Sample records for ky01 ct corn

  1. Corn Silage Virginia Corn &

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    Virginia Corn Silage Testing 2006 Virginia Corn & Small Grain Management #12;#12; The 2006 Virginia Corn Silage Hybrid Trials The 2006 Virginia Corn Silage Hybrid Trials Coordnated by B. Jones, H. Behl Syngenta Co.) NK Brand Po Box 959, Mnneapols, MN 55440 Poneer H-bred Int'l, Inc. Poneer 7501 Memoral

  2. Corn Hybrid Virginia Corn &

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    Virginia Corn Hybrid and Management Trials 2007 Virginia Corn & Small Grain Management #12;VIRGINIA CORN HYBRID AND MANAGEMENT TRIALS IN 2007 Coordinators of Virginia Corn Hybrid Trials in 2007 Wade Thomason, Extension Specialist, Department of Crop and Soil Environmental Sciences, Virginia Tech Harry

  3. Corn Hybrid Virginia Corn &

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    Virginia Corn Hybrid Management and Trials 2006 Virginia Corn & Small Grain Management #12;#12;Virginia Corn Hybrid and Management Trials 2006 Coordinators of Virginia Corn Hybrid Trials in 2006 Wade Thomason, Extension Specialist, Department of Crop and Soil Environmental Sciences, Virginia Tech Harry

  4. Cont. Rot. Rot. DC Cont. Rot. Rot. DC Cont. Rot. Rot. DC Corn Corn Beans Wheat Beans Corn Corn Beans Wheat Beans Corn Corn Beans Wheat Beans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Scott A.

    Cont. Rot. Rot. DC Cont. Rot. Rot. DC Cont. Rot. Rot. DC Corn Corn Beans Wheat Beans Corn Corn Beans Wheat Beans Corn Corn Beans Wheat Beans Expected yield per acre2 118 126 39 62 23 149 158 49 70 29

  5. Cont. Rot. Rot. DC Cont. Rot. Rot. DC Cont. Rot. Rot. DC Corn Corn Beans Wheat Beans Corn Corn Beans Wheat Beans Corn Corn Beans Wheat Beans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cont. Rot. Rot. DC Cont. Rot. Rot. DC Cont. Rot. Rot. DC Corn Corn Beans Wheat Beans Corn Corn Beans Wheat Beans Corn Corn Beans Wheat Beans Expected yield per acre2 119 127 39 62 23 149 159 49 70 29

  6. Corn Hybrids for Texas. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bockholt, A. J.; Collier, J. W.

    1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Land resource areas and corn test locations. Discussion of Results e areas affords an opportunity to determine if any Weather conditions were highly differences in adaptation to climatic and general corn production during the 3 soil conditions... usually has a climate for corn production and appr TABLE 6. CORN PERFORMANCE TEST, EAST BERLANDS, 1957-59 Bushels of shelled corn per acre ' Y-1 Kirby- Nacog- Mount Bowie' jr: ville doches Jyk~leasant countv A'! Texas 30 Texas 32 Texas 28 Texas...

  7. Mechanical Harvesting of Corn.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sorenson, J. W. (Jerome Wallace); Smith, H. P. (Harris Pearson)

    1948-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    - - TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION R. D. LEWIS, Director ' College Station, Texas BULLETIN 706 OCTOBER 1948 Mechanical Harvesting of Corn H. P. SMITH and J. W. SORENSON, JR. Department of Agricultural Engineering LlBRARY Atricaltr... of corn, from which they harvest about 77 million bushels valued at about 584 million. Most of the corn produced in Texas is harvested by hand. There were approximately 800 corn-picking machines of all types used in Texas in 1947. Texas farmers grow...

  8. Corn Production in Texas.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collier, Jesse W. (Jesse Wilton); Rogers, John S. (John Sinclair)

    1952-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    during wet seasons, and they may cause appreciable damage each year in the more humid sections. Hybrids such as Texas 24 and 30, which possess some resistance, shorrld be used where diseases and i~sects are a serious problem. The Texas hybrid corn... in this bulletin and recommendations are given for corn production in the different areas of the ' State. Numerous diseases and insects attack corn in Texas and are responsible for considerable damage to the crop. These organisms are especiallv prevalent...

  9. FOOD PRESERVATION SERIES CornMichigan-grown corn is available

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    under cool running water before preparing it. Do not use soap or detergent. Use a separate cutting board kernels and cooked lima beans. Add corn kernels to other raw vegetables in a salad. Add canned corn. sodium Boil whole ears of corn. Remove husk and silk from ears. Wash corn under cool running water. Fill

  10. Corn Hybrids for Texas. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rogers, J. S.; Bockholt, A. J.; Collier, J. W.

    1957-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    - Corn Hybrid$ for . ;mE Tgmt 4.College Sta. 9Sulphw Spgr. @.Holland l9.GreenviUe 24Stephmville 5.Kibyvilb IO.(;brkrvilb B.Tanpb 20Mm 25.Chilkothe TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATIC R. D. LEWIS. DIRECTOR, COLLEGE STATION, TEXAS DIGEST... - . Corn hybrids were planted on 81 percent of the Texas corn acreage in 1956. Most of this acreage was devoted to hybrids developed and released by the Texas Agricultural Experiment Station. These hybrids usually outyield open-pollinated varieties by 20...

  11. Corn Hybrids for Texas. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rogers, J. S.; McAfee, T. E.

    1954-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Corn Hybrids for Terns ST LOCATIONS AREA I AREA II ARE4 Ill AREA IV 2Prdrie View 7.Tylw lZ.Lockhart 17.Waxahachie 22San Antonio 3.Cleveland 8.Mt. Pbctont I3Brsnha B.Garland 23Lamposas 4.Colbqe Sta. 9Sulphw Spp. 14Holland l9.0reenvilb 24...Stephenville ,J* 5.K'rbyvilb I0.Cbrkdb 15.Tanpk 2ODetiion 25.Wllothe TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION R. D. LEWIS. DIRECTOR, COLLEGE STATION, TEXAS DIGEST The Texas corn acreage planted to hybrids increased from less than 1 percent of the total acrea...

  12. Potato Corn Chowder Ingredients

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    tablespoons margarine 1/4 cup all-purpose flour 2 cups skim milk 1/8 teaspoon pepper Directions 1. Wash. 2. Microwave on high for 8 minutes. 3. Open corn and pour into a colander. Rinse with cool water. Stir until thoroughly mixed and smooth. 5. Slowly add skim milk to saucepan and stir until thickened

  13. Estimating Corn Grain Yields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blumenthal, Jurg M.; Thompson, Wayne

    2009-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

    can collect samples from a corn field and use this data to calculate the yield estimate. An interactive grain yield calculator is provided in the Appendix of the pdf version of this publication. The calculator is also located in the publication.... Plan and prepare for sample and data collection. 2. Collect field samples and record data. 3. Analyze the data using the interactive grain yield calculator in the Appendix. Plan and prepare for sample and data collection Predetermine sample locations...

  14. Ethanol extraction of phytosterols from corn fiber

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Abbas, Charles (Champaign, IL); Beery, Kyle E. (Decatur, IL); Binder, Thomas P. (Decatur, IL); Rammelsberg, Anne M. (Decatur, IL)

    2010-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides a process for extracting sterols from a high solids, thermochemically hydrolyzed corn fiber using ethanol as the extractant. The process includes obtaining a corn fiber slurry having a moisture content from about 20 weight percent to about 50 weight percent solids (high solids content), thermochemically processing the corn fiber slurry having high solids content of 20 to 50% to produce a hydrolyzed corn fiber slurry, dewatering the hydrolyzed corn fiber slurry to achieve a residual corn fiber having a moisture content from about 30 to 80 weight percent solids, washing the residual corn fiber, dewatering the washed, hydrolyzed corn fiber slurry to achieve a residual corn fiber having a moisture content from about 30 to 80 weight percent solids, and extracting the residual corn fiber with ethanol and separating at least one sterol.

  15. 2015 Request for Proposals from the Michigan Corn Marketing Program Corn Marketing Program of Michigan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Douches, David S.

    1 2015 Request for Proposals from the Michigan Corn Marketing Program Corn Marketing Program of Michigan 2015 Request for Proposals Released August 24, 2014 The Corn Marketing Program of Michigan (CMPM for increasing economic viability of corn production in Michigan through innovative research and market

  16. Butterbean, Corn and Tomato Salad Ingredients

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    Butterbean, Corn and Tomato Salad Ingredients: 15 ounces butter beans, drained and rinsed 15 ounces cans of butterbeans and corn. Pour into a colander, and rinse under running water to remove sodium

  17. Broccoli and Corn Bake Ingredients

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    broccoli, frozen, thawed 20 low sodium whole-wheat crackers 1 egg, beaten 5 ounces evaporated skim milk and pour into a colander. Rinse under cool water to remove salt, set aside to drain. 3. Place crackers milk and add to egg. Beat until well mixed. 5. Add corn, thawed broccoli, half of the crushed crackers

  18. The Corn and Climate Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Debinski, Diane M.

    Administration National Weather Service North Central Bioeconomy Consortium US Climate Change Science Program Editorial Board Brendan Jordan, Great Plains Institute, staff for the North Central Bioeconomy Consortium Institute, staff for the North Central Bioeconomy Consortium Prepared by Megan Hassler and Sarah Wash Corn

  19. INDEX TO VIRGINIA CORN HYBRID AND MANAGEMENT TRIALS 1998 SECTION I. VIRGINIA CORN HYBRID TRIALS IN 1998.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    INDEX TO VIRGINIA CORN HYBRID AND MANAGEMENT TRIALS 1998 SECTION I. VIRGINIA CORN HYBRID TRIALS IN 1998. Companies participating in the 1998 Corn Hybrid Trials 2 1998 Virginia Corn Hybird Plot, and 1998. 36 SECTION II. EVALUATION OF DOUBLECROP CORN UNDER IRRIGATION IN EASTERN VIRGINIA. Table 27

  20. NETL CT Imaging Facility

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2014-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    NETL's CT Scanner laboratory is equipped with three CT scanners and a mobile core logging unit that work together to provide characteristic geologic and geophysical information at different scales, non-destructively.

  1. NETL CT Imaging Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2013-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

    NETL's CT Scanner laboratory is equipped with three CT scanners and a mobile core logging unit that work together to provide characteristic geologic and geophysical information at different scales, non-destructively.

  2. SECTION I. VIRGINIA CORN HYBRID TRIALS IN 1997. Companies Participating in the 1997 Corn Hybrid Trials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    1 SECTION I. VIRGINIA CORN HYBRID TRIALS IN 1997. Companies Participating in the 1997 Corn Hybrid COLUMBIA PLAINVIEW TX 79072 NORTHRUP KING CO. NORTHRUP KING PO BOX 959 MINNEAPOLIS MN 55440 PIONEER HI, INC. WILSON PO BOX 391 HARLAN IA 51537 VIRGINIA CORN HYBRID TRIALS IN 1997 Coordinated by H. Behl, E

  3. Managing Insect and Mite Pests of Texas Corn.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stewart, J.W.; Patrick, Carl; Cronholm, Gregory B.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    damage to the brace roots and fibrous roots may cause plants to lodge. A "goose necking" appearance occurs when lodged plants continue to grow. The southern corn rootworm deposits eggs in he corn field after the corn is in the seedling stage... practice. Producers are encouraged to rotate soil insecticides each year for best results. SEEDLING TO PRE-TASSEL STAGE INSECT CONTROL Corn Leaf Aphid Although heavy populations of corn leaf aphids may cause damage to seedling corn plants, fields...

  4. Biochemical Production of Ethanol from Corn Stover: 2007 State...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Biochemical Production of Ethanol from Corn Stover: 2007 State of Technology Model Biochemical Production of Ethanol from Corn Stover: 2007 State of Technology Model An update to...

  5. Owens Corning | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRoseConcernsCompany OilInformationPre-TaxShelf LandsOpenCorning Jump

  6. September 2010 FAPRI-MU US Biofuels, Corn Processing,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noble, James S.

    September 2010 FAPRI-MU US Biofuels, Corn Processing, Distillers Grains, Fats, Switchgrass-882-4256 or the US Department of Education, Office of Civil Rights. #12;1 Overview of FAPRI-MU Biofuels, Corn listed here represent US biofuel, corn processing, distillers grains, fats, switchgrass, and corn stover

  7. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Life Cycle Assessment of Bioethanol Derived from Corn and Corn Stover

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Bioethanol Derived from Corn and Corn Stover Dora Ip Farbod Ahmadi Diba Derek Pope University of British Farbod Ahmadi Diba Derek Pope 4/16/2010 Life Cycle Assessment of Bioethanol Derived from Corn and Corn Stover #12;2 Abstract This paper follows the growing research of bioethanol fuels produced from farmed

  8. Maximizing the enzymic saccharification of corn stover 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaar, William Edward

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ; thus, biomass has considerable potential as a fermentation feedstock. Corn stover represents an especially important resource because it is the single largest source of agricultural residue in the United States. The best method to obtain fermentable...

  9. The estimated costs of corn, corn silage, soybeans, alfalfa, and pasture maintenance in this report are

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duffy, Michael D.

    The estimated costs of corn, corn silage, soybeans, alfalfa, and pasture maintenance in this report summaries, production and costs data from the Depart- ments of Economics, Agricultural and Biosystems and other input suppliers around the state. These costs estimates are representative of average costs

  10. Corn Performance Trials Companies Participating in the 1994 Corn Performance Trials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    Virginia Corn Performance Trials in 1994 #12;#12;1 Companies Participating in the 1994 Corn IN 46031 CARGILL HYBRID SEEDS CARGILL PO BOX 5645 MINNEAPOLIS MN 55440 CAVERNDALE FARMS INC. CAVERNDALE SCIENCES MYCOGEN 624 27TH ST LUBBOCK TX 79404 NORTHRUP KING CO. NORTHRUP KING 317 330TH ST STANTON MN 55018

  11. Medical Imaging Computed Tomography (CT)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massey, Thomas N.

    Module 10 Medical Imaging · X-rays · Computed Tomography (CT) · Positron Emission Tomography (PET Sources PET-TOF #12;Four Sources PET #12;Four Sources PET-TOF #12;PET Scan MRI CT scan #12;Endocrine Gland,000 pixels! #12;Modern Example of CT Scan with the addition of Surface Shading Standard CT With Surface

  12. CT Solar Loan

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Clean Energy Finance and Investment Authority is offering a pilot loan program, CT Solar Loan, to provide homeowners with 15-year loans for solar PV equipment. The loans are administered...

  13. Barley tortillas and barley flours in corn tortillas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mitre-Dieste, Carlos Marcelo

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Barley tortillas (100%) were easily processed using corn tortilla technology. Flavor and color of barley tortillas were different from those of corn or wheat tortillas. Barley tortillas were generally darker, maybe due to ...

  14. The estimated costs of corn, corn silage, soybeans, al-falfa, and pasture maintenance in this report are based

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duffy, Michael D.

    The estimated costs of corn, corn silage, soybeans, al- falfa, and pasture maintenance record summaries, production and costs data from the Departments of Economics, Agricultural cooperatives and other input suppliers around the state. These costs estimates are representative of average

  15. ANTHRAQUINONE CORN SEED TREATMENT (AVITECTM ) AS A FEEDING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ANTHRAQUINONE CORN SEED TREATMENT (AVITECTM ) AS A FEEDING REPELLENT FOR RING-NECKED PHEASANTS and Fisheries Sciences South Dakota State University 2009 #12;ANTHRAQUINONE CORN SEED TREATMENT (AVITECTM the South Dakota Department of Game, Fish, and Parks. #12;v ABSTRACT ANTHRAQUINONE CORN SEED TREATMENT

  16. THE 2001 NET ENERGY BALANCE OF CORN-ETHANOL (PRELIMINARY)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patzek, Tadeusz W.

    .S. Department of Energy, Center for Transportation Research, Energy Systems Division, Argonne National per gallon for the industry. The study results suggest that corn ethanol is energy efficient on the latest data on corn production and corn yield, (2) improving the quality of estimates for energy used

  17. Thermodynamics of the Corn-Ethanol Biofuel Cycle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patzek, Tadeusz W.

    into Corn Production . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 3.11 Solar Energy Input into Corn . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 4.5 Overall Energy Balance of the Corn-Ethanol Process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 II.1 The Earth is an Open System to Heat Flow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 10.2 Conclusions

  18. Variations in Vitamin A and in Chemical Composition of Corn.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

    1931-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    such as rickets, scurvy, or beri-beri. Vitamin A was one of the first vitamins discovered. It occurs in large quantity in yellow corn, while little or none is founcl in white corn. For the purpose of this study, samples of corn grown at the various substations...

  19. FIELD CROPS 2012 Weeds: Corn 5-53

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    in Delmarva corn production. To be successful in controlling weeds in corn, the weed control program must this record to plan your weed control program. Cultural control. Several aspects of cultural weed control should be considered in planning a corn weed control program. These include weed-free seed, cover crops

  20. Biofuel derived from Microalgae Corn-based Ethanol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blouin-Demers, Gabriel

    ) Comparing both Energy Sources (1) 0 500 1000 1500 2000 Corn Microalgae Land Area Needed (M ha) 0 20000 40000 60000 80000 100000 Corn Microalgae Oil Yield (L/ha) #12;Comparing both Energy Sources (2) BackgroundBiofuel derived from Microalgae Corn-based Ethanol #12;Outline · Production processes for each

  1. Energy Analysis of the Corn-Ethanol Biofuel Cycle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patzek, Tadeusz W.

    Energy Analysis of the Corn-Ethanol Biofuel Cycle First Draft Tad W. Patzek Department of Civil legitimately ask: Why do the various energy balances of the corn-ethanol cycle still differ so much? Why do some authors claim that the corn-ethanol cycle has a positive net energy balance (Wang et al., 1997

  2. Bioaugmentation for Electricity Generation from Corn Stover

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that it is possible to directly generate electricity from waste corn stover in MFCs through bioaugmentation using of an MFC, bacteria break down organic matter and release electrons to the electrode. Most MFC tests used by Zuo et al., 501 ( 20 mW/m2 was generated from a paper recycling wastewater containing cellulose

  3. DOW CORNING CORPORATION Material Safety Data Sheet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garmestani, Hamid

    -88-3 Toluene The above components are hazardous as defined in 29 CFR 1910.1200. 3. HAZARDS or water spray. Water can be used to cool fire exposed containers. Fire Fighting Measures: Self to keep fire exposed containers cool. #12;DOW CORNING CORPORATION Material Safety Data Sheet Page: 3 of 8

  4. Corn Ethanol -April 2006 11 Cover Story

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patzek, Tadeusz W.

    Corn Ethanol - April 2006 11 Cover Story orn ethanol is the fuel du jour. It's domestic. It oil into gasoline or diesel fuel. Ethanol refineries also use huge amounts of water. An average dry's not oil. Ethanol's going to help promote "energy independence." Magazines trumpet it as the motor vehicle

  5. A supply forecasting model for Zimbabwe's corn sector: a time series and structural analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Makaudze, Ephias

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Zimbabwean government utilizes the corn supply forecasts to establish producer prices for the following growing season, estimate corn storage and handling costs, project corn import needs and associated costs, and to assess the Grain Marketing...

  6. Microscopic Analysis of Corn Fiber Using Corn Starch- and Cellulose-Specific Molecular Probes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Porter, S. E.; Donohoe, B. S.; Beery, K. E.; Xu, Q.; Ding, S.-Y.; Vinzant, T. B.; Abbas, C. A.; Himmel, M. E.

    2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ethanol is the primary liquid transportation fuel produced from renewable feedstocks in the United States today. The majority of corn grain, the primary feedstock for ethanol production, has been historically processed in wet mills yielding products such as gluten feed, gluten meal, starch, and germ. Starch extracted from the grain is used to produce ethanol in saccharification and fermentation steps; however the extraction of starch is not 100% efficient. To better understand starch extraction during the wet milling process, we have developed fluorescent probes that can be used to visually localize starch and cellulose in samples using confocal microscopy. These probes are based on the binding specificities of two types of carbohydrate binding modules (CBMs), which are small substrate-specific protein domains derived from carbohydrate degrading enzymes. CBMs were fused, using molecular cloning techniques, to a green fluorescent protein (GFP) or to the red fluorescent protein DsRed (RFP). Using these engineered probes, we found that the binding of the starch-specific probe correlates with starch content in corn fiber samples. We also demonstrate that there is starch internally localized in the endosperm that may contribute to the high starch content in corn fiber. We also surprisingly found that the cellulose-specific probe did not bind to most corn fiber samples, but only to corn fiber that had been hydrolyzed using a thermochemical process that removes the residual starch and much of the hemicellulose. Our findings should be of interest to those working to increase the efficiency of the corn grain to ethanol process.

  7. Corn Belt Energy Corporation- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Corn Belt Energy Corporation (CBEC), in association with the Wabash Valley Power Association, provides its customers with the "Power Moves" energy efficiency rebate program. Through this program,...

  8. Sandia Energy - JBEI Researchers Splice Corn Gene into Switchgrass...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The JBEI researchers, working with researchers at the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Agricultural Research Service, have demonstrated that introducing a maize (corn)...

  9. acid pretreated corn: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (LCA) using the Ga 77 Researchers use corn waste to generate electricity Renewable Energy Websites Summary: to create hydrogen." The Penn State researcher and colleagues also...

  10. STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY OWENS CORNING SCIENCE...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Building-Integrated Photovoltaic Shingles Using Monocrystalline Silicon Thin Film Solar Cells." OWENS CORNING is a sub-awardee under the cooperative agreement. Solexel Inc....

  11. Partnership Logging Accidents Cornelis de Hoop, LA Forest Products Lab

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Partnership Logging Accidents · by · Cornelis de Hoop, LA Forest Products Lab · Albert Lefort Agreement · 1998 & 1999 Accident Reports · 25 injuries reported · 185 loggers signed up · 8 deaths 1999

  12. CT NC0

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling Corp -KWatertowni5W 95.5x-L* d! CT NC0 - i , ,.

  13. Improved Multivariate Calibration Models for Corn Stover Feedstock and Dilute-Acid Pretreated Corn Stover

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolfrum, E. J.; Sluiter, A. D.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have studied rapid calibration models to predict the composition of a variety of biomass feedstocks by correlating near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopic data to compositional data produced using traditional wet chemical analysis techniques. The rapid calibration models are developed using multivariate statistical analysis of the spectroscopic and wet chemical data. This work discusses the latest versions of the NIR calibration models for corn stover feedstock and dilute-acid pretreated corn stover. Measures of the calibration precision and uncertainty are presented. No statistically significant differences (p = 0.05) are seen between NIR calibration models built using different mathematical pretreatments. Finally, two common algorithms for building NIR calibration models are compared; no statistically significant differences (p = 0.05) are seen for the major constituents glucan, xylan, and lignin, but the algorithms did produce different predictions for total extractives. A single calibration model combining the corn stover feedstock and dilute-acid pretreated corn stover samples gave less satisfactory predictions than the separate models.

  14. Corn Storage Protein - A Molecular Genetic Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Messing, Joachim [Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey

    2013-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Corn is the highest yielding crop on earth and probably the most valuable agricultural product of the United States. Because it converts sun energy through photosynthesis into starch and proteins, we addressed energy savings by focusing on protein quality. People and animals require essential amino acids derived from the digestion of proteins. If proteins are relatively low in certain essential amino acids, the crop becomes nutritionally defective and has to be supplemented. Such deficiency affects meat and fish production and countries where corn is a staple. Because corn seed proteins have relatively low levels of lysine and methionine, a diet has to be supplemented with soybeans for the missing lysine and with chemically synthesized methionine. We therefore have studied genes expressed during maize seed development and their chromosomal organization. A critical technical requirement for the understanding of the molecular structure of genes and their positional information was DNA sequencing. Because of the length of sequences, DNA sequencing methods themselves were insufficient for this type of analysis. We therefore developed the so-called “DNA shotgun sequencing” strategy, where overlapping DNA fragments were sequenced in parallel and used to reconstruct large DNA molecules via overlaps. Our publications became the most frequently cited ones during the decade of 1981-1990 and former Associate Director of Science for the Office of Basic Energy Sciences Patricia M. Dehmer presented our work as one of the great successes of this program. A major component of the sequencing strategy was the development of bacterial strains and vectors, which were also used to develop the first biotechnology crops. These crops possessed new traits thanks to the expression of foreign genes in plants. To enable such expression, chimeric genes had to be constructed using our materials and methods by the industry. Because we made our materials and methods freely available to academia and industry, progress in plant research and new crop development could accelerate and benefit the public.

  15. Prediction of corn tortilla textural quality using stress relaxation methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guo, Zhihong

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ). The effects of moisture content and resting time on corn masa textural property were investigated. Texture of properties of corn tortilla (fresh up to stale) was evaluated using the stress relaxation technique in two different modes, pure tension and bending-tension...

  16. Biofuels from Corn Stover: Pyrolytic Production and Catalytic Upgrading Studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Capunitan, Jewel Alviar

    2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    explored, in an attempt to convert an abundant agricultural residue, corn stover, into potential bio-fuels. Pyrolysis of corn stover was carried out at 400, 500 and 600oC and at moderate pressure. Maximum bio-char yield of 37.3 wt.% and liquid product...

  17. Suggestions for Weed Control in Corn

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baumann, Paul A.

    2002-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

    F r ontier ? for additional w eed contr ol. Consult (R efer to label for specific w eeds BASF U se rate determined b y inches of soil) or sur face applied the pr oduct label. R o tational cr o p r estrictions will contr olled.) C.E.C. (cationex...) or sur face contr olled.) BASF applied within 2 w eeks of U se rate is determined b y C.E.C. (cation ex change planting. Early postemergence capacity) or soil textur e and organic matter befor e corn is12 inches tall, but content. Can make split...

  18. Tall Corn Ethanol LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries PvtStratosolar Jump to:Holdings Co08.0 -TEEMP JumpTakigamiTalbotts LtdTall Corn

  19. Glacial Lakes Corn Processors | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating AGeothermal/Exploration <Glacial Energy HoldingsGlacial Lakes Corn

  20. Grupo Corn lio Brennand | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating AGeothermal/ExplorationGoods |Grundy Electric Coop, IncGrupo Corn lio

  1. Managing Insect and Mite Pests of Texas Corn

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Porter, Patrick; Cronholm, Gregory B.; Parker, Roy D.; Troxclair, Noel N.; Patrick, Carl D.; Biles, Stephen; Morrison, William P.

    2006-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

    weedy fields, larvae may be able to feed on weed roots until they are large and then move to corn roots and cause significant damage. In this case, control may not be as good as it should have been. Also, it is common for a very small percentage... be reduced or in some cases eliminated by a crop rotation scheme including soybeans or other crops that are not fed upon by rootworms. In most areas of Texas, corn has been rotated successfully with sorghum without damage from the Mexican corn rootworm...

  2. Sweet Corn Tests in the Lower Rio Grande Valley.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pickett, B. S. (Barzalli Stewart)

    1947-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Erie has more earworm resistance than either Ioarn or Golden Hybrid 2439. It is less sub- ject to bird damage than 2439. and suckers less. The plant is taller and more vigorous than most of the sweet corn varieties studied. It is slightly later... supply, * an important factor in corn earworm control. Jour. of Anr. Res. 68:73-77. 1944. 3. Dicke, F. F.. and M. T. Jenkins: Susceptibility of certain strains of field cc in hybrid combinations to damage by corn ear worms. U.S.D.A. Tech. Bul. 898...

  3. Watergrass and Volunteer Sorghum Control in Corn.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiese, A.F.; Chenault, E.W.; Lavake, D.E.; Hollingsworth, Dale

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Corn Preplant LblA emergence LblA emergence herbicide (ai) herbicide (ail herbicide (ail (LbIA) (BulA) c*" (NolA) AAtrex 442 c-e 820 c-e 1,561 b-d 1506 3 e 2 350 de 12,192 ab 12,288 ab 1 1,328 a-c 11,616a-c Princep AAtrex 1ya iha 125... Aatrex 3 _ Evik + SC 2 202 e 123a-c 11,136a-c Check .- -_ 4,991 a 90 d 9,216 c Weans followed by the sgme letaer --&= fwel of significance. bSun 11Eoilat 1 gaHanper&cmin COupont WK surfactant at 0.5% of mtzi&k%ume. TABLE 8. WATERGRASS COMa AND...

  4. Corn Belt Energy Coop- Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (Illinois)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Corn Belt Energy, through the Wabash Valley Power Association, offers business, school, and farm customers a variety of energy efficient rebates and incentives through its "Power Moves" program....

  5. Direct Comparison of Alfalfa Nitrogen Credits to Corn and Wheat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balser, Teri C.

    Station Ashland Ag Research Station #12;Alfalfa N credits to corn: · Infrequent fertilizer N responses Rate Aug Sep lb/a --------- bu/a --------- 15 48 48 35 55 43 55 52 51 75 62 49 Ashland, 2001

  6. Lime pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis of corn stover 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Se Hoon

    2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Renewable energy sources, such as lignocellulosic biomass, are environmentally friendly because they emit less pollution without contributing net carbon dioxide to the atmosphere. Among lignocellulosic biomass, corn stover is a very useful feedstock...

  7. Lime pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis of corn stover

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Se Hoon

    2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Renewable energy sources, such as lignocellulosic biomass, are environmentally friendly because they emit less pollution without contributing net carbon dioxide to the atmosphere. Among lignocellulosic biomass, corn stover is a very useful feedstock...

  8. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Sylvania Corning Nuclear...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    to SYLVANIA CORNING NUCLEAR CORP., INC., SYLVANIA LABORATORIES NY.07-1 - Letter, Smith to Norris, Contract at (30-1)-1293- U Metal Requirements, March 5, 1953 NY.07-2 -...

  9. The Origin of Indian Corn and its Relatives.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mangelsdorf, Paul C. (Paul Christoph); Reeves, R. G. (Robert Gatlin)

    1939-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    if it were not that when it hybridizes with Zea, some of the segregates are indistinguishable from Mexican varieties. Zea L. Maize, Indian Corn The genus Zea usually is distinguished from its near relatives by having separate staminate and pistillate...TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION A. B. CONNER, DIRECTOR, College Station, Texas BULLETIN NO. 574 (Monograph) MAY 1939 THE ORIGIN OF INDIAN CORN AND ITS RELATIVES P. C. MANGELSDORF AND R. G. REEVES Division of Agronomy (In cooperation...

  10. The values and practices associated with high moisture corn

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Finch, Charles B

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    damage and a corresponding reduction in feeding value can occur. Kernel size will vary greatly depending on corn growing conditions, variety and 13 especially kernel location on the cob. Kernels which come from the upper end of the cob will be smaller... of the corn. Owens (1986) states that browning of HMC does not affect performance, but discoloration can be an indication of heating during feedout which in turn decreases feed intake. Possible chemical causes could be a reaction between reducing sugars...

  11. Legumes for Soil Improvement for Cotton and Corn.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reynolds, E. B.; Rea, H. E.; Whitney, Eli; Rich, P. A.; Roberts, J. E.

    1958-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    medium yields, averaging about 28 bushels for the several treatments, were caused by severe corn rootworm damage. In an adjoin- ing experiment, which suffered little or no damage by the rootworm, the average yield was nearly 50 bushels per acre... of all the treatments was about 51 bushels per acre. Low to medium yields in the other years were caused bv deficient or poor distribution of rainfall, unavoidable lateness of planting or replanting necessitated by corn rootworm dam- age. In 1950...

  12. Characteristics of corn and sorghum for tortilla processing 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gonzalez de Palacios, Maria de Jesus

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CHARACTERISTICS OF CORN AND SORGHUM FOR TORTILLA PROCESSING A Thesis by MARIA DE JESUS GONZALEZ DE PALACIOS Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A8M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE December 1980 Major Subject: Food Science and Technology CHARACTERISTICS OF CORN AND SORGHUM FOR TORTILLA PROCESSING A Thesis by MARIA DE JESUS GONZALEZ DE PALACIOS Approved as to style and content by: an o omm t em er em er ea o...

  13. Characteristics of corn and sorghum for tortilla processing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gonzalez de Palacios, Maria de Jesus

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CHARACTERISTICS OF CORN AND SORGHUM FOR TORTILLA PROCESSING A Thesis by MARIA DE JESUS GONZALEZ DE PALACIOS Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A8M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE December 1980 Major Subject: Food Science and Technology CHARACTERISTICS OF CORN AND SORGHUM FOR TORTILLA PROCESSING A Thesis by MARIA DE JESUS GONZALEZ DE PALACIOS Approved as to style and content by: an o omm t em er em er ea o...

  14. Greenhouse gases in the corn-to-fuel ethanol pathway.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, M. Q.

    1998-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) has applied its Greenhouse gas, Regulated Emissions and Energy in Transportation (GREET) full-fuel-cycle analysis model to examine greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions of corn-feedstock ethanol, given present and near-future production technology and practice. On the basis of updated information appropriate to corn farming and processing operations in the four principal corn- and ethanol-producing states (Illinois, Iowa, Minnesota, and Nebraska), the model was used to estimate energy requirements and GHG emissions of corn farming; the manufacture, transportation to farms, and field application of fertilizer and pesticide; transportation of harvested corn to ethanol plants; nitrous oxide emissions from cultivated cornfields; ethanol production in current average and future technology wet and dry mills; and operation of cars and light trucks using ethanol fuels. For all cases examined on the basis of mass emissions per travel mile, the corn-to-ethanol fuel cycle for Midwest-produced ethanol used in both E85 and E10 blends with gasoline outperforms conventional (current) and reformulated (future) gasoline with respect to energy use and GHG production. Also, GHG reductions (but not energy use) appear surprisingly sensitive to the value chosen for combined soil and leached N-fertilizer conversion to nitrous oxide. Co-product energy-use attribution remains the single key factor in estimating ethanol's relative benefits because this value can range from 0 to 50%, depending on the attribution method chosen.

  15. Bt vs. non-Bt corn (Zea mays L.) hybrids: effect on degradation of corn stover in soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salvatore, Herminia T.

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Page Figure 1 Mean temperatures during 2004 corn growing season in College Station, TX. .......???????????????????...... 48 Figure 2 Monthly rain in millimeters during the first half of 2004 in College Station, TX...., 2000; Mann et al., 2002; Spedding et al., 2004; DeFelice et al., 2006), and therefore, farmers adopt various techniques to deal with the stover. At least 50% of corn stover, roughly 300 billion pounds, will be tilled back into the soil (DeFelice et al...

  16. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Seymour CT Site - CT 02

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling Corp -K Le BlondSanta SusanaSeymour CT Site - CT

  17. Comparison of CT, PET, and PET/CT for Staging of Patients with Indolent Non-Hodgkin’s Lymphoma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fueger, Barbara J.; Yeom, Kristen; Czernin, Johannes; Sayre, James W.; Phelps, Michael E.; Allen-Auerbach, Martin S.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Differences between PET and CT were not significant forperformed significantly better than PET and CT in correctlyadditional information over PET and CT for the staging and

  18. Limited View Angle Iterative CT Reconstruction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Connelly, "CT Technologies," in Aspects of Explosives Detection, Elsevier 2009. Dual energy CT Z. Ying, R. Nam and C. R. Crawford, "Dual energy computed tomography for explosive detection," Journal of X

  19. MBI Biorefinery: Corn to Biomass, Ethanol to Biochemicals and Biomaterials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2006-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The project is a continuation of DOE-funded work (FY02 and FY03) that has focused on the development of the ammonia fiber explosion (AFEX) pretreatment technology, fermentation production of succinic acid and new processes and products to enhance dry mill profitability. The primary objective for work beginning in April 2004 and ending in November 2005 is focus on the key issues related to the: (1) design, costing and construction plan for a pilot AFEX pretreatment system, formation of a stakeholder development team to assist in the planning and design of a biorefinery pilot plant, continued evaluation of corn fractionation technologies, corn oil extraction, AFEX treatment of corn fiber/DDGs; (2) development of a process to fractionate AFEX-treated corn fiber and corn stover--cellulose and hemicellulose fractionation and sugar recovery; and (3) development of a scalable batch succinic acid production process at 500 L at or below $.42/lb, a laboratory scale fed-batch process for succinic acid production at or below $.40/lb, a recovery process for succinic acid that reduces the cost of succinic acid by $.02/lb and the development of an acid tolerant succinic acid production strain at lab scale (last objective not to be completed during this project time period).

  20. Effects of Bt-corn decomposition on the composition of the soil meso-and macrofauna

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richner, Heinz

    to the environment. At this point genetically modified corn, expressing Cry proteins of the soil bacterium Bacillus bags Soil invertebrates a b s t r a c t Genetically modified Bt-corn is able to fight main insect pests than 4%. All corn varieties were likewise used as food resource by decomposers, thus the Bt

  1. INTERSPECIFIC AND INTRASPECIFIC COMPETITION OF COMMON SUNFLOWER (HELIANTHUS ANNUUS L.) IN FIELD CORN (ZEA MAYS L.)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Falkenberg, Nyland R.

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    corn. Field studies were conducted in 2006 and 2007 to 1) define the density-dependent effects of common sunflower competition with corn; 2) define the necessary weed-free periods of common sunflower in corn; 3) evaluate common sunflower control...

  2. Kaffir Corn and Milo Maize for Fattening Cattle.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marshall, F. R. (Frederick Rupert); Burns, John C.

    1907-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    is used, when price permits, for mixing with ground feed. Even though this be the case at this time the grower has no complaint to make, because all of the grain offered for sale up to this time has been taken at fair prices. It is altogether desirable... liaffir corn at a price much lover than that of Indian corn, biit refuqe to do so because of a misunderstanding of its ac- tual value. It is with a view to serving thes6 two classas as well as others lilcelp to desire infformation upon tbe same snbjecte...

  3. Alternatives for Using Failed Corn in the Texas High Plains Ted McCollum III and Brent Bean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukhtar, Saqib

    for Using Failed Corn in the Texas High Plains Ted McCollum III and Brent Bean Extension Beef Cattle The Texas A&M University System SCS-1998-18 Some corn producers are deciding to quit watering a portion of their corn fields in order to reallocate the water. What can be done to salvage some value from the corn

  4. SECO - Dow Corning's Wood Fueled Industrial Cogeneration Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Betts, W. D.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1979, Dow Corning Corporation decided to build a wood fueled steam and electric cogeneration (SECO) power plant at Midland, Michigan. This decision was prompted by the high cost of oil and natural gas, an abundant supply of wood in mid Michigan...

  5. SECO - Dow Corning's Wood Fueled Industrial Cogeneration Project 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Betts, W. D.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1979, Dow Corning Corporation decided to build a wood fueled steam and electric cogeneration (SECO) power plant at Midland, Michigan. This decision was prompted by the high cost of oil and natural gas, an abundant supply of wood in mid Michigan...

  6. INDEX TO VIRGINIA CORN HYBRID AND MANAGEMENT TRIALS 1999 SECTION I. VIRGINIA CORN HYBRID TRIALS IN 1999.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    CORPORTATION AUGUSTA 106 FAIRBURN RD MT SOLON VA 22843 BIO GENE BIO GENE 5491 TRI COUNTY HWY SARDINIA OH 45171 at Middlesex County, Virginia in 1998 and at New Kent County, Virginia in 1999 37 Table 29. Three-year corn hybrid studies at Middlesex County, Virginia in 1997 and 1998 and at New Kent County in 1999. 37 SECTION

  7. "EMM Region","PC","IGCC","PC","Conv. CT","Adv. CT","Conv. CC...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    "EMM Region","PC","IGCC","PC","Conv. CT","Adv. CT","Conv. CC","Adv. CC","Adv. CC wCCS","Fuel Cell","Nuclear","Biomass","MSW","On-shore Wind","Off-shore Wind","Solar...

  8. CT Offshore | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2,AUDIT REPORT Americium/CuriumAguaBBBWind-BrizaHKC WindCT Offshore Place:

  9. Siemens AG, CT, September 2001 CORPORATETECHNOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    s © Siemens AG, CT, September 2001 CORPORATETECHNOLOGY Research and Technology at Siemens Transportation Power Information & Communications Health Automation & Control #12;2© Siemens AGResearch and Technology at Siemens CORPORATETECHNOLOGY CT / E 020 a - 02.01 Key Figures for 2000 Amounts in billions

  10. Corn Varieties in Texas : Their Regional and Seasonal Adaptation.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mangelsdorf, Paul C. (Paul Christoph)

    1929-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    presented in Progress Reports from Angleton, Denton, Beaumont, Troup, Beeville, Temple, Spur, Lubbock, Pecos, and Nacogdoches, and in Bulletin 276, "Corn Variety Experiments, Substation No. 3, Angleton." SCOPE OF THE BULLETIN Two of the most important... to both regional ' and seasonal variations. To determine the adaptation of varieties to these two influences a variety-date-of-planting test was instituted in 1918. This test has been conducted at eleven substations throughout the State, in most cases...

  11. The effect of stress cracked and broken corn kernels on alkaline processing losses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, David Scott

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    (~. 70, P&. 06). There were significant differences in COD and DML (KRATIO= 100) between highly damaged corn and the less damaged counterpart of the same hybrid. Stress cracked corn, however, only slightly increased COD and DML. The ease of pericarp... Sigruficance of Com and Cooking Parameters . . . LIST OF FIGURES Page Stress Crack, Pericarp, and Broken Kernel Damage of Corn . . Flow Chart of Procedutes and Differences Between Cook Methods I and H 21 24 Correlation between Thousand Kernel Weight...

  12. A Study of the Black and the Yellow Molds of Ear Corn

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taubenhaus, J. J. (Jacob Joseph)

    1920-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    corn from t Lrne cause, it map be asserted that the Texas growers are sustaini yearly loss of $5,818,349. The thoughtful farmer will at once real the importance of being able to save this unnecessary waste. It sho~ be added that as far as the corn... that in some regions, practically every ear of sweet corn was damaged, and that throughout the entire country 70 to 90 per cer *Monthly Crop Reporter, .U. S. Department of Agriculture, 5:121-11 Dec. 1919. lt. 10, TLTURAL of the ears of field corn were...

  13. alkaline-pretreated corn stover: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Stronach) 1931-01-01 68 Researchers use corn waste to generate electricity Renewable Energy Websites Summary: to create hydrogen." The Penn State researcher and colleagues also...

  14. afex-treated corn stover: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Stronach) 1931-01-01 68 Researchers use corn waste to generate electricity Renewable Energy Websites Summary: to create hydrogen." The Penn State researcher and colleagues also...

  15. CORN DEVELOPMENT AND KEY GROWTH STAGES Brent Bean and Carl Patrick, Extension Agronomist and Entomologist

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukhtar, Saqib

    CORN DEVELOPMENT AND KEY GROWTH STAGES Brent Bean and Carl Patrick, Extension Agronomist to have the soil profile full of water prior to tas

  16. Techno-economic analysis of using corn stover to supply heat and power to a corn ethanol plant - Part 2: Cost of heat and power generation systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mani, Sudhagar [University of Georgia; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine [ORNL; Togore, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy; Turhollow Jr, Anthony F [ORNL

    2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a techno-economic analysis of corn stover fired process heating (PH) and the combined heat and power (CHP) generation systems for a typical corn ethanol plant (ethanol production capacity of 170 dam3). Discounted cash flow method was used to estimate both the capital and operating costs of each system and compared with the existing natural gas fired heating system. Environmental impact assessment of using corn stover, coal and natural gas in the heat and/or power generation systems was also evaluated. Coal fired process heating (PH) system had the lowest annual operating cost due to the low fuel cost, but had the highest environmental and human toxicity impacts. The proposed combined heat and power (CHP) generation system required about 137 Gg of corn stover to generate 9.5 MW of electricity and 52.3 MW of process heat with an overall CHP efficiency of 83.3%. Stover fired CHP system would generate an annual savings of 3.6 M$ with an payback period of 6 y. Economics of the coal fired CHP system was very attractive compared to the stover fired CHP system due to lower fuel cost. But the greenhouse gas emissions per Mg of fuel for the coal fired CHP system was 32 times higher than that of stover fired CHP system. Corn stover fired heat and power generation system for a corn ethanol plant can improve the net energy balance and add environmental benefits to the corn to ethanol biorefinery.

  17. Separation of Corn Fiber and Conversion to Fuels and Chemicals Phase II: Pilot-scale Operation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abbas, Charles; Beery, Kyle; Orth, Rick; Zacher, Alan

    2007-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the Department of Energy (DOE)-supported corn fiber conversion project, “Separation of Corn Fiber and Conversion to Fuels and Chemicals Phase II: Pilot-scale Operation” is to develop and demonstrate an integrated, economical process for the separation of corn fiber into its principal components to produce higher value-added fuel (ethanol and biodiesel), nutraceuticals (phytosterols), chemicals (polyols), and animal feed (corn fiber molasses). This project has successfully demonstrated the corn fiber conversion process on the pilot scale, and ensured that the process will integrate well into existing ADM corn wet-mills. This process involves hydrolyzing the corn fiber to solubilize 50% of the corn fiber as oligosaccharides and soluble protein. The solubilized fiber is removed and the remaining fiber residue is solvent extracted to remove the corn fiber oil, which contains valuable phytosterols. The extracted oil is refined to separate the phytosterols and the remaining oil is converted to biodiesel. The de-oiled fiber is enzymatically hydrolyzed and remixed with the soluble oligosaccharides in a fermentation vessel where it is fermented by a recombinant yeast, which is capable of fermenting the glucose and xylose to produce ethanol. The fermentation broth is distilled to remove the ethanol. The stillage is centrifuged to separate the yeast cell mass from the soluble components. The yeast cell mass is sold as a high-protein yeast cream and the remaining sugars in the stillage can be purified to produce a feedstock for catalytic conversion of the sugars to polyols (mainly ethylene glycol and propylene glycol) if desirable. The remaining materials from the purification step and any materials remaining after catalytic conversion are concentrated and sold as a corn fiber molasses. Additional high-value products are being investigated for the use of the corn fiber as a dietary fiber sources.

  18. The conversion of corn stover and pig manure to carboxylic acids with the MixAlco process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Black, Amanda Spring

    2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    of these processes to a feedstock of corn stover and pig manure. During fermentation, corn stover was the energy source (carbohydrates) and pig manure was the nutrient source (vitamins, minerals, and growth factors). A countercurrent fermentation procedure...

  19. Increasing corn for biofuel production reduces biocontrol services in agricultural landscapes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Landis, Doug

    November 5, 2008 (received for review May 22, 2008) Increased demand for corn grain as an ethanol feedstock of cellulosic ethanol production processes that use a variety of feedstocks could foster increased diversity has driven a rapid expansion of the corn ethanol industry in the United States. Continuing growth

  20. Global Indirect Effects of U.S. Corn Ethanol Production: A Review of the Evidence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grissino-Mayer, Henri D.

    Global Indirect Effects of U.S. Corn Ethanol Production: A Review of the Evidence Energy security) requires 36 billion gallons of ethanol by 2022 to replace about 20 percent of U.S. gasoline consumption. Since 2001 ethanol produc- tion, mainly from corn, has increased dramatically at an annual average

  1. Summary of findings from the Biomass Refining Consortium for Applied Fundamentals and Innovation (CAFI): corn

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Riverside, University of

    employed to develop comparative sugar yield data for each pretreatment and subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis (CAFI): corn stover pretreatment Richard T. Elander Æ Bruce E. Dale Æ Mark Holtzapple Æ Michael R, has devel- oped comparative data on the conversion of corn stover to sugars by several leading

  2. Coproducts From Corn Processing 47 Applied Biochemistry and Biotechnology Vol. 128, 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of

    Increased demand for ethanol as a fuel additive has resulted in dramatic growth in ethanol production production was 3 billion gal/yr (1). Much of the fuel ethanol production capacity in the United States. Ethanol is produced from corn by either wet milling or dry-grind processing. In wet milling, the corn

  3. M. Lelic 12/7/99 1CORNING Inc. L 5033PRE PID Controllers in Nineties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gajic, Zoran

    M. Lelic 12/7/99 1CORNING Inc. L 5033PRE PID Controllers in Nineties Muhidin Lelic CorningOverview Purpose: extract the essence of the most recent development of PID control Based on the survey of papers-Nichols based PIDs (10) Frequency domain based PIDs (22) Relay based PIDs (29) Optimization methods based PIDs

  4. 16 CSA News March 2013 thanol from corn has been the primary biofuel for liq-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeLucia, Evan H.

    16 CSA News March 2013 E thanol from corn has been the primary biofuel for liq- uid fuels in the United States, but perennial cellulosic biofuels are on the horizon. Intensive corn production with large of nitrogen losses on large, tile-drained fields planted with perennial biofuels in the Midwest of the United

  5. Effects of barley flour and beta-glucans in corn tortillas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silva, Laura

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The effects of b-glucan on corn tortilla texture were evaluated. Barley flour (9.7% b-glucan) was substituted at 2.5, 5 and 10% for dry masa flour in corn tortillas. Texture was evaluated after 4 hr and up to 7 d storage ...

  6. Ecology and Management of the Western Bean Cutworm (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) in Corn and Dry Beans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ginzel, Matthew

    Ecology and Management of the Western Bean Cutworm (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) in Corn and Dry Beans Lansing MI 48824. J. Integ. Pest Mngmt. 1(1): 2010; DOI: 10.1603/IPM10003 ABSTRACT. The western bean mainly on corn and dry beans. The historical geographic range of the western bean cutworm covered

  7. Influence of Genetic Background on Anthocyanin and Co-Pigment Profile and Stability of Colored Corn

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collison, Amy Elizabeth

    2014-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    stability of several experimental hybrid varieties of corn from four phenotypes (red, purple, blue, and red/blue). The goal was to determine if genetics/phenotype can be utilized to selectively breed for pigmented corn lines with greater stability during...

  8. The effect of CO regulations on the cost of corn ethanol production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    The effect of CO 2 regulations on the cost of corn ethanol production This article has been) 024003 (9pp) doi:10.1088/1748-9326/3/2/024003 The effect of CO2 regulations on the cost of corn ethanol the effect of CO2 price on the effective cost of ethanol production we have developed a model that integrates

  9. Evaluation of mixing characteristics of corn dry masa flours

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lobeira Massu, Rodrigo

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of MASTER OF SCIENCE Approved as to style and content by loyd . Roon (Chair of Com ' ee) Ronald L. Richter (Member) Ralph D. Waniska (Member) ert Almeida-Dominguez (Member) ry Acu (Chair, Food Science and Technology Faculty) E. C. A. Rung (Head... of the embryonic axis and the scutellum which functions as a nutritive organ for the embryo. The germ makes up 10-12% of the kernel dry weight. About 85'/o of the lipids in corn are in the germ which has a lipid concentration of 30-38'%%d . Mos t lipid sar e fre...

  10. Dow Corning Europe S A | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating A Potential MicrohydroDistrict ofDongjin Semichem CoDow Corning Europe S A

  11. Robbins Corn & Bulk Services | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ |Rippey Jump to: navigation, searchRobbins Corn & Bulk

  12. South Corning, New York: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt LtdShawangunk, NewSingaporeSonix Japan IncInformation SouthHeights,Corning,

  13. Corn LP formerly Central Iowa Renewable Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, clickInformationNew|Core Analysis At Geysers| Open EnergyAl.,A,CorixBeltCorn

  14. Little Sioux Corn Processors LP | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |Jilin ZhongdiantouLichuan CityLiqcrytech LLC JumpListLittle Sioux Corn

  15. Gene Controls Flowering Time in Corn - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist.Newof EnergyFundingGene Controls Flowering Time in Corn Great

  16. CT imaging of enhanced oil recovery experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gall, B.L.

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray computerized tomography (Cr) has been used to study fluid distributions during chemical enhanced oil recovery experiments. Four CT-monitored corefloods were conducted, and oil saturation distributions were calculated at various stages of the experiments. Results suggested that this technique could add significant information toward interpretation and evaluation of surfactant/polymer EOR recovery methods. CT-monitored tracer tests provided information about flow properties in the core samples. Nonuniform fluid advance could be observed, even in core that appeared uniform by visual inspection. Porosity distribution maps based on CT density calculations also showed the presence of different porosity layers that affected fluid movement through the cores. Several types of CT-monitored corefloods were conducted. Comparisons were made for CT-monitored corefloods using chemical systems that were highly successful in reducing residual oil saturations in laboratory experiments and less successful systems. Changes were made in surfactant formulation and in concentration of the mobility control polymer. Use of a poor mobility control agent failed to move oil that was not initially displaced by the injected surfactant solution; even when a good'' surfactant system was used. Use of a less favorable surfactant system with adequate mobility control could produce as much oil as the use of a good surfactant system with inadequate mobility control. The role of mobility control, therefore, becomes a critical parameter for successful application of chemical EOR. Continuation of efforts to use CT imaging in connection with chemical EOR evaluations is recommended.

  17. CT imaging of enhanced oil recovery experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gall, B.L.

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray computerized tomography (Cr) has been used to study fluid distributions during chemical enhanced oil recovery experiments. Four CT-monitored corefloods were conducted, and oil saturation distributions were calculated at various stages of the experiments. Results suggested that this technique could add significant information toward interpretation and evaluation of surfactant/polymer EOR recovery methods. CT-monitored tracer tests provided information about flow properties in the core samples. Nonuniform fluid advance could be observed, even in core that appeared uniform by visual inspection. Porosity distribution maps based on CT density calculations also showed the presence of different porosity layers that affected fluid movement through the cores. Several types of CT-monitored corefloods were conducted. Comparisons were made for CT-monitored corefloods using chemical systems that were highly successful in reducing residual oil saturations in laboratory experiments and less successful systems. Changes were made in surfactant formulation and in concentration of the mobility control polymer. Use of a poor mobility control agent failed to move oil that was not initially displaced by the injected surfactant solution; even when a ``good`` surfactant system was used. Use of a less favorable surfactant system with adequate mobility control could produce as much oil as the use of a good surfactant system with inadequate mobility control. The role of mobility control, therefore, becomes a critical parameter for successful application of chemical EOR. Continuation of efforts to use CT imaging in connection with chemical EOR evaluations is recommended.

  18. Ash Reduction of Corn Stover by Mild Hydrothermal Preprocessing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. Toufiq Reza; Rachel Emerson; M. Helal Uddin; Garold Gresham; Charles J. Coronella

    2014-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Lignocellulosic biomass such as corn stover can contain high ash content, which may act as an inhibitor in downstream conversion processes. Most of the structural ash in biomass is located in the cross-linked structure of lignin, which is mildly reactive in basic solutions. Four organic acids (formic, oxalic, tartaric, and citric) were evaluated for effectiveness in ash reduction, with limited success. Because of sodium citrate’s chelating and basic characteristics, it is effective in ash removal. More than 75 % of structural and 85 % of whole ash was removed from the biomass by treatment with 0.1 g of sodium citrate per gram of biomass at 130 °C and 2.7 bar. FTIR, fiber analysis, and chemical analyses show that cellulose and hemicellulose were unaffected by the treatment. ICP–AES showed that all inorganics measured were reduced within the biomass feedstock, except sodium due to the addition of Na through the treatment. Sodium citrate addition to the preconversion process of corn stover is an effective way to reduced physiological ash content of the feedstock without negatively impacting carbohydrate and lignin content.

  19. Friction Reduction for Microhole CT Drilling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ken Newman; Patrick Kelleher; Edward Smalley

    2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this 24 month project focused on improving microhole coiled tubing drilling bottom hole assembly (BHA) reliability and performance, while reducing the drilling cost and complexity associated with inclined/horizontal well sections. This was to be accomplished by eliminating the need for a downhole drilling tractor or other downhole coiled tubing (CT) friction mitigation techniques when drilling long (>2,000 ft.) of inclined/horizontal wellbore. The technical solution to be developed and evaluated in this project was based on vibrating the coiled tubing at surface to reduce the friction along the length of the downhole CT drillstring. The Phase 1 objective of this project centered on determining the optimum surface-applied vibration system design for downhole CT friction mitigation. Design of the system would be based on numerical modeling and laboratory testing of the CT friction mitigation achieved with various types of surface-applied vibration. A numerical model was developed to predict how far downhole the surface-applied vibration would travel. A vibration test fixture, simulating microhole CT drilling in a horizontal wellbore, was constructed and used to refine and validate the numerical model. Numerous tests, with varying surface-applied vibration parameters were evaluated in the vibration test fixture. The data indicated that as long as the axial force on the CT was less than the helical buckling load, axial vibration of the CT was effective at mitigating friction. However, surface-applied vibration only provided a small amount of friction mitigation as the helical buckling load on the CT was reached or exceeded. Since it would be impractical to assume that routine field operations be conducted at less than the helical buckling load of the CT, it was determined that this technical approach did not warrant the additional cost and maintenance issues that would be associated with the surface vibration equipment. As such, the project was concluded following completion of Phase 1, and Phase 2 (design, fabrication, and testing of a prototype surface vibration system) was not pursued.

  20. Respiratory correlated cone beam CT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sonke, Jan-Jakob; Zijp, Lambert; Remeijer, Peter; Herk, Marcel van [Department of Radiation Oncology, Netherlands Cancer Institute - Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Plesmanlaan 121, 1066 CX Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scanner integrated with a linear accelerator is a powerful tool for image guided radiotherapy. Respiratory motion, however, induces artifacts in CBCT, while the respiratory correlated procedures, developed to reduce motion artifacts in axial and helical CT are not suitable for such CBCT scanners. We have developed an alternative respiratory correlated procedure for CBCT and evaluated its performance. This respiratory correlated CBCT procedure consists of retrospective sorting in projection space, yielding subsets of projections that each corresponds to a certain breathing phase. Subsequently, these subsets are reconstructed into a four-dimensional (4D) CBCT dataset. The breathing signal, required for respiratory correlation, was directly extracted from the 2D projection data, removing the need for an additional respiratory monitor system. Due to the reduced number of projections per phase, the contrast-to-noise ratio in a 4D scan reduced by a factor 2.6-3.7 compared to a 3D scan based on all projections. Projection data of a spherical phantom moving with a 3 and 5 s period with and without simulated breathing irregularities were acquired and reconstructed into 3D and 4D CBCT datasets. The positional deviations of the phantoms center of gravity between 4D CBCT and fluoroscopy were small: 0.13{+-}0.09 mm for the regular motion and 0.39{+-}0.24 mm for the irregular motion. Motion artifacts, clearly present in the 3D CBCT datasets, were substantially reduced in the 4D datasets, even in the presence of breathing irregularities, such that the shape of the moving structures could be identified more accurately. Moreover, the 4D CBCT dataset provided information on the 3D trajectory of the moving structures, absent in the 3D data. Considerable breathing irregularities, however, substantially reduces the image quality. Data presented for three different lung cancer patients were in line with the results obtained from the phantom study. In conclusion, we have successfully implemented a respiratory correlated CBCT procedure yielding a 4D dataset. With respiratory correlated CBCT on a linear accelerator, the mean position, trajectory, and shape of a moving tumor can be verified just prior to treatment. Such verification reduces respiration induced geometrical uncertainties, enabling safe delivery of 4D radiotherapy such as gated radiotherapy with small margins.

  1. Update of distillers grains displacement ratios for corn ethanol life-cycle analysis.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arora, S.; Wu, M.; Wang, M.; Energy Systems

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Production of corn-based ethanol (either by wet milling or by dry milling) yields the following coproducts: distillers grains with solubles (DGS), corn gluten meal (CGM), corn gluten feed (CGF), and corn oil. Of these coproducts, all except corn oil can replace conventional animal feeds, such as corn, soybean meal, and urea. Displacement ratios of corn-ethanol coproducts including DGS, CGM, and CGF were last updated in 1998 at a workshop at Argonne National Laboratory on the basis of input from a group of experts on animal feeds, including Prof. Klopfenstein (University of Nebraska, Lincoln), Prof. Berger (University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign), Mr. Madson (Rapheal Katzen International Associates, Inc.), and Prof. Trenkle (Iowa State University) (Wang 1999). Table 1 presents current dry milling coproduct displacement ratios being used in the GREET model. The current effort focuses on updating displacement ratios of dry milling corn-ethanol coproducts used in the animal feed industry. Because of the increased availability and use of these coproducts as animal feeds, more information is available on how these coproducts replace conventional animal feeds. To glean this information, it is also important to understand how industry selects feed. Because of the wide variety of available feeds, animal nutritionists use commercial software (such as Brill Formulation{trademark}) for feed formulation. The software recommends feed for the animal on the basis of the nutritional characteristics, availability, and price of various animal feeds, as well as on the nutritional requirements of the animal (Corn Refiners Association 2006). Therefore, feed formulation considers both the economic and the nutritional characteristics of feed products.

  2. Nutritional value of Quality Protein Maize, food and feed corn for starter and grower pigs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, James Scot

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    corn, 7. 6, , 29, . 054, 4. 01. Growth trials with starter (28-d duration, four pens of six pigs/diet, 6 kg initial weight) and grower (35-d duration, eight pens of two pigs/diet, 23 kg initial weight) pigs evaluated five diets, a QPM-soybean meal... diet formulated on a lysine basis (. 96g in starter and . 70g in grower diets) and four diets arranged in a 2 (food corn vs feed corn) X 2 (Iow vs high soybean meal) factorial, Soybean meal was added to provide the level in the QPM diet...

  3. A Five-Year Assessment of Corn Stover Harvest in Central Iowa, USA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Douglas L. Karlen; Stuart J. Birell; J. Richard Hess

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sustainable feedstock harvest strategies are needed to ensure bioenergy production does not irreversibly degrade soil resources. The objective for this study was to document corn (Zea mays L.) grain and stover fraction yields, plant nutrient removal and replacement costs, feedstock quality, soil-test changes, and soil quality indicator response to four stover harvest strategies for continuous corn and a corn-soybean [Glycine max. (L.) Merr.] rotation. The treatments included collecting (1) all standing plant material above a stubble height of 10 cm (whole plant), (2) the upper-half by height (ear shank upward), (3) the lower-half by height (from the 10 cm stubble height to just below the earshank), or (4) no removal. Collectable biomass from Treatment 2 averaged 3.9 ({+-}0.8) Mg ha{sup -1} for continuous corn (2005 through 2009), and 4.8 ({+-}0.4) Mg ha{sup -1} for the rotated corn (2005, 2007, and 2009). Compared to harvesting only the grain, collecting stover increased the average N-P-K removal by 29, 3 and 34 kg ha{sup -1} for continuous corn and 42, 3, and 34 kg ha{sup -1} for rotated corn, respectively. Harvesting the lower-half of the corn plant (Treatment 3) required two passes, resulted in frequent plugging of the combine, and provided a feedstock with low quality for conversion to biofuel. Therefore, Treatment 3 was replaced by a 'cobs-only' harvest starting in 2009. Structural sugars glucan and xylan accounted for up to 60% of the chemical composition, while galactan, arabinan, and mannose constituted less than 5% of the harvest fractions collected from 2005 through 2008. Soil-test data from samples collected after the first harvest (2005) revealed low to very low plant-available P and K levels which reduced soybean yield in 2006 after harvesting the whole-plant in 2005. Average continuous corn yields were 21% lower than rotated yields with no significant differences due to stover harvest. Rotated corn yields in 2009 showed some significant differences, presumably because soil-test P was again in the low range. A soil quality analysis using the Soil Management Assessment Framework (SMAF) with six indicators showed that soils at the continuous corn and rotated sites were functioning at an average of 93 and 83% of their inherent potential, respectively. With good crop management practices, including routine soil-testing, adequate fertilization, maintenance of soil organic matter, sustained soil structure, and prevention of wind, water or tillage erosion, a portion of the corn stover being produced in central Iowa, USA can be harvested in a sustainable manner.

  4. Corn Meal in the Food Supply of Texans.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winters, Jet C.; Scoular, Florence I.; McLaughlin, Laura; Lamb, Mina W.; Whitacre, Jessie

    1956-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the non-enriched meal makes a variable contribution to the value of the corresponding enriched meal. TABLE 2. THIAMINE CONTENT OF CORN ME : ALS Mcg/g wet basis1 Kind of Non-enriched Enriche meal No. No. repli- Range Av. repli- Range Av. cations...-enriched Enriched Non-enriched Enriched bread No. repli- Range Avm NO. repli- Range cations Av. Range Av. Range Av. cations i Texas Tech. Sour milk Everlite 3 1.40 2 1.35 1.35 1.44 1.51 2.29 2.26 i::: 2.36 1.43 2.24 Aunt Jemima Sweet milk 1.28 1.40 2...

  5. Comparison of CT and MR-CT Fusion for Prostate Post-Implant Dosimetry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maletz, Kristina L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, St. Luke's-Roosevelt Hospital Center, Beth Israel Medical Center, Continuum Health Partners, New York, NY (Israel); Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, NY (United States); Ennis, Ronald D., E-mail: REnnis@chpnet.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, St. Luke's-Roosevelt Hospital Center, Beth Israel Medical Center, Continuum Health Partners, New York, NY (Israel); Ostenson, Jason; Pevsner, Alexander [Department of Radiation Oncology, St. Luke's-Roosevelt Hospital Center, Beth Israel Medical Center, Continuum Health Partners, New York, NY (Israel); Kagen, Alexander [Department of Radiology, Beth Israel Medical Center, St. Luke's-Roosevelt Hospital, Continuum Health Partners, New York, NY (Israel); Wernick, Iddo [Department of Radiation Oncology, St. Luke's-Roosevelt Hospital Center, Beth Israel Medical Center, Continuum Health Partners, New York, NY (Israel)

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The use of T2 MR for postimplant dosimetry (PID) after prostate brachytherapy allows more anatomically accurate and precise contouring but does not readily permit seed identification. We developed a reproducible technique for performing MR-CT fusion and compared the resulting dosimetry to standard CT-based PID. Methods and Materials: CT and T1-weighted MR images for 45 patients were fused and aligned based on seed distribution. The T2-weighted MR image was then fused to the aligned T1. Reproducibility of the fusion technique was tested by inter- and intraobserver variability for 13 patients. Dosimetry was computed for the prostate as a whole and for the prostate divided into anterior and posterior sectors of the base, mid-prostate, and apex. Results: Inter- and intraobserver variability for the fusion technique showed less than 1% variation in D90. MR-CT fusion D90 and CT D90 were nearly equivalent for the whole prostate, but differed depending on the identification of superior extent of the base (p = 0.007) and on MR/CT prostate volume ratio (p = 0.03). Sector analysis showed a decrease in MR-CT fusion D90 in the anterior base (ratio 0.93 {+-}0.25, p < 0.05) and an increase in MR-CT fusion D90 in the apex (p < 0.05). The volume of extraprostatic tissue encompassed by the V100 is greater on MR than CT. Factors associated with this difference are the MR/CT volume ratio (p < 0.001) and the difference in identification of the inferior extent of the apex (p = 0.03). Conclusions: We developed a reproducible MR-CT fusion technique that allows MR-based dosimetry. Comparing the resulting postimplant dosimetry with standard CT dosimetry shows several differences, including adequacy of coverage of the base and conformity of the dosimetry around the apex. Given the advantage of MR-based tissue definition, further study of MR-based dosimetry is warranted.

  6. abdominal multislice ct: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    planning. It includes an abdominal computer tomography (CT) image Leow, Wee Kheng 17 CT-PET Landmark-based Lung Registration Using a Dynamic Breathing Model S. Chambon1 Physics...

  7. abdominal ct images: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    methods establish microCT imaging as a useful tool for comparative Metscher, Brian 31 CT-PET Landmark-based Lung Registration Using a Dynamic Breathing Model S. Chambon1 Physics...

  8. abdominal ct findings: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    planning. It includes an abdominal computer tomography (CT) image Leow, Wee Kheng 11 CT-PET Landmark-based Lung Registration Using a Dynamic Breathing Model S. Chambon1 Physics...

  9. Characterization and Combustion Performance of Corn Oil-Based Biofuel Blends

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Savant, Gautam Sandesh

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    into biodiesel. It is well known vegetable oil to biodiesel conversion involves many processes including transesterification, which makes biodiesel costly and time-consuming to produce. In this study, the effects of blending high-viscosity fresh and used corn...

  10. BIOETHANOL PRODUCTION FROM WET OXIDSED CORN STOVER USING PRE-TREATED MANURE AS A NUTRIENT SOURCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BIOETHANOL PRODUCTION FROM WET OXIDSED CORN STOVER USING PRE-TREATED MANURE AS A NUTRIENT SOURCE E for the production of bioethanol. This pre-treatment method, similar to other hot water pre-treatments, acts

  11. Iowa farmer hopes corn cobs will bring in extra cash | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    supply the United States with a biofuel that may have a promising future: cellulosic ethanol. He grows corn and soybeans at his farm in Cylinder, a little community of about 100...

  12. STA'n:MENT OF CONSIDERAT IONS REQUEST BY CORNING J 'CORP ORA...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    quality and performance of ceramic electrolyte members and developing th e manufac turing mea ns to dramatically lower their cost. CORNING 's success should enable PolyPus ' s...

  13. The effects of Maize Dwarf Mosaic Virus (MDMV) on different corn hybrids (Zea mays L.) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lammoglia Villagomez, Agustin

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A study was conducted to determine the effects of Maize Dwarf Mosaic Virus (MDMV) on different agronomic and grain quality characteristics of 106 corn hybrids. A randomized split-plot design with 3 replications was used. The virus isolate obtained...

  14. Tolerance and weed management systems in imidazolinone tolerant corn (Zea mays L.)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Ann Marie

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Research was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of imidazolinone weed management systems and tolerance of imidazolinone tolerant corn to imazapic. Field experiments were conducted in 1997 and 1998 at the Texas Agricultural Experiment Station (TAES...

  15. Energy Efficiency Improvements and Cost Saving Opportunities in the Corn Wet Milling Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galitsky, C.; Worrell, E.

    Corn wet milling is the most energy intensive industry in the food and kindred products group (SIC 20). Plants typically spend approximately $15 to 25 million per year on energy, one of its largest operating costs, making energy efficiency...

  16. Antistaling properties of amylases, wheat gluten and CMC on corn tortilla 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bueso Ucles, Francisco Javier

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Antistaling properties of enzymes (xylanase, bacterial maltogenic and conventional a-amylases), CMC and vital wheat gluten on corn tortillas were evaluated during storage for up to 21 days. Effect of storage time (0-21 ...

  17. Interrelationships among alternative export variables and their impacts on corn prices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clarke, Somkid Tammakrut

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    export variable. Corn export sales data (collected by USDA since 1973) provide an additional source of information on export movements, thus offering an alternative export demand indicator. Data on commercial stocks at terminals and port elevators...). The primary objective of this study was to assess the impacts of these alternative export variables (sales, stocks, and shipments) on corn prices, and to investigate the dynamic interrelationships among these variables. The observations were carried out...

  18. Determination of total dietary fiber and resistant starch in processed corn and rice products

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corujo Martinez, Juan Ignacio

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DETERMINATION OF TOTAL DIETARY FIBER AND RESISTANT STARCH IN PROCESSED CORN AND RICE PRODUCTS A Thesis by JUAN IGNACIO CORUJO MARTINEZ Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree 'of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1991 Major Subject: Food Science and Technology DETERMINATION OF TOTAL DIETARY FIBER AND RESISTANT STARCH IN PROCESSED CORN AND RICE PRODUCTS A Thesis by JUAN IGNACIO CORUJO MARTINEZ Approved...

  19. Anatomic measurement accuracy: CT parameters and 3D rendering effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vorperian, Houri K.

    Anatomic measurement accuracy: CT parameters and 3D rendering effects Brian J Whyms a, E Michael of Neuroscience #12;INTRODUCTION · Measurements from 3D-CT rendering are used in research and clinical management-CT rendering techniques on measurements #12;METHODS Scanned: · 3 human mandibles · a phantom object Phantom

  20. Economic Impact of Harvesting Corn Stover under Time Constraint: The Case of North Dakota

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Maung, Thein A.; Gustafson, Cole R.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study examines the impact of stochastic harvest field time on profit maximizing potential of corn cob/stover collection in North Dakota. Three harvest options are analyzed using mathematical programming models. Our findings show that under the first corn grain only harvest option, farmers are able to complete harvesting corn grain and achieve maximum net income in a fairly short amount of time with existing combine technology. However, under the second simultaneous corn grain and cob (one-pass) harvest option, farmers generate lower net income compared to the net income of the first option. This is due to the slowdown in combinemore »harvest capacity as a consequence of harvesting corn cobs. Under the third option of separate corn grain and stover (two-pass) harvest option, time allocation is the main challenge and our evidence shows that with limited harvest field time available, farmers find it optimal to allocate most of their time harvesting grain and then proceed to harvest and bale stover if time permits at the end of harvest season. The overall findings suggest is that it would be more economically efficient to allow a firm that is specialized in collecting biomass feedstock to participate in cob/stover harvest business.« less

  1. Life-cycle energy and greenhouse gas emission impacts of different corn ethanol plant types.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, M.; Wu, M.; Huo, H.; Energy Systems

    2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the United States began a program to develop ethanol as a transportation fuel, its use has increased from 175 million gallons in 1980 to 4.9 billion gallons in 2006. Virtually all of the ethanol used for transportation has been produced from corn. During the period of fuel ethanol growth, corn farming productivity has increased dramatically, and energy use in ethanol plants has been reduced by almost by half. The majority of corn ethanol plants are powered by natural gas. However, as natural gas prices have skyrocketed over the last several years, efforts have been made to further reduce the energy used in ethanol plants or to switch from natural gas to other fuels, such as coal and wood chips. In this paper, we examine nine corn ethanol plant types--categorized according to the type of process fuels employed, use of combined heat and power, and production of wet distiller grains and solubles. We found that these ethanol plant types can have distinctly different energy and greenhouse gas emission effects on a full fuel-cycle basis. In particular, greenhouse gas emission impacts can vary significantly--from a 3% increase if coal is the process fuel to a 52% reduction if wood chips are used. Our results show that, in order to achieve energy and greenhouse gas emission benefits, researchers need to closely examine and differentiate among the types of plants used to produce corn ethanol so that corn ethanol production would move towards a more sustainable path.

  2. Comparison of CT, PET, and PET/CT for Staging of Patients with Indolent Non-Hodgkin’s Lymphoma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fueger, Barbara J.; Yeom, Kristen; Czernin, Johannes; Sayre, James W.; Phelps, Michael E.; Allen-Auerbach, Martin S.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    B. J. Fueger et al. : PET/CT for indolent lymphoma Table 2.Performance for detection of nodal disease Sensitivity PETCT PET/CT pG0.001 vs PET, CT Specificity pG0.001 vs PET

  3. Aflatoxin resistance in selected maize (Zea mays L.) varieties as affected by corn earworm (Helicoverpa zea [Boddie]) infestation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Uphoff, Michael Donald

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ) in preharvest corn is a severe problem in some parts of the U. S. An experiment was designed to determine if the corn earworm (Heli~cov ~ yea a[Boddie]) was an effective vector of g. ~a and if damage caused by the insect predisposed maize varieties.... No differences among overall treatments were found. Apparently, treatment with corn earworm eggs was not effective in causing an increased amount of ear damage. Results showed there were statistically significant differences among varieties for inoculated...

  4. Techno-economic analysis of using corn stover to supply heat and power to a corn ethanol plant - Part 1: Cost of feedstock supply logistics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine [ORNL; Mani, Sudhagar [University of Georgia; Togore, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy; Turhollow Jr, Anthony F [ORNL

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Supply of corn stover to produce heat and power for a typical 170 dam3 dry mill ethanol plant is proposed. The corn ethanol plant requires 5.6 MW of electricity and 52.3 MW of process heat, which creates the annual stover demand of as much as 140 Gg. The corn stover supply system consists of collection, preprocessing, transportation and on-site fuel storage and preparation to produce heat and power for the ethanol plant. Economics of the entire supply system was conducted using the Integrated Biomass Supply Analysis and Logistics (IBSAL) simulation model. Corn stover was delivered in three formats (square bales, dry chops and pellets) to the combined heat and power plant. Delivered cost of biomass ready to be burned was calculated at 73 $ Mg-1 for bales, 86 $ Mg-1 for pellets and 84 $ Mg-1 for field chopped biomass. Among the three formats of stover supply systems, delivered cost of pelleted biomass was the highest due to high pelleting cost. Bulk transport of biomass in the form of chops and pellets can provide a promising future biomass supply logistic system in the US, if the costs of pelleting and transport are minimized.

  5. Costs of Harvesting, Storing in a Large Pile, and Transporting Corn Stover in a Wet Form

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turhollow Jr, Anthony F [ORNL; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine [ORNL

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Corn stover is potentially an attractive biomass resource, but must be stored if used to supply a biorefinery year-round. Based on experience with successfully storing water-saturated large piles of bagasse for the pulping industry, Atchison and Hettenhaus (2003) proposed that such a system can also be applied to corn stover. Regardless of the technical feasibility of this system, in this article we estimate the cost of harvesting corn stover in a single pass with corn grain, delivering the chopped biomass to a storage pile, storing the stover in a wet form in a large pile at 75% moisture in a 211,700-dry Mg facility within a radius of 24 km from the field, and transporting the stover 64 km to a biorefinery. Field-ground corn stover can be delivered to a biorefinery by rail for $55 to $61/dry Mg. Truck transport is more expensive, $71 to $77/dry Mg. To achieve a minimum cost in the system proposed by Atchison and Hettenhaus, it is necessary to field densify stover to 74 dry kg/m3, without losing combine field efficiency, have a large storage pile to spread fixed costs of storage over enough biomass, and use rail transportation. Compared to storage in an on-farm bunker silo at $60/dry Mg, there are limited circumstances in which large pile storage has a cost advantage.

  6. Complications in CT-guided Procedures: Do We Really Need Postinterventional CT Control Scans?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nattenmüller, Johanna, E-mail: johanna.nattenmueller@med.uni-heidelberg.de; Filsinger, Matthias, E-mail: Matthias_filsinger@web.de; Bryant, Mark, E-mail: mark.bryant@med.uni-heidelberg.de; Stiller, Wolfram, E-mail: Wolfram.Stiller@med.uni-heidelberg.de; Radeleff, Boris, E-mail: boris.radeleff@med.uni-heidelberg.de; Grenacher, Lars, E-mail: lars.grenacher@med.uni-heidelberg.de; Kauczor, Hans-Ullrich, E-mail: hu.kauczor@med.uni-heidelberg.de; Hosch, Waldemar, E-mail: waldemar.hosch@urz.uni-heidelberg.de [University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Germany)

    2013-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

    PurposeThe aim of this study is twofold: to determine the complication rate in computed tomography (CT)-guided biopsies and drainages, and to evaluate the value of postinterventional CT control scans.MethodsRetrospective analysis of 1,067 CT-guided diagnostic biopsies (n = 476) and therapeutic drainages (n = 591) in thoracic (n = 37), abdominal (n = 866), and musculoskeletal (ms) (n = 164) locations. Severity of any complication was categorized as minor or major. To assess the need for postinterventional CT control scans, it was determined whether complications were detected clinically, on peri-procedural scans or on postinterventional scans only.ResultsThe complication rate was 2.5 % in all procedures (n = 27), 4.4 % in diagnostic punctures, and 1.0 % in drainages; 13.5 % in thoracic, 2.0 % in abdominal, and 3.0 % in musculoskeletal procedures. There was only 1 major complication (0.1 %). Pneumothorax (n = 14) was most frequent, followed by bleeding (n = 9), paresthesia (n = 2), material damage (n = 1), and bone fissure (n = 1). Postinterventional control acquisitions were performed in 65.7 % (701 of 1,067). Six complications were solely detectable in postinterventional control acquisitions (3 retroperitoneal bleeds, 3 pneumothoraces); all other complications were clinically detectable (n = 4) and/or visible in peri-interventional controls (n = 21).ConclusionComplications in CT-guided interventions are rare. Of these, thoracic interventions had the highest rate, while pneumothoraces and bleeding were most frequent. Most complications can be detected clinically or peri-interventionally. To reduce the radiation dose, postinterventional CT controls should not be performed routinely and should be restricted to complicated or retroperitoneal interventions only.

  7. The Energy Balance of Corn Ethanol: An Update. By Hosein Shapouri, James A. Duffield, and Michael Wang. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Office of the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, Robert B.

    #12;The Energy Balance of Corn Ethanol: An Update. By Hosein Shapouri, James A. Duffield.34. Keywords: Ethanol, net energy balance, corn production, energy. About the Authors Shapouri and Duffield . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Energy Balance Issue

  8. Renal infarction: CT diagnosis and correlation between CT findings and etiologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wong, W.S.; Moss, A.A.; Federle, M.P.; Cochran, S.T.; London, S.S.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The CT scans and the clinical records of 12 patients who had renal infarction were reviewed. The renal infarcts were classified as either focal or global. The CT findings were correlated with the etiologies of renal infarction. Embolism was the most common cause of renal infarcts that were multifocal with involvement of both kidneys. Trauma caused a unilateral global type of infract. A case of sickle cell anemia presented with multiple ''slit-like'' focal infarcts and enlarged kidneys. Forty-seven per cent of infarcts demonstrated the cortical rim sign, 11% were acapsular fluid collection, and 6% had an abnormally thickened renal fascia.

  9. Elements of Dry-Grind Corn-Processing Streams 113 Applied Biochemistry and Biotechnology Vol. 134, 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of ethanol as a fuel additive, ethanol production has increased markedly in the past decade. Ethanol-grind corn process is one of two technologies used to convert corn into ethanol. In this process, all kernel with solubles; ethanol; dry-grind processing; stillage; syrup; element concentrations. #12;114 Belyea et al

  10. Field Experiments at College Station with Corn, Cotton and Forage Plants.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Connel, J. H.; Clayton, James

    1896-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    H O J Z m P O P m r i I [ F Z M?Seed from A. W. Burpee, Phila? delphia, Pa.; cost, $2.25 per half-bushel. Same as Waterloo Early Dent; roasting ear, June 14th; yield per acre, 35.8 bushels of corn. One hun? dred pounds shucked ear corn yield 88... medium size; yield per acre, 31.3 bush? els of com. One hundred pounds shucked ear corn yield 87.4 pounds grain. S H o Z t [ m F T H P C Z KF s O P mM?Seed from D. Landreth & Sons, Phila? delphia, Pa.; cost, $1.75 per half-bushel. A white flint...

  11. aneurysm ct evaluation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    die Magnetresonanztomographie und die Positronen-Emissionstomographie ( CT, MRT, PET) sind heute, neben der Ultraschalltechnik, die wichtigsten nicht-invasiven bildgebenden...

  12. aided ct image: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Imaging X-rays Computed Tomography (CT) Positron Emission Tomography (PET 12;LSO-APD Array Schematic 12;Time-of-Flight PET 12;Energy Spectrum with lutetium...

  13. Segmentation of artifacts and anatomy in CT metal artifact reduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karimi, Seemeen; Cosman, Pamela; Wald, Christoph; Martz, Harry

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Maximum- likelihood dual-energy tomographic imageartifact reduction by dual energy CT using monoenergetictive reconstruction of dual energy data 21 has the potential

  14. CT. L-2 United States Government

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling Corp -KWatertowni5W 95.5x-L* d! CT NC0 - i ,

  15. Factors affecting the efficiency of the mechanical corn picker in Mississippi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kimbrough, Emmett Alexander

    1953-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . piciher s C~eett, Ph pt. hee nee ste-pes en hens Pets seethes e nle harvest approximately h75 acre pex. hour, depending on ths field con ditions and field cise General dimensions and s cificaticns, The machine weighs approxi mateIy 1~509 pounds...) picker net yield& {2) picker losses, (3) loose eax' losses x and (4) shelled cox?l losses s The last operation cr factor studied before the corn pickax' was operated in the corn plots wss to search for loose ears that, msy' have been knocked off...

  16. Factors affecting the efficiency of the mechanical corn picker in Mississippi 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kimbrough, Emmett Alexander

    1953-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . piciher s C~eett, Ph pt. hee nee ste-pes en hens Pets seethes e nle harvest approximately h75 acre pex. hour, depending on ths field con ditions and field cise General dimensions and s cificaticns, The machine weighs approxi mateIy 1~509 pounds...) picker net yield& {2) picker losses, (3) loose eax' losses x and (4) shelled cox?l losses s The last operation cr factor studied before the corn pickax' was operated in the corn plots wss to search for loose ears that, msy' have been knocked off...

  17. Sources of Corn for Ethanol Production in the United States: A Review and Decomposition Analysis of the Empirical Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oladosu, Gbadebo A [ORNL; Kline, Keith L [ORNL; Uria Martinez, Rocio [ORNL; Eaton, Laurence M [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of corn for ethanol production in the United States quintupled between 2001 and 2009, generating concerns that this could lead to the conversion of forests and grasslands around the globe, known as indirect land-use change (iLUC). Estimates of iLUC and related food versus fuel concerns rest on the assumption that the corn used for ethanol production in the United States would come primarily from displacing corn exports and land previously used for other crops. A number of modeling efforts based on these assumptions have projected significant iLUC from the increases in the use of corn for ethanol production. The current study tests the veracity of these assumptions through a systematic decomposition analysis of the empirical data from 2001 to 2009. The logarithmic mean divisia index decomposition method (Type I) was used to estimate contributions of different factors to meeting the corn demand for ethanol production. Results show that about 79% of the change in corn used for ethanol production can be attributed to changes in the distribution of domestic corn consumption among different uses. Increases in the domestic consumption share of corn supply contributed only about 5%. The remaining contributions were 19% from added corn production, and 2% from stock changes. Yield change accounted for about two-thirds of the contributions from production changes. Thus, the results of this study provide little support for large land-use changes or diversion of corn exports because of ethanol production in the United States during the past decade.

  18. Sclerosing angiomatoid nodular transformation of the spleen: CT, MR, PET, and 99mTc-sulfur colloid SPECT CT findings with gross and histopathological correlation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thacker, Curtis; Korn, Ronald; Millstine, John; Harvin, Howard; Lier Ribbink, Jeffrey A.; Gotway, Michael B.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    computed tomography-CT (FDG-PET CT) survey which revealed aof the spleen: CT, MR, PET, and 99m Tc-sulfur colloid SPECTT2, no enhancement US CT MR FDG-PET N/A › uptake N/A N/A N/A

  19. Automated movement correction for dynamic PET/CT images: Evaluation with phantom and patient data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    co- registration between PET and CT and for between frameco-registration between PET and CT, the PET images with ACregistration between PET and CT. Figure 3 shows that small

  20. Radioimmuntherapie3 Radioimmundiagnostik (Immuno-PET/CT)3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gollisch, Tim

    Radioimmuntherapie3 Radioimmundiagnostik (Immuno-PET/CT)3 Entzündungsdiagnostik mit [18F]FDG3 of Inflammatory Diseases with [18F]FDG3 Characterisation of Multinodular Toxic Goiter3 Radioactive tracers onkologischer Therapiekonzepte Radioimmunotherapy3 Radioimmunodiagnostics (Immuno-PET/CT)3 Diagnosis

  1. Companies Participating in the 1996 Corn Performance Trials Company Brand Address

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    CARGILL HYBRID SEEDS CARGILL PO BOX 5645 MINNEAPOLIS MN 55440 DEKALB PLANT GENETICS DEKALB 3100 SYCAMORE MYCOGEN PO BOX 68 TULIA TX 79088 NORTHRUP KING CO. NORTHRUP KING PO BOX 959 MINNEAPOLIS MN 55440 PIONEER-6000 WILSON SEEDS, INC. WILSON PO BOX 391 HARLAN IA 51537 VIRGINIA CORN PERFORMANCE TRIALS IN 1996 Coordinated

  2. Companies Participating in the 1995 Corn Performance Trials Company Brand Address

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    MINNEAPOLIS MN 55440 CAVERNDALE FARMS INC. CAVERNDALE 1921 BLUEGRASS RD DANVILLE KY 40422-9293 DEKALB PLANT MINNEAPOLIS MN 55440 PIONEER HI-BRED INT., INC. PIONEER BRAND 1000 W JEFFERSON ST TIPTON IN 46072 SOUTHERN PO BOX 391 HARLAN IA 51537 VIRGINIA CORN PERFORMANCE TRIALS IN 1995 Coordinated by H. Behl, E. R

  3. Developing and Testing a Trafficability Index for Planting Corn and Cotton in the Texas Blackland Prairie

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Helms, Adam J.

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    to producers because the high water holding capacity is a product of a high clay percentage. This research was aimed to develop and test an expert-based trafficabililty index, based upon soil moisture, for planting cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) and corn (Zea...

  4. Fractionation of phenolic compounds from a purple corn extract and evaluation of antioxidant and antimutagenic activities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedreschi, Romina Paola

    2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    anthocyanin-glucosides. Cyadinin-3glucoside was the main constituent (44.4 ?? 4.7%) followed by the acylated cyanidin-3-glucoside (26.9 ?? 8.0%). Other phenolic compounds present in the purple corn corresponded to protocatechuic acid, vanillic acid, and p...

  5. The Integrated Biorefinery: Conversion of Corn Fiber to Value-added Chemicals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Susanne Kleff

    2007-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation provides a summary of Michigan Biotechnology Institute's efforts to employ the corn fiber fraction of a dry grind ethanol plant as a feedstock to produce succinic acid which has potential as a building block intermediate for a wide range of commodity chemicals.

  6. Potential impact of Thailand's alcohol program on production, consumption, and trade of cassava, sugarcane, and corn

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boonserm, P.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On the first of May 1980, Thailand's fuel-alcohol program was announced by the Thai government. According to the program, a target of 147 million liters of ethanol would be produced in 1981, from cassava, sugarcane, and other biomasses. Projecting increases in output each year, the target level of ethanol produciton was set at 482 million liters of ethanol for 1986. The proposed amount of ethanol production could create a major shift up in the demand schedule of energy crops such as cassava, sugarcane, and corn. The extent of the adjustments in price, production, consumption, and exports for these energy crops need to be evaluated. The purpose of this study is to assess the potential impact of Thailand's fuel-alcohol program on price, production, consumption, and exports of three potential energy crops: cassava, sugarcane, and corn. Econometric commodity models of cassava, sugarcane, and corn are constructed and used as a method of assessment. The overall results of the forecasting simulations of the models indicate that the fuel-alcohol program proposed by the Thai government will cause the price, production, and total consumption of cassava, sugarcane, and corn to increase; on the other hand, it will cause exports to decline. In addition, based on the relative prices and the technical coefficients of ethanol production of these three energy crops, this study concludes that only cassava should be used to produce the proposed target of ethanol production.

  7. Cellulase Adsorption and Relationship to Features of Corn Stover Solids Produced by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Riverside, University of

    ARTICLE Cellulase Adsorption and Relationship to Features of Corn Stover Solids Produced by Leading to sugars for fermentation to ethanol or other products, enzyme adsorption and its relationship to substrate acid, lime, and sulfur dioxide (SO2) pretreat- ments were measured at 48C. Langmuir adsorption para

  8. FARM NET INCOME IMPACT OF SWITCHGRASS PRODUCTION AND CORN STOVER COLLECTION FOR HEAT AND POWER GENERATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    GENERATION by Mitchell A. Myhre A thesis submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree and Corn Stover Collection for Heat and Power Generation Mitchell A. Myhre Advisor: Associate Professor. Last but not least I would like to thank my wife Lisa for her love and support. #12;iv Table

  9. GEOSPATIAL DECISION SUPPORT FOR SEED COMPANIES IN THE CORN BELT Marcus E. Tooze1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reichenbach, Stephen E.

    GEOSPATIAL DECISION SUPPORT FOR SEED COMPANIES IN THE CORN BELT Marcus E. Tooze1 , S. Hatten2 , W in the seed industry, new applications emerge for mapping, analysis, and interpretation of cultivar. In addition, a geospatial framework was developed to identify the soil landscapes that had the best soil

  10. Wednesday, July 19, 2006 Researchers use corn waste to generate electricity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    's process uses a microbial fuel cell to convert organic material into electricity. Previous work has shown compounds in the corn waste and these compounds can be fed to microbial fuel cells. The microbial fuel cells atoms that combine with the electrons and oxygen to form water. The microbial fuel cells were inoculated

  11. Direct application of West Coast geothermal resources in a wet-corn-milling plant. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The engineering and economic feasibility of using the geothermal resources in East Mesa, California, in a new corn processing plant is evaluated. Institutional barriers were also identified and evaluated. Several alternative plant designs which used geothermal energy were developed. A capital cost estimate and rate of return type of economic analysis were performed to evaluate each alternative. (MHR)

  12. Agricultural Robot Turning in the Headland of Corn Fields Jinlin Xue1,a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of variable FOV of camera. A settled FOV has been always used in autonomous vehicles for field applications so robot in corn fields. 1. Introduction Since agricultural vehicle navigation based on machine vision was first proposed, methods based on machine vision have been studied extensively in agricultural vehicles

  13. Economic Analysis of Atoxigenic Mitigation Methods for Aflatoxin in Corn in Central Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sampson, Jessica Sue

    2014-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    atoxigenic treatments and each case was simulated across a range of crop insurance options available to corn producers in Bell County. A total of 50 scenarios were simulated and compared based on net revenue. Results show atoxigenics do provide a monetary...

  14. MICHIGAN'S SOIL NITRATE TEST FOR CORN MSU SOIL AND PLANT NUTRIENT LAB

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Isaacs, Rufus

    MICHIGAN'S SOIL NITRATE TEST FOR CORN MSU SOIL AND PLANT NUTRIENT LAB Michigan State University Extension Crop and Soil Sciences Department Michigan State University WHY TEST SOIL FOR NITRATES Nitrate testing of soil is an excellent and inexpensive way of evaluating the available nitrogen (N) status

  15. Membrane separation of solids from corn processing streams Tricia L. Templin a,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) 1536­1545 #12;requiring use of scrubbers and thermal oxidizers; exposure of coproducts to heat can are characterized by high water content. Removal of water and recovery of solids are major economic and logistical. Ultrafiltration of STW and SKW had little effect on water removal or solids recovery. Corn was processed

  16. Impact of surfactants on pretreatment of corn stover Qing Qing, Bin Yang 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Riverside, University of

    glycol 4000 during water-only or dilute acid pretreatment of corn stover at 140­220 °C were evaluated energy security, trade deficit, environmental, and economic issues that are becoming more urgent in light of declining petroleum reserves and increasing international demand for transportation fuels. However

  17. Forest Fuel Reduction Survey Analysis: Forest Administrators Cornelis F. de Hoop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Qinglin

    Forest Fuel Reduction Survey Analysis: Forest Administrators by Cornelis F. de Hoop Amith Hanumappa to seriously investigate and execute the methods required to carry out a successful fuel reduction project operations wherein fuel reduction is a primary management objective. Literature on this wave of activity

  18. A Review of "John Milton: Life, Work, and Thought" by Gordon Campbell and Thomas N. Corns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nardo, Anna K.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    that no liberal scholar would waste his time on the kind of dross the antiquaries worked on? (356). By contrast, these two modern antiquaries turn dross into true coin. Campbell and Corns do for Milton?s prose what Barbara Lewalski did for Milton?s poetry...

  19. USDA Projections of Bioenergy-Related Corn and Soyoil Use for 2010-2019

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    biofuel policy and trends, and e) bioenergy impacts on U.S. grain prices are explained below. EconomicUSDA Projections of Bioenergy-Related Corn and Soyoil Use for 2010-2019 Daniel M. O through 2019 period included estimates of world and U.S. energy prices, ethanol and biodiesel production

  20. Imaging corn plants with PhytoPET, a modular PET system for plant biology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, S.; Kross, B.; McKisson, J.; McKisson, J. E.; Weisenberger, A. G.; Xi, W.; Zorn, C.; Bonito, G.; Howell, C. R.; Reid, C. D.; Crowell, A.; Cumberbatch, L. C.; Topp, C.; Smith, M. F.

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PhytoPET is a modular positron emission tomography (PET) system designed specifically for plant imaging. The PhytoPET design allows flexible arrangements of PET detectors based on individual standalone detector modules built from single Hamamatsu H8500 position sensitive photomultiplier tubes and pixelated LYSO arrays. We have used the PhytoPET system to perform preliminary corn plant imaging studies at the Duke University Biology Department Phytotron. Initial evaluation of the PhytoPET system to image the biodistribution of the positron emitting tracer {sup 11}C in corn plants is presented. {sup 11}CO{sub 2} is loaded into corn seedlings by a leaf-labeling cuvette and translocation of {sup 11}C-sugars is imaged by a flexible arrangement of PhytoPET modules on each side. The PhytoPET system successfully images {sup 11}C within corn plants and allows for the dynamic measurement of {sup 11}C-sugar translocation from the leaf to the roots.

  1. Multi-energy CT Based on a Prior Rank, Intensity and Sparsity Model (PRISM)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soatto, Stefano

    -color, as a natural extension of dual energy CT [1], the future of CT will be multi-energy, generating much richer

  2. Development of a performance-based industrial energy efficiency indicator for corn refining plants.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyd, G. A.; Decision and Information Sciences; USEPA

    2006-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Organizations that implement strategic energy management programs have the potential to achieve sustained energy savings if the programs are carried out properly. A key opportunity for achieving energy savings that plant managers can take is to determine an appropriate level of energy performance by comparing their plant's performance with that of similar plants in the same industry. Manufacturing facilities can set energy efficiency targets by using performance-based indicators. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), through its ENERGY STAR{reg_sign} program, has been developing plant energy performance indicators (EPIs) to encourage a variety of U.S. industries to use energy more efficiently. This report describes work with the corn refining industry to provide a plant-level indicator of energy efficiency for facilities that produce a variety of products--including corn starch, corn oil, animal feed, corn sweeteners, and ethanol--for the paper, food, beverage, and other industries in the United States. Consideration is given to the role that performance-based indicators play in motivating change; the steps needed to develop indicators, including interacting with an industry to secure adequate data for an indicator; and the actual application and use of an indicator when complete. How indicators are employed in the EPA's efforts to encourage industries to voluntarily improve their use of energy is discussed as well. The report describes the data and statistical methods used to construct the EPI for corn refining plants. Individual equations are presented, as are the instructions for using them in an associated Excel spreadsheet.

  3. Size reduction of high- and low-moisture corn stalks by linear knife grid system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Womac, A.R. [University of Tennessee; Igathinathane, C. [Mississippi State University (MSU); Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine [ORNL; Narayan, S. [First American Scientific Co.

    2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High- and low-moisture corn stalks were tested using a linear knife grid size reduction device developed for first-stage size reduction. The device was used in conjunction with a universal test machine that quantified shearing stress and energy characteristics for forcing a bed of corn stalks through a grid of sharp knives. No published engineering performance data for corn stover with similar devices are available to optimize performance; however, commercial knife grid systems exist for forage size reduction. From the force displacement data, mean and maximum ultimate shear stresses, cumulative and peak mass-based cutting energies for corn stalks, and mean new surface area-based cutting energies were determined from 4 5 refill runs at two moisture contents (78.8% and 11.3% wet basis), three knife grid spacings (25.4, 50.8, and 101.6 mm), and three bed depths (50.8, 101.6, and 152.4 mm). In general, the results indicated that peak failure load, ultimate shear stress, and cutting energy values varied directly with bed depth and inversely with knife grid spacing. Mean separation analysis established that high- and low-moisture conditions and bed depths 101.6 mm did not differ significantly (P < 0.05) for ultimate stress and cutting energy values, but knife grid spacing were significantly different. Linear knife grid cutting energy requirements for both moisture conditions of corn stalks were much smaller than reported cutting energy requirements. Ultimate shear stress and cutting energy results of this research should aid the engineering design of commercial scale linear knife gird size reduction equipment for various biomass feedstocks.

  4. The Future of Corn-Ethanol in Fuel Sector of United States from Environmental and Economic Standpoint

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tulva, Arya Nath

    2007-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    per gallon to the cost. ? Corn production in the U.S. erodes soil about 12 times faster than the soil can be reformed and irrigating corn mines groundwater 25 percent faster than the natural recharge rate of ground water. The environmental system...-products. Shapouri and Graboski estimates NEV of 16,193 Btu/gal. They indicate that ethanol production utilizes abundant domestic energy supplies of coal and natural gas to convert corn into a premium liquid fuel that can replace petroleum imports by a factor of 7...

  5. Corn versus three sorghums grown under the same dryland conditions as feeds for growing-finishing swine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meadows, Doyle Gene

    1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ), received the same fertilisation rate and. were cleaned prior to feeding. The four gra, ins and the diets in which they werc used were designated. : corn, non-yellow sorghum (N-Y), hetero-yellow sorghum (H-Y) and yellow sorghum (Y). The grains...-Y sorghum to S. 02fo for the N-Y sorghum. Lysinc content was higher in corn than the average of the sorghums (0. 25 us. 0. 22fo). Corn had a. slightly higher gross energy value (8. 97 kcal/g) than the average of the sorghums (g. 94 kcal/g) which resulted...

  6. Corn versus three sorghums grown under the same dryland conditions as feeds for growing-finishing swine 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meadows, Doyle Gene

    1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , (range of 8$. 5 to 102. 4 percent) the value of corn. A wide variation existed in effic'ency due to quality of' grain and protein supplements, creating a need for m &re identification of' ration constituents, More recent trials in which high quality... The data, indicates a 5. Pjo advantage in feed efficI. ency for corn over the average of the sorghum diets ($. 15 vs. 3. 27) . The advan- tage for corn in feed ef'ficiency is less than has been reported by Peo and. Hudman (1958), 11. II@; Danielson and...

  7. Building Technologies Program: Tax Deduction Qualified Software- Owens Corning Commercial Energy Calculator (OC-CEC) version 1.1

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Provides required documentation that Owens Corning Commercial Energy Calculator (OC-CEC) version 1.1 meets Internal Revenue Code §179D, Notice 2006-52, dated June 2, 2006, for calculating commercial building energy and power cost savings.

  8. The effect of enzymes and hydrocolloids on the texture of tortillas from fresh nixtamalized masa and nixtamalized corn flour 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gutierrez de Velasco, Arturo Carlos

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The texture of tortillas was improved by the addition of maltogenic amylase and carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) and guar gum to fresh masa from ground nixtamal (FNM) and nixtamalized corn flour (NCF) masa. Differences in the ...

  9. Comparison of lines of corn selected on Lufkin fine sandy loam and Norwood silt loam with and without commercial fertilizer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McAfee, Thomas Edison

    1953-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    COMPARISON OF LINES OF CORN SELE CTED ON LUFKIN FINE SANDY LOAM AND NORWOOD SILT LOAM WITH AND WITHOUT COMMERCIAL FERTILIZER A Dissertation By Thomas Edison MoAfee Approved as to style and content by: Chairman of Committee Heac...Kor Department May, 1953 COMPARISON OF LINES OF CORN SELECTED ON LUFKIN FINE SANDY LOAM AND NORWOOD SILT LOAM WITH AND WITHOUT COMMERCIAL FERTILIZER By Thomas Edison McAfee 111 A Dissertation Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural...

  10. Quantifying Cradle-to-Farm Gate Life-Cycle Impacts Associated with Fertilizer used for Corn, Soybean, and Stover Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Powers, S. E.

    2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fertilizer use can cause environmental problems, particular eutrophication of water bodies from excess nitrogen or phosphorus. Increased fertilizer runoff is a concern for harvesting corn stover for ethanol production. This modeling study found that eutrophication potential for the base case already exceeds proposed water quality standards, that switching to no-till cultivation and collecting stover increased that eutrophication potential by 21%, and that switching to continuous-corn production on top of that would triple eutrophication potential.

  11. Low-Dose Dual-Energy CT for PET Attenuation Correction with Statistical Sinogram Restoration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fessler, Jeffrey A.

    1 Low-Dose Dual-Energy CT for PET Attenuation Correction with Statistical Sinogram Restoration. of Michigan & Univ. of Washington Outline Introduction - PET/CT background - CT-based attenuation correction for PET Conventional sinogram decomposition in DE-CT Statistically motivated sinogram restoration in DE

  12. Fuel ethanol produced from U.S. Midwest corn : help or hindrance to the vision of Kyoto?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, M.; Saricks, C.; Wu, M.; Energy Systems

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study, we examined the role of corn-feedstock ethanol in reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, given present and near-future technology and practice for corn farming and ethanol production. We analyzed the full-fuel-cycle GHG effects of corn-based ethanol using updated information on corn operations in the upper Midwest and existing ethanol production technologies. Information was obtained from representatives of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, faculty of midwestern universities with expertise in corn production and animal feed, and acknowledged authorities in the field of ethanol plant engineering, design, and operations. Cases examined included use of E85 (85% ethanol and 15% gasoline by volume) and E10 (10% ethanol and 90% gasoline). Among key findings is that Midwest-produced ethanol outperforms conventional (current) and reformulated (future) gasoline with respect to energy use and GHG emissions (on a mass emission per travel mile basis). The superiority of the energy and GHG results is well outside the range of model noise. An important facet of this work has been conducting sensitivity analyses. These analyses let us rank the factors in the corn-to-ethanol cycle that are most important for limiting GHG generation. These rankings could help ensure that efforts to reduce that generation are targeted more effectively.

  13. Energy and greenhouse gas emission effects of corn and cellulosic ethanol with technology improvements and land use changes.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, M.; Han, J.; Haq, Z; Tyner, .W.; Wu, M.; Elgowainy, A. (Energy Systems)

    2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Use of ethanol as a transportation fuel in the United States has grown from 76 dam{sup 3} in 1980 to over 40.1 hm{sup 3} in 2009 - and virtually all of it has been produced from corn. It has been debated whether using corn ethanol results in any energy and greenhouse gas benefits. This issue has been especially critical in the past several years, when indirect effects, such as indirect land use changes, associated with U.S. corn ethanol production are considered in evaluation. In the past three years, modeling of direct and indirect land use changes related to the production of corn ethanol has advanced significantly. Meanwhile, technology improvements in key stages of the ethanol life cycle (such as corn farming and ethanol production) have been made. With updated simulation results of direct and indirect land use changes and observed technology improvements in the past several years, we conducted a life-cycle analysis of ethanol and show that at present and in the near future, using corn ethanol reduces greenhouse gas emission by more than 20%, relative to those of petroleum gasoline. On the other hand, second-generation ethanol could achieve much higher reductions in greenhouse gas emissions. In a broader sense, sound evaluation of U.S. biofuel policies should account for both unanticipated consequences and technology potentials. We maintain that the usefulness of such evaluations is to provide insight into how to prevent unanticipated consequences and how to promote efficient technologies with policy intervention.

  14. Dynamic Bowtie for Fan-beam CT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Fenglin; Cong, Wenxiang; Hsieh, Scott; Pelc, Norbert

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A bowtie is a filter used to shape an x-ray beam and equalize its flux reaching different detector channels. For development of spectral CT with energy-discriminative photon-counting (EDPC) detectors, here we propose and evaluate a dynamic bowtie for performance optimization based on a patient model or a scout scan. Our dynamic bowtie modifies an x-ray beam intensity profile by mechanical rotation and adaptive adjustment of the x-ray source flux. First, a mathematical model for dynamic bowtie filtering is established for an elliptical section in fan-beam geometry, and the contour of the optimal bowtie is derived. Then, numerical simulation is performed to compare the performance of the dynamic bowtie in the cases of an ideal phantom and a realistic cross-section relative to the counterparts without any bowtie and with a fixed bowtie respectively. Our dynamic bowtie can equalize the expected numbers of photons in the case of an ideal phantom. In practical cases, our dynamic bowtie can effectively reduce the dy...

  15. Enzymatic Digestibility of Corn Stover Fractions in Response to Fungal Pretreatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cui, Z. F.; Wan, C. X.; Shi, J.; Sykes, R. W.; Li, Y. B.

    2012-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Corn stover fractions (leaves, cobs, and stalks) were studied for enzymatic digestibility after pretreatment with a white rot fungus, Ceriporiopsis subvermispora. Among the three fractions, leaves had the least recalcitrance to fungal pretreatment and the lignin degradation reached 45% after 30 days of pretreatment. The lignin degradation of stalks and cobs was similar but was significantly lower than that of leaves (p < 0.05). For all fractions, xylan and glucan degradation followed a pattern similar to lignin degradation, with leaves having a significantly higher percentage of degradation (p < 0.05). Hydrolytic enzyme activity also revealed that the fungus was more active in the degradation of carbohydrates in leaves. As a result of fungal pretreatment, the highest sugar yield, however, was obtained with corn cobs.

  16. TLD assessment of mouse dosimetry during microCT imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Figueroa, Said Daibes; Winkelmann, Christopher T.; Miller, William H.; Volkert, Wynn A.; Hoffman, Timothy J. [Harry S. Truman Memorial VA Hospital, Columbia, Missouri 65201 (United States) and Department of Radiology, University of Missouri, Columbia, Missouri 65201 (United States); Department of Veterinary Pathobiology, University of Missouri, Columbia, Missouri 65201 (United States); Nuclear Science and Engineering Institute, University of Missouri, Columbia, Missouri 65201 (United States); Department of Radiology, University of Missouri, Columbia, Missouri 65201 (United States); Harry S. Truman Memorial VA Hospital, Columbia, Missouri 65201 (United States) and Departments of Internal Medicine, Chemistry, and the Nuclear Science and Engineering Institute, University of Missouri, Columbia, Missouri 65201 (United States)

    2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Advances in laboratory animal imaging have provided new resources for noninvasive biomedical research. Among these technologies is microcomputed tomography (microCT) which is widely used to obtain high resolution anatomic images of small animals. Because microCT utilizes ionizing radiation for image formation, radiation exposure during imaging is a concern. The objective of this study was to quantify the radiation dose delivered during a standard microCT scan. Radiation dose was measured using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs), which were irradiated employing an 80 kVp x-ray source, with 0.5 mm Al filtration and a total of 54 mA s for a full 360 deg rotation of the unit. The TLD data were validated using a 3.2 cm{sup 3} CT ion chamber probe. TLD results showed a single microCT scan air kerma of 78.0{+-}5.0 mGy when using a poly(methylmethacrylate) (PMMA) anesthesia support module and an air kerma of 92.0{+-}6.0 mGy without the use of the anesthesia module. The validation CT ion chamber study provided a measured radiation air kerma of 81.0{+-}4.0 mGy and 97.0{+-}5.0 mGy with and without the PMMA anesthesia module, respectively. Internal TLD analysis demonstrated an average mouse organ radiation absorbed dose of 76.0{+-}5.0 mGy. The author's results have defined x-ray exposure for a routine microCT study which must be taken into consideration when performing serial molecular imaging studies involving the microCT imaging modality.

  17. Development and evaluation of corn cooking procedures for the production of tortillas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Des Rosiers, Mary Candace

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    each cooking treatment. The texture of the tortillas was then measured by the Instron. Extent of gelatinization via enzyme susceptibility was negatively correlated with the Instron grain shear values. Amylograph peaks and particle size determination... Samples of Corn. Chemical Analysis. Preparation of Nixtamal Preparation of Masa. Preparation of Tortillas Evaluation of Particle Size Measurement of Gelatinization. Evaluation of Optimum Cook Time. Color Measurement and Subjective Tests Evaluation...

  18. Creating Reliable Data and Reporting to Support Strategic Energy Management at Corning Incorporated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garforth, P.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Creating Reliable Data & Reporting to Support Strategic Energy Management at Corning Incorporated Industrial Energy Technology Conference May 20th, 2014 New Orleans, Louisiana Peter Garforth Garforth International llc Energy Managers’ Workshop ESL... relevant energy data to support Corporate performance targets ESL-IE-14-05-29 Proceedings of the Thrity-Sixth Industrial Energy Technology Conference New Orleans, LA. May 20-23, 2014 Performance Reporting Totals – Usage, Cost, GHG-Emissions Corp Division...

  19. Prececal, postileal and total tract starch digestion in ponies fed corn, oats, barley or sorghum grain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Fairfax Ferguson

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the foot during the acute disease . J. Equine Mad . and Surg. 2: 439. Householder, D. D. 1978. Prececal, postileal and total tract digestion and growth performance in horses fed concentrate rations containing oats or sorghum grain processed by crimping...PRECECAL, POSTILEAL AND TOTAL TRACT STARCH DIGESTION IN PONIES FED CORN, OATS, BARLEY OR SORGHUM GRAIN A Thesis by FAIRFAX FERGUSON ARNOLD Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements...

  20. Life-cycle assessment of corn-based butanol as a potential transportation fuel.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, M.; Wang, M.; Liu, J.; Huo, H.; Energy Systems

    2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Butanol produced from bio-sources (such as corn) could have attractive properties as a transportation fuel. Production of butanol through a fermentation process called acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) has been the focus of increasing research and development efforts. Advances in ABE process development in recent years have led to drastic increases in ABE productivity and yields, making butanol production worthy of evaluation for use in motor vehicles. Consequently, chemical/fuel industries have announced their intention to produce butanol from bio-based materials. The purpose of this study is to estimate the potential life-cycle energy and emission effects associated with using bio-butanol as a transportation fuel. The study employs a well-to-wheels analysis tool--the Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET) model developed at Argonne National Laboratory--and the Aspen Plus{reg_sign} model developed by AspenTech. The study describes the butanol production from corn, including grain processing, fermentation, gas stripping, distillation, and adsorption for products separation. The Aspen{reg_sign} results that we obtained for the corn-to-butanol production process provide the basis for GREET modeling to estimate life-cycle energy use and greenhouse gas emissions. The GREET model was expanded to simulate the bio-butanol life cycle, from agricultural chemical production to butanol use in motor vehicles. We then compared the results for bio-butanol with those of conventional gasoline. We also analyzed the bio-acetone that is coproduced with bio-butanol as an alternative to petroleum-based acetone. Our study shows that, while the use of corn-based butanol achieves energy benefits and reduces greenhouse gas emissions, the results are affected by the methods used to treat the acetone that is co-produced in butanol plants.

  1. Recovery of Recombinant and Native Proteins from Rice and Corn Seed 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilken, Lisa Rachelle

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    .5 precipitation and pH 6 adsorption and 2) pH 4.5 extraction and pH 6 adsorption in the presence of TRIS counter-ions. Both methods improved the binding capacity from 8.6 mg/mL to >25 mg/mL and maintained HuLZ purity. Processing of dry-milled corn germ to increase...

  2. Succinic Acid as a Byproduct in a Corn-based Ethanol Biorefinery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MBI International

    2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    MBI endeavored to develop a process for succinic acid production suitable for integration into a corn-based ethanol biorefinery. The project investigated the fermentative production of succinic acid using byproducts of corn mill operations. The fermentation process was attuned to include raw starch, endosperm, as the sugar source. A clean-not-sterile process was established to treat the endosperm and release the monomeric sugars. We developed the fermentation process to utilize a byproduct of corn ethanol fermentations, thin stillage, as the source of complex nitrogen and vitamin components needed to support succinic acid production in A. succinogenes. Further supplementations were eliminated without lowering titers and yields and a productivity above 0.6 g l-1 hr-1was achieved. Strain development was accomplished through generation of a recombinant strain that increased yields of succinic acid production. Isolation of additional strains with improved features was also pursued and frozen stocks were prepared from enriched, characterized cultures. Two recovery processes were evaluated at pilot scale and data obtained was incorporated into our economic analyses.

  3. CT reconstruction techniques for improved accuracy of lung CT airway measurement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodriguez, A. [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 (United States); Ranallo, F. N. [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 and Department of Radiology, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin 53792 (United States); Judy, P. F. [Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States); Gierada, D. S. [Department of Radiology, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri 63110 (United States); Fain, S. B., E-mail: sfain@wisc.edu [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 (United States); Department of Radiology, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin 53792 (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering,University of Wisconsin School of Engineering, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To determine the impact of constrained reconstruction techniques on quantitative CT (qCT) of the lung parenchyma and airways for low x-ray radiation dose. Methods: Measurement of small airways with qCT remains a challenge, especially for low x-ray dose protocols. Images of the COPDGene quality assurance phantom (CTP698, The Phantom Laboratory, Salem, NY) were obtained using a GE discovery CT750 HD scanner for helical scans at x-ray radiation dose-equivalents ranging from 1 to 4.12 mSv (12–100 mA s current–time product). Other parameters were 40 mm collimation, 0.984 pitch, 0.5 s rotation, and 0.625 mm thickness. The phantom was sandwiched between 7.5 cm thick water attenuating phantoms for a total length of 20 cm to better simulate the scatter conditions of patient scans. Image data sets were reconstructed using STANDARD (STD), DETAIL, BONE, and EDGE algorithms for filtered back projection (FBP), 100% adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR), and Veo reconstructions. Reduced (half) display field of view (DFOV) was used to increase sampling across airway phantom structures. Inner diameter (ID), wall area percent (WA%), and wall thickness (WT) measurements of eight airway mimicking tubes in the phantom, including a 2.5 mm ID (42.6 WA%, 0.4 mm WT), 3 mm ID (49.0 WA%, 0.6 mm WT), and 6 mm ID (49.0 WA%, 1.2 mm WT) were performed with Airway Inspector (Surgical Planning Laboratory, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, MA) using the phase congruency edge detection method. The average of individual measures at five central slices of the phantom was taken to reduce measurement error. Results: WA% measures were greatly overestimated while IDs were underestimated for the smaller airways, especially for reconstructions at full DFOV (36 cm) using the STD kernel, due to poor sampling and spatial resolution (0.7 mm pixel size). Despite low radiation dose, the ID of the 6 mm ID airway was consistently measured accurately for all methods other than STD FBP. Veo reconstructions showed slight improvement over STD FBP reconstructions (4%–9% increase in accuracy). The most improved ID and WA% measures were for the smaller airways, especially for low dose scans reconstructed at half DFOV (18 cm) with the EDGE algorithm in combination with 100% ASIR to mitigate noise. Using the BONE + ASIR at half BONE technique, measures improved by a factor of 2 over STD FBP even at a quarter of the x-ray dose. Conclusions: The flexibility of ASIR in combination with higher frequency algorithms, such as BONE, provided the greatest accuracy for conventional and low x-ray dose relative to FBP. Veo provided more modest improvement in qCT measures, likely due to its compatibility only with the smoother STD kernel.

  4. Dose uncertainty due to computed tomography ,,CT... slice thickness in CT-based high dose rate brachytherapy of the prostate cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pouliot, Jean

    Dose uncertainty due to computed tomography ,,CT... slice thickness in CT-based high dose rate in Medicine. DOI: 10.1118/1.1785454 Key words: high dose rate brachytherapy, computed tomography, prostate at risk OARs by providing three-dimensional 3D anatomical information from computed tomography CT

  5. Realistic simulation of reduced-dose CT with noise modeling and sinogram synthesis using DICOM CT images

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Won Kim, Chang [Interdisciplinary Program of Bioengineering Major Seoul National University College of Engineering, San 56-1, Silim-dong, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 152-742, South Korea and Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, 28, Yongon-dong, Chongno-gu, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of)] [Interdisciplinary Program of Bioengineering Major Seoul National University College of Engineering, San 56-1, Silim-dong, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 152-742, South Korea and Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, 28, Yongon-dong, Chongno-gu, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jong Hyo, E-mail: kimjhyo@snu.ac.kr [Department of Radiology, Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, 28, Yongon-dong, Chongno-gu, Seoul, 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Transdisciplinary Studies, Graduate School of Convergence Science and Technology, Seoul National University, Suwon, Gyeonggi-do, 443-270 (Korea, Republic of); Advanced Institutes of Convergence Technology, Seoul National University, Suwon, Gyeonggi-do, 443-270 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Reducing the patient dose while maintaining the diagnostic image quality during CT exams is the subject of a growing number of studies, in which simulations of reduced-dose CT with patient data have been used as an effective technique when exploring the potential of various dose reduction techniques. Difficulties in accessing raw sinogram data, however, have restricted the use of this technique to a limited number of institutions. Here, we present a novel reduced-dose CT simulation technique which provides realistic low-dose images without the requirement of raw sinogram data. Methods: Two key characteristics of CT systems, the noise equivalent quanta (NEQ) and the algorithmic modulation transfer function (MTF), were measured for various combinations of object attenuation and tube currents by analyzing the noise power spectrum (NPS) of CT images obtained with a set of phantoms. Those measurements were used to develop a comprehensive CT noise model covering the reduced x-ray photon flux, object attenuation, system noise, and bow-tie filter, which was then employed to generate a simulated noise sinogram for the reduced-dose condition with the use of a synthetic sinogram generated from a reference CT image. The simulated noise sinogram was filtered with the algorithmic MTF and back-projected to create a noise CT image, which was then added to the reference CT image, finally providing a simulated reduced-dose CT image. The simulation performance was evaluated in terms of the degree of NPS similarity, the noise magnitude, the bow-tie filter effect, and the streak noise pattern at photon starvation sites with the set of phantom images. Results: The simulation results showed good agreement with actual low-dose CT images in terms of their visual appearance and in a quantitative evaluation test. The magnitude and shape of the NPS curves of the simulated low-dose images agreed well with those of real low-dose images, showing discrepancies of less than +/?3.2% in terms of the noise power at the peak height and +/?1.2% in terms of the spatial frequency at the peak height. The magnitudes of the noise measured for 12 different combinations the phantom size, tube current, and reconstruction kernel for the simulated and real low-dose images were very similar, with differences of 0.1 to 4.7%. Thep value for a statistical testing of the difference in the noise magnitude ranged from 0.99 to 0.11, showing that there was no difference statistically between the noise magnitudes of the real and simulated low-dose images using our method. The strength and pattern of the streak noise in an anthropomorphic phantom was also consistent with expectations. Conclusions: A novel reduced-dose CT simulation technique was developed which uses only CT images while not requiring raw sinogram data. Our method can provide realistic simulation results under reduced-dose conditions both in terms of the noise magnitude and the textual appearance. This technique has the potential to promote clinical research for patient dose reductions.

  6. WMU Power Generation Study Task 2.0 Corn Cob Co-Combustion Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Much attention has been focused on renewable energy use in large-scale utilities and very small scale distributed energy systems. However, there is little information available regarding renewable energy options for midscale municipal utilities. The Willmar Municipal Utilities Corn Cob-Coal Co-Combustion Project was initiated to investigate opportunities available for small to midscale municipal utilities to "go green". The overall goal of the Project was to understand the current t'enewable energy research and energy efficiency projects that are or have been implemented at both larger and smaller scale and determine the applicability to midscale municipal utilities. More specific objectives for Task 2.0 of this project were to determine the technical feasibility of co-combusting com cobs with coal in the existing WMU boiler, and to identify any regulatory issues that might need to be addressed if WMU were to obtain a significant portion of its heat from such co-combustion. This report addresses the issues as laid out in the study proposal. The study investigated the feasibility of and demonstrated the technical effectiveness of co-combusting corn cobs with coal in the Willmar Municipal Utilities stoker boiler steam generation power plant. The results of the WMU Co-Combustion Project will serve as a model for other midscale utilities who wish to use corn cobs to generate renewable electrical energy. As a result of the Co-Combustion Project, the WMU plans to upgrade their stoker boiler to accept whole corn cobs as well as other types of biomass, while still allowing the fuel delivery system to use 100% coal as needed. Benefits of co-combustion will include: energy security, reduced Hg and CO2 air emissions, improved ash chemistry, potential future carbon credit sales, an immediate positive effect on the local economy, and positive attention focused on the WMU and the City of Willmar. The first step in the study was to complete a feasibility analysis. The feasibility analysis anticipated only positive results from the combustion of corn cobs with coal in the WMU power plant boiler, and therefore recommended that the project proceed. The study proceeded with a review of the existing WMU Power Plant configuration; cob fuel analyses; an application for an Air Quality Permit from the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency to conduct the co-combustion test burns; identification of and a site visit to a similar facility in Iowa; an evaluation of cob grinding machines; and agreements with a corn grower, a cob harvester, and the City of Willmar to procure, harvest, and store cobs. The WMU power plant staff constructed a temporary cob feed system whereby the cobs could be injected into the #3 Boiler firebox, at rates up to 40% of the boiler total heat input. Test burns were conducted, during which air emissions were monitored and fuel and ash samples analyzed. The results of the test burns indicated that the monitored flue gas quality improved slightly during the test burns. The WMU was able to determine that modifications to the #3 Boiler fuel feed system to accept com cobs on a permanent basis would be technically feasible and would enable the WMU to generate electricity from renewable fuels on a dispatchable basis.

  7. Energy efficiency improvement and cost saving opportunities for the Corn Wet Milling Industry: An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galitsky, Christina; Worrell, Ernst; Ruth, Michael

    2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Corn wet milling is the most energy intensive industry within the food and kindred products group (SIC 20), using 15 percent of the energy in the entire food industry. After corn, energy is the second largest operating cost for corn wet millers in the United States. A typical corn wet milling plant in the United States spends approximately $20 to $30 million per year on energy, making energy efficiency improvement an important way to reduce costs and increase predictable earnings, especially in times of high energy-price volatility. This report shows energy efficiency opportunities available for wet corn millers. It begins with descriptions of the trends, structure and production of the corn wet milling industry and the energy used in the milling and refining process. Specific primary energy savings for each energy efficiency measure based on case studies of plants and references to technical literature are provided. If available, typical payback periods are also listed. The report draws upon the experiences of corn, wheat and other starch processing plants worldwide for energy efficiency measures. The findings suggest that given available resources and technology, there are opportunities to reduce energy consumption cost-effectively in the corn wet milling industry while maintaining the quality of the products manufactured. Further research on the economics of the measures, as well as the applicability of these to different wet milling practices, is needed to assess the feasibility of implementation of selected technologies at individual plants.

  8. Fattening Steers on Cottonseed Meal and Cottonseed Hulls With and Without Corn; The Influence of Age on Fattening Steers.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, J. M. (John McKinley); Lush, Jay L. (Jay Laurence); Jones, James Hazlitt

    1923-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    111 llsteers Lot IV 10 steers Third thirty days. ..... 115.6C.S.M 274.6corn ......... 612.8 hulls. ....... 210.2C.S.M ..... 871.1 hulls. ....... I 3.54C.S.M ...... 8.41corn .......... 18.77 hulls. ........ 5.39C.S.M ...... 22.34 hulls.... ........ Lot I11 11 steers Lot IV 10 steers Fourth thirty days. $10.11 8.17 ...... 3.23C.S.M 10.41 corn.. ........ 23.21 hulls. ........ ...... 6.18C.S.M 26.54 hulls. ........ Lot 111 llsteers Lot IV 10 steers (If the steer with the abscess were...

  9. Molecular imaging in oncology: the acceptance of PET/CT and the emergence of MR/PET imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schiepers, Christiaan; Dahlbom, Magnus

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CT—Computed tomography . PET—Positron Emission Tomography .body imaging with MRI or PET/CT: the future for single-Sollitto RA et al (2009) 18F-FDG PET/CT of transitional cell

  10. Unusual association of alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma with pancreatic metastasis: emerging role of PET-CT in tumor staging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Christie R, Daw NC et al ( 2005) PET/CT in the evaluation ofComparative study of FDG PET/CT and conventional imaging inet al (2009) Diagnostic value of PET/CT for the staging and

  11. Estimated cumulative radiation dose from PET/CT in children with malignancies: reply to Gelfand et al

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chawla, Soni C.; Boechat, M. Ines; McNitt-Gray, Michael

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    radiation dose from PET/CT in children with malignancies.radiation dose from PET/CT in children with malig- nancies:radiation dose from PET/CT in children with malignancies:

  12. Molecular imaging in oncology: the acceptance of PET/CT and the emergence of MR/PET imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schiepers, Christiaan; Dahlbom, Magnus

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    only [2] to combining PET and CT [3] and PET and MRI [4].varies widely between PET and CT, e.g. arms up or down,body imaging with MRI or PET/CT: the future for single-

  13. Estimated cumulative radiation dose from PET/CT in children with malignancies: a 5-year retrospective review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    N, Feig SA (2007) PET/CT in the evaluating pediatriccan be used for both PET and CT studies. The ALARA principleMB, Christie R, Daw NC (2005) PET/CT in the evaluation of

  14. Unusual association of alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma with pancreatic metastasis: emerging role of PET-CT in tumor staging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The combination of PET and CT provided a mean effective doseChristie R, Daw NC et al ( 2005) PET/CT in the evaluation ofComparative study of FDG PET/CT and conventional imaging in

  15. A comparison of silage and grain yields of four corn hybrids at three locations in Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martelino, Rafael Agcaoili

    1954-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A (X)HPARISOM Of SILAGM AND GRAIN YI~ QF FODR ~ HYBRIDS AT THRE1'' LOGATIONS IM TzXAS A Thesis RAPAol, A. I JKThI, INO Approve as to stgrle aml content Qs (~chairmen of GcnsmLtt ( Haad Department June, 1&54 , ;. RY OF TE A v..., grain yield and lodging peroentage of four corn hybrids and three spacings& Tyler . . ~ 17 ') ~ bined analysis of varianoe of silage yields for the tmo locations ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ o ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 20 10. Combined analysis of varianoe of grain...

  16. Dust suppression characteristics of mineral oil when applied to corn, wheat, or soybeans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, David Don

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and must be added repeatedly. Several water applications could raise the mo i stu re content of grain to the point of encouraging mold growth. Peterson (1977) reported that an average worker wi 1 1 breathe from 4 to 10 m of air during an eight hour work... Jones, B. S. , Texas Al!M University Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. Calvin B. Parnell, Jr. Corn, wheat, and soybean samples weighing 454 g each were treated with mineral oil at rates of 50, 100, 200, 400, and 600 ppm and grain dust...

  17. Effect of genotype on cooking and texture of corn for tortilla production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bedolla, Santiago

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cell to measure n1xtamal texture . . . Plunger (A) and Ottawa cell (C) to measure tortilla texture Page 13 17 Effect of cook1ng time on n1xtamal texture of corneous, 1ntermediate and floury hybrids (Linear model) Effect of cooking time... composition of corn on the average is: water, 13. 5K; protein, 10K; oil, 4%; carbohydrates 70. 7X; and ash, 1. 4X. The germ contains about 35% oil, 20K protein and 10% ash (Hopkins et al. , 1903; Katz et al. , 1974). Nixtamal Preparation Nethods...

  18. Automatic CT simulation optimization for radiation therapy: A general strategy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Hua, E-mail: huli@radonc.wustl.edu; Chen, Hsin-Chen; Tan, Jun; Gay, Hiram; Michalski, Jeff M.; Mutic, Sasa [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri 63110 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri 63110 (United States); Yu, Lifeng [Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905 (United States)] [Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905 (United States); Anastasio, Mark A. [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri 63110 (United States)] [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri 63110 (United States); Low, Daniel A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States)

    2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: In radiation therapy, x-ray computed tomography (CT) simulation protocol specifications should be driven by the treatment planning requirements in lieu of duplicating diagnostic CT screening protocols. The purpose of this study was to develop a general strategy that allows for automatically, prospectively, and objectively determining the optimal patient-specific CT simulation protocols based on radiation-therapy goals, namely, maintenance of contouring quality and integrity while minimizing patient CT simulation dose. Methods: The authors proposed a general prediction strategy that provides automatic optimal CT simulation protocol selection as a function of patient size and treatment planning task. The optimal protocol is the one that delivers the minimum dose required to provide a CT simulation scan that yields accurate contours. Accurate treatment plans depend on accurate contours in order to conform the dose to actual tumor and normal organ positions. An image quality index, defined to characterize how simulation scan quality affects contour delineation, was developed and used to benchmark the contouring accuracy and treatment plan quality within the predication strategy. A clinical workflow was developed to select the optimal CT simulation protocols incorporating patient size, target delineation, and radiation dose efficiency. An experimental study using an anthropomorphic pelvis phantom with added-bolus layers was used to demonstrate how the proposed prediction strategy could be implemented and how the optimal CT simulation protocols could be selected for prostate cancer patients based on patient size and treatment planning task. Clinical IMRT prostate treatment plans for seven CT scans with varied image quality indices were separately optimized and compared to verify the trace of target and organ dosimetry coverage. Results: Based on the phantom study, the optimal image quality index for accurate manual prostate contouring was 4.4. The optimal tube potentials for patient sizes of 38, 43, 48, 53, and 58 cm were 120, 140, 140, 140, and 140 kVp, respectively, and the corresponding minimum CTDIvol for achieving the optimal image quality index 4.4 were 9.8, 32.2, 100.9, 241.4, and 274.1 mGy, respectively. For patients with lateral sizes of 43–58 cm, 120-kVp scan protocols yielded up to 165% greater radiation dose relative to 140-kVp protocols, and 140-kVp protocols always yielded a greater image quality index compared to the same dose-level 120-kVp protocols. The trace of target and organ dosimetry coverage and the ? passing rates of seven IMRT dose distribution pairs indicated the feasibility of the proposed image quality index for the predication strategy. Conclusions: A general strategy to predict the optimal CT simulation protocols in a flexible and quantitative way was developed that takes into account patient size, treatment planning task, and radiation dose. The experimental study indicated that the optimal CT simulation protocol and the corresponding radiation dose varied significantly for different patient sizes, contouring accuracy, and radiation treatment planning tasks.

  19. Simultaneous Detection and Registration for Ileo-Cecal Valve Detection in 3D CT Colonography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbu, Adrian

    Simultaneous Detection and Registration for Ileo-Cecal Valve Detection in 3D CT Colonography Le Lu1-Cecal Valve (ICV) detection in both clean and tagged 3D CT colonography scans. Our final ICV detection system

  20. Effect of Enrichment on the Thiamine, Riboflavin and Niacin of Corn Meal and Grits as Prepared for Eating.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whitacre, Jessie; Pace, June K.; Thomas, Kathreen

    1952-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Effects of Enrichment on the Thiamine, Riboflavin and Niacin of Corn Meal and Grits as Prepared for Eating [Blank Page in Original Bulletin] DIGEST This bulletin deals with the increase in the vitamin value of corn meal and grits dishes due... was as nearly as possible like Texas home procedure. Each prepar- ation was analyzed to find out how much of each vitamin was left in the cooked product. Approximately the same amount of riboflavin and niacin was in each preparation after cooking as before...

  1. Hairy Vetch, Bur Clover and Oats as Soil-Building Crops for Cotton and Corn in Texas.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morris, H. F. (Harry Forest); Johnson, P. R. (Paul Rufus); Reynolds, E. B. (Elbert Brunner)

    1950-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for soil improvement increased the average yields of cot- ton ancl corn about 40 percent at College Station for the 11 years, 1937-47. Vetch increased the average yield of cotton 75 to 84 percent and practically doubled the yield of corn at Tyler... yields of cotton than the use of 400 pounds of a 4-8-4 fertilizer per acre at Tyler and Nacog- doches. Hairy vetch was a better green-manure crop than oats at Tyler and oats or bur clover at Nacogdoches. The effects of plowing under hairy vetch lasted...

  2. The feasibility and profitability of short season corn and sorghum cropping systems on the Texas High Plains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vagts, Todd Anthony

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in the U. S. , therefore, irrigation management, particularly with limited irrigation, is very critical (Howell et al. , 1989). Seasonal ET rates for corn range from 30. 8 to 39. 5 inches with corn yields varying from 132 bu/acre to 204 bu/acre (Eck... 80 bu/acre for grain only wheat and 70 bu/acre for graze-grain wheat. All phosphorous was applied in the fall. Fertilizer was applied in fifteen inch bands in the fall with a knife injector and was applied in granular form in the spring...

  3. CT Poison Control Center 2014 Video Contest Rules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Duck O.

    CT Poison Control Center 2014 Video Contest Rules To Enter: 1) Record and upload a video to your an immediate family member who is an employee of the Connecticut Poison Control Center. Video Requirements: · DO NOT HANDLE, INGEST OR USE ANY ACTUAL POISONOUS OR HAZARDOUSSUBSTANCES. IF YOU HAVE QUESTIONS ABOUT

  4. Pulmonary fissure segmentation on CT Jingbin Wang a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Betke, Margrit

    between the lobes in the lungs. Its segmentation is of clinical interest as it facilitates the assessment of lung disease on a lobar level. This paper describes a new approach for segmenting the major fissures in both lungs on thin-section computed tomography (CT). An image transformation called ``ridge map

  5. Status and Promise CT's and Magnetized Target Fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Hill (LLNL) #12;CT's: Spheromaks & Field Reversed Configurations At LLNL, the SSPX experiment is investigating spheromak formation, sustainment, and confinement issues. (Hill, Mclean, Wood, Ryutov). At UC-Davis, formation and acceleration of spheromaks. (Hwang) At the U of Washington, field reversed configuration

  6. Collapsibility of Lung Volume by Paired Inspiratory and Expiratory CT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collapsibility of Lung Volume by Paired Inspiratory and Expiratory CT Scans: Correlations with Lung Function and Mean Lung Density Tsuneo Yamashiro, MD, Shin Matsuoka, MD, PhD, Brian J. Bartholmai, MD, Rau: To evaluate the relationship between measurements of lung volume (LV) on inspiratory/expiratory computed

  7. Thoracic CT-PET Registration Using a 3D Breathing Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Thoracic CT-PET Registration Using a 3D Breathing Model Antonio Moreno1 , Sylvie Chambon1 , Anand P Orlando, USA Abstract. In the context of thoracic CT-PET volume registration, we present a novel method applications. We consider Computed Tomography (CT) and Positron Emission Tomography (PET) in thoracic regions

  8. Measurements from 3D-CT renderings are used in research and clinical management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vorperian, Houri K.

    Measurements from 3D-CT renderings are used in research and clinical management: · Characterization for the prism]) RENDERING TECHNIQUES USED in ANALYZE 10.0: - Volume Render - (2) Volumes of Interest 1) VOI-Auto & 2) VOI-Manual TOTAL 3D-CT MODELS: 3 mandibles X 18 CT series X 3 rendering techniques = 162 mandible

  9. Automated Tumour Delineation Using Joint PET/CT Information Vaclav Potesil 1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Xiaolei

    Automated Tumour Delineation Using Joint PET/CT Information Vaclav Potesil 1,2 , Xiaolei Huang 1 for automated delineation of tumor boundaries in whole-body PET/CT by jointly using information from both PET. Keywords: Tumor delineation, PET-CT, segmentation, radiation therapy planning 1. INTRODUCTION

  10. Augmenting CT Cardiac Roadmaps with Segmented Streaming Qi Duan a,b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Augmenting CT Cardiac Roadmaps with Segmented Streaming Ultrasound Qi Duan a,b , Guy Shechter Static X-ray computed tomography (CT) volumes are often used as anatomic roadmaps during catheter. Augmenting these static CT roadmaps with segmented myocardial borders extracted from live ultrasound (US

  11. Soft Classification with Gaussian Mixture Model for Clinical Dual-Energy CT Reconstructions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Soft Classification with Gaussian Mixture Model for Clinical Dual-Energy CT Reconstructions, and Ken D. Sauer, Member, IEEE Abstract--We study the distribution of the clinical dual-energy CT (DECT material separation. Index Terms--Computed tomography (CT), dual energy, sta- tistical method, Gaussian

  12. The New Oncology: Cost-effectiveness and Matchless Impactof PET-CT in Cancer Management CME

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jadvar, Hossein

    The New Oncology: Cost-effectiveness and Matchless Impactof PET-CT in Cancer Management CME Author in integrating cost-effective FDG-PET and PET-CT fusion techniques into their clinical armamentarium to refine the clinical impact and cost-effectiveness of advanced imaging studies such as FDG-PET scanning and PET-CT

  13. Automatic Lung Nodule Detection from Chest CT Data Using Geometrical Features: Initial Results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whelan, Paul F.

    Automatic Lung Nodule Detection from Chest CT Data Using Geometrical Features: Initial Results for automatic lung nodule detection from Chest CT data is proposed. The proposed system includes the methods of lung segmentation and nodule detection from CT data. The algorithm for lung segmentation consists

  14. Robust Segmentation of Challenging Lungs in CT using Multi-Stage Learning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robust Segmentation of Challenging Lungs in CT using Multi-Stage Learning and Level Set.Kevin Zhou1 Abstract Automatic segmentation of lung tissue in thoracic CT scans is useful for diagnosis and treatment planning of pulmonary diseases. Unlike healthy lung tissue that is easily identifiable in CT scans

  15. EFFECT OF ANATOMICAL FRACTIONATION ON THE ENZYMATIC HYDROLYSIS OF ACID AND ALKALINE PRETREATED CORN STOVER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K. B. Duguid; M. D. Montross; C. W. Radtke; C. L. Crofcheck; L. M. Wendt; S. A. Shearer

    2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Due to concerns with biomass collection systems and soil sustainability there are opportunities to investigate the optimal plant fractions to collect for conversion. An ideal feedstock would require low severity pretreatment to release a maximum amount of sugar during enzymatic hydrolysis. Corn stover fractions were separated by hand and analyzed for glucan, xylan, acid soluble lignin, acid insoluble lignin, and ash composition. The stover fractions were also pretreated with either 0, 0.4, or 0.8% NaOH for 2 hours at room temperature, washed, autoclaved and saccharified. In addition, acid pretreated samples underwent simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) to ethanol. In general, the two pretreatments produced similar trends with cobs, husks, and leaves responding best to the pretreatments, the tops of stalks responding slightly less, and the bottom of the stalks responding the least. For example, corn husks pretreated with 0.8% NaOH released over 90% (standard error of 3.8%) of the available glucan, while only 45% (standard error of 1.1%) of the glucan was produced from identically treated stalk bottoms. Estimates of the theoretical ethanol yield using acid pretreatment followed by SSF were 65% (standard error of 15.9%) for husks and 29% (standard error of 1.8%) for stalk bottoms. This suggests that integration of biomass collection systems to remove sustainable feedstocks could be integrated with the processes within a biorefinery to minimize overall ethanol production costs.

  16. Modification of Corn Starch Ethanol Refinery to Efficiently Accept Various High-Impact Cellulosic Feedstocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Derr, Dan

    2013-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of the Corn-to-Cellulosic Migration (CCM) pilot facility was to demonstrate the implementation of advanced technologies and methods for conversion of non-food, cellulosic feedstocks into ethanol, assess the economics of the facility and evaluate potential environmental benefits for biomass to fuels conversion. The CCM project was comprised of design, build, and operate phases for the CCM pilot facility as well as research & development, and modeling components. The CCM pilot facility was designed to process 1 tonne per day of non-food biomass and biologically convert that biomass to ethanol at a rate of 70 gallons per tonne. The plant demonstrated throughputs in excess of 1 tonne per day for an extended run of 1400 hours. Although target yields were not fully achieved, the continuous operation validated the design and operability of the plant. These designs will permit the design of larger scale operations at existing corn milling operations or for greenfield plants. EdeniQ, a partner in the project and the owner of the pilot plant, continues to operate and evaluate other feedstocks.

  17. Modeled Impacts of Cover Crops and Vegetative Barriers on Corn Stover Availability and Soil Quality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ian J. Bonner; David J. Muth Jr.; Joshua B. Koch; Douglas L. Karlen

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Environmentally benign, economically viable, and socially acceptable agronomic strategies are needed to launch a sustainable lignocellulosic biofuel industry. Our objective was to demonstrate a landscape planning process that can ensure adequate supplies of corn (Zea mays L.) stover feedstock while protecting and improving soil quality. The Landscape Environmental Assessment Framework (LEAF) was used to develop land use strategies that were then scaled up for five U.S. Corn Belt states (Nebraska, Iowa, Illinois, Indiana, and Minnesota) to illustrate the impact that could be achieved. Our results show an annual sustainable stover supply of 194 million Mg without exceeding soil erosion T values or depleting soil organic carbon [i.e., soil conditioning index (SCI)?>?0] when no-till, winter cover crop, and vegetative barriers were incorporated into the landscape. A second, more rigorous conservation target was set to enhance soil quality while sustainably harvesting stover. By requiring erosion to be <1/2 T and the SCI-organic matter (OM) subfactor to be >?0, the annual sustainable quantity of harvestable stover dropped to148 million Mg. Examining removal rates by state and soil resource showed that soil capability class and slope generally determined the effectiveness of the three conservation practices and the resulting sustainable harvest rate. This emphasizes that sustainable biomass harvest must be based on subfield management decisions to ensure soil resources are conserved or enhanced, while providing sufficient biomass feedstock to support the economic growth of bioenergy enterprises.

  18. Effect of pelleting on the recalcitrance and bioconversion of dilute-acid pretreated corn stover

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allison E Ray; Amber Hoover; Gary Gresham

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Background: Knowledge regarding the performance of densified biomass in biochemical processes is limited. The effects of densification on biochemical conversion are explored here. Methods: Pelleted corn stover samples were generated from bales that were milled to 6.35 mm. Low-solids acid pretreatment and simultaneous saccharification and fermentation were performed to evaluate pretreatment efficacy and ethanol yields achieved for pelleted and ground stover (6.35 mm and 2 mm) samples. Both pelleted and 6.35-mm ground stover were evaluated using a ZipperClave® reactor under high-solids, process-relevant conditions for multiple pretreatment severities (Ro), followed by enzymatic hydrolysis of the washed, pretreated solids. Results: Monomeric xylose yields were significantly higher for pellets (approximately 60%) than for ground formats (approximately 38%). Pellets achieved approximately 84% of theoretical ethanol yield (TEY); ground stover formats had similar profiles, reaching approximately 68% TEY. Pelleting corn stover was not detrimental to pretreatment efficacy for both low- and high-solids conditions, and even enhanced ethanol yields.

  19. Fuel-Cycle Fossil Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Fuel Ethanol Produced from U.S. Midwest Corn

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patzek, Tadeusz W.

    #12;Fuel-Cycle Fossil Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Fuel Ethanol Produced from U on a mass emission per travel mile basis, the corn-to-ethanol fuel cycle for Midwest-produced ethanol% of total domestic ethanol production. That is, while the model still covers all alternative fuels and five

  20. Soil compaction is a manageable factor that can lim-it grain or silage yield on many Virginia soils. Corn

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    Soil compaction is a manageable factor that can lim- it grain or silage yield on many Virginia soils. Corn plants growing on compacted areas are often stunted and have slower root penetration rates grown in these areas. Compaction is created when soil particles are pressed together, reducing the pore

  1. A Review of "The Complete Works of Gerrard Winstanley" edited by Thomas N. Corns, Ann Hughes, and David Loewenstein

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayes, Tom

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -modern English politics for some time to come. Thomas N. Corns, Ann Hughes, and David Loewenstein, eds. The Complete Works of Gerrard Winstanley. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2009. Vol. I. xi+600pp. Vol. II. 465pp. $335. Review by tom hayes, baruch...

  2. As corn-based biofuels reach their practical limits, advanced algae-based biofuels are poised to supply

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reisslein, Martin

    SEMTE abstract As corn-based biofuels reach their practical limits, advanced algae-based biofuels of Energy, General Electric, Algenol Biofuels, and Southern Company. Currently a post-doctoral fellow working for Algenol Biofuels, Dr. Lively is expanding his expertise in gas and liquid separations

  3. Current biofuel feedstock crops such as corn lead to large environmental losses of N through nitrate leaching and N2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeLucia, Evan H.

    219 Current biofuel feedstock crops such as corn lead to large environmental losses of N through biofuel crops established on a rich Mollisol soil. Reduced Nitrogen Losses after Conversion of Row Crop Agriculture to Perennial Biofuel Crops Candice M. Smith, Mark B. david,* Corey A. Mitchell, Michael d. Masters

  4. Keeping Corn Farmers Seeing Green As recently as 100 years ago, farmers plowed their fields with horses and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , and agencies such as U.S. Department of Agriculture have long relied on NOAA's weather and climate begins. The economic ties between climate information and agriculture are considerable. For example: Global Climate Change Impacts in the U.S., 2009) #12;impacts. Corn is particularly susceptible to heat

  5. Land Use and Water Efficiency in Current and Potential Future U.S. Corn and Brazilian Sugarcane Ethanol Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ethanol Systems Ethan Warner1, Yimin Zhang1, Helena Chum2 , Robin Newmark1 Biofuels represent technological learning, sugarcane and corn ethanol industries have achieved steady improvements in resource Scope Abstract Conclusions The GHG savings and land energy productivity of both ethanol systems have

  6. Owens Corning

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Residential Insulation, Frank O'Brien Bernini, VP & Chief Sustainability Officer, Paul Smith, VP Building Materials Group Marketing, John Libonati, VP Government and Public...

  7. Corn fodder

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Curtis, Geo. W. (George Washington)

    1891-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    from stalks below; 4th best-or poorest plan of all-to strip leaves from entire stalk. PLAT 1. Tope cut, only, above eara 14.375 4.258 2.145 65.558 1.587 9.750 -- Protein ....................... Fat .......................... Crude Fibre...

  8. Owens Corning

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO2:Introduction toManagementOPAM PolicyOfEnergyOutreach toOverviewOverview

  9. Combining a Breathing Model and Tumor-Specific Rigidity Constraints for Registration of CT-PET Thoracic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chambon, Sylvie

    Combining a Breathing Model and Tumor-Specific Rigidity Constraints for Registration of CT-PET modalities, namely Computerized Tomography (CT) and Positron Emission Tomography (PET). While recent technical advancements in combined CT/PET scanners provide 3D CT and PET data of the thoracic region

  10. In-patient to isocenter KERMA ratios in CT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huda, Walter; Ogden, Kent M.; Lavallee, Robert L.; Roskopf, Marsha L.; Scalzetti, Ernest M. [Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC), 96 Jonathan Lucas Street (MSC 323), Charleston, South Carolina 29425-3230 (United States); Department of Radiology, SUNY Upstate Medical University, 750 E Adams Street, Syracuse, New York 13210 (United States)

    2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To estimate in-patient KERMA for specific organs in computed tomography (CT) scanning using ratios to isocenter free-in-air KERMA obtained using a Rando phantom.Method: A CT scan of an anthropomorphic phantom results in an air KERMA K at a selected phantom location and air kerma K{sub CT} at the CT scanner isocenter when the scan is repeated in the absence of the phantom. The authors define the KERMA ratio (R{sub K}) as K/ K{sub CT}, which were experimentally determined in a Male Rando Phantom using lithium fluoride chips (TLD-100). R{sub K} values were obtained for a total of 400 individual point locations, as well as for 25 individual organs of interest in CT dosimetry. CT examinations of Rando were performed on a GE LightSpeed Ultra scanner operated at 80 kV, 120 kV, and 140 kV, as well as a Siemens Sensation 16 operated at 120 kV. Results: At 120 kV, median R{sub K} values for the GE and Siemens scanners were 0.60 and 0.64, respectively. The 10th percentile R{sub K} values ranged from 0.34 at 80 kV to 0.54 at 140 kV, and the 90th percentile R{sub K} values ranged from 0.64 at 80 kV to 0.78 at 140 kV. The average R{sub K} for the 25 Rando organs at 120 kV was 0.61 {+-} 0.08. Average R{sub K} values in the head, chest, and abdomen showed little variation. Relative to R{sub K} values in the head, chest, and abdomen obtained at 120 kV, R{sub K} values were about 12% lower in the pelvis and about 58% higher in the cervical spine region. Average R{sub K} values were about 6% higher on the Siemens Sensation 16 scanner than the GE LightSpeed Ultra. Reducing the x-ray tube voltage from 120 kV to 80 kV resulted in an average reduction in R{sub K} value of 34%, whereas increasing the x-ray tube voltage to 140 kV increased the average R{sub K} value by 9%. Conclusions: In-patient to isocenter relative KERMA values in Rando phantom can be used to estimate organ doses in similar sized adults undergoing CT examinations from easily measured air KERMA values at the isocenter (free in air). Conversion from in-patient air KERMA values to tissue dose would require the use of energy-appropriate conversion factors.

  11. Utilizing a simple CT dosimetry phantom for the comprehension of the operational characteristics of CT AEC systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsalafoutas, Ioannis A. [Medical Physics Department, Anticancer-Oncology Hospital of Athens “Agios Savvas,” 171 Alexandras Avenue, 115 22 Athens (Greece)] [Medical Physics Department, Anticancer-Oncology Hospital of Athens “Agios Savvas,” 171 Alexandras Avenue, 115 22 Athens (Greece); Varsamidis, Athanasios; Thalassinou, Stella; Efstathopoulos, Efstathios P. [Second Department of Radiology, Medical School, University of Athens, University General Hospital, “Attikon,” Rimini 1, 124 62 Athens (Greece)] [Second Department of Radiology, Medical School, University of Athens, University General Hospital, “Attikon,” Rimini 1, 124 62 Athens (Greece)

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To investigate the utility of the nested polymethylacrylate (PMMA) phantom (which is available in many CT facilities for CTDI measurements), as a tool for the presentation and comparison of the ways that two different CT automatic exposure control (AEC) systems respond to a phantom when various scan parameters and AEC protocols are modified.Methods: By offsetting the two phantom's components (the head phantom and the body ring) half-way along their longitudinal axis, a phantom with three sections of different x-ray attenuation was created. Scan projection radiographs (SPRs) and helical scans of the three-section phantom were performed on a Toshiba Aquilion 64 and a Philips Brilliance 64 CT scanners, with different scan parameter selections [scan direction, pitch factor, slice thickness, and reconstruction interval (ST/RI), AEC protocol, and tube potential used for the SPRs]. The dose length product (DLP) values of each scan were recorded and the tube current (mA) values of the reconstructed CT images were plotted against the respective Z-axis positions on the phantom. Furthermore, measurements of the noise levels at the center of each phantom section were performed to assess the impact of mA modulation on image quality.Results: The mA modulation patterns of the two CT scanners were very dissimilar. The mA variations were more pronounced for Aquilion 64, where changes in any of the aforementioned scan parameters affected both the mA modulations curves and DLP values. However, the noise levels were affected only by changes in pitch, ST/RI, and AEC protocol selections. For Brilliance 64, changes in pitch affected the mA modulation curves but not the DLP values, whereas only AEC protocol and SPR tube potential selection variations affected both the mA modulation curves and DLP values. The noise levels increased for smaller ST/RI, larger weight category AEC protocol, and larger SPR tube potential selection.Conclusions: The nested PMMA dosimetry phantom can be effectively utilized for the comprehension of CT AEC systems performance and the way that different scan conditions affect the mA modulation patterns, DLP values, and image noise. However, in depth analysis of the reasons why these two systems exhibited such different behaviors in response to the same phantom requires further investigation which is beyond the scope of this study.

  12. Comparison of Dow Corning 544 antifoam to IIT747 antifoam in the 1/240 SRAT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koopman, D.C.

    2000-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility requested that the Immobilization Technology Section compare the relative foaming tendencies of sludge simulant during simulated Chemical Processing Cell operations (HLW-DWPF-TTR-99-0012). Dow Corning 544 antifoam, currently used in DWPF, was compared to a new antifoam formulation developed at the Illinois Institute of Technology. A task plan was written and approved. The task plan deliverables included a recommendation on the choice of antifoam, an evaluation of the influence of solids concentration on foaming, an evaluation on the effect of boil-up rate on foaming, an estimate of the mass of steam stripped to remove 90 percent of the mercury, and a determination of the fate of mercury. Additional parameters to be investigated during experimentation included the maximum foam height observed, hydrogen generation rates, and nitrite destruction rates.

  13. Upright cone beam CT imaging using the onboard imager

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fave, Xenia, E-mail: xjfave@mdanderson.org; Martin, Rachael [Department of Imaging Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 and The University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences at Houston, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States)] [Department of Imaging Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 and The University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences at Houston, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Yang, Jinzhong; Balter, Peter; Court, Laurence [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Carvalho, Luis [Varian Medical Systems, Zug 6303 (Switzerland)] [Varian Medical Systems, Zug 6303 (Switzerland); Pan, Tinsu [Department of Imaging Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States)] [Department of Imaging Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States)

    2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Many patients could benefit from being treated in an upright position. The objectives of this study were to determine whether cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) could be used to acquire upright images for treatment planning and to demonstrate whether reconstruction of upright images maintained accurate geometry and Hounsfield units (HUs). Methods: A TrueBeam linac was programmed in developer mode to take upright CBCT images. The gantry head was positioned at 0°, and the couch was rotated to 270°. The x-ray source and detector arms were extended to their lateral positions. The x-ray source and gantry remained stationary as fluoroscopic projections were taken and the couch was rotated from 270° to 90°. The x-ray tube current was normalized to deposit the same dose (measured using a calibrated Farmer ion chamber) as that received during a clinical helical CT scan to the center of a cylindrical, polyethylene phantom. To extend the field of view, two couch rotation scans were taken with the detector offset 15 cm superiorly and then 15 cm inferiorly. The images from these two scans were stitched together before reconstruction. Upright reconstructions were compared to reconstructions from simulation CT scans of the same phantoms. Two methods were investigated for correcting the HUs, including direct calibration and mapping the values from a simulation CT. Results: Overall geometry, spatial linearity, and high contrast resolution were maintained in upright reconstructions. Some artifacts were created and HU accuracy was compromised; however, these limitations could be removed by mapping the HUs from a simulation CT to the upright reconstruction for treatment planning. Conclusions: The feasibility of using the TrueBeam linac to take upright CBCT images was demonstrated. This technique is straightforward to implement and could be of enormous benefit to patients with thoracic tumors or those who find a supine position difficult to endure.

  14. Effects of feeding stimulant and insecticide mixtures on feeding response and morality of adult male corn earworm, Helicoverpa zea (Boddie)(Lepidoptera:Noctuidae)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clemens, Christopher Glen

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    stimulants on feeding behavior and mortality of pheromone trap captured adult male corn earworms, Helicoverpa zea (Boddie), to screen and evaluate toxicants for use in an attracticide formulation. Commercially-available formulations of acephate, boric acid...

  15. Effects of feeding stimulant and insecticide mixtures on feeding response and morality of adult male corn earworm, Helicoverpa zea (Boddie)(Lepidoptera:Noctuidae) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clemens, Christopher Glen

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    stimulants on feeding behavior and mortality of pheromone trap captured adult male corn earworms, Helicoverpa zea (Boddie), to screen and evaluate toxicants for use in an attracticide formulation. Commercially-available formulations of acephate, boric acid...

  16. Effect of reducing amino acid excess in a corn-soybean meal diet on performance, nitrogen balance and nutrient digestibilities of growing pigs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelly, Katherine Ann

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EFFECT OF REDUCING AMINO ACID EXCESS IN A CORN-SOYBEAN MEAL DIET ON PERFORMANCE, NITROGEN BALANCE AND NUTRIENT DIGESTIBILITIES OF GROWING PIGS A Thesis by KATHERINE ANN KELLY Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University... in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1988 Major Subject: Nutrition EFFECT OF REDUCING AMINO ACID EXCESS IN A CORN-SOYBEAN MEAL DIET ON PERFORMANCE, NITROGEN BALANCE AND NUTRIFNT DIGESTIBILITIES OF GROWING...

  17. Dedicated breast CT: Fibroglandular volume measurements in a diagnostic population

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vedantham, Srinivasan; Shi Linxi; Karellas, Andrew; O'Connell, Avice M. [Department of Radiology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Massachusetts 01655 (United States); Department of Imaging Sciences, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York 14642 (United States)

    2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To determine the mean and range of volumetric glandular fraction (VGF) of the breast in a diagnostic population using a high-resolution flat-panel cone-beam dedicated breast CT system. This information is important for Monte Carlo-based estimation of normalized glandular dose coefficients and for investigating the dependence of VGF on breast dimensions, race, and pathology. Methods: Image data from a clinical trial investigating the role of dedicated breast CT that enrolled 150 women were retrospectively analyzed to determine the VGF. The study was conducted in adherence to a protocol approved by the institutional human subjects review boards and written informed consent was obtained from all study participants. All participants in the study were assigned BI-RADS{sup Registered-Sign} 4 or 5 as per the American College of Radiology assessment categories after standard diagnostic work-up and underwent dedicated breast CT exam prior to biopsy. A Gaussian-kernel based fuzzy c-means algorithm was used to partition the breast CT images into adipose and fibroglandular tissue after segmenting the skin. Upon determination of the accuracy of the algorithm with a phantom, it was applied to 137 breast CT volumes from 136 women. VGF was determined for each breast and the mean and range were determined. Pathology results with classification as benign, malignant, and hyperplasia were available for 132 women, and were used to investigate if the distributions of VGF varied with pathology. Results: The algorithm was accurate to within {+-}1.9% in determining the volume of an irregular shaped phantom. The study mean ({+-} inter-breast SD) for the VGF was 0.172 {+-} 0.142 (range: 0.012-0.719). VGF was found to be negatively correlated with age, breast dimensions (chest-wall to nipple length, pectoralis to nipple length, and effective diameter at chest-wall), and total breast volume, and positively correlated with fibroglandular volume. Based on pathology, pairwise statistical analysis (Mann-Whitney test) indicated that at the 0.05 significance level, there was no significant difference in distributions of VGF without adjustment for age between malignant and nonmalignant breasts (p= 0.41). Pairwise comparisons of the distributions of VGF in increasing order of mammographic breast density indicated all comparisons were statistically significant (p < 0.002). Conclusions: This study used a different clinical prototype breast CT system than that in previous studies to image subjects from a different geographical region, and used a different algorithm for analysis of image data. The mean VGF estimated from this study is within the range reported in previous studies, indicating that the choice of 50% glandular weight fraction to represent an average breast for Monte Carlo-based estimation of normalized glandular dose coefficients in mammography needs revising. In the study, the distributions of VGF did not differ significantly with pathology.

  18. Effect of plant populations and row spacings on plant and ear characters and grain yield of corn hybrids 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silapapun, Anek

    1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    break- age and barren stalks increased with increase in population densities. Allessi and Power (2) also found that number of barren stalks increased and ear weight decreased with increased plant population. Bleasdale (7) proposed that if a crop...EFFECT OF PLANT POPULATIONS AND ROW SPACINGS ON PLANT AND EAR CHARACTERS AND GRAIN YIELD OF CORN HYBRIDS A Thesis by ANEK SILAPAPUN Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement...

  19. Forecasting Mexican imports of U.S. corn, sorghum and soybeans under free trade and debt reduction scenarios

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lyford, Conrad Power

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    INFORMATION Mexican External Debt and Structural Adjustment U. S. - Mexico Agricultural Trade Commodity Specific Factors LITERATURE REVIEW Economic Integration and the Welfare Impacts of a FTA Modeling Methods METHOD OF ANALYSIS AND DATA Description... BACKGROUND INFORMATION To analyze corn, sorghum and soybean trade it is useful to outline several background factors. First, Mexican external debt and its impact on U. S. -Mexican agricultural trade will be discussed. Second, U. S. -Mexican agricultural...

  20. Embedded Library in WebCT: Pushing UCSD Library Resources to Faculty Courses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ho, SuHui

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    keeper about pushing the library to department pages & webEmbedded Library in WebCT:Pushing UCSD Library Resources to Faculty Courses Presenter:

  1. A Fossilized Opal A To Opal C-T Transformation On The Northeast...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Fossilized Opal A To Opal C-T Transformation On The Northeast Atlantic Margin- Support For A Significantly Elevated Palaeogeothermal Gradient During The Neogene? Jump to:...

  2. CT Scans of Cores Metadata, Barrow, Alaska 2015

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Katie McKnight; Tim Kneafsey; Craig Ulrich

    Individual ice cores were collected from Barrow Environmental Observatory in Barrow, Alaska, throughout 2013 and 2014. Cores were drilled along different transects to sample polygonal features (i.e. the trough, center and rim of high, transitional and low center polygons). Most cores were drilled around 1 meter in depth and a few deep cores were drilled around 3 meters in depth. Three-dimensional images of the frozen cores were constructed using a medical X-ray computed tomography (CT) scanner. TIFF files can be uploaded to ImageJ (an open-source imaging software) to examine soil structure and densities within each core.

  3. Towards local progression estimation of pulmonary emphysema using CT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Staring, M., E-mail: m.staring@lumc.nl; Bakker, M. E.; Shamonin, D. P.; Reiber, J. H. C.; Stoel, B. C. [Department of Radiology, Division of Image Processing, Leiden University Medical Center, PO Box 9600, 2300 RC Leiden (Netherlands)] [Department of Radiology, Division of Image Processing, Leiden University Medical Center, PO Box 9600, 2300 RC Leiden (Netherlands); Stolk, J. [Department of Pulmonology, Leiden University Medical Center, PO Box 9600, 2300 RC Leiden (Netherlands)] [Department of Pulmonology, Leiden University Medical Center, PO Box 9600, 2300 RC Leiden (Netherlands)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Whole lung densitometry on chest CT images is an accepted method for measuring tissue destruction in patients with pulmonary emphysema in clinical trials. Progression measurement is required for evaluation of change in health condition and the effect of drug treatment. Information about the location of emphysema progression within the lung may be important for the correct interpretation of drug efficacy, or for determining a treatment plan. The purpose of this study is therefore to develop and validate methods that enable the local measurement of lung density changes, which requires proper modeling of the effect of respiration on density. Methods: Four methods, all based on registration of baseline and follow-up chest CT scans, are compared. The first naïve method subtracts registered images. The second employs the so-called dry sponge model, where volume correction is performed using the determinant of the Jacobian of the transformation. The third and the fourth introduce a novel adaptation of the dry sponge model that circumvents its constant-mass assumption, which is shown to be invalid. The latter two methods require a third CT scan at a different inspiration level to estimate the patient-specific density-volume slope, where one method employs a global and the other a local slope. The methods were validated on CT scans of a phantom mimicking the lung, where mass and volume could be controlled. In addition, validation was performed on data of 21 patients with pulmonary emphysema. Results: The image registration method was optimized leaving a registration error below half the slice increment (median 1.0 mm). The phantom study showed that the locally adapted slope model most accurately measured local progression. The systematic error in estimating progression, as measured on the phantom data, was below 2 gr/l for a 70 ml (6%) volume difference, and 5 gr/l for a 210 ml (19%) difference, if volume correction was applied. On the patient data an underlying linearity assumption relating lung volume change with density change was shown to hold (fitR{sup 2} = 0.94), and globalized versions of the local models are consistent with global results (R{sup 2} of 0.865 and 0.882 for the two adapted slope models, respectively). Conclusions: In conclusion, image matching and subsequent analysis of differences according to the proposed lung models (i) has good local registration accuracy on patient data, (ii) effectively eliminates a dependency on inspiration level at acquisition time, (iii) accurately predicts progression in phantom data, and (iv) is reasonably consistent with global results in patient data. It is therefore a potential future tool for assessing local emphysema progression in drug evaluation trials and in clinical practice.

  4. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- New Canaan Site - CT 08

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling Corp - CT 0-01Naturita36 SupplyCanaan Site -

  5. Simultaneous CT and SPECT tomography using CZT detectors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Paulus, Michael J. (Knoxville, TN); Sari-Sarraf, Hamed (Lubbock, TX); Simpson, Michael L. (Knoxville, TN); Britton, Jr., Charles L. (Alcoa, TN)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for simultaneous transmission x-ray computed tomography (CT) and single photon emission tomography (SPECT) comprises the steps of: injecting a subject with a tracer compound tagged with a .gamma.-ray emitting nuclide; directing an x-ray source toward the subject; rotating the x-ray source around the subject; emitting x-rays during the rotating step; rotating a cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) two-sided detector on an opposite side of the subject from the source; simultaneously detecting the position and energy of each pulsed x-ray and each emitted .gamma.-ray captured by the CZT detector; recording data for each position and each energy of each the captured x-ray and .gamma.-ray; and, creating CT and SPECT images from the recorded data. The transmitted energy levels of the x-rays lower are biased lower than energy levels of the .gamma.-rays. The x-ray source is operated in a continuous mode. The method can be implemented at ambient temperatures.

  6. Response Surface Analysis of Elemental Composition and Energy Properties of Corn Stover During Torrefaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jaya Shankar Tumuluru; Richard D. Boardman; Christopher T. Wright

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This research studied the effects of torrefaction temperature (250-250 C) and time (30-120 minutes) on elemental composition and energy properties changes in corn stover. Torrefied material was analyzed for moisture content, moisture-free carbon (%), hydrogen (%), nitrogen (%), sulfur (%), and higher heating value (MJ/kg). Results at 350 C and 120 minutes indicated a steep decrease in moisture content to a final value of about 1.48% - a reduction of about 69%. With respect to carbon content, the increase was about 23%, while hydrogen and sulfur content decreased by about 46.82% and 66.6%, respectively. The hydrogen-to-carbon ratio decreased as torrefaction temperature and time increased, with the lowest value of 0.6 observed at 350 C and 120 minutes. Higher heating value measured at 350 C and 60 minutes increased by about 22% and the maximum degree of carbonization observed was about 1.21. Further, the regression models developed for chemical composition in terms of torrefaction temperature and time adequately described the process with coefficient of determination values (R2) in the range of 0.92-0.99 for the elemental composition and energy properties studied. Response surface plots indicated that increasing both torrefaction temperature and time resulted in decreased moisture content, hydrogen content, and the hydrogen to-carbon ratio, and increased carbon content and higher heating value. This effect was more significant at torrefaction temperatures and times >280 C and >30 minutes.

  7. STABILITY OF DOW CORNING Q2-3183A ANTIFOAM IN IRRADIATED HYDROXIDE SOLUTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, T; Crawford, C; Burket, P; Calloway, B

    2009-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Researchers at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) examined the stability of Dow Corning Q2-3183A antifoam to radiation and aqueous hydroxide solutions. Initial foam control studies with Hanford tank waste showed the antifoam reduced foaming. The antifoam was further tested using simulated Hanford tank waste spiked with antifoam that was heated and irradiated (2.1 x 10{sup 4} rad/h) at conditions (90 C, 3 M NaOH, 8 h) expected in the processing of radioactive waste through the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) at Hanford. After irradiation, the concentration of the major polymer components polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and polypropylene glycol (PPG) in the antifoam was determined by gel permeation chromatography (GPC). No loss of the major polymer components was observed after 24 h and only 15 wt% loss of PDMS was reported after 48 h. The presence of degradation products were not observed by gas chromatography (GC), gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GCMS) or high performance liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS). G values were calculated from the GPC analysis and tabulated. The findings indicate the antifoam is stable for 24 h after exposure to gamma radiation, heat, and alkaline simulated waste.

  8. Effects of the difference in tube voltage of the CT scanner on dose calculation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rhee, Dong Joo; Moon, Young Min; Kim, Jung Ki; Jeong, Dong Hyeok

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Computed Tomography (CT) measures the attenuation coefficient of an object and converts the value assigned to each voxel into a CT number. In radiation therapy, CT number, which is directly proportional to the linear attenuation coefficient, is required to be converted to electron density for radiation dose calculation for cancer treatment. However, if various tube voltages were applied to take the patient CT image without applying the specific CT number to electron density conversion curve, the accuracy of dose calculation would be unassured. In this study, changes in CT numbers for different materials due to change in tube voltage were demonstrated and the dose calculation errors in percentage depth dose (PDD) and a clinical case were analyzed. The maximum dose difference in PDD from TPS dose calculation and Monte Carlo simulation were 1.3 % and 1.1 % respectively when applying the same CT number to electron density conversion curve to the 80 kVp and 140 kVp images. In the clinical case, the different CT nu...

  9. CT-PET Landmark-based Lung Registration Using a Dynamic Breathing Model S. Chambon1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    CT-PET Landmark-based Lung Registration Using a Dynamic Breathing Model S. Chambon1 , A. Moreno1-based registration of CT (at two different instants of the breathing cycle, intermediate expirations) and PET images in order to simulate the instant in the breathing cycle most similar to the PET image and guarantee

  10. SPECIAL REPORTS AND REVIEWS Mass Screening With CT Colonography: Should the Radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brenner, David Jonathan

    SPECIAL REPORTS AND REVIEWS Mass Screening With CT Colonography: Should the Radiation Exposure is highly advantageous, it can be performed with lower radiation doses than almost any other CT examination market in the United States would soon be over 100 million people. Therefore, it is pertinent to consider

  11. Siemens AG, CT IC 4, H.-G. Zimmermann1 CORPORATETECHNOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmidhuber, Juergen

    © Siemens AG, CT IC 4, H.-G. Zimmermann1 CORPORATETECHNOLOGY System Identification & Forecasting with Advanced Neural Networks Principles, Techniques, Applications Hans Georg Zimmermann Siemens AG Email : Hans_Georg.Zimmermann@siemens.com © Siemens AG, CT IC 4, H.-G. Zimmermann2 CORPORATETECHNOLOGY . . . . ! " i ii wxw 0 w1 wn xn x1 Distinct

  12. Bone Surface Reconstruction From CT/MR Images Using Fast Marching and Level Set Methods1)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chetverikov, Dmitry

    Bone Surface Reconstruction From CT/MR Images Using Fast Marching and Level Set Methods1) Istv surfaces reconstructed from MR volumes are shown. 1 Outline of the project One of our current projects steps of bone surface reconstruction from CT/MR slice images. 2 Main steps of reconstruction 2.1

  13. A Model-Based Iterative Algorithm for Dual-Energy X-Ray CT Reconstruction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Model-Based Iterative Algorithm for Dual-Energy X-Ray CT Reconstruction Ruoqiao Zhang, Jean, Senior Member, IEEE Abstract--Recent developments in dual-energy X-ray CT have shown a number of benefits the opportunity to reduce noise and artifacts in dual energy reconstructions. However, previous approaches

  14. Multi-Material Decomposition Using Statistical Image Reconstruction in X-Ray CT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fessler, Jeffrey A.

    and Jeffrey A. Fessler Abstract--Dual-energy (DE) CT scans provide two sets of measurements at two different-mean-square (RMS) errors. Index Terms--Computed tomography, dual energy, multi- material decomposition, statistical image reconstruction I. INTRODUCTION Dual-energy (DE) CT reconstruction methods typically re- construct

  15. Hemorrhage Slices Detection in Brain CT Images Ruizhe Liu, Chew Lim Tan, Tze Yun Leong

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tan, Chew Lim

    Hemorrhage Slices Detection in Brain CT Images Ruizhe Liu, Chew Lim Tan, Tze Yun Leong Department) scans are widely used in today's diagnosis of head traumas. It is effective to disclose the bleeding Tomography (CT) scans are widely used in today's diagnosis of head traumas. It is effective to disclose

  16. AUTOMATIC HEART ISOLATION FOR CT CORONARY VISUALIZATION USING G. Funka-Lea1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boykov, Yuri

    AUTOMATIC HEART ISOLATION FOR CT CORONARY VISUALIZATION USING GRAPH-CUTS G. Funka-Lea1 , Y. Boykov3 isolate the outer surface of the entire heart in Computer Tomogra- phy (CT) cardiac scans. Isolating the entire heart allows the coronary vessels on the surface of the heart to be easily visu- alized despite

  17. Non-Destructive Whole Lung Assessment via Multi-scale Micro CT Imaging Combined with Stereology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Ge

    Non-Destructive Whole Lung Assessment via Multi-scale Micro CT Imaging Combined with Stereology Tech, Virginia, USA Running head Non-Destructive Whole Lung Assessment via µCT Contact Information Eric-hoffman@uiowa.edu Phone: 319-353-6213 Fax: 319-356-1503 #12;Abstract Estimating volume fractions of the lung parenchyma

  18. Location registration and recognition (LRR) for serial analysis of nodules in lung CT scans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Location registration and recognition (LRR) for serial analysis of nodules in lung CT scans Michal t In the clinical workflow for lung cancer management, the comparison of nodules between CT scans from subsequent in investigating the condition of the lung. The algorithm uses a combination of feature extraction, indexing

  19. ROBUST SEGMENTATION OF LUNG TISSUE IN CHEST CT SCANNING Amal Farag, James Graham and Aly Farag

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Louisville, University of

    ROBUST SEGMENTATION OF LUNG TISSUE IN CHEST CT SCANNING Amal Farag, James Graham and Aly Farag.edu ABSTRACT This paper deals with segmentation of the lung tissues from low dose CT (LDCT) scans of the chest. Goal is correct segmentation as well as maintaining the details of the lung region in the chest cavity

  20. Automated segmentation of lungs with severe interstitial lung disease in CT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Automated segmentation of lungs with severe interstitial lung disease in CT Jiahui Wang Department: Accurate segmentation of lungs with severe interstitial lung disease ILD in thoracic computed tomography CT developed in this study a texture analysis-based method for accurate segmentation of lungs with severe ILD

  1. CT-FIRE (V1.3 Beta2) User's Manual, LOCI @ UW-Madison CT-FIRE V1.3 Beta2 User's Manual (November 6 2014)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yavuz, Deniz

    CT-FIRE (V1.3 Beta2) User's Manual, LOCI @ UW-Madison 1 CT-FIRE V1.3 Beta2 User's Manual (November straightness. Using #12;CT-FIRE (V1.3 Beta2) User's Manual, LOCI @ UW-Madison 2 the advanced output control-processing. Major features of the versions Version 1.3 Beta2 (newest): The primary change in CT-FIRE V1.3 Beta2

  2. Pulmonary Vascular Tree Segmentation from Contrast-Enhanced CT Images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Helmberger, M; Pienn, M; Balint, Z; Olschewski, A; Bischof, H

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a pulmonary vessel segmentation algorithm, which is fast, fully automatic and robust. It uses a coarse segmentation of the airway tree and a left and right lung labeled volume to restrict a vessel enhancement filter, based on an offset medialness function, to the lungs. We show the application of our algorithm on contrast-enhanced CT images, where we derive a clinical parameter to detect pulmonary hypertension (PH) in patients. Results on a dataset of 24 patients show that quantitative indices derived from the segmentation are applicable to distinguish patients with and without PH. Further work-in-progress results are shown on the VESSEL12 challenge dataset, which is composed of non-contrast-enhanced scans, where we range in the midfield of participating contestants.

  3. Monitoring internal organ motion with continuous wave radar in CT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pfanner, Florian [Institute of Medical Physics, University of Erlangen–Nürnberg, 91052 Erlangen, Germany and Siemens AG, Healthcare Sector, Siemensstr. 1, 91301 Forchheim (Germany)] [Institute of Medical Physics, University of Erlangen–Nürnberg, 91052 Erlangen, Germany and Siemens AG, Healthcare Sector, Siemensstr. 1, 91301 Forchheim (Germany); Maier, Joscha [Medical Physics in Radiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)] [Medical Physics in Radiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Allmendinger, Thomas; Flohr, Thomas [Siemens AG, Healthcare Sector, Siemensstr. 1, 91301 Forchheim (Germany)] [Siemens AG, Healthcare Sector, Siemensstr. 1, 91301 Forchheim (Germany); Kachelrieß, Marc [Institute of Medical Physics, University of Erlangen–Nürnberg, 91052 Erlangen, Germany and Medical Physics in Radiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)] [Institute of Medical Physics, University of Erlangen–Nürnberg, 91052 Erlangen, Germany and Medical Physics in Radiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To avoid motion artifacts in medical imaging or to minimize the exposure of healthy tissues in radiation therapy, medical devices are often synchronized with the patient's respiratory motion. Today's respiratory motion monitors require additional effort to prepare the patients, e.g., mounting a motion belt or placing an optical reflector on the patient's breast. Furthermore, they are not able to measure internal organ motion without implanting markers. An interesting alternative to assess the patient's organ motion is continuous wave radar. The aim of this work is to design, implement, and evaluate such a radar system focusing on application in CT.Methods: The authors designed a radar system operating in the 860 MHz band to monitor the patient motion. In the intended application of the radar system, the antennas are located close to the patient's body inside the table of a CT system. One receive and four transmitting antennas are used to avoid the requirement of exact patient positioning. The radar waves propagate into the patient's body and are reflected at tissue boundaries, for example at the borderline between muscle and adipose tissue, or at the boundaries of organs. At present, the authors focus on the detection of respiratory motion. The radar system consists of the hardware mentioned above as well as of dedicated signal processing software to extract the desired information from the radar signal. The system was evaluated using simulations and measurements. To simulate the radar system, a simulation model based on radar and wave field equations was designed and 4D respiratory-gated CT data sets were used as input. The simulated radar signals and the measured data were processed in the same way. The radar system hardware and the signal processing algorithms were tested with data from ten volunteers. As a reference, the respiratory motion signal was recorded using a breast belt simultaneously with the radar measurements.Results: Concerning the measurements of the test persons, there is a very good correlation (?= 0.917) between the respiratory motion phases received by the radar system and the external motion monitor. Our concept of using an array of transmitting antennas turned out to be widely insensitive to the positioning of the test persons. A time shift between the respiratory motion curves recorded with the radar system and the motion curves from the external respiratory monitor was observed which indicates a slight difference between internal organ motion and motion detected by the external respiratory monitor. The simulations were in good accordance with the measurements.Conclusions: A continuous wave radar operating in the near field of the antennas can be used to determine the respiratory motion of humans accurately. In contrast to trigger systems used today, the radar system is able to measure motion inside the body. If such a monitor was routinely available in clinical CT, it would be possible optimizing the scan start with respect to the respiratory state of the patient. Breathing commands would potentially widely be avoided, and as far as uncooperative patients or children are concerned, less sedation might be necessary. Further applications of the radar system could be in radiation therapy or interventional imaging for instance.

  4. Investigation of statistical iterative reconstruction for dedicated breast CT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Makeev, Andrey; Glick, Stephen J. [UMass Medical School, 55 Lake Avenue North, Worcester, Massachusetts 01655 (United States)] [UMass Medical School, 55 Lake Avenue North, Worcester, Massachusetts 01655 (United States)

    2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Dedicated breast CT has great potential for improving the detection and diagnosis of breast cancer. Statistical iterative reconstruction (SIR) in dedicated breast CT is a promising alternative to traditional filtered backprojection (FBP). One of the difficulties in using SIR is the presence of free parameters in the algorithm that control the appearance of the resulting image. These parameters require tuning in order to achieve high quality reconstructions. In this study, the authors investigated the penalized maximum likelihood (PML) method with two commonly used types of roughness penalty functions: hyperbolic potential and anisotropic total variation (TV) norm. Reconstructed images were compared with images obtained using standard FBP. Optimal parameters for PML with the hyperbolic prior are reported for the task of detecting microcalcifications embedded in breast tissue.Methods: Computer simulations were used to acquire projections in a half-cone beam geometry. The modeled setup describes a realistic breast CT benchtop system, with an x-ray spectra produced by a point source and an a-Si, CsI:Tl flat-panel detector. A voxelized anthropomorphic breast phantom with 280 ?m microcalcification spheres embedded in it was used to model attenuation properties of the uncompressed woman's breast in a pendant position. The reconstruction of 3D images was performed using the separable paraboloidal surrogates algorithm with ordered subsets. Task performance was assessed with the ideal observer detectability index to determine optimal PML parameters.Results: The authors' findings suggest that there is a preferred range of values of the roughness penalty weight and the edge preservation threshold in the penalized objective function with the hyperbolic potential, which resulted in low noise images with high contrast microcalcifications preserved. In terms of numerical observer detectability index, the PML method with optimal parameters yielded substantially improved performance (by a factor of greater than 10) compared to FBP. The hyperbolic prior was also observed to be superior to the TV norm. A few of the best-performing parameter pairs for the PML method also demonstrated superior performance for various radiation doses. In fact, using PML with certain parameter values results in better images, acquired using 2 mGy dose, than FBP-reconstructed images acquired using 6 mGy dose.Conclusions: A range of optimal free parameters for the PML algorithm with hyperbolic and TV norm-based potentials is presented for the microcalcification detection task, in dedicated breast CT. The reported values can be used as starting values of the free parameters, when SIR techniques are used for image reconstruction. Significant improvement in image quality can be achieved by using PML with optimal combination of parameters, as compared to FBP. Importantly, these results suggest improved detection of microcalcifications can be obtained by using PML with lower radiation dose to the patient, than using FBP with higher dose.

  5. Computational analysis of whole body CT documents a bone structure alteration in adult advanced chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piana, Michele

    progression. PET/CT images were analyzed using dedicated software, able to recognize an external 2-pixel bone ring whose Hounsfield coefficient served as cut off to recognize trabecular and compact bone. PET/CT of the disease. Keywords: Image Analysis, Bone Marrow, Skeletal Structure, ACLL, PET/CT #12;3 Introduction

  6. Measuring the whole bone marrow asset in humans by a computational approach to integrated PET/CT imaging.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piana, Michele

    ; 7 CNR-SPIN. Genova. Italy Running Head: PET/CT measurement of bone marrow volume AddressMeasuring the whole bone marrow asset in humans by a computational approach to integrated PET/CT to chemotherapy. Keywords: PET/CT; bone marrow imaging; image processing. #12;2 Introduction Bone marrow (BM

  7. Dual energy CT-based characterization of x-ray attenuation properties of breast equivalent material plates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Dual energy CT-based characterization of x-ray attenuation properties of breast equivalent material of the same nominal breast density equivalence (+ 1.5 HU). In addition, dual energy CT provided mono equivalent material, breast density, attenuation properties, linear attenuation coefficients, dual energy CT

  8. Statistical analysis of Multi-Material Components using Dual Energy CT Christoph Heinzl, Johann Kastner, Torsten Moller, and Eduard Groller

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Statistical analysis of Multi-Material Components using Dual Energy CT Christoph Heinzl, Johann plastics-metal components. The presented work makes use of dual energy CT data acquisi- tion for artefact pipeline based on the dual ex- posure technique of dual energy CT. After prefilter- ing and multi

  9. Abstract-Proton Computed Tomography (CT) has important implications for both image-guided diagnosis and radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    Abstract- Proton Computed Tomography (CT) has important implications for both image-guided diagnosis and radiation therapy. For diagnosis, the fact that the patient dose committed by proton CT and contrast, may be exploited in dose-critical clinical settings. Proton CT is also the most appropriate

  10. for Proton CT R. P. Johnson, Member, IEEE, V. Bashkirov, V. Giacometti, R. F. Hurley, P. Piersimoni,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    for Proton CT R. P. Johnson, Member, IEEE, V. Bashkirov, V. Giacometti, R. F. Hurley, P. Piersimoni beam test results with our pre-clinical (Phase-II) head scanner developed for proton computed tomography (pCT). After extensive preclinical testing, pCT will be employed in support of proton therapy

  11. T4DT: Processing 4D CT scans of the Lungs Robert Fowler Joe Warren Yin Zhang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Warren, Joe

    T4DT: Processing 4D CT scans of the Lungs Robert Fowler Joe Warren Yin Zhang Rice University technology for processing time-varying CT scans (4D CT) of the lungs. In particular, we propose to develop these tools to quantitatively assess the effectiveness of current treatments for lung cancer. #12;T4DT

  12. SU-E-J-43: Deformed Planning CT as An Electron Density Substitute for Cone-Beam CT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mishra, K [Cleveland State University, Cleveland, OH (United States); Godley, A [Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To confirm that deforming the planning CT to the daily Cone-Beam CTs (CBCT) can provide suitable electron density for adaptive planning. We quantify the dosimetric difference between plans calculated on deformed planning CTs (DPCT) and daily CT-on-rails images (CTOR). CTOR is used as a test of the method as CTOR already contains accurate electron density to compare against. Methods: Five prostate only IMRT patients, each with five CTOR images, were selected and re-planned on Panther (Prowess Inc.) with a uniform 5 mm PTV expansion, prescribed 78 Gy. The planning CT was deformed to match each CTOR using ABAS (Elekta Inc.). Contours were drawn on the CTOR, and copied to the DPCT. The original treatment plan was copied to both the CTOR and DPCT, keeping the center of the prostate as the isocenter. The plans were then calculated using the collapsed cone heterogeneous dose engine of Prowess and typical DVH planning parameters used to compare them. Results: Each DPCT was visually compared to its CTOR with no differences observed. The agreement of the copied CTOR contours with the DPCT anatomy further demonstrated the deformation accuracy. The plans calculated using CTOR and DPCT were compared. Over the 25 plan pairs, the average difference between them for prostate D100, D98 and D95 were 0.5%, 0.2%, and 0.2%; PTV D98, D95 and mean dose: 0.3%, 0.2% and 0.3%; bladder V70, V60 and mean dose: 1.1%, 0.7%, and 0.2%; and rectum mean dose: 0.3%. (D100 is the dose covering 100% of the target; V70 is the volume of the organ receiving 70 Gy). Conclusion: We observe negligible difference between the dose calculated on the DPCT and the CTOR, implying that deformed planning CTs are a suitable substitute for electron density. The method can now be applied to CBCTs. Research version of Panther provided by Prowess Inc. Research version of ABAS provided by Elekta Inc.

  13. Engineering, Nutrient Removal, and Feedstock Conversion Evaluations of Four Corn Stover Harvest Scenarios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reed L. Hoskinson; Douglas L. Karlen; Stuart J. Birrell; Corey W. Radtke; W.W. Wilhelm

    2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Crop residue has been identified as a near-term source of biomass for renewable fuel, heat, power, chemicals and other bio-materials. Replicated plots were established in a corn (Zea mays L.) field near Ames, IA to evaluate four harvest scenarios (low cut, high-cut top, high-cut bottom, and normal cut). A prototype one-pass harvest system was used to collect the residue samples. High-cut top and high-cut bottom samples were obtained from the same plots in two separate operations. Chemical composition, dilute acid pretreatment response, ethanol conversion efficiency and gasification parameters for each scenario were determined. Mean grain yield (10.1 Mg ha-1 dry weight) was representative of the area. The four harvest scenarios removed 6.7, 4.9, 1.7, and 5.1 Mg ha-1 of dry matter. Expressed as harvest indices (HI) the values were 0.60 for low cut, 0.66 for normal cut, and 0.61 for the total high-cut (top + bottom) scenarios, which are probably realistic for machine harvest and current hybrids. The macro-nutrient replacement value for the normal harvest scenario under our conditions was $57.36 ha-1 or $11.27 Mg-1. Harvesting stalk bottoms increased the water content, the risk of combine damage, the transportation costs, and left insufficient soil cover, while also producing a problematic feedstock. Harvesting stover at current combine height (~40 cm) would be best for farmers and ethanol producers because of better harvest speed and efficiency as well as the quality of the ethanol feedstock.

  14. Influence of Airflow on Laboratory Storage of High Moisture Corn Stover

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lynn M. Wendt; Ian J. Bonner; Amber N. Hoover; Rachel M. Emerson; William A. Smith

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Storing high moisture biomass for bioenergy use is a reality in many areas of the country where wet harvest conditions and environmental factors prevent dry storage from being feasible. Aerobic storage of high moisture biomass leads to microbial degradation and self-heating, but oxygen limitation can aid in material preservation. To understand the influence of oxygen presence on high moisture biomass (50 %, wet basis), three airflow rates were tested on corn stover stored in laboratory reactors. Temperature, carbon dioxide production, dry matter loss, chemical composition, fungal abundance, pH, and organic acids were used to monitor the effects of airflow on storage conditions. The results of this work indicate that oxygen availability impacts both the duration of self-heating and the severity of dry matter loss. High airflow systems experienced the greatest initial rates of loss but a shortened microbially active period that limited total dry matter loss (19 %). Intermediate airflow had improved preservation in short-term storage compared to high airflow systems but accumulated the greatest dry matter loss over time (up to 27 %) as a result of an extended microbially active period. Low airflow systems displayed the best performance with the lowest rates of loss and total loss (10 %) in storage at 50 days. Total structural sugar levels of the stored material were preserved, although glucan enrichment and xylan loss were documented in the high and intermediate flow conditions. By understanding the role of oxygen availability on biomass storage performance, the requirements for high moisture storage solutions may begin to be experimentally defined.

  15. Hydrocarbon Liquid Production via Catalytic Hydroprocessing of Phenolic Oils Fractionated from Fast Pyrolysis of Red Oak and Corn Stover

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Elliott, Douglas C.; Wang, Huamin; Rover, Majorie; Whitmer, Lysle; Smith, Ryan; Brown, Robert C.

    2015-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Phenolic oils were produced from fast pyrolysis of two different biomass feedstocks, red oak and corn stover and evaluated in hydroprocessing tests for production of liquid hydrocarbon products. The phenolic oils were produced with a bio-oil fractionating process in combination with a simple water wash of the heavy ends from the fractionating process. Phenolic oils derived from the pyrolysis of red oak and corn stover were recovered with yields (wet biomass basis) of 28.7 wt% and 14.9 wt%, respectively, and 54.3% and 58.6% on a carbon basis. Both precious metal catalysts and sulfided base metal catalyst were evaluated for hydrotreatingmore »the phenolic oils, as an extrapolation from whole bio-oil hydrotreatment. They were effective in removing heteroatoms with carbon yields as high as 81% (unadjusted for the 90% carbon balance). There was nearly complete heteroatom removal with residual O of only 0.4% to 5%, while N and S were reduced to less than 0.05%. Use of the precious metal catalysts resulted in more saturated products less completely hydrotreated compared to the sulfided base metal catalyst, which was operated at higher temperature. The liquid product was 42-52% gasoline range molecules and about 43% diesel range molecules. Particulate matter in the phenolic oils complicated operation of the reactors, causing plugging in the fixed-beds especially for the corn stover phenolic oil. This difficulty contrasts with the catalyst bed fouling and plugging, which is typically seen with hydrotreatment of whole bio-oil. This problem was substantially alleviated by filtering the phenolic oils before hydrotreating. More thorough washing of the phenolic oils during their preparation from the heavy ends of bio-oil or on-line filtration of pyrolysis vapors to remove particulate matter before condensation of the bio-oil fractions is recommended.« less

  16. Hydrocarbon Liquid Production via Catalytic Hydroprocessing of Phenolic Oils Fractionated from Fast Pyrolysis of Red Oak and Corn Stover

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Elliott, Douglas C. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Wang, Huamin [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Rover, Majorie [Iowa State University, Ames, IA (United States); Whitmer, Lysle [Iowa State University, Ames, IA (United States); Smith, Ryan [Iowa State University, Ames, IA (United States); Brown, Robert C. [Iowa State University, Ames, IA (United States)

    2015-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Phenolic oils were produced from fast pyrolysis of two different biomass feedstocks, red oak and corn stover and evaluated in hydroprocessing tests for production of liquid hydrocarbon products. The phenolic oils were produced with a bio-oil fractionating process in combination with a simple water wash of the heavy ends from the fractionating process. Phenolic oils derived from the pyrolysis of red oak and corn stover were recovered with yields (wet biomass basis) of 28.7 wt% and 14.9 wt%, respectively, and 54.3% and 58.6% on a carbon basis. Both precious metal catalysts and sulfided base metal catalyst were evaluated for hydrotreating the phenolic oils, as an extrapolation from whole bio-oil hydrotreatment. They were effective in removing heteroatoms with carbon yields as high as 81% (unadjusted for the 90% carbon balance). There was nearly complete heteroatom removal with residual O of only 0.4% to 5%, while N and S were reduced to less than 0.05%. Use of the precious metal catalysts resulted in more saturated products less completely hydrotreated compared to the sulfided base metal catalyst, which was operated at higher temperature. The liquid product was 42-52% gasoline range molecules and about 43% diesel range molecules. Particulate matter in the phenolic oils complicated operation of the reactors, causing plugging in the fixed-beds especially for the corn stover phenolic oil. This difficulty contrasts with the catalyst bed fouling and plugging, which is typically seen with hydrotreatment of whole bio-oil. This problem was substantially alleviated by filtering the phenolic oils before hydrotreating. More thorough washing of the phenolic oils during their preparation from the heavy ends of bio-oil or on-line filtration of pyrolysis vapors to remove particulate matter before condensation of the bio-oil fractions is recommended.

  17. A physiological basis for determining a possible mechanism for migration in Helicoverpa zea (Boddie), the corn earworm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weise, Carolyn Joan

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to the stimulation and capacity of a migratory insect. 13 2. Restraining of the insect in the dissecting dish using modeling clay (a), so that the neck membrane is exposed (b) for the allatectomy procedure... 18 3. Tethered corn earworm moth on a flight mill 19 4... dissecting dish. To restrain the insect, a clay "seat" was molded in the bottom of the dish. The insect was then laid in the seat with its ventral side up and held by placing one strip of clay across the thorax, as illustrated in Figure 2a. The head...

  18. Abbreviated life tables of natural populations of the corn earworm, Heliothis zea (Boddie) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), on peanuts in Comanche and Erath Counties, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sears, Darrell Eugene

    1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for the corn earworm on irrigated peanuts in Comanche and Erath Counti es, Texas, 1973 21 4 Abbreviated natural mortality table for the corn earworm on dryland peanuts in Comanche and Erath Counties, Texas, 1973 23 5 Partial mortality budget for the July...); the cereal leaf beetle, Oulema ~1 ~ (L)(Shed t 1. 1970); th p p1 9 11 , d ~Sa erda inornata Say (Gimbl e and Knight 1970) . In addition, Harcourt (1963) initiated a th) ee-part study on the popu- 1 ti dy i 6 th 6 1 d p t t 6 tl, 6~it decemlineata (Say...

  19. CtIP tetramer assembly is required for DNA-end resection and repair

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davies, Owen R.; Forment, Josep V.; Sun, Meidai; Belotserkovskaya, Rimma; Coates, Julia; Galanty, Yaron; Demir, Mukerrem; Morton, Christopher; Rzechorzek, Neil; Jackson, Stephen P.; Pellegrini, Luca

    2015-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    1     CtIP tetramer assembly is required for DNA-end resection and repair Owen R. Davies1,4*, Josep V. Forment1,2,3*, Meidai Sun1, Rimma Belotserkovskaya1,2, Julia Coates1,2, Yaron Galanty1,2, Mukerrem Demir1,2, Christopher Morton1... that a CtIP tetramer architecture is essential for effective DSB repair by homologous recombination. Keywords CtIP/RBBP8, double-strand DNA break repair, DNA-end resection, gene conversion, homologous recombination. 3...

  20. Iterative image-domain decomposition for dual-energy CT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Niu, Tianye; Dong, Xue; Petrongolo, Michael; Zhu, Lei, E-mail: leizhu@gatech.edu [Nuclear and Radiological Engineering and Medical Physics Programs, The George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States)] [Nuclear and Radiological Engineering and Medical Physics Programs, The George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States)

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Dual energy CT (DECT) imaging plays an important role in advanced imaging applications due to its capability of material decomposition. Direct decomposition via matrix inversion suffers from significant degradation of image signal-to-noise ratios, which reduces clinical values of DECT. Existing denoising algorithms achieve suboptimal performance since they suppress image noise either before or after the decomposition and do not fully explore the noise statistical properties of the decomposition process. In this work, the authors propose an iterative image-domain decomposition method for noise suppression in DECT, using the full variance-covariance matrix of the decomposed images. Methods: The proposed algorithm is formulated in the form of least-square estimation with smoothness regularization. Based on the design principles of a best linear unbiased estimator, the authors include the inverse of the estimated variance-covariance matrix of the decomposed images as the penalty weight in the least-square term. The regularization term enforces the image smoothness by calculating the square sum of neighboring pixel value differences. To retain the boundary sharpness of the decomposed images, the authors detect the edges in the CT images before decomposition. These edge pixels have small weights in the calculation of the regularization term. Distinct from the existing denoising algorithms applied on the images before or after decomposition, the method has an iterative process for noise suppression, with decomposition performed in each iteration. The authors implement the proposed algorithm using a standard conjugate gradient algorithm. The method performance is evaluated using an evaluation phantom (Catphan©600) and an anthropomorphic head phantom. The results are compared with those generated using direct matrix inversion with no noise suppression, a denoising method applied on the decomposed images, and an existing algorithm with similar formulation as the proposed method but with an edge-preserving regularization term. Results: On the Catphan phantom, the method maintains the same spatial resolution on the decomposed images as that of the CT images before decomposition (8 pairs/cm) while significantly reducing their noise standard deviation. Compared to that obtained by the direct matrix inversion, the noise standard deviation in the images decomposed by the proposed algorithm is reduced by over 98%. Without considering the noise correlation properties in the formulation, the denoising scheme degrades the spatial resolution to 6 pairs/cm for the same level of noise suppression. Compared to the edge-preserving algorithm, the method achieves better low-contrast detectability. A quantitative study is performed on the contrast-rod slice of Catphan phantom. The proposed method achieves lower electron density measurement error as compared to that by the direct matrix inversion, and significantly reduces the error variation by over 97%. On the head phantom, the method reduces the noise standard deviation of decomposed images by over 97% without blurring the sinus structures. Conclusions: The authors propose an iterative image-domain decomposition method for DECT. The method combines noise suppression and material decomposition into an iterative process and achieves both goals simultaneously. By exploring the full variance-covariance properties of the decomposed images and utilizing the edge predetection, the proposed algorithm shows superior performance on noise suppression with high image spatial resolution and low-contrast detectability.

  1. Temporal and spectral imaging with micro-CT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnston, Samuel M.; Johnson, G. Allan; Badea, Cristian T. [Center for In Vivo Microscopy, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States)

    2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Micro-CT is widely used for small animal imaging in preclinical studies of cardiopulmonary disease, but further development is needed to improve spatial resolution, temporal resolution, and material contrast. We present a technique for visualizing the changing distribution of iodine in the cardiac cycle with dual source micro-CT. Methods: The approach entails a retrospectively gated dual energy scan with optimized filters and voltages, and a series of computational operations to reconstruct the data. Projection interpolation and five-dimensional bilateral filtration (three spatial dimensions + time + energy) are used to reduce noise and artifacts associated with retrospective gating. We reconstruct separate volumes corresponding to different cardiac phases and apply a linear transformation to decompose these volumes into components representing concentrations of water and iodine. Since the resulting material images are still compromised by noise, we improve their quality in an iterative process that minimizes the discrepancy between the original acquired projections and the projections predicted by the reconstructed volumes. The values in the voxels of each of the reconstructed volumes represent the coefficients of linear combinations of basis functions over time and energy. We have implemented the reconstruction algorithm on a graphics processing unit (GPU) with CUDA. We tested the utility of the technique in simulations and applied the technique in an in vivo scan of a C57BL/6 mouse injected with blood pool contrast agent at a dose of 0.01 ml/g body weight. Postreconstruction, at each cardiac phase in the iodine images, we segmented the left ventricle and computed its volume. Using the maximum and minimum volumes in the left ventricle, we calculated the stroke volume, the ejection fraction, and the cardiac output. Results: Our proposed method produces five-dimensional volumetric images that distinguish different materials at different points in time, and can be used to segment regions containing iodinated blood and compute measures of cardiac function. Conclusions: We believe this combined spectral and temporal imaging technique will be useful for future studies of cardiopulmonary disease in small animals.

  2. Metabolism of carbaryl, chloropyrifos, DDT, and parathion in the European corn borer: effects of microsporidiosis on toxicity and detoxication

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tetreault, G.E.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An investigation was conducted to examine the effects of microsporidiosis on an insect's response to insecticide intoxication. Healthy European corn borer, Ostrinia nubilalis, larvae and those heavily infected with the microsporidian pathogen, Nosema pyrausta, were bioassayed with ten insecticides. The compounds used were carbaryl, carbofuran, chlorophrifos, DDT, diazinon, fonofos, methomyl, parathion, permethrin, and terbufos. Third instar larvae were used for topical bioassays. The compounds carbaryl, carbofuran, chlorophrifos, methomyl and terbufos were found to be significantly more toxic to diseased insects than healthy insects at the 0.05 probability level. To examine the effect of Nosema pyrausta infection on the European corn borer's ability to detoxify insecticides, /sup 14/C ring-labeled carbaryl, chlorophrifos, DDT, and parathion were topically applied to fourth instar larvae. Qualitative differences between healthy and diseased insects were found in the metabolic pathways of carbaryl, DDT, and parathion. The degradative fate of chlorophrifos was the same in both groups. Quantitatively, each insecticide penetrated diseased larvae faster. This resulted in larger amounts of the applied dose of parent compound and metabolites being found in the feces from diseased insects. Conversely, healthy insects had more of these materials present in the body and associated with the cuticle.

  3. Impact of tumor size and tracer uptake heterogeneity in F-FDG PET and CT NonSmall Cell Lung Cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    heterogeneity on various PET uptake delineation approaches. Methods: 25 NSCLC cancer patients with 18F-FDG PET/CT increasingly used for staging Non-small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) (1). In addition, the use of 18 F-FDG PET/CT F-FDG), associated with Computed Tomography (CT) since the development of PET/CT devices, has been

  4. RIS-M-2586 ELASTIC-PLASTIC FRACTURE MECHANICS ANALYSIS OF A CT-SPECIMEN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    RISØ-M-2586 ELASTIC-PLASTIC FRACTURE MECHANICS ANALYSIS OF A CT-SPECIMEN - A TWO-DIMENSIONAL APPROACH Gunner C. Larsen Abstract. This report documents the results obtained from an elastic-plastic

  5. angiographic c-arm ct: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Christchurch Medical School) Summary The MARS-CT team has had great success over the past 6 months with support portfolio. This support underpins the research and development to...

  6. Low-Dose Spiral CT Scans for Early Lung Cancer Detection

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Low-dose spiral computed tomography (CT) scanning is a noninvasive medical imaging test that has been used for the early detection of lung cancer for over 16 years (Sone et al. 1998; Henschke et.al. 1999).

  7. Lung nodule detection in low-dose and high-resolution CT scans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delogu, P; Gori, I; Preite Martínez, A; Retico, A; Tata, A

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We are developing a computer-aided detection (CAD) system for the identification of small pulmonary nodules in screening CT scans. The main modules of our system, i.e. a dot-enhancement filter for nodule candidate selection and a neural classifier for false positive finding reduction, are described. The preliminary results obtained on the so-far collected database of lung CT are discussed.

  8. Semi-automatic delineation using weighted CT-MRI registered images for radiotherapy of nasopharyngeal cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fitton, I. [European Georges Pompidou Hospital, Department of Radiology, 20 rue Leblanc, 75015, Paris (France); Cornelissen, S. A. P. [Image Sciences Institute, UMC, Department of Radiology, P.O. Box 85500, 3508 GA Utrecht (Netherlands); Duppen, J. C.; Rasch, C. R. N.; Herk, M. van [The Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Department of Radiotherapy, Plesmanlaan 121, 1066 CX Amsterdam (Netherlands); Steenbakkers, R. J. H. M. [University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Radiation Oncology, Hanzeplein 1, 9713 GZ Groningen (Netherlands); Peeters, S. T. H. [UZ Gasthuisberg, Herestraat 49, 3000 Leuven, Belgique (Belgium); Hoebers, F. J. P. [Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO clinic), GROW School for Oncology and Development Biology Maastricht, 6229 ET Maastricht (Netherlands); Kaanders, J. H. A. M. [UMC St-Radboud, Department of Radiotherapy, Geert Grooteplein 32, 6525 GA Nijmegen (Netherlands); Nowak, P. J. C. M. [ERASMUS University Medical Center, Department of Radiation Oncology,Groene Hilledijk 301, 3075 EA Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To develop a delineation tool that refines physician-drawn contours of the gross tumor volume (GTV) in nasopharynx cancer, using combined pixel value information from x-ray computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) during delineation. Methods: Operator-guided delineation assisted by a so-called ''snake'' algorithm was applied on weighted CT-MRI registered images. The physician delineates a rough tumor contour that is continuously adjusted by the snake algorithm using the underlying image characteristics. The algorithm was evaluated on five nasopharyngeal cancer patients. Different linear weightings CT and MRI were tested as input for the snake algorithm and compared according to contrast and tumor to noise ratio (TNR). The semi-automatic delineation was compared with manual contouring by seven experienced radiation oncologists. Results: A good compromise for TNR and contrast was obtained by weighing CT twice as strong as MRI. The new algorithm did not notably reduce interobserver variability, it did however, reduce the average delineation time by 6 min per case. Conclusions: The authors developed a user-driven tool for delineation and correction based a snake algorithm and registered weighted CT image and MRI. The algorithm adds morphological information from CT during the delineation on MRI and accelerates the delineation task.

  9. A novel mechanism and kinetic model to explain enhanced xylose yields from dilute sulfuric acid compared to hydrothermal pretreatment of corn stover

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Riverside, University of

    A novel mechanism and kinetic model to explain enhanced xylose yields from dilute sulfuric acid stover Dilute sulfuric acid Hydrothermal pretreatment Kinetic model Xylose a b s t r a c t Pretreatment of corn stover in 0.5% sulfuric acid at 160 °C for 40 min realized a maximum monomeric plus oligomeric

  10. Investment in Corn-Ethanol Plants in the Midwestern United States: An Analysis Using Reduced-Form and Structural Models1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, C.-Y. Cynthia

    1 Investment in Corn-Ethanol Plants in the Midwestern United States: An Analysis Using Reduced-Form and Structural Models1 C.-Y. Cynthia Lin and Karen E. Thome Abstract Ethanol has attracted considerable policy policy and strategic interactions affect decisions about when and where to invest in building new ethanol

  11. Consequences of reproductive barriers for genealogical discordance in the European corn Erik B. Dopman, Luisa Prez, Steven M. Bogdanowicz, and Richard G. Harrison

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dopman, Erik B.

    borer Consequences of reproductive barriers for genealogical discordance in the European corn Erik, see: Notes: #12;Consequences of reproductive barriers for genealogical discordance in the European is often incomplete, gene genealogies will be discordant, and most regions of the genome will display

  12. Determining Fiber and Protein Degradation Rates of Corn Milling (Co)Products and Their Effects on Rumen Bacterial Populations and Lactating Dairy Cow Performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Whitney

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    as within a single ethanol plant (Belyea et al., 2004). As more information about the quality of corn (co)products becomes available, new strategies of (co)product feeding will be developed. Feedstuff processing methods have been shown to affect feed...

  13. Is New Zealand's food supply under threat? What have we learned from the escape of genetically modified (GM) corn throughout New

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickman, Mark

    Is New Zealand's food supply under threat? What have we learned from the escape of genetically. This realization undermines claims that uses of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) outside of the laboratory can modified (GM) corn throughout New Zealand? The most alarming outcome of the recently concluded

  14. Atmospheric deposition, resuspension, and root uptake of Pu in corn and other grain-producing agroecosystems near a nuclear fuel facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pinder, J.E. III; McLeod, K.W.; Adriano, D.C.; Corey, J.C.; Boni, A.L. (Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, Aiken, SC (USA))

    1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Plutonium released to the environment may contribute to dose to humans through inhalation or ingestion of contaminated foodstuffs. Plutonium contamination of agricultural plants may result from interception and retention of atmospheric deposition, resuspension of Pu-bearing soil particles to plant surfaces, and root uptake. Plutonium on vegetation surfaces may be transferred to grain surfaces during mechanical harvesting. Data obtained from corn grown near the U.S. Department of Energy's H-Area nuclear fuel chemical separations facility on the Savannah River Site were used to estimate parameters of a simple model of Pu transport in agroecosystems. The parameter estimates for corn were compared to those previously obtained for wheat and soybeans. Despite some differences in parameter estimates among crops, the relative importances of atmospheric deposition, resuspension, and root uptake were similar among crops. For even small deposition rates, the relative importances of processes for Pu contamination of corn grain should be: transfer of atmospheric deposition from vegetation surfaces to grain surfaces during combining greater than resuspension of soil to grain surfaces greater than root uptake. Approximately 3.9 X 10(-5) of a year's atmospheric deposition is transferred to grain. Approximately 6.2 X 10(-9) of the Pu inventory in the soil is resuspended to corn grain, and a further 7.3 X 10(-10) of the soil Pu inventory is absorbed and translocated to grains.

  15. Atmospheric deposition, resuspension and root uptake of plutonium in corn and other grain-producing agroecosystems near a nuclear fuel facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pinder, J.E. III; McLeod, K.W.; Adriano, D.C. (Savannah River Ecology Lab., Aiken, SC (United States)); Corey, J.C.; Boni, A.L. (Savannah River Lab., Aiken, SC (United States))

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Plutonium released to the environment may contribute to dose to humans through inhalation or ingestion of contaminated foodstuffs. Plutonium contamination of agricultural plants may result from interception and retention of atmospheric deposition, resuspension of Pu-bearing soil particles to plant surfaces, and root uptake and translocation to grain. Plutonium on vegetation surfaces may be transferred to grain surfaces during mechanical harvesting. Data obtained from corn grown near the US Department of Energy's H-Area nuclear fuel chemical separations facility on the Savannah River Site was used to estimated parameters of a simple model of Pu transport in agroecosystems. The parameter estimates for corn were compared to those previously obtained for wheat and soybeans. Despite some differences in parameter estimates among crops, the relative importances of atmospheric deposition, resuspension and root uptake were similar among crops. For even small deposition rates, the relative importances of processes for Pu contamination of corn grain should be: transfer of atmospheric deposition from vegetation surfaces to grain surfaces during combining > resuspension of soil to grain surfaces > root uptake. Approximately 3.9 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} of a year's atmospheric deposition is transferred to grain. Approximately 6.2 {times} 10{sup {minus}9} of the Pu inventory in the soil is resuspended to corn grain, and a further 7.3 {times} 10{sup {minus}10} of the soil inventory is absorbed by roots and translocated to grains.

  16. Atmospheric deposition, resuspension and root uptake of plutonium in corn and other grain-producing agroecosystems near a nuclear fuel facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pinder, J.E. III; McLeod, K.W.; Adriano, D.C. [Savannah River Ecology Lab., Aiken, SC (United States); Corey, J.C.; Boni, A.L. [Savannah River Lab., Aiken, SC (United States)

    1989-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Plutonium released to the environment may contribute to dose to humans through inhalation or ingestion of contaminated foodstuffs. Plutonium contamination of agricultural plants may result from interception and retention of atmospheric deposition, resuspension of Pu-bearing soil particles to plant surfaces, and root uptake and translocation to grain. Plutonium on vegetation surfaces may be transferred to grain surfaces during mechanical harvesting. Data obtained from corn grown near the US Department of Energy`s H-Area nuclear fuel chemical separations facility on the Savannah River Site was used to estimated parameters of a simple model of Pu transport in agroecosystems. The parameter estimates for corn were compared to those previously obtained for wheat and soybeans. Despite some differences in parameter estimates among crops, the relative importances of atmospheric deposition, resuspension and root uptake were similar among crops. For even small deposition rates, the relative importances of processes for Pu contamination of corn grain should be: transfer of atmospheric deposition from vegetation surfaces to grain surfaces during combining > resuspension of soil to grain surfaces > root uptake. Approximately 3.9 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} of a year`s atmospheric deposition is transferred to grain. Approximately 6.2 {times} 10{sup {minus}9} of the Pu inventory in the soil is resuspended to corn grain, and a further 7.3 {times} 10{sup {minus}10} of the soil inventory is absorbed by roots and translocated to grains.

  17. Regional-Scale Assessment of Nitrous Oxide Emissions within the US Corn Belt: The Impact of Precipitation and Agricultural Drainage on Indirect Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Regional-Scale Assessment of Nitrous Oxide Emissions within the US Corn Belt: The Impact of Precipitation and Agricultural Drainage on Indirect Emissions Tim Griffis1, Xuhui Lee2, John Baker3, Peter, but mitigation strategies have been limited by the large uncertainties in both direct and indirect emission

  18. Instructions for Corning Model 220 pH Meter The electrode tip is a fragile glass bulb. Be careful or you will break it with a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cross, George

    Instructions for Corning Model 220 pH Meter The electrode tip is a fragile glass bulb. Be careful a polymer body electrode can create sufficient internal pressure to "explode" the glass bulb. When of cotton in the plastic electrode cover sleeve, add pH 7 buffer, and insert the electrode bulb

  19. Lung Dose Calculation With SPECT/CT for {sup 90}Yittrium Radioembolization of Liver Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, Naichang, E-mail: yun@ccf.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Srinivas, Shaym M.; DiFilippo, Frank P.; Shrikanthan, Sankaran [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States)] [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Levitin, Abraham; McLennan, Gordon; Spain, James [Department of Interventional Radiology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States)] [Department of Interventional Radiology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Xia, Ping; Wilkinson, Allan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To propose a new method to estimate lung mean dose (LMD) using technetium-99m labeled macroaggregated albumin ({sup 99m}Tc-MAA) single photon emission CT (SPECT)/CT for {sup 90}Yttrium radioembolization of liver tumors and to compare the LMD estimated using SPECT/CT with clinical estimates of LMD using planar gamma scintigraphy (PS). Methods and Materials: Images of 71 patients who had SPECT/CT and PS images of {sup 99m}Tc-MAA acquired before TheraSphere radioembolization of liver cancer were analyzed retrospectively. LMD was calculated from the PS-based lung shunt assuming a lung mass of 1 kg and 50 Gy per GBq of injected activity shunted to the lung. For the SPECT/CT-based estimate, the LMD was calculated with the activity concentration and lung volume derived from SPECT/CT. The effect of attenuation correction and the patient's breathing on the calculated LMD was studied with the SPECT/CT. With these effects correctly taken into account in a more rigorous fashion, we compared the LMD calculated with SPECT/CT with the LMD calculated with PS. Results: The mean dose to the central region of the lung leads to a more accurate estimate of LMD. Inclusion of the lung region around the diaphragm in the calculation leads to an overestimate of LMD due to the misregistration of the liver activity to the lung from the patient's breathing. LMD calculated based on PS is a poor predictor of the actual LMD. For the subpopulation with large lung shunt, the mean overestimation from the PS method for the lung shunt was 170%. Conclusions: A new method of calculating the LMD for TheraSphere and SIR-Spheres radioembolization of liver cancer based on {sup 99m}Tc-MAA SPECT/CT is presented. The new method provides a more accurate estimate of radiation risk to the lungs. For patients with a large lung shunt calculated from PS, a recalculation of LMD based on SPECT/CT is recommended.

  20. MRI-based treatment planning with pseudo CT generated through atlas registration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uh, Jinsoo, E-mail: jinsoo.uh@stjude.org; Merchant, Thomas E.; Hua, Chiaho [Department of Radiological Sciences, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee 38105 (United States)] [Department of Radiological Sciences, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee 38105 (United States); Li, Yimei; Li, Xingyu [Department of Biostatistics, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee 38105 (United States)] [Department of Biostatistics, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee 38105 (United States)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility and accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based treatment planning using pseudo CTs generated through atlas registration. Methods: A pseudo CT, providing electron density information for dose calculation, was generated by deforming atlas CT images previously acquired on other patients. The authors tested 4 schemes of synthesizing a pseudo CT from single or multiple deformed atlas images: use of a single arbitrarily selected atlas, arithmetic mean process using 6 atlases, and pattern recognition with Gaussian process (PRGP) using 6 or 12 atlases. The required deformation for atlas CT images was derived from a nonlinear registration of conjugated atlas MR images to that of the patient of interest. The contrasts of atlas MR images were adjusted by histogram matching to reduce the effect of different sets of acquisition parameters. For comparison, the authors also tested a simple scheme assigning the Hounsfield unit of water to the entire patient volume. All pseudo CT generating schemes were applied to 14 patients with common pediatric brain tumors. The image similarity of real patient-specific CT and pseudo CTs constructed by different schemes was compared. Differences in computation times were also calculated. The real CT in the treatment planning system was replaced with the pseudo CT, and the dose distribution was recalculated to determine the difference. Results: The atlas approach generally performed better than assigning a bulk CT number to the entire patient volume. Comparing atlas-based schemes, those using multiple atlases outperformed the single atlas scheme. For multiple atlas schemes, the pseudo CTs were similar to the real CTs (correlation coefficient, 0.787–0.819). The calculated dose distribution was in close agreement with the original dose. Nearly the entire patient volume (98.3%–98.7%) satisfied the criteria of chi-evaluation (<2% maximum dose and 2 mm range). The dose to 95% of the volume and the percentage of volume receiving at least 95% of the prescription dose in the planning target volume differed from the original values by less than 2% of the prescription dose (root-mean-square, RMS < 1%). The PRGP scheme did not perform better than the arithmetic mean process with the same number of atlases. Increasing the number of atlases from 6 to 12 often resulted in improvements, but statistical significance was not always found. Conclusions: MRI-based treatment planning with pseudo CTs generated through atlas registration is feasible for pediatric brain tumor patients. The doses calculated from pseudo CTs agreed well with those from real CTs, showing dosimetric accuracy within 2% for the PTV when multiple atlases were used. The arithmetic mean process may be a reasonable choice over PRGP for the synthesis scheme considering performance and computational costs.

  1. The effects of Biozyme on the germination and emergence of bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) and sweet corn (Zea mays L.) seeds under suboptimal temperatures, pesticide overdose, and salinity stress 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Campos Cruz, Armando

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE EFFECTS OF BIOZYME? ON THE GERMINATION AND EMERGENCE OF BEAN (Phaseolus vulgaris L) AND SWEET CORN (Zea mays L. ) SEEDS UNDER SUBOPTIMAL TEMPERATURES, PESTICIDE OVERDOSE, AND SALINITY STRESS A Thesis by ARMANDO CAMPOS CRUZ Submitted... vulgaris L) AND SWEET CORN (Zea mays I ) SEEDS UNDER SUBOPTIMAL TEMPERATURES, PESTICIDE OVERDOSE, AND SALINITY STRESS A Thesis by ARMANDO CAMPOS CRUZ Submitted to Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree...

  2. Brachial Plexus Injury from CT-Guided RF Ablation Under General Anesthesia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shankar, Sridhar, E-mail: shankars@ummhc.org; Sonnenberg, Eric van; Silverman, Stuart G.; Tuncali, Kemal [Brigham and Women's Hospital, Department of Radiology (United States); Flanagan, Hugh L. [Brigham and Women's Hospital, Department of Anesthesia (United States); Whang, Edward E. [Brigham and Women's Hospital, Department of Surgery (United States)

    2005-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Brachial plexus injury in a patient under general anesthesia (GA) is not uncommon, despite careful positioning and, particularly, awareness of the possibility. The mechanism of injury is stretching and compression of the brachial plexus over a prolonged period. Positioning the patient within the computed tomography (CT) gantry for abdominal or chest procedures can simulate a surgical procedure, particularly when GA is used. The potential for brachial plexus injury is increased if the case is prolonged and the patient's arms are raised above the head to avoid CT image degradation from streak artifacts. We report a case of profound brachial plexus palsy following a CT-guided radiofrequency ablation procedure under GA. Fortunately, the patient recovered completely. We emphasize the mechanism of injury and detail measures to combat this problem, such that radiologists are aware of this potentially serious complication.

  3. Application of the optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) technique for mouse dosimetry in micro-CT imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vrigneaud, Jean-Marc; Courteau, Alan; Oudot, Alexandra; Collin, Bertrand [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Centre Georges-François Leclerc, 1 rue Professeur Marion, Dijon 21079 Cedex (France)] [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Centre Georges-François Leclerc, 1 rue Professeur Marion, Dijon 21079 Cedex (France); Ranouil, Julien [Landauer Europe, 33 avenue du Général Leclerc, Fontenay-aux-Roses 92266 Cedex (France)] [Landauer Europe, 33 avenue du Général Leclerc, Fontenay-aux-Roses 92266 Cedex (France); Morgand, Loïc; Raguin, Olivier [Oncodesign, 20 rue Jean Mazen, Dijon 21076 Cedex (France)] [Oncodesign, 20 rue Jean Mazen, Dijon 21076 Cedex (France); Walker, Paul [LE2i CNRS UMR 5158, Faculty of Medicine, BP 87900, 21079 Dijon Cedex (France)] [LE2i CNRS UMR 5158, Faculty of Medicine, BP 87900, 21079 Dijon Cedex (France); Brunotte, François [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Centre Georges-François Leclerc, 1 rue Professeur Marion, Dijon 21079 Cedex, France and LE2i CNRS UMR 5158, Faculty of Medicine, BP 87900, 21079 Dijon Cedex (France)] [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Centre Georges-François Leclerc, 1 rue Professeur Marion, Dijon 21079 Cedex, France and LE2i CNRS UMR 5158, Faculty of Medicine, BP 87900, 21079 Dijon Cedex (France)

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Micro-CT is considered to be a powerful tool to investigate various models of disease on anesthetized animals. In longitudinal studies, the radiation dose delivered by the micro-CT to the same animal is a major concern as it could potentially induce spurious effects in experimental results. Optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters (OSLDs) are a relatively new kind of detector used in radiation dosimetry for medical applications. The aim of this work was to assess the dose delivered by the CT component of a micro-SPECT (single-photon emission computed tomography)/CT camera during a typical whole-body mouse study, using commercially available OSLDs based on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C crystals.Methods: CTDI (computed tomography dose index) was measured in micro-CT with a properly calibrated pencil ionization chamber using a rat-like phantom (60 mm in diameter) and a mouse-like phantom (30 mm in diameter). OSLDs were checked for reproducibility and linearity in the range of doses delivered by the micro-CT. Dose measurements obtained with OSLDs were compared to those of the ionization chamber to correct for the radiation quality dependence of OSLDs in the low-kV range. Doses to tissue were then investigated in phantoms and cadavers. A 30 mm diameter phantom, specifically designed to insert OSLDs, was used to assess radiation dose over a typical whole-body mouse imaging study. Eighteen healthy female BALB/c mice weighing 27.1 ± 0.8 g (1 SD) were euthanized for small animal measurements. OLSDs were placed externally or implanted internally in nine different locations by an experienced animal technician. Five commonly used micro-CT protocols were investigated.Results: CTDI measurements were between 78.0 ± 2.1 and 110.7 ± 3.0 mGy for the rat-like phantom and between 169.3 ± 4.6 and 203.6 ± 5.5 mGy for the mouse-like phantom. On average, the displayed CTDI at the operator console was underestimated by 1.19 for the rat-like phantom and 2.36 for the mouse-like phantom. OSLDs exhibited a reproducibility of 2.4% and good linearity was found between 60 and 450 mGy. The energy scaling factor was calculated to be between 1.80 ± 0.16 and 1.86 ± 0.16, depending on protocol used. In phantoms, mean doses to tissue over a whole-body CT examination were ranging from 186.4 ± 7.6 to 234.9 ± 7.1 mGy. In mice, mean doses to tissue in the mouse trunk (thorax, abdomen, pelvis, and flanks) were between 213.0 ± 17.0 and 251.2 ± 13.4 mGy. Skin doses (3 OSLDs) were much higher with average doses between 350.6 ± 25.3 and 432.5 ± 34.1 mGy. The dose delivered during a topogram was found to be below 10 mGy. Use of the multimouse bed of the system gave a significantly 20%–40% lower dose per animal (p < 0.05).Conclusions: Absorbed doses in micro-CT were found to be relatively high. In micro-SPECT/CT imaging, the micro-CT unit is mainly used to produce a localization frame. As a result, users should pay attention to adjustable CT parameters so as to minimize the radiation dose and avoid any adverse radiation effects which may interfere with biological parameters studied.

  4. Comparison of MRI-based and CT/MRI fusion-based postimplant dosimetric analysis of prostate brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tanaka, Osamu [Department of Radiology, Gifu University School of Medicine, Gifu City (Japan)]. E-mail: osa-mu@umin.ac.jp; Hayashi, Shinya [Department of Radiology, Gifu University School of Medicine, Gifu City (Japan); Matsuo, Masayuki [Department of Radiology, Gifu University School of Medicine, Gifu City (Japan); Sakurai, Kota [Department of Radiology, Gifu University School of Medicine, Gifu City (Japan); Department of Urology, Gifu University School of Medicine, Gifu City (Japan); Nakano, Masahiro [Department of Urology, Gifu University School of Medicine, Gifu City (Japan); Maeda, Sunaho [Department of Radiology, Gifu University School of Medicine, Gifu City (Japan); Kajita, Kimihiro R.T. [Department of Radiology, Gifu University School of Medicine, Gifu City (Japan); Deguchi, Takashi [Department of Urology, Gifu University School of Medicine, Gifu City (Japan); Hoshi, Hiroaki [Department of Radiology, Gifu University School of Medicine, Gifu City (Japan)

    2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to compare the outcomes between magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based and computed tomography (CT)/MRI fusion-based postimplant dosimetry methods in permanent prostate brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Between October 2004 and March 2006, a total of 52 consecutive patients with prostate cancer were treated by brachytherapy, and postimplant dosimetry was performed using CT/MRI fusion. The accuracy and reproducibility were prospectively compared between MRI-based dosimetry and CT/MRI fusion-based dosimetry based on the dose-volume histogram (DVH) related parameters as recommended by the American Brachytherapy Society. Results: The prostate volume was 15.97 {+-} 6.17 cc (mean {+-} SD) in MRI-based dosimetry, and 15.97 {+-} 6.02 cc in CT/MRI fusion-based dosimetry without statistical difference. The prostate V100 was 94.5% and 93.0% in MRI-based and CT/MRI fusion-based dosimetry, respectively, and the difference was statistically significant (p = 0.002). The prostate D90 was 119.4% and 114.4% in MRI-based and CT/MRI fusion-based dosimetry, respectively, and the difference was statistically significant (p = 0.004). Conclusion: Our current results suggested that, as with fusion images, MR images allowed accurate contouring of the organs, but they tended to overestimate the analysis of postimplant dosimetry in comparison to CT/MRI fusion images. Although this MRI-based dosimetric discrepancy was negligible, MRI-based dosimetry was acceptable and reproducible in comparison to CT-based dosimetry, because the difference between MRI-based and CT/MRI fusion-based results was smaller than that between CT-based and CT/MRI fusion-based results as previously reported.

  5. Dynamic cone beam CT angiography of carotid and cerebral arteries using canine model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cai Weixing; Zhao Binghui; Conover, David; Liu Jiangkun; Ning Ruola [Department of Imaging Sciences, University of Rochester, 601 Elmwood Avenue, Rochester, New York 14642 (United States); Department of Radiology, Shanghai 6th People's Hospital, 600 Yishan Road, Xuhui, Shanghai (China); Koning Corporation, Lennox Tech Enterprise Center, 150 Lucius Gordon Drive Suite 112, West Henrietta, New York 14586 (United States); Department of Imaging Sciences, University of Rochester, 601 Elmwood Avenue, Rochester, New York 14642 (United States); Department of Imaging Sciences, University of Rochester, 601 Elmwood Avenue, Rochester, New York 14642 (United States) and Koning Corporation, Lennox Tech Enterprise Center, 150 Lucius Gordon Drive Suite 112, West Henrietta, New York 14586 (United States)

    2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: This research is designed to develop and evaluate a flat-panel detector-based dynamic cone beam CT system for dynamic angiography imaging, which is able to provide both dynamic functional information and dynamic anatomic information from one multirevolution cone beam CT scan. Methods: A dynamic cone beam CT scan acquired projections over four revolutions within a time window of 40 s after contrast agent injection through a femoral vein to cover the entire wash-in and wash-out phases. A dynamic cone beam CT reconstruction algorithm was utilized and a novel recovery method was developed to correct the time-enhancement curve of contrast flow. From the same data set, both projection-based subtraction and reconstruction-based subtraction approaches were utilized and compared to remove the background tissues and visualize the 3D vascular structure to provide the dynamic anatomic information. Results: Through computer simulations, the new recovery algorithm for dynamic time-enhancement curves was optimized and showed excellent accuracy to recover the actual contrast flow. Canine model experiments also indicated that the recovered time-enhancement curves from dynamic cone beam CT imaging agreed well with that of an IV-digital subtraction angiography (DSA) study. The dynamic vascular structures reconstructed using both projection-based subtraction and reconstruction-based subtraction were almost identical as the differences between them were comparable to the background noise level. At the enhancement peak, all the major carotid and cerebral arteries and the Circle of Willis could be clearly observed. Conclusions: The proposed dynamic cone beam CT approach can accurately recover the actual contrast flow, and dynamic anatomic imaging can be obtained with high isotropic 3D resolution. This approach is promising for diagnosis and treatment planning of vascular diseases and strokes.

  6. Performance characterization of the Caltech corn act torus injector P. K. Loewenhardt,a) M. R. Browqb) J. Yee, and P. M. Bellan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Michael R.

    A compact torus (CT), or spheromak, is a toroidal mag- netofluid configuration in which plasma is cot tokamak by the Caltech Spheromak Ijec- tion experiment to study helicity injection and refueling,3

  7. Radiation dose reduction in medical CT through equally sloped tomography Benjamin P. Fahimian1,2,6

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soatto, Stefano

    Council on Radiation Protection & Measurements10 , CT accounts for about 15% of the total radiological50Radiation dose reduction in medical CT through equally sloped tomography Benjamin P. Fahimian1 Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 3 Biomedical Physics

  8. A method for measuring joint kinematics designed for accurate registration of kinematic data to models constructed from CT data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischer, Kenneth J.; Manson, T. T.; Pfaeffle, H. J.; Tomaino, M. M.; Woo, S. L-Y

    2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for position and 0.1 degrees for orientation for linkage digitization and better than +/- 0.2 mm and +/- 0.2 degrees for CT digitization. Surface models of the radius and ulna were constructed from CT data, as an example application. Kinematics of the bones...

  9. USPSTF Recommends Low-Dose CT Screening for Heavy Smoke Published on Cancer Network (http://www.cancernetwork.com)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Serfling, Robert

    remains the leading cause of cancer death in the United States, and is the third most common of all radiography, and found an overall reduction in death from any cause in the CT group of 6.7% (95% CI, 1, lie largely in the high rates of false positives. A total of 96.4% of the positive low-dose CT results

  10. 2002 IEEE NSS/MIC pCT: Hartmut F.-W. Sadrozinski , SCIPP Towards Proton Computed Tomography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    2002 IEEE NSS/MIC pCT: Hartmut F.-W. Sadrozinski , SCIPP SCIPPSCIPP Towards Proton Computed Tomography L. R. Johnson, B. Keeney, G. Ross, H. F.-W. Sadrozinski, A. Seiden, D.C. Williams, L. Zhang Santa Radiography MC Study #12;2002 IEEE NSS/MIC pCT: Hartmut F.-W. Sadrozinski , SCIPP SCIPPSCIPP Computed

  11. Manifold Learning for 4D CT Reconstruction of the Lung Manfred Georg*, Richard Souvenir, Andrew Hope, Robert Pless*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pless, Robert

    Manifold Learning for 4D CT Reconstruction of the Lung Manfred Georg*, Richard Souvenir, Andrew, Canada Andrew.Hope@rmp.uhn.on.ca Abstract Computed Tomography is used to create models of lung dynamics because it provides high contrast images of lung tissue. Creating 4D CT models which capture dynamics

  12. Evaluation of lysine deficient grower diets for heavy breed replacement pullets and a comparison of sorghum grains and corn as a carbohydrate source for broiler-breeder hens

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tolan, Alan

    1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EVALUATION OF LYSINE DEFICIENT GROWER DIETS FOR HEAVY BREED REPLACEMENT PULLETS AND A COMPARISON OF SORGHUM GRAINS AND CORN AS A CARBOHYDRATE SOURCE FOR BROILER-BREEDER HENS A Thesis ALAN TOLAN Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas... ARM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE January 1967 Major Subject: Animal Nutrition EVALUATION OF LYSINE DEFICIENT GROWER DIETS FOR HEAVY BREED REPLACEMENT PULLETS AND A COMPARISON OF SORGHUM...

  13. Analyzing the Effect of Variations in Soil and Management Practices on the Sustainability of Corn Stover-Based Bioethanol Production in Mississippi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woli, Prem; Paz, Joel

    2011-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The inherent variability in corn stover productivity due to variations in soils and crop management practices might contribute to a variation in corn stover-based bioethanol sustainability. This study was carried out to examine how changes in soil types and crop management options would affect corn stover yield (CSY) and the sustainability of the stover-based ethanol production in the Delta region of Mississippi. Based on potential acreage and geographical representation, three locations were selected. Using CERES-Maize model, stover yields were simulated for several scenarios of soils and crop management options. Based on 'net energy value (NEV)' computed from CSYs, a sustainability indicator for stover-based bioethanol production was established. The effects of soils and crop management options on CSY and NEV were determined using ANOVA tests and regression analyses. Both CSY and NEV were significantly different across sandy loam, silt loam, and silty clay loam soils and also across high-, mid-, and low-yielding cultivars. With an increase in irrigation level, both CSY and NEV increased initially and decreased after reaching a peak. A third-degree polynomial relationship was found between planting date and CSY and NEV each. By moving from the lowest to the highest production scenario, values of CSY and NEV could be increased by 86 to 553%, depending on location and weather condition. The effects of variations in soils and crop management options on NEV were the same as on CSY. The NEV was positive for all scenarios, indicating that corn stover-based ethanol production system in the Delta region is sustainable.

  14. Direct application of west coast geothermal resources in a wet corn milling plant supplementary analyses and information dissemination. Final report, addendum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    In an extension to the scope of the previous studies, supplementary analyses were to be performed for both plants which would assess the economics of geothermal energy if coal had been the primary fuel rather than oil and gas. The studies include: supplementary analysis for a coal fired wet corn milling plant, supplementary analysis for an East Coast frozen food plant with coal fired boilers, and information dissemination activities.

  15. Does dual-energy CT of lower-extremity tendons incur penalties in patient radiation exposure or reduced multiplanar reconstruction image quality?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    diagnostic value of dual-energy CT and MRI in the detectionusing dual-source dual-energy MDCT: Results of JAFROCfor dose reduction in dual energy hepatic CT using non-

  16. Multimodal Vessel Visualization of Mouse Aorta PET/CT Scans Timo Ropinski, Member, IEEE, Sven Hermann, Rainer Reich, Michael Schafers, and Klaus Hinrichs, Member, IEEE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hinrichs, Klaus

    Multimodal Vessel Visualization of Mouse Aorta PET/CT Scans Timo Ropinski, Member, IEEE, Sven present a visualization system for the visual analysis of PET/CT scans of aortic arches of mice

  17. Concurrent segmentation of the prostate on MRI and CT via linked statistical shape models for radiotherapy planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chowdhury, Najeeb; Toth, Robert; Chappelow, Jonathan; Kim, Sung; Motwani, Sabin; Punekar, Salman; Lin Haibo; Both, Stefan; Vapiwala, Neha; Hahn, Stephen; Madabhushi, Anant

    2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Prostate gland segmentation is a critical step in prostate radiotherapy planning, where dose plans are typically formulated on CT. Pretreatment MRI is now beginning to be acquired at several medical centers. Delineation of the prostate on MRI is acknowledged as being significantly simpler to perform, compared to delineation on CT. In this work, the authors present a novel framework for building a linked statistical shape model (LSSM), a statistical shape model (SSM) that links the shape variation of a structure of interest (SOI) across multiple imaging modalities. This framework is particularly relevant in scenarios where accurate boundary delineations of the SOI on one of the modalities may not be readily available, or difficult to obtain, for training a SSM. In this work the authors apply the LSSM in the context of multimodal prostate segmentation for radiotherapy planning, where the prostate is concurrently segmented on MRI and CT. Methods: The framework comprises a number of logically connected steps. The first step utilizes multimodal registration of MRI and CT to map 2D boundary delineations of the prostate from MRI onto corresponding CT images, for a set of training studies. Hence, the scheme obviates the need for expert delineations of the gland on CT for explicitly constructing a SSM for prostate segmentation on CT. The delineations of the prostate gland on MRI and CT allows for 3D reconstruction of the prostate shape which facilitates the building of the LSSM. In order to perform concurrent prostate MRI and CT segmentation using the LSSM, the authors employ a region-based level set approach where the authors deform the evolving prostate boundary to simultaneously fit to MRI and CT images in which voxels are classified to be either part of the prostate or outside the prostate. The classification is facilitated by using a combination of MRI-CT probabilistic spatial atlases and a random forest classifier, driven by gradient and Haar features. Results: The authors acquire a total of 20 MRI-CT patient studies and use the leave-one-out strategy to train and evaluate four different LSSMs. First, a fusion-based LSSM (fLSSM) is built using expert ground truth delineations of the prostate on MRI alone, where the ground truth for the gland on CT is obtained via coregistration of the corresponding MRI and CT slices. The authors compare the fLSSM against another LSSM (xLSSM), where expert delineations of the gland on both MRI and CT are employed in the model building; xLSSM representing the idealized LSSM. The authors also compare the fLSSM against an exclusive CT-based SSM (ctSSM), built from expert delineations of the gland on CT alone. In addition, two LSSMs trained using trainee delineations (tLSSM) on CT are compared with the fLSSM. The results indicate that the xLSSM, tLSSMs, and the fLSSM perform equivalently, all of them out-performing the ctSSM. Conclusions: The fLSSM provides an accurate alternative to SSMs that require careful expert delineations of the SOI that may be difficult or laborious to obtain. Additionally, the fLSSM has the added benefit of providing concurrent segmentations of the SOI on multiple imaging modalities.

  18. SU-E-J-86: Lobar Lung Function Quantification by PET Galligas and CT Ventilation Imaging in Lung Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eslick, E; Kipritidis, J; Keall, P [University of Sydney, Camperdown, NSW (Australia); Bailey, D; Bailey, E [Royal North Shore Hospital, St. Leonards, NSW (Australia)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to quantify the lobar lung function using the novel PET Galligas ([68Ga]-carbon nanoparticle) ventilation imaging and the investigational CT ventilation imaging in lung cancer patients pre-treatment. Methods: We present results on our first three lung cancer patients (2 male, mean age 78 years) as part of an ongoing ethics approved study. For each patient a PET Galligas ventilation (PET-V) image and a pair of breath hold CT images (end-exhale and end-inhale tidal volumes) were acquired using a Siemens Biograph PET CT. CT-ventilation (CT-V) images were created from the pair of CT images using deformable image registration (DIR) algorithms and the Hounsfield Unit (HU) ventilation metric. A comparison of ventilation quantification from each modality was done on the lobar level and the voxel level. A Bland-Altman plot was used to assess the difference in mean percentage contribution of each lobe to the total lung function between the two modalities. For each patient, a voxel-wise Spearmans correlation was calculated for the whole lungs between the two modalities. Results: The Bland-Altman plot demonstrated strong agreement between PET-V and CT-V for assessment of lobar function (r=0.99, p<0.001; range mean difference: ?5.5 to 3.0). The correlation between PET-V and CT-V at the voxel level was moderate(r=0.60, p<0.001). Conclusion: This preliminary study on the three patients data sets demonstrated strong agreement between PET and CT ventilation imaging for the assessment of pre-treatment lung function at the lobar level. Agreement was only moderate at the level of voxel correlations. These results indicate that CT ventilation imaging has potential for assessing pre-treatment lobar lung function in lung cancer patients.

  19. Soft Tissue Visualization Using a Highly Efficient Megavoltage Cone Beam CT Imaging System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pouliot, Jean

    Soft Tissue Visualization Using a Highly Efficient Megavoltage Cone Beam CT Imaging System Farhad A developed an imaging system that is optimized for MV and can acquire Megavoltage CBCT images containing soft through the detector. #12;The ability of an x-ray imaging system to differentiate soft tissues is affected

  20. Lobe-based Estimating Ventilation and Perfusion from 3D CT scans of the Lungs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Warren, Joe

    Lobe-based Estimating Ventilation and Perfusion from 3D CT scans of the Lungs Travis McPhail Joe are the ventilation (air flow) and perfusion (blood flow) in the patient's lungs. Given the flow of air and blood as possible. The current state of the art technology for assessing the ventilation in a patient's lungs

  1. CLASSIFICATION OF BIOMEDICAL HIGH-RESOLUTION MICRO-CT IMAGES FOR DIRECT VOLUME RENDERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    López-Sánchez, Maite

    CLASSIFICATION OF BIOMEDICAL HIGH-RESOLUTION MICRO-CT IMAGES FOR DIRECT VOLUME RENDERING Maite L,cerquide,davidm,anna}@maia.ub.es ABSTRACT This paper introduces a machine learning approach into the process of direct volume rendering that generates the classification func- tion within the optical property function used for rendering. Briefly

  2. The feasibility of head motion tracking in helical CT: A step toward motion correction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Jung-Ha [Medical Radiation Sciences, University of Sydney, NSW 2141 (Australia); Nuyts, Johan [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Katholieke Universiteit, Leuven, Belgium and Medical Imaging Research Center, Katholieke Universiteit, Leuven (Belgium); Kuncic, Zdenka [School of Physics, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Fulton, Roger [Medical Radiation Sciences, University of Sydney, NSW 2141 (Australia); School of Physics, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Department of Medical Physics, Westmead Hospital, Westmead, NSW 2145 (Australia)

    2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To establish a practical and accurate motion tracking method for the development of rigid motion correction methods in helical x-ray computed tomography (CT). Methods: A commercially available optical motion tracking system provided 6 degrees of freedom pose measurements at 60 Hz. A 4 Multiplication-Sign 4 calibration matrix was determined to convert raw pose data acquired in tracker coordinates to a fixed CT coordinate system with origin at the isocenter of the scanner. Two calibration methods, absolute orientation (AO), and a new method based on image registration (IR), were compared by means of landmark analysis and correlation coefficient in phantom images coregistered using the derived motion transformations. Results: Transformations calculated using the IR-derived calibration matrix were found to be more accurate, with positional errors less than 0.5 mm (mean RMS), and highly correlated image voxel intensities. The AO-derived calibration matrix yielded larger mean RMS positional errors ( Asymptotically-Equal-To 1.0 mm), and poorer correlation coefficients. Conclusions: The authors have demonstrated the feasibility of accurate motion tracking for retrospective motion correction in helical CT. Their new IR-based calibration method based on image registration and function minimization was simpler to perform and delivered more accurate calibration matrices. This technique is a useful tool for future work on rigid motion correction in helical CT and potentially also other imaging modalities.

  3. Hydro-thermal flow in a rough fracture EC Contract SES6-CT-2003-502706

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmittbuhl, Jean

    Hydro-thermal flow in a rough fracture EC Contract SES6-CT-2003-502706 PARTICIPANT ORGANIZATION NAME: CNRS Synthetic 2nd year report Related with Work Package............ HYDRO-THERMAL FLOW in the influence of a realistic geometry of the fracture on its hydro-thermal response. Several studies have

  4. Interactive Separation of Segmented Bones in CT Volumes Using Graph Cut

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ju, Tao

    mask customized to the shape of the bone, such as the femoral head. However, creat- ing masks for bones of different methodology have been reported for bone segmen- tation (see a recent survey in [1]). DueInteractive Separation of Segmented Bones in CT Volumes Using Graph Cut Lu Liu, David Raber, David

  5. DAWN: A JOURNEY TO THE BEGINNING OF THE SOLAR SYSTEM C.T. Russell(1)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zuber, Maria

    -ray/neutron spectrometer, a magnetometer and a gravity investigation. Dawn uses solar arrays to power its xenon ion engine solar panels roughly 21 m tip-to-tip, a 5 m magnetometer boom and three ion thrusters, one of whichDAWN: A JOURNEY TO THE BEGINNING OF THE SOLAR SYSTEM C.T. Russell(1) , A. Coradini(2) , W

  6. Lee, C-T A Laser Ablation Data Reduction 2006 LASER ABLATION ICP-MS: DATA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Cin-Ty Aeolus

    Lee, C-T A Laser Ablation Data Reduction 2006 1 LASER ABLATION ICP-MS: DATA REDUCTION Cin-Ty A. Lee 24 September 2006 Analysis and calculation of concentrations Laser ablation analyses are done in time by turning on the laser and ablating the sample, generating a time-dependent signal (Fig. 1). Measurements

  7. jCT: A Java Code Tomograph Markus Lumpe, Samiran Mahmud, and Olga Goloshchapova

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lumpe, Markus

    jCT: A Java Code Tomograph Markus Lumpe, Samiran Mahmud, and Olga Goloshchapova Faculty,smahmud,ogoloshchapova}@swin.edu.au Abstract--We are concerned with analyzing software, in par- ticular, with its nature and how developer software engineering where measurement seeks to capture attributes affecting the product, process

  8. SCIPP 06/04 1 Prototype Tracking Studies for Proton CT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    SCIPP 06/04 1 Prototype Tracking Studies for Proton CT Nate Blumenkrantz, Jason Feldt, Jason the feasibility of proton computed tomography, the most likely path (MLP) of protons inside an absorber resolution. The locations of 200 MeV protons were measured at three different absorber depth of PMMA (3.75, 6

  9. Development of a proton Computed Tomography (pCT) scanner at NIU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Uzunyan, S A; Boi, S; Coutrakon, G; Dyshkant, A; Erdelyi, B; Gearhart, A; Hedin, D; Johnson, E; Krider, J; Zutshi, V; Ford, R; Fitzpatrick, T; Sellberg, G; Rauch, J E; Roman, M; Rubinov, P; Wilson, P; Lalwani, K; Naimuddin, M

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe the development of a proton Computed Tomography (pCT) scanner at Northern Illinois University (NIU) in collaboration with Fermilab and Delhi University. This paper provides an overview of major components of the scanner and a detailed description of the data acquisition system (DAQ).

  10. Development of a proton Computed Tomography (pCT) scanner at NIU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. A. Uzunyan; G. Blazey; S. Boi; G. Coutrakon; A. Dyshkant; B. Erdelyi; A. Gearhart; D. Hedin; E. Johnson; J. Krider; V. Zutshi; R. Ford; T. Fitzpatrick; G. Sellberg; J. E. Rauch; M. Roman; P. Rubinov; P. Wilson; K. Lalwani; M. Naimuddin

    2013-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe the development of a proton Computed Tomography (pCT) scanner at Northern Illinois University (NIU) in collaboration with Fermilab and Delhi University. This paper provides an overview of major components of the scanner and a detailed description of the data acquisition system (DAQ).

  11. Surface Extraction from Multi-Material Components for Metrology using Dual Energy CT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    materials (e.g., carbon-fibre-reinforced plas- tics) induce manufacturers to design new functionSurface Extraction from Multi-Material Components for Metrology using Dual Energy CT Christoph surface models of multi-material components using dual energy com- puted tomography (DECT

  12. Toxoplasma encephalitis in Haitian adults with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome: a clinical-pathologic-CT correlation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Post, M.J.D.; Chan, J.C.; Hensley, G.T.; Hoffman, T.A.; Moskowitz, L.B.; Lippmann, S.

    1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The clinical data, histologic findings, and computed tomographic (CT) abnormalities in eight adult Haitians with toxoplasma encephalitis were analyzed retrospectively. Diagnosis was established by identification of Toxoplasma gondii on autopsy in five and brain biopsy in three specimens and subsequently confirmed by the immunoperoxidase method. All these patiens, six of whom had been in the United States for 24 months or less, had severe idiopathic immunodeficiency syndrome. All were lymphopenic and six were on treatment for tuberculosis when the toxoplasma encephalitis developed. All patients were studied with CT when they developed an altered mental status and fever associated with seizures and/or focal neurologic deficits. Scans before treatment showed multiple intraparenchymal lesions in seven and a single lesion in the thalamus in one. Ring and/or nodular enhancement of the lesions was found in six and hypodense areas in two. Progressions of abnormalities occurred on serial studies. These CT findings that were best shown on axial and coronal thin-section double-dose contrast studies were useful but not diagnostically pathognomonic. In patients with similar clinical presentation CT is recommended to identify focal areas of involvement and to guide brain biopsy or excision so that prompt medical thereapy of this often lethal infection can be instituted.

  13. Multi-stage Learning for Robust Lung Segmentation in Challenging CT Volumes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Multi-stage Learning for Robust Lung Segmentation in Challenging CT Volumes Michal Sofka1 , Jens Imaging, Siemens Healthcare, Oxford, UK Abstract. Simple algorithms for segmenting healthy lung parenchyma an ini- tialization of a statistical shape model of the lungs. The initialization first detects

  14. Technical Reports Ultra-low Dose Lung CT Perfusion Regularized by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Virginia Tech

    Technical Reports Ultra-low Dose Lung CT Perfusion Regularized by a Previous Scan1 Hengyong Yu, Ph­regularized reconstruction (PSRR) method was proposed to reduce radiation dose and applied to lung perfusion studies. Normal and ultra-low-dose lung computed tomographic perfusion studies were compared in terms of the estimation

  15. A Framework for Automatic Segmentation of Lung Nodules from Low Dose Chest CT Scans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farag, Aly A.

    A Framework for Automatic Segmentation of Lung Nodules from Low Dose Chest CT Scans Ayman El-Baz1 the high accuracy of the proposed approach. 1 Introduction Because lung cancer is the most common cause 1, an initial LDCT slice is segmented with our algorithms introduced in [3] to isolate lung tissues

  16. Volume Estimation and Surgery Planning from Lung CT Images ANA ELISA FERREIRA SCHMIDT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Volume Estimation and Surgery Planning from Lung CT Images ANA ELISA FERREIRA SCHMIDT 1 , PAULO to assist the planning of lung reduction surgeries, a technique that has been proposed for the treatment of certain illnesses. Doctors need to decide which portions of the lungs to remove to achieve a certain

  17. Automatic Lung Segmentation of Volumetric Low-Dose CT Scans Using Graph Cuts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farag, Aly A.

    Automatic Lung Segmentation of Volumetric Low-Dose CT Scans Using Graph Cuts Asem M. Ali and Aly A for unsupervised segmentation of the lung region from low dose computed tomography (LDCT) images. We follow distribution model. To better spec- ify region borders between lung and chest, each empirical distribution

  18. Statistical model based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) in clinical CT systems: Experimental assessment of noise performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Ke; Tang, Jie [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1111 Highland Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 (United States)] [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1111 Highland Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 (United States); Chen, Guang-Hong, E-mail: gchen7@wisc.edu [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1111 Highland Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 and Department of Radiology, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 600 Highland Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53792 (United States)] [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1111 Highland Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 and Department of Radiology, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 600 Highland Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53792 (United States)

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To reduce radiation dose in CT imaging, the statistical model based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) method has been introduced for clinical use. Based on the principle of MBIR and its nonlinear nature, the noise performance of MBIR is expected to be different from that of the well-understood filtered backprojection (FBP) reconstruction method. The purpose of this work is to experimentally assess the unique noise characteristics of MBIR using a state-of-the-art clinical CT system. Methods: Three physical phantoms, including a water cylinder and two pediatric head phantoms, were scanned in axial scanning mode using a 64-slice CT scanner (Discovery CT750 HD, GE Healthcare, Waukesha, WI) at seven different mAs levels (5, 12.5, 25, 50, 100, 200, 300). At each mAs level, each phantom was repeatedly scanned 50 times to generate an image ensemble for noise analysis. Both the FBP method with a standard kernel and the MBIR method (Veo{sup ®}, GE Healthcare, Waukesha, WI) were used for CT image reconstruction. Three-dimensional (3D) noise power spectrum (NPS), two-dimensional (2D) NPS, and zero-dimensional NPS (noise variance) were assessed both globally and locally. Noise magnitude, noise spatial correlation, noise spatial uniformity and their dose dependence were examined for the two reconstruction methods. Results: (1) At each dose level and at each frequency, the magnitude of the NPS of MBIR was smaller than that of FBP. (2) While the shape of the NPS of FBP was dose-independent, the shape of the NPS of MBIR was strongly dose-dependent; lower dose lead to a “redder” NPS with a lower mean frequency value. (3) The noise standard deviation (?) of MBIR and dose were found to be related through a power law of ????(dose){sup ??} with the component ? ? 0.25, which violated the classical ????(dose){sup ?0.5} power law in FBP. (4) With MBIR, noise reduction was most prominent for thin image slices. (5) MBIR lead to better noise spatial uniformity when compared with FBP. (6) A composite image generated from two MBIR images acquired at two different dose levels (D1 and D2) demonstrated lower noise than that of an image acquired at a dose level of D1+D2. Conclusions: The noise characteristics of the MBIR method are significantly different from those of the FBP method. The well known tradeoff relationship between CT image noise and radiation dose has been modified by MBIR to establish a more gradual dependence of noise on dose. Additionally, some other CT noise properties that had been well understood based on the linear system theory have also been altered by MBIR. Clinical CT scan protocols that had been optimized based on the classical CT noise properties need to be carefully re-evaluated for systems equipped with MBIR in order to maximize the method's potential clinical benefits in dose reduction and/or in CT image quality improvement.

  19. Enlarged longitudinal dose profiles in cone-beam CT and the need for modified dosimetry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mori, Shinichiro; Endo, Masahiro; Nishizawa, Kanae; Tsunoo, Takanori; Aoyama, Takahiko; Fujiwara, Hideaki; Murase, Kenya [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); School of Health Sciences, Nagoya University, Nagoya 461-8673 (Japan); School of Allied Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Osaka University, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to examine phantom length necessary to assess radiation dose delivered to patients in cone-beam CT with an enlarged beamwidth, we measured dose profiles in cylindrical phantoms of sufficient length using a prototype 256-slice CT-scanner developed at our institute. Dose profiles parallel to the rotation axis were measured at the central and peripheral positions in PMMA (polymethylmethacrylate) phantoms of 160 or 320 mm diameter and 900 mm length. For practical application, we joined unit cylinders (150 mm long) together to provide phantoms of 900 mm length. Dose profiles were measured with a pin photodiode sensor having a sensitive region of approximately 2.8x2.8 mm{sup 2} and 2.7 mm thickness. Beamwidths of the scanner were varied from 20 to 138 mm. Dose profile integrals (DPI) were calculated using the measured dose profiles for various beamwidths and integration ranges. For the body phantom (320-mm-diam phantom), 76% of the DPI was represented for a 20 mm beamwidth and 60% was represented for a 138 mm beamwidth if dose profiles were integrated over a 100 mm range, while more than 90% of the DPI was represented for beamwidths between 20 and 138 mm if integration was carried out over a 300 mm range. The phantom length and integration range for dosimetry of cone-beam CT needed to be more than 300 mm to represent more than 90% of the DPI for the body phantom with the beamwidth of more than 20 mm. Although we reached this conclusion using the prototype 256-slice CT-scanner, it may be applied to other multislice CT-scanners as well.

  20. Comparison of Fusion Imaging Using a Combined SPECT/CT System and Intra-arterial CT: Assessment of Drug Distribution by an Implantable Port System in Patients Undergoing Hepatic Arterial Infusion Chemotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ikeda, Osamu, E-mail: osamu-3643ik@do9.enjoy.ne.jp; Kusunoki, Shinichiroh; Nakaura, Takeshi; Shiraishi, Shinya; Kawanaka, Kouichi; Tomiguchi, Seiji; Yamashita, Yasuyuki [Kumamoto University Graduate School of Medical and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Department of Diagnostic Radiology (Japan); Takamori, Hiroshi; Chikamoto, Akira; Kanemitsu, Keiichiro [Kumamoto University Graduate School of Medical and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Gastroenterological Surgery (Japan)

    2006-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Hepatic arterial infusion (HAI) chemotherapy is effective for treating primary and metastatic carcinoma of the liver. We compared the perfusion patterns of HAI chemotherapy on intra-arterial port-catheter computed tomography (iapc-CT) and fused images obtained with a combined single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) system. We studied 28 patients with primary or metastatic carcinoma of the liver who bore an implantable HAI port system. All underwent abdominal SPECT using Tc-99m-MAA (185 Mbq); the injection rate was 1 mL/min, identical to the chemotherapy infusion rate, and 0.5 mL/sec for iapc-CT. Delivery was through an implantable port. We compared the intrahepatic perfusion (IHP) and extrahepatic perfusion (EHP) patterns of HAI chemotherapy on iapc-CT images and fused images obtained with a combined SPECT/CT system. In 23 of 28 patients (82%), IHP patterns on iapc-CT images and fused images were identical. In 5 of the 28 patients (18%), IHP on fusion images was different from IHP on iapc-CT images. EHP was seen on fused images in 12 of the 28 patients (43%) and on iapc-CT images in 8 patients (29%). In 17 patients (61%), upper gastrointestinal endoscopy revealed gastroduodenal mucosal lesions. EHP was revealed on fused images in 10 of these patients; 9 of them manifested gastroduodenal toxicity at the time of subsequent HAI chemotherapy. Fusion imaging using the combined SPECT/CT system reflects the actual distribution of the infused anticancer agent. This information is valuable not only for monitoring adequate drug distribution but also for avoiding potential extrahepatic complications.

  1. Reconstruction of a time-averaged midposition CT scan for radiotherapy planning of lung cancer patients using deformable registration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolthaus, J. W. H.; Sonke, J.-J.; Herk, M. van; Damen, E. M. F. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Plesmanlaan 121, 1066 CX Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: lower lobe lung tumors move with amplitudes of up to 2 cm due to respiration. To reduce respiration imaging artifacts in planning CT scans, 4D imaging techniques are used. Currently, we use a single (midventilation) frame of the 4D data set for clinical delineation of structures and radiotherapy planning. A single frame, however, often contains artifacts due to breathing irregularities, and is noisier than a conventional CT scan since the exposure per frame is lower. Moreover, the tumor may be displaced from the mean tumor position due to hysteresis. The aim of this work is to develop a framework for the acquisition of a good quality scan representing all scanned anatomy in the mean position by averaging transformed (deformed) CT frames, i.e., canceling out motion. A nonrigid registration method is necessary since motion varies over the lung. Methods and Materials: 4D and inspiration breath-hold (BH) CT scans were acquired for 13 patients. An iterative multiscale motion estimation technique was applied to the 4D CT scan, similar to optical flow but using image phase (gray-value transitions from bright to dark and vice versa) instead. From the (4D) deformation vector field (DVF) derived, the local mean position in the respiratory cycle was computed and the 4D DVF was modified to deform all structures of the original 4D CT scan to this mean position. A 3D midposition (MidP) CT scan was then obtained by (arithmetic or median) averaging of the deformed 4D CT scan. Image registration accuracy, tumor shape deviation with respect to the BH CT scan, and noise were determined to evaluate the image fidelity of the MidP CT scan and the performance of the technique. Results: Accuracy of the used deformable image registration method was comparable to established automated locally rigid registration and to manual landmark registration (average difference to both methods <0.5 mm for all directions) for the tumor region. From visual assessment, the registration was good for the clearly visible features (e.g., tumor and diaphragm). The shape of the tumor, with respect to that of the BH CT scan, was better represented by the MidP reconstructions than any of the 4D CT frames (including MidV; reduction of 'shape differences' was 66%). The MidP scans contained about one-third the noise of individual 4D CT scan frames. Conclusions: We implemented an accurate method to estimate the motion of structures in a 4D CT scan. Subsequently, a novel method to create a midposition CT scan (time-weighted average of the anatomy) for treatment planning with reduced noise and artifacts was introduced. Tumor shape and position in the MidP CT scan represents that of the BH CT scan better than MidV CT scan and, therefore, was found to be appropriate for treatment planning.

  2. Estimation of the weighted CTDI{sub {infinity}} for multislice CT examinations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li Xinhua; Zhang Da; Liu, Bob [Division of Diagnostic Imaging Physics, Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States)

    2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to examine the variations of CT dose index (CTDI) efficiencies, {epsilon}(CTDI{sub 100})=CTDI{sub 100}/CTDI{sub {infinity}}, with bowtie filters and CT scanner types. Methods: This was an extension of our previous study [Li, Zhang, and Liu, Phys. Med. Biol. 56, 5789-5803 (2011)]. A validated Monte Carlo program was used to calculate {epsilon}(CTDI{sub 100}) on a Siemens Somatom Definition scanner. The {epsilon}(CTDI{sub 100}) dependencies on tube voltages and beam widths were tested in previous studies. The influences of different bowtie filters and CT scanner types were examined in this work. The authors tested the variations of {epsilon}(CTDI{sub 100}) with bowtie filters on the Siemens Definition scanner. The authors also analyzed the published CTDI measurements of four independent studies on five scanners of four models from three manufacturers. Results: On the Siemens Definition scanner, the difference in {epsilon}(CTDI{sub W}) between using the head and body bowtie filters was 2.5% (maximum) in the CT scans of the 32-cm phantom, and 1.7% (maximum) in the CT scans of the 16-cm phantom. Compared with CTDI{sub W}, the weighted CTDI{sub {infinity}} increased by 30.5% (on average) in the 32-cm phantom, and by 20.0% (on average) in the 16-cm phantom. These results were approximately the same for 80-140 kV and 1-40 mm beam widths (4.2% maximum deviation). The differences in {epsilon}(CTDI{sub 100}) between the simulations and the direct measurements of four previous studies were 1.3%-5.0% at the center/periphery of the 16-cm/32-cm phantom (on average). Conclusions: Compared with CTDI{sub vol}, the equilibrium dose for large scan lengths is 30.5% higher in the 32-cm phantom, and is 20.0% higher in the 16-cm phantom. The relative increases are practically independent of tube voltages (80-140 kV), beam widths (up to 4 cm), and the CT scanners covered in this study.

  3. Correlation between human observer performance and model observer performance in differential phase contrast CT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Ke; Garrett, John [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1111 Highland Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 (United States)] [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1111 Highland Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 (United States); Chen, Guang-Hong [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1111 Highland Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 and Department of Radiology, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 600 Highland Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53792 (United States)] [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1111 Highland Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 and Department of Radiology, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 600 Highland Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53792 (United States)

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: With the recently expanding interest and developments in x-ray differential phase contrast CT (DPC-CT), the evaluation of its task-specific detection performance and comparison with the corresponding absorption CT under a given radiation dose constraint become increasingly important. Mathematical model observers are often used to quantify the performance of imaging systems, but their correlations with actual human observers need to be confirmed for each new imaging method. This work is an investigation of the effects of stochastic DPC-CT noise on the correlation of detection performance between model and human observers with signal-known-exactly (SKE) detection tasks.Methods: The detectabilities of different objects (five disks with different diameters and two breast lesion masses) embedded in an experimental DPC-CT noise background were assessed using both model and human observers. The detectability of the disk and lesion signals was then measured using five types of model observers including the prewhitening ideal observer, the nonprewhitening (NPW) observer, the nonprewhitening observer with eye filter and internal noise (NPWEi), the prewhitening observer with eye filter and internal noise (PWEi), and the channelized Hotelling observer (CHO). The same objects were also evaluated by four human observers using the two-alternative forced choice method. The results from the model observer experiment were quantitatively compared to the human observer results to assess the correlation between the two techniques.Results: The contrast-to-detail (CD) curve generated by the human observers for the disk-detection experiments shows that the required contrast to detect a disk is inversely proportional to the square root of the disk size. Based on the CD curves, the ideal and NPW observers tend to systematically overestimate the performance of the human observers. The NPWEi and PWEi observers did not predict human performance well either, as the slopes of their CD curves tended to be steeper. The CHO generated the best quantitative agreement with human observers with its CD curve overlapping with that of human observer. Statistical equivalence between CHO and humans can be claimed within 11% of the human observer results, including both the disk and lesion detection experiments.Conclusions: The model observer method can be used to accurately represent human observer performance with the stochastic DPC-CT noise for SKE tasks with sizes ranging from 8 to 128 pixels. The incorporation of the anatomical noise remains to be studied.

  4. Effect of process variables on the density and durability of the pellets made from high moisture corn stover

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jaya Shankar Tumuluru

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A flat die pellet mill was used to understand the effect of high levels of feedstock moisture content in the range of 28–38% (w.b.), with die rotational speeds of 40–60 Hz, and preheating temperatures of 30–110 °C on the pelleting characteristics of 4.8 mm screen size ground corn stover using an 8 mm pellet die. The physical properties of the pelletised biomass studied are: (a) pellet moisture content, (b) unit, bulk and tapped density, and (c) durability. Pelletisation experiments were conducted based on central composite design. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) indicated that feedstock moisture content influenced all of the physical properties at P < 0.001. Pellet moisture content decreased with increase in preheating temperature to about 110 °C and decreasing the feedstock moisture content to about 28% (w.b.). Response surface models developed for quality attributes with respect to process variables has adequately described the process with coefficient of determination (R2) values of >0.88. The other pellet quality attributes such as unit, bulk, tapped density, were maximised at feedstock moisture content of 30–33% (w.b.), die speeds of >50 Hz and preheating temperature of >90 °C. In case of durability a medium moisture content of 33–34% (w.b.) and preheating temperatures of >70 °C and higher die speeds >50 Hz resulted in high durable pellets. It can be concluded from the present study that feedstock moisture content, followed by preheating, and die rotational speed are the interacting process variables influencing pellet moisture content, unit, bulk and tapped density and durability.

  5. Cholecystokinin-Assisted Hydrodissection of the Gallbladder Fossa during FDG PET/CT-guided Liver Ablation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tewari, Sanjit O., E-mail: tewaris@mskcc.org [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Molecular Imaging and Therapy Service, Department of Radiology (United States); Petre, Elena N., E-mail: petree@mskcc.org [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Interventional Radiology Service, Department of Radiology (United States); Osborne, Joseph, E-mail: osbornej@mskcc.org [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Molecular Imaging and Therapy Service, Department of Radiology (United States)] [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Molecular Imaging and Therapy Service, Department of Radiology (United States); Sofocleous, Constantinos T., E-mail: sofoclec@mskcc.org [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Interventional Radiology Service, Department of Radiology (United States)

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A 68-year-old female with colorectal cancer developed a metachronous isolated fluorodeoxyglucose-avid (FDG-avid) segment 5/6 gallbladder fossa hepatic lesion and was referred for percutaneous ablation. Pre-procedure computed tomography (CT) images demonstrated a distended gallbladder abutting the segment 5/6 hepatic metastasis. In order to perform ablation with clear margins and avoid direct puncture and aspiration of the gallbladder, cholecystokinin was administered intravenously to stimulate gallbladder contraction before hydrodissection. Subsequently, the lesion was ablated successfully with sufficient margins, of greater than 1.0 cm, using microwave with ultrasound and FDG PET/CT guidance. The patient tolerated the procedure very well and was discharged home the next day.

  6. Adaptive nonlocal means filtering based on local noise level for CT denoising

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Zhoubo; Trzasko, Joshua D.; Lake, David S.; Blezek, Daniel J.; Manduca, Armando, E-mail: manduca.armando@mayo.edu [Department of Physiology and Biomedical Engineering, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905 (United States)] [Department of Physiology and Biomedical Engineering, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905 (United States); Yu, Lifeng; Fletcher, Joel G.; McCollough, Cynthia H. [Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905 (United States)] [Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905 (United States)

    2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To develop and evaluate an image-domain noise reduction method based on a modified nonlocal means (NLM) algorithm that is adaptive to local noise level of CT images and to implement this method in a time frame consistent with clinical workflow. Methods: A computationally efficient technique for local noise estimation directly from CT images was developed. A forward projection, based on a 2D fan-beam approximation, was used to generate the projection data, with a noise model incorporating the effects of the bowtie filter and automatic exposure control. The noise propagation from projection data to images was analytically derived. The analytical noise map was validated using repeated scans of a phantom. A 3D NLM denoising algorithm was modified to adapt its denoising strength locally based on this noise map. The performance of this adaptive NLM filter was evaluated in phantom studies in terms of in-plane and cross-plane high-contrast spatial resolution, noise power spectrum (NPS), subjective low-contrast spatial resolution using the American College of Radiology (ACR) accreditation phantom, and objective low-contrast spatial resolution using a channelized Hotelling model observer (CHO). Graphical processing units (GPU) implementation of this noise map calculation and the adaptive NLM filtering were developed to meet demands of clinical workflow. Adaptive NLM was piloted on lower dose scans in clinical practice. Results: The local noise level estimation matches the noise distribution determined from multiple repetitive scans of a phantom, demonstrated by small variations in the ratio map between the analytical noise map and the one calculated from repeated scans. The phantom studies demonstrated that the adaptive NLM filter can reduce noise substantially without degrading the high-contrast spatial resolution, as illustrated by modulation transfer function and slice sensitivity profile results. The NPS results show that adaptive NLM denoising preserves the shape and peak frequency of the noise power spectrum better than commercial smoothing kernels, and indicate that the spatial resolution at low contrast levels is not significantly degraded. Both the subjective evaluation using the ACR phantom and the objective evaluation on a low-contrast detection task using a CHO model observer demonstrate an improvement on low-contrast performance. The GPU implementation can process and transfer 300 slice images within 5 min. On patient data, the adaptive NLM algorithm provides more effective denoising of CT data throughout a volume than standard NLM, and may allow significant lowering of radiation dose. After a two week pilot study of lower dose CT urography and CT enterography exams, both GI and GU radiology groups elected to proceed with permanent implementation of adaptive NLM in their GI and GU CT practices. Conclusions: This work describes and validates a computationally efficient technique for noise map estimation directly from CT images, and an adaptive NLM filtering based on this noise map, on phantom and patient data. Both the noise map calculation and the adaptive NLM filtering can be performed in times that allow integration with clinical workflow. The adaptive NLM algorithm provides effective denoising of CT data throughout a volume, and may allow significant lowering of radiation dose.

  7. Evaluation of the potential utility of flat panel CT for quantifying relative contrast enhancement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, A. Kyle; Mahvash, Armeen [Department of Imaging Physics, Division of Diagnostic Imaging, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Department of Interventional Radiology, Division of Diagnostic Imaging, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States)

    2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Certain directed oncologic therapies seek to take advantage of the fact that tumors are typically more susceptible to directed therapeutic agents than normal tissue owing to their extensive networks of poorly formed, leaky vasculature. If differences between the vascularity of normal and tumor tissues could be quantified, patients could be selected for or excluded from directed treatments on the basis of this difference. However, angiographic imaging techniques such as digital subtraction angiography (DSA) yield two-dimensional data that may be inadequate for this task. As a first step, the authors evaluated the feasibility of using a commercial implementation of flat panel computed tomography (FPCT) to quantify differences in enhancement of a simulated tumor compared with normal tissue based on differences in CT number measured in precontrast and postcontrast scans. Methods: To evaluate the FPCT scanner studied, the authors scanned several phantoms containing simulated normal and tumor tissues. In the first experiment, the authors used an anthropomorphic phantom containing inclusions representing normal, tumor, and bone tissue to evaluate the constancy of CT numbers in scans repeated at clinically relevant intervals of 1 and 3 min. The authors then scanned gelatin phantoms containing dilutions of iodinated contrast to evaluate the accuracy of relative contrast enhancement measurements for a clinical FPCT system. Data were analyzed using widely available software. Results: CT numbers measured in identical locations were constant over both scan intervals evaluated. Measured relative contrast enhancement values were accurate compared with known relative contrast enhancement values. Care must be taken to avoid artifacts in reconstructed images when placing regions of interest. Conclusions: Despite its limitations, FPCT in the interventional laboratory can be used to quantify relative contrast enhancement in phantoms. This is accomplished by measuring CT number in simulated tumor and normal tissue on precontrast and postcontrast scans. This information opens the door for refinement of technique in an effort to use such a technique to plan directed therapies.

  8. Transhepatic CT-Guided Radiofrequency Ablation of Adrenal Metastases from Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuehl, Hilmar, E-mail: hilmar.kuehl@uni-due.de; Stattaus, Joerg; Forsting, Michael; Antoch, Gerald [University Hospital Essen, University at Duisburg-Essen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology (Germany)

    2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The prognosis of patients with adrenal metastases from hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) has been poor, and aggressive treatment of these tumors is mandatory to improve patients' survival. Since adrenalectomy may be difficult to perform after previous surgery of the right liver lobe, other approaches are required to treat the adrenal mass. This report aims at demonstrating the feasibility of CT-guided transhepatic radiofrequency ablation of right adrenal HCC metastases pretreated with chemoembolization in patients unable to undergo surgical resection.

  9. SU-E-T-93: Creation of Standardized APBI SAVI Cavities Using CT Registration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dahl, R [Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Develop a consistent and rapid method of generating the initial cavity structure for Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation (APBI) using the SAVI applicator. Methods: Four SAVI (Cianna Medical) applicators (6-1 Mini, 6-1, 8-1, and 10-1) were scanned on a CT simulator. The applicators were scanned in air with the CT slices (0.625mm axial thickness) perpendicular to the long axis of the applicator. Following scanning the CT images were transferred to Eclipse (Varian Medical Systems) and contours of the cavity were drawn. The cavity proximal and distal locations were defined according to MD specification. The scans and contours were then re-imported into the CT virtual simulation workstation.At the time of patient planning the appropriate applicator scan is anonymized and imported into Eclipse. In Brachytherapy Planning two Marker points are placed, one at the distal band location (cavity start) and the second at a defined distance along the applicator (cavity end). The actual patient scan is then registered to the applicator scan. A three point match is used to quickly get the two scans in approximate alignment. Manually matching is then used to fine tune the alignment of the cavity contour and Marker points. Results: The standard applicator scans have shown to agree well with the applicators in the patient scans. The time taken to register the scans has shown to be less than generating the cavities using the standard methods of contouring on the axial slices or using the dose shaper with sources in the central channel. Conclusion: The registration of a standard applicator scan and contour has improved the consistency in the generation of the initial cavity (SAVI) structure. Planning structures used for dose calculation are created with that structure as a starting point so accuracy and consistency are important for dose evaluation and plan comparison.

  10. SU-E-I-43: Pediatric CT Dose and Image Quality Optimization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stevens, G; Singh, R [GE Healthcare, Waukesha, WI (United States)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To design an approach to optimize radiation dose and image quality for pediatric CT imaging, and to evaluate expected performance. Methods: A methodology was designed to quantify relative image quality as a function of CT image acquisition parameters. Image contrast and image noise were used to indicate expected conspicuity of objects, and a wide-cone system was used to minimize scan time for motion avoidance. A decision framework was designed to select acquisition parameters as a weighted combination of image quality and dose. Phantom tests were used to acquire images at multiple techniques to demonstrate expected contrast, noise and dose. Anthropomorphic phantoms with contrast inserts were imaged on a 160mm CT system with tube voltage capabilities as low as 70kVp. Previously acquired clinical images were used in conjunction with simulation tools to emulate images at different tube voltages and currents to assess human observer preferences. Results: Examination of image contrast, noise, dose and tube/generator capabilities indicates a clinical task and object-size dependent optimization. Phantom experiments confirm that system modeling can be used to achieve the desired image quality and noise performance. Observer studies indicate that clinical utilization of this optimization requires a modified approach to achieve the desired performance. Conclusion: This work indicates the potential to optimize radiation dose and image quality for pediatric CT imaging. In addition, the methodology can be used in an automated parameter selection feature that can suggest techniques given a limited number of user inputs. G Stevens and R Singh are employees of GE Healthcare.

  11. Development of Advanced CdTe Solar Cells Based on High Temperature Corning Glass Substrates: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-10-373

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnes, T.

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NREL has developed advanced processes for CdTe solar cells, but because of the temperature limitations of conventional soda lime glass, many of these processes have not been transferred to manufacturing. Corning is developing high temperature substrate glasses that are believed to be manufacturable and will lead to lower $/watt modules costs. The purpose of this CRADA is to evaluate these glasses in the advanced NREL processes. In addition, the CRADA seeks to develop manufacturable processes for transparent conductive oxide layers based on cadmium stannate.

  12. Owens Corning and Silicon Valley Power Partner to Make Energy Savings a Reality, Save Energy Now (SEN), Industrial Technologies Program (ITP), Utility Case Study (Brochure)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin of Contamination in ManyDepartmentOutreachDepartment ofProgram49, the Owens Corning Santa

  13. Retrocrural splanchnic nerve alchohol neurolysis with a CT-guided anterior transaortic approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fields, S. [Hadassah University Hospital, Jerusalem (Israel)] [Hadassah University Hospital, Jerusalem (Israel)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Retrocrural splanchnic nerve alcohol neurolysis with a CT-guided anterior transonic approach, a new method for splanchnic block alleviation of chronic abdominal pain, is described. Ten patients with chronic abdominal pain requiring narcotic treatment, six with pancreatic carcinoma, one with gastric carcinoma, two with chronic pancreatitis, and one with pain of unknown etiology, were referred for splanchnic nerve neurolysis. With CT guidance, a 20 gauge needle was placed through the aorta into the retrocrural space at T11-T12, and 5-15 ml 96% alcohol was injected into the retrocrural space. Following the procedure, 6 of 10 patients were pain free, 2 patients had temporary pain relief, and 2 patients were without response. There were no significant complications. CT-guided anterior transaortic retrocrural splanchnic nerve alcohol neurolysis is technically feasible, easier to perform than the classic posterolateral approach, and may have less risk of complications. The success rate in this initial trial was reasonable and, therefore, this technique provides an additional method for the treatment of abdominal pain. 12 refs., 2 figs.

  14. CT-Guided Radiofrequency Ablation in Patients with Hepatic Metastases from Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jakobs, Tobias F., E-mail: tobias.jakobs@med.uni-muenchen.de; Hoffmann, Ralf-Thorsten; Schrader, Angelika [Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich, Department of Radiology (Germany); Stemmler, Hans Joachim [Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich, Department of Internal Medicine III (Germany); Trumm, Christoph [Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich, Department of Radiology (Germany); Lubienski, Andreas [University of Schleswig-Holstein, Department of Radiology (Germany); Murthy, Ravi [The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Division of Diagnostic Imaging (United States); Helmberger, Thomas K. [Klinikum Bogenhausen, Department of Radiology (Germany); Reiser, Maximilian F. [Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich, Department of Radiology (Germany)

    2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate technical success, technique effectiveness, and survival following radiofrequency ablation for breast cancer liver metastases and to determine prognostic factors. Forty-three patients with 111 breast cancer liver metastases underwent CT-guided percutaneous radiofrequency (RF) ablation. Technical success and technique effectiveness was evaluated by performing serial CT scans. We assessed the prognostic value of hormone receptor status, overexpression of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), and presence of extrahepatic tumor spread. Survival rates were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Technical success was achieved in 107 metastases (96%). Primary technique effectiveness was 96%. During follow-up local tumor progression was observed in 15 metastases, representing a secondary technique effectiveness of 86.5%. The overall time to progression to the liver was 10.5 months. The estimated overall median survival was 58.6 months. There was no significant difference in terms of survival probability with respect to hormone receptor status, HER2 overexpression, and presence of isolated bone metastases. Survival was significantly lower among patients with extrahepatic disease, with the exception of skeletal metastases. We conclude that CT-guided RF ablation of liver metastases from breast cancer can be performed with a high degree of technical success and technique effectiveness, providing promising survival rates in patients with no visceral extrahepatic disease. Solitary bone metastases did not negatively affect survival probability after RF ablation.

  15. Quality assurance for image-guided radiation therapy utilizing CT-based technologies: A report of the AAPM TG-179

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bissonnette, Jean-Pierre; Balter, Peter A.; Dong Lei; Langen, Katja M.; Lovelock, D. Michael; Miften, Moyed; Moseley, Douglas J.; Pouliot, Jean; Sonke, Jan-Jakob; Yoo, Sua [Task Group 179, Department of Radiation Physics, Princess Margaret Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, M5G 2M9 (Canada); Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, M. D. Anderson Cancer Center Orlando, Orlando, Florida 32806 (United States); Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York 10021 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado 80045 (United States); Department of Radiation Physics, Princess Margaret Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, M5G 2M9 (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, UCSF Comprehensive Cancer Center, 1600 Divisadero St., Suite H 1031, San Francisco, California 94143-1708 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Plesmanlaan 121, 1066 CX Amsterdam (Netherlands); Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States)

    2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Commercial CT-based image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) systems allow widespread management of geometric variations in patient setup and internal organ motion. This document provides consensus recommendations for quality assurance protocols that ensure patient safety and patient treatment fidelity for such systems. Methods: The AAPM TG-179 reviews clinical implementation and quality assurance aspects for commercially available CT-based IGRT, each with their unique capabilities and underlying physics. The systems described are kilovolt and megavolt cone-beam CT, fan-beam MVCT, and CT-on-rails. A summary of the literature describing current clinical usage is also provided. Results: This report proposes a generic quality assurance program for CT-based IGRT systems in an effort to provide a vendor-independent program for clinical users. Published data from long-term, repeated quality control tests form the basis of the proposed test frequencies and tolerances.Conclusion: A program for quality control of CT-based image-guidance systems has been produced, with focus on geometry, image quality, image dose, system operation, and safety. Agreement and clarification with respect to reports from the AAPM TG-101, TG-104, TG-142, and TG-148 has been addressed.

  16. Freehand Two-Step CT-Guided Brain Tumor Biopsy: A Fast and Effective Interventional Procedure in Selected Patients

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thanos, Loukas, E-mail: loutharad@yahoo.com; Mylona, Sofia; Galani, Panagiota; Kalioras, Vasilios; Pomoni, Maria; Batakis, Nikolaos ['Korgialeneio-Benakeio', Hellenic Red-Cross Hospital of Athens, Radiology Department (Greece)

    2006-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose. To evaluate the efficacy and safety of CT-guided needle biopsy of brain lesions without a stereotactic device, and to determine the best possible indications for this technique. Methods. From February 2001 to February 2004, 20 patients (12 men, 8 women; age 61-82 years) underwent CT-guided brain lesion biopsy. The procedure started with a brain CT scan for lesion localization and for selection of the inlet for needle insertion. The patient was then transported to the operating room where cranioanatrisis was performed. Subsequently, the biopsy was performed under CT guidance using a 14G brain biopsy needle with a blind smooth end and lateral holes. At the end of the biopsy, the field was checked for possible complications with a CT scan. Results. Histopathologic results were: brain tumor in 16 patients (80%), inflammatory process in 3 (15%), and no conclusive diagnosis in 1 (5%). A repeat of the process was required in 2 patients. A minor complication of local hematoma was found in 1 patient (5%). There were no deaths or other serious complications.Conclusion. CT-guided biopsy is a reliable method for histopathologic diagnosis of brain lesions in selected cases. It is a simple, fast, effective, low-cost procedure with minimal complications, indicated especially for superficial and large tumors.

  17. The effects of calcitic and dolomitic limestone rates and particle sizes on soil chemical changes, plant nutrient concentration, and yields of corn and Coastal bermudagrass on two acid Texas soils 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haby, Vincent A

    1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    significantly increased Ca to 18 inches, while only the 6-ton/acre rate of fine dolomitic lime- stone increased Ca into the same depth. All dolomitic treatments increased Mg to 18-inch depths. Sampling deeper than 18 inches in the 6 ton/acre dolomitic fine... formed soluble salts with the NO and were leached down as Ca(ND ) Limestone treatments did not produce significant increases in yield of corn or Coastal bermudagrass. The no-lime plots produced 70 bushels of corn and 9. 2 tons of oven-dry Coastal...

  18. The effects of gantry tilt on breast dose and image noise in cardiac CT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoppe, Michael E.; Gandhi, Diksha; Schmidt, Taly Gilat [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Marquette University, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53233 (United States)] [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Marquette University, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53233 (United States); Stevens, Grant M. [GE Healthcare, Waukesha, Wisconsin 53188 (United States)] [GE Healthcare, Waukesha, Wisconsin 53188 (United States); Foley, W. Dennis [Department of Radiology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Froedtert Memorial Lutheran Hospital, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53226 (United States)] [Department of Radiology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Froedtert Memorial Lutheran Hospital, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53226 (United States)

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: This study investigated the effects of tilted-gantry acquisition on image noise and glandular breast dose in females during cardiac computed tomography (CT) scans. Reducing the dose to glandular breast tissue is important due to its high radiosensitivity and limited diagnostic significance in cardiac CT scans.Methods: Tilted-gantry acquisition was investigated through computer simulations and experimental measurements. Upon IRB approval, eight voxelized phantoms were constructed from previously acquired cardiac CT datasets. Monte Carlo simulations quantified the dose deposited in glandular breast tissue over a range of tilt angles. The effects of tilted-gantry acquisition on breast dose were measured on a clinical CT scanner (CT750HD, GE Healthcare) using an anthropomorphic phantom with MOSFET dosimeters in the breast regions. In both simulations and experiments, scans were performed at gantry tilt angles of 0°–30°, in 5° increments. The percent change in breast dose was calculated relative to the nontilted scan for all tilt angles. The percent change in noise standard deviation due to gantry tilt was calculated in all reconstructed simulated and experimental images.Results: Tilting the gantry reduced the breast dose in all simulated and experimental phantoms, with generally greater dose reduction at increased gantry tilts. For example, at 30° gantry tilt, the dosimeters located in the superior, middle, and inferior breast regions measured dose reductions of 74%, 61%, and 9%, respectively. The simulations estimated 0%–30% total breast dose reduction across the eight phantoms and range of tilt angles. However, tilted-gantry acquisition also increased the noise standard deviation in the simulated phantoms by 2%–50% due to increased pathlength through the iodine-filled heart. The experimental phantom, which did not contain iodine in the blood, demonstrated decreased breast dose and decreased noise at all gantry tilt angles.Conclusions: Tilting the gantry reduced the dose to the breast, while also increasing noise standard deviation. Overall, the noise increase outweighed the dose reduction for the eight voxelized phantoms, suggesting that tilted gantry acquisition may not be beneficial for reducing breast dose while maintaining image quality.

  19. Correlation between model observer and human observer performance in CT imaging when lesion location is uncertain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leng, Shuai; Yu, Lifeng; Zhang, Yi; McCollough, Cynthia H. [Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic, 200 First Street Southwest, Rochester, Minnesota 55905 (United States)] [Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic, 200 First Street Southwest, Rochester, Minnesota 55905 (United States); Carter, Rickey [Department of Biostatistics, Mayo Clinic, 200 First Street Southwest, Rochester, Minnesota 55905 (United States)] [Department of Biostatistics, Mayo Clinic, 200 First Street Southwest, Rochester, Minnesota 55905 (United States); Toledano, Alicia Y. [Biostatistics Consulting, LLC, 10606 Wheatley Street, Kensington, Maryland 20895 (United States)] [Biostatistics Consulting, LLC, 10606 Wheatley Street, Kensington, Maryland 20895 (United States)

    2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the correlation between model observer and human observer performance in CT imaging for the task of lesion detection and localization when the lesion location is uncertain.Methods: Two cylindrical rods (3-mm and 5-mm diameters) were placed in a 35 × 26 cm torso-shaped water phantom to simulate lesions with ?15 HU contrast at 120 kV. The phantom was scanned 100 times on a 128-slice CT scanner at each of four dose levels (CTDIvol = 5.7, 11.4, 17.1, and 22.8 mGy). Regions of interest (ROIs) around each lesion were extracted to generate images with signal-present, with each ROI containing 128 × 128 pixels. Corresponding ROIs of signal-absent images were generated from images without lesion mimicking rods. The location of the lesion (rod) in each ROI was randomly distributed by moving the ROIs around each lesion. Human observer studies were performed by having three trained observers identify the presence or absence of lesions, indicating the lesion location in each image and scoring confidence for the detection task on a 6-point scale. The same image data were analyzed using a channelized Hotelling model observer (CHO) with Gabor channels. Internal noise was added to the decision variables for the model observer study. Area under the curve (AUC) of ROC and localization ROC (LROC) curves were calculated using a nonparametric approach. The Spearman's rank order correlation between the average performance of the human observers and the model observer performance was calculated for the AUC of both ROC and LROC curves for both the 3- and 5-mm diameter lesions.Results: In both ROC and LROC analyses, AUC values for the model observer agreed well with the average values across the three human observers. The Spearman's rank order correlation values for both ROC and LROC analyses for both the 3- and 5-mm diameter lesions were all 1.0, indicating perfect rank ordering agreement of the figures of merit (AUC) between the average performance of the human observers and the model observer performance.Conclusions: In CT imaging of different sizes of low-contrast lesions (?15 HU), the performance of CHO with Gabor channels was highly correlated with human observer performance for the detection and localization tasks with uncertain lesion location in CT imaging at four clinically relevant dose levels. This suggests the ability of Gabor CHO model observers to meaningfully assess CT image quality for the purpose of optimizing scan protocols and radiation dose levels in detection and localization tasks for low-contrast lesions.

  20. Correlation between internal fiducial tumor motion and external marker motion for liver tumors imaged with 4D-CT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beddar, A. Sam [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)]. E-mail: abeddar@mdanderson.org; Kainz, Kristofer [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Briere, Tina Marie [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Tsunashima, Yoshikazu [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Pan Tinsu [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Prado, Karl [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Mohan, Radhe [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Gillin, Michael [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Krishnan, Sunil [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: We investigated the correlation between the motions of an external marker and internal fiducials implanted in the liver for 8 patients undergoing respiratory-based computed tomography (four-dimensional CT [4D-CT]) procedures. Methods and Materials: The internal fiducials were gold seeds, 3 mm in length and 1.2 mm in diameter. Four patients each had one implanted fiducial, and the other four had three implanted fiducials. The external marker was a plastic box, which is part of the Real-Time Position Management System (RPM) used to track the patient's respiration. Each patient received a standard helical CT scan followed by a time-correlated CT-image acquisition (4D-CT). The 4D-CT images were reconstructed in 10 separate phases covering the entire respiratory cycle. Results: The internal fiducial motion is predominant in the superior-inferior direction, with a range of 7.5-17.5 mm. The correlation between external respiration and internal fiducial motion is best during expiration. For 2 patients with their three fiducials separated by a maximum of 3.2 cm, the motions of the fiducials were well correlated, whereas for 2 patients with more widely spaced fiducials, there was less correlation. Conclusions: In general, there is a good correlation between internal fiducial motion imaged by 4D-CT and external marker motion. We have demonstrated that gating may be best performed at the end of the respiratory cycle. Special attention should be paid to gating for patients whose fiducials do not move in synchrony, because targeting on the correct respiratory amplitude alone would not guarantee that the entire tumor volume is within the treatment field.

  1. A modular VME or IBM PC based data acquisition system for multi-modality PET/CT scanners of different sizes and detector types

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crosetto, D B

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A modular VME or IBM PC based data acquisition system for multi-modality PET/CT scanners of different sizes and detector types

  2. Real-time, programmable, digital signal-processing electronics for extracting the information from a detector module for multi-modality PET/SPECT/CT scanners

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crosetto, D B

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Real-time, programmable, digital signal-processing electronics for extracting the information from a detector module for multi-modality PET/SPECT/CT scanners

  3. Stationary table CT dosimetry and anomalous scanner-reported values of CTDI{sub vol}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dixon, Robert L., E-mail: rdixon@wfubmc.edu [Department of Radiology, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, North Carolina 27157 (United States); Boone, John M. [Departments of Radiology and Biomedical Engineering, University of California Davis, Sacramento, California 95817 (United States)] [Departments of Radiology and Biomedical Engineering, University of California Davis, Sacramento, California 95817 (United States)

    2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Anomalous, scanner-reported values of CTDI{sub vol} for stationary phantom/table protocols (having elevated values of CTDI{sub vol} over 300% higher than the actual dose to the phantom) have been observed; which are well-beyond the typical accuracy expected of CTDI{sub vol} as a phantom dose. Recognition of these outliers as “bad data” is important to users of CT dose index tracking systems (e.g., ACR DIR), and a method for recognition and correction is provided. Methods: Rigorous methods and equations are presented which describe the dose distributions for stationary-table CT. A comparison with formulae for scanner-reported values of CTDI{sub vol} clearly identifies the source of these anomalies. Results: For the stationary table, use of the CTDI{sub 100} formula (applicable to a moving phantom only) overestimates the dose due to extra scatter and also includes an overbeaming correction, both of which are nonexistent when the phantom (or patient) is held stationary. The reported DLP remains robust for the stationary phantom. Conclusions: The CTDI-paradigm does not apply in the case of a stationary phantom and simpler nonintegral equations suffice. A method of correction of the currently reported CTDI{sub vol} using the approach-to-equilibrium formula H(a) and an overbeaming correction factor serves to scale the reported CTDI{sub vol} values to more accurate levels for stationary-table CT, as well as serving as an indicator in the detection of “bad data.”.

  4. SU-E-I-18: CT Scanner QA Using Normalized CTDI Ratio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Randazzo, M; Tambasco, M; Russell, B [San Diego State University, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To create a ratio of weighted computed tomography dose index (CTDIw) data normalized to in-air measurements (CTDIair) as a function of beam quality to create a look-up table for frequent, rapid quality assurance (QA) checks of CTDI. Methods: The CTDIw values were measured according to TG-63 protocol using a pencil ionization chamber (Unfors Xi CT detector) and head and body Polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) phantoms (16 and 32 cm diameter, respectively). Single scan dose profiles were measured at each clinically available energy (80,100,120,140 kVp) on three different CT scanners (two Siemens SOMATOM Definition Flash and one GE Optima), using a tube current of 400 mA, a one second rotation time, and the widest available beam width (32 × 0.6 mm and 16 × 1.25 mm, respectively). These values were normalized to CTDIair measurements using the same conditions as CTDIw. The ratios (expressed in cGy/R) were assessed for each scanner as a function of each energy's half value layer (HVL) paired with the phantom's appropriate bow tie filter measured in mmAl. Results: Normalized CTDI values vary linearly with HVL for both the head and body phantoms. The ratios for the two Siemens machines are very similar at each energy. Compared to the GE scanner, these values vary between 10–20% for each kVp setting. Differences in CTDIair contribute most to the deviation of the ratios across machines. Ratios are independent of both mAs and collimation. Conclusion: Look-up tables constructed of normalized CTDI values as a function of HVL can be used to derive CTDIw data from only three in-air measurements (one for CTDIair and two with added filtration for HVL) to allow for simple, frequent QA checks without CT phantom setup. Future investigations will involve comparing results with Monte Carlo simulations for validation.

  5. Specific recommendations for accurate and direct use of PET-CT in PET guided radiotherapy for head and neck sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, C. M., E-mail: christopher.thomas@gstt.nhs.uk; Convery, D. J.; Greener, A. G. [Guy's and St. Thomas’ NHS Foundation Trust, Medical Physics Department, St. Thomas’ Hospital, London SE1 7EH (United Kingdom)] [Guy's and St. Thomas’ NHS Foundation Trust, Medical Physics Department, St. Thomas’ Hospital, London SE1 7EH (United Kingdom); Pike, L. C.; Baker, S.; Woods, E. [Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, King's College London, King's Health Partners, St. Thomas’ Hospital, London SE1 7EH (United Kingdom)] [Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, King's College London, King's Health Partners, St. Thomas’ Hospital, London SE1 7EH (United Kingdom); Hartill, C. E. [Guy's and St. Thomas’ NHS Foundation Trust, Radiotherapy, Clinical Outpatients Clinic, St. Thomas’ Hospital, London SE1 7EH (United Kingdom)] [Guy's and St. Thomas’ NHS Foundation Trust, Radiotherapy, Clinical Outpatients Clinic, St. Thomas’ Hospital, London SE1 7EH (United Kingdom)

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To provide specific experience-based guidance and recommendations for centers wishing to develop, validate, and implement an accurate and efficient process for directly using positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) for the radiotherapy planning of head and neck cancer patients. Methods: A PET-CT system was modified with hard-top couch, external lasers and radiotherapy immobilization and indexing devices and was subject to a commissioning and quality assurance program. PET-CT imaging protocols were developed specifically for radiotherapy planning and the image quality and pathway tested using phantoms and five patients recruited into an in-house study. Security and accuracy of data transfer was tested throughout the whole data pathway. The patient pathway was fully established and tested ready for implementation in a PET-guided dose-escalation trial for head and neck cancer patients. Results: Couch deflection was greater than for departmental CT simulator machines. An area of high attenuation in the couch generated image artifacts and adjustments were made accordingly. Using newly developed protocols CT image quality was suitable to maintain delineation and treatment accuracy. Upon transfer of data to the treatment planning system a half pixel offset between PET and CT was observed and corrected. By taking this into account, PET to CT alignment accuracy was maintained below 1 mm in all systems in the data pathway. Transfer of structures delineated in the PET fusion software to the radiotherapy treatment planning system was validated. Conclusions: A method to perform direct PET-guided radiotherapy planning was successfully validated and specific recommendations were developed to assist other centers. Of major concern is ensuring that the quality of PET and CT data is appropriate for radiotherapy treatment planning and on-treatment verification. Couch movements can be compromised, bore-size can be a limitation for certain immobilization techniques, laser positioning may affect setup accuracy and couch deflection may be greater than scanners dedicated to radiotherapy. The full set of departmental commissioning and routine quality assurance tests applied to radiotherapy CT simulators must be carried out on the PET-CT scanner. CT image quality must be optimized for radiotherapy planning whilst understanding that the appearance will differ between scanners and may affect delineation. PET-CT quality assurance schedules will need to be added to and modified to incorporate radiotherapy quality assurance. Methods of working for radiotherapy and PET staff will change to take into account considerations of both parties. PET to CT alignment must be subject to quality control on a loaded and unloaded couch preferably using a suitable emission phantom, and tested throughout the whole data pathway. Data integrity must be tested throughout the whole pathway and a system included to verify that delineated structures are transferred correctly. Excellent multidisciplinary team communication and working is vital, and key staff members on both sides should be specifically dedicated to the project. Patient pathway should be clearly devised to optimize patient care and the resources of all departments. Recruitment of a cohort of patients into a methodology study is valuable to test the quality assurance methods and pathway.

  6. Implementation and commissioning of an integrated micro-CT/RT system with computerized independent jaw collimation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jensen, Michael D. [Department of Medical Biophysics, The University of Western Ontario, 1151 Richmond Street, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada)] [Department of Medical Biophysics, The University of Western Ontario, 1151 Richmond Street, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada); Hrinivich, W. Thomas; Jung, Jongho A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Western Ontario, 1151 Richmond Street, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Western Ontario, 1151 Richmond Street, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada); Holdsworth, David W. [Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute, 100 Perth Drive, London, Ontario N6A 5K8 (Canada) [Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute, 100 Perth Drive, London, Ontario N6A 5K8 (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, The University of Western Ontario, 1151 Richmond Street, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada); Department of Surgery, The University of Western Ontario, 1151 Richmond Street, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada); Drangova, Maria [Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute, 100 Perth Drive, London, Ontario N6A 5K8, Canada and Department of Medical Biophysics, The University of Western Ontario 1151 Richmond Street, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada)] [Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute, 100 Perth Drive, London, Ontario N6A 5K8, Canada and Department of Medical Biophysics, The University of Western Ontario 1151 Richmond Street, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada); Chen, Jeff [Department of Physics and Engineering, London Regional Cancer Program, London Health Sciences Centre, 800 Commissioners Road East, London, Ontario N6A 5W9 (Canada) [Department of Physics and Engineering, London Regional Cancer Program, London Health Sciences Centre, 800 Commissioners Road East, London, Ontario N6A 5W9 (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, The University of Western Ontario, 1151 Richmond Street, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada); Department of Oncology, The University of Western Ontario, 1151 Richmond Street, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada); Wong, Eugene [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Western Ontario, 1151 Richmond Street, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada) [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Western Ontario, 1151 Richmond Street, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, The University of Western Ontario, 1151 Richmond Street, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada); Department of Oncology, The University of Western Ontario, 1151 Richmond Street, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada); Department of Physics and Engineering, London Regional Cancer Program, London Health Sciences Centre, 800 Commissioners Road East, London, Ontario N6A 5W9 (Canada)

    2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To design, construct, and commission a set of computer-controlled motorized jaws for a micro-CT/RT system to perform conformal image-guided small animal radiotherapy.Methods: The authors designed and evaluated a system of custom-built motorized orthogonal jaws, which allows the delivery of off-axis rectangular fields on a GE eXplore CT 120 preclinical imaging system. The jaws in the x direction are independently driven, while the y-direction jaws are symmetric. All motors have backup encoders, verifying jaw positions. Mechanical performance of the jaws was characterized. Square beam profiles ranging from 2 × 2 to 60 × 60 mm{sup 2} were measured using EBT2 film in the center of a 70 × 70 × 22 mm{sup 3} solid water block. Similarly, absolute depth dose was measured in a solid water and EBT2 film stack 50 × 50 × 50 mm{sup 3}. A calibrated Farmer ion chamber in a 70 × 70 × 20 mm{sup 3} solid water block was used to measure the output of three field sizes: 50 × 50, 40 × 40, and 30 × 30 mm{sup 2}. Elliptical target plans were delivered to films to assess overall system performance. Respiratory-gated treatment was implemented on the system and initially proved using a simple sinusoidal motion phantom. All films were scanned on a flatbed scanner (Epson 1000XL) and converted to dose using a fitted calibration curve. A Monte Carlo beam model of the micro-CT with the jaws has been created using BEAMnrc for comparison with the measurements. An example image-guided partial lung irradiation in a rat is demonstrated.Results: The averaged random error of positioning each jaw is less than 0.1 mm. Relative output factors measured with the ion chamber agree with Monte Carlo simulations within 2%. Beam profiles and absolute depth dose curves measured from the films agree with simulations within measurement uncertainty. Respiratory-gated treatments applied to a phantom moving with a peak-to-peak amplitude of 5 mm showed improved beam penumbra (80%–20%) from 3.9 to 0.8 mm.Conclusions: A set of computer-controlled motorized jaws for a micro-CT/RT system were constructed with position reliably better than a tenth of a millimeter. The hardware system is ready for image-guided conformal radiotherapy for small animals with capability of respiratory-gated delivery.

  7. Quantitative comparison of noise texture across CT scanners from different manufacturers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Solomon, Justin B.; Christianson, Olav; Samei, Ehsan [Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories and Clinical Imaging Physics Group, Department of Radiology, Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories and Clinical Imaging Physics Group, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories and Clinical Imaging Physics Group, Medical Physics Graduate Program, Departments of Radiology, Physics, Biomedical Engineering, and Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States)

    2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To quantitatively compare noise texture across computed tomography (CT) scanners from different manufacturers using the noise power spectrum (NPS). Methods: The American College of Radiology CT accreditation phantom (Gammex 464, Gammex, Inc., Middleton, WI) was imaged on two scanners: Discovery CT 750HD (GE Healthcare, Waukesha, WI), and SOMATOM Definition Flash (Siemens Healthcare, Germany), using a consistent acquisition protocol (120 kVp, 0.625/0.6 mm slice thickness, 250 mAs, and 22 cm field of view). Images were reconstructed using filtered backprojection and a wide selection of reconstruction kernels. For each image set, the 2D NPS were estimated from the uniform section of the phantom. The 2D spectra were normalized by their integral value, radially averaged, and filtered by the human visual response function. A systematic kernel-by-kernel comparison across manufacturers was performed by computing the root mean square difference (RMSD) and the peak frequency difference (PFD) between the NPS from different kernels. GE and Siemens kernels were compared and kernel pairs that minimized the RMSD and |PFD| were identified. Results: The RMSD (|PFD|) values between the NPS of GE and Siemens kernels varied from 0.01 mm{sup 2} (0.002 mm{sup -1}) to 0.29 mm{sup 2} (0.74 mm{sup -1}). The GE kernels 'Soft,''Standard,''Chest,' and 'Lung' closely matched the Siemens kernels 'B35f,''B43f,''B41f,' and 'B80f' (RMSD < 0.05 mm{sup 2}, |PFD| < 0.02 mm{sup -1}, respectively). The GE 'Bone,''Bone+,' and 'Edge' kernels all matched most closely with Siemens 'B75f' kernel but with sizeable RMSD and |PFD| values up to 0.18 mm{sup 2} and 0.41 mm{sup -1}, respectively. These sizeable RMSD and |PFD| values corresponded to visually perceivable differences in the noise texture of the images. Conclusions: It is possible to use the NPS to quantitatively compare noise texture across CT systems. The degree to which similar texture across scanners could be achieved varies and is limited by the kernels available on each scanner.

  8. Improving best-phase image quality in cardiac CT by motion correction with MAM optimization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rohkohl, Christopher; Bruder, Herbert; Stierstorfer, Karl [Siemens AG, Healthcare Sector, Siemensstrasse 1, 91301 Forchheim (Germany); Flohr, Thomas [Siemens AG, Healthcare Sector, Siemensstrasse 1, 91301 Forchheim (Germany); Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, Eberhard Karls University, Hoppe-Seyler-Str. 3, 72076 Tuebingen (Germany)

    2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Research in image reconstruction for cardiac CT aims at using motion correction algorithms to improve the image quality of the coronary arteries. The key to those algorithms is motion estimation, which is currently based on 3-D/3-D registration to align the structures of interest in images acquired in multiple heart phases. The need for an extended scan data range covering several heart phases is critical in terms of radiation dose to the patient and limits the clinical potential of the method. Furthermore, literature reports only slight quality improvements of the motion corrected images when compared to the most quiet phase (best-phase) that was actually used for motion estimation. In this paper a motion estimation algorithm is proposed which does not require an extended scan range but works with a short scan data interval, and which markedly improves the best-phase image quality. Methods: Motion estimation is based on the definition of motion artifact metrics (MAM) to quantify motion artifacts in a 3-D reconstructed image volume. The authors use two different MAMs, entropy, and positivity. By adjusting the motion field parameters, the MAM of the resulting motion-compensated reconstruction is optimized using a gradient descent procedure. In this way motion artifacts are minimized. For a fast and practical implementation, only analytical methods are used for motion estimation and compensation. Both the MAM-optimization and a 3-D/3-D registration-based motion estimation algorithm were investigated by means of a computer-simulated vessel with a cardiac motion profile. Image quality was evaluated using normalized cross-correlation (NCC) with the ground truth template and root-mean-square deviation (RMSD). Four coronary CT angiography patient cases were reconstructed to evaluate the clinical performance of the proposed method. Results: For the MAM-approach, the best-phase image quality could be improved for all investigated heart phases, with a maximum improvement of the NCC value by 100% and of the RMSD value by 81%. The corresponding maximum improvements for the registration-based approach were 20% and 40%. In phases with very rapid motion the registration-based algorithm obtained better image quality, while the image quality of the MAM algorithm was superior in phases with less motion. The image quality improvement of the MAM optimization was visually confirmed for the different clinical cases. Conclusions: The proposed method allows a software-based best-phase image quality improvement in coronary CT angiography. A short scan data interval at the target heart phase is sufficient, no additional scan data in other cardiac phases are required. The algorithm is therefore directly applicable to any standard cardiac CT acquisition protocol.

  9. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Metals Selling Corp - CT 0-01

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling Corp - CT 0-01 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site:

  10. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- New England Lime Co - CT 10

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling Corp - CT 0-01Naturita36 SupplyCanaan Site

  11. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Olin Mathieson - CT 0-02

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling Corp - CT 0-01Naturita36NewNortonOhmart

  12. A comparison of CT- and ultrasound-based imaging to localize the prostate for external beam radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McNair, Helen A. [Department of Radiotherapy, Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: Helen.McNair@rmh.nhs.uk; Mangar, Stephen A. [Department of Academic Urology Unit, Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton (United Kingdom); Coffey, Jerome [Department of Academic Urology Unit, Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton (United Kingdom); Shoulders, Beverley [Department of Radiotherapy, Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton (United Kingdom); Hansen, Vibeke N. [Department of Physics, Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton (United Kingdom); Norman, Andrew [Department of Radiotherapy, Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton (United Kingdom); Department of Physics, Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton (United Kingdom); Department of Radiology, Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton (United Kingdom); Department of Academic Urology Unit, Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton (United Kingdom); Staffurth, John [Department of Academic Urology Unit, Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton (United Kingdom); Sohaib, S. Aslam [Department of Radiology, Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton (United Kingdom); Warrington, Alan P. [Department of Physics, Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton (United Kingdom); Dearnaley, David P. [Department of Academic Urology Unit, Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton (United Kingdom)

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: This study assesses the accuracy of NOMOS B-mode acquisition and targeting system (BAT) compared with computed tomography (CT) in localizing the prostate. Methods and Materials: Twenty-six patients were CT scanned, and the prostate was localized by 3 observers using the BAT system. The BAT couch shift measurements were compared with the CT localization. Six of the patients had gold markers present in the prostate, and the prostate movement determined by BAT was compared with the movement determined by the gold markers. Results: Using the BAT system, the 3 observers determined the prostate position to be a mean of 1-5 mm over all directions with respect to the CT. The proportion of readings with a difference >3 mm between the observers was in the range of 25% to 44%. The prostate movement based on gold markers was an average of 3-5 mm different from that measured by BAT. The literature assessing the accuracy and reproducibility on BAT is summarized and compared with our findings. Conclusions: We have found that there are systematic differences between the BAT-defined prostate position compared with that estimated on CT using gold grain marker seeds.

  13. SU-E-T-99: Design and Development of Isocenter Parameter System for CT Simulation Laser Based On DICOM RT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luo, G [Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China (China)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: In order to receive DICOM files from treatment planning system and generate patient isocenter positioning parameter file for CT laser system automatically, this paper presents a method for communication with treatment planning system and calculation of isocenter parameter for each radiation field. Methods: Coordinate transformation and laser positioning file formats were analyzed, isocenter parameter was calculated via data from DICOM CT Data and DICOM RTPLAN file. An in-house software-DicomGenie was developed based on the object-oriented program platform-Qt with DCMTK SDK (Germany OFFIS company DICOM SDK) . DicomGenie was tested for accuracy using Philips CT simulation plan system (Tumor LOC, Philips) and A2J CT positioning laser system (Thorigny Sur Marne, France). Results: DicomGenie successfully established DICOM communication between treatment planning system, DICOM files were received by DicomGenie and patient laser isocenter information was generated accurately. Patient laser parameter data files can be used for for CT laser system directly. Conclusion: In-house software DicomGenie received and extracted DICOM data, isocenter laser positioning data files were created by DicomGenie and can be use for A2J laser positioning system.

  14. Cotton and Corn Experiments.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pittuck, B. C.

    1897-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the different characteristics, if any, of the entiTe :field: Soil Plot. No.- 1. 3. I 5. 7. 9. 11. 13. 15. 17. 20. 25. 26. ------------------ ---- Silica and Sand ..... 94.39 94.28 94.4 94.62 94.11 95.15 94.63 94.06 93.65 94.81 94.07 93.85 Water-air dry....89 38.89 42.45 44.84 41.06 55.01 Diameter-Sand. Between .05 and 0.01 mm. 10.71 6. 87 4. 70 5. 37 8. 40 8. 44 6. 71 10.01 14. 93 3. 78 8. 57 13.18 6. 61 5.06 3. 74 3. 59 15.23 8. 62 14.22 9. 26 2. 76 4. 99 3. 98 5. 87 6. 32 10.02 Diameter-Silt. ? Below...

  15. Southern corn rootworm control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wipprecht, Read

    1952-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in all tbe plots ssjcing reylaccting neoesssrN, Expericent No, 4. vas a dupjisate of lbrperisant No, 1 aud vas oondust ed aa Nurleson else ~ soL1 and ad)aoent to Rq?raiment N'o, 2, Cbcs occrn rootsorm damaged plant vas found in a obeob plcct, R... Vg 0 7$ 0 74 0 7& 0 0 0 0 93 0 0 92 0 90 0 90 0 88 0 88 0 95 0 0 0 0 0 3 2 78 73 Vg 75 XETAIL OF TABES 1 Kxyer %naacp Ro RHLLKIS OF VARIA5CE 30, 00 33, 21 0 00 0~00 10, 00 14~ 5 V5 33, %j K, 9Q 27 A +36 ~65 RC $2 35~4~ 365T...

  16. Corn Hybrids for Texas.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bockholt, A. J.; Collier, J. W.

    1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Loams and sandy loams Sandy soils Coast Prairie Blackland Loams and sandy loams Blackland Prairies Blackland Mixed land Grand Prairie Blackland Mixed land West Cross Timbers Rio Grande Plain Blackland Sands and sandy loams Lower Rio Grande... Valley and Winter Garden Dist. (under irrigation) Clays and loams Sands and sandy loams Rolling Plains Clay loams Sands and sandy loams High Plains (irrigated) Clay loams Sandy loams Sands Spac- Fertilizer dress- I " ing at ing of Planting...

  17. Corn Hybrids for Texas.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rogers, J. S.; Bockholt, A. J.; Collier, J. W.

    1957-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Root Stalk Unsound Worm dam- Shelling, % Days to Ears per Entries bushels lodging, % breakage, % ears, % age score1 silk plant Texas 28 ."-' Texas 26 Texas 32 Texas 30 Texas 15W Texas 17W Asgrow lOlW United U72 Keystone 222 Funk G711 De....0 6.3 8.2 9.9 10.1 13.0 13.1 16.9 193 16.7 38 40 43 Texas 28 Texas 26 Texas 30 Texas 15W United U72 Keystone 222 Funk G711 TRF 3 Surcropper Ferguson's Yellow Dent Number of tests included 6-YEAR AVERAGE, 1951-56 'Refers to the relative...

  18. Corn Hybrids for Texas.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rogers, J. S.; McAfee, T. E.

    1954-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    hybrid, was superior to all othey hybrids in freedom from root lodging. Watsrr 124, Keystone 222, Texas 24, Funk G711 an( Texas 30 were superior to other yellow hybrid\\ in resistance to root lodging. Texas 15W agair Angleton Lake Charles clay... degrees of damage. hybrids in resistance to stalk breakage. Ic.\\db L4, Texas 30 and Watson 124 were the I :ellow hybrids most resistant to stalk breakage. 3nk G711 and Keystone 222 were especially ' :u~eeptible to stalk breakage. a Growers who plan...

  19. Technical Note: Precision and accuracy of a commercially available CT optically stimulated luminescent dosimetry system for the measurement of CT dose index

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vrieze, Thomas J.; Sturchio, Glenn M.; McCollough, Cynthia H. [Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905 (United States); Department of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905 (United States); Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905 (United States)

    2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To determine the precision and accuracy of CTDI{sub 100} measurements made using commercially available optically stimulated luminescent (OSL) dosimeters (Landaur, Inc.) as beam width, tube potential, and attenuating material were varied. Methods: One hundred forty OSL dosimeters were individually exposed to a single axial CT scan, either in air, a 16-cm (head), or 32-cm (body) CTDI phantom at both center and peripheral positions. Scans were performed using nominal total beam widths of 3.6, 6, 19.2, and 28.8 mm at 120 kV and 28.8 mm at 80 kV. Five measurements were made for each of 28 parameter combinations. Measurements were made under the same conditions using a 100-mm long CTDI ion chamber. Exposed OSL dosimeters were returned to the manufacturer, who reported dose to air (in mGy) as a function of distance along the probe, integrated dose, and CTDI{sub 100}. Results: The mean precision averaged over 28 datasets containing five measurements each was 1.4%{+-} 0.6%, range = 0.6%-2.7% for OSL and 0.08%{+-} 0.06%, range = 0.02%-0.3% for ion chamber. The root mean square (RMS) percent differences between OSL and ion chamber CTDI{sub 100} values were 13.8%, 6.4%, and 8.7% for in-air, head, and body measurements, respectively, with an overall RMS percent difference of 10.1%. OSL underestimated CTDI{sub 100} relative to the ion chamber 21/28 times (75%). After manual correction of the 80 kV measurements, the RMS percent differences between OSL and ion chamber measurements were 9.9% and 10.0% for 80 and 120 kV, respectively. Conclusions: Measurements of CTDI{sub 100} with commercially available CT OSL dosimeters had a percent standard deviation of 1.4%. After energy-dependent correction factors were applied, the RMS percent difference in the measured CTDI{sub 100} values was about 10%, with a tendency of OSL to underestimate CTDI relative to the ion chamber. Unlike ion chamber methods, however, OSL dosimeters allow measurement of the radiation dose profile.

  20. Percutaneous Extraction of Cement Leakage After Vertebroplasty Under CT and Fluoroscopy Guidance: A New Technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amoretti, Nicolas, E-mail: amorettinicolas@yahoo.fr; Huwart, Laurent, E-mail: huwart.laurent@wanadoo.fr [Centre Hospitalo-Universitaire de Nice, Department of Radiology (France)

    2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: We report a new minimally invasive technique of extraction of cement leakage following percutaneous vertebroplasty in adults. Methods: Seven adult patients (five women, two men; mean age: 81 years) treated for vertebral compression fractures by percutaneous vertebroplasty had cement leakage into perivertebral soft tissues along the needle route. Immediately after vertebroplasty, the procedure of extraction was performed under computed tomography (CT) and fluoroscopy guidance: a Chiba needle was first inserted using the same route as the vertebroplasty until contact was obtained with the cement fragment. This needle was then used as a guide for an 11-gauge Trocar t'am (Thiebaud, France). After needle withdrawal, a 13-gauge endoscopy clamp was inserted through the cannula to extract the cement fragments. The whole procedure was performed under local anesthesia. Results: In each patient, all cement fragments were withdrawn within 10 min, without complication. Conclusions: This report suggests that this CT- and fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous technique of extraction could reduce the rate of cement leakage-related complications.

  1. Sparse signal reconstruction from polychromatic X-ray CT measurements via mass attenuation discretization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gu, Renliang; Dogandži?, Aleksandar [Iowa State University, Center for Nondestructive Evaluation, 1915 Scholl Road, Ames, IA 50011 (United States)

    2014-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a method for reconstructing sparse images from polychromatic x-ray computed tomography (ct) measurements via mass attenuation coefficient discretization. The material of the inspected object and the incident spectrum are assumed to be unknown. We rewrite the Lambert-Beer’s law in terms of integral expressions of mass attenuation and discretize the resulting integrals. We then present a penalized constrained least-squares optimization approach for reconstructing the underlying object from log-domain measurements, where an active set approach is employed to estimate incident energy density parameters and the nonnegativity and sparsity of the image density map are imposed using negative-energy and smooth ?{sub 1}-norm penalty terms. We propose a two-step scheme for refining the mass attenuation discretization grid by using higher sampling rate over the range with higher photon energy, and eliminating the discretization points that have little effect on accuracy of the forward projection model. This refinement allows us to successfully handle the characteristic lines (Dirac impulses) in the incident energy density spectrum. We compare the proposed method with the standard filtered backprojection, which ignores the polychromatic nature of the measurements and sparsity of the image density map. Numerical simulations using both realistic simulated and real x-ray ct data are presented.

  2. Patients with Life-Threatening Arterial Renal Hemorrhage: CT Angiography and Catheter Angiography with Subsequent Superselective Embolization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sommer, C. M., E-mail: christof.sommer@med.uni-heidelberg.de; Stampfl, U.; Bellemann, N.; Ramsauer, S. [University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Germany); Loenard, B. M. [University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Urology (Germany); Haferkamp, A. [University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Anesthesiology (Germany); Hallscheidt, P.; Richter, G. M.; Kauczor, H. U.; Radeleff, B. A. [University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Germany)

    2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the technical and clinical success of superselective embolization in patients with life-threatening arterial renal hemorrhage undergoing preinterventional CT angiography. Forty-three patients with clinical signs of life-threatening arterial renal hemorrhage underwent CT angiography and catheter angiography. Superselective embolization was indicated in the case of a positive catheter angiography. Primary study goals were technical and clinical success of superselective embolization. Secondary study goals were CT angiographic and catheter angiographic image findings and clinical follow-up. The mean time interval between CT angiography and catheter angiography was 8.3 {+-} 10.3 h (range, 0.2-34.1 h). Arterial renal hemorrhage was identified with CT angiography in 42 of 43 patients (98%) and catheter angiography in 39 of 43 patients (91%) (overview angiography in 4 of 43 patients [9%], selective angiography in 16 of 43 patients [37%], and superselective angiography in 39 of 43 patients [91%]). Superselective embolization was performed in 39 of 43 patients (91%) and technically successful in 37 of 39 patients (95%). Therefore, coil embolization was performed in 13 of 37 patients (35%), liquid embolization in 9 of 37 patients (24%), particulate embolization in 1 of 37 patients (3%), and a combination in 14 of 37 patients (38%). Clinical failure occurred in 8 of 39 patients (21%) and procedure-related complications in 2 of 39 patients (5%). The 30-day mortality rate was 3%. Hemoglobin decreased significantly prior to intervention (P < 0.001) and increased significantly after intervention (P < 0.005). In conclusion, superselective embolization is effective, reliable, and safe in patients with life-threatening arterial renal hemorrhage. In contrast to overview and selective angiography, only superselective angiography allows reliable detection of arterial renal hemorrhage. Preinterventional CT angiography is excellent for detection and localization of arterial renal hemorrhage and appropriate for guidance of the embolization procedure.

  3. Radiofrequency Ablation Assisted by Real-Time Virtual Sonography and CT for Hepatocellular Carcinoma Undetectable by Conventional Sonography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakai, Motoki, E-mail: momonga@wakayama-med.ac.jp; Sato, Morio; Sahara, Shinya; Takasaka, Isao; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Minamiguchi, Hiroki; Tanihata, Hirohiko; Kimura, Masashi [Wakayama Medical University, Department of Radiology (Japan); Takeuchi, Nozomu [Hidaka General Hospital, Department of Radiology (Japan)

    2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Real-time virtual sonography (RVS) is a diagnostic imaging support system, which provides the same cross-sectional multiplanar reconstruction images as ultrasound images on the same monitor screen in real time. The purpose of this study was to evaluate radiofrequency ablation (RFA) assisted by RVS and CT for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) undetectable with conventional sonography. Subjects were 20 patients with 20 HCC nodules not detected by conventional sonography but detectable by CT or MRI. All patients had hepatitis C-induced liver cirrhosis; there were 13 males and 7 females aged 55-81 years (mean, 69.3 years). RFA was performed in the CT room, and the tumor was punctured with the assistance of RVS. CT was performed immediately after puncture, and ablation was performed after confirming that the needle had been inserted into the tumor precisely. The mean number of punctures and success rates of the first puncture were evaluated. Treatment effects were evaluated with dynamic CT every 3 months after RFA. RFA was technically feasible and local tumor control was achieved in all patients. The mean number of punctures was 1.1, and the success rate of the first puncture was 90.0%. This method enabled safe ablation without complications. The mean follow-up period was 13.5 month (range, 9-18 months). No local recurrence was observed at the follow-up points. In conclusion, RFA assisted by RVS and CT is a safe and efficacious method of treatment for HCC undetectable by conventional sonography.

  4. SU-E-J-113: The Influence of Optimizing Pediatric CT Simulator Protocols On the Treatment Dose Calculation in Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Y; Zhang, J; Hu, Q; Tie, J; Wu, H [Key Laboratory of Carcinogenesis and Translational Research (Ministry of Education), Department of Radiotherapy, Peking University Cancer Hospital ' Institute, Beijing (China); Deng, J [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University, New Haven, CT (United States)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To investigate the possibility of applying optimized scanning protocols for pediatric CT simulation by quantifying the dosimetric inaccuracy introduced by using a fixed HU to density conversion. Methods: The images of a CIRS electron density reference phantom (Model 062) were acquired by a Siemens CT simulator (Sensation Open) using the following settings of tube voltage and beam current: 120 kV/190mA (the reference protocol used to calibrate CT for our treatment planning system (TPS)); Fixed 190mA combined with all available kV: 80, 100, and 140; fixed 120 kV and various current from 37 to 444 mA (scanner extremes) with interval of 30 mA. To avoid the HU uncertainty of point sampling in the various inserts of known electron densities, the mean CT numbers of the central cylindrical volume were calculated using DICOMan software. The doses per 100 MU to the reference point (SAD=100cm, Depth=10cm, Field=10X10cm, 6MV photon beam) in a virtual cubic phantom (30X30X30cm) were calculated using Eclipse TPS (calculation model: AcurosXB-11031) by assigning the CT numbers to HU of typical materials acquired by various protocols. Results: For the inserts of densities less than muscle, CT number fluctuations of all protocols were within the tolerance of 10 HU as accepted by AAPM-TG66. For more condensed materials, fixed kV yielded stable HU with any mA combination where largest disparities were found in 1750mg/cc insert: HU{sub reference}=1801(106.6cGy), HU{sub minimum}=1799 (106.6cGy, error{sub dose}=0.00%), HU{sub maximum}=1815 (106.8cGy, error{sub dose}=0.19%). Yet greater disagreements were observed with increasing density when kV was modified: HU{sub minimum}=1646 (104.5cGy, error{sub dose}=- 1.97%), HU{sub maximum}=2487 (116.4cGy, error{sub dose}=9.19%) in 1750mg/cc insert. Conclusion: Without affecting treatment dose calculation, personalized mA optimization of CT simulator can be conducted by fixing kV for a better cost-effectiveness of imaging dose and quality especially for children. Unless recalibrated, kV should be constant for all anatomical sites if diagnostic CT scanner is used as a simulator. This work was partially supported by Capital Medical Development Scientific Research Fund of China.

  5. International Conference on Fully 3D Reconstruction in Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Linau, Germany, July 9-13, 2007 Abstract--Four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Germany, July 9-13, 2007 Abstract--Four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT) plays an important role computed tomography (4D-CT) with respiratory gating provides dynamic volume imaging datasets of the moving

  6. Objective index of image fidelity for JPEG2000 compressed body CT images

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Kil Joong; Lee, Kyoung Ho; Kang, Heung-Sik; Kim, So Yeon; Kim, Young Hoon; Kim, Bohyoung; Seo, Jinwook; Mantiuk, Rafal [Department of Radiation Applied Life Science, Seoul National University College of Medicine, 28 Yongon-dong, Chongno-gu, Seoul, 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Institute of Radiation Medicine, and Seoul National University Medical Research Center, 300 Gumi-dong, Bundang-gu, Seongnam-si, Gyeonggido, 463-707 (Korea, Republic of); School of Computer Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, 599 Gwanak-Ro, Gwanak-Gu, Seoul, 151-744 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Computer Science, University of British Columbia, 201-2366 Main Mall, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 1Z4 (Canada)

    2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Compression ratio (CR) has been the de facto standard index of compression level for medical images. The aim of the study is to evaluate the CR, peak signal-to-noise ratio (PSNR), and a perceptual quality metric (high-dynamic range visual difference predictor HDR-VDP) as objective indices of image fidelity for Joint Photographic Experts Group (JPEG) 2000 compressed body computed tomography (CT) images, from the viewpoint of visually lossless compression approach. A total of 250 body CT images obtained with five different scan protocols (5-mm-thick abdomen, 0.67-mm-thick abdomen, 5-mm-thick lung, 0.67-mm-thick lung, and 5-mm-thick low-dose lung) were compressed to one of five CRs (reversible, 6:1, 8:1, 10:1, and 15:1). The PSNR and HDR-VDP values were calculated for the 250 pairs of the original and compressed images. By alternately displaying an original and its compressed image on the same monitor, five radiologists independently determined if the pair was distinguishable or indistinguishable. The kappa statistic for the interobserver agreement among the five radiologists' responses was 0.70. According to the radiologists' responses, the number of distinguishable image pairs tended to significantly differ among the five scan protocols at 6:1-10:1 compressions (Fisher-Freeman-Halton exact tests). Spearman's correlation coefficients between each of the CR, PSNR, and HDR-VDP and the number of radiologists who responded as distinguishable were 0.72, -0.77, and 0.85, respectively. Using the radiologists' pooled responses as the reference standards, the areas under the receiver-operating-characteristic curves for the CR, PSNR, and HDR-VDP were 0.87, 0.93, and 0.97, respectively, showing significant differences between the CR and PSNR (p=0.04), or HDR-VDP (p<0.001), and between the PSNR and HDR-VDP (p<0.001). In conclusion, the CR is less suitable than the PSNR or HDR-VDP as an objective index of image fidelity for JPEG2000 compressed body CT images. The HDR-VDP is more promising than the PSNR as such an index.

  7. Regarding Autocontouring and Manual Contouring: Which Is the Better Method for Target Delineation Using 18F-FDG PET/CT in NonSmall Cell Lung Cancer? By K. Wu et al

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Using 18F-FDG PET/CT in Non­Small Cell Lung Cancer? By K. Wu et al M Hatt, D Visvikis, C Cheze Le Rest delineation in PET/CT for NSCLC. 17 NSCLC tumors were delineated with both automated and manual approaches, using either combined PET/CT or CT and PET independently. As expected, the manual contouring of the PET

  8. Evaluation of Radiation Dose Reduction during CT Scans Using Oxide Bismuth and Nano-Barium Sulfate Shields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seoung, Youl-Hun

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate radiation dose reduction and image quality during CT scanning by using a new dose reduction fiber sheet (DRFS) with commercially available bismuth shields. These DRFS were composed of nano-barium sulfate (BaSO4), filling the gaps left by the large oxide bismuth (Bi2O3) particle sizes. The radiation dose was measured five times at directionss of 12 o'clock from the center of the polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) head phantom to calculate an average value using a CT ionization chamber. The image quality measured CT transverse images of the PMMA head phantom depending on X-ray tube voltages and the type of shielding. Two regions of interest in CT transverse images were chosen from the right and left areas under the surface of the PMMA head phantom and from ion chamber holes located at directions of 12 o'clock from the center of the PMMA head phantom. The results of this study showed that the new DRFS shields could reduce dosages to 15.61%, 23.05%, and 22.71% more in ...

  9. 200 MeV Proton Radiography Studies with a Hand Phantom Using a Prototype Proton CT Scanner

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    200 MeV Proton Radiography Studies with a Hand Phantom Using a Prototype Proton CT Scanner Tia.F.W. Sadrozinski, K. Schubert, R. Schulte, B. Schultze, D. Steinberg, M. Witt, A. Zatserklyaniy Abstract--Proton alignment and verification procedures for proton beam radiation therapy. The quality of the image, both

  10. Osteocytes number and volume in osteoporotic and in healthy bone biopsies analysed using Synchrotron CT: a pilot study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prohaska, Steffen

    Synchrotron CT: a pilot study Ritter Z.1 , Staude A.2 , Prohaska S.3 , Brand R.4 Friedmann A.1,5 , Hege H.C.3 by synchrotron radiation to quantify the number and volume was set. The major objective was to determine in 70% ethanol in tailored containers adapted for the measurement requirement at BESSY aiming

  11. EVALUATION OF GEOMETRIC FEATURE DESCRIPTORS FOR DETECTION AND CLASSIFICATION OF LUNG NODULES IN LOW DOSE CT SCANS OF THE CHEST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farag, Aly A.

    EVALUATION OF GEOMETRIC FEATURE DESCRIPTORS FOR DETECTION AND CLASSIFICATION OF LUNG NODULES IN LOW descriptors, common in computer vision, for false positive reduction and for classification of lung nodules in low dose CT (LDCT) scans. A data-driven lung nodule modeling approach creates templates for common

  12. TRACE/PARCS calculations of exercises 1 and 2 of the V1000CT-2 benchmark

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ivanov, B.; Ivanov, K. [Pennsylvania State Univ., 230 Reber Bldg, Univ. Park, PA 16801 (United States); Popov, E. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 1 Bethel Valley Rd., Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Exercises 1 and 2 of the VVER-1000 Coolant Transient Benchmark Phase 2 (V1000CT-2) are investigated using coupled three-dimensional (3-D) neutron kinetics/thermal-hydraulics code TRACE/PARCS. Two coarse mesh 3-D thermal-hydraulic models (with six angular sectors and with eighteen angular sectors) were developed for the system code TRACE for Exercise 1 and their applicability is evaluated using the test data provided in the benchmark specification. The six sector model is then coupled with the PARCS 3-D neutron kinetics model in order to analyze Exercise 2 of the benchmark. The results show that TRACE code is accurate enough to simulate the flow mixing occurring in the downcomer of the VVER-1000 reactor. (authors)

  13. CT Measurements of Two-Phase Flow in Fractured Porous Media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brigham, William E.; Castanier Louis M.; Hughes, Richard G.

    1999-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the design, construction, and preliminary results of an experiment that studies imbibition displacement in two fracture blocks. Multiphase (oil/water) displacements will be conducted at the same rate on three core configurations. The configurations are a compact core, a two-block system with a 1 mm spacer between the blocks, and a two-block system with no spacer. The blocks are sealed in epoxy so that saturation measurements can be made throughout the displacement experiments using a Computed Tomography (CT) scanner. Preliminary results are presented from a water/air experiment. These results suggest that it is incorrect to assume negligible capillary continuity between matrix blocks as is often done.

  14. CT of the liver and spleen with EOE-13: review of 225 examinations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, D.L.; Vermess, M.; Doppman, J.L.; Simon, R.M.; Sugarbaker, P.H.; O'Leary, T.J.; Grimes, G.; Chatterji, D.G.; Willis, M.

    1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EOE-13 is an experimental liver-spleen-specific computed tomographic (CT) contrast agent developed at the National Institutes of Health. Experience with this agent in 225 clinical examinations is described. On average, use of EOE-13 increases the attenuation of normal liver by 32.5 H and that of normal spleen by 52.3 H. Tumors in these organs increase only 2.6 H, making them more easily detectable. Most of the iodine in EOE-13 appears to clear from the liver and spleen by 24 hr after injection. No deaths or permanent morbidity have been observed. The complication rate is 3.6%. EOE-13 is valuable for the detection of hepatic and splenic tumors.

  15. Mapping motion from 4D-MRI to 3D-CT for use in 4D dose calculations: A technical feasibility study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boye, Dirk [Center for Proton Therapy, Paul Scherrer Institut, 5232 Villigen-PSI (Switzerland); Computer Vision Laboratory, ETH Zuerich, 8092 Zuerich (Switzerland); Lomax, Tony [Center for Proton Therapy, Paul Scherrer Institut, 5232 Villigen-PSI (Switzerland); ETH Zuerich, 8092 Zuerich (Switzerland); Knopf, Antje [Center for Proton Therapy, Paul Scherrer Institut, 5232 Villigen-PSI (Switzerland)

    2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Target sites affected by organ motion require a time resolved (4D) dose calculation. Typical 4D dose calculations use 4D-CT as a basis. Unfortunately, 4D-CT images have the disadvantage of being a 'snap-shot' of the motion during acquisition and of assuming regularity of breathing. In addition, 4D-CT acquisitions involve a substantial additional dose burden to the patient making many, repeated 4D-CT acquisitions undesirable. Here the authors test the feasibility of an alternative approach to generate patient specific 4D-CT data sets. Methods: In this approach motion information is extracted from 4D-MRI. Simulated 4D-CT data sets [which the authors call 4D-CT(MRI)] are created by warping extracted deformation fields to a static 3D-CT data set. The employment of 4D-MRI sequences for this has the advantage that no assumptions on breathing regularity are made, irregularities in breathing can be studied and, if necessary, many repeat imaging studies (and consequently simulated 4D-CT data sets) can be performed on patients and/or volunteers. The accuracy of 4D-CT(MRI)s has been validated by 4D proton dose calculations. Our 4D dose algorithm takes into account displacements as well as deformations on the originating 4D-CT/4D-CT(MRI) by calculating the dose of each pencil beam based on an individual time stamp of when that pencil beam is applied. According to corresponding displacement and density-variation-maps the position and the water equivalent range of the dose grid points is adjusted at each time instance. Results: 4D dose distributions, using 4D-CT(MRI) data sets as input were compared to results based on a reference conventional 4D-CT data set capturing similar motion characteristics. Almost identical 4D dose distributions could be achieved, even though scanned proton beams are very sensitive to small differences in the patient geometry. In addition, 4D dose calculations have been performed on the same patient, but using 4D-CT(MRI) data sets based on variable breathing patterns to show the effect of possible irregular breathing on active scanned proton therapy. Using a 4D-CT(MRI), including motion irregularities, resulted in significantly different proton dose distributions. Conclusions: The authors have demonstrated that motion information from 4D-MRI can be used to generate realistic 4D-CT data sets on the basis of a single static 3D-CT data set. 4D-CT(MRI) presents a novel approach to test the robustness of treatment plans in the circumstance of patient motion.

  16. CT imaging during microwave ablation: Analysis of spatial and temporal tissue contraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Dong; Brace, Christopher L., E-mail: clbrace@wisc.edu [Departments of Radiology and Biomedical Engineering, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 (United States)

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To analyze the spatial distribution and temporal development of liver tissue contraction during high-temperature ablation by using intraprocedural computed tomography (CT) imaging. Methods: A total of 46 aluminum fiducial markers were positioned in a 60 × 45 mm grid, in a single plane, around a microwave ablation antenna in each of six ex vivo bovine liver samples. Ablations were performed for 10 min at 100 W. CT data of the liver sample were acquired every 30 s during ablation. Fiducial motion between acquisitions was tracked in postprocessing and used to calculate measures of tissue contraction and contraction rates. The spatial distribution and temporal evolution of contraction were analyzed. Results: Fiducial displacement indicated that the zone measured postablation was 8.2 ± 1.8 mm (?20%) smaller in the radial direction and 7.1 ± 1.0 mm (?10%) shorter in the longitudinal direction than the preablation tissue dimension. Therefore, the total ablation volume was reduced from its preablation value by approximately 45%. Very little longitudinal contraction was noted in the distal portion of the ablation zone. Central tissues contracted more than 60%, which was near an estimated limit of ?70% based on initial water content. More peripheral tissues contracted only 15% in any direction. Contraction rates peaked during the first 60 s of heating with a roughly exponential decay over time. Conclusions: Ablation zones measured posttreatment are significantly smaller than the pretreatment tissue dimensions. Tissue contraction is spatially dependent, with the greatest effect occurring in the central ablation zone. Contraction rate peaks early and decays over time.

  17. Statistical CT noise reduction with multiscale decomposition and penalized weighted least squares in the projection domain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tang Shaojie; Tang Xiangyang [Imaging and Medical Physics, Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Emory University School of Medicine, 1701 Uppergate Dr., C-5018, Atlanta, Georgia 30322 (United States); School of Automation, Xi'an University of Posts and Telecommunications, Xi'an, Shaanxi 710121 (China); Imaging and Medical Physics, Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Emory University School of Medicine, 1701 Uppergate Dr., C-5018, Atlanta, Georgia 30322 (United States)

    2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purposes: The suppression of noise in x-ray computed tomography (CT) imaging is of clinical relevance for diagnostic image quality and the potential for radiation dose saving. Toward this purpose, statistical noise reduction methods in either the image or projection domain have been proposed, which employ a multiscale decomposition to enhance the performance of noise suppression while maintaining image sharpness. Recognizing the advantages of noise suppression in the projection domain, the authors propose a projection domain multiscale penalized weighted least squares (PWLS) method, in which the angular sampling rate is explicitly taken into consideration to account for the possible variation of interview sampling rate in advanced clinical or preclinical applications. Methods: The projection domain multiscale PWLS method is derived by converting an isotropic diffusion partial differential equation in the image domain into the projection domain, wherein a multiscale decomposition is carried out. With adoption of the Markov random field or soft thresholding objective function, the projection domain multiscale PWLS method deals with noise at each scale. To compensate for the degradation in image sharpness caused by the projection domain multiscale PWLS method, an edge enhancement is carried out following the noise reduction. The performance of the proposed method is experimentally evaluated and verified using the projection data simulated by computer and acquired by a CT scanner. Results: The preliminary results show that the proposed projection domain multiscale PWLS method outperforms the projection domain single-scale PWLS method and the image domain multiscale anisotropic diffusion method in noise reduction. In addition, the proposed method can preserve image sharpness very well while the occurrence of 'salt-and-pepper' noise and mosaic artifacts can be avoided. Conclusions: Since the interview sampling rate is taken into account in the projection domain multiscale decomposition, the proposed method is anticipated to be useful in advanced clinical and preclinical applications where the interview sampling rate varies.

  18. Contouring Variability of the Penile Bulb on CT Images: Quantitative Assessment Using a Generalized Concordance Index

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carillo, Viviana [Department of Medical Physics, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milano (Italy)] [Department of Medical Physics, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milano (Italy); Cozzarini, Cesare [Department of Radiotherapy, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milano (Italy)] [Department of Radiotherapy, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milano (Italy); Perna, Lucia; Calandra, Mauro [Department of Medical Physics, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milano (Italy)] [Department of Medical Physics, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milano (Italy); Gianolini, Stefano [Medical Software Solutions GmbH, Hagendorn (Switzerland)] [Medical Software Solutions GmbH, Hagendorn (Switzerland); Rancati, Tiziana [Prostate Cancer Program, IRCCS National Institute of Cancer, Milano (Italy)] [Prostate Cancer Program, IRCCS National Institute of Cancer, Milano (Italy); Spinelli, Antonello Enrico [Department of Medical Physics, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milano (Italy)] [Department of Medical Physics, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milano (Italy); Vavassori, Vittorio [Department of Radiotherapy, Cliniche Gavazzeni Humanitas, Bergamo (Italy)] [Department of Radiotherapy, Cliniche Gavazzeni Humanitas, Bergamo (Italy); Villa, Sergio [Department of Radiotherapy 1, IRCCS National Institute of Cancer, Milano (Italy)] [Department of Radiotherapy 1, IRCCS National Institute of Cancer, Milano (Italy); Valdagni, Riccardo [Prostate Cancer Program, IRCCS National Institute of Cancer, Milano (Italy) [Prostate Cancer Program, IRCCS National Institute of Cancer, Milano (Italy); Department of Radiotherapy 1, IRCCS National Institute of Cancer, Milano (Italy); Fiorino, Claudio, E-mail: fiorino.claudio@hsr.it [Department of Medical Physics, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milano (Italy)] [Department of Medical Physics, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milano (Italy)

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Within a multicenter study (DUE-01) focused on the search of predictors of erectile dysfunction and urinary toxicity after radiotherapy for prostate cancer, a dummy run exercise on penile bulb (PB) contouring on computed tomography (CT) images was carried out. The aim of this study was to quantitatively assess interobserver contouring variability by the application of the generalized DICE index. Methods and Materials: Fifteen physicians from different Institutes drew the PB on CT images of 10 patients. The spread of DICE values was used to objectively select those observers who significantly disagreed with the others. The analyses were performed with a dedicated module in the VODCA software package. Results: DICE values were found to significantly change among observers and patients. The mean DICE value was 0.67, ranging between 0.43 and 0.80. The statistics of DICE coefficients identified 4 of 15 observers who systematically showed a value below the average (p value range, 0.013 - 0.059): Mean DICE values were 0.62 for the 4 'bad' observers compared to 0.69 of the 11 'good' observers. For all bad observers, the main cause of the disagreement was identified. Average DICE values were significantly worse from the average in 2 of 10 patients (0.60 vs. 0.70, p < 0.05) because of the limited visibility of the PB. Excluding the bad observers and the 'bad' patients,' the mean DICE value increased from 0.67 to 0.70; interobserver variability, expressed in terms of standard deviation of DICE spread, was also reduced. Conclusions: The obtained values of DICE around 0.7 shows an acceptable agreement, considered the small dimension of the PB. Additional strategies to improve this agreement are under consideration and include an additional tutorial of the so-called bad observers with a recontouring procedure, or the recontouring by a single observer of the PB for all patients included in the DUE-01 study.

  19. Assessment of contrast enhanced respiration managed cone-beam CT for image guided radiotherapy of intrahepatic tumors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jensen, Nikolaj K. G., E-mail: nkyj@regionsjaelland.dk [Physics and Engineering, London Regional Cancer Program, London, Ontario N6A3K7 (Canada)] [Physics and Engineering, London Regional Cancer Program, London, Ontario N6A3K7 (Canada); Stewart, Errol [Radiology, St. Joseph's Health Care, London, Ontario N6A 4V2 (Canada) [Radiology, St. Joseph's Health Care, London, Ontario N6A 4V2 (Canada); Imaging Research Lab, Robarts Research Institute, London, Ontario N6A 5B7 (Canada); Imaging Program, Lawson Health Research Institute, London, Ontario N6C 2R5 (Canada); Lock, Michael; Fisher, Barbara [Radiation Oncology, London Regional Cancer Program, London, Ontario N6A3K7 (Canada) [Radiation Oncology, London Regional Cancer Program, London, Ontario N6A3K7 (Canada); Department of Oncology, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 4L6 (Canada); Kozak, Roman [Radiology, St. Joseph's Health Care, London, Ontario N6A 4V2 (Canada)] [Radiology, St. Joseph's Health Care, London, Ontario N6A 4V2 (Canada); Chen, Jeff [Physics and Engineering, London Regional Cancer Program, London, Ontario N6A3K7 (Canada) [Physics and Engineering, London Regional Cancer Program, London, Ontario N6A3K7 (Canada); Department of Oncology, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 4L6 (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 5C1 (Canada); Lee, Ting-Yim [Radiology, St. Joseph's Health Care, London, Ontario N6A 4V2 (Canada) [Radiology, St. Joseph's Health Care, London, Ontario N6A 4V2 (Canada); Imaging Research Lab, Robarts Research Institute, London, Ontario N6A 5B7 (Canada); Imaging Program, Lawson Health Research Institute, London, Ontario N6C 2R5 (Canada); Department of Oncology, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 4L6 (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 5C1 (Canada); Wong, Eugene [Physics and Engineering, London Regional Cancer Program, London, Ontario N6A3K7 (Canada) [Physics and Engineering, London Regional Cancer Program, London, Ontario N6A3K7 (Canada); Department of Oncology, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 4L6 (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 5C1 (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Contrast enhancement and respiration management are widely used during image acquisition for radiotherapy treatment planning of liver tumors along with respiration management at the treatment unit. However, neither respiration management nor intravenous contrast is commonly used during cone-beam CT (CBCT) image acquisition for alignment prior to radiotherapy. In this study, the authors investigate the potential gains of injecting an iodinated contrast agent in combination with respiration management during CBCT acquisition for liver tumor radiotherapy. Methods: Five rabbits with implanted liver tumors were subjected to CBCT with and without motion management and contrast injection. The acquired CBCT images were registered to the planning CT to determine alignment accuracy and dosimetric impact. The authors developed a simulation tool for simulating contrast-enhanced CBCT images from dynamic contrast enhanced CT imaging (DCE-CT) to determine optimal contrast injection protocols. The tool was validated against contrast-enhanced CBCT of the rabbit subjects and was used for five human patients diagnosed with hepatocellular carcinoma. Results: In the rabbit experiment, when neither motion management nor contrast was used, tumor centroid misalignment between planning image and CBCT was 9.2 mm. This was reduced to 2.8?mm when both techniques were employed. Tumors were not visualized in clinical CBCT images of human subjects. Simulated contrast-enhanced CBCT was found to improve tumor contrast in all subjects. Different patients were found to require different contrast injections to maximize tumor contrast. Conclusions: Based on the authors’ animal study, respiration managed contrast enhanced CBCT improves IGRT significantly. Contrast enhanced CBCT benefits from patient specific tracer kinetics determined from DCE-CT.

  20. The effects of Biozyme on the germination and emergence of bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) and sweet corn (Zea mays L.) seeds under suboptimal temperatures, pesticide overdose, and salinity stress

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Campos Cruz, Armando

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Biozyme on the Germination and Emergence of Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L ) and Sweet Corn (Zea mays L. ) Seeds Under Suboptimal Temperatures, Pesticide Overdose, and Salinity Stress. (May 1994) Armando Campos Cruz, B S. , Instituto Tecnologico y de... thanks go to Grupo Bioquimico Mexicano S. A. de C. V. , for their financial assistance and support of my research project without which this work could not have been completed, and to the Department of Horticultural Sciences of Texas A&M University...

  1. Calculations of two new dose metrics proposed by AAPM Task Group 111 using the measurements with standard CT dosimetry phantoms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Xinhua; Zhang, Da; Liu, Bob [Division of Diagnostic Imaging Physics and Webster Center for Advanced Research and Education in Radiation, Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States)] [Division of Diagnostic Imaging Physics and Webster Center for Advanced Research and Education in Radiation, Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States)

    2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: AAPM Task Group 111 proposed to measure the equilibrium dose-pitch product D-caret{sub eq} for scan modes involving table translation and the midpoint dose D{sub L}(0) for stationary-table modes on the central and peripheral axes of sufficiently long (e.g., at least 40 cm) phantoms. This paper presents an alternative approach to calculate both metrics using the measurements of scanning the standard computed tomographic (CT) dosimetry phantoms on CT scanners.Methods: D-caret{sub eq} was calculated from CTDI{sub 100} and ?(CTDI{sub 100}) (CTDI{sub 100} efficiency), and D{sub L}(0) was calculated from D-caret{sub eq} and the approach to equilibrium function H(L) =D{sub L}(0)/D{sub eq}, where D{sub eq} was the equilibrium dose. CTDI{sub 100} may be directly obtained from several sources (such as medical physicist's CT scanner performance evaluation or the IMPACT CT patient dosimetry calculator), or be derived from CTDI{sub Vol} using the central to peripheral CTDI{sub 100} ratio (R{sub 100}). The authors have provided the required ?(CTDI{sub 100}) and H(L) data in two previous papers [X. Li, D. Zhang, and B. Liu, Med. Phys. 39, 901–905 (2012); and ibid. 40, 031903 (10pp.) (2013)]. R{sub 100} was assessed for a series of GE, Siemens, Philips, and Toshiba CT scanners with multiple settings of scan field of view, tube voltage, and bowtie filter.Results: The calculated D{sub L}(0) and D{sub L}(0)/D{sub eq} in PMMA and water cylinders were consistent with the measurements on two GE CT scanners (LightSpeed 16 and VCT) by Dixon and Ballard [Med. Phys. 34, 3399–3413 (2007)], the measurements on a Siemens CT scanner (SOMATOM Spirit Power) by Descamps et al. [J. Appl. Clin. Med. Phys. 13, 293–302 (2012)], and the Monte Carlo simulations by Boone [Med. Phys. 36, 4547–4554 (2009)].Conclusions: D-caret{sub eq} and D{sub L}(0) can be calculated using the alternative approach. The authors have provided the required ?(CTDI{sub 100}) and H(L) data in two previous papers. R{sub 100} is presented for a majority of multidetector CT scanners currently on the market, and can be easily assessed for other CT scanners or operating conditions not covered in this study. The central to peripheral D{sub eq} ratio is about 1.50 and 1.12 times of R{sub 100} for the 32- and 16-cm diameter PMMA phantom, respectively.

  2. Effects of ray profile modeling on resolution recovery in clinical CT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hofmann, Christian [Institute of Medical Physics, Friedrich–Alexander University (FAU), Erlangen, Bavaria 91052 (Germany)] [Institute of Medical Physics, Friedrich–Alexander University (FAU), Erlangen, Bavaria 91052 (Germany); Knaup, Michael [Medical Physics in Radiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg 69120 (Germany)] [Medical Physics in Radiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg 69120 (Germany); Kachelrieß, Marc, E-mail: marc.kachelriess@dkfz-heidelberg.de [Medical Physics in Radiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg 69120, Germany and Institute of Medical Physics, Friedrich–Alexander University (FAU), Erlangen, Bavaria 91052 (Germany)] [Medical Physics in Radiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg 69120, Germany and Institute of Medical Physics, Friedrich–Alexander University (FAU), Erlangen, Bavaria 91052 (Germany)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Iterative image reconstruction gains more and more interest in clinical routine, as it promises to reduce image noise (and thereby patient dose), to reduce artifacts, or to improve spatial resolution. However, among vendors and researchers, there is no consensus of how to best achieve these goals. The authors are focusing on the aspect of geometric ray profile modeling, which is realized by some algorithms, while others model the ray as a straight line. The authors incorporate ray-modeling (RM) in nonregularized iterative reconstruction. That means, instead of using one simple single needle beam to represent the x-ray, the authors evaluate the double integral of attenuation path length over the finite source distribution and the finite detector element size in the numerical forward projection. Our investigations aim at analyzing the resolution recovery (RR) effects of RM. Resolution recovery means that frequencies can be recovered beyond the resolution limit of the imaging system. In order to evaluate, whether clinical CT images can benefit from modeling the geometrical properties of each x-ray, the authors performed a 2D simulation study of a clinical CT fan-beam geometry that includes the precise modeling of these geometrical properties. Methods: All simulations and reconstructions are performed in native fan-beam geometry. A water phantom with resolution bar patterns and a Forbild thorax phantom with circular resolution patterns representing calcifications in the heart region are simulated. An FBP reconstruction with a Ram–Lak kernel is used as a reference reconstruction. The FBP is compared to iterative reconstruction techniques with and without RM: An ordered subsets convex (OSC) algorithm without any RM (OSC), an OSC where the forward projection is modeled concerning the finite focal spot and detector size (OSC-RM) and an OSC with RM and with a matched forward and backprojection pair (OSC-T-RM, T for transpose). In all cases, noise was matched to be able to focus on comparing spatial resolution. The authors use two different simulation settings. Both are based on the geometry of a typical clinical CT system (0.7 mm detector element size at isocenter, 1024 projections per rotation). Setting one has an exaggerated source width of 5.0 mm. Setting two has a realistically small source width of 0.5 mm. The authors also investigate the transition from setting one to two. To quantify image quality, the authors analyze line profiles through the resolution patterns to define a contrast factor (CF) for contrast-resolution plots, and the authors compare the normalized cross-correlation (NCC) with respect to the ground truth of the circular resolution patterns. To independently analyze whether RM is of advantage, the authors implemented several iterative reconstruction algorithms: The statistical iterative reconstruction algorithm OSC, the ordered subsets simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique (OSSART) and another statistical iterative reconstruction algorithm, denoted with ordered subsets maximum likelihood (OSML) algorithm. All algorithms were implemented both without RM (denoted as OSC, OSSART, and OSML) and with RM (denoted as OSC-RM, OSSART-RM, and OSML-RM). Results: For the unrealistic case of a 5.0 mm focal spot the CF can be improved by a factor of two due to RM: the 4.2 LP/cm bar pattern, which is the first bar pattern that cannot be resolved without RM, can be easily resolved with RM. For the realistic case of a 0.5 mm focus, all results show approximately the same CF. The NCC shows no significant dependency on RM when the source width is smaller than 2.0 mm (as in clinical CT). From 2.0 mm to 5.0 mm focal spot size increasing improvements can be observed with RM. Conclusions: Geometric RM in iterative reconstruction helps improving spatial resolution, if the ray cross-section is significantly larger than the ray sampling distance. In clinical CT, however, the ray is not much thicker than the distance between neighboring ray centers, as the focal spot size is small and detector crosstalk is negligi

  3. SU-E-I-78: Improving Prostatic Delineation Using Dual-Energy CT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gersh, J; Fried, D [Gibbs Cancer Center ' Research Institute - Pelham, Greer, SC (United States)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Visual prostatic definition is difficult using conventional CT. This is because the prostate is surrounded closely with tissue of similar electron density. Definition is further hindered when the region contains high-Z material (such as fiducial markers). Dual-energy CT (DECT) is a technique where images are rendered using two tube voltages during a single scan session. This study evaluates DECT as a means of improving prostatic volume delineation for radiation oncology. Methods: The patients were scanned using a Definition AS20 (Siemens Healthcare, Malvern, PA). This device uses a single-tube configuration, where two scans of differing energies are performed in serial. The scans are acquired with tube voltage of 80kVp and 140kVp. Following acquisition, these scan data were used to generate effective monoenergetic scans ranging from 40keV to 190keV. In the current study, the data were presented to observers using a novel program, which allows real-time adjustment of window, level, and effective keV; all while scrolling through volumetric slices. Three patients were scanned, each with a different high-contrast material in or around the prostate: I-125 seeds, gold fiducial markers, and prostatic calcifications. These images are compared to a weighted average of the 80kVp and 140kVP scans, which yield a scan similar to that of a 120 kVp scan, which is a common tube voltage in radiation oncology. Results: Prostatic definition improved in each case. Differentiation of soft tissue from surrounding adipose improved with lower keV, while higher keV provided a reduction of high-z artifacts. Furthermore, the dynamic adjustment of the keV allowed observers to better recognize regions of differing tissue composition within this relatively homogeneous area. Conclusion: By simultaneously providing the observer with the benefits of high-energy images and low-energy images, and allowing adjustment in real-time, improved imaging in highly homogeneous regions such as the male pelvis is achievable.

  4. Three-dimensional anisotropic adaptive filtering of projection data for noise reduction in cone beam CT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maier, Andreas; Wigstroem, Lars; Hofmann, Hannes G.; Hornegger, Joachim; Zhu Lei; Strobel, Norbert; Fahrig, Rebecca [Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States) and Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, Linkoeping University, Linkoeping (Sweden); Pattern Recognition Laboratory, Department of Computer Science, Friedrich-Alexander University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, 91054, Erlangen (Germany); Nuclear and Radiological Engineering and Medical Physics Programs, George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States); Siemens AG Healthcare, Forchheim 91301 (Germany); Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

    2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The combination of quickly rotating C-arm gantry with digital flat panel has enabled the acquisition of three-dimensional data (3D) in the interventional suite. However, image quality is still somewhat limited since the hardware has not been optimized for CT imaging. Adaptive anisotropic filtering has the ability to improve image quality by reducing the noise level and therewith the radiation dose without introducing noticeable blurring. By applying the filtering prior to 3D reconstruction, noise-induced streak artifacts are reduced as compared to processing in the image domain. Methods: 3D anisotropic adaptive filtering was used to process an ensemble of 2D x-ray views acquired along a circular trajectory around an object. After arranging the input data into a 3D space (2D projections + angle), the orientation of structures was estimated using a set of differently oriented filters. The resulting tensor representation of local orientation was utilized to control the anisotropic filtering. Low-pass filtering is applied only along structures to maintain high spatial frequency components perpendicular to these. The evaluation of the proposed algorithm includes numerical simulations, phantom experiments, and in-vivo data which were acquired using an AXIOM Artis dTA C-arm system (Siemens AG, Healthcare Sector, Forchheim, Germany). Spatial resolution and noise levels were compared with and without adaptive filtering. A human observer study was carried out to evaluate low-contrast detectability. Results: The adaptive anisotropic filtering algorithm was found to significantly improve low-contrast detectability by reducing the noise level by half (reduction of the standard deviation in certain areas from 74 to 30 HU). Virtually no degradation of high contrast spatial resolution was observed in the modulation transfer function (MTF) analysis. Although the algorithm is computationally intensive, hardware acceleration using Nvidia's CUDA Interface provided an 8.9-fold speed-up of the processing (from 1336 to 150 s). Conclusions: Adaptive anisotropic filtering has the potential to substantially improve image quality and/or reduce the radiation dose required for obtaining 3D image data using cone beam CT.

  5. Volumetric quantification of lung nodules in CT with iterative reconstruction (ASiR and MBIR)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Baiyu [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 and Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States)] [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 and Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Barnhart, Huiman [Department of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States)] [Department of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Richard, Samuel [Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 and Department of Radiology, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States)] [Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 and Department of Radiology, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Robins, Marthony [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States)] [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Colsher, James [Department of Radiology, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States)] [Department of Radiology, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Samei, Ehsan [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States) [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Department of Radiology, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Department of Physics, Department of Biomedical Engineering, and Department of Electronic and Computer Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States)

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Volume quantifications of lung nodules with multidetector computed tomography (CT) images provide useful information for monitoring nodule developments. The accuracy and precision of the volume quantification, however, can be impacted by imaging and reconstruction parameters. This study aimed to investigate the impact of iterative reconstruction algorithms on the accuracy and precision of volume quantification with dose and slice thickness as additional variables.Methods: Repeated CT images were acquired from an anthropomorphic chest phantom with synthetic nodules (9.5 and 4.8 mm) at six dose levels, and reconstructed with three reconstruction algorithms [filtered backprojection (FBP), adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASiR), and model based iterative reconstruction (MBIR)] into three slice thicknesses. The nodule volumes were measured with two clinical software (A: Lung VCAR, B: iNtuition), and analyzed for accuracy and precision.Results: Precision was found to be generally comparable between FBP and iterative reconstruction with no statistically significant difference noted for different dose levels, slice thickness, and segmentation software. Accuracy was found to be more variable. For large nodules, the accuracy was significantly different between ASiR and FBP for all slice thicknesses with both software, and significantly different between MBIR and FBP for 0.625 mm slice thickness with Software A and for all slice thicknesses with Software B. For small nodules, the accuracy was more similar between FBP and iterative reconstruction, with the exception of ASIR vs FBP at 1.25 mm with Software A and MBIR vs FBP at 0.625 mm with Software A.Conclusions: The systematic difference between the accuracy of FBP and iterative reconstructions highlights the importance of extending current segmentation software to accommodate the image characteristics of iterative reconstructions. In addition, a calibration process may help reduce the dependency of accuracy on reconstruction algorithms, such that volumes quantified from scans of different reconstruction algorithms can be compared. The little difference found between the precision of FBP and iterative reconstructions could be a result of both iterative reconstruction's diminished noise reduction at the edge of the nodules as well as the loss of resolution at high noise levels with iterative reconstruction. The findings do not rule out potential advantage of IR that might be evident in a study that uses a larger number of nodules or repeated scans.

  6. Process Design and Economics for Biochemical Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass to Ethanol: Dilute-Acid Pretreatment and Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Corn Stover

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Humbird, D.; Davis, R.; Tao, L.; Kinchin, C.; Hsu, D.; Aden, A.; Schoen, P.; Lukas, J.; Olthof, B.; Worley, M.; Sexton, D.; Dudgeon, D.

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes one potential biochemical ethanol conversion process, conceptually based upon core conversion and process integration research at NREL. The overarching process design converts corn stover to ethanol by dilute-acid pretreatment, enzymatic saccharification, and co-fermentation. Building on design reports published in 2002 and 1999, NREL, together with the subcontractor Harris Group Inc., performed a complete review of the process design and economic model for the biomass-to-ethanol process. This update reflects NREL's current vision of the biochemical ethanol process and includes the latest research in the conversion areas (pretreatment, conditioning, saccharification, and fermentation), optimizations in product recovery, and our latest understanding of the ethanol plant's back end (wastewater and utilities). The conceptual design presented here reports ethanol production economics as determined by 2012 conversion targets and 'nth-plant' project costs and financing. For the biorefinery described here, processing 2,205 dry ton/day at 76% theoretical ethanol yield (79 gal/dry ton), the ethanol selling price is $2.15/gal in 2007$.

  7. NREL 2012 Achievement of Ethanol Cost Targets: Biochemical Ethanol Fermentation via Dilute-Acid Pretreatment and Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Corn Stover

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tao, L.; Schell, D.; Davis, R.; Tan, E.; Elander, R.; Bratis, A.

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For the DOE Bioenergy Technologies Office, the annual State of Technology (SOT) assessment is an essential activity for quantifying the benefits of biochemical platform research. This assessment has historically allowed the impact of research progress achieved through targeted Bioenergy Technologies Office funding to be quantified in terms of economic improvements within the context of a fully integrated cellulosic ethanol production process. As such, progress toward the ultimate 2012 goal of demonstrating cost-competitive cellulosic ethanol technology can be tracked. With an assumed feedstock cost for corn stover of $58.50/ton this target has historically been set at $1.41/gal ethanol for conversion costs only (exclusive of feedstock) and $2.15/gal total production cost (inclusive of feedstock) or minimum ethanol selling price (MESP). This year, fully integrated cellulosic ethanol production data generated by National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) researchers in their Integrated Biorefinery Research Facility (IBRF) successfully demonstrated performance commensurate with both the FY 2012 SOT MESP target of $2.15/gal (2007$, $58.50/ton feedstock cost) and the conversion target of $1.41/gal through core research and process improvements in pretreatment, enzymatic hydrolysis, and fermentation.

  8. Methane hydrate distribution from prolonged and repeated formation in natural and compacted sand samples: X-ray CT observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rees, E.V.L.; Kneafsey, T.J.; Seol, Y.

    2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To study physical properties of methane gas hydrate-bearing sediments, it is necessary to synthesize laboratory samples due to the limited availability of cores from natural deposits. X-ray computed tomography (CT) and other observations have shown gas hydrate to occur in a number of morphologies over a variety of sediment types. To aid in understanding formation and growth patterns of hydrate in sediments, methane hydrate was repeatedly formed in laboratory-packed sand samples and in a natural sediment core from the Mount Elbert Stratigraphic Test Well. CT scanning was performed during hydrate formation and decomposition steps, and periodically while the hydrate samples remained under stable conditions for up to 60 days. The investigation revealed the impact of water saturation on location and morphology of hydrate in both laboratory and natural sediments during repeated hydrate formations. Significant redistribution of hydrate and water in the samples was observed over both the short and long term.

  9. Cone-Beam CT with Flat-Panel-Detector Digital Angiography System: Early Experience in Abdominal Interventional Procedures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirota, Shozo, E-mail: hirota-s@hyo-med.ac.jp; Nakao, Norio; Yamamoto, Satoshi; Kobayashi, Kaoru; Maeda, Hiroaki; Ishikura, Reiichi; Miura, Koui; Sakamoto, Kiyoshi [Hyogo College of Medicine, Department of Radiology (Japan); Ueda, Ken [Hitachi Medical Corporation, Research and Development Center (Japan); Baba, Rika [Hitachi Limited, Central Research Laboratory (Japan)

    2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We developed a cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) system equipped with a large flat-panel detector. Data obtained by 200{sup o} rotation imaging are reconstructed by means of CBCT to generate three-dimensional images. We report the use of CBCT angiography using CBCT in 10 patients with 8 liver malignancies and 2 hypersplenisms during abdominal interventional procedures. CBCT was very useful for interventional radiologists to confirm a perfusion area of the artery catheter wedged on CT by injection of contrast media through the catheter tip, although the image quality was slightly degraded, scoring as 2.60 on average by streak artifacts. CBCT is space-saving because it does not require a CT system with a gantry, and it is also time-saving because it does not require the transfer of patients.

  10. SU-E-J-92: On-Line Cone Beam CT Based Planning for Emergency and Palliative Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Held, M; Morin, O; Pouliot, J [UC San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To evaluate and develop the feasibility of on-line cone beam CT based planning for emergency and palliative radiotherapy treatments. Methods: Subsequent to phantom studies, a case library of 28 clinical megavoltage cone beam CT (MVCBCT) was built to assess dose-planning accuracies on MVCBCT for all anatomical sites. A simple emergency treatment plan was created on the MVCBCT and copied to its reference CT. The agreement between the dose distributions of each image pair was evaluated by the mean dose difference of the dose volume and the gamma index of the central 2D axial plane. An array of popular urgent and palliative cases was also evaluated for imaging component clearance and field-of-view. Results: The treatment cases were categorized into four groups (head and neck, thorax/spine, pelvis and extremities). Dose distributions for head and neck treatments were predicted accurately in all cases with a gamma index of >95% for 2% and 2 mm criteria. Thoracic spine treatments had a gamma index as low as 60% indicating a need for better uniformity correction and tissue density calibration. Small anatomy changes between CT and MVCBCT could contribute to local errors. Pelvis and sacral spine treatment cases had a gamma index between 90% and 98% for 3%/3 mm criteria. The limited FOV became an issue for large pelvis patients. Imaging clearance was difficult for cases where the tumor was positioned far off midline. Conclusion: The MVCBCT based dose planning and delivery approach is feasible in many treatment cases. Dose distributions for head and neck patients are unrestrictedly predictable. Some FOV restrictions apply to other treatment sites. Lung tissue is most challenging for accurate dose calculations given the current imaging filters and corrections. Additional clinical cases for extremities need to be included in the study to assess the full range of site-specific planning accuracies. This work is supported by Siemens.

  11. Automated segmentation of the pulmonary arteries in low-dose CT by vessel tracking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wala, Jeremiah; Lee, Jaesung; Jirapatnakul, Artit; Biancardi, Alberto; Reeves, Anthony

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a fully automated method for top-down segmentation of the pulmonary arterial tree in low-dose thoracic CT images. The main basal pulmonary arteries are identified near the lung hilum by searching for candidate vessels adjacent to known airways, identified by our previously reported airway segmentation method. Model cylinders are iteratively fit to the vessels to track them into the lungs. Vessel bifurcations are detected by measuring the rate of change of vessel radii, and child vessels are segmented by initiating new trackers at bifurcation points. Validation is accomplished using our novel sparse surface (SS) evaluation metric. The SS metric was designed to quantify the magnitude of the segmentation error per vessel while significantly decreasing the manual marking burden for the human user. A total of 210 arteries and 205 veins were manually marked across seven test cases. 134/210 arteries were correctly segmented, with a specificity for arteries of 90%, and average segmentation error of 0.15 mm...

  12. CT-scan-monitored electrical-resistivity measurements show problems achieving homogeneous saturation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sprunt, E.S.; Davis, R.M.; Muegge, E.L. (Mobil R and D Corp. (US)); Desai, K.P. (Saudi Aramco (SA))

    1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports on x-ray computerized tomography (CT) scans obtained during measurement of the electrical resistivity of core samples which revealed some problems in obtaining uniform saturation along the lengths of the samples. The electrical resistivity of core samples is measured as a function of water saturation to determine the saturation exponent used in electric-log interpretation. An assumption in such tests is that the water saturation is uniformly distributed. Failure of this assumption can result in errors in the determination of the saturation exponent. Three problems were identified in obtaining homogeneous water saturation in two samples of a Middle Eastern carbonate grainstone: a stationary front formed in one sample at 1-psi oil/brine capillary pressure, a moving front formed at oil/brine capillary pressure {le}4 psi in samples tested in fresh mixed-wettability and cleaned water-wet states, and the heterogeneous fluid distribution caused by a rapidly moving front did not dissipate when the capillary pressure was eliminated in the samples.

  13. A Novel Time-Based Readout Scheme for a Combined PET-CT Detector Using APDs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Powolny, F; Hillemanns, H; Jarron, P; Lecoq, P; Meyer, T C; Moraes, D

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper summarizes CERN R&D work done in the framework of the European Commission's FP6 BioCare Project. The objective was to develop a novel "time-based" signal processing technique to read out LSO-APD photodetectors for medical imaging. An important aspect was to employ the technique in a combined scenario for both computer tomography (CT) and positron emission tomography (PET) with effectively no tradeoffs in efficiency and resolution compared to traditional single mode machines. This made the use of low noise and yet very high-speed monolithic front-end electronics essential so as to assure the required timing characteristics together with a high signal-to-noise ratio. Using APDs for photon detection, two chips, traditionally employed for particle physics, could be identified to meet the above criteria. Although both were not optimized for their intended new medical application, excellent performance in conjunction with LSO-APD sensors could be derived. Whereas a measured energy resolution of 16% (...

  14. Reduction of false positives on the rectal tube in computer-aided detection for CT colonography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Iordanescu, Gheorghe; Summers, Ronald M. [Department of Radiology, National Institutes of Health Building 10, Room 1C660, 10 Center Drive MSC 1182, Bethesda, Maryland 20892-1182 (United States)

    2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To eliminate false-positive (FP) polyp detections on the rectal tube (RT) in CT colonography (CTC) computer-aided detection (CAD). Methods: We use a three-stage approach to detect the RT: detect the RT shaft, track the tube to the tip and label all the voxels that belong to the RT. We applied our RT detection algorithm on a CTC dataset consisting of 80 datasets (40 patients scanned in both prone and supine positions). Two different types of RTs were present, characterized by differences in shaft/bulb diameters, wall intensities, and shape of tip. Results: The algorithm detected 90% of RT shafts and completely tracked 72% of them. We labeled all the voxels belonging to the completely tracked RTs (72%) and in 11 out of 80 (14%) cases the RT voxels were partially labeled. We obtained a 9.2% reduction of the FPs in the initial polyp candidates' population, and a 7.9% reduction of the FPs generated by our CAD system. None of the true-positive detections were mislabeled. Conclusions: The algorithm detects the RTs with good accuracy, is robust with respect to the two different types of RT used in our study, and is effective at reducing the number of RT FPs reported by our CAD system.

  15. Introduction of heat map to fidelity assessment of compressed CT images

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Hyunna; Kim, Bohyoung; Seo, Jinwook; Park, Seongjin; Shin, Yeong-Gil [School of Computer Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, 599 Kwanak-ro, Kwanak-gu, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kil Joong [Department of Radiation Applied Life Science, Seoul National University College of Medicine, 28 Yongon-dong, Chongno-gu, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kyoung Ho [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Institute of Radiation Medicine and Seoul National University Medical Research Center, 300 Gumi-dong, Bundang-gu, Seongnam-si, Gyeonggi-do 463-707 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: This study aimed to introduce heat map, a graphical data presentation method widely used in gene expression experiments, to the presentation and interpretation of image fidelity assessment data of compressed computed tomography (CT) images. Methods: The authors used actual assessment data that consisted of five radiologists' responses to 720 computed tomography images compressed using both Joint Photographic Experts Group 2000 (JPEG2000) 2D and JPEG2000 3D compressions. They additionally created data of two artificial radiologists, which were generated by partly modifying the data from two human radiologists. Results: For each compression, the entire data set, including the variations among radiologists and among images, could be compacted into a small color-coded grid matrix of the heat map. A difference heat map depicted the advantage of 3D compression over 2D compression. Dendrograms showing hierarchical agglomerative clustering results were added to the heat maps to illustrate the similarities in the data patterns among radiologists and among images. The dendrograms were used to identify two artificial radiologists as outliers, whose data were created by partly modifying the responses of two human radiologists. Conclusions: The heat map can illustrate a quick visual extract of the overall data as well as the entirety of large complex data in a compact space while visualizing the variations among observers and among images. The heat map with the dendrograms can be used to identify outliers or to classify observers and images based on the degree of similarity in the response patterns.

  16. SU-E-J-190: Characterization of Radiation Induced CT Number Changes in Tumor and Normal Lung During Radiation Therapy for Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, C; Liu, F; Tai, A; Gore, E; Johnstone, C; Li, X [Medical College of Wisconsin Milwaukee WI (United States)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To measure CT number (CTN) changes in tumor and normal lung as a function of radiation therapy (RT) dose during the course of RT delivery for lung cancer using daily IGRT CT images and single respiration phase CT images. Methods: 4D CT acquired during planning simulation and daily 3D CT acquired during daily IGRT for 10 lung cancer cases randomly selected in terms of age, caner type and stage, were analyzed using an in-house developed software tool. All patients were treated in 2 Gy fractions to primary tumors and involved nodal regions. Regions enclosed by a series of isodose surfaces in normal lung were delineated. The obtained contours along with target contours (GTVs) were populated to each singlephase planning CT and daily CT. CTN in term of Hounsfield Unit (HU) of each voxel in these delineated regions were collectively analyzed using histogram, mean, mode and linear correlation. Results: Respiration induced normal lung CTN change, as analyzed from single-phase planning CTs, ranged from 9 to 23 (±2) HU for the patients studied. Normal lung CTN change was as large as 50 (±12) HU over the entire treatment course, was dose and patient dependent and was measurable with dose changes as low as 1.5 Gy. For patients with obvious tumor volume regression, CTN within the GTV drops monotonically as much as 10 (±1) HU during the early fractions with a total dose of 20 Gy delivered. The GTV and CTN reductions are significantly correlated with correlation coefficient >0.95. Conclusion: Significant RT dose induced CTN changes in lung tissue and tumor region can be observed during even the early phase of RT delivery, and may potentially be used for early prediction of radiation response. Single respiration phase CT images have dramatically reduced statistical noise in ROIs, making daily dose response evaluation possible.

  17. The human ACC2 CT-domain C-terminus is required for full functionality and has a novel twist

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Madauss, Kevin P.; Burkhart, William A.; Consler, Thomas G.; Cowan, David J.; Gottschalk, William K.; Miller, Aaron B; Short, Steven A.; Tran, Thuy B.; Williams, Shawn P.; (GSKNC); (Duke); (UNC)

    2009-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Inhibition of acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) may prevent lipid-induced insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes, making the enzyme an attractive pharmaceutical target. Although the enzyme is highly conserved amongst animals, only the yeast enzyme structure is available for rational drug design. The use of biophysical assays has permitted the identification of a specific C-terminal truncation of the 826-residue human ACC2 carboxyl transferase (CT) domain that is both functionally competent to bind inhibitors and crystallizes in their presence. This C-terminal truncation led to the determination of the human ACC2 CT domain-CP-640186 complex crystal structure, which revealed distinctions from the yeast-enzyme complex. The human ACC2 CT-domain C-terminus is comprised of three intertwined -helices that extend outwards from the enzyme on the opposite side to the ligand-binding site. Differences in the observed inhibitor conformation between the yeast and human structures are caused by differing residues in the binding pocket.

  18. Wavelet based characterization of ex vivo vertebral trabecular bone structure with 3T MRI compared to microCT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krug, R; Carballido-Gamio, J; Burghardt, A; Haase, S; Sedat, J W; Moss, W C; Majumdar, S

    2005-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Trabecular bone structure and bone density contribute to the strength of bone and are important in the study of osteoporosis. Wavelets are a powerful tool to characterize and quantify texture in an image. In this study the thickness of trabecular bone was analyzed in 8 cylindrical cores of the vertebral spine. Images were obtained from 3 Tesla (T) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and micro-computed tomography ({micro}CT). Results from the wavelet based analysis of trabecular bone were compared with standard two-dimensional structural parameters (analogous to bone histomorphometry) obtained using mean intercept length (MR images) and direct 3D distance transformation methods ({micro}CT images). Additionally, the bone volume fraction was determined from MR images. We conclude that the wavelet based analyses delivers comparable results to the established MR histomorphometric measurements. The average deviation in trabecular thickness was less than one pixel size between the wavelet and the standard approach for both MR and {micro}CT analysis. Since the wavelet based method is less sensitive to image noise, we see an advantage of wavelet analysis of trabecular bone for MR imaging when going to higher resolution.

  19. Combined iterative reconstruction and image-domain decomposition for dual energy CT using total-variation regularization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dong, Xue; Niu, Tianye; Zhu, Lei, E-mail: leizhu@gatech.edu [Nuclear and Radiological Engineering and Medical Physics Programs, The George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States)] [Nuclear and Radiological Engineering and Medical Physics Programs, The George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Dual-energy CT (DECT) is being increasingly used for its capability of material decomposition and energy-selective imaging. A generic problem of DECT, however, is that the decomposition process is unstable in the sense that the relative magnitude of decomposed signals is reduced due to signal cancellation while the image noise is accumulating from the two CT images of independent scans. Direct image decomposition, therefore, leads to severe degradation of signal-to-noise ratio on the resultant images. Existing noise suppression techniques are typically implemented in DECT with the procedures of reconstruction and decomposition performed independently, which do not explore the statistical properties of decomposed images during the reconstruction for noise reduction. In this work, the authors propose an iterative approach that combines the reconstruction and the signal decomposition procedures to minimize the DECT image noise without noticeable loss of resolution. Methods: The proposed algorithm is formulated as an optimization problem, which balances the data fidelity and total variation of decomposed images in one framework, and the decomposition step is carried out iteratively together with reconstruction. The noise in the CT images from the proposed algorithm becomes well correlated even though the noise of the raw projections is independent on the two CT scans. Due to this feature, the proposed algorithm avoids noise accumulation during the decomposition process. The authors evaluate the method performance on noise suppression and spatial resolution using phantom studies and compare the algorithm with conventional denoising approaches as well as combined iterative reconstruction methods with different forms of regularization. Results: On the Catphan©600 phantom, the proposed method outperforms the existing denoising methods on preserving spatial resolution at the same level of noise suppression, i.e., a reduction of noise standard deviation by one order of magnitude. This improvement is mainly attributed to the high noise correlation in the CT images reconstructed by the proposed algorithm. Iterative reconstruction using different regularization, including quadratic orq-generalized Gaussian Markov random field regularization, achieves similar noise suppression from high noise correlation. However, the proposed TV regularization obtains a better edge preserving performance. Studies of electron density measurement also show that our method reduces the average estimation error from 9.5% to 7.1%. On the anthropomorphic head phantom, the proposed method suppresses the noise standard deviation of the decomposed images by a factor of ?14 without blurring the fine structures in the sinus area. Conclusions: The authors propose a practical method for DECT imaging reconstruction, which combines the image reconstruction and material decomposition into one optimization framework. Compared to the existing approaches, our method achieves a superior performance on DECT imaging with respect to decomposition accuracy, noise reduction, and spatial resolution.

  20. The effect of spatial micro-CT image resolution and surface complexity on the morphological 3D analysis of open porous structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pyka, Grzegorz, E-mail: gregory.pyka@mtm.kuleuven.be [Department of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, KU Leuven, Kasteelpark Arenberg 44 – PB2450, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Kerckhofs, Greet [Department of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, KU Leuven, Kasteelpark Arenberg 44 – PB2450, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Biomechanics Research Unit, Université de Liege, Chemin des Chevreuils 1 - BAT 52/3, B-4000 Liège (Belgium); Schrooten, Jan; Wevers, Martine [Department of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, KU Leuven, Kasteelpark Arenberg 44 – PB2450, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium)

    2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In material science microfocus X-ray computed tomography (micro-CT) is one of the most popular non-destructive techniques to visualise and quantify the internal structure of materials in 3D. Despite constant system improvements, state-of-the-art micro-CT images can still hold several artefacts typical for X-ray CT imaging that hinder further image-based processing, structural and quantitative analysis. For example spatial resolution is crucial for an appropriate characterisation as the voxel size essentially influences the partial volume effect. However, defining the adequate image resolution is not a trivial aspect and understanding the correlation between scan parameters like voxel size and the structural properties is crucial for comprehensive material characterisation using micro-CT. Therefore, the objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of the spatial image resolution on the micro-CT based morphological analysis of three-dimensional (3D) open porous structures with a high surface complexity. In particular the correlation between the local surface properties and the accuracy of the micro-CT-based macro-morphology of 3D open porous Ti6Al4V structures produced by selective laser melting (SLM) was targeted and revealed for rough surfaces a strong dependence of the resulting structure characteristics on the scan resolution. Reducing the surface complexity by chemical etching decreased the sensitivity of the overall morphological analysis to the spatial image resolution and increased the detection limit. This study showed that scan settings and image processing parameters need to be customized to the material properties, morphological parameters under investigation and the desired final characteristics (in relation to the intended functional use). Customization of the scan resolution can increase the reliability of the micro-CT based analysis and at the same time reduce its operating costs. - Highlights: • We examine influence of the image resolution on ?CT-based morphological analysis. • Surface properties influence accuracy of ?CT-based morphology of porous structures. • Total porosity was the least sensitive to surface complexity and scan voxel size. • The beam thickness analysis was overestimated by the surface roughness. • Voxel size customization can significantly reduce a cost of the ?CT-based analysis.

  1. Noise suppression in reconstruction of low-Z target megavoltage cone-beam CT images

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang Jing; Robar, James; Guan Huaiqun [Department of Radiation Oncology, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas 75235 (United States); Departments of Radiation Oncology and Physics and Atmospheric Science, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, B3H1V7 (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, Saint Vincent Hospital, Worcester, Massachusetts 01608 (United States)

    2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To improve the image contrast-to-noise (CNR) ratio for low-Z target megavoltage cone-beam CT (MV CBCT) using a statistical projection noise suppression algorithm based on the penalized weighted least-squares (PWLS) criterion. Methods: Projection images of a contrast phantom, a CatPhan{sup Registered-Sign} 600 phantom and a head phantom were acquired by a Varian 2100EX LINAC with a low-Z (Al) target and low energy x-ray beam (2.5 MeV) at a low-dose level and at a high-dose level. The projections were then processed by minimizing the PWLS objective function. The weighted least square (WLS) term models the noise of measured projection and the penalty term enforces the smoothing constraints of the projection image. The variance of projection data was chosen as the weight for the PWLS objective function and it determined the contribution of each measurement. An anisotropic quadratic form penalty that incorporates the gradient information of projection image was used to preserve edges during noise reduction. Low-Z target MV CBCT images were reconstructed by the FDK algorithm after each projection was processed by the PWLS smoothing. Results: Noise in low-Z target MV CBCT images were greatly suppressed after the PWLS projection smoothing, without noticeable sacrifice of the spatial resolution. Depending on the choice of smoothing parameter, the CNR of selected regions of interest in the PWLS processed low-dose low-Z target MV CBCT image can be higher than the corresponding high-dose image.Conclusion: The CNR of low-Z target MV CBCT images was substantially improved by using PWLS projection smoothing. The PWLS projection smoothing algorithm allows the reconstruction of high contrast low-Z target MV CBCT image with a total dose of as low as 2.3 cGy.

  2. CT measurements of two-phase flow in fractured porous media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hughes, R.G.; Brigham, W.E.; Castanier, L.M.

    1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The simulation of flow in naturally fractured reservoirs commonly divides the reservoir into two continua - the matrix system and the fracture system. Flow equations are written presuming that the primary flow between grid blocks occurs through the fracture system and that the primary fluid storage is in the matrix system. The dual porosity formulation of the equations assumes that there is no flow between matrix blocks while the dual permeability formulation allows fluid movement between matrix blocks. Since most of the fluid storage is contained in the matrix, recovery is dominated by the transfer of fluid from the matrix to the high conductivity fractures. The physical mechanisms influencing this transfer have been evaluated primarily through numerical studies. Relatively few experimental studies have investigated the transfer mechanisms. Early studies focused on the prediction of reservoir recoveries from the results of scaled experiments on single reservoir blocks. Recent experiments have investigated some of the mechanisms that are dominant in gravity drainage situations and in small block imbibition displacements. The mechanisms active in multiphase flow in fractured media need to be further illuminated, since some of the experimental results appear to be contradictory. This report describes the design, construction, and preliminary results of an experiment that studies imbibition displacement in two fracture blocks. Multiphase (oil/water) displacements will be conducted at the same rate on three core configurations. The configurations are a compact core, a two-block system with a 1 mm spacer between the blocks, and a two-block system with no spacer. The blocks are sealed in epoxy so that saturation measurements can be made throughout the displacement experiments using a Computed Tomography (CT) scanner.

  3. MicroCT-Based Skeletal Models for Use in Tomographic Voxel Phantoms for Radiological Protection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wesley Bolch

    2010-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    ABSTRACT The University of Florida (UF) proposes to develop two high-resolution image-based skeletal dosimetry models for direct use by ICRP Committee 2’s Task Group on Dose Calculation in their forthcoming Reference Voxel Male (RVM) and Reference Voxel Female (RVF) whole-body dosimetry phantoms. These two phantoms are CT-based, and thus do not have the image resolution to delineate and perform radiation transport modeling of the individual marrow cavities and bone trabeculae throughout their skeletal structures. Furthermore, new and innovative 3D microimaging techniques will now be required for the skeletal tissues following Committee 2’s revision of the target tissues of relevance for radiogenic bone cancer induction. This target tissue had been defined in ICRP Publication 30 as a 10-?m cell layer on all bone surfaces of trabecular and cortical bone. The revised target tissue is now a 50-?m layer within the marrow cavities of trabecular bone only and is exclusive of the marrow adipocytes. Clearly, this new definition requires the use of 3D microimages of the trabecular architecture not available from past 2D optical studies of the adult skeleton. With our recent acquisition of two relatively young cadavers (males of age 18-years and 40-years), we will develop a series of reference skeletal models that can be directly applied to (1) the new ICRP reference voxel man and female phantoms developed for the ICRP, and (2) pediatric phantoms developed to target the ICRP reference children. Dosimetry data to be developed will include absorbed fractions for internal beta and alpha-particle sources, as well as photon and neutron fluence-to-dose response functions for direct use in external dosimetry studies of the ICRP reference workers and members of the general public

  4. Comparison of different liquid anaerobic digestion effluents as inocula and nitrogen sources for solid-state batch anaerobic digestion of corn stover

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu Fuqing; Shi Jian [Department of Food, Agricultural and Biological Engineering, Ohio State University, Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center, 1680 Madison Ave., Wooster, OH 44691 (United States); Lv Wen; Yu Zhongtang [Department of Animal Sciences, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Li Yebo, E-mail: li.851@osu.edu [Department of Food, Agricultural and Biological Engineering, Ohio State University, Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center, 1680 Madison Ave., Wooster, OH 44691 (United States)

    2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Compared methane production of solid AD inoculated with different effluents. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Food waste effluent (FWE) had the largest population of acetoclastic methanogens. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Solid AD inoculated with FWE produced the highest methane yield at F/E ratio of 4. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dairy waste effluent (DWE) was rich of cellulolytic and xylanolytic bacteria. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Solid AD inoculated with DWE produced the highest methane yield at F/E ratio of 2. - Abstract: Effluents from three liquid anaerobic digesters, fed with municipal sewage sludge, food waste, or dairy waste, were evaluated as inocula and nitrogen sources for solid-state batch anaerobic digestion of corn stover in mesophilic reactors. Three feedstock-to-effluent (F/E) ratios (i.e., 2, 4, and 6) were tested for each effluent. At an F/E ratio of 2, the reactor inoculated by dairy waste effluent achieved the highest methane yield of 238.5 L/kgVS{sub feed}, while at an F/E ratio of 4, the reactor inoculated by food waste effluent achieved the highest methane yield of 199.6 L/kgVS{sub feed}. The microbial population and chemical composition of the three effluents were substantially different. Food waste effluent had the largest population of acetoclastic methanogens, while dairy waste effluent had the largest populations of cellulolytic and xylanolytic bacteria. Dairy waste also had the highest C/N ratio of 8.5 and the highest alkalinity of 19.3 g CaCO{sub 3}/kg. The performance of solid-state batch anaerobic digestion reactors was closely related to the microbial status in the liquid anaerobic digestion effluents.

  5. The effects of calcitic and dolomitic limestone rates and particle sizes on soil chemical changes, plant nutrient concentration, and yields of corn and Coastal bermudagrass on two acid Texas soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haby, Vincent A

    1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Laboratory study. Particle size. Field study. Source. . 26 . 26 Rate. . 28 Particle size. . . $0 Soil pH change with depth. Influence oi' Limestone on Ca and Ng at Different Soil Depths. . Influence of Limestone on Yields oi' Corn and Coastal... to increase the downward movement of Ca and Mg snd to reduce soil acidity as determined by pH measurements (2, 3, 4, 26, 45, 46, 54, 56). Adams et al. (3) using dolomitic lime- stone, have shown that on a Cecil sandy loam soil, N rates of 0, 400, snd 800...

  6. Establishing a process of irradiating small animal brain using a CyberKnife and a microCT scanner

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Haksoo; Welford, Scott [Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, Ohio 44106 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, Ohio 44106 (United States); Fabien, Jeffrey; Zheng, Yiran; Yuan, Jake; Brindle, James; Yao, Min; Lo, Simon; Wessels, Barry; Machtay, Mitchell; Sohn, Jason W., E-mail: jason.sohn@case.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, Ohio 44106 and University Hospitals of Cleveland, 11100 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, Ohio 44106 (United States); Sloan, Andrew [Department of Neurosurgery, School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, Ohio 44106 (United States)] [Department of Neurosurgery, School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, Ohio 44106 (United States)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Establish and validate a process of accurately irradiating small animals using the CyberKnife G4 System (version 8.5) with treatment plans designed to irradiate a hemisphere of a mouse brain based on microCT scanner images. Methods: These experiments consisted of four parts: (1) building a mouse phantom for intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) quality assurance (QA), (2) proving usability of a microCT for treatment planning, (3) fabricating a small animal positioning system for use with the CyberKnife's image guided radiotherapy (IGRT) system, and (4)in vivo verification of targeting accuracy. A set of solid water mouse phantoms was designed and fabricated, with radiochromic films (RCF) positioned in selected planes to measure delivered doses. After down-sampling for treatment planning compatibility, a CT image set of a phantom was imported into the CyberKnife treatment planning system—MultiPlan (ver. 3.5.2). A 0.5 cm diameter sphere was contoured within the phantom to represent a hemispherical section of a mouse brain. A nude mouse was scanned in an alpha cradle using a microCT scanner (cone-beam, 157 × 149 pixels slices, 0.2 mm longitudinal slice thickness). Based on the results of our positional accuracy study, a planning treatment volume (PTV) was created. A stereotactic body mold of the mouse was “printed” using a 3D printer laying UV curable acrylic plastic. Printer instructions were based on exported contours of the mouse's skin. Positional reproducibility in the mold was checked by measuring ten CT scans. To verify accurate dose delivery in vivo, six mice were irradiated in the mold with a 4 mm target contour and a 2 mm PTV margin to 3 Gy and sacrificed within 20 min to avoid DNA repair. The brain was sliced and stained for analysis. Results: For the IMRT QA using a set of phantoms, the planned dose (6 Gy to the calculation point) was compared to the delivered dose measured via film and analyzed using Gamma analysis (3% and 3 mm). A passing rate of 99% was measured in areas of above 40% of the prescription dose. The final inverse treatment plan was comprised of 43 beams ranging from 5 to 12.5 mm in diameter (2.5 mm size increments are available up to 15 mm in diameter collimation). Using the Xsight Spine Tracking module, the CyberKnife system could not reliably identify and track the tiny mouse spine; however, the CyberKnife system could identify and track the fiducial markers on the 3D mold.In vivo positional accuracy analysis using the 3D mold generated a mean error of 1.41 mm ± 0.73 mm when fiducial markers were used for position tracking. Analysis of the dissected brain confirmed the ability to target the correct brain volume. Conclusions: With the use of a stereotactic body mold with fiducial markers, microCT imaging, and resolution down-sampling, the CyberKnife system can successfully perform small-animal radiotherapy studies.

  7. Tumor Tracking Method Based on a Deformable 4D CT Breathing Motion Model Driven by an External Surface Surrogate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fassi, Aurora, E-mail: aurora.fassi@mail.polimi.it [Dipartimento di Elettronica, Informazione e Bioingegneria, Politecnico di Milano, Milano (Italy); Schaerer, Joël; Fernandes, Mathieu [CREATIS, CNRS UMR 5220, INSERM U1044, Université Lyon 1, INSA-Lyon, Villeurbanne (France); Department of Radiotherapy, Centre Léon Bérard, Lyon (France); Riboldi, Marco [Dipartimento di Elettronica, Informazione e Bioingegneria, Politecnico di Milano, Milano (Italy); Bioengineering Unit, CNAO Foundation, Pavia (Italy); Sarrut, David [CREATIS, CNRS UMR 5220, INSERM U1044, Université Lyon 1, INSA-Lyon, Villeurbanne (France); Department of Radiotherapy, Centre Léon Bérard, Lyon (France); Baroni, Guido [Dipartimento di Elettronica, Informazione e Bioingegneria, Politecnico di Milano, Milano (Italy); Bioengineering Unit, CNAO Foundation, Pavia (Italy)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To develop a tumor tracking method based on a surrogate-driven motion model, which provides noninvasive dynamic localization of extracranial targets for the compensation of respiration-induced intrafraction motion in high-precision radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: The proposed approach is based on a patient-specific breathing motion model, derived a priori from 4-dimensional planning computed tomography (CT) images. Model parameters (respiratory baseline, amplitude, and phase) are retrieved and updated at each treatment fraction according to in-room radiography acquisition and optical surface imaging. The baseline parameter is adapted to the interfraction variations obtained from the daily cone beam (CB) CT scan. The respiratory amplitude and phase are extracted from an external breathing surrogate, estimated from the displacement of the patient thoracoabdominal surface, acquired with a noninvasive surface imaging device. The developed method was tested on a database of 7 lung cancer patients, including the synchronized information on internal and external respiratory motion during a CBCT scan. Results: About 30 seconds of simultaneous acquisition of CBCT and optical surface images were analyzed for each patient. The tumor trajectories identified in CBCT projections were used as reference and compared with the target trajectories estimated from surface displacement with the a priori motion model. The resulting absolute differences between the reference and estimated tumor motion along the 2 image dimensions ranged between 0.7 and 2.4 mm; the measured phase shifts did not exceed 7% of the breathing cycle length. Conclusions: We investigated a tumor tracking method that integrates breathing motion information provided by the 4-dimensional planning CT with surface imaging at the time of treatment, representing an alternative approach to point-based external–internal correlation models. Although an in-room radiograph-based assessment of the reliability of the motion model is envisaged, the developed technique does not involve the estimation and continuous update of correlation parameters, thus requiring a less intense use of invasive imaging.

  8. A Fully Automated Method for CT-on-Rails-Guided Online Adaptive Planning for Prostate Cancer Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Xiaoqiang; Quan, Enzhuo M.; Li, Yupeng [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Pan, Xiaoning [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Health Science Center at Tyler, Tyler, Texas (United States); Zhou, Yin [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Wang, Xiaochun [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Du, Weiliang [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Kudchadker, Rajat J.; Johnson, Jennifer L. [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Kuban, Deborah A.; Lee, Andrew K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Zhang, Xiaodong, E-mail: xizhang@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: This study was designed to validate a fully automated adaptive planning (AAP) method which integrates automated recontouring and automated replanning to account for interfractional anatomical changes in prostate cancer patients receiving adaptive intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) based on daily repeated computed tomography (CT)-on-rails images. Methods and Materials: Nine prostate cancer patients treated at our institution were randomly selected. For the AAP method, contours on each repeat CT image were automatically generated by mapping the contours from the simulation CT image using deformable image registration. An in-house automated planning tool incorporated into the Pinnacle treatment planning system was used to generate the original and the adapted IMRT plans. The cumulative dose–volume histograms (DVHs) of the target and critical structures were calculated based on the manual contours for all plans and compared with those of plans generated by the conventional method, that is, shifting the isocenters by aligning the images based on the center of the volume (COV) of prostate (prostate COV-aligned). Results: The target coverage from our AAP method for every patient was acceptable, while 1 of the 9 patients showed target underdosing from prostate COV-aligned plans. The normalized volume receiving at least 70 Gy (V{sub 70}), and the mean dose of the rectum and bladder were reduced by 8.9%, 6.4 Gy and 4.3%, 5.3 Gy, respectively, for the AAP method compared with the values obtained from prostate COV-aligned plans. Conclusions: The AAP method, which is fully automated, is effective for online replanning to compensate for target dose deficits and critical organ overdosing caused by interfractional anatomical changes in prostate cancer.

  9. Using Synchrotron X-Ray Nano-CT to Characterize SOFC Electrode Microstructures in Three-Dimensions at Operating Temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shearing, P.R.; Bradley, R.S.; Gelb, J.; Lee, S.N.; Atkinson, A.; Withers, P.J.; Brandon, N.P. (Manchester); (Xradia); (ICL)

    2012-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    In recent years, developments in tomography tools have provided unprecedented insight into the microstructure of electrodes for solid oxide fuel cells, enabling researchers to establish direct links between electrode microstructure and electrochemical performance. Here we present results of high resolution, synchrotron X-ray nano computed tomography experiments, which have enabled microstructural characterisation of a mixed ionic electronic conducting lanthanum strontium cobalt iron oxide (LSCF) cathode with sub-50nm resolution at operating temperature. Using the uniquely non-destructive nano-CT platform, it is possible to characterise microstructural evolution processes associated with heating and operation in-situ.

  10. Daily dose monitoring with atlas-based auto-segmentation on diagnostic quality CT for prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Wen; Vassil, Andrew; Xia, Ping [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, Ohio 44106 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, Ohio 44106 (United States); Zhong, Yahua [Department of Radiation Oncology, Zhongnan Hospital, Wuhan 430071 (China)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Zhongnan Hospital, Wuhan 430071 (China)

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of daily dose monitoring using a patient specific atlas-based autosegmentation method on diagnostic quality verification images.Methods: Seven patients, who were treated for prostate cancer with intensity modulated radiotherapy under daily imaging guidance of a CT-on-rails system, were selected for this study. The prostate, rectum, and bladder were manually contoured on the first six and last seven sets of daily verification images. For each patient, three patient specific atlases were constructed using manual contours from planning CT alone (1-image atlas), planning CT plus first three verification CTs (4-image atlas), and planning CT plus first six verification CTs (7-image atlas). These atlases were subsequently applied to the last seven verification image sets of the same patient to generate the auto-contours. Daily dose was calculated by applying the original treatment plans to the daily beam isocenters. The autocontours and manual contours were compared geometrically using the dice similarity coefficient (DSC), and dosimetrically using the dose to 99% of the prostate CTV (D99) and the D5 of rectum and bladder.Results: The DSC of the autocontours obtained with the 4-image atlases were 87.0%± 3.3%, 84.7%± 8.6%, and 93.6%± 4.3% for the prostate, rectum, and bladder, respectively. These indices were higher than those from the 1-image atlases (p < 0.01) and comparable to those from the 7-image atlases (p > 0.05). Daily prostate D99 of the autocontours was comparable to those of the manual contours (p= 0.55). For the bladder and rectum, the daily D5 were 95.5%± 5.9% and 99.1%± 2.6% of the planned D5 for the autocontours compared to 95.3%± 6.7% (p= 0.58) and 99.8%± 2.3% (p < 0.01) for the manual contours.Conclusions: With patient specific 4-image atlases, atlas-based autosegmentation can adequately facilitate daily dose monitoring for prostate cancer.

  11. Technical Note: Skin thickness measurements using high-resolution flat-panel cone-beam dedicated breast CT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shi Linxi; Vedantham, Srinivasan; Karellas, Andrew [Department of Radiology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Massachusetts 01655 (United States); O'Connell, Avice M. [Department of Radiology, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York 14642 (United States)

    2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To determine the mean and range of location-averaged breast skin thickness using high-resolution dedicated breast CT for use in Monte Carlo-based estimation of normalized glandular dose coefficients. Methods: This study retrospectively analyzed image data from a clinical study investigating dedicated breast CT. An algorithm similar to that described by Huang et al.['The effect of skin thickness determined using breast CT on mammographic dosimetry,' Med. Phys. 35(4), 1199-1206 (2008)] was used to determine the skin thickness in 137 dedicated breast CT volumes from 136 women. The location-averaged mean breast skin thickness for each breast was estimated and the study population mean and range were determined. Pathology results were available for 132 women, and were used to investigate if the distribution of location-averaged mean breast skin thickness varied with pathology. The effect of surface fitting to account for breast curvature was also studied. Results: The study mean ({+-} interbreast SD) for breast skin thickness was 1.44 {+-} 0.25 mm (range: 0.87-2.34 mm), which was in excellent agreement with Huang et al. Based on pathology, pair-wise statistical analysis (Mann-Whitney test) indicated that at the 0.05 significance level, there were no significant difference in the location-averaged mean breast skin thickness distributions between the groups: benign vs malignant (p= 0.223), benign vs hyperplasia (p= 0.651), hyperplasia vs malignant (p= 0.229), and malignant vs nonmalignant (p= 0.172). Conclusions: Considering this study used a different clinical prototype system, and the study participants were from a different geographical location, the observed agreement between the two studies suggests that the choice of 1.45 mm thick skin layer comprising the epidermis and the dermis for breast dosimetry is appropriate. While some benign and malignant conditions could cause skin thickening, in this study cohort the location-averaged mean breast skin thickness distributions did not differ significantly with pathology. The study also underscored the importance of considering breast curvature in estimating breast skin thickness.

  12. Final environment impact report supplement: Northeast corridor improvement project electrification: New Haven, CT to Boston, MA. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is a supplement to the final environmental impact report (FEIR) published in October 1994 on the proposal by the National Railroad Passenger Corporation (Amtrak) to complete the electrification of the Northeast Corridor main line by extending electrification from New Haven, CT, to Boston, MA. The purpose of this supplement is to provide additional information relative to: the Roxbury Substation Alternative Analysis; an expanded discussion on mitigation of potential adverse impacts; draft Section 61 findings; the Memorandum of Understanding between Amtrak and the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority (MBTA) for Route 128 Station; Amtrak`s draft outreach program; and to address other Massachusetts Environmental Policy Act concerns.

  13. Spiral CT Quantification of Aorto-Renal Calcification and Its Use in the Detection of Atheromatous Renal Artery Stenosis: A Study in 42 Patients

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gayard, Pierre; Garcier, Jean-Marc; Boire, Jean-Yves; Ravel, Anne; Perez, Nessim; Privat, Christian; Lucien, Pascal; Viallet, Jean-Francois; Boyer, Louis [Department of Radiology, University Hospital, BP 69, F-63003 Clermont Ferrand (France)

    2000-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To investigate whether a correlation exists between aortic and renal arterial calcifications detected with spiral CT and significant angiographic renal artery stenosis (RAS).Methods: Forty-two patients (mean age 67 years, range 37-84 years), of whom 24 were hypertensive, prospectively underwent abdominal helical CT and aortic and renal arteriography. The 3-mm thickness CT scans (pitch = 1) were reconstructed each millimeter. A manual outline of the renal artery including its ostial portion was produced. Calcific hyperdensities were defined as areas of density more than 130 HU. CT data were compared with the presence or absence of RAS on angiography (24 cases); hypertension and age were taken into account (Mann-Whitney U-test).Results: CT detection and quantification appeared to be reliable and reproductible. We did not find any correlation between aortic and renal arterial calcifications and RAS, even for the patients above 65 years, with or without hypertension. There was no correlation either between calcifications and hypertension in patients without RAS. Conclusion: In this population, aortic and renal arterial calcifications have no predictive value for RAS.

  14. Radiofrequency Ablation of Non-Small-Cell Carcinoma of the Lung Under Real-Time FDG PET CT Guidance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schoellnast, Helmut; Larson, Steven M. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology (United States); Nehmeh, Sadek A. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Medical Physics (United States); Carrasquillo, Jorge A.; Thornton, Raymond H.; Solomon, Stephen B., E-mail: solomons@mskcc.org [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology (United States)

    2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a well-established method in treatment of patients with lung carcinomas who are not candidates for surgical resection. Usually computed tomographic (CT) guidance is used for the procedure, thus enabling needle placement and permitting evaluation of complications such as pneumothorax and bleeding. {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) is generally used for tumor activity assessment and is therefore useful in follow-up after tumor treatment. A method that provides real-time image-based monitoring of RFA to ensure complete tumor ablation would be a valuable tool. In this report, we describe the behavior of preinjected FDG during PET CT-guided RFA of a non-small-cell lung carcinoma and discuss the value of FDG as a tool to provide intraprocedure monitor ablation. The size and the form of the activity changed during ablation. Ablation led to increase of the size and blurring and irregularity of the contour compared to pretreatment imaging. The maximal standardized uptake value decreased only slightly during the procedure. Therefore, before RFA, FDG PET can guide initial needle placement, but it does not serve as a monitoring tool to evaluate residual viable tissue during the procedure.

  15. SU-E-I-82: Improving CT Image Quality for Radiation Therapy Using Iterative Reconstruction Algorithms and Slightly Increasing Imaging Doses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noid, G; Chen, G; Tai, A; Li, X [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Iterative reconstruction (IR) algorithms are developed to improve CT image quality (IQ) by reducing noise without diminishing spatial resolution or contrast. For CT in radiation therapy (RT), slightly increasing imaging dose to improve IQ may be justified if it can substantially enhance structure delineation. The purpose of this study is to investigate and to quantify the IQ enhancement as a result of increasing imaging doses and using IR algorithms. Methods: CT images were acquired for phantoms, built to evaluate IQ metrics including spatial resolution, contrast and noise, with a variety of imaging protocols using a CT scanner (Definition AS Open, Siemens) installed inside a Linac room. Representative patients were scanned once the protocols were optimized. Both phantom and patient scans were reconstructed using the Sinogram Affirmed Iterative Reconstruction (SAFIRE) and the Filtered Back Projection (FBP) methods. IQ metrics of the obtained CTs were compared. Results: IR techniques are demonstrated to preserve spatial resolution as measured by the point spread function and reduce noise in comparison to traditional FBP. Driven by the reduction in noise, the contrast to noise ratio is doubled by adopting the highest SAFIRE strength. As expected, increasing imaging dose reduces noise for both SAFIRE and FBP reconstructions. The contrast to noise increases from 3 to 5 by increasing the dose by a factor of 4. Similar IQ improvement was observed on the CTs for selected patients with pancreas and prostrate cancers. Conclusion: The IR techniques produce a measurable enhancement to CT IQ by reducing the noise. Increasing imaging dose further reduces noise independent of the IR techniques. The improved CT enables more accurate delineation of tumors and/or organs at risk during RT planning and delivery guidance.

  16. SU-E-J-219: Quantitative Evaluation of Motion Effects On Accuracy of Image-Guided Radiotherapy with Fiducial Markers Using CT Imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ali, I; Oyewale, S; Ahmad, S; Algan, O [University of Oklahoma Health Sciences, Oklahoma City, OK (United States); Alsbou, N [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Ada, OH (United States)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To investigate quantitatively patient motion effects on the localization accuracy of image-guided radiation with fiducial markers using axial CT (ACT), helical CT (HCT) and cone-beam CT (CBCT) using modeling and experimental phantom studies. Methods: Markers with different lengths (2.5 mm, 5 mm, 10 mm, and 20 mm) were inserted in a mobile thorax phantom which was imaged using ACT, HCT and CBCT. The phantom moved with sinusoidal motion with amplitudes ranging 0–20 mm and a frequency of 15 cycles-per-minute. Three parameters that include: apparent marker lengths, center position and distance between the centers of the markers were measured in the different CT images of the mobile phantom. A motion mathematical model was derived to predict the variations in the previous three parameters and their dependence on the motion in the different imaging modalities. Results: In CBCT, the measured marker lengths increased linearly with increase in motion amplitude. For example, the apparent length of the 10 mm marker was about 20 mm when phantom moved with amplitude of 5 mm. Although the markers have elongated, the center position and the distance between markers remained at the same position for different motion amplitudes in CBCT. These parameters were not affected by motion frequency and phase in CBCT. In HCT and ACT, the measured marker length, center and distance between markers varied irregularly with motion parameters. The apparent lengths of the markers varied with inverse of the phantom velocity which depends on motion frequency and phase. Similarly the center position and distance between markers varied inversely with phantom speed. Conclusion: Motion may lead to variations in maker length, center position and distance between markers using CT imaging. These effects should be considered in patient setup using image-guided radiation therapy based on fiducial markers matching using 2D-radiographs or volumetric CT imaging.

  17. Staling in corn tortillas prepared from nixtamalized corn flour

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez de Castro, Deborah Ann

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in starch pasting properties after baking. Amylopectin retrograded slowly and imparted softness and extensibility when present in a gelatinized state. Extensive amylopectin retrogradation occurred after 24 h storage, yielding a brittle, less flexible...

  18. HDRMC, an accelerated Monte Carlo dose calculator for high dose rate brachytherapy with CT-compatible applicators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chibani, Omar, E-mail: omar.chibani@fccc.edu; C-M Ma, Charlie [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19111 (United States)] [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19111 (United States)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To present a new accelerated Monte Carlo code for CT-based dose calculations in high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy. The new code (HDRMC) accounts for both tissue and nontissue heterogeneities (applicator and contrast medium). Methods: HDRMC uses a fast ray-tracing technique and detailed physics algorithms to transport photons through a 3D mesh of voxels representing the patient anatomy with applicator and contrast medium included. A precalculated phase space file for the{sup 192}Ir source is used as source term. HDRM is calibrated to calculated absolute dose for real plans. A postprocessing technique is used to include the exact density and composition of nontissue heterogeneities in the 3D phantom. Dwell positions and angular orientations of the source are reconstructed using data from the treatment planning system (TPS). Structure contours are also imported from the TPS to recalculate dose-volume histograms. Results: HDRMC was first benchmarked against the MCNP5 code for a single source in homogenous water and for a loaded gynecologic applicator in water. The accuracy of the voxel-based applicator model used in HDRMC was also verified by comparing 3D dose distributions and dose-volume parameters obtained using 1-mm{sup 3} versus 2-mm{sup 3} phantom resolutions. HDRMC can calculate the 3D dose distribution for a typical HDR cervix case with 2-mm resolution in 5 min on a single CPU. Examples of heterogeneity effects for two clinical cases (cervix and esophagus) were demonstrated using HDRMC. The neglect of tissue heterogeneity for the esophageal case leads to the overestimate of CTV D90, CTV D100, and spinal cord maximum dose by 3.2%, 3.9%, and 3.6%, respectively. Conclusions: A fast Monte Carlo code for CT-based dose calculations which does not require a prebuilt applicator model is developed for those HDR brachytherapy treatments that use CT-compatible applicators. Tissue and nontissue heterogeneities should be taken into account in modern HDR brachytherapy planning.

  19. CT-guided Bipolar and Multipolar Radiofrequency Ablation (RF Ablation) of Renal Cell Carcinoma: Specific Technical Aspects and Clinical Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sommer, C. M., E-mail: christof.sommer@med.uni-heidelberg.de [University Hospital Heidelberg, INF 110, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Germany); Lemm, G.; Hohenstein, E. [Minimally Invasive Therapies and Nuclear Medicine, SLK Kliniken Heilbronn GmbH, Clinic for Radiology (Germany); Bellemann, N.; Stampfl, U. [University Hospital Heidelberg, INF 110, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Germany); Goezen, A. S.; Rassweiler, J. [Clinic for Urology, SLK Kliniken Heilbronn GmbH (Germany); Kauczor, H. U.; Radeleff, B. A. [University Hospital Heidelberg, INF 110, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Germany); Pereira, P. L. [Minimally Invasive Therapies and Nuclear Medicine, SLK Kliniken Heilbronn GmbH, Clinic for Radiology (Germany)

    2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose. This study was designed to evaluate the clinical efficacy of CT-guided bipolar and multipolar radiofrequency ablation (RF ablation) of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and to analyze specific technical aspects between both technologies. Methods. We included 22 consecutive patients (3 women; age 74.2 {+-} 8.6 years) after 28 CT-guided bipolar or multipolar RF ablations of 28 RCCs (diameter 2.5 {+-} 0.8 cm). Procedures were performed with a commercially available RF system (Celon AG Olympus, Berlin, Germany). Technical aspects of RF ablation procedures (ablation mode [bipolar or multipolar], number of applicators and ablation cycles, overall ablation time and deployed energy, and technical success rate) were analyzed. Clinical results (local recurrence-free survival and local tumor control rate, renal function [glomerular filtration rate (GFR)]) and complication rates were evaluated. Results. Bipolar RF ablation was performed in 12 procedures and multipolar RF ablation in 16 procedures (2 applicators in 14 procedures and 3 applicators in 2 procedures). One ablation cycle was performed in 15 procedures and two ablation cycles in 13 procedures. Overall ablation time and deployed energy were 35.0 {+-} 13.6 min and 43.7 {+-} 17.9 kJ. Technical success rate was 100 %. Major and minor complication rates were 4 and 14 %. At an imaging follow-up of 15.2 {+-} 8.8 months, local recurrence-free survival was 14.4 {+-} 8.8 months and local tumor control rate was 93 %. GFR did not deteriorate after RF ablation (50.8 {+-} 16.6 ml/min/1.73 m{sup 2} before RF ablation vs. 47.2 {+-} 11.9 ml/min/1.73 m{sup 2} after RF ablation; not significant). Conclusions. CT-guided bipolar and multipolar RF ablation of RCC has a high rate of clinical success and low complication rates. At short-term follow-up, clinical efficacy is high without deterioration of the renal function.

  20. SU-E-I-20: Dead Time Count Loss Compensation in SPECT/CT: Projection Versus Global Correction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siman, W; Kappadath, S [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To compare projection-based versus global correction that compensate for deadtime count loss in SPECT/CT images. Methods: SPECT/CT images of an IEC phantom (2.3GBq 99mTc) with ?10% deadtime loss containing the 37mm (uptake 3), 28 and 22mm (uptake 6) spheres were acquired using a 2 detector SPECT/CT system with 64 projections/detector and 15 s/projection. The deadtime, Ti and the true count rate, Ni at each projection, i was calculated using the monitor-source method. Deadtime corrected SPECT were reconstructed twice: (1) with projections that were individually-corrected for deadtime-losses; and (2) with original projections with losses and then correcting the reconstructed SPECT images using a scaling factor equal to the inverse of the average fractional loss for 5 projections/detector. For both cases, the SPECT images were reconstructed using OSEM with attenuation and scatter corrections. The two SPECT datasets were assessed by comparing line profiles in xyplane and z-axis, evaluating the count recoveries, and comparing ROI statistics. Higher deadtime losses (up to 50%) were also simulated to the individually corrected projections by multiplying each projection i by exp(-a*Ni*Ti), where a is a scalar. Additionally, deadtime corrections in phantoms with different geometries and deadtime losses were also explored. The same two correction methods were carried for all these data sets. Results: Averaging the deadtime losses in 5 projections/detector suffices to recover >99% of the loss counts in most clinical cases. The line profiles (xyplane and z-axis) and the statistics in the ROIs drawn in the SPECT images corrected using both methods showed agreement within the statistical noise. The count-loss recoveries in the two methods also agree within >99%. Conclusion: The projection-based and the global correction yield visually indistinguishable SPECT images. The global correction based on sparse sampling of projections losses allows for accurate SPECT deadtime loss correction while keeping the study duration reasonable.

  1. The Heating of Corn Chops.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraps, G. S.

    1912-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    OF SUB-STATIONS. E. E. B in fobd , Beeville Sub-Station......... ................................... Beeville, Bee County W, S. H o tc h k is s , Troup Sub-Station........................................ Troup, Smith County E. M. J oh n s to n... , Cooperative Rice Station................Beaumont, Jefferson County I. S. Y o rk , Spur Sub-Station.......................................................... Spur, Dickens County T. W . B u e l l , Denton, Sub...

  2. marrow with beans and corn

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    When the marrow is *almost* cooked, add the beans and the sweetcorn and cook until the ... If you do need to add water during cooking, keep it to a minimum.

  3. Integrated Corn-Based Biorefinery

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This fact sheet summarizes a U.S. Department of Energy Biomass Program research and development project.

  4. Cooking with Corn Syrup (Spanish)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anding, Jenna

    2001-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    utilizar. Para asegurar una mejor calidad utilice el jarabe en un periodo que no exceda un a?o desde el momento en que lo adquiri?. Imitaci?n de Pay de Nuez (rinde 8 porciones) Ingredientes 1 /2 taza de az?car 1 /4 de taza (media barrita) de mantequilla o... Extensionista Especialista en Nutrici?n, El Sistema Universitario Texas A&M. Producido por Agricultural Communications, El Sistema Universitario Texas A&M. Conforme a la ley federal y la pol...

  5. Cooking with Corn Syrup (Spanish) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anding, Jenna

    2001-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    fuente de energ?a: 1 cucharada sopera de jarabe de ma?z con- tiene aproximadamente 56 calor?as. Almacenamiento Guarde el jarabe de ma?z sin abrir en un sitio fresco y seco. No lo guarde en el refrigerador por que se pondr? muy espeso y ser? dif?cil de...

  6. Corn Plus | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, clickInformationNew|Core Analysis At Geysers| Open

  7. ModPET: A Novel Small-Animal PET System Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and PET/CT systems have become the gold standard for imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arizona, University of

    ModPET: A Novel Small-Animal PET System Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and PET/CT systems have these results to their human counterparts. Current small-animal PET scanners are very costly and complicated for Gamma-Ray Imaging, we are developing a novel small-animal PET scanner that utilizes common modular

  8. Three-dimensional multiphase segmentation of X-ray CT data of porous materials using a Bayesian Markov random field framework

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kulkarni, Ramaprasad; Tuller, Markus; Fink, Wolfgang; Wildschild, Dorthe (Oregon State U.); (Ariz)

    2012-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Advancements in noninvasive imaging methods such as X-ray computed tomography (CT) have led to a recent surge of applications in porous media research with objectives ranging from theoretical aspects of pore-scale fluid and interfacial dynamics to practical applications such as enhanced oil recovery and advanced contaminant remediation. While substantial efforts and resources have been devoted to advance CT technology, microscale analysis, and fluid dynamics simulations, the development of efficient and stable three-dimensional multiphase image segmentation methods applicable to large data sets is lacking. To eliminate the need for wet-dry or dual-energy scans, image alignment, and subtraction analysis, commonly applied in X-ray micro-CT, a segmentation method based on a Bayesian Markov random field (MRF) framework amenable to true three-dimensional multiphase processing was developed and evaluated. Furthermore, several heuristic and deterministic combinatorial optimization schemes required to solve the labeling problem of the MRF image model were implemented and tested for computational efficiency and their impact on segmentation results. Test results for three grayscale data sets consisting of dry glass beads, partially saturated glass beads, and partially saturated crushed tuff obtained with synchrotron X-ray micro-CT demonstrate great potential of the MRF image model for three-dimensional multiphase segmentation. While our results are promising and the developed algorithm is stable and computationally more efficient than other commonly applied porous media segmentation models, further potential improvements exist for fully automated operation.

  9. Published: March 25, 2011 r 2011 American Chemical Society 1208 dx.doi.org/10.1021/ct100738h |J. Chem. Theory Comput. 2011, 7, 12081219

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ponder, Jay

    Published: March 25, 2011 r 2011 American Chemical Society 1208 dx.doi.org/10.1021/ct100738h |J, Jay W. Ponder,|| and Bernard R. Brooks*, Department of Chemistry, University of South Florida, 4202 E. This new facility is fully integrated with free energy perturbation methods, Hessian-based methods

  10. 1. Birru, D., C.-T. Chou, and A. Seyedi, "Coordination in Wireless Networks Having Devices with Different Physical Layer Transmission Schemes," US Patent 8233505, Jul. 31, 2012.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pattanaik, Sumanta N.

    Patents 1. Birru, D., C.-T. Chou, and A. Seyedi, "Coordination in Wireless Networks Having Devices with Different Physical Layer Transmission Schemes," US Patent 8233505, Jul. 31, 2012. 2. Birru, D. and A. Seyedi, "Cost-Effective Preamble Structure for High-Speed Communication of Packetized System," US Patent 8

  11. Proton Radiography Studies for Proton CT M. Petterson, N. Blumenkrantz, J. Feldt, J. Heimann, D. Lucia, A. Seiden, D. C. Williams, H. F.-W. Sadrozinski,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    Proton Radiography Studies for Proton CT M. Petterson, N. Blumenkrantz, J. Feldt, J. Heimann, D. Randazzo, V. Sipala Abstract­We report the results of a beam experiment to develop proton Computed of a phantom to predict the path of the proton within the phantom and of a crystal calorimeter to measure

  12. A detailed pore characterization in 2D and 3D by means of optical and fluorescence microscopy combined with high-resolution X-ray CT.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gent, Universiteit

    combined with high-resolution X-ray CT. Research Unit: Sedimentary Geology and Engineering Geology Topic about oil reservoirs, aquifers, building stone weathering). In the past, the pore network was mainly/or laboratory work: Precise sampling of the geological material. Petrographical research with optical

  13. Final environmental impact statement/report. Volume 4. Comment letters and public hearing transcripts. Northeast corridor improvement project electrication: New Haven, CT to Boston, MA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is the final environmental impact statement and final environmental impact report (FEIS/R) on the proposal by the National Railroad Passenger Corporation (Amtrak) to complete the electrification of the Northeast Corridor main line by extending electric traction from New Haven, CT, to Boston, MA. This document (Volume IV) reprints the comments received on the DEIS/R.

  14. SU-E-I-90: Medical Physicists' Implication in Diagnostic CT in Switzerland: Results of After One Year of Experience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryckx, N.; Elandoy, C.; Bize, J.; Verdun, F.R. [Lausanne University Hospital, Lausanne, VD (Switzerland)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Since January 1st 2008, the Swiss ordinance on radiation protection requires the involvement of a medical physicist to support the optimization process of medical imaging techniques using ionizing radiation. After a long process of implementation, this requirement is satisfied all over the country since the beginning of 2013. The goal of this contribution is to summarize the main results obtained in this first year of experience in CT. Methods: We assessed the output and clinical use of 45 CT units using a three-pronged approach. First, we assessed the output of the device (CTDIvol, primary beam collimation and HU in water at different tube tensions). Secondly, we characterized the local chest and abdomen acquisition and reconstruction protocols using the Catphan 600 phantom. Lastly, we assessed the clinical use of the machine by analyzing an extract of a dozen clinical examinations per unit. Results: 9 out of 45 units had incorrect collimator settings, e.g. 4mm instead of 1mm. We witnessed also a large spread in reconstruction parameters, especially for reconstructed slice thickness, thus showing notable variations in low contrast detectability performances. Clinical practice is also clearly spread out. For example, estimated patient effective dose per abdomen examination lies at 18.7+/?12.7mSv (min: 2.0mSv — max: 112.0mSv). Chest and brain scans have a narrower dispersion, but patient effective dose is also spread by about a factor of 10 to 20. Conclusion: The spread in clinical practice being fairly large, it appears of crucial importance to collaborate more closely with radiologists and technologists to assess it. The lack of statistical precision will imply that we analyze clinical practice according to a specific medical demand rather than an anatomical region. Furthermore, low contrast sensitivity (LCD) being a crucial parameter, an objective method using a model observer will be used to assess LCD.

  15. SU-E-I-93: Improved Imaging Quality for Multislice Helical CT Via Sparsity Regularized Iterative Image Reconstruction Method Based On Tensor Framelet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nam, H [Ewha Womans University, Seoul, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Guo, M [Shanghai JiaoTong University, Shanghai, Shanghai (China); Lee, K [Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Li, R [Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA (United States); Xing, L [Stanford UniversitySchool of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Gao, H [Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, Shanghai (China)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Inspired by compressive sensing, sparsity regularized iterative reconstruction method has been extensively studied. However, its utility pertinent to multislice helical 4D CT for radiotherapy with respect to imaging quality, dose, and time has not been thoroughly addressed. As the beginning of such an investigation, this work carries out the initial comparison of reconstructed imaging quality between sparsity regularized iterative method and analytic method through static phantom studies using a state-of-art 128-channel multi-slice Siemens helical CT scanner. Methods: In our iterative method, tensor framelet (TF) is chosen as the regularization method for its superior performance from total variation regularization in terms of reduced piecewise-constant artifacts and improved imaging quality that has been demonstrated in our prior work. On the other hand, X-ray transforms and its adjoints are computed on-the-fly through GPU implementation using our previous developed fast parallel algorithms with O(1) complexity per computing thread. For comparison, both FDK (approximate analytic method) and Katsevich algorithm (exact analytic method) are used for multislice helical CT image reconstruction. Results: The phantom experimental data with different imaging doses were acquired using a state-of-art 128-channel multi-slice Siemens helical CT scanner. The reconstructed image quality was compared between TF-based iterative method, FDK and Katsevich algorithm with the quantitative analysis for characterizing signal-to-noise ratio, image contrast, and spatial resolution of high-contrast and low-contrast objects. Conclusion: The experimental results suggest that our tensor framelet regularized iterative reconstruction algorithm improves the helical CT imaging quality from FDK and Katsevich algorithm for static experimental phantom studies that have been performed.

  16. SU-E-J-151: Dosimetric Evaluation of DIR Mapped Contours for Image Guided Adaptive Radiotherapy with 4D Cone-Beam CT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balik, S [Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, OH (United States); Weiss, E; Williamson, J; Hugo, G [Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA (United States); Jan, N; Zhang, L [Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia (United States); Roman, N [San Antonio Precision Center Ctr, San Antonio, TX (United States); Christensen, G [University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To estimate dosimetric errors resulting from using contours deformably mapped from planning CT to 4D cone beam CT (CBCT) images for image-guided adaptive radiotherapy of locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods: Ten locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients underwent one planning 4D fan-beam CT (4DFBCT) and weekly 4DCBCT scans. Multiple physicians delineated the gross tumor volume (GTV) and normal structures in planning CT images and only GTV in CBCT images. Manual contours were mapped from planning CT to CBCTs using small deformation, inverse consistent linear elastic (SICLE) algorithm for two scans in each patient. Two physicians reviewed and rated the DIR-mapped (auto) and manual GTV contours as clinically acceptable (CA), clinically acceptable after minor modification (CAMM) and unacceptable (CU). Mapped normal structures were visually inspected and corrected if necessary, and used to override tissue density for dose calculation. CTV (6mm expansion of GTV) and PTV (5mm expansion of CTV) were created. VMAT plans were generated using the DIR-mapped contours to deliver 66 Gy in 33 fractions with 95% and 100% coverage (V66) to PTV and CTV, respectively. Plan evaluation for V66 was based on manual PTV and CTV contours. Results: Mean PTV V66 was 84% (range 75% – 95%) and mean CTV V66 was 97% (range 93% – 100%) for CAMM scored plans (12 plans); and was 90% (range 80% – 95%) and 99% (range 95% – 100%) for CA scored plans (7 plans). The difference in V66 between CAMM and CA was significant for PTV (p = 0.03) and approached significance for CTV (p = 0.07). Conclusion: The quality of DIR-mapped contours directly impacted the plan quality for 4DCBCT-based adaptation. Larger safety margins may be needed when planning with auto contours for IGART with 4DCBCT images. Reseach was supported by NIH P01CA116602.

  17. SU-E-J-83: Ion Imaging to Better Estimate In-Vivo Relative Stopping Powers Using X-Ray CT Prior-Knowledge Information

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dias, M [Dipartamento di Elettronica, Informazione e Bioingegneria - DEIB, Politecnico di Milano (Italy); Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Collins-Fekete, C [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Departement de physique, de genie physique et d'optique et Centre de recherche sur le cancer, Universite Laval, Quebec (Canada); Riboldi, M; Baroni, G [Dipartamento di Elettronica, Informazione e Bioingegneria - DEIB, Politecnico di Milano (Italy); Doolan, P [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); University College London, London (United Kingdom); Hansen, D [Experimental Clinical Oncology, Aarhus University, 8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Seco, J [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To reduce uncertainties in relative stopping power (RSP) estimates for ions (alpha and carbon) by using Ion radiographic-imaging and X-ray CT prior-knowledge. Methods: A 36×36 phantom matrix composed of 9 materials with different thicknesses and randomly placed is generated. Theoretical RSPs are calculated using stopping power (SP) data from three references (Janni, ICRU49 and Bischel). We introduced an artificial systematic error (1.5%, 2.5% or 3.5%) and a random error (<0.5%) to the SP to simulated patient ion-range errors present in clinic environment. Carbon/alpha final energy for each RSPs set (theoretical and from CT images) is obtained with a ray-tracing algorithm. A gradient descent (GD) method is used to minimize the difference in exit particle energy, between theory and X-ray CT RSP maps, by iteratively correcting the RSP map from X-ray CT. Once a new set of RSPs is obtained for a direction a new optimization is done over other direction using the RSPs from the previous optimization. Theoretical RSPs are compared with experimental RSPs obtained with Gammex Phantom. Results: Preliminary results show that optimized RSP values can be obtained with smaller uncertainties (<1%) than clinical RSPs (1.5% to 3.5%). Theoretical values from three different references show uncertainties, up to 3% from experimental values. Further investigation will consider prior-knowledge from RSP obtained with CT images and ion radiographies from Monte Carlo Simulations. Conclusion: GD and ray-tracing methods have been implemented to reduce RSP uncertainties from values obtained for clinical treatment. Experimental RSPs will be obtained using carbon/alpha beams to consider the existence of material dependent systematic errors. Based on the results, it is hoped to show that using ray-tracing optimization with ion radiography and prior knowledge on RPSs, treatment planning accuracy and cost-effectiveness can be improved.

  18. SU-C-12A-03: The Impact of Contrast Medium On Radiation Dose in CT: A Systematic Evaluation Across 58 Patient Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sahbaee, P [NC State University, Raleigh, NC (United States); Samei, E [Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Segars, W [Duke University, Durham, NC (United States)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To assess the effect of contrast medium on radiation dose as a function of time via Monte Carlo simulation from the liver CT scan across a library of 5D XCAT models Methods: A validated Monte Carlo simulation package (PENELOPE) was employed to model a CT system (LightSpeed 64 VCT, GE Healthcare). The radiation dose was estimated from a common abdomen CT examination. The dose estimation was performed on a library of adult extended cardiac-torso (5D XCAT) phantoms (35 male, 23 female, mean age 51.5 years, mean weight 80.2 kg). The 5D XCAT models were created based on patient-specific iodine concentration-time results from our computational contrast medium propagation model for different intravenous injection protocols. To enable a dynamic estimation of radiation dose, each organ in the model was assigned to its own time-concentration curve via the PENELOPE package, material.exe. Using the Monte Carlo, for each scan time point after the injection, 80 million photons were initiated and tracked through the phantoms. Finally, the dose to the liver was tallied from the deposited energy. Results: Monte Carlo simulation results of radiation dose delivered to the liver from the XCAT models indicated up to 30% increase in dose for different time after the administration of contrast medium. Conclusion: The contrast enhancement is employed in over 60% of imaging modalities, which not only remarkably affects the CT image quality, but also increases the radiation dose by as much as 70%. The postinjection multiple acquisition in several enhanced CT protocols, makes the radiation dose increment through the use of contrast medium, an inevitable factor in optimization of these protocols. The relationship between radiation dose and injected contrast medium as a function of time studied in this work allows optimization of contrast administration for vulnerable individuals.

  19. Cost Effective Bioethanol via Acid Pretreatment of Corn Stover, Saccharification, and Conversion via a Novel Fermentation Organism: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number: CRD-12-485

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dowe, N.

    2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This research program will convert acid pretreated corn stover to sugars at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and then transfer these sugars to Honda R&D and its partner the Green Earth Institute (GEI) for conversion to ethanol via a novel fermentation organism. In phase one, NREL will adapt its pretreatment and saccharification process to the unique attributes of this organism, and Honda R&D/GEI will increase the sugar conversion rate as well as the yield and titer of the resulting ethanol. In later phases, NREL, Honda R&D, and GEI will work together at NREL to optimize and scale-up to pilot-scale the Honda R&D/GEI bioethanol production process. The final stage will be to undertake a pilot-scale test at NREL of the optimized bioethanol conversion process.

  20. Performance of incross egg-type pullets as affected by coccidiostats and granite grit during the growing period and varying levels of corn and milo during the laying period

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malik, Dharam Dev

    1962-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    's wee ge~. by tbs Xmet Q. etc@ pxotste XaveXe~ ~ +eras Xqee'ee tbe Na@y egeA. Ie tba X957 tope Ct ceo stet+1 tbat ptotete 'XeeeXs of V, X5& LI ee4 XX pateeet esa'e ~kbXs Ce ~ t~, femk ef@etemey en4 esXat~e of boly eefgbti ~oa eed 8hKttet (XS59...

  1. -CT CT)Computed Tomography(. ,. , -100 ,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pinsky, Ross

    ) QSR. / ( · -ISO 13485. ·. ·ISO 13485 / /-FDA-. ·.( ,) Manual Assembler : . /BB-. ·. Compliance ExpertProduction · -FDA . , ISO , . · , , , . : · 2-4 . · GMP

  2. Assessment and management of interfractional variations in daily diagnostic-quality-CT guided prostate-bed irradiation after prostatectomy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Feng; Ahunbay, Ergun; Lawton, Colleen; Allen Li, X., E-mail: ali@mcw.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53226 (United States)

    2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To quantify interfractional anatomic variations and limitations of the current practice of image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) for prostate-bed patients and to study dosimetric benefits of an online adaptive replanning scheme that addresses the interfractional variations. Methods: Contours for the targets and organs at risk (OARs) from daily diagnostic-quality CTs acquired with in-room CT (CTVision, Siemens) were generated by populating the planning contours using an autosegmentation tool based on deformable registration (ABAS, Elekta) with manual editing for ten prostate-bed patients treated with postoperative daily CT-guided IMRT. Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) obtained by maximizing the overlap of contours for a structure between the daily and plan contours was used to quantify the organ deformation between the plan and daily CTs. Three interfractional-variation-correction schemes, the current standard practice of IGRT repositioning, a previously developed online adaptive RT (ART), and the full reoptimization, were applied to these daily CTs and a number of dose-volume quantities for the targets and organs at risk were compared for their effectiveness to account for the interfractional variations. Results: Large interfractional organ deformations in prostate-bed irradiation were seen. The mean DSCs for CTV, rectum, and bladder were 86.6 ± 5.1% (range from 61% to 97%), 77.3% ± 7.4% (range from 55% to 90%), and 75.4% ± 11.2% (range from 46% to 96%), respectively. The fractional and cumulative dose-volume quantities for CTV and PTV: V100 (volume received at least 100% prescription dose), and rectum and bladder: V{sub 45Gy} and V{sub 60Gy} (volume received at least 45 or 60 Gy), were compared for the repositioning, adaptive, reoptimization, and original plans. The fractional and cumulative dosimetric results were nearly the same. The average cumulative CTV V100 were 88.0%, 98.4%, 99.2%, and 99.3% for the IGRT, ART, reoptimization, and original plans, respectively. The corresponding rectal V{sub 45Gy} (V{sub 60Gy}) were 58.7% (27.3%), 48.1% (20.7%), 43.8% (16.1%), and 44.9% (16.8%). The results for bladder were comparable among three schemes. Paired two-tailed Wilcoxon signed-rank tests were performed and it was found that ART and reoptimization provide better target coverage and better OAR sparing, especially rectum sparing. Conclusions: The interfractional organ motions and deformations during prostate-bed irradiation are significant. The online adaptive replanning scheme is capable of effectively addressing the large organ deformation, resulting in cumulative doses equivalent to those originally planned.

  3. Organ doses, effective doses, and risk indices in adult CT: Comparison of four types of reference phantoms across different examination protocols

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang Yakun; Li Xiang; Paul Segars, W.; Samei, Ehsan [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 and Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 and Department of Radiology, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States) and Department of Radiology, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Department of Radiology, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States) and Departments of Physics, Biomedical Engineering, and Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States)

    2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Radiation exposure from computed tomography (CT) to the public has increased the concern among radiation protection professionals. Being able to accurately assess the radiation dose patients receive during CT procedures is a crucial step in the management of CT dose. Currently, various computational anthropomorphic phantoms are used to assess radiation dose by different research groups. It is desirable to better understand how the dose results are affected by different choices of phantoms. In this study, the authors assessed the uncertainties in CT dose and risk estimation associated with different types of computational phantoms for a selected group of representative CT protocols. Methods: Routinely used CT examinations were categorized into ten body and three neurological examination categories. Organ doses, effective doses, risk indices, and conversion coefficients to effective dose and risk index (k and q factors, respectively) were estimated for these examinations for a clinical CT system (LightSpeed VCT, GE Healthcare). Four methods were used, each employing a different type of reference phantoms. The first and second methods employed a Monte Carlo program previously developed and validated in our laboratory. In the first method, the reference male and female extended cardiac-torso (XCAT) phantoms were used, which were initially created from the Visible Human data and later adjusted to match organ masses defined in ICRP publication 89. In the second method, the reference male and female phantoms described in ICRP publication 110 were used, which were initially developed from tomographic data of two patients and later modified to match ICRP 89 organ masses. The third method employed a commercial dosimetry spreadsheet (ImPACT group, London, England) with its own hermaphrodite stylized phantom. In the fourth method, another widely used dosimetry spreadsheet (CT-Expo, Medizinische Hochschule, Hannover, Germany) was employed together with its associated male and female stylized phantoms. Results: For fully irradiated organs, average coefficients of variation (COV) ranged from 0.07 to 0.22 across the four male phantoms and from 0.06 to 0.18 across the four female phantoms; for partially irradiated organs, average COV ranged from 0.13 to 0.30 across the four male phantoms and from 0.15 to 0.30 across the four female phantoms. Doses to the testes, breasts, and esophagus showed large variations between phantoms. COV for gender-averaged effective dose and k factor ranged from 0.03 to 0.23 and from 0.06 to 0.30, respectively. COV for male risk index and q factor ranged from 0.06 to 0.30 and from 0.05 to 0.36, respectively; COV for female risk index and q factor ranged from 0.06 to 0.49 and from 0.07 to 0.54, respectively. Conclusions: Despite closely matched organ mass, total body weight, and height, large differences in organ dose exist due to variation in organ location, spatial distribution, and dose approximation method. Dose differences for fully irradiated radiosensitive organs were much smaller than those for partially irradiated organs. Weighted dosimetry quantities including effective dose, male risk indices, k factors, and male q factors agreed well across phantoms. The female risk indices and q factors varied considerably across phantoms.

  4. Geology, hydrothermal petrology, stable isotope geochemistry, and fluid inclusion geothermometry of LASL geothermal test well C/T-1 (Mesa 31-1), East Mesa, Imperial Valley, California, USA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, K.R.; Elders, W.A.

    1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Borehole Mesa 31-1 (LASL C/T-1) is an 1899-m (6231-ft) deep well located in the northwestern part of the East Mesa Geothermal Field. Mesa 31-1 is the first Calibration/Test Well (C/T-1) in the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL), Geothermal Log Interpretation Program. The purpose of this study is to provide a compilation of drillhole data, drill cuttings, well lithology, and formation petrology that will serve to support the use of well LASL C/T-1 as a calibration/test well for geothermal logging. In addition, reviews of fluid chemistry, stable isotope studies, isotopic and fluid inclusion geothermometry, and the temperature log data are presented. This study provides the basic data on the geology and hydrothermal alteration of the rocks in LASL C/T-1 as background for the interpretation of wireline logs.

  5. Influence of radiation therapy on the lung-tissue in breast cancer patients: CT-assessed density changes and associated symptoms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rotstein, S.; Lax, I.; Svane, G. (Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden))

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The relative electron density of lung tissue was measured from computer tomography (CT) slices in 33 breast cancer patients treated by various techniques of adjuvant radiotherapy. The measurements were made before radiotherapy, 3 months and 9 months after completion of radiation therapy. The changes in lung densities at 3 months and 9 months were compared to radiation induced radiological (CT) findings. In addition, subjective symptoms such as cough and dyspnoea were assessed before and after radiotherapy. It was observed that the mean of the relative electron density of lung tissue varied from 0.25 when the whole lung was considered to 0.17 when only the anterior lateral quarter of the lung was taken into account. In patients with positive radiological (CT) findings the mean lung density of the anterior lateral quarter increased 2.1 times 3 months after radiotherapy and was still increased 1.6 times 6 months later. For those patients without findings, in the CT pictures the corresponding values were 1.2 and 1.1, respectively. The standard deviation of the pixel values within the anterior lateral quarter of the lung increased 3.8 times and 3.2 times at 3 months and 9 months, respectively, in the former group, as opposed to 1.2 and 1.1 in the latter group. Thirteen patients had an increase in either cough or dyspnoea as observed 3 months after completion of radiotherapy. In eleven patients these symptoms persisted 6 months later. No significant correlation was found between radiological findings and subjective symptoms. However, when three different treatment techniques were compared among 29 patients the highest rate of radiological findings was observed in patients in which the largest lung volumes received the target dose. A tendency towards an increased rate of subjective symptoms was also found in this group.

  6. SU-E-J-267: Weekly Volumetric and Dosimetric Changes in Adaptive Conformal Radiotherapy of Non-Small-Cell-Lung Cancer Using 4D CT and Gating

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Z [the 6th People's Hospital of Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai, Shanghai (China); Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Shang, Q [Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Xiong, F; Zhang, X; Zhang, Q; Fu, S [the 6th People's Hospital of Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai, Shanghai (China)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: This study was to evaluate the significance of weekly imageguided patient setup and to assess the volumetric and dosimetric changes in no-small-cell-lung cancer (NSCLC) patients treated with adaptive conformal radiotherapy (CRT). Methods: 9 NSCLC patients treated with 3D CRT underwent 4D CT-on-rail every five fractions. ITV was generated from three phases of the 4DCT (the end of exhalation, 25% before and after the end of exhalation). The margin of ITV to PTV is 5mm. 6 weekly CTs were acquired for each patient. The weekly CTs were fused with the planning CT by vertebrae. The couch shift was recorded for each weekly CT to evaluate the setup error. The gross tumor volumes (GTVs) were contoured on weekly CT images by a physician. Beams from the original plans were applied to weekly CTs to calculate the delivered doses. All patients underwent replanning after 20 fractions. Results: Among the total 54 CTs, the average setup error was 2.0± 1.7, 2.6± 2.1, 2.7± 2.2 mm in X, Y, and Z direction, respectively. The average volume of the primary GTV was reduced from 42.45 cc to 22.78 cc (47.04%) after 6 weeks. The maximal volume regression occurred between 15 and 20 fractions. Adaptive radiation therapy (ART) reduced the V20 and V5 of the lung by 33.5% and 16.89%, respectively. ART also reduced Dmean and D1/3 of the heart by 31.7% and 32.32%, respectively. Dmax of the spinal cord did not vary much during the treatment course. Conclusion: 5 mm margin is sufficient for 4D weekly CTguided radiotherapy in lung cancer. Tumor regression was observed in the majority of patients. ART significantly reduced the OARs dose. Our preliminary results indicated that an off-line ART approach is appropriate in clinical practice.

  7. SU-E-I-48: The Behavior of AEC in Scan Regions Outside the Localizer Radiograph FOV: An In Phantom Study of CT Systems From Four Vendors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Supanich, M [Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL (United States); Bevins, N [Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, MI (United States)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: This review of scanners from 4 major manufacturers examines the clinical impact of performing CT scans that extend into areas of the body that were not acquired in the CT localizer radiograph. Methods: Anthropomorphic chest and abdomen phantoms were positioned together on the tables of CT scanners from 4 different vendors. All of the scanners offered an Automatic Exposure Control (AEC) option with both lateral and axial tube current modulation. A localizer radiograph was taken covering the entire extent of both phantoms and then the scanner's Chest-Abdomen-Pelvis (CAP) study was performed with the clinical AEC settings employed and the scan and reconstruction range extending from the superior portion of the chest phantom through the inferior portion of the abdomen phantom. A new study was then initiated with a localizer radiograph extending the length of the chest phantom (not covering the abdomen phantom). The same CAP protocol and AEC settings were then used to scan and reconstruct the entire length of both phantoms. Scan parameters at specific locations in the abdomen phantom from both studies were investigated using the information contained in the DICOM metadata of the reconstructed images. Results: The AEC systems on all scanners utilized different tube current settings in the abdomen phantom for the scan completed without the full localizer radiograph. The AEC system behavior was also scanner dependent with the default manual tube current, the maximum tube current and the tube current at the last known position observed as outcomes. Conclusion: The behavior of the AEC systems of CT scanners in regions not covered by the localizer radiograph is vendor dependent. To ensure optimal image quality and radiation exposure it is important to include the entire planned scan region in the localizer radiograph.

  8. Final environmental impact statement/report and 4(f) statement. Volume 1. Northeast corridor improvement project electrification: New Haven, CT to Boston, MA. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is the final environmental impact statement and final environmental impact report (FEIS/R) on the proposal by the National Railroad Passenger Corporation (Amtrak) to complete the electrification of the Northeast Corridor main line by extending electric traction from New Haven, CT, to Boston, MA. This document (Volume I) is the main body of the FEIS/R and includes a 4(f) Statement on the proposed location of an electrification facility in the Great Swamp Wildlife Management Area.

  9. Record of decision: Final environmental impact statement/report and 4(f) statement. Northeast Corridor Improvement Project electrification, New Haven, CT to Boston, MA. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This record of decision (ROD) completes the environmental review by the Federal Administration (FRA) of the proposal by the National Railroad Passenger Corporation (Amtrak) to extend electric train operation from New Haven, CT, to Boston, MA. In this ROD, FRA approves Amtrak`s proposal subject to the inclusion into the project of a number of measures to eliminate or minimize potential adverse environmental impacts.

  10. Appendix to the final environmental impact report supplement. Northeast Corridor Improvement Project electrification, New Haven, CT to Boston, MA. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is an appendix to the final Environmental Impact Report Supplement, published on February 15, 1995, addressing the proposal by the National Railroad Passenger Corporation (Amtrak) to complete the electrification of the Northeast Corridor main line by extending electric traction from New Haven, CT, to Boston, MA. The purpose of this document is to discuss the selection of the Boston area electrical substation site and the relocation of a paralleling station in East Foxboro.

  11. Final environmental impact statement/report. Volume 2. Technical studies. Northeast corridor improvement project electrification: New Haven, CT to Boston, MA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is the final environmental impact statement and final environmental impact report (FEIS/R) on the proposal by the National Railroad Passenger Corporation (Amtrak) to complete the electrification of the Northeast Corridor main line by extending electric traction from New Haven, CT, to Boston, MA. This document (Volume II) presents additional technical studies to supplement Volume III of the DEIS/R issued in October 1993 (PB94-111838).

  12. Virtual monochromatic imaging in dual-source and dual-energy CT for visualization of acute ischemic stroke

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hara, Hidetake; Matsuzawa, Hiroki; Inoue, Toshiyuki; Abe, Shinji; Satoh, Hitoshi; Nakajima, Yasuo

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have recently developed a phantom that simulates acute ischemic stroke. We attempted to visualize acute-stage cerebral infarction by applying virtual monochromatic images to this phantom using dual-energy CT (DECT). Virtual monochromatic images were created using DECT from 40 to 100 keV at every 10 keV and from 60 to 80 keV at every 1 keV, under three energy conditions of tube voltages with thin (Sn) filters. Calculation of the CNR values allowed us to evaluate the visualization of acute-stage cerebral infarction. The CNR value of a virtual monochromatic image was the highest at 68 keV under 80 kV / Sn 140 kV, at 72 keV under 100 kV / Sn 140 kV, and at 67 keV under 140 kV / 80 kV. The CNR values of virtual monochromatic images between 65 and 75 keV were significantly higher than those obtained for all other created energy images. Therefore, optimal conditions for visualizing acute ischemic stroke were achievable.

  13. SU-E-J-256: Dual Energy Planar Image Based Localization in the Absence of On-Board CT Images

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sadagopan, R; Yang, J; Li, H [M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To develop a tool enabling soft tissue based image guidance using dual energy radiographs for cases when on-board CT is not available. Method: Dual energy planar radiographs can be applied to image guidance for targeting lung lesions because the bone based alignment only may not be sufficient as the lesions move. We acquired images of an anthropomorphic thorax phantom at 120 and 60 KVp respectively. Using a weighted logarithmic subtraction of these dual energy images, a soft tissue enhanced and a bone enhanced image were generated and they could be used for the image guidance purpose. Similar processing was also applied to a dual energy image set acquired for a patient undergoing a proton therapy. Results: The soft tissue enhanced images suppressed bones (ribs and scapula) overlying on lung, thus enabling a better visualization of soft tissue and lesion, while the bone enhanced image suppressed the soft tissue. These enhanced effects were visually apparent without further processing for display enhancements, such as using histogram or edge enhancement technique. Conclusions: The phantom image processing was encouraging. The initial test on the patient image set showed that other post processing might still be able to add value in visualizing soft tissues in addition to the dual energy soft tissue enhancement. More evaluations are needed to determine the potential benefit of this technique in the clinic.

  14. An anthropomorphic multimodality (CT/MRI) phantom prototype for end-to-end tests in radiation therapy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gallas, Raya R; Runz, Armin; Niebuhr, Nina I; Jäkel, Oliver; Greilich, Steffen

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With the increasing complexity of external beam therapy, so-called "end-to-end" tests are intended to cover all steps from therapy planning to follow-up to fulfill the high demands on quality assurance. As magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) gains growing importance in the treatment process and established phantoms (such as the Alderson head) cannot be used for those tests, novel multimodality phantoms have to be developed. Here, we present a feasibility study for such a customizable multimodality head phantom. We used a set of patient CT images as the basis for the anthropomorphic head shape. The recipient - consisting of an epoxy resin - was produced using rapid prototyping (3D printing). The phantom recipient includes a nasal air cavity, two soft tissues volumes and cranial bone. Additionally a spherical tumor volume was positioned in the center. The volumes were filled with dipotassium phosphate-based cranial bone surrogate, agarose gel, and distilled water. The tumor volume was filled with normoxic dosimetr...

  15. Volume Changes of Experimental Carotid Sidewall Aneurysms Due to Embolization with Liquid Embolic Agents: A Multidetector CT Angiography Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dudeck, O. [Charite, Campus Virchow Clinic, Department of Radiology (Germany)], E-mail: oliver.dudeck@charite.de; Okuducu, A. F. [Charite, Campus Virchow Clinic, Department of Neuropathology (Germany); Jordan, O. [University of Geneva, School of Pharmacy (Switzerland); Tesmer, K.; Pech, M. [Charite, Campus Virchow Clinic, Department of Radiology (Germany); Weigang, E. [Albert-Ludwigs-University of Freiburg, Department of Cardiovascular Surgery (Germany); Ruefenacht, D. A. [University Hospital of Geneva, Neuroradiology Section (Switzerland); Doelker, E. [University of Geneva, School of Pharmacy (Switzerland); Felix, R. [Charite, Campus Virchow Clinic, Department of Radiology (Germany)

    2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Iodine-containing polyvinyl alcohol polymer (I-PVAL) is a novel precipitating liquid embolic that allows for artifact-free evaluation of CT angiography (CTA). As accurate aneurysm volumetry can be performed with multidetector CTA, we determined volumes of experimental aneurysms before, immediately after, and 4 weeks after embolization of 14 porcine experimental carotid sidewall aneurysms with this liquid embolic. An automated three-dimensional software measurement tool was used for volumetric analysis of volume-rendering CTA data. Furthermore, intra-aneurysmal pressure changes during liquid embolization were measured in four silicone aneurysms and potential polymer volume changes within 4 weeks were assessed in vitro. Liquid embolic injection was performed during temporary balloon occlusion of the aneurysm neck, resulting in a mean occlusion rate of 98.3%. Aneurysms enlarged significantly during embolization by 61.1 {+-} 28.9%, whereas a significant shrinkage of 5.6 {+-} 2.7% was observed within the follow-up period. Histologic analysis revealed an inflammatory foreign body reaction with partial polymer degradation. In silicone aneurysm models, intra-aneurysmal pressure remained unchanged during liquid embolic injection, whereas balloon inflation resulted in a mean pressure increase of 31.2 {+-} 0.7%. No polymer shrinkage was observed in vitro. The aneurysm enlargement noted was presumably due to pressure elevation after balloon inflation, which resulted in dilatation of the weak venous wall of the newly constructed aneurysm-another shortcoming of this experimental aneurysm model. The volume decrease after 4 weeks expressed partial polymer degradation.

  16. Percutaneous Radiofrequency Ablation for the Treatment of Liver Neoplasms in the Caudate Lobe Left of the Vena Cava: Electrode Placement Through the Left Lobe of the Liver Under CT-Fluoroscopic Guidance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yamakado, Koichiro, E-mail: yama@clin.medic.mie-u.ac.jp; Nakatsuka, Atsuhiro; Akeboshi, Masao; Takaki, Haruyuki; Takeda, Kan [Mie University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology (Japan)

    2005-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Five hepatocellular carcinomas and one liver metastasis located in the caudate lobe left of the inferior vena cava were successfully treated by radiofrequency (RF) ablation by placing the RF electrode into each tumor through the left lobe of the liver under the CT-fluoroscopic guidance. All tumors were free of enhancement on dynamic contrast-enhanced CT during the mean follow-up period of 6.3 months. There were no major complications related to the procedures.

  17. CT head-scan dosimetry in an anthropomorphic phantom and associated measurement of ACR accreditation-phantom imaging metrics under clinically representative scan conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brunner, Claudia C.; Stern, Stanley H.; Chakrabarti, Kish [U.S. Food and Drug Administration, 10903 New Hampshire Avenue, Silver Spring, Maryland 20993 (United States)] [U.S. Food and Drug Administration, 10903 New Hampshire Avenue, Silver Spring, Maryland 20993 (United States); Minniti, Ronaldo [National Institute of Standards and Technology, 100 Bureau Drive, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States)] [National Institute of Standards and Technology, 100 Bureau Drive, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States); Parry, Marie I. [Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, 8901 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, Maryland 20889 (United States)] [Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, 8901 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, Maryland 20889 (United States); Skopec, Marlene [National Institutes of Health, 9000 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, Maryland 20892 (United States)] [National Institutes of Health, 9000 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, Maryland 20892 (United States)

    2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To measure radiation absorbed dose and its distribution in an anthropomorphic head phantom under clinically representative scan conditions in three widely used computed tomography (CT) scanners, and to relate those dose values to metrics such as high-contrast resolution, noise, and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) in the American College of Radiology CT accreditation phantom.Methods: By inserting optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters (OSLDs) in the head of an anthropomorphic phantom specially developed for CT dosimetry (University of Florida, Gainesville), we measured dose with three commonly used scanners (GE Discovery CT750 HD, Siemens Definition, Philips Brilliance 64) at two different clinical sites (Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, National Institutes of Health). The scanners were set to operate with the same data-acquisition and image-reconstruction protocols as used clinically for typical head scans, respective of the practices of each facility for each scanner. We also analyzed images of the ACR CT accreditation phantom with the corresponding protocols. While the Siemens Definition and the Philips Brilliance protocols utilized only conventional, filtered back-projection (FBP) image-reconstruction methods, the GE Discovery also employed its particular version of an adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) algorithm that can be blended in desired proportions with the FBP algorithm. We did an objective image-metrics analysis evaluating the modulation transfer function (MTF), noise power spectrum (NPS), and CNR for images reconstructed with FBP. For images reconstructed with ASIR, we only analyzed the CNR, since MTF and NPS results are expected to depend on the object for iterative reconstruction algorithms.Results: The OSLD measurements showed that the Siemens Definition and the Philips Brilliance scanners (located at two different clinical facilities) yield average absorbed doses in tissue of 42.6 and 43.1 mGy, respectively. The GE Discovery delivers about the same amount of dose (43.7 mGy) when run under similar operating and image-reconstruction conditions, i.e., without tube current modulation and ASIR. The image-metrics analysis likewise showed that the MTF, NPS, and CNR associated with the reconstructed images are mutually comparable when the three scanners are run with similar settings, and differences can be attributed to different edge-enhancement properties of the applied reconstruction filters. Moreover, when the GE scanner was operated with the facility's scanner settings for routine head exams, which apply 50% ASIR and use only approximately half of the 100%-FBP dose, the CNR of the images showed no significant change. Even though the CNR alone is not sufficient to characterize the image quality and justify any dose reduction claims, it can be useful as a constancy test metric.Conclusions: This work presents a straightforward method to connect direct measurements of CT dose with objective image metrics such as high-contrast resolution, noise, and CNR. It demonstrates that OSLD measurements in an anthropomorphic head phantom allow a realistic and locally precise estimation of magnitude and spatial distribution of dose in tissue delivered during a typical CT head scan. Additional objective analysis of the images of the ACR accreditation phantom can be used to relate the measured doses to high contrast resolution, noise, and CNR.

  18. Design and evaluation of a variable aperture collimator for conformal radiotherapy of small animals using a microCT scanner

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graves, Edward E.; Zhou Hu; Chatterjee, Raja; Keall, Paul J.; Gambhir, Sanjiv Sam; Contag, Christopher H.; Boyer, Arthur L. [Department of Radiology Oncology, Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Department of Mechanical Engineering, Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Department of Radiology Oncology, Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Department of Radiology, Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Department of Radiology, Scott and White Hospital, Temple, Texas 76508 (United States)

    2007-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Treatment of small animals with radiation has in general been limited to planar fields shaped with lead blocks, complicating spatial localization of dose and treatment of deep-seated targets. In order to advance laboratory radiotherapy toward what is accomplished in the clinic, we have constructed a variable aperture collimator for use in shaping the beam of microCT scanner. This unit can image small animal subjects at high resolution, and is capable of delivering therapeutic doses in reasonable exposure times. The proposed collimator consists of two stages, each containing six trapezoidal brass blocks that move along a frame in a manner similar to a camera iris producing a hexagonal aperture of variable size. The two stages are offset by 30 deg. and adjusted for the divergence of the x-ray beam so as to produce a dodecagonal profile at isocenter. Slotted rotating driving plates are used to apply force to pins in the collimator blocks and effect collimator motion. This device has been investigated through both simulation and measurement. The collimator aperture size varied from 0 to 8.5 cm as the driving plate angle increased from 0 to 41 deg. . The torque required to adjust the collimator varied from 0.5 to 5 N{center_dot}m, increasing with increasing driving plate angle. The transmission profiles produced by the scanner at isocenter exhibited a penumbra of approximately 10% of the collimator aperture width. Misalignment between the collimator assembly and the x-ray source could be identified on the transmission images and corrected by adjustment of the collimator location. This variable aperture collimator technology is therefore a feasible and flexible solution for adjustable shaping of radiation beams for use in small animal radiotherapy as well as other applications in which beam shaping is desired.

  19. A study of respiration-correlated cone-beam CT scans to correct target positioning errors in radiotherapy of thoracic cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santoro, J. P.; McNamara, J.; Yorke, E.; Pham, H.; Rimner, A.; Rosenzweig, K. E.; Mageras, G. S. [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York 10065 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York 10065 (United States); Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York 10065 (United States)

    2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: There is increasingly widespread usage of cone-beam CT (CBCT) for guiding radiation treatment in advanced-stage lung tumors, but difficulties associated with daily CBCT in conventionally fractionated treatments include imaging dose to the patient, increased workload and longer treatment times. Respiration-correlated cone-beam CT (RC-CBCT) can improve localization accuracy in mobile lung tumors, but further increases the time and workload for conventionally fractionated treatments. This study investigates whether RC-CBCT-guided correction of systematic tumor deviations in standard fractionated lung tumor radiation treatments is more effective than 2D image-based correction of skeletal deviations alone. A second study goal compares respiration-correlated vs respiration-averaged images for determining tumor deviations. Methods: Eleven stage II-IV nonsmall cell lung cancer patients are enrolled in an IRB-approved prospective off-line protocol using RC-CBCT guidance to correct for systematic errors in GTV position. Patients receive a respiration-correlated planning CT (RCCT) at simulation, daily kilovoltage RC-CBCT scans during the first week of treatment and weekly scans thereafter. Four types of correction methods are compared: (1) systematic error in gross tumor volume (GTV) position, (2) systematic error in skeletal anatomy, (3) daily skeletal corrections, and (4) weekly skeletal corrections. The comparison is in terms of weighted average of the residual GTV deviations measured from the RC-CBCT scans and representing the estimated residual deviation over the treatment course. In the second study goal, GTV deviations computed from matching RCCT and RC-CBCT are compared to deviations computed from matching respiration-averaged images consisting of a CBCT reconstructed using all projections and an average-intensity-projection CT computed from the RCCT. Results: Of the eleven patients in the GTV-based systematic correction protocol, two required no correction, seven required a single correction, one required two corrections, and one required three corrections. Mean residual GTV deviation (3D distance) following GTV-based systematic correction (mean {+-} 1 standard deviation 4.8 {+-} 1.5 mm) is significantly lower than for systematic skeletal-based (6.5 {+-} 2.9 mm, p= 0.015), and weekly skeletal-based correction (7.2 {+-} 3.0 mm, p= 0.001), but is not significantly lower than daily skeletal-based correction (5.4 {+-} 2.6 mm, p= 0.34). In two cases, first-day CBCT images reveal tumor changes-one showing tumor growth, the other showing large tumor displacement-that are not readily observed in radiographs. Differences in computed GTV deviations between respiration-correlated and respiration-averaged images are 0.2 {+-} 1.8 mm in the superior-inferior direction and are of similar magnitude in the other directions. Conclusions: An off-line protocol to correct GTV-based systematic error in locally advanced lung tumor cases can be effective at reducing tumor deviations, although the findings need confirmation with larger patient statistics. In some cases, a single cone-beam CT can be useful for assessing tumor changes early in treatment, if more than a few days elapse between simulation and the start of treatment. Tumor deviations measured with respiration-averaged CT and CBCT images are consistent with those measured with respiration-correlated images; the respiration-averaged method is more easily implemented in the clinic.

  20. A database for estimating organ dose for coronary angiography and brain perfusion CT scans for arbitrary spectra and angular tube current modulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rupcich, Franco; Badal, Andreu; Kyprianou, Iacovos; Schmidt, Taly Gilat [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Marquette University, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53233 (United States); Division of Imaging and Applied Mathematics (OSEL/CDRH), US Food and Drug Administration, Silver Spring, Maryland 20905 (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Marquette University, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53233 (United States)

    2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to develop a database for estimating organ dose in a voxelized patient model for coronary angiography and brain perfusion CT acquisitions with any spectra and angular tube current modulation setting. The database enables organ dose estimation for existing and novel acquisition techniques without requiring Monte Carlo simulations. Methods: The study simulated transport of monoenergetic photons between 5 and 150 keV for 1000 projections over 360 Degree-Sign through anthropomorphic voxelized female chest and head (0 Degree-Sign and 30 Degree-Sign tilt) phantoms and standard head and body CTDI dosimetry cylinders. The simulations resulted in tables of normalized dose deposition for several radiosensitive organs quantifying the organ dose per emitted photon for each incident photon energy and projection angle for coronary angiography and brain perfusion acquisitions. The values in a table can be multiplied by an incident spectrum and number of photons at each projection angle and then summed across all energies and angles to estimate total organ dose. Scanner-specific organ dose may be approximated by normalizing the database-estimated organ dose by the database-estimated CTDI{sub vol} and multiplying by a physical CTDI{sub vol} measurement. Two examples are provided demonstrating how to use the tables to estimate relative organ dose. In the first, the change in breast and lung dose during coronary angiography CT scans is calculated for reduced kVp, angular tube current modulation, and partial angle scanning protocols relative to a reference protocol. In the second example, the change in dose to the eye lens is calculated for a brain perfusion CT acquisition in which the gantry is tilted 30 Degree-Sign relative to a nontilted scan. Results: Our database provides tables of normalized dose deposition for several radiosensitive organs irradiated during coronary angiography and brain perfusion CT scans. Validation results indicate total organ doses calculated using our database are within 1% of those calculated using Monte Carlo simulations with the same geometry and scan parameters for all organs except red bone marrow (within 6%), and within 23% of published estimates for different voxelized phantoms. Results from the example of using the database to estimate organ dose for coronary angiography CT acquisitions show 2.1%, 1.1%, and -32% change in breast dose and 2.1%, -0.74%, and 4.7% change in lung dose for reduced kVp, tube current modulated, and partial angle protocols, respectively, relative to the reference protocol. Results show -19.2% difference in dose to eye lens for a tilted scan relative to a nontilted scan. The reported relative changes in organ doses are presented without quantification of image quality and are for the sole purpose of demonstrating the use of the proposed database. Conclusions: The proposed database and calculation method enable the estimation of organ dose for coronary angiography and brain perfusion CT scans utilizing any spectral shape and angular tube current modulation scheme by taking advantage of the precalculated Monte Carlo simulation results. The database can be used in conjunction with image quality studies to develop optimized acquisition techniques and may be particularly beneficial for optimizing dual kVp acquisitions for which numerous kV, mA, and filtration combinations may be investigated.