testing, the MASF was modified and prepared to meet the pump testing requirements set forth by the Test Specification and the Statement of Work.

Berglin, B.G.

1998-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

113

CP&L-1-B Wholesale Power Rate Schedule | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1-B Wholesale Power Rate Schedule 1-B Wholesale Power Rate Schedule CP&L-1-B Wholesale Power Rate Schedule Area: Carolina Power & Light, Eastern Division System: Kerr-Philpott This rate schedule shall be available to public bodies and cooperatives (any one of whom is hereinafter called the Customer) in North Carolina and South Carolina to whom power may be transmitted and scheduled pursuant to contracts between the Government and Carolina Power & Light Company (hereinafter called the Company) and the Customer. This rate schedule shall be applicable to the sale at wholesale of power and accompanying energy generated at the John H. Kerr and Philpott Projects and sold under appropriate contracts between the Government and the Customer. Document Available for Download CP&L-1-B Rate Schedule

114

A self-adaptive goal-oriented hp finite element method with electromagnetic applications. Part II: Electrodynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for Computational Engineering and Sciences (ICES), The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712, United States b Department of Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin singularities. The goal-oriented refinement strategy is an extension of a fully automatic, energy-norm based, hp

Torres-Verdín, Carlos

115

An algorithm for transferring 2D arbitrary hp-refined finite element axially symmetric meshes to three dimensions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Petroleum Engineering, The University of Texas in Austin (3) Institute for Computational Engineering and Sciences, ICES, The University of Texas in Austin Abstract The 2D and 3D fully automatic hp adaptive Finite is solved on the coarse and on the fine mesh. The energy norm (H1 Sobolev space norm) difference between

Torres-Verdín, Carlos

116

It's Elemental - The Element Sodium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Neon Neon Previous Element (Neon) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Magnesium) Magnesium The Element Sodium [Click for Isotope Data] 11 Na Sodium 22.98976928 Atomic Number: 11 Atomic Weight: 22.98976928 Melting Point: 370.95 K (97.80°C or 208.04°F) Boiling Point: 1156 K (883°C or 1621°F) Density: 0.97 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Solid Element Classification: Metal Period Number: 3 Group Number: 1 Group Name: Alkali Metal What's in a name? From the English word soda and from the Medieval Latin word sodanum, which means "headache remedy." Sodium's chemical symbol comes from the Latin word for sodium carbonate, natrium. Say what? Sodium is pronounced as SO-dee-em. History and Uses: Although sodium is the sixth most abundant element on earth and comprises

117

OBSERVATIONS AND ANALYSES OF THE ECCENTRIC ORBIT ECLIPSING BINARY HP DRACONIS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present results of an analysis of all available data of the double-lined spectroscopic and eclipsing binary HP Draconis. The analyses make use of unpublished radial velocity (RV) and extensive photoelectric photometry data as well as published Hipparcos photometric observations and RV data from Asiago Observatory. The system is eccentric and the current analyses suggest apsidal motion to be present only weakly, but a significant amount of third light is found in all three passbands, B, V, and hip. Relatively high precision has been achieved for the mass and radius among the absolute parameters with fractional error of 0.95% or better: M{sub 1,2} = 1.133 {+-} 0.005, 1.094 {+-} 0.007 M{sub sun}; R{sub 1,2} = 1.371 {+-} 0.012, 1.052 {+-} 0.010 R{sub sun}. Other derived parameters are P = 10.76152 {+-} 0.00019 days, a = 26.79 {+-} 0.04 R{sub sun}, e = 0.0367 {+-} 0.0009, {omega} = 0.693 {+-} 0.037, q = 0.966 {+-} 004, and {Delta}T = 105 {+-} 5 K. We derive a distance to the system of 77 {+-} 3 pc. Comparison with Padova theoretical models for different chemical compositions suggests that the components may be of solar age and roughly solar composition, with the primary component less than half as dense as the secondary component and slightly evolved off the zero-age main sequence.

Milone, E. F. [Physics and Astronomy Department, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB T2N 1N4 (Canada); Kurpinska-Winiarska, M. [Cracow Astronomical Observatory, Cracow (Poland); Oblak, E., E-mail: milone@ucalgary.c, E-mail: kurpin@oa.uj.edu.p, E-mail: ed.oblak@sfr.f [Observatoire de Besancon, UTINAM Institut-UMR CNRS 6213, Besancon (France)

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

118

Coal desulfurization with sodium hypochlorite.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Wet desulfurization of Pittsburgh No. 8 coal and Illinois No. 6 coal were conducted with sodium hypochlorite in the laboratory. Pittsburgh No. 8 coal was (more)

Li, Wei, M.S.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Thermophysical Properties of Sodium Nitrate and Sodium Chloride  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Thermophysical Properties of Sodium Nitrate and Sodium Chloride Thermophysical Properties of Sodium Nitrate and Sodium Chloride Solutions and Their Effects on Fluid Flow in Unsaturated Media Tianfu Xu and Karsten Pruess Earth Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 ABSTRACT. Understanding movement of saline sodium nitrate (NaNO 3 ) waste solutions is important for assessing the contaminant migration near leaking waste storage tanks in the unsaturated zone at the Hanford site (Washington, USA). The purpose of this study is to contribute a basic understanding of effects of the thermophysical behavior of NaNO 3 solutions on fluid flow in unsaturated media. We first present mathematical expressions for the dependence of density, viscosity, solubility and vapor pressure of

120

(001) textured L1{sub 0}-FePt pseudo spin valve with TiN spacer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

TiN was investigated as a potential spacer material in L1{sub 0}-FePt based pseudo spin valves (PSV). PSVs with the structure MgO/L1{sub 0}-Fe{sub 50}Pt{sub 50} (20 nm)/TiN (5 nm)/L1{sub 0}-Fe{sub 50}Pt{sub 50} (x nm) were fabricated, where x was varied from 5 to 20 nm. The highest giant magnetoresistance (GMR) ratio of 0.61% was obtained for the PSV with a top L1{sub 0}-FePt thickness of 20 nm. Contributions to the GMR arose from both the spin dependent scattering at the FePt/TiN interfaces and domain wall resistivity. Magnon magnetoresistance was also observed in the fabricated PSVs.

Ho, P. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National University of Singapore, 117576 Singapore (Singapore) and Data Storage Institute, Agency of Science, Technology and Research (A-STAR), 117608 Singapore (Singapore); Han, G. C. [Data Storage Institute, Agency of Science, Technology and Research (A-STAR), 117608 Singapore (Singapore); He, K. H.; Chow, G. M.; Chen, J. S. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National University of Singapore, 117576 Singapore (Singapore)

2011-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "l-1 hp sodium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

I l1. CONTRACT 10 CODE PAGE OF PAGES AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATIONIMODIFICATION OF CONTRACT  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

I I l1. CONTRACT 10 CODE PAGE OF PAGES AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATIONIMODIFICATION OF CONTRACT 1 I 2. AMENDMENTIMODIFICATION NO. 3. EFFECTIVE DATE 4. REQUISITION/PURCHASE REQ. NO. IS. PROJECT NO. (If applicable) 218 See Block 16C 6 . ISSUED BY CODE 7. ADMINISTERED BY (If other than Item 6) 05008 CODE 105008 NNSA/Oakridge Site Office NNSA/Oakridge Site Office U.S . Department of Energy U.S. Department of Energy NNSA/Y-12 Site Office NNSA/Y-12 Site Office P.O. Box 2050 P.O. Box 2050 301 Bear Creek Road 301 Bear Creek Road Building Building Oak Ridge TN 37831 Oak Ridge TN 37831 8. NAME AND ADDRESS OF CONTRACTOR (No., MI'H/. county. Stole /JIId ZIP Codo) 9A. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION NO. {xl f-- BABCOCK & WILCOX TECHNICAL SERVICES Y-12, LLC Attn: WILLIE J. WILSON

122

Structural controlled magnetic anisotropy in Heusler L1{sub 0}-MnGa epitaxial thin films  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ferromagnetic L1{sub 0}-MnGa thin films have been epitaxially grown on GaN, sapphire, and MgO substrates using molecular beam epitaxy. Using diffraction techniques, the epitaxial relationships are determined. It is found that the crystalline orientation of the films differ due to the influence of the substrate. By comparing the magnetic anisotropy to the structural properties, a clear correlation could be established indicating that the in-plane and out-of-plane anisotropy is directly determined by the crystal orientation of the film and could be controlled via selection of the substrates. This result could be helpful in tailoring magnetic anisotropy in thin films for spintronic applications.

Wang Kangkang; Lu Erdong; Smith, Arthur R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Nanoscale and Quantum Phenomena Institute, Ohio University, Athens, Ohio 45701 (United States); Knepper, Jacob W.; Yang Fengyuan [Department of Physics, Ohio State University, 191 Woodruff Ave., Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States)

2011-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

123

Columnar grain growth of FePt(L1{sub 0}) thin films  

SciTech Connect

An experimental approach for obtaining perpendicular FePt-SiOx thin films with a large height to diameter ratio FePt(L1{sub 0}) columnar grains is presented in this work. The microstructure for FePt-SiOx composite thin films as a function of oxide volume fraction, substrate temperature, and film thickness is studied by plan view and cross section TEM. The relations between processing, microstructure, epitaxial texture, and magnetic properties are discussed. By tuning the thickness of the magnetic layer and the volume fraction of oxide in the film at a sputtering temperature of 410 deg. C, a 16 nm thick perpendicular FePt film with {approx}8 nm diameter of FePt grains was obtained. The height to diameter ratio of the FePt grains was as large as 2. Ordering at lower temperature can be achieved by introducing a Ag sacrificial layer.

Yang En; Ho Hoan [Data Storage Systems Center, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States); Laughlin, David E. [Data Storage Systems Center, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States); ALCOA Professor of Physical Metallurgy, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States); Zhu Jiangang [Data Storage Systems Center, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States); ABB Professor of Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States)

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

CS 314, LS,LTM: L1: Introduction 1 CS 314 Principles ofCS 314 Principles of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

314, LS,LTM: L1: Introduction 3 BookBook · Michael L. Scott, Programming Language Pragmatics, 3rd an algorithm ­ you don't "say" a program, you design and construct it (but you don't say an essay or a novel edition #12;CS 314, LS,LTM: L1: Introduction 4 WorkWork · 2 Midterms · Final · 4 (?) projects · Homework

Steinberg, Louis

125

Simulation of sodium boiling experiments with THERMIT sodium version  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Natural and forced convection experiments(SBTF and French) are simulated with the sodium version of the thermal-hydraulic computer code THERMIT. Simulation is done for the test secti- -on with the pressure-velocity boundary ...

Huh, Kang Yul

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Water simulation of sodium reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The thermal hydraulic simulation of a large sodium reactor by a scaled water model is examined. The Richardson Number, friction coefficient and the Peclet Number can be closely matched with the water system at full power and the similarity is retained for buoyancy driven flows. The simulation of thermal-hydraulic conditions in a reactor vessel provided by a scaled water experiment is better than that by a scaled sodium test. Results from a correctly scaled water test can be tentatively extrapolated to a full size sodium system.

Grewal, S.S.; Gluekler, E.L.

1981-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

127

Performance Analysis of Potassium Heat Pipes Radiator for HP-STMCs Space Reactor Power System  

SciTech Connect

A detailed design and performance results of C-C finned, and armored potassium heat pipes radiator for a 110 kWe Heat Pipes-Segmented Thermoelectric Module Converters (HP-STMCs) Space Reactor Power system (SRPS) are presented. The radiator consists of two sections; each serves an equal number of STMCs and has 162 longitudinal potassium heat pipes with 0.508 mm thick C-C fins. The width of the C-C fins at the minor diameter of the radiator is almost zero, but increases with distance along the radiator to reach 3.7 cm at the radiator's major diameter. The radiator's heat pipes (OD = 2.42 cm in front and 3.03 cm in rear) have thin titanium (0.0762 mm thick) liners and wicks (0.20 mm thick with an effective pore radius of 12-16 {mu}m) and a 1.016 mm thick C-C wall. The wick is separated from the titanium liner by a 0.4 mm annulus filled with liquid potassium to increase the capillary limit. The outer surfaces of the heat pipes in the front and rear sections of the radiator are protected with a C-C armor that is 2.17 mm and 1.70 mm thick, respectively. The inside surface of the heat pipes in the front radiator is thermally insulated while the C-C finned condensers of the rear heat pipes are exposed, radiating into space through the rear opening of the radiator cavity. The heat pipes in both the front and the rear radiators have a 1.5 m long evaporator section and each dissipates 4.47 kW while operating at 43.6% of the prevailing sonic limit. The front and rear radiator sections are 5.29 m and 2.61 m long with outer surface area and mass of 47.1 m2 and 314.3 kg, and 39.9 m2 and 243.2 kg, respectively. The total radiator is 7.63 m long and has minor and major diameters of 1.48 m and 5.57 m, respectively, and a total surface area of 87 m2; however, the effective radiator area, after accounting for heat rejection through the rear of the radiator cavity, is 98.8 m2. The radiator's total mass including the C-C armor is 557.5 kg and the specific area and specific mass are 6.41 kg/m2 and 5.07 kg/kWe, respectively.

El-Genk, Mohamed S.; Tournier, Jean-Michel [Institute for Space and Nuclear Power Studies, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM, 87131 (United States); Chemical and Nuclear Engineering Dept., University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM, 87131 (United States)

2004-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

128

Next Generation Natural Gas Vehicle Program Phase I: Clean Air Partners 0.5 g/hp-h NOx Engine Concept; Final Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Subcontractor report details work done by Clean Air Partners to develop 0.5 g/hp-h NOx natural gas engine exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) technology for the Next Generation Natural Gas Vehicle Program.

Wong, H. C.

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Low-Pressure Sodium Lighting  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Low-pressure sodium lighting provides more energy-efficient outdoor lighting than high-intensity discharge lighting, but it has very poor color rendition. Typical applications include highway and...

130

The Whole Genome Sequence of Sphingobium chlorophenolicum L-1: Insights into the Evolution of the Pentachlorophenol Degradation Pathway  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sphingobium chlorophenolicum Strain L-1 can mineralize the toxic pesticide pentachlorophenol (PCP). We have sequenced the genome of S. chlorophenolicum Strain L-1. The genome consists of a primary chromosome that encodes most of the genes for core processes, a secondary chromosome that encodes primarily genes that appear to be involved in environmental adaptation, and a small plasmid. The genes responsible for degradation of PCP are found on chromosome 2. We have compared the genomes of S. chlorophenolicum Strain L-1 and Sphingobium japonicum, a closely related Sphingomonad that degrades lindane. Our analysis suggests that the genes encoding the first three enzymes in the PCP degradation pathway were acquired via two different horizontal gene transfer events, and the genes encoding the final two enzymes in the pathway were acquired from the most recent common ancestor of these two bacteria.

Copley, Shelley D. [University of Colorado; Rokicki, Joseph [University of Colorado; Turner, Pernilla [University of Colorado; Daligault, Hajnalka E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Nolan, Matt [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Land, Miriam L [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Observations and Measurements of Orbitally Excited L=1 B Mesons at the D0 Experiment  

SciTech Connect

This thesis describes investigations of the first set of orbitally excited (L = 1) states for both the B{sub d}{sup 0} and B{sub s}{sup 0} meson systems (B**{sub d} and B**{sub s}). The data sample corresponds to 1.35 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity, collected in 2002-2006 by the D0 detector, during the Run IIa operation of the Tevatron p{bar p} colliding beam accelerator. The B**{sub d} states are fully reconstructed in decays to B{sup (*)+} {pi}{sup -}, with B{sup (*)+} {yields} {gamma} J/{psi}K{sup +}, J/{psi} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}, yielding 662 {+-} 91 events, and providing the first strong evidence for the resolution of two narrow resonances, B{sub 1} and B*{sub 2}. The masses are extracted from a binned {chi}{sup 2} fit to the invariant mass distribution, giving M(B{sub 1}) = 5720.7 {+-} 2.4(stat.) {+-} 1.3(syst.) {+-} 0.5 (PDG) MeV/c{sup 2} and M(B*{sub 2}) = 5746.9 {+-} 2.4(stat.) {+-} 1.0(syst.) {+-} 0.5(PDG) MeV/c{sup 2}. The production rate of narrow B**{sub d} {yields} B{pi} resonances relative to the B{sup +} meson is determined to be [13.9 {+-} 1.9(stat.) {+-} 3.2(syst.)]%. The same B{sup +} sample is also used to reconstruct the analogous states in the B{sub s}{sup 0} system, in decays B**{sub s} {yields} B{sup (*)+} K{sup -}. A single resonance in the invariant mass distribution is found with a statistical significance of 5{sigma}, interpreted as the B*{sub s2} state. The mass is determined to be M(B*{sub s2}) = 5839.6 {+-} 1.1(stat.) {+-} 0.4(syst.) {+-} 0.5(PDG) MeV/c{sup 2}, and the production rate of B*{sub s2} {yields} BK resonances is measured to be a fraction (2.14 {+-} 0.43 {+-} 0.24)% of the corresponding rate for B{sup +} mesons. Alternative fitting hypotheses give inconclusive evidence for the presence of the lighter B{sub s1} meson.

Williams, Mark Richard James; /Lancaster U.

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Vacuum pyrolysis of sodium stearate  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Vacuum pyrolysis of sodium stearate was studied to provide useful information for Green River oil shale pyrolysis. Sodium stearate is a typical compound of carboxylic acid salts amounting to 3.6% of total organic materials in the oil shale by methanol extraction. Sodium stearate contained in a stainless steel miniature reactor was heated at 450/sup 0/C in a fluidized sand bath. Pyrolysis times ranged from 15 to 120 minutes. The amounts of gas and liquid products were measured and composition determined by gas chromatography. Ethane, methane, propylene plus propane, hydrogen, carbon dioxide, and carbon monoxide are the major gaseous products, in order of decreasing concentration. The predominant liquid product is a C/sub 17/ alkene with C/sub 12/-C/sub 21/ alkene/alkane pairs present. The first order decomposition rate constant for sodium stearate at 450/sup 0/C was calculated to be 6.4 x 10/sup -3/ min./sup -1/. 18 refs., 7 figs.

Chong, S.L.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Seal for sodium sulfur battery  

SciTech Connect

This invention is directed to a seal for a sodium sulfur battery in which the sealing is accomplished by a radial compression seal made on a ceramic component of the battery which separates an anode compartment from a cathode compartment of the battery.

Topouzian, Armenag (Birmingham, MI); Minck, Robert W. (Lathrup Village, MI); Williams, William J. (Northville, MI)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Volume efficient sodium sulfur battery  

SciTech Connect

In accordance with the teachings of this specification, a sodium sulfur battery is formed as follows. A plurality of box shaped sulfur electrodes are provided, the outer surfaces of which are defined by an electrolyte material. Each of the electrodes have length and width dimensions substantially greater than the thicknesses thereof as well as upwardly facing surface and a downwardly facing surface. An electrode structure is contained in each of the sulfur electrodes. A holding structure is provided for holding the plurality of sulfur electrodes in a stacked condition with the upwardly facing surface of one sulfur electrode in facing relationship to the downwardly facing surface of another sulfur electrode thereabove. A small thickness dimension separates each of the stacked electrodes thereby defining between each pair of sulfur electrodes a volume which receives the sodium reactant. A reservoir is provided for containing sodium. A manifold structure interconnects the volumes between the sulfur electrodes and the reservoir. A metering structure controls the flow of sodium between the reservoir and the manifold structure.

Mikkor, Mati (Ann Arbor, MI)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Energy Basics: Low-Pressure Sodium Lighting  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Low-Pressure Sodium Lighting Low-pressure sodium lighting provides more energy-efficient outdoor lighting than high-intensity discharge lighting, but it has very poor color...

136

High-pressure synthesis and crystal structure of the lithium borate HP-LiB{sub 3}O{sub 5}  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The new lithium borate HP-LiB{sub 3}O{sub 5} was synthesized under high-pressure/high-temperature conditions of 6 GPa and 1050 deg. C in a multianvil press with a Walker-type module. The compound crystallizes in the space group Pnma (no. 62) with the lattice parameters a=829.7(2), b=759.6(2), and c=1726.8(4) pm (Z=16). The high-pressure compound HP-LiB{sub 3}O{sub 5} is built up from a three-dimensional network of BO{sub 4} tetrahedra and BO{sub 3} groups, which incorporates Li{sup +} ions in channels along the b-axis. Band assignments of measured IR- and Raman spectra were done via quantum-mechanical calculations. Additionally, the thermal behavior of HP-LiB{sub 3}O{sub 5} was investigated. - Graphical abstract: The new high-pressure compound HP-LiB{sub 3}O{sub 5} is built up from a three-dimensional network of BO4 tetrahedra and BO{sub 3} groups, which incorporates Li{sup +} ions in channels along the b-axis. In this paper, the synthesis, the crystal structure, and the properties of HP-LiB{sub 3}O{sub 5} are described. Highlights: > Synthesis of a new lithium borate with the composition HP-LiB{sub 3}O{sub 5} at high pressure. > In contrast to the non-centrosymmetric phase LiB{sub 3}O{sub 5}, this high-pressure phase is centrosymmetric. > First example of ternary alkali borates exhibiting threefold bridging oxygen atoms.

Neumair, Stephanie C.; Vanicek, Stefan [Institut fuer Allgemeine, Anorganische und Theoretische Chemie, Leopold-Franzens-Universitaet Innsbruck, Innrain 52a, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Kaindl, Reinhard; Toebbens, Daniel M. [Institut fuer Mineralogie und Petrographie, Leopold-Franzens-Universitaet Innsbruck, Innrain 52, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Wurst, Klaus [Institut fuer Allgemeine, Anorganische und Theoretische Chemie, Leopold-Franzens-Universitaet Innsbruck, Innrain 52a, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Huppertz, Hubert, E-mail: Hubert.Huppertz@uibk.ac.at [Institut fuer Allgemeine, Anorganische und Theoretische Chemie, Leopold-Franzens-Universitaet Innsbruck, Innrain 52a, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

137

Protective tubes for sodium heated water tubes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heat exchanger in which water tubes are heated by liquid sodium which minimizes the results of accidental contact between the water and the sodium caused by failure of one or more of the water tubes. A cylindrical protective tube envelopes each water tube and the sodium flows axially in the annular spaces between the protective tubes and the water tubes.

Essebaggers, Jan (39 Honeyman Dr., Succasunna, NJ 07876)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Chloride substitution in sodium borohydride  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The dissolution of sodium chloride and sodium borohydride into each other resulting in formation of solid solutions of composition Na(BH{sub 4}){sub 1-x}Cl{sub x} is studied. The dissolution reaction is facilitated by two methods: ball milling or combination of ball milling and annealing at 300 deg. C for three days of NaBH{sub 4}-NaCl samples in molar ratios of 0.5:0.5 and 0.75:0.25. The degree of dissolution is studied by Rietveld refinement of synchrotron radiation powder X-ray diffraction (SR-PXD) data. The results show that dissolution of 10 mol% NaCl into NaBH{sub 4}, forming Na(BH{sub 4}){sub 0.9}Cl{sub 0.1}, takes place during ball milling. A higher degree of dissolution of NaCl in NaBH{sub 4} is obtained by annealing resulting in solid solutions containing up to 57 mol% NaCl, i.e. Na(BH{sub 4}){sub 0.43}Cl{sub 0.57}. In addition, annealing results in dissolution of 10-20 mol% NaBH{sub 4} into NaCl. The mechanism of the dissolution during annealing and the decomposition pathway of the solid solutions are studied by in situ SR-PXD. Furthermore, the stability upon hydrogen release and uptake were studied by Sieverts measurements. - Graphical Abstract: Dissolution of sodium chloride and sodium borohydride into each other resulting in formation of solid solutions of composition Na(BH{sub 4}){sub 1-x}Cl{sub x} is studied. Dissolution is facilitated by two methods: ball milling or annealing at 300 deg. C for three days of NaBH{sub 4}-NaCl samples. Sample compositions and dissolution mechanism are studied by Rietveld refinement of synchrotron radiation powder X-ray diffraction data. Highlights: > Studies of dissolution of sodium chloride and sodium borohydride into each other. > Solid state diffusion facilitated by mechanical and thermal treatments. > Dissolution is more efficiently induced by heating than by mechanical treatment. > Mechanism for dissolution studied by Rietveld refinement of in situ SR-PXD data.

Ravnsbaek, Dorthe B.; Rude, Line H. [Center for Materials Crystallography (CMC), Interdisciplinary Nanoscience Center (iNANO), Department of Chemistry, Aarhus University, Langelandsgade 140, DK-8000 Arhus C (Denmark); Jensen, Torben R., E-mail: trj@chem.au.dk [Center for Materials Crystallography (CMC), Interdisciplinary Nanoscience Center (iNANO), Department of Chemistry, Aarhus University, Langelandsgade 140, DK-8000 Arhus C (Denmark)

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

139

Fire suppressing apparatus. [sodium fires  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus for smothering a liquid sodium fire comprises a pan, a perforated cover on the pan, and tubed depending from the cover and providing communication between the interior of the pan and the ambient atmosphere through the perforations in the cover. Liquid caught in the pan rises above the lower ends of the tubes and thus serves as a barrier which limits the amount of air entering the pan.

Buttrey, K.E.

1980-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

140

Sodium technology, 1972--1973  

SciTech Connect

References to 897 publications on sodium and NaK technology cited in Nuclear Science Abstracts Volume 26 (1972) through Volume 27 (1973 through June) are contained in this bibliography. Keyword indexing is displayed under each citation to provide information on the contents of the document. References are arranged in order by the original NSA abstract number which approximately places them in chronological order. Sequence numbers appear beside each reference, and the personal author index refers to these sequence numbers. The subject index refers to the original abstract numbers. (auth)

1974-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "l-1 hp sodium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Batteries with Orthorhombic Sodium Manganese Oxide Cathodes  

Berkeley National Laboratory researchers have discovered a low-cost, low-toxicity manganese oxide for rechargeable lithium and sodium batteries.

142

Electrolytic process to produce sodium hypochlorite using sodium ion conductive ceramic membranes  

SciTech Connect

An electrochemical process for the production of sodium hypochlorite is disclosed. The process may potentially be used to produce sodium hypochlorite from seawater or low purity un-softened or NaCl-based salt solutions. The process utilizes a sodium ion conductive ceramic membrane, such as membranes based on NASICON-type materials, in an electrolytic cell. In the process, water is reduced at a cathode to form hydroxyl ions and hydrogen gas. Chloride ions from a sodium chloride solution are oxidized in the anolyte compartment to produce chlorine gas which reacts with water to produce hypochlorous and hydrochloric acid. Sodium ions are transported from the anolyte compartment to the catholyte compartment across the sodium ion conductive ceramic membrane. Sodium hydroxide is transported from the catholyte compartment to the anolyte compartment to produce sodium hypochlorite within the anolyte compartment.

Balagopal, Shekar; Malhotra, Vinod; Pendleton, Justin; Reid, Kathy Jo

2012-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

143

HP White Laboratory, Inc.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Send E-Mail to NVLAP at: NVLAP@nist.gov. Personal Body Armor Testing. ... 7 Ballistic Resistance of Body Armor, Section 7, Ballistic Test Methods. ...

2014-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

144

New HP 1304A  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of others will make you more productive (and more valuable!) If no one else has seen the problem, you must solve it yourself. At this stage, apply the Rules of Logical Troubleshooting. This consists of milking the instrument for all symptoms available. Use your eyes, ears and nose. Are lights lit? Readouts active? Are there any signs of heat or broken components? Are there any abnormal sounds? Pops, hissing, hum? Is there a smell associated with a particular area? Essence

Servl Ce; Info R Mati; N From; He Wlett-packard

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

SRC burn test in 700-hp oil-designed boiler. Annex Volume C. Boiler emission report. Final technical report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Solvent-Refined Coal (SRC) test burn program was conducted at the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) located in Bruceton, Pa. One of the objectives of the study was to determine the feasibility of burning SRC fuels in boilers set up for fuel oil firing and to characterize emissions. Testing was conducted on the 700-hp oil-fired boiler used for research projects. No. 6 fuel oil was used for baseline data comparison, and the following SRC fuels were tested: SRC Fuel (pulverized SRC), SRC Residual Oil, and SRC-Water Slurry. Uncontrolled particulate emission rates averaged 0.9243 lb/10/sup 6/ Btu for SRC Fuel, 0.1970 lb/10/sup 6/ Btu for SRC Residual Oil, and 0.9085 lb/10/sup 6/ Btu for SRC-Water Slurry. On a lb/10/sup 6/ Btu basis, emissions from SRC Residual Oil averaged 79 and 78%, respectively, lower than the SRC Fuel and SRC-Water Slurry. The lower SRC Residual Oil emissions were due, in part, to the lower ash content of the oil and more efficient combustion. The SRC Fuel had the highest emission rate, but only 2% higher than the SRC-Water Slurry. Each fuel type was tested under variable boiler operating parameters to determine its effect on boiler emissions. The program successfully demonstrated that the SRC fuels could be burned in fuel oil boilers modified to handle SRC fuels. This report details the particulate emission program and results from testing conducted at the boiler outlet located before the mobile precipitator take-off duct. The sampling method was EPA Method 17, which uses an in-stack filter.

Not Available

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

New York Power Authority Sodium Sulfur Battery Storage Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

for 220 buses * 3 x 600 HP compressor load * Dedicated LIPA feeder LI Bus Motivation LIPA Tariff Time Energy (kWh) Demand (kWmonth) I, off peak Mid-7am 0.0440 - II, peak...

147

Hadronic production of the $P$-wave excited $B_c$-states ($B_{cJ,L=1}^*$)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Adopting the complete $\\alpha_s^4$ approach of the perturbative QCD (pQCD) and updated parton distribution functions, we have estimated the hadronic production of $P$-wave excited $B_c$-states ($B_{cJ,L=1}^*$). In the estimate, special care on the relation of the production amplitude to the derivative of wave function at origin of the potential model is payed. For experimental references, main uncertainties are discussed, and the total cross sections and the distributions of the production with reasonable cuts at the energies of Tevatron and LHC are computed and presented. The results show that $P$-wave production may contribute to the $B_c$-meson production indirectly by a factor about 0.5 of the direct production, and with such a big cross section, it is worth further to study the possibility to observe the $P$-wave production itself experimentally.

Chao-Hsi Chang; Jian-Xiong Wang; Xing-Gang Wu

2004-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

148

Fast MCMC sampling for sparse Bayesian inference in high-dimensional inverse problems using L1-type priors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sparsity has become a key concept for solving of high-dimensional inverse problems using variational regularization techniques. Recently, using similar sparsity-constraints in the Bayesian framework for inverse problems by encoding them in the prior distribution has attracted attention. Important questions about the relation between regularization theory and Bayesian inference still need to be addressed when using sparsity promoting inversion. A practical obstacle for these examinations is the lack of fast posterior sampling algorithms for sparse, high-dimensional Bayesian inversion: Accessing the full range of Bayesian inference methods requires being able to draw samples from the posterior probability distribution in a fast and efficient way. The most commonly applied Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) sampling algorithms for this purpose are Metropolis-Hastings (MH) schemes. However, we demonstrate in this article that for sparse priors relying on L1-norms, their efficiency dramatically decreases when the lev...

Lucka, Felix

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Fabrication of [001]L1{sub 0}-FePtRh ferro-antiferromagnetic pattern by flat-patterning method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A flat-patterning method that exploits the ferromagnetic (FM) - antiferromagnetic (AF) transition in [001]-oriented L1{sub 0} FePt{sub 1-x}Rh{sub x} films was investigated. FM-AF patterns with dot diameters between 15 and 1000 nm were fabricated by locally diffusing a small percentage of FePt atoms onto the FePt{sub 1-x}Rh{sub x} film. The geometric and magnetic properties of the patterns were analyzed in detail. Only the area whose composition crossed the FM-AF threshold underwent a magnetic phase change to the FM phase. FM dots with single-domain structures were observed in the AF matrix in the range of 15-100 nm by magnetic force microscopy.

Hasegawa, T.; Tomioka, T.; Ishio, S. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Akita University, 1-1 Tegata Gakuen-machi, Akita (Japan); Kondo, Y.; Yamane, H. [Akita Industrial Technology Center (AIT), 4-11 Sanuki Araya, Akita (Japan)

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

In-Situ Method for Treating Residual Sodium  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A unique process for deactivating residual sodium in Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) systems which uses humidified (but not saturated) carbon dioxide at ambient temperature and pressure to convert residual sodium into solid sodium bicarbonate.

Sherman, Steven R.; Henslee, S. Paul

2005-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

151

SO/sub 2/ scrubbing: more work for sodium  

SciTech Connect

The effects that dry scrubbing of flue gases with sodium sorbents could have on supplies of naturally-occurring sodium compounds such as nahcolite and trona are discussed.

Not Available

1984-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

152

Radial power flattening in sodium fast reactors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In order to improve a new design for a uranium startup sodium cooled fast reactor which was proposed at MIT, this thesis evaluated radial power flattening by varying the fuel volume fraction at a fixed U-235 enrichment of ...

Krentz-Wee, Rebecca (Rebecca Elizabeth)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Low-temperature Sodium-Beta Battery  

Rechargeable metallic sodium batteries have application in large-scale energy storage applications such as electric power generation and distribution, in motive applications such as electric vehicles, hybrids, and plug-in hybrids, and for aerospace ...

154

Method of preparing silicon from sodium fluosilicate  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for preparing high purity silicon metal from Na.sub.2 SiF.sub.6 (sodium fluosilicate). The sodium fluosilicate is heated to decomposition temperature to form NaF, which retains most of the impurities, and gaseous SiF.sub.4. The SiF.sub.4 is then reduced by the bomb reduction method using a reductant having a low packing density.

Schmidt, Frederick A. (Ames, IA); Rehbein, David (Ames, IA); Chiotti, Premo (Ames, IA)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Detection of periodic signatures in the solar power spectrum. On the track of l=1 gravity modes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the present work we show robust indications of the existence of g modes in the Sun using 10 years of GOLF data. The present analysis is based on the exploitation of the collective properties of the predicted low-frequency (25 to 140 microHz) g modes: their asymptotic nature, which implies a quasi equidistant separation of their periods for a given angular degree (l). The Power Spectrum (PS) of the Power Spectrum Density (PSD), reveals a significant structure indicating the presence of features (peaks) in the PSD with near equidistant periods corresponding to l=1 modes in the range n=-4 to n=-26. The study of its statistical significance of this feature was fully undertaken and complemented with Monte Carlo simulations. This structure has a confidence level better than 99.86% not to be due to pure noise. Furthermore, a detailed study of this structure suggests that the gravity modes have a much more complex structure than the one initially expected (line-widths, magnetic splittings...). Compared to the latest solar models, the obtained results tend to favor a solar core rotating significantly faster than the rest of the radiative zone. In the framework of the Phoebus group, we have also applied the same methodology to other helioseismology instruments on board SoHO and ground based networks.

R. A. Garcia; S. Turck-Chieze; S. J. Jimenez-Reyes; J. Ballot; P. L. Palle; A. Eff-Darwich; S. Mathur; J. Provost

2006-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

156

High Resolution Mappings of the L=1.3 deg Complex in Molecular Lines : Discovery of a Proto-Superbubble  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report the results of molecular line observations toward the l=1.3 deg complex, ananomalous cloud complex in the central molecular zone of the Galaxy. We have taken high resolution maps of the CO J=1-0, HCN J=1-0, HCO+ J=1-0, SiO J=1-0 and J=2-1 lines. The complex is found to be rich in shells and arcs of dense molecular gas. We have identified 9 expanding shells in HCN maps and compact SiO features associated to the shells. The intensity ratios of HCN/CO, HCO+/CO and CO J=3-2/J=1-0 are coherently enhanced by a factor of a few in gas with an LSR velocity higher than 110 kms^-1. The high-velocity gas has a high density [n_H ~ 10^4.5 cm^-3] and high SiO/13CO intensity ratio indicating that the gas was shocked. The typical HCN/HCO+ intensity ratio is found to be 2.3, being higher by an factor of a few than those in the Galactic disk clouds. The typical kinetic energy and expansion time of the shells are estimated to be 10^(50.9 - 52.5) erg and 10^(4.6 - 5.3) yr, respectively. The kinetic energy could be furnished by multiple supernova and/or hypernova explosions with a rate of 10^(-3 - -4) yr^-1. These estimates suggest that the expanding shells as a whole may be in the early stage of superbubble formation. This proto-superbubble may be originated by a massive cluster formation which took place 10^(6.8 - 7.6) yr ago.

Kunihiko Tanaka; Kazuhisa Kamegai; Makoto Nagai; Tomoharu Oka

2007-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

157

Synthesis, structure refinement at 296 K and physico-chemical characterizations of KMnHP{sub 3}O{sub 10}  

SciTech Connect

Potassium manganese(III) monohydrogentriphosphate KMnHP{sub 3}O{sub 10} was synthesized by flux method and characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction, crystallizes in the monoclinic system with centric space group C2/c. The parameters of the unit cell are a = 12.104(1), b = 8.287(1). c = 9.150(1) A, {beta} = 110.97(1) deg. and Z = 4. The structure was solved at 296 K using 893 independent reflections and refined until R(F) = 0.022; wR(F{sup 2}) = 0.045. The atomic arrangement of the title compound consists of MnO{sub 6} octahedra linked by hydrogentriphosphate anions to form a three-dimensional framework containing tunnels parallel to the c-axis where the K{sup +} cations are inserted. The structure of KMnHP{sub 3}O{sub 10} contains a single Mn site which is surrounded by typical Jahn-Teller [2 + 2 + 2] distorted octahedron. The title material has been also characterized by different physico-chemical techniques: powder X-ray diffraction, IR, NMR and CI spectroscopies and DTA-TGA-DSC thermal analysis.

Mechergui, J. [Chemistry Department, Bizerta Science Faculty, 7021 Jarzouna, Bizerta (Tunisia); Belam, W. [Chemistry Department, Bizerta Science Faculty, 7021 Jarzouna, Bizerta (Tunisia)], E-mail: WahidBelam@yahoo.fr

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Method of making a sodium sulfur battery  

SciTech Connect

A method of making a portion of a sodium sulfur battery is disclosed. The battery portion made is a portion of the container which defines the volume for the cathodic reactant materials which are sulfur and sodium polysulfide materials. The container portion is defined by an outer metal casing with a graphite liner contained therein, the graphite liner having a coating on its internal diameter for sealing off the porosity thereof. The steel outer container and graphite pipe are united by a method which insures that at the operating temperature of the battery, relatively low electrical resistance exists between the two materials because they are in intimate contact with one another.

Elkins, Perry E. (Santa Ana, CA)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

PROGRAM TOPIC: GASIFICATION TECHNOLOGIES PREVENTING AGGLOMERATION PROBLEMS DURING GASIFICATION OF HIGH-SODIUM LIGNITE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Previous gasification studies have shown that sodium vapor released from high-sodium lignites can react with silica to form sticky sodium silicates. 1,2,3

Robert S. Dahlin; Johnny R. Dorminey; Southern Company Services; Wanwang Peng; Southern Company Services; Pannalal Vimalch; Southern Company Services

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

INHIBITION OF WASHED SLUDGE WITH SODIUM NITRITE  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the results of electrochemical tests used to determine the relationship between the concentration of the aggressive anions in washed sludge and the minimum effective inhibitor concentration. Sodium nitrate was added as the inhibitor because of its compatibility with the DWPF process. A minimum of 0.05M nitrite is required to inhibit the washed sludge simulant solution used in this study. When the worst case compositions and safety margins are considered, it is expected that a minimum operating limit of nearly 0.1M nitrite will be specified. The validity of this limit is dependent on the accuracy of the concentrations and solubility splits previously reported. Sodium nitrite additions to obtain 0.1M nitrite concentrations in washed sludge will necessitate the additional washing of washed precipitate in order to decrease its sodium nitrite inhibitor requirements sufficiently to remain below the sodium limits in the feed to the DWPF. Nitrite will be the controlling anion in "fresh" washed sludge unless the soluble chloride concentration is about ten times higher than predicted by the solubility splits. Inhibition of "aged" washed sludge will not be a problem unless significant chloride dissolution occurs during storage. It will be very important tomonitor the composition of washed sludge during processing and storage.

Congdon, J.; Lozier, J.

2012-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "l-1 hp sodium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

The electrical conductivity of sodium polysulfide melts  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The sodium polysulfide melt has been described by a macroscopic model. This model considers the melt to be composed of sodium cations, monosulfide anions, and neutral sulfur solvent. The transport equations of concentrated-solution theory are used to derived the governing equations for this binaryelectrolyte melt model. These equations relate measurable transport properties to fundamental transport parameters. The focus of this research is to measure the electrical conductivity of sodium polysulfide melts and calculate one of fundamental transport parameters from the experimental data. The conductance cells used in the conductivity measurements are axisymmetric cylindrical cells with a microelectrode. The electrode effects, including double-layer capacity, charge transfer resistance, and concentration overpotential, were minimized by the use of the alternating current at an adequately high frequency. The high cell constants of the conductance cells not only enhanced the experimental accuracy but also made the electrode effects negligible. The electrical conductivities of sodium polysulfide Na{sub 2}S{sub 4} and Na{sub 2}S{sub 5} were measured as a function of temperature (range: 300 to 360{degree}C). Variations between experiments were only up to 2%. The values of the Arrhenius activation energy derived from the experimental data are about 33 kJ/mol. The fundamental transport parameter which quantifies the interaction within sodium cations and monosulfide anions are of interest and expected to be positive. Values of it were calculated from the experimental conductivity data and most of them are positive. Some negative values were obtained probably due to the experimental errors of transference number, diffusion coefficient, density or conductivity data.

Meihui Wang

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Optimization of Deep Drilling Performance - Development and Benchmark Testing of Advanced Diamond Product Drill Bits & HP/HT Fluids to Significantly Improve Rates of Penetration  

SciTech Connect

This document details the progress to date on the OPTIMIZATION OF DEEP DRILLING PERFORMANCE--DEVELOPMENT AND BENCHMARK TESTING OF ADVANCED DIAMOND PRODUCT DRILL BITS AND HP/HT FLUIDS TO SIGNIFICANTLY IMPROVE RATES OF PENETRATION contract for the year starting October 2004 through September 2005. The industry cost shared program aims to benchmark drilling rates of penetration in selected simulated deep formations and to significantly improve ROP through a team development of aggressive diamond product drill bit--fluid system technologies. Overall the objectives are as follows: Phase 1--Benchmark ''best in class'' diamond and other product drilling bits and fluids and develop concepts for a next level of deep drilling performance; Phase 2--Develop advanced smart bit-fluid prototypes and test at large scale; and Phase 3--Field trial smart bit--fluid concepts, modify as necessary and commercialize products. As of report date, TerraTek has concluded all Phase 1 testing and is planning Phase 2 development.

Alan Black; Arnis Judzis

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

163

Viscosity and density tables of sodium chloride solutions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A file is presented containing tabulated data extracted from the scientific literature on the density and viscosity of aqueous sodium chloride solutions. Also included is a bibliography of the properties of aqueous sodium chloride solutions. (MHR)

Fair, J.A.; Ozbek, H. (comps.) [comps.

1977-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Structure and Properties of Piezoelectric Sodium Bismuth Titanate ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Structure and Properties of Piezoelectric Sodium Bismuth Titanate ... Nanostructures and Their Potential for Mechanical Energy Scavenging.

165

Sodium and sulfur release and recapture during black liquor burning  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this study was to provide data on sulfur and sodium volatilization during black liquor burning, and on SO2 capture by solid sodium carbonate and sodium chloride. This data was interpreted and modeled into rate equations suitable for use in computational models for recovery boilers.

Frederick, W.J.; Iisa, K.; Wag, K.; Reis, V.V.; Boonsongsup, L.; Forssen, M.; Hupa, M.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Corrosion performance of advanced structural materials in sodium.  

SciTech Connect

This report gives a description of the activities in design, fabrication, construction, and assembling of a pumped sodium loop for the sodium compatibility studies on advanced structural materials. The work is the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) portion of the effort on the work project entitled, 'Sodium Compatibility of Advanced Fast Reactor Materials,' and is a part of Advanced Materials Development within the Reactor Campaign. The objective of this project is to develop information on sodium corrosion compatibility of advanced materials being considered for sodium reactor applications. This report gives the status of the sodium pumped loop at Argonne National Laboratory, the specimen details, and the technical approach to evaluate the sodium compatibility of advanced structural alloys. This report is a deliverable from ANL in FY2010 (M2GAN10SF050302) under the work package G-AN10SF0503 'Sodium Compatibility of Advanced Fast Reactor Materials.' Two reports were issued in 2009 (Natesan and Meimei Li 2009, Natesan et al. 2009) which examined the thermodynamic and kinetic factors involved in the purity of liquid sodium coolant for sodium reactor applications as well as the design specifications for the ANL pumped loop for testing advanced structural materials. Available information was presented on solubility of several metallic and nonmetallic elements along with a discussion of the possible mechanisms for the accumulation of impurities in sodium. That report concluded that the solubility of many metals in sodium is low (<1 part per million) in the temperature range of interest in sodium reactors and such trace amounts would not impact the mechanical integrity of structural materials and components. The earlier report also analyzed the solubility and transport mechanisms of nonmetallic elements such as oxygen, nitrogen, carbon, and hydrogen in laboratory sodium loops and in reactor systems such as Experimental Breeder Reactor-II, Fast Flux Test Facility, and Clinch River Breeder Reactor. Among the nonmetallic elements discussed, oxygen is deemed controllable and its concentration in sodium can be maintained in sodium for long reactor life by using cold-trap method. It was concluded that among the cold-trap and getter-trap methods, the use of cold trap is sufficient to achieve oxygen concentration of the order of 1 part per million. Under these oxygen conditions in sodium, the corrosion performance of structural materials such as austenitic stainless steels and ferritic steels will be acceptable at a maximum core outlet sodium temperature of {approx}550 C. In the current sodium compatibility studies, the oxygen concentration in sodium will be controlled and maintained at {approx}1 ppm by controlling the cold trap temperature. The oxygen concentration in sodium in the forced convection sodium loop will be controlled and monitored by maintaining the cold trap temperature in the range of 120-150 C, which would result in oxygen concentration in the range of 1-2 ppm. Uniaxial tensile specimens are being exposed to flowing sodium and will be retrieved and analyzed for corrosion and post-exposure tensile properties. Advanced materials for sodium exposure include austenitic alloy HT-UPS and ferritic-martensitic steels modified 9Cr-1Mo and NF616. Among the nonmetallic elements in sodium, carbon was assessed to have the most influence on structural materials since carbon, as an impurity, is not amenable to control and maintenance by any of the simple purification methods. The dynamic equilibrium value for carbon in sodium systems is dependent on several factors, details of which were discussed in the earlier report. The current sodium compatibility studies will examine the role of carbon concentration in sodium on the carburization-decarburization of advanced structural materials at temperatures up to 650 C. Carbon will be added to the sodium by exposure of carbon-filled iron tubes, which over time will enable carbon to diffuse through iron and dissolve into sodium. The method enables addition of dissolved carbon (without carb

Natesan, K.; Momozaki, Y.; Li, M.; Rink, D.L. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

2012-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

167

DESIGN AND OPERATION OF A 10.000 GPM D.C. ELECTROMAGNETIC SODIUM PUMP AND 250.000 AMPERE HOMOPOLAR GENERATOR  

SciTech Connect

single unit with the abililty to pump highly radioactive sodium (10/sup 8/ Mev/(cm/sup 3/) (sec) at high temperature (800 deg C) is described. The unit components are aligned vertically to reduce the electrical conductor length between homopolar generator and pump. The entire structure, including the 1250- hp drive motor is 30 ft high and weighs 35 tons. The pump is designed to develop a head of 75 psi at a pumping rate of 10,000 gpm. At this rate the generator must deliver 250,000 amp at 2.5 v. The low-voltage requirement of the pump permits the use of flat sheet insulation of pure mica or ceramic. The pump is limited in temperature by the curie point of iron (763 deg C). The homopolar generator is of the liquid brush type: eutectic NaK serves as the current- conductor between the rotating and stationary members. There are no windings in the machine other per strap. The essence of the pump-power supply unit lies in its ability to convert 2300-volt, 3-phase electrical power to controllable sodium pumping. Tests on the unit have revealed many interesting results which will aid greatly in the design of advanced models. (auth) Performacne tests are being conducted on two prootype 5000-gpm sodium pumps for application in the primary and secondary heat transfer systems of the EBR-II. Both pumps, one electromagnetic and one mechanical, have operated more than 5500 hr in sodium at temperatures whcih chave exceeded 800 deg F. The pump designs and test facilities are descrbied. (auth)

Jaross, R.A.; Barnes, A.H.

1958-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

168

CAST STONE FORMULATION AT HIGHER SODIUM CONCENTRATIONS  

SciTech Connect

A low temperature waste form known as Cast Stone is being considered to provide supplemental Low Activity Waste (LAW) immobilization capacity for the Hanford site. Formulation of Cast Stone at high sodium concentrations is of interest since a significant reduction in the necessary volume of Cast Stone and subsequent disposal costs could be achieved if an acceptable waste form can be produced with a high sodium molarity salt solution combined with a high water to premix (or dry blend) ratio. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the factors involved with increasing the sodium concentration in Cast Stone, including production and performance properties and the retention and release of specific components of interest. Three factors were identified for the experimental matrix: the concentration of sodium in the simulated salt solution, the water to premix ratio, and the blast furnace slag portion of the premix. The salt solution simulants used in this study were formulated to represent the overall average waste composition. The cement, blast furnace slag, and fly ash were sourced from a supplier in the Hanford area in order to be representative. The test mixes were prepared in the laboratory and fresh properties were measured. Fresh density increased with increasing sodium molarity and with decreasing water to premix ratio, as expected given the individual densities of these components. Rheology measurements showed that all of the test mixes produced very fluid slurries. The fresh density and rheology data are of potential value in designing a future Cast Stone production facility. Standing water and density gradient testing showed that settling is not of particular concern for the high sodium compositions studied. Heat of hydration measurements may provide some insight into the reactions that occur within the test mixes, which may in turn be related to the properties and performance of the waste form. These measurements showed that increased sodium concentration in the salt solution reduced the time to peak heat flow, and reducing the amount of slag in the premix increased the time to peak heat flow. These observations may help to describe some of the cured properties of the samples, in particular the differences in compressive strength observed after 28 and 90 days of curing. Samples were cured for at least 28 days at ambient temperature in the laboratory prior to cured properties analyses. The low activity waste form for disposal at the Hanford Site is required to have a compressive strength of at least 500 psi. After 28 days of curing, several of the test mixes had mean compressive strengths that were below the 500 psi requirement. Higher sodium concentrations and higher water to premix ratios led to reduced compressive strength. Higher fly ash concentrations decreased the compressive strength after 28 days of curing. This may be explained in that the cementitious phases matured more quickly in the mixes with higher concentrations of slag, as evidenced by the data for the time to peak heat generation. All of the test mixes exhibited higher mean compressive strengths after 90 days of curing, with only one composition having a mean compressive strength of less than 500 psi. Leach indices were determined for the test mixes for contaminants of interest. The leaching performance of the mixes evaluated in this study was not particularly sensitive to the factors used in the experimental design. This may be beneficial in demonstrating that the performance of the waste form is robust with respect to changes in the mix composition. The results of this study demonstrate the potential to achieve significantly higher waste loadings in Cast Stone and other low temperature, cementitious waste forms. Additional work is needed to elucidate the hydration mechanisms occurring in Cast Stone formulated with highly concentrated salt solutions since these reactions are responsible for determining the performance of the cured waste form. The thermal analyses completed in this study provide some preliminary insight, although the limited

Fox, K.; Edwards, T.; Roberts, K.

2013-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

169

CAST STONE FORMULATION AT HIGHER SODIUM CONCENTRATIONS  

SciTech Connect

A low temperature waste form known as Cast Stone is being considered to provide supplemental Low Activity Waste (LAW) immobilization capacity for the Hanford site. Formulation of Cast Stone at high sodium concentrations is of interest since a significant reduction in the necessary volume of Cast Stone and subsequent disposal costs could be achieved if an acceptable waste form can be produced with a high sodium molarity salt solution combined with a high water to premix (or dry blend) ratio. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the factors involved with increasing the sodium concentration in Cast Stone, including production and performance properties and the retention and release of specific components of interest. Three factors were identified for the experimental matrix: the concentration of sodium in the simulated salt solution, the water to premix ratio, and the blast furnace slag portion of the premix. The salt solution simulants used in this study were formulated to represent the overall average waste composition. The cement, blast furnace slag, and fly ash were sourced from a supplier in the Hanford area in order to be representative. The test mixes were prepared in the laboratory and fresh properties were measured. Fresh density increased with increasing sodium molarity and with decreasing water to premix ratio, as expected given the individual densities of these components. Rheology measurements showed that all of the test mixes produced very fluid slurries. The fresh density and rheology data are of potential value in designing a future Cast Stone production facility. Standing water and density gradient testing showed that settling is not of particular concern for the high sodium compositions studied. Heat of hydration measurements may provide some insight into the reactions that occur within the test mixes, which may in turn be related to the properties and performance of the waste form. These measurements showed that increased sodium concentration in the salt solution reduced the time to peak heat flow, and reducing the amount of slag in the premix increased the time to peak heat flow. These observations may help to describe some of the cured properties of the samples, in particular the differences in compressive strength observed after 28 and 90 days of curing. Samples were cured for at least 28 days at ambient temperature in the laboratory prior to cured properties analyses. The low activity waste form for disposal at the Hanford Site is required to have a compressive strength of at least 500 psi. After 28 days of curing, several of the test mixes had mean compressive strengths that were below the 500 psi requirement. Higher sodium concentrations and higher water to premix ratios led to reduced compressive strength. Higher fly ash concentrations decreased the compressive strength after 28 days of curing. This may be explained in that the cementitious phases matured more quickly in the mixes with higher concentrations of slag, as evidenced by the data for the time to peak heat generation. All of the test mixes exhibited higher mean compressive strengths after 90 days of curing, with only one composition having a mean compressive strength of less than 500 psi. Leach indices were determined for the test mixes for contaminants of interest. The leaching performance of the mixes evaluated in this study was not particularly sensitive to the factors used in the experimental design. This may be beneficial in demonstrating that the performance of the waste form is robust with respect to changes in the mix composition. The results of this study demonstrate the potential to achieve significantly higher waste loadings in Cast Stone and other low temperature, cementitious waste forms. Additional work is needed to elucidate the hydration mechanisms occurring in Cast Stone formulated with highly concentrated salt solutions since these reactions are responsible for determining the performance of the cured waste form. The thermal analyses completed in this study provide some preliminary insight, although the limited

Fox, K.; Roberts, K.; Edwards, T.

2013-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

170

Large-scale sodium spray fire code validation (SOFICOV) test  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A large-scale, sodium, spray fire code validation test was performed in the HEDL 850-m/sup 3/ Containment System Test Facility (CSTF) as part of the Sodium Spray Fire Code Validation (SOFICOV) program. Six hundred fifty eight kilograms of sodium spray was sprayed in an air atmosphere for a period of 2400 s. The sodium spray droplet sizes and spray pattern distribution were estimated. The containment atmosphere temperature and pressure response, containment wall temperature response and sodium reaction rate with oxygen were measured. These results are compared to post-test predictions using SPRAY and NACOM computer codes.

Jeppson, D.W.; Muhlestein, L.D.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Sodium Plugging Test Loop - Nuclear Engineering Division (Argonne)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sodium Plugging Test Loop Sodium Plugging Test Loop Sodium Plugging Test Loop Overview Other Facilities Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr Sodium Plugging Test Loop This experimental setup is part of the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) Advanced Fuel Cycle R&D work carried out at Argonne on advanced sodium component technology. Bookmark and Share For long range sodium technology research and development, employing supercritical CO2 Brayton cycle power conversion technology as an advanced balance of plant technology is being considered. The component that provides the interface between the sodium and supercritical CO2 is a compact heat exchanger known as a printed circuit heat exchanger (PCHE). This heat exchanger has very small coolant flow passages that may foul or

172

Idaho Site Obtains Patent for Nuclear Reactor Sodium Cleanup Treatment |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Obtains Patent for Nuclear Reactor Sodium Cleanup Obtains Patent for Nuclear Reactor Sodium Cleanup Treatment Idaho Site Obtains Patent for Nuclear Reactor Sodium Cleanup Treatment March 28, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis CWI engineers Jeff Jones, David Tolman, right, and Kirk Dooley (seated) developed a treatment to safely dissolve a bicarbonate crust and treat and remove the sodium in the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II at the Idaho site. CWI engineers Jeff Jones, David Tolman, right, and Kirk Dooley (seated) developed a treatment to safely dissolve a bicarbonate crust and treat and remove the sodium in the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II at the Idaho site. Piping in the east boiler basement of the sodium processing building was color coded for easy identification. Orange indicates sodium and green identifies cooling water.

173

Low-Pressure Sodium Lighting Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Low-Pressure Sodium Lighting Basics Low-Pressure Sodium Lighting Basics Low-Pressure Sodium Lighting Basics August 16, 2013 - 10:17am Addthis Low-pressure sodium lighting provides more energy-efficient outdoor lighting than high-intensity discharge lighting, but it has very poor color rendition. Typical applications include highway and security lighting, where color is not important. Low-pressure sodium lamps work somewhat like fluorescent lamps. Like high-intensity discharge lighting, low-pressure sodium lamps require up to 10 minutes to start and have to cool before they can restart. Therefore, they are most suitable for applications in which they stay on for hours at a time. They are not suitable for use with motion detectors. The chart below compares low-pressure sodium lamps and high-intensity

174

Idaho Site Obtains Patent for Nuclear Reactor Sodium Cleanup Treatment |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Idaho Site Obtains Patent for Nuclear Reactor Sodium Cleanup Idaho Site Obtains Patent for Nuclear Reactor Sodium Cleanup Treatment Idaho Site Obtains Patent for Nuclear Reactor Sodium Cleanup Treatment March 28, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis CWI engineers Jeff Jones, David Tolman, right, and Kirk Dooley (seated) developed a treatment to safely dissolve a bicarbonate crust and treat and remove the sodium in the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II at the Idaho site. CWI engineers Jeff Jones, David Tolman, right, and Kirk Dooley (seated) developed a treatment to safely dissolve a bicarbonate crust and treat and remove the sodium in the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II at the Idaho site. Piping in the east boiler basement of the sodium processing building was color coded for easy identification. Orange indicates sodium and green identifies cooling water.

175

Report on sodium compatibility of advanced structural materials.  

SciTech Connect

This report provides an update on the evaluation of sodium compatibility of advanced structural materials. The report is a deliverable (level 3) in FY11 (M3A11AN04030403), under the Work Package A-11AN040304, 'Sodium Compatibility of Advanced Structural Materials' performed by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), as part of Advanced Structural Materials Program for the Advanced Reactor Concepts. This work package supports the advanced structural materials development by providing corrosion and tensile data from the standpoint of sodium compatibility of advanced structural alloys. The scope of work involves exposure of advanced structural alloys such as G92, mod.9Cr-1Mo (G91) ferritic-martensitic steels and HT-UPS austenitic stainless steels to a flowing sodium environment with controlled impurity concentrations. The exposed specimens are analyzed for their corrosion performance, microstructural changes, and tensile behavior. Previous reports examined the thermodynamic and kinetic factors involved in the purity of liquid sodium coolant for sodium reactor applications as well as the design, fabrication, and construction of a forced convection sodium loop for sodium compatibility studies of advanced materials. This report presents the results on corrosion performance, microstructure, and tensile properties of advanced ferritic-martensitic and austenitic alloys exposed to liquid sodium at 550 C for up to 2700 h and at 650 C for up to 5064 h in the forced convection sodium loop. The oxygen content of sodium was controlled by the cold-trapping method to achieve {approx}1 wppm oxygen level. Four alloys were examined, G92 in the normalized and tempered condition (H1 G92), G92 in the cold-rolled condition (H2 G92), G91 in the normalized and tempered condition, and hot-rolled HT-UPS. G91 was included as a reference to compare with advanced alloy, G92. It was found that all four alloys showed weight loss after sodium exposures at 550 and 650 C. The weight loss of the four alloys was comparable after sodium exposures at 550 C; the weight loss of ferritic-martensitic steels, G92 and G91 is more significant than that of austenitic stainless steel, HT-UPS after sodium exposures at 650 C. Sodium exposures up to 2700 h at 550 C had no significant influence on tensile properties, while sodium exposures up to 5064 h at 650 C dramatically lowered the tensile strengths of the four alloys. The ultimate tensile strength of H1 G92, H2 G92, and G91 ferritic-martensitic steels was reduced to as much as nearly half of its initial value after sodium exposures at 650 C. Though the uniform elongation was recovered to some extent, these three ferritic-martensitic steels showed considerable strain softening after sodium exposures. The yield stress of HT-UPS austenitic stainless steel increased, the ultimate tensile strength decreased, and the total elongation was reduced after sodium exposures at 650 C. The dynamic strain aging effect observed in the as-received HT-UPS specimens became less pronounced after sodium exposures at 650 C. Microstructural characterization of sodium-exposed specimens showed no appreciable surface deterioration or grain structure changes under an optical microscope, except for the H2 G92 steel, in which the martensite structure transformed to large grain ferrite after sodium exposures at 650 C. TEM observations of the sodium-exposed H2 G92 steel showed significant recrystallization after sodium exposure for 2700 h at 550 C, and transformation of martensite to ferrite and high density of precipitates in nearly dislocation-free matrix after sodium exposures at 650 C. Further microstructural analysis and evaluation of decarburization/carburization behavior is needed to understand the dramatic changes in the tensile strengths of advanced ferritic-martensitic and austenitic steels after sodium exposures at 650 C.

Li, M.; Natesan, K.; Momozaki, Y.; Rink, D.L.; Soppet, W.K.; Listwan, J.T. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

2012-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

176

Super-radiance in the sodium resonance lines from sodium iodide arc lamps  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Super-radiance observed within the centers of the sodium resonance D lines emitted by arc lamps containing sodium iodide as additive in a high-pressure mercury plasma environment was studied by high-resolution emission spectroscopy. The spectral radiance of these self-reversed lines including super-radiance was simulated by considering a local enhancement of the source function due to the presence of an additional source of radiation near the arc wall. Causes of this hitherto unrecognized source of radiation are given.

Karabourniotis, D. [Department of Physics, Institute of Plasma Physics, University of Crete, 71003 Heraklion (Greece); Drakakis, E. [Department of Electrical Engineering, Technological Educational Institute, Heraklion (Greece)

2010-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

177

Factors contributing to the breakdown of sodium beta-alumina  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Clarification of the breakdown process occurring during charge transfer in sodium beta alumina solid electrolytes was derived from: (1) studying the effects of molten sodium contact at 350/sup 0/C on single crystal sodium beta alumina and polycrystalline sodium beta alumina; (2) determination of critical current density by monitoring acoustic emissions accompanying crack growth in sodium/sodium beta alumina/sodium cells subjected to linear current ramping at 1 mA cm/sup -2/ sec/sup -1/; (3) failure analysis conducted on cycled electrolytes, some from commercial sodium/sulfur cells, which had been subjected to up to 703 Ahr cm/sup -2/ of charge transfer. Gray coloration developing in beta aluminas in contact with molten sodium was found to be a consequence of formation, through reduction by sodium, of oxygen vacancies charge compensated by electrons. Electronic conductivity of the electrolyte increases as a result. No second phase formation was detected. Colored electrolytes from sodium/sulfur cells show evidence of a newly recognized degradation mechanism in which fracture occurs when sodium is reduced and deposited internally under pressure as metal in regions where an electronic conductivity gradient exists. Heating colored beta aluminas in air produces reoxidation and bleaching. Kinetics and other properties of the coloration and bleaching processes were determined. Critical current density was found to bear an inverse relation to average electrolyte grain size. Evidence was found in the cycled electrolytes for a slow crack growth mechanism and a progressive mode of degradation advancing from the sulfur electrode interface. Implications of the findings for the construction and operation of sodium/sulfur battery systems are discussed.

Buechele, A.C.

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

An Industry/DOE Program to Develop and Benchmark Advanced Diamond Product Drill Bits and HP/HT Drilling Fluids to Significantly Improve Rates of Penetration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A deep drilling research program titled 'An Industry/DOE Program to Develop and Benchmark Advanced Diamond Product Drill Bits and HP/HT Drilling Fluids to Significantly Improve Rates of Penetration' was conducted at TerraTek's Drilling and Completions Laboratory. Drilling tests were run to simulate deep drilling by using high bore pressures and high confining and overburden stresses. The purpose of this testing was to gain insight into practices that would improve rates of penetration and mechanical specific energy while drilling under high pressure conditions. Thirty-seven test series were run utilizing a variety of drilling parameters which allowed analysis of the performance of drill bits and drilling fluids. Five different drill bit types or styles were tested: four-bladed polycrystalline diamond compact (PDC), 7-bladed PDC in regular and long profile, roller-cone, and impregnated. There were three different rock types used to simulate deep formations: Mancos shale, Carthage marble, and Crab Orchard sandstone. The testing also analyzed various drilling fluids and the extent to which they improved drilling. The PDC drill bits provided the best performance overall. The impregnated and tungsten carbide insert roller-cone drill bits performed poorly under the conditions chosen. The cesium formate drilling fluid outperformed all other drilling muds when drilling in the Carthage marble and Mancos shale with PDC drill bits. The oil base drilling fluid with manganese tetroxide weighting material provided the best performance when drilling the Crab Orchard sandstone.

TerraTek

2007-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

179

Fact Sheet: Sodium-Beta Batteries (October 2012)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sodium-Beta Batteries Sodium-Beta Batteries Improving the performance and reducing the cost of sodium-beta batteries for large-scale energy storage Sodium-beta batteries (Na-beta batteries or NBBs) use a solid beta-alumina (ß˝-Al 2 O 3 ) electrolyte membrane that selectively allows sodium ion transport between a positive electrode (e.g., a metal halide) and a negative sodium electrode. NBBs typically operate at temperatures near 350˚C. They are increasingly used in renewable storage and utility applications due to their high round-trip efficiency, high energy densities, and energy storage capacities ranging from a few kilowatt-hours to multiple megawatt-hours. In fact, U.S. utilities

180

Sodium/Phosphorus-Sulfur Cells II. Phase Equilibria  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

II. Phase Equilibria II. Phase Equilibria Title Sodium/Phosphorus-Sulfur Cells II. Phase Equilibria Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 1996 Authors Ridgway, Paul L., Frank R. McLarnon, and John S. Newman Journal Journal of the Electrochemistry Society Volume 143 Issue 2 Pagination 412-417 Keywords 25 ENERGY STORAGE, 36 MATERIALS SCIENCE, ALUMINIUM OXIDES, equilibrium, performance, PHASE DIAGRAMS, PHOSPHIDES, PHOSPHORUS ADDITIONS, SODIUM COMPOUNDS, SODIUM SULFIDES, SODIUM-SULFUR BATTERIES Abstract Equilibrium open-circuit cell voltage data from a sodium/{beta}{double_prime}-alumina/phosphorus-sulfur cell utilizing P/S ratios of 0, 0.143, and 0.332 and a sodium atom fraction ranging from 0 to 0.4 were interpreted to construct ternary phase diagrams of the Na-P-S ternary system at 350 and 400 C.

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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Review of Chemical Processes for the Synthesis of Sodium Borohydride  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Review of Chemical Processes for the Synthesis of Sodium Borohydride Review of Chemical Processes for the Synthesis of Sodium Borohydride Millennium Cell Inc. Prepared by Ying Wu Michael T. Kelly Jeffrey V. Ortega Under DOE Cooperative Agreement DE-FC36-04GO14008 August 2004 Table of Contents Introduction..................................................................................................................................... 1 Section 1: Commercially Practiced Sodium Borohydride Synthesis Process ............................... 2 The Brown-Schlesinger Process ................................................................................................. 2 The Bayer Process.......................................................................................................................

182

METHOD FOR REDUCING THE IMPURITY RESISTIVITY OF SODIUM  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The inherent resistivity of sodium, at cryogenic temperatures, can be reduced by clustering the impurity atoms within the crystal latiice structure of the sodium, thereby reducing the effective electron collision cross section and thus reducing the number of collisions between the electrons and such lattice imperfections. The clustering is effected by heating the sodium to a temperature approaching its melting point, and maintaining the temperature for a period of time ranging generally from two to six days. (AEC)

Post, R.F.; Taylor, C.E.

1963-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

183

PROCESSING OF SODIUM--POTASSIUM NIOBATE CERAMICS.  

SciTech Connect

Sintering studies of undoped (Na{sub 0.5}K{sub 0.5})NbO{sub 3} and the same material doped with 1/2, 1, 2, and 4 mole percent BaO and 2 mole % B{sub 2}O{sub 3} were made. The persistence of a second phase after calcining to form the compound led to a study of reactions occurring during calcination. The calcining of sodium-potassium niobates involves the formation of an intermediate compound (the second phase) and its subsequent reaction with sodium oxide and potassium oxide to form (Na{sub 0.5}K{sub 0.5})NbO{sub 3}. Sintering data show that up to 1/2 mole % BaO added to the system increases the initial densification. However, the sintered bodies then exhibit densification and form sharp cubic grains and large voids. Indications are that a liquid phase is the major contributor to densification of this system through the mechanism of particle rearrangement, and that the contribution of any sintering mechanism to densification is negligible.

Powell, B.R. Jr.

1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Sodium tetraphenylborate solubility and dissolution rates  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The rate of solid sodium tetraphenylborate (NaTPB) dissolution in In-Tank Precipitation salt solutions has been experimentally determined. The data indicates that the dissolution rate of solid NaTPB is a minor contributor the lag time experienced in the 1983 Salt Decontamination Demonstration Test and should not be considered as the rate determining step. Current analytical models for predicting the time to reach the composite lower flammability limit assume that the lag time is not more than 6 hours, and the data supports this assumption (i.e., dissolution by itself requires much less than 6 hours). The data suggests that another step--such as mass transport, the reaction of a benzene precursor or the mixing behavior--is the rate determining factor for benzene release to the vapor space in Tank 48H. In addition, preliminary results from this program show that the degree of agitation employed is not a significant parameter in determining the rate of NaTPB dissolution. As a result of this study, an improved equation for predicting equilibrium tetraphenylborate solubility with respect to temperature and sodium ion concentration has been determined.

Barnes, M.J.; Peterson, R.A.; Swingle, R.F.; Reeves, C.T.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

185

Sodium Reactor Experiment decommissioning. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Sodium Reactor Experiment (SRE) located at the Rockwell International Field Laboratories northwest of Los Angeles was developed to demonstrate a sodium-cooled, graphite-moderated reactor for civilian use. The reactor reached full power in May 1958 and provided 37 GWh to the Southern California Edison Company grid before it was shut down in 1967. Decommissioning of the SRE began in 1974 with the objective of removing all significant radioactivity from the site and releasing the facility for unrestricted use. Planning documentation was prepared to describe in detail the equipment and techniques development and the decommissioning work scope. A plasma-arc manipulator was developed for remotely dissecting the highly radioactive reactor vessels. Other important developments included techniques for using explosives to cut reactor vessel internal piping, clamps, and brackets; decontaminating porous concrete surfaces; and disposing of massive equipment and structures. The documentation defined the decommissioning in an SRE dismantling plan, in activity requirements for elements of the decommissioning work scope, and in detailed procedures for each major task.

Carroll, J.W.; Conners, C.C.; Harris, J.M.; Marzec, J.M.; Ureda, B.F.

1983-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

186

Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project ? Countdown to Startup  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Date: March 19, 2012 Media Contact: Natalie Packer, 208-533-0253 Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project Countdown to Startup Marking completion of another major...

187

Energy absorber for sodium-heated heat exchanger  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heat exchanger is described in which water-carrying tubes are heated by liquid sodium and in which the results of accidental contact between the water and the sodium caused by failure of one or more of the water tubes is minimized. An energy absorbing chamber contains a compressible gas and is connected to the body of flowing sodium by a channel so that, in the event of a sodium-water reaction, products of the reaction will partially fill the energy absorbing chamber to attenuate the rise in pressure within the heat exchanger.

Essebaggers, J.

1975-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Battery Electrode Materials Based on Layered Sodium Titanates  

Berkeley Lab researcher Marca Doeff and colleagues have developed a new electrode material based on a layered sodium titanate compound that can be ...

189

Interaction of sodium vapor and graphite studied by ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The kinetics of the reaction between graphite and sodium vapor is analyzed with support ... High temperature compression test to determine the anode paste...

190

Low Temperature Sodium-Sulfur Grid Storage and EV Battery  

Berkeley Lab researcher Gao Liu has developed an innovative design for a battery, made primarily of sodium and sulfur, that holds promise for both ...

191

Low Temperature Sodium-Sulfur Grid Storage and EV Battery ...  

Berkeley Lab researcher Gao Liu has developed an innovative design for a battery, made primarily of sodium and sulfur, that holds promise for both large-scale grid ...

192

NASICON-Type Electrolytes for Low Temperature Sodium Battery ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, NASICON-Type Electrolytes for Low Temperature Sodium Battery Applications. Author(s), Hui Zhang, Xingbo Liu. On-Site Speaker ( Planned)...

193

ESS 2012 Peer Review - Sodium Intercalation Battery for Stationary...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

LLC 35 Hartwell Avenue Lexington, MA 02421-3102 www.TIAXLLC.com Sodium Intercalation Battery for Stationary Storage Energy Storage Systems Program (ESS) Peer Review and Update...

194

Sodium cobalt bronze batteries and a method for making same  

SciTech Connect

A solid state secondary battery utilizing a low cost, environmentally sound, sodium cobalt bronze electrode. A method is provided for producing same.

Doeff, Marca M. (Hayward, CA); Ma, Yanping (Berkeley, CA); Visco, Steven J. (Berkeley, CA); DeJonghe, Lutgard (Lafayette, CA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Reductive Sulfur-fixation Smelting of Stibnite Concentrate in Sodium ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, A new process to extracted antimony directly from stibnite concentrate by reductive sulfur-fixation smelting in sodium molten salt has been...

196

Influence of Petroleum Coke Sulphur Content on the Sodium ... - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 1, 1993 ... Influence of Petroleum Coke Sulphur Content on the Sodium Sensitivity of Carbon Anodes by S.M. Hume ... TMS Student Member price: 0.00.

197

Sodium cobalt bronze batteries and a method for making same  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A solid state secondary battery utilizing a low cost, environmentally sound, sodium cobalt bronze electrode is described. A method is provided for producing same. 11 figs.

Doeff, M.M.; Ma, Y.; Visco, S.J.; DeJonghe, L.

1999-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

198

Planar Sodium Metal Halide Battery for Renewable Integration and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this work we will present a sodium ߔ-alumina cell designed for widespread renewable energy integration and electrical grid applications. The new generation...

199

Sodium fast reactor safety and licensing research plan. Volume II.  

SciTech Connect

Expert panels comprised of subject matter experts identified at the U.S. National Laboratories (SNL, ANL, INL, ORNL, LBL, and BNL), universities (University of Wisconsin and Ohio State University), international agencies (IRSN, CEA, JAEA, KAERI, and JRC-IE) and private consultation companies (Radiation Effects Consulting) were assembled to perform a gap analysis for sodium fast reactor licensing. Expert-opinion elicitation was performed to qualitatively assess the current state of sodium fast reactor technologies. Five independent gap analyses were performed resulting in the following topical reports: (1) Accident Initiators and Sequences (i.e., Initiators/Sequences Technology Gap Analysis), (2) Sodium Technology Phenomena (i.e., Advanced Burner Reactor Sodium Technology Gap Analysis), (3) Fuels and Materials (i.e., Sodium Fast Reactor Fuels and Materials: Research Needs), (4) Source Term Characterization (i.e., Advanced Sodium Fast Reactor Accident Source Terms: Research Needs), and (5) Computer Codes and Models (i.e., Sodium Fast Reactor Gaps Analysis of Computer Codes and Models for Accident Analysis and Reactor Safety). Volume II of the Sodium Research Plan consolidates the five gap analysis reports produced by each expert panel, wherein the importance of the identified phenomena and necessities of further experimental research and code development were addressed. The findings from these five reports comprised the basis for the analysis in Sodium Fast Reactor Research Plan Volume I.

Ludewig, H. (Brokhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY); Powers, D. A.; Hewson, John C.; LaChance, Jeffrey L.; Wright, A. (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Phillips, J.; Zeyen, R. (Institute for Energy Petten, Saint-Paul-lez-Durance, France); Clement, B. (IRSN/DPAM.SEMIC Bt 702, Saint-Paul-lez-Durance, France); Garner, Frank (Radiation Effects Consulting, Richland, WA); Walters, Leon (Advanced Reactor Concepts, Los Alamos, NM); Wright, Steve; Ott, Larry J. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); Suo-Anttila, Ahti Jorma; Denning, Richard (Ohio State University, Columbus, OH); Ohshima, Hiroyuki (Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki, Japan); Ohno, S. (Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki, Japan); Miyhara, S. (Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki, Japan); Yacout, Abdellatif (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Farmer, M. (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Wade, D. (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Grandy, C. (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Schmidt, R.; Cahalen, J. (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Olivier, Tara Jean; Budnitz, R. (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA); Tobita, Yoshiharu (Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki, Japan); Serre, Frederic (Centre d'%C3%94etudes nucl%C3%94eaires de Cadarache, Cea, France); Natesan, Ken (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Carbajo, Juan J. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); Jeong, Hae-Yong (Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon, Korea); Wigeland, Roald (Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID); Corradini, Michael (University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI); Thomas, Justin (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Wei, Tom (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Sofu, Tanju (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Flanagan, George F. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); Bari, R. (Brokhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY); Porter D. (Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID); Lambert, J. (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Hayes, S. (Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID); Sackett, J. (Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID); Denman, Matthew R.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Environmental, health, and safety issues of sodium-sulfur batteries for electric and hybrid vehicles. Volume 3, Transport of sodium-sulfur and sodium-metal-chloride batteries  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report examines the shipping regulations that govern the shipment of dangerous goods. Since the elemental sodium contained in both sodium-sulfur and sodium-metal-chloride batteries is classified as a dangerous good, and is listed on both the national and international hazardous materials listings, both national and international regulatory processes are considered in this report The interrelationships as well as the differences between the two processes are highlighted. It is important to note that the transport regulatory processes examined in this report are reviewed within the context of assessing the necessary steps needed to provide for the domestic and international transport of sodium-beta batteries. The need for such an assessment was determined by the Shipping Sub-Working Group (SSWG) of the EV Battery Readiness Working Group (Working Group), created in 1990. The Working Group was created to examine the regulatory issues pertaining to in-vehicle safety, shipping, and recycling of sodium-sulfur batteries, each of which is addressed by a sub-working group. The mission of the SSWG is to establish basic provisions that will ensure the safe and efficient transport of sodium-beta batteries. To support that end, a proposal to the UN Committee of Experts was prepared by the SSWG, with the goal of obtaining a proper shipping name and UN number for sodium-beta batteries and to establish the basic transport requirements for such batteries (see the appendix for the proposal as submitted). It is emphasized that because batteries are large articles containing elemental sodium and, in some cases, sulfur, there is no existing UN entry under which they can be classified and for which modal transport requirements, such as the use of packaging appropriate for such large articles, are provided for. It is for this reason that a specific UN entry for sodium-beta batteries is considered essential.

Hammel, C.J.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "l-1 hp sodium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Sodium waste technology: A summary report. [Melt-drain-evaporation-calcination (MEDEC)  

SciTech Connect

The Sodium Waste Technology (SWT) Program was established to resolve long-standing issues regarding disposal of sodium-bearing waste and equipment. Comprehensive SWT research programs investigated a variety of approaches for either removing sodium from sodium-bearing items, or disposal of items containing sodium residuals. The most successful of these programs was the design, test, and the production operation of the Sodium Process Demonstration Facility at ANL-W. The technology used was a series of melt-drain-evaporate operations to remove nonradioactive sodium from sodium-bearing items and then converting the sodium to storable compounds.

Abrams, C.S.; Witbeck, L.C.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Sodium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Neon Neon Previous Element (Neon) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Magnesium) Magnesium Isotopes of the Element Sodium [Click for Main Data] Most of the isotope data on this site has been obtained from the National Nuclear Data Center. Please visit their site for more information. Naturally Occurring Isotopes Mass Number Natural Abundance Half-life 23 100% STABLE Known Isotopes Mass Number Half-life Decay Mode Branching Percentage 18 1.3×10-21 seconds Proton Emission 100.00% 19 < 40 nanoseconds Proton Emission No Data Available 20 447.9 milliseconds Electron Capture with delayed Alpha Decay 20.05% Electron Capture 100.00% 21 22.49 seconds Electron Capture 100.00% 22 2.6027 years Electron Capture 100.00% 23 STABLE - - 24 14.997 hours Beta-minus Decay 100.00%

203

Low temperature sodium-beta battery  

SciTech Connect

A battery that will operate at ambient temperature or lower includes an enclosure, a current collector within the enclosure, an anode that will operate at ambient temperature or lower within the enclosure, a cathode that will operate at ambient temperature or lower within the enclosure, and a separator and electrolyte within the enclosure between the anode and the cathode. The anode is a sodium eutectic anode that will operate at ambient temperature or lower and is made of a material that is in a liquid state at ambient temperature or lower. The cathode is a low melting ion liquid cathode that will operate at ambient temperature or lower and is made of a material that is in a liquid state at ambient temperature or lower.

Farmer, Joseph C

2013-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

204

Update; Sodium advanced fast reactor (SAFR) concept  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports on the sodium advanced fast reactor (SAFR) concept developed by the team of Rockwell International, Combustion Engineering, and Bechtel during the 3-year period extending from January 1985 to December 1987 as one element in the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor Program. In January 1988, the team was expanded to include Duke Engineering and Services, Inc., and the concept development was extended under DOE's Program for Improvement in Advanced Modular LMR Design. The SAFR plant concept employs a 450-MWe pool-type liquid metal cooled reactor as its basic module. The reactor assembly module is a standardized shop-fabricated unit that can be shipped to the plant site by barge for installation. Shop fabrication minimizes nuclear-grade field fabrication and reduces the plant construction schedule. Reactor modules can be used individually or in multiples at a given site to supply the needed generating capacity.

Oldenkamp, R.D.; Brunings, J.E. (Rockwell International Corp., Canoga Park, CA (USA)); Guenther, E. (Combustion Engineering, Windsor, CT (US)); Hren, R. (Bechtel National Inc., San Francisco, CA (US))

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

FUEL PROGRAMMING FOR SODIUM GRAPHITE REACTORS  

SciTech Connect

The effect of fuel programming, i.e., the scheme used for changing fuel in a core, on the reactivity and specific power of a sodium graphite reactor is discussed Fuel programs considered Include replacing fuel a core-load at a time or a radial zone at a time, replacing fuel to manutain the same average exposure of fuel elements throughout the core, and replacing and transferring fuel elements to maintain more highly exposed fuel in the center or at the periphery of the core. Flux and criticality calculations show the degree of power flattening and the concurrent decrease in effective multiplication which results from maintaining more exposed fuel toward the core center. Corverse effects are shown for the case of maintaining more exposed fuel near the core periphery. The excess reactivity which must be controlled in the various programs is considered. Illustrative schedules for implementing each of these programs in an SGR are presented. (auth)

Connolly, T.J.

1959-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

206

U.S. DI!PARTMFNT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NEPA DE1'l1R1.llNATION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PARTMFNT OF ENERGY PARTMFNT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NEPA DE1'l1R1.llNATION RECIPIENT:Loudoun County Virginia Government Page 1 of2 STATE:: VA PROJECT TITLE: Scott Jenkins Parking Lot LED Lighting with Solar Arrays and on·site EV Charging Stations Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procurement Instrument Number NEPA Control Number em Number EEOOOO868 DE-EEOOOO86B GFO-OOOO868-OO3 EEO Based on my review orthe information concerning tbe proposed action, as NEPA CompliaMt Officer (authorized under DOE Order 451.1A), I have made the following determination; ex, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: 85.1 Actions to conserve energy. demonstrate potential energy conservation, and promote energy-efficiency that do not increase the indoor concentrations of potentially harmful substances. These actions may involve financial and technical

207

EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTE R NEPA DE1"l1lU.-llNATION RECIPIENT:Physical Optics Corporation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CENTE CENTE R NEPA DE1"l1lU.-llNATION RECIPIENT:Physical Optics Corporation PROJECT TITLE : Electrically Supported Thermal Exchange (ELSTEX) Technology Page 1 of2 STATE: CA Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procurement Instrument Number NEPA Control Number em Number DE-FOA-OOOO336 DE-EEOOO5130 GF0-0005130-001 EE5130 Based on my re view of the information concerning the proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 451. 1A), I have made tbe following determination: ex, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: A9 Information gathering (including, but not limited to, literature surveys, inventories, audits). data analysis (including computer modeling), document preparation (such as conceptual design or feasibility studies. analytical energy supply

208

Method of removing bulk sodium from metallic surfaces  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process of removing sodium from an article, particularly one made of stainless steel, by treating it with a mixture of water vapor and a gas which is inert to sodium is described. By selecting combinations of temperature and water vapor-to-gas ratio, the reaction temperature is controlled to prevent damage to the articles.

Maffei, H.P.; Borisch, R.R.

1975-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

209

Independent Oversight Assessment, Idaho Cleanup Project Sodium Bearing  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Idaho Cleanup Project Sodium Idaho Cleanup Project Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project - November 2012 Independent Oversight Assessment, Idaho Cleanup Project Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project - November 2012 November 2012 Assessment of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Idaho Cleanup Project Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Enforcement and Oversight (Independent Oversight), within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), conducted an independent assessment of nuclear safety culture at the DOE Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project (SBWTP). The primary objective of the evaluation was to provide information regarding the status of the safety culture at SBWTP. The data collection phase of the assessment occurred in April and May 2012. SBWTP is one of DOE's largest nuclear

210

Independent Oversight Review, Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project -  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project - Federal - June 2012 Independent Oversight Review, Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project - Federal - June 2012 June 2012 Review of the Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project - Integrated Waste Treatment Unit Federal Operational Readiness Review This report documents the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Enforcement and Oversight (Independent Oversight), within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), independent review of the Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project-Integrated Waste Treatment Unit (SBWTP-IWTU) DOE (Federal) Operational Readiness Review (D-ORR). The review was performed by the HSS Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations and was intended to assess the effectiveness of the CORR process as implemented for

211

EIS-0287: Notice of Preferred Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Technology |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Preferred Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Preferred Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Technology EIS-0287: Notice of Preferred Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Technology Idaho High-Level Waste (HLW) and Facilities Disposition In October 2002, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE or the Department) issued the Final Idaho High-Level Waste (HLW) and Facilities Disposition Environmental Impact Statement (DOE/EIS-0287 (Final EIS)). The Final EIS contains an evaluation of reasonable alternatives for the management of mixed transuranic waste/sodium bearing waste (SBW),1 mixed HLW calcine, and associated low-level waste (LLW), as well as disposition alternatives for HLW facilities when their missions are completed. DOE/EIS-0287, Notice of Preferred Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Technology, Office of Environmental Management, Idaho, 70 FR 44598 (August

212

Independent Oversight Review, Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project -  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project - Contractor - June 2012 Independent Oversight Review, Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project - Contractor - June 2012 June 2012 Review of the Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project - Integrated Waste Treatment Unit Contractor Operational Readiness Review This report documents the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Enforcement and Oversight (Independent Oversight), within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), independent review of the Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project-Integrated Waste Treatment Unit (SBWTP-IWTU) contractor Operational Readiness Review (C-ORR). The review was conducted at the Idaho Site from February 27 to March 6, 2012. This report discusses the background, scope, results, and conclusions of the review, as well as

213

Solid-state sodium batteries using polymer electrolytes and sodium intercalation electrode materials  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Solid-state sodium cells using polymer electrolytes (polyethylene oxide mixed with sodium trifluoromethanesulfonate: PEO{sub n}NaCF{sub 3}SO{sub 3}) and sodium cobalt oxide positive electrodes are characterized in terms of discharge and charge characteristics, rate capability, cycle life, and energy and power densities. The P2 phase Na{sub x}CoO{sub 2} can reversibly intercalate sodium in the range of x = 0.3 to 0.9, giving a theoretical specific energy of 440 Wh/kg and energy density of 1,600 Wh/l. Over one hundred cycles to 60% depth of discharge have been obtained at 0.5 mA/cm{sup 2}. Experiments show that the electrolyte/Na interface is stable and is not the limiting factor to cell cycle life. Na{sub 0.7}CoO{sub 2} composite electrodes containing various amounts of carbon black additive are investigated. The transport properties of polymer electrolytes are the critical factors for performance. These properties (the ionic conductivity, salt diffusion coefficient, and ion transference number) are measured for the PEO{sub n}NaCF{sub 3}SO{sub 3} system over a wide range of concentrations at 85 C. All the three transport properties are very salt-concentration dependent. The ionic conductivity exhibits a maximum at about n = 20. The transference number, diffusion coefficient, and thermodynamic factor all vary with salt concentration in a similar fashion, decreasing as the concentration increases, except for a local maximum. These results verify that polymer electrolytes cannot be treated as ideal solutions. The measured transport-property values are used to analyze and optimize the electrolytes by computer simulation and also cell testing. Salt precipitation is believed to be the rate limiting process for cells using highly concentrated solutions, as a result of lower values of these properties, while salt depletion is the limiting factor when a dilute solution is used.

Ma, Y. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Mineral Engineering]|[Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). Materials Sciences Div.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Decommissioning of Experimental Breeder Reactor - II Complex, Post Sodium Draining  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Experimental Breeder Reactor - II (EBR-II) was shutdown in September 1994 as mandated by the United States Department of Energy. This sodium-cooled reactor had been in service since 1964. The bulk sodium was drained from the primary and secondary systems and processed. Residual sodium remaining in the systems after draining was converted into sodium bicarbonate using humid carbon dioxide. This technique was tested at Argonne National Laboratory in Illinois under controlled conditions, then demonstrated on a larger scale by treating residual sodium within the EBR-II secondary cooling system, followed by the primary tank. This process, terminated in 2002, was used to place a layer of sodium bicarbonate over all exposed surfaces of sodium. Treatment of the remaining EBR-II sodium is governed by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). The Idaho Department of Environmental Quality issued a RCRA Operating Permit in 2002, mandating that all hazardous materials be removed from EBR-II within a 10 year period, with the ability to extend the permit and treatment period for another 10 years. A preliminary plan has been formulated to remove the remaining sodium and NaK from the primary and secondary systems using moist carbon dioxide, steam and nitrogen, and a water flush. The moist carbon dioxide treatment was resumed in May 2004. As of August 2005, approximately 60% of the residual sodium within the EBR-II primary tank had been treated. This process will continue through the end of 2005, when it is forecast that the process will become increasingly ineffective. At that time, subsequent treatment processes will be planned and initiated. It should be noted that the processes and anticipated costs associated with these processes are preliminary. Detailed engineering has not been performed, and approval for these methods has not been obtained from the regulator or the sponsors.

J. A. (Bart) Michelbacher; S. Paul Henslee; Collin J. Knight; Steven R. sherman

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Ion Recognition Approach to Volume Reduction of Alkaline Tank Waste by Separation and Recycle of Sodium Hydroxide and Sodium Nitrate  

SciTech Connect

This research was intended to provide the scientific foundation upon which the feasibility of liquid-liquid extraction chemistry for bulk reduction of the volume of high-activity tank waste can be evaluated. Primary focus has been on sodium hydroxide separation, with potential Hanford application. Value in sodium hydroxide separation can potentially be found in alternative flowsheets for treatment and disposal of low-activity salt waste. Additional value can be expected in recycle of sodium hydroxide for use in waste retrieval and sludge washing, whereupon additions of fresh sodium hydroxide to the waste can be avoided. Potential savings are large both because of the huge cost of vitrification of the low-activity waste stream and because volume reduction of high-activity wastes could obviate construction of costly new tanks. Toward these ends, the conceptual development begun in the original proposal was extended with the formulation of eight fundamental approaches that could be undertaken for extraction of sodium hydroxide.

Bruce A. Moyer; Alan P. Marchand; Peter V. Bonnesen; Jeffrey C. Bryan; Tamara J. Haverlock

2004-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

216

Experimental investigations on sodium plugging in narrow flow channels.  

SciTech Connect

A series of experiments was performed to investigate the potential for plugging of narrow flow channels of sodium by impurities (e.g., oxides). In the first phase of the experiments, clean sodium was circulated through the test sections simulating flow channels in a compact diffusion-bonded heat exchanger such as a printed circuit heat exchanger. The primary objective was to see if small channels whose cross sections are semicircles of 2, 4, and 6 mm in diameter are usable in liquid sodium applications where sodium purity is carefully controlled. It was concluded that the 2-mm channels, the smallest of the three, could be used in clean sodium systems at temperatures even as low as 100 to 110 C without plugging. In the second phase, sodium oxide was added to the loop, and the oxygen concentration in the liquid sodium was controlled by means of varying the cold-trap temperature. Intentional plugging was induced by creating a cold spot in the test sections, and the subsequent plugging behavior was observed. It was found that plugging in the 2-mm test section was initiated by lowering the cold spot temperature below the cold-trap temperature by 10 to 30 C. Unplugging of the plugged channels was accomplished by heating the affected test section.

Momozaki, Y.; Cho, D. H.; Sienicki, J. J.; Moisseytsev, A.; Nuclear Engineering Division

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Molecular dynamics study of sodium using a model pseudopotential  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The dynamics of sodium is investigated using the coulomb and Born-Mayer interaction augmented by a model pseudopotential to represent the electron interactions including screening, exchange, and correlation. The model parameters were previously determined and have been shown to accurately reproduce experimental equation-of-state, lattice vibration, and crystal phase properties of sodium in the harmonic limit. In this paper the equation-of-state and structural properties are examined in molecular dynamics calculations. The long range effects of the potential are included. Typically, each particle interacts with about 500 neighbors. The calculated equation of state of sodium in the hcp, bcc, and liquid structures is discussed.

Swanson, R.E.; Straub, G.K.; Holian, B.L.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Sodium Bearing Waste Processing Alternatives Analysis  

SciTech Connect

A multidisciplinary team gathered to develop a BBWI recommendation to DOE-ID on the processing alternatives for the sodium bearing waste in the INTEC Tank Farm. Numerous alternatives were analyzed using a rigorous, systematic approach. The data gathered were evaluated through internal and external peer reviews for consistency and validity. Three alternatives were identified to be top performers: Risk-based Calcination, MACT to WIPP Calcination and Cesium Ion Exchange. A dual-path through early Conceptual design is recommended for MACT to WIPP Calcination and Cesium Ion Exchange since Risk-based Calcination does not require design. If calcination alternatives are not considered based on giving Type of Processing criteria significantly greater weight, the CsIX/TRUEX alternative follows CsIX in ranking. However, since CsIX/TRUEX shares common uncertainties with CsIX, reasonable backups, which follow in ranking, are the TRUEX and UNEX alternatives. Key uncertainties must be evaluated by the decision-makers to choose one final alternative. Those key uncertainties and a path forward for the technology roadmapping of these alternatives is provided.

Murphy, James Anthony; Palmer, Brent J; Perry, Keith Joseph

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Structure and Aqueous Solubility of Sodium Isosaccharinate  

SciTech Connect

It has been recently shown that isosaccharinic acid, C6H12O6 (ISA), and its derivative salts have a great potential for practical application in the area of nuclear waste treatment and disposal sites management. Several studies demonstrated the effect of ISA complexation on radionuclide solubility and sorptive properties, especially on actinides in (+4) oxidation state like Np(IV) and Th(IV). The presence of ISA and/or its derivatives strongly affects the migration of radionuclides by increasing their solubility in water by several orders of magnitude and Na-ISA has been proposed as a component of decontamination formulations for actinide-contaminated surfaces. Here we report the synthesis, crystal's structure and characterization (FTIR, TGA) of sodium isosaccharate, NaC6H11O6-H2O (Na-ISA). The structure has been solved by single crystal X-ray diffraction methods. The solubility of Na-ISA has been evaluated and compared to that of Ca-ISA based on the structural features of both compounds.

Bontchev, Ranko P.; Moore, Robert; Tucker, Mark; Holt, Kathleen

2004-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

220

NMR monitoring of intracellular sodium in dog and rabbit kidney tubules  

SciTech Connect

{sup 23}Na-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) was used to monitor intra- and extracellular sodium in suspensions of dog cortical tubules, rabbit cortical tubules, and dog thick ascending limbs. The NMR visibility of the intracellular sodium was determined by comparing the NMR and flame photometry results and by redistributing the sodium ions between the intra- and extracellular compartments using the ionophore nystatin (influx) or sodium substitution for choline in the extracellular fluid (efflux). The intracellular sodium visibility was {approximately}30% for the total sodium and 58% for the transportable sodium. Addition of sodium to sodium-depleted homogenates of dog renal cortex also showed a loss of visibility. The values of the relaxation times T{sub 1} and T{sub 2} were determined but could not be correlated with the visibility measurements. The intracellular sodium concentration in dog cortical tubules incubated in optimal biochemical conditions was estimated at 51 mM was dependent on the extracellular sodium concentration.

Boulanger, Y.; Vinay, P.; Boulanger, M. (Universite de Montreal, Quebec (Canada))

1987-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "l-1 hp sodium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

ADVANCED ONCE-THROUGH STEAM GENERATOR FOR SODIUM APPLICATION  

SciTech Connect

Preliminary design calculations were performed for a once-through type steam generator and reheater for advanced sodium power plants in the 300-Mwe range. Parameters and performance data are presented. (D.L.C.)

Terpe, G.R.

1960-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

222

Internal structure, hygroscopic and reactive properties of mixed sodium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Internal structure, hygroscopic and Internal structure, hygroscopic and reactive properties of mixed sodium methanesulfonate-sodium chloride particles Internal structure, hygroscopic and reactive properties of mixed sodium methanesulfonate-sodium chloride particles Print Friday, 13 May 2011 00:00 Scientists recently combined experimental approaches and molecular dynamics modeling to gain new insights into the internal structure of sea salt particles and relate it to their fundamental chemical reactivity in the atmosphere. This research shows that surface enhancement or depletion of chemical components in marine particles can occur because of the difference in the chemical nature of the species. Because the atmospheric chemistry of the salt particles takes place at the gas-particle interface, understanding their complex surfaces provides new insights about their effect on the environment and climate change. Article Link.

223

Probabilistic transient analysis of fuel choices for sodium fast reactors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis presents the implications of using a risk-informed licensing framework to inform the design of Sodium Fast Reactors. NUREG-1860, more commonly known as the Technology Neutral Framework (TNF), is a risk-informed ...

Denman, Matthew R

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

United States, France and Japan Increase Cooperation on Sodium...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

on Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor Prototypes February 1, 2008 - 11:13am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC -The U.S Department of Energy (DOE), the French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) and...

225

Probabilistic transient analysis of fuel choices for sodium fast reactors.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis presents the implications of using a risk-informed licensing framework to inform the design of Sodium Fast Reactors. NUREG-1860, more commonly known as the (more)

Denman, Matthew R

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Reactor protection system design alternatives for sodium fast reactors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Historically, unprotected transients have been viewed as design basis events that can significantly challenge sodium-cooled fast reactors. The perceived potential consequences of a severe unprotected transient in a ...

DeWitte, Jacob D. (Jacob Dominic)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Loop simulation capability for sodium-cooled systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A one-dimensional loop simulation capability has been implemented in the thermal-hydraulic analysis code, THERMIT-4E. This code had been used to simulate and investigate flow in test sections of experimental sodium loops ...

Adekugbe, Oluwole A.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

ESS 2012 Peer Review - Sodium-based Battery Development - Dave...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. Sodium-based Battery Development A Family of Batteries for Large Scale Energy Storage D. Ingersoll, C....

229

Wall pressure exerted by hydrogenation of sodium aluminum hydride.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Wall pressure exerted by the bulk expansion of a sodium aluminum hydride bed was measured as a function of hydrogen content. A custom apparatus was designed and loaded with sodium alanates at densities of 1.0, 1.1, and 1.16 g/cc. Four complete cycles were performed to identify variations in measured pressure. Results indicated poor correlation between exerted pressure and hydrogen capacity of the sodium alanate beds. Mechanical pressure due to the hydrogenation of sodium alanates does not influence full-scale system designs as it falls within common design factors of safety. Gas pressure gradients within the porous solid were identified and may limit reaction rates, especially for high aspect ratio beds.

Perras, Yon E.; Dedrick, Daniel E.; Zimmerman, Mark D.

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

SODIUM-HEATED STEAM GENERATOR DEVELOPMENT. Interim Status Report  

SciTech Connect

Design and development of a once -through sodiumheated steam generator are discussed. Research proposals are discussed for evaluating: carbon transfer and mass transfer effects in the steam generator, effect on heat transfer and two- phase flow of coiling tubes, corrosion of Croloy 21/4 in products of sodium-water reactions, procedure for welding tube to back side of the tube sheet, radiographic inspection of back side tube welds, and chemical simulation of sodium environment for leak testing. (N.W.R.)

1964-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

231

High temperature sodium testing of the CRBR prototype primary pump  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Qualification testing in sodium of the CRBR primary pump was conducted through 1982. This paper presents an overview of the test program, a description of the Sodium Pump Test Facility (largest of its kind in the world), a brief description of the test article and summary overview of results. Of special interest were the high temperature gas convection tests and the extensive flow/speed control (dynamic) tests. Special innovative test methods were employed to investigate these phenomena.

Tessier, M.J.; Grimaldi, J.L.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Alignment and operability analysis of a vertical sodium pump  

SciTech Connect

With the objective of identifying important alignment features of pumps such as FFTF, HALLAM, EBR II, PNC, PHENIX, and CRBR, alignment of the vertical sodium pump for the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant (CRBRP) is investigated. The CRBRP pump includes a flexibly coupled pump shaft and motor shaft, two oil-film tilting-pad hydrodynamic radial bearings in the motor plus a vertical thrust bearing, and two sodium hydrostatic bearings straddling the double-suction centrifugal impeller in the pump.

Gupta, V.K.; Fair, C.E.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Hydrogen storage in sodium aluminum hydride.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Sodium aluminum hydride, NaAlH{sub 4}, has been studied for use as a hydrogen storage material. The effect of Ti, as a few mol. % dopant in the system to increase kinetics of hydrogen sorption, is studied with respect to changes in lattice structure of the crystal. No Ti substitution is found in the crystal lattice. Electronic structure calculations indicate that the NaAlH{sub 4} and Na{sub 3}AlH{sub 6} structures are complex-ionic hydrides with Na{sup +} cations and AlH{sub 4}{sup -} and AlH{sub 6}{sup 3-} anions, respectively. Compound formation studies indicate the primary Ti-compound formed when doping the material at 33 at. % is TiAl{sub 3} , and likely Ti-Al compounds at lower doping rates. A general study of sorption kinetics of NaAlH{sub 4}, when doped with a variety of Ti-halide compounds, indicates a uniform response with the kinetics similar for all dopants. NMR multiple quantum studies of solution-doped samples indicate solvent interaction with the doped alanate. Raman spectroscopy was used to study the lattice dynamics of NaAlH{sub 4}, and illustrated the molecular ionic nature of the lattice as a separation of vibrational modes between the AlH{sub 4}{sup -} anion-modes and lattice-modes. In-situ Raman measurements indicate a stable AlH{sub 4}{sup -} anion that is stable at the melting temperature of NaAlH{sub 4}, indicating that Ti-dopants must affect the Al-H bond strength.

Ozolins, Vidvuds; Herberg, J.L. (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); McCarty, Kevin F.; Maxwell, Robert S. (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Stumpf, Roland Rudolph; Majzoub, Eric H.

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Advanced sodium fast reactor accident source terms : research needs.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An expert opinion elicitation has been used to evaluate phenomena that could affect releases of radionuclides during accidents at sodium-cooled fast reactors. The intent was to identify research needed to develop a mechanistic model of radionuclide release for licensing and risk assessment purposes. Experts from the USA, France, the European Union, and Japan identified phenomena that could affect the release of radionuclides under hypothesized accident conditions. They qualitatively evaluated the importance of these phenomena and the need for additional experimental research. The experts identified seven phenomena that are of high importance and have a high need for additional experimental research: High temperature release of radionuclides from fuel during an energetic eventEnergetic interactions between molten reactor fuel and sodium coolant and associated transfer of radionuclides from the fuel to the coolantEntrainment of fuel and sodium bond material during the depressurization of a fuel rod with breached claddingRates of radionuclide leaching from fuel by liquid sodiumSurface enrichment of sodium pools by dissolved and suspended radionuclidesThermal decomposition of sodium iodide in the containment atmosphereReactions of iodine species in the containment to form volatile organic iodides. Other issues of high importance were identified that might merit further research as development of the mechanistic model of radionuclide release progressed.

Powers, Dana Auburn; Clement, Bernard [IRSN/DPAM.SEMIC Bt 702, Saint-Paul-lez-Durance, France] IRSN/DPAM.SEMIC Bt 702, Saint-Paul-lez-Durance, France; Denning, Richard [Ohio State University, Columbus, OH] Ohio State University, Columbus, OH; Ohno, Shuji [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki, Japan] Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki, Japan; Zeyen, Roland [Institute for Energy Petten, Saint-Paul-lez-Durance, France] Institute for Energy Petten, Saint-Paul-lez-Durance, France

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Advanced sodium fast reactor accident source terms : research needs.  

SciTech Connect

An expert opinion elicitation has been used to evaluate phenomena that could affect releases of radionuclides during accidents at sodium-cooled fast reactors. The intent was to identify research needed to develop a mechanistic model of radionuclide release for licensing and risk assessment purposes. Experts from the USA, France, the European Union, and Japan identified phenomena that could affect the release of radionuclides under hypothesized accident conditions. They qualitatively evaluated the importance of these phenomena and the need for additional experimental research. The experts identified seven phenomena that are of high importance and have a high need for additional experimental research: High temperature release of radionuclides from fuel during an energetic eventEnergetic interactions between molten reactor fuel and sodium coolant and associated transfer of radionuclides from the fuel to the coolantEntrainment of fuel and sodium bond material during the depressurization of a fuel rod with breached claddingRates of radionuclide leaching from fuel by liquid sodiumSurface enrichment of sodium pools by dissolved and suspended radionuclidesThermal decomposition of sodium iodide in the containment atmosphereReactions of iodine species in the containment to form volatile organic iodides. Other issues of high importance were identified that might merit further research as development of the mechanistic model of radionuclide release progressed.

Powers, Dana Auburn; Clement, Bernard [IRSN/DPAM.SEMIC Bt 702, Saint-Paul-lez-Durance, France] IRSN/DPAM.SEMIC Bt 702, Saint-Paul-lez-Durance, France; Denning, Richard [Ohio State University, Columbus, OH] Ohio State University, Columbus, OH; Ohno, Shuji [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki, Japan] Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki, Japan; Zeyen, Roland [Institute for Energy Petten, Saint-Paul-lez-Durance, France] Institute for Energy Petten, Saint-Paul-lez-Durance, France

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Independent Oversight Assessment, Idaho Cleanup Project Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project- November 2012  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Assessment of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Idaho Cleanup Project Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project

237

Method of and apparatus for removing silicon from a high temperature sodium coolant  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of and system for removing silicon from a high temperature liquid sodium coolant system for a nuclear reactor. The sodium is cooled to a temperature below the silicon saturation temperature and retained at such reduced temperature while inducing high turbulence into the sodium flow for promoting precipitation of silicon compounds and ultimate separation of silicon compound particles from the liquid sodium.

Yunker, Wayne H. (Richland, WA); Christiansen, David W. (Kennewick, WA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Fast Flux Test Facility, Sodium Storage Facility project-specific project management plan  

SciTech Connect

This Project-Specific Project Management Plan describes the project management methods and controls used by the WHC Projects Department to manage Project 03-F-031. The Sodium Storage Facility provides for storage of the 260,000 gallons of sodium presently in the FFTF Plant. The facility will accept the molten sodium transferred from the FFTF sodium systems, and store the sodium in a solid state under an inert cover gas until such time as a Sodium Reaction Facility is available for final disposal of the sodium.

Shank, D.R.

1994-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

239

Generation IV International Forum Signs Agreement to Collaborate on Sodium  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Forum Signs Agreement to Collaborate on Forum Signs Agreement to Collaborate on Sodium Cooled Fast Reactors Generation IV International Forum Signs Agreement to Collaborate on Sodium Cooled Fast Reactors February 17, 2006 - 11:58am Addthis FUKUI , JAPAN - The Department of Energy today announced that the United States signed a sodium-cooled fast reactor systems arrangement with France and Japan, providing the framework for collaboration among these countries on the research and development of these advanced nuclear reactors. The signing of the agreement took place on February 16, 2006. This arrangement will support the development of technologies associated with the U.S.-led Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP), announced earlier this month by Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman. GNEP is a

240

Independent Oversight Review, Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project -  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Federal - June 2012 Federal - June 2012 Independent Oversight Review, Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project - Federal - June 2012 June 2012 Review of the Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project - Integrated Waste Treatment Unit Federal Operational Readiness Review This report documents the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Enforcement and Oversight (Independent Oversight), within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), independent review of the Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project-Integrated Waste Treatment Unit (SBWTP-IWTU) DOE (Federal) Operational Readiness Review (D-ORR). The review was performed by the HSS Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations and was intended to assess the effectiveness of the CORR process as implemented for the SBWTP-IWTU. This review also provides additional data regarding

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "l-1 hp sodium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Independent Oversight Review, Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project -  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Contractor - June 2012 Contractor - June 2012 Independent Oversight Review, Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project - Contractor - June 2012 June 2012 Review of the Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project - Integrated Waste Treatment Unit Contractor Operational Readiness Review This report documents the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Enforcement and Oversight (Independent Oversight), within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), independent review of the Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project-Integrated Waste Treatment Unit (SBWTP-IWTU) contractor Operational Readiness Review (C-ORR). The review was conducted at the Idaho Site from February 27 to March 6, 2012. This report discusses the background, scope, results, and conclusions of the review, as well as opportunities for improvement (OFIs) and items identified for further

242

Method of forming and starting a sodium sulfur battery  

SciTech Connect

A method of forming a sodium sulfur battery and of starting the reactive capability of that battery when heated to a temperature suitable for battery operation is disclosed. An anodic reaction zone is constructed in a manner that sodium is hermetically sealed therein, part of the hermetic seal including fusible material which closes up openings through the container of the anodic reaction zone. The hermetically sealed anodic reaction zone is assembled under normal atmospheric conditions with a suitable cathodic reaction zone and a cation-permeable barrier. When the entire battery is heated to an operational temperature, the fusible material of the hermetically sealed anodic reaction zone is fused, thereby allowing molten sodium to flow from the anodic reaction zone into reactive engagement with the cation-permeable barrier.

Paquette, David G. (Costa Mesa, CA)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

ESS 2012 Peer Review - Sodium-based Battery Development - Dave Ingersoll, SNL  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sodium-based Battery Development Sodium-based Battery Development A Family of Batteries for Large Scale Energy Storage D. Ingersoll, C. Apblett, E. Spoerke, K. Zavadil, R. Cygan, J. Ihlefeld, F. Delnick, & T. Anderson Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM Prof. E. Wachsman University of Maryland, College Park, MD Profs. R. Kee & J. Porter, Dr. H. Zhu Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO S. Bhavaraju & M. Robins Ceramatec, Inc, Salt Lake City, UT D. Beeaff CoorsTek, Inc, Golden, CO J. Martin Boulder Ionics, Golden CO US DOE Energy Storage Systems Research Program Peer Review, Washington, DC, Sept. 26-28, 2012 Sodium-based batteries  Purpose  Demonstrate a family of sodium-based battery chemistries  sodium-iodine, sodium-bromine, sodium-air, sodium insertion, sodium-metal, etc

244

Study of cesium volatility from sodium carbonate based melts  

SciTech Connect

Purpose of this study was to obtain thermodynamic data on cesium volatility from sodium carbonate-based molten salts for application to the Rockwell-ETEC molten salt oxidation process. At 1073 to 1373 K, volatility tests were conducted on a horizontal and a vertical transpiration apparatus using a carrier gas composed of CO{sub 2}(g) and H{sub 2}O(g) which was passed over or bubbled through a sodium carbonate bath containing cesium carbonate and various additives. The major vapor species was identified to be CsOH(g) except when greater than 3% chloride is present in the melt, then the major vapor species is CsCl(g). The decrease in volatility of cesium as a function of cesium concentration in Cs{sub 2}CO{sub 3{minus}}Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} mixtures follows Raoult`s law very closely. Thus, this system exhibits close to ideal solution behavior. Addition of 22.5 wt % sodium sulfate decreases the cesium volatility by just under a factor of 2, and the addition of 10.0 wt % sodium chloride increases the cesium volatility about an order of magnitude. The addition of 2.0 wt % ash, molecular sieve, or silica show little or no effect. However, the data indicate that higher concentrations of ash will decrease the cesium volatility. For the addition of 22.5 wt % sodium sulfate the activity coefficient, {gamma}(Cs{sub 2}CO{sub 3}){sup {1/2}}, is calculated to be 0.720 {plus_minus} 0.068, and for the addition of 10.0 wt % sodium chloride, the activity coefficient, {gamma}(CsCl), is calculated to be 8.118 {plus_minus} 2.317. Assuming that Henry`s law applies, these activity coefficients are used to extrapolate the effect on cesium retention in the molten salt oxidizer of sulfate and chloride at lower cesium concentrations.

Ebbinghaus, B.B.; Krikorian, O.H.; Adamson, M.G.; Fleming, D.L.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Sodium and lithium corrosion in molybdenum heat pipes  

SciTech Connect

Sodium and lithium corrosin in molybdenum heat pipes has been shown to be impurity dependent rather than solubility dependent. Impurities represent the major contributors to corrosion in the heat pipes tested. Our experiments have shown no evidence of direct solution of molybdenum by either sodium or lithium. Analysis has suggested that a critical concentration of impurities is required to initiate corrosion. Thus it appears that corrosion in Mo/Na and Mo/Li heat pipes can be controlled if impurity concentration can be limited by removal of impurities from the working fluid and heat pipe components prior to operation or by internal gettering during operation.

Lundberg, L.B.; Merrigan, M.A.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Solid-state laser system for laser cooling of Sodium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We demonstrate a frequency-stabilized, all-solid laser source at 589 nm with up to 800 mW output power. The laser relies on sum-frequency generation from two laser sources at 1064 nm and 1319 nm through a PPKTP crystal in a doubly-resonant cavity. We obtain conversion efficiency as high as 2 W/W^2 after optimization of the cavity parameters. The output wavelength is tunable over 60 GHz, which is sufficient to lock on the Sodium D2 line. The robustness, beam quality, spectral narrowness and tunability of our source make it an alternative to dye lasers for atomic physics experiments with Sodium atoms.

Emmanuel Mimoun; Luigi de Sarlo; Jean-Jacques Zondy; Jean Dalibard; Fabrice Gerbier

2009-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

247

Solid-state laser system for laser cooling of Sodium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We demonstrate a frequency-stabilized, all-solid laser source at 589 nm with up to 800 mW output power. The laser relies on sum-frequency generation from two laser sources at 1064 nm and 1319 nm through a PPKTP crystal in a doubly-resonant cavity. We obtain conversion efficiency as high as 2 W/W^2 after optimization of the cavity parameters. The output wavelength is tunable over 60 GHz, which is sufficient to lock on the Sodium D2 line. The robustness, beam quality, spectral narrowness and tunability of our source make it an alternative to dye lasers for atomic physics experiments with Sodium atoms.

Mimoun, Emmanuel; Zondy, Jean-Jacques; Dalibard, Jean; Gerbier, Fabrice

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Sodium-Doped Molybdenum Targets for Controllable Sodium Incorporation in CIGS Solar Cells: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The efficiency of Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS) solar cells is enhanced when Na is incorporated in the CIGS absorber layer. This work examines Na incorporation in CIGS utilizing Na-doped Mo sputtered from targets made with sodium molybdate-doped (MONA) powder. Mo:Na films with varying thicknesses were sputtered onto Mo-coated borosilicate glass (BSG) or stainless steel substrates for CIGS solar cells. By use of this technique, the Na content of CIGS can be varied from near-zero to higher than that obtained from a soda-lime glass (SLG) substrate. Targets and deposition conditions are described. The doped Mo films are analyzed, and the resulting devices are compared to devices fabricated on Mo-coated SLG as well as Mo-coated BSG with NaF. Completed devices utilizing MONA exceeded 15.7% efficiency without anti-reflective coating, which was consistently higher than devices prepared with the NaF precursor. Strategies for minimizing adhesion difficulties are presented.

Mansfield, L. M.; Repins, I. L.; Glynn, S.; Carducci, M. D.; Honecker, D. M.; Pankow, J.; Young, M.; DeHart, C.; Sundaramoorthy, R.; Beall, C. L.; To, B.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Nickel container of highly-enriched uranium bodies and sodium  

SciTech Connect

A fuel element comprises highly a enriched uranium bodies coated with a nonfissionable, corrosion resistant material. A plurality of these bodies are disposed in layers, with sodium filling the interstices therebetween. The entire assembly is enclosed in a fluid-tight container of nickel.

Zinn, Walter H. (Hinsdale, IL)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Compatibility Assessment of Advanced Stainless Steels in Sodium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Type 316L stainless steel capsules containing commercially pure sodium and miniature tensile specimens of HT-UPS (austenitic, 14Cr-16Ni), NF-616 (ferritic/martensitic, 9Cr-2W-0.5Mo), or 316L (austenitic, 17Cr-10Ni-2Mo) stainless steel were exposed at 600 or 700 C for 100 and 400 h as a screening test for compatibility. Using weight change, tensile testing, and metallographic analysis, HT-UPS and 316L were found to be largely immune to changes resulting from sodium exposure, but NF-616 was found susceptible to substantial decarburization at 700 C. Subsequently, two thermal convection loops (TCLs) constructed of 316L and loaded with commercially pure sodium and miniature tensile specimens of HT-UPS and 316L were operated for 2000 h each one between 500 and 650 C, the other between 565 and 725 C at a flow rate of about 1.5 cm/s. Changes in specimen appearance, weight, and tensile properties were observed to be very minor in all cases, and there was no metallographic evidence of microstructure changes, composition gradients, or mass transfer resulting from prolonged exposure in a TCL. Thus, it appears that HT-UPS and 316L stainless steels are similarly compatible with commercially pure sodium under these exposure conditions.

Pawel, Steven J [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Volatility of Aqueous Acetic Acid, Formic Acid, and Sodium Acetate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The quality of water and steam is central to ensuring power plant component availability and reliability. A key part of developing operating cycle chemistry guidelines is an understanding of the impurity distribution between water and steam. This report examines the volatility of some of the principal cycle organic corrodents: acetic acid, formic acid, and sodium acetate.

2000-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

252

Method of generating hydrogen gas from sodium borohydride  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A compact solid source of hydrogen gas, where the gas is generated by contacting water with micro-disperse particles of sodium borohydride in the presence of a catalyst, such as cobalt or ruthenium. The micro-disperse particles can have a substantially uniform diameter of 1-10 microns, and preferably about 3-5 microns. Ruthenium or cobalt catalytic nanoparticles can be incorporated in the micro-disperse particles of sodium borohydride, which allows a rapid and complete reaction to occur without the problems associated with caking and scaling of the surface by the reactant product sodium metaborate. A closed loop water management system can be used to recycle wastewater from a PEM fuel cell to supply water for reacting with the micro-disperse particles of sodium borohydride in a compact hydrogen gas generator. Capillary forces can wick water from a water reservoir into a packed bed of micro-disperse fuel particles, eliminating the need for using an active pump.

Kravitz, Stanley H. (Placitas, NM); Hecht, Andrew M. (Sandia Park, NM); Sylwester, Alan P. (Albuquerque, NM); Bell, Nelson S. (Albuquerque, NM)

2007-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

253

Method of Manufacturing Micro-Disperse Particles of Sodium Borohydride  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A compact solid source of hydrogen gas, where the gas is generated by contacting water with micro-disperse particles of sodium borohydride in the presence of a catalyst, such as cobalt or ruthenium. The micro-disperse particles can have a substantially uniform diameter of 1-10 microns, and preferably about 3-5 microns. Ruthenium or cobalt catalytic nanoparticles can be incorporated in the micro-disperse particles of sodium borohydride, which allows a rapid and complete reaction to occur without the problems associated with caking and scaling of the surface by the reactant product sodium metaborate. A closed loop water management system can be used to recycle wastewater from a PEM fuel cell to supply water for reacting with the micro-disperse particles of sodium borohydride in a compact hydrogen gas generator. Capillary forces can wick water from a water reservoir into a packed bed of micro-disperse fuel particles, eliminating the need for using an active pump.

Kravitz, Stanley H. (Placitas, NM); Hecht, Andrew M. (Sandia Park, NM); Sylwester. Alan P. (Albuquerque, NM); Bell, Nelson S. (Albuquerque, NM)

2008-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

254

Sodium sulfur container with chromium/chromium oxide coating  

SciTech Connect

A coating of chromium/chromium oxide is disclosed for coating the surfaces of electrically conducting components of a sodium sulfur battery. This chromium/chromium oxide coating is placed on the surfaces of the electrically conducting components of the battery which are in contact with molten polysulfide and sulfur reactants during battery operation.

Ludwig, Frank A. (Irvine, CA); Higley, Lin R. (Santa Ana, CA)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

An Electrical Cathode Model of a High Pressure Sodium Lamp  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An electrical cathode model (ECM) of a high pressure sodium lamp (HPS) based on physical laws has been developed. The proposed ECM calculates the instantaneous voltage drop in a cathode sheath and the temperature distribution inside the cathode using ... Keywords: cathode model, HPS lamp ballast designs

Jose Luis Tapia; Joel O. Pacheco Sotelo; Eduardo Diaz Rodriguez; Yulia Nikolaevna Ledeneva; Rene Arnulfo Garcia Hernandez

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Chemical kinetic studies on dry sorbents. Final report. [Sodium bicarbonate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The scope of this research investigation has included a review of potential additives suitable for dry flue-gas desulfurization (FGD) and a bench scale laboratory study to determine the chemical kinetics for the reaction of five different sorbents with sulfur dioxide. The sorbents chosen included sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO/sub 3/), soda ash (Na/sub 2/CO/sub 3/), trona, lime (CaO) and hydrated lime (Ca(OH)/sub 2/). This study has shown that: (1) The reaction rate increases with temperature for soda ash and calcium oxide. The reaction temperature has an inverse effect on sodium bicarbonate and trona due, primarily, to the simultaneous thermal activation reaction. The calcium hydroxide-SO/sub 2/ reaction increased up to 550/sup 0/F, and then decreased, due to uneven gas flow distribution. (2) The reaction rates for soda ash, calcium oxide and calcium hydroxide were increased by decreasing their particle size. This effect was not confirmed for sodium bicarbonate and trona where reaction temperature was the most important reaction parameter. (3) Reaction with soda ash was found to be limited by the presence of an impervious ash layer which prevented interparticle gaseous diffusion. Calcium oxide and calcium hydroxide were found to be limited by a slow chemical reaction rate. Results on the rate-limiting steps for sodium bicarbonate and trona were inconclusive because of the simultaneous thermal activation reaction. (4) The effect of thermal activation was to increase the reaction rate for sodium bicarbonate and trona at lower temperatures. This effect was less pronounced at higher temperatures. (5) Results obtained for nitric oxide show limited adsorption for the five sorbents tested as compared to the finding for sulfur dioxide.

Davis, W.T.; Keener, T.C.

1982-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

257

Method of and apparatus for removing silicon from a high temperature sodium coolant  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent discloses a method of and system for removing silicon from a high temperature liquid sodium coolant system for a nuclear reactor. The sodium is cooled to a temperature below the silicon saturation temperature and retained at such reduced temperature while inducing high turbulence into the sodium flow for promoting precipitation of silicon compounds and ultimate separation of silicon compound particles from the liquid sodium.

Yunker, W.H.; Christiansen, D.W.

1983-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

258

Go No-Go Recommendation for Sodium Borohydride for On-Board Vehicular Hydrogen Storage  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

Independent review panel recommendation for go/no go decision on use of hydrolysis of sodium borohydride for hydrogen storage.

259

A new approach in signal processing for sodium boiling noise detection by probability density function estimates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The probability density function (pdf) method of noise signal processing has been investigated for its capability and quality in detecting sodium boiling noise. In an attempt to identify proper features of the pdf for sodium boiling noise detection, the segmented areas under the pdf curves have been found sensitive to sodium boiling noise. New approaches have been followed in selecting the feature threshold and achieving the targeted probabilities for false and missed sodium boiling noise detection.

Reddy, C.P.; Singh, O.P.; Vyjayanthi, R.K.; Prabhakar, R.

1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Growth Rate of Marine Microalgal Species using Sodium Bicarbonate for Biofuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With additional research on species characteristics and continued work towards cost effective production methods, algae are viewed as a possible alternative biofuel crop to current feedstocks such as corn. Current open pond production methods involve bubbling carbon dioxide (CO_(2)) gas into the media to provide a carbon source for photosynthesis, but this can be very inefficient releasing most CO_(2) back into the atmosphere. This research began by investigating the effect of sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO_(3)) in the growth media as an alternative carbon source to bubbling CO_(2) into the cultures. The second part examined if NaHCO_(3) could act as a lipid trigger in higher (10.0 g/L) concentrations. The microalgae species Dunaliella tertiolecta (Chlorophyta), Mayamaea spp. (Baciallariophyta) and Synechoccocus sp. (Cyanophyta) were grown with 0.0 g/L, 0.5g/L, 1.0 g/L, 2.0 g/L and 5.0 g/L dissolved NaHCO_(3) in modified seawater (f/2) media. To investigate effects of NaHCO_(3) on lipid accumulation, growth media cultures were divided into two ?lipid phase? medias containing either 0.0g/L (non-boosted) or 10.0 g/L (boosted) NaHCO_(3) treatments. Culture densities were determined using spectrophotometry, which showed both all three species are able to successfully grow in media ameliorated with these high NaHCO_(3) concentrations. Highest growth phase culture densities occurred in NaHCO_(3) concentrations of 2.0 g/L for D. tertiolecta and Mayamaea spp., and the 5.0 g/L treatment for Synechoccocus sp. Highest growth rates occurred in the 5.0 g/L NaHCO_(3) concentration treatments for D. tertiolecta, Mayamaea spp., and Synechoccocus sp. (0.205 d-1 0.010, 0.119 d-1 0.004, and 0.372 d-1 0.003 respectively). As a lipid accumulation trigger two of the three species (D. tertiolecta and Mayamaea spp) had their highest end day oil indices in a 10.0 g/L treatment. Highest oil indices occurred in boosted 5.0 g/L Dunaliella tertiolecta and 2.0 g/L Mayamaea spp. (13136 895 and 62844 8080 respectively (relative units)). The results obtained indicate NaHCO3 could be used as a photosynthetic carbon source for growth in all three species and a lipid trigger for D. tertiolecta and Mayamaea spp.

Gore, Matthew

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "l-1 hp sodium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Microsoft Word - EC Sodium coolant removal.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 1 SECTION A. Project Title: MFC - EBR-II Sodium Removal/RCRA Closure Activities SECTION B . Project Description The proposed action will remove the sodium from the Experimental Breeder Reactor (EBR)-II piping system and tanks to achieve clean-closure for eventual decommissioning, deactivation and demolition (DD&D). The clean-closure will be completed in compliance with the EBR-II Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (HWMA/RCRA) Storage and Treatment Permit PER-120, which includes the closure plan. EBR-II is located at the Materials and Fuels Complex at the Idaho National Laboratory. The EBR-II DD&D actions will be addressed under the Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation, and Liability Act, specifically, the Engineering Evaluation/Cost

262

First-Principles Study on Electron Conduction in Sodium Nanowire  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. We present detailed first-principles calculations of the electron-conduction properties of a three-sodium-atom nanowire suspended between semi-infinite crystalline Na(001) electrodes during its elongation. Our investigations reveal that the conductance is ? 1 G0 before the nanowire breaks and only one channel with the characteristic of the 3s orbital of the center atom in the nanowire contributes to the electron conduction. Moreover, the channel fully opens around the Fermi level, and the behavior of the channel-current density is insensitive to the structural deformation of the nanowire. These results verify that the conductance trace as a function of the electrode spacing exhibits a flat plateau at ? 1 G0 during elongation. First-Principles Study on Electron Conduction in Sodium Nanowire 2 1.

Yoshiyuki Egami; Takashi Sasaki; Tomoya Ono

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Preventing ash agglomeration during gasification of high-sodium lignite  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Various additives were evaluated to assess their ability to prevent ash agglomeration during the gasification of high-sodium lignite. Additives that showed promise in simple muffle furnace tests included meta-kaolin, vermiculite, two types of silica fume, and one type of bauxite. Additives that were tested and rejected included dolomite, calcite, sand flour, kaolinite, fine kaolin, and calcined bauxite. Based on the muffle furnace test results, the meta-kaolin was selected for a follow-on demonstration in a pilot-scale coal gasifier. Pilot-scale testing showed that the addition of coarse (minus 14-mesh, 920-{mu}m mean size) meta-kaolin at a feed rate roughly equivalent to the ash content of the lignite (10 wt %) successfully prevented agglomeration and deposition problems during gasification of high-sodium lignite at a maximum operating temperature of 927{sup o}C (1700{sup o}F). 13 refs., 24 figs., 1 tab.

Robert S. Dahlin; Johnny R. Dorminey; WanWang Peng; Roxann F. Leonard; Pannalal Vimalchand [Southern Research Institute and Southern Company Services, Wilsonville, AL (USA). Power Systems Development Facility

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

264

Sodium-Beta Alumina Batteries: Status and Challenges  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Sodium-beta alumina batteries, have been extensively developed for a few decades and encouraging progress has been achieved so far. The anode is typically molten sodium while the cathode can be molten sulfur (Na-S battery) or solid transition metal halides plus a liquid phase secondary electrolyte (e.g., ZEBRA battery). The electrolyte typically used is a ?"-Al2O3 solid membrane. The issues prohibiting broad commercialization of this type of technology are dependent on the materials used, but can be broadly described as relatively high cost, safety (particularly for the Na-S couple), and low power. This paper offers a review on materials and designs for the batteries and discusses the challenges ahead for further technology improvement.

Lu, Xiaochuan; Lemmon, John P.; Sprenkle, Vincent L.; Yang, Zhenguo

2010-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

265

TEN-YEAR SODIUM-REACTOR DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM  

SciTech Connect

>A 10-year program of development and construction of large-scale, sodium-cooled reactors is summarized. The current state of development of the SGR and its associated components is sufficiently advanced to permit construction of economic plants within the 10-year period. Two advanced Sodium Reactor concepts are presented. A construction program involving two reactor experiments and two full-scale plants with a capacity of 550 Mwe, together with associated development, is estimated to cost 6 million. Of this amount approximately 06 million would be borne by the AEC and the remainder by power utility companies. Escalation and construction loan interest charges are included in these figures. The cost of power from the larger power plant would be approximately 6 mills/kw-hr, based on 1959 dollars. (auth)

1959-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

266

CORE PARAMETER STUDY FOR A 300-MW SODIUM GRAPHITE REACTOR  

SciTech Connect

A core parameter study of the operating costs was performed for a 300- Mwe sodium graphite reactor, a scale-up of the Hallam Power Reactor. The results of the study indicate that the core design is nsar optimum and that core modifications would reduce the power costs by less than 5%. The lattice spacing, fuel rod diameter, and sodium flow can be varied within a rather broad range without significant changes in power generation costs. The effect of the fuel cladning thickness is more significant; fuel cycle costs can be reduced if stainless steel canning is replaced with zirconium canning. Use of UC in place of uraniummolybdenum fuel would also permit cost reductions. (D.L.C.)

Corcoran, W.P.

1959-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

267

Selective Adsorption of Sodium Aluminum Fluoride Salts from Molten Aluminum  

SciTech Connect

Aluminum is produced in electrolytic reduction cells where alumina feedstock is dissolved in molten cryolite (sodium aluminum fluoride) along with aluminum and calcium fluorides. The dissolved alumina is then reduced by electrolysis and the molten aluminum separates to the bottom of the cell. The reduction cell is periodically tapped to remove the molten aluminum. During the tapping process, some of the molten electrolyte (commonly referred as bath in the aluminum industry) is carried over with the molten aluminum and into the transfer crucible. The carryover of molten bath into the holding furnace can create significant operational problems in aluminum cast houses. Bath carryover can result in several problems. The most troublesome problem is sodium and calcium pickup in magnesium-bearing alloys. Magnesium alloying additions can result in Mg-Na and Mg-Ca exchange reactions with the molten bath, which results in the undesirable pickup of elemental sodium and calcium. This final report presents the findings of a project to evaluate removal of molten bath using a new and novel micro-porous filter media. The theory of selective adsorption or removal is based on interfacial surface energy differences of molten aluminum and bath on the micro-porous filter structure. This report describes the theory of the selective adsorption-filtration process, the development of suitable micro-porous filter media, and the operational results obtained with a micro-porous bed filtration system. The micro-porous filter media was found to very effectively remove molten sodium aluminum fluoride bath by the selective adsorption-filtration mechanism.

Leonard S. Aubrey; Christine A. Boyle; Eddie M. Williams; David H. DeYoung; Dawid D. Smith; Feng Chi

2007-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

268

Sodium boiling in LMFBR fuel assemblies. Progress report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Objective is to improve current understanding of sodium voiding behavior under postulated LMFBR accident conditions. Multi-dimensional computer models are being developed under low flow and low power conditions. The following computer codes are being developed and assessed: NATOF-2D, THERMIT-S-6E, and THERMIT-S-4E. The effect of virtual mass on the characteristics and numerical stability in two-phase flows was studied. (DLC)

Not Available

1981-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

269

Chaotic Dynamos Generated by a Turbulent Flow of Liquid Sodium  

SciTech Connect

We report the observation of several dynamical regimes of the magnetic field generated by a turbulent flow of liquid sodium (VKS experiment). Stationary dynamos, transitions to relaxation cycles or to intermittent bursts, and random field reversals occur in a fairly small range of parameters. Large scale dynamics of the magnetic field result from the interactions of a few modes. The low dimensional nature of these dynamics is not smeared out by the very strong turbulent fluctuations of the flow.

Ravelet, F.; Monchaux, R.; Aumaitre, S.; Chiffaudel, A.; Daviaud, F.; Dubrulle, B. [Service de Physique de lEtat Condense, Direction des Sciences de la Matiere, CEA-Saclay, CNRS URA 2464, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette cedex (France); Berhanu, M.; Fauve, S.; Mordant, N.; Petrelis, F. [Laboratoire de Physique Statistique de lEcole Normale Superieure, CNRS UMR 8550, 24 Rue Lhomond, 75231 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Bourgoin, M.; Odier, Ph.; Plihon, N.; Pinton, J.-F.; Volk, R. [Laboratoire de Physique de lEcole Normale Superieure de Lyon, CNRS UMR 5672, 46 allee dItalie, 69364 Lyon Cedex 07 (France)

2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

270

Sodium-Bearing Waste Treatment, Applied Technology Plan  

SciTech Connect

Settlement Agreement between the Department of Energy and the State of Idaho mandates treatment of sodium-bearing waste at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center within the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. One of the requirements of the Settlement Agreement is to complete treatment of sodium-bearing waste by December 31, 2012. Applied technology activities are required to provide the data necessary to complete conceptual design of four identified alternative processes and to select the preferred alternative. To provide a technically defensible path forward for the selection of a treatment process and for the collection of needed data, an applied technology plan is required. This document presents that plan, identifying key elements of the decision process and the steps necessary to obtain the required data in support of both the decision and the conceptual design. The Sodium-Bearing Waste Treatment Applied Technology Plan has been prepared to provide a description/roadmap of the treatment alternative selection process. The plan details the results of risk analyzes and the resulting prioritized uncertainties. It presents a high-level flow diagram governing the technology decision process, as well as detailed roadmaps for each technology. The roadmaps describe the technical steps necessary in obtaining data to quantify and reduce the technical uncertainties associated with each alternative treatment process. This plan also describes the final products that will be delivered to the Department of Energy Idaho Operations Office in support of the office's selection of the final treatment technology.

Lance Lauerhass; Vince C. Maio; S. Kenneth Merrill; Arlin L. Olson; Keith J. Perry

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Development of the sodium/sulfur technology for energy storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) has supported the development of the sodium-sulfur technology since 1973. The programs have focused on progressing core aspects of the technology and completing initial battery engineering for both mobile and stationary applications. An overview of the Office of Energy Management (OEM) activities is contained in this paper. Two major development programs have been active: the first with Ford Aerospace and Communications Corporation (1975 to 1985), and the second with Chloride Silent Power Limited (1985 to 1990). With the completion this year of the qualification of a cell suitable for initial Solar Energy Systems (SES) applications, the emphasis of future DOE/OEM sodium/sulfur programs will shift to SES-battery engineering and development. The initial effort will resolve a number of issues related to the feasibility of utilizing the sodium/sulfur technology in these large-scale applications. This multi-year activity will represent the initial phase of an integrated long-term DOE-supported program to produce a commercially viable battery system.

Landgrebe, A. (USDOE Assistant Secretary for Conservation and Renewable Energy, Washington, DC (USA). Office of Energy Management); Magnani, N.J. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (USA))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Compact intermediate heat transport system for sodium cooled reactor  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a combination with a sodium cooled reactor having an intermediate heat exchanger for extracting heat in a nonradioactive secondary sodium loop from the sodium rector. It comprises: first and second upstanding closed cylindrical vessels, one of the cylindrical vessels being exterior of the other of the cylindrical vessels; the other of the cylindrical vessels being interior, smaller, and concentric of the larger cylindrical vessel so as to define between the inside of the larger vessel and the outside of the smaller vessel an interstitial annular volume; at least one feedwater inlet plenums at the bottom of the larger vessel communicated to the interstitial annular volume; at least one feedwater outlet plenums at the top of the larger and outer vessel communicated to the interstitial annular volume; tubes communicated to the feedwater inlet plenum at the bottom of the vessels and to the steam outlet plenum at the top of the vessel; a first conduit; a large submersible electromagnetic pump; and a jet pump having an inlet, a venturi, and a diffusing outlet.

Boardman, C.E.; Maurer, J.P.

1990-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

273

Sodium Dichromate Barrel Landfill expedited response action proposal  

SciTech Connect

The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) recommended that the US Department of Energy (DOE) prepare an expedited response action (ERA) for the Sodium Dichromate Barrel Landfill. The Sodium Dichromate Barrel Disposal Site was used in 1945 for disposal of crushed barrels. The site location is the sole waste site within the 100-IU-4 Operable Unit. The Waste Information Data System (WIDS 1992) assumes that the crushed barrels contained 1% residual sodium dichromate at burial time and that only buried crushed barrels are at the site. Burial depth is shallow since visual inspection finds numerous barrel debris on the surface. A non-time-critical ERA proposal includes preparation of an engineering evaluation and cost analysis (EE/CA) section. The EE/CA is a rapid, focused evaluation of available technologies using specific screening factors to assess feasibility, appropriateness, and cost. The ERA goal is to reduce the potential for any contaminant migration from the landfill to the soil column, groundwater, and Columbia River. Since the landfill is the only waste site within the operable unit, the ERA will present a final remediation of the 100-IU-4 operable unit.

Not Available

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Sodium meta-autunite colloids: Synthesis, characterization,stability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Waste forms of U such as those in the United States Department of Energy's Hanford Site often contain high concentrations of Na and P. Low solubility sodium uranyl phosphates such as sodium meta-autunite have the potential to form mobile colloids that can facilitate transport of this radionuclide. In order to understand the geochemical behavior of uranyl phosphate colloids, we synthesized sodiummeta-autunite colloids, and characterized their morphology, chemical composition, structure, dehydration, and surface charge. The stability of these synthetic plate-shaped colloids was tested with respect to time and pH. The highest aggregation rate was observed at pH 3, and the rate decreases as pH increases, indicating that higher stability of colloid dispersion under neutral and alkaline pH conditions. The synthetic colloids are all negatively charged and no isoelectric points were found over a pH range of 3 to 9. The zeta-potentials of the colloids in the phosphate solution show a strong pH-dependence in the more acidic range over time, but are relatively constant in the neutral and alkaline pH range. The geochemical behavior of the synthetic colloids can be interpreted using DLVO theory. The results suggest that formation of mobile sodium meta-autunite colloids can enhance the transport of U in some contaminated sediments.

zzuoping@lbl.gov

2004-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

275

EIS-0306: Treatment and Management of Sodium-Bonded Spent Nuclear Fuel |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

306: Treatment and Management of Sodium-Bonded Spent Nuclear 306: Treatment and Management of Sodium-Bonded Spent Nuclear Fuel EIS-0306: Treatment and Management of Sodium-Bonded Spent Nuclear Fuel Summary This EIS evaluates the potential environmental impacts of the proposed electrometallurgical treatment of DOE-owned sodium bonded spent nuclear fuel in the Fuel Conditioning Facility at Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W). Public Comment Opportunities None available at this time. Documents Available for Download September 19, 2000 EIS-0306: Record of Decision Treatment and Management of Sodium-Bonded Spent Nuclear Fuel July 1, 2000 EIS-0306: Final Environmental Impact Statement Treatment and Management of Sodium-Bonded Spent Nuclear Fuel July 1, 1999 EIS-0306: Draft Environmental Impact Statement Treatment of Sodium-Bonded Spent Nuclear Fuel

276

Design and development of Stirling Engines for stationary power generation applications in the 500 to 3000 hp range. Subtask 1A report: state-of-the-art conceptual design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The first portion of the Conceptual Design Study of Stirling Engines for Stationary Power Application in the 500 to 3000 hp range which was aimed at state-of-the-art stationary Stirling engines for a 1985 hardware demonstration is summarized. The main goals of this effort were to obtain reliable cost data for a stationary Stirling engine capable of meeting future needs for total energy/cogeneration sysems and to establish a pragmatic and conservative base design for a first generation hardware. Starting with an extensive screening effort, 4 engine types, i.e., V-type crank engine, radial engine, swashplate engine, and rhombic drive engine, and 3 heat transport systems, i.e., heat pipe, pressurized gas heat transport loop, and direct gas fired system, were selected. After a preliminary layout cycle, the rhombic drive engine was eliminated due to intolerable maintenance difficulties on the push rod seals. V, radial and swashplate engines were taken through a detailed design/layout cycle, to establish all important design features and reliable engine weights. After comparing engine layouts and analyzing qualitative and quantitative evaluation criteria, the V-crank engine was chosen as the candidate for a 1985 hardware demonstration.

None

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

HIGH SODIUM SIMULANT TESTING TO SUPPORT SB8 SLUDGE PREPARATION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Scoping studies were completed for high sodium simulant SRAT/SME cycles to determine any impact to CPC processing. Two SRAT/SME cycles were performed with simulant having sodium supernate concentration of 1.9M at 130% and 100% of the Koopman Minimum Acid requirement. Both of these failed to meet DWPF processing objectives related to nitrite destruction and hydrogen generation. Another set of SRAT/SME cycles were performed with simulant having a sodium supernate concentration of 1.6M at 130%, 125%, 110%, and 100% of the Koopman Minimum Acid requirement. Only the run at 110% met DWPF processing objectives. Neither simulant had a stoichiometric factor window of 30% between nitrite destruction and excessive hydrogen generation. Based on the 2M-110 results it was anticipated that the 2.5M stoichiometric window for processing would likely be smaller than from 110-130%, since it appeared that it would be necessary to increase the KMA factor by at least 10% above the minimum calculated requirement to achieve nitrite destruction due to the high oxalate content. The 2.5M-130 run exceeded the DWPF hydrogen limits in both the SRAT and SME cycle. Therefore, testing of this wash endpoint was halted. This wash endpoint with this minimum acid requirement and mercury-noble metal concentration profile appears to be something DWPF should not process due to an overly narrow window of stoichiometry. The 2M case was potentially processable in DWPF, but modifications would likely be needed in DWPF such as occasionally accepting SRAT batches with undestroyed nitrite for further acid addition and reprocessing, running near the bottom of the as yet ill-defined window of allowable stoichiometric factors, potentially extending the SRAT cycle to burn off unreacted formic acid before transferring to the SME cycle, and eliminating formic acid additions in the frit slurry.

Newell, J.

2012-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

278

Self-welding evaluation of reactor materials in flowing sodium  

SciTech Connect

An experimental study was made of the self-welding of various combinations of FBR materials (304 ss, Inconel 718, A286, Stellite 156, and Stellite 6) in sodium at 800 to 1100$sup 0$F for time periods up to 6 months and contact stresses of 2 to 148 ksi. Stresses required to separate the surfaces were determined. Self-welding was observed only at temperatures of 1050$sup 0$F and above, with the breakaway force being less than 5 ksi. (DLC)

Chang, J.Y.; Flagella, P.N.; Schrock, S.L.

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Electrolytic Treatment of ICPP Sodium-Bearing Waste Simulant  

SciTech Connect

Two proof-of-principle tests were conducted to determine if nitrate can be destroyed electrochemically in a simulated Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) Sodium-Bearing waste. Both tests demonstrated the destruction of nitrate as well as the removal of other metals in the simulant. Metals removal is believed to be due to precipitation as a result of a change in the pH of the waste solution from strongly acidic to highly alkaline and reduction to a metal or metal oxide. Although gas evolution at the cathode was visible during each test, there were no visible signs of NO{sub x} formation in either test.

Hobbs, D.T.

1995-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

280

Feed Composition for Sodium-Bearing Waste Treatment Process  

SciTech Connect

Treatment of sodium-bearing waste (SBW) at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) within the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory is mandated by a Settlement Agreement between the Department of Energy and the State of Idaho. One of the requirements of the Settlement Agreement is to complete treatment of SBW by December 31, 2012. To support both design and development studies for the SBW treatment process, detailed feed compositions are needed. This report contains the expected compositions of these feed streams and the sources and methods used in obtaining these compositions.

Barnes, C.M.

2000-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "l-1 hp sodium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

STATIC SODIUM TEST OF WESTINGHOUSE FLOW CONTROLLER BEARING  

SciTech Connect

Tests were carried out to determine the action of a static sodium environment on a special high-temperature ball bearing while operating at the specified speed and loading. The test bearing was operated at 85 rpm and 870 pounds axial load for 385 hr at 1000 deg F. Visual inspection of the test bearing showed a very marked increase in roughness of both the balls and the ball races. Details of the measurements and a photograph of the bearing parts after test are given. On the basis of this test it did not appear that this bearing will be satisfactory for the service intended. (M.C.G.)

Cygan, R.

1960-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

United States, France and Japan Increase Cooperation on Sodium-Cooled Fast  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

United States, France and Japan Increase Cooperation on United States, France and Japan Increase Cooperation on Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor Prototypes United States, France and Japan Increase Cooperation on Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor Prototypes February 1, 2008 - 11:13am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC -The U.S Department of Energy (DOE), the French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) and Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) today expanded cooperation to coordinate Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor Prototype development through a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) signed by DOE Assistant Secretary for Nuclear Energy Dennis R. Spurgeon, CEA Chairman Alain Bugat and JAEA President Toshio Okazaki. The MOU establishes a collaborative framework with the ultimate goal of deploying sodium-cooled fast reactor prototypes. A sodium-cooled fast reactor uses liquid sodium

283

Ion Recognition Approach to Volume Reduction of Alkaline Tank Waste by Separation of Sodium Salts  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this research involving collaboration between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is to explore new approaches to the separation of sodium hydroxide, sodium nitrate, and other sodium salts from high-level alkaline tank waste. The principal potential benefit is a major reduction in disposed waste volume, obviating the building of expensive new waste tanks and reducing the costs of low-activity waste immobilization. Principles of ion recognition are being researched toward discovery of liquid extraction systems that selectively separate sodium hydroxide and sodium nitrate from other waste components. The successful concept of pseudohydroxide extraction using fluorinated alcohols and phenols is being developed at ORNL and PNNL toward a greater understanding of the controlling equilibria, role of solvation, and of synergistic effects involving crown ethers. Studies at PNNL are directed toward new solvent formulation for the practical sodium pseudohydroxide extraction systems.

Levitskaia, Tatiana G.; Lumetta, Gregg J.; Moyer, Bruce A.; Bonnesen, Peter V.

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

OPERATING EXPERIENCE WITH THE SODIUM REACTOR EXPERIMENT AND ITS APPLICATION TO THE HALLAM NUCLEAR POWER FACILITY  

SciTech Connect

The Sodium Reactor Experiment (SRE) was constructed to demonstrate the feasibility of sodium-oooled graphitemoderated reactors for central station power. The operating experience of SRE has provided valuable data for the design of the Hallam Nuclear Power Facillty (HNPF) now under construction. Some of the difficulties found in the SRE, which HNPF will be designed to avoid, are the sodium-sodium intermediate heat exchanger (horizontal position in SRE gave trouble; a vertical position will be used in HNPF), sodium pumps, handling of broken fuel elements, and excessive thermal stresses due to inadequate coolant flow. Other features of HNPF include the addition of an activity monitoring system for the core cover gas, elimination of tetralin for auxiliary cooling of plant equipment, instrumentation of fuel elements, and addition of carbon traps in the primary sodium system. SRE operation has demonstrated unusual reactor stability and capability for rapid power changes. (D.L.C.)

Beeley, R.J.; Mahlmeister, J.E.

1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

AN ADVANCED SODIUM-GRAPHITE REACTOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANT  

SciTech Connect

An advanced sodium-cooled, graphite-moderated nuclear power plant is described which utilizes high-pressure, high-temperature steam to generate electricity at a high thermal efficiency. Steam is generated at 2400 psig, superheated to 1050 deg F and, after partial expansion in the turbine, reheated to 1000 deg F. Net thermal efficiency of the plant is 42.3%. In a plant sized to produce a net electrical output of 256 Mw, the estimated cost is 8232/kw. Estimated cost of power generation is 6.7 mills/kwh. In a similar plant with a net electrical output of 530 Mw, the estimated power generating cost is 5.4 mills/ kwh. Most of the components of the plant are within the capability of current technology. The major exception is the fuel material, uranium carbide. Preliminary results of the development work now in progress indicate that uranium carbide would be an excellent fuel for high-temperature reactors, but temperature and burnup limitation have yet to be firmly established. Additional development work is also required on the steam generators. These are the single-barrier type similar to those which will be used in the Enrico Fernri Fast Breeder Reactor plant but produce steam at higher pressure and temperature. Questions also remain regarding the use of nitrogen as a cover gas over sodium at 1200 deg F and compatibility of the materials used in the primary neutron shield. All of these questions are currently under investigation. (auth)

Churchill, J.R.; Renard, J.

1960-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

286

Synaptosomal calcium influx is activated by sodium fluoride  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Neuronal calcium channels can be modulated by changes in membrane potential or by activation of channel-associated receptors. The latter may be modulated by guanine nucleotide binding proteins. NaF, which activates guanine nucleotide binding proteins, caused a large stimulation of /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ uptake by synaptosomes prepared from rat brain. Stimulation of /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ influx by NaF (i) was apparent in media containing either 5 mM-K+ or 50 mM-K+, (ii) was slower than the fast-phase of voltage-dependent /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ influx but continued for a longer period of time than did depolarization-induced /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ influx, and (iii) was not mimicked or modified by a number of drugs, including ouabain, dinitrophenol, sodium azide or sodium vanadate. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that NaF activates a guanine nucleotide binding protein associated with receptor-coupled calcium channels, resulting in stimulation of calcium influx.

Jope, R.S.; Lally, K.M.

1988-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

287

TRUEX partitioning studies applied to ICPP sodium-bearing waste  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP), located in southeast Idaho at the USDOE Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, formerly reprocessed highly enriched spent nuclear fuel to recover fissionable uranium. The HLW raffinates from the combined PUREX/REDOX type uranium recovery process were converted to solid oxides (calcine) in a high temperature fluidized bed. Liquid effluents from the calcination process were combined with liquid sodium bearing waste (SBW) generated primarily in conjunction with decontamination activities. Due to the high sodium content in the SBW, this secondary waste stream is not directly amenable to solidification via calcination. Currently, approximately 1.5 millon gallons of liquid SBW are stored at the ICPP in large tanks. Several treatment options for the SBW are currently being considered, including the TRansUranic EXtraction (TRUEX) process developed by Horwitz and co-workers at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), in preparation for the final disposition of SBW. Herein described are experimental results of radionuclide tracer studies with simulated SBW using the TRUEX process solvent.

Herbst, R.S.; Brewer, K.N.; Law, J.D.; Tranter, T.J.; Todd, T.A.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

REACTIONS OF SODIUM PEROXIDE WITH COMPONENTS OF LEGACY PLUTONIUM MATERIALS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Plutonium oxide (PuO{sub 2}) calcined at >900 C resists dissolution in nitric acid (HNO{sub 3})-potassium fluoride (KF) solutions, a common method for their dissolution. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has developed an alternate method for large samples of PuO{sub 2}-bearing materials using sodium peroxide (Na{sub 2}O{sub 2}) fusion as a pretreatment. The products of the reaction between Na{sub 2}O{sub 2} and PuO{sub 2} have been reported in the literature. As part of the SRNL development effort, additional data about the reaction between Na{sub 2}O{sub 2} and PuO{sub 2} were required. Also needed were data concerning the reaction of Na{sub 2}O{sub 2} with other components that may be present in the feed materials. Sodium peroxide was reacted with aluminum metal (Al), beryllium metal (Be), graphite, potassium chloride (KCl), magnesium chloride (MgCl{sub 2}), and calcium chloride (CaCl{sub 2}). The paper reports and discusses the reaction products of these and related compounds with Na{sub 2}O{sub 2}.

Pierce, R.; Missimer, D.; Crowder, M.

2011-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

289

Sodium fast reactor safety and licensing research plan. Volume I.  

SciTech Connect

This report proposes potential research priorities for the Department of Energy (DOE) with the intent of improving the licensability of the Sodium Fast Reactor (SFR). In support of this project, five panels were tasked with identifying potential safety-related gaps in available information, data, and models needed to support the licensing of a SFR. The areas examined were sodium technology, accident sequences and initiators, source term characterization, codes and methods, and fuels and materials. It is the intent of this report to utilize a structured and transparent process that incorporates feedback from all interested stakeholders to suggest future funding priorities for the SFR research and development. While numerous gaps were identified, two cross-cutting gaps related to knowledge preservation were agreed upon by all panels and should be addressed in the near future. The first gap is a need to re-evaluate the current procedures for removing the Applied Technology designation from old documents. The second cross-cutting gap is the need for a robust Knowledge Management and Preservation system in all SFR research areas. Closure of these and the other identified gaps will require both a reprioritization of funding within DOE as well as a re-evaluation of existing bureaucratic procedures within the DOE associated with Applied Technology and Knowledge Management.

Sofu, Tanju (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); LaChance, Jeffrey L.; Bari, R. (Brokhaven National Laboratory Upton, NY); Wigeland, Roald (Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID); Denman, Matthew R.; Flanagan, George F. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN)

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Preliminary engineering design of sodium-cooled CANDLE core  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The CANDLE burning process is characterized by the autonomous shifting of burning region with constant reactivity and constant spacial power distribution. Evaluations of such critical burning process by using widely used neutron diffusion and burning codes under some realistic engineering constraints are valuable to confirm the technical feasibility of the CANDLE concept and to put the idea into concrete core design. In the first part of this paper, it is discussed that whether the sustainable and stable CANDLE burning process can be reproduced even by using conventional core analysis tools such as SLAROM and CITATION-FBR. As a result, it is certainly possible to demonstrate it if the proper core configuration and initial fuel composition required as CANDLE core are applied to the analysis. In the latter part, an example of a concrete image of sodium cooled, metal fuel, 2000MWt rating CANDLE core has been presented by assuming an emerging inevitable technology of recladding. The core satisfies engineering design criteria including cladding temperature, pressure drop, linear heat rate, and cumulative damage fraction (CDF) of cladding, fast neutron fluence and sodium void reactivity which are defined in the Japanese FBR design project. It can be concluded that it is feasible to design CANDLE core by using conventional codes while satisfying some realistic engineering design constraints assuming that recladding at certain time interval is technically feasible.

Takaki, Naoyuki; Namekawa, Azuma; Yoda, Tomoyuki; Mizutani, Akihiko; Sekimoto, Hiroshi [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Tokai University, Kitakaname, Hiratsuka, Kanagawa 259-1292 (Japan); AISA, Fuchu, Ishioka, Ibaraki 315-0013 (Japan); Research Laboratory for Nuclear Reactors, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo, 152-8550 (Japan)

2012-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

291

Safety evaluation for packaging for 1720-DR sodium-filled tank  

SciTech Connect

Preparations are under way to sell the sodium stored in the 1720-DR tank in the 1720-DR building. This will require that the tank, as well as the 1720-DR facility, be moved to the 300 Area, so that the sodium may be melted and transferred into a railroad tanker car. Because the sodium is a hazardous material and is being shipped in a nonspecification packaging, a safety evaluation for packaging (SEP) is required. This SEP approves the sodium-filled tank for a single shipment from the 105-DR area to the 300 Area.

Mercado, M.S.

1996-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

292

Sodium compatibility studies of low friction carbide coatings for reactor application  

SciTech Connect

Design requirements for low friction materials in FFTF have led to an experimental sodium compatibility program, the objective of which is to select and qualify a low friction coating for the fuel assembly duct load pad. Results are given for chromium carbide and titanium carbide-based coatings on stainless steel exposed to 1160 deg F sodium for several thousand hours. A chromium carbide coating (with a nichrome binder) having an average corrosion rate of approximately 0.25 mpy exhibits optimum sodium compatibility behavior of the materials examined. Both plasma-sprayed chromium carbide and titanium carbide based coatings were found to be unstable when exposed to sodium. (auth)

Whitlow, G.A.; Miller, R.L.; Schrock, S.L.; Wu, P.C.S.

1973-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Sodium-Lithium Ratio In Water Applied To Geothermometry Of Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Sodium-Lithium Ratio In Water Applied To Geothermometry Of Geothermal Reservoirs Jump to: navigation,...

294

Study of Trona (Sodium Sesquicarbonate) Reactivity with Sulfur Dioxide in a Simulated Flue Gas.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Dry injection of sodium-based sorbents has gained a lot of attention in the last few years. With Dry injection, it is possible to achieve almost (more)

Srinivasn, Rangesh

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Application of the technology neutral framework to sodium cooled fast reactors.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Sodium cooled fast reactors (SFRs) are considered as a novel example to exercise the Technology Neutral Framework (TNF) proposed in NUREG- 1860. One reason for (more)

Johnson, Brian C. (Brian Carl)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Excess consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages and sodium in children and adolescents  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with 100% juice or water intake Milk intake inverselyOnce water is included with dietary intake, the differenceswater based on heath risks of excessive sodium intake and

Banerjee, Victoria; Dankiewicz, Cheryl

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Sodium Sulfur (NaS) Battery Research in Korea: Part II ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, The activities of sodium sulfur (NaS) battery research in Korea ... The presentation was focused on the development of tubular NaS batteries...

298

Litteraturlista fr Specialutbildning i talpedagogik, 60 hp  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

linguistique appliquée (Svenska fören. för tillämpad språkvetenskap) (ASLA). ASLA:s skriftserie, 15. S.45 suédoise de linguistique appliquée (Svenska fören. för tillämpad språkvetenskap) (ASLA). ASLA:s skriftserie:s höstsymposium, Karlstad, 10-12 november 1994. Uppsala: Association suédoise de linguistique appliquée (Svenska

299

HP Angle Light 4x3 Blue  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8. UNAUTHORIZED OR INAPPROPRIATE APPLICATIONS OR DEVICES ON CONTROL SYSTEMS NETWORKS - Iran, Summer 2009, Classified electronics data on US president's helicopter (MarineOne)...

300

80 HP PLASMA ASSISTED CATALYST SYSTEM  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The US economy is linked to efficient heavy vehicle transportation and diesel remains the fuel of choice for mass transportation of goods and services. Diesel engines remain the most reliable and cost effective system for commerce. Recent deleterious effects of diesel exhaust on health and environment have led to an urgent need for cost effective technologies that would bring about reduction in NOx and PM. CARB estimates on-road diesel mobile source will contribute almost 50% NOx and 78% PM emissions by 2010. As a result recent Federal and State mandates have been adopted to reduce emissions from diesel exhaust to 1 Gm/bhp.-Hr of NOx and 0.05 Gm/bhp-hr of PM by the year 2007. The 2007 standard is to be achieved in a stepwise manner starting with the standards for 2002 namely 2 Gm/bhp-hr NOx and 0.1 Gm/bhp-hr of PM. 2002 standards are likely to be met by most engine manufacturer by some modified form of exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) system or by employing a sophisticated engine control system. Importance of cost effective technology requirement is further exaggerated by the fact that in recent years diesel engine production have increased dramatically see figure 1 and has out stripped the gasoline engine production almost 4:1 see figure 2. Currently gasoline engine employs a 3-way catalytic system for NOx and HC reduction and in order for the 3-way system to work the engine is run near stoichiometric air : fuel ratio so that exhaust has virtually no oxygen. This strategy has resulted in a poorer efficiency and hence less efficient utilization of our natural resources. By contrast diesel engine operate on a lean burn principals i.e. air rich and currently there are no commercial technologies available for treating NOx and PM. Technologies being considered for reducing NOx from lean burn (diesel) exhaust are; Lean NOx catalyst systems, NOx adsorber system, Selective Catalytic Reduction systems and plasma assisted catalyst system. Of all these technologies Plasma assisted catalyst system is probably the most attractive since it can use currently available fuel onboard.

Slone, Ralph

2001-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "l-1 hp sodium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Remedial Action Certification Docket - Sodium Reactor Experiment (SRE)  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

c~-?i-- c~-?i-- I ,3-l Remedial Action Certification Docket - Sodium Reactor Experiment (SRE) .Complex and the Hot Cave Facility (Bldg. 003), Santa Susana ,Fie!d Laboratory, Chatsworth, California ..:'..~::Yerlette Gatl in, MA-232 I am attaching for entry into the Public Document Room, one copy of the N -23 subject documentat ion. These documents are the backup data for the certification that the facilfties are radiologically acceptable for b- unrestricted use as noted in the certification statement published in the &aney Federal Register. Inasmuch as the certification for unrestricted use is 9/2(/85 being published in the Federal Register, it is prudent that the attached documentation also be available to the public. These documents should be retained In accordance with DOE Order 1324.2--disposal schedule 25.

302

Feasibility Study for Vitrification of Sodium-Bearing Waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Treatment of sodium-bearing waste (SBW) at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) within the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory is mandated under a Settlement Agreement between the Department of Energy and the State of Idaho. One of the requirements of the Settlement Agreement is the complete calcination (i.e., treatment) of all SBW by December 31, 2012. One of the proposed options for treatment of SBW is vitrification. This study will examine the viability of SBW vitrification. This study describes the process and facilities to treat the SBW, from beginning waste input from INTEC Tank Farm to the final waste forms. Schedules and cost estimates for construction and operation of a Vitrification Facility are included. The study includes a facility layout with drawings, process description and flow diagrams, and preliminary equipment requirements and layouts.

J. J. Quigley; B. D. Raivo; S. O. Bates; S. M. Berry; D. N. Nishioka; P. J. Bunnell

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

THE SODIUM GRAPHITE REACTOR POWER PLANT FOR CPPD  

SciTech Connect

The plant arrangement, component design, and the functions of various systems are described and illustrated. Relative estimated costs of the systems and major components are indicated. The reactor core is designed around requiremouts for 254 thermal megawatts, 950 deg F maximum sodium temperature, stainless steel clad graphite moderator blocks, and low enrichment (0.015 to 0.04 U/sup 235/) uranium fuel elements. The fuel cycle is described for the possible fuel elements. The fuel cost factors are discussed. Burn-up limitations encountered for metallic fuel in the SGR temperature range indicate UO/sub 2/ the more desirable choice. The estimated cost of electrical energy associated with the UO/sub 2/ fuel is given. (auth)

Olson, R.L.; Gerber, R.C.; Gordon, R.B.; Ross-Clunis, H.A.; Stolz, J.F.

1958-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

304

Sodium-Bearing Waste Treatment Alternatives Implementation Study  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this document is to discuss issues related to the implementation of each of the five down-selected INEEL/INTEC radioactive liquid waste (sodium-bearing waste - SBW) treatment alternatives and summarize information in three main areas of concern: process/technical, environmental permitting, and schedule. Major implementation options for each treatment alternative are also identified and briefly discussed. This report may touch upon, but purposely does not address in detail, issues that are programmatic in nature. Examples of these include how the SBW will be classified with respect to the Nuclear Waste Policy Act (NWPA), status of Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) permits and waste storage availability, available funding for implementation, stakeholder issues, and State of Idaho Settlement Agreement milestones. It is assumed in this report that the SBW would be classified as a transuranic (TRU) waste suitable for disposal at WIPP, located in New Mexico, after appropriate treatment to meet transportation requirements and waste acceptance criteria (WAC).

Charles M. Barnes; James B. Bosley; Clifford W. Olsen

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Sodium fast reactor fuels and materials : research needs.  

SciTech Connect

An expert panel was assembled to identify gaps in fuels and materials research prior to licensing sodium cooled fast reactor (SFR) design. The expert panel considered both metal and oxide fuels, various cladding and duct materials, structural materials, fuel performance codes, fabrication capability and records, and transient behavior of fuel types. A methodology was developed to rate the relative importance of phenomena and properties both as to importance to a regulatory body and the maturity of the technology base. The technology base for fuels and cladding was divided into three regimes: information of high maturity under conservative operating conditions, information of low maturity under more aggressive operating conditions, and future design expectations where meager data exist.

Denman, Matthew R.; Porter, Douglas (Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID); Wright, Art (Argonne National Laboratory Argonne, IL); Lambert, John (Argonne National Laboratory Argonne, IL); Hayes, Steven (Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID); Natesan, Ken (Argonne National Laboratory Argonne, IL); Ott, Larry J. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); Garner, Frank (Radiation Effects Consulting. Richland, WA); Walters, Leon (Advanced Reactor Concepts, Idaho Falls, ID); Yacout, Abdellatif (Argonne National Laboratory Argonne, IL)

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Sodium sulfur battery design for the ETX-II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chloride Silent Power Limited (CSPL) has developed a number of laboratory and field test batteries in support of its sodium sulfur development program. The most demanding of these test batteries is being developed for the Ford ETX-II electric vehicle, under a three year contract from the US Department of Energy. A major milestone of this program is to build and test an Intermediate Deliverable (ID) battery which is a fully representative section of the final battery. This will allow the performance predictions to be evaluated using an operational battery before the final battery is built and delivered. The performance predictions for the battery have been made and are described in this paper. The Intermediate Deliverable Battery, representing one third of the full battery both electrically and thermally, has now been built and preliminary test results are available.

Mangan, M.F.; Leadbetter, A.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

THE SODIUM GRAPHITE REACTOR: TOMMORROW'S POWER PLANT  

SciTech Connect

A description is given of the Advanced Sodium Graphite Reactor Power Plant, including the reactor, heat transfer systems, generatirg plant, control systems, and the economics of producing 256 Mw(e). The safety of this design is due to its unusually low operating pressure, absence of chemically incompatible materials in the core, and excellent stability under atatic and dynamic conditions. The reactor is being constructed at Hallam, Nebraska, at a probable cost of 0 to 0/kw, exclusive of the first core costs. The 151 fuel elements of uranium carbide are enriched to 2.75 at.% U/sup 235/ and clad in stainless steel. The average thermal neutron flux in the fuel is 8 x 10/sup 13/ n/cm/sup 2/sec. (B.O.G.)

Beeley, R.J.; Lowell, E.G.; Polak, H.; Renard, J.

1960-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

308

Diffusion bonding resistant valve development for sodium service  

SciTech Connect

Unanticipated functional failures occurred in valves undergoing containment integrity testing for liquid sodium service. The failures resulted from diffusion bonding of the Stellite 6B valve plug to the Type 316 stainless steel (SS) seat. As a result of these failures, a valve development program was undertaken. A modified valve incorporating a Tribaloy 800 plug showed significant improvement in resistance to diffusion bonding but still failed after long term exposure in a closed position. A second modified valve using Tribaloy 800 in both the valve plug and seat successfully resisted diffusion bonding failure. This paper reports the details of the testing and posttest valve examinations. The results of scanning electron microscopy, dispersive x-ray spectrometry, and metallography provide the characteristics of the valve failures. Limitations of the various valve designs are also discussed.

Crandall, D.L.; Low, J.O.; Chung, D.T.; Loop, R.B.

1984-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

309

Design Considerations for Economically Competitive Sodium Cooled Fast Reactors  

SciTech Connect

The technological viability of sodium cooled fast reactors (SFR) has been established by various experimental and prototype (demonstration) reactors such as EBR-II, FFTF, Phnix, JOYO, BN-600 etc. However, the economic competitiveness of SFR has not been proven yet. The perceived high cost premium of SFRs over LWRs has been the primary impediment to the commercial expansion of SFR technologies. In this paper, cost reduction options are discussed for advanced SFR designs. These include a hybrid loop-pool design to optimize the primary system, multiple reheat and intercooling helium Brayton cycle for the power conversion system and the potential for suppression of intermediate heat transport system. The design options for the fully passive decay heat removal systems are also thoroughly examined. These include direct reactor auxiliary cooling system (DRACS), reactor vessel auxiliary cooling system (RVACS) and the newly proposed pool reactor auxiliary cooling system (PRACS) in the context of the hybrid loop-pool design.

Hongbin Zhang; Haihua Zhao

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Quantitative measurement of atomic sodium in the plume of a single burning coal particle  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The release of volatile sodium during coal combustion is a significant factor in the fouling and corrosion of heat transfer surfaces within industrial coal-fired boilers. A method for measuring the temporal release of atomic sodium from a single coal particle is described. Laser absorption was used to calibrate laser-induced fluorescence measurements of atomic sodium utilising the sodium D1 line (589.59 nm) in a purpose-designed flat flame environment. The calibration was then applied to planar laser-induced fluorescence measurements of sodium atoms in the plume from a single Victorian brown coal particle (53 mg) suspended within the flat flame. The peak concentration of atomic sodium was approximately 64.1 ppb after 1080.5 s, which appears to correspond to the end of char combustion. To our knowledge this is the first in situ quantitative measurement of the concentration field of atomic sodium in the plume above a burning particle. A simple kinetic model has been used to estimate the rate of sodium decay in the post-flame gases. Comparison of the estimated and measured decay rates showed reasonable agreement. (author)

van Eyk, P.J.; Ashman, P.J.; Alwahabi, Z.T. [Cooperative Research Centre for Clean Power from Lignite, School of Chemical Engineering, The University of Adelaide, South Australia 5005 (Australia); Nathan, G.J. [School of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Adelaide, South Australia 5005 (Australia)

2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

311

Sodium Chloride Hideout In a Simulated Steam Generator Tube and Tube Support Place Crevice  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Localized corrosion of steam generator (SG) tubing in PWRs has been a serious problem that limits the life of this component. Preliminary measurements of sodium chloride hideout in simulated PWR SG crevices have shown that hideout rate increases with heat flux and concentration of sodium chloride in the bulk water.

1998-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

312

Sodium Heat Engine Development Program. Phase 1, Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Sodium Heat Engine (SHE) is an efficient thermoelectric conversion device which directly generates electricity from a thermally regenerative electrochemical cell that relies on the unique conduction properties of {beta}{double_prime}-alumina solid electrolyte (BASE). Laboratory models of a variety of SHE devices have demonstrated the feasibility and efficiency of the system, engineering development of large prototype devices has been slowed by a series of materials and fabrication problems. Failure of the electrolyte tubes has been a recurring problem and a number of possible causes have been postulated. To address these issues, a two-phase engineering development program was undertaken. This report summarizes the final results of the first phase of the program, which included extensive materials characterization activities, a study of applicable nondestructive evaluation methods, an investigation of possible stress states that would contribute to fracture, and certain operational issues associated with the electromagnetic pumps used in the SHE prototype. Mechanical and microstructural evaluation of commercially obtained BASE tubes revealed that they should be adequate for SHE applications and that sodium exposure produced no appreciable deleterious strength effects. Processing activities to produce a more uniform and smaller grain size for the BASE tubes were completed using isostatic pressing, extrusion, and slip casting. Green tubes were sintered by conventional and microwave plasma methods. Of particular interest is the residual stress state in the BASE tubes, and both analysis and nondestructive evaluation methods were employed to evaluate these stresses. X-ray and neutron diffraction experiments were performed to determine the bulk residual stresses in commercially fabricated BASE tubes; however, tube-to-tube variations and variations among the various methods employed did not allow formulation of a definitive definition of the as-fabricated stress state.

Singh, J.P.; Kupperman, D.S.; Majumdar, S.; Dorris, S.; Gopalsami, N.; Dieckman, S.L.; Jaross, R.A.; Johnson, D.L.; Gregar, J.S.; Poeppel, R.B.; Raptis, A.C.; Valentin, R.A.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

105-DR Large Sodium Fire Facility closure plan. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Site, located northwest of the city of Richland, Washington, houses reactors, chemical-separation systems, and related facilities used for the production of special nuclear materials, and activities associated with nuclear energy development. The 105-DR Large Sodium Fire Facility (LSFF), which was in operation from about 1972 to 1986, was a research laboratory that occupied the former ventilation supply room on the southwest side of the 105-DR Reactor facility. The LSFF was established to provide a means of investigating fire and safety aspects associated with large sodium or other metal alkali fires in the liquid metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR) facilities. The 105-DR Reactor facility was designed and built in the 1950`s and is located in the 100-D Area of the Hanford Site. The building housed the 105-DR defense reactor, which was shut down in 1964. The LSFF was initially used only for engineering-scale alkali metal reaction studies. In addition, the Fusion Safety Support Studies program sponsored intermediate-size safety reaction tests in the LSFF with lithium and lithium lead compounds. The facility has also been used to store and treat alkali metal waste, therefore the LSFF is subject to the regulatory requirements for the storage and treatment of dangerous waste. Closure will be conducted pursuant to the requirements of the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303-610. This closure plan presents a description of the facility, the history of waste managed, and the procedures that will be followed to close the LSFF as an Alkali Metal Treatment Facility. No future use of the LSFF is expected.

Not Available

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Research on Active Power Factor Correction of the Electronic Ballast for High-Pressure Sodium Lamps Based on L6563  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the recent years, there has been a growing interest in the design of high-pressure sodium lamp electronic ballast. Two measures are proposed to improve the power factor of high-pressure sodium lamp electronic ballasts from the definition of harmonic ... Keywords: high-pressure sodium lamps, electronic ballast, active power factor correction, L6563

Sun Jing

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

TRUEX partitioning from radioactive ICPP sodium bearing waste  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) located at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory in Southeast Idaho is currently evaluating several treatment technologies applicable to waste streams generated over several decades of-nuclear fuel reprocessing. Liquid sodium bearing waste (SBW), generated primarily during decontamination activities, is one of the waste streams of interest. The TRansUranic EXtraction (TRUEX) process developed at Argonne National Laboratory is currently being evaluated to separate the actinides from SBW. On a mass basis, the amount of the radioactive species in SBW are low relative to inert matrix components. Thus, the advantage of separations is a dramatic decrease in resulting volumes of high activity waste (HAW) which must be dispositioned. Numerous studies conducted at the ICPP indicate the applicability of the TRUEX process has been demonstrated; however, these studies relied on a simulated SBW surrogate for the real waste. Consequently, a series of batch contacts were performed on samples of radioactive ICPP SBW taken from tank WM-185 to verify that actual waste would behave similarly to the simulated waste. The test results with SBW from tank WM-185 indicate the TRUEX solvent effectively extracts the actinides from the samples of actual waste. Gross alpha radioactivity, attributed predominantly to Pu and Am, was reduced from 3.14E+04 dps/mL to 1.46 dps/mL in three successive batch contacts with fresh TRUEX solvent. This reduction corresponds to a decontamination factor of DF = 20,000 or 99.995% removal of the gross a activity in the feed. The TRUEX solvent also extracted the matrix components Zr, Fe, and Hg to an appreciable extent (D{sub Zr} > 10, D{sub Fe} {approx} 2, D{sub Hg} {approx}6). Iron co-extracted with the actinides can be successfully scrubbed from the organic with 0.2 M HNO{sub 3}. Mercury can be selectively partitioned from the actinides with either sodium carbonate or nitric acid ({ge} 5 M HNO{sub 3}) solutions.

Herbst, R.S.; Brewer, K.N.; Tranter, T.J.; Todd, T.A.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Environmental, health, and safety issues of sodium-sulfur batteries for electric and hybrid vehicles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report examines the shipping regulations that govern the shipment of dangerous goods. Since the elemental sodium contained in both sodium-sulfur and sodium-metal-chloride batteries is classified as a dangerous good, and is listed on both the national and international hazardous materials listings, both national and international regulatory processes are considered in this report The interrelationships as well as the differences between the two processes are highlighted. It is important to note that the transport regulatory processes examined in this report are reviewed within the context of assessing the necessary steps needed to provide for the domestic and international transport of sodium-beta batteries. The need for such an assessment was determined by the Shipping Sub-Working Group (SSWG) of the EV Battery Readiness Working Group (Working Group), created in 1990. The Working Group was created to examine the regulatory issues pertaining to in-vehicle safety, shipping, and recycling of sodium-sulfur batteries, each of which is addressed by a sub-working group. The mission of the SSWG is to establish basic provisions that will ensure the safe and efficient transport of sodium-beta batteries. To support that end, a proposal to the UN Committee of Experts was prepared by the SSWG, with the goal of obtaining a proper shipping name and UN number for sodium-beta batteries and to establish the basic transport requirements for such batteries (see the appendix for the proposal as submitted). It is emphasized that because batteries are large articles containing elemental sodium and, in some cases, sulfur, there is no existing UN entry under which they can be classified and for which modal transport requirements, such as the use of packaging appropriate for such large articles, are provided for. It is for this reason that a specific UN entry for sodium-beta batteries is considered essential.

Hammel, C.J.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Sodium-bearing Waste Treatment Technology Evaluation Report  

SciTech Connect

Sodium-bearing waste (SBW) disposition is one of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Idaho Operation Offices (NE-ID) and State of Idahos top priorities at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The INEEL has been working over the past several years to identify a treatment technology that meets NE-ID and regulatory treatment requirements, including consideration of stakeholder input. Many studies, including the High-Level Waste and Facilities Disposition Environmental Impact Statement (EIS), have resulted in the identification of five treatment alternatives that form a short list of perhaps the most appropriate technologies for the DOE to select from. The alternatives are (a) calcination with maximum achievable control technology (MACT) upgrade, (b) steam reforming, (c) cesium ion exchange (CsIX) with immobilization, (d) direct evaporation, and (e) vitrification. Each alternative has undergone some degree of applied technical development and preliminary process design over the past four years. This report presents a summary of the applied technology and process design activities performed through February 2004. The SBW issue and the five alternatives are described in Sections 2 and 3, respectively. Details of preliminary process design activities for three of the alternatives (steam reforming, CsIX, and direct evaporation) are presented in three appendices. A recent feasibility study provides the details for calcination. There have been no recent activities performed with regard to vitrification; that section summarizes and references previous work.

Charles M. Barnes; Arlin L. Olson; Dean D. Taylor

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

High-temperature sodium nickel chloride battery for electric vehicles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Although the sodium-nickel chloride cell couple has a high voltage (2.59 V) and a high specific energy (790 Wh/kg), the performance of present incarnations of this battery tend to be limited by their power. Because the nickel chloride electrode dominates the resistance and weight of the cell, research on this cell couple at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) has been primarily directed toward improving both the specific power and energy of the NiCl{sub 2} electrodes. During the course of these investigations a major breakthrough was achieved in lowering the impedance and increasing the usable capacity through the use of chemical additives and a tailored electrode morphology. This improved Ni/NiCl{sub 2} electrode has excellent performance characteristics, wide-temperature operation and fast recharge capability. Modeling studies done on this electrode indicate that a fully developed Na/NiCl{sub 2} battery based on ANL-single tube and bipolar designs would surpass the mid-term and approach the long-term goals of the US Advanced Battery Consortium.

Prakash, J.; Redey, L.; Nelson, P.A.; Vissers, D.R. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Electrotechnical Technology Program

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

EXTENDING SODIUM FAST REACTOR DRIVER FUEL USE TO HIGHER TEMPERATURES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Calculations of potential sodium-cooled fast reactor fuel temperatures were performed to estimate the effects of increasing the outlet temperature of a given fast reactor design by increasing pin power, decreasing assembly flow, or increasing inlet temperature. Based upon experience in the U.S., both metal and mixed oxide (MOX) fuel types are discussed in terms of potential performance effects created by the increased operating temperatures. Assembly outlet temperatures of 600, 650 and 700 C were used as goal temperatures. Fuel/cladding chemical interaction (FCCI) and fuel melting, as well as challenges to the mechanical integrity of the cladding material, were identified as the limiting phenomena. For example, starting with a recent 1000 MWth fast reactor design, raising the outlet temperature to 650 C through pin power increase increased the MOX centerline temperature to more than 3300 C and the metal fuel peak cladding temperature to more than 700 C. These exceeded limitations to fuel performance; fuel melting was limiting for MOX and FCCI for metal fuel. Both could be alleviated by design fixes, such as using a barrier inside the cladding to minimize FCCI in the metal fuel, or using annular fuel in the case of MOX. Both would also require an advanced cladding material with improved stress rupture properties. While some of these are costly, the benefits of having a high-temperature reactor which can support hydrogen production, or other missions requiring high process heat may make the extra costs justified.

Douglas L. Porter

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Process Flow Chart for Immobilizing of Radioactive High Concentration Sodium Hydroxide Product from the Sodium Processing Facility at the BN-350 Nuclear power plant in Aktau, Kazakhstan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the results of a joint research investigations carried out by the group of Kazakhstan, British and American specialists in development of a new material for immobilization of radioactive 35% sodium hydroxide solutions from the sodium coolant processing facility of the BN-350 nuclear power plant. The resulting solid matrix product, termed geo-cement stone, is capable of isolating long lived radionuclides from the environment. The physico-mechanical properties of geo-cement stone have been investigated and the flow chart for its production verified in a full scale experiments. (author)

Burkitbayev, M.; Omarova, K.; Tolebayev, T. [Ai-Farabi Kazakh National University, Chemical Faculty, Republic of Kazakhstan (Kazakhstan); Galkin, A. [KATEP Ltd., Republic of Kazakhstan (Kazakhstan); Bachilova, N. [NIISTROMPROEKT Ltd., Republic of Kazakhstan (Kazakhstan); Blynskiy, A. [Nuclear Technology Safety Centre, Republic of Kazakhstan (Kazakhstan); Maev, V. [MAEK-Kazatomprom Ltd., Republic of Kazakhstan (Kazakhstan); Wells, D. [NUKEM Limited- a member of the Freyssinet Group, Winfrith Technology Centre, Dorchester, Dorset (United Kingdom); Herrick, A. [NUKEM Limited- a member of the Freyssinet Group, Caithness (United Kingdom); Michelbacher, J. [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "l-1 hp sodium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Sodium/Phosphorus-Sulfur Cells I. Cell Performance Paul L. Ridgway,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sodium/Phosphorus-Sulfur Cells Sodium/Phosphorus-Sulfur Cells I. Cell Performance Paul L. Ridgway, Frank R. McLarnon, and Elton J. Cairns* Energy and Environment Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, and Department of Chemical Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720, USA ABSTRACT Sodium/°-alumina/phosphorus-sulfur cells utilizing P/S ratios of 0, 0.143, 0.332, and 1.17 at temperatures from 350 to 500°C were studied by measurement of the equilibrium cell voltages at open circuit, and the steady-state cell voltages at current densities up to 70 mA/cm2. States of charge, represented by sodium atom fraction in the P-S electrode, ranged from 0 to 0.4. Open-circuit voltages up to 2.65 V were measured. Theoretical specific energies up to 825 Wh/kg were cal-

322

Process for sodium sulfide/ferrous sulfate treatment of hexavalent chromium and other heavy metals  

SciTech Connect

433 of 9384 ) United States Patent 5,000,859 Suciu , et al. March 19, 1991 Process for sodium sulfide/ferrous sulfate treatment of hexavalent chromium and other heavy metals

Suciu, Dan F. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wikoff, Penny M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Beller, John M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Carpenter, Charles J. (Lynn Haven, FL)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Applying risk informed methodologies to improve the economics of sodium-cooled fast reactors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In order to support the increasing demand for clean sustainable electricity production and for nuclear waste management, the Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor (SFR) is being developed. The main drawback has been its high capital ...

Nitta, Christopher C

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Development of a model to predict flow oscillations in low-flow sodium boiling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An experimental and analytical program has been carried out in order to better understand the cause and effect of flow oscillations in boiling sodium systems. These oscillations have been noted in previous experiments with ...

Levin, Alan Edward

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Metal corrosion in a supercritical carbon dioxide - liquid sodium power cycle.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A liquid sodium cooled fast reactor coupled to a supercritical carbon dioxide Brayton power cycle is a promising combination for the next generation nuclear power production process. For optimum efficiency, a microchannel heat exchanger, constructed by diffusion bonding, can be used for heat transfer from the liquid sodium reactor coolant to the supercritical carbon dioxide. In this work, we have reviewed the literature on corrosion of metals in liquid sodium and carbon dioxide. The main conclusions are (1) pure, dry CO{sub 2} is virtually inert but can be highly corrosive in the presence of even ppm concentrations of water, (2) carburization and decarburization are very significant mechanism for corrosion in liquid sodium especially at high temperature and the mechanism is not well understood, and (3) very little information could be located on corrosion of diffusion bonded metals. Significantly more research is needed in all of these areas.

Moore, Robert Charles; Conboy, Thomas M.

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Ultracold molecules from ultracold atoms : interactions in sodium and lithium gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The thesis presents results from experiments in which ultracold Sodium-6 and Lithium-23 atomic gases were studied near a Feshbach resonance at high magnetic fields. The enhanced interactions between atoms in the presence ...

Christensen, Caleb A

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

An Evaluation of the Annular Fuel and Bottle-Shaped Fuel Concepts for Sodium Fast Reactors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Two innovative fuel concepts, the internally and externally cooled annular fuel and the bottle-shaped fuel, were investigated with the goal of increasing the power density and reduce the pressure drop in the sodium-cooled ...

Memmott, Matthew

328

Thermal-hydraulic analysis of innovative fuel configurations for the sodium fast reactor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The sodium fast reactor (SFR) is currently being reconsidered as an instrument for actinide management throughout the world, thanks in part to international programs such as the Generation-IV and especially the Global ...

Memmott, Matthew J

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Tools for supercritical carbon dioxide cycle analysis and the cycle's applicability to sodium fast reactors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor (SFR) and the Supercritical Carbon Dioxide (S-C0?) Recompression cycle are two technologies that have the potential to impact the power generation landscape of the future. In order for their ...

Ludington, Alexander R. (Alexander Rockwell)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Materials Issues in High Temperature Ultrasonic Transducers for Under-Sodium Viewing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Liquid sodium is used as the coolant in some fast spectrum nuclear reactors. This material is optically opaque. To facilitate operations and maintenance activities, an ultrasonic under-sodium viewing system has been developed. In the USA, the technology was successfully demonstrated in the 1970's, and, over the intervening 30+ years the capability was lost. This paper reports materials challenges encountered in developing both single-element and linear phased array 2 MHz transducers that must operate at temperatures up to 260C. The critical issues are fundamentally material selection: the ability of a transducer to be immersed into liquid sodium and function at 260C, to achieve wetting and transmission of ultrasound into the sodium, and to be able to be removed and re-used.

Bond, Leonard J.; Griffin, Jeffrey W.; Posakony, Gerald J.; Harris, Robert V.; Baldwin, David L.

2012-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

331

Sol-Gel Synthesis of Bio-Active Nanoporous Sodium Zirconate ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, Bio-active sodium substituted zirconium was coated by sol-gel method ... Templates Facilitates Neural Stem Cell Adhesion, Proliferation and Differentiation ... Improving the Resistance of Ceramic Surfaces to Biofilm Formation.

332

Solar test of an integrated sodium reflux heat pipe receiver/reactor for thermochemical energy transport  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A chemical reactor for carbon dioxide reforming of methane was integrated into a sodium reflux heat pipe receiver and tested in the solar furnace of the Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot, Israel. The receiver/reactor was a heat pipe with seven tubes inside an evacuated metal box containing sodium. The catalyst, 0.5 wt% Rh on alumina, filled two of the tubes with the front surface of the box serving as the solar absorber. In operation, concentrated sunlight heated the front plate and vaporized sodium from a wire mesh wick attached to other side. Sodium vapor condensed on the reactor tubes, releasing latent heat and returning to the wick by gravity. The receiver system performed satisfactorily in many tests under varying flow conditions. The maximum power absorbed was 7.5 kW at temperatures above 800C. The feasibility of operating a heat pipe receiver/reactor under solar conditions was proven, and the advantages of reflux devices confirmed.

Diver, R.B.; Fish, J.D. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)); Levitan, R.; Levy, M.; Meirovitch, E.; Rosin, H. (Weizmann Inst. of Science, Rehovot (Israel)); Paripatyadar, S.A.; Richardson, J.T. (Univ. of Houston, TX (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Application of the Technology Neutral Framework to Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sodium cooled fast reactors (SFRs) are considered as a novel example to exercise the Technology Neutral Framework (TNF) proposed in NUREG-1860. One reason for considering SFRs is that they have historically had a licensing ...

Johnson, Brian C.

334

Application of the technology neutral framework to sodium cooled fast reactors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sodium cooled fast reactors (SFRs) are considered as a novel example to exercise the Technology Neutral Framework (TNF) proposed in NUREG- 1860. One reason for considering SFRs is that they have historically had a licensing ...

Johnson, Brian C. (Brian Carl)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Oxygen-hydrogen meter assembly for use in remote sodium sampling systems  

SciTech Connect

An assembly of an electrolytic oxygen meter and a diffusion type hydrogen meter was designed to fit into the Multipurpose Sampler hardware already installed and operating on the four FFTF sodium systems. One of the key elements in this assembly is a ceramic-metal sealed oxygen sensor which allows use of a metal tube to extend the 51 cm (20 in.) between the sampler top and the flowing sodium region.

Barton, G.B.; Bohringer, A.P.; Yount, J.A.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

REDUCTION OF PLUTONIUM TO Pu$sup +3$ BY SODIUM DITHIONITE IN POTASSIUM CARBONATE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Plutonium values are reduced in an alkaline aqueous medlum to the trlvalent state by means of sodium dlthionite. Plutonlum values are also separated from normally assoclated contaminants by metathesizing a lanthanum fluoride carrier precipitate containing plutonium with a hydroxide solution, performing the metathesis in the presence of about 0.2 M sodium dithionite at a temperature of between 40 and 90 icient laborato C.

Miller, D.R.; Hoekstra, H.R.

1958-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

337

Glass Formulation Development for INEEL Sodium-Bearing Waste  

SciTech Connect

For about four decades, radioactive wastes have been collected and calcined from nuclear fuels reprocessing at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC), formerly Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP). Over this time span, secondary radioactive wastes have also been collected and stored as liquid from decontamination, laboratory activities, and fuel-storage activities. These liquid wastes are collectively called sodium-bearing wastes (SBW). About 5.7 million liters of these wastes are temporarily stored in stainless steel tanks at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). Vitrification is being considered as an immobilization step for SBW with a number of treatment and disposal options. A systematic study was undertaken to develop a glass composition to demonstrate direct vitrification of INEEL's SBW. The objectives of this study were to show the feasibility of SBW vitrification, not a development of an optimum formulation. The waste composition is relatively high in sodium, aluminum, and sulfur. A specific composition and glass property restrictions, discussed in Section 2, were used as a basis for the development. Calculations based on first-order expansions of selected glass properties in composition and some general tenets of glass chemistry led to an additive (fit) composition (68.69 mass % SiO{sub 2}, 14.26 mass% B{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 11.31 mass% Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 3.08 mass% TiO{sub 2}, and 2.67 mass % Li{sub 2}O) that meets all property restrictions when melted with 35 mass % of SBW on an oxide basis, The glass was prepared using oxides, carbonates, and boric acid and tested to confirm the acceptability of its properties. Glass was then made using waste simulant at three facilities, and limited testing was performed to test and optimize processing-related properties and confirm results of glass property testing. The measured glass properties are given in Section 4. The viscosity at 1150 C, 5 Pa{center_dot}s, is nearly ideal for waste-glass processing in a standard liquid-fed joule-heated melter. The normalized elemental releases by 7-day PCT are all well below 1 g/m{sup 2}, which is a very conservative set point used in this study. The T{sub L}, ignoring sulfate formation, is less than the 1050 C limit. Based on these observations and the reasonable waste loading of 35 mass 0/0, the SBW glass was a prime candidate for further testing. Sulfate salt segregation was observed in all test melts formed from oxidized carbonate precursors. Melts fabricated using SBW simulants suggest that the sulfate-salt segregation seen in oxide and carbonate melts was much less of a problem. The cause for the difference is likely H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} fuming during the boil-down stage of wet-slurry processing. Additionally, some crucible tests with SBW simulant were conducted at higher temperatures (1250 C), which could increase the volatility of sulfate salts. The fate of sulfate during the melting process is still uncertain and should be the topic of future studies. The properties of the simulant glass confirmed those of the oxide and carbonate glass. Corrosion tests on Inconel 690 electrodes and K-3 refractory blocks conducted at INEEL suggest that the glass is not excessively corrosive. Based on the results of this study, the authors recommend that a glass made of 35% SBW simulant (on a mass oxide and halide basis) and 65% of the additive mix (either filled or raw chemical) be used in demonstrating the direct vitrification of INEEL SBW. It is further recommended that a study be conducted to determine the fate of sulfate during glass processing and the tolerance of the chosen melter technology to sulfate salt segregation and corrosivity of the melt.

J.D. Vienna; M.J. Schweiger; D.E. Smith; H.D. Smith; J.V. Crum; D.K. Peeler; I.A. Reamer; C.A. Musick; R.D. Tillotson

1999-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

338

Glass Formulation Development for INEEL Sodium-Bearing Waste  

SciTech Connect

For about four decades, radioactive wastes have been collected and calcined from nuclear fuels reprocessing at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC), formerly Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP). Over this time span, secondary radioactive wastes have also been collected and stored as liquid from decontamination, laboratory activities, and fuel-storage activities. These liquid wastes are collectively called sodium-bearing wastes (SBW). About 5.7 million liters of these wastes are temporarily stored in stainless steel tanks at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). Vitrification is being considered as an immobilization step for SBW with a number of treatment and disposal options. A systematic study was undertaken to develop a glass composition to demonstrate direct vitrification of INEEL's SBW. The objectives of this study were to show the feasibility of SBW vitrification, not a development of an optimum formulation. The waste composition is relatively high in sodium, aluminum, and sulfur. A specific composition and glass property restrictions, discussed in Section 2, were used as a basis for the development. Calculations based on first-order expansions of selected glass properties in composition and some general tenets of glass chemistry led to an additive (fit) composition (68.69 mass % SiO{sub 2}, 14.26 mass% B{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 11.31 mass% Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 3.08 mass% TiO{sub 2}, and 2.67 mass % Li{sub 2}O) that meets all property restrictions when melted with 35 mass % of SBW on an oxide basis, The glass was prepared using oxides, carbonates, and boric acid and tested to confirm the acceptability of its properties. Glass was then made using waste simulant at three facilities, and limited testing was performed to test and optimize processing-related properties and confirm results of glass property testing. The measured glass properties are given in Section 4. The viscosity at 1150 C, 5 Pa{center_dot}s, is nearly ideal for waste-glass processing in a standard liquid-fed joule-heated melter. The normalized elemental releases by 7-day PCT are all well below 1 g/m{sup 2}, which is a very conservative set point used in this study. The T{sub L}, ignoring sulfate formation, is less than the 1050 C limit. Based on these observations and the reasonable waste loading of 35 mass 0/0, the SBW glass was a prime candidate for further testing. Sulfate salt segregation was observed in all test melts formed from oxidized carbonate precursors. Melts fabricated using SBW simulants suggest that the sulfate-salt segregation seen in oxide and carbonate melts was much less of a problem. The cause for the difference is likely H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} fuming during the boil-down stage of wet-slurry processing. Additionally, some crucible tests with SBW simulant were conducted at higher temperatures (1250 C), which could increase the volatility of sulfate salts. The fate of sulfate during the melting process is still uncertain and should be the topic of future studies. The properties of the simulant glass confirmed those of the oxide and carbonate glass. Corrosion tests on Inconel 690 electrodes and K-3 refractory blocks conducted at INEEL suggest that the glass is not excessively corrosive. Based on the results of this study, the authors recommend that a glass made of 35% SBW simulant (on a mass oxide and halide basis) and 65% of the additive mix (either filled or raw chemical) be used in demonstrating the direct vitrification of INEEL SBW. It is further recommended that a study be conducted to determine the fate of sulfate during glass processing and the tolerance of the chosen melter technology to sulfate salt segregation and corrosivity of the melt.

J.D. Vienna; M.J. Schweiger; D.E. Smith; H.D. Smith; J.V. Crum; D.K. Peeler; I.A. Reamer; C.A. Musick; R.D. Tillotson

1999-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

339

A Novel Low-Cost Sodium-Zinc Chloride Battery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The sodium-metal halide (ZEBRA) battery has been considered as one of the most attractive energy storage systems for stationary and transportation applications. Even though Na-NiCl2 battery has been widely investigated, there is still a need to develop a more economical system to make this technology more attractive for commercialization. In the present work, a novel low-cost Na-ZnCl2 battery with a thin planar ??-Al2O3 solid electrolyte (BASE) was proposed, and its electrochemical reactions and battery performance were investigated. Compared to the Na-NiCl2 chemistry, the ZnCl2-based chemistry was more complicated, in which multiple electrochemical reactions including liquid-phase formation occurred at temperatures above 253C. During the first stage of charge, NaCl reacted with Zn to form Na in the anode and Na2ZnCl4 in the cathode. Once all the residual NaCl was consumed, further charging led to the formation of a NaCl-ZnCl2 liquid phase. At the end of charge, the liquid phase reacted with Zn to produce solid ZnCl2. To identify the effects of liquid-phase formation on electrochemical performance, button cells were assembled and tested at 280C and 240C. At 280C where the liquid phase formed during cycling, cells revealed quite stable cyclability. On the other hand, more rapid increase in polarization was observed at 240C where only solid-state electrochemical reactions occurred. SEM analysis indicated that the stable performance at 280C was due to the suppressed growth of Zn and NaCl particles, which were generated from the liquid phase during discharge of each cycle.

Lu, Xiaochuan; Li, Guosheng; Kim, Jin Yong; Lemmon, John P.; Sprenkle, Vincent L.; Yang, Zhenguo

2013-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

340

Ion Recognition Approach to Volume Reduction of Alkaline Tank Waste by Separation of Sodium Salts  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this research involving collaboration between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is to explore new approaches to the separation of sodium hydroxide, sodium nitrate, and other sodium salts from high-level alkaline tank waste. The principal potential benefit is a major reduction in disposed waste volume, obviating the building of expensive new waste tanks and reducing the costs of vitrification. Principles of ion recognition are being researched toward discovery of liquid-liquid extraction systems that selectively separate sodium hydroxide and sodium nitrate from other waste components. The successful concept of pseudo hydroxide extraction using fluorinated alcohols and phenols is being developed at ORNL and PNNL toward a greater understanding of the controlling equilibria, role of solvation, and of synergistic effects involving crown ethers. Synthesis efforts are being directed toward enhanced sodium binding by crown ethers, both neutral and proton-ionizable. Studies with real tank waste at PNNL will provide feedback toward solvent compositions that have promising properties.

Moyer, Bruce A.; Bonnesen, Peter V.; Custelcean, Radu; Delmau, Laetitia H.; Engle, Nancy L.; Kang, Hyun-Ah; Keever, Tamara J.; Marchand, Alan P.; Gadthula, Srinivas; Gore, Vinayak K.; Huang, Zilin; Sivappa, Rasapalli; Tirunahari, Pavan K.; Levitskaia, Tatiana G.; Lumetta, Gregg J.

2005-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "l-1 hp sodium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Ion Recognition Approach to Volume Reduction of Alkaline Tank Waste by Separation of Sodium Salts  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this research involving collaboration between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is to explore new approaches to the separation of sodium hydroxide, sodium nitrate, and other sodium salts from high-level alkaline tank waste. The principal potential benefit is a major reduction in disposed waste volume, obviating the building of expensive new waste tanks and reducing the costs of low-activity waste immobilization. Principles of ion recognition are being researched toward discovery of liquid-liquid extraction systems that selectively separate sodium hydroxide and sodium nitrate from other waste components. The successful concept of pseudohydroxide extraction using fluorinated alcohols and phenols is being developed at ORNL and PNNL toward a greater understanding of the controlling equilibria, role of solvation, and of synergistic effects involving crown ethers. Synthesis efforts are being directed toward enhanced sodium binding by crown ethers, both neutral and proton-ionizable. Studies with real tank waste at PNNL will provide feedback toward solvent compositions that have promising properties.

Levitskaia, Tatiana G.; Lumetta, Gregg J.; Moyer, Bruce A.; Bonnesen, Peter V.

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

An evaluation of neutralization for processing sodium-bearing liquid waste  

SciTech Connect

This report addresses an alternative concept for potentially managing the sodium-bearing liquid waste generated at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant from the current method of calcining a blend of sodium waste and high-level liquid waste. The concept is based on removing the radioactive components from sodium-bearing waste by neutralization and grouting the resulting low-level waste for on-site near-surface disposal. Solidifying the sodium waste as a remote-handled transuranic waste is not considered to be practical because of excessive costs and inability to dispose of the waste in a timely fashion. Although neutralization can remove most radioactive components to provide feed for a solidified low-level waste, and can reduce liquid inventories four to nine years more rapidly than the current practice of blending sodium-bearing liquid waste with first-cycle raffinite, the alternative will require major new facilities and will generate large volumes of low-level waste. Additional facility and operating costs are estimated to be at least $500 million above the current practice of blending and calcining. On-site, low-level waste disposal may be technically difficult and conflict which national and state policies. Therefore, it is recommended that the current practice of calcining a blend of sodium-bearing liquid waste and high-level liquid waste be continued to minimize overall cost and process complexities. 17 refs., 4 figs., 16 tabs.

Chipman, N.A.; Engelgau, G.O.; Berreth, J.R.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

An Innovative Hybrid Loop-Pool Design for Sodium Cooled Fast Reactor  

SciTech Connect

The existing sodium cooled fast reactors (SFR) have two types of designs loop type and pool type. In the loop type design, such as JOYO (Japan) [1] and MONJU (Japan), the primary coolant is circulated through intermediate heat exchangers (IHX) external to the reactor tank. The major advantages of loop design include compactness and easy maintenance. The disadvantage is higher possibility of sodium leakage. In the pool type design such as EBR-II (USA), BN-600M(Russia), Superphnix (France) and European Fast Reactor [2], the reactor core, primary pumps, IHXs and direct reactor auxiliary cooling system (DRACS) heat exchangers (DHX) all are immersed in a pool of sodium coolant within the reactor vessel, making a loss of primary coolant extremely unlikely. However, the pool type design makes primary system large. In the latest ANLs Advanced Burner Test Reactor (ABTR) design [3], the primary system is configured in a pool-type arrangement. The hot sodium at core outlet temperature in hot pool is separated from the cold sodium at core inlet temperature in cold pool by a single integrated structure called Redan. Redan provides the exchange of the hot sodium from hot pool to cold pool through IHXs. The IHXs were chosen as the traditional tube-shell design. This type of IHXs is large in size and hence large reactor vessel is needed.

Haihua Zhao; Hongbin Zhang

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Solar-thermal Water Splitting Using the Sodium Manganese Oxide Process & Preliminary H2A Analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

There are three primary reactions in the sodium manganese oxide high temperature water splitting cycle. In the first reaction, Mn2O3 is decomposed to MnO at 1,500°C and 50 psig. This reaction occurs in a high temperature solar reactor and has a heat of reaction of 173,212 J/mol. Hydrogen is produced in the next step of this cycle. This step occurs at 700°C and 1 atm in the presence of sodium hydroxide. Finally, water is added in the hydrolysis step, which removes NaOH and regenerates the original reactant, Mn2O3. The high temperature solar?driven step for decomposing Mn2O3 to MnO can be carried out to high conversion without major complication in an inert environment. The second step to produce H2 in the presence of sodium hydroxide is also straightforward and can be completed. The third step, the low temperature step to recover the sodium hydroxide is the most difficult. The amount of energy required to essentially distill water to recover sodium hydroxide is prohibitive and too costly. Methods must be found for lower cost recovery. This report provides information on the use of ZnO as an additive to improve the recovery of sodium hydroxide.

Todd M. Francis, Paul R. Lichty, Christopher Perkins, Melinda Tucker, Peter B. Kreider, Hans H. Funke, Allan Lewandowski, and Alan W. Weimer

2012-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

345

pcaL1: An Implementation of Three Methods for L1-Norm Principal ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The authors would like to acknowledge the Center for. High Performance Computing at VCU for providing computational infrastructure and sup- port.

346

The Hilbert transform does not map L^1(Mw) to L^{1,\\infty}(w)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We prove that the analogue for the Hilbert transform of a classical weighted inequality by Fefferman and Stein for the Hardy Littlewood maximal operator does not hold. This is a sequel to paper arXiv:1008.3943 by the first author, which shows the same for the general Haar multiplier operator.

Reguera, Maria Carmen

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Sustained Recycle in Light Water and Sodium-Cooled Reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

From a physics standpoint, it is feasible to sustain recycle of used fuel in either thermal or fast reactors. This paper examines multi-recycle potential performance by considering three recycling approaches and calculating several fuel cycle parameters, including heat, gamma, and neutron emission of fresh fuel; radiotoxicity of waste; and uranium utilization. The first recycle approach is homogeneous mixed oxide (MOX) fuel assemblies in a light water reactor (LWR). The transuranic portion of the MOX was varied among Pu, NpPu, NpPuAm, or all-TRU. (All-TRU means all isotopes through Cf-252.) The Pu case was allowed to go to 10% Pu in fresh fuel, but when the minor actinides were included, the transuranic enrichment was kept below 8% to satisfy the expected void reactivity constraint. The uranium portion of the MOX was enriched uranium. That enrichment was increased (to as much as 6.5%) to keep the fuel critical for a typical LWR irradiation. The second approach uses heterogeneous inert matrix fuel (IMF) assemblies in an LWR - a mix of IMF and traditional UOX pins. The uranium-free IMF fuel pins were Pu, NpPu, NpPuAm, or all-TRU. The UOX pins were limited to 4.95% U-235 enrichment. The number of IMF pins was set so that the amount of TRU in discharged fuel from recycle N (from both IMF and UOX pins) was made into the new IMF pins for recycle N+1. Up to 60 of the 264 pins in a fuel assembly were IMF. The assembly-average TRU content was 1-6%. The third approach uses fast reactor oxide fuel in a sodium-cooled fast reactor with transuranic conversion ratio of 0.50 and 1.00. The transuranic conversion ratio is the production of transuranics divided by destruction of transuranics. The FR at CR=0.50 is similar to the CR for the MOX case. The fast reactor cases had a transuranic content of 33-38%, higher than IMF or MOX.

Steven J. Piet; Samuel E. Bays; Michael A. Pope; Gilles J. Youinou

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

SNAKE Sodium S-CO2 Interactions Experiment - Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SNAKE Sodium S-CO2 Interactions Experiment SNAKE Sodium S-CO2 Interactions Experiment Capabilities Engineering Experimentation Reactor Safety Testing and Analysis Overview Nuclear Reactor Severe Accident Experiments MAX NSTF SNAKE Aerosol Experiments System Components Laser Applications Robots Applications Other Facilities Other Capabilities Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr SNAKE Sodium S-CO2 Interactions Experiment 1 2 The supercritical carbon dioxide (S-CO2) Brayton cycle, coupled with a Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor (SFR), has been identified as a new and innovative energy conversion technology that could contribute to improving the economics of advanced nuclear energy. For these reactors, a new generation of compact, highly-efficient heat exchangers (HXs) will be employed that show great promise in improving the safety and cost of SFRs; however, small HX leaks could still occur. SNAKE is designed to study S-CO2 leakage into sodium.

349

Aerosol behavior during sodium spray fires and comparison with computer codes. [LMFBR  

SciTech Connect

The results of sodium spray fires in air in the 850-m/sup 3/ CSTF vessel are discussed. During these tests, sodium at 600/sup 0/C was sprayed downward through commercial nozzles located 16 m above the floor. Test AB3 released 48 kg of sodium spray in 140 seconds with 670-..mu..m MMD drop size and produced a maximum pressure increase of 0.041 MPa and 30 g/m/sup 3/ of airborne sodium compounds. Test NT-1 sprayed 82 kg of sodium at 320 ..mu..m MMD drop size over 4.7 hours. In both tests, large stable temperature gradients, not predicated by pre-test SPRAY computer code calculations, were observed. Also, post-test estimations of pressure and aerosol concentration made using SPRAY and HAA-3B codes exceeded actual values measured. Thus, the codes conservatively over-predicted the aerosol leakage potential. The experimental data and the SPRAY and HAA-3B code calculations are compared and discussed.

McCormack, J.D.; Hilliard, R.K.; Postma, A.K.; Owen, R.K.

1979-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Development of the sodium/sulfur battery technology for utility applications  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy is sponsoring the development of battery energy storage systems for electric utilities. An important part of this DOE program is the engineering of the battery subsystem. Because lower costs are possible and less space is required compared with conventional battery technologies, two advanced battery systems are being developed: sodium/sulfur and zinc/bromine. A brief description of the development approach being followed along with the current status of the sodium/sulfur technology is described in this paper. Of immediate relevance, a factory integrated modular sodium/sulfur system has been designed that incorporates many of the advantages of this technology. Each module (designated as NAS-P{sub AC}) combines a 600-kWh sodium/sulfur battery, a 300 kW power converter and a control system. In addition to the potential for low life-cycle cost, other specific benefits include excellent portability and an installed system-level footprint that is about 20% of an equivalent system using lead-acid batteries. The sodium/sulfur battery is designed to deliver its rated energy for 1500 cycles or 5 years of maintenance-free operation.

Braithwaite, J.W. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Koenig, A.A. [Silent Power, Inc., Wayne, PA (United States)

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

The Effects of Temperature on the Electrochemical Performance of Sodium-Nickel Chloride Batteries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The sodium-nickel chloride (ZEBRA) battery is typically fabricated with a thick tubular ?"-alumina solid electrolyte (BASE) and operated at relatively high temperatures (? 300C) to achieve adequate electrochemical performance. In the present work, a planar-type sodium-nickel chloride battery possessing a thin BASE (~600 ?m thick) was tested in order to evaluate the feasibility of the battery operation at low temperatures (?200C). Electrochemical test results revealed that the battery was able to be cycled at C/3 rate at as low as 175C despite the higher cell polarization at the reduced temperature. Overall, low operating temperature resulted in a considerable improvement in the stability of cell performance. Cell degradation was negligible at 175C, while 55% increase in end-of-charge polarization was observed at 280C after 60 cycles. SEM analysis indicated that the performance degradation at higher temperatures was related to the particle growth of both nickel and sodium chloride in the cathode. The cells tested at lower temperatures (e.g., 175 and 200C), however, exhibited a sharp drop in cell voltage at the end of discharge due to the diffusion limitation, possibly caused by the limited ionic conductivity of NaAlCl4 melt or the poor wettability of sodium on the BASE. Therefore, improvements in the ionic conductivity of a secondary electrolyte and sodium wetting are desirable to further enhance the battery performance at low temperatures.

Lu, Xiaochuan; Li, Guosheng; Kim, Jin Yong; Lemmon, John P.; Sprenkle, Vincent L.; Yang, Zhenguo

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Experimental and Analytical Simulation of MFCI (Molten Fuel Coolant Interaction) during CDA (Core Disruptive Accident) in Sodium Cooled Fast Reactor.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??With increasing demand for understanding Severe Accident Scenario in Sodium Cooled Fast Reactors, there is an urgent need of enhancing numerical and experimental simulation techniques. (more)

Natarajan, Venkataraman

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Quantitative in-situ measurements of sodium release during the combustion of single coal particles using planar laser induced fluorescence.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The release of sodium from low rank coal during combustion is known to be an important factor in the phenomena of fouling and corrosion in (more)

van Eyk, Philip Joseph

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

ESS 2012 Peer Review - Sodium Intercalation Battery for Stationary Storage - David Ofer, Tiax  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sodium Intercalation Battery for Sodium Intercalation Battery for Stationary Storage Energy Storage Systems Program (ESS) Peer Review and Update Meeting 2012 David Ofer Ofer.david@tiaxllc.com Washington DC, September 27, 2012 Sodium Intercalation Battery for Stationary Storage Background and Purpose 2 Large-scale stationary energy storage for integration with renewables and for off-peak energy capture is a new application requiring new rechargeable batteries. * New combination of requirements - Long cycle life under deep cycling use profile - High cycling efficiency - Moderate rate capability - Very low cost - No requirement for particularly high specific energy or energy density * TIAX is developing a novel Na-ion battery - Leverages teachings of Li-ion technology - Targets novel low-cost chemistry and cell design

355

Cost Transfers at the Department's Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Facility Construction Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

U.S. Department of Energy U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inspector General Office of Audits and Inspections Audit Report Cost Transfers at the Department's Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Facility Construction Project OAS-M-13-03 August 2013 Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 August 8, 2013 MEMORANDUM FOR THE SENIOR ADVISOR FOR ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT FROM: Rickey R. Hass Deputy Inspector General for Audits and Inspections Office of Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Audit Report on "Cost Transfers at the Department's Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Facility Construction Project" BACKGROUND In 2005, the Department of Energy (Department) awarded the Idaho Cleanup Project contract to CH2M ♦ WG Idaho, LLC (CWI) to remediate the Idaho National Laboratory. The Sodium

356

Fact Sheet: Sodium-Beta Batteries (October 2012) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Beta Batteries (October 2012) Beta Batteries (October 2012) Fact Sheet: Sodium-Beta Batteries (October 2012) DOE's Energy Storage Program is funding research to further develop a novel planar design for sodium-beta batteries (Na-beta batteries or NBBs) that will improve energy and power densities and simplify manufacturing. This project will demonstrate a planar prototype that operates at <300 degrees Celsius and will scale up the storage capacity to 5 kW, improving on the performance levels being pursued in related battery research projects. Fact Sheet: Sodium-Beta Batteries (October 2012) More Documents & Publications Energy Storage Systems 2012 Peer Review Presentations - Poster Session 1 (Day 1): ARPA-E Projects Energy Storage Systems 2012 Peer Review and Update Meeting Advanced Materials and Devices for Stationary Electrical Energy Storage

357

Sodium arsenite impairs insulin secretion and transcription in pancreatic {beta}-cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Human studies have shown that chronic inorganic arsenic (iAs) exposure is associated with a high prevalence and incidence of type 2 diabetes. However, the mechanism(s) underlying this effect are not well understood, and practically, there is no information available on the effects of arsenic on pancreatic {beta}-cells functions. Thus, since insulin secreted by the pancreas plays a crucial role in maintaining glucose homeostasis, our aim was to determine if sodium arsenite impairs insulin secretion and mRNA expression in single adult rat pancreatic {beta}-cells. Cells were treated with 0.5, 1, 2, 5 and 10 {mu}M sodium arsenite and incubated for 72 and 144 h. The highest dose tested (10 {mu}M) decreased {beta}-cell viability, by 33% and 83%, respectively. Insulin secretion and mRNA expression were evaluated in the presence of 1 and 5 {mu}M sodium arsenite. Basal insulin secretion, in 5.6 mM glucose, was not significantly affected by 1 or 5 {mu}M treatment for 72 h, but basal secretion was reduced when cells were exposed to 5 {mu}M sodium arsenite for 144 h. On the other hand, insulin secretion in response to 15.6 mM glucose decreased with sodium arsenite in a dose-dependent manner in such a way that cells were no longer able to distinguish between different glucose concentrations. We also showed a significant decrease in insulin mRNA expression of cells exposed to 5 {mu}M sodium arsenite during 72 h. Our data suggest that arsenic may contribute to the development of diabetes mellitus by impairing pancreatic {beta}-cell functions, particularly insulin synthesis and secretion.

Diaz-Villasenor, Andrea [Department of Genomic Medicine and Environmental Toxicology, Instituto de Investigaciones Biomedicas, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (Mexico); Sanchez-Soto, M. Carmen [Department of Biophysics, Instituto de Fisiologia Celular, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Ciudad Universitaria, A.P. 70-253 Coyoacan, Mexico D.F. 04510 (Mexico); Cebrian, Mariano E. [Section of Environmental Toxicology, CINVESTAV, IPN, Mexico City (Mexico); Ostrosky-Wegman, Patricia [Department of Genomic Medicine and Environmental Toxicology, Instituto de Investigaciones Biomedicas, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (Mexico); Hiriart, Marcia [Department of Biophysics, Instituto de Fisiologia Celular, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Ciudad Universitaria, A.P. 70-253 Coyoacan, Mexico D.F. 04510 (Mexico)]. E-mail: mhiriart@ifc.unam.mx

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Repassivation Potential of Alloy 22 in Sodium and Calcium Chloride Brines  

SciTech Connect

A comprehensive matrix of 60 tests was designed to explore the effect of calcium chloride vs. sodium chloride and the ratio R of nitrate concentration over chloride concentration on the repassivation potential of Alloy 22. Tests were conducted using the cyclic potentiodynamic polarization (CPP) technique at 75 C and at 90 C. Results show that at a ratio R of 0.18 and higher nitrate was able to inhibit the crevice corrosion in Alloy 22 induced by chloride. Current results fail to show in a consistent way a different effect on the repassivation potential of Alloy 22 for calcium chloride solutions than for sodium chloride solutions.

Rebak, R B; Ilevbare, G O; Carranza, R M

2007-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

359

Generation of a Magnetic Field by Dynamo Action in a Turbulent Flow of Liquid Sodium  

SciTech Connect

We report the observation of dynamo action in the von Karman sodium experiment, i.e., the generation of a magnetic field by a strongly turbulent swirling flow of liquid sodium. Both mean and fluctuating parts of the field are studied. The dynamo threshold corresponds to a magnetic Reynolds number R{sub m}{approx}30. A mean magnetic field of the order of 40 G is observed 30% above threshold at the flow lateral boundary. The rms fluctuations are larger than the corresponding mean value for two of the components. The scaling of the mean square magnetic field is compared to a prediction previously made for high Reynolds number flows.

Monchaux, R.; Chiffaudel, A.; Daviaud, F.; Dubrulle, B.; Gasquet, C.; Marie, L.; Ravelet, F. [Service de Physique de l'Etat Condense, Direction des Sciences de la Matiere, CEA-Saclay, CNRS URA 2464, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette cedex (France); Berhanu, M.; Fauve, S.; Mordant, N.; Petrelis, F. [Laboratoire de Physique Statistique de l'Ecole Normale Superieure, CNRS UMR 8550, 24 Rue Lhomond, 75231 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Bourgoin, M.; Moulin, M.; Odier, Ph.; Pinton, J.-F.; Volk, R. [Laboratoire de Physique de l'Ecole Normale Superieure de Lyon, CNRS UMR 5672, 46 allee d'Italie, 69364 Lyon Cedex 07 (France)

2007-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

360

Method of making a current collector for a sodium/sulfur battery  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This specification is directed to a method of making a current collector for a sodium/sulfur battery. The current collector so-made is electronically conductive and resistant to corrosive attack by sulfur/polysulfide melts. The method includes the step of forming the current collector for the sodium/sulfur battery from a composite material formed of aluminum filled with electronically conductive fibers selected from the group of fibers consisting essentially of graphite fibers having a diameter up to 10 microns and silicon carbide fibers having a diameter in a range of 500--1,000 angstroms. 2 figs.

Tischer, R.P.; Winterbottom, W.L.; Wroblowa, H.S.

1987-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "l-1 hp sodium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Method of making a current collector for a sodium/sulfur battery  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This specification is directed to a method of making a current collector (14) for a sodium/sulfur battery (10). The current collector so-made is electronically conductive and resistant to corrosive attack by sulfur/polysulfide melts. The method includes the step of forming the current collector for the sodium/sulfur battery from a composite material (16) formed of aluminum filled with electronically conductive fibers selected from the group of fibers consisting essentially of graphite fibers having a diameter up to 10 microns and silicon carbide fibers having a diameter in a range of 500-1000 angstroms.

Tischer, Ragnar P. (Birmingham, MI); Winterbottom, Walter L. (Farmington Hills, MI); Wroblowa, Halina S. (West Bloomfield, MI)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Preliminary analysis of patent trends for sodium/sulfur battery technology  

SciTech Connect

This document summarizes development trends in sodium/sulfur battery technology based on data from US patents. Purpose of the study was to use the activity, timing and ownership of 285 US patents to identify and describe broad patterns of change in sodium/sulfur battery technology. The analysis was conducted using newly developed statistical and computer graphic techniques for describing technology development trends from patent data. This analysis suggests that for some technologies trends in patent data provide useful information for public and private R and D planning.

Triplett, M.B.; Winter, C.; Ashton, W.B.

1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

100-MW NUCLEAR POWER PLANT UTILIZING A SODIUM COOLED, GRAPHITE MODERATED REACTOR  

SciTech Connect

The conceptual design of a 100 Mw(e) nuclear power plant is described. The plant utilized a sodium-cooled graphite-moderated reactor with stainless- steel clad. slightiy enriched UO/sub 2/ fuel. The reactor is provided with three main coolant circuits, and the steam cycle has three stages of regenerative heating. The plant control system allows automatic operation over the range of 20 to 100% load, or manual operation at all loads. The site, reactor, sodium systems, reactor auxiliaries, fuel handling, instrumentation, turbine-generator, buildings. and safety measures are described. Engineering drawings are included. (W.D.M.)

1958-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

364

Partitioning of gadolinium and its induced phase separation in sodium-aluminoborosilicate glasses  

SciTech Connect

Phase separation in sodium-aluminoborosilicate glasses was systematically studied as a function of Gd2O3 concentration with transmission electronic microscopy (TEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and electronic energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) methods. Dissolving Gd2O3 in sodium-aluminoborosilicate glasses causes phase separation when the Na2O/(Na2O + Al2O3) is between 0.4 and 0.6. Samples of these glasses were examined in the TEM with ELFS. The results are reported.

Qian, Maoxu; Li, Liyu; Li, Hong; Strachan, Denis M.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Current Status of Health and Safety Issues of Sodium/Metal Chloride (Zebra) Batteries  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report addresses environmental, health, and safety (EH&S) issues associated with sodium/ metal chloride batteries, in general, although most references to specific cell or battery types refer to units developed or being developed under the Zebra trademark. The report focuses on issues pertinent to sodium/metal chloride batteries and their constituent components; however, the fact that some ''issues'' arise from interaction between electric vehicle (EV) and battery design compels occasional discussion amid the context of EV vehicle design and operation. This approach has been chosen to provide a reasonably comprehensive account of the topic from a cell technology perspective and an applications perspective.

Trickett, D.

1998-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

366

EVALUATION OF CALANDRIA, THIMBLE, AND CANNED-MODERATOR CONCEPTS FOR SODIUM GRAPHITE REACTORS  

SciTech Connect

In efforts to improve the neutron economy and lower the capital costs of sodium graphite reactors, several methods of separating the sodium and graphite were investigated including the calandria, the thimble, and the canned moderator reactors. An analysis including nuclear, heat transfer, and economic comparisons was made of these SGR concepts. Based upon neutron economy and feasibility of core fabrication, the calandria concept appears to offer the greatest potential for improvement in 8GR design. The thimble concept provides some improvement in neutron economy but introduced numerous problems requiring developmental work. (auth)

Reed, G.L.

1960-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

367

F POWER MEASUREMENT FOR GENERATION IV SODIUM FAST R. COULON, S. NORMAND, M. MICHEL, L. BARBOT, T. DOMENECH,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.F-84500 Bollène, France. ABSTRACT The Phénix nuclear power plant has been a French Sodium Fast Reactor20 F POWER MEASUREMENT FOR GENERATION IV SODIUM FAST REACTORS R. COULON, S. NORMAND, M. MICHEL, L at the Phénix reactor shows that the use of 20 F as power tagging agent gives a fast and accurate power

368

HPS replacement project drives garage costs down. [High-pressure sodium luminaires  

SciTech Connect

The high cost of energy had forced a four-story New York airport parking garage to turn off almost half its low bay lights, leaving it gloomy and vandal-prone. By replacing the original lamps with high-pressure sodium (HPS) luminaires, the garage brightened its image with 2400 fewer fixtures and netted an annual energy savings of $60,000.

Not Available

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Formation and prevention of agglomerated deposits during the gasification of high-sodium lignite  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A high-sodium lignite from the Freedom mine in North Dakota was tested in the transport gasifier at the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF). During the first use of the high-sodium lignite in October 2003, agglomerated deposits formed at various locations in the transport gasifier system. An extensive laboratory testing program was carried out to characterize the deposits, understand the mechanism of the deposit formation, and test various methods of preventing or minimizing the agglomeration. The results of the deposit analysis and initial lab studies suggested that sodium released from the lignite was deposited on the surface of the sand bed material, resulting in the formation of sticky sodium silicates. Additional laboratory tests indicated that the agglomeration could be avoided or minimized by replacing the sand with a nonreactive bed material (e.g., coarse coal ash), operating at slightly reduced temperatures and using certain types of additives. By using these procedures, we completely eliminated the deposition problems in a subsequent gasification run in August 2004. 10 refs., 10 figs.

Robert S. Dahlin; WanWang Peng; Matt Nelson; Pannalal Vimalchand; Guohai Liu [Southern Research Institute and Southern Company Services, Wilsonville, AL (United States). Power Systems Development Facility

2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

370

Review of FY 2001 Development Work for Vitrification of Sodium Bearing Waste  

SciTech Connect

Treatment of sodium-bearing waste (SBW) at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) within the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory is mandated by the Settlement Agreement between the Department of Energy and the State of Idaho. This report discusses significant findings from vitrification technology development during 2001 and their impacts on the design basis for SBW vitrification.

Taylor, Dean Dalton; Barnes, Charles Marshall

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Review of FY2001 Development Work for Vitrification of Sodium Bearing Waste  

SciTech Connect

Treatment of sodium-bearing waste (SBW) at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) within the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory is mandated by the Settlement Agreement between the Department of Energy and the State of Idaho. This report discusses significant findings from vitrification technology development during 2001 and their impacts on the design basis for SBW vitrification.

Barnes, C.M.; Taylor, D.D.

2002-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

372

Advanced Materials for Sodium-Beta Alumina Batteries: Status, Challenges and Perspectives  

SciTech Connect

The increasing penetration of renewable energy and the trend toward clean, efficient transportation have spurred growing interests in sodium-beta alumina batteries that store electrical energy via sodium ion transport across a ?"-Al2O3 solid electrolyte at elevated temperatures (typically 300~350C). Currently, the negative electrode or anode is metallic sodium in molten state during battery operation; the positive electrode or cathode can be molten sulfur (Na-S battery) or solid transition metal halides plus a liquid phase secondary electrolyte (e.g., ZEBRA battery). Since the groundbreaking works in the sodium-beta alumina batteries a few decades ago, encouraging progress has been achieved in improving battery performance, along with cost reduction. However there remain issues that hinder broad applications and market penetration of the technologies. To better the Na-beta alumina technologies require further advancement in materials along with component and system design and engineering. This paper offers a comprehensive review on materials of electrodes and electrolytes for the Na-beta alumina batteries and discusses the challenges ahead for further technology improvement.

Lu, Xiaochuan; Xia, Guanguang; Lemmon, John P.; Yang, Zhenguo

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Statistical Analysis of Sodium Doppler WindTemperature Lidar Measurements of Vertical Heat Flux  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A statistical study is presented of the errors in sodium Doppler lidar measurements of wind and temperature in the mesosphere that arise from the statistics of the photon-counting process that is inherent in the technique. The authors use data ...

Liguo Su; Richard L. Collins; David A. Krueger; Chiao-Yao She

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Review of sodium effects on candidate materials for central receiver solar-thermal power systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Available information on the corrosion behavior and mechanical properties of structural materials in a high-temperature sodium environment has been reviewed to compile a data base for selection of materials for advanced central-receiver solar-power systems, for which sodium is being considered as a heat-transfer fluid and thermal-storage medium. Candidate materials for this application (e.g., Types 304, 316, and 321 stainless steel, Alloy 800, and Fe-2 1/4 Cr-1Mo and Fe-9Cr-1Mo ferritic steels) have been used in the construction of various components for liquid-metal fast-breeder reactors in this country and abroad with considerable success. Requirements for additional information on material properties in a sodium environment are identified. The additional data coupled with more quantitative deformation models, failure criteria, and component design rules will further reduce uncertainties in the assessment of performance limits and component reliability in large sodium heat-transport systems. 120 references.

Chopra, O.K.; Wang, J.Y.N.; Natesan, K.

1979-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Process for making boron nitride using sodium cyanide and boron phosphate  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This is a very simple process for making boron nitride by mixing sodium cyanide and boron phosphate and heating the mixture in an inert atmosphere until a reaction takes place. The product is a white powder of boron nitride that can be used in applications that require compounds that are stable at high temperatures and that exhibit high electrical resistance.

Bamberger, C.E.

1987-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

376

Conceptual Design of a MEDE Treatment System for Sodium Bonded Fuel  

SciTech Connect

Unirradiated sodium bonded metal fuel and casting scrap material containing highly enriched uranium (HEU) is stored at the Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) on the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). This material, which includes intact fuel assemblies and elements from the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) and Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) reactors as well as scrap material from the casting of these fuels, has no current use under the terminated reactor programs for both facilities. The Department of Energy (DOE), under the Sodium-Bonded Spent Nuclear Fuel Treatment Record of Decision (ROD), has determined that this material could be prepared and transferred to an off-site facility for processing and eventual fabrication of fuel for commercial nuclear reactors. A plan is being developed to prepare, package and transfer this material to the DOE High Enriched Uranium Disposition Program Office (HDPO), located at the Y-12 National Security Complex in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Disposition of the sodium bonded material will require separating the elemental sodium from the metallic uranium fuel. A sodium distillation process known as MEDE (Melt-Drain-Evaporate), will be used for the separation process. The casting scrap material needs to be sorted to remove any foreign material or fines that are not acceptable to the HDPO program. Once all elements have been cut and loaded into baskets, they are then loaded into an evaporation chamber as the first step in the MEDE process. The chamber will be sealed and the pressure reduced to approximately 200 mtorr. The chamber will then be heated as high as 650 C, causing the sodium to melt and then vaporize. The vapor phase sodium will be driven into an outlet line where it is condensed and drained into a receiver vessel. Once the evaporation operation is complete, the system is de-energized and returned to atmospheric pressure. This paper describes the MEDE process as well as a general overview of the furnace systems, as necessary, to complete the MEDE process.

Carl E. Baily; Karen A. Moore; Collin J. Knight; Peter B. Wells; Paul J. Petersen; Ali S. Siahpush; Matthew T. Weseman

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Effect of Sodium Carboxymethyl Celluloses on Water-catalyzed Self-degradation of 200-degree C-heated Alkali-Activated Cement  

SciTech Connect

We investigated the usefulness of sodium carboxymethyl celluloses (CMC) in promoting self-degradation of 200C-heated sodium silicate-activated slag/Class C fly ash cementitious material after contact with water. CMC emitted two major volatile compounds, CO2 and acetic acid, creating a porous structure in cement. CMC also reacted with NaOH from sodium silicate to form three water-insensitive solid reaction products, disodium glycolate salt, sodium glucosidic salt, and sodium bicarbonate. Other water-sensitive solid reaction products, such as sodium polysilicate and sodium carbonate, were derived from hydrolysates of sodium silicate. Dissolution of these products upon contact with water generated heat that promoted cements self-degradation. Thus, CMC of high molecular weight rendered two important features to the water-catalyzed self-degradation of heated cement: One was the high heat energy generated in exothermic reactions in cement; the other was the introduction of extensive porosity into cement.

Sugama T.; Pyatina, T.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center Sodium-Bearing Waste Treatment Research and Development FY-2002 Status Report  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) is considering several optional processes for disposal of liquid sodium-bearing waste. During fiscal year 2002, immobilization-related research included of grout formulation development for sodium-bearing waste, absorption of the waste on silica gel, and off-gas system mercury collection and breakthrough using activated carbon. Experimental results indicate that sodium-bearing waste can be immobilized in grout at 70 weight percent and onto silica gel at 74 weight percent. Furthermore, a loading of 11 weight percent mercury in sulfur-impregnated activated carbon was achieved with 99.8% off-gas mercury removal efficiency.

Herbst, Alan Keith; Deldebbio, John Anthony; Mc Cray, John Alan; Kirkham, Robert John; Olson, Lonnie Gene; Scholes, Bradley Adams

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Fact Sheet: Sodium-Ion Batteries for Grid-Level Applications (October 2012)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Aquion Energy, Inc. Aquion Energy, Inc. American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) Sodium-Ion Batteries for Grid-Level Applications Demonstrating low-cost, grid-scale, ambient temperature sodium-ion batteries In June 2012, Aquion Energy, Inc. completed the testing and demonstration requirements for the U.S. Department of Energy's program with its low-cost, grid-scale, ambient temperature Aqueous Hybrid Ion (AHI) energy storage device. During the three-year project, Aquion manufactured hundreds of batteries and assemble them into high-voltage, grid-scale systems. This project helped them move their aqueous electrochemical energy storage device from bench-scale testing to pilot-scale manufacturing. The testing successfully demonstrated a grid-connected, high voltage (>1,000 V), 13.5 kWh system with a 4-hour discharge.

380

ESS 2012 Peer Review - Advanced Sodium Battery - Joonho Koh, Materials & Systems Research  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sodium Battery Sodium Battery Joonho Koh (jkoh@msrihome.com), Greg Tao (gtao@msrihome.com), Neill Weber, and Anil V. Virkar Materials & Systems Research, Inc., 5395 W 700 S, Salt Lake City, UT 84104 Company Introduction History  Founded in 1990 by Dr. Dinesh K. Shetty and Dr. Anil V. Virkar  Currently 11 employees including 5 PhDs  10,000 ft² research facility in Salt Lake City, Utah MSRI's Experience of Na Batteries Status of the Na Batteries Overall Project Description Goal Develop advanced Na battery technology for enhanced safety, reduced fabrication cost, and high-power performance Approach  Innovative cell design using stronger structural materials  Reduction of the fabrication cost using a simple and reliable processing technique

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "l-1 hp sodium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Calcination of Fluorinel-sodium waste blends using sugar as a feed additive (formerly WINCO-11879)  

SciTech Connect

Methods were studied for using sugar as a feed additive for converting the sodium-bearing wastes stored at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant into granular, free flowing solids by fluidized-bed calcination at 500{degrees}C. All methods studied blended sodium-bearing wastes with Fluorinel wastes but differed in the types of sugar (sucrose or dextrose) that were added to the blend. The most promising sugar additive was determined to be sucrose, since it is converted more completely to inorganic carbon than is dextrose. The effect of the feed aluminum-to-alkali metal mole ratio on calcination of these blends with sugar was also investigated. Increasing the aluminum-to-alkali metal ratio from 0.6 to 1.0 decreased the calcine product-to-fines ratio from 3.0 to 1.0 and the attrition index from 80 to 15%. Further increasing the ratio to 1.25 had no effect.

Newby, B.J.; Thomson, T.D.; O`Brien, B.H.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) Sodium Bearing Waste - Waste Incidental to Reprocessing Determination  

SciTech Connect

U.S. Department of Energy Manual 435.1-1, Radioactive Waste Management, Section I.1.C, requires that all radioactive waste subject to Department of Energy Order 435.1 be managed as high-level radioactive waste, transuranic waste, or low-level radioactive waste. Determining the radiological classification of the sodium-bearing waste currently in the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center Tank Farm Facility inventory is important to its proper treatment and disposition. This report presents the technical basis for making the determination that the sodium-bearing waste is waste incidental to spent fuel reprocessing and should be managed as mixed transuranic waste. This report focuses on the radiological characteristics of the sodiumbearing waste. The report does not address characterization of the nonradiological, hazardous constituents of the waste in accordance with Resource Conservation and Recovery Act requirements.

Jacobson, Victor Levon

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

A sodium-sulfur battery for the ETX-II propulsion system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A Canadian built 52 kWh sodium-sulphur battery is being integrated with the ETX-II powertrain. The propulsion system thus formed is being installed in a Ford Aerostar compact-size van for test and development purposes. The selection and design of the traction battery, as an integral part of the propulsion system, will be outlined in this paper along with the projected performance of the test bed vehicle under both highway and urban driving conditions. The results of a battery optimization study will also be discussed. Braking energy recovery (regeneration) is an important part of the ETX-II system capability and needs to be carefully managed when used with sodium-sulphur batteries. This will be discussed to show its effect on the system performance.

Altmejd, M. (Powerplex Technologies, Inc., Downsview, ON (Canada)); Dzieciuch, M. (Ford Motor Co., Dearborn, MI (United States))

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

A sodium-sulfur battery for the ETX-II propulsion system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Canadian built 52 kWh sodium-sulphur battery is being integrated with the ETX-II powertrain. The propulsion system thus formed is being installed in a Ford Aerostar compact-size van for test and development purposes. The selection and design of the traction battery, as an integral part of the propulsion system, will be outlined in this paper along with the projected performance of the test bed vehicle under both highway and urban driving conditions. The results of a battery optimization study will also be discussed. Braking energy recovery (regeneration) is an important part of the ETX-II system capability and needs to be carefully managed when used with sodium-sulphur batteries. This will be discussed to show its effect on the system performance.

Altmejd, M. [Powerplex Technologies, Inc., Downsview, ON (Canada); Dzieciuch, M. [Ford Motor Co., Dearborn, MI (United States)

1988-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

385

Sodium sulfur electric vehicle battery engineering program final report, September 2, 1986--June 15, 1993  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In September 1986 a contract was signed between Chloride Silent Power Limited (CSPL) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) entitled ``Sodium Sulfur Electric Vehicle Battery Engineering Program``. The aim of the cost shared program was to advance the state of the art of sodium sulfur batteries for electric vehicle propulsion. Initially, the work statement was non-specific in regard to the vehicle to be used as the design and test platform. Under a separate contract with the DOE, Ford Motor Company was designing an advanced electric vehicle drive system. This program, called the ETX II, used a modified Aerostar van for its platform. In 1987, the ETX II vehicle was adopted for the purposes of this contract. This report details the development and testing of a series of battery designs and concepts which led to the testing, in the US, of three substantial battery deliverables.

NONE

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Two dimensional, two fluid model for sodium boiling in LMFBR fuel assemblies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A two dimensional numerical model for the simulation of sodium boiling transient was developed using the two fluid set of conservation equations. A semiimplicit numerical differencing scheme capable of handling the problems associated with the ill-posedness implied by the complex characteristic roots of the two fluid problems was used, which took advantage of the dumping effect of the exchange terms. Of particular interest in the development of the model was the identification of the numerical problems caused by the strong disparity between the axial and radial dimensions of fuel assemblies. A solution to this problem was found which uses the particular geometry of fuel assemblies to accelerate the convergence of the iterative technique used in the model. Three sodium boiling experiments were simulated with the model, with good agreement between the experimental results and the model predictions.

Granziera, M.R.; Kazimi, M.S.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Sodium/sulfur battery engineering for stationary energy storage. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The use of modular systems to distribute power using batteries to store off-peak energy and a state of the art power inverter is envisioned to offer important national benefits. A 4-year, cost- shared contract was performed to design and develop a modular, 300kVA/300-kWh system for utility and customer applications. Called Nas-P{sub AC}, this system uses advanced sodium/sulfur batteries and requires only about 20% of the space of a lead-acid-based system with a smaller energy content. Ten, 300-VDC, 40-kWh sodium/sulfur battery packs are accommodated behind a power conversion system envelope with integrated digital control. The resulting design facilities transportation, site selection, and deployment because the system is quiet and non-polluting, and can be located in proximity to the load. This report contains a detailed description of the design and supporting hardware development performed under this contract.

Koenig, A.; Rasmussen, J. [Silent Power, Inc., Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

A SODIUM COOLED, GRAPHITE MODERATED, LOW ENRICHMENT URANIUM REACTOR FOR THE PRODUCTION OF USEFUL POWER  

SciTech Connect

A design study is presented for a sodium cooled, graphite moderated power reactor utilizing low enrichment uranium fuel. The design is characterized by dependence on existing technology and the use of standard, or nearly standard, components. The reactor has a nominal rating of 167 thermal megawatts, and a plant comprising three such reactors for a total output of 500 thermal megawatts is described. Sodium in a secondary, non-radioactive, circulation system carries the heat to a steam generator at 910 deg F and is returned at 420 deg F. Steam conditions at the turbine throttle are 600 psig and 825 deg F. Cost of the complete reactor power plant, consisting of the three reactors and one 150- megawatt turbogenerator, is estimated to be approximately ,165,000. (auth)

Weisner, E.F. ed.

1954-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

389

Technical Information on the Carbonation of the EBR-II Reactor, Summary Report Part 1: Laboratory Experiments and Application to EBR-II Secondary Sodium System  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Residual sodium is defined as sodium metal that remains behind in pipes, vessels, and tanks after the bulk sodium metal has been melted and drained from such components. The residual sodium has the same chemical properties as bulk sodium, and differs from bulk sodium only in the thickness of the sodium deposit. Typically, sodium is considered residual when the thickness of the deposit is less than 5-6 cm. This residual sodium must be removed or deactivated when a pipe, vessel, system, or entire reactor is permanently taken out of service, in order to make the component or system safer and/or to comply with decommissioning regulations. As an alternative to the established residual sodium deactivation techniques (steam-and-nitrogen, wet vapor nitrogen, etc.), a technique involving the use of moisture and carbon dioxide has been developed. With this technique, sodium metal is converted into sodium bicarbonate by reacting it with humid carbon dioxide. Hydrogen is emitted as a by-product. This technique was first developed in the laboratory by exposing sodium samples to humidified carbon dioxide under controlled conditions, and then demonstrated on a larger scale by treating residual sodium within the Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) secondary cooling system, followed by the primary cooling system, respectively. The EBR-II facility is located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) in southeastern Idaho, U.S.A. This report is Part 1 of a two-part report. It is divided into three sections. The first section describes the chemistry of carbon dioxide-water-sodium reactions. The second section covers the laboratory experiments that were conducted in order to develop the residual sodium deactivation process. The third section discusses the application of the deactivation process to the treatment of residual sodium within the EBR-II secondary sodium cooling system. Part 2 of the report, under separate cover, describes the application of the technique to residual sodium treatment within the EBR-II primary sodium cooling system and related systems.

Steven R. Sherman

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

ANALYSIS OF THE HEAT GENERATION IN THE PRIMARY SODIUM PIPE TUNNELS, INTERMEDIATE HEAT EXCHANGER CELLS, AND THE PRIMARY SODIUM FILL TANK VAULT FOR THE HALLAM NUCLEAR POWER FACILITY (HNPF)  

SciTech Connect

I. An adequate and conservative calculational method for evaluation of the heat generation distribution in the primary sodium system substructural areas was developed. The method was programed for the IBM 704 and the IBM 709. The results obtained from analysis of the gamma heat generation in the primary sodium pipe tunnels and in the intermediate heat exchanger cells are presented. Calculations are outlined, and gamma attenuation coefficients for concrete, sodium, and steel are given. II. Results obtained from analysis of the gamma heat generation in areas where the primary sodium system piping layout was changed from that of the previous analysis are presented. Major changes in magnitude of the hot spot heat generation due to the changes are pointed out. (auth)

Legendre, P.J.

1959-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

391

EVALUATION OF KANIGEN, ELECTROLESS NICKEL PLATING FOR STEAM SIDE OF A SODIUM COMPONENT STEAM GENERATOR  

SciTech Connect

The evaluation of Kanigen electroless nickel plating for surfaces in contact with water and steam in a sodium-heated Type 316 stainless steel steam generator is reported. The purpose of the coating is to afford protection from stress corrosion cracking originating on the water-steam side of the unit. It is concluded that the Kanigen coating does not afford adequate protection for the service conditions. (D.L.C.)

1961-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

392

Alternative TRUEX-Based Pretreatment Processing of INEEL Sodium Bearing Waste  

SciTech Connect

The goals of this study were to demonstrate a selective complexant for separating mercury from the transuranic (TRU) elements in the transuranic extraction (TRUEX) process and to demonstrate alternative stripping methods to eliminate phosphorus-containing, actinide stripping agents during TRUEX processing. The work described in this report provides the basis for implementing an improved TRUEX-based flowsheet for processing INEEL sodium-bearing waste using only minor modifications to the current Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) flowsheet design.

Rapko, Brian M.; Fiskum, Sandra K.; Lumetta, Gregg J.

2000-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

393

A Heterogeneous Sodium Fast Reactor Designed to Transmute Minor Actinide Actinide Waste Isotopes into Plutonium Fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An axial heterogeneous sodium fast reactor design is developed for converting minor actinide waste isotopes into plutonium fuel. The reactor design incorporates zirconium hydride moderating rods in an axial blanket above the active core. The blanket design traps the active cores axial leakage for the purpose of transmuting Am-241 into Pu-238. This Pu-238 is then co-recycled with the spent driver fuel to make new driver fuel. Because Pu-238 is significantly more fissile than Am-241 in a fast neutron spectrum, the fissile worth of the initial minor actinide material is upgraded by its preconditioning via transmutation in the axial targets. Because, the Am-241 neutron capture worth is significantly stronger in a moderated epithermal spectrum than the fast spectrum, the axial targets serve as a neutron trap which recovers the axial leakage lost by the active core. The sodium fast reactor proposed by this work is designed as an overall transuranic burner. Therefore, a low transuranic conversion ratio is achieved by a degree of core flattening which increases axial leakage. Unlike a traditional pancake design, neutron leakage is recovered by the axial target/blanket system. This heterogeneous core design is constrained to have sodium void and Doppler reactivity worth similar to that of an equivalent homogeneous design. Because minor actinides are irradiated only once in the axial target region; elemental partitioning is not required. This fact enables the use of metal targets with electrochemical reprocessing. Therefore, the irradiation environment of both drivers and targets was constrained to ensure applicability of the established experience database for metal alloy sodium fast reactor fuels.

Samuel E. Bays

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Photoelectron emission from island metallic sodium films during the excitation of localized plasmon resonances  

SciTech Connect

The photoelectron emission from island sodium films is studied under the action of radiation that is resonant to the collective electron excitations in the nanoparticles forming a film. Noticeable deviations from the Fowler law and an increase in the photoelectron yield are detected. The dependences of the photoeffect efficiency from these films on their structural parameters, the polarization vector, and the angle of radiation incidence are obtained.

Vartanyan, T. A.; Vashchenko, E. V., E-mail: vashenko.elena@mail.ru; Leonov, N. B.; Przhibel'skii, S. G.; Khromov, V. V. [St. Petersburg State University of Information Technologies, Mechanics, and Optics (Russian Federation)

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

395

PRELIMINARY DESIGN STUDY FOR A SODIUM-GRAPHITE-REACTOR IRRADIATION FACILITY  

SciTech Connect

The results of an investigation to integrate a Na/sup 24/ irradiation processing facility with an operating sodium graphite reactor are presented. An irradiation facility incorporated into a reference SGR (Hallam Nuclear Power Facility, Hallam, Nebraska) is described. Development of the facility application, preliminary design criteria and capital and operating costs are discussed. Recommendations for further development of the technology and economics of this type of irradiation facility are included. (auth)

Thompson, D.S.; Benaroya, V.

1959-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

396

FINAL PERFORMANCE TESTS OF TWO-COOLANT-REGION SODIUM PUMP SHAFT FREEZE- SELAS  

SciTech Connect

A prototype of the two-coolant-region pump shaft freezeseals intended for application to the Hallam Power Reactor sodium pumps was fabricated. Tests under simulated reactor service conditions revealed satisfactory operation only when the lower of the two regions received heat from the circulating fluid (tetralin in the tests). With the inlet temperature of tetralin to the upper region of the seal maintained at 95 deg F and that to the lower region held in the range 240 to 285 deg F the sealfunctioned satisfactorily for 1100 hr. When 95 deg F coolant was circulated through both sections of the seal excessive cooling occurred, resulting in either improper formation of the seal or in seizure of the shaft when rotative speed was low. In this case, the cooling load on the seal varied directly with both shaft speed and bulk sodium temperature. A maximum cooling load of 2.56 kw occurred at a shaft speed of 840 rpm and with a bulk sodium temperature of 1000 deg F. (C.J.G.)

Streck, F.O.

1960-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

397

Preliminary evaluation of regulatory and safety issues for sodium-sulfur batteries in electric vehicle applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) Electric and Hybrid Vehicle Program is involved in the development and evaluation of sodium-sulfur energy storage batteries for electric vehicle (EV) applications. Laboratory testing of complete battery systems, to be followed by controlled in-vehicle testing and on-road usage, are expected to occur as components of the DOE program during the 1988--1990 time frame. Testing and operation of sodium-sulfur batteries at other DOE contractor facilities may also take place during this time frame. A number of regulatory and safety issues can affect the technical scope, schedule, and cost of the expected programmatic activities. This document describes these issues and requirements, provides a preliminary evaluation of their significance, and lists those critical items that may result from them. The actions needed to permit the conduct of a successful program at DOE contractor facilities are identified, and concerns that could affect the eventual commercialization potential of sodium-sulfur batteries are noted to the extent they are known.

Evans, D.R.; Henriksen, G.L.; Hunt, G.L.

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Phase 2 THOR Steam Reforming Tests for Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About one million gallons of acidic, hazardous, and radioactive sodium-bearing waste is stored in stainless steel tanks at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC), which is a major operating facility of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. Steam reforming is a candidate technology being investigated for converting the waste into a road ready waste form that can be shipped to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in New Mexico for interment. A steam reforming technology patented by Studsvik, Inc., and licensed to THOR Treatment Technologies has been tested in two phases using a Department of Energy-owned fluidized bed test system located at the Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) Science and Technology Applications Research Center located in Idaho Falls, Idaho. The Phase 1 tests were reported earlier in 2003. The Phase 2 tests are reported here. For Phase 2, the process feed rate, stoichiometry, and chemistry were varied to identify and demonstrate process operation and product characteristics under different operating conditions. Two test series were performed. During the first series, the process chemistry was designed to produce a sodium carbonate product. The second series was designed to produce a more leach-resistant, mineralized sodium aluminosilicate product. The tests also demonstrated the performance of a MACT-compliant off-gas system.

Nicholas R. Soelberg

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

LMR design concepts for transuranic management in low sodium void worth cores  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The fuel cycle processing techniques and hard neuron spectrum of the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) metal fuel cycle have favorable characteristics for the management of transuranics; and the wide range of breeding characteristics available in metal fuelled cores provides for flexibility in transuranic management strategy. Previous studies indicate that most design options which decrease the breeding ratio also show a decrease in sodium void worth; therefore, low void worths are achievable in transuranic burning (low breeding ratio) core designs. This paper describes numerous trade studies assessing various design options for a low void worth transuranic burner core. A flat annular core design appears to be a promising concept; the high leakage geometry yields a low breeding ratio and small sodium void worth. To allow flexibility in breeding characteristics, alternate design options which achieve fissile self-sufficiency are also evaluated. A self-sufficient core design which is interchangeable with the burner core and maintains a low sodium void worth is developed. 13 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

Hill, R.N.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Integrated fuel performance and thermal-hydraulic sub-channel models for analysis of sodium fast reactors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sodium Fast Reactors (SFR) show promise as an effective way to produce clean safe nuclear power while properly managing the fuel cycle. Accurate computer modeling is an important step in the design and eventual licensing ...

Fricano, Joseph William

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "l-1 hp sodium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Applications of carbon-13 and sodium-23 NMR in the study of plants, animal, and human cells  

SciTech Connect

Carbon-13 and sodium-23 NMR have been applied to the study of a variety of plant, animal and human cell types. Sodium NMR, in combination with dysprosium shift reagents, has been used to monitor sodium transport kinetics in salt-adapted, and non-adapted cells of P. milliaceum and whole D. spicata plants. The sodium content of human erythrocytes and leukemic macrophages was measured. Carbon-13 NMR was used to determine the structure and metabolism of rat epididymal fat pad adipocytes in real time. Insulin and isoproterenol-stimulated triacylglycerol turnover could be monitored in fat cell suspensions. (1-/sup 13/C) glucose was used as a substrate to demonstrate futile metabolic cycling from glucose to glycerol during lypolysis. Cell wall polysaccharide synthesis was followed in suspensions of P. milliaceum cells using (1-/sup 13/C) glucose as a precursor. These results illustrate the wide range of living systems which are amenable to study with NMR. 14 refs., 21 figs.

Sillerud, L.O.; Heyser, J.W.; Han, C.H.; Bitensky, M.W.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

A four-equation two-phase flow model for sodium boiling simulation of LMFBR fuel assemblies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A three-dimensional numerical model for the simulation of sodium boiling transients has been developed. The model uses mixture mass and energy equations, while employing a separate momentum equation for each phase. Thermal ...

Schor, Andrei L.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Modelling of thermo-mechanical and irradiation behavior of metallic and oxide fuels for sodium fast reactors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A robust and reliable code to model the irradiation behavior of metal and oxide fuels in sodium cooled fast reactors is developed. Modeling capability was enhanced by adopting a non-empirical mechanistic approach to the ...

Karahan, Aydin

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Technical Information on the Carbonation of the EBR-II Reactor, Summary Report Part 2: Application to EBR-II Primary Sodium System and Related Systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Residual sodium is defined as sodium metal that remains behind in pipes, vessels, and tanks after the bulk sodium metal has been melted and drained from such components. The residual sodium has the same chemical properties as bulk sodium, and differs from bulk sodium only in the thickness of the sodium deposit. Typically, sodium is considered residual when the thickness of the deposit is less than 5-6 cm. This residual sodium must be removed or deactivated when a pipe, vessel, system, or entire reactor is permanently taken out of service, in order to make the component or system safer and/or to comply with decontamination and decomissioning regulations. As an alternative to the established residual sodium deactivation techniques (steam-and-nitrogen, wet vapor nitrogen, etc.), a technique involving the use of moisture and carbon dioxide has been developed. With this technique, sodium metal is converted into sodium bicarbonate by reacting it with humid carbon dioxide. Hydrogen is emitted as a by-product. This technique was first developed in the laboratory by exposing sodium samples to humidifed carbon dioxide under controlled conditions, and then demonstrated on a larger scale by treating residual sodium within the Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) secondary cooling system, followed by the primary cooling system, respectively. The EBR-II facility is located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) in southeastern Idaho, USA. This report is Part 2 of a two-part report. This second report provides a supplement to the first report and describes the application of the humdidified carbon dioxide technique ("carbonation") to the EBR-II primary tank, primary cover gas systems, and the intermediate heat exchanger. Future treatment plans are also provided.

Steven R. Sherman; Collin J. Knight

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Assessment of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Idaho Cleanup Project Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project, November 2012  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Idaho Cleanup Project Idaho Cleanup Project Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project May 2011 November 2012 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Independent Oversight Assessment of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Idaho Cleanup Project Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project Table of Contents 1.0 Introduction........................................................................................................................................... 1 2.0 Scope and Methodology ....................................................................................................................... 2

406

Laboratory Characterization of Advanced SO2 Control By-Products: Dry Sodium and Calcium In-Duct Injection Wastes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Extensive laboratory investigation indicates that the physical and chemical characterization and engineering properties of dry sodium and calcium in-duct injection wastes differ, as do the refuse and by-product management options associated with them. Utilities can use this report on the chemical, physical, engineering, and leachate properties of dry sodium and calcium in-duct injection wastes to better plan for and manage future waste disposal and/or use.

1990-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

407

Technology gap analysis on sodium-cooled reactor fuel handling system supporting advanced burner reactor development.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goals of the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) are to expand the use of nuclear energy to meet increasing global energy demand in an environmentally sustainable manner, to address nuclear waste management issues without making separated plutonium, and to address nonproliferation concerns. The advanced burner reactor (ABR) is a fast reactor concept which supports the GNEP fuel cycle system. Since the integral fast reactor (IFR) and advanced liquid-metal reactor (ALMR) projects were terminated in 1994, there has been no major development on sodium-cooled fast reactors in the United States. Therefore, in support of the GNEP fast reactor program, the history of sodium-cooled reactor development was reviewed to support the initiation of this technology within the United States and to gain an understanding of the technology gaps that may still remain for sodium fast reactor technology. The fuel-handling system is a key element of any fast reactor design. The major functions of this system are to receive, test, store, and then load fresh fuel into the core; unload from the core; then clean, test, store, and ship spent fuel. Major requirements are that the system must be reliable and relatively easy to maintain. In addition, the system should be designed so that it does not adversely impact plant economics from the viewpoints of capital investment or plant operations. In this gap analysis, information on fuel-handling operating experiences in the following reactor plants was carefully reviewed: EBR-I, SRE, HNPF, Fermi, SEFOR, FFTF, CRBR, EBR-II, DFR, PFR, Rapsodie, Phenix, Superphenix, KNK, SNR-300, Joyo, and Monju. The results of this evaluation indicate that a standardized fuel-handling system for a commercial fast reactor is yet to be established. However, in the past sodium-cooled reactor plants, most major fuel-handling components-such as the rotatable plug, in-vessel fuel-handling machine, ex-vessel fuel transportation cask, ex-vessel sodium-cooled storage, and cleaning stations-have accumulated satisfactory construction and operation experiences. In addition, two special issues for future development are described in this report: large capacity interim storage and transuranic-bearing fuel handling.

Chikazawa, Y.; Farmer, M.; Grandy, C.; Nuclear Engineering Division

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Sodium (Na)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...Ionization state Potential, eV I 5.139 II 47.286 III 71.64 IV 98.91 V 138.39 VI 172.15 VII 208.47 VIII 264.18 IX 299.87 X 1465.091 XI 1648.659...

409

Sodium Batteries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 28, 2013 ... Program Organizers: Xingbo Liu, West Virginia University; Terry ... Cheng, University of Kentucky; Keeyoung Jung, Research Institute of...

410

Thermochemical cyclic system for decomposing H.sub.2 O and/or CO.sub.2 by means of cerium-titanium-sodium-oxygen compounds  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thermochemical closed cyclic process for the decomposition of water and/or carbon dioxide to hydrogen and/or carbon monoxide begins with the reaction of ceric oxide (CeO.sub.2), titanium dioxide (TiO.sub.2) and sodium titanate (Na.sub.2 TiO.sub.3) to form sodium cerous titanate (NaCeTi.sub.2 O.sub.6) and oxygen. Sodium cerous titanate (NaCeTi.sub.2 O.sub.6) reacted with sodium carbonate (Na.sub.2 CO.sub.3) in the presence of steam, produces hydrogen. The same reaction, in the absence of steam, produces carbon monoxide. The products, ceric oxide and sodium titanate, obtained in either case, are treated with carbon dioxide and water to produce ceric oxide, titanium dioxide, sodium titanate, and sodium bicarbonate. After dissolving sodium bicarbonate from the mixture in water, the remaining insoluble compounds are used as starting materials for a subsequent cycle. The sodium bicarbonate can be converted to sodium carbonate by heating and returned to the cycle.

Bamberger, Carlos E. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Thermochemical cyclic system for decomposing H/sub 2/O and/or CO/sub 2/ by means of cerium-titanium-sodium-oxygen compounds  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thermochemical closed cyclic process for the decomposition of water and/or carbon dioxide to hydrogen and/or carbon monoxide begins with the reaction of ceric oxide (CeO/sub 2/), titanium dioxide (TiO/sub 2/) and sodium titanate (Na/sub 2/TiO/sub 3/) to form sodium cerous titanate (NaCeTi/sub 2/O/sub 6/) and oxygen. Sodium cerous titanate (NaCeTi/sub 2/O/sub 6/) reacted with sodium carbonate (Na/sub 2/CO/sub 3/) in the presence of steam, produces hydrogen. The same reaction, in the absence of steam, produces carbon monoxide. The products, ceric oxide and sodium titanate, obtained in either case, are treated with carbon dioxide and water to produce ceric oxide, titanium dioxide, sodium titanate, and sodium bicarbonate. After dissolving sodium bicarbonate from the mixture in water, the remaining insoluble compounds are used as starting materials for a subsequent cycle. The sodium bicarbonate can be converted to sodium carbonate by heating and returned to the cycle.

Bamberger, C.E.

1980-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

412

Probing the Failure Mechanism of SnO2 Nanowires for Sodium-ion Batteries  

SciTech Connect

Non-lithium metals such as sodium have attracted wide attention as a potential charge carrying ion for rechargeable batteries, performing the same role as lithium in lithium- ion batteries. As sodium and lithium have the same +1 charge, it is assumed that what has been learnt about the operation of lithium ion batteries can be transferred directly to sodium batteries. Using in-situ TEM, in combination with DFT calculations, we probed the structural and chemical evolution of SnO2 nanowire anodes in Na-ion batteries and compared them quantitatively with results from Li-ion batteries [Science 330 (2010) 1515]. Upon Na insertion into SnO2, a displacement reaction occurs, leading to the formation of amorphous NaxSn nanoparticles covered by crystalline Na2O shell. With further Na insertion, the NaxSn core crystallized into Na15Sn4 (x=3.75). Upon extraction of Na (desodiation), the NaxSn core transforms to Sn nanoparticles. Associated with a volume shrinkage, nanopores appear and metallic Sn particles are confined in hollow shells of Na2O, mimicking a peapod structure. These pores greatly increase electrical impedance, therefore naturally accounting for the poor cyclability of SnO2. DFT calculations indicate that Na+ diffuses 30 times slower than Li+ in SnO2, in agreement with in-situ TEM measurement. Insertion of Na can chemo-mechanically soften the reaction product to greater extent than in lithiation. Therefore, in contrast to the lithiation of SnO2, no dislocation plasticity was seen ahead of the sodiation front. This direct comparison of the results from Na and Li highlights the critical role of ionic size and electronic structure of different ionic species on the charge/discharge rate and failure mechanisms in these batteries.

Gu, Meng; Kushima, Akihiro; Shao, Yuyan; Zhang, Jiguang; Liu, Jun; Browning, Nigel D.; Li, Ju; Wang, Chong M.

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

413

Production of high brightness H- beam by charge exchange of hydrogen atom beam in sodium jet  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Production of H{sup -} beam for accelerators applications by charge exchange of high brightness hydrogen neutral beam in a sodium jet cell is experimentally studied in joint BNL-BINP experiment. In the experiment, a hydrogen-neutral beam with 3-6 keV energy, equivalent current up to 5 A and 200 microsecond pulse duration is used. The atomic beam is produced by charge exchange of a proton beam in a pulsed hydrogen target. Formation of the proton beam is performed in an ion source by four-electrode multiaperture ion-optical system. To achieve small beam emittance, the apertures in the ion-optical system have small enough size, and the extraction of ions is carried out from the surface of plasma emitter with a low transverse ion temperature of {approx}0.2 eV formed as a result of plasma jet expansion from the arc plasma generator. Developed for the BNL optically pumped polarized ion source, the sodium jet target with recirculation and aperture diameter of 2 cm is used in the experiment. At the first stage of the experiment H{sup -} beam with 36 mA current, 5 keV energy and {approx}0.15 cm {center_dot} mrad normalized emittance was obtained. To increase H{sup -} beam current ballistically focused hydrogen neutral beam will be applied. The effects of H{sup -} beam space-charge and sodium-jet stability will be studied to determine the basic limitations of this approach.

Davydenko, V.; Zelenski, A.; Ivanov, A.; Kolmogorov, A.

2010-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

414

Theoretical study of sodium and potassium resonance lines pressure broadened by helium atoms  

SciTech Connect

We perform fully quantum mechanical calculations in the binary approximation of the emission and absorption profiles of the sodium 3s-3p and potassium 4s-4p resonance lines under the influence of a helium perturbing gas. We use carefully constructed potential energy surfaces and transition dipole moments to compute the emission and absorption coefficients at temperatures from 158 to 3000 K. Contributions from quasibound states are included. The resulting red and blue wing profiles agree well with previous theoretical calculations and with experimental measurements.

Zhu, Cheng; Babb, James F.; Dalgarno, Alex [ITAMP, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States)

2006-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

415

Process for converting sodium nitrate-containing, caustic liquid radioactive wastes to solid insoluble products  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for converting sodium nitrate-containing, caustic, radioactive wastes to a solid, relatively insoluble, thermally stable form is provided and comprises the steps of reacting powdered aluminum silicate clay, e.g., kaolin, bentonite, dickite, halloysite, pyrophyllite, etc., with the sodium nitrate-containing radioactive wastes which have a caustic concentration of about 3 to 7 M at a temperature of 30.degree. C to 100.degree. C to thereby entrap the dissolved radioactive salts in the aluminosilicate matrix. In one embodiment the sodium nitrate-containing, caustic, radioactive liquid waste, such as neutralized Purex-type waste, or salts or oxide produced by evaporation or calcination of these liquid wastes (e.g., anhydrous salt cake) is converted at a temperature within the range of 30.degree. C to 100.degree. C to the solid mineral form-cancrinite having an approximate chemical formula 2(NaAlSiO.sub.4) .sup.. xSalt.sup.. y H.sub.2 O with x = 0.52 and y = 0.68 when the entrapped salt is NaNO.sub.3. In another embodiment the sodium nitrate-containing, caustic, radioactive liquid is reacted with the powdered aluminum silicate clay at a temperature within the range of 30.degree. C to 100.degree. C, the resulting reaction product is air dried eitheras loose powder or molded shapes (e.g., bricks) and then fired at a temperature of at least 600.degree. C to form the solid mineral form-nepheline which has the approximate chemical formula of NaAlSiO.sub.4. The leach rate of the entrapped radioactive salts with distilled water is reduced essentially to that of the aluminosilicate lattice which is very low, e.g., in the range of 10.sup.-.sup.2 to 10.sup.-.sup.4 g/cm.sup.2 -- day for cancrinite and 10.sup.-.sup.3 to 10.sup.-.sup.5 g/cm.sup.2 -- day for nepheline.

Barney, Gary S. (Richland, WA); Brownell, Lloyd E. (Richland, WA)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Feed Composition for Sodium-Bearing Waste Treatment Process, Rev. 3  

SciTech Connect

Treatment of sodium-bearing waste (SBW) at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) within the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory is mandated by a Settlement Agreement between the Department of Energy and the State of Idaho. One of the requirements of the Settlement Agreement is to complete treatment of SBW by December 31, 2012. To support both design and development studies for the SBW treatment process, detailed feed compositions are needed. This report contains the expected compositions of these feed streams and the sources and methods used in obtaining these compositions.

Barnes, Charles Marshall

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Pre-Decisional Sodium Bearing Waste Technology Development Roadmap FY-01 Update  

SciTech Connect

This report provides an update to the Sodium Bearing Waste (SBW) Technology Development Roadmap generated a year ago. It outlines progress made to date and near-term plans for the technology development work necessary to support processing SBW. In addition, it serves as a transition document to the Risk Management Plan (RMP) required by the Project per DOE Order 413.3, Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets. Technical uncertainties have been identified as design basis elements (DBEs) and captured in a technical baseline database. As the risks are discovered, assessed, and mitigated, the status of the DBEs in the database will be updated and tracked to closure.

Mc Dannel, Gary Eidson

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Transport of Magnetic Field by a Turbulent Flow of Liquid Sodium  

SciTech Connect

We study the effect of a turbulent flow of liquid sodium generated in the von Karman geometry, on the localized field of a magnet placed close to the frontier of the flow. We observe that the field can be transported by the flow on distances larger than its integral length scale. In the most turbulent configurations, the mean value of the field advected at large distance vanishes. However, the rms value of the fluctuations increases linearly with the magnetic Reynolds number. The advected field is strongly intermittent.

Volk, R.; Odier, Ph.; Pinton, J.-F. [Laboratoire de Physique de l'Ecole Normale Superieure de Lyon, CNRS UMR 5672, 47 allee d'Italie, 69364 Lyon Cedex 07 (France); Ravelet, F.; Monchaux, R.; Chiffaudel, A.; Daviaud, F. [Service de Physique de l'Etat Condense, Direction des Sciences de la Matiere, CEA-Saclay, CNRS URA 2464, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette cedex (France); Berhanu, M.; Fauve, S.; Mordant, N.; Petrelis, F. [Laboratoire de Physique Statistique de l'Ecole Normale Superieure, CNRS UMR 8550, 24 Rue Lhomond, 75231 Paris Cedex 05 (France)

2006-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

419

Nutrition Guide Station Menu Items Portion Size Calories Protein Total Fat Carbohydrates Sodium Cholesterol Total Fiber  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nutrition Guide #12;Station Menu Items Portion Size Calories Protein Total Fat Carbohydrates Sodium.00 43 70.0 0.0 Turkey Breast 4 oz 172 20 7.00 0.00 520 47.0 0.0 Grilled White Meat Chicken 4 oz 125 28 1.40 0.00 74 66.0 0.0 Fried Boneless Chicken 4 oz 212 38 5.00 0.58 90 103.0 0.0 Ham 4 oz 120 20 4.00 0

Aronov, Boris

420

Sodium-sulfur battery development. Phase VB final report, October 1, 1981--February 28, 1985  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the technical progress made under Contract No. DE-AM04-79CH10012 between the U.S. Department of Energy, Ford Aerospace & Communications Corporations and Ford Motor Company, for the period 1 October 1981 through 28 February 1985, which is designated as Phase VB of the Sodium-Sulfur Battery Development Program. During this period, Ford Aerospace held prime technical responsibility and Ford Motor Company carried out supporting research. Ceramatec, Inc., was a major subcontractor to Ford Aerospace for electrolyte development and production.

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "l-1 hp sodium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

High intensity discharge 400-watt sodium ballast. Phase I. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The results of a research and development program directed toward design, test, and evaluation of energy efficient High Intensity Discharge (HID) Solid State 400-Watt Ballast lighting system are reported. Phase I of the project which was designed to modify the existing Datapower ballast to LBL configuration, measure performance characteristics, and compare efficiency with a core/coil ballast including energy loss analysis is covered. In addition, Datapower was tasked to build six (6) prototype 400-Watt High Pressure Sodium Ballasts for verification tests by an independent test facility and follow-on performance and life tests at LBL.

Felper, G.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Data:7c1f6f07-0cde-495c-973f-863fd48649ac | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

40 400 220.92 333.36 291.48 451.68 Underground Wiring 61 H.P. Sodium 25 100 182.16 241.92 211.56 269.52 177.72 245.04 66 H.P. Sodium 30 200 205.20 279.72 240.84 336.00 200.04...

423

Experimental Development and Demonstration of Ultrasonic Measurement Diagnostics for Sodium Fast Reactor Thermal-hydraulics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This research project will address some of the principal technology issues related to sodium-cooled fast reactors (SFR), primarily the development and demonstration of ultrasonic measurement diagnostics linked to effective thermal convective sensing under normatl and off-normal conditions. Sodium is well-suited as a heat transfer medium for the SFR. However, because it is chemically reactive and optically opaque, it presents engineering accessibility constraints relative to operations and maintenance (O&M) and in-service inspection (ISI) technologies that are currently used for light water reactors. Thus, there are limited sensing options for conducting thermohydraulic measurements under normal conditions and off-normal events (maintenance, unanticipated events). Acoustic methods, primarily ultrasonics, are a key measurement technology with applications in non-destructive testing, component imaging, thermometry, and velocimetry. THis project would have yielded a better quantitative and qualitative understanding of the thermohydraulic condition of solium under varied flow conditions. THe scope of work will evaluate and demonstrate ultrasonic technologies and define instrumentation options for the SFR.

Tokuhiro, Akira; Jones, Byron

2013-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

424

State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA) Checklist for the 105-DR Large Sodium Fire Facility Closure Plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Hanford Site, located northwest of the city of Richland, Washington, houses reactors, chemical-separation systems, and related facilities used for the production of special nuclear materials, as well as for activities associated with nuclear energy development. The 105-DR Large Sodium Fire Facility (LSFF), which was in operation from about 1972 to 1986, was a research laboratory that occupied the former ventilation supply room on the southwest side of the 105-DR Reactor facility. The LSFF was established to provide means of investigating fire and safety aspects associated with large sodium or other metal alkali fires in the liquid metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR) facilities. The 105-DR Reactor facility was designed and built in the 1950's and is located in the 100-D Area of the Hanford Site. The building housed the DR defense reactor, which was shut down in 1964. The LSFF is subject to the regulatory requirements for the storage and treatment of dangerous wastes. Clean closure is the proposed method of closure for the LSFF. Closure will be conducted pursuant to the requirements of the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303-610 (Ecology 1989). This closure plan presents a description of the facility, the history of wastes managed, and the procedures that will be followed to close the LSFF as an Alkali Metal Treatment Facility. No future use of the LSFF is expected.

Not Available

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

R and D Trends For The Future Sodium Fast Reactors In France  

SciTech Connect

The sodium fast reactors are the natural Generation IV candidate, thanks to their strong potential for incineration and/or breeding that allow drastic fissile materials economy and fission waste products recycling or transmutation. The question is now to make evolve the existing or past projects of reactors to systems fully compatible with Generation IV objectives, in particular with regard to the economy, durability and safety. This work must be achieved in an international frame which requires a sharing of the objectives and will allow, in the long term, the sharing of the activities. However, in order to ensure the overall coherence of the various development programs defined within the Gen-IV framework, it is necessary to define a new SFR development plan based on the experience gained in France (Phenix, Superphenix) and Europe, in the EFR project. The commonly agreed SFR system issues to be improved or further investigated are its capital cost, safety issues (sodium risks, core criticality accidents), and in-service inspection and maintenance technology. (authors)

Dufour, Ph. [CEA-Cadarache, DEN/DER/SESI/LESA, bat. 212, 13108 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Anzieu, P. [CEA-Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Lecarpentier, D. [EDF-R and D, Departement SINETICS, 1 av du General De Gaulle, 92140 Clamart (France); Serpantie, JP. [AREVA-Framatome ANP (France)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Inherent Prevention and Mitigation of Severe Accident Consequences in Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactors  

SciTech Connect

Safety challenges for sodium-cooled fast reactors include maintaining core temperatures within design limits and assuring the geometry and integrity of the reactor core. Due to the high power density in the reactor core, heat removal requirements encourage the use of high-heat-transfer coolants such as liquid sodium. The variation of power across the core requires ducted assemblies to control fuel and coolant temperatures, which are also used to constrain core geometry. In a fast reactor, the fuel is not in the most neutronically reactive configuration during normal operation. Accidents leading to fuel melting, fuel pin failure, and fuel relocation can result in positive reactivity, increasing power, and possibly resulting in severe accident consequences including recriticalities that could threaten reactor and containment integrity. Inherent safety concepts, including favorable reactivity feedback, natural circulation cooling, and design choices resulting in favorable dispersive characteristics for failed fuel, can be used to increase the level of safety to the point where it is highly unlikely, or perhaps even not credible, for such severe accident consequences to occur.

Roald A. Wigeland; James E. Cahalan

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Selecting the suitable dopants: electronic structures of transition metal and rare earth doped thermoelectric sodium cobaltate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Engineered Na0.75CoO2 is considered a prime candidate to achieve high efficiency thermoelectric systems to regenerate electricity from waste heat. In this work, three elements with outmost electronic configurations, (1) an open d shell (Ni), (2) a closed d shell (Zn), and (3) an half fill f shell (Eu) with a maximum unpaired electrons, were selected to outline the dopants' effects on electronic and crystallographic structures of Na0.75CoO2. Systematic ab initio density functional calculations showed that the formation energy of these dopants was found to be lowest when residing on sodium layer and ranked as -1.1 eV, 0.44 eV and 3.44 eV for Eu, Ni and Zn respectively. Furthermore Ni was also found to be stable when substituting Co ion. As these results show great harmony with existing experimental data, they provide new insights into the fundamental principle of dopant selection for manipulating the physical properties in the development of high performance sodium cobaltate based thermoelectric materials.

Assadi, M H N; Yu, A B

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Final report-passive safety optimization in liquid sodium-cooled reactors.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of a three-year collaboration between Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) to identify and quantify the performance of innovative design features in metallic-fueled, sodium-cooled fast reactor designs. The objective of the work was to establish the reliability and safety margin enhancements provided by design innovations offering significant potential for construction, maintenance, and operating cost reductions. The project goal was accomplished with a combination of advanced model development (Task 1), analysis of innovative design and safety features (Tasks 2 and 3), and planning of key safety experiments (Task 4). Task 1--Computational Methods for Analysis of Passive Safety Design Features: An advanced three-dimensional subassembly thermal-hydraulic model was developed jointly and implemented in ANL and KAERI computer codes. The objective of the model development effort was to provide a high-accuracy capability to predict fuel, cladding, coolant, and structural temperatures in reactor fuel subassemblies, and thereby reduce the uncertainties associated with lower fidelity models previously used for safety and design analysis. The project included model formulation, implementation, and verification by application to available reactor tests performed at EBR-II. Task 2--Comparative Analysis and Evaluation of Innovative Design Features: Integrated safety assessments of innovative liquid metal reactor designs were performed to quantify the performance of inherent safety features. The objective of the analysis effort was to identify the potential safety margin enhancements possible in a sodium-cooled, metal-fueled reactor design by use of passive safety mechanisms to mitigate low-probability accident consequences. The project included baseline analyses using state-of-the-art computational models and advanced analyses using the new model developed in Task 1. Task 3--Safety Implications of Advanced Technology Power Conversion and Design Innovations and Simplifications: Investigations of supercritical CO{sub 2} gas turbine Brayton cycles coupled to the sodium-cooled reactors and innovative concepts for sodium-to-CO{sub 2} heat exchangers were performed to discover new designs for high efficiency electricity production. The objective of the analyses was to characterize the design and safety performance of equipment needed to implement the new power cycle. The project included considerations of heat transfer and power conversion systems arrangements and evaluations of systems performance. Task 4--Post Accident Heat Removal and In-Vessel Retention: Test plans were developed to evaluate (1) freezing and plugging of molten metallic fuel in subassembly geometry, (2) retention of metallic fuel core melt debris within reactor vessel structures, and (3) consequences of intermixing of high pressure CO{sub 2} and sodium. The objective of the test plan development was to provide planning for measurements of data needed to characterize the consequences of very low probability accident sequences unique to metallic fuel and CO{sub 2} Brayton power cycles. The project produced three test plans ready for execution.

Cahalana, J. E.; Hahn, D.; Nuclear Engineering Division; Korea Atomic Energy Research Inst.

2007-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

429

Stack Gas Heat Recovery from 100 to 1200 HP Boilers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With newspaper reports of March 1980 fuel price increases at as much as a 110% annualized rate, energy users are becoming more keenly aware of the urgency of conserving energy--and energy dollars. It is becoming increasingly more difficult for business to remain competitive while "passing through" fuel cost increases to consumers. As energy becomes an increased percentage of the budget, energy conservation with have an increasing impact on profitability. While at the time of this writing our nation appears to be blessed with a generally expanding energy supply, not too many months ago commercial and industrial energy users in some parts of the country had experienced energy rationing or even curtailment. In certain industries, this resulted in reduced production and caused personnel layoffs. U.S. Government reports indicate that roughly 20% of all fuel is consumed in boilers. A savings in boiler fuel consumption can have a positive impact on energy conservation, and become an important component in the solution of our nation's "energy crisis."

Judson, T. H.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Cost Benefit Evaluation of HP Turbine Admission Schemes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The scheme used to position the control valves that admit steam to high-pressure turbines has a direct effect on the turbines performance. This report describes the two most common admission schemes, partial and full arc, and discusses their effects on heat rate, reliability, and cost versus benefit under different loading conditions and modes of operation.BackgroundHistorically, most steam turbines in coal-fired power plants operated in a ...

2012-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

431

U-010:HP Onboard Administrator Unspecified Flaw Lets Remote Users...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Manager Unspecified Flaw Lets Remote Users Gain Unauthorized Access V-120: EMC Smarts Network Configuration Manager Java RMI Access Control Flaw Lets Remote Users Gain Full Control...

432

A Survey of hp-Adaptive Strategies for Elliptic Partial ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 1 i+1 NI is not known at this point, since it is the sum of the ni. Successive iter- ations are used to solve for ni and NI simultaneously. ...

2011-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

433

HP MSR30/50 Routers with Encryption Accelerator Modules  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 1 The RS-232/485 interfaces is reserved and not supported at present. ... Officer shall clean the module of any grease, dirt, or oil before applying the ...

2013-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

434

D2L-D4L1.xls  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 QUENCH TESTS 1 QUENCH TESTS 0 500 1000 1500 2000 2500 3000 3500 4000 4500 5000 5500 6000 6500 7000 7500 8000 8500 9000 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 20 QUENCH NUMBER QUENCH CURRENT (A) Liquid Cooling Forced Flow Cooling 7 TeV (6015A) 7.56 TeV (6505A) no warm bore tube forced flow cooling liquid helium bath cooling no warm bore liquid helium bath cooling no warm bore 19-April-2002 (revised 8-Jan-2003) (revised 19-Dec-03) (revised 9-Jan-04) J. F. Muratore Brookhaven National Lab D2L101 QUENCH SUMMARY Magcool Bay C ________________________________________________________________________________

435

D2L-D4L1.xls  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 QUENCH TESTS 7 QUENCH TESTS 0 500 1000 1500 2000 2500 3000 3500 4000 4500 5000 5500 6000 6500 7000 7500 8000 8500 9000 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 20 QUENCH NUMBER QUENCH CURRENT (A) Right Upper (Forced Flow) Level-No Quench (Forced Flow) Right Lower (Liquid) 7 TeV (6015A) 7.56 TeV (6505A) liquid helium bath cooling forced flow cooling WBT CLOSED 16-Sept-2003 J. F. Muratore Brookhaven National Lab D2L107 QUENCH SUMMARY Magcool Bay C ________________________________________________________________________________ QUENCH RUN CURRENT T1 T3 START MIITS COIL COMMENTS # # (A) (K) (K) (ms) ________________________________________________________________________________

436

D2L-D4L1.xls  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8 QUENCH TESTS 8 QUENCH TESTS 0 500 1000 1500 2000 2500 3000 3500 4000 4500 5000 5500 6000 6500 7000 7500 8000 8500 9000 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 20 QUENCH NUMBER QUENCH CURRENT (A) Right Upper (Forced Flow) Right Lower (Forced Flow) Left Upper (Liquid) 7 TeV (6015A) 7.56 TeV (6505A) liquid helium bath cooling forced flow cooling WBT CLOSED 20-Oct-2003 J. F. Muratore Brookhaven National Lab D2L108 QUENCH SUMMARY Magcool Bay C ________________________________________________________________________________ QUENCH RUN CURRENT T1 T3 START MIITS COIL COMMENTS # # (A) (K) (K) (ms) ________________________________________________________________________________

437

D2L-D4L1.xls  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 QUENCH TESTS 2 QUENCH TESTS 0 500 1000 1500 2000 2500 3000 3500 4000 4500 5000 5500 6000 6500 7000 7500 8000 8500 9000 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 20 QUENCH NUMBER QUENCH CURRENT (A) Quench Level - No Quench 7 TeV (6015A) 7.56 TeV (6505A) no warm bore tube liquid helium bath cooling forced flow cooling no warm bore tube 7-June-2002 J. F. Muratore Brookhaven National Lab D2L102 QUENCH SUMMARY Magcool Bay C ________________________________________________________________________________ QUENCH RUN CURRENT T1 T4 START MIITS COIL COMMENTS # # (A) (K) (K) (ms) ________________________________________________________________________________ T = 4.5K (nom)

438

TID-4500, UC-25 l1etals, Ceramics and Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Monsieur A. Mottu Societe Genevoise d'lnstruments de Physiqu~ Geneva, SWITZERLAND Professor Dr. -lng. ... Dr. Dipl. lng. ...

2007-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

439

An inexact interior point method for L1-regularized sparse ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to design highly effective preconditioners to efficiently solve the large and ill- ...... [ 11] J. Fan, Y. Feng, and Y. Wu, Network exploration via the adaptive LASSO.

440

ALTERNATING DIRECTION ALGORITHMS FOR l1-PROBLEMS IN ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

x from a data vector b defined in (3.2), the relative error in x is defined in terms of percentage: RelErr(x) = x ? x ..... In track and field, human speed is measured...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "l-1 hp sodium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

On Theory of Compressive Sensing via l1-Minimization: Simple ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

null space of A??1 is a rotation of that of A, and such a rotation does not alter the success rate .... overall conditioning of the set of m k submatrices of A.

442

A Pure L1-norm Principal Component Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The authors would also like to acknowledge The Center for High Performance Computing at VCU for providing computational infrastructure and support.

443

A Coordinate Gradient Descent Method for l1-regularized Convex ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Apr 16, 2008 ... In this paper, we propose the CGD method to solve (1) and, in particular, ...... involving A, we only needs to evaluate Ad, where d is a descent direction, once at each ... where ? is Gaussian white noise with variance (0.01 Ax)2.

444

Purple L1 Milestone Review Panel GPFS Functionality and Performance  

SciTech Connect

The GPFS deliverable for the Purple system requires the functionality and performance necessary for ASC I/O needs. The functionality includes POSIX and MPIIO compatibility, and multi-TB file capability across the entire machine. The bandwidth performance required is 122.15 GB/s, as necessary for productive and defensive I/O requirements, and the metadata performance requirement is 5,000 file stats per second. To determine success for this deliverable, several tools are employed. For functionality testing of POSIX, 10TB-files, and high-node-count capability, the parallel file system bandwidth performance test IOR is used. IOR is an MPI-coordinated application that can write and then read to a single shared file or to an individual file per process and check the data integrity of the file(s). The MPIIO functionality is tested with the MPIIO test suite from the MPICH library. Bandwidth performance is tested using IOR for the required 122.15 GB/s sustained write. All IOR tests are performanced with data checking enabled. Metadata performance is tested after ''aging'' the file system with 80% data block usage and 20% inode usage. The fdtree metadata test is expected to create/remove a large directory/file structure in under 20 minutes time, akin to interactive metadata usage. Multiple (10) instances of ''ls -lR'', each performing over 100K stats, are run concurrently in different large directories to demonstrate 5,000 stats/sec.

Loewe, W E

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

D2L-D4L1.xls  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 QUENCH TESTS 4 QUENCH TESTS 0 500 1000 1500 2000 2500 3000 3500 4000 4500 5000 5500 6000 6500 7000 7500 8000 8500 9000 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 20 QUENCH NUMBER QUENCH CURRENT (A) Right Upper (Forced Flow) Left Upper (Forced Flow) Right Lower (Forced Flow) Right Lower (Liquid) Thermal Cycle Thermal Cycle 7 TeV (6015A) 7.56 TeV (6505A) WBT CLOSED WBT OPEN 14-Jan-2003 J. F. Muratore Brookhaven National Lab D2L104 QUENCH SUMMARY Magcool Bay C ________________________________________________________________________________ QUENCH RUN CURRENT T1 T3 START MIITS COIL COMMENTS # # (A) (K) (K) (ms) ________________________________________________________________________________

446

D2L-D4L1.xls  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 QUENCH TESTS 1 QUENCH TESTS 0 500 1000 1500 2000 2500 3000 3500 4000 4500 5000 5500 6000 6500 7000 7500 8000 8500 9000 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 20 QUENCH NUMBER QUENCH CURRENT (A) Left Lower Level-no quench (forced flow) 7 TeV (6015A) 7.56 TeV (6505A) forced flow cooling WBT CLOSED 31-Mar-2004 J. F. Muratore Brookhaven National Lab D4L101 QUENCH SUMMARY Magcool Bay C ________________________________________________________________________________ QUENCH RUN CURRENT T1 T3 START MIITS COIL COMMENTS # # (A) (K) (K) (ms) ________________________________________________________________________________ T = 4.5K (nom) Warm bore tubes installed, sealed, and under vacuum

447

A literature review of radiolytic gas generation as a result of the decomposition of sodium nitrate wastes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this literature review is to determine expected chemical reactions and the gas generation associated with radiolytic decomposition of radioactive sodium nitrate wastes such as the wastes stored in the Melton Valley Storage Tanks (MVST) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The literature survey summarizes expected chemical reactions and identifies the gases expected to be generated as a result of the radiolytic decomposition. The literature survey also identifies G values, which are the expression for radiation chemical yields as molecules of gas formed per 100 eV of absorbed energy, obtained from experimental studies of the radiolytic decomposition of water and sodium nitrate. 2 tabs., 32 refs.

Kasten, J.L.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Analytical and experimental simulation of boiling oscillations in sodium with a low-pressure water system. [LMFBR  

SciTech Connect

An experimental and analytical program designed to simulate sodium boiling under low-power, low-flow conditions has been completed. Experiments were performed using atmospheric- pressure water as a simulant fluid and a simple one-dimensional model was developed for the system. Results indicate that water is a suitable simulant for liquid sodium under certain conditions and that the model does a fair job of modeling the system. In addition, oscillations that occur during the boiling process appear to augment substantially the heat transfer between liquid and vapor in condensation.

Levin, A.E.; Griffith, P.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Calcium-Mediated Regulation of Proton-Coupled Sodium Transport - Final Report  

SciTech Connect

The long-term goal of our experiments was to understand mechanisms that regulate energy coupling by ion currents in plants. Activities of living organisms require chemical, mechanical, osmotic or electrical work, the energy for which is supplied by metabolism. Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) has long been recognized as the universal energy currency, with metabolism supporting the synthesis of ATP and the hydrolysis of ATP being used for the subsequent work. However, ATP is not the only energy currency in living organisms. A second and very different energy currency links metabolism to work by the movement of ions passing from one side of a membrane to the other. These ion currents play a major role in energy capture and they support a range of physiological processes from the active transport of nutrients to the spatial control of growth and development. In Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis), the activity of a plasma membrane Na+/H+ exchanger, SALT OVERLY SENSITIVE1 (SOS1), is essential for regulation of sodium ion homeostasis during plant growth in saline conditions. Mutations in SOS1 result in severely reduced seedling growth in the presence of salt compared to the growth of wild type. SOS1 is a secondary active transporter coupling movement of sodium ions out of the cell using energy stored in the transplasma membrane proton gradient, thereby preventing the build-up of toxic levels of sodium in the cytosol. SOS1 is regulated by complexes containing the SOS2 and CALCINEURIN B-LIKE10 (CBL10) or SOS3 proteins. CBL10 and SOS3 (also identified as CBL4) encode EF-hand calcium sensors that interact physically with and activate SOS2, a serine/threonine protein kinase. The CBL10/SOS2 or SOS3/SOS2 complexes then activate SOS1 Na+/H+ exchange activity. We completed our studies to understand how SOS1 activity is regulated. Specifically, we asked: (1) how does CBL10 regulate SOS1 activity? (2) What role do two putative CBL10-interacting proteins play in SOS1 regulation? (3) Are there differences in the regulation and/or activity of SOS1 in plants differing in their adaptation to salinity?

Schumaker, Karen S [Professor] [Professor

2013-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

450

Go/No-Go Recommendation for Sodium Borohydride for On-Board Vehicular Hydrogen Storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MP-150-42220 MP-150-42220 U. S. Department of Energy Hydrogen Program Go/No-Go Recommendation for Sodium Borohydride for On-Board Vehicular Hydrogen Storage National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov NREL is a U. S. Department of Energy Laboratory operated by Midwest Research Institute and Battelle Contract No. DE-AC36-98-GO10337 I I n n d d e e p p e e n n d d e e n n t t R R e e v v i i e e w w November 2007 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government. Neither the United States government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or

451

Measurement of sodium-argon cluster ion recombination by coherent microwave scattering  

SciTech Connect

This present work demonstrates a non-intrusive measurement of the rate constant for sodium-argon cluster ions (Na{sup +}{center_dot}Ar) recombining with electrons. The measurements begin with resonance enhanced multi-photon ionization of the Na followed by coherent microwave scattering (radar) to monitor the plasma density. The Na{sup +}{center_dot}Ar adduct was formed in a three-body reaction. The plasma decay due to recombination reactions was monitored as a function of time and modeled to determine the rate constant. At 473 K, the rate constant is 1.8{sub -0.5}{sup +0.7}x10{sup -6}cm{sup 3}/s in an argon buffer at 100 Torr and initial Na number density of 5.5 x 10{sup 10} cm{sup -3}.

Wu Yue; Sawyer, Jordan; Zhang Zhili [Mechanical, Aerospace and Biomedical Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville Tennessee 37996 (United States); Shneider, Mikhail N. [Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Viggiano, Albert A. [Air Force Research Laboratory, Space Vehicles Directorate, Kirtland Air Force Base, New Mexico 87117 (United States)

2012-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

452

Process Options Description for Vitrification Flowsheet Model of INEEL Sodium Bearing Waste  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this document is to provide the technical information to Savannah River Site (SRS) personnel that is required for the development of a basic steady-state process simulation of the vitrification treatment train of sodium bearing waste (SBW) at Idaho National Engineering and nvironmental Laboratory (INEEL). INEEL considers simulation to have an important role in the integration/optimization of treatment process trains for the High Level Waste (HLW) Program. This project involves a joint Technical Task Plan (TTP ID77WT31, Subtask C) between SRS and INEEL. The work scope of simulation is different at the two sites. This document addresses only the treatment of SBW at INEEL. The simulation model(s) is to be built by SRS for INEEL in FY-200